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Sample records for cell culture assay

  1. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  2. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Cultures and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Frisch, Benjamin J.; Calvi, Laura M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The adult hematopoietic system is repopulated in its entirety from a rare cell type known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that reside in the marrow space throughout the skeletal system. Here we describe the isolation and identification of HSCs both phenotypically and functionally. PMID:24482184

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell cultures and assays.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Benjamin J; Calvi, Laura M

    2014-01-01

    The adult hematopoietic system is repopulated in its entirety from a rare cell type known as hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that reside in the marrow space throughout the skeletal system. Here we describe the isolation and identification of HSCs both phenotypically and functionally. PMID:24482184

  5. Massively Parallel Reporter Assays in Cultured Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Melnikov, Alexandre; Zhang, Xiaolan; Rogov, Peter; Wang, Li; Mikkelsen, Tarjei S.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic reporter assay is a well-established and powerful tool for dissecting the relationship between DNA sequences and their gene regulatory activities. The potential throughput of this assay has, however, been limited by the need to individually clone and assay the activity of each sequence on interest using protein fluorescence or enzymatic activity as a proxy for regulatory activity. Advances in high-throughput DNA synthesis and sequencing technologies have recently made it possible to overcome these limitations by multiplexing the construction and interrogation of large libraries of reporter constructs. This protocol describes implementation of a Massively Parallel Reporter Assay (MPRA) that allows direct comparison of hundreds of thousands of putative regulatory sequences in a single cell culture dish. PMID:25177895

  6. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  7. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus. PMID:23306266

  8. Luciferase reporter assay in Drosophila and mammalian tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Chi

    2014-01-01

    Luciferase reporter gene assays are one of the most common methods for monitoring gene activity. Because of their sensitivity, dynamic range, and lack of endogenous activity, luciferase assays have been particularly useful for functional genomics in cell-based assays, such as RNAi screening. This unit describes delivery of two luciferase reporters with other nucleic acids (siRNA /dsRNA), measurement of the dual luciferase activities, and analysis of data generated. The systematic query of gene function (RNAi) combined with the advances in luminescent technology have made it possible to design powerful whole genome screens to address diverse and significant biological questions. PMID:24652620

  9. A novel microfluidic platform with stable concentration gradient for on chip cell culture and screening assays.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bi-Yi; Hu, Shan-Wen; Qian, Guang-Sheng; Xu, Jing-Juan; Chen, Hong-Yuan

    2013-09-21

    In this work a novel microfluidic platform for cell culture and assay is developed. On the chip a static cell culture region is coupled with dynamic fluidic nutrition supply structures. The cell culture unit has a sandwich structure with liquid channels on the top, the cell culture reservoir in the middle and gas channels on the bottom. Samples can be easily loaded into the reservoir and exchange constantly with the external liquid environment by diffusion. Since the flow direction is perpendicular to the liquid channel on the top of the reservoir, the cells in the reservoir are shielded from shear-force. By assembling the basic units into an array, a steady concentration gradient can be generated. Cell culture models both for continuous perfusion and one-off perfusion were established on the chip. Both adherent and suspended cells were successfully cultured on the chip in 2D and 3D culture modes. After culturing, the trapped cells were recovered for use in a later assay. As a competitive candidate for a standard cell culture and assay platform, this chip is also adaptable for cytotoxicity and cell growth assays. PMID:23884407

  10. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time. PMID:25654744

  11. Microfluidic assay for simultaneous culture of multiple cell types on surfaces or within hydrogels

    E-print Network

    Shin, Yoojin

    This protocol describes a simple but robust microfluidic assay combining three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The microfluidic platform comprises hydrogel-incorporating chambers between surface-accessible ...

  12. Gonococcal and meningococcal pathogenesis as defined by human cell, cell culture, and organ culture assays.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D S

    1989-01-01

    Human cells, cell cultures, and organ cultures have been extremely useful for studying the events that occur when gonococci and meningococci encounter human mucosal surfaces. The specificity and selectivity of these events for human cells are striking and correlate with the adaptation of these pathogens for survival on human mucous membranes. To colonize these sites, meningococci and gonococci have developed mechanisms to damage local host defenses such as the mucociliary blanket, to attach to epithelial cells, and to invade these cells. Attachment to epithelial cells mediated by pili, and to some types of cells mediated by PIIs, serves to anchor the organism close to sources of nutrition and allows multiplication. Intracellular invasion, possibly initiated by the major porin protein, may provide additional nutritional support and protection from host defenses. Mucosal invasion may also result in access of gonococci and meningococci to the bloodstream, leading to dissemination. Images PMID:2497953

  13. TOTAL CULTURABLE VIRUS QUANTAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter describes a quantal method for assaying culturable human enteric viruses from water matrices. The assay differs from the plaque assay described in Chapter 10 (December 1987 Revision) in that it is based upon the direct microscopic viewing of cells for virus-induced ...

  14. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile. PMID:20023265

  15. Microfluidic cell culture chip with multiplexed medium delivery and efficient cell/scaffold loading mechanisms for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional cell culture-based assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Shih-Siou; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-06-01

    This study reports a microfluidic cell culture chip consisting of 48 microbioreactors for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture-based assays. Its advantages include the capability for multiplexed and backflow-free medium delivery, and both efficient and high-throughput micro-scale, 3-D cell culture construct loading. In this work, the microfluidic cell culture chip is fabricated using two major processes, specifically, a computer-numerical-controlled (CNC) mold machining process and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication process. The chip is composed of micropumps, microbioreactors, connecting microchannels and a cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism. The performance of the new pneumatic micropumps and the cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism has been experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that this proposed multiplexed medium-pumping design is able to provide a uniform pumping rate ranging from 1.5 to 298.3 ?l hr(-1) without any fluid backflow and the resultant medium contamination. In addition, the simple cell/agarose loading method has been proven to be able to load the 3-D cell culture construct uniformly and efficiently in all 48 microbioreactors investigated. Furthermore, a micro-scale, perfusion, 3-D cell culture-based assay has been successfully demonstrated using this proposed cell culture chip. The experimental results are also compared to a similar evaluation using a conventional static 3-D cell culture with a larger scale culture. It is concluded that the choice of a cell culture format can influence assay results. As a whole, because of the inherent advantages of a miniaturized perfusion 3-D cell culture assay, the cell culture chip not only can provide a stable, well-defined and more biologically-meaningful culture environment, but it also features a low consumption of research resources. Moreover, due to the integrated medium pumping mechanism and the simple cell/agarose loading method, this chip is economical and time efficient. All of these traits are particularly useful for high-precision and high-throughput 3-D cell culture-based assays. PMID:21234690

  16. COMPARATIVE TOXICITIES OF DIFFERENT FORMS OF ASBESTOS IN A CELL CULTURE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three forms of Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) asbestos, amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile, were assayed for their cytotoxicity (inhibition of colony formation) in cell culture. Using embryonic human intestine-derived (I-407) and adult rat liver-derived (ARL-6) ep...

  17. Nine surface plasmon resonance assays for specific protein quantitation during cell culture and process development.

    PubMed

    Frostell, Åsa; Mattsson, Anna; Eriksson, Åsa; Wallby, Elisabeth; Kärnhall, Johan; Illarionova, Nina B; Estmer Nilsson, Camilla

    2015-05-15

    Quantitation of protein is essential during pharmaceutical development, and a variety of methods and technologies for determination of total and specific protein concentration are available. Here we describe the development of a streamlined assay platform for specific quantitation assays using surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. A total of nine different assays were developed using similar conditions, of which eight assays were for quantitation of different human blood plasma proteins (IgG, IgG1-4 subclasses, IgA, transferrin, and albumin) from a chromatography-based IgG plasma process. Lastly, an assay for monitoring the concentration of a recombinant monoclonal antibody during 13 days of CHO cell culturing was developed. Assay performances were compared with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), nephelometry, ARCHITECT, and Cobas c501. SPR assays were shown to have higher sensitivity than analysis using nephelometry, ARCHITECT, and Cobas and to have significantly lower analysis and hands-on time compared with ELISA. Furthermore, the SPR assays were robust enough to be used for up to 12 days, allowing specific protein concentration measurement of a sample to be completed at line within 10 min. Using the same platform with only few varied parameters between different assays has saved time in the lab as well as for evaluation and presentation of results. PMID:25700863

  18. A radiolabel-release microwell assay for proteolytic enzymes present in cell culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Rucklidge, G.J.; Milne, G. )

    1990-03-01

    A modified method for the measurement of proteolytic enzyme activity in cell culture-conditioned media has been developed. Using the release of 3H-labeled peptides from 3H-labeled gelatin the method is performed in microwell plates. The substrate is insolubilized and attached to the wells by glutaraldehyde treatment, thus eliminating the need for a precipitation step at the end of the assay. The assay is sensitive, reproducible, and convenient for small sample volumes. The effect of different protease inhibitors on activity can be assessed rapidly allowing an early characterization of the enzyme. It can also be adapted to microplate spectrophotometric analysis by staining residual substrate with Coomassie blue.

  19. Single-cell assays

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Declan; Ren, Kangning; Wu, Hongkai

    2011-01-01

    This review presents an overview of literature that describes the applications of microfluidics to assay individual cells. We quantify the content of an individual mammalian cell, so that we can understand what criteria a single-cell assay must satisfy to be successful. We put in context the justification for single-cell assays and identify the characteristics that are relevant to single-cell assays. We review the literature from the past 24 months that describe the methods that use microfabrication—conventional or otherwise—and microfluidics in particular to study individual cells, and we present our views on how an increasing emphasis on three-dimensional cell culture and the demonstration of the first chemically defined cell might impact single-cell assays. PMID:21559238

  20. A Zebrafish Cell Culture Assay for the Identification of MicroRNA Targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weiyi; Guan, Yihong

    2010-01-01

    Abstract MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small noncoding RNAs that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. Studies have shown that zebrafish miRNAs play a key role in embryo development, tissue fate establishment, and differentiation by interacting with specific targets, usually in the 3?UTR of the mRNA. Identification of the target sequence is fundamental to elucidating miRNA function. Since bioinformatics can predict hundreds of potential targets for each miRNA, experimental validation of the actual target site is required. Although recent studies have employed the HEK293 cell line to investigate mammalian miRNA targets, our results have shown that the cell line is not suitable for studies of zebrafish miR-430b miRNA. In this article we describe a convenient in vitro assay system that involves the use of zebrafish cell cultures and a luciferase reporter construct to evaluate miR-430b target sites. The cell culture-based assay could be used to validate target sequences of other zebrafish miRNAs. PMID:21158564

  1. Cell Culture-Taqman PCR Assay for Evaluation of Cryptosporidium parvum Disinfection

    PubMed Central

    Keegan, Alexandra R.; Fanok, Stella; Monis, Paul T.; Saint, Christopher P.

    2003-01-01

    Cryptosporidium parvum represents a challenge to the water industry and a threat to public health. In this study, we developed a cell culture-quantitative PCR assay to evaluate the inactivation of C. parvum with disinfectants. The assay was validated by using a range of disinfectants in common use in the water industry, including low-pressure UV light (LP-UV), ozone, mixed oxidants (MIOX), and chlorine. The assay was demonstrated to be reliable and sensitive, with a lower detection limit of a single infectious oocyst. Effective oocyst inactivation was achieved (>2 log10 units) with LP-UV (20 mJ/cm2) or 2 mg of ozone/liter (for 10 min). MIOX and chlorine treatments of oocysts resulted in minimal effective disinfection, with <0.1 log10 unit being inactivated. These results demonstrate the inability of MIOX to inactivate Cryptosporidium. The assay is a valuable tool for the evaluation of disinfection systems for drinking water and recycled water. PMID:12732515

  2. Gamma radiation increases endonuclease-dependent L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay.

    PubMed

    Farkash, Evan A; Kao, Gary D; Horman, Shane R; Prak, Eline T Luning

    2006-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (LINE-1s, L1s) are the most active mobile elements in the human genome and account for a significant fraction of its mass. The propagation of L1 in the human genome requires disruption and repair of DNA at the site of integration. As Barbara McClintock first hypothesized, genotoxic stress may contribute to the mobilization of transposable elements, and conversely, element mobility may contribute to genotoxic stress. We tested the ability of genotoxic agents to increase L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay. We observed that cells exposed to gamma radiation exhibited increased levels of L1 retrotransposition. The L1 retrotransposition frequency was proportional to the number of phosphorylated H2AX foci, an indicator of genotoxic stress. To explore the role of the L1 endonuclease in this context, endonuclease-deficient tagged L1 constructs were produced and tested for their activity in irradiated cells. The activity of the endonuclease-deficient L1 was very low in irradiated cells, suggesting that most L1 insertions in irradiated cells still use the L1 endonuclease. Consistent with this interpretation, DNA sequences that flank L1 insertions in irradiated cells harbored target site duplications. These results suggest that increased L1 retrotransposition in irradiated cells is endonuclease dependent. The mobilization of L1 in irradiated cells potentially contributes to genomic instability and could be a driving force for secondary mutations in patients undergoing radiation therapy. PMID:16507671

  3. The Unreliability of MTT Assay in the Cytotoxic Test of Primary Cultured Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Yona; Park, Hyung Woo; Moon, Hyo Eun; Bae, Seongtae; Kim, JinWook; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    MTT assay is commonly used to assess the cellular cytotoxicity caused by anticancer drugs in glioblastomas. However, there have been some reports insisting that MTT assay exhibited non-specific intracellular reduction of tetrazolium which led to underestimated results of cytotoxicity. Here, we examine whether or not MTT assay can lead to incorrect information regarding alcohol-induced cytotoxicity on immortalized and primary glioblastoma cells. MTT assay was applied to assess the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity at various ethanol concentrations. The cellular cytotoxicity induced by different doses of ethanol was analyzed and compared through several cytotoxic assays. Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity observed through MTT assay on both cell types was shown to be ethanol dose-dependent below a 3% concentration. However, the cytotoxicity was shown to be markedly underestimated only in primary cells at a 5% concentration. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed increased expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased expressions of anti-apoptotic proteins in an ethanol dose-dependent manner in both cell types. Furthermore, we present a possible mechanism for the unreliable result of MTT assay. A high concentration of ethanol induces more severe membrane damage and increased intracellular concentration of NADH in primary cells which enhances the nonspecific reduction of tetrazolium salt. Together, our findings demonstrate that the cytotoxicity on primary cells could inaccurately be assessed when detected through MTT assay. Therefore, a careful interpretation is needed when one would analyze the cytotoxic results of MTT assay, and it is suggested that other assays must be accompanied to produce more reliable and accurate cytotoxic results on primary glioblastoma cells. PMID:26412973

  4. Transformation of BALB/c-3T3 cells: III. Development of a co-culture clonal survival assay for quantification of chemical cytotoxicity in high-density cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, E J

    1993-01-01

    A co-culture clonal survival assay was developed to measure the cytotoxicity of test chemical treatments to BALB/c-3T3 cells because the standard clonal survival assay using 200 wild type (WT) cells frequently overestimates chemical cytotoxicity when compared with identical treatment doses in high-density cultures. The assay used co-cultures of 3.2 x 10(4) WT cells, the same seeding density used in the transformation assay, and 200 ouabain resistant (OUAr) cells. After a 48-hr test chemical treatment, co-cultured cells were fed with culture medium containing 4 mM ouabain. The test chemical was cytotoxic to an equal percentage of WT and OUAr cells. Ouabain treatments killed the remaining WT cells. Thus, OUAr cells surviving the test chemical treatment measured the relative cloning efficiency (RCE) of all treated cells in the high-density cell co-culture. The co-culture assay succeeded because metabolic cooperation at the OUAr locus was not detected in BALB/c-3T3 cells. Five chemicals induced comparable cytotoxic responses in both assays, including actinomycin D, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, N'-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine, dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium chloride. In contrast, chemical cytotoxic responses detected in the standard and co-culture assays differed by > or = 10-fold for 11-aminoundecanoic acid, benzo[a]pyrene, cytosine arabinoside, and 3-methyl-cholanthrene and differed by > 2-fold for 2-acetylaminofluorene and dimethylnitrosamine. Detection of 11-aminoundecanoic acid-induced transformation was shown to be dependent on selecting treatment doses from the co-culture assay data. Thus, this method permits more accurate assessment of both chemical-induced cytotoxicity and transformation. PMID:8243400

  5. Validation of a Cell-Free Translation Assay for Detecting Shiga Toxin 2 in Bacterial Culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have validated a cell-free translation (CFT) assay for detecting Shiga toxin (Stx). The limit of detection (LOD) for pure Stx2 (PStx2) and partially pure Stx2 (PPStx2) in water reached 20 pg/µl and 3.5 pg/µL respectively without the artificial process of proteolytic activation and reduction of th...

  6. Metabolic response of environmentally isolated microorganisms to industrial effluents: Use of a newly described cell culture assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    An environmental application using a microtiter culture assay to measure the metabolic sensitivity of microorganisms to petrochemical effluents will be tested. The Biomedical Operations and Research Branch at NASA JSC has recently developed a rapid and nondestructive method to measure cell growth and metabolism. Using a colorimetric procedure the uniquely modified assay allows the metabolic kinetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to be measured. Use of such an assay if adapted for the routine monitoring of waste products, process effluents, and environmentally hazardous substances may prove to be invaluable to the industrial community. The microtiter method as described will be tested using microorganisms isolated from the Galveston Bay aquatic habitat. The microbial isolates will be identified prior to testing using the automated systems available at JSC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium, and lead will provide control toxic chemicals. The toxicity of industrial effluent from two industrial sites will be tested. An effort will be made to test the efficacy of this assay for measuring toxicity in a mixed culture community.

  7. MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE ASSAY TO QUANTITATE CHEMICALLY INDUCED ANEUPLOIDY: USE OF A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HUMAN/MOUSE CELL HYBRID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing a human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cell line R3-5, to detect chemically induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome seg...

  8. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  9. A murine stromal cell line allows the proliferation of very primitive human CD34++/CD38- progenitor cells in long-term cultures and semisolid assays.

    PubMed

    Issaad, C; Croisille, L; Katz, A; Vainchenker, W; Coulombel, L

    1993-06-01

    Analysis of molecular mechanisms associated with stem cell commitment and differentiation requires an in vitro assay that identifies the most primitive hematopoietic stem cells in human bone marrow. Such primitive stem cells usually do not form colonies in short-term semisolid assays and are best identified by their ability to initiate sustained hematopoiesis when they are cocultured with competent stromal cells. In this study, we investigated whether a murine marrow stromal cell line (MS-5) that supports colony-forming unit-spleen (CFU-S) maintenance would permit, both in short-term colony assays and long-term cultures, the development of primitive human stem cells sorted on the basis of their high expression of CD34 and lack of expression of CD38 antigen. In short-term colony assays, this population included almost exclusively primitive progenitor cells. MS-5 cells synergized with any combination of interleukin-3, Steel factor, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, agar-leukocyte conditioned medium, and erythropoietin and increased at least twofold both the cloning efficiency of CD34++/CD38- cells and the size of the colonies. Furthermore, MS-5 cells triggered the development of multipotent blast cell progenitors with a high proliferative potential, which in these conditions represented 1% to 2% of CD34++/CD38- cells. When MS-5 cells were substituted by human stromal cells or when growth factor combinations were used in the absence of stromal cells, much lower numbers of CFU-blast were detected. This selective action of MS-5 on early progenitors was also observed when MS-5 cells were used as feeders in long-term cultures of CD34++/CD38- cells. Murine cells promoted the expansion of high proliferative potential primitive progenitor cells up to 3 months, although they did not support their differentiation in mature clonogenic progenitors or terminally differentiated cells. Sustained hematopoiesis in these longterm cultures was accounted for by 2% to 5% of initial CD34++/CD38- cells as estimated by limiting dilution experiments. Mechanisms by which murine stromal cells act specifically on human primitive stem cells are unclear, but from our data this effect is unlikely to be explained solely by known species cross-reactive growth factors. Further manipulation of this long-term coculture system should prove useful in identifying stromal molecules regulating commitment and differentiation of early human progenitor cells. PMID:7684620

  10. A convenient rapid culture assay for the detection of enteroviruses in clinical samples: comparison with conventional cell culture and RT-PCR.

    PubMed

    Terletskaia-Ladwig, Elena; Meier, Silvia; Hahn, Ralph; Leinmüller, Michael; Schneider, Franz; Enders, Martin

    2008-08-01

    A convenient rapid culture assay (RCA) for the detection of enteroviruses was evaluated against RT-PCR using 576 stool and 102 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples. One hundred and ninety stool samples were also tested by conventional cell culture (CCC). The RCA used immunoperoxidase staining of cell culture plates with a blend of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against enterovirus VP1 on the second and sixth days after inoculation. This blend was composed of 5D8/1 (Dako) and four 'in-house' mAbs. CCC was performed using fluorescence staining with the Enterovirus Screening Set (Chemicon International) for culture confirmation. Detection of enteroviruses by the RCA was more successful in colonic carcinoma (CaCo-2) and rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells than in human embryonic lung fibroblasts, HEp2 and A549 cells. The performance of CCC in RD cells was hindered by rapid cell degeneration and non-specific staining of cells during culture confirmation. The sensitivity of the RCA compared to RT-PCR in stool samples was found to be 71 % (115/161) on the second day and 87 % (140/161) on the sixth day. The sensitivity of the RCA in CSF samples was 38 % (22/58) after 2 days and 59 % (34/58) after 6 days. The specificity of the RCA was 100 %. All CCC-positive samples were positive by the RCA. CCC required 3-14 days for virus recovery. In conclusion, the RCA has the same sensitivity as CCC, significantly shortens the time required for the detection of enteroviruses, and prevents pitfalls associated with using RD cells for CCC. For diagnosis of aseptic meningitis in CSF samples, RT-PCR should be performed. PMID:18628502

  11. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N.; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-01-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  12. Development of multicellular tumor spheroid (MCTS) culture from breast cancer cell and a high throughput screening method using the MTT assay.

    PubMed

    Ho, Wan Yong; Yeap, Swee Keong; Ho, Chai Ling; Rahim, Raha Abdul; Alitheen, Noorjahan Banu

    2012-01-01

    In comparison to monolayer cells, MCTS has been claimed as more suitable candidate for studying drug penetration due to the high resemblance to solid tumors. However, the cultivation of MCTS is cumbersome, time consuming, and most technique fail to generate spheroids with uniform sizes. Therefore, the application of spheroid cultures in high throughput screening has been rather limiting. Besides, the lack of a well established screening protocol method that is applicable to spheroid could also be attributed to this limitation. Here we report a simple way of cultivating homogenous MCTS cultures with compact and rigid structure from the MCF-7 cells. Besides, we had also made some modifications to the standard MTT assay to realize high throughput screening of these spheroids. Using the modified protocol, tamoxifen showed cytotoxicity effect towards MCTS cultures from MCF-7 with high consistency. The results correlated well with the cultures' response assessed by LDH release assay but the latter assay was not ideal for detecting a wide range of cytotoxicity due to high basal background reading. The MTT assay emerged as a better indicator to apoptosis event in comparison to the LDH release assay. Therefore, the method for spheroid generation and the modified MTT assay we reported here could be potentially applied to high throughput screening for response of spheroid cultures generated from MCF-7 as well as other cancer cell lines towards cytotoxic stimuli. PMID:22970274

  13. Discovering and differentiating new and emerging clonal populations of Chlamydia trachomatis with a novel shotgun cell culture harvest assay.

    PubMed

    Somboonna, Naraporn; Mead, Sally; Liu, Jessica; Dean, Deborah

    2008-03-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is the leading cause of preventable blindness and bacterial sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Plaque assays have been used to clonally segregate laboratory-adapted C. trachomatis strains from mixed infections, but no assays have been reported to segregate clones from recent clinical samples. We developed a novel shotgun cell culture harvest assay for this purpose because we found that recent clinical samples do not form plaques. Clones were strain-typed by using outer membrane protein A and 16S rRNA sequences. Surprisingly, ocular trachoma reference strain A/SA-1 contained clones of Chlamydophila abortus. C. abortus primarily infects ruminants and pigs and has never been identified in populations where trachoma is endemic. Three clonal variants of reference strain Ba/Apache-2 were also identified. Our findings reflect the importance of clonal isolation in identifying constituents of mixed infections containing new or emerging strains and of viable clones for research to more fully understand the dynamics of in vivo strain-mixing, evolution, and disease pathogenesis. PMID:18325260

  14. Bioluminescence Assay for Cell Viability.

    PubMed

    Lomakina, G Yu; Modestova, Yu A; Ugarova, N N

    2015-06-01

    Theoretical aspects of the adenosine triphosphate bioluminescence assay based on the use of the firefly luciferin-luciferase system are considered, as well as its application for assessing cell viability in microbiology, sanitation, medicine, and ecology. Various approaches for the analysis of individual or mixed cultures of microorganisms are presented, and capabilities of the method for investigation of biological processes in live cells including necrosis, apoptosis, as well as for investigation of the dynamics of metabolism are described. PMID:26531016

  15. Quantitation of viable Coxiella burnetii in milk using an integrated cell culture-polymerase chain reaction (ICC-PCR) assay.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Diana; Shieh, Y-Carol; Tortorello, Mary; Kukreja, Ankush; Shazer, Arlette; Schlesser, Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The obligate intracellular pathogen Coxiella burnetii has long been considered the most heat resistant pathogen in raw milk, making it the reference pathogen for determining pasteurisation conditions for milk products. New milk formulations and novel non-thermal processes require validation of effectiveness which requires a more practical method for analysis than using the currently used animal model for assessing Coxiella survival. Also, there is an interest in better characterising thermal inactivation of Coxiella in various milk formulations. To avoid the use of the guinea pig model for evaluating Coxiella survival, an Integrated Cell Culture-PCR (ICC-PCR) method was developed for determining Coxiella viability in milk. Vero cell cultures were directly infected from Coxiella-contaminated milk in duplicate 24-well plates. Viability of the Coxiella in milk was shown by a ?0·5 log genome equivalent (ge)/ml increase in the quantity of IS111a gene from the baseline post-infection (day 0) level after 9-11 d propagation. Coxiella in skim, 2%, and whole milk, and half and half successfully infected Vero cells and increased in number by at least 2 logs using a 48-h infection period followed by 9-d propagation time. As few as 125 Coxiella ge/ml in whole milk was shown to infect and propagate at least 2 logs in the optimised ICC-PCR assay, though variable confirmation of propagation was shown for as low as 25 Coxiella ge/ml. Applicability of the ICC-PCR method was further proven in an MPN format to quantitate the number of viable Coxiella remaining in whole milk after 60 °C thermal treatment at 0, 20, 40, 60 and 90 min. PMID:26143937

  16. VALIDATION ANALYSIS OF AN ECDYSTEROID RECEPTOR AGONIST ASSAY USING INTACT CULTURED LEPIDOPTERA CELLS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we report on the ecdysteroid-responsiveness of the insect cell line Se4 (BCIRL/AMCY-SeE-CLG4) from embryos of the beet armyworm, Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae). The cells express an ecdysteroid receptor (EcR) activity as indicated by their response to the insect molting hor...

  17. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based system for determining the physiological level of poly(ADP-ribose) in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Ida, Chieri; Yamashita, Sachiko; Tsukada, Masaki; Sato, Teruaki; Eguchi, Takayuki; Tanaka, Masakazu; Ogata, Shin; Fujii, Takahiro; Nishi, Yoshisuke; Ikegami, Susumu; Moss, Joel; Miwa, Masanao

    2016-02-01

    PolyADP-ribosylation is mediated by poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) and may be involved in various cellular events, including chromosomal stability, DNA repair, transcription, cell death, and differentiation. The physiological level of PAR is difficult to determine in intact cells because of the rapid synthesis of PAR by PARPs and the breakdown of PAR by PAR-degrading enzymes, including poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3. Artifactual synthesis and/or degradation of PAR likely occurs during lysis of cells in culture. We developed a sensitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure the physiological levels of PAR in cultured cells. We immediately inactivated enzymes that catalyze the synthesis and degradation of PAR. We validated that trichloroacetic acid is suitable for inactivating PARPs, PARG, and other enzymes involved in metabolizing PAR in cultured cells during cell lysis. The PAR level in cells harvested with the standard radioimmunoprecipitation assay buffer was increased by 450-fold compared with trichloroacetic acid for lysis, presumably because of activation of PARPs by DNA damage that occurred during cell lysis. This ELISA can be used to analyze the biological functions of polyADP-ribosylation under various physiological conditions in cultured cells. PMID:26548958

  18. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-? Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Mayara F; Palmer, Mitchell V; Vordermeier, H Martin; Whelan, Adam O; Fosse, James M; Nonnecke, Brian J; Waters, W Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-?. Interferon-? release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4(+) T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-? ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  19. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-? Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Whelan, Adam O.; Fosse, James M.; Nonnecke, Brian J.; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-?. Interferon-? release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4+ T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-? ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  20. A Scalable Perfusion Culture System with Miniature Peristaltic Pumps for Live-Cell Imaging Assays with Provision for Microfabricated Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Sreenath; Suma, M.S.; Raju, Shilpa R.; Bhargav, Santosh D.B.; Arunima, S.; Das, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a perfusion culture system with miniature bioreactors and peristaltic pumps. The bioreactors are designed for perfusion, live-cell imaging studies, easy incorporation of microfabricated scaffolds, and convenience of operation in standard cell culture techniques. By combining with miniature peristaltic pumps—one for each bioreactor to avoid cross-contamination and to maintain desired flow rate in each—we have made a culture system that facilitates perfusion culture inside standard incubators. This scalable system can support multiple parallel perfusion experiments. The major components are fabricated by three-dimensional printing using VeroWhite, which we show to be amenable to ex vivo cell culture. Furthermore, the components of the system can be reused, thus making it economical. We validate the system and illustrate its versatility by culturing primary rat hepatocytes, live imaging the growth of mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) on microfabricated ring-scaffolds inserted into the bioreactor, performing perfusion culture of breast cancer cells (MCF7), and high-magnification imaging of hepatocarcinoma cells (HuH7). PMID:26309810

  1. Development of a Highly Sensitive Cell-Based Assay for Detecting Botulinum Neurotoxin Type A through Neural Culture Media Optimization.

    PubMed

    Hong, Won S; Pezzi, Hannah M; Schuster, Andrea R; Berry, Scott M; Sung, Kyung E; Beebe, David J

    2016-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) is the most lethal naturally produced neurotoxin. Due to the extreme toxicity, BoNTs are implicated in bioterrorism, while the specific mechanism of action and long-lasting effect was found to be medically applicable in treating various neurological disorders. Therefore, for both public and patient safety, a highly sensitive, physiologic, and specific assay is needed. In this paper, we show a method for achieving a highly sensitive cell-based assay for BoNT/A detection using the motor neuron-like continuous cell line NG108-15. To achieve high sensitivity, we performed a media optimization study evaluating three commercially available neural supplements in combination with retinoic acid, purmorphamine, transforming growth factor ?1 (TGF?1), and ganglioside GT1b. We found nonlinear combinatorial effects on BoNT/A detection sensitivity, achieving an EC50 of 7.4 U ± 1.5 SD (or ~7.9 pM). The achieved detection sensitivity is comparable to that of assays that used primary and stem cell-derived neurons as well as the mouse lethality assay. PMID:26420788

  2. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  3. Comparison of a frozen human foreskin fibroblast cell assay to an enzyme immunoassay and toxigenic culture for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Strachan, Alastair J; Evans, Natalie E; Williams, O Martin; Spencer, Robert C; Greenwood, Rosemary; Probert, Chris J

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to validate the Hs27 ReadyCell assay (RCCNA) as an alternative CCNA method compared against a commonly used commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method and toxigenic culture (TC) reference standard. A total of 860 samples were identified from those submitted to the Health Protection Agency microbiology laboratories over a 30-week period. RCCNA performed much better than EIA when using TC as a gold standard, with sensitivities of 90.8% versus 78.6% and positive predictive value of 87.3% to 81.9%, respectively. The Hs27 Human Foreskin Fibroblast ReadyCells are an easy-to-use and a sensitive CCNA method for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile directly from stool. A turnaround time of up to 48 h for a negative result and possible need for repeat testing make it an unsuitable method to be used in most clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23107315

  4. Identification of Candidate Agents Active against N. ceranae Infection in Honey Bees: Establishment of a Medium Throughput Screening Assay Based on N. ceranae Infected Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  5. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  6. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... Microbiological assay culture medium. (a) Identification. A microbiological assay culture medium is a device...

  7. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile: comparison of the cell culture neutralization, Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays.

    PubMed

    Pancholi, P; Kelly, C; Raczkowski, M; Balada-Llasat, J M

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Several laboratory techniques are available to detect C. difficile toxins or the genes that encode them in fecal samples. We evaluated the Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi (Cepheid, CA) that detect the toxin B gene (tcdB) and tcdB, cdt, and a deletion in tcdC associated with the 027/NAP1/BI strain, respectively, by real-time PCR, and the Illumigene C. difficile (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) that detects the toxin A gene (tcdA) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification in stool specimens. Toxigenic culture was used as the reference method for discrepant stool specimens. Two hundred prospective and fifty retrospective diarrheal stool specimens were tested simultaneously by the cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (CCNA) and the Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays. Of the 200 prospective stools tested, 10.5% (n = 23) were determined to be positive by CCNA, 17.5% (n = 35) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile, and 21.5% (n = 43) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 50 retrospective stools, previously determined to be positive by CCNA, 94% (n = 47) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile and 100% (n = 50) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 11 discrepant results (i.e., negative by Illumigene C. difficile but positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi), all were determined to be positive by the toxigenic culture. A total of 21% of the isolates were presumptively identified by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi as the 027/NAP1/BI strain. The Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi assays were the most sensitive, rapid, and easy-to use assays for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in stool specimens. PMID:22278839

  8. Improved Risk Analysis by Dual Direct Detection of Total and Infectious Cryptosporidium Oocysts on Cell Culture in Combination with Immunofluorescence Assay?

    PubMed Central

    Lalancette, Cindy; Di Giovanni, George D.; Prévost, Michèle

    2010-01-01

    The inactivation of Cryptosporidium oocysts is a main driver in the selection of water treatment disinfection strategies, and microbial risk analysis provides a sound basis for optimizing water treatment processes. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency method 1622/23 provides an estimate of the total oocyst count; however, it cannot be used directly for risk assessment, as it does not determine the fraction of infectious oocysts. Improved assessment of the risk for designated sources or in treated water requires evaluation of the total number of oocysts and an estimate of their infectivity. We developed a dual direct detection method using differential immunofluorescent staining that allows detection of both oocysts and cell culture infection foci for each sample. Using Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, various pH levels, proteases, and gastroenteric compounds and substrates were assessed to determine their abilities to enhance the number of infection foci. The results showed that the key trigger for oocyst stimulation was acidification. Addition of a low concentration of d-glucose (50 mM) to the infection media increased rates of infectivity, while a higher dose (300 mM) was inhibitory. The total number of oocysts in each sample was determined by counting the oocysts remaining on a cell monolayer and the oocysts recovered from cell monolayer washes during processing using a simple filtration technique. With the dual direct detection on cell culture with immunofluorescence assay method, it is now possible to determine the numbers of total and infectious oocysts for a given sample in a single analysis. Direct percentages of infectivity are then calculated, which allows more accurate assessments of risk. PMID:19933339

  9. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L. (Downers Grove, IL); Thilly, William G. (Winchester, MA)

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  10. Fluorescence Assay 2. http://www.tgrbio.com/cancer-cell-lines-primary-cell-

    E-print Network

    Collins, Gary S.

    Fluorescence Assay References 1. 2. http://www.tgrbio.com/cancer-cell-lines-primary-cell- cultures/cell-models-hek-293-cells.html Conclusion A Novel Fluorescence Assay for the Determination of Ligand Binding Constant-therapies in cancer patients. This makes the study of both agonist and antagonist ligands important as the knowledge

  11. Time-Resolved Cell Culture Assay Analyser (TReCCA Analyser) for the Analysis of On-Line Data: Data Integration—Sensor Correction—Time-Resolved IC50 Determination

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Tobias; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved cell culture assays circumvent the need to set arbitrary end-points and reveal the dynamics of quality controlled experiments. However, they lead to the generation of large data sets, which can represent a complexity barrier to their use. We therefore developed the Time-Resolved Cell Culture Assay (TReCCA) Analyser program to perform standard cell assay analyses efficiently and make sophisticated in-depth analyses easily available. The functions of the program include data normalising and averaging, as well as smoothing and slope calculation, pin-pointing exact change time points. A time-resolved IC50/EC50 calculation provides a better understanding of drug toxicity over time and a more accurate drug to drug comparison. Finally the logarithmic sensor recalibration function, for sensors with an exponential calibration curve, homogenises the sensor output and enables the detection of low-scale changes. To illustrate the capabilities of the TReCCA Analyser, we performed on-line monitoring of dissolved oxygen in the culture media of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 treated with different concentrations of the anti-cancer drug Cisplatin. The TReCCA Analyser is freely available at www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/biowissenschaften/ipmb/biologie/woelfl/Research.html. By introducing the program, we hope to encourage more systematic use of time-resolved assays and lead researchers to fully exploit their data. PMID:26110644

  12. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  13. Assay methods for antihepatotoxic activity using peroxide-induced cytotoxicity in primary cultured hepatocytes1.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Y; Kato, O; Hikino, H

    1985-02-01

    Conditions were investigated to devise IN VITRO assay methods for antihepatotoxic activity using peroxide-induced damage in primary cultured rat liver cells. Utilizing linoleic acid peroxide, benzoyl peroxide, cumene hydroperoxide and adenosine diphosphate/Fe (3+), satisfactory assay procedures were established. Some natural products known to exert liver-protective effects IN VIVO were screened to reveal that glycyrrhetinic acid, glycyrrhizin, cynarin, silybin and desoxypodophyllotoxin showed similar antihepatotoxic activity in these four assay methods. PMID:17340401

  14. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  15. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L. (Marblehead, MA); Thilly, William G. (Winchester, MA)

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  16. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  17. Human HepaRG Cells can be Cultured in Hanging-drop Plates for Cytochrome P450 Induction and Function Assays.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Norie; Usui, Takashi; Slawny, Nicky; Chesné, Christophe; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent guidance/guidelines for industry recommend that cytochrome P450 induction can be assessed using human hepatocyte enzyme activity and/or mRNA levels to evaluate potential drug- drug interactions. To evaluate time-dependent cytochrome P450 induction precisely, induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 mRNA was confirmed (>2-fold) by the treatment with omeprazole, phenobarbital, and rifampicin, respectively, for 24 or 48 h on day 3 from the start of culture. After 24 h, the fold induction of CYP1A2 with 3.6 and 1.8x10(4) HepaRG cells per well was lower than that for 7.2x10(4) cells. CYP1A2 induction levels at 24 h were higher than those after 48 h. In contrast, higher CYP2B6 inductions were confirmed after 48 h exposure than after 24 h, independent of the number of cells per well. To help reduce the use of human cryopreserved hepatocytes, typical P450-dependent enzyme activities were investigated in human HepaRG cells cultured in commercial hanging-drop plates. Newly designed 96-well hanging-drop plates were capable of maintaining human CYP3A-dependent midazolam hydroxylation activities for up to 4 days using only 10% of the recommended initial 7.2x10(4) cells per well. Favorable HepaRG function using hanging-drop plates was confirmed by detecting 1'- hydroxymidazolam O-glucuronide on day 3, suggesting an improvement over traditional control plates in which this metabolite can be detected for 24-well plates. These results suggest that the catalytic function and/or induction of CYP1A2, CYP2B6, and CYP3A4 can be readily assessed with reduced numbers of starting HepaRG cells cultured in three-dimensional cultures in drops prepared with hanging-drop plates. PMID:25600204

  18. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-12-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  19. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100...Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure...

  20. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100...Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure...

  1. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100...Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure...

  2. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100...Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864.7100...Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure...

  4. Functional assays for human embryonic stem cell pluripotency.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Michael D; Kardel, Melanie D; Eaves, Connie J

    2011-01-01

    Realizing the potential that human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold, both for the advancement of biomedical science and the development of new treatments for many human disorders, will be greatly facilitated by the introduction of standardized methods for assessing and altering the biological properties of these cells. The 7-day in vitro alkaline phosphatase colony-forming cell (AP(+)-CFC) assay currently offers the most sensitive and specific method to quantify the frequency of undifferentiated cells present in a culture. In this regard, it is superior to any phenotypic assessment protocol. The AP(+)-CFC assay, thus, provides a valuable tool for monitoring the quality of hESC cultures, and also for evaluating quantitative changes in pluripotent cell numbers following manipulations that may affect the self-renewal and differentiation properties of the treated cells. Two other methods routinely used to evaluate hESC pluripotency involve either culturing the cells under conditions that promote the formation of nonadherent differentiating cell aggregates (termed embryoid bodies), or transplanting the cells into immunodeficient mice to obtain teratomas containing differentiated cells representative of endoderm, mesoderm, and ectoderm lineages. PMID:21042985

  5. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  6. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  7. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  8. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  9. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  10. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  11. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  12. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid dynamic shear (i.e., as required for viability of shear-sensitive cells) to the developing engineered tissue construct. This bioreactor was recently utilized to show independent and interactive effects of a growth factor (IGF-I) and slow bidirectional perfusion on the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of 3D tissue engineering cardiac constructs. The main application of this system is within the tissue engineering industry. The ideal final application is within the automated mass production of tissue- engineered constructs. Target industries could be both life sciences companies as well as bioreactor device producing companies.

  13. Quantum Dot-Based Cell Motility Assay

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Weiwei; Pellegrino, Teresa; Parak Wolfgang J; Boudreau,Rosanne; Le Gros, Mark A.; Gerion, Daniele; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Larabell, Carolyn A.

    2005-06-06

    Because of their favorable physical and photochemical properties, colloidal CdSe/ZnS-semiconductor nanocrystals (commonly known as quantum dots) have enormous potential for use in biological imaging. In this report, we present an assay that uses quantum dots as markers to quantify cell motility. Cells that are seeded onto a homogeneous layer of quantum dots engulf and absorb the nanocrystals and, as a consequence, leave behind a fluorescence-free trail. By subsequently determining the ratio of cell area to fluorescence-free track area, we show that it is possible to differentiate between invasive and noninvasive cancer cells. Because this assay uses simple fluorescence detection, requires no significant data processing, and can be used in live-cell studies, it has the potential to be a powerful new tool for discriminating between invasive and noninvasive cancer cell lines or for studying cell signaling events involved in migration.

  14. Assay method for antihepatotoxic activity using galactosamine-induced cytotoxicity in primary-cultured hepatocytes.

    PubMed

    Kiso, Y; Tohkin, M; Hikino, H

    1983-01-01

    Conditions were investigated to devise an in vitro assay method for antihepatotoxic activity using galactosamine-produced injury in primary-cultured mouse and rat liver cells. Employing 1.5-h preincubated hepatocytes prepared from rats, which were much more sensitive to the hepatotoxin, a satisfactory assay procedure was achieved. Some natural products known to exert liver-protective effects in vivo were subjected to screening by this in vitro assay method to reveal that cynarin, desoxypodophyllotoxin, glycyrrhetinic acid, glycyrrhizin, picroside II, and silybin possessed significant antihepatotoxic activity. The described assay method may be useful for primary screening of antihepatotoxic activity of materials of plant origin. The assay method has a number of advantages including the ability to dispose numerous samples at one time at a low cost, the requirement of small sample sizes, little variation, and good reproducibility of results. PMID:6677713

  15. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864... enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity in... kinase or 2,3-diphosphoglycerate. A red blood cell enzyme assay is used to determine the enzyme...

  16. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  17. Oxygen Control For Bioreactors And In-vitro Cell Assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nock, V.; Blaikie, R. J.; David, T.

    2009-07-01

    Dissolved oxygen (DO) is an important parameter in biomedical and cell-culture applications. Several studies have found cell survival and function to be intimately linked to oxygen concentration. Laminar flow, as observed in microfluidic devices, provides an ideal environment to manipulate and control concentration gradients. In this paper we demonstrate the first characterization of integrated fluorescence-based oxygen sensors for DO measurement within a cell-culture bioreactor device. Solid-state PtOEPK/PS sensor patterns were integrated into the PDMS-based bioreactor and calibrated for detection of DO concentration with a superimposed layer of collagen and Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells. The sensor signal of the layer subjacent to the cells was found to follow a Stern-Volmer model and the intensity ratio was measured to I0/I100 = 3.9 after 3 days in culture. The device provides a novel tool for the control and spatially-resolved measurement of oxygen levels in cellular assays and cell-culture applications.

  18. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of trichothecenes produced by the Bioherbicide Myrothecium verrucaria in cell cultures, extracts, and plant tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates for trichothecene detection, possessing cross-reactivity with several trichothecene mycotoxins (e.g., verrucarin A, and J, roridin A, L-2, E, and H), were tested for their ability to detect trichothecenes produced by a strain of...

  19. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  20. Semi-quantitative assay for polyketide prymnesins isolated from Prymnesium parvum (Haptophyta) cultures.

    PubMed

    La Claire, J W; Manning, S R; Talarski, A E

    2015-08-01

    A fluorometric assay was developed to semi-quantify co-purified polyketide prymnesins-1 and -2 (PPs) from Prymnesium parvum cultures. Evaluations performed throughout the growth cycle of 5 practical salinity unit (PSU) cultures detected relatively 8-10 × more PPs in the culture medium (exotoxins) than in cells (endotoxins). The [exotoxin] remained stable and relatively low until post-log growth, when they increased significantly. However, on a per-cell basis, [exotoxin] declined throughout log phase and subsequently increased dramatically during late- and post-log phases. The [endotoxin] remained stable until late- and post-log phases, when it achieved its highest level before declining sharply. Shaking cultures of strains from Texas, South Carolina and the United Kingdom displayed dramatically different [exotoxin] during post-log decline. Cultures adapted to 30 PSU had significantly lower [exotoxin] over the course of cultivation than those grown at 5 PSU. Phosphate limitation enhanced [exotoxin] on a per-cell basis, especially in late- and post-log cultures. Media containing streptomycin exhibited a ?20% increase in [exotoxin] in post-log cultures vs. control treatments, but it had only negligible effects on endotoxin levels. Brefeldin A had minimal effects on [exotoxin], suggesting that the presence of PPs in the medium may be largely derived from cell lysis or some other passive means. PMID:26079952

  1. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  2. KERATINOCYTE CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS ASSAY: CORRELATION WITH IN VIVO TUMOR STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A murine keratinocyte cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was characterized and examined as an in vitro model system for studying the biotransformation of promutagens/procarcinogens by mouse skin. The assay used living cultured newborn SENCAR keratinocytes for the metabolic activatio...

  3. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 ; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  4. Cell culture's spider silk road.

    PubMed

    Perkel, Jeffrey

    2014-06-01

    A number of synthetic and natural materials have been tried in cell culture and tissue engineering applications in recent years. Now Jeffrey Perkel takes a look at one new culture component that might surprise you-spider silk. PMID:24924388

  5. DETECTION AND TITRATION OF BLUETONGUE VIRUS IN CULICOIDES INSECT CELL CULTURE BY AN ANTIGEN-CAPTURE ENZYME-LINKED IMMUNOSORBENT ASSAY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) infects sheep, cattle and other ruminants and is transmitted by Culicoides spp. of biting midges. Virus is typically isolated and characterized by infection of susceptible vertebrate cells that undergo detectable and measurable cytopathic effects. Cell lines derived from C. ...

  6. Measurement of Glucose Uptake in Cultured Cells.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Norio; Ueda-Wakagi, Manabu; Sato, Takuya; Kawasaki, Kengo; Sawada, Keisuke; Kawabata, Kyuichi; Akagawa, Mitsugu; Ashida, Hitoshi

    2015-01-01

    Facilitative glucose uptake transport systems are ubiquitous in animal cells and are responsible for transporting glucose across cell surface membranes. Evaluation of glucose uptake is crucial in the study of numerous diseases and metabolic disorders such as myocardial ischemia, diabetes mellitus, and cancer. Detailed in this unit are laboratory methods for assessing glucose uptake into mammalian cells. The unit is divided into five sections: (1) a brief overview of glucose uptake assays in cultured cells; (2) a method for measuring glucose uptake using radiolabeled 3-O-methylglucose; (3) a method for measuring glucose uptake using radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose (2DG); (4) a microplate method for measuring 2DG-uptake using an enzymatic, fluorometric assay; and (5) a microplate-based method using a fluorescent analog of 2DG. © 2015 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:26646194

  7. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  8. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  9. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  10. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  11. High-Content Assays for Characterizing the Viability and Morphology of 3D Cancer Spheroid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mitlo, Trisha; Hesley, Jayne; Luke, Steve; Owens, Windsor; Cromwell, Evan F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing interest in using three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling cancer and tissue biology to accelerate translation research. Development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active area of investigation. The goal of this study was to develop higher throughput high-content imaging and analysis methods to characterize phenotypic changes in human cancer spheroids in response to compound treatment. We optimized spheroid cell culture protocols using low adhesion U-bottom 96- and 384-well plates for three common cancer cell lines and improved the workflow with a one-step staining procedure that reduces assay time and minimizes variability. We streamlined imaging acquisition by using a maximum projection algorithm that combines cellular information from multiple slices through a 3D object into a single image, enabling efficient comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. A custom image analysis method was implemented to provide multiparametric characterization of single-cell and spheroid phenotypes. We report a number of readouts, including quantification of marker-specific cell numbers, measurement of cell viability and apoptosis, and characterization of spheroid size and shape. Assay performance was assessed using established anticancer cytostatic and cytotoxic drugs. We demonstrated concentration–response effects for different readouts and measured IC50 values, comparing 3D spheroid results to two-dimensional cell cultures. Finally, a library of 119 approved anticancer drugs was screened across a wide range of concentrations using HCT116 colon cancer spheroids. The proposed methods can increase performance and throughput of high-content assays for compound screening and evaluation of anticancer drugs with 3D cell models. PMID:26317884

  12. High-content assays for characterizing the viability and morphology of 3D cancer spheroid cultures.

    PubMed

    Sirenko, Oksana; Mitlo, Trisha; Hesley, Jayne; Luke, Steve; Owens, Windsor; Cromwell, Evan F

    2015-09-01

    There is an increasing interest in using three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling cancer and tissue biology to accelerate translation research. Development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active area of investigation. The goal of this study was to develop higher throughput high-content imaging and analysis methods to characterize phenotypic changes in human cancer spheroids in response to compound treatment. We optimized spheroid cell culture protocols using low adhesion U-bottom 96- and 384-well plates for three common cancer cell lines and improved the workflow with a one-step staining procedure that reduces assay time and minimizes variability. We streamlined imaging acquisition by using a maximum projection algorithm that combines cellular information from multiple slices through a 3D object into a single image, enabling efficient comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. A custom image analysis method was implemented to provide multiparametric characterization of single-cell and spheroid phenotypes. We report a number of readouts, including quantification of marker-specific cell numbers, measurement of cell viability and apoptosis, and characterization of spheroid size and shape. Assay performance was assessed using established anticancer cytostatic and cytotoxic drugs. We demonstrated concentration-response effects for different readouts and measured IC50 values, comparing 3D spheroid results to two-dimensional cell cultures. Finally, a library of 119 approved anticancer drugs was screened across a wide range of concentrations using HCT116 colon cancer spheroids. The proposed methods can increase performance and throughput of high-content assays for compound screening and evaluation of anticancer drugs with 3D cell models. PMID:26317884

  13. 3D culture assays of murine mammary branching morphogenesis and epithelial invasion.

    PubMed

    Nguyen-Ngoc, Kim-Vy; Shamir, Eliah R; Huebner, Robert J; Beck, Jennifer N; Cheung, Kevin J; Ewald, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Epithelia are fundamental tissues that line cavities, glands, and outer body surfaces. We use three-dimensional (3D) embedded culture of primary murine mammary epithelial ducts, called "organoids," to recapitulate in days in culture epithelial programs that occur over weeks deep within the body. Modulating the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) allows us to model cell- and tissue-level behaviors observed in normal development, such as branching morphogenesis, and in cancer, such as invasion and dissemination. Here, we describe a collection of protocols for 3D culture of mammary organoids in different ECMs and for immunofluorescence staining of 3D culture samples and mammary gland tissue sections. We illustrate expected phenotypic outcomes of each assay and provide troubleshooting tips for commonly encountered technical problems. PMID:25245692

  14. In vitro assays for cobblestone area-forming cells, LTC-IC, and CFU-C.

    PubMed

    van Os, Ronald P; Dethmers-Ausema, Bertien; de Haan, Gerald

    2008-01-01

    Various assays exist that measure the function of hematopoietic stemcells (HSCs). In this chapter, in vitro assays are described that measure the frequency of progenitors (colony-forming unit in culture; CFU-C), stem cells (long-term culture-initiating cell; LTC-IC), or both (cobblestone area-forming cell assay; CAFC). These assays measure the potential of a test cell population retrospectively, i.e., at the time its activity is evident when the stem cell itself is often not detectable anymore. Although the in vitro LTC-IC and CAFC assays have been shown to correlate with in vivo activity, in vivo transplantation assays, where it can be shown that cells possess the ability to indefinitely repopulate all blood lineages, are the ultimate proof for HSC activity. Nevertheless, these in vitro assays provide an excellent method to screen for stem cell activity of a putative stem cell population or for screening the effect of a certain treatment on HSCs. PMID:18370297

  15. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d). PMID:24030442

  16. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  17. CYTOTOXICITY OF CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS TOWARDS HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EVALUATED IN A CLONAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of human bronchial epithelial cells after administration of four chemical carcinogens was measured in a clonal assay. Human bronchial epithelial cells were obtained from outgrowths of explanted tissue pieces. Serum-free medium was used for both explant culture and clonal...

  18. Detection of mumps virus in clinical specimens by rapid centrifugation culture and conventional tube cell culture.

    PubMed

    Germann, D; Gorgievski, M; Ströhle, A; Matter, L

    1998-07-01

    Conventional tube cell culture was compared with a 2 day and 5 day spin-amplified shell vial indirect immunofluorescence assay for the detection of mumps virus in swabs from the area of Stensen's duct. The sensitivity and specificity of the shell vial assay were 95.9 and 100%, respectively. The shell vial detected 66.3% of the positive cultures within 2 days of inoculation while the first positive results were available by conventional tube cell culture after 3 days (1.6%) reaching 72.4% of all culture positive specimens after 7 days. These data suggest that a centrifugation shell vial indirect immunofluorescence assay may be useful for rapid detection of mumps virus in clinical specimens. PMID:9705175

  19. Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Inferences-from In Vivo Assays

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Hematopoietic Stem Cells: Inferences-from In Vivo Assays CONNIEEAVES,CINDYMILLER,JOHANNE CASHMAN Columbia, Canada Key Words.Hematopoietic stem cells Transplantation Cord blood. Expansion Growthfactors murine hematopoietic stem cells to be quantitated. Measurements of murine CRU have shown

  20. High cell density attenuates reactive oxygen species: implications for in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis P; Yahav, Jonathan; Sperandeo, Michael; Maloney, Lauren; McTigue, Monica; Lin, Fubao; Clark, Richard A F

    2012-01-01

    In vitro cell-based assays are an essential and universally used step in elucidation of biological processes as well as in drug development. However, results obtained depend on the validity of protocols used. This statement certainly pertains to in vitro assays of oxidative stress. The holy grail of in vitro models is reliability and predictability of outcomes that relate to a single variable like addition of hydrogen peroxide or xanthine oxidase. Without such validated outcomes, comparison of results among different laboratories is not possible. Achieving this goal requires a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between the cells, their environment, and the experimental assays. Furthermore, as this knowledge is attained, it must be disseminated and used to update and standardize existing protocols. Here, we confirm and extend the effect of pyruvate and cell density on in vitro oxidative stress assays. Cell viability was assessed using a colorimetric assay measuring the reduction of a tetrazolium salt (XTT) into a colored formazan dye. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured using the foxp3 assay. We confirmed a previously reported finding that pyruvate, a common ingredient in cell culture media, acts as an extracellular scavenger of reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrated that cell density directly correlates with resistance to oxidative stress in tissue culture. It is theorized that the protective effect due to cell density predominantly relates to intracellular factors such as reduced glutathione and extracellular factors such as catalase. PMID:22107255

  1. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20?mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35?mL/min. After 8?h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11?±?3?mg/dL compared with PP with 100?±?16?mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17?h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time. PMID:25894522

  2. The Molecular Bacterial Load Assay Replaces Solid Culture for Measuring Early Bactericidal Response to Antituberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mtafya, Bariki; Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Kohlenberg, Anke; Rachow, Andrea; Rojas-Ponce, Gabriel; McHugh, Timothy D.; Heinrich, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the use of the molecular bacterial load (MBL) assay, for measuring viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum, in comparison with solid agar and liquid culture. The MBL assay provides early information on the rate of decline in bacterial load and has technical advantages over culture in either form. PMID:24871215

  3. Sensor enhanced microfluidic devices for cell based assays and organs on chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gärtner, Claudia; Ungerböck, Birgit; Schulz, Ingo; Jahn, Tobias; Mosig, Alexander; Mayr, Torsten; Becker, Holger

    2015-05-01

    Cell-based assays and organ-like substrates gather increasing attention due to their potentials in diagnostic and drug development. The use of these cell-based systems will allow to better understand in-vivo processes and to test for the direct influence of different substances on cell viability or metabolic activity e.g. in drug development and in addition to identify the influence of generated metabolites or different cell types. In this paper we present a respective technical platform, which enables the use of such cell-based assays. The platform is based on a microfluidic cell-assay toolbox, designed in a fashion allowing to minimize manual steps for cell culture on chip. Elements being essential for this work include membrane elements integrated into a microfluidic device for the separation of liquid stream together with a targeted supply of reagents and a three dimensional feeding of embedded cells. The influence of the metabolism from one cell type on the other can be evaluated due to the arrangement of cell compartments as interacting networks. A respective Lab-on-a-chip handling platform allows for the direct manipulation on a microscope stage and an incubator-free cell culture. Furthermore, luminescent sensors represent promising tools to be embedded into the microfluidic system to monitor the on-chip conditions or to provide information on cell viability and metabolic activity. Finally, examples for implemented assays on chip will be presented, ranging from cell culture showing the cell behavior in respect to surface functionalization and different growth conditions to finally embedding organ-on-chip structures of cultured cell lines.

  4. Use of the tetrazolium assay in measuring the response of human tumor cells to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.; McMillan, T.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Three human tumor cell lines of widely differing radiosensitivity were used to examine the characteristics of the 3-(4,5-dimethyl(thiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphery)tetradium bromide (MTT) assay and to select suitable conditions for its use in assessing the response of cells to ionizing radiation. The optimal concentration of MTT and the time of incubation of the cells with MTT were individualized for each cell line. The relationship between absorbance and cell number was not linear over the wide range of cell numbers that were used. A calibration curve of absorbance against cell number for each cell line was therefore used. Using the assay to quantify metabolically viable cells, growth curves of irradiated and unirradiated cells were constructed on days 0-14 after irradiation. Accurate surviving fractions could be calculated only when cells were in exponential growth. Using this modification to its interpretation, the MTT assay was able to provide a reproducible measure of survival, which compared well with clonogenic cell survival measurements. However, the necessity to optimize conditions of the MTT assay for each cell line severely limits its usefulness in determining the radiosensitivity of cells in primary human tumor cultures.

  5. Human norovirus culture in B cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-01-01

    Human noroviruses (HunoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HunoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HunoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-sydney HunoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HunoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. analysis of infection or attachment samples, including rna extraction and rt-qpcr, requires ~6 h. PMID:26513671

  6. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ?6 h. PMID:26513671

  7. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  8. The neurosphere assay applied to neural stem cells and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Galli, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mammalian brain has raised many expectations as these unique cells might recapitulate different neurological diseases, including brain tumors, both from a functional and molecular perspective. Proper in vitro culturing of NSCs has emerged as a critical methodological issue, given that it should preserve the in vivo features of NSCs, with particular emphasis on cell heterogeneity. At the same time, the methodology for NSC culturing should allow the production of large amounts of cells to be exploited not only for prospective clinical applications, but also for drug screening. Direct in vitro selection of NSCs and, very recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) by means of defined serum-free conditions represents the most reliable methodology to obtain long-term expanding SC lines. Here we describe the methods currently employed to enrich for NSCs/CSCs based on the NeuroSphere Assay (NSA) and their adaptation to specific assays for testing the efficacy of neuroactive compounds. PMID:23436418

  9. Production of an antiproliferative furanoheliangolide by Lychnophora ericoides cell culture.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Pierre Alexandre; Amarante, Maria Fernanda Castro; Pereira, Ana Maria Soares; Bertoni, Bianca; França, Suzelei Castro; Pessoa, Cláudia; de Moraes, Manoel Odorico; Costa-Lotufo, Letícia Veras; Pereira, Marcio Roberto Pinho; Lopes, Norberto Peporine

    2004-12-01

    This work reports for the first time the production a furanoheliangolide (goyazensolide) by plant cell culture. Monitoring of the goyazensolide metabolism revealed that the maximum production occurred during the lag phase of the Lychnophora ericoides callus culture. The antiproliferative activity of obtained goyazensolide was evaluated against seven cancer cell lines using MTT assay. The results revealed a potent cytotoxic activity for the furaheliangolide with IC50 values in the range of 0.06 microg/ml for CEM leukemia cells to 0.75 microg/ml for B16 melanome cells. PMID:15577239

  10. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  11. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium.

    PubMed

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  12. Cell culture compositions

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  13. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew; Graupner, Anne; Gutzkow, Kristine B.; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the comet assay single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i) Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii) reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods, and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used – in combination with a reference curve – to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose, and they are inexpensive. PMID:25774164

  14. Three-Dimensional Co-Culture Assay System for Angiogenesis and Metastasis

    Cancer.gov

    This technology features an assay for the detection and measurement of angiogenesis and metastasis. A three-dimensional co-culture system has been developed that closely mimics the in vivo environment in which angiogenesis and metastatic tumors develop.

  15. Cell-patterned glass spray for direct drug assay using mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Wang, Shiqi; Chen, Qiushui; Jiang, Hao; Liang, Shuping; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2015-09-10

    In this work, the establishment of a glass spray mass spectrometry (GS-MS) platform for direct cell-based drug assay was described. Cell co-culture, drug-induced cell apoptosis, proliferation analysis and intracellular drug absorption measurement were performed simultaneously on this specifically designed platform. Two groups of co-cultured cells (NIH-3T3/HepG2 and HepG2/MCF-7) were cultivated and they showed high viability within 3 days. The biocompatibility of the platform facilitated the subsequent bioassays, in which, cyclophosphamide (CPA) and genistein were used as the model drugs. The distinctions of cell apoptosis and proliferation between the mono-cultured and co-cultured cells were clearly observed and well explained by in situ GS-MS measurements. A satisfactory linearity of the calibration curve between the relative MS intensity and CPA concentrations was obtained using stable isotope labeling method (y = 0.16545 + 0.0985x, R(2) = 0.9937). The variations in the quantity of absorbed drug were detected and the results were consistent with the concentration-dependence of cell apoptosis. All the results demonstrated that direct cell-based drug assay could be performed on the stable isotope labeling assisted GS-MS platform in a facile and quantitative manner. PMID:26388483

  16. Are in vitro estimates of cell diffusivity and cell proliferation rate sensitive to assay geometry?

    PubMed

    Treloar, Katrina K; Simpson, Matthew J; McElwain, D L Sean; Baker, Ruth E

    2014-09-01

    Cells respond to various biochemical and physical cues during wound-healing and tumour progression. in vitro assays used to study these processes are typically conducted in one particular geometry and it is unclear how the assay geometry affects the capacity of cell populations to spread, or whether the relevant mechanisms, such as cell motility and cell proliferation, are somehow sensitive to the geometry of the assay. In this work we use a circular barrier assay to characterise the spreading of cell populations in two different geometries. Assay 1 describes a tumour-like geometry where a cell population spreads outwards into an open space. Assay 2 describes a wound-like geometry where a cell population spreads inwards to close a void. We use a combination of discrete and continuum mathematical models and automated image processing methods to obtain independent estimates of the effective cell diffusivity, D, and the effective cell proliferation rate, ?. Using our parameterised mathematical model we confirm that our estimates of D and ? accurately predict the time-evolution of the location of the leading edge and the cell density profiles for both assay 1 and assay 2. Our work suggests that the effective cell diffusivity is up to 50% lower for assay 2 compared to assay 1, whereas the effective cell proliferation rate is up to 30% lower for assay 2 compared to assay 1. PMID:24787651

  17. Development of a Treatment Algorithm for Streptococci and Enterococci from Positive Blood Cultures Identified with the Verigene Gram-Positive Blood Culture Assay

    PubMed Central

    Alby, Kevin; Daniels, Lindsay M.; Weber, David J.

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-eight blood cultures with a Gram stain result of Gram-positive cocci in pairs and/or chains were evaluated with the Nanosphere Verigene Gram-positive blood culture (BC-GP) assay. The overall concordance of the assay with culture was 89.7% (70/78 cultures), allowing for the development of a targeted treatment algorithm. PMID:23985910

  18. Resistance to lipid peroxidation by cultured neoplastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arneson, R.M.; Wander, J.D.; Cabot, M.C.; Tan, E.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The membranes of murine neuroblastoma cells (C1300) and human leukemia cells (HL-60) exhibit markedly increased resistance to peroxidation and undifferentiated Friend erythroleukemia cells were highly resistant to peroxidation. These findings suggest that high resistance to peroxidation and changes in the level of resistance occur commonly in cultured cells. Both cytosolic and membrane-associated factors that can prevent the onset of lipid peroxidation are present in differentiating neuroblastoma cells. A highly sensitive, single-phase assay for antioxidant activity failed to detect the presence of an antioxidant that could be associated with increased resistance to peroxidation in neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, lipid analyses of neuroblastoma cells revealed no parameter that could be related to this increase; however, this resistance phenomenon is abolished by adding arachidonic acid to the culture medium at levels that do not affect cell growth or viability. Protective factors exist in the cytosolic fraction of rat liver homogenate, which are able to neutralize the toxic products of lipid peroxidation rather than prevent the initiation of peroxidation. These protective factors were detected, and could possibly be isolated, by a cytotoxicity assay employing Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the course of this work, we discovered an antioxidant artifact that is widely distributed in commercial tissue culture media. A simple procedure has been developed to detect this antioxidant in lots of culture media.

  19. DETECTION OF ANEUPLOIDY BY A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cells to detect chemically-induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome segregation fol...

  20. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases. PMID:25506353

  1. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, H.; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl O.

    1997-12-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular redox state, impaired cell division, formation of giant cells and cell shrinking, swelling of mitochondria and loss of cristae as well as DNA damage.

  2. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1998-01-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular redox state, impaired cell division, formation of giant cells and cell shrinking, swelling of mitochondria and loss of cristae as well as DNA damage.

  3. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  4. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  5. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  6. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  7. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  8. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6..., SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to as tissue...

  9. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  10. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  11. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  12. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  13. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6...AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference to cell cultures, which may be referred to...

  14. Evaluation of ochratoxin A for mutagenicity in a battery of bacterial and mammalian cell assays.

    PubMed

    Bendele, A M; Neal, S B; Oberly, T J; Thompson, C Z; Bewsey, B J; Hill, L E; Rexroat, M A; Carlton, W W; Probst, G S

    1985-10-01

    Ochratoxin A (OA), a nephrotoxic mycotoxin, was evaluated for genotoxic potential in a battery of in vitro and in vivo assays. OA was not mutagenic to Salmonella typhimurium, either with or without metabolic activation, in the plate incorporation (Ames) test at concentrations of 50-600 micrograms OA/plate or in the gradient plate assay at concentrations of 0.1-1000 micrograms OA/ml. No induction of unscheduled DNA synthesis was evident in primary cultures of rat hepatocytes exposed to concentrations of OA ranging from 0.000025 to 500 micrograms/ml. In the mouse lymphoma forward mutation assay, exposure of L5178Y TK+/- mouse lymphoma cells to OA did not increase the numbers of L5178Y TK-/- mutants. There was no significant difference between the numbers of sister-chromatid exchanges in cells from OA-treated Chinese hamsters and those in cells from the negative-control animals. PMID:3905543

  15. Phenotypic modulation of swine aortic smooth muscle cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Monical, P.L.

    1986-01-01

    A study was undertaken to compare aortic smooth muscle cells with log phase cells in terms of DNA and protein synthesis, total protein kinase activity including the relative ratios of amino acid-specific kinases, and phosphoamino acid response of quiescent cells to serum, and nascent proteins and phosphoproteins in the cell layer and conditioned medium. The rate of incorporation of (/sup 3/H)-Tdr in nodular cells was almost negligible when compared to cells 24 hours after seeding while the level of protein synthesis was approximately equal in both cell types. Total protein kinase activity of permeabilized cells was assayed in the presence of 10 mM Ca/sup +2/ or Mn/sup +2/ with exogenous cation omitted in controls. The level of activity measured in Ca/sub 2//sup +/-stimulated assays or in controls did not differ significantly in both cell types. Likewise, the activity of amino acid-specific kinases were also similar. In the Mn/sup +2/-stimulated assay, however, a significant different was observed. The nodular cells had a lower level of activity in this assay that was also reflected in a lower level of phosphotyrosine. When cultures were labeled in vitro with (/sup 32/P)-orthophosphate, incorporation of the label into phosphotyrosine was too low to be measured accurately.

  16. A simple assay based on HIV infection preventing the reclustering of MT-4 cells*

    PubMed Central

    Szucs, G.; Melnick, J. L.; Hollinger, F. B.

    1988-01-01

    This report confirms and extends the recent work of Pauwels et al. on a ”reclustering” assay (a simple microtitration plate method) for the determination of human immuno-deficiency virus (HIV) infection of MT-4 cells. MT-4 cells, which are highly susceptible to and permissive for HIV, typically grow in clusters. In the absence of virus these cell aggregates, after dissociation by pipetting, reform into clusters within 2 to 3 hours. Growth of HIV results in an inhibition of reclustering, with an end-point some 4-5 days after initiation of infection. In cultures inoculated with 5 to 8 TCID50 of HIV, only 2-4% of the cells remain viable after 4 days. Correspondingly, HIV antigens can be detected by immunofluorescence in more than 90% of the cells remaining in the culture. The sensitivity of the ”reclustering” assay is only slightly less than that of the immunofluorescence test. A colorimetric assay is also described that employs a tetrazolium salt (designated as MTT) to measure the cytolytic effect of various dilutions of HIV; comparable virus titres were obtained. This reclustering assay now appears to offer the simplest method for titration of prototype HIV in virus stocks and when used in drug evaluation tests and for measurement of HIV neutralizing antibodies. ImagesPlate 2Plate 1 PMID:3069234

  17. Tracking the Invasion of Small Numbers of Cells in Paper-Based Assays with Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Truong, Andrew S; Lochbaum, Christian A; Boyce, Matthew W; Lockett, Matthew R

    2015-11-17

    Paper-based scaffolds are an attractive material for culturing mammalian cells in a three-dimensional environment. There are a number of previously published studies, which utilize these scaffolds to generate models of aortic valves, cardiac ischemia and reperfusion, and solid tumors. These models have largely relied on fluorescence imaging and microscopy to quantify cells in the scaffolds. We present here a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based method, capable of quantifying multiple cell types in a single culture with the aid of DNA barcodes: unique sequences of DNA introduced to the genome of individual cells or cell types through lentiviral transduction. PCR-based methods are highly specific and are amenable to high-throughput and multiplexed analyses. To validate this method, we engineered two different breast cancer lines to constitutively express either a green or red fluorescent protein. These cells lines allowed us to directly compare the ability of fluorescence imaging (of the fluorescent proteins) and qPCR (of the unique DNA sequences of the fluorescent proteins) to quantify known numbers of cells in the paper based-scaffolds. We also used both methods to quantify the distribution of these breast cell lines in homotypic and heterotypic invasion assays. In the paper-based invasion assays, a single sheet of paper containing cells suspended in a hydrogel was sandwiched between sheets of paper containing only hydrogel. The stack was incubated, and the cells invaded the adjacent layers. The individual sheets of the invasion assay were then destacked and the number of cells in each layer quantified. Our results show both methods can accurately detect cell populations of greater than 500 cells. The qPCR method can repeatedly and accurately detect as few as 50 cells, allowing small populations of highly invasive cells to be detected and differentiated from other cell types. PMID:26507077

  18. A novel in vitro survival assay of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to ionizing radiation

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Motohiro; Otsuka, Kensuke; Kondo, Hisayoshi; Hamada, Nobuyuki; Tomita, Masanori; Takahashi, Masayuki; Nakasono, Satoshi; Iwasaki, Toshiyasu; Yoshida, Kazuo

    2014-01-01

    The microcolony assay developed by Withers and Elkind has been a gold standard to assess the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to high (?8 Gy) doses of ionizing radiation (IR), but is not applicable in cases of exposure to lower doses. Here, we developed a novel in vitro assay that enables assessment of the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower IR doses. The assay includes in vitro culture of small intestinal stem cells, which allows the stem cells to develop into epithelial organoids containing all four differentiated cell types of the small intestine. We used Lgr5-EGFP-IRES-CreERT2/ROSA26-tdTomato mice to identify Lgr5+ stem cells and their progeny. Enzymatically dissociated single crypt cells from the duodenum and jejunum of mice were irradiated with 7.25, 29, 101, 304, 1000, 2000 and 4000 mGy of X-rays immediately after plating, and the number of organoids was counted on Day 12. Organoid-forming efficiency of irradiated cells relative to that of unirradiated controls was defined as the surviving fraction of stem cells. We observed a significant decrease in the surviving fraction of stem cells at ?1000 mGy. Moreover, fluorescence-activated cell sorting analyses and passage of the organoids revealed that proliferation of stem cells surviving IR is significantly potentiated. Together, the present study demonstrates that the in vitro assay is useful for quantitatively assessing the surviving fraction of small intestinal stem cells after exposure to lower doses of IR as compared with previous examinations using the microcolony assay. PMID:24511147

  19. Assaying endothelial-mural cell interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies in genetically malleable embryonic model systems have enabled the identification of factors required for blood vessel formation. However, it is not possible in most in vivo systems to dissect carefully the exact cellular behaviours, as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions t...

  20. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  1. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  2. Improving the design of the agarose spot assay for eukaryotic cell chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Szatmary, Alex C.; Stuelten, Christina H.; Nossal, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Migration of cells along gradients of effector molecules, i.e., chemotaxis, is necessary in immune response and is involved in development and cancer metastasis. The experimental assessment of chemotaxis thus is of high interest. The agarose spot assay is a simple tissue culture system used to analyze chemotaxis. Although direction sensing requires gradients to be sufficiently steep, how the chemical gradients developed in this assay change over time, and thus, under what conditions chemotaxis is plausible, has not yet been determined. Here, we use numerical solution of the diffusion equation to determine the chemoattractant gradient produced in the assay. Our analysis shows that, for the usual spot size, the lifetime of the assay is optimized if the chemoattractant concentration in the spot is initially 30 times the dissociation constant of the chemoattractant-receptor bond. This result holds regardless of the properties of the chemoattractant. With this initial concentration, the chemoattractant gradient falls to the minimum threshold for directional sensing at the same time that the concentration drops to the optimal level for detecting gradient direction. If a higher initial chemoattractant concentration is used, the useful lifetime of the assay is likely to be shortened because receptor saturation may decrease the cells’ sensitivity to the gradient; lower initial concentrations would result in too little chemoattractant for the cells to detect. Moreover, chemoattractants with higher diffusion coefficients would sustain gradients for less time. Based on previous measurements of the diffusion coefficients of the chemoattractants EGF and CXCL12, we estimate that the assay will produce gradients that cells can sense for a duration of 10 h for EGF and 5 h for CXCL12. These gradient durations are comparable to what can be achieved with the Boyden chamber assay. The analysis presented in this work facilitates determination of suitable parameters for the assay, and can be used to assess whether observed cell motility is likely due to chemotaxis or chemokinesis. PMID:25530845

  3. Automated platform for sensor-based monitoring and controlled assays of living cells and tissues.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Brischwein, M; Kleinhans, R; Demmel, F; Schwarzenberger, T; Pfister, C; Wolf, B

    2013-12-15

    Cellular assays have become a fundamental technique in scientific research, pharmaceutical drug screening or toxicity testing. Therefore, the requirements of technical developments for automated assays raised in the same rate. A novel measuring platform was developed, which combines automated assay processing with label-free high-content measuring and real-time monitoring of multiple metabolic and morphologic parameters of living cells or tissues. Core of the system is a test plate with 24 cell culture wells, each equipped with opto-chemical sensor-spots for the determination of cellular oxygen consumption and extracellular acidification, next to electrode-structures for electrical impedance sensing. An automated microscope provides the optical sensor read-out and allows continuous cell imaging. Media and drugs are supplied by a pipetting robot system. Therefore, assay can run over several days without personnel interaction. To demonstrate the performance of the platform in physiologic assays, we continuously recorded the kinetics of metabolic and morphologic parameters of MCF-7 breast cancer cells under the influence of the cytotoxin chloroacetaldehyde. The data point out the time resolved effect kinetics over the complete treatment period. Thereby, the measuring platform overcomes problems of endpoint tests, which cannot monitor the kinetics of different parameters of the same cell population over longer time periods. PMID:23838277

  4. Micronucleus assay with tetrad cells of Tradescantia.

    PubMed

    Mišík, Miroslav; Pichler, Clemens; Rainer, Bernhard; Nersesyan, Armen; Knasmueller, Siegfried

    2013-01-01

    The Tradescantia micronucleus assay is being used since almost 50 years for the detection of genotoxins (including carcinogens) in the environment. A large database on the effects of individual compounds and of complex environmental mixtures (soil, air and water) has accumulated. In contrast to other mutagenicity test systems, the effects of low concentrations of heavy metals, radionuclides, certain herbicides and pesticides, and gaseous mutagens can be detected and it is also possible to use the test for in situ biomonitoring studies. The test system has been validated, and standardized protocols have been developed for laboratory experiments and for field studies, which are described in this chapter. PMID:23896890

  5. Living cell imaging and Rac1-GTP levels of CXCL12-treated migrating neural progenitor cells in stripe assay

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Min; Song, Aihong; Lai, Siqiang; Qiu, Lisha; Huang, Yunlong; Chen, Qiang; Zhu, Bing; Xu, Dongsheng; Zheng, Jialin C.

    2015-01-01

    This data article contains three figures and three videos related to the research article entitled “Applications of Stripe Assay in the Study of CXCL12-mediated Neural Progenitor Cell Migration and Polarization” Zhang et al. (2015) [1], which uses stripe assay to study mouse neural progenitor cell (NPC) migration and polarization. The current article describes the neurosphere method used to culture NPCs. NPCs in neurospheres and monolayer were characterized using immunocytochemistry method with antibodies against two classic NPC markers: nestin and SOX2. The article also describes method to obtain sufficient protein lysates from NPCs in the stripe assay. When protein lysates were subjected to Rac1 affinity precipitation, Rac1-GTP was detected in the pull-down samples. In addition, the articles provides live cell imaging data to better understand CXCL12-mediated cellular migration and polarization. PMID:26693502

  6. Choosing an Appropriate Modelling Framework for Analysing Multispecies Co-culture Cell Biology Experiments.

    PubMed

    Markham, Deborah C; Simpson, Matthew J; Baker, Ruth E

    2015-04-01

    In vitro cell biology assays play a crucial role in informing our understanding of the migratory, proliferative and invasive properties of many cell types in different biological contexts. While mono-culture assays involve the study of a population of cells composed of a single cell type, co-culture assays study a population of cells composed of multiple cell types (or subpopulations of cells). Such co-culture assays can provide more realistic insights into many biological processes including tissue repair, tissue regeneration and malignant spreading. Typically, system parameters, such as motility and proliferation rates, are estimated by calibrating a mathematical or computational model to the observed experimental data. However, parameter estimates can be highly sensitive to the choice of model and modelling framework. This observation motivates us to consider the fundamental question of how we can best choose a model to facilitate accurate parameter estimation for a particular assay. In this work we describe three mathematical models of mono-culture and co-culture assays that include different levels of spatial detail. We study various spatial summary statistics to explore if they can be used to distinguish between the suitability of each model over a range of parameter space. Our results for mono-culture experiments are promising, in that we suggest two spatial statistics that can be used to direct model choice. However, co-culture experiments are far more challenging: we show that these same spatial statistics which provide useful insight into mono-culture systems are insufficient for co-culture systems. Therefore, we conclude that great care ought to be exercised when estimating the parameters of co-culture assays. PMID:25549623

  7. Microfluidic assay-based optical measurement techniques for cell analysis: A review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Ryul; Song, Hyerin; Sung, Jong Hwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Kyujung

    2016-03-15

    Since the early 2000s, microfluidic cell culture systems have attracted significant attention as a promising alternative to conventional cell culture methods and the importance of designing an efficient detection system to analyze cell behavior on a chip in real time is raised. For this reason, various measurement techniques for microfluidic devices have been developed with the development of microfluidic assays for high-throughput screening and mimicking of in vivo conditions. In this review, we discuss optical measurement techniques for microfluidic assays. First of all, the recent development of fluorescence- and absorbance-based optical measurement systems is described. Next, advanced optical detection systems are introduced with respect to three emphases: 1) optimization for long-term, real-time, and in situ measurements; 2) performance improvements; and 3) multimodal analysis conjugations. Moreover, we explore presents future prospects for the establishment of optical detection systems following the development of complex, multi-dimensional microfluidic cell culture assays to mimic in vivo tissue, organ, and human systems. PMID:26409023

  8. Cancer Phylogenetics from Single-Cell Assays Gregory Pennington

    E-print Network

    Cancer Phylogenetics from Single-Cell Assays Gregory Pennington Stanley Shackney Russell Schwartz of possible ways different genetic lesions might uncouple cell growth from normal controls. Two cancers the Carnegie Mellon University Berkman Faculty Development Fund. #12;Keywords: computational biology, cancer

  9. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-?L), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown in other ILs/salts. The growth curve trends obtained by D2D matched conventional yeast culturing in microtiter wells, validating the D2D platform. We believe that our approach represents a generic platform for multi-step biochemical assays such as drug screening, digital PCR, enzyme assays, immunoassays and cell-based assays. PMID:25354549

  10. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  11. Dynamized Preparations in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Sunila, Ellanzhiyil Surendran; Preethi, Korengath Chandran; Kuttan, Girija

    2009-01-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties. PMID:18955237

  12. Dynamized preparations in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sunila, Ellanzhiyil Surendran; Kuttan, Ramadasan; Preethi, Korengath Chandran; Kuttan, Girija

    2009-06-01

    Although reports on the efficacy of homeopathic medicines in animal models are limited, there are even fewer reports on the in vitro action of these dynamized preparations. We have evaluated the cytotoxic activity of 30C and 200C potencies of ten dynamized medicines against Dalton's Lymphoma Ascites, Ehrlich's Ascites Carcinoma, lung fibroblast (L929) and Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines and compared activity with their mother tinctures during short-term and long-term cell culture. The effect of dynamized medicines to induce apoptosis was also evaluated and we studied how dynamized medicines affected genes expressed during apoptosis. Mother tinctures as well as some dynamized medicines showed significant cytotoxicity to cells during short and long-term incubation. Potentiated alcohol control did not produce any cytotoxicity at concentrations studied. The dynamized medicines were found to inhibit CHO cell colony formation and thymidine uptake in L929 cells and those of Thuja, Hydrastis and Carcinosinum were found to induce apoptosis in DLA cells. Moreover, dynamized Carcinosinum was found to induce the expression of p53 while dynamized Thuja produced characteristic laddering pattern in agarose gel electrophoresis of DNA. These results indicate that dynamized medicines possess cytotoxic as well as apoptosis-inducing properties. PMID:18955237

  13. Microfluidic Proximity Ligation Assay for Profiling Signaling Networks with Single-Cell Resolution.

    PubMed

    Blazek, Matthias; Roth, Günter; Zengerle, Roland; Meier, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    The proximity ligation assay (PLA) is a technique that can be used to characterize proteins, protein-protein interactions, and protein modifications at the single-cell level. Image-based in situ detection of proteins using PLA is a quantitative method with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. The miniaturization and parallelization of the PLA onto a microfluidic chip and concurrent use of an automated cell-culture system increase the throughput of this technology. Here, we describe the performance of PLA on a microfluidic chip. We provide protocols for on-chip cell culture, time-shifted cell stimulation and fixation, PLA implementation, and computational image analysis in order to achieve single-cell resolution. As a proof of concept, we studied the phosphorylation of Akt in response to stimulation with platelet-derived growth factor. PMID:26542722

  14. Cell-based assays for Parkinson's disease using differentiated human LUHMES cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-min; Yin, Ming; Zhang, Min-hua

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Lund human mesencephalic (LUHMES) cells can be differentiated to post-mitotic cells with biochemical, morphological and functional features of dopaminergic (DAergic) neurons. Given the limited scale of primary DAergic neuron culture, we developed differentiated LUHMES cell-based cytotoxicity assays for identifying neuroprotective agents for Parkinson's disease (PD). Methods: LUHMES cells were incubated in a differentiation medium containing cAMP and GDNF for 6 d, and then differentiated cells were treated with MPP+ or infected with baculovirus containing ?-synuclein. Cytotoxicity was determined by measuring intracellular ATP levels and caspase 3/7 activity in the cells. DAergic neuron-specific marker protein and mRNA levels in the cells were analyzed using Western blotting and RT-PCR, respectively. Results: LUHMES cells grew extensive neurites and became post-mitotic neuron-like cells during differentiation period, and three DAergic neuron markers TH, DAT and Nurr1 exhibited different expression profiles. MPP+ dose-dependently reduced ATP levels in the cells with an IC50 value of 65 ?mol/L. MPP+ (80 ?mol/L) significantly increased caspase 3/7 activity in the cells. Both the CDK inhibitor GW8510 and the GSK3? inhibitor SB216763 effectively rescued MPP+-induced reduction of ATP levels with EC50 values of 12 and 205 nmol/L, respectively. Overexpression of ?-synuclein also significantly decreased intracellular ATP levels and increased caspase 3/7 activity in the cells. GW8510 and SB216763 effectively rescued ?-synuclein overexpression-induced reduction of ATP levels, whereas GW8510, but not SB216763, ameliorated ?-synuclein overexpression-induced increase of caspase 3/7 activity. Conclusion: MPP+- and ?-synuclein overexpression-induced cytotoxicity of differentiated LUHMES cells may serve as good alternative systems for identifying neuroprotective compounds for PD. PMID:24989254

  15. Cell-based flow cytometry assay to measure cytotoxic activity.

    PubMed

    Noto, Alessandra; Ngauv, Pearline; Trautmann, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    Cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells is rarely evaluated. We describe here a new cell-based assay to measure the capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to kill CD4+ T cells loaded with their cognate peptide. Target CD4+ T cells are divided into two populations, labeled with two different concentrations of CFSE. One population is pulsed with the peptide of interest (CFSE-low) while the other remains un-pulsed (CFSE-high). Pulsed and un-pulsed CD4+ T cells are mixed at an equal ratio and incubated with an increasing number of purified CD8+ T cells. The specific killing of autologous target CD4+ T cells is analyzed by flow cytometry after coculture with CD8+ T cells containing the antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells detected by peptide/MHCI tetramer staining. The specific lysis of target CD4+ T cells measured at different effector versus target ratios, allows for the calculation of lytic units, LU??/10(6) cells. This simple and straightforward assay allows for the accurate measurement of the intrinsic capacity of CD8+ T cells to kill target CD4+ T cells. PMID:24378436

  16. Cell-based Flow Cytometry Assay to Measure Cytotoxic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Noto, Alessandra; Ngauv, Pearline; Trautmann, Lydie

    2013-01-01

    Cytolytic activity of CD8+ T cells is rarely evaluated. We describe here a new cell-based assay to measure the capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells to kill CD4+ T cells loaded with their cognate peptide. Target CD4+ T cells are divided into two populations, labeled with two different concentrations of CFSE. One population is pulsed with the peptide of interest (CFSE-low) while the other remains un-pulsed (CFSE-high). Pulsed and un-pulsed CD4+ T cells are mixed at an equal ratio and incubated with an increasing number of purified CD8+ T cells. The specific killing of autologous target CD4+ T cells is analyzed by flow cytometry after coculture with CD8+ T cells containing the antigen-specific effector CD8+ T cells detected by peptide/MHCI tetramer staining. The specific lysis of target CD4+ T cells measured at different effector versus target ratios, allows for the calculation of lytic units, LU30/106 cells. This simple and straightforward assay allows for the accurate measurement of the intrinsic capacity of CD8+ T cells to kill target CD4+ T cells. PMID:24378436

  17. Towards personalized medicine: chemosensitivity assays of patient lung cancer cell spheroids in a perfused microfluidic platform.

    PubMed

    Ruppen, Janine; Wildhaber, Franziska D; Strub, Christoph; Hall, Sean R R; Schmid, Ralph A; Geiser, Thomas; Guenat, Olivier T

    2015-07-21

    Cancer is responsible for millions of deaths worldwide and the variability in disease patterns calls for patient-specific treatment. Therefore, personalized treatment is expected to become a daily routine in prospective clinical tests. In addition to genetic mutation analysis, predictive chemosensitive assays using patient's cells will be carried out as a decision making tool. However, prior to their widespread application in clinics, several challenges linked to the establishment of such assays need to be addressed. To best predict the drug response in a patient, the cellular environment needs to resemble that of the tumor. Furthermore, the formation of homogeneous replicates from a scarce amount of patient's cells is essential to compare the responses under various conditions (compound and concentration). Here, we present a microfluidic device for homogeneous spheroid formation in eight replicates in a perfused microenvironment. Spheroid replicates from either a cell line or primary cells from adenocarcinoma patients were successfully created. To further mimic the tumor microenvironment, spheroid co-culture of primary lung cancer epithelial cells and primary pericytes were tested. A higher chemoresistance in primary co-culture spheroids compared to primary monoculture spheroids was found when both were constantly perfused with cisplatin. This result is thought to be due to the barrier created by the pericytes around the tumor spheroids. Thus, this device can be used for additional chemosensitivity assays (e.g. sequential treatment) of patient material to further approach the personalized oncology field. PMID:26088102

  18. A hybrid microfluidic platform for cell-based assays via diffusive and convective trans-membrane perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchagina, Elizaveta; Mc Glade, Declan; Glynn, Macdara; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel 3D hybrid assembly of a polymer microfluidic chip with polycarbonate track-etched membrane (PCTEM) enabling membrane-supported cell culture. Two chip designs have been developed to establish either diffusive or convective reagent delivery using the integrated PCTEM. While it is well suited to a range of cell-based assays, we specifically employ this platform for the screening of a common antitumor chemotoxic agent (mitomycin C – MMC) on the HL60 myeloid leukemia cell line. The toxic activity of MMC is based on the generation of severe DNA damage in the cells. Using either mode of operation, the HL60 cells were cultured on-chip before, during, and after exposure to MMC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 50??M. Cell viability was analysed off-chip by the trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The results of the on-chip viability assay were found to be consistent with those obtained off-chip and indicated ca. 40% cell survival at MMC concentration of 50??M. The catalogue of capabilities of the here described cell assay platform comprises of (i) the culturing of cells either under shear-free conditions or under induced through-membrane flows, (ii) the tight time control of the reagent exposure, (iii) the straightforward assembly of devices, (iv) the flexibility on the choice of the membrane, and, prospectively, (v) the amenability for large-scale parallelization. PMID:24404021

  19. An easy cell-based microchip assay method for a CYP1A1-mediated drug metabolism using adhesive cells, HepG2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Masaru; Yamamoto, Tatsuhiro; Sekimoto, Masashi; Degawa, Masakuni; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa

    2009-05-01

    We have developed a convenient cell-based assay method using a microchip. In the method, adhesive cells, HepG2, were cultured in the conventional culture dish containing glass disks and then the disks covered with the HepG2 were transferred to the microchip for cell assay. Activity of ethoxyresorufin O-deethylation (EROD), which is mainly mediated by cytochrome P4501A1 (CYP1A1), in HepG2 was measured. Treatment of HepG2 with 3-methylcholanthrene, a CYP1A1 inducer, resulted in significant increase in EROD activity.

  20. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  1. Improved focus assay of reticuloendotheliosis virus in a quail fibroblast cell line (QT35).

    PubMed

    Cho, B R

    1984-01-01

    Reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV) strains T and CS consistently induced focus formation in a quail fibroblast cell line designated QT35 that was maintained under agarose overlay following inoculation of REV. The foci were more distinct and better circumscribed than those that developed in QT35 cultures under fluid medium. The focus formation in QT35 cultures under agarose overlay was inhibited by REV antiserum, and there were a highly significant correlation (r = 0.966, P less than 0.005) and a linear relationship between the number of foci that developed and relative virus concentration inoculated. This provides a valid focus assay for REVs. PMID:6721800

  2. Radiometric macrophage culture assay for rapid evaluation of antileprosy activity of rifampin

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, A.; Seshadri, P.S.; Prasad, H.K.; Sathish, M.; Nath, I.

    1983-10-01

    The antileprosy effect of rifampin was evaluated by a newly developed rapid in vitro assay wherein 31 human-derived strains and 1 armadillo-derived strain of Mycobacterium leprae were maintained for 2 and 3 weeks, respectively, in murine and human macrophages in the presence of (3H)thymidine. Of these strains, 27 showed significant incorporation of the radiolabel in cultures of live bacilli as compared with control cultures of heat-killed bacilli of the same strain. Consistent and significant inhibition of (3H)thymidine uptake was observed in M. leprae resident cultures with 3 to 200 ng of rifampin per ml as compared with similar cultures without the drug. In general, an increase in percent inhibition was seen from 3 to 20 ng/ml, with marginal increases at 40, 50, and 100 ng/ml. M. leprae strains appear to be remarkably susceptible to this drug in the in vitro assay.

  3. Transgenic Rodent Assay for Quantifying Male Germ Cell Mutant Frequency

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Gingerich, John D.; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic ?gt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources. PMID:25145276

  4. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  5. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  6. Optimization of a dendritic cell-based assay for the in vitro priming of naïve human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Moser, Janice M; Sassano, Emily R; Leistritz, Del C; Eatrides, Jennifer M; Phogat, Sanjay; Koff, Wayne; Drake, Donald R

    2010-02-28

    Methods to prime human CD4(+) T cells in vitro would be of significant value for the pre-clinical evaluation of vaccine candidates and other immunotherapeutics. However, to date, there is no reliable method for the induction of primary human T cell responses in the laboratory. Here, we optimized a culture strategy incorporating highly purified lymphocytes and dendritic cells, in the absence of any exogenous growth factors, for the in vitro sensitization of naïve CD4(+) T cells against a variety of protein antigens. This fully autologous approach, which was superior to the more traditional PBMC assay for supporting the induction of primary human T helper cell responses in culture, elicited effector cells capable of producing a variety of Th cytokines, including IFNgamma, TNFalpha, IL-2, IL-5, IL-17 and IL-21, and memory cells that could be restimulated multiple times with a specific antigen. Through simple modifications to this culture method, we evaluated the role of dendritic cell maturation state and regulatory T cells on the sensitization of naïve T helper cells, which highlights its utility for addressing basic questions of human immunobiology. Finally, using the formulated yellow fever vaccine, YF-VAX (R), we provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the utility of the system for evaluating the T cell immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in a pre-clinical setting. PMID:19925804

  7. Novel Patient Cell-Based HTS Assay for Identification of Small Molecules for a Lysosomal Storage Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ribbens, Jameson; Zheng, Wei; Southall, Noel; Hu, Xin; Marugan, Juan J.; Ferrer, Marc; Maegawa, Gustavo H. B.

    2011-01-01

    Small molecules have been identified as potential therapeutic agents for lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs), inherited metabolic disorders caused by defects in proteins that result in lysosome dysfunctional. Some small molecules function assisting the folding of mutant misfolded lysosomal enzymes that are otherwise degraded in ER-associated degradation. The ultimate result is the enhancement of the residual enzymatic activity of the deficient enzyme. Most of the high throughput screening (HTS) assays developed to identify these molecules are single-target biochemical assays. Here we describe a cell-based assay using patient cell lines to identify small molecules that enhance the residual arylsulfatase A (ASA) activity found in patients with metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD), a progressive neurodegenerative LSD. In order to generate sufficient cell lines for a large scale HTS, primary cultured fibroblasts from MLD patients were transformed using SV40 large T antigen. These SV40 transformed (SV40t) cells showed to conserve biochemical characteristics of the primary cells. Using a specific colorimetric substrate para-nitrocatechol sulfate (pNCS), detectable ASA residual activity were observed in primary and SV40t fibroblasts from a MLD patient (ASA-I179S) cultured in multi-well plates. A robust fluorescence ASA assay was developed in high-density 1,536-well plates using the traditional colorimetric pNCS substrate, whose product (pNC) acts as “plate fluorescence quencher” in white solid-bottom plates. The quantitative cell-based HTS assay for ASA generated strong statistical parameters when tested against a diverse small molecule collection. This cell-based assay approach can be used for several other LSDs and genetic disorders, especially those that rely on colorimetric substrates which traditionally present low sensitivity for assay-miniaturization. In addition, the quantitative cell-based HTS assay here developed using patient cells creates an opportunity to identify therapeutic small molecules in a disease-cellular environment where potentially disrupted pathways are exposed and available as targets. PMID:22216298

  8. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean’s force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (> 90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  9. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Nathamgari, S Shiva P; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-12-21

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean's force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (>90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  10. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to (/sup 3/H)leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to ..gamma..-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with (/sup 3/H)leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures.

  11. Nanopillar based electrochemical biosensor for monitoring microfluidic based cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gangadharan, Rajan

    In-vitro assays using cultured cells have been widely performed for studying many aspects of cell biology and cell physiology. These assays also form the basis of cell based sensing. Presently, analysis procedures on cell cultures are done using techniques that are not integrated with the cell culture system. This approach makes continuous and real-time in-vitro measurements difficult. It is well known that the availability of continuous online measurements for extended periods of time will help provide a better understanding and will give better insight into cell physiological events. With this motivation we developed a highly sensitive, selective and stable microfluidic electrochemical glucose biosensor to make continuous glucose measurements in cell culture media. The performance of the microfluidic biosensor was enhanced by adding 3D nanopillars to the electrode surfaces. The microfluidic glucose biosensor consisted of three electrodes---Enzyme electrode, Working electrode, and Counter electrode. All these electrodes were enhanced with nanopillars and were optimized in their respective own ways to obtain an effective and stable biosensing device in cell culture media. For example, the 'Enzyme electrode' was optimized for enzyme immobilization via either a polypyrrole-based or a self-assembled-monolayer-based immobilization method, and the 'Working electrode' was modified with Prussian Blue or electropolymerized Neutral Red to reduce the working potential and also the interference from other interacting electro-active species. The complete microfluidic biosensor was tested for its ability to monitor glucose concentration changes in cell culture media. The significance of this work is multifold. First, the developed device may find applications in continuous and real-time measurements of glucose concentrations in in-vitro cell cultures. Second, the development of a microfluidic biosensor will bring technical know-how toward constructing continuous glucose monitoring devices. Third, the methods used to develop 3D electrodes incorporated with nanopillars can be used for other applications such as neural probes, fuel cells, solar cells etc., and finally, the knowledge obtained from the immobilization of enzymes onto nanostructures sheds some new insight into nanomaterial/biomolecule interactions.

  12. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  13. Stable Expression of the Alkaline Phosphatase Marker Gene by Neural Cells in Culture and after Transplantation into the CNS Using

    E-print Network

    Fischer, Itzhak

    the developing nervous system and their proper- ties analyzed by culture assays in vitro and by trans- plantation, Madison, Wisconsin 53706; and §Laboratory of Neuroscience, GRC, National Institute of Aging, 5600 Nathan- oping nervous system and their properties analyzed by culture assays and by transplanting these cells

  14. Antibody inhibition of human cytomegalovirus spread in epithelial cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaohong; Lee, Ronzo; Adler, Stuart P.; McVoy, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Anti-cytomegalovirus (CMV) antibodies reduce the incidence of CMV transmission and ameliorate the severity of CMV-associated disease. Neutralizing activity, measured as the ability of antibodies to prevent entry of cell-free virus, is an important component of natural immunity. However, in vivo CMV amplification may occur mainly via spread between adjacent cells within tissues. Thus, inhibition of cell-to-cell spread may be important when evaluating therapeutic antibodies or humoral responses to infection or immunization. In vitro CMV cell-to-cell spread is largely resistant to antibodies in fibroblast cultures but sensitive in endothelial cell cultures. In the present study antibodies in CMV hyperimmuneglobulin or seropositive human sera inhibited CMV cell-to-cell spread in epithelial cell cultures. Spread inhibition activity was quantitated with a GFP reporter assay employing GFP-tagged epithelialtropic variants of CMV strains Towne or AD169. Measurement of spread inhibition provides an additional parameter for the evaluation of candidate vaccines or immunotherapeutics and to further characterize the role of antibodies in controlling CMV transmission and disease. PMID:23669101

  15. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  16. Particle-induced cell migration assay (PICMA): A new in vitro assay for inflammatory particle effects based on permanent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Götz A; Schremmer, Isabell; Rostek, Alexander; Loza, Kateryna; Rosenkranz, Nina; Brüning, Thomas; Epple, Matthias; Bünger, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a decisive pathophysiologic mechanism of particle toxicity and accumulation of neutrophils in the lung is believed to be a crucial step in this process. This study describes an in vitro model for investigations of the chemotactic attraction of neutrophils in response to particles using permanent cell lines. We challenged NR8383 rat macrophages with particles that were characterized concerning chemical nature, crystallinity, and size distribution in the dry state and in the culture medium. The cell supernatants were used to investigate migration of differentiated human leukemia cells (dHL-60 cells). The dose range for the tests was determined using an impedance-based Real-Time Cell Analyzer. The challenge of NR8383 cells with 32-96 ?g cm(-2) coarse and nanosized particles resulted in cell supernatants which induced strong and dose-dependent migration of dHL-60 cells. Quartz caused the strongest effects - exceeding the positive control "fetal calf serum" (FCS) several-fold, followed by silica, rutile, carbon black, and anatase. BaSO4 served as inert control and induced no cell migration. Particles caused NR8383 cells to secrete chemotactic compounds. The assay clearly distinguished between the particles of different inflammatory potential in a highly reproducible way. Specificity of the test is suggested by negative results with BaSO4. PMID:25896209

  17. Impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in a paper-based microchamber.

    PubMed

    Lei, Kin Fong; Huang, Chia-Hao; Tsang, Ngan-Ming

    2016-01-15

    Recently, 3D cell culture technique was proposed to provide a more physiologically-meaningful environment for cell-based assays. With the development of microfluidics technology, cellular response can be quantified by impedance measurement technique in a real-time and non-invasive manner. However, handling of these microfluidic systems requires a trained engineering personnel and the operation is not compatible to traditional biological research laboratories. In this work, we incorporated the impedance measurement technique to paper-based 3D cell culture model and demonstrated non-invasive quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel during the culture course. A cellulose filter paper was patterned with an array of circular microchambers. Cells were encapsulated in hydrogel and loaded to the microchambers for culturing cells in 3D environment. At the preset schedule during the culture course, the paper was placed on a glass substrate with measurement electrodes for the impedance measurement. Cells in each microchamber was represented by impedance magnitude and cell proliferation could be studied over time. Also, conventional bio-assay was performed to further confirm the feasibility of the impedimetric quantification of cells encapsulated in hydrogel cultured in the paper-based microchamber. This technique provides a convenient, fast, and non-invasive approach to monitor cells cultured in 3D environment. It has potential to be developed for routine 3D cell culture protocol in biological research laboratories. PMID:26592655

  18. A novel micronucleus in vitro assay utilizing human hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kotova, N; Hebert, N; Härnwall, E-L; Vare, D; Mazurier, C; Douay, L; Jenssen, D; Grawé, J

    2015-10-01

    The induction of micronucleated reticulocytes in the bone marrow is a sensitive indicator of chromosomal damage. Therefore, the micronucleus assay in rodents is widely used in genotoxicity and carcinogenicity testing. A test system based on cultured human primary cells could potentially provide better prediction compared to animal tests, increasing patient safety while also implementing the 3Rs principle, i.e. replace, reduce and refine. Hereby, we describe the development of an in vitro micronucleus assay based on animal-free ex vivo culture of human red blood cells from hematopoietic stem cells. To validate the method, five clastogens with direct action, three clastogens requiring metabolic activation, four aneugenic and three non-genotoxic compounds have been tested. Also, different metabolic systems have been applied. Flow cytometry was used for detection and enumeration of micronuclei. Altogether, the results were in agreement with the published data and indicated that a sensitive and cost effective in vitro assay to assess genotoxicity with a potential to high-throughput screening has been developed. PMID:26208286

  19. A flow cytometry-based assay to assess minute frequencies of CD8+ T cells by their cytolytic function.

    PubMed

    Stanke, Jonas; Hoffmann, Corinna; Erben, Ulrike; von Keyserling, Helmut; Stevanovic, Stefan; Cichon, Guenter; Schneider, Achim; Kaufmann, Andreas M

    2010-08-31

    Limited sample size and low sensitivity of currently used functional assays challenge direct analysis of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocyte activity to quantify antigen-specific immunity after infection or vaccination. Our flow cytometry-based assay reproducibly detects at least three epitope-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes by their cytolytic function. As exemplified for viral epitopes restricted to the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A2, the HLA-A2+ human somatic cell hybrid T2 provided an about 10-fold more sensitive readout as compared to autologous B-lymphoblastoid cells or the human erythroleukemia cell line K562 transfected to express HLA-A2 when used as target cells. We named our assay VITAL-FR assay, referring to Hermans et al. (2004) and indicating the modification of using Far Red (FR) dye instead of CMTMR. Under optimal conditions the VITAL-FR assay proved 30 times more sensitive than the 51chromium-release assay to assess epitope-specific target cell lysis. The high overall sensitivity of the VITAL-FR assay basically depended on the negligible spectral overlap of the emission of a stable Far Red fluorescent reporter with the green tracer for target cell labelling. It also profited from long co-incubation of effector and target cells of up to 72, from prior in-vitro culture increasing the frequency of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells and from generic, easily accessible standardized target cells that were used with only 10(3) specific and 10(3) control target cells per individual experimental reaction. Our functional approach with the VITAL-FR assay therefore ideally suits for monitoring CD8+ T cell-mediated cytotoxicity in e.g. vaccination studies with known MHC-restricted immunogenic peptides in scientific and diagnostic applications. PMID:20558172

  20. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. ell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in productiv...

  1. Functional cell mediated lympholysis I. Description of the assay.

    PubMed

    Goeken, N E; Thompson, J S

    1981-01-01

    The anamnestic response by human bi-directional (BD) mixed lymphocyte cultures (MLC) to restimulation by cells of the original stimulating type is generally strikingly reduced as compared to that of standard one-way cultures. This difference was shown not to be related to a change in kinetics nor was it due to exhaustion of the media or soluble factors since fresh media did not ameliorate the effect nor were supernatants from BD cultures found to be suppressive. The relative inhibition was also not reversed by removal of the allogeneic cells by phenotype specific antiserum. Cytotoxic tests with donor and responder specific antisera revealed that the cells bearing that phenotype were dramatically reduced in BD as compared to one-way cultures. Thus, the diminished secondary response appears to be due to cytotoxic elimination of the responder cells. This allogeneic cytotoxicity is dependent on non-T, phagocytic, adherent cells. The phenomenon is called Functional Cell Mediated Lympholysis (F-CML). PMID:6460344

  2. Use of a human plaque-forming cell assay to study peripheral blood bursa-equivalent cell activation and excessive suppressor cell activity in humoral immunodeficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Herrod, H G; Buckley, R H

    1979-01-01

    A plaque assay that detects human mononuclear blood cells producing immunoglobulin (Ig)M antibody to sheep erythrocytes was investigated for its usefulness in studying B-cell activation and regulation in 24 patients with humoral immunodeficiency. Cells from 3 of 15 patients with common variable agammaglobulinemia produced some plaques (range 40--160/10(6) cells; normal range 80--1240/10(6)), but those from the other 12, from all 7 with x-linked agammaglobulinemia and from the 2 with x-linked immunodeficiency with hyper-IgM failed to produce any detectable plaques. In co-cultures of patient and normal cells a very good correlation was seen between results of the plaque assay and an IgM biosynthesis assay in detecting excessive suppressor cell activity. Cells from 7 of 15 common variable agammaglobulinemics, from 3 of 7 x-linked agammaglobulinemics, and from both patients with hyper-IgM caused significant suppression of IgM biosynthesis and(or) plaque formation by normal cells. The observations in the last two groups and discordance for excess suppressor activity in identical twins with common variable agammaglobulinemia suggest that the activity develops secondarily to whatever their primary defects may be. Culturing non-T cells from common variable agammaglobulinemics exhibiting excessive suppressor cell activity with normal T cells resulted in plaque formation in four of five patients so studied; in all five the suppressor activity was found in the T-cell population. The availability of a plaque assay for the study of blood cells from immunodeficient patients provides a new probe to examine the cellular nature of such defects. PMID:376549

  3. Prion protein lacks robust cytoprotective activity in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Heather M; Harris, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background The physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) remains unknown. However, PrPC has been reported to possess a cytoprotective activity that prevents death of neurons and other cells after a toxic stimulus. To explore this effect further, we attempted to reproduce several of the assays in which a protective activity of PrP had been previously demonstrated in mammalian cells. Results In the first set of experiments, we found that PrP over-expression had a minimal effect on the death of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells treated with TNF-? and Prn-p0/0 immortalized hippocampal neurons (HpL3-4 cells) subjected to serum deprivation. In the second set of assays, we observed only a small difference in viability between cerebellar granule neurons cultured from PrP-null and control mice in response to activation of endogenous or exogenous Bax. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest either that cytoprotection is not a physiologically relevant activity of PrPC, or that PrPC-dependent protective pathways operative in vivo are not adequately modeled by these cell culture systems. We suggest that cell systems capable of mimicking the neurotoxic effects produced in transgenic mice by N-terminally deleted forms of PrP or Doppel may represent more useful tools for analyzing the cytoprotective function of PrPC. PMID:18718018

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; School of Life and Health Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 7EJ ; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  5. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  6. A Comparison of Real-Time and Endpoint Cell Viability Assays for Improved Synthetic Lethal Drug Validation.

    PubMed

    Single, Andrew; Beetham, Henry; Telford, Bryony J; Guilford, Parry; Chen, Augustine

    2015-12-01

    Cell viability assays fulfill a central role in drug discovery studies. It is therefore important to understand the advantages and disadvantages of the wide variety of available assay methodologies. In this study, we compared the performance of three endpoint assays (resazurin reduction, CellTiter-Glo, and nuclei enumeration) and two real-time systems (IncuCyte and xCELLigence). Of the endpoint approaches, both the resazurin reduction and CellTiter-Glo assays showed higher cell viabilities when compared directly to stained nuclei counts. The IncuCyte and xCELLigence real-time systems were comparable, and both were particularly effective at tracking the effects of drug treatment on cell proliferation at sub-confluent growth. However, the real-time systems failed to evaluate contrasting cell densities between drug-treated and control-treated cells at full growth confluency. Here, we showed that using real-time systems in combination with endpoint assays alleviates the disadvantages posed by each approach alone, providing a more effective means to evaluate drug toxicity in monolayer cell cultures. Such approaches were shown to be effective in elucidating the toxicity of synthetic lethal drugs in an isogenic pair of MCF10A breast cell lines. PMID:26384394

  7. Biomass segregation in sage cell suspension culture.

    PubMed

    Bolta, Ziga; Baricevic, Dea; Raspor, Peter

    2003-01-01

    The biomass of sage (Salvia officinalis L.) cell suspension culture was composed of single cells and cell aggregates. The development of aggregated cell culture from a single-cell suspension was monitored by particle size distribution for four particle size classes. Particle size distribution was compared between the biomass grown in bioreactor and shake flasks. The size of the particles had a strong influence on content of secondary metabolite, ursolic acid (UA). The single cell biomass fraction accumulated up to 7.7 mg UA g(-1) DW which was up to 50 times higher compared to aggregated biomass fractions. PMID:12882308

  8. SNP panel identification assay (SPIA): a genetic-based assay for the identification of cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Demichelis, Francesca; Greulich, Heidi; Macoska, Jill A.; Beroukhim, Rameen; Sellers, William R.; Garraway, Levi; Rubin, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    Translational research hinges on the ability to make observations in model systems and to implement those findings into clinical applications, such as the development of diagnostic tools or targeted therapeutics. Tumor cell lines are commonly used to model carcinogenesis. The same tumor cell line can be simultaneously studied in multiple research laboratories throughout the world, theoretically generating results that are directly comparable. One important assumption in this paradigm is that researchers are working with the same cells. However, recent work using high throughput genomic analyses questions the accuracy of this assumption. Observations by our group and others suggest that experiments reported in the scientific literature may contain pre-analytic errors due to inaccurate identities of the cell lines employed. To address this problem, we developed a simple approach that enables an accurate determination of cell line identity by genotyping 34 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we describe the empirical development of a SNP panel identification assay (SPIA) compatible with routine use in the laboratory setting to ensure the identity of tumor cell lines and human tumor samples throughout the course of long term research use. PMID:18304946

  9. Clonogenic assay allows for selection of a primitive mammary epithelial cell population in bovine.

    PubMed

    Martignani, Eugenio; Cravero, Diego; Miretti, Silvia; Accornero, Paolo; Baratta, Mario

    2015-11-01

    Adult mammary stem cells have been identified in several species including the bovine. They are responsible for the development of the gland and for cyclic remodeling during estrous cycles and pregnancy. Epithelial cell subpopulations exist within the mammary gland. We and others showed previously that the Colony Forming Cell (CFC) assay can be used to detect lineage-restricted mammary progenitors. We carried out CFCs with bovine mammary cells and manually separated colonies with specific morphologies associated with either a luminal or a myoepithelial phenotype. Expression of specific markers was assessed by immunocytochemistry or by flow cytometry to confirm that the manual separation resulted in isolation of phenotipically different cells. When transplanted in recipient immunodeficient mice, we found that only myoepithelial-like colonies gave rise to outgrowths that resembled bovine mammary alveoli, thus proving that adult stem cells were maintained during culture and segregated with myoepithelial cells. After recovery of the cells from the transplanted mice and subsequent progenitor content analysis, we found a tendency to detect a higher progenitor frequency when myoepithelial-like colonies were transplanted. We here demonstrate that bovine adult mammary stem cells can be sustained in short-term culture and that they can be enriched by manually selecting for basal-like morphology. PMID:26321394

  10. Establishment, characterization, and toxicological application of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) primary skin fibroblast cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sarah J; Zychowski, Gregory V; Bauman, Sandy W; Higgins, Benjamin M; Raudsepp, Terje; Gollahon, Lauren S; Wooten, Kimberly J; Cole, Jennifer M; Godard-Codding, Céline

    2014-12-16

    Pollution is a well-known threat to sea turtles but its impact is poorly understood. In vitro toxicity testing presents a promising avenue to assess and monitor the effects of environmental pollutants in these animals within the legal constraints of their endangered status. Reptilian cell cultures are rare and, in sea turtles, largely derived from animals affected by tumors. Here we describe the full characterization of primary skin fibroblast cell cultures derived from biopsies of multiple healthy loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), and the subsequent optimization of traditional in vitro toxicity assays to reptilian cells. Characterization included validating fibroblast cells by morphology and immunocytochemistry, and optimizing culture conditions by use of growth curve assays with a fractional factorial experimental design. Two cell viability assays, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and an assay measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression by quantitative PCR were optimized in the characterized cells. MTT and LDH assays confirmed cytotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid at 500 ?M following 72 and 96 h exposures while CYP1A5 induction was detected after 72 h exposure to 0.1-10 ?M benzo[a]pyrene. This research demonstrates the validity of in vitro toxicity testing in sea turtles and highlights the need to optimize mammalian assays to reptilian cells. PMID:25384208

  11. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  12. Insect cell culture in reagent bottles

    PubMed Central

    Rieffel, S.; Roest, S.; Klopp, J.; Carnal, S.; Marti, S.; Gerhartz, B.; Shrestha, B.

    2014-01-01

    Growing insect cells with high air space in culture vessel is common from the early development of suspension cell culture. We believed and followed it with the hope that it allows sufficient air for optimal cell growth. However, we missed to identify how much air exactly cells need for its growth and multiplication. Here we present the innovative method that changed the way we run insect cell culture. The method is easy to adapt, cost-effective and useful for both academic and industrial research labs. We believe this method will revolutionize the way we run insect cell culture by increasing throughput in a cost-effective way. In our study we identified:•Insect cells need to be in suspension; air space in culture vessel and type of culture vessel is of less importance. Shaking condition that introduces small air bubbles and maintains it in suspension for longer time provides better oxygen transfer in liquid. For this, high-fill volume in combination with speed and shaking diameter are important.•Commercially available insect cells are not fragile as original isolates. These cells can easily withstand higher shaking speed.•Growth condition in particular lab set-up needs to be optimized. The condition used in one lab may not be optimum for another lab due to different incubators from different vendors. PMID:26150948

  13. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  14. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  15. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  16. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  17. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section 864.2280... HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification....

  18. Stability of human mesenchymal stem cells during in vitro culture: considerations for cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Binato, R; de Souza Fernandez, T; Lazzarotto-Silva, C; Du Rocher, B; Mencalha, A; Pizzatti, L; Bouzas, L F; Abdelhay, E

    2013-02-01

    Ex vivo expansion and manipulation of human mesenchymal stem cells are important approaches to immunoregulatory and regenerative cell therapies. Although these cells show great potential for use, issues relating to their overall nature emerge as problems in the field. The need for extensive cell quantity amplification in vitro to obtain sufficient cell numbers for use, poses a risk of accumulating genetic and epigenetic abnormalities that could lead to sporadic malignant cell transformation. In this study, we have examined human mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow, over extended culture time, using cytogenetic analyses, mixed lymphocyte reactions, proteomics and gene expression assays to determine whether the cultures would retain their potential for use in subsequent passages. Results indicate that in vitro cultures of these cells demonstrated chromosome variability after passage 4, but their immunomodulatory functions and differentiation capacity were maintained. At the molecular level, changes were observed from passage 5 on, indicating initiation of differentiation. Together, these results lead to the hypothesis that human mesenchymal stem cells cultures can be used successfully in cell therapy up to passage 4. However, use of cells from higher passages would have to be analysed case by case. PMID:23163975

  19. A cell-based screening assay for Natural Killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Blom, W Marty; van Nielen, Wim G L; de Groene, Els M; Albers, Ruud

    2009-06-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important in the first response against viruses and tumours. Compounds that modulate human NK cell activity offer interesting prophylactic and therapeutic options, however, a systematic screening tool is lacking. Development of suitable NK cell lines or receptor-based assays is hindered by the highly complicated regulation of the different NK cell subsets by multiple receptors. Here, we describe a cell-based flowcytometric activity assay adapted to identify NK cell modulating compounds. Fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with NK-sensitive K562 target cells labelled with 5-(6)-carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester, followed by DNA-labelling with propidium iodide to identify dead cells. The assay demonstrated a good performance with an average Z'-factor of 0.6 and over 95% of the assays fulfilled the quality criteria, suggesting that it is possible to use a complex system with two different cell types to screen compounds. A large number of (natural) compounds and extracts were tested and normalized to the positive control, Interleukin-2. Promising and less promising compounds were distinguished. Effectiveness of compounds was based on the augmentation of NK cell activity as well as the number of responding subjects. To conclude the assay is robust, reliable and can be used for functional screening of natural compounds modulating NK cell activity. PMID:19293002

  20. Photomicronucleus assay of phototoxic and pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals in human keratinocyte NCTC2544 cells.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Mayumi; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae

    2011-07-14

    Photochemical genotoxicity was evaluated in human keratinocyte NCTC2544 cells. The cells were pre-treated with photogenotoxic or pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals and irradiated with a solar-simulator for 50min at a total UV dose of 5J/cm(2) or placed in the dark for the same period. After washing, the cells were cultured for 1.5-2 cell cycles with fresh culture medium. At the end of culturing, slide specimens were prepared and examined for micronucleus formation. 8-Methoxypsoralen, a photogenotoxic chemical, strongly induced micronucleated cells with UV irradiation but not under non-irradiation conditions. Therefore, NCTC2544 cells were subjected to further investigation to evaluate the possible photogenotoxicity of other chemicals. 6-Methylcoumarin, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide and protoporphyrin IX disodium salt, which are all known phototoxic substances, induced micronucleated cells with irradiation but not in the non-irradiation state. These phototoxic substances were confirmed to be photogenotoxic. Tetrabenzoporphine and 5-aminolevulinic acid, which are used for photodynamic therapy, showed phototoxicity. However, these chemicals did not induce micronucleated cells in the irradiated or non-irradiated state, suggesting a lack of photogenotoxicity. Among 3 pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals having no light absorbance at 290-700nm, neither cycloheximide nor disulfoton induced micronucleated cells with or without irradiation; zinc oxide induced micronucleated cells with irradiation and, to a lesser extent, without irradiation. Based on the results of the photogenotoxicity assays of these 9 chemicals, NCTC2544 cells are considered to be a suitable test system to evaluate the photogenotoxic potential of chemicals. PMID:21524715

  1. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy (Yijuan); Kiss, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including (1) cell lines capable of synthesizing the required molecules at high productivities that ensure low operating cost; (2) culture media and bioreactor culture conditions that achieve both the requisite productivity and meet product quality specifications; (3) appropriate on-line and off-line sensors capable of providing information that enhances process control; and (4) good understanding of culture performance at different scales to ensure smooth scale-up. Successful implementation also requires appropriate strategies for process development, scale-up and process characterization and validation that enable robust operation and ensure compliance with current regulations. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the art technology in key aspects of cell culture, e.g., generation of highly productive cell lines and optimization of cell culture process conditions. We also summarize the current thinking on appropriate process development strategies and process advances that might affect process development. PMID:20622510

  2. Measurement of single-cell adhesion strength using a microfluidic assay.

    PubMed

    Christ, Kevin V; Williamson, Kyle B; Masters, Kristyn S; Turner, Kevin T

    2010-06-01

    Despite the importance of cell adhesion in numerous physiological, pathological, and biomaterial-related responses, our understanding of adhesion strength at the cell-substrate interface and its relationship to cell function remains incomplete. One reason for this deficit is a lack of accessible experimental approaches that quantify adhesion strength at the single-cell level and facilitate large numbers of tests. The current work describes the design, fabrication, and use of a microfluidic-based method for single-cell adhesion strength measurements. By applying a monotonically increasing flow rate in a microfluidic channel in combination with video microscopy, the adhesion strength of individual NIH3T3 fibroblasts cultured for 24 h on various surfaces was measured. The small height of the channel allows high shear stresses to be generated under laminar conditions, allowing strength measurements on well-spread, strongly adhered cells that cannot be characterized in most conventional assays. This assay was used to quantify the relationship between morphological characteristics and adhesion strength for individual well-spread cells. Cell adhesion strength was found to be positively correlated with both cell area and circularity. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis was performed to examine the role of cell geometry in determining the actual stress applied to the cell. Use of this method to examine adhesion at the single-cell level allows the detachment of strongly-adhered cells under a highly-controllable, uniform loading to be directly observed and will enable the characterization of biological events and relationships that cannot currently be achieved using existing methods. PMID:20213215

  3. A Differential Cell Capture Assay for Evaluating Antibody Interactions with Cell Surface Targets

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, David J.; Kenanova, Vania E.; Lepin, Eric J.; McCabe, Katelyn E.; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Ohashi, Minori; Wang, Shutao; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Wu, Anna M.; Behrenbruch, Christian P.

    2015-01-01

    Many biological and biomedical laboratory assays require the use of antibodies and antibody fragments that strongly bind to their cell-surface targets. Conventional binding assays such as the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and flow cytometry have many challenges, including capital equipment requirements, labor intensiveness, and large reagent and sample consumption. Although these techniques are successful in mainstream biology, there is an unmet need for a tool to quickly ascertain the relative binding capabilities of antibodies/antibody fragments to cell-surface targets on the bench top at low cost. We describe a novel cell capture assay that enables several candidate antibodies to be evaluated quickly as to their relative binding efficacies to their cell-surface targets. We used chimeric rituximab and murine anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies as cell capture agents on a functionalized microscope slide surface to assess their relative binding affinities based on how well they capture CD20-expressing mammalian cells. We found that these antibodies’ concentration-dependent cell capture profiles correlate with their relative binding affinities. A key observation of this assay involved understanding how differences in capture surfaces affect the assay results. This approach can find utility when an antibody or antibody fragment against a known cell line needs to be selected for targeting studies. PMID:20178770

  4. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  5. Innovative and economic potential of mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Werner, R G

    1998-04-01

    Innovations for economic optimization of manufacturing processes of mammalian cell culture processes address new expression systems, optimized cell culture media and feeding systems, economy of scale, efficient harvest systems for viable cell separation, redesign of downstream processing and reduction of the overall number of quality control assays. A very efficient expression system in Chinese hamster ovary cells is the NEOSPLA expression system yielding 60-100 micrograms monoclonal antibodies per cell and day. Efficient supplements in nutrient feeding are insulin and amino acids which contribute to a high extent to the productivity of the mammalian cell culture process. Large scale manufacturing processes lower cost of goods by reduction of turn around cost for cleaning and steaming in place, media preparation, number of batches for annual campaign, in-process and quality control. In downstream processing the number of process steps and the step yield are responsible for the economics. Process control systems in a computer assisted manufacturing plant increase success rate, reduces man power and minimizes shifts. In the innovative process also alternative technologies such as transgenic animals should be considered to improve the economy of the manufacturing processes. PMID:9608886

  6. In vivo assay to monitor flavonoid uptake across plant cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Antonio; Petrussa, Elisa; Peresson, Carlo; Bertolini, Alberto; Vianello, Angelo; Braidot, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids represent one of the most important molecules of plant secondary metabolism, playing many different biochemical and physiological roles. Although their essential role in plant life and human health has been elucidated by many studies, their subcellular transport and accumulation in plant tissues remains unclear. This is due to the absence of a convenient and simple method to monitor their transport. In the present work, we suggest an assay able to follow in vivo transport of quercetin, the most abundant flavonoid in plant tissues. This uptake was monitored using 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (DPBA), a fluorescent probe, in non-pigmented Vitis vinifera cell cultures. PMID:26504740

  7. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  8. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  9. Oscillatory behavior of cells in tissue culture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar; Linton, Michael F. A.; Keese, Charles R.

    1998-03-01

    Fibroblasts and epithelial cells organize themselves in distinct patterns in tissue culture which indicates that neighboring cells communicate. A striking example of such communication is the oscillatory behavior of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells reported here. These oscillations were discovered using a biosensor referred to as ECIS (Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing). In this measurement cells are seeded out on a small electrode deposited at the bottom of a tissue culture well and immersed in ordinary culture medium. By measuring the changes in the impedance of the electrode as a function of time, many important properties of the cells on the electrode can be inferred, such as motion, morphology changes and membrane capacitance. The impedance oscillations of MDCK cells were observed with highly confluent cell layers, where the approximately 100 cells on the electrode acted in unison. The communication between cells can be demonstrated directly by a variation of the ECIS concept, where cells are cultured on two closely spaced electrodes. The impedance fluctuations are measured independently on each electrode and compared by using a cross-correlation function.

  10. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    E-print Network

    Ni, Ming

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods ...

  11. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  12. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations from whole blood cultures correlate with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cellular immune assays are impractical because they require labor-intensive isolation of cells from their natural environment. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between cell culture supernatant TNF-alpha from isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and w...

  13. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  14. Culture and transfection of axolotl cells.

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Ferretti, Patrizia; Roy, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The use of cells grown in vitro has been instrumental for multiple aspects of biomedical research and especially molecular and cellular biology. The ability to grow cells from multicellular organisms like humans, squids, or salamanders is important to simplify the analyses and experimental designs to help understand the biology of these organisms. The advent of the first cell culture has allowed scientists to tease apart the cellular functions, and in many situations these experiments help understand what is happening in the whole organism. In this chapter, we describe techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of an established cell line from axolotl, a species widely used for studying epimorphic regeneration. PMID:25740487

  15. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  16. Cell-Based Lipid Flippase Assay Employing Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria S; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example. PMID:26695048

  17. Isolation and Expansion of Human Glioblastoma Multiforme Tumor Cells Using the Neurosphere Assay

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Hassan; Millette, Sebastien; Ansari, Saeed; Rahman, Maryam; Deleyrolle, Loic P.; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2011-01-01

    Stem-like cells have been isolated in tumors such as breast, lung, colon, prostate and brain. A critical issue in all these tumors, especially in glioblastoma mutliforme (GBM), is to identify and isolate tumor initiating cell population(s) to investigate their role in tumor formation, progression, and recurrence. Understanding tumor initiating cell populations will provide clues to finding effective therapeutic approaches for these tumors. The neurosphere assay (NSA) due to its simplicity and reproducibility has been used as the method of choice for isolation and propagation of many of this tumor cells. This protocol demonstrates the neurosphere culture method to isolate and expand stem-like cells in surgically resected human GBM tumor tissue. The procedures include an initial chemical digestion and mechanical dissociation of tumor tissue, and subsequently plating the resulting single cell suspension in NSA culture. After 7-10 days, primary neurospheres of 150-200 ?m in diameter can be observed and are ready for further passaging and expansion. PMID:22064695

  18. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  19. Genotoxicity studies of methyl isocyanate in Salmonella, Drosophila, and cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Zeiger, E.; Haworth, S.; Ivett, J.; Valencia, R.

    1987-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of methyl isocyanate (MIC) were investigated using four short-term tests: the Salmonella reversion assay (Ames test), the Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal assay, and the sister chromatic exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberration assays in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. No evidence was found for the induction of mutations in either Salmonella or Drosophila. MIC did, however, induce SCEs and chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells both in the presence and absence of Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9.

  20. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R. (7290 Sayre Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Smith, Helene S. (5693 Cabot Dr., Oakland, CA 94611); Hackett, Adeline J. (82 Evergreen Dr., Orinda, CA 94563)

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  1. Direct 5S rRNA assay for monitoring mixed-culture bioprocesses

    SciTech Connect

    Stoner, D.L.; Bulmer, D.K.; Ward, T.E.

    1996-06-01

    This study demonstrates the efficacy of a direct 5S rRNA assay for the characterization of mixed microbial populations by using as an example the bacteria associated with acidic mining environments. The direct 5S rRNA assay described herein represents a nonselective, direct molecular method for monitoring and characterizing the predominant, metabolically active members of a microbial population. The foundation of the assay is high-resolution denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis in denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE), which is used to separate 5S rRNA species during electrophoresis in denaturing gradient gels. With mixtures of RNA extracted from laboratory cultures, the upper practical limit for detection in the current experimental system has been estimated to be greater than 15 different species. With this method, the resolution was demonstrated to be effective at least to the species level. The strength of this approach was demonstrated by the ability to discriminate between Thiobacillus ferrooxidans ATCC 19859 and Thiobacillus thiooxidans ATCC 8085, two very closely related species. Migration patterns for the 5S rRNA from members of the genus Thiobacillus were readily distinguishable from those of the general Acidiphilium and Leptospirillum. In conclusion, the 5S rRNA assay represents a powerful method by which the structure of a microbial population within acidic environments can be assessed. 40 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Henrietta Lacks, HeLa cells, and cell culture contamination.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Brendan P; Nelson-Rees, Walter A; Hutchins, Grover M

    2009-09-01

    Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 of an aggressive adenocarcinoma of the cervix. A tissue biopsy obtained for diagnostic evaluation yielded additional tissue for Dr George O. Gey's tissue culture laboratory at Johns Hopkins (Baltimore, Maryland). The cancer cells, now called HeLa cells, grew rapidly in cell culture and became the first human cell line. HeLa cells were used by researchers around the world. However, 20 years after Henrietta Lacks' death, mounting evidence suggested that HeLa cells contaminated and overgrew other cell lines. Cultures, supposedly of tissues such as breast cancer or mouse, proved to be HeLa cells. We describe the history behind the development of HeLa cells, including the first published description of Ms Lacks' autopsy, and the cell culture contamination that resulted. The debate over cell culture contamination began in the 1970s and was not harmonious. Ultimately, the problem was not resolved and it continues today. Finally, we discuss the philosophical implications of the immortal HeLa cell line. PMID:19722756

  3. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  4. Responses of the L5178Y mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. V: 27 coded chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, D.B.; Brown, A.G.; Howgate, S.; McBride, D.; Riach, C. ); Caspary, W.J. )

    1991-01-01

    Twenty-seven chemicals were tested for their mutagenic potential in the L5178Y tk{sup +}/tk{sup {minus}} mouse lymphoma cell forward mutation assay. Cultures were exposed to the chemicals for 4 hr, then cultured for 2 days before plating in soft agar with or without trifluorothymidine (TFT), 3 {mu}g/ml. The chemicals were tested at least twice. Statistically significant responses were obtained with acid orange 10, aniline, benzaldehyde o-chloroaniline, chlorodibromomethane, cytembena, 1,2-dibromo-4-(1,2-dibromomethyl) cyclohexane, dieldrin, lithocholic acid, oxytetracycline, phenazopyridine HCl, 1phenyl-3-methyl-5-pyrazolone, sodium diethyldithiocarbamate, solvent yellow 14, tetraethylthiuram disulfide (disulfiram), 2,4-toluene diisocyanate, and 2,6-toluene diisocyanate. Apart from phenazopyridine HCl, acid orange 10, and solvent yellow 14, rat liver S9 mix was not a requirement for the mutagenic activity of these compounds.

  5. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  6. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  7. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  8. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280 Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in...

  9. Biosynthesis of cellulose: studies with tobacco protoplasts and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, G.; Blaschek, W.; Haass, D.; Koehler, H.

    1983-01-01

    The cell wall of regenerating tobacco protoplasts was shown to be mainly composed of noncellulosic ..beta..-1,3- and ..beta..-1,4-linked glucans with a cellulose content of only about 5%. Some pectic and hemicellulosic material is released by these protoplasts into the culture medium. The DP distribution of the ..cap alpha..-cellulose in regenerating protoplasts as well as in suspension-cultured cells, callus, or tobacco mesophyll revealed the existence of mainly two DP fractions with low (DP<500) and higher (DP 2000-3000) molecular weight, both of which contribute to the cellulosic network of the primary cell wall. The alkali-soluble and alkali-insoluble products of glucan synthetase assays with particulate enzyme fractions were analyzed in detail. By prelabeling with (/sup 14/C)glucose, the existence of primer glucans, which are elongated in the appropriate in vitro assay, could be substantiated. Alkali-soluble glucans consisted of a very short, if any, primer glucan, to which about 40 glucose units were added in vitro. The glucans in the alkali-insoluble fraction have an average DP of 200-250 and are synthesized in vitro by chain elongation via addition of about 30 new glucose units to a 1,4-linked primer glucan of DPapprox.200. 27 references, 6 figures, 2 tables.

  10. Assaying Ceramide Synthase Activity In Vitro and in Living Cells Using Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lim, Xin Ying; Pickford, Russell; Don, Anthony S

    2016-01-01

    Sphingolipids are one the major lipid families in eukaryotes, incorporating a diverse array of structural and signaling lipids such as sphingomyelin and gangliosides. The core lipid component for all complex sphingolipids is ceramide, a diacyl lipid consisting of a variable length fatty acid linked through an amide bond to a long chain base such as sphingosine or dihydrosphingosine. This reaction is catalyzed by a family of six ceramide synthases (CERS1-6), each of which preferentially catalyzes the synthesis of ceramides with different fatty acid chain lengths. Ceramides are themselves potent cellular and physiological signaling molecules heavily implicated in diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases, making it important for researchers to have access to sensitive and accurate assays for ceramide synthase activity. This chapter describes methods for assaying ceramide synthase activity in cell or tissue lysates, or in cultured cells (in situ), using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) as the readout. LC-MS/MS is a very sensitive and accurate means for assaying ceramide synthase reaction products. PMID:26552671

  11. Optimization of cytotoxicity assay by real-time, impedance-based cell analysis.

    PubMed

    Ramis, G; Martínez-Alarcón, L; Quereda, J J; Mendonça, L; Majado, M J; Gomez-Coelho, K; Mrowiec, A; Herrero-Medrano, J M; Abellaneda, J M; Pallares, F J; Ríos, A; Ramírez, P; Muñoz, A

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents an optimized procedure for assessing an immune-mediated cytotoxicity, produced after the addition of human and baboon serum to transgenic porcine fibroblasts. This procedure is performed with the xCELLigence Real-Time Cell Analyzer (RTCA). The xCELLigence system measures the impedance variations in the culture media of a 96-well microelectronic plate, and shows the changes in cell number and morphology in a real-time plot. However, different factors need to be optimized before developing an RTCA assay. Thus, we studied the influence of several variables, such as the number of cells seeded, the time the cells were allowed to grow before the tests, the serum concentration and the addition of rabbit complement. The findings were confirmed by the WST-1 classical cytotoxicity test. The results showed that 7.5?×?10(3) cells seeded per well produced the adequate CI in 10 h. The area under the curve and the CImin versus concentration values showed a very high correlation index (r(2)?=?0.966 and r(2)?=?0.92 for the first 50 h after challenge, respectively), proving that CI variations are directly proportional to the quantity of serum added. The addition of complement resulted in lower CImin values. Therefore, both the cytolysis level with and without exogenous complement addition had to be assessed. There was a high correlation between the relative cytotoxicity assessed by WST-1 and the CI obtained by RTCA when exogenous complement was not added (r(2)?=?0.827; p?culture conditions have an important influence on RTCA cytotoxicity assays. PMID:23887614

  12. Toxicity of oxidized beta-carotene to cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Hurst, John S; Saini, Manjit K; Jin, Gui-Fang; Awasthi, Yogesh C; van Kuijk, Frederik J G M

    2005-08-01

    Carotenoids are effective antioxidants in vitro, but they are also susceptible to autoxidation, which generates volatile and biologically active aldehydes and ketones. In a previous study, we showed that autoxidized beta-carotene inhibits Na+-K+-ATPase activity more effectively than aldehydic products derived from lipid peroxidation, such as 4-hydroxynonenal. In this study, we compared mitochondrial dysfunction in cultured human K562 erythroleukaemic and 28 SV4 retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells in response to the degradation products of beta-carotene autoxidation using the MTT assay. We found that oxidized beta-carotene is cytotoxic and that mitochondrial function is decreased in both K562 and RPE cells. In addition, the RPE cells were more resistant to this form of oxidative stress, suggesting that its cytotoxicity may depend on cellular antioxidant capacity. PMID:15967438

  13. Development and validation of an in vitro micronucleus assay platform in TK6 cells.

    PubMed

    Sobol, Zhanna; Homiski, Michael L; Dickinson, Donna A; Spellman, Richard A; Li, Dingzhou; Scott, Andrew; Cheung, Jennifer R; Coffing, Stephanie L; Munzner, Jennifer B; Sanok, Kelley E; Gunther, William C; Dobo, Krista L; Schuler, Maik

    2012-07-01

    The Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has recently adopted Test Guideline 487 (TG487) for conducting the in vitro micronucleus (MNvit) assay. The purpose of this study is to evaluate and validate treatment conditions for the use of p53 competent TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in a TG487 compliant MNvit assay. The ten reference compounds suggested in TG487 (mitomycin C, cytosine arabinoside, cyclophosphamide, benzo-a-pyrene, vinblastine sulphate, colchicine, sodium chloride, nalidixic acid and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate and pyrene) and noscapine hydrochloride were chosen for this study. In order to optimize the micronucleus response after treatment with some positive substances, we extended the recovery time after pulse treatment from 2 cell cycles recommended in TG487 to 3 cell cycles for untreated cells (40h). Each compound was tested in at least one of four exposure conditions: a 4h exposure followed by a 40h recovery, a 4h exposure followed by a 24h recovery, a 4h exposure in the presence of an exogenous metabolic activation system followed by a 40h recovery period, and a 27h continuous direct treatment. Results show that the direct acting clastogens, clastogens requiring metabolic activation and aneugens caused a robust increase in micronuclei in at least one test condition whereas the negative compounds did not induce micronuclei. The negative control cultures exhibited reproducibly low and consistent micronucleus frequencies ranging from 0.4 to 1.8% (0.8±0.3% average and standard deviation). Furthermore, extending the recovery period from 24h to 40h produced a 2-fold higher micronucleus frequency after a 4h pulse treatment with mitomycin C. In summary, the protocol described in this study in TK6 cells produced the expected result with model compounds and should be suitable for performing the MNvit assay in accordance with guideline TG487. PMID:22445949

  14. Probing Enzymatic Activity inside Living Cells Using a Nanowire-Cell "Sandwich" Assay

    E-print Network

    Walsworth, Ronald L.

    of an intracellular signal transduction pathway requires minimally invasive methods for probing enzyme activity in situ. Here, we describe a new method for monitoring enzyme activity in living cells by sandwiching live cell assay, enzyme activity Enzymes mediate a wide range of cellular processes, and dynamic control

  15. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality

    E-print Network

    Huang, Yanyi

    A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1 of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. A nthrax, a lethal infectious disease

  16. Evaluation of spheroid head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell models in comparison to monolayer cultures

    PubMed Central

    KADLETZ, LORENZ; HEIDUSCHKA, GREGOR; DOMAYER, JULIAN; SCHMID, RAINER; ENZENHOFER, ELISABETH; THURNHER, DIETMAR

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models are the most common method used to investigate tumor cells in vitro. In the few last decades, a multicellular spheroid model has gained attention due to its adjacency to tumors in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate immunohistochemical differences between these two cell culture systems. The FaDu, CAL27 and SCC25 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were seeded out in monolayer and multicellular spheroids. The FaDu and SCC25 cells were treated with increasing doses of cisplatin and irradiation. CAL27 cells were not used in theproliferation experiments, since the spheroids of CAL27 cells were not able to process the reagent in CCK-8 assays. Furthermore, they were stained to present alterations of the following antigens: Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epithelial growth factor and survivin. Differences in growth rates and expression patterns were detected in certain HNSCC cell lines. The proliferation rates showed a significant divergence of cells grown in the three-dimensional model compared with cells grown in the 2D model. Overall, multicellular spheroids are a promising method to reproduce the immunohistochemical aspects and characteristics of tumor cells, and may show different response rates to therapeutic options. PMID:26622664

  17. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed by a cell can be revealed, and glycosylation mutants classified into phenotypic groups that may reflect a loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutation in a specific gene involved in glycan synthesis. PMID:24903886

  18. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-?) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-? observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-? induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-? induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-? induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  19. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  20. Verbascoside production by plant cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Inagaki, N; Nishimura, H; Okada, M; Mitsuhashi, H

    1991-01-01

    Verbascoside was found to be produced in all calli derived from eleven species that contained the compound in their leaves. Cell suspension cultures were also established in three species, i.e., Leucosceptrum japonicum f. barbinerve, Syringa josikaea, and Sy. vulgaris, all of which were found to produce verbascoside at more than 1 g/l. Of the three species, suspension cultures of L. japonicum f. barbinerve showed rapid growth and the highest yield of verbascoside (1.89 g/l). In these cultures, the effects of major salt concentration in B5 medium on cell growth and verbascoside production were examined. Maximum cell growth and maximum verbascoside production were both achieved by reducing the major salt concentration to half that of the original medium. PMID:24213785

  1. Proliferation assay of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Ando, Ayumi; Hirano, Kazumi; Ogura, Chika; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Ikeguchi, Masamichi; Seki, Atsushi; Nishihara, Shoko; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Proliferation assays of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been performed with cell culture media exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs), which generate reactive species in the media at room temperature. It is found that serum in cell culture media functions as a scavenger of highly reactive species and tends to protect cells in the media against cellular damage. On the other hand, if serum is not present in a cell culture medium when it is exposed to APP, the medium becomes cytotoxic and cannot be detoxified by serum added afterwards. Plasma-induced cytotoxic media hinder proliferation of mouse ES cells and may even cause cell death. It is also shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that organic compounds in cell culture media are in general not significantly modified by plasma exposure. These results indicate that if there is no serum in media when they are exposed to APPs, highly reactive species (such as OH radicals) generated in the media by the APP exposure are immediately converted to less reactive species (such as H2O2), which can no longer readily react with serum that is added to the medium after plasma exposure. This study has clearly shown that it is these less reactive species, rather than highly reactive species, that make the medium cytotoxic to mouse ES cells.

  2. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  3. High-Content Assays for Hepatotoxicity Using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell–Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sirenko, Oksana; Hesley, Jayne; Rusyn, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Development of predictive in vitro assays for early toxicity evaluation is extremely important for improving the drug development process and reducing drug attrition rates during clinical development. High-content imaging-based in vitro toxicity assays are emerging as efficient tools for safety and efficacy testing to improve drug development efficiency. In this report we have used an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)–derived hepatocyte cell model having a primary tissue-like phenotype, unlimited availability, and the potential to compare cells from different individuals. We examined a number of assays and phenotypic markers and developed automated screening methods for assessing multiparameter readouts of general and mechanism-specific hepatotoxicity. Endpoints assessed were cell viability, nuclear shape, average and integrated cell area, mitochondrial membrane potential, phospholipid accumulation, cytoskeleton integrity, and apoptosis. We assayed compounds with known mechanisms of toxicity and also evaluated a diverse hepatotoxicity library of 240 compounds. We conclude that high-content automated screening assays using iPSC-derived hepatocytes are feasible, provide information about mechanisms of toxicity, and can facilitate the safety assessment of drugs and chemicals. PMID:24229356

  4. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  5. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Timm, David M; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Raphael, Robert M; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Killian, T C; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  6. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows surface-linked ligands to diffuse freely in two dimensions. Ligands can become reorganized beneath cells, by reaction-diffusion processes, and may also adopt spatial configurations reflecting those of their cognate receptors on the cell surface (Figure 1B). This provides a significant benefit over conventional cell signaling and culturing systems that present inflexible distributions of signaling molecules. In this study, we observe marked differences in the response of cells to membrane surface displayed soluble ligands as a function of membrane fluidity. Tethering of soluble signaling molecules to fluid supported membranes opens up opportunities to use already developed membrane fabrication technologies to present soluble components within a surface array format.

  7. Comparison of rat and hamster hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Barfknect, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated marked differences in the capacity of hepatocytes from rats or hamsters to mediate the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to genotoxic (i.e., mutagenic) products. Thus far, very few investigations of species differences in DNA repair have been performed. Therefore, a comparison of the relative extent of DNA repair elicited by various genotoxic chemicals in rat and hamster hepatocyes was conducted, using the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay. Of the ll chemicals tested, eight were more potent in inducing DNA repair in hamster hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. Dimethylnitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 9-aminoacridine, pararosaniline hydrochloride, 1-naphthylamine, benzidine and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane were all active in hamster hepatocytes at a concentration at least ten times less than the lowest effective concentration in rat hepatocytes. The direct-acting alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, was equipotent inducing DNA repair in both rat and hamster hepatocytes, indicating that the differences in DNA repair observed for the other chemicals were probably not a result of species differences in DNA repair capacities. In contrast, 1-nitropyrene produced a greater DNA repair response in rat hepatocyes than hamster hepatocytes, while the bacterial mutagen 3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride was inactive in both hepatocyte systems. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using hamster hepatocytes in the HPC/DR assay and illustrate the utility of performing the assay with hepatocytes from more than one species.

  8. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 103 CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  9. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci directly from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 10(3) CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  10. Single-Cell Based Quantitative Assay of Chromosome Transmission Fidelity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jin; Heinecke, Dominic; Mulla, Wahid A.; Bradford, William D.; Rubinstein, Boris; Box, Andrew; Haug, Jeffrey S.; Li, Rong

    2015-01-01

    Errors in mitosis are a primary cause of chromosome instability (CIN), generating aneuploid progeny cells. Whereas a variety of factors can influence CIN, under most conditions mitotic errors are rare events that have been difficult to measure accurately. Here we report a green fluorescent protein?based quantitative chromosome transmission fidelity (qCTF) assay in budding yeast that allows sensitive and quantitative detection of CIN and can be easily adapted to high-throughput analysis. Using the qCTF assay, we performed genome-wide quantitative profiling of genes that affect CIN in a dosage-dependent manner and identified genes that elevate CIN when either increased (icCIN) or decreased in copy number (dcCIN). Unexpectedly, qCTF screening also revealed genes whose change in copy number quantitatively suppress CIN, suggesting that the basal error rate of the wild-type genome is not minimized, but rather, may have evolved toward an optimal level that balances both stability and low-level karyotype variation for evolutionary adaptation. PMID:25823586

  11. Multilayer-based lab-on-a-chip systems for perfused cell-based assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Udo; Sonntag, Frank; Grünzner, Stefan; Busek, Mathias; Schmieder, Florian; Franke, Volker

    2014-12-01

    A novel integrated technology chain of laser-microstructured multilayer foils for fast, flexible, and low-cost manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices especially for complex cell and tissue culture applications, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-cells ratio, was developed and established. Initially the microfluidic system is constructively divided into individual layers, which are formed by separate foils or plates. Based on the functional boundary conditions and the necessary properties of each layer, their corresponding foils and plates are chosen. In the third step, the foils and plates are laser microstructured and functionalized from both sides. In the fourth and last manufacturing step, the multiple plates and foils are joined using different bonding techniques like adhesive bonding, welding, etc. This multilayer technology together with pneumatically driven micropumps and valves permits the manufacturing of fluidic structures and perfusion systems, which spread out above multiple planes. Based on the established lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays, a multilayer microfluidic system with two parallel connected cell culture chambers was successfully implemented.

  12. Direct contact cytotoxicity assays for filter-collected, carbonaceous (soot) nanoparticulate material and observations of lung cell response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soto, K. F.; Garza, K. M.; Shi, Y.; Murr, L. E.

    A simple, direct contact, cytotoxicity (in vitro) assay has been developed where particulate matter (PM) collected on glass fiber filters was exposed to human epithelial (lung) cells. Carbonaceous (soot) PM included tire, wood, diesel, candle, and variously combusted natural gas PM from a kitchen stove range. Black carbon PM and a commercial multiwall carbon nanotube aggregate PM was also examined in vitro as surrogate materials, and all experimental PM was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Assay results for 48 h cultures showed toxicity for all carbonaceous PM with various natural gas PM being the most toxic; this was comparable to the toxicity induced by the surrogate PM. Light microscopy examination of affected epithelial cells confirmed the semi-quantitative results. Comparison of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) content and concentration for the carbonaceous PM showed no PAH correlation with relative cell viability (cell death) after 48 h.

  13. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  14. The Standard Scrapie Cell Assay: Development, Utility and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Jacques; Aiken, Judd; Westaway, David; McKenzie, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are a family of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that involve the misfolding of a host protein, PrPC. Measuring prion infectivity is necessary for determining efficacy of a treatment or infectivity of a prion purification procedure; animal bioassays are, however, very expensive and time consuming. The Standard Scrapie Cell Assay (SSCA) provides an alternative approach. The SSCA facilitates quantitative in vitro analysis of prion strains, titres and biological properties. Given its robust nature and potential for high throughput, the SSCA has substantial utility for in vitro characterization of prions and can be deployed in a number of settings. Here we provide an overview on establishing the SSCA, its use in studies of disease dissemination and pathogenesis, potential pitfalls and a number of remaining challenges. PMID:25602372

  15. Rapid isolation of dengue-neutralizing antibodies from single cell-sorted human antigen-specific memory B-cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kara S; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Zhifeng; Horton, Melanie S; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Min; Dubey, Sheri A; DiStefano, Daniel J; Ettenger, Andrew; Fong, Rachel H; Doranz, Benjamin J; Casimiro, Danilo R; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring antigen-specific memory B cells and the antibodies they encode is important for understanding the specificity, breadth and duration of immune response to an infection or vaccination. The antibodies isolated could further help design vaccine antigens for raising relevant protective immune responses. However, developing assays to measure and isolate antigen-specific memory B cells is technically challenging due to the low frequencies of these cells that exist in the circulating blood. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method to identify and isolate dengue envelope-specific memory B cells using a labeled dengue envelope protein. We enumerated dengue-envelope specific memory B cells from a cohort of dengue seropositive donors using this direct flow cytometry assay. A more established and conventional assay, the cultured B ELISPOT, was used as a benchmark comparator. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the single-sorted memory B-cell specificity by culturing B cells and differentiating them into plasma cells using cell lines expressing CD40L. The culture supernatants were assayed for antigen binding and the ability of the antibodies to neutralize the cognate dengue virus. Moreover, we successfully isolated the heavy and light Ig sequences and expressed them as full-length recombinant antibodies to reproduce the activity seen in culture supernatants. Mapping of these antibodies revealed a novel epitope for dengue 2 virus serotype. In conclusion, we established a reproducible methodology to enumerate antigen-specific memory B cells and assay their encoded antibodies for functional characterization. PMID:26491897

  16. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  17. The Effect of Spaceflight on Bone Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the response of bone to mechanical loading (unloading) is extremely important in defining the means of adaptation of the body to a variety of environmental conditions such as during heightened physical activity or in extended explorations of space or the sea floor. The mechanisms of the adaptive response of bone are not well defined, but undoubtedly they involve changes occurring at the cellular level of bone structure. This proposal has intended to examine the hypothesis that the loading (unloading) response of bone is mediated by specific cells through modifications of their activity cytoskeletal elements, and/or elaboration of their extracellular matrices. For this purpose, this laboratory has utilized the results of a number of previous studies defining molecular biological, biochemical, morphological, and ultrastructural events of the reproducible mineralization of a primary bone cell (osteoblast) culture system under normal loading (1G gravity level). These data and the culture system then were examined following the use of the cultures in two NASA shuttle flights, STS-59 and STS-63. The cells collected from each of the flights were compared to respective synchronous ground (1G) control cells examined as the flight samples were simultaneously analyzed and to other control cells maintained at 1G until the time of shuttle launch, at which point they were terminated and studied (defined as basal cells). Each of the cell cultures was assayed in terms of metabolic markers- gene expression; synthesis and secretion of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, including certain cytoskeletal components; assembly of collagen into macrostructural arrays- formation of mineral; and interaction of collagen and mineral crystals during calcification of the cultures. The work has utilized a combination of biochemical techniques (radiolabeling, electrophoresis, fluorography, Western and Northern Blotting, and light microscopic immunofluorescence) and structural methods (conventional and high voltage electron microscopy, inununocytochemistry, stereomicroscopy, and 3D image reconstruction). The studies have provided new knowledge of aspects of bone cell development and structural regulation, extracellular matrix assembly, and mineralization during spaceflight and under normal gravity. The information has contributed to insights into the means in general by which cells respond and adapt to different conditions of gravity (loading). The data may as well have suggested an underlying basis for the observed loss of bone by vertebrates, including man, in microgravity; and these scientific results may have implications for understanding bone loss following fracture healing and extended periods of inactivity such as during long-term bedrest.

  18. Sensitivity of solid culture, broth culture, and real-time PCR assays for milk and colostrum samples from Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis-infectious dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Laurin, Emilie; McKenna, Shawn; Chaffer, Marcelo; Keefe, Greg

    2015-12-01

    Mycobacterium avium ssp. paratuberculosis (MAP) can be shed in feces, milk, and colostrum. The goal of this study was to assess assays that detect MAP in these sample types, including effects of lactation stage or season. Understanding the performance of these assays could improve how they are used, limiting the risk of infection to calves. Forty-six previously confirmed MAP-positive cows from 7 Atlantic Canadian dairy farms were identified for colostrum sampling and monthly sampling of milk and feces over a 12-mo period. Samples were assayed for MAP using solid culture, broth culture, and direct real-time PCR (qPCR). Across assay types, test sensitivity when applied to milk samples averaged 25% of that when applied to fecal samples. For colostrum samples, sensitivity depended on assay type, with sensitivity of qPCR being approximately 46% of that in feces. Across sample types, sensitivity of qPCR was higher than that of the other assays. Sensitivity of qPCR, when applied to milk samples, was significantly higher in summer than in other seasons. Summer was also the season with highest agreement between milk and fecal samples collected within the same month. Our results suggest that qPCR would detect more cows shedding MAP in their milk and colostrum than solid or broth culture assays, particularly during the summer, thus providing better management information to limit exposure of calves to this infectious organism. PMID:26476944

  19. Progress Towards Drosophila Epithelial Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Simcox, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila epithelial research is at the forefront of the field; however, there are no well-characterized epithelial cell lines that could provide a complementary in vitro model for studies conducted in vivo. Here, a protocol is described that produces epithelial cell lines. The method uses genetic manipulation of oncogenes or tumor suppressors to induce embryonic primary culture cells to rapidly progress to permanent cell lines. It is, however, a general method and the type of cells that comprise a given line is not controlled experimentally. Indeed, only a small fraction of the lines produced are epithelial in character. For this reason, additional work needs to be done to develop a more robust epithelial cell-specific protocol. It is expected that Drosophila epithelial cell lines will have great utility for in vitro analysis of epithelial biology, particularly high-throughput analyses such as RNAi screens. PMID:23097097

  20. Comparisons of cell culture medium using distribution of morphological features in microdevice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroto; Enomoto, Junko; Ikeda, Yurika; Honda, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Junji; Kato, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    As the number of available cell types grows, it becomes necessary to develop more effective ways to optimize the cell-culture medium for each cell line and culture condition. However, because of the vast number of parameters that must be decided, such as the combination of components, optimization is both laborious and costly. Microdevices are a cost-effective way to perform such evaluations because they use only a small volume of media and enable high-throughput analyses. However, assays performed in microdevices are themselves minimized, and each assay unit (well/chamber) commonly contains an insufficient number of cells for comprehensive evaluations such as gene-expression or flow-cytometry analyses. To address this issue, we introduced image-based analysis in conjunction with microdevice assays; this approach allows quantification of every cell in each assay unit. To quantitatively profile differences in cellular behaviors in a microdevice under different culture media conditions, we developed a non-staining image-based analysis method that utilizes cellular morphology. Our approach combines the structural advantages of microdevices, which can increase the stability of images, and the quantitative advantages of an image-based cell evaluation technique that utilizes time-course population change in several morphological features. Our results demonstrate that cellular changes due to small alterations in the concentration of serum in medium or differences in the basal medium can be profiled using only microscopic images. PMID:26149718

  1. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M.; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ERpos) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ERpos cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ERpos HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ERpos HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGF? signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ERpos cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ERpos HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  2. THE ACTIVITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL SAMPLES IN A CELL CULTURE TEST FOR ASBESTOS TOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The inhibition of colony-forming efficiency of cultured human embryonic intestine-derived epithelial (I-407) cells was utilized in order to assay the toxic potential of six coded samples of particulate matter provided by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Th...

  3. Hydrocortisone effect of arylsulfatase A in primary mouse brain cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Marcelo, A.; Pieringer, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    The primary goal of this study was to study the mechanism of action of hydrocortisone (HC) on arylsulfatase A (ASA) in primary cultures of cells that were dissociated from the brains of embryonic mice. Cells were cultured in a defined medium in the absence or in the presence of 3 ..mu..M HC. The specific activity of ASA in nontreated cells was 1.297 U/mg (U = ..mu..mol/hr) while the value for the HC-treated cells was 0.783 U/mg. The authors data shows that HC inhibits ASA activity in these cultures cells (p < 0.001). The determination of the ASA enzyme activity was assayed primarily with the artificial substrate p-nitrocatechol sulfate. However, the natural substrate (cerebroside /sup 35/S-sulfate) also as active and correlated linearly with the activity of p-nitrocatechol sulfate. Purified ASA was isolated from calf brains and used to generate an antibody (Ab) against ASA. The specificity of the Ab for the ASA protein of cell cultures was tested in Ouchterlony double immunodiffusion studies. The Ab was used in a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to quantify the number of ASA molecules in the cell extracts from the embryonic mouse cell cultures. Preliminary data suggest that HC decreases the number of ASA molecules.

  4. A Rapid and Sensitive Method for Measuring N-Acetylglucosaminidase Activity in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauri, Victor; Lotfi, Parisa; Segatori, Laura; Sardiello, Marco

    2013-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method to quantitatively assess N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAG) activity in cultured cells is highly desirable for both basic research and clinical studies. NAG activity is deficient in cells from patients with Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB (MPS IIIB) due to mutations in NAGLU, the gene that encodes NAG. Currently available techniques for measuring NAG activity in patient-derived cell lines include chromogenic and fluorogenic assays and provide a biochemical method for the diagnosis of MPS IIIB. However, standard protocols require large amounts of cells, cell disruption by sonication or freeze-thawing, and normalization to the cellular protein content, resulting in an error-prone procedure that is material- and time-consuming and that produces highly variable results. Here we report a new procedure for measuring NAG activity in cultured cells. This procedure is based on the use of the fluorogenic NAG substrate, 4-Methylumbelliferyl-2-acetamido-2-deoxy-alpha-D-glucopyranoside (MUG), in a one-step cell assay that does not require cell disruption or post-assay normalization and that employs a low number of cells in 96-well plate format. We show that the NAG one-step cell assay greatly discriminates between wild-type and MPS IIIB patient-derived fibroblasts, thus providing a rapid method for the detection of deficiencies in NAG activity. We also show that the assay is sensitive to changes in NAG activity due to increases in NAGLU expression achieved by either overexpressing the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal function, or by inducing TFEB activation chemically. Because of its small format, rapidity, sensitivity and reproducibility, the NAG one-step cell assay is suitable for multiple procedures, including the high-throughput screening of chemical libraries to identify modulators of NAG expression, folding and activity, and the investigation of candidate molecules and constructs for applications in enzyme replacement therapy, gene therapy, and combination therapies. PMID:23840811

  5. USE OF CELL CULTURE FOR EVALUATING NEUROTOXICITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter familiarizes the reader with the need to develop, validate and utilize in vitro models to test chemicals for neurotoxic potential. he major advantages and disadvantages of using cell and tissue culture, factors which have stimulated and hampered the promulgation of i...

  6. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  7. [Efficiency of bacteriological culture and the immunofluorescent assay to detect Campylobacter fetus in bovine genital fluids].

    PubMed

    Marcellino, Romanela B; Morsella, Claudia G; Cano, Dora; Paolicchi, Fernando A

    2015-01-01

    Bovine genital campylobacteriosis is a reproductive disease that affects cattle production. It is caused by Campylobacter fetus subspecies, C. fetus fetus (Cff) and C. fetus venerealis (Cfv). The aim of this study was to identify the presence of C. fetus in genital fluids by bacteriological culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and to compare the results. Two groups of 6 heifers and 5 bulls, one infected with Cff (Cff group) and the other with Cfv (Cfv group) were formed. Two heifers and 2 bulls, all of them uninfected, made up the control group. Samples of cervicovaginal mucus and preputial fluid were processed by culture and DIF. In the Cff group, 100% of the heifers and 80% of the bulls were infected, while in the Cfv group, 50% of the heifers and 60% of the bulls were infected. The degree of agreement (Kappa values) from benchmarking diagnostic techniques were 0.57 for heifers in the Cff group and 0.52 for heifers in the Cfv group, whereas the values for bulls were 0.17 and 0.27, respectively. Heifers yielded more positive results in the DIF assay than in the culture, exhibiting 5.6% increase in the Cff group and 7.4% in the Cfv group. The lowest percentage of positive results for DIF in bulls, 40% less for the Cff group and 5.2% for the Cfv group, could be due to improper sampling. Kappa values showed moderate agreement for the heifers and low for the bulls. PMID:26187267

  8. Understanding cellular networks to improve hematopoietic stem cell expansion cultures

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    Understanding cellular networks to improve hematopoietic stem cell expansion cultures Daniel C blood stem cell growth have met with limited success. Considering that adult stem cell cultures-output systems, adult stem cell cultures are better described as complex, non-linear, multiple-input multiple

  9. A quantification of human cells using an ERV-3 real time PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Yuan, C C; Miley, W; Waters, D

    2001-02-01

    A novel approach to quantifying human cells using a real time PCR assay was developed. The target sequence used in the assay is a 135 bp segment within the unique 1.7 kb Hind III / Pst I fragment of the ERV-3 envelope gene. ERV-3 is a full-length human endogenous retrovirus present in known copy number in all human cells. The detection range of ERV-3 by real time PCR is from 10(6) to 10(1). The precision described, sensitivity and specificity of the assay indicate that the ERV-3 sequence is an accurate cell quantitation marker. The quantitative ERV-3 assay enables simple, fast, and reproducible detection and quantitation of the cell number. The assay can be used to determine the sample DNA conditions and also it can be used to adjust the quantitative DNA measurements of other target gene assays relative to the number of cell equivalents. PMID:11164492

  10. Method of determining the number of cells in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, D.T.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a color-sensitivity method for determining the number of cells in in vitro cell culture at a sensitivity as low as about 100 or about 500 cells. It comprises lysing the cells and incubating the lysate with p-nitrophenyl phosphate at acid pH for a predetermined period of time at a temperature of from about 35{degrees} to about 38{degrees}C. and then measuring the color development at 400 to 420 nanometers and correlating the color development with cell number by comparing with a control standard of known cell number.

  11. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground-based investigations simulating the conditions expected in the flight experiment. Several parameters including cell concentration, time between cell loading and activation, and storage temperature on cell survival were examined to characterise cell response and optimise the experiments to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. Results indicate that the objectives of the experiments could be met with delays up to 5 days between cell loading into the hardware and initial in flight experiment activation, without the need for medium exchange. Experiment hardware of this kind, which is adaptable to a wide range of cell types and can be easily interfaced to different spacecraft facilities, offers the possibility for a wide range of experimenters successfully and easily to utilise future flight opportunities.

  12. In vitro toxicity testing with microplate cell cultures: Impact of cell binding.

    PubMed

    Gülden, Michael; Schreiner, Jeannine; Seibert, Hasso

    2015-06-01

    In vitro generated data on toxic potencies are generally based on nominal concentrations. However, cellular and extracellular binding and elimination processes may reduce the available free fraction of a compound. Then, nominal effective concentrations do not represent appropriate measures of toxic exposure in vitro and underestimate toxic potencies. In this study it was investigated whether cell binding can affect the availability of chemicals in microplate based toxicity assays. To this end the cytotoxicity of compounds like mercury chloride, digitonin and alcohol ethoxylates, accumulated by cells via different modes, was investigated in 96-well microplate cultures with varying concentrations of Balb/c 3T3 cells. The median effective nominal concentrations of all but one of the tested compounds depended linearly from the cell concentration. Applying a previously developed equilibrium distribution model cell concentration-independent median effective extracellular concentrations and cell burdens, respectively, could be calculated. The compounds were accumulated by the cells with bioconcentration factors, BCF, between 480 and ? 25,000. Cell binding of the alcohol ethoxylates was correlated with their lipophilicity. The results show that significant cell binding can occur even at the small cell volume fractions (? 1 × 10(-5) to 3 × 10(-3) L/L) encountered in microplate assays. To what extent cell binding affects the bioavailability depends on the BCF and the cell volume fraction. EC50 measurements in the presence of at least two different cell concentrations allow for excluding or detecting significant cell binding and for determining more appropriate measures of toxic exposure in vitro like median effective extracellular (free) concentrations or cell burdens. PMID:24291469

  13. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  14. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  15. Non-colony type monolayer culture of human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin G.; Mallon, Barbara S.; Hamilton, Rebecca S.; Kozhich, Olga A.; Park, Kyeyoon; Hoeppner, Daniel J.; Robey, Pamela G.; McKay, Ronald D.G.

    2012-01-01

    Regenerative medicine, relying on human embryonic stem cell (hESC) technology, opens promising new avenues for therapy of many severe diseases. However, this approach is restricted by limited production of the desired cells due to the refractory properties of hESC growth in vitro. It is further hindered by insufficient control of cellular stress, growth rates, and heterogeneous cellular states under current culture conditions. In this study, we report a novel cell culture method based on a non-colony type monolayer (NCM) growth. Human ESCs under NCM remain pluripotent as determined by teratoma assays and sustain the potential to differentiate into three germ layers. This NCM culture has been shown to homogenize cellular states, precisely control growth rates, significantly increase cell production, and enhance hESC recovery from cryopreservation without compromising chromosomal integrity. This culture system is simple, robust, scalable, and suitable for high-throughput screening and drug discovery. PMID:22910561

  16. A quick and low-cost PCR-based assay for Candida spp. identification in positive blood culture bottles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Differences in the susceptibility of Candida species to antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important for clinical management of candidemia. Molecular tests are not yet standardized or available in most clinical laboratories, although such tests can reduce the time required for species identification, as compared to the conventional culture-based methods. To decrease laboratory costs and improve diagnostic accuracy, different molecular methods have been proposed, including DNA extraction protocols to produce pure DNA free of PCR inhibitors. The objective of this study was to validate a new format of molecular method, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rDNA gene amplification followed by sequencing, to identify common and cryptic Candida species causing candidemia by analyzing DNA in blood culture bottles positive for yeasts. Methods For DNA extraction, an “in-house” protocol based on organic solvent extraction was tested. Additional steps of liquid nitrogen incubation followed by mechanical disruption ensured complete cell lysis, and highly pure DNA. One hundred sixty blood culture bottles positive for yeasts were processed. PCR assays amplified the ITS region. The DNA fragments of 152 samples were sequenced and these sequences were identified using the GenBank database (NCBI). Molecular yeast identification was compared to results attained by conventional method. Results The organic solvent extraction protocol showed high reproducibility in regards to DNA quantity, as well as high PCR sensitivity (10 pg of C. albicans DNA and 95% amplification on PCR). The identification of species at the molecular level showed 97% concordance with the conventional culturing method. The molecular method tested in the present study also allowed identification of species not commonly implicated in human infections. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our molecular method presents significant advantages over the conventional yeast culture identification method by providing accurate results within 24 hours, in contrast to at least 72 hours required by the automated conventional culture method. Additionally, our molecular method allowed the identification of mixed infections, as well as infections due to emergent fungal pathogens. This economical DNA extraction method developed in our laboratory provided high-quality DNA and 60% cost savings compared to commercial methods. PMID:24099320

  17. Elevated cell invasion in a tumor sphere culture of RSV-M mouse glioma cells.

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Motonobu; Yawata, Toshio; Takemura, Mitsuhiro; Higashi, Youichirou; Nakai, Eiichi; Shimizu, Keiji; Ueba, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are the sole population possessing high self-renewal activity in tumors, with their existence affecting tumor recurrence. However, the invasive activity of CSCs has yet to be fully understood. In this article, we established a tumor sphere culture of RSV-M mouse glioma cells (RSV-M-TS) and evaluated their migration and invasion activities. Histological analysis of a tumor formed by cranial injection of the RSV-M-TS cells showed highly invasive properties and similarities with human malignant glioma tissues. When the migration activity of both RSV-M and RSV-M-TS cells were compared by intracranial injection, rapid migration of RSV-M-TS cells was observed. To confirm the invasive capabilities of RSV-M-TS cells, a three-dimensional collagen invasion assay was performed in vitro using RSV-M, RSV-M-TS, and RSV-M-TS cells cultured with medium containing serum. RSV-M and RSV-M-TS cultured with medium containing serum for 8 days indicated low migration activity, while moderate invasion activity was observed in RSV-M-TS cells. This activity was further enhanced by incubation with medium containing serum overnight. To identify the genes involved in this invasion activity, we performed quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array analysis of RSV-M and RSV-M-TS cells. Of 84 cancer metastasis-related genes, up-regulation was observed in 24 genes, while 4 genes appeared to be down-regulated in RSV-M-TS cells. These results suggest that the enhanced invasive activity of glioma sphere cells correlates with a number of tumor metastasis-related genes and plays a role in the dissemination and invasion of glioma cells. PMID:25744351

  18. The detection of pyrogens in sera from patients with symptoms of sepsis using an ex vivo whole blood culture assay.

    PubMed

    Pool, E J; Bouic, P

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether the ex vivo whole blood culture (WBC) assay system can be used to detect pyrogens in blood from patients with symptoms of sepsis. Blood samples from 35 patients with symptoms of sepsis were assayed for bacterial contamination using the radiometric blood culture assay. Serum from the same patients were screened for IL-6, C-reactive protein (CRP) and pyrogens using the whole blood culture assay. Serum samples from 26 patients tested positive for pyrogens. Of the 26 patients with pyrogenic serum, 15 had elevated serum IL-6 levels and 19 had elevated CRP levels. Only two of the samples had positive blood cultures as detected by the routine radiometric assay. Both of these patients had high serum CRP and pyrogen levels, while only one of them had an elevated serum IL-6 level. These results show that the WBC is very sensitive in detecting pyrogens in serum of patients. This technique can be a useful tool to quantitate pyrogens in sera from patients with symptoms of sepsis and to determine whether their clinical symptoms are caused by pyretic substances in their circulatory system. PMID:10225511

  19. Advantages and challenges of microfluidic cell culture in polydimethylsiloxane devices.

    PubMed

    Halldorsson, Skarphedinn; Lucumi, Edinson; Gómez-Sjöberg, Rafael; Fleming, Ronan M T

    2015-01-15

    Culture of cells using various microfluidic devices is becoming more common within experimental cell biology. At the same time, a technological radiation of microfluidic cell culture device designs is currently in progress. Ultimately, the utility of microfluidic cell culture will be determined by its capacity to permit new insights into cellular function. Especially insights that would otherwise be difficult or impossible to obtain with macroscopic cell culture in traditional polystyrene dishes, flasks or well-plates. Many decades of heuristic optimization have gone into perfecting conventional cell culture devices and protocols. In comparison, even for the most commonly used microfluidic cell culture devices, such as those fabricated from polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), collective understanding of the differences in cellular behavior between microfluidic and macroscopic culture is still developing. Moving in vitro culture from macroscopic culture to PDMS based devices can come with unforeseen challenges. Changes in device material, surface coating, cell number per unit surface area or per unit media volume may all affect the outcome of otherwise standard protocols. In this review, we outline some of the advantages and challenges that may accompany a transition from macroscopic to microfluidic cell culture. We focus on decisive factors that distinguish macroscopic from microfluidic cell culture to encourage a reconsideration of how macroscopic cell culture principles might apply to microfluidic cell culture. PMID:25105943

  20. Quantitative analysis of La Crosse virus transcription and replication in cell cultures and mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kempf, Brian J; Blair, Carol D; Beaty, Barry J

    2006-02-01

    La Crosse (LAC) virus (family Bunyaviridae, genus Orthobunyavirus) small (S) segment negative-sense RNA genome (vRNA), positive-sense full-length RNA complement (vcRNA), and subgenomic mRNA were assayed in infected cell cultures and female Aedes (Ochlerotatus) triseriatus mosquito tissues using quantitative PCR (Q-PCR). During persistent infection of C6/36 (Aedes albopictus) and MAT (Aedes triseriatus) cultured cells and cytolytic infection of BHK-21 cultured cells, LAC vRNA was the most abundant RNA species, followed by mRNA and vcRNA. RNA copy numbers per cell were quantified and vRNA correlated to virus titer in cell culture medium. The Q-PCR assay proved more sensitive than reverse transcription (RT)-PCR and immunofluorescence assays (IFA) for detecting LAC virus infection of mosquitoes. After infection of female mosquitoes orally, quantities of LAC RNA increased in ovaries for 6 days, and as ovarian biosynthetic activity quiesced, LAC RNA quantities decreased then remained detectable at a low level. After a second, noninfectious blood meal, quantities of LAC RNA in ovaries increased significantly, quantitatively confirming correlation of LAC virus RNA synthesis with vector metabolic activity. Coregulation of viral replication and mosquito ovary metabolic activity may condition efficient transovarial transmission. PMID:16474075

  1. Manipulating gene expression and signaling activity in cultured mouse limb bud cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowski, Jordan P.; Pursell, Taylor A.; Rabinowitz, Adam H.; Vokes, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The vertebrate limb bud is a well-established system for studying the mechanisms driving growth and patterning of an embryonic tissue. However, approaches for manipulating gene expression are currently limited to time-consuming methods. Culturing primary limb bud cells could potentially be used as a quicker assay. However, limb cells in culture quickly differentiate into cartilage under normal conditions, and approaches delivering DNA and siRNA into primary limb cells in culture are limited. These technical limitations have restricted the utility of limb buds for investigating problems that require higher-throughput approaches. Results In this report we describe adaptations to a method for culturing primary limb bud cells in a pre-chondrogenic state, and generate a population of mouse primary limb cells that are responsive to Hedgehog (Hh) signaling. Hh-stimulated cells upregulate Hh target genes as well as an exogenous Hh-responsive reporter. We then describe a method for highly efficient delivery of plasmids and siRNAs into cultured primary limb bud cells in a 96-well format. Conclusion Cultures of primary limb bud cells are amenable to gene manipulation under conditions that maintain the limb cells in a Hh-responsive, undifferentiated state. This approach provides a medium-throughput system to manipulate gene expression, and test DNA regulatory elements. PMID:24633820

  2. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (inventor); Prewett, Tacey (inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (inventor); Francis, Karen (inventor); Andrews, Angela (inventor); Oconnor, Kim (inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  3. Acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde from cultured white cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye-Won; Umber, Brandon J; Meinardi, Simone; Leu, Szu-Yun; Zaldivar, Frank; Blake, Donald R; Cooper, Dan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Noninvasive detection of innate immune function such as the accumulation of neutrophils remains a challenge in many areas of clinical medicine. We hypothesized that granulocytes could generate volatile organic compounds. Methods To begin to test this, we developed a bioreactor and analytical GC-MS system to accurately identify and quantify gases in trace concentrations (parts per billion) emitted solely from cell/media culture. A human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL60, frequently used to assess neutrophil function, was grown in serum-free medium. Results HL60 cells released acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde in a time-dependent manner. The mean ± SD concentration of acetaldehyde in the headspace above the cultured cells following 4-, 24- and 48-h incubation was 157 ± 13 ppbv, 490 ± 99 ppbv, 698 ± 87 ppbv. For hexanaldehyde these values were 1 ± 0.3 ppbv, 8 ± 2 ppbv, and 11 ± 2 ppbv. In addition, our experimental system permitted us to identify confounding trace gas contaminants such as styrene. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human immune cells known to mimic the function of innate immune cells, like neutrophils, produce volatile gases that can be measured in vitro in trace amounts. PMID:19402909

  4. Isoflavone daidzein possesses no antioxidant activities in cell-free assays but induces the antioxidant enzyme catalase.

    PubMed

    Kampkötter, Andreas; Chovolou, Yvonni; Kulawik, Andreas; Röhrdanz, Elke; Weber, Nadine; Proksch, Peter; Wätjen, Wim

    2008-09-01

    Epidemiologic studies have shown that dietary intake of isoflavonones is associated with several properties beneficial to human health. It has been suggested that at least some of these effects are related to the antioxidant activity of isoflavonoids. We analyzed the antioxidant activity of the major isoflavones found in soybeans, but none of these compounds showed prominent antioxidant effects in cell-free assay systems (trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay and 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl assay). Therefore, we examined the hypothesis that the antioxidative effects of isoflavones are caused indirectly by up-regulation of antioxidative enzymes, thereby lowering intracellular concentration of reactive oxygene species. Daidzein shows a significant induction of catalase promoter activity at 100 micromol/L in a reporter gene assay and at 200 micromol/L in Northern blot experiments. Another hypothesis for antioxidant effects caused by isoflavones is due to metabolism by intestinal bacteria. Analyzing the daidzein metabolites 3'-OH-daidzein and 6-OH-daidzein in our cell culture model, we found strong antioxidant effects (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl and trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay). We conclude that isoflavone daidzein up-regulates the antioxidant enzyme catalase but shows only little antioxidant capacity per se. Antioxidant effects of this dietary isoflavonone may also be due to formation of the antioxidant metabolites 6-OH-daidzein and 3'-OH-daidzein. PMID:19083468

  5. Flow Cell Assays with Microtubules: Motility/Dynamics in Fluorescence and VE-DIC

    E-print Network

    Mitchison, Tim

    Flow Cell Assays with Microtubules: Motility/Dynamics in Fluorescence and VE-DIC Flow cell assays to the tape edge, where flow is not laminar resulting in poor washes/solution transfers). For VE-DIC (video well for VE-DIC. Other labs use far more extensive and excruciating cleaning procedures

  6. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  7. Apoptosis in Batch Cultures of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells

    E-print Network

    Sinskey, Anthony J.

    Apoptosis in Batch Cultures of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells J. Goswami,1 A. J. Sinskey,2 H. Steller of the main problems in the culture of Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cells continues to be the inability. Keywords: cell culture; Chinese Hamster Ovary; apopto- sis; caspase; bcl-2 INTRODUCTION Chinese Hamster

  8. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  9. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-? from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-? secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFN? concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  10. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    DOEpatents

    An, Yuehuei H. (Charleston, SC); Mironov, Vladimir A. (Mt. Pleasant, SC); Gutowska, Anna (Richland, WA)

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  11. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  12. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  13. Cytopathogenicity of Naegleria for cultured neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fulford, D.E.

    1985-01-01

    The cytopathic activity of live Naegleria amoebae and cell-free lysates of Naegleria for B-103 rat neuroblastoma cells was investigated using a /sup 51/Cr release assay. Live amoebae and cell-free lysates of N. fowleri, N. australiensis, N. lovaniensis, and N. gruberi all induced sufficient damage to radiolabeled B-103 cells to cause a significant release of chromium. The cytotoxic activity present in the cell-free lysates of N. fowleri can be recovered in the supernatant fluid following centrifugation at 100,000xg and precipitation of the 100,000xg supernatant fluid with ammonium sulfate. Initial characterization of the cytotoxic factor indicates that it is a heat labile, pH sensitive, soluble protein. The cytotoxic activity is abolished by either extraction, unaffected by repeated freeze-thawing, and is not sensitive to inhibitors of proteolytic enzymes. Phospholipase A activity was detected in the cytotoxic ammonium sulfate precipitable material, suggesting that this enzyme activity may have a role in the cytotoxic activity of the cell-free lysates.

  14. Cancer Stem Cells Sensitivity Assay (STELLA) in Patients with Advanced Lung and Colorectal Cancer: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    D’Arcangelo, Manolo; Todaro, Matilde; Salvini, Jessica; Benfante, Antonina; Colorito, Maria Luisa; D’Incecco, Armida; Landi, Lorenza; Apuzzo, Tiziana; Rossi, Elisa; Sani, Spartaco; Stassi, Giorgio; Cappuzzo, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer stem cells represent a population of immature tumor cells found in most solid tumors. Their peculiar features make them ideal models for studying drug resistance and sensitivity. In this study, we investigated whether cancer stem cells isolation and in vitro sensitivity assay are feasible in a clinical setting. Methods Cancer stem cells were isolated from effusions or fresh cancer tissue of 23 patients who progressed after standard therapy failure. Specific culture conditions selected for immature tumor cells that express markers of stemness. These cells were exposed in vitro to chemotherapeutic and targeted agents. Results Cancer stem cells were extracted from liver metastases in 6 cases (25%), lung nodules in 2 (8%), lymph node metastases in 3 (12.5%) and pleural/peritoneal/pericardial effusion in 13 (54%). Cancer stem cells were successfully isolated in 15 patients (63%), including 14 with lung cancer (93.3%). A sensitivity assay was successfully performed in 7 patients (30.4%), with a median of 15 drugs/combinations tested (range 5-28) and a median time required for results of 51 days (range 37-95). Conclusion The approach used for the STELLA trial allowed isolation of cancer stem cells in a consistent proportion of patients. The low percentage of cases completing the full procedure and the long median time for obtaining results highlights the need for a more efficient procedure. Trial Registration ClinalTrials.gov NCT01483001 PMID:25955492

  15. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  16. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  17. Development of a lentivirus vector-based assay for non-destructive monitoring of cell fusion activity.

    PubMed

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J; de Vries, Antoine A F

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS-) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS- both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS- while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS- was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for quantifying cell-to-cell fusion progression based on GpLuc has been developed. PMID:25028973

  18. Development of a Lentivirus Vector-Based Assay for Non-Destructive Monitoring of Cell Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J.; de Vries, Antoine A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS?) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS? both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS? while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS? was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for quantifying cell-to-cell fusion progression based on GpLuc has been developed. PMID:25028973

  19. Perfluoroalkylated compounds induce cell death and formation of reactive oxygen species in cultured cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Reistad, Trine; Fonnum, Frode; Mariussen, Espen

    2013-03-27

    The present communication investigates the effects of different perfluoroalkylated compounds (PFCs) on formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and cell death in cultured cerebellar granule cells. This allows direct comparison with similar effects found for other environmental contaminants like polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame-retardants. The increase in ROS formation and cell death was assayed using the fluorescent probe 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate (DCFH-DA) and the trypan blue exclusion assay. The effects of the PFCs were structure dependent. Cell death was induced at relatively low concentrations by perfluorooctyl sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctane sulfonylamide (PFOSA) and the fluorotelomer alcohol 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecanol (FTOH 8:2) with EC(50)-values of 62 ± 7.6, 13 ± 1.8 and 15 ± 4.2 ?M (mean ± SD) respectively. PFOS, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and PFOSA induced a concentration dependent increase in ROS formation with EC(50)-values of 27 ± 9.0, 25 ± 11 and 57 ± 19?M respectively. Reduced cell viability and ROS formation were observed at concentration level close to what is found in serum of occupationally exposed workers. The effect of PFCs on ROS formation and cell viability was compared with other halogenated compounds and future investigations should emphasize effects of mixtures and how physical chemical properties of the compounds influence their toxicity. PMID:23340305

  20. Isolation and culture of larval cells from C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Sihui; Banerjee, Diya; Kuhn, Jeffrey R

    2011-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool to study cell function. In C. elegans the ability to isolate and culture cells has been limited to embryonically derived cells. However, cells or blastomeres isolated from mixed stage embryos terminally differentiate within 24 hours of culture, thus precluding post-embryonic stage cell culture. We have developed an efficient and technically simple method for large-scale isolation and primary culture of larval-stage cells. We have optimized the treatment to maximize cell number and minimize cell death for each of the four larval stages. We obtained up to 7.8×10(4) cells per microliter of packed larvae, and up to 97% of adherent cells isolated by this method were viable for at least 16 hours. Cultured larval cells showed stage-specific increases in both cell size and multinuclearity and expressed lineage- and cell type-specific reporters. The majority (81%) of larval cells isolated by our method were muscle cells that exhibited stage-specific phenotypes. L1 muscle cells developed 1 to 2 wide cytoplasmic processes, while L4 muscle cells developed 4 to 14 processes of various thicknesses. L4 muscle cells developed bands of myosin heavy chain A thick filaments at the cell center and spontaneously contracted ex vivo. Neurons constituted less than 10% of the isolated cells and the majority of neurons developed one or more long, microtubule-rich protrusions that terminated in actin-rich growth cones. In addition to cells such as muscle and neuron that are high abundance in vivo, we were also able to isolate M-lineage cells that constitute less than 0.2% of cells in vivo. Our novel method of cell isolation extends C. elegans cell culture to larval developmental stages, and allows use of the wealth of cell culture tools, such as cell sorting, electrophysiology, co-culture, and high-resolution imaging of subcellular dynamics, in investigation of post-embryonic development and physiology. PMID:21559335

  1. Micro-Arrayed Human Embryonic Stem Cells-Derived Cardiomyocytes for In Vitro Functional Assay

    PubMed Central

    Serena, Elena; Cimetta, Elisa; Zatti, Susi; Zaglia, Tania; Zagallo, Monica; Keller, Gordon; Elvassore, Nicola

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the body and any major insult can result in a significant loss of heart cells. The development of an in vitro-based cardiac tissue could be of paramount importance for many aspects of the cardiology research. In this context, we developed an in vitro assay based on human cardiomyocytes (hCMs) and ad hoc micro-technologies, suitable for several applications: from pharmacological analysis to physio-phatological studies on transplantable hCMs. We focused on the development of an assay able to analyze not only hCMs viability, but also their functionality. Methods hCMs were cultured onto a poly-acrylamide hydrogel with tunable tissue-like mechanical properties and organized through micropatterning in a 20×20 array. Arrayed hCMs were characterized by immunofluorescence, GAP-FRAP analyses and live and dead assay. Their functionality was evaluated monitoring the excitation-contraction coupling. Results Micropatterned hCMs maintained the expression of the major cardiac markers (cTnT, cTnI, Cx43, Nkx2.5, ?-actinin) and functional properties. The spontaneous contraction frequency was (0.83±0.2) Hz, while exogenous electrical stimulation lead to an increase up to 2 Hz. As proof of concept that our device can be used for screening the effects of pathological conditions, hCMs were exposed to increasing levels of H2O2. Remarkably, hCMs viability was not compromised with exposure to 0.1 mM H2O2, but hCMs contractility was dramatically suppressed. As proof of concept, we also developed a microfluidic platform to selectively treat areas of the cell array, in the perspective of performing multi-parametric assay. Conclusions Such system could be a useful tool for testing the effects of multiple conditions on an in vitro cell model representative of human heart physiology, thus potentially helping the processes of therapy and drug development. PMID:23152776

  2. Ascorbic acid transport into cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, E.I.; May, V.; Eipper, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    An amidating enzyme designated peptidyl-glycine ..cap alpha..-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) has been studied in a variety of tissues and is dependent on molecular oxygen and stimulated by copper and ascorbic acid. To continue investigating the relationship among cellular ascorbic acid concentrations, amidating ability, and PAM activity, the authors studied ascorbic acid transport in three cell preparations that contain PAM and produce amidated peptides: primary cultures of rat anterior and intermediate pituitary and mouse AtT-20 tumor cells. When incubated in 50 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid all three cell preparations concentrated ascorbic acid 20- to 40-fold, producing intracellular ascorbate concentrations of 1 to 2 mM, based on experimentally determined cell volumes. All three cell preparations displayed saturable ascorbic acid uptake with half-maximal initial rates occurring between 9 and 18 ..mu..M ascorbate. Replacing NaCl in the uptake buffer with choline chloride significantly diminished ascorbate uptake in all three preparations. Ascorbic acid efflux from these cells was slow, displaying half-lives of 7 hours. Unlike systems that transport dehydroascorbic acid, the transport system for ascorbic acid in these cells was not inhibited by glucose. Thus, ascorbate is transported into pituitary cells by a sodium-dependent, active transport system.

  3. Identification of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells: strength and drawbacks of functional assays.

    PubMed

    Coulombel, Laure

    2004-09-20

    A major challenge in hematopoiesis is to conceive assays that could bring useful insights into experimental and clinical hematology. This means identifying separately the various classes of hematopoietic progenitors that are produced sequentially during the progression from stem cells to differentiated functional cells. Standardized short-term colony assays easily quantify lineage-committed myeloid precursors, but identification of primitive cells, which have both the ability to repopulate durably myeloid and lymphoid lineages and perhaps to self-renew, still depends on in vivo assays. Whatever the assay, two important requisites have to be solved: one is the definition of appropriate read-outs that will depend solely on the function of these cells, and the second is to evaluate precisely their numbers and proliferative potential in quantitative assays. When evaluating hematopoiesis, three parameters have to be taken into account: (1) the lack of reliable correlation between the phenotype of a given cell and its function. This is especially problematic in post-transplantation situations where cells from transplanted animals are analysed; (2) functionally heterogeneous cells are identified in a single assay; and (3) ontogeny-related changes in hematopoietic cell proliferation and self-renewal that, in human beings, hampers the exploration of adult stem cells. Nevertheless, years of progress in the manipulation of hematopoietic stem cells have recently resulted in the purification of a cell subset that repopulates irradiated recipients with absolute efficiency. PMID:15378081

  4. Efficacy of decoquinate against Neospora caninum tachyzoites in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, D S; Butler, J M; Blagburn, B L

    1997-01-01

    Neospora caninum is a major cause of abortion in dairy cattle in the United States and other countries. Abortions and neonatal mortality also occur in other ruminant species. Decoquinate is an anticoccidial that is approved for use in cattle and goats in the United States. We studied the efficacy of decoquinate against tachyzoites of N. caninum in a 5-day of treatment, cell culture flask lesion-based assay. Decoquinate killed tachyzoites at concentrations of 0.1 and 0.01 microgram ml-1. Decoquinate had little measurable effect on extracellular tachyzoites. Decoquinate acted quickly to kill intracellular stages at coccidiocidal concentrations; tachyzoites were killed within 5 min at 0.1 microgram ml-1 decoquinate. PMID:9066049

  5. Development of a one-step embryonic stem cell-based assay for the screening of sprouting angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Hermant, Bastien; Desroches-Castan, Agnès; Dubessay, Marie-Laure; Prandini, Marie-Hélène; Huber, Philippe; Vittet, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis assays are important tools for the identification of regulatory molecules and the potential development of therapeutic strategies to modulate neovascularization. Although numerous in vitro angiogenesis models have been developed in the past, they exhibit limitations since they do not recapitulate the entire angiogenic process or correspond to multi-step procedures that are not easy to use. Convenient, reliable, easily quantifiable and physiologically relevant assays are still needed for pharmacological screenings of angiogenesis. Results Here, we have optimized an angiogenesis model based on ES cell differentiation for screening experiments. We have established conditions leading to angiogenic sprouting of embryoid bodies during ES cell differentiation in type I three-dimensional collagen gels. Immunostaining experiments carried out during these cultures showed the formation of numerous buds comprising CD31 positive cells, after 11 days of culture of ES cells. Moreover, this one-step model has been validated in response to activators and inhibitors of angiogenesis. Sprouting was specifically stimulated in the presence of VEGF and FGF2. Alternatively, endothelial sprouting induced by angiogenic activators was inhibited by angiogenesis inhibitors such as angiostatin, TGF? and PF4. Sprouting angiogenesis can be easily quantified by image analysis after immunostaining of endothelial cells with CD31 pan-endothelial marker. Conclusion Taken together, these data clearly validate that this one-step ES differentiation model constitutes a simple and versatile angiogenesis system that should facilitate, in future investigations, the screening of both activators and inhibitors of angiogenesis. PMID:17437635

  6. Evaluation of 309 Environmental Chemicals Using a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Kelly J.; Barrier, Marianne; Jeffay, Susan; Nichols, Harriette P.; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Singh, Amar V.; Reif, David M.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Judson, Richard S.; Dix, David J.; Kavlock, Robert; Hunter, Edward S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES) cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (?,? myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7) and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™) were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (?500) revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26) that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A) were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation. PMID:21666745

  7. The miR-7 Identified from Collagen Biomaterial-Based Three-Dimensional Cultured Cells Regulates Neural Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yi; Xiao, Zhifeng; Chen, Tong; Wei, Jianshu; Chen, Lei; Liu, Lijun; Chen, Bing; Wang, Xiujie; Li, Xiaoran

    2014-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that three-dimensional (3D) cultures provide more appropriate microenvironments to control stem cell response compared with traditional two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, the molecular mechanism involved in 3D cultured stem cells is not well known. Several microRNAs whose target genes involved in the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells were found to be downregulated in 3D cultured PA-1 cells. Among them, miR-7 was predicted to target Kruppel-like factor 4 (Klf4), a key gene for self-renewal of neural stem cells (NSCs). We showed that the differentiation of NSCs was inhibited in 3D collagen scaffolds compared with 2D cultured cells. The quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) analysis indicated that the expression of miR-7 and Klf4 changed significantly in 2D cultures, whereas the expression stability of miR-7 and Klf4 was detected in 3D cultures. Using luciferase assay and western blot, Klf4 was identified as a target of miR-7 indicating that miR-7 plays a critical role in maintaining the self-renewal capacity through a Klf4-dependent mechanism in 3D cultured cells. Thus, the collagen scaffold-based 3D cell cultures may provide a platform to reveal the regulatory mechanism of cell regulators, which are difficult to find in traditional 2D cell cultures. PMID:24200387

  8. Bovine recto-anal junction squamous epithelial (RSE) cell adhesion assay for studying Escherichia coli O157 adherence

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An adherence assay, using recto-anal junction squamous epithelial cells (RSEC), was developed for Escherichia coli O157 and related organisms. The assay was standardized in comparison with the routinely used HEp-2 cell adherence assay, in this “proof of concept” study. The novel RSEC adhesion assay ...

  9. ASBESTOS AND GASTRO-INTESTINAL CANCER: CELL CULTURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three forms of asbestos: amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile, were assayed for their cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in cell clture. Using embjryonic human intestine derived and adult rat liver derived epitelial cells, the order of toxicity was chrysotile > amosite = crocidolite. ...

  10. Reduction of misleading ("false") positive results in mammalian cell genotoxicity assays. I. Choice of cell type.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Paul; Smith, Katie; Young, Jamie; Jeffrey, Laura; Kirkland, David; Pfuhler, Stefan; Carmichael, Paul

    2012-02-18

    Current in vitro mammalian cell genotoxicity assays show a high rate of positive results, many of which are misleading when compared with in vivo genotoxicity or rodent carcinogenicity data. P53-deficiency in many of the rodent cell lines may be a key factor in this poor predictivity. As part of an European Cosmetics Industry Association initiative for improvement of in vitro mammalian cell assays, we have compared several rodent cell lines (V79, CHL, CHO) with p53-competent human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HuLy), TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells, and the human liver cell line, HepG2. We have compared in vitro micronucleus (MN) induction following treatment with 19 compounds that were accepted as producing misleading or "false" positive results in in vitro mammalian cell assays [6]. Of these, six chemicals (2-ethyl-1,3-hexandiol, benzyl alcohol, urea, sodium saccharin, sulfisoxazole and isobutyraldehyde) were not toxic and did not induce any MN at concentrations up to 10mM. d,l-Menthol and ethionamide induced cytotoxicity, but did not induce MN. o-Anthranilic acid was not toxic and did not induce MN in V79, CHL, CHO, HuLy and HepG2 cells up to 10mM. Toxicity was induced in TK6 cells, although there were no increases in MN frequency up to and above the 55% toxicity level. The other 10 chemicals (1,3-dihydroxybenzene, curcumin, propyl gallate, p-nitrophenol, ethyl acrylate, eugenol, tert-butylhydroquinone, 2,4-dichlorophenol, sodium xylene sulfonate and phthalic anhydride) produced cytotoxicity in at least one cell type, and were evaluated further for MN induction in most or all of the cell types listed above. All these chemicals induced MN at concentrations <10mM, with levels of cytotoxicity below 60% (measured as the replication index) in at least one cell type. The rodent cell lines (V79, CHO and CHL) were consistently more susceptible to cytotoxicity and MN induction than p53-competent cells, and are therefore more susceptible to giving misleading positive results. These data suggest that a reduction in the frequency of misleading positive results can be achieved by careful selection of the mammalian cell type for genotoxicity testing. PMID:22138618

  11. An assay for serum cytotoxicity against erythroid precursor cells in pure red cell aplasia.

    PubMed

    Löwenberg, B; Ghio, R

    1977-11-01

    Several reports have indicated that a circulating serum inhibitor (antibody) is involved in the pathogenesis of acquired pure red cell aplasia (PRCA). In the present study, the pathophysiologic significance of this inhibitor was assessed according to the status of erythroid progenitor cells in the bone marrow. So far, direct proof for the antibody acting against erythroid stemcells was lacking. Employing an "in vitro" assay, erythroid colony forming cell (CFU-e) numbers in PRCA marrow were quantified and the cytotoxic effect of PRCA serum on CFU-e was investigated. It was revealed that the CFU-e population size in the marrow of PRCA patients was severely reduced; at the same time the relative number of myeloid colony forming cells was normal. The serum was demonstrated to contain a factor cell which was cytotoxic to CFU-e, in the presence of complement. The results indicate that inhibition of erythropoiesis in PRCA is achieved by a complement dependent plasma factor which eliminates or inactivates CFU-e and which constitutes an effective block at the precursor cell level in the differentiation pathway of the erythroid line. The data present a practical assay for measuring cytotoxic factors affecting erythroid stem cells. PMID:597564

  12. A cell-based assay for aggregation inhibitors as therapeutics of polyglutamine-repeat disease and validation in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Barbara L.; Kazantsev, Alexsey; Raffioni, Simona; Illes, Katalin; Pallos, Judit; Bodai, Laszlo; Slepko, Natalia; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.; Hersch, Steven; Housman, David E.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Michels Thompson, Leslie

    2003-05-01

    The formation of polyglutamine-containing aggregates and inclusions are hallmarks of pathogenesis in Huntington's disease that can be recapitulated in model systems. Although the contribution of inclusions to pathogenesis is unclear, cell-based assays can be used to screen for chemical compounds that affect aggregation and may provide therapeutic benefit. We have developed inducible PC12 cell-culture models to screen for loss of visible aggregates. To test the validity of this approach, compounds that inhibit aggregation in the PC12 cell-based screen were tested in a Drosophila model of polyglutamine-repeat disease. The disruption of aggregation in PC12 cells strongly correlates with suppression of neuronal degeneration in Drosophila. Thus, the engineered PC12 cells coupled with the Drosophila model provide a rapid and effective method to screen and validate compounds.

  13. A Tubing-Free Microfluidic Wound Healing Assay Enabling the Quantification of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuanchen; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Deyong; Jia, Xin; Wang, Junbo; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a tubing-free microfluidic wound healing assay to quantify the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), where gravity was used to generate a laminar flow within microfluidic channels, enabling cell seeding, culture, and wound generation. As the first systemic study to quantify the migration of VSMCs within microfluidic environments, the effects of channel geometries, surface modifications and chemokines on cellular migration were investigated, revealing that 1) height of the micro channels had a significant impact on cell migration; 2) the surface coating of collagen induced more migration of VSMCs than fibronectin coated surfaces and 3) platelet derived growth factor resulted in maximal cell migration compared to tumor necrosis factor alpha and fetal bovine serum. Furthermore, migrations of five types of VSMCs (e.g., the human vascular smooth muscle cell line, two types of primary vascular smooth cells, and VSMCs isolated from two human samples) were quantified, finding that VSMCs from the cell line and human samples demonstrated comparable migration distances, which were significantly lower than the migration distances of two primary cell types. As a platform technology, this wound healing assay may function as a new model to study migration of VSMCs within microfluidic environments. PMID:26365412

  14. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be integrated a total analysis system to evaluate engineered protein and DNA.

  15. Survey of Culture, GoldenGate Assay, Universal Biosensor Assay, and 16S rRNA Gene Sequencing as Alternative Methods of Bacterial Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Pop, Mihai; Antonio, Martin; Walker, Alan W.; Mai, Volker; Ahmed, Dilruba; Oundo, Joseph; Tamboura, Boubou; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M.; Kotloff, Karen; Li, Shan; Magder, Laurence S.; Paulson, Joseph N.; Liu, Bo; Ikumapayi, Usman; Ebruke, Chinelo; Dione, Michel; Adeyemi, Mitchell; Rance, Richard; Stares, Mark D.; Ukhanova, Maria; Barnes, Bret; Lewis, Ian; Ahmed, Firoz; Alam, Meer Taifur; Amin, Ruhul; Siddiqui, Sabbir; Ochieng, John B.; Ouma, Emmanuel; Juma, Jane; Mailu, Eunice; Omore, Richard; O'Reilly, Ciara E.; Hannis, James; Manalili, Sheri; DeLeon, Jonna; Yasuda, Irene; Blyn, Lawrence; Ranken, Raymond; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Ecker, David J.; Hossain, M. Anowar; Breiman, Robert F.; Morris, J. Glenn; McDaniel, Timothy K.; Parkhill, Julian; Saha, Debasish; Sampath, Rangarajan; Stine, O. Colin; Nataro, James P.

    2013-01-01

    Cultivation-based assays combined with PCR or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based methods for finding virulence factors are standard methods for detecting bacterial pathogens in stools; however, with emerging molecular technologies, new methods have become available. The aim of this study was to compare four distinct detection technologies for the identification of pathogens in stools from children under 5 years of age in The Gambia, Mali, Kenya, and Bangladesh. The children were identified, using currently accepted clinical protocols, as either controls or cases with moderate to severe diarrhea. A total of 3,610 stool samples were tested by established clinical culture techniques: 3,179 DNA samples by the Universal Biosensor assay (Ibis Biosciences, Inc.), 1,466 DNA samples by the GoldenGate assay (Illumina), and 1,006 DNA samples by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Each method detected different proportions of samples testing positive for each of seven enteric pathogens, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, and Aeromonas spp. The comparisons among detection methods included the frequency of positive stool samples and kappa values for making pairwise comparisons. Overall, the standard culture methods detected Shigella spp., EPEC, ETEC, and EAEC in smaller proportions of the samples than either of the methods based on detection of the virulence genes from DNA in whole stools. The GoldenGate method revealed the greatest agreement with the other methods. The agreement among methods was higher in cases than in controls. The new molecular technologies have a high potential for highly sensitive identification of bacterial diarrheal pathogens. PMID:23884998

  16. Survey of culture, goldengate assay, universal biosensor assay, and 16S rRNA Gene sequencing as alternative methods of bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Brianna; Pop, Mihai; Antonio, Martin; Walker, Alan W; Mai, Volker; Ahmed, Dilruba; Oundo, Joseph; Tamboura, Boubou; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M; Kotloff, Karen; Li, Shan; Magder, Laurence S; Paulson, Joseph N; Liu, Bo; Ikumapayi, Usman; Ebruke, Chinelo; Dione, Michel; Adeyemi, Mitchell; Rance, Richard; Stares, Mark D; Ukhanova, Maria; Barnes, Bret; Lewis, Ian; Ahmed, Firoz; Alam, Meer Taifur; Amin, Ruhul; Siddiqui, Sabbir; Ochieng, John B; Ouma, Emmanuel; Juma, Jane; Mailu, Eunice; Omore, Richard; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Hannis, James; Manalili, Sheri; Deleon, Jonna; Yasuda, Irene; Blyn, Lawrence; Ranken, Raymond; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Ecker, David J; Hossain, M Anowar; Breiman, Robert F; Morris, J Glenn; McDaniel, Timothy K; Parkhill, Julian; Saha, Debasish; Sampath, Rangarajan; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2013-10-01

    Cultivation-based assays combined with PCR or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based methods for finding virulence factors are standard methods for detecting bacterial pathogens in stools; however, with emerging molecular technologies, new methods have become available. The aim of this study was to compare four distinct detection technologies for the identification of pathogens in stools from children under 5 years of age in The Gambia, Mali, Kenya, and Bangladesh. The children were identified, using currently accepted clinical protocols, as either controls or cases with moderate to severe diarrhea. A total of 3,610 stool samples were tested by established clinical culture techniques: 3,179 DNA samples by the Universal Biosensor assay (Ibis Biosciences, Inc.), 1,466 DNA samples by the GoldenGate assay (Illumina), and 1,006 DNA samples by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Each method detected different proportions of samples testing positive for each of seven enteric pathogens, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, and Aeromonas spp. The comparisons among detection methods included the frequency of positive stool samples and kappa values for making pairwise comparisons. Overall, the standard culture methods detected Shigella spp., EPEC, ETEC, and EAEC in smaller proportions of the samples than either of the methods based on detection of the virulence genes from DNA in whole stools. The GoldenGate method revealed the greatest agreement with the other methods. The agreement among methods was higher in cases than in controls. The new molecular technologies have a high potential for highly sensitive identification of bacterial diarrheal pathogens. PMID:23884998

  17. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion. PMID:26022509

  18. Induction of vascular endothelial phenotype and cellular proliferation from human cord blood stem cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Brian; Z-M Wan, Jim; Abley, Doris; Akabutu, John

    2005-05-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that stem cells derived from adult hematopoietic tissues are capable of trans-differentiation into non-hematopoietic cells, and that the culture in microgravity ( ?g) may modulate the proliferation and differentiation. We investigated the application of ?g to human umbilical cord blood stem cells (CBSC) in the induction of vascular endothelial phenotype expression and cellular proliferation. CD34+ mononuclear cells were isolated from waste human umbilical cord blood samples and cultured in simulated ?g for 14 days. The cells were seeded in rotary wall vessels (RWV) with or without microcarrier beads (MCB) and vascular endothelial growth factor was added during culture. Controls consisted of culture in 1 G. The cell cultures in RWV were examined by inverted microscopy. Cell counts, endothelial cell and leukocyte markers performed by flow-cytometry and FACS scan were assayed at days 1, 4, 7 and at the termination of the experiments. Culture in RWV revealed significantly increased cellular proliferation with three-dimensional (3D) tissue-like aggregates. At day 4, CD34+ cells cultured in RWV bioreactor without MCB developed vascular tubular assemblies and exhibited endothelial phenotypic markers. These data suggest that CD34+ human umbilical cord blood progenitors are capable of trans-differentiation into vascular endothelial cell phenotype and assemble into 3D tissue structures. Culture of CBSC in simulated ?g may be potentially beneficial in the fields of stem cell biology and somatic cell therapy.

  19. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  20. Assessing the data quality in predictive toxicology using a panel of cell lines and cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Pohjala, Leena; Tammela, Päivi; Samanta, Swapan K; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Vuorela, Pia

    2007-03-15

    In vitro cell viability assays have a central role in predictive toxicology, both in assessing acute toxicity of chemicals and as a source of experimental data for in silico methods. However, the quality of in vitro toxicity databanks fluctuates dramatically because information they contain is obtained under varying conditions and in different laboratories. The aim of this study was to identify the factors responsible for these deviations and thus the quality of the data extracted for predictive toxicology. Three cell viability assays measuring LDH leakage, WST-1 reduction, and intracellular ATP were compared in an automated environment using four mammalian cell lines: Caco-2, Calu-3, Huh-7, and BHK. Using four standard compounds--polymyxin B, gramicidin, 5-fluorouracil, and camptothecin--a significant lack of sensitivity in LDH assay compared with the other assays was observed. Because the viability IC(50) values for the standards were similar among the cell lines, the biochemical characteristics of different cell lines seem to play only a minor role, with an exception being the hepatocellular Huh-7 cell line. Toxicity assessment of new 1,2,4-triazoles revealed significant differences in their toxic potential, and the results indicate the same sensitivity profile among the assays as observed with the standard compounds. Overall, it can be argued that the assay selection is the most important factor governing the uniform quality of the data obtained from in vitro cell viability assays. PMID:17266913

  1. Biology on a Chip: Microfabrication for Studying the Behavior of Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianzhen; Tourovskaia, Anna; Folch, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The ability to culture cells in vitro has revolutionized hypothesis testing in basic cell and molecular biology research and has become a standard methodology in drug screening and toxicology assays. However, the traditional cell culture methodology—consisting essentially of the immersion of a large population of cells in a homogeneous fluid medium—has become increasingly limiting, both from a fundamental point of view (cells in vivo are surrounded by complex spatiotemporal microenvironments) and from a practical perspective (scaling up the number of fluid handling steps and cell manipulations for high-throughput studies in vitro is prohibitively expensive). Micro fabrication technologies have enabled researchers to design, with micrometer control, the biochemical composition and topology of the substrate, the medium composition, as well as the type of neighboring cells surrounding the microenvironment of the cell. In addition, microtechnology is conceptually well suited for the development of fast, low-cost in vitro systems that allow for high-throughput culturing and analysis of cells under large numbers of conditions. Here we review a variety of applications of microfabrication in cell culture studies, with an emphasis on the biology of various cell types. PMID:15139302

  2. Assessment of cell death studies by monitoring hydrogen peroxide in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irina; Prell, Erik; Weiwad, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been widely used to study the oxidative stress response. However, H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposes into H2O and O2. Consequently, a wide range of exposure times and treatment concentrations has been described in the literature. In the present study, we established a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay, which was originally described for food and body liquids, as a method for the precise quantification of H2O2 concentrations in cell culture media. We observed that the presence of FCS and high cell densities significantly accelerate the decomposition of H2O2, therefore acting as a protection against cell death by accidental necrosis. PMID:24747006

  3. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (inventor); Wolf, David A. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  4. Effect of KnockOut serum replacement on germ cell development of immature testis tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Cai, Chunhong; Wu, Xin; Cheng, Yanxia; Lin, Tao; Wei, Guanghui; He, Dawei

    2016-01-15

    To compare KnockOut serum replacement (KSR) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) for the development of germ cells. Testicular tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured for 4 weeks in culture media supplemented with FBS or KSR. Tissue area was measured at the beginning and end of the culturing period. Testicular histology, development of the germ cells, and the diameter of seminiferous tubules were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. After 4 weeks in culture, apoptosis and expression of the stage-specific spermatogenesis marker genes Kit, Sycp3, and Crisp1 were assayed. Tissues cultured in KSR-supplemented media were able to sustain growth and gradually increase seminiferous tubule diameter during the culture period. In addition, spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes, secondary spermatocytes, and round spermatids were observed after 4 weeks in culture, and reverse transcription-PCR confirmed expression of the marker genes. In comparison, tissues cultured in FBS-supplemented media showed dwindling testicular organization, necrotic seminiferous tubules, and expression of Kit, but inconsistent expression of Sycp3 and Crisp1 KnockOut serum replacement outperforms FBS as a growth media supplements for culturing immature spermatogonial tissue culture. PMID:26474686

  5. Rapid fluorescence-based assay for radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity testing in mammalian cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Begg, A.C.; Mooren, E.

    1989-02-01

    An efficient and rapid cytotoxicity assay has been developed, particularly for radiobiological studies, utilizing 96-well microtiter plates. Several days after treatment, cell numbers per well were measured by fluorescent intensity using an automatic reader after staining with the DNA specific dye Hoechst 33258. For radiobiological applications, a microtiter plate irradiation box was designed and built which allowed a variable number of wells (minimum 4, maximum 16) to be irradiated at one time. In this manner, complete dose-response curves could be obtained from one plate. The assay depends on the growth of surviving and untreated cells, and by appropriate choice of conditions (cell numbers plated, time of assay), cell survival curves for this quick fluorescence assay were in reasonable agreement with those from a clonogenic assay for cisplatin and X-ray-induced cell killing. The assay can span 1.5-2 decades of cell survival and is suitable for any cell line which grows as a monolayer. Radiobiological applications were tested using agents or conditions which modified radiation damage. Firstly, sublethal damage repair could be demonstrated in RIF1 mouse tumor cells by comparing the survival curve for a single X-ray dose with that for two fractions separated by 4 h. Secondly, incorporation of 5-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine into cellular DNA was shown to radiosensitize Chinese Hamster cells, with similar enhancement ratios obtained from the fluorescence and clonogenic assays. Thirdly, radiosensitization by cisplatin and radioprotection by cysteamine could be readily measured using the quick fluorescence assay. The ability to have multiple dose groups per plate makes it an efficient assay for both radiosensitivity and chemosensitivity testing.

  6. Quantitative high-throughput single-cell cytotoxicity assay for T cells.

    PubMed

    Liadi, Ivan; Roszik, Jason; Romain, Gabrielle; Cooper, Laurence J N; Varadarajan, Navin

    2013-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy can harness the specificity of immune response to target and eliminate tumors. Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) based on the adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown considerable promise in clinical trials(1-4). There are several advantages to using CAR(+) T cells for the treatment of cancers including the ability to target non-MHC restricted antigens and to functionalize the T cells for optimal survival, homing and persistence within the host; and finally to induce apoptosis of CAR(+) T cells in the event of host toxicity(5). Delineating the optimal functions of CAR(+) T cells associated with clinical benefit is essential for designing the next generation of clinical trials. Recent advances in live animal imaging like multiphoton microscopy have revolutionized the study of immune cell function in vivo(6,7). While these studies have advanced our understanding of T-cell functions in vivo, T-cell based ACT in clinical trials requires the need to link molecular and functional features of T-cell preparations pre-infusion with clinical efficacy post-infusion, by utilizing in vitro assays monitoring T-cell functions like, cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. Standard flow-cytometry based assays have been developed that determine the overall functioning of populations of T cells at the single-cell level but these are not suitable for monitoring conjugate formation and lifetimes or the ability of the same cell to kill multiple targets(8). Microfabricated arrays designed in biocompatible polymers like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are a particularly attractive method to spatially confine effectors and targets in small volumes(9). In combination with automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, thousands of effector-target interactions can be monitored simultaneously by imaging individual wells of a nanowell array. We present here a high-throughput methodology for monitoring T-cell mediated cytotoxicity at the single-cell level that can be broadly applied to studying the cytolytic functionality of T cells. PMID:23407457

  7. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  8. Development of phenotypic screening assays for ?-globin induction using primary human bone marrow day 7 erythroid progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Xie, Wensheng; Gore, Elizabeth R; Montoute, Monica N; Bee, Weilin Tiger; Zappacosta, Francesca; Zeng, Xin; Wu, Zining; Kallal, Lorena; Ames, Robert S; Pope, Andrew J; Benowitz, Andrew; Erickson-Miller, Connie L

    2013-12-01

    Sickle cell anemia (SCA) is a genetic disorder of the ?-globin gene. SCA results in chronic ischemia with pain and tissue injury. The extent of SCA symptoms can be ameliorated by treatment with drugs, which result in increasing the levels of ?-globin in patient red blood cells. Hydroxyurea (HU) is a Food and Drug Administration-approved drug for SCA, but it has dose-limiting toxicity, and patients exhibit highly variable treatment responses. To identify compounds that may lead to the development of better and safer medicines, we have established a method using primary human bone marrow day 7 erythroid progenitor cells (EPCs) to screen for compounds that induce ?-globin production. First, human marrow CD34(+) cells were cultured and expanded for 7 days and characterized for the expression of erythroid differentiation markers (CD71, CD36, and CD235a). Second, fresh or cryopreserved EPCs were treated with compounds for 3 days in 384-well plates followed by ?-globin quantification by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which was validated using HU and decitabine. From the 7408 compounds screened, we identified at least one new compound with confirmed ?-globin-inducing activity. Hits are undergoing analysis in secondary assays. In this article, we describe the method of generating fit-for-purpose EPCs; the development, optimization, and validation of the ELISA and secondary assays for ?-globin detection; and screening results. PMID:24163393

  9. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  10. Direct fluorescent assay of urokinase and plasminogen activators of normal and malignant cells: kinetics and inhibitor profiles.

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, M; Quigley, J P; Ashe, B; Dorn, C; Goldfarb, R; Troll, W

    1978-01-01

    A direct rate assay for plasminogen activator has been developed using a synthetic fluorogenic peptide substrate, 7-(N-Cbz-glycylglycylargininamido)-4-methylcoumarin trifluoroacetate. The assay correlates well with the standard 125I-labeled fibrin plate assay using highly purified urokinase, culture fluids from WI-38, Chinese hamster vary or HeLa cells, or Rous sarcoma virus-transformed chick fibroblasts as the source of plasminogen activator. The assay is sensitive, rapid, and linear throughout a wide range of enzyme concentrations. With this substrate it is possible to determine inhibitor profiles for the various plasminogen activators, independently of the interfering potential of plasmin. All of the enzymes tested are inhibited by leupeptin and antipain but not by the related aldehydes, elastatinal and chymostatin. The macromolecular inhibitors soybean trypsin inhibitor and trasylol have little or no effect on the plasminogen activators tested. This substrate should be useful for the study of the effect of various agents on functional changes in cells secreting this enzyme and also should allow kinetic measurements of potential inhibitors. PMID:204931

  11. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  12. A modified human ELISPOT assay to detect specific responses to primary tumor cell targets

    PubMed Central

    Malyguine, Anatoli; Strobl, Susan L; Shafer-Weaver, Kimberly A; Ulderich, Tracy; Troke, Angela; Baseler, Michael; Kwak, Larry W; Neelapu, Sattva S

    2004-01-01

    Background The desired outcome of cancer vaccination is to induce a potent T cell response which can specifically recognize and eliminate autologous tumor cells in vivo. Accordingly, immunological assays that demonstrate recognition of native tumor cells (tumor-specific) may be more clinically relevant than assays that demonstrate recognition of tumor protein or peptide (antigen-specific). Methods Towards this goal, we adapted the IFN-? ELISPOT assay to measure immune responses against autologous primary tumor cells in vaccinated cancer patients. As a model system to develop the assay, we utilized peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) directly isolated from follicular lymphoma patients vaccinated with tumor-derived idiotype protein. Results After optimizing several variables, we demonstrated that the modified IFN-? ELISPOT assay could be used to reliably and reproducibly determine the tumor-reactive T cell frequency in the PBMC of these patients. The precursor frequency of tumor-reactive T cells was significantly higher in the postvaccine PBMC, compared with prevaccine samples in all patients tested. Furthermore, the specificity of these T cells was established by the lack of reactivity against autologous normal B cells. Conclusions These results demonstrate the feasibility of quantitating tumor-specific T cell responses when autologous, primary tumor cells are available as targets. PMID:15050026

  13. Microfluidics and cancer analysis: cell separation, cell/tissue culture, cell mechanics, and integrated analysis systems.

    PubMed

    Pappas, Dimitri

    2016-01-21

    Among the growing number of tools available for cancer studies, microfluidic systems have emerged as a promising analytical tool to elucidate cancer cell and tumor function. Microfluidic methods to culture cells have created approaches to provide a range of environments from single-cell analysis to complex three-dimensional devices. In this review we discuss recent advances in tumor cell culture, cancer cell analysis, and advanced studies enabled by microfluidic systems. PMID:26579548

  14. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J.; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72?h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15?min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z??=?0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3?h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47?h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples. PMID:26383544

  15. A chemically defined culture medium containing Rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 for the fabrication of stratified squamous epithelial cell grafts.

    PubMed

    Aslanova, Afag; Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Yamamoto, Masakazu

    2015-05-01

    With the development of a culture method for stratified squamous epithelial cells, tissue-engineered epithelial cell sheets have been successfully applied as clinical cell grafts. However, the implementation of these cell sheets without the use of any animal-derived materials is highly desirable. In this study, Rho-associated protein kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was used to develop a chemically defined culture medium for the fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts consisting of human epidermal and oral keratinocytes, and the proliferation activity, cell morphology, and gene expressions of the keratinocytes were analyzed. The results of a colorimetric assay indicated that Y-27632 significantly promoted the proliferation of the keratinocytes in culture media both with and without fetal bovine serum (FBS), although there were no indications of Y-27632 efficacy on cell morphology and stratification of the keratinocytes in culture medium without any animal-derived materials. The results of quantitative RT-PCR revealed that gene expressions correlated with cell adhesion, cell-cell junction, proliferation markers, and stem/progenitor markers in cultured keratinocytes were not strongly affected by the addition of Y-27632 to the culture medium. Moreover, gene expressions of differentiation markers in stratified keratinocytes cultured in medium without FBS were nearly identical to those of keratinocytes co-cultured with 3T3 feeder cells. Interestingly, the expressions of differentiation markers in cultured stratified keratinocytes were suppressed by FBS, whereas they were reconstructed by either co-culture of a 3T3 feeder layer or addition of Y-27632 into the culture medium containing FBS. These findings indicate that Y-27632 is a useful supplement for the development of a chemically defined culture medium for fabrication of stratified epithelial cell grafts for clinical applications for the purpose of developing the culture medium with a lower risk of pathogen transmission that might arise from animal-derived materials. PMID:25735980

  16. The Type of Responder T-Cell Has a Significant Impact in a Human In Vitro Suppression Assay

    PubMed Central

    Jana, Srikanta; Campbell, Hope; Woodliff, Jeffrey; Waukau, Jill; Jailwala, Parthav; Ghorai, Jugal; Ghosh, Soumitra; Glisic, Sanja

    2010-01-01

    Background In type 1 diabetes (T1D), a prototypic autoimmune disease, effector T cells destroy beta cells. Normally, CD4+CD25+high, or natural regulatory T cells (Tregs), counter this assault. In autoimmunity, the failure to suppress CD4+CD25low T cells is important for disease development. However, both Treg dysfunction and hyperactive responder T-cell proliferation contribute to disease. Methods/Principal Findings We investigated human CD4+CD25low T cells and compared them to CD4+CD25- T cells in otherwise equivalent in vitro proliferative conditions. We then asked whether these differences in suppression are exacerbated in T1D. In both single and co-culture with Tregs, the CD4+CD25low T cells divided more rapidly than CD4+CD25- T cells, which manifests as increased proliferation/reduced suppression. Time-course experiments showed that this difference could be explained by higher IL-2 production from CD4+CD25low compared to CD4+CD25- T cells. There was also a significant increase in CD4+CD25low T-cell proliferation compared to CD4+CD25- T cells during suppression assays from RO T1D and at-risk subjects (n?=?28, p?=?0.015 and p?=?0.024 respectively). Conclusions/Significance The in vitro dual suppression assays proposed here could highlight the impaired sensitivity of certain responder T cells to the suppressive effect of Tregs in human autoimmune diseases. PMID:21151941

  17. DOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201400081 Inhibition of Cathepsin Activity in a Cell-Based Assay by

    E-print Network

    Turro, Claudia

    or presence of irradiation in bone marrow macrophage (BMM) or PC3 cells, as determined by MTT assaysDOI: 10.1002/cmdc.201400081 Inhibition of Cathepsin Activity in a Cell-Based Assay by a Light was demonstrat- ed in a cell-based assay. Inhibitors of cathepsin K, Cbz-Leu- NHCH2CN (2) and Cbz

  18. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  19. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay. PMID:22933153

  20. Density gradient electrophoresis of cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, L. D.; Kunze, M. E.; Giranda, V.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Ground based confirmation of the electrophoretic heterogeneity of human embryonic kidney cell cultures, the general characterization of their electrophoretic migration, and observations on the general properties of cultures derived from electrophoretic subpopulations were studied. Cell migration in a density gradient electrophoresis column and cell electrophoretic mobility was determined. The mobility and heterogeneity of cultured human embryonic kidney cells with those of fixed rat erythrocytes as model test particle was compared. Electrophoretically separated cell subpopulations with respect to size, viability, and culture characteristics were examined.

  1. Differential determinants of cancer cell insensitivity to antimitotic drugs discriminated by a one-step cell imaging assay.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yangzhong; Xie, Tiao; Florian, Stefan; Moerke, Nathan; Shamu, Caroline; Benes, Cyril; Mitchison, Timothy J

    2013-10-01

    Cancer cells can be drug resistant due to genetic variation at multiple steps in the drug response pathway, including drug efflux pumping, target mutation, and blunted apoptotic response. These are not discriminated by conventional cell survival assays. Here, we report a rapid and convenient high-content cell-imaging assay that measures multiple physiological changes in cells responding to antimitotic small-molecule drugs. Our one-step, no-wash assay uses three dyes to stain living cells and is much more accurate for scoring weakly adherent mitotic and apoptotic cells than conventional antibody-based assays. We profiled responses of 33 cell lines to 8 antimitotic drugs at multiple concentrations and time points using this assay and deposited our data and assay protocols into a public database (http://lincs.hms.harvard.edu/). Our data discriminated between alternative mechanisms that compromise drug sensitivity to paclitaxel and revealed an unexpected bell-shaped dose-response curve for BI2536, a highly selective inhibitor of Polo-like kinases. Our approach can be generalized, is scalable, and should therefore facilitate identification of molecular biomarkers for mechanisms of drug insensitivity in high-throughput screens and other assays. PMID:23788527

  2. Gravity, chromosomes, and organized development in aseptically cultured plant cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krikorian, Abraham D.

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the PCR experiment are: to test the hypothesis that microgravity will in fact affect the pattern and developmental progression of embryogenically competent plant cells from one well-defined, critical stage to another; to determine the effects of microgravity in growth and differentiation of embryogenic carrot cells grown in cell culture; to determine whether microgravity or the space environment fosters an instability of the differentiated state; and to determine whether mitosis and chromosome behavior are adversely affected by microgravity. The methods employed will consist of the following: special embryogenically competent carrot cell cultures will be grown in cell culture chambers provided by NASDA; four cell culture chambers will be used to grow cells in liquid medium; two dishes (plant cell culture dishes) will be used to grow cells on a semi-solid agar support; progression to later embryonic stages will be induced in space via crew intervention and by media manipulation in the case of liquid grown cell cultures; progression to later stages in case of semi-solid cultures will not need crew intervention; embryo stages will be fixed at a specific interval (day 6) in flight only in the case of liquid-grown cultures; and some living cells and somatic embryos will be returned for continued post-flight development and 'grown-out.' These will derive from the semi-solid grown cultures.

  3. Optimized luciferase assay for cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of short oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Helmfors, Henrik; Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2015-09-01

    An improved assay for screening for the intracellular delivery efficacy of short oligonucleotides using cell-penetrating peptides is suggested. This assay is an improvement over previous assays that use luciferase reporters for cell-penetrating peptides because it has been scaled up from a 24-well format to a 96-well format and no longer relies on a luciferin reagent that has been commercially sourced. In addition, the homemade luciferin reagent is useful in multiple cell lines and in different assays that rely on altering the expression of luciferase. To establish a new protocol, the composition of the luciferin reagent was optimized for both signal strength and longevity by multiple two-factorial experiments varying the concentrations of adenosine triphosphate, luciferin, coenzyme A, and dithiothreitol. In addition, the optimal conditions with respect to cell number and time of transfection for both short interfering RNA (siRNA) and splice-correcting oligonucleotides (SCOs) are established. Optimal transfection of siRNA and SCOs was achieved using the reverse transfection method where the oligonucleotide complexes are already present in the wells before the cells are plated. Z' scores were 0.73 for the siRNA assay and 0.71 for the SCO assay, indicating that both assays are suitable for high-throughput screening. PMID:26049099

  4. Tension, Free Space, and Cell Damage in a Microfluidic Wound Healing Assay

    E-print Network

    Murrell, Michael

    We use a novel, microfluidics-based technique to deconstruct the classical wound healing scratch assay, decoupling the contribution of free space and cell damage on the migratory dynamics of an epithelial sheet. This method ...

  5. A rapid survival assay to measure drug-induced cytotoxicity and cell cycle effects

    E-print Network

    Valiathan, Chandni

    We describe a rapid method to accurately measure the cytotoxicity of mammalian cells upon exposure to various drugs. Using this assay, we obtain survival data in a fraction of the time required to perform the traditional ...

  6. Detection of circulating immune complexes by Raji cell assay: comparison of flow cytometric and radiometric methods

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsmore, S.F.; Crockard, A.D.; Fay, A.C.; McNeill, T.A.; Roberts, S.D.; Thompson, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Several flow cytometric methods for the measurement of circulating immune complexes (CIC) have recently become available. We report a Raji cell flow cytometric assay (FCMA) that uses aggregated human globulin (AHG) as primary calibrator. Technical advantages of the Raji cell flow cytometric assay are discussed, and its clinical usefulness is evaluated in a method comparison study with the widely used Raji cell immunoradiometric assay. FCMA is more precise and has greater analytic sensitivity for AHG. Diagnostic sensitivity by the flow cytometric method is superior in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients: however, diagnostic specificity is similar for both assays, but the reference interval of FCMA is narrower. Significant correlations were found between CIC levels obtained with both methods in SLE, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis patients and in longitudinal studies of two patients with cerebral SLE. The Raji cell FCMA is recommended for measurement of CIC levels to clinical laboratories with access to a flow cytometer.

  7. Quantitative Validation of the Presto Blue Metabolic Assay for Online Monitoring of Cell Proliferation in a 3D Perfusion Bioreactor System.

    PubMed

    Sonnaert, Maarten; Papantoniou, Ioannis; Luyten, Frank P; Schrooten, Jan Ir

    2015-06-01

    As the fields of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine mature toward clinical applications, the need for online monitoring both for quantitative and qualitative use becomes essential. Resazurin-based metabolic assays are frequently applied for determining cytotoxicity and have shown great potential for monitoring 3D bioreactor-facilitated cell culture. However, no quantitative correlation between the metabolic conversion rate of resazurin and cell number has been defined yet. In this work, we determined conversion rates of Presto Blue, a resazurin-based metabolic assay, for human periosteal cells during 2D and 3D static and 3D perfusion cultures. Our results showed that for the evaluated culture systems there is a quantitative correlation between the Presto Blue conversion rate and the cell number during the expansion phase with no influence of the perfusion-related parameters, that is, flow rate and shear stress. The correlation between the cell number and Presto Blue conversion subsequently enabled the definition of operating windows for optimal signal readouts. In conclusion, our data showed that the conversion of the resazurin-based Presto Blue metabolic assay can be used as a quantitative readout for online monitoring of cell proliferation in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system, although a system-specific validation is required. PMID:25336207

  8. mRNA transfection of mouse and human neural stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    McLenachan, Samuel; Zhang, Dan; Palomo, Ana Belén Alvarez; Edel, Michael J; Chen, Fred K

    2013-01-01

    The use of synthetic mRNA as an alternative gene delivery vector to traditional DNA-based constructs provides an effective method for inducing transient gene expression in cell cultures without genetic modification. Delivery of mRNA has been proposed as a safer alternative to viral vectors in the induction of pluripotent cells for regenerative therapies. Although mRNA transfection of fibroblasts, dendritic and embryonic stem cells has been described, mRNA delivery to neurosphere cultures has not been previously reported. Here we sought to establish an efficient method for delivering mRNA to primary neurosphere cultures. Neurospheres derived from the subventricular zone of adult mice or from human embryonic stem cells were transfected with EGFP mRNA by lipofection and electroporation. Transfection efficiency and expression levels were monitored by flow cytometry. Cell survival following transfection was examined using live cell counting and the MTT assay. Both lipofection and electroporation provided high efficiency transfection of neurospheres. In comparison with lipofection, electroporation resulted in increased transfection efficiencies, but lower expression per cell and shorter durations of expression. Additional rounds of lipofection renewed EGFP expression in neurospheres, suggesting this method may be suitable for reprogramming applications. In summary, we have developed a protocol for achieving high efficiency transfection rates in mouse and human neurosphere cell culture that can be applied for future studies of gene function studies in neural stem cells, such as defining efficient differentiation protocols for glial and neuronal linages. PMID:24386231

  9. Microfluidic devices for cell culture and handling in organ-on-a-chip applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Schulz, Ingo; Mosig, Alexander; Jahn, Tobias; Gärtner, Claudia

    2014-03-01

    For many problems in system biology or pharmacology, in-vivo-like models of cell-cell interactions or organ functions are highly sought after. Conventional stationary cell culture in 2D plates quickly reaches its limitations with respect to an in-vivo like expression and function of individual cell types. Microfabrication technologies and microfluidics offer an attractive solution to these problems. The ability to generate flow as well as geometrical conditions for cell culture and manipulation close to the in-vivo situation allows for an improved design of experiments and the modeling of organ-like functionalities. Furthermore, reduced internal volumes lead to a reduction in reagent volumes necessary as well as an increased assay sensitivity. In this paper we present a range of microfluidic devices designed for the co-culturing of a variety of cells. The influence of substrate materials and surface chemistry on the cell morphology and viability for long-term cell culture has been investigated as well as strategies and medium supply for on-chip cell cultivation.

  10. Convenient cell fusion assay for rapid screening for HIV entry inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibo; Radigan, Lin; Zhang, Li

    2000-03-01

    Human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV)-induced cell fusion is a critical pathway of HIV spread from infected cells to uninfected cells. A rapid and simple assay was established to measure HIV-induce cell fusion. This study is particularly useful to rapid screen for HIV inhibitors that block HIV cell-to-cell transmission. Present study demonstrated that coculture of HIV-infected cells with uninfected cells at 37 degree(s)C for 2 hours resulted in the highest cell fusion rate. Using this cell fusion assay, we have identified several potent HIV inhibitors targeted to the HIV gp41 core. These antiviral agents can be potentially developed as antiviral drugs for chemotherapy and prophylaxis of HIV infection and AIDS.

  11. Microfluidic biomechanical assay for red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum

    E-print Network

    Ma, Hongshen

    Microfluidic biomechanical assay for red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum Quan Guo December 2011 DOI: 10.1039/c2lc20857a Red blood cells parasitized by Plasmodium falciparum can and simplified analysis, we developed a microfluidic device to measure red blood cell deformability using

  12. Biolistic transformation of cotton embryogenic cell suspension cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic transformation of cotton is highly dependent on the ability to regenerate fertile plants from transgenic cells through somatic embryogenesis. Induction of embryogenic cell cultures is genotype-dependant. However, once embryogenic cell cultures are available, they can be effectively used fo...

  13. Three-Dimensional Cell Culture: A Breakthrough in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Antoni, Delphine; Burckel, Hélène; Josset, Elodie; Noel, Georges

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an important tool for biological research. Two-dimensional cell culture has been used for some time now, but growing cells in flat layers on plastic surfaces does not accurately model the in vivo state. As compared to the two-dimensional case, the three-dimensional (3D) cell culture allows biological cells to grow or interact with their surroundings in all three dimensions thanks to an artificial environment. Cells grown in a 3D model have proven to be more physiologically relevant and showed improvements in several studies of biological mechanisms like: cell number monitoring, viability, morphology, proliferation, differentiation, response to stimuli, migration and invasion of tumor cells into surrounding tissues, angiogenesis stimulation and immune system evasion, drug metabolism, gene expression and protein synthesis, general cell function and in vivo relevance. 3D culture models succeed thanks to technological advances, including materials science, cell biology and bioreactor design. PMID:25768338

  14. Microsystems platforms for array-based single-cell biological assays

    E-print Network

    Taff, Brian M., 1978-

    2008-01-01

    For much of the past century, plated cell cultures have served investigations regarding a variety of fundamental biological processes. Though this in vitro approach has been fruitful, for surveying topics including cell ...

  15. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Amy J. C.; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. PMID:26343729

  16. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Swartz, Justin E; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W M; Willems, Stefan M; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. PMID:26343729

  17. Direct Gene Transfer into Human Cultured Cells Facilitated by Laser Micropuncture of the Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wen; Wilkinson, Joyce; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 × 10-4-3 × 10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  18. Primary cell culture method for the honeybee Apis mellifera.

    PubMed

    Ju, Hyunhee; Ghil, Sungho

    2015-10-01

    Honeybees are among the most important pollinators in nature, and honeybee-associated products are useful in various areas, including the food industry. However, honeybees may be infected by various types of pathogens. The study of honeybee-associated diseases would greatly benefit from a successful cell culture system, but although some honeybee cell culture techniques have been introduced, these methods have not yet been fully established. Here, we describe a primary cell culture method for the honeybee, Apis mellifera. We isolated, sterilized, and seeded egg cells into non-coated cell culture dishes to generate cell aggregates. After approximately 10 d, aggregates were dissociated and seeded to cell culture dishes. Cell passages were continuously performed, with sub-culturing every 3-4 d. The cells expressed non-adherent phenotypes. Their growth increased with the passage number when they were cultured in growth medium based on L-15 insect medium but not Schneider's insect medium. Finally, polymerase chain reaction confirmed that the cells originated from A. mellifera. Our results suggest that the culturing methods described herein are appropriate for isolating primary cells from honeybee eggs. These methods could thus facilitate the study of honeybee-associated pathogenesis, development, and toxicology. PMID:26138241

  19. Skeletal muscle satellite cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molnar, Greg; Hartzell, Charles R.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.

    1993-01-01

    Satellite cells are postnatal myoblasts responsible for providing additional nuclei to growing or regenerating muscle cells. Satellite cells retain the capacity to proliferate and differentiate in vitro and therefore provide a useful model to study postnatal muscle development. Most culture systems used to study postnatal muscle development are limited by the two-dimensional (2-D) confines of the culture dish. Limiting proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells in 2-D could potentially limit cell-cell contacts important for developing the level of organization in skeletal muscle obtained in vivo. Culturing satellite cells on microcarrier beads suspended in the High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) designed by NASA provides a low shear, three-dimensional (3-D) environment to study muscle development. Primary cultures established from anterior tibialis muscles of growing rats (approximately 200 gm) were used for all studies and were composed of greater than 75 % satellite cells. Different inoculation densities did not affect the proliferative potential of satellite cells in the HARV. Plating efficiency, proliferation, and glucose utilization were compared between 2-D flat culture and 3-D HARV culture. Plating efficiency (cells attached - cells plated x 100) was similar between the two culture systems. Proliferation was reduced in HARV cultures and this reduction was apparent for both satellite cells and non-satellite cells. Furthermore, reduction in proliferation within the HARV could not be attributed to reduced substrate availability since glucose levels in media from HARV and 2-D cell culture were similar. Morphologically, microcarrier beads within the HARVS were joined together by cells into three-dimensional aggregates composed of greater than 10 beads/aggregate. Aggregation of beads did not occur in the absence of cells. Myotubes were often seen on individual beads or spanning the surface of two beads. In summary, proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells on microcarrier beads within the HARV bioreactor results in a three dimensional level of organization that could provide a more suitable model to study postnatal muscle development.

  20. Comparison of five different in vitro assays for assessment of sodium metavanadate cytotoxicity in Chinese hamster ovary cells (CHO-K1 line).

    PubMed

    Zwolak, Iwona

    2015-08-01

    This investigation was undertaken to compare five different in vitro cytotoxicity assays for their power in revealing vanadium-mediated toxicity in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cells. The cells were exposed to sodium metavanadate (NaVO(3)) in the range of 10-1000 µM for 24 h and thereafter the cytotoxic effects of NaVO(3) were measured by colorimetric in vitro assays: the neutral red (NR) test, the 2,3-bis[2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl]-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) assay, the resazurin assay, the sulforhodamine B (SR-B) assay, and by microscopic assessment of cell viability using the trypan blue (TB) staining method. Among the assays used, the NR test was the most sensitive, since it revealed metavanadate cytotoxicity at the lowest NaVO(3) dose (=50 µM). Also, NaVO(3) cytotoxicity expressed as inhibitory concentration (IC) showed the lowest values for the NR test. Three other tests XTT, resazurin, and SR-B assays showed intermediate sensitivity revealing the cytotoxicity of NaVO(3) at 100 µM. The corresponding IC10 and IC50 values calculated for the XTT, resazurin, and SR-B tests were similar. The TB staining method was the least sensitive, since it recorded metavanadate cytotoxicity at the highest NaVO(3) concentration tested (=600 µM). Based on the cytotoxicity end points measured with the above assays, it can be concluded that lysosomal/Golgi apparatus damage (measured by NR assay) may be the primary effect of NaVO(3) on CHO-K1 cells. The disintegration of mitochondria (assessed with the XTT and resazurin assays) probably follows lysosomal impairment. Plasma membrane permeability (staining with TB) occurs at a late stage of NaVO(3)-induced cytotoxicity on CHO-K1 cells. The results obtained in this research work show that the NR test can be recommended as a very sensitive assay for the assessment of NaVO(3) cytotoxicity in the CHO-K1 cell culture model. Considering the convenience of assay performance along with adequate sensitivity, the XTT and resazurin assays can also be advocated for NaVO(3) cytotoxicity assessment. PMID:23524879

  1. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.; Killian, T. C.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies.

  2. Three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic cell levitation.

    PubMed

    Souza, Glauco R; Molina, Jennifer R; Raphael, Robert M; Ozawa, Michael G; Stark, Daniel J; Levin, Carly S; Bronk, Lawrence F; Ananta, Jeyarama S; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A; Gelovani, Juri G; Killian, T C; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2010-04-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool in drug discovery, tissue engineering and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional cell growth with gene expression, signalling and morphology that can be different from those found in vivo, and this compromises its clinical relevance. Here, we report a three-dimensional tissue culture based on magnetic levitation of cells in the presence of a hydrogel consisting of gold, magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and filamentous bacteriophage. By spatially controlling the magnetic field, the geometry of the cell mass can be manipulated, and multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture can be achieved. Magnetically levitated human glioblastoma cells showed similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumour xenografts. Taken together, these results indicate that levitated three-dimensional culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and may be more feasible for long-term multicellular studies. PMID:20228788

  3. Three-dimensional Tissue Culture Based on Magnetic Cell Levitation

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Glauco R.; Molina, Jennifer R.; Raphael, Robert M.; Ozawa, Michael G.; Stark, Daniel J.; Levin, Carly S.; Bronk, Lawrence F.; Ananta, Jeyarama S.; Mandelin, Jami; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Bankson, James A.; Gelovani, Juri G.

    2015-01-01

    Cell culture is an essential tool for drug discovery, tissue engineering, and stem cell research. Conventional tissue culture produces two-dimensional (2D) cell growth with gene expression, signaling, and morphology that can differ from those in vivo and thus compromise clinical relevancy1–5. Here we report a three-dimensional (3D) culture of cells based on magnetic levitation in the presence of hydrogels containing gold and magnetic iron oxide (MIO) nanoparticles plus filamentous bacteriophage. This methodology allows for control of cell mass geometry and guided, multicellular clustering of different cell types in co-culture through spatial variance of the magnetic field. Moreover, magnetic levitation of human glioblastoma cells demonstrates similar protein expression profiles to those observed in human tumor xenografts. Taken together, these results suggest levitated 3D culture with magnetized phage-based hydrogels more closely recapitulates in vivo protein expression and allows for long-term multi-cellular studies. PMID:20228788

  4. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  5. Neferine inhibits cultured hepatic stellate cell activation and facilitates apoptosis: A possible molecular mechanism.

    PubMed

    Ding, Hui; Shi, Jinghong; Wang, Ying; Guo, Jia; Zhao, Juhui; Dong, Lei

    2011-01-10

    Neferine is a major alkaloid component of "Lian Zi Xin", embryos of the seeds of Nelumbo nucifera Gaertner, Nymphaeaceae. Previous studies have shown that neferine has an inhibitory effect on pulmonary fibrosis through its anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities and inhibition of cytokines and NF-?B. However, it is unknown whether neferine also has an inhibitory effect on liver fibrosis through inhibition of TGF-?1 and collagen I and facilitation of apoptosis of hepatic stellate cells. This study examined the effects of neferine on cultured hepatic stellate (HSC-T6) cells and explored its possible action mechanisms by means of MTT assay, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, flow-cytometric annexin V-PI assay and Hoechst 33258 staining, as well as real-time PCR and western blotting. The results showed that neferine administration (2, 4, 6, 8 and 10?mol/l) significantly decreased the TGF-?1 and collagen I produced in HSC-T6 cells, and increased the HSC-T6 cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Neferine treatment for 48h at concentrations of 6 and 10?mol/l significantly increased Bax and caspase 3 mRNAs and proteins, and reduced Bcl2 and alpha-smooth muscle actin (?-SMA) mRNAs and proteins. Our data indicate that neferine efficiently inhibits cultured HSC-T6 cell activation and induces apoptosis by increasing Bax and caspase 3 expression via the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:20969858

  6. On-chip gradient generation in 256 microfluidic cell cultures: simulation and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Somaweera, Himali; Haputhanthri, Shehan O; Ibraguimov, Akif; Pappas, Dimitri

    2015-08-01

    A microfluidic diffusion diluter was used to create a stable concentration gradient for dose response studies. The microfluidic diffusion diluter used in this study consisted of 128 culture chambers on each side of the main fluidic channel. A calibration method was used to find unknown concentrations with 12% error. Flow rate dependent studies showed that changing the flow rates generated different gradient patterns. Mathematical simulations using COMSOL Multi-physics were performed to validate the experimental data. The experimental data obtained for the flow rate studies agreed with the simulation results. Cells could be loaded into culture chambers using vacuum actuation and cultured for long times under low shear stress. Decreasing the size of the culture chambers resulted in faster gradient formation (20 min). Mass transport into the side channels of the microfluidic diffusion diluter used in this study is an important factor in creating the gradient using diffusional mixing as a function of the distance. To demonstrate the device's utility, an H2O2 gradient was generated while culturing Ramos cells. Cell viability was assayed in the 256 culture chambers, each at a discrete H2O2 concentration. As expected, the cell viability for the high concentration side channels increased (by injecting H2O2) whereas the cell viability in the low concentration side channels decreased along the chip due to diffusional mixing as a function of distance. COMSOL simulations were used to identify the effective concentration of H2O2 for cell viability in each side chamber at 45 min. The gradient effects were confirmed using traditional H2O2 culture experiments. Viability of cells in the microfluidic device under gradient conditions showed a linear relationship with the viability of the traditional culture experiment. Development of the microfluidic device used in this study could be used to study hundreds of concentrations of a compound in a single experiment. PMID:26050759

  7. A simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator for quantum dot cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Liu, Wu; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-05-21

    In this work, a simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator was successfully developed for cytotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) assay. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator is composed of eight parallel channels which are respectively surrounded by 1-8 microwells with optimized length and width. The cells fall into microwells by gravity and the cell densities are obviously dependent of microwell number. In a case study, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were successfully utilized for generating cell density gradients on the microfluidic chip. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator was proved to be easily handled, cell-friendly and could be used to conduct the subsequent cell-based assay. As a proof-of-concept, QD cytotoxicity was evaluated and the results exhibited obvious cell density-dependence. For comparison, QD cytotoxicity was also investigated with a series of cell densities infused by pipette tips. Higher reproducibility was observed on the microfluidic cell density gradient generator and cell density was demonstrated to be a vital factor in cytotoxic study. With higher efficiency, controllability and reproducibility, the microfluidic cell density gradient generator could be integrated into microfluidic analysis systems to promote chip-based biological assay. PMID:23538998

  8. Automatic cell cloning assay for determining the clonogenic capacity of cancer and cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Fedr, Radek; Pernicová, Zuzana; Slabáková, Eva; Straková, Nicol; Bouchal, Jan; Grepl, Michal; Kozubík, Alois; Sou?ek, Karel

    2013-05-01

    The clonogenic assay is a well-established in vitro method for testing the survival and proliferative capability of cells. It can be used to determine the cytotoxic effects of various treatments including chemotherapeutics and ionizing radiation. However, this approach can also characterize cells with different phenotypes and biological properties, such as stem cells or cancer stem cells. In this study, we implemented a faster and more precise method for assessing the cloning efficiency of cancer stem-like cells that were characterized and separated using a high-speed cell sorter. Cell plating onto a microplate using an automatic cell deposition unit was performed in a single-cell or dilution rank mode by the fluorescence-activated cell sorting method. We tested the new automatic cell-cloning assay (ACCA) on selected cancer cell lines and compared it with the manual approach. The obtained results were also compared with the results of the limiting dilution assay for different cell lines. We applied the ACCA to analyze the cloning capacity of different subpopulations of prostate and colon cancer cells based on the expression of the characteristic markers of stem (CD44 and CD133) and cancer stem cells (TROP-2, CD49f, and CD44). Our results revealed that the novel ACCA is a straightforward approach for determining the clonogenic capacity of cancer stem-like cells identified in both cell lines and patient samples. PMID:23450810

  9. Synthesis of fibronectin by cultured human endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    Plasma fibronectin is probably the major nonimmune particulate opsonin in blood and is cross-linked to fibrin during the final stage of blood coagulation. Fibronectin also occurs in an insoluble form in basement membranes especially those underlying endothelial cells and in loose connective tissue. Fibronectin was demonstrated in cultured human endothelial cells and in the surrounding extracellular matrix by immunofluorescence microscopy by using antibody to human plasma fibronectin. Cultured human endothelial cells released fibronectin into the culture medium which was immunologically identical to the fibronectin in human plasma. Cultured human endothelial cells were labeled with [3H] leucine. The radioactive fibronectin present in the endothelial postculture medium and in urea extracts of cellular monolayers was isolated with either anti-fibronectin coupled to Protein A-Sepharose or double antibody immunoprecipitation and characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. When reduced, the [3H] fibronectin synthesized by cultured endothelial cells had the same mol wt (approximately 200,000) as plasma fibronectin. Unreduced, the [3H] fibronectin synthesized by endothelial cells migrated as a dimer, as did plasma fibronectin. Fibronectin accounted for approximately 15% of the protein synthesized and released by endothelial cells into the culture medium. Thus, cultured endothelial cells synthesize fibronectin, secrete it into the culture medium, and incorporate it into extracellular matrix. The results suggest that the endothelial cell is potentially a major site of synthesis of circulating plasma fibronectin. In addition, fibronectin derived from endothelial cells may be an important structural component of the subendothelium. PMID:355597

  10. GFP-complementation assay to detect functional CPP and protein delivery into living cells

    PubMed Central

    Milech, Nadia; Longville, Brooke AC; Cunningham, Paula T; Scobie, Marie N; Bogdawa, Heique M; Winslow, Scott; Anastasas, Mark; Connor, Theresa; Ong, Ferrer; Stone, Shane R; Kerfoot, Maria; Heinrich, Tatjana; Kroeger, Karen M; Tan, Yew-Foon; Hoffmann, Katrin; Thomas, Wayne R; Watt, Paul M; Hopkins, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Efficient cargo uptake is essential for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) therapeutics, which deliver widely diverse cargoes by exploiting natural cell processes to penetrate the cell’s membranes. Yet most current CPP activity assays are hampered by limitations in assessing uptake, including confounding effects of conjugated fluorophores or ligands, indirect read-outs requiring secondary processing, and difficulty in discriminating internalization from endosomally trapped cargo. Split-complementation Endosomal Escape (SEE) provides the first direct assay visualizing true cytoplasmic-delivery of proteins at biologically relevant concentrations. The SEE assay has minimal background, is amenable to high-throughput processes, and adaptable to different transient and stable cell lines. This split-GFP-based platform can be useful to study transduction mechanisms, cellular imaging, and characterizing novel CPPs as pharmaceutical delivery agents in the treatment of disease. PMID:26671759

  11. Cell and tissue culture of Miscanthus Sacchariflorus

    SciTech Connect

    Godovikova, V.A.; Moiseyeva, E.A.; Shumny, V.K.

    1995-11-01

    Since recent time search and introduction of new species of plants have paid attention. More perspective are perennial low maintenance landscape plants from genera Phragmites L. and Miscanthus Anderss. known as high speed growing and great amount of cellulose`s containing. Absence of seeds production and limited distribution area prevent from immediately introduction the plants of this species. The main goal of our investigation is the scientific development of the cell and tissue culture methods to get changing clones, salt and cold tolerant plants and their micropogation. At present there are collection of biovariety represented by subspecies, ecotypes and plant regenerants of two species - Miscanthus purpurascens (Anders.) and Miscanthus sacchariflorus (Maxim.). Successful results have been achieved in screening of culture media, prepared on MS base medium and contained a row of tropic components to protect the explant and callus tissue from oxidation and necrosis. Initially the callus was induced from stem segments, apical and nodular meristem of vegetative shoots of elulalia, growing in hydroponic greenhouse. Morphological and cytologic analysis of plant-regenerants have been done.

  12. Single Cell Adhesion Assay Using Computer Controlled Micropipette

    PubMed Central

    Salánki, Rita; H?s, Csaba; Orgovan, Norbert; Péter, Beatrix; Sándor, Noémi; Bajtay, Zsuzsa; Erdei, Anna; Horvath, Robert; Szabó, Bálint

    2014-01-01

    Cell adhesion is a fundamental phenomenon vital for all multicellular organisms. Recognition of and adhesion to specific macromolecules is a crucial task of leukocytes to initiate the immune response. To gain statistically reliable information of cell adhesion, large numbers of cells should be measured. However, direct measurement of the adhesion force of single cells is still challenging and today’s techniques typically have an extremely low throughput (5–10 cells per day). Here, we introduce a computer controlled micropipette mounted onto a normal inverted microscope for probing single cell interactions with specific macromolecules. We calculated the estimated hydrodynamic lifting force acting on target cells by the numerical simulation of the flow at the micropipette tip. The adhesion force of surface attached cells could be accurately probed by repeating the pick-up process with increasing vacuum applied in the pipette positioned above the cell under investigation. Using the introduced methodology hundreds of cells adhered to specific macromolecules were measured one by one in a relatively short period of time (?30 min). We blocked nonspecific cell adhesion by the protein non-adhesive PLL-g-PEG polymer. We found that human primary monocytes are less adherent to fibrinogen than their in vitro differentiated descendants: macrophages and dendritic cells, the latter producing the highest average adhesion force. Validation of the here introduced method was achieved by the hydrostatic step-pressure micropipette manipulation technique. Additionally the result was reinforced in standard microfluidic shear stress channels. Nevertheless, automated micropipette gave higher sensitivity and less side-effect than the shear stress channel. Using our technique, the probed single cells can be easily picked up and further investigated by other techniques; a definite advantage of the computer controlled micropipette. Our experiments revealed the existence of a sub-population of strongly fibrinogen adherent cells appearing in macrophages and highly represented in dendritic cells, but not observed in monocytes. PMID:25343359

  13. Quantum dot labeling and tracking of cultured limbal epithelial cell transplants in-vitro

    PubMed Central

    Genicio, Nuria; Paramo, Juan Gallo; Shortt, Alex J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Cultured human limbal epithelial cells (HLEC) have shown promise in the treatment of limbal stem cell deficiency but little is known about their survival, behaviour and long-term fate post transplantation. The aim of this research was to evaluate, in-vitro, quantum dot (QDot) technology as a tool for tracking transplanted HLEC. METHODS In-vitro cultured HLEC were labeled with Qdot nanocrystals. Toxicity was assessed using live-dead assays. The effect on HLEC function was assessed using colony forming efficiency assays and expression of CK3, P63alpha and ABCG2. Sheets of cultured HLEC labeled with Qdot nanocrystals were transplanted onto decellularised human corneo-scleral rims in an organ culture model and observed to investigate the behaviour of transplanted cells. RESULTS Qdot labeling had no detrimental effect on HLEC viability or function in-vitro. Proliferation resulted in a gradual reduction in Qdot signal but sufficient signal was present to allow tracking of cells through multiple generations. Cells labeled with Qdots could be reliably detected and observed using confocal microscopy for at least 2 weeks post transplantation in our organ culture model. In addition it was possible to label and observe epithelial cells in intact human corneas using the Rostock corneal module adapted for use with the Heidelberg HRA. CONCLUSIONS This work demonstrates that Qdots combined with existing clinical equipment could be used to track HLEC for up to 2 weeks post transplantation, however, our model does not permit the assessment of cell labeling beyond 2 weeks. Further characterisation in in-vivo models are required. PMID:26024089

  14. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation for evaluating efficacy/toxicity of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabino, Luis G.; Menezes, Priscila F. C.; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Souza, Glauco; Killian, Thomas C.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    We used three dimensional cell cultures (3D) based on the magnetic levitation method (MLM) to evaluate cytotoxicity of photodynamic therapy (PDT). First, we decorated Hep G2 and MDA-MB-321 cells with NanoShuttle by introducing it in the media and incubated overnight. Next day, we transferred the cells to a 6-well plate and placed a magnetic driver on the top of the plate to start levitation. We monitored the formation of the 3D cell culture by optical microscopy and after four days, we added the photosensitizer Photogem (PG) in the culture media in concentrations of 50, 25, 12.5, 6.25?g/ml. We incubated them for 24 hours, after that we washed the cultures with PBS and added fresh media. Samples were then illuminated for 600s using a 630nm LED-based device, generating light intensities of 30 mW/cm2 in a total light fluence of 18 J/cm2. Following the illumination, we added fresh media, and 30 hours later, the 3D structures were broken using a pipettor and the cells seeded in 96 well plates, 105 cells per well, with a magnetic drive placed on the bottom of the plate to create cell culture dots. After 24 hours, we used a MTT assay to evaluate PDT cytotoxicity. The PDT effect, evaluated by the half maximal effective concentration (EC50), in MDA-MB-231 cells (EC50 =3.14 ?g/ml) is more aggressive compared to the effect of PDT in Hep G2 cells (EC50 = 7.48 ?g/ml). It suggests that the cell culture structure and its interaction facilitated the PG uptake and consequently elevated the Photodynamic effect for MDA-MB-231.

  15. Evaluation of the BD Max StaphSR Assay for Rapid Identification of Staphylococcus aureus and Methicillin-Resistant S. aureus in Positive Blood Culture Broths.

    PubMed

    Dalpke, Alexander H; Hofko, Marjeta; Hamilton, Fiona; Mackenzie, Laura; Zimmermann, Stefan; Templeton, Kate

    2015-11-01

    We evaluated the performance of the BD Max StaphSR assay for the direct detection of Staphylococcus aureus from blood culture medium. In a two-center trial, 155 blood cultures from the BD Bactec FX system and 212 from the bioMérieux BacT/Alert system were tested; 170 bottles yielded S. aureus, and all were identified correctly by the BD Max StaphSR assay. The assay required approximately 2.5 h, thus allowing rapid identification of blood cultures flagged positive. PMID:26292311

  16. Analysis of micronuclei and microtubule arrangement to identify aneuploidy-inducing agents in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Degrassi, F.; Pisano, C.; Tanzarella, C.; Antoccia, A.; Battistoni, A.

    1993-12-31

    The development of in vitro test methods to detect environmental agents that might induce aneuploidy is of crucial importance in genotoxicity testing. Chromosome numerical changes may arise from damage to various cell structures and activities such as spindle components or kinetochore proteins as well as from damage to the chromosomes. Therefore, the development of effective assays to identify chromosome misdistribution in mammalian cell cultures requires the contribution of different research areas such as cytogenetics, molecular biology and cell biology. Recently, we have been working at the development of an in vitro test for aneuploidy-inducing agents combining the micronucleus assay with the immunofluorescent staining of kinetochores in micronuclei (MN). The assay has been standardized by analyzing the induction of MN containing kinetochores (CREST-positive MN) after a number of agents with different mechanism of action. Subsequently, the optimization of the assay has been carried out by introducing cytochalasin-B (cyt-B) in the test protocol in order to score MN in cells that have undergone one cell cycle. Finally, with the aim of providing an understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the production of CREST-positive MN we have analyzed the cellular structures involved in mitotic division by using specific antibodies in immunofluorescence studies.

  17. Screening ToxCast™ Phase I Chemicals in a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) Assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    An Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) in vitro assay with mouse embryonic stem cells was used to screen the ToxCast Phase I chemical library for effects on cellular differentiation and cell number. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) established the ...

  18. Confocal Imaging of Microglial Cell Dynamics in Hippocampal Slice Cultures

    E-print Network

    Dailey, Michael E.

    Confocal Imaging of Microglial Cell Dynamics in Hippocampal Slice Cultures Michael E. Dailey1 are described for imaging the cellular dynamics of microglia in live mammalian brain slice cultures. Brain or static filter culture technique, stained with one or more fluorescent dyes, and imaged by scanning laser

  19. Cell-line Engineering of Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells for Low-temperature Culture

    E-print Network

    Kiat, Tan Hong

    Developments in mammalian cell culture and recombinant technology has allowed for the production of recombinant proteins for use as human therapeutics. Mammalian cell culture is typically operated at the physiological ...

  20. Antigen specific killing assay using CFSE labeled target cells.

    PubMed

    Durward, Marina; Harms, Jerome; Splitter, Gary

    2010-01-01

    Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester (CFSE) can be used to easily and quickly label a cell population of interest for in vivo investigation. This labeling has classically been used to study proliferation and migration. In the method presented here, we have shortened the timeline after adoptive transfer to look at survival and killing of epitope specific CFSE labeled target cells. The level of specific killing of a CD8 + T cell clone can indicate the quality of the response, as their quantity may be misleading. Specific CD8+ T cells can become functionally exhausted over time with a decline in cytokine production and killing. Also, certain CD8 + T cell clones may not kill as well as others with differing TCR specificities. For effective Cell Mediated Immunity (CMI), antigens must be identified that produce not only adequate numbers of responding T cells, but also functionally robust responding T cells. Here we assess the percent cell specific killing of two peptide specific T cell clones in BALB/c mice. PMID:21085108

  1. Culture of cells from mammalian tissue cryopreserved without cryoprotection 

    E-print Network

    Charles, Lara Nicole

    2009-05-15

    Donor cells for nuclear transfer are usually prepared by the culture of fresh tissue. However, animal carcasses are sometimes frozen without cryoprotectants and if it were possible to obtain live cells from carcasses (tissue) preserved...

  2. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280... cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  3. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2280... cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  4. Using Tissue Culture To Investigate Plant Cell Differentiation and Dedifferentiation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozzone, Donna M.

    1997-01-01

    Describes an experimental project that uses plant tissue culture techniques to examine cell differentiation in the carrot. Allows students to gain experience in some important techniques and to explore fundamental questions about cell differentiation. (DDR)

  5. THREE DIMENSIONAL TISSUE CULTURING BASED ON MAGNETIC CELL LEVITATION

    E-print Network

    Killian, Thomas C.

    THREE DIMENSIONAL TISSUE CULTURING BASED ON MAGNETIC CELL LEVITATION by James Aman A senior thesis ........................................................4-26 4.2 Complications of magnetic cell levitation of the magnetic fields. #12;iii Contents Chapter 1 Introduction

  6. A High Throughput Screening Assay for Anti-Mycobacterial Small Molecules Based on Adenylate Kinase Release as a Reporter of Cell Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Lauren; Ebsworth-Mojica, Katherine; DiDone, Louis; Li, Shao-Gang; Freundlich, Joel S.; Connell, Nancy; Dunman, Paul M.; Krysan, Damian J.

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is well-established to be one of the most important bacterial pathogens for which new antimicrobial therapies are needed. Herein, we describe the development of a high throughput screening assay for the identification of molecules that are bactericidal against Mycobacteria. The assay utilizes the release of the intracellular enzyme adenylate kinase into the culture medium as a reporter of mycobacterial cell death. We demonstrate that the assay is selective for mycobactericidal molecules and detects anti-mycobacterial activity at concentrations below the minimum inhibitory concentration of many molecules. Thus, the AK assay is more sensitive than traditional growth assays. We have validated the AK assay in the HTS setting using the Mtb surrogate organism M. smegmatis and libraries of FDA approved drugs as well as a commercially available Diversity set. The screen of the FDA-approved library demonstrated that the AK assay is able to identify the vast majority of drugs with known mycobactericidal activity. Importantly, our screen of the Diversity set revealed that the increased sensitivity of the AK assay increases the ability of M. smegmatis-based screens to detect molecules with relatively poor activity against M. smegmatis but good to excellent activity against Mtb. PMID:26098625

  7. Genotoxic effects of sunlight-activated waste water in cultured mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Strniste, G.F.; Chen, D.J.; Okinaka, R.T.

    1982-07-01

    Cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells were incubated with dilutions of an oil shale retort process water and exposed to nautral sunlight. An enhancement of sevenfold to ninefold was seen in photoinduced cytotoxicity (by a colony-forming assay) and mutagenicity (at the hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) locus) for cells pretreated with the process water compared to effects seen in cells exposed to sunlight only. Significant photoinduced cytotoxicity was also observed in cultured human skin fibroblasts when exposed to the process water before being exposed to near UV (NUV) radiation. The mutation frequencies (determined for the HPRT locus) induced by the process water and NUV radiation were as great as those frequencies seen for far UV light alone. Increases in genotoxicity were observed in excision repair-deficient xeroderma pigmentosum skin fibroblasts when compared to the responses seen in normal cells. Risks to health resulting from the phototransformation of these oil shale retort process waste waters are unassessed at this time.

  8. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001), even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures. PMID:24713904

  9. A comparative study of culture methods and PCR assay for Salmonella detection in poultry drinking water.

    PubMed

    Soria, M C; Soria, M A; Bueno, D J

    2013-01-01

    The present work compared 2 culture methods and PCR assays for motile and nonmotile Salmonella detection using artificially contaminated poultry drinking water. The specificity was 1 for all methods studied. The accuracy and sensitivity were 1 for all motile strains, whereas these parameters were between 0 and 0.7 for nonmotile Salmonella strains. The positive predictive value and negative predictive value were 1 for all motile Salmonella strains in the 3 methods used. Nonmotile Salmonella strains showed a positive predictive value of 1 in the PCR method. However, the positive predictive value was indeterminate in the tetrathionate (TT) methods for both strains tested and in the modified semisolid Rappaport-Vassiliadis (MSRV) method for Salmonella Pullorum. On the other hand, the negative predictive value was between 0.20 and 0.43 for the 3 methods. The detection level of motile strains was 4 to 7 cfu/25 mL for all methods. Nonmotile Salmonella strains could not be detected in the TT method, whereas only Salmonella Gallinarum could be recovered from 1.1 × 10(1) cfu/25 mL in the MSRV method. In relation to the molecular methods, PCR could detect these strains from 1.1 × 10(4) cfu/25 mL. Extending incubation time of the enrichment medium to 6 d in the TT method did not improve the isolation rates. In general, all selective plating media did not show any statistical differences in the parameters of performance studied. The kappa coefficient showed that there was an excellent agreement between the 3 methods for motile strains. For nonmotile strains, the agreement was poor between the MSRV and the PCR; there was no agreement when the TT method was compared with the MSRV and the PCR methods. The difference in detection levels obtained with the methods used for motile and nonmotile Salmonella strains and the difficulty in detecting these last strains represents a potential problem when a poultry water sample is considered negative for the presence of Salmonella. PMID:23243252

  10. Use of cell-based assays in myasthenia gravis and other antibody-mediated diseases.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Cruz, P M; Huda, S; López-Ruiz, P; Vincent, A

    2015-08-01

    The increasing demand on diagnostic assays that are sensitive and specific for pathogenic antibodies, and the interest in identifying new antigens, prompted the development of cell-based assays for the detection of autoantibodies in myasthenia gravis and other autoimmune disorders. Cell-based assays were initially used to show that clustering the AChR improved the positivity in myasthenia gravis, and similar assays have now been applied to detection of antibodies to neuromuscular junction candidate proteins such as LRP4 and agrin. In addition cell-based assays have been used in the routine detection of antibodies to proteins expressed on the surface of neurons (NMDAR, LGI1, CASPR2, AMPAR, GABA-A/B, GlyR, and DPPX) and glia (AQP4, MOG). Here, we summarize the findings in myasthenia and discuss the advantages, disadvantages and controversial issues of using cell-based assays in the detection of these antibodies, and their relevance to the testing of preclinical models of disease. PMID:25783660

  11. Uptake, accumulation, and egress of erythromycin by tissue culture cells of human origin.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J R; Johnson, P; Miller, M F

    1985-01-01

    The ability of erythromycin A base to penetrate and accumulate in tissue culture cells of human origin was investigated. The antibiotic was highly concentrated by early passage cells of normal bronchus, kidney, liver, lung, and skin and by cancer cells derived from breast, liver, and lung. Intracellular levels 4 to 12 times that of the extracellular milieu were obtained in both early-passage and transformed cells. The total quantity of erythromycin accumulated depended on the extracellular concentration of antibiotic, but the cellular/extracellular ratios were, for the most part, independent of the initial extracellular drug concentration. In all cell types tested, the accumulated antibiotic rapidly egressed when cells were incubated in antibiotic-free medium. Bioactivity assays demonstrated that the expelled drug was unmetabolized, fully active antibiotic. The concentration of erythromycin by a variety of human cell types probably accounts, in part, for the effectiveness of the antibiotic against intracellular parasites such as Legionella and Chlamydia spp. PMID:3994346

  12. Sensitive and selective detection of mycoplasma in cell culture samples using cantilever sensors.

    PubMed

    Xu, Sen; Sharma, Harsh; Mutharasan, Raj

    2010-04-15

    In this article we report a new biosensor-based method that is more sensitive and rapid than the current approach for detecting mycoplasma in cell culture samples. Piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensors respond to mass change via resonant frequency change. They are sensitive at femtogram level and can be used directly in liquid for label-free detection. Common cell culture contaminant, Acholeplasma laidlawii was detected in both buffer and cell culture medium. Two different sources (positive control from a commercial kit and ATCC 23206) were analyzed using antibody-immobilized PEMC sensor. Resonant frequency decrease caused by binding of A. laidlawii was monitored in real-time using an impedance analyzer. Positive detection was confirmed by a second antibody binding. The limit of detection (LOD) was lower than 10(3) CFU/mL in cell culture medium using PEMC sensor while parallel ELISA assays showed LOD as 10(7) CFU/mL. This study shows that PEMC sensor can be used for sensitive and rapid mycoplasma detection in cell culture samples. PMID:20014143

  13. Optimization of Betanodavirus culture and enumeration in striped snakehead fish cells.

    PubMed

    Hick, Paul; Tweedie, Alison; Whittington, Richard J

    2011-05-01

    An optimized culture method for detection of infection of fish with the Red spotted grouper nervous necrosis virus (RGNNV) genotype of betanodavirus in striped snakehead (SSN-1, Channa striatus) cells is described. Inoculation of fish tissue homogenates at the same time or within 4 hr of seeding the SSN-1 cells was as sensitive as the method recommended by the World Organization for Animal Health, where homogenates were adsorbed onto an established cell monolayer. Such modification halved the time required and the costs of consumables, and reduced the potential for error when processing large numbers of samples. Positive culture results were obtained from 88.3% of 392 fish tissue homogenates in which RGNNV was detected using a quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay; 99.7% of 943 tissue homogenates, which were qRT-PCR negative, were cell culture negative. Cytopathic effect (CPE) was characterized by large intracytoplasmic vacuoles in 0.1-60% of cells. Detachment of affected cells from the culture surface resulting in progressive disruption of the monolayer occurred in 46.4% of primary cultures and 96.0% of subcultures of positive samples. Identification of CPE that did not disrupt the cell monolayer increased estimates of the 50% tissue culture infective dose (TCID(50)) by 1.07-2.79 logs (95% confidence interval). The predicted mean TCID(50)/ml was 3.3 logs higher when cells were inoculated less than 36 hr after subculture at less than 80% confluence compared to cells inoculated at greater than 80% confluence and more than 36 hr after subculture (P < 0.05). PMID:21908274

  14. Comparative genotoxicity of nanosilver in human liver HepG2 and colon Caco2 cells evaluated by a flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay.

    PubMed

    Sahu, Saura C; Njoroge, Joyce; Bryce, Steven M; Yourick, Jeffrey J; Sprando, Robert L

    2014-11-01

    Two widely used in vitro cell culture models, human liver HepG2 cells and human colon Caco2 cells, and flow cytometry techniques were evaluated as tools for rapid screening of potential genotoxicity of food-related nanosilver. Comparative genotoxic potential of 20?nm silver was evaluated in HepG2 and Caco2 cell cultures by a flow cytometric-based in vitro micronucleus assay. The nanosilver, characterized by the dynamic light scattering, transmission electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry analysis, showed no agglomeration of the silver nanoparticles. The inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy analysis demonstrated the uptake of 20?nm silver by both cell types. The 20?nm silver exposure of HepG2 cells increased the concentration-dependent micronucleus formation sevenfold at 10?µg?ml(-1) concentration in attached cell conditions and 1.3-fold in cell suspension conditions compared to the vehicle controls. However, compared to the vehicle controls, the 20?nm silver exposure of Caco2 cells increased the micronucleus formation 1.2-fold at a concentration of 10?µg?ml(-1) both in the attached cell conditions as well as in the cell suspension conditions. Our results of flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay appear to suggest that the HepG2 cells are more susceptible to the nanosilver-induced micronucleus formation than the Caco2 cells compared to the vehicle controls. However, our results also suggest that the widely used in vitro models, HepG2 and Caco2 cells and the flow cytometric in vitro micronucleus assay are valuable tools for the rapid screening of genotoxic potential of nanosilver and deserve more careful evaluation. PMID:25224830

  15. An infected chicken kidney cell co-culture ELISpot for enhanced detection of T cell responses to avian influenza and vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Peroval, Marylene; Boyd, Amy; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the immune responses of chickens to the influenza virus is essential for the development of new strategies of vaccination and control. We have developed a method incorporating infected chicken kidney cells (CKC) in culture with splenocytes in an IFN? ELISpot assay to enumerate ex vivo responses against influenza virus antigens. Splenocytes from birds challenged with influenza showed specific responses to the influenza virus, with responding cells being mainly CD8 positive. The utility of the assay was also demonstrated in the detection of an antigen specific enhancement of IFN? producing cells from birds vaccinated with recombinant Fowlpox vectored influenza nucleoprotein and matrix protein. PMID:25450002

  16. Effect of Aflatoxin B1 on Growth of Bovine Mammary Epithelial Cells in 3D and Monolayer Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Forouharmehr, Ali; Harkinezhad, Taher; Qasemi-Panahi, Babak

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Many studies have been showed transfer of aflatoxins, toxins produced by Aspergillus flvaus and Aspergillus parasiticus fungi, into milk. These toxins are transferred into the milk through digestive system by eating contaminated food. Due to the toxicity of these materials, it seems that it has side effects on the growth of mammary cells. Therefore, the present work aimed to investigate possible toxic effects of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) on bovine mammary epithelial cells in monolayer and three-dimensional cultures. Methods: Specimens of the mammary tissue of bovine were sized out in size 2×2 cm in slaughterhouse. After disinfection and washing in sterile PBS, primary cell culture was performed by enzymatic digestion of tissue with collagenase. When proper numbers of cells were achieved in monolayer culture, cells were seeded in a 24-well culture plate for three-dimensional (3D) culture in Matrigel matrix. After 21 days of 3D culture and reaching the required number of cells, the concentrations of 15, 25 and 35 µL of AFB1 were added to the culture in quadruplicate and incubated for 8 hours. Cellular cytotoxicity was examined using standard colorimetric assay and finally, any change in the morphology of the cells was studied by microscopic technique. Results: Microscopic investigations showed necrosis of the AFB1-exposed cells compared to the control cells. Also, bovine mammary epithelial cells were significantly affected by AFB1 in dose and time dependent manner in cell viability assays. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that AFB1 can induce cytotoxicity and necrosis in bovine mammary epithelial cells. PMID:24312827

  17. GFP-complementation assay to detect functional CPP and protein delivery into living cells.

    PubMed

    Milech, Nadia; Longville, Brooke Ac; Cunningham, Paula T; Scobie, Marie N; Bogdawa, Heique M; Winslow, Scott; Anastasas, Mark; Connor, Theresa; Ong, Ferrer; Stone, Shane R; Kerfoot, Maria; Heinrich, Tatjana; Kroeger, Karen M; Tan, Yew-Foon; Hoffmann, Katrin; Thomas, Wayne R; Watt, Paul M; Hopkins, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    Efficient cargo uptake is essential for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) therapeutics, which deliver widely diverse cargoes by exploiting natural cell processes to penetrate the cell's membranes. Yet most current CPP activity assays are hampered by limitations in assessing uptake, including confounding effects of conjugated fluorophores or ligands, indirect read-outs requiring secondary processing, and difficulty in discriminating internalization from endosomally trapped cargo. Split-complementation Endosomal Escape (SEE) provides the first direct assay visualizing true cytoplasmic-delivery of proteins at biologically relevant concentrations. The SEE assay has minimal background, is amenable to high-throughput processes, and adaptable to different transient and stable cell lines. This split-GFP-based platform can be useful to study transduction mechanisms, cellular imaging, and characterizing novel CPPs as pharmaceutical delivery agents in the treatment of disease. PMID:26671759

  18. On-chip ultrasonic sample preparation for cell based assays

    E-print Network

    great promise for applications in cellular and molecular diagnostics. Introduction Sample preparation to the analysis.1 The conventional cell separation tech- niques rely on size, density and differential expression for multiple-step cellular sample preparation is acoustophoresis, i.e. manipulation of suspended cells

  19. MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL ASSAY FOR EVALUATING THE GENOTOXICITY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CHEMICALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The development and utilization of a monochromosomal hybrid cell assay for detecting aneuploidy and chromosomal aberrations are described. The monochromosomal hybrid cell lines were produced by a two-step process involving transfer of a marker bacterial gene to a human chromosome...

  20. Reporter gene assay demonstrates functional differences in estrogen receptor activity in purified breast cancer cells: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Singh, Anjana; Ali, Simak; Kothari, Manish S; De Bella, Manuela Tamburo; Smith, Clive; Timms, Emma; Slade, Martin J; Foxwell, Brian M; Coombes, R Charles

    2003-12-10

    Tamoxifen has contributed to a dramatic reduction in breast cancer mortality and recent results indicate that aromatase inhibitors may further improve survival in some patients. Nevertheless, a substantial proportion of patients become resistant to treatment. To date, with the exception of estrogen receptor (ER) determination by ligand binding or immunohistochemical techniques, there has been no way of predicting which of several therapies is indicated in particular patients. We describe a novel assay using the adenoviral gene delivery system to assess ER function in breast cancer cells derived directly from patients. The purification and short-term culture of these cells has been recently described by our laboratory. Adenovirus containing an estrogen-regulated beta-galactosidase reporter gene (ERE-lacZ) was constructed and used to test ER activity in breast cancer cells derived from 18 patients with primary and 16 patients with metastatic cancer, under varying treatment schedules. The adenoviral assay enabled ER activity to be readily determined in purified cells from primary breast cancers and secondary sites. Breast cancers cells could be categorized on the basis of ER activity in the absence of ligand, the presence of estrogen or anti-estrogens. In primary breast cancers, our results correlated with ER determination by immunohistochemistry in 78% of cases. In patients who had become resistant to tamoxifen, however, we found some in whom reporter activity was stimulated by tamoxifen and others whose tumors were either still estrogen responsive or completely unresponsive, irrespective of the original ER content. Our findings indicate that this reporter assay could be useful in decisions regarding use of adjuvant endocrine therapies in breast cancer. PMID:14566818

  1. Measurement of Separase Proteolytic Activity in Single Living Cells by a Fluorogenic Flow Cytometry Assay

    PubMed Central

    Haaß, Wiltrud; Kleiner, Helga; Müller, Martin C.; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Fabarius, Alice; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    ESPL1/Separase, an endopeptidase, is required for centrosome duplication and separation of sister-chromatides in anaphase of mitosis. Overexpression and deregulated proteolytic activity of Separase as frequently observed in human cancers is associated with the occurrence of supernumerary centrosomes, chromosomal missegregation and aneuploidy. Recently, we have hypothesized that increased Separase proteolytic activity in a small subpopulation of tumor cells may serve as driver of tumor heterogeneity and clonal evolution in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Currently, there is no quantitative assay to measure Separase activity levels in single cells. Therefore, we have designed a flow cytometry-based assay that utilizes a Cy5- and rhodamine 110 (Rh110)-biconjugated Rad21 cleavage site peptide ([Cy5-D-R-E-I-M-R]2-Rh110) as smart probe and intracellular substrate for detection of Separase enzyme activity in living cells. As measured by Cy5 fluorescence the cellular uptake of the fluorogenic peptide was fast and reached saturation after 210 min of incubation in human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells. Separase activity was recorded as the intensity of Rh110 fluorescence released after intracellular peptide cleavage providing a linear signal gain within a 90–180 min time slot. Compared to conventional cell extract-based methods the flow cytometric assay delivers equivalent results but is more reliable, bypasses the problem of vague loading controls and unspecific proteolysis associated with whole cell extracts. Especially suited for the investigaton of blood- and bone marrow-derived hematopoietic cells the flow cytometric Separase assay allows generation of Separase activity profiles that tell about the number of Separase positive cells within a sample i.e. cells that currently progress through mitosis and about the range of intercellular variation in Separase activity levels within a cell population. The assay was used to quantify Separase proteolytic activity in leukemic cell lines and peripheral blood samples from leukemia patients. PMID:26267133

  2. Mixture models for single-cell assays with applications to vaccine studies.

    PubMed

    Finak, Greg; McDavid, Andrew; Chattopadhyay, Pratip; Dominguez, Maria; De Rosa, Steve; Roederer, Mario; Gottardo, Raphael

    2014-01-01

    Blood and tissue are composed of many functionally distinct cell subsets. In immunological studies, these can be measured accurately only using single-cell assays. The characterization of these small cell subsets is crucial to decipher system-level biological changes. For this reason, an increasing number of studies rely on assays that provide single-cell measurements of multiple genes and proteins from bulk cell samples. A common problem in the analysis of such data is to identify biomarkers (or combinations of biomarkers) that are differentially expressed between two biological conditions (e.g. before/after stimulation), where expression is defined as the proportion of cells expressing that biomarker (or biomarker combination) in the cell subset(s) of interest. Here, we present a Bayesian hierarchical framework based on a beta-binomial mixture model for testing for differential biomarker expression using single-cell assays. Our model allows the inference to be subject specific, as is typically required when assessing vaccine responses, while borrowing strength across subjects through common prior distributions. We propose two approaches for parameter estimation: an empirical-Bayes approach using an Expectation-Maximization algorithm and a fully Bayesian one based on a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm. We compare our method against classical approaches for single-cell assays including Fisher's exact test, a likelihood ratio test, and basic log-fold changes. Using several experimental assays measuring proteins or genes at single-cell level and simulations, we show that our method has higher sensitivity and specificity than alternative methods. Additional simulations show that our framework is also robust to model misspecification. Finally, we demonstrate how our approach can be extended to testing multivariate differential expression across multiple biomarker combinations using a Dirichlet-multinomial model and illustrate this approach using single-cell gene expression data and simulations. PMID:23887981

  3. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  4. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  5. A Neutralizing Antibody Assay Based on a Reporter of Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuling; Li, Jia J; Kim, Hyun Jun; Liu, Xu; Liu, Weiyi; Akhgar, Ahmad; Bowen, Michael A; Spitz, Susan; Jiang, Xu-Rong; Roskos, Lorin K; White, Wendy I

    2015-11-01

    Benralizumab is a humanized anti-IL5 receptor ? (IL5R?) monoclonal antibody (mAb) with enhanced (afucosylation) antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) function. An ADCC reporter cell-based neutralizing antibody (NAb) assay was developed and characterized to detect NAb against benralizumab in human serum to support the clinical development of benralizumab. The optimal ratio of target cells to effector cells was 3:1. Neither parental benralizumab (fucosylated) nor benralizumab Fab resulted in ADCC activity, confirming the requirement for ADCC activity in the NAb assay. The serum tolerance of the cells was determined to be 2.5%. The cut point derived from normal and asthma serum samples was comparable. The effective range of benralizumab was determined, and 35 ng/mL [80% maximal effective concentration (EC80)] was chosen as the standard concentration to run in the assessment of NAb. An affinity purified goat anti-benralizumab polyclonal idiotype antibody preparation was shown to have NAb since it inhibited ADCC activity in a dose-dependent fashion. The low endogenous concentrations of IL5 and soluble IL5 receptor (sIL5R) did not demonstrate to interfere with the assay. The estimated assay sensitivities at the cut point were 1.02 and 1.10 ?g/mL as determined by the surrogate neutralizing goat polyclonal and mouse monoclonal anti-drug antibody (ADA) controls, respectively. The assay can detect NAb (at 2.5 ?g/mL) in the presence of 0.78 ?g/mL benralizumab. The assay was not susceptible to non-specific matrix effects. This study provides an approach and feasibility of developing an ADCC cell-based NAb assay to support biopharmaceuticals with an ADCC function. PMID:26205082

  6. Biotechnology and aquaculture: the role of cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Bols, N C

    1991-01-01

    Cell culturing complements recombinant DNA technology in the application of biotechnology to aquaculture. Cell cultures can be prepared from the three main groups of multicellular organisms in aquaculture: fish, shellfish, and seaweeds. These cultures can contribute indirectly to the successful farming of these organisms by providing basic insights into how their growth, reproduction, and health can be understood and manipulated. Finally, they can be a direct source of diverse biochemical products for use in aquaculture, medicine and the food industry. PMID:14543738

  7. Long-term maintenance of human induced pluripotent stem cells by automated cell culture system

    PubMed Central

    Konagaya, Shuhei; Ando, Takeshi; Yamauchi, Toshiaki; Suemori, Hirofumi; Iwata, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells, such as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, are regarded as new sources for cell replacement therapy. These cells can unlimitedly expand under undifferentiated conditions and be differentiated into multiple cell types. Automated culture systems enable the large-scale production of cells. In addition to reducing the time and effort of researchers, an automated culture system improves the reproducibility of cell cultures. In the present study, we newly designed a fully automated cell culture system for human iPS maintenance. Using an automated culture system, hiPS cells maintained their undifferentiated state for 60 days. Automatically prepared hiPS cells had a potency of differentiation into three germ layer cells including dopaminergic neurons and pancreatic cells. PMID:26573336

  8. Horizontally rotated cell culture system with a coaxial tubular oxygenator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, David A. (inventor); Schwarz, Ray P. (inventor); Trinh, Tinh T. (inventor)

    1991-01-01

    The present invention relates to a horizontally rotating bioreactor useful for carrying out cell and tissue culture. For processing of mammalian cells, the system is sterilized and fresh fluid medium, microcarrier beads, and cells are admitted to completely fill the cell culture vessel. An oxygen containing gas is admitted to the interior of the permeable membrane which prevents air bubbles from being introduced into the medium. The cylinder is rotated at a low speed within an incubator so that the circular motion of the fluid medium uniformly suspends the microbeads throughout the cylinder during the cell growth period. The unique design of this cell and tissue culture device was initially driven by two requirements imposed by its intended use for feasibility studies for three dimensional culture of living cells and tissues in space by JSC. They were compatible with microgravity and simulation of microgravity in one G. The vessels are designed to approximate the extremely quiescent low shear environment obtainable in space.

  9. A new cell line-based neutralization assay for primary HIV type 1 isolates.

    PubMed

    Shi, Y; Albert, J; Francis, G; Holmes, H; Fenyö, E M

    2002-09-01

    Simple and standardized assays for detection and quantification of neutralizing antibodies to primary HIV-1 isolates are needed in research on HIV-1 vaccines and pathogenesis. Here we describe a new HIV-1 neutralization assay that is based on plaque formation in U87.CD4-CCR5 and U87.CD4-CXCR4 cells, which is an attractive alternative to peripheral blood mononuclear cell-based assays. Infected cells form syncytia, that is, plaques, that can be stained with hematoxylin and enumerated by light microscopy. Neutralization is determined by the ability of a serum to reduce the number of plaque-forming units (PFU) relative to controls exposed to medium or negative serum. The intraassay variation of the plaque-forming unit determinations was tested with 15 serum-virus combinations and showed good reproducibility. The differences ranged from -19 to +27% and had a standard deviation of +/- 9.1%. On the basis of these data the cutoff for neutralization (i.e., plaque reduction) was set to 30% (3.3 standard deviations). Virus titration experiments showed that neutralization results were dependent on virus dose and therefore the neutralization assays should be performed with a virus dose of 10-100 PFU/well. The reproducibility of the new neutralization assay was tested with 4 primary viruses and 9 sera for a total of 20 virus-serum combinations. The mean difference in neutralization (i.e. plaque reduction) determinations performed on different days was as small as 11%. None of 10 Swedish sera and 1 Ugandan plasma pool from HIV-1-uninfected subjects were positive for neutralization, indicating that the assay has high specificity. In summary, the new U87.CD4 cell line-based neutralization assay for primary HIV-1 isolates is a highly reproducible, sensitive, and high-throughput assay that is well suited for large-scale HIV-1 neutralization studies. PMID:12230938

  10. Biona-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedericks, C.

    1999-01-01

    Sensors 2000! is developing a system to demonstrate the ability to perform accurate, real-time measurements of pH and CO2 in a cell culture media in Space. The BIONA-C Cell Culture pH Monitoring System consists of S2K! developed ion selective sensors and control electronics integrated with the fluidics of a cell culture system. The integrated system comprises a "rail" in the Cell Culture Module (CCM) of WRAIR (Space Biosciences of Walter Read Army Institute of Research). The CCM is a Space Shuttle mid-deck locker experiment payload. The BIONA-C is displayed along with associated graphics and text explanations. The presentation will stimulate interest in development of sensor technology for real-time cell culture measurements. The transfer of this technology to other applications will also be of interest. Additional information is contained in the original document.

  11. A Molecular Assay for Sensitive Detection of Pathogen-Specific T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasprowicz, Victoria O.; Mitchell, Jessica E.; Chetty, Shivan; Govender, Pamla; Huang, Kuan-Hsiang Gary; Fletcher, Helen A.; Webster, Daniel P.; Brown, Sebastian; Kasmar, Anne; Millington, Kerry; Day, Cheryl L.; Mkhwanazi, Nompumelelo; McClurg, Cheryl; Chonco, Fundisiwe; Lalvani, Ajit; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Klenerman, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Here we describe the development and validation of a highly sensitive assay of antigen-specific IFN-? production using real time quantitative PCR (qPCR) for two reporters - monokine-induced by IFN-? (MIG) and the IFN-? inducible protein-10 (IP10). We developed and validated the assay and applied it to the detection of CMV, HIV and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) specific responses, in a cohort of HIV co-infected patients. We compared the sensitivity of this assay to that of the ex vivo RD1 (ESAT-6 and CFP-10)-specific IFN-? Elispot assay. We observed a clear quantitative correlation between the two assays (P<0.001). Our assay proved to be a sensitive assay for the detection of MTB-specific T cells, could be performed on whole blood samples of fingerprick (50 uL) volumes, and was not affected by HIV-mediated immunosuppression. This assay platform is potentially of utility in diagnosis of infection in this and other clinical settings. PMID:21853018

  12. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  13. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  14. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... cell culture processing applications. 876.5885 Section 876.5885 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  15. Immunoglobulin production induced in vitro by glucocorticoid hormones: T cell-dependent stimulation of immunoglobulin production without B cell proliferation in cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Grayson, J; Dooley, N J; Koski, I R; Blaese, R M

    1981-01-01

    The direct effects of steroid hormones on the production of immunoglobulins and DNA synthesis by human T and B lymphocytes was evaluated in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. As detected by a reverse hemolytic plaque assay, the addition of 0.1 mM to 10 nM hydrocortisone to lymphocytes in culture in the absence of other stimulants or mitogens, resulted in the dramatic induction of immunoglobulin production with responses comparable to those seen in similar cultures stimulated with pokeweed mitogen. Steroid-stimulated immunoglobulin production was first seen after 48 h and peaked at 8-10 d of culture. The production of IgG, IgA, and IgM was induced following incubation with steroid. Glucocorticoids, but not estrogens or androgens, were capable of mediating this effect, and only compounds with affinity for the glucocorticoid receptor were active. The induction of immunoglobulin production was dependent on both T cells and monocytes; cultures depleted of either cell type did not produce immunoglobulin when stimulated with glucocorticoid hormones. Proliferation of B cells or T cells could not be detected by [3H]thymidine incorporation or total cell recovery from steroid-stimulated cultures, even though such cultures demonstrated marked increases in immunoglobulin production. The mechanism responsible for this functional maturation of B cells to become high rate immunoglobulin producing cells is as yet undefined, although it appears to involve more than merely steroid mediated inactivation of suppressor T cells. PMID:7033287

  16. Control of MRSA infection and colonisation in an intensive care unit by GeneOhm MRSA assay and culture methods

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the major nosocomial pathogens. Due to the diffusion of MRSA strains in both hospital and community settings, prevention and control strategies are receiving increased attention. Approximately 25% to 30% of the population is colonised with S. aureus and 0.2% to 7% with MRSA. The BD GeneOhm MRSA real-time PCR assay offers quicker identification of MRSA-colonised patients than do culture methods. Methods Ninety-five patients admitted to the Intensive Care Unit of IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo of Pavia (Italy) for a period > 24 h were screened for MRSA colonisation with both the culture method and the GeneOhm assay. Results Of the 246 nasal swabs collected from 95 patients, 36 samples were found to be positive by both methods (true-positive). 30% of colonised patients had developed the MRSA infection. Conclusion Our results show that the GeneOhm MRSA assay is a valuable diagnostic tool for detecting MRSA quickly in nasal swabs. This study confirms that colonisation represents a high risk factor for MRSA infection, and that good MRSA surveillance in an Intensive Care Unit is therefore an excellent way to prevent MRSA infection. PMID:19703294

  17. 3D spheroid cultures improve the metabolic gene expression profiles of HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Yu; Hori, Yuji; Yamamoto, Tomohisa; Urashima, Toshiki; Ohara, Yasunori; Tanaka, Hideo

    2015-01-01

    3D (three-dimensional) cultures are considered to be an effective method for toxicological studies; however, little evidence has been reported whether 3D cultures have an impact on hepatocellular physiology regarding lipid or glucose metabolism. In the present study, we conducted physiological characterization of hepatoma cell lines HepG2 and HepaRG cells cultured in 3D conditions using a hanging drop method to verify the effect of culture environment on cellular responses. Apo (Apolipoprotein)B as well as albumin secretion was augmented by 3D cultures. Expression of genes related to not only drug, but also glucose and lipid metabolism were significantly enhanced in 3D cultured HepaRG spheroids. Furthermore, mRNA levels of CYP (cytochrome P450) enzymes following exposure to corresponding inducers increased under the 3D condition. These data suggest that this simple 3D culture system without any special biomaterials can improve liver-specific characteristics including lipid metabolism. Considering that the system enables high-throughput assay, it may become a powerful tool for compound screening concerning hepatocellular responses in order to identify potential drugs. PMID:26182370

  18. Video lensfree microscopy of 2D and 3D culture of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allier, C. P.; Vinjimore Kesavan, S.; Coutard, J.-G.; Cioni, O.; Momey, F.; Navarro, F.; Menneteau, M.; Chalmond, B.; Obeid, P.; Haguet, V.; David-Watine, B.; Dubrulle, N.; Shorte, S.; van der Sanden, B.; Di Natale, C.; Hamard, L.; Wion, D.; Dolega, M. E.; Picollet-D'hahan, N.; Gidrol, X.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2014-03-01

    Innovative imaging methods are continuously developed to investigate the function of biological systems at the microscopic scale. As an alternative to advanced cell microscopy techniques, we are developing lensfree video microscopy that opens new ranges of capabilities, in particular at the mesoscopic level. Lensfree video microscopy allows the observation of a cell culture in an incubator over a very large field of view (24 mm2) for extended periods of time. As a result, a large set of comprehensive data can be gathered with strong statistics, both in space and time. Video lensfree microscopy can capture images of cells cultured in various physical environments. We emphasize on two different case studies: the quantitative analysis of the spontaneous network formation of HUVEC endothelial cells, and by coupling lensfree microscopy with 3D cell culture in the study of epithelial tissue morphogenesis. In summary, we demonstrate that lensfree video microscopy is a powerful tool to conduct cell assays in 2D and 3D culture experiments. The applications are in the realms of fundamental biology, tissue regeneration, drug development and toxicology studies.

  19. Microfluidic concentration-enhanced single cell enzyme activity assay

    E-print Network

    Sarkar, Aniruddh

    2013-01-01

    Cells sense stimuli, process information and respond using signaling networks regulated by enzymatic activity of various proteins. Aberrations in signaling are associated with diseases such as cancer. Most current methods ...

  20. Assays to measure nuclear mechanics in interphase cells

    PubMed Central

    Isermann, Philipp; Davidson, Patricia M.; Sliz, Josiah D.

    2012-01-01

    The nucleus is the characteristic hallmark of all eukaryotic cells. The physical properties of the nucleus reflect important biological characteristics, such as chromatin organization or nuclear envelope composition; they can also directly affect cellular function, for example, when cells pass through narrow constrictions, where the stiff nucleus may present a limiting factor. We present two complementary techniques to probe the mechanical properties of the nucleus. In the first, nuclear stiffness relative to the surrounding cytoskeleton is inferred from induced nuclear deformations during strain application to cells on an elastic substrate. In the second approach, nuclear deformability is deduced from the transit time through a perfusion-based microfabricated device with constrictions smaller than the size of the nucleus. These complementary methods, which can be applied to measure nuclear stiffness in large numbers of living adherent or suspended cells, can help identify important changes in nuclear mechanics associated with disease or development. PMID:22968843

  1. [Stem cell factor production from cultured nasal epithelial cells--effect on SCF production by drugs].

    PubMed

    Koyama, Mamoru; Otsuka, Hirokuni; Kusumi, Taeko; Yamauchi, Yoko

    2002-02-01

    We studied whether epithelial cells cultured in serum-free medium contained other cells or not, there were differences in SCF production from cultured nasal epithelial cells between groups of nonallergic and allergic patients, and among degrees of serum mite-CAP RAST classes of allergic patients, and how drugs inhibited SCF production. As a result, no other contaminating cells except mast cell existed in cultured cells. There was a significant difference in SCF production of cultured cells between nonallergic and class 1-2, 3-4, 5-6, and between class 1-2 and 3-4, 5-6 of mite CAP-RAST class. Cyclosporin, prednisolone, fluticasone, ketotifen, and clemastine inhibited SCF production from cultured epithelial cells, but cromoglicate and suplatast did not. Inhibition means the reduction of SCF from cells, not the growth of cultured nasal epithelial cells. PMID:11905054

  2. Cell-based optical assay for amyloid ?-induced neuronal cell dysfunction using femtosecond-pulsed laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seunghee; Yoon, Jonghee; Choi, Chulhee

    2015-03-01

    Amyloid ?-protein (A?) is known as a key molecule related to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Over time, the amyloid cascade disrupts essential function of mitochondria including Ca2+ homeostasis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) regulation, and eventually leads to neuronal cell death. However, there have been no methods that analyze and measure neuronal dysfuction in pathologic conditions quantitatively. Here, we suggest a cell-based optical assay to investigate neuronal function in AD using femtosecond-pulsed laser stimulation. We observed that laser stimulation on primary rat hippocampal neurons for a few microseconds induced intracellular Ca2+ level increases or produced intracellular ROS which was a primary cause of neuronal cell death depending on delivered energy. Although A? treatment alone had little effect on the neuronal morphologies and networks in a few hours, A?-treated neurons showed delayed Ca2+ increasing pattern and were more vulnerable to laser-induced cell death compared to normal neurons. Our results collectively indicate that femtosecond laser stimulation can be a useful tool to study neuronal dysfuction related to AD pathologies. We anticipate this optical method to enable studies in the early progression of neuronal impairments and the quantitative evaluation of drug effects on neurons in neurodegenerative diseases, including AD and Parkinson's disease in a preclinical study.

  3. Automation of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture in Arrayed Microfluidic

    E-print Network

    Beebe, David J.

    cancer pro- gression1e4 and stem cell differentiation.5 Although cells can be maintained and grown usingAutomation of Three-Dimensional Cell Culture in Arrayed Microfluidic Devices Sara I. Montanez. A Peltier cooler maintains the collagen as a liquid at 4 C during cell seeding, followed by polymerization

  4. Bile salts inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of culture human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru; Gong, Jun; Wang, Hui; Wang, Li

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the effect of six bile salts: glycocholate (GC), glycochenodeoxycholate (GCDC), glycodeoxycholate (GDC), taurocholate (TC), taurochenodeoxycholate (TCDC), taurodeoxycholate (TDC), and their mixture on cultured human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells. METHODS: Human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells were cultured with serum-free keratinocyte medium. 3-[4,5-Dimethylthiaolyl]-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was applied to the detection of cell proliferation. Apoptotic morphology was observed by phase-contrast video microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. Sub-G1 DNA fragmentations and early apoptotic cells were assayed by flow cytometry (FCM) with propidium iodide (PI) staining and annexin V-FITC conjugated with PI staining. Apoptotic DNA ladders on agarose gel electrophoresis were observed. RESULTS: Except for GC, GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC and their mixture could initiate growth inhibition of esophageal mucosal epithelial cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. TUNEL and FCM assays demonstrated that the bile salts at 500 ?mol/L and their mixture at 1 500 ?mol/L induced apoptosis except for GC. The percentage of sub-G1 detected by FCM with PI staining was 83.5% in cells treated with 500 ?mol/L TC for 2 h, and 19.8%, 20.4%, 25.6%, 13.5%, and 75.8% in cells treated with 500 ?mol/L GCDC, TCDC, GDC, TDC, and 1 500 ?mol/L mixture for 24 h, respectively, which were higher than that of the control (1.5%). The percentage was 1.4% in cells with 500 ?mol/L GC for 24 h. DNA ladders on agarose gel electrophoresis were seen in cells treated with 500 ?mol/L TC for 2 h and 1 500 ?mol/L mixture for 24 h. CONCLUSION: All GCDC, GDC, TC, TCDC, TDC and their mixture can inhibit growth and induce apoptosis of cultured human normal esophageal mucosal epithelial cells, but GC is well tolerated by the cells. PMID:16425417

  5. Cell density modulates growth, extracellular matrix, and protein synthesis of cultured rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wolthuis, A.; Boes, A.; Grond, J.

    1993-01-01

    Mesangial cell (MC) hyperplasia and accumulation of extracellular matrix are hallmarks of chronic glomerular disease. The present in vitro study examined the effects of cell density on growth, extracellular matrix formation, and protein synthesis of cultured rat MCs. A negative linear relationship was found between initial plating density and DNA synthesis per cell after 24 hours incubation in medium with 10% fetal calf serum (range: 1 x 10(3) to 7 x 10(5) MCs/2cm2, r = 0.996, P < 0.001). Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of the amount of fibronectin in the conditioned medium after 72 hours showed a negative relationship with increasing cell density. In contrast, the amount of cell-associated fibronectin increased to maximal values in confluent cultures, and no further increase was seen at supraconfluency. The relative collagen synthesis in the conditioned medium and cell layer--assessed by collagenase digestion after 5 hours [3H]proline pulse labeling--showed a similar pattern. Secreted collagen decreased with increasing cell density from 3.4% to 0.2% of total protein synthesis. In contrast, cell-associated collagen increased from 1.1% to 11.8% of newly synthesized protein until confluency followed by a decrease to 4.2% at supraconfluency. Specific immunoprecipitation of collagen types I, III, and IV revealed a significant (twofold) increase in collagen I synthesis per cell at confluency. Collagen III and IV synthesis was not affected by cell density. Specific protein expression in both the medium and cell layer were analyzed by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (150 to 20 kd, pI 5.0 to 7.0) after 20 hours steady-state metabolic labeling with [35S]methionine. Supraconfluent MCs displayed overexpression of 10, underexpression of four, new expression of five, and changed mobility of three different intracellular proteins. Of interest was the overexpression of two proteins (89 kd, pI 5.31 and 72 kd, pI 5.32) that were identified by immunoblotting as the stress proteins heat-shock protein 90 and glucose-related protein 78, respectively. The progressive increase of cell-associated fibronectin and collagens, particularly collagen type I, in confluent MCs resembles extracellular matrix accumulation in glomerular disease. The increased expression of stress proteins in supraconfluent MCs is of interest in view of the analogy between glomerulosclerosis and atherosclerosis in which stress proteins are expressed in high concentrations. Images Figure 5 PMID:8214012

  6. Incidence of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk using cultural method and the PCR assay

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Ebrahim; Momtaz, Hassan; Behzadnia, Asma; Baghbadorani, Zeinab Torki

    2014-01-01

    Objective To determine the prevalence rate of Listeria species in bovine, ovine, caprine, camel and water buffalo milk in Iran. Methods From September 2010 to December 2011 a total of 260 bulk milk samples including 85 bovine, 37 camel, 34 water buffalo, 56 ovine and 48 caprine bulk milk samples were collected from commercial dairy herds, in Fars and Khuzestan provinces, Iran and were evaluated for the presence of Listeria species using cultural method and the PCR assay. Results Using cultural method, 19 samples (7.3%) were positive for Listeria spp. The highest prevalence of Listeria was found in raw water buffalo milk (11.8%), followed by raw bovine milk (10.6%), raw ovine milk (7.1%), and raw caprine milk (4.2%) samples. All 37 camel milk samples from 20 camel breeding farms were negative for Listeria spp. The overall prevalence of Listeria was 7.3%, in which Listeria innocua was the most recovered species (4.2%); the remaining isolates were Listeria monocytogenes (1.9%), Listeria ivanovii (0.08%) and Listeria seeligari (0.04%). The PCR assay could identify 8 Listeria-contaminated milk samples that were negative using the cultural method. Conclusions The results presented in this study indicate the potential risk of infection with Listeria in people consuming raw and unpasteurized milk.

  7. The microfluidic multitrap nanophysiometer for hematologic cancer cell characterization reveals temporal sensitivity of the calcein-AM efflux assay

    PubMed Central

    Byrd IV, Thomas F.; Hoang, Loi T.; Kim, Eric G.; Pfister, Matthew E.; Werner, Erik M.; Arndt, Stephen E.; Chamberlain, Jeffrey W.; Hughey, Jacob J.; Nguyen, Bao A.; Schneibel, Erik J.; Wertz, Laura L.; Whitfield, Jonathan S.; Wikswo, John P.; Seale, Kevin T.

    2014-01-01

    Cytometric studies utilizing flow cytometry or multi-well culture plate fluorometry are often limited by a deficit in temporal resolution and a lack of single cell consideration. Unfortunately, many cellular processes, including signaling, motility, and molecular transport, occur transiently over relatively short periods of time and at different magnitudes between cells. Here we demonstrate the multitrap nanophysiometer (MTNP), a low-volume microfluidic platform housing an array of cell traps, as an effective tool that can be used to study individual unattached cells over time with precise control over the intercellular microenvironment. We show how the MTNP platform can be used for hematologic cancer cell characterization by measuring single T cell levels of CRAC channel modulation, non-translational motility, and ABC-transporter inhibition via a calcein-AM efflux assay. The transporter data indicate that Jurkat T cells exposed to indomethacin continue to accumulate fluorescent calcein for over 60 minutes after calcein-AM is removed from the extracellular space. PMID:24873950

  8. Post-Thaw Non-Cultured and Post-Thaw Cultured Equine Cord Blood Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Equally Suppress Lymphocyte Proliferation In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Lynn B.; Tessier, Laurence; Koenig, Judith B.; Koch, Thomas G.

    2014-01-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are receiving increased attention for their non-progenitor immunomodulatory potential. Cryopreservation is commonly used for long-term storage of MSC. Post-thaw MSC proliferation is associated with a lag-phase in vitro. How this lag-phase affect MSC immunomodulatory properties is unknown. We hypothesized that in vitro there is no difference in lymphocyte suppression potential between quick-thawed cryopreserved equine cord blood (CB) MSC immediately included in mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) and same MSC allowed post-thaw culture time prior to inclusion in MLR. Cryopreserved CB-MSC from five unrelated foals were compared using two-way MLR. For each of the five unrelated MSC cultures, paired MLR assays of MSC allowed five days of post-thaw culture and MSC included in MLR assay immediately post-thawing were evaluated. We report no difference in the suppression of lymphocyte proliferation by CB-MSC that had undergone post-thaw culture and MSC not cultured post-thaw (p<0.0001). Also, there was no inter-donor variability between the lymphocyte suppressive properties of MSC harvested from the five different donors (p?=?0.13). These findings suggest that cryopreserved CB-MSC may have clinical utility immediately upon thawing. One implication hereof is the possibility of using cryopreserved CB-MSC at third party locations without the need for cell culture equipment or competencies. PMID:25438145

  9. Predictive value of cell assays for developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of conazole fungicides.

    PubMed

    Dreisig, Karin; Taxvig, Camilla; Birkhøj Kjærstad, Mia; Nellemann, Christine; Hass, Ulla; Vinggaard, Anne Marie

    2013-01-01

    This paper evaluates in vivo predictability of a battery of in vitro tests covering developmental toxicity and embryotoxicity of five widely used conazole fungicides. The conazoles were investigated in the embryonic stem cell test, and data were compared to in vivo embryotoxicity data. The same conazoles were evaluated on the basis of data from a battery of cell assays for endocrine activity, including assays for AR, ER, AhR, and sex hormone synthesis, and data were compared to in vivo developmental toxicity data. Overall, the ranking of the five conazole fungicides based on in vitro data were in reasonably good agreement with available in vivo effects. Ketoconazole and epoxiconazole are the most potent embryotoxic compounds, whereas prochloraz belongs to the most potent developmental toxicants. In conclusion, a rough prediction of the ranking of these conazole fungicides for in vivo toxicity data was possible by a holistic evaluation of data from a panel of cell-based assays. PMID:23861077

  10. Three dimensional spheroid cell culture for nanoparticle safety testing.

    PubMed

    Sambale, Franziska; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Stahl, Frank; Blume, Cornelia; Stiesch, Meike; Kasper, Cornelia; Bahnemann, Detlef; Scheper, Thomas

    2015-07-10

    Nanoparticles are widely employed for many applications and the number of consumer products, incorporating nanotechnology, is constantly increasing. A novel area of nanotechnology is the application in medical implants. The widespread use of nanoparticles leads to their higher prevalence in our environment. This, in turn, raises concerns regarding potential risks to humans. Previous studies have shown possible hazardous effects of some nanoparticles on mammalian cells grown in two-dimensional (2D) cultures. However, 2D in vitro cell cultures display several disadvantages such as changes in cell shape, cell function, cell responses and lack of cell-cell contacts. For this reason, the development of better models for mimicking in vivo conditions is essential. In the present work, we cultivated A549 cells and NIH-3T3 cells in three-dimensional (3D) spheroids and investigated the effects of zinc oxide (ZnO-NP) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NP). The results were compared to cultivation in 2D monolayer culture. A549 cells in 3D cell culture formed loose aggregates which were more sensitive to the toxicity of ZnO-NP in comparison to cells grown in 2D monolayers. In contrast, NIH-3T3 cells showed a compact 3D spheroid structure and no differences in the sensitivity of the NIH-3T3 cells to ZnO-NP were observed between 2D and 3D cultures. TiO2-NP were non-toxic in 2D cultures but affected cell-cell interaction during 3D spheroid formation of A549 and NIH-3T3 cells. When TiO2-NP were directly added during spheroid formation in the cultures of the two cell lines tested, several smaller spheroids were formed instead of a single spheroid. This effect was not observed if the nanoparticles were added after spheroid formation. In this case, a slight decrease in cell viability was determined only for A549 3D spheroids. The obtained results demonstrate the importance of 3D cell culture studies for nanoparticle safety testing, since some effects cannot be revealed in 2D cell culture. PMID:25595712

  11. Regulation of cyclooxygenase expression in cultured vascular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pash, J.M.

    1988-01-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolism in vascular tissue results in synthesis of prostacylin. The key enzyme in this synthesis pathway, cyclooxygenase, is down-regulated through self-inactivation. An analogous refractory state is produced by aspirin which irreversibly acetylates the enzyme. To further understand this phenomenon, the inactivation and recovery of cyclooxygenase activity was assayed in cultured ray vascular smooth muscle cells using exogenously added arachidonic acid. Self-inactivation of cyclooxygenase was observed following treatment with micromolar amounts of arachidonic acid. The recovery of cyclooxygenase activity following self-inactivation was analogous to that observed following aspirin-inactivation in that it depended on protein synthesis and required either serum or EGF. Two additional factors, TGF-{beta} and uric acid, were found to enhance the stimulation of cyclooxygenase recovery by EGF. A defined medium containing 10 ng/mL EGF, 1 ng/mL TGF{beta} and 0.1 mM uric acid duplicated the cyclooxygenase recovery activity of 10% serum. Stimulation of cyclooxygenase activity by EGF and TGF-{beta} was inhibited by cycloheximide but not by actinomycin-D, indicating a link to increased translation of pre-existing mRNA. A lack of significant effect on overall protein synthesis by EGF and TGF-{beta}, measured by ({sup 35}S)-methionine incorporation under conditions where a multi-fold increase in cyclooxygenase activity was seen, indicates that the translational regulation of a small fraction of total mRNA and possibly cyclooxygenase is occurring.

  12. Ultrastructural and biochemical findings in brain cell cultures infected with canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Glaus, T; Griot, C; Richard, A; Althaus, U; Herschkowitz, N; Vandevelde, M

    1990-01-01

    To study the pathomechanism of demyelination in canine distemper (CD), dog brain cell cultures were infected with virulent A75/17-CD virus (CDV) and examined ultrastructurally. Special attention was paid to the oligodendrocytes, which were specifically immunolabelled. In addition, cerebroside sulfotransferase (CST), an enzyme specific for oligodendrocyte activity was assayed during the course of the infection. Infection and maturation as well as CDV-induced changes were found in astrocytes and brain macrophages. Infection of oligodendrocytes was rarely seen, although CST activity of the culture markedly decreased and vacuolar degeneration of these cells occurred, resulting in their complete disappearance. We concluded that the degeneration of oligodendrocytes and demyelination is not due to direct virus-oligodendrocyte interaction, but due to CDV-induced events in other glial cells. PMID:2360417

  13. Effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on three sex steroids in two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and in the H295R cell assay.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Naja Wessel; Hansen, Cecilie Hurup; Nellemann, Christine; Styrishave, Bjarne; Halling-Sørensen, Bent

    2015-10-01

    Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors are known to have a range of disorders that are often linked to the endocrine system e.g. hormonal imbalances, breast enlargement, sexual dysfunction, and menstrual cycle disorders. The mechanisms behind most of these disorders are not known in details. In this study we investigated whether the endocrine effect due to SSRI exposure could be detected in well adopted in vitro steroidogenesis assays, two versions of the aromatase enzyme inhibition assay and the H295R cell assay. The five drugs citalopram, fluoxetine, fluvoxamine, paroxetine and sertraline, were shown to inhibit the aromatase enzyme in both types of aromatase assays. The IC50 values ranged from 3 to 600 ?M. All five SSRIs, were further investigated in the H295R cell line. All compounds altered the steroid secretion from the cells, the lowest observed effect levels were 0.9 ?M and 3.1 ?M for sertraline and fluvoxamine, respectively. In general the H295R cell assay was more sensitive to SSRI exposure than the two aromatase assays, up to 20 times more sensitive. This indicates that the H295R cell line is a better tool for screening endocrine disrupting effects. Our findings show that the endocrine effects of SSRIs may, at least in part, be due to interference with the steroidogenesis. PMID:26162595

  14. Functional activity of mitochondria in cultured neural precursor cells.

    PubMed

    Plotnikov, E Yu; Marei, M V; Podgornyi, O V; Aleksandrova, M A; Zorov, D B; Sukhikh, G T

    2006-01-01

    We studied mitochondrial transmembrane potential of neural precursor cells forming neurospheres in culture. Uneven energization of mitochondria in neurosphere cells was detected. Heterogeneity of cells by the mitochondrial potential increased with neurosphere enlargement during culturing. Decrease in the mitochondrial potential in the central cells in large spheres, presumably caused by insufficient diffusion of oxygen and nutrients, can provoke their damage and death. Population of cells with high mitochondrial potential responded to addition of the nuclear dye by a decrease in mitochondrial potential, which can indicate functioning of ABCG2 complex in these cells, characteristic of undifferentiated stem cells. These data will help to create optimum conditions for culturing of neural stem cells for the maintenance of their maximum functional and proliferative activity. PMID:16929986

  15. Chemotherapy in heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells with interconversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dilão, Rui

    2015-02-01

    Recently, the interconversion between differentiated and stem-like cancer cells has been observed. Here, we model the in vitro growth of heterogeneous cell cultures in the presence of interconversion from differentiated cancer cells to cancer stem cells (CSCs), showing that, by targeting only CSC with cytotoxic agents, it is not always possible to eradicate cancer. We have determined the kinetic conditions under which cytotoxic agents in in vitro heterogeneous cultures of cancer cells eradicate cancer. In particular, we have shown that the chemotherapeutic elimination of in vitro cultures of heterogeneous cancer cells is effective only if it targets all cancer cell types, and if the induced death rates for the different subpopulations of cancer cell types are large enough. The quantitative results of the model are compared and validated with experimental data.

  16. [Benzopyrene metabolism in cultured liver cells of human embryo].

    PubMed

    Belitski?, G A; Era?zer, T L; Grinberg, K N; Kesina, A Ia

    1977-01-01

    The hepatic cells of human embryos cultivated as a monolayer retain their ability to metabolize the carcinogenic hydrocarbon benz (a) pyrene (BP). The intensity of BP metabolism is higher in the "young" cultures of hepatic cells than in fibroblast cultures obtained from the same embryo. At later terms the former becomes equal for both tissues as a result of a decreased metabolic activity of hepatic cells. PMID:919412

  17. Cell viability, proliferation and extracellular matrix production of human annulus fibrosus cells cultured within PDLLA/Bioglass composite foam scaffolds in vitro.

    PubMed

    Helen, Wilda; Gough, Julie E

    2008-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess cell viability, attachment, morphology, proliferation, and collagen and sulphated glycosaminoglycan (s-GAG) production by human annulus fibrosus (HAF) cells cultured in vitro in poly(d,l-lactide) (PDLLA)/Bioglass composite foams. PDLLA foams with different percentages (0, 5 and 30wt.%) of Bioglass particles were prepared by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). HAF cell viability in the PDLLA/Bioglass foam was analysed using Live/Dead staining. HAF cell attachment was observed using SEM. An assessment of cell proliferation was conducted using the WST-1 assay. The level of s-GAG and collagen produced by HAF cells was quantified using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay and Sircoltrade mark assay after 4 weeks of culture. The presence of collagen types I and II within the PDLLA/Bioglass composite foams was analysed using immunohistochemistry. Live/dead staining showed that many viable HAF cells were present on the top surface of the foams as well as penetrating into the internal pore structure, suggesting that the PDLLA/Bioglass composite materials are non-toxic and that the presence of Bioglass particles within PDLLA scaffolds does not inhibit HAF cell growth. The SEM observations revealed that more clusters of HAF cells were attached to the pore walls of both the PDLLA/5BG foam and the PDLLA/30BG foam when compared with the PDLLA/0BG foam. WST-1 assay performed over a period of 4 weeks showed an increased tendency of HAF cells to proliferate within both the PDLLA/5BG foam and the PDLLA/30BG foam when compared with both the tissue culture plastic control and the PDLLA/0BG foam, indicating the presence of Bioglass in the foam has a positive effect on HAF cell proliferation. Sircoltrade mark and DMMB assays showed that HAF cells cultured within the PDLLA/30BG foam had a greater ability to deposit collagen and proteoglycan when compared with the control and the PDLLA/0BG foam after 4 weeks in culture, suggesting that the increase of Bioglass content may induce microenvironmental changes which promote the production of extracellular matrix containing abundant collagen and s-GAG. The immunohistochemical analysis of collagen production demonstrated that collagen produced in all cultures was predominantly of type I. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the use of PDLLA/Bioglass composite as cell-carrier materials for future treatments of the intervertebral disc with damaged AF region. PMID:18023627

  18. Microfluidics meet cell biology: bridging the gap by validation and application of microscale techniques for cell biological assays

    PubMed Central

    Paguirigan, Amy L.; Beebe, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Microscale techniques have been applied to biological assays for nearly two decades, but haven’t been widely integrated as common tools in biological laboratories. The significant differences between several physical phenomena at the microscale versus the macroscale have been exploited to provide a variety of new types of assays (such as gradient production or spatial cell patterning). However, the use of these devices by biologists seems to be limited by issues regarding biological validation, ease of use, and the limited available readouts for assays done using microtechnology. Critical validation work has been done recently that highlights the current challenges for microfluidic methods and suggest ways in which future devices might be improved to better integrate with biological assays. With more validation and improved designs, microscale techniques hold immense promise as a platform to study aspects of cell biology that are not possible using current macroscale techniques. PMID:18693260

  19. Development and evaluation of an ELIME assay to reveal the presence of Salmonella in irrigation water: Comparison with Real-Time PCR and the Standard Culture Method.

    PubMed

    Volpe, G; Delibato, E; Fabiani, L; Pucci, E; Piermarini, S; D'Angelo, A; Capuano, F; De Medici, D; Palleschi, G

    2016-03-01

    A reliable, low-cost and easy-to-use ELIME (Enzyme-Linked-Immuno-Magnetic-Electrochemical) assay for detection of Salmonella enterica in irrigation water is presented. Magnetic beads (MBs), coupled to a strip of eight-magnetized screen-printed electrodes localized at the bottom of eight wells (8-well/SPE strip), effectively supported a sandwich immunological chain. Enzymatic by-product is quickly measured by chronoamperometry, using a portable instrument. With the goal of developing a method able to detect a wide range of Salmonella serotypes, including S. Napoli and S. Thompson strains responsible for various community alerts, different kinds of MBs, antibodies and blocking agents were tested. The final system employs MBs coated with a broad reactivity monoclonal antibody anti-salmonella and blocked with dry milk. For a simple and rapid assay these two steps were performed in a preliminary phase, while the two sequential incubations for the immuno-recognition events were merged in a single step of 1h. In parallel a Real-Time PCR (RTi-PCR) method, based on a specific locked nucleic acid (LNA) fluorescent probe and an internal amplification control (IAC), was carried out. The selectivity of the ELIME and RTi-PCR assays was proved by inclusivity and exclusivity tests performed analyzing different Salmonella serotypes and non-target microorganisms, most commonly isolated from environmental sources. Furthermore, both methods were applied to experimentally and not experimentally contaminated irrigation water samples. Results confirmed by the ISO culture method, demonstrated the effectiveness of ELIME and RTi-PCR assays to detect a low number of salmonella cells (1-10 CFU/L) reducing drastically the long analysis time usually required to reveal this pathogen. PMID:26717832

  20. Feeding Frequency Affects Cultured Rat Pituitary Cells in Low Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hymer, W. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Salada, T.; Cenci, R.; Krishnan, K.; Mukai, C.; Nagaoka, S.

    1996-01-01

    In this report, we describe the results of a rat pituitary cell culture experiment done on STS-65 in which the effect of cell feeding on the release of the six anterior pituitary hormones was studied. We found complex microgravity related interactions between the frequency of cell feeding and the quantity and quality (i.e. biological activity) of some of the six hormones released in flight. Analyses of growth hormone (GH) released from cells into culture media on different mission days using gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography yielded qualitatively similar results between ground and flight samples. Lack of cell feeding resulted in extensive cell clumping in flight (but not ground) cultures. Vigorous fibroblast growth occurred in both ground and flight cultures fed 4 times. These results are interpreted within the context of autocrine and or paracrine feedback interactions. Finally the payload specialist successfully prepared a fresh trypsin solution in microgravity, detached the cells from their surface and reinserted them back into the culture chamber. These cells reattached and continued to release hormone in microgravity. In summary, this experiment shows that pituitary cells are microgravity sensitive and that coupled operations routinely associated with laboratory cel1 culture can also be accomplished in low gravity.

  1. Cytocompatibility of the selected calcium phosphate based bone cements: comparative study in human cell culture.

    PubMed

    Olkowski, Rados?aw; Kaszczewski, Piotr; Czechowska, Joanna; Siek, Dominika; Pijocha, Dawid; Zima, Aneta; ?lósarczyk, Anna; Lewandowska-Szumie?, Ma?gorzata

    2015-12-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPC) are valuable bone fillers. Recently they have been also considered as the basis for drug-, growth factors- or cells-delivery systems. Broad possibilities to manipulate CPC composition provide a unique opportunity to obtain materials with a wide range of physicochemical properties. In this study we show that CPC composition significantly influences cell response. Human bone derived cells were exposed to the several well-characterized different cements based on calcium phosphates, magnesium phosphates and calcium sulfate hemihydrate (CSH). Cell viability assays, live/dead staining and real-time observation of cells in contact with the materials (time-laps) were performed. Although all the investigated materials have successfully passed a standard cytocompatibility assay, cell behavior in a direct contact with the materials varied depending on the material and the experimental system. The most recommended were the ?-TCP-based materials which proved suitable as a support for cells in a direct contact. The materials which caused a decrease of calcium ions concentration in culture induced the negative cell response, however this effect might be expected efficiently compensated in vivo. All the materials consisting of CSH had negative impact on the cells. The obtained results strongly support running series of cytocompatibility studies for preclinical evaluation of bone cements. PMID:26511138

  2. Cell cultures from the symbiotic soft coral Sinularia flexibilis.

    PubMed

    Khalesi, Mohammad K; Vera-Jiménez, N I; Aanen, D K; Beeftink, H H; Wijffels, R H

    2008-01-01

    The symbiotic octocoral Sinularia flexibilis is a producer of potential pharmaceuticals. Sustainable mass production of these corals as a source of such compounds demands innovative approaches, including coral cell culture. We studied various cell dissociation methodologies and the feasibility of cultivation of S. flexibilis cells on different media and cell dissociation methodologies. Mechanical dissociation of coral tissue always yielded the highest number of cells and allowed subsequent cellular growth in all treatments. The best results from chemical dissociation reagents were found with trypsin-ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid. Coral cells obtained from spontaneous dissociation did not grow. Light intensity was found to be important for coral cell culture showing an enduring symbiosis between the cultured cells and their intracellular algae. The Grace's insect medium and Grace's modified insect medium were found to be superior substrates. To confirm the similarity of the cultured cells and those in the coral tissue, a molecular test with Internal Transcribed Spacer primers was performed. Thereby, the presence of similar cells of both the coral cells and zooxanthella in different culture media was confirmed. PMID:18661193

  3. Lithium chloride induces mesenchymal-to-epithelial reverting transition in primary colon cancer cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    COSTABILE, VALERIA; DURATURO, FRANCESCA; DELRIO, PAOLO; REGA, DANIELA; PACE, UGO; LICCARDO, RAFFAELLA; ROSSI, GIOVANNI BATTISTA; GENESIO, RITA; NITSCH, LUCIO; IZZO, PAOLA; DE ROSA, MARINA

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) confers stem cell-like phenotype and more motile properties to carcinoma cells. During EMT, the expression of E-cadherin decreases, resulting in loss of cell-cell adhesion and increased migration. Expression of Twist1 and other pleiotropic transcription factors, such as Snail, is known to activate EMT. We established primary colon cancer cell cultures from samples of operated patients and validated cultures by cytogenetic and molecular biology approaches. Western blot assay, quantitative real-time PCR and immunofluorescence were performed to investigate the expression of E-cadherin, vimentin, ?-catenin, cytokeratin-20 and -18, Twist1, Snail, CD44, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX2), Sox2, Oct4 and Nanog. Moreover, cell differentiation was induced by incubation with LiCl-containing medium for 10 days. We observed that these primary colorectal cancer (CRC) cells lost expression of the E-cadherin epithelial marker, which was instead expressed in cancer and normal colon mucosa of the same patient, while overexpressed vimentin (mesenchymal marker), Twist1, Snail (EMT markers) and COX2. Cytokeratin-18 was expressed both in tissues and cell cultures. Expression of stem cell markers, such as CD44, Oct4 and Nanog, were also observed. Following differentiation with the glycogen synthase kinase 3? (GSK3?) inhibitor LiCl, the cells began to express E-cadherin and, at once, Twist1 and Snail expression was strongly downregulated, suggesting a MET-reverting process. In conclusion, we established primary colon mesenchymal cancer cell cultures expressing mesenchymal and epithelial biomarkers together with high level of EMT transcription factors. We propose that they could represent a good model for studying EMT and its reverting mechanism, the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET). Our observation indicates that LiCl, a GSK3? inhibitor, induces MET in vitro, suggesting that LiCl and GSK3? could represent, respectively, interesting drug, and target for CRC therapy. PMID:25738332

  4. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment...DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and...

  5. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment...DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and...

  6. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment...DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and...

  7. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment...DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and...

  8. 21 CFR 864.2240 - Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cell and tissue culture supplies and equipment...DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Cell And Tissue Culture Products § 864.2240 Cell and tissue culture supplies and...

  9. Figure 2: Active cell culture substrate mechanically perturbs cells. Top: Electron

    E-print Network

    Movileanu, Liviu

    diseases. In addition, the detailed understanding of cellular mechano-biology in the context of stem cellFigure 2: Active cell culture substrate mechanically perturbs cells. Top: Electron micrographs of an active cell culture substrate that can be triggered to transition from a grooved topography to a flat

  10. Simplified three-dimensional culture system for long-term expansion of embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Christina; Perez-Cruet, Mick; Chavez, Ferman; Chaudhry, G Rasul

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To devise a simplified and efficient method for long-term culture and maintenance of embryonic stem cells requiring less frequent passaging. METHODS: Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) labeled with enhanced yellow fluorescent protein were cultured in three-dimensional (3-D) self-assembling scaffolds and compared with traditional two-dimentional (2-D) culture techniques requiring mouse embryonic fibroblast feeder layers or leukemia inhibitory factor. 3-D scaffolds encapsulating ESCs were prepared by mixing ESCs with polyethylene glycol tetra-acrylate (PEG-4-Acr) and thiol-functionalized dextran (Dex-SH). Distribution of ESCs in 3-D was monitored by confocal microscopy. Viability and proliferation of encapsulated cells during long-term culture were determined by propidium iodide as well as direct cell counts and PrestoBlue (PB) assays. Genetic expression of pluripotency markers (Oct4, Nanog, Klf4, and Sox2) in ESCs grown under 2-D and 3-D culture conditions was examined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Protein expression of selected stemness markers was determined by two different methods, immunofluorescence staining (Oct4 and Nanog) and western blot analysis (Oct4, Nanog, and Klf4). Pluripotency of 3-D scaffold grown ESCs was analyzed by in vivo teratoma assay and in vitro differentiation via embryoid bodies into cells of all three germ layers. RESULTS: Self-assembling scaffolds encapsulating ESCs for 3-D culture without the loss of cell viability were prepared by mixing PEG-4-Acr and Dex-SH (1:1 v/v) to a final concentration of 5% (w/v). Scaffold integrity was dependent on the degree of thiol substitution of Dex-SH and cell concentration. Scaffolds prepared using Dex-SH with 7.5% and 33% thiol substitution and incubated in culture medium maintained their integrity for 11 and 13 d without cells and 22 ± 5 d and 37 ± 5 d with cells, respectively. ESCs formed compact colonies, which progressively increased in size over time due to cell proliferation as determined by confocal microscopy and PB staining. 3-D scaffold cultured ESCs expressed significantly higher levels (P < 0.01) of Oct4, Nanog, and Kl4, showing a 2.8, 3.0 and 1.8 fold increase, respectively, in comparison to 2-D grown cells. A similar increase in the protein expression levels of Oct4, Nanog, and Klf4 was observed in 3-D grown ESCs. However, when 3-D cultured ESCs were subsequently passaged in 2-D culture conditions, the level of these pluripotent markers was reduced to normal levels. 3-D grown ESCs produced teratomas and yielded cells of all three germ layers, expressing brachyury (mesoderm), NCAM (ectoderm), and GATA4 (endoderm) markers. Furthermore, these cells differentiated into osteogenic, chondrogenic, myogenic, and neural lineages expressing Col1, Col2, Myog, and Nestin, respectively. CONCLUSION: This novel 3-D culture system demonstrated long-term maintenance of mouse ESCs without the routine passaging and manipulation necessary for traditional 2-D cell propagation. PMID:26328022

  11. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ER(pos)) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ER(pos) cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ER(pos) HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ER(pos) HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGF? signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ER(pos) cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ER(pos) HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  12. Asymmetric cell kinetics genes: the key to expansion of adult stem cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Sherley, James L

    2002-07-01

    A singular challenge in stem cell research today is the expansion and propagation of functional adult stem cells. Unlike embryonic stem cells, which are immortal in culture, adult stem cells are notorious for the difficulty encountered when attempts are made to expand them in culture. One overlooked reason for this difficulty may be the inherent asymmetric cell kinetics of stem cells in postnatal somatic tissues. Senescence is the expected fate of a culture whose growth depends on adult stem cells that divide with asymmetric cell kinetics. Therefore, the bioengineering of strategies to expand adult stem cells in culture requires knowledge of cellular mechanisms that control asymmetric cell kinetics. The properties of several genes recently implicated to function in a cellular pathway(s) that regulates asymmetric cell kinetics are discussed. Understanding the function of these genes in asymmetric cell kinetics mechanisms may be the key that unlocks the adult stem cell expansion problem. PMID:12806130

  13. Clausmarin A, Potential Immunosuppressant Revealed by Yeast-Based Assay and Interleukin-2 Production Assay in Jurkat T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suauam, Pitipreya; Yingyongnarongkul, Boon-ek; Palaga, Tanapat; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Yompakdee, Chulee

    2015-01-01

    Small-molecule inhibitors of Ca2+-signaling pathways are of medicinal importance, as exemplified by the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A. Using a yeast-based assay devised for the specific detection of Ca2+-signaling inhibitors, clausmarin A, a previously reported terpenoid coumarin, was identified as an active substance. Here, we investigated the likely mechanism of clausmarin A action in yeast and Jurkat T-cells. In the presence of 100 mM CaCl2 in the growth medium of Ca2+-sensitive ?zds1 strain yeast, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent alleviation of various defects due to hyperactivation of Ca2+ signaling, such as growth inhibition, polarized bud growth and G2 phase cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, clausmarin A inhibited the growth of ?mpk1 (lacking the Mpk1 MAP kinase pathway) but not ?cnb1 (lacking the calcineurin pathway) strain, suggesting that clausmarin A inhibited the calcineurin pathway as presumed from the synthetic lethality of these pathways. Furthermore, clausmarin A alleviated the serious defects of a strain expressing a constitutively active form of calcineurin. In the human Jurkat T-cell line, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-2 production and IL-2 gene transcription, as well as an inhibition of NFAT dephosphorylation. The effects of clausmarin A observed in both yeast and Jurkat cells are basically similar to those of FK506. Our study revealed that clausmarin A is an inhibitor of the calcineurin pathway, and that this is probably mediated via inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity. As such, clausmarin A is a potential immunosuppressant. PMID:26313553

  14. Semi-microdroplet assay for cell adhesion molecules. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tawa, Lawrence Shinzo

    1988-01-01

    A new cell-to-cell adhesion assay was devised. Using dissociated embryos of the sea urchin, this procedure involves rotating a 0.100 ml suspension of single cells with 0.100 ml of the solution to be tested in the bulb portion of a transfer pipet with the tip removed. After 1 hour of rotation at 60 rpm at 15 C, the contents of each bulb were transferred into individual wells of a 96 well flat bottom plate. After the plate was incubated for 1 hour at 15 C, black and white photographs were taken with a 35 mm camera attached to an inverted photomicroscope. Examining a proof sheet of the negatives directly allowed a rapid evaluation of suspected cell adhesion promoting factors. A ranking system was used to evaluate all samples. The assay was tested by examining the effect of specific solutions on the aggregation of single cells obtained from dissociated 23 hour embryos.

  15. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity assessment of Euphorbia hirta in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Ping, Kwan Yuet; Darah, Ibrahim; Chen, Yeng; Sasidharan, Sreenivasan

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity activity of Euphorbia hirta (E. hirta) in MCF-7 cell line model using comet assay. Methods The cytotoxicity of E. hirta extract was investigated by employing brine shrimp lethality assay and the genotoxicity of E. hirta was assessed by using Comet assay. Results Both toxicity tests exhibited signi?cant toxicity result. In the comet assay, the E. hirta extract exhibited genotoxicity effects against MCF-7 DNA in a time-dependent manner by increasing mean percentage of DNA damage. The extract of E. hirta showed signi?cant toxicity against brine shrimp with an LC50 value of 620.382 µg/mL (24 h). Comparison with positive control potassium dichromate signifies that cytotoxicity exhibited by the methanol extract might have moderate activity. Conclusion The present work confirmed the cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of E. hirta. However, the observed toxicity of E. hirta extracts needs to be confirmed in additional studies. PMID:23998008

  16. Growth of melanocytes in human epidermal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Staiano-Coico, L.; Hefton, J.M.; Amadeo, C.; Pagan-Charry, I.; Madden, M.R.; Cardon-Cardo, C. )

    1990-08-01

    Epidermal cell cultures were grown in keratinocyte-conditioned medium for use as burn wound grafts; the melanocyte composition of the grafts was studied under a variety of conditions. Melanocytes were identified by immunohistochemistry based on a monoclonal antibody (MEL-5) that has previously been shown to react specifically with melanocytes. During the first 7 days of growth in primary culture, the total number of melanocytes in the epidermal cultures decreased to 10% of the number present in normal skin. Beginning on day 2 of culture, bipolar melanocytes were present at a mean cell density of 116 +/- 2/mm2; the keratinocyte to melanocyte ratio was preserved during further primary culture and through three subpassages. Moreover, exposure of cultures to mild UVB irradiation stimulated the melanocytes to proliferate, suggesting that the melanocytes growing in culture maintained their responsiveness to external stimuli. When the sheets of cultured cells were enzymatically detached from the plastic culture flasks before grafting, melanocytes remained in the basal layer of cells as part of the graft applied to the patient.

  17. Three-dimensional culture of annulus fibrosus cells within PDLLA/Bioglass composite foam scaffolds: assessment of cell attachment, proliferation and extracellular matrix production.

    PubMed

    Helen, Wilda; Merry, Catherine L R; Blaker, Jonny J; Gough, Julie E

    2007-04-01

    The objective of the present study was to assess cell attachment, proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) production by bovine annulus fibrosus (BAF) cells cultured in vitro in PDLLA/Bioglass composite foams. PDLLA foams incorporated with different percentages (0, 5 and 30wt%) of Bioglass particles were prepared by thermally induced phase separation (TIPS) process and characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). BAF cell morphology and attachment within the PDLLA/Bioglass foams were analysed using SEM. An assessment of cell proliferation was conducted using the WST-1 assay. The amount of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG) were quantified using the 1,9-dimethylmethylene blue (DMMB) assay after 4 weeks in culture. Furthermore, the amount of collagen synthesis was determined using a hydroxyproline assay, and the presence of collagen types I and II was investigated using Western blotting. Our results reveal that PDLLA/Bioglass foam scaffolds can provide an appropriate microenvironment for BAF cell culture which enhances cell proliferation and promotes the production of sGAG, collagen type I and collagen type II. These findings provide preliminary evidence for the use of PDLLA/Bioglass composite scaffolds as cell-carrier materials for future treatments of intervertebral discs with damaged AF regions. PMID:17250887

  18. Flow cytometric lifetime-based cell viability assay using propidium iodide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinkamp, John A.; Lehnert, Bruce E.; Lehnert, Nancy M.

    1999-05-01

    Assays which discriminate and enumerate dying or dead cells are important in various types of cellular studies. In many instances, there is a need to identify dead cells that interfere with fluorescent probes which are used to measure functional and physiological properties in viable cells. For example, dead cells can introduce analytical errors arising from (1) nonspecific uptake of fluorescent probes, leading to erroneous percentages of positive labeled cells, (2) increased autofluorescence, and (3) altered antigen expression. The ability to detect dead cells is also of importance in determining the effectiveness of cytotoxic agents. Propidium iodide (PPI) exclusion, which is analogous to the non- fluorescent trypan blue dye test for viability, is used extensively in flow cytometry assays. However, the use of PI can potentially limit the application of additional fluorescent probes due to spectral overlap of the probe with PI. In this report we present phase-resolved fluorescence studies on rat and murine thymus cells labeled with phycoerythrin-antiThy 1.1 and phycoerythrin/Texas Red-antiThy 1.2 immunofluorescence markers, respectively, and PI. Overlapping emission spectra are resolved based on differences in fluorescence lifetimes of the probes and PI. These studies demonstrate a new lifetime-based viability method for use in analysis of immunofluorescent probes and for assaying the dynamics of cell killing.

  19. Dynamic mass redistribution assay decodes differentiation of a neural progenitor stem cell.

    PubMed

    Pai, Sadashiva; Verrier, Florence; Sun, Haiyan; Hu, Haibei; Ferrie, Ann M; Eshraghi, Azita; Fang, Ye

    2012-10-01

    Stem cells hold great potential in drug discovery and development. However, challenges remain to quantitatively measure the functions of stem cells and their differentiated products. Here, we applied fluorescent imaging, quantitative real-time PCR, and label-free dynamic mass redistribution (DMR) assays to characterize the differentiation process of the ReNcell VM human neural progenitor stem cell. Immunofluorescence imaging showed that after growth factor withdrawal, the neuroprogenitor stem cell was differentiated into dopaminergic neurons, astrocytes, and oligodendrocytes, thus creating a neuronal cell system. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis showed that the differentiated cell system released dopamine upon depolarization with KCl. In conjunction with quantitative real-time PCR, DMR assays using a G-protein-coupled receptor agonist library revealed that a subset of receptors, including dopamine D(1) and D(4) receptors, underwent marked alterations in both receptor expression and signaling pathway during the differentiation process. These findings suggest that DMR assays can decode the differentiation process of stem cells at the cell system level. PMID:22885730

  20. Urokinase production by electrophoretically separated cultured human embryonic kidney cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunze, M. E.; Plank, L. D.; Giranda, V.; Sedor, K.; Todd, P. W.

    1985-01-01

    Urokinase is a plasminogen activator found in urine. Relatively pure preparations have been tested in Europe, Japan and the United States for the treatment of deep vein thrombosis and other dangerous blood clots. Human embryonic kidney cell cultures have been found to produce urokinase at much higher concentrations, but less than 5% of the cells in typical cultures are producers. Since human diploid cells become senescent in culture the selection of clones derived from single cells will not provide enough material to be useful, so a bulk purification method is needed for the isolation of urokinase producing cell populations. Preparative cell electrophoresis was chosen as the method, since evidence exists that human embryonic cell cultures are richly heterogeneous with respect to electrophoretic mobility, and preliminary electrophoretic separations on the Apollo-Soyuz space flight produced cell populations that were rich in urokinase production. Similarly, erythropoietin is useful in the treatment of certain anemias and is a kidney cell duct, and electrophoretically enriched cell populations producing this product have been reported. Thus, there is a clear need for diploid human cells that produce these products, and there is evidence that such cells should be separable by free-flow cell electrophoresis.

  1. Cite this: Lab Chip, 2013, 13, 424 Kit-On-A-Lid-Assays for accessible self-contained cell

    E-print Network

    Beebe, David J.

    favorably. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform technology called ``Kit-On-A-Lid-Assay'' (KOALA to perform cell-based assays. The KOALA platform allows the pre-packaging of reagents, cryopreservation-based assays. The operation of the KOALA platform is user-friendly and consists of bringing together a lid

  2. Blood Culture and Stimulation Conditions for the Diagnosis of Tuberculosis in Cervids by the Cervigam Assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mitogen and antigen induced interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) responses of peripheral blood leukocytes from cervids were evaluated using a commercial, whole blood assay for the cytokine (Cervigam trademark, Prionics AG). Whole blood was from Mycobacterium bovis-infected white-tailed deer and reindeer, M....

  3. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Goodman, C H; Russell, B J; Velez, J O; Laven, J J; Nicholson, W L; Bagarozzi, D A; Moon, J L; Bedi, K; Johnson, B W

    2014-11-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus. PMID:25102428

  4. Development of an algorithm for production of inactivated arbovirus antigens in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Goodman, C.H.; Russell, B.J.; Velez, J.O.; Laven, J.J.; Nicholson, W.L; Bagarozzi, D.A.; Moon, J.L.; Bedi, K.; Johnson, B.W.

    2015-01-01

    Arboviruses are medically important pathogens that cause human disease ranging from a mild fever to encephalitis. Laboratory diagnosis is essential to differentiate arbovirus infections from other pathogens with similar clinical manifestations. The Arboviral Diseases Branch (ADB) reference laboratory at the CDC Division of Vector-Borne Diseases (DVBD) produces reference antigens used in serological assays such as the virus-specific immunoglobulin M antibody-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MAC-ELISA). Antigen production in cell culture has largely replaced the use of suckling mice; however, the methods are not directly transferable. The development of a cell culture antigen production algorithm for nine arboviruses from the three main arbovirus families, Flaviviridae, Togaviridae, and Bunyaviridae, is described here. Virus cell culture growth and harvest conditions were optimized, inactivation methods were evaluated, and concentration procedures were compared for each virus. Antigen performance was evaluated by the MAC-ELISA at each step of the procedure. The antigen production algorithm is a framework for standardization of methodology and quality control; however, a single antigen production protocol was not applicable to all arboviruses and needed to be optimized for each virus. PMID:25102428

  5. A novel high-throughput nematicidal assay using embryo cells and larvae of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yiling; Xiang, Meichun; Liu, Shuchun; Li, Erwei; Che, Yongsheng; Liu, Xingzhong

    2014-04-01

    Human health safety and environmental concerns have resulted in the widespread deregistration of several agronomic important nematicides. New and safer nematicides are urgently needed. However, a high-throughput bioassay for screening potential nematicides has not been established. We developed a two-step high-throughput nematicidal screening method to combine a cell-based MTS colorimetric assay with Caenorhabditis elegans embryo cells for preliminary cytotoxicity screening (step 1) followed by in vitro larval assay for nematicidal activity (step 2). Based on three conventional nematicides' test, high correlations were obtained between cell viability and larval viability and "r" values were 0.78 for Avermectin, 0.95 for Fosthiazate, and 0.65 for Formaldehyde solution. Further assays with 60 fungal secondary metabolites (extracts, fractions and pure compounds) also demonstrated the high correlation between cell viability and larval viability (r=0.60) and between the C. elegans cell viability and the juvenile viability of soybean cyst nematode Heterodera glycines (r=0.48) and pine wood nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (r=0.56). Six metabolites with high cytotoxicity have performed high larval mortality with a LC50 range of 6.8-500?g/ml. These results indicate that the proposed two-step screening assay represents an efficient and labor-saving method for screening natural nematicidal products. PMID:24594258

  6. Cell culture on hydrophilicity-controlled silicon nitride surfaces.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Miyakawa, Atsuo; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-12-01

    Cell culture on silicon nitride membranes is required for atmospheric scanning electron microscopy, electron beam excitation assisted optical microscopy, and various biological sensors. Cell adhesion to silicon nitride membranes is typically weak, and cell proliferation is limited. We increased the adhesion force and proliferation of cultured HeLa cells by controlling the surface hydrophilicity of silicon nitride membranes. We covalently coupled carboxyl groups on silicon nitride membranes, and measured the contact angles of water droplets on the surfaces to evaluate the hydrophilicity. We cultured HeLa cells on the coated membranes and evaluated stretch of the cell. Cell migration and confluence were observed on the coated silicon nitride films. We also demonstrated preliminary observation result with direct electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope. PMID:26415963

  7. The cellular thermal shift assay for evaluating drug target interactions in cells.

    PubMed

    Jafari, Rozbeh; Almqvist, Helena; Axelsson, Hanna; Ignatushchenko, Marina; Lundbäck, Thomas; Nordlund, Pär; Martinez Molina, Daniel

    2014-09-01

    Thermal shift assays are used to study thermal stabilization of proteins upon ligand binding. Such assays have been used extensively on purified proteins in the drug discovery industry and in academia to detect interactions. Recently, we published a proof-of-principle study describing the implementation of thermal shift assays in a cellular format, which we call the cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA). The method allows studies of target engagement of drug candidates in a cellular context, herein exemplified with experimental data on the human kinases p38? and ERK1/2. The assay involves treatment of cells with a compound of interest, heating to denature and precipitate proteins, cell lysis, and the separation of cell debris and aggregates from the soluble protein fraction. Whereas unbound proteins denature and precipitate at elevated temperatures, ligand-bound proteins remain in solution. We describe two procedures for detecting the stabilized protein in the soluble fraction of the samples. One approach involves sample workup and detection using quantitative western blotting, whereas the second is performed directly in solution and relies on the induced proximity of two target-directed antibodies upon binding to soluble protein. The latter protocol has been optimized to allow an increased throughput, as potential applications require large numbers of samples. Both approaches can be completed in a day. PMID:25101824

  8. Establishment, culture, and characterization of Guinea pig fetal fibroblast cell.

    PubMed

    Mehrabani, Davood; Mahboobi, Reza; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Zare, Shahrokh; Tamadon, Amin; Hosseini, Seyed Ebrahim

    2014-01-01

    Establishment of Guinea pig fetal fibroblast cells and their biological evaluation before and after cryopreservation were the main purposes of this study. After determination of the proper age of pregnancy by ultrasonography, 30 days old fetuses of Guinea pigs were recovered. Their skins were cut into small pieces (1?mm(2)) and were cultured. When reaching 80-90% confluence, the cells were passaged. Cells of the second and eighth passages were cultured in 24-well plates (4 × 10(4) cells/well) for 6 days and three wells per day were counted. The average cell counts at each time point were then plotted against time and the population doubling time (PDT) was determined. Then, vials of cells (2 × 10(6) cells/mL) were cryopreserved for 1 month and after thawing, the cell viability was evaluated. The PDT of the second passage was about 23?h and for the eighth passage was about 30?h. The viability of the cultures was 95% in the second passage and 74.5% in the eighth passage. It was shown that the Guinea pig fetal fibroblast cell culture can be established using the adherent culture method while, after freezing, the viability indices of these cells were favorable. PMID:24790770

  9. Recent developments in cell-based assays and stem cell technologies for Botulinum neurotoxin research and drug discovery

    PubMed Central

    Kiris, Erkan; Kota, Krishna P.; Burnett, James C.; Soloveva, Veronica; Kane, Christopher D.; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are exceptionally potent inhibitors of neurotransmission, causing muscle paralysis and respiratory failure associated with the disease botulism. Currently, no drugs are available to counter intracellular BoNT poisoning. To develop effective medical treatments, cell-based assays provide a valuable system to identify novel inhibitors in a time- and cost-efficient manner. Consequently, cell-based systems including immortalized cells, primary neurons, and stem-cell derived neurons have been established. Stem cell-derived neurons are highly sensitive to BoNT intoxication and represent an ideal model to study the biological effects of BoNTs. Robust immunoassays are used to quantify BoNT activity and play a central role during inhibitor screening. In this review, we examine recent progress in physiologically relevant cell-based assays and high-throughput screening approaches for the identification of both direct and indirect BoNT inhibitors. PMID:24450833

  10. Different Donor Cell Culture Methods Can Influence the Developmental Ability of Cloned Sheep Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shan; Li, WenDa

    2015-01-01

    It was proposed that arresting nuclear donor cells in G0/G1 phase facilitates the development of embryos that are derived from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Full confluency or serum starvation is commonly used to arrest in vitro cultured somatic cells in G0/G1 phase. However, it is controversial as to whether these two methods have the same efficiency in arresting somatic cells in G0/G1 phase. Moreover, it is unclear whether the cloned embryos have comparable developmental ability after somatic cells are subjected to one of these methods and then used as nuclear donors in SCNT. In the present study, in vitro cultured sheep skin fibroblasts were divided into four groups: (1) cultured to 70–80% confluency (control group), (2) cultured to full confluency, (3) starved in low serum medium for 4 d, or (4) cultured to full confluency and then further starved for 4 d. Flow cytometry was used to assay the percentage of fibroblasts in G0/G1 phase, and cell counting was used to assay the viability of the fibroblasts. Then, real-time reverse transcription PCR was used to determine the levels of expression of several cell cycle-related genes. Subsequently, the four groups of fibroblasts were separately used as nuclear donors in SCNT, and the developmental ability and the quality of the cloned embryos were compared. The results showed that the percentage of fibroblasts in G0/G1 phase, the viability of fibroblasts, and the expression levels of cell cycle-related genes was different among the four groups of fibroblasts. Moreover, the quality of the cloned embryos was comparable after these four groups of fibroblasts were separately used as nuclear donors in SCNT. However, cloned embryos derived from fibroblasts that were cultured to full confluency combined with serum starvation had the highest developmental ability. The results of the present study indicate that there are synergistic effects of full confluency and serum starvation on arresting fibroblasts in G0/G1 phase, and the short-term treatment of nuclear donor cells with these two methods could improve the efficiency of SCNT. PMID:26291536

  11. Dynamic Transcription Factor Activity Profiling in 2D and 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, Abigail D.; Bernabé, Beatriz Peñalver; Weiss, Michael S.; Shin, Seungjin; Weng, Stanley; Broadbelt, Linda J.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2014-01-01

    Live-cell assays to measure cellular function performed within 3D cultures have the potential to elucidate the underlying processes behind disease progression and tissue formation. Cells cultured in 3D interact and remodel their microenvironment and can develop into complex structures. We have developed a transcription factor (TF) activity array that uses bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of lentiviral delivered luminescent reporter constructs that allows for the non-invasive imaging of TF activity in both 2D and 3D culture. Imaging can be applied repeatedly throughout culture to capture dynamic TF activity, though appropriate normalization is necessary. We investigated in-well normalization using Gaussia or Renilla luciferase, and external well normalization using firefly luciferase. Gaussia and Renilla luciferase were each unable to provide consistent normalization for long-term measurement of TF activity. However, external well normalization provided low variability and accounted for changes in cellular dynamics. Using external normalization, dynamic TF activities were quantified for five TFs. The array captured expected changes in TF activity to stimuli, however the array also provided dynamic profiles within 2D and 3D that have not been previously characterized. The development of the technology to dynamically track TF activity within cells cultured in both 2D and 3D can provide greater understanding of complex cellular processes. PMID:22949103

  12. Growth, ageing and death of a photoautotrophic plant cell culture.

    PubMed

    Peters, W; Ritter, J; Tiller, H; Valdes, O; Renner, U; Fountain, M; Beck, E

    2000-02-01

    Batch cultures of photoautotrophic cell suspensions of Chenopodium rubrum L., growing in an inorganic medium on CO2 under a daily balanced light-dark regime of 16: 8 h could be maintained for approximately 100 d without subcultivation. The long-lived cultures showed an initial cell division phase of 4 weeks, followed by a stationary phase of another 4 weeks, after which ageing and progressive cell death reduced the number of living cells and the cultures usually expired after another 3-4 weeks. These developmental phases of the cell culture were characterised with respect to photosynthetic performance, dark respiration, content of phytohormones and capacity of cell division. Cell division of the majority of the cells finished in the G1- or G0-phase of the cell cycle, caused by a pronounced decline in the endogenous levels of auxin and cytokinins. Supply of these growth factors to resting cells resulted in resumption of cytokinesis, at least by some of the cells. However, responsiveness to the phytohormones declined during the stationary phase, and subcultivation was no longer possible beyond day 60 when the phases of ageing and death commenced. Ageing was characterised by a further decline in the photosynthetic capacity of the cells, by a climacteric enhancement of dark respiration, but also by a slight increase in the level of IAA and cytokinins concomitant with a decrease in ethylene. Similarities and differences between the development of batch-cultured photoautotrophic cells of C. rubrum and that of a leaf are discussed with respect to using the cell culture as a model for a leaf. PMID:10750906

  13. Comprehensive analysis of signal transduction in three-dimensional ECM-based tumor cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Eke, Iris; Hehlgans, Stephanie; Zong, Yaping; Cordes, Nils

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of signal transduction and protein phosphorylation is fundamental to understanding physiological and pathological cell behavior and identifying novel therapeutic targets. Despite the fact that the use of physiological three-dimensional cell culture assays is increasing, 3D proteomics and phosphoproteomics remain challenging due to difficulties with easy, robust and reproducible sample preparation. Here, we present an easy-to-perform, reliable and time-efficient method for the production of 3D cell lysates that does not compromise cell adhesion before cell lysis. The samples can be used for western blotting as well as phosphoproteome array technology. This technique will be of interest for researchers working in all fields of biology and drug development. PMID:26618185

  14. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  15. Assaying Blood Cell Populations of the Drosophila melanogaster Larva

    PubMed Central

    Petraki, Sophia; Alexander, Brandy; Brückner, Katja

    2015-01-01

    In vertebrates, hematopoiesis is regulated by inductive microenvironments (niches). Likewise, in the invertebrate model organism Drosophila melanogaster, inductive microenvironments known as larval Hematopoietic Pockets (HPs) have been identified as anatomical sites for the development and regulation of blood cells (hemocytes), in particular of the self-renewing macrophage lineage. HPs are segmentally repeated pockets between the epidermis and muscle layers of the larva, which also comprise sensory neurons of the peripheral nervous system. In the larva, resident (sessile) hemocytes are exposed to anti-apoptotic, adhesive and proliferative cues from these sensory neurons and potentially other components of the HPs, such as the lining muscle and epithelial layers. During normal development, gradual release of resident hemocytes from the HPs fuels the population of circulating hemocytes, which culminates in the release of most of the resident hemocytes at the beginning of metamorphosis. Immune assaults, physical injury or mechanical disturbance trigger the premature release of resident hemocytes into circulation. The switch of larval hemocytes between resident locations and circulation raises the need for a common standard/procedure to selectively isolate and quantify these two populations of blood cells from single Drosophila larvae. Accordingly, this protocol describes an automated method to release and quantify the resident and circulating hemocytes from single larvae. The method facilitates ex vivo approaches, and may be adapted to serve a variety of developmental stages of Drosophila and other invertebrate organisms. PMID:26650404

  16. Insect cell culture and applications to research and pest management

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Building on earlier research, insect cell culture began with the successful establishment of one cell line from pupal ovarian tissue. The field has grown to the extent that now over 500 insect cell lines have been established from many insect species representing numerous insect Orders and from seve...

  17. Immunodissection and culture of rabbit cortical collecting tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spielman, W.S.; Sonnenburg, W.K.; Allen, M.L.; Arend, L.J.; Gerozissis, K.; Smith, W.L.

    1986-08-01

    A mouse monoclonal antibody designated IgG3 (rct-30) has been prepared that reacts specifically with an antigen on the surface of all cells comprising the cortical and medullary rabbit renal collecting tubule including the arcades. Plastic culture dishes coated with IgG3 (rct-30) were used to isolate collecting tubule cells from collagenase dispersions of rabbit renal cortical cells by immunoadsorption. Typically, 10W rabbit cortical collecting tubule (RCCT) cells were obtained from 5 g of renal cortex (2 kidneys). Between 20 and 30% of the RCCT cells were reactive with peanut lectin suggesting that RCCT cells are a mixture of principal and intercalated cells. Approximately 10X RCCT cells were obtained after 4 to 5 days in primary culture. Moreover, RCCT cells continued to proliferate after passaging with a doubling time of approx.32 h. RCCT cells passaged once and then cultured 4-5 days were found 1) to synthesize cAMP in response to arginine vasopressin (AVP), prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), isoproterenol, and parathyroid hormone, but not calcitonin, prostaglandin D2, or prostaglandin I, and 2) to release PGE2 in response to bradykinin but not arginine vasopressin or isoproterenol. The results indicate that cultured RCCT cells retain many of the hormonal, histochemical, and morphological properties expected for a mixture of principal and intercalated rabbit cortical collecting tubule epithelia. RCCT cells should prove useful both for studying hormonal interactions in the cortical collecting tubule and as a starting population for isolating intercalated collecting tubule epithelia.

  18. Improved Method for Culturing Guinea-Pig Macrophage Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, J.

    1982-01-01

    Proper nutrients and periodic changes in culture medium maintain cell viability for a longer period. New method uses a thioglycolate solution, instead of mineral oil, to induce macrophage cells in guinea pigs and also uses an increased percent of fetal-calf bovine serum in cultivation medium. Macrophage cells play significant roles in the body's healing and defense systems.

  19. TRANSFORMATION OF SUGAR BEET CELL SUSPENSION CULTURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A sugar beet transformation method was developed using particle bombardment of short-term suspension cultures of a breeding line FC607. Highly embryogenic suspension cultures derived from leaf callus were bombarded with the uidA (GUS) reporter gene under the control of either the osmotin or protein...

  20. Preparation and use of HIV-1 infected primary CD4+ T-cells as target cells in natural killer cell cytotoxic assays.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Ward, Jeffrey P; Barker, Edward

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a vital component of the innate immune response to virus-infected cells. It is important to understand the ability of NK cells to recognize and lyse HIV-1 infected cells because identifying any aberrancy in NK cell function against HIV-infected cells could potentially lead to therapies that would enhance their cytolytic activity. There is a need to use HIV-infected primary T-cell blasts as target cells rather then infected-T-cell lines in the cytotoxicity assays. T-cell lines, even without infection, are quite susceptible to NK cell lysis. Furthermore, it is necessary to use autologous primary cells to prevent major histocompatibility complex class I mismatches between the target and effector cell that will result in lysis. Early studies evaluating NK cell cytolytic responses to primary HIV-infected cells failed to show significant killing of the infected cells. However, using HIV-1 infected primary T-cells as target cells in NK cell functional assays has been difficult due the presence of contaminating uninfected cells. This inconsistent infected cell to uninfected cell ratio will result in variation in NK cell killing between samples that may not be due to variability in donor NK cell function. Thus, it would be beneficial to work with a purified infected cell population in order to standardize the effector to target cell ratios between experiments. Here we demonstrate the isolation of a highly purified population of HIV-1 infected cells by taking advantage of HIV-1's ability to down-modulate CD4 on infected cells and the availability of commercial kits to remove dead or dying cells. The purified infected primary T-cell blasts can then be used as targets in either a degranulation or cytotoxic assay with purified NK cells as the effector population. Use of NK cells as effectors in a degranulation assay evaluates the ability of an NK cell to release the lytic contents of specialized lysosomes called "cytolytic granules". By staining with a fluorochrome conjugated antibody against CD107a, a lysosomal membrane protein that becomes expressed on the NK cell surface when the cytolytic granules fuse to the plasma membrane, we can determine what percentage of NK cells degranulate in response to target cell recognition. Alternatively, NK cell lytic activity can be evaluated in a cytotoxic assay that allows for the determination of the percentage of target cells lysed by release of (51)Cr from within the target cell in the presence of NK cells. PMID:21445040

  1. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  2. 21 CFR 876.5885 - Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and... DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5885 Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell culture processing applications. (a) Identification. Tissue culture media for human ex vivo tissue and cell...

  3. A CpG-methylation-based assay to predict survival in clear cell renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jin-Huan; Haddad, Ahmed; Wu, Kai-Jie; Zhao, Hong-Wei; Kapur, Payal; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Zhao, Liang-Yun; Chen, Zhen-Hua; Zhou, Yun-Yun; Zhou, Jian-Cheng; Wang, Bin; Yu, Yan-Hong; Cai, Mu-Yan; Xie, Dan; Liao, Bing; Li, Cai-Xia; Li, Pei-Xing; Wang, Zong-Ren; Zhou, Fang-Jian; Shi, Lei; Liu, Qing-Zuo; Gao, Zhen-Li; He, Da-Lin; Chen, Wei; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; Li, Quan-Zhen; Margulis, Vitaly; Luo, Jun-Hang

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) display divergent clinical behaviours. Molecular markers might improve risk stratification of ccRCC. Here we use, based on genome-wide CpG methylation profiling, a LASSO model to develop a five-CpG-based assay for ccRCC prognosis that can be used with formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded specimens. The five-CpG-based classifier was validated in three independent sets from China, United States and the Cancer Genome Atlas data set. The classifier predicts the overall survival of ccRCC patients (hazard ratio=2.96-4.82; P=3.9 × 10(-6)-2.2 × 10(-9)), independent of standard clinical prognostic factors. The five-CpG-based classifier successfully categorizes patients into high-risk and low-risk groups, with significant differences of clinical outcome in respective clinical stages and individual 'stage, size, grade and necrosis' scores. Moreover, methylation at the five CpGs correlates with expression of five genes: PITX1, FOXE3, TWF2, EHBP1L1 and RIN1. Our five-CpG-based classifier is a practical and reliable prognostic tool for ccRCC that can add prognostic value to the staging system. PMID:26515236

  4. EVALUATING VIRULENCE OF WATERBORNE AND CLINCIAL AEROMONAS ISOLATES USING GENE EXPRESSION AND MORTALITY IN NEONATAL MICE FOLLOWED BY ASSESSING CELL CULTURE'S ABILITY TO PREDICT VIRULENCE BASED ON TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The virulence of multiple Aeromonas spp. were assessed using two models, a neonatal mouse assay and a mouse intestinal cell culture. Transcriptional responses to both infection models were assessed using microarrays. After artificial infection with a variety of Aeromonas spp., ...

  5. Preparation of Feeder plates for ES cell culture Gelatinize Tissue Culture Plates

    E-print Network

    Preparation of Feeder plates for ES cell culture Gelatinize Tissue Culture Plates Gelatinize plates with 0.1% gelatin at room temperature for two hours. (150 µl/well of 96 well plate; 12 ml/10 cm; 4 ml/6cm. Plate cells in gelatinized plates (150 µl/well of 96 well plate; 12 ml/10 cm; 4 ml/6cm; 2 ml/well of 6

  6. Mechanical & cell culture properties of elastin-like polypeptide, collagen, bioglass, and carbon nanosphere composites.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Tyler S; Sbravati, Nathanael D; Janorkar, Amol V

    2013-10-01

    Collagen, the most commonly used extra-cellular matrix protein for tissue engineering applications, displays poor mechanical properties. Here, we report on the preparation and characterization of novel multi-component composite systems that incorporate a genetically engineered, biocompatible polymer (elastin-like polypeptide, ELP), biodegradable ceramic (45S5 bioglass), carbon nanosphere chains (CNSC), and minimal amount (~25% w/w) of collagen. We hypothesized that incorporation of bioglass and CNSC would improve mechanical properties of the composites. Our results showed that the tensile strength and elastic modulus nearly doubled after addition of the bioglass and CNSC compared to the control ELP-collagen hydrogels. Further, MC3T3-E1 pre-osteoblasts were cultured within the composite hydrogels and a thorough biochemical and morphological characterization was performed. Live/dead assay confirmed high cell viability (>95%) for all hydrogels by day 21 of culture. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and osteocalcin (OCN) production assessed the pre-osteoblast differentiation. Normalized ALP activity was highest for the cells cultured within ELP-bioglass-collagen hydrogels, while normalized OCN production was equivalent for all hydrogels. Alizarin red staining confirmed the mineral deposition by the cells within all hydrogels. Thus, the multi-component composite hydrogels displayed improved mechanical and cell culture properties and may be suitable scaffold materials for bone tissue engineering. PMID:23677640

  7. In vitro antioxidant effect of Camellia sinensis on human cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Yasmeen, Humaira; Hasnain, Shahida

    2015-09-01

    Camellia sinensisis traditionally used in many polyherbal preparations for the treatment of different diseases and infections. Its action has been associated with its antioxidant activities. In this study, antioxidant effect of Camellia sinensis on hydrogen peroxide-induced human lymphocyte cell cultures was estimated. Camellia sinensis showed high contents of ascorbic acid, phenols, flavonoids, and flavonols. Good scavenging activity was evident by scavenging assays e.g. 2,2-DiPhenyl-2-Picrylhydrazyl Hydrate (DPPH), 2,2-Azinobis (3-ethyl-BenzoThiazoline-6-Sulfonic acid (ABTS) radical assay and reducing power assay. Moreover, High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC-UV) chromatographs showed many notable peaks of unidentified bioactive compounds. In vitro antioxidant actions were determined by the activities of catalase (ELISA kit method), superoxide dismutase, lipid peroxidation and total protein contents on lymphocyte cell cultures. In vitro experimental trial showed strong antioxidant repair mechanism of plant against oxidative stress. Results of extraction with solvent methanol showed the highest antioxidant activity. Camellia sinensis is promising source of natural antioxidants and further studies might be a likely source of its use in remedy of different diseases. PMID:26408866

  8. A Rapid Assay for Gene Expression in Cotton Cells Transformed with Oncogenic Binary Agrobacterium Strains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple expression assay for evaluation of gene constructs for input of traits into cotton cells (Gossypium hirsutum L.) using oncogenic binary Agrobacterium strains is presented. Explants from three commercial cotton varieties, representing diverse genotypes, exhibited tumor or root formation to ...

  9. Dendritic cell migration assay: a potential prediction model for identification of contact allergens.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, Susan; Spiekstra, Sander; Corsini, Emanuela; McLeod, Julie; Reinders, Judith

    2013-04-01

    This manuscript describes methodology and a prediction model for the MUTZ-LC migration assay. The assay represents the physiological change in Langerhans cell (LC) behavior after exposure to a sensitizing chemical, resulting in LC migration from the epidermis to the dermis. MUTZ-LC are derived from the commercially available MUTZ-3 cell line. Upon exposure to a sensitizer MUTZ-LC migrate preferentially towards CXCL12 whereas upon exposure to a non-sensitizer MUTZ-LC migrate towards CCL5. A CXCL12/CCL5 ratio >1.10 in 2/3 independent experiments is indicative of a sensitizer, whereas a CXCL12/CCL5 ratio ?1.10 is indicative of a non-sensitizer. At non cytotoxic chemical concentrations 9 sensitizers (2,4-dinitrochlorobenzene, paraphenylendiamine, cinnamaldehyde, isoeugenol, nickel-sulfate, tetramethylthiuram disulfide, eugenol, cinnamic-alcohol, ammonium-hexachloroplatinate) were distinguished from 4 non sensitizers (sodium lauryl sulfate, salicylic acid, phenol, octanoic acid). Critical points in assay performance are (i) MUTZ-3 passage number after thawing (p6-p40); (ii) cell viability (>80%); (iii) standard curve to optimize correlation of fluorescence with cell number; and (iv) optimization of the concentration of rhCXCL12 and rhCCL5 in transwell. The protocol has been tested in three European laboratories and results suggest that it may provide working conditions for performing the DC migration assay which is aimed at distinguishing sensitizers from non sensitizers. PMID:22683935

  10. CONTROLLING ACOUSTIC STREAMING IN A MULTI-WELL MICROPLATE FOR IMPROVING LIVE CELL ASSAYS

    E-print Network

    CONTROLLING ACOUSTIC STREAMING IN A MULTI-WELL MICROPLATE FOR IMPROVING LIVE CELL ASSAYS M. Ohlin of Technology, SWEDEN ABSTRACT Acoustic streaming in a multi-well microplate is investigated using two different ultrasonic actuation frequency-schemes: Single-frequency and frequency-modulation. The streaming is tracked