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Sample records for cell culture assay

  1. Biochemical Assays of Cultured Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barlow, G. H.

    1985-01-01

    Subpopulations of human embryonic kidney cells isolated from continuous flow electrophoresis experiments performed at McDonnell Douglas and on STS-8 have been analyzed. These analyses have included plasminogen activator assays involving indirect methodology on fibrin plated and direct methodology using chromogenic substrates. Immunological studies were performed and the conditioned media for erythropoietin activity and human granulocyte colony stimulating (HGCSF) activity was analyzed.

  2. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  3. Microcystis aeruginosa toxin: cell culture toxicity, hemolysis, and mutagenicity assays.

    PubMed Central

    Grabow, W O; Du Randt, W C; Prozesky, O W; Scott, W E

    1982-01-01

    Crude toxin was prepared by lyophilization and extraction of toxic Microcystis aeruginosa from four natural sources and a unicellular laboratory culture. The responses of cultures of liver (Mahlavu and PCL/PRF/5), lung (MRC-5), cervix (HeLa), ovary (CHO-K1), and kidney (BGM, MA-104, and Vero) cell lines to these preparations did not differ significantly from one another, indicating that toxicity was not specific for liver cells. The results of a trypan blue staining test showed that the toxin disrupted cell membrane permeability within a few minutes. Human, mouse, rat, sheep, and Muscovy duck erythrocytes were also lysed within a few minutes. Hemolysis was temperature dependent, and the reaction seemed to follow first-order kinetics. Escherichia coli, Streptococcus faecalis, and Tetrahymena pyriformis were not significantly affected by the toxin. The toxin yielded negative results in Ames/Salmonella mutagenicity assays. Microtiter cell culture, trypan blue, and hemolysis assays for Microcystis toxin are described. The effect of the toxin on mammalian cell cultures was characterized by extensive disintegration of cells and was distinguishable from the effects of E. coli enterotoxin, toxic chemicals, and pesticides. A possible reason for the acute lethal effect of Microcystis toxin, based on cytolytic activity, is discussed. Images PMID:6808921

  4. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Hutchison, Janine R.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Valentine, Nancy B.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Ozanich, Richard M.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2013-01-10

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that leads to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be 1) of human gastrointestinal origin, 2) expresses apical microvilli, and 3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log10 increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both reverse transcription quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. Using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus.

  5. Defining cell culture conditions to improve human norovirus infectivity assays.

    PubMed

    Straub, T M; Hutchison, J R; Bartholomew, R A; Valdez, C O; Valentine, N B; Dohnalkova, A; Ozanich, R M; Bruckner-Lea, C J

    2013-01-01

    Significant difficulties remain for determining whether human noroviruses (hNoV) recovered from water, food, and environmental samples are infectious. Three-dimensional (3-D) tissue culture of human intestinal cells has shown promise in developing an infectivity assay, but reproducibility, even within a single laboratory, remains problematic. From the literature and our observations, we hypothesized that the common factors that lead to more reproducible hNoV infectivity in vitro requires that the cell line be (1) of human gastrointestinal origin, (2) expresses apical microvilli, and (3) be a positive secretor cell line. The C2BBe1 cell line, which is a brush-border producing clone of Caco-2, meets these three criteria. When challenged with Genogroup II viruses, we observed a 2 Log(10) increase in viral RNA titer. A passage experiment with GII viruses showed evidence of the ability to propagate hNoV by both quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and microscopy. In our hands, using 3-D C2BBe1 cells improves reproducibility of the infectivity assay for hNoV, but the assay can still be variable. Two sources of variability include the cells themselves (mixed phenotypes of small and large intestine) and initial titer measurements using qRT-PCR that measures all RNA vs. plaque assays that measure infectious virus. PMID:23306266

  6. A cell culture assay for the detection of cardiotoxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Loew-Friedrich, Iv.; von Bredow, F.; Schoeppe, W. )

    1991-04-01

    An important step in minimizing the number of animal experiments in medical research is the study of in vitro model systems. The authors propose the use of shock protein formation, which is a cellular response to cell-damaging stress as an assay to monitor cardiotoxicity. Isolated and cultured cardiac myocytes were prepared by a trypsin digestion method from 18-day-old fetal mice. These cells respond to typical substances inducing shock protein formation in other cellular systems as well as to known cardiotoxins with the de novo synthesis of shock proteins. Pharmaceuticals relevant in transplant medicine were tested for possible cardiotoxic effects: Cyclosporine A evokes shock protein formation at subtherapeutic concentrations. Azathioprine and methyl-prednisolone exert the same effect but at concentration ranges highly above the therapeutic level. The ability to induce shock protein synthesis obviously seems to be restricted to toxic drugs. The data presented demonstrate that the proposed in vitro model system for cardiotoxicity is animal saving and sensitive.

  7. In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin A.; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia A.; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-01-30

    Human noroviruses (NoV) cause severe, self-limiting gastroenteritis that typically lasts 24 - 48 hours. The true nature of NoV pathogenesis remains unknown due to the lack of suitable tissue culture or animal models. Here we show, for the first time, that NoV can infect and replicate in an organoid, three-dimensional (3-D) model of human small intestinal epithelium (INT-407). Cellular differentiation for this model was achieved by growing the cells in 3-D on porous collagen I-coated microcarrier beads under conditions of physiological fluid shear in rotating wall vessel bioreactors. Microscopy, PCR, and fluorescent in-situ hybridization were employed to provide evidence of NoV infection. CPE and norovirus RNA was detected at each of the five cell passages for both genogroup I and II viruses. Our results demonstrate that the highly differentiated 3-D cell culture model can support the natural growth of human noroviruses, whereas previous attempts using differentiated monolayer cultures failed.

  8. Gonococcal and meningococcal pathogenesis as defined by human cell, cell culture, and organ culture assays.

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, D S

    1989-01-01

    Human cells, cell cultures, and organ cultures have been extremely useful for studying the events that occur when gonococci and meningococci encounter human mucosal surfaces. The specificity and selectivity of these events for human cells are striking and correlate with the adaptation of these pathogens for survival on human mucous membranes. To colonize these sites, meningococci and gonococci have developed mechanisms to damage local host defenses such as the mucociliary blanket, to attach to epithelial cells, and to invade these cells. Attachment to epithelial cells mediated by pili, and to some types of cells mediated by PIIs, serves to anchor the organism close to sources of nutrition and allows multiplication. Intracellular invasion, possibly initiated by the major porin protein, may provide additional nutritional support and protection from host defenses. Mucosal invasion may also result in access of gonococci and meningococci to the bloodstream, leading to dissemination. Images PMID:2497953

  9. Comparison of two rapid assays for Clostridium difficile Common antigen and a C difficile toxin A/B assay with the cell culture neutralization assay.

    PubMed

    Reller, Megan E; Alcabasa, Romina C; Lema, Clara A; Carroll, Karen C

    2010-01-01

    We compared 3 rapid assays for Clostridium difficile with a cell culture cytotoxicity neutralization assay (CCNA). Of 600 stool samples, 46 were positive for toxigenic C difficile. Both rapid common antigen assays were highly sensitive (91.3%-100%) and, therefore, were appropriate screening tests. The rapid toxin assay had poor sensitivity (61%) but excellent specificity (99.3%). Testing stools for glutamate dehydrogenase (step 1) and those positive with a rapid toxin assay (step 2) would correctly classify 81% of submitted specimens within 2 hours, including during periods of limited staffing (evenings, nights, and weekends). CCNA could then be used as a third step to test rapid toxin-negative samples, thereby providing a final result for the remaining 19% of samples by 48 to 72 hours. The use of rapid assays as outlined could enhance timely diagnosis of C difficile. PMID:20023265

  10. Microfluidic cell culture chip with multiplexed medium delivery and efficient cell/scaffold loading mechanisms for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional cell culture-based assays.

    PubMed

    Huang, Song-Bin; Wu, Min-Hsien; Wang, Shih-Siou; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2011-06-01

    This study reports a microfluidic cell culture chip consisting of 48 microbioreactors for high-throughput perfusion 3-dimensional (3-D) cell culture-based assays. Its advantages include the capability for multiplexed and backflow-free medium delivery, and both efficient and high-throughput micro-scale, 3-D cell culture construct loading. In this work, the microfluidic cell culture chip is fabricated using two major processes, specifically, a computer-numerical-controlled (CNC) mold machining process and a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) replication process. The chip is composed of micropumps, microbioreactors, connecting microchannels and a cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism. The performance of the new pneumatic micropumps and the cell/agarose scaffold loading mechanism has been experimentally evaluated. The experimental results show that this proposed multiplexed medium-pumping design is able to provide a uniform pumping rate ranging from 1.5 to 298.3 μl hr(-1) without any fluid backflow and the resultant medium contamination. In addition, the simple cell/agarose loading method has been proven to be able to load the 3-D cell culture construct uniformly and efficiently in all 48 microbioreactors investigated. Furthermore, a micro-scale, perfusion, 3-D cell culture-based assay has been successfully demonstrated using this proposed cell culture chip. The experimental results are also compared to a similar evaluation using a conventional static 3-D cell culture with a larger scale culture. It is concluded that the choice of a cell culture format can influence assay results. As a whole, because of the inherent advantages of a miniaturized perfusion 3-D cell culture assay, the cell culture chip not only can provide a stable, well-defined and more biologically-meaningful culture environment, but it also features a low consumption of research resources. Moreover, due to the integrated medium pumping mechanism and the simple cell/agarose loading method, this chip is economical and time efficient. All of these traits are particularly useful for high-precision and high-throughput 3-D cell culture-based assays. PMID:21234690

  11. COMPARATIVE TOXICITIES OF DIFFERENT FORMS OF ASBESTOS IN A CELL CULTURE ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three forms of Union Internationale Contre le Cancer (UICC) asbestos, amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile, were assayed for their cytotoxicity (inhibition of colony formation) in cell culture. Using embryonic human intestine-derived (I-407) and adult rat liver-derived (ARL-6) ep...

  12. Toxicity of cyanoacrylates in vitro using extract dilution assay on cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Ciapetti, G; Stea, S; Cenni, E; Sudanese, A; Marraro, D; Toni, A; Pizzoferrato, A

    1994-01-01

    Comparative cytotoxicity testing of four cyanoacrylate adhesives suggested for orthopaedic applications was performed. These substances were placed in complete culture medium with serum and the resulting extraction fluids were tested on L 929 cells and human lymphocytes. Testing procedures include cell morphology assessment using light microscopy and vital dyes, cell counting using a computer-assisted image analysis system, cell growth measurement using total protein content assay and cell viability assessment using the MTT method. Quantitation of the toxicity of the degradation products released by cyanoacrylates in the extracts was achieved and differences in the cytopathic effect related to the chemical composition of the cyanoacrylates were found. A toxicity rating of the assayed cyanoacrylate adhesives was obtained as follows (in order of increasing toxicity): BCA < xCA < ECAg < ECAl. PMID:8011865

  13. A sensitive method to assay the xanthine oxidase activity in primary cultures of cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Valenti, D; Gagliardi, S; Passarella, S

    2000-11-01

    Since xanthine oxidase (XO, Xanthine:oxidoreductase, E.C.1.2.3.22) is a key enzyme in reactive oxygen specie formation which plays a major role in cell oxidative stress, the availability of a sensitive and simple assay useful to detect its activity in monolayer cell cultures is worthwhile. In order to achieve this, we developed a method in which the conversion of pterine into isoxanthopterin is monitored fluorimetrically. Temperature assay was 50 degrees C. The activity of XO was detected in cerebellar granule cells exposed to glutamate. Since XO is formed from protease-dependent xanthine dehydrogenase processing, its activity appearance was found to be prevented by the protease inhibitor, leupeptin, as well as the glutamate NMDA-receptor inhibitor, MK-801, and the Ca(++) complexing agent, EGTA. The reported novel protocol, at variance with a conventional method, is shown to be a simple, fast, sensitive and relatively cheap method to assay XO activity. In addition, the reported assay can be applied to any cell type in culture. PMID:11086257

  14. Detection of infectious virus from field-collected mosquitoes by vero cell culture assay.

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Philip M; Andreadis, Theodore G; Finan, Shannon L; Shepard, John J; Thomas, Michael C

    2011-01-01

    Mosquitoes transmit a number of distinct viruses including important human pathogens such as West Nile virus, dengue virus, and chickungunya virus. Many of these viruses have intensified in their endemic ranges and expanded to new territories, necessitating effective surveillance and control programs to respond to these threats. One strategy to monitor virus activity involves collecting large numbers of mosquitoes from endemic sites and testing them for viral infection. In this article, we describe how to handle, process, and screen field-collected mosquitoes for infectious virus by Vero cell culture assay. Mosquitoes are sorted by trap location and species, and grouped into pools containing ≤50 individuals. Pooled specimens are homogenized in buffered saline using a mixer-mill and the aqueous phase is inoculated onto confluent Vero cell cultures (Clone E6). Cell cultures are monitored for cytopathic effect from days 3-7 post-inoculation and any viruses grown in cell culture are identified by the appropriate diagnostic assays. By utilizing this approach, we have isolated 9 different viruses from mosquitoes collected in Connecticut, USA, and among these, 5 are known to cause human disease. Three of these viruses (West Nile virus, Potosi virus, and La Crosse virus) represent new records for North America or the New England region since 1999. The ability to detect a wide diversity of viruses is critical to monitoring both established and newly emerging viruses in the mosquito population. PMID:21694689

  15. Colorimetric growth assay for epidermal cell cultures by their crystal violet binding capacity.

    PubMed

    Bonnekoh, B; Wevers, A; Jugert, F; Merk, H; Mahrle, G

    1989-01-01

    The application of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive colorimetric growth assay was tested for human epidermal cells subcultured in uncoated plastic dishes. Cell layers were incubated with a crystal violet (CV) solution (0.2% with ethanol 2% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl buffer, pH 7.8) for 10 min at room temperature. After rinsing with 0.5 M Tris-Cl (pH 7.8) the cell layer was dried and decolorized with a sodium-dodecylsulfate solution (0.5% with ethanol 50% in 0.5 M Tris-Cl, pH 7.8) for 60 min at 37 degrees C. The extinction of the supernatant was read at the absorption maximum of 586 nm. The protein content of attached cells as classical parameter for quantifying cell growth was strongly related to CV extinction with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.98. Furthermore, the subcellular protein binding qualities of CV were analyzed. The water-soluble protein fraction of cultured epidermal cells was separated by sodium-dodecylsulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and stained with CV. We found a staining pattern which was qualitatively very similar to that of Coomassie blue, however less intense. Keratin electrophoresis revealed an affinity of CV to the 48, 50, and 56 kD cytokeratins. In conclusion, this CV assay is a reliable and simple method for the monitoring of epidermal cell growth in cultures. PMID:2482013

  16. Microfluidic assay for simultaneous culture of multiple cell types on surfaces or within hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Yoojin; Han, Sewoon; Jeon, Jessie S.; Yamamoto, Kyoko; Zervantonakis, Ioannis K.; Sudo, Ryo; Kamm, Roger D.; Chung, Seok

    2014-01-01

    This protocol describes a simple but robust microfluidic assay combining three-dimensional (3D) and two-dimensional (2D) cell culture. The microfluidic platform comprises hydrogel incorporating chambers between surface-accessible microchannels. Using this platform, well-defined biochemical and biophysical stimuli can be applied to multiple cell types interacting over distances of <1mm, thereby replicating many aspects of the in vivo microenvironment. Capabilities exist for time-dependent manipulation of flows and concentration gradients as well as high-resolution real-time imaging for observing spatial-temporal single cell behavior, cell-cell communication, cell-matrix interactions and cell population dynamics. These heterotypic cell type assays can be used to study cell survival, proliferation, migration, morphogenesis and differentiation under controlled conditions. Applications include the study of previously unexplored cellular interactions, and have already provided new insights into how biochemical and biophysical factors regulate interactions between populations of different cell types. It takes 3 days to fabricate the system and experiments can run for up to several weeks. PMID:22678430

  17. Determination of monoclonal antibody production in cell culture using novel microfluidic and traditional assays.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Ryo; Otero, José Manuel; Chwistek, Adam; Hamel, Jean-François P

    2002-10-01

    This study compares microfluidic technology (Protein 200 LabChip Assay kit, Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer, referred to here as Protein 200) to the traditional approach for protein analysis, one-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), for the sizing and quantification of immunoglobulin G (IgG) in hybridoma cell cultures. Internal references differ between each method: purified IgG was used alone in SDS-PAGE while myosin (the upper marker) was added to each sample in Protein 200. The IgG used here were produced in cultures propagated in either a serum-free or a serum-containing medium. With serum-containing samples, there was a significant difference in the IgG concentrations (p < 0.05) between SDS-PAGE and Protein 200. The concentration determined by SDS-PAGE was significantly higher (> 30%) than by Protein 200 or by high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) because the large amounts of serum albumin in the samples affect the accuracy of SDS-PAGE. Protein 200 can determine size similarly to SDS-PAGE in serum-free samples (standard error of the mean, SEM, < 1%, 95% confidence < +/-1%), unlike in serum-containing samples. The Protein 200 assay was more effective than the traditional one-dimensional SDS-PAGE in determining concentration and size of IgG in cell culture samples and it provided a miniaturized and convenient platform for rapid analysis. PMID:12412133

  18. Gamma radiation increases endonuclease-dependent L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay

    PubMed Central

    Farkash, Evan A.; Kao, Gary D.; Horman, Shane R.; Prak, Eline T. Luning

    2006-01-01

    Long Interspersed Elements (LINE-1s, L1s) are the most active mobile elements in the human genome and account for a significant fraction of its mass. The propagation of L1 in the human genome requires disruption and repair of DNA at the site of integration. As Barbara McClintock first hypothesized, genotoxic stress may contribute to the mobilization of transposable elements, and conversely, element mobility may contribute to genotoxic stress. We tested the ability of genotoxic agents to increase L1 retrotransposition in a cultured cell assay. We observed that cells exposed to gamma radiation exhibited increased levels of L1 retrotransposition. The L1 retrotransposition frequency was proportional to the number of phosphorylated H2AX foci, an indicator of genotoxic stress. To explore the role of the L1 endonuclease in this context, endonuclease-deficient tagged L1 constructs were produced and tested for their activity in irradiated cells. The activity of the endonuclease-deficient L1 was very low in irradiated cells, suggesting that most L1 insertions in irradiated cells still use the L1 endonuclease. Consistent with this interpretation, DNA sequences that flank L1 insertions in irradiated cells harbored target site duplications. These results suggest that increased L1 retrotransposition in irradiated cells is endonuclease dependent. The mobilization of L1 in irradiated cells potentially contributes to genomic instability and could be a driving force for secondary mutations in patients undergoing radiation therapy. PMID:16507671

  19. Differentiation of THP1 Cells into Macrophages for Transwell Co-culture Assay with Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Michael P; Young, Helen; Hurlstone, Adam; Wellbrock, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how immune cells such as macrophages interact with cancer cells is of increasing interest, as cancer treatments move towards combining both targeted- and immuno- therapies in new treatment regimes. This protocol is using THP-1 cells, a human leukemia monocytic cell line that can be differentiated into macrophages. This allows studying the effects of the macrophage secretome on cancer cells (on e.g. growth, drug response or gene expression) in co-cultures without direct cell contact interactions. This is an important aspect as it removes the presence of any phagocytic aspect to changes in the cancer cell number and behaviour. The in vitro THP-1 monocyte differentiation into polarized macrophages was used to study the effects of both M1 and M2 type populations of macrophages on melanoma cells (Smith et al., 2014; Tsuchiya et al., 1980). M1 type macrophages are classically thought to be tumour suppressing as opposed to M2 type macrophages, which are thought to possess tissue repairing and tumour growth promoting activities.

  20. The Unreliability of MTT Assay in the Cytotoxic Test of Primary Cultured Glioblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hwa Yeon; Kim, Yona; Park, Hyung Woo; Moon, Hyo Eun; Bae, Seongtae; Kim, JinWook; Kim, Dong Gyu

    2015-01-01

    MTT assay is commonly used to assess the cellular cytotoxicity caused by anticancer drugs in glioblastomas. However, there have been some reports insisting that MTT assay exhibited non-specific intracellular reduction of tetrazolium which led to underestimated results of cytotoxicity. Here, we examine whether or not MTT assay can lead to incorrect information regarding alcohol-induced cytotoxicity on immortalized and primary glioblastoma cells. MTT assay was applied to assess the ethanol-induced cytotoxicity at various ethanol concentrations. The cellular cytotoxicity induced by different doses of ethanol was analyzed and compared through several cytotoxic assays. Ethanol-induced cytotoxicity observed through MTT assay on both cell types was shown to be ethanol dose-dependent below a 3% concentration. However, the cytotoxicity was shown to be markedly underestimated only in primary cells at a 5% concentration. RT-PCR and Western Blot showed increased expressions of pro-apoptotic proteins and decreased expressions of anti-apoptotic proteins in an ethanol dose-dependent manner in both cell types. Furthermore, we present a possible mechanism for the unreliable result of MTT assay. A high concentration of ethanol induces more severe membrane damage and increased intracellular concentration of NADH in primary cells which enhances the nonspecific reduction of tetrazolium salt. Together, our findings demonstrate that the cytotoxicity on primary cells could inaccurately be assessed when detected through MTT assay. Therefore, a careful interpretation is needed when one would analyze the cytotoxic results of MTT assay, and it is suggested that other assays must be accompanied to produce more reliable and accurate cytotoxic results on primary glioblastoma cells. PMID:26412973

  1. Exploring the dark side of MTT viability assay of cells cultured onto electrospun PLGA-based composite nanofibrous scaffolding materials.

    PubMed

    Qi, Ruiling; Shen, Mingwu; Cao, Xueyan; Guo, Rui; Tian, Xuejiao; Yu, Jianyong; Shi, Xiangyang

    2011-07-21

    One major method used to evaluate the biocompatibility of porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials is MTT (3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay. The MTT cell viability assay is based on the absorbance of the dissolved MTT formazan crystals formed in living cells, which is proportional to the number of viable cells. Due to the strong dye sorption capability of porous scaffolding materials, we propose that the cell viability determined from the MTT assay is likely to give a false negative result. In this study, we aim to explore the effect of the adsorption of MTT formazan on the accuracy of the viability assay of cells cultured onto porous electrospun poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanofibers, HNTs (halloysite nanotubes)/PLGA, and CNTs (multiwalled carbon nanotubes)/PLGA composite nanofibrous mats. The morphology of electrospun nanofibers and L929 mouse fibroblasts cultured onto the nanofibrous scaffolds were observed using scanning electron microscopy. The viability of cells proliferated for 3 days was evaluated through the MTT assay. In the meantime, the adsorption of MTT formazan onto the same electrospun nanofibers was evaluated and the standard concentration-absorbance curve was obtained in order to quantify the contribution of the adsorbed MTT formazan during the MTT cell viability assay. We show that the PLGA, and the HNTs- or CNTs-doped PLGA nanofibers display appreciable MTT formazan dye sorption, corresponding to 35.6-50.2% deviation from the real cell viability assay data. The better dye sorption capability of the nanofibers leads to further deviation from the real cell viability. Our study gives a general insight into accurate MTT cytotoxicity assessment of various porous tissue engineering scaffolding materials, and may be applicable to other colorimetric assays for analyzing the biological properties of porous scaffolding materials. PMID:21647502

  2. A Functional Assay to Assess Connexin 43-Mediated Cell-to-Cell Communication of Second Messengers in Cultured Bone Cells.

    PubMed

    Stains, Joseph P; Civitelli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transfer of small molecules is a fundamental way by which multicellular organisms coordinate function. Recent work has highlighted the complexity of biologic responses downstream of gap junctions. As the connexin-regulated effectors are coming into focus, there is a need to develop functional assays that allow specific testing of biologically relevant second messengers. Here, we describe a modification of the classic gap junction parachute assay to assess biologically relevant molecules passed through gap junctions. PMID:27207296

  3. Flow cytometric assay detecting cytotoxicity against human endogenous retrovirus antigens expressed on cultured multiple sclerosis cells

    PubMed Central

    Mller-Larsen, A; Brudek, T; Petersen, T; Petersen, E L; Aagaard, M; Hansen, D T; Christensen, T

    2013-01-01

    Damage of target cells by cytotoxicity, either mediated by specific lymphocytes or via antibody-dependent reactions, may play a decisive role in causing the central nervous system (CNS) lesions seen in multiple sclerosis (MS). Relevant epitopes, antibodies towards these epitopes and a reliable assay are all mandatory parts in detection and evaluation of the pertinence of such cytotoxicity reactions. We have adapted a flow cytometry assay detecting CD107a expression on the surface of cytotoxic effector cells to be applicable for analyses of the effect on target cells from MS patients expressing increased amounts of human endogenous retrovirus antigens. MS patients also have increased antibody levels to these antigens. The target cells are spontaneously growing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of B cell lineage, expressing human endogenous retrovirus HERV epitopes on their surface. Polyclonal antibodies against defined peptides in the Env-and Gag-regions of the HERVs were raised in rabbits and used in antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC)-assays. Rituximab (Roche), a chimeric monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed primarily on B cells, was used as control antibody. Without antibodies this system is suitable for analyses of natural killer cell activity. In optimization of the assay we have used effector lymphocytes from healthy donors. The most effective effector cells are CD56+ cells. CD8+ T cells also express CD107a in ADCC. Using the adapted assay, we demonstrate significant ADCC activity to target cells expressing HERV epitopes, and additionally a low level of NK activity. PMID:23656307

  4. Validation of a Cell-Free Translation Assay for Detecting Shiga Toxin 2 in Bacterial Culture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have validated a cell-free translation (CFT) assay for detecting Shiga toxin (Stx). The limit of detection (LOD) for pure Stx2 (PStx2) and partially pure Stx2 (PPStx2) in water reached 20 pg/µl and 3.5 pg/µL respectively without the artificial process of proteolytic activation and reduction of th...

  5. Transformation of BALB/c-3T3 cells: III. Development of a co-culture clonal survival assay for quantification of chemical cytotoxicity in high-density cell cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Matthews, E J

    1993-01-01

    A co-culture clonal survival assay was developed to measure the cytotoxicity of test chemical treatments to BALB/c-3T3 cells because the standard clonal survival assay using 200 wild type (WT) cells frequently overestimates chemical cytotoxicity when compared with identical treatment doses in high-density cultures. The assay used co-cultures of 3.2 x 10(4) WT cells, the same seeding density used in the transformation assay, and 200 ouabain resistant (OUAr) cells. After a 48-hr test chemical treatment, co-cultured cells were fed with culture medium containing 4 mM ouabain. The test chemical was cytotoxic to an equal percentage of WT and OUAr cells. Ouabain treatments killed the remaining WT cells. Thus, OUAr cells surviving the test chemical treatment measured the relative cloning efficiency (RCE) of all treated cells in the high-density cell co-culture. The co-culture assay succeeded because metabolic cooperation at the OUAr locus was not detected in BALB/c-3T3 cells. Five chemicals induced comparable cytotoxic responses in both assays, including actinomycin D, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, N'-methyl-N-nitro-N'-nitrosoguanidine, dimethyl sulfoxide and sodium chloride. In contrast, chemical cytotoxic responses detected in the standard and co-culture assays differed by > or = 10-fold for 11-aminoundecanoic acid, benzo[a]pyrene, cytosine arabinoside, and 3-methyl-cholanthrene and differed by > 2-fold for 2-acetylaminofluorene and dimethylnitrosamine. Detection of 11-aminoundecanoic acid-induced transformation was shown to be dependent on selecting treatment doses from the co-culture assay data. Thus, this method permits more accurate assessment of both chemical-induced cytotoxicity and transformation. PMID:8243400

  6. Metabolic response of environmentally isolated microorganisms to industrial effluents: Use of a newly described cell culture assay

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, Robert N.

    1992-01-01

    An environmental application using a microtiter culture assay to measure the metabolic sensitivity of microorganisms to petrochemical effluents will be tested. The Biomedical Operations and Research Branch at NASA JSC has recently developed a rapid and nondestructive method to measure cell growth and metabolism. Using a colorimetric procedure the uniquely modified assay allows the metabolic kinetics of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells to be measured. Use of such an assay if adapted for the routine monitoring of waste products, process effluents, and environmentally hazardous substances may prove to be invaluable to the industrial community. The microtiter method as described will be tested using microorganisms isolated from the Galveston Bay aquatic habitat. The microbial isolates will be identified prior to testing using the automated systems available at JSC. Sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), cadmium, and lead will provide control toxic chemicals. The toxicity of industrial effluent from two industrial sites will be tested. An effort will be made to test the efficacy of this assay for measuring toxicity in a mixed culture community.

  7. An improved metaphase index assay for detecting thyroid growth stimulators using FRTL-5 thyroid cells cultured on a microtitre plate.

    PubMed

    Ealey, P A; Mitchell, S D; Rowles, P M; Marshall, N J

    1988-06-28

    The metaphase index assay (MIA) for thyroid growth stimulators, as originally described, used FRTL-5 thyroid cells cultured in Bellco culture chambers and glass microscope slides. The metaphases were observed using the nuclear strain aceto-lacto orcein. However the surface properties of the glass proved to be variable and so polystyrene microscope slides were substituted. The aceto-lacto orcein stain was found to be unsuitable for use with polystyrene because of the solvents and mountant used. Therefore combinations of various other nuclear stains and mounting media were tested. The Giemsa stain, which was found to be the most satisfactory, could be applied to FRTL-5 cells maintained on the large variety of plastic supports now available for tissue culture, e.g., 96 well microtitre plates. This permitted the design of an MIA which is much more convenient, robust and economical in its use of clinical samples. The results with seven IgG preparations derived from the sera of patients with a variety of thyroid disorders are presented. In its revised form, the metaphase index assay provides a rapid screening assay for thyroid growth stimulators, such as autoantibodies and TSH. PMID:2455750

  8. Polymer-based mesh as supports for multi-layered 3D cell culture and assays.

    PubMed

    Simon, Karen A; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron D; Ngo, Philip M; Whitesides, George M

    2014-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system-Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM)-that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells-layer-by-layer-within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis-(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  9. Comparison of nasopharyngeal aspirate and nasopharyngeal swab specimens for respiratory syncytial virus diagnosis by cell culture, indirect immunofluorescence assay, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ahluwalia, G; Embree, J; McNicol, P; Law, B; Hammond, G W

    1987-01-01

    Paired nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) and nasopharyngeal swab (NPS) specimens obtained from each of 32 hospitalized infants with X-ray-confirmed pneumonia (91%) or bronchiolitis were tested for respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection by virus culture, the indirect immunofluorescent-antibody (IFA) technique, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA; Ortho Diagnostic Systems, Inc.), and spot hybridization with a human genomic probe to quantitate cellular DNA. RSV was isolated in cell cultures from 72% (23 of 32) of patients by using NPA specimens compared with 47% (15 of 32) by using NPS specimens. With tissue culture positivity as the reference test, the sensitivities of the ELISA on NPA and NPS specimens were found to be 69% (16 of 23) and 61% (14 of 23), respectively, with a specificity and a positive predictive value from both sites of 100%. The sensitivities of the IFA technique compared with the cell culture on NPA and NPS specimens were 61% (14 of 23) and 52% (12 of 23) with specificities of 89 and 78% and positive predictive values of 96 and 92%, respectively. Despite the recovery of significantly more cells (as shown by detection of more cellular DNA by using NPA specimens), virus was detected by the IFA technique or ELISA at similar frequencies in paired specimens. However, virus was recovered more often from NPA than NPS specimens by cell culture, and ELISA optical density readings and the number of RSV-positive fluorescing cells were greater for NPA specimens. NPA specimen collection was less traumatic for the patient, was an easier procedure for the physician to perform, and provided a superior laboratory specimen for RSV diagnosis than the NPS technique. PMID:3294883

  10. MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE ASSAY TO QUANTITATE CHEMICALLY INDUCED ANEUPLOIDY: USE OF A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HUMAN/MOUSE CELL HYBRID

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing a human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cell line R3-5, to detect chemically induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome seg...

  11. Polymer-Based Mesh as Supports for Multi-layered 3D Cell Culture and Assays

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Karen A.; Park, Kyeng Min; Mosadegh, Bobak; Subramaniam, Anand Bala; Mazzeo, Aaron; Ngo, Phil M.; Whitesides, George M.

    2013-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) culture systems can mimic certain aspects of the cellular microenvironment found in vivo, but generation, analysis and imaging of current model systems for 3D cellular constructs and tissues remain challenging. This work demonstrates a 3D culture system – Cells-in-Gels-in-Mesh (CiGiM) – that uses stacked sheets of polymer-based mesh to support cells embedded in gels to form tissue-like constructs; the stacked sheets can be disassembled by peeling the sheets apart to analyze cultured cells—layer-by-layer—within the construct. The mesh sheets leave openings large enough for light to pass through with minimal scattering, and thus allowing multiple options for analysis—(i) using straightforward analysis by optical light microscopy, (ii) by high-resolution analysis with fluorescence microscopy, or (iii) with a fluorescence gel scanner. The sheets can be patterned into separate zones with paraffin film-based decals, in order to conduct multiple experiments in parallel; the paraffin-based decal films also block lateral diffusion of oxygen effectively. CiGiM simplifies the generation and analysis of 3D culture without compromising throughput, and quality of the data collected: it is especially useful in experiments that require control of oxygen levels, and isolation of adjacent wells in a multi-zone format. PMID:24095253

  12. Optimization of a radiolabel DNA-binding assay in cultured mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Cecilia Diaz; Priestley, Catherine C; O'Donovan, Mike; Bolcsfoldi, George; Fred, Charlotta

    2011-08-16

    An improved protocol for the radiolabel DNA-binding assay, which gives a high yield of highly pure DNA has been developed by use of mouse lymphoma cells. The critical difference from previously published methods is the use of enzymatic degradation of proteins in the later DNA purification steps rather than during the homogenisation procedure. Different DNA-purification methodologies were first compared and the protocol of choice was optimized later on; both steps were performed with [(35)S]-labelled amino acids for labelling of cellular protein, which enabled both the quantification of cellular protein contaminating the DNA sample and the distinction between cellular and enzyme-derived protein. The assay was later evaluated and shown to give reproducible results based on the data obtained with benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) and doxorubicin in two different laboratories. In addition, two further reference compounds, dopamine and diazepam and one proprietary AstraZeneca compound were also tested in mouse lymphoma cells in one laboratory. The two compounds B[a]P and doxorubicin were identified as suitable positive controls for routine testing in the presence and absence of S9, respectively. Exposing 90-100×10(6) cells to (14)C-labelled compound with a molar radioactivity of 2MBq/μmol, yields approximately 500μg DNA with <3% total protein contamination, of which approximately 7% is of cellular origin (<0.2%). The detection level is approximately 2adducts/10(8) dNTP. PMID:21640194

  13. Comparison of BGM and PLC/PRC/5 Cell Lines for Total Culturable Viral Assay of Treated Sewage▿

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, Roberto A.; Gundy, Patricia M.; Gerba, Charles P.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare PLC/PRF/5 and BGM cell lines for use in a total culturable viral assay (TCVA) of treated sewage effluents. Samples were collected before and after chlorination from an activated sludge wastewater treatment plant and from the effluent of a high-rate enhanced flocculation system, followed by UV light disinfection. Cell monolayers were observed for cytopathic effect (CPE) after two passages of 14 days each. Monolayers exhibiting viral CPE were tested for the presence of adenoviruses and enteroviruses by PCR or reverse transcription-PCR. Eight percent of the samples exhibited CPE on BGM cells, and 57% showed CPE on PLC/PRF/5 cells. Only enteroviruses were detected on the BGM cells, while 30% and 52% of the samples were positive for enteroviruses and adenoviruses, respectively, on the PLC/PRF/5 cells. Thirty percent of the samples were positive for both adenoviruses and enteroviruses in chlorinated activated sludge effluent. Thirty percent of the samples were positive for adenoviruses in the UV treatment effluent, but no enteroviruses were detected. In conclusion, the PLC/PRF/5 cells were more susceptible than BGM cells to viruses found in treated sewage. The use of BGM cells for TCVA may underestimate viral concentration in sewage effluent samples. The PLC/PRF/5 cells were more susceptible to adenoviruses, which is important in the evaluation of UV disinfection systems because adenoviruses are highly resistant to UV inactivation. PMID:18326686

  14. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N.; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-01-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  15. Traceable clonal culture and chemodrug assay of heterogeneous prostate carcinoma PC3 cells in microfluidic single cell array chips.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jaehoon; Ingram, Patrick N; Bersano-Begey, Tom; Yoon, Euisik

    2014-11-01

    Cancer heterogeneity has received considerable attention for its role in tumor initiation and progression, and its implication for diagnostics and therapeutics in the clinic. To facilitate a cellular heterogeneity study in a low cost and highly efficient manner, we present a microfluidic platform that allows traceable clonal culture and characterization. The platform captures single cells into a microwell array and cultures them for clonal expansion, subsequently allowing on-chip characterization of clonal phenotype and response against drug treatments. Using a heterogeneous prostate cancer model, the PC3 cell line, we verified our prototype, identifying three different sub-phenotypes and correlating their clonal drug responsiveness to cell phenotype. PMID:25553180

  16. Comparison of Assays for Sensitive and Reproducible Detection of Cell Culture-Infectious Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in Drinking Water

    PubMed Central

    Di Giovanni, George D.; Rochelle, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the three most commonly used assays for detecting Cryptosporidium sp. infections in cell culture: immunofluorescent antibody and microscopy assay (IFA), PCR targeting Cryptosporidium sp.-specific DNA, and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) targeting Cryptosporidium sp.-specific mRNA. Monolayers of HCT-8 cells, grown in 8-well chamber slides or 96-well plates, were inoculated with a variety of viable and inactivated oocysts to assess assay performance. All assays detected infection with low doses of flow cytometry-enumerated Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, including infection with one oocyst and three oocysts. All methods also detected infection with Cryptosporidium hominis. The RT-PCR assay, IFA, and PCR assay detected infection in 23%, 25%, and 51% of monolayers inoculated with three C. parvum oocysts and 10%, 9%, and 16% of monolayers inoculated with one oocyst, respectively. The PCR assay was the most sensitive, but it had the highest frequency of false positives with mock-infected cells and inactivated oocysts. IFA was the only infection detection assay that did not produce false positives with mock-infected monolayers. IFA was also the only assay that detected infections in all experiments with spiked oocysts recovered from Envirochek capsules following filtration of 1,000 liters of treated water. Consequently, cell culture with IFA detection is the most appropriate method for routine and sensitive detection of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in drinking water. PMID:22038611

  17. Comparison of assays for sensitive and reproducible detection of cell culture-infectious Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Anne M; Giovanni, George D Di; Rochelle, Paul A

    2012-01-01

    This study compared the three most commonly used assays for detecting Cryptosporidium sp. infections in cell culture: immunofluorescent antibody and microscopy assay (IFA), PCR targeting Cryptosporidium sp.-specific DNA, and reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) targeting Cryptosporidium sp.-specific mRNA. Monolayers of HCT-8 cells, grown in 8-well chamber slides or 96-well plates, were inoculated with a variety of viable and inactivated oocysts to assess assay performance. All assays detected infection with low doses of flow cytometry-enumerated Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts, including infection with one oocyst and three oocysts. All methods also detected infection with Cryptosporidium hominis. The RT-PCR assay, IFA, and PCR assay detected infection in 23%, 25%, and 51% of monolayers inoculated with three C. parvum oocysts and 10%, 9%, and 16% of monolayers inoculated with one oocyst, respectively. The PCR assay was the most sensitive, but it had the highest frequency of false positives with mock-infected cells and inactivated oocysts. IFA was the only infection detection assay that did not produce false positives with mock-infected monolayers. IFA was also the only assay that detected infections in all experiments with spiked oocysts recovered from Envirochek capsules following filtration of 1,000 liters of treated water. Consequently, cell culture with IFA detection is the most appropriate method for routine and sensitive detection of infectious Cryptosporidium parvum and Cryptosporidium hominis in drinking water. PMID:22038611

  18. A Rapid and Specific Microplate Assay for the Determination of Intra- and Extracellular Ascorbate in Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Darius J. R.; Lawen, Alfons

    2014-01-01

    Vitamin C (ascorbate) plays numerous important roles in cellular metabolism, many of which have only come to light in recent years. For instance, within the brain, ascorbate acts in a neuroprotective and neuromodulatory manner that involves ascorbate cycling between neurons and vicinal astrocytes - a relationship that appears to be crucial for brain ascorbate homeostasis. Additionally, emerging evidence strongly suggests that ascorbate has a greatly expanded role in regulating cellular and systemic iron metabolism than is classically recognized. The increasing recognition of the integral role of ascorbate in normal and deregulated cellular and organismal physiology demands a range of medium-throughput and high-sensitivity analytic techniques that can be executed without the need for highly expensive specialist equipment. Here we provide explicit instructions for a medium-throughput, specific and relatively inexpensive microplate assay for the determination of both intra- and extracellular ascorbate in cell culture. PMID:24747535

  19. Quantum dot-based assay for Cu(2+) quantification in bacterial cell culture.

    PubMed

    Durán-Toro, V; Gran-Scheuch, A; Órdenes-Aenishanslins, N; Monrás, J P; Saona, L A; Venegas, F A; Chasteen, T G; Bravo, D; Pérez-Donoso, J M

    2014-04-01

    A simple and sensitive method for quantification of nanomolar copper with a detection limit of 1.2×10(-10)M and a linear range from 10(-9) to 10(-8)M is reported. For the most useful analytical concentration of quantum dots, 1160μg/ml, a 1/Ksv value of 11μM Cu(2+) was determined. The method is based on the interaction of Cu(2+) with glutathione-capped CdTe quantum dots (CdTe-GSH QDs) synthesized by a simple and economic biomimetic method. Green CdTe-GSH QDs displayed the best performance in copper quantification when QDs of different sizes/colors were tested. Cu(2+) quantification is highly selective given that no significant interference of QDs with 19 ions was observed. No significant effects on Cu(2+) quantification were determined when different reaction matrices such as distilled water, tap water, and different bacterial growth media were tested. The method was used to determine copper uptake kinetics on Escherichia coli cultures. QD-based quantification of copper on bacterial supernatants was compared with atomic absorption spectroscopy as a means of confirming the accuracy of the reported method. The mechanism of Cu(2+)-mediated QD fluorescence quenching was associated with nanoparticle decomposition. PMID:24433980

  20. Microtissue Culture Plaque Assay for Herpesvirus saimiri

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Emerson W.; Dunkel, Virginia C.

    1973-01-01

    A microtissue culture method for the plaque assay of Herpesvirus saimiri has been developed. Virus titrations carried out in Microtest II tissue culture plates (Falcon) yielded reproducible results that agreed well with those obtained by employing macrocultures. The described method is quantitative, reproducible, economical, and suitable for routine assay of large numbers of virus samples. Images PMID:4201642

  1. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-γ Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Maggioli, Mayara F.; Palmer, Mitchell V.; Vordermeier, H. Martin; Whelan, Adam O.; Fosse, James M.; Nonnecke, Brian J.; Waters, W. Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-γ. Interferon-γ release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4+ T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-γ ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  2. Application of Long-term cultured Interferon-? Enzyme-linked Immunospot Assay for Assessing Effector and Memory T Cell Responses in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Maggioli, Mayara F; Palmer, Mitchell V; Vordermeier, H Martin; Whelan, Adam O; Fosse, James M; Nonnecke, Brian J; Waters, W Ray

    2015-01-01

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of nave cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled up to 95 % of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a lifetime. In humans, two functionally distinct subsets of memory T cells have been described based on the expression of lymph node homing receptors. Central memory T cells express C-C chemokine receptor 7 and CD45RO and are mainly located in T-cell areas of secondary lymphoid organs. Effector memory T cells express CD45RO, lack CCR7 and display receptors associated with lymphocyte homing to peripheral or inflamed tissues. Effector T cells do not express either CCR7 or CD45RO but upon encounter with antigen produce effector cytokines, such as interferon-?. Interferon-? release assays are used for the diagnosis of bovine and human tuberculosis and detect primarily effector and effector memory T cell responses. Central memory T cell responses by CD4(+) T cells to vaccination, on the other hand, may be used to predict vaccine efficacy, as demonstrated with simian immunodeficiency virus infection of non-human primates, tuberculosis in mice, and malaria in humans. Several studies with mice and humans as well as unpublished data on cattle, have demonstrated that interferon-? ELISPOT assays measure central memory T cell responses. With this assay, peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured in decreasing concentration of antigen for 10 to 14 days (long-term culture), allowing effector responses to peak and wane; facilitating central memory T cells to differentiate and expand within the culture. PMID:26275095

  3. A Scalable Perfusion Culture System with Miniature Peristaltic Pumps for Live-Cell Imaging Assays with Provision for Microfabricated Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Balakrishnan, Sreenath; Suma, M.S.; Raju, Shilpa R.; Bhargav, Santosh D.B.; Arunima, S.; Das, Saumitra

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We present a perfusion culture system with miniature bioreactors and peristaltic pumps. The bioreactors are designed for perfusion, live-cell imaging studies, easy incorporation of microfabricated scaffolds, and convenience of operation in standard cell culture techniques. By combining with miniature peristaltic pumps—one for each bioreactor to avoid cross-contamination and to maintain desired flow rate in each—we have made a culture system that facilitates perfusion culture inside standard incubators. This scalable system can support multiple parallel perfusion experiments. The major components are fabricated by three-dimensional printing using VeroWhite, which we show to be amenable to ex vivo cell culture. Furthermore, the components of the system can be reused, thus making it economical. We validate the system and illustrate its versatility by culturing primary rat hepatocytes, live imaging the growth of mouse fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) on microfabricated ring-scaffolds inserted into the bioreactor, performing perfusion culture of breast cancer cells (MCF7), and high-magnification imaging of hepatocarcinoma cells (HuH7). PMID:26309810

  4. Time-lapse imaging assay using the BioStation CT: Asensitive drug-screening method for three-dimensional cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Sakamoto, Ruriko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Shimomura, Manami; Itoh, Manabu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is beneficial for physiological studies of tumor cells, due to its potential to deliver a high quantity of cell culture information that is representative of the cancer microenvironment and predictive of drug responses invivo. Currently, gel-associated or matrix-associated 3D cell culture is comprised of intricate procedures that often result in experimental complexity. Therefore, we developed an innovative anti-cancer drug sensitivity screening technique for 3D cell culture on NanoCulture Plates (NCP) by employing the imaging device BioStation CT. Here, we showed that the human breast cancer cell lines BT474 and T47D form multicellular spheroids on NCP plates and compared their sensitivity to the anti-cancer drugs trastuzumab and paclitaxel using the BioStation CT. The anticancer drugs reduced spheroid migration velocity and suppressed spheroid fusion. In addition, primary cells derived from the human breast cancer tissues B58 and B61 grown on NCP plates also exhibited similar drug sensitivity. These results were in good agreement with the conventional assay method using ATP quantification. We confirmed the antitumor effects of the drugs on cells seeded in 96-well plates using the BioStation CT imaging technique. We expect this method to be useful in research for new antitumor agents and for drug sensitivity tests in individually-tailored cancer treatments. PMID:25865675

  5. Time-lapse imaging assay using the BioStation CT: a sensitive drug-screening method for three-dimensional cell culture.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Ruriko; Rahman, M Mamunur; Shimomura, Manami; Itoh, Manabu; Nakatsura, Tetsuya

    2015-06-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is beneficial for physiological studies of tumor cells, due to its potential to deliver a high quantity of cell culture information that is representative of the cancer microenvironment and predictive of drug responses invivo. Currently, gel-associated or matrix-associated 3D cell culture is comprised of intricate procedures that often result in experimental complexity. Therefore, we developed an innovative anti-cancer drug sensitivity screening technique for 3D cell culture on NanoCulture Plates (NCP) by employing the imaging device BioStation CT. Here, we showed that the human breast cancer cell lines BT474 and T47D form multicellular spheroids on NCP plates and compared their sensitivity to the anti-cancer drugs trastuzumab and paclitaxel using the BioStation CT. The anticancer drugs reduced spheroid migration velocity and suppressed spheroid fusion. In addition, primary cells derived from the human breast cancer tissues B58 and B61 grown on NCP plates also exhibited similar drug sensitivity. These results were in good agreement with the conventional assay method using ATP quantification. We confirmed the antitumor effects of the drugs on cells seeded in 96-well plates using the BioStation CT imaging technique. We expect this method to be useful in research for new antitumor agents and for drug sensitivity tests in individually-tailored cancer treatments. PMID:25865675

  6. Combination of immunoprecipitation (IP)-ATP_Glo kinase assay and melanogenesis for the assessment of potent and safe PAK1-blockers in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Binh Cao Quan; Be Tu, Pham Thi; Tawata, Shinkichi; Maruta, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Cucurbitacin I (CBI) is a triterpene from a bitter melon called Goya grown in Okinawa, Japan, and directly inhibits both the Tyr-kinase JAK2 and the G protein RAC, leading to the inactivation of PAK1 (RAC/CDC42-activated kinase 1). Bio 30, a propolis produced in New Zealand, contains CAPE (caffeic acid phenethyl ester) as the major anti-cancer ingredient which directly down-regulates RAC, leading to the inactivation of PAK1. Since PAK1 is essential for the growth of RAS cancer cells such as A549 cell line which carry an oncogenic K-RAS mutant, and the melanogenesis in skin cells, here using these PAK1-blockers as model compounds, we introduce a new approach to the quick assessment of PAK1-blockers in cell culture. First, combining the immuno-precipitation (IP) of PAK1 from cell lysate and the in vitro ATP_Glo kinase assay kit (called "Macaroni-Western" assay), we confirmed that both CBI and Bio 30 inactivate PAK1 in A549 lung cancer cells in 24 h, and inhibit their PAK1-dependent growth in 72 h. Furthermore, we verified that CBI inhibits the PAK1/PAK4-dependent melanogenesis in melanoma cells by far more than 50%, while Bio 30 inhibits the melanogenesis only by 50%, with only a merginal effect on their growth per se. Since the "Macaroni-Western" kinase assay and melanogenesis are both rather simple and quick, the combination of these two cell culture assays would be highly useful for selecting both "potent" (highly cell-permeable) and "safe" (non-toxic) natural or synthetic PAK1-blockers. PMID:26370527

  7. Development of a combined in vitro cell culture--quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the disinfection performance of pulsed light for treating the waterborne enteroparasite Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Garvey, Mary; Stocca, Alessia; Rowan, Neil

    2014-09-01

    Giardia lamblia is a flagellated protozoan parasite that is recognised as a frequent cause of water-borne disease in humans and animals. We report for the first time on the use of a combined in vitro HCT-8 cell culture-quantitative PCR assay for evaluating the efficacy of using pulsed UV light for treating G. lamblia parasites. Findings showed that current methods that are limited to using vital stains before and after cyst excystation are not appropriate for monitoring or evaluating cyst destruction post PUV-treatments. Use of the human ileocecal HCT-8 cell line was superior to that of the human colon Caco-2 cell line for in vitro culture and determining PUV sensitivity of treated cysts. G. lamblia cysts were also shown to be more resistant to PUV irradiation compared to treating similar numbers of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts. These observations also show that the use of this HCT-8 cell culture assay may replace use of animal models for determining disinfection performances of PUV for treating both C. parvum and G. lamblia. PMID:24929148

  8. Cell isolation and culture.

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Sihui; Kuhn, Jeffrey R

    2013-01-01

    Cell isolation and culture are essential tools for the study of cell function. Isolated cells grown under controlled conditions can be manipulated and imaged at a level of resolution that is not possible in whole animals or even tissue explants. Recent advances have allowed for large-scale isolation and culture of primary C. elegans cells from both embryos and all four larval stages. Isolated cells can be used for single-cell profiling, electrophysiology, and high-resolution microscopy to assay cell autonomous development and behavior. This chapter describes protocols for the isolation and culture of C. elegans embryonic and larval stage cells. Our protocols describe isolation of embryonic and L1 stage cells from nematodes grown on high-density NA22 bacterial plates and isolation of L2 through L4 stage cells from nematodes grown in axenic liquid culture. Both embryonic and larval cells can be isolated from nematode populations within 3 hours and can be cultured for several days. A primer on sterile cell culture techniques is given in the appendices. PMID:23430760

  9. An assay combining cell culture with reverse transcriptase PCR to detect and determine the infectivity of waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum.

    PubMed Central

    Rochelle, P A; Ferguson, D M; Handojo, T J; De Leon, R; Stewart, M H; Wolfe, R L

    1997-01-01

    The presence of Cryptosporidium in drinking water supplies is a significant problem faced by the water industry. Although a variety of methods exist for the detection of waterborne oocysts, water utilities currently have no way of assessing the infectivity of detected oocysts and consequently are unable to accurately determine the risks posed to public health by waterborne Cryptosporidium. In this paper, the development of an infectivity assay for waterborne Cryptosporidium parvum is described. Oocysts were inoculated onto monolayers of Caco-2 cells and grown on microscope slides, and infections were detected by C. parvum specific reverse transcriptase PCR of extracted mRNA, targeting the heat shock protein 70 (hsp70) gene. A single infectious oocyst was detected by this experimental procedure. The use of concentrated samples obtained from 250 liters of finished water had no observable effect on the integrity of cell monolayers or on the infectivity of oocysts seeded into the concentrate. Intracellular developmental stages of the parasite were also detected by using fluorescently labeled antibodies. One pair of PCR primers targeting the hsp70 gene was specific for C. parvum, while a second pair recognized all species of Cryptosporidium tested. The C. parvum-specific primers amplified DNA from 1 to 10 oocysts used to seed 65 to 100 liters of concentrated environmental water samples and were compatible with multiplex PCR for the simultaneous detection of C. parvum and Giardia lambia. This paper confirms the utility of PCR for the detection of waterborne C. parvum and, most importantly, demonstrates the potential of an in vitro infectivity assay. PMID:9143132

  10. Use of Cell Culture-PCR Assay Based on Combination of A549 and BGMK Cell Lines and Molecular Identification as a Tool To Monitor Infectious Adenoviruses and Enteroviruses in River Water

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheonghoon; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Han, Euiri; Kim, Sang-Jong

    2004-01-01

    Viral contamination in environmental samples can be underestimated because a single cell line might reproduce only some enteric viruses and some enteric viruses do not exhibit apparent cytopathic effects in cell culture. To overcome this problem, we evaluated a cell culture-PCR assay based on a combination of A549 and Buffalo green monkey kidney (BGMK) cell lines as a tool to monitor infectious adenoviruses and enteroviruses in river water. Water samples were collected 10 times at each of four rivers located in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea, and then cultured on group 1 cells (BGMK cells alone) and group 2 cells (BGMK and A549 cells). Reverse transcription and multiplex PCR were performed, followed by phylogenetic analysis of the amplicons. Thirty (75.0%) of the 40 samples were positive for viruses based on cell culture, and the frequency of positive samples grown on group 2 cells (65.0%) was higher than the frequency of positive samples grown on group 1 cells (50.0%). The number of samples positive for adenoviruses was higher with A549 cells (13 samples) than with BGMK cells (one sample); the numbers of samples positive for enteroviruses were similar with both types of cells. By using phylogenetic analysis, adenoviral amplicons were grouped into subgenera A, C, D, and F, and enteroviral amplicons were grouped into coxsackieviruses B3 and B4 and echoviruses 6, 7, and 30, indicating that A549 and BGMK cells were suitable for recovering a wide range of adenoviral and enteroviral types. The cell culture-PCR assay with a combination of A549 and BGMK cells and molecular identification could be a useful tool for monitoring infectious adenoviruses and enteroviruses in aquatic environments. PMID:15528536

  11. High density micromass cultures of a human chondrocyte cell line: a reliable assay system to reveal the modulatory functions of pharmacological agents.

    PubMed

    Greco, K V; Iqbal, A J; Rattazzi, L; Nalesso, G; Moradi-Bidhendi, N; Moore, A R; Goldring, M B; Dell'Accio, F; Perretti, M

    2011-12-15

    Osteoarthritis is a highly prevalent and disabling disease for which we do not have a cure. The identification of suitable molecular targets is hindered by the lack of standardized, reproducible and convenient screening assays. Following extensive comparisons of a number of chondrocytic cell lines, culture conditions, and readouts, we have optimized an assay utilizing C-28/I2, a chondrocytic cell line cultured in high-density micromasses. Utilizing molecules with known effects on cartilage (e.g. IL-1β, TGFβ1, BMP-2), we have exploited this improved protocol to (i) evoke responses characteristic of primary chondrocytes; (ii) assess the pharmacodynamics of gene over-expression using non-viral expression vectors; (iii) establish the response profiles of known pharmacological treatments; and (iv) investigate their mechanisms of action. These data indicate that we have established a medium-throughput methodology for studying chondrocyte-specific cellular and molecular responses (from gene expression to rapid quantitative measurement of sulfated glycosaminoglycans by Alcian blue staining) that may enable the discovery of novel therapeutics for pharmacological modulation of chondrocyte activation in osteoarthritis. PMID:21946086

  12. Advances in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Maramorosch, K. )

    1987-01-01

    This book presents papers on advances in cell culture. Topics covered include: Genetic changes in the influenza viruses during growth in cultured cells; The biochemistry and genetics of mosquito cells in culture; and Tree tissue culture applications.

  13. Comparison of a frozen human foreskin fibroblast cell assay to an enzyme immunoassay and toxigenic culture for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Strachan, Alastair J; Evans, Natalie E; Williams, O Martin; Spencer, Robert C; Greenwood, Rosemary; Probert, Chris J

    2013-01-01

    This study set out to validate the Hs27 ReadyCell assay (RCCNA) as an alternative CCNA method compared against a commonly used commercial enzyme immunoassay (EIA) method and toxigenic culture (TC) reference standard. A total of 860 samples were identified from those submitted to the Health Protection Agency microbiology laboratories over a 30-week period. RCCNA performed much better than EIA when using TC as a gold standard, with sensitivities of 90.8% versus 78.6% and positive predictive value of 87.3% to 81.9%, respectively. The Hs27 Human Foreskin Fibroblast ReadyCells are an easy-to-use and a sensitive CCNA method for the detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile directly from stool. A turnaround time of up to 48 h for a negative result and possible need for repeat testing make it an unsuitable method to be used in most clinical laboratory setting. PMID:23107315

  14. Identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infection in honey bees: establishment of a medium throughput screening assay based on N. ceranae infected cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  15. Identification of Candidate Agents Active against N. ceranae Infection in Honey Bees: Establishment of a Medium Throughput Screening Assay Based on N. ceranae Infected Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gisder, Sebastian; Genersch, Elke

    2015-01-01

    Many flowering plants in both natural ecosytems and agriculture are dependent on insect pollination for fruit set and seed production. Managed honey bees (Apis mellifera) and wild bees are key pollinators providing this indispensable eco- and agrosystem service. Like all other organisms, bees are attacked by numerous pathogens and parasites. Nosema apis is a honey bee pathogenic microsporidium which is widely distributed in honey bee populations without causing much harm. Its congener Nosema ceranae was originally described as pathogen of the Eastern honey bee (Apis cerana) but jumped host from A. cerana to A. mellifera about 20 years ago and spilled over from A. mellifera to Bombus spp. quite recently. N. ceranae is now considered a deadly emerging parasite of both Western honey bees and bumblebees. Hence, novel and sustainable treatment strategies against N. ceranae are urgently needed to protect honey and wild bees. We here present the development of an in vitro medium throughput screening assay for the identification of candidate agents active against N. ceranae infections. This novel assay is based on our recently developed cell culture model for N. ceranae and coupled with an RT-PCR-ELISA protocol for quantification of N. ceranae in infected cells. The assay has been adapted to the 96-well microplate format to allow automated analysis. Several substances with known (fumagillin) or presumed (surfactin) or no (paromomycin) activity against N. ceranae were tested as well as substances for which no data concerning N. ceranae inhibition existed. While fumagillin and two nitroimidazoles (metronidazole, tinidazole) totally inhibited N. ceranae proliferation, all other test substances were inactive. In summary, the assay proved suitable for substance screening and demonstrated the activity of two synthetic antibiotics against N. ceranae. PMID:25658121

  16. An optimized microplate assay system for quantitative evaluation of plant cell wall-degrading enzyme activity of fungal culture extracts.

    PubMed

    King, Brian C; Donnelly, Marie K; Bergstrom, Gary C; Walker, Larry P; Gibson, Donna M

    2009-03-01

    Developing enzyme cocktails for cellulosic biomass hydrolysis complementary to current cellulase systems is a critical step needed for economically viable biofuels production. Recent genomic analysis indicates that some plant pathogenic fungi are likely a largely untapped resource in which to prospect for novel hydrolytic enzymes for biomass conversion. In order to develop high throughput screening assays for enzyme bioprospecting, a standardized microplate assay was developed for rapid analysis of polysaccharide hydrolysis by fungal extracts, incorporating biomass substrates. Fungi were grown for 10 days on cellulose- or switchgrass-containing media to produce enzyme extracts for analysis. Reducing sugar released from filter paper, Avicel, corn stalk, switchgrass, carboxymethylcellulose, and arabinoxylan was quantified using a miniaturized colorimetric assay based on 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid. Significant interactions were identified among fungal species, growth media composition, assay substrate, and temperature. Within a small sampling of plant pathogenic fungi, some extracts had crude activities comparable to or greater than T. reesei, particularly when assayed at lower temperatures and on biomass substrates. This microplate assay system should prove useful for high-throughput bioprospecting for new sources of novel enzymes for biofuel production. PMID:18973283

  17. Multiplexing cell viability assays.

    PubMed

    Gerets, Helga H J; Dhalluin, Stéphane; Atienzar, Franck A

    2011-01-01

    Today, obtaining mechanistic insights into biological, toxicological, and pathological processes is of upmost importance. Researchers aim to obtain as many as possible data from one cell sample to understand the biological processes under study. Multiplexing, which is the ability to gather more than one set of data from the same sample, fulfills completely this objective. Obviously, multiplexing has several advantages compared to single plex experiments and probably the most important one is that data on various parameters at exactly the same time point on the same cells or group of cells can be obtained and consequently this may contribute to saving time and effort and a reduction of the costs.In this chapter, different endpoints were measured starting from two-seeded multiwell plates, namely, cell viability, caspase-3/7 activity, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH) measurements. These -different endpoints were analyzed together to determine the cytotoxic properties of pharmaceutical compounds and/or reference compounds. A 96-well plate was designed to allow appropriate measurement of five doses of a compound in triplicate to determine the effect of the compound on the six different endpoints. The first four endpoints (cell viability, caspase-3/7 activity, LDH, and ATP) are discussed in detail in this chapter. AST and GLDH measurements are not discussed in detail as these are fully automatic measurements and thus behind the scope of this chapter.As an illustrating example, the reference compound tamoxifen was used to evaluate its cytotoxic properties using the hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 cells. PMID:21468971

  18. In vitro Cell Migration and Invasion Assays

    PubMed Central

    Justus, Calvin R.; Leffler, Nancy; Ruiz-Echevarria, Maria; Yang, Li V.

    2014-01-01

    Migration is a key property of live cells and critical for normal development, immune response, and disease processes such as cancer metastasis and inflammation. Methods to examine cell migration are very useful and important for a wide range of biomedical research such as cancer biology, immunology, vascular biology, cell biology and developmental biology. Here we use tumor cell migration and invasion as an example and describe two related assays to illustrate the commonly used, easily accessible methods to measure these processes. The first method is the cell culture wound closure assay in which a scratch is generated on a confluent cell monolayer. The speed of wound closure and cell migration can be quantified by taking snapshot pictures with a regular inverted microscope at several time intervals. More detailed cell migratory behavior can be documented using the time-lapse microscopy system. The second method described in this paper is the transwell cell migration and invasion assay that measures the capacity of cell motility and invasiveness toward a chemo-attractant gradient. It is our goal to describe these methods in a highly accessible manner so that the procedures can be successfully performed in research laboratories even just with basic cell biology setup. PMID:24962652

  19. Detection of toxigenic Clostridium difficile: comparison of the cell culture neutralization, Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays.

    PubMed

    Pancholi, P; Kelly, C; Raczkowski, M; Balada-Llasat, J M

    2012-04-01

    Clostridium difficile is the most important cause of nosocomial diarrhea. Several laboratory techniques are available to detect C. difficile toxins or the genes that encode them in fecal samples. We evaluated the Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi (Cepheid, CA) that detect the toxin B gene (tcdB) and tcdB, cdt, and a deletion in tcdC associated with the 027/NAP1/BI strain, respectively, by real-time PCR, and the Illumigene C. difficile (Meridian Bioscience, Inc.) that detects the toxin A gene (tcdA) by loop-mediated isothermal amplification in stool specimens. Toxigenic culture was used as the reference method for discrepant stool specimens. Two hundred prospective and fifty retrospective diarrheal stool specimens were tested simultaneously by the cell cytotoxin neutralization assay (CCNA) and the Xpert C. difficile, Xpert C. difficile/Epi, and Illumigene C. difficile assays. Of the 200 prospective stools tested, 10.5% (n = 23) were determined to be positive by CCNA, 17.5% (n = 35) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile, and 21.5% (n = 43) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 50 retrospective stools, previously determined to be positive by CCNA, 94% (n = 47) were determined to be positive by Illumigene C. difficile and 100% (n = 50) were determined to be positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi. Of the 11 discrepant results (i.e., negative by Illumigene C. difficile but positive by Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi), all were determined to be positive by the toxigenic culture. A total of 21% of the isolates were presumptively identified by the Xpert C. difficile/Epi as the 027/NAP1/BI strain. The Xpert C. difficile and Xpert C. difficile/Epi assays were the most sensitive, rapid, and easy-to use assays for the detection of toxigenic C. difficile in stool specimens. PMID:22278839

  20. The use of real-time cell analyzer technology in drug discovery: defining optimal cell culture conditions and assay reproducibility with different adherent cellular models.

    PubMed

    Atienzar, Franck A; Tilmant, Karen; Gerets, Helga H; Toussaint, Gaelle; Speeckaert, Sebastien; Hanon, Etienne; Depelchin, Olympe; Dhalluin, Stephane

    2011-07-01

    The use of impedance-based label-free technology applied to drug discovery is nowadays receiving more and more attention. Indeed, such a simple and noninvasive assay that interferes minimally with cell morphology and function allows one to perform kinetic measurements and to obtain information on proliferation, migration, cytotoxicity, and receptor-mediated signaling. The objective of the study was to further assess the usefulness of a real-time cell analyzer (RTCA) platform based on impedance in the context of quality control and data reproducibility. The data indicate that this technology is useful to determine the best coating and cellular density conditions for different adherent cellular models including hepatocytes, cardiomyocytes, fibroblasts, and hybrid neuroblastoma/neuronal cells. Based on 31 independent experiments, the reproducibility of cell index data generated from HepG2 cells exposed to DMSO and to Triton X-100 was satisfactory, with a coefficient of variation close to 10%. Cell index data were also well reproduced when cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts were exposed to 21 compounds three times (correlation >0.91, p < 0.0001). The data also show that a cell index decrease is not always associated with cytotoxicity effects and that there are some confounding factors that can affect the analysis. Finally, another drawback is that the correlation analysis between cellular impedance measurements and classical toxicity endpoints has been performed on a limited number of compounds. Overall, despite some limitations, the RTCA technology appears to be a powerful and reliable tool in drug discovery because of the reasonable throughput, rapid and efficient performance, technical optimization, and cell quality control. PMID:21518825

  1. Isolation of equine endothelial cells and life cell angiogenesis assay.

    PubMed

    Dietze, Kathrin; Slosarek, Ilka; Fuhrmann-Selter, Tania; Hopperdietzel, Carsten; Plendl, Johanna; Kaessmeyer, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Arterial or venous thromboses are frequent clinical complications with the risk of fatal progression. Recent studies suggest the disruption of angiogenesis in the course of thrombus resolution as the underlying pathomechanism. Very similar to the situation in human patients, equine vessels have been described to be particularly susceptible to thrombosis. In contrast to humans, equine donors are readily available to obtain organs and tissues for isolation of endothelial cells. Objective of this study was to isolate equine endothelial cells and develop an angiogenesis assay from primary cultures. Macrovascular endothelial cells were obtained from jugular veins and carotid arteries of nine horses, one of which suffered from inflammatory processes. After enzymatic isolation, the cells were incubated in different selective primary media. Phenotypic identification of endothelial cells was accomplished by morphology and positive staining to von Willebrand factor. The reliable, inexpensive, and standardized combination of methods presented here resulted in pure endothelial cultures for angiogenesis assays that can be used in any cell culture laboratory. Inverted phase microscopy and life cell imaging was used to characterize the stages of the angiogenic cascade of the endothelial cells. Life cell imaging gave new insights into the in vitro formation of capillary like structures including exocytosis of microparticles from endothelial cells before integration into the three-dimensional structure. We hypothesize that a specific population of endothelial cells showing a highly active migration pattern in life cell imaging might play a role in the resolution of thrombosis. PMID:25227198

  2. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1985-01-01

    A line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity) is disclosed. Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. Mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics, are also disclosed.

  3. Time-Resolved Cell Culture Assay Analyser (TReCCA Analyser) for the Analysis of On-Line Data: Data Integration—Sensor Correction—Time-Resolved IC50 Determination

    PubMed Central

    Werner, Tobias; Wölfl, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Time-resolved cell culture assays circumvent the need to set arbitrary end-points and reveal the dynamics of quality controlled experiments. However, they lead to the generation of large data sets, which can represent a complexity barrier to their use. We therefore developed the Time-Resolved Cell Culture Assay (TReCCA) Analyser program to perform standard cell assay analyses efficiently and make sophisticated in-depth analyses easily available. The functions of the program include data normalising and averaging, as well as smoothing and slope calculation, pin-pointing exact change time points. A time-resolved IC50/EC50 calculation provides a better understanding of drug toxicity over time and a more accurate drug to drug comparison. Finally the logarithmic sensor recalibration function, for sensors with an exponential calibration curve, homogenises the sensor output and enables the detection of low-scale changes. To illustrate the capabilities of the TReCCA Analyser, we performed on-line monitoring of dissolved oxygen in the culture media of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 treated with different concentrations of the anti-cancer drug Cisplatin. The TReCCA Analyser is freely available at www.uni-heidelberg.de/fakultaeten/biowissenschaften/ipmb/biologie/woelfl/Research.html. By introducing the program, we hope to encourage more systematic use of time-resolved assays and lead researchers to fully exploit their data. PMID:26110644

  4. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are

  5. Cell Culture Made Easy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dye, Frank J.

    1985-01-01

    Outlines steps to generate cell samples for observation and experimentation. The procedures (which use ordinary laboratory equipment) will establish a short-term primary culture of normal mammalian cells. Information on culture vessels and cell division and a list of questions to generate student interest and involvement in the topics are…

  6. Optimizing stem cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Van Der Sanden, Boudewijn; Dhobb, Mehdi; Berger, François; Wion, Didier

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells always balance between self-renewal and differentiation. Hence, stem cell culture parameters are critical and need to be continuously refined according to progress in our stem cell biology understanding and the latest technological developments. This led to the progressive replacement of ill-defined additives such as serum or feeder cell layers by recombinant cytokines or growth factors. Another example is the control of the oxygen pressure. For many years cell cultures have been done under atmospheric oxygen pressure which is much higher than the one experienced by stem cells in vivo. A consequence of cell metabolism is that cell culture conditions are constantly changing. Therefore, the development of high sensitive monitoring processes and control algorithms is required for ensuring cell culture medium homeostasis. Stem cells also sense the physical constraints of their microenvironment. Rigidity, stiffness and geometry of the culture substrate influence stem cell fate. Hence, nanotopography is probably as important as medium formulation in the optimization of stem cell culture conditions. Recent advances include the development of synthetic bioinformative substrates designed at the micro- and nanoscale level. On going research in many different fields including stem cell biology, nanotechnology, and bioengineering suggest that our current way to culture cells in Petri dish or flasks will soon be outdated as flying across the Atlantic Ocean in the Lindbergh’s plane. PMID:20803548

  7. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, C.L.; Thilly, W.G.

    1999-08-10

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics. 3 figs.

  8. Mutation assays involving blood cells that metabolize toxic substances

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Charles L.; Thilly, William G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention pertains to a line of human blood cells which have high levels of oxidative activity (such as oxygenase, oxidase, peroxidase, and hydroxylase activity). Such cells grow in suspension culture, and are useful to determine the mutagenicity of xenobiotic substances that are metabolized into toxic or mutagenic substances. The invention also includes mutation assays using these cells, and other cells with similar characteristics.

  9. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay

    PubMed Central

    Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Coker, Bamidele Atinuke; Nudamajo, Felix Yasha; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25%) of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1), CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32), enterovirus 71 (EV71), EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed. PMID:27087810

  10. Direct Detection and Identification of Enteroviruses from Faeces of Healthy Nigerian Children Using a Cell-Culture Independent RT-Seminested PCR Assay.

    PubMed

    Faleye, Temitope Oluwasegun Cephas; Adewumi, Moses Olubusuyi; Coker, Bamidele Atinuke; Nudamajo, Felix Yasha; Adeniji, Johnson Adekunle

    2016-01-01

    Recently, a cell-culture independent protocol for detection of enteroviruses from clinical specimen was recommended by the WHO for surveillance alongside the previously established protocols. Here, we investigated whether this new protocol will show the same enterovirus diversity landscape as the established cell-culture dependent protocols. Faecal samples were collected from sixty apparently healthy children in Ibadan, Nigeria. Samples were resuspended in phosphate buffered saline, RNA was extracted, and the VP1 gene was amplified using WHO recommended RT-snPCR protocol. Amplicons were sequenced and sequences subjected to phylogenetic analysis. Fifteen (25%) of the 60 samples yielded the expected band size. Of the 15 amplicons sequenced, 12 were exploitable. The remaining 3 had electropherograms with multiple peaks and were unexploitable. Eleven of the 12 exploitable sequences were identified as Coxsackievirus A1 (CVA1), CVA3, CVA4, CVA8, CVA20, echovirus 32 (E32), enterovirus 71 (EV71), EVB80, and EVC99. Subsequently, the last exploitable sequence was identified as enterobacteriophage baseplate gene by nucleotide BLAST. The results of this study document the first description of molecular sequence data on CVA1, CVA8, and E32 strains present in Nigeria. The result further showed that species A enteroviruses were more commonly detected in the region when cell-culture bias is bypassed. PMID:27087810

  11. Mammalian Cell Culture Simplified.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Robert; Solomon, Sondra

    1991-01-01

    A tissue culture experiment that does not require elaborate equipment and that can be used to teach sterile technique, the principles of animal cell line maintenance, and the concept of cell growth curves is described. The differences between cancerous and normal cells can be highlighted. The procedure is included. (KR)

  12. [Thermophilic eukaryotic cell cultures].

    PubMed

    Bakhutashvili, V I; Dzhavakhishvili, N A; Kupradze, S A; Chkhotua, R N; Bobokhidze, N G

    1991-01-01

    Thermophilic clones of lymphoblastoid cell cultures Namalwa were generated and found to be capable of life and reproduction at a temperature of 60 degrees C. The reproductive dynamics, cytology, and ultrastructure of these clones were studied. PMID:1803780

  13. Traditional and emerging methods for analyzing cell activity in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Stewart, N T; Byrne, K M; Hosick, H L; Vierck, J L; Dodson, M V

    2000-03-01

    The selection of appropriate techniques to assay for markers of cell activity is important for obtaining optimal results in cell culture-based research. This paper is intended as a guide to many of the assays currently available and new techniques that have been recently introduced in the literature. This paper addresses both manual assay techniques, including the use of hemocytometers, phase contrast microscopy, cell staining, and the immunofluorescent antibody assay (IFA), and automated assays for cell activity, including stained optical density, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, creatine kinase assay, DNA quantification, electronic cell counting, flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, image analysis, chemiluminescence, radioisotope labeling, precursor incorporation, in-situ hybridization/ligand binding, and enzyme-linked immuno-culture assay (ELICA). Advantages/disadvantages and applicability of these assays to different areas of cell culture research are discussed, and guidelines for selecting an appropriate assay are suggested. PMID:10650337

  14. Digital Microfluidic Cell Culture.

    PubMed

    Ng, Alphonsus H C; Li, Bingyu Betty; Chamberlain, M Dean; Wheeler, Aaron R

    2015-01-01

    Digital microfluidics (DMF) is a droplet-based liquid-handling technology that has recently become popular for cell culture and analysis. In DMF, picoliter- to microliter-sized droplets are manipulated on a planar surface using electric fields, thus enabling software-reconfigurable operations on individual droplets, such as move, merge, split, and dispense from reservoirs. Using this technique, multistep cell-based processes can be carried out using simple and compact instrumentation, making DMF an attractive platform for eventual integration into routine biology workflows. In this review, we summarize the state-of-the-art in DMF cell culture, and describe design considerations, types of DMF cell culture, and cell-based applications of DMF. PMID:26643019

  15. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  16. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  17. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  18. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  19. 21 CFR 866.2350 - Microbiological assay culture medium.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Microbiological assay culture medium. 866.2350 Section 866.2350 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES IMMUNOLOGY AND MICROBIOLOGY DEVICES Microbiology Devices §...

  20. Liver Cell Culture Devices

    PubMed Central

    Andria, B.; Bracco, A.; Cirino, G.; Chamuleau, R. A. F. M.

    2010-01-01

    In the last 15 years many different liver cell culture devices, consisting of functional liver cells and artificial materials, have been developed. They have been devised for numerous different applications, such as temporary organ replacement (a bridge to liver transplantation or native liver regeneration) and as in vitro screening systems in the early stages of the drug development process, like assessing hepatotoxicity, hepatic drug metabolism, and induction/inhibition studies. Relevant literature is summarized about artificial human liver cell culture systems by scrutinizing PubMed from 2003 to 2009. Existing devices are divided in 2D configurations (e.g., static monolayer, sandwich, perfused cells, and flat plate) and 3D configurations (e.g., liver slices, spheroids, and different types of bioreactors). The essential features of an ideal liver cell culture system are discussed: different types of scaffolds, oxygenation systems, extracellular matrixes (natural and artificial), cocultures with nonparenchymal cells, and the role of shear stress problems. Finally, miniaturization and high-throughput systems are discussed. All these factors contribute in their own way to the viability and functionality of liver cells in culture. Depending on the aim for which they are designed, several good systems are available for predicting hepatotoxicity and hepatic metabolism within the general population. To predict hepatotoxicity in individual cases genomic analysis might be essential as well. PMID:26998397

  1. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  2. Culturing Uveal Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Angi, Martina; Versluis, Mieke; Kalirai, Helen

    2015-01-01

    A major challenge in cancer research is the use of appropriate models with which to study a specific biological question. Cell lines have long been used to study cellular processes and the effects of individual molecules because they are easy to use, grow rapidly, produce reproducible results and have a strong track record in research. In uveal melanoma in particular, the absence of animal models that faithfully replicate the behavior of the human disease has propagated the generation and use of numerous cell lines by individual research groups. This in itself, however, can be viewed as a problem due to the lack of standardization when characterizing these entities to determine how closely they reflect the genetic and phenotypic characteristics of this disease. The alternative is to use in vitro primary cultures of cells obtained directly from uveal melanoma patient samples, but this too has its difficulties. Primary cell cultures are difficult to use, hard to obtain and can show considerable heterogeneity. In this article, we review the following: (1) the uveal melanoma cell lines that are currently available, discussing the importance of establishing a bank of those that represent the molecular heterogeneity of uveal melanoma; (2) the methods used to isolate and perform short-term cultures of primary uveal melanoma cells, and (3) the establishment of 3D tissue culture models that bridge the gap between 2D in vitro systems and in vivo models with which to dissect cancer biology and perform therapeutic screens. PMID:27171555

  3. Assaying chemotaxis of Dictyostelium cells.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, Michelle C; Firtel, Richard A

    2006-01-01

    Both prokaryote and eukaryote cells can sense and move up chemical concentration gradients (chemotax). As a means of finding food sources during vegetative growth, Dictyostelium discoideum naturally chemotaxes toward chemicals released by bacteria. As part of its developmental life cycle, D. discoideum chemotaxes towards cAMP. This chapter describes protocols for using Dictyostelium to understand the cell biology behind and the signaling events necessary for eukaryotic amoeboid chemotaxis. The chapter includes analyses of random cell motility, directed motility up chemical gradients, cellular responses to uniform chemoattractant exposure, and the utility of fluorescent probes for chemotaxis signaling events. Random cell motility in the absence of chemoattractant is analyzed to decipher the properties of self-organizing pseudopodia extension and retraction. Monitoring chemotaxis toward cAMP and folate allows the determination of signaling events required for sensing a chemical gradient and moving in a directed, persistent manner up the gradient. Uniform chemoattractant exposure is employed to elucidate the immediate intracellular responses to chemoattractant stimulation. Finally, analyzing cells expressing fluorescent fusion proteins is vital to elucidating the location of signaling events during chemotaxis. PMID:16957303

  4. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc., has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc., is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  5. Cell Culturing of Cytoskeleton

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Biomedical research offers hope for a variety of medical problems, from diabetes to the replacement of damaged bone and tissues. Bioreactors, which are used to grow cells and tissue cultures, play a major role in such research and production efforts. Cell culturing, such as this bone cell culture, is an important part of biomedical research. The BioDyn payload includes a tissue engineering investigation. The commercial affiliate, Millenium Biologix, Inc. has been conducting bone implant experiments to better understand how synthetic bone can be used to treat bone-related illnesses and bone damaged in accidents. On STS-95, the BioDyn payload will include a bone cell culture aimed to help develop this commercial synthetic bone product. Millenium Biologix, Inc. is exploring the potential for making human bone implantable materials by seeding its proprietary artificial scaffold material with human bone cells. The product of this tissue engineering experiment using the Bioprocessing Modules (BPMs) on STS-95 is space-grown bone implants, which could have potential for dental implants, long bone grafts, and coating for orthopedic implants such as hip replacements.

  6. Quantification of Dehalospirillum multivorans in Mixed-Culture Biofilms with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay.

    PubMed

    Bauer-Kreisel, P; Eisenbeis, M; Scholz-Muramatsu, H

    1996-08-01

    A fast, highly selective and sensitive method to quantify specific biomasses in mixed-culture biofilms is described. It consists of detachment of a biofilm from its support material, resolution of the detached biofilm flocs in order to separate the enclosed cells and antigens, and quantification of specific biomass by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:16535389

  7. Quantification of Dehalospirillum multivorans in Mixed-Culture Biofilms with an Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bauer-Kreisel, P.; Eisenbeis, M.; Scholz-Muramatsu, H.

    1996-01-01

    A fast, highly selective and sensitive method to quantify specific biomasses in mixed-culture biofilms is described. It consists of detachment of a biofilm from its support material, resolution of the detached biofilm flocs in order to separate the enclosed cells and antigens, and quantification of specific biomass by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. PMID:16535389

  8. Oscillating Cell Culture Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freed, Lisa E.; Cheng, Mingyu; Moretti, Matteo G.

    2010-01-01

    To better exploit the principles of gas transport and mass transport during the processes of cell seeding of 3D scaffolds and in vitro culture of 3D tissue engineered constructs, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor provides a flow of cell suspensions and culture media directly through a porous 3D scaffold (during cell seeding) and a 3D construct (during subsequent cultivation) within a highly gas-permeable closed-loop tube. This design is simple, modular, and flexible, and its component parts are easy to assemble and operate, and are inexpensive. Chamber volume can be very low, but can be easily scaled up. This innovation is well suited to work with different biological specimens, particularly with cells having high oxygen requirements and/or shear sensitivity, and different scaffold structures and dimensions. The closed-loop changer is highly gas permeable to allow efficient gas exchange during the cell seeding/culturing process. A porous scaffold, which may be seeded with cells, is fixed by means of a scaffold holder to the chamber wall with scaffold/construct orientation with respect to the chamber determined by the geometry of the scaffold holder. A fluid, with/without biological specimens, is added to the chamber such that all, or most, of the air is displaced (i.e., with or without an enclosed air bubble). Motion is applied to the chamber within a controlled environment (e.g., oscillatory motion within a humidified 37 C incubator). Movement of the chamber induces relative motion of the scaffold/construct with respect to the fluid. In case the fluid is a cell suspension, cells will come into contact with the scaffold and eventually adhere to it. Alternatively, cells can be seeded on scaffolds by gel entrapment prior to bioreactor cultivation. Subsequently, the oscillatory cell culture bioreactor will provide efficient gas exchange (i.e., of oxygen and carbon dioxide, as required for viability of metabolically active cells) and controlled levels of fluid dynamic shear (i.e., as required for viability of shear-sensitive cells) to the developing engineered tissue construct. This bioreactor was recently utilized to show independent and interactive effects of a growth factor (IGF-I) and slow bidirectional perfusion on the survival, differentiation, and contractile performance of 3D tissue engineering cardiac constructs. The main application of this system is within the tissue engineering industry. The ideal final application is within the automated mass production of tissue- engineered constructs. Target industries could be both life sciences companies as well as bioreactor device producing companies.

  9. Electrical wound-healing assay for cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Keese, Charles R.; Wegener, Joachim; Walker, Sarah R.; Giaever, Ivar

    2004-01-01

    Confluent cell monolayers in tissue culture are fragile and can easily be mechanically disrupted, often leaving an area devoid of cells. This opening in the cell sheet is then repopulated, because the cells on the fringe of the damage, which are no longer contact-inhibited, move into the available space. This mechanical disruption is often done deliberately in a “wound-healing” assay as a means to assess the migration of the cells. In such assays, a scrape is made in the cell layer followed by microscopy to monitor the advance of the cells into the wound. We have found that these types of assays can also be accomplished electrically. In this approach, cells growing on small electrodes and monitored by using electric cell-substrate impedance sensing are subjected to currents, resulting in severe electroporation and subsequent cell death. After this invasive treatment, the electrode's impedance is again monitored to chart the migration and ultimate healing of the wound. We report here that this procedure to study cell behavior is both highly reproducible, quantitative, and provides data similar to that acquired with traditional measurements. PMID:14747654

  10. Assaying Cell Cycle Status Using Flow Cytometry.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kang Ho; Sederstrom, Joel M

    2015-01-01

    In this unit, two protocols are described for analyzing cell cycle status using flow cytometry. The first is based on the simultaneous analysis of proliferation-specific marker (Ki-67) and cellular DNA content, which discriminate resting/quiescent cell populations (G0 cell) and quantify cell cycle distribution (G1, S, or G2/M), respectively. The second is based on differential staining of DNA and RNA through co-staining of Hoechst 33342 and Pyronin Y, which is also useful to identify G0 cells from G1 cells. Along with these methods for analyzing cell cycle status, two additional methods for cell proliferation assays with recent updates of newly developed fluorophores, which allow multiplex analysis of cell cycle status, cell proliferation, and a gene of interest using flow cytometry, are outlined. PMID:26131851

  11. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay detection of trichothecenes produced by the Bioherbicide Myrothecium verrucaria in cell cultures, extracts, and plant tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) plates for trichothecene detection, possessing cross-reactivity with several trichothecene mycotoxins (e.g., verrucarin A, and J, roridin A, L-2, E, and H), were tested for their ability to detect trichothecenes produced by a strain of...

  12. Application of long-term cultured interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay for assessing effector and memory T cell responses in cattle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effector and memory T cells are generated through developmental programing of naïve cells following antigen recognition. If the infection is controlled, up to 95% of the T cells generated during the expansion phase are eliminated (i.e., contraction phase) and memory T cells remain, sometimes for a l...

  13. Replication of cultured lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guzowski, D.; Bienkowski, R.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have investigated the conditions necessary to support replication of lung type 2 epithelial cells in culture. Cells were isolated from mature fetal rabbit lungs (29d gestation) and cultured on feeder layers of mitotically inactivated 3T3 fibroblasts. The epithelial nature of the cells was demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescent staining for keratin and by polyacid dichrome stain. Ultrastructural examination during the first week showed that the cells contained myofilaments, microvilli and lamellar bodies (markers for type 2 cells). The following changes were observed after the first week: increase in cell size; loss of lamellar bodies and appearance of multivesicular bodies; increase in rough endoplasmic reticulum and golgi; increase in tonafilaments and well-defined junctions. General cell morphology was good for up to 10 wk. Cells cultured on plastic surface degenerated after 1 wk. Cell replication was assayed by autoradiography of cultures exposed to (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and by direct cell counts. The cells did not replicate during the first week; however, between 2-10 wk the cells incorporated the label and went through approximately 6 population doublings. They have demonstrated that lung alveolar epithelial cells can replicate in culture if they are maintained on an appropriate substrate. The coincidence of ability to replicate and loss of markers for differentiation may reflect the dichotomy between growth and differentiation commonly observed in developing systems.

  14. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  15. Relative embryotoxic potency of p-substituted phenols in the embryonic stem cell test (EST) and comparison to their toxic potency in vivo and in the whole embryo culture (WEC) assay.

    PubMed

    Strikwold, Marije; Woutersen, Ruud A; Spenkelink, Bert; Punt, Ans; Rietjens, Ivonne M C M

    2012-09-01

    The applicability of the embryonic stem cell test (EST) as an alternative for in vivo embryotoxicity testing was evaluated for a series of five p-substituted phenols. To this purpose, the potency ranking for this class of compounds derived from the inhibition of cardiomyocyte differentiation in the EST was compared to in vivo embryotoxic potency data obtained from literature and to the potency ranking defined in the in vitro whole embryo culture (WEC) assay. From the results obtained it appears that the EST was able to identify the embryotoxic potential for p-substituted phenols, providing an identical potency ranking compared to the WEC assay. However, the EST was not able to predict an accurate ranking for the phenols compared to their potency observed in vivo. Only phenol, the least potent compound within this series, was correctly ranked. Furthermore, p-mercaptophenol was correctly identified as a relative potent congener of the phenols tested, but its ranking was distorted by p-heptyloxyphenol, of which the toxicity was overestimated in the EST. It is concluded that when attempting to explain the observed disparity in potency rankings between in vitro and in vivo embryotoxicity, the in vitro models should be combined with a kinetic model describing in vivo absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion processes of the compounds. PMID:22820428

  16. Measurement of Reactive Oxygen Species in the Culture Media Using Acridan Lumigen PS-3 Assay

    PubMed Central

    Uy, Benedict; McGlashan, Susan R.; Shaikh, Shamim B.

    2011-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated continuously during aerobic metabolism. ROS are highly reactive molecules and in excessive amounts, can lead to protein and DNA oxidation, protein cross-linking, and cell death. Cell-culture models provide a valuable tool in understanding the mechanisms that lead to cell death. Accumulation of ROS within cells and/or their release into the culture media are highly cell type-specific. The ability to estimate ROS levels in the culture media is an important step in understanding the mechanisms contributing to disease processes. In this paper, we describe the optimization of a simple method to estimate ROS levels in the culture media using the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 reagent provided in the Amersham ECL Plus kit (GE Healthcare, UK). We have shown that the Acridan Lumigen PS-3 assay generates ROS-specific chemiluminescence in fresh as well as media stored at ?20C, in as little as 1020 ?l of samples. The method was able to detect the dose (of stimulants)- and time (acute and chronic)-dependent changes in ROS levels in media collected from various cell types. Our results suggest that the kit reagents, PBS buffer, and various media did not contribute significantly to the overall chemiluminescence generated in the assay; however, we suggest that the unused medium specific for each cell type should be used as blanks and final readings of test samples normalized against these readings. As this method uses commonly available laboratory equipment and commercially available reagents, we believe this assay is convenient, economical, and specific in estimating ROS released extracellularly into the culture media. PMID:21966257

  17. Antibody secreting cell assay for influenza A virus in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An ELISPOT assay to enumerate B-cells producing antibodies specific to a given antigen, also known as an antibody secreting cell (ASC) assay, was adapted to detect B-cells specific for influenza A virus (IAV). The assay is performed ex vivo and enumerates ASC at a single cell level. A simple ASC det...

  18. Multinucleated giant cells from fibroblast cultures.

    PubMed

    Holt, Dolly J; Grainger, David W

    2011-06-01

    Many multinucleated giant cells are well-known to form from macrophage origin. Those formed from other cell types are less described, but may be as prevalent in pathological tissue. Giant multinucleated cells derived from secondary and primary fibroblast sources in various cultures with similar characteristics to foreign body giant cells are reported. Secondary-transformed NIH 3T3 fibroblasts rapidly fuse within 24 h in contact co-cultures with RAW 264.7 immortalized macrophages, while 3T3 monocultures, non-contact (transwell) co-cultures, and macrophage-conditioned media-treated 3T3 monocultures all do not fuse. Primary-derived murine fibroblasts also form multinucleated cells, both in the presence or absence of co-cultured macrophages that increase during long-term culture (5-30 days). In contrast to 3T3 fusion, this primary cell phenomenon is not due to fibroblast fusion, but rather to nuclear division without cytokinesis. That these multinucleated fibroblasts can originate via different mechanisms may influence and distinguish their behaviors in conditions under which they may arise, including various in vitro culture assays, and in certain fibroblastic pathologies such as the foreign body response, fibrosis, cancer and aged tissue. PMID:21397323

  19. High-Content Assays for Characterizing the Viability and Morphology of 3D Cancer Spheroid Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Mitlo, Trisha; Hesley, Jayne; Luke, Steve; Owens, Windsor; Cromwell, Evan F.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract There is an increasing interest in using three-dimensional (3D) spheroids for modeling cancer and tissue biology to accelerate translation research. Development of higher throughput assays to quantify phenotypic changes in spheroids is an active area of investigation. The goal of this study was to develop higher throughput high-content imaging and analysis methods to characterize phenotypic changes in human cancer spheroids in response to compound treatment. We optimized spheroid cell culture protocols using low adhesion U-bottom 96- and 384-well plates for three common cancer cell lines and improved the workflow with a one-step staining procedure that reduces assay time and minimizes variability. We streamlined imaging acquisition by using a maximum projection algorithm that combines cellular information from multiple slices through a 3D object into a single image, enabling efficient comparison of different spheroid phenotypes. A custom image analysis method was implemented to provide multiparametric characterization of single-cell and spheroid phenotypes. We report a number of readouts, including quantification of marker-specific cell numbers, measurement of cell viability and apoptosis, and characterization of spheroid size and shape. Assay performance was assessed using established anticancer cytostatic and cytotoxic drugs. We demonstrated concentrationresponse effects for different readouts and measured IC50 values, comparing 3D spheroid results to two-dimensional cell cultures. Finally, a library of 119 approved anticancer drugs was screened across a wide range of concentrations using HCT116 colon cancer spheroids. The proposed methods can increase performance and throughput of high-content assays for compound screening and evaluation of anticancer drugs with 3D cell models. PMID:26317884

  20. KERATINOCYTE CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS ASSAY: CORRELATION WITH IN VIVO TUMOR STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A murine keratinocyte cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was characterized and examined as an in vitro model system for studying the biotransformation of promutagens/procarcinogens by mouse skin. The assay used living cultured newborn SENCAR keratinocytes for the metabolic activatio...

  1. 3D Culture Assays of Murine Mammary Branching Morphogenesis and Epithelial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen-Ngoc, Kim-Vy; Shamir, Eliah R.; Huebner, Robert J.; Beck, Jennifer N.; Cheung, Kevin J.; Ewald, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Epithelia are fundamental tissues that line cavities, glands, and outer body surfaces. We use three-dimensional (3D) embedded culture of primary murine mammary epithelial ducts, called “organoids,” to recapitulate in days in culture epithelial programs that occur over weeks deep within the body. Modulating the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) allows us to model cell- and tissue-level behaviors observed in normal development, such as branching morphogenesis, and in cancer, such as invasion and dissemination. Here, we describe a collection of protocols for 3D culture of mammary organoids in different ECMs and for immunofluorescence staining of 3D culture samples and mammary gland tissue sections. We illustrate expected phenotypic outcomes of each assay and provide troubleshooting tips for commonly encountered technical problems. PMID:25245692

  2. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  3. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  4. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  5. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  6. 21 CFR 864.7100 - Red blood cell enzyme assay.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Red blood cell enzyme assay. 864.7100 Section 864...) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Hematology Kits and Packages § 864.7100 Red blood cell enzyme assay. (a) Identification. Red blood cell enzyme assay is a device used to measure the activity...

  7. Assays for transglutaminases in cell death.

    PubMed

    Melino, G; Candi, E; Steinert, P M

    2000-01-01

    Several in vivo and in vitro experimental model systems demonstrate a direct relationship between the expression and activity of tissue transglutaminase [tTG; also called transglutaminase type 2 (TGase 2)] and programmed cell death or apoptosis. This is based on mRNA and protein studies, sense and antisense transfection, identification of N epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)-lysine cross-links in extracted apoptotic bodies, and in blue mouse experiments. In the epidermis, apoptosis occurs under particular conditions in the proliferative basal layer with the involvement of the tTG enzyme. However, in epidermal keratinocytes other TGases (TGase 1, TGase 3, and perhaps TGase X) are normally activated in a terminal differentiation program, called cornification, that leads to cell death. These cells perform their functions after death, providing an elastic physical and permeability barrier to the skin. In fact, TGase 1 mutations cause the skin disease lamellar ichthyosis. Because all TGases share strong similarities in structure and function, being involved in mechanisms of cell death, this chapter describes the current assays for TGases at the mRNA, protein, and enzymatic levels. We also describe procedures to produce, purify, and characterize recombinant TGases, to identify mutation in disease, to isolate cross-linked bodies, and to analyze the N epsilon-(gamma-glutamyl)-lysine isopeptide cross-links. Finally, we discuss general rules for the interpretation and comparison of these events in cell death. PMID:10914039

  8. Huanglongbing and psyllid cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We successfully established cell cultures of the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Psyllidae: Hemiptera), DcHH-1. The cell culture also supported growth of Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. This bacterial pathogen is associated with Huanglongbing, known as citrus greening disease. Research on...

  9. Polydimethylsiloxane SlipChip for mammalian cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chia-Wen; Peng, Chien-Chung; Liao, Wei-Hao; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2015-11-01

    This paper reports a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) SlipChip for in vitro cell culture applications, multiple-treatment assays, cell co-cultures, and cytokine detection assays. The PDMS SlipChip is composed of two PDMS layers with microfluidic channels on each surface that are separated by a thin silicone fluid (Si-fluid) layer. The integration of Si-fluid enables the two PDMS layers to be slid to different positions; therefore, the channel patterns can be re-arranged for various applications. The SlipChip design significantly reduces the complexity of sample handling, transportation, and treatment processes. To apply the developed SlipChip for cell culture applications, human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549) and lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) were cultured to examine the biocompatibility of the developed PDMS SlipChip. Moreover, embryonic pluripotent stem cells (ES-D3) were also cultured in the device to evaluate the retention of their stemness in the device. The experimental results show that cell morphology, viability and proliferation are not affected when the cells are cultured in the SlipChip, indicating that the device is highly compatible with mammalian cell culture. In addition, the stemness of the ES-D3 cells was highly retained after they were cultured in the device, suggesting the feasibility of using the SlipChip for stem cell research. Various cell experiments, such as simultaneous triple staining of cells and co-culture of MRC-5 with A549 cells, were also performed to demonstrate the functionalities of the PDMS SlipChip. Furthermore, we used a cytokine detection assay to evaluate the effect of endotoxin (lipopolysaccharides, LPS) treatment on the cytokine secretion of A549 cells using the SlipChip. The developed PDMS SlipChip provides a straightforward and effective platform for various on-chip in vitro cell cultures and consequent analysis, which is promising for a number of cell biology studies and biomedical applications. PMID:26381390

  10. Production scale insect cell culture.

    PubMed

    Agathos, S N

    1991-01-01

    Insect cells in culture are currently commanding great interest as superior hosts for the efficient production of biologicals with applications in health care and in agriculture. Insect cell culture is ripe for scale-up technologies, in order to meet future projected production requirements of (a) insect viruses used as bioinsecticides and (b) recombinant proteins of therapeutic potential for humans and animals. The single most prominent system used in research-based and in commercial insect cell culture today involves lepidopteran cells transfected with baculovirus expression vectors for abundant formation of recombinant biologicals. However, dipteran insect cell lines also are beginning to emerge as useful tools in biotechnology. Current practices in bioprocess development using insect cell culture, advances in media formulation and in insect cell bioreactor design, and emerging trends are presented and critically evaluated. PMID:14543739

  11. Use of Japanese quail embryo fibroblast cells for propagation and assay of turkey herpesvirus FC-126.

    PubMed

    Colwell, W M; Simmons, D G; Muse, K E

    1974-01-01

    Japanese quail (Coturnix coturnix japonica) fibroblast cell culture monolayers were found to provide a very satisfactory system in which to propagate and assay turkey herpesvirus FC-126, which is used for production of Marek's disease vaccine. Japanese quail cells were more sensitive than duck cells and of approximately equal sensitivity to chicken cells. Foci of infection developed rapidly and uniformly, were of larger size, and were more easily discernible in quail cells than in chicken cells. PMID:4855648

  12. Bead aggregation assays for the characterization of putative cell adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Emond, Michelle R; Jontes, James D

    2014-01-01

    Cell-cell adhesion is fundamental to multicellular life and is mediated by a diverse array of cell surface proteins. However, the adhesive interactions for many of these proteins are poorly understood. Here we present a simple, rapid method for characterizing the adhesive properties of putative homophilic cell adhesion molecules. Cultured HEK293 cells are transfected with DNA plasmid encoding a secreted, epitope-tagged ectodomain of a cell surface protein. Using functionalized beads specific for the epitope tag, the soluble, secreted fusion protein is captured from the culture medium. The coated beads can then be used directly in bead aggregation assays or in fluorescent bead sorting assays to test for homophilic adhesion. If desired, mutagenesis can then be used to elucidate the specific amino acids or domains required for adhesion. This assay requires only small amounts of expressed protein, does not require the production of stable cell lines, and can be accomplished in 4 days. PMID:25350770

  13. High density cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  14. Mesenchymal stem cells from patients to assay bone graft substitutes.

    PubMed

    Manfrini, M; Di Bona, C; Canella, A; Lucarelli, E; Pellati, A; D'Agostino, A; Barbanti-Bròdano, G; Tognon, M

    2013-06-01

    Bio-engineered scaffolds used in orthopedic clinical applications induce different tissue responses after implantation. In this study, non-stoichiometric Mg(2+) ions and stoichiometric apatites, which are used in orthopedic surgery as bone substitutes, have been assayed in vitro with human adult mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) to evaluate cytocompatibility and osteoconductivity. hMSCs from the bone marrow aspirates of orthopedic patients were isolated and analyzed by flow cytometry for the surface markers Stro1, CD29, CD44, CD71, CD73, CD90, CD105 (positive) and CD45, CD235 (negative). The hMSC were analyzed for self-renewal capacity and for differentiation potential. The hMSC, which were grown on different biomaterials, were analyzed for (i) cytotoxicity by AlamarBlue metabolic assay, (ii) osteoconductivity by ELISA for activated focal adhesion kinase, (iii) cytoskeleton organization by fluorescence microscopy, and (iv) cell morphology which was investigated by scan electron microscopy (SEM). Results indicate that isolated cell populations agree with minimal criteria for defining hMSC cultures. Non-stoichiometric Mg(2+) and stoichiometric apatites, in granular form, represent a more favorable environment for mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and growth compared to the non-stoichiometric Mg(2+) apatite, in nano-structured paste form. This study indicates that different forms of biomaterials modulate osteoconductivity and cellular growth by differential activation focal adhesion kinase. PMID:23129455

  15. A novel method for culturing neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xue-Sheng; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Wei-Guo; Shen, Gang; Pan, De-Sheng; Luo, Ming

    2007-01-01

    The standard culture method for neural stem cells cannot prevent the attachment of neurospheres, which eventually result in differentiation. This study developed a new method for long-term neural stem cell cultivation. In the antiattachment group, neural stem cells were cultured in flasks coated with 1.5% agarose gel. As a control, cells were cultured in plastic flasks. The 5-bromine-deoxyuridine incorporation assay was used to determine the S-phase labeling index of both groups. The methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT) colorimetric assay was used to determine the total cell vitality. After a 3-mo culture, the spontaneous differentiation of stem cells was studied using immunocytochemistry for neuroepithelial stem cell protein. We found that neural stem cells grew rapidly in the antiattachment flasks. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups in terms of the S-phase labeling index or MTT assay. When cultured for 3 mo in vitro, many more cells differentiated in the control than in the antiattachment group (32.05 vs. 0.64%, P < 0.01). Moreover, the neural stem cells in the antiattachment group remained multipotent. Therefore, flasks coated with agarose gel are suitable for long-term neural stem cell culture. PMID:17619224

  16. Viral inhibition assay: a CD8 T cell neutralization assay for use in clinical trials of HIV-1 vaccine candidates.

    PubMed

    Spentzou, Aggeliki; Bergin, Philip; Gill, Dilbinder; Cheeseman, Hannah; Ashraf, Ambreen; Kaltsidis, Harry; Cashin-Cox, Michelle; Anjarwalla, Insiyah; Steel, Alan; Higgs, Christopher; Pozniak, Anton; Piechocka-Trocha, Alicja; Wong, Johnson; Anzala, Omu; Karita, Etienne; Dally, Len; Gotch, Frances; Walker, Bruce; Gilmour, Jill; Hayes, Peter

    2010-03-01

    We have characterized an assay measuring CD8 T cell-mediated inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type 1 replication, demonstrating specificity and reproducibility and employing a panel of primary HIV-1 isolates. The assay uses relatively simple autologous cell culture and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, avoids generation of T cell clones, and can be performed with <2 million peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Efficient CD8 T cell-mediated cross-clade inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro was demonstrated in antiretroviral therapy-naive HIV-1-infected subjects with controlled viral replication in vivo but not in viremic subjects. An HIV-1 vaccine candidate, consisting of DNA and recombinant adenovirus 5 vectors tested in a phase I clinical trial, induced CD8 T cells that efficiently inhibited HIV-1 in a HLA-I-dependent manner. Assessment of direct antiviral T cell function by this assay provides additional information to guide vaccine design and the prioritizing of candidates for further clinical trials. PMID:20132004

  17. Three-dimensional cell culturing by magnetic levitation.

    PubMed

    Haisler, William L; Timm, David M; Gage, Jacob A; Tseng, Hubert; Killian, T C; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-10-01

    Recently, biomedical research has moved toward cell culture in three dimensions to better recapitulate native cellular environments. This protocol describes one method for 3D culture, the magnetic levitation method (MLM), in which cells bind with a magnetic nanoparticle assembly overnight to render them magnetic. When resuspended in medium, an external magnetic field levitates and concentrates cells at the air-liquid interface, where they aggregate to form larger 3D cultures. The resulting cultures are dense, can synthesize extracellular matrix (ECM) and can be analyzed similarly to the other culture systems using techniques such as immunohistochemical analysis (IHC), western blotting and other biochemical assays. This protocol details the MLM and other associated techniques (cell culture, imaging and IHC) adapted for the MLM. The MLM requires 45 min of working time over 2 d to create 3D cultures that can be cultured in the long term (>7 d). PMID:24030442

  18. Kit-On-A-Lid-Assays for accessible self-contained cell assays.

    PubMed Central

    Berthier, Erwin; Guckenberger, David J.; Cavnar, Peter; Huttenlocher, Anna; Keller, Nancy P.

    2013-01-01

    Microfluidics have demonstrated the ability to improve the control of the biomechanical and biochemical properties of cell-based assays. However, microscale methods typically rely on macroscopic reagent handling and fluidic loading protocols that are technically challenging and do not scale favorably. Here, we demonstrate a microfluidic platform technology called Kit-On-A-Lid-Assay (KOALA), that enables the creation of self-contained microfluidic cell-based assays, integrating all the steps required to perform cell-based assays. The operation of the KOALA platform is user-friendly and consists of bringing together a lid containing the microchannels, and a base containing the pre-packaged reagents, thereby causing fluidic exchange in all the channels simultaneously. We demonstrate that the KOALA cell-based assays can be operated from start to finish without any external laboratory equipment. Finally, we demonstrate KOALA-bases with advanced function allowing the freezing, thawing, and storing of cell-suspensions. PMID:23229806

  19. Atraumatic Pulsatile Leukocyte Circulation for Long-Term In Vitro Dynamic Culture and Adhesion Assays.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Giulia; Stoiber, Martin; Pfeiffer, Dagmar; Schima, Heinrich

    2015-11-01

    Low flow rate pumping of cell suspensions finds current applications in bioreactors for short-term dynamic cell culture and adhesion assays. The aim of this study was to develop an atraumatic pump and hemodynamically adapted test circuit to allow operating periods of at least several hours. A computer-controlled mini-pump (MP) was constructed based on non-occlusive local compression of an elastic tube with commercial bi-leaflet valves directing the pulsatile flow into a compliant circuit. Cell damage and activation in the system were tested with whole blood in comparison with a set with a conventional peristaltic pump (PP). Activation of circulating THP-1 monocytes was tested by measuring the expression of CD54 (ICAM-1). Additionally, monocyte-endothelial interactions were monitored using a parallel-plate flow chamber with an artificial stenosis. The system required a priming volume of only 20 mL, delivering a peak pulsatile flow of up to 35 mL/min. After 8 h, blood hemolysis was significantly lower for MP with 11 ± 3 mg/dL compared with PP with 100 ± 16 mg/dL. CD142 (tissue factor) expression on blood monocytes was 50% lower for MP. With MP, THP-1 cells could be pumped for extended periods (17 h), with no enhanced expression of CD54 permitting the long-term co-culture of THP-1 with endothelial cells and the analysis of flow pattern effects on cell adhesion. A low-damage assay setup was developed, which allows the pulsatile flow of THP-1 cells and investigation of their interaction with other cells or surfaces for extended periods of time. PMID:25894522

  20. CYTOTOXICITY OF CHEMICAL CARCINOGENS TOWARDS HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EVALUATED IN A CLONAL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Survival of human bronchial epithelial cells after administration of four chemical carcinogens was measured in a clonal assay. Human bronchial epithelial cells were obtained from outgrowths of explanted tissue pieces. Serum-free medium was used for both explant culture and clonal...

  1. The Molecular Bacterial Load Assay Replaces Solid Culture for Measuring Early Bactericidal Response to Antituberculosis Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Mtafya, Bariki; Phillips, Patrick P. J.; Hoelscher, Michael; Ntinginya, Elias N.; Kohlenberg, Anke; Rachow, Andrea; Rojas-Ponce, Gabriel; McHugh, Timothy D.; Heinrich, Norbert

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the use of the molecular bacterial load (MBL) assay, for measuring viable Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum, in comparison with solid agar and liquid culture. The MBL assay provides early information on the rate of decline in bacterial load and has technical advantages over culture in either form. PMID:24871215

  2. Cell culture purity issues and DFAT cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, Shengjuan; Department of Animal Sciences, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99164 ; Bergen, Werner G.; Zan, Linsen; Dodson, Michael V.

    2013-04-12

    Highlights: •DFAT cells are progeny cells derived from dedifferentiated mature adipocytes. •Common problems in this research is potential cell contamination of initial cultures. •The initial cell culture purity is crucial in DFAT cell research field. -- Abstract: Dedifferentiation of mature adipocytes, in vitro, has been pursued/documented for over forty years. The subsequent progeny cells are named dedifferentiated adipocyte-derived progeny cells (DFAT cells). DFAT cells are proliferative and likely to possess mutilineage potential. As a consequence, DFAT cells and their progeny/daughter cells may be useful as a potential tool for various aspects of tissue engineering and as potential vectors for the alleviation of several disease states. Publications in this area have been increasing annually, but the purity of the initial culture of mature adipocytes has seldom been documented. Consequently, it is not always clear whether DFAT cells are derived from dedifferentiated mature (lipid filled) adipocytes or from contaminating cells that reside in an impure culture.

  3. Rapid Dissociation of HIV-1 from Cultured Cells Severely Limits Infectivity Assays, Causes the Inactivation Ascribed to Entry Inhibitors, and Masks the Inherently High Level of Infectivity of Virions▿

    PubMed Central

    Platt, Emily J.; Kozak, Susan L.; Durnin, James P.; Hope, Thomas J.; Kabat, David

    2010-01-01

    By using immunofluorescence microscopy to observe and analyze freshly made HIV-1 virions adsorbed onto cells, we found that they are inherently highly infectious, rather than predominantly defective as previously suggested. Surprisingly, polycations enhance titers 20- to 30-fold by stabilizing adsorption and preventing a previously undescribed process of rapid dissociation, strongly implying that infectivity assays for many viruses are limited not only by inefficient virus diffusion onto cells but also by a postattachment race between entry and dissociation. This kinetic competition underlies inhibitory effects of CCR5 antagonists and explains why adaptive HIV-1 mutations overcome many cell entry limitations by accelerating entry. PMID:20042508

  4. High cell density attenuates reactive oxygen species: implications for in vitro assays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dennis P; Yahav, Jonathan; Sperandeo, Michael; Maloney, Lauren; McTigue, Monica; Lin, Fubao; Clark, Richard A F

    2012-01-01

    In vitro cell-based assays are an essential and universally used step in elucidation of biological processes as well as in drug development. However, results obtained depend on the validity of protocols used. This statement certainly pertains to in vitro assays of oxidative stress. The holy grail of in vitro models is reliability and predictability of outcomes that relate to a single variable like addition of hydrogen peroxide or xanthine oxidase. Without such validated outcomes, comparison of results among different laboratories is not possible. Achieving this goal requires a thorough understanding of the complex interplay between the cells, their environment, and the experimental assays. Furthermore, as this knowledge is attained, it must be disseminated and used to update and standardize existing protocols. Here, we confirm and extend the effect of pyruvate and cell density on in vitro oxidative stress assays. Cell viability was assessed using a colorimetric assay measuring the reduction of a tetrazolium salt (XTT) into a colored formazan dye. Extracellular hydrogen peroxide concentrations were measured using the foxp3 assay. We confirmed a previously reported finding that pyruvate, a common ingredient in cell culture media, acts as an extracellular scavenger of reactive oxygen species. We also demonstrated that cell density directly correlates with resistance to oxidative stress in tissue culture. It is theorized that the protective effect due to cell density predominantly relates to intracellular factors such as reduced glutathione and extracellular factors such as catalase. PMID:22107255

  5. Novel predictive assay for contact allergens using human skin explant cultures.

    PubMed

    Pistoor, F H; Rambukkana, A; Kroezen, M; Lepoittevin, J P; Bos, J D; Kapsenberg, M L; Das, P K

    1996-07-01

    Contact allergens sensitize the immune system by the binding to and subsequent activation of Langerhans cells (LCs), the antigen-presenting cells of the skin. At present, new chemicals are usually tested for their contact allergenicity in animal models. To develop an animal-replacing predictive in vivo assay for the identification of potential contact allergens, we compared the effects of epicutaneous application of six known contact allergens, five known irritants and two dermatologically inactive chemicals on LCs in skin biopsy cultures from seven healthy donors. Immunohistochemical analysis of cryostat sections of all the biopsies treated with contact allergens showed 1) a large reduction in the number of LCs in epidermis, as evaluated by a decrease in human leukocyte antigens (HLA)-DR-expressing cells, and CD1a-expressing cells and 2) accumulation of the remaining LCs at the epidermal-dermal junction. In contrast, the irritants, inactive chemicals, and solvents did not induce these changes. Morphometrical analysis indicated that the contact allergen-induced reduction in the number of HLA-DR+ and CD1a+ LCs per millimeter of epidermis was significant and was dependent on the concentration of the contact allergens. Flow cytometric analysis of isolated epidermal cells confirmed the immunohistochemical findings. In combination, these results suggest that the culture of ex vivo human skin explants provides a promising model to predict potential allergenicity of newly produced chemical compounds and can therefore replace current animal models. PMID:8686758

  6. Insect virus: assays for toxic effects and transformation potential in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hartig, P C; Chapman, M A; Hatch, G G; Kawanishi, C Y

    1989-01-01

    The nuclear polyhedrosis virus of Autographa californica (AcNPV) was evaluated by using in vitro test systems for toxicity and transforming potential in mammalian cells. Mass cell cultures of CV-1 and WI38 cells appeared unaffected by AcNPV at a multiplicity of infection of 5. Human foreskin cells grew more slowly after inoculation but eventually produced healthy monolayers. The sensitivities of the inhibition of reproductive survivability assays were greater and demonstrated slight AcNPV toxicity to CV-1, WI38, and human foreskin cells. Toxicity was not ameliorated when gradient-purified or psoralen-inactivated virus was used, suggesting that the toxic component of the preparation is part of the virion or copurifies with it. AcNPV was not toxic to and did not transform BALB/c 3T3 cells or primary cell cultures derived from Syrian hamster embryo cells (SHE). Unlike the BALB/c 3T3 transformation assay, the SHE assay detected no spontaneous transformants. The SHE transformation assay can employ simian adenovirus 7 as a positive control. SHE are transformed by numerous viruses and so are useful in assessment protocols. This study suggests that in vitro assessment of viral pesticide toxicity should employ the inhibition of reproductive survivability assay and that transformation assessment is best done with the SHE-simian adenovirus 7 procedure. PMID:2675761

  7. An overview of colorimetric assay methods used to assess survival or proliferation of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Vega-Avila, Elisa; Pugsley, Michael K

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this review is to briefly describe some colorimetric methods that are commonly used to evaluate a new chemical entity (NCE) on cell cultures in non-clinical oncology discovery research. These methods have the distinct advantage over other techniques in that they can be applied and used in a cell monolayer or a suspension culture. Both protein assay determination and cell viability assays may be conducted using these culture systems. The viability of cell cultures is routinely assessed by utilizing the metabolic capacity of cells which biochemically convert chemicals (usually color dyes) which can then be conveniently measured at specific wavelengths using a multi-well plate reader. Resazurin (Alamar Blue) is an example of one of these metabolically active compounds. Resazurin is a nontoxic dye that can also be used to measure migration and cellular invasion without resorting to sacrifice of the cells during the test procedure. Another is 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (bromodeoxyuridine or BrdU) which is a thymidine analog that incorporates into the DNA of dividing cells during the S-phase of the cell cycle. We will also discuss the colorimetric version of the traditional 3H-thymidine incorporation and immunoenzymatic assay used to measure DNA synthesis and its application to discovery research. PMID:22423572

  8. Shape memory polymers for active cell culture.

    PubMed

    Davis, Kevin A; Luo, Xiaofan; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2011-01-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs) are a class of "smart" materials that have the ability to change from a fixed, temporary shape to a pre-determined permanent shape upon the application of a stimulus such as heat(1-5). In a typical shape memory cycle, the SMP is first deformed at an elevated temperature that is higher than its transition temperature, T(trans;) [either the melting temperature (T(m;)) or the glass transition temperature (T(g;))]. The deformation is elastic in nature and mainly leads to a reduction in conformational entropy of the constituent network chains (following the rubber elasticity theory). The deformed SMP is then cooled to a temperature below its T(trans;) while maintaining the external strain or stress constant. During cooling, the material transitions to a more rigid state (semi-crystalline or glassy), which kinetically traps or "freezes" the material in this low-entropy state leading to macroscopic shape fixing. Shape recovery is triggered by continuously heating the material through T(trans;) under a stress-free (unconstrained) condition. By allowing the network chains (with regained mobility) to relax to their thermodynamically favored, maximal-entropy state, the material changes from the temporary shape to the permanent shape. Cells are capable of surveying the mechanical properties of their surrounding environment(6). The mechanisms through which mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment control cell behavior are areas of active research. Substrates of defined topography have emerged as powerful tools in the investigation of these mechanisms. Mesoscale, microscale, and nanoscale patterns of substrate topography have been shown to direct cell alignment, cell adhesion, and cell traction forces(7-14). These findings have underscored the potential for substrate topography to control and assay the mechanical interactions between cells and their physical environment during cell culture, but the substrates used to date have generally been passive and could not be programmed to change significantly during culture. This physical stasis has limited the potential of topographic substrates to control cells in culture. Here, active cell culture (ACC) SMP substrates are introduced that employ surface shape memory to provide programmed control of substrate topography and deformation. These substrates demonstrate the ability to transition from a temporary grooved topography to a second, nearly flat memorized topography. This change in topography can be used to control cell behavior under standard cell culture conditions. PMID:21750496

  9. Cultured Human Renal Cortical Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    During the STS-90 shuttle flight in April 1998, cultured renal cortical cells revealed new information about genes. Timothy Hammond, an investigator in NASA's microgravity biotechnology program was interested in culturing kidney tissue to study the expression of proteins useful in the treatment of kidney diseases. Protein expression is linked to the level of differentiation of the kidney cells, and Hammond had difficulty maintaining differentiated cells in vitro. Intrigued by the improvement in cell differentiation that he observed in rat renal cells cultured in NASA's rotating wall vessel (a bioreactor that simulates some aspects of microgravity) and during an experiment performed on the Russian Space Station Mir, Hammond decided to sleuth out which genes were responsible for controlling differentiation of kidney cells. To do this, he compared the gene activity of human renal cells in a variety of gravitational environments, including the microgravity of the space shuttle and the high-gravity environment of a centrifuge. Hammond found that 1,632 genes out of 10,000 analyzed changed their activity level in microgravity, more than in any of the other environments. These results have important implications for kidney research as well as for understanding the basic mechanism for controlling cell differentiation.

  10. Cell culture compositions

    DOEpatents

    Dunn-Coleman, Nigel; Goedegebuur, Frits; Ward, Michael; Yiao, Jian

    2014-03-18

    The present invention provides a novel endoglucanase nucleic acid sequence, designated egl6 (SEQ ID NO:1 encodes the full length endoglucanase; SEQ ID NO:4 encodes the mature form), and the corresponding endoglucanase VI amino acid sequence ("EGVI"; SEQ ID NO:3 is the signal sequence; SEQ ID NO:2 is the mature sequence). The invention also provides expression vectors and host cells comprising a nucleic acid sequence encoding EGVI, recombinant EGVI proteins and methods for producing the same.

  11. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays

    PubMed Central

    Tran, T. M.; Abate, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  12. Electrical lysis of cells for detergent-free droplet assays.

    PubMed

    de Lange, N; Tran, T M; Abate, A R

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lysis is critical when analyzing single cells in microfluidic droplets, but existing methods utilize detergents that can interfere with the assays to be performed. We demonstrate robust cell lysis without the use of detergents or other chemicals. In our method, cells are exposed to electric field immediately before encapsulation in droplets, resulting in cell lysis. We characterize lysis efficiency as a function of control parameters and demonstrate compatibility with enzymatic assays by measuring the catalysis of β-glucosidase, an important cellulase used in the conversion of biomass to biofuel. Our method enables assays in microfluidic droplets that are incompatible with detergents. PMID:27051471

  13. Mononuclear cells contaminating acute lymphoblastic leukaemic samples tested for cellular drug resistance using the methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium assay.

    PubMed Central

    Kaspers, G. J.; Veerman, A. J.; Pieters, R.; Broekema, G. J.; Huismans, D. R.; Kazemier, K. M.; Loonen, A. H.; Rottier, M. A.; van Zantwijk, C. H.; Hhlen, K.

    1994-01-01

    The methyl-thiazol-tetrazolium (MTT) assay is a drug resistance assay which cannot discriminate between malignant and non-malignant cells. We previously reported that samples with > or = 80% leukaemic cells at the start of culture give similar results in the MTT assay and the differential staining cytotoxicity assay, in which a discrimination between malignant and non-malignant cells can be made. However, the percentage of leukaemic cells may change during culture, which might affect the results of the MTT assay. We studied 106 untreated childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) samples with > or = 80% leukaemic cells at the start of culture. This percentage decreased below 80% in 28%, and below 70% in 13%, of the samples after 4 days of culture. A decrease below 70% occurred more often in case of 80-89% leukaemic cells (9/29) than in case of > or = 90% leukaemic cells at the start of culture (5/77, P = 0.0009). Samples with < 70% leukaemic cells after culture were significantly more resistant to 6 out of 13 drugs, and showed a trend towards being more resistant to two more drugs, than samples with > or = 80% leukaemic cells. No such differences were seen between samples with 70-79% and samples with > or = 80% leukaemic cells after culture. We next studied in another 30 ALL samples whether contaminating mononuclear cells could be removed by using immunoamagnetic beads. Using a beads to target cell ratio of 10:1, the percentage of leukaemic cells increased from mean 72% (s.d. 9.3%) to mean 87% (s.d. 6.7%), with an absolute increase of 2-35%. The recovery of leukaemic cells was mean 82.1% (range 56-100%, s.d. 14.0%). The procedure itself did not influence the results of the MTT assay in three samples containing only leukaemic cells. We conclude that it is important to determine the percentage of leukaemic cells at the start and at the end of the MTT assay and similar drug resistance assays. Contaminating mononuclear cells can be successfully removed from ALL samples using immunomagnetic beads. This approach may increase the number of leukaemic samples which can be evaluated for cellular drug resistance with the MTT assay or a similar cell culture drug resistance assay. PMID:7981053

  14. Human norovirus culture in B cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Melissa K; Grau, Katrina R; Costantini, Veronica; Kolawole, Abimbola O; de Graaf, Miranda; Freiden, Pamela; Graves, Christina L; Koopmans, Marion; Wallet, Shannon M; Tibbetts, Scott A; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Wobus, Christiane E; Vinjé, Jan; Karst, Stephanie M

    2015-12-01

    Human noroviruses (HuNoVs) are a leading cause of foodborne disease and severe childhood diarrhea, and they cause a majority of the gastroenteritis outbreaks worldwide. However, the development of effective and long-lasting HuNoV vaccines and therapeutics has been greatly hindered by their uncultivability. We recently demonstrated that a HuNoV replicates in human B cells, and that commensal bacteria serve as a cofactor for this infection. In this protocol, we provide detailed methods for culturing the GII.4-Sydney HuNoV strain directly in human B cells, and in a coculture system in which the virus must cross a confluent epithelial barrier to access underlying B cells. We also describe methods for bacterial stimulation of HuNoV B cell infection and for measuring viral attachment to the surface of B cells. Finally, we highlight variables that contribute to the efficiency of viral replication in this system. Infection assays require 3 d and attachment assays require 3 h. Analysis of infection or attachment samples, including RNA extraction and RT-qPCR, requires ∼6 h. PMID:26513671

  15. Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) extract exhibits atropine-sensitive activity in a cultured cardiomyocyte assay.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Satin; Long, Shannon R; Proteau, Philip J; Filtz, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) plant extract is used as a herbal alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it was shown that hawthorn extract preparations caused negative chronotropic effects in a cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocyte assay, independent of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effect of hawthorn extract to decrease the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis that hawthorn is acting via muscarinic receptors, the effect of hawthorn extract on atrial versus ventricular cardiomyocytes in culture was evaluated. As would be expected for activation of muscarinic receptors, hawthorn extract had a greater effect in atrial cells. Atrial and/or ventricular cardiomyocytes were then treated with hawthorn extract in the presence of atropine or himbacine. Changes in the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes revealed that both muscarinic antagonists significantly attenuated the negative chronotropic activity of hawthorn extract. Using quinuclidinyl benzilate, L-[benzylic-4,4'-(3)H] ([(3)H]-QNB) as a radioligand antagonist, the effect of a partially purified hawthorn extract fraction to inhibit muscarinic receptor binding was quantified. Hawthorn extract fraction 3 dose-dependently inhibited [(3)H]-QNB binding to mouse heart membranes. Taken together, these findings suggest that decreased contraction frequency by hawthorn extracts in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes may be mediated via muscarinic receptor activation. PMID:18696181

  16. Principles of cancer cell culture.

    PubMed

    Cree, Ian A

    2011-01-01

    The basics of cell culture are now relatively common, though it was not always so. The pioneers of cell culture would envy our simple access to manufactured plastics, media and equipment for such studies. The prerequisites for cell culture are a well lit and suitably ventilated laboratory with a laminar flow hood (Class II), CO(2) incubator, benchtop centrifuge, microscope, plasticware (flasks and plates) and a supply of media with or without serum supplements. Not only can all of this be ordered easily over the internet, but large numbers of well-characterised cell lines are available from libraries maintained to a very high standard allowing the researcher to commence experiments rapidly and economically. Attention to safety and disposal is important, and maintenance of equipment remains essential. This chapter should enable researchers with little prior knowledge to set up a suitable laboratory to do basic cell culture, but there is still no substitute for experience within an existing well-run laboratory. PMID:21516394

  17. Use of the tetrazolium assay in measuring the response of human tumor cells to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.; McMillan, T.J. )

    1990-03-01

    Three human tumor cell lines of widely differing radiosensitivity were used to examine the characteristics of the 3-(4,5-dimethyl(thiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphery)tetradium bromide (MTT) assay and to select suitable conditions for its use in assessing the response of cells to ionizing radiation. The optimal concentration of MTT and the time of incubation of the cells with MTT were individualized for each cell line. The relationship between absorbance and cell number was not linear over the wide range of cell numbers that were used. A calibration curve of absorbance against cell number for each cell line was therefore used. Using the assay to quantify metabolically viable cells, growth curves of irradiated and unirradiated cells were constructed on days 0-14 after irradiation. Accurate surviving fractions could be calculated only when cells were in exponential growth. Using this modification to its interpretation, the MTT assay was able to provide a reproducible measure of survival, which compared well with clonogenic cell survival measurements. However, the necessity to optimize conditions of the MTT assay for each cell line severely limits its usefulness in determining the radiosensitivity of cells in primary human tumor cultures.

  18. Bone marrow stromal cell assays – in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Pamela Gehron; Kuznetsov, Sergei A.; Riminucci, Mara; Bianco, Paolo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Populations of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs, also known as bone marrow-derived “mesenchymal stem cells”) contain a a subset of cells that are able to recapitulate the formation of a bone/marrow organ (skeletal stem cells, SSCs). The biological properties of BMSC cultures are assessed by a variety of assays, both in vitro and in vivo. Application of these assays in an appropriate fashion provide a great deal of information on the role of BMSCs, and the subset of SSCs, in health and in disease. PMID:24482181

  19. Comparison of culture media and chairside assays for enumerating mutans streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Hildebrandt, G.H.; Bretz, W.A.

    2011-01-01

    Aim This study compared several traditional culture-based media and chairside cultural assays for ability to recover mutans streptococci (MS) from pure cultures and from saliva samples. Methods and Results When pure cultures were used with traditional culture-based media, mitis-salivarius bacitracin (MSB) agar demonstrated less support for bacterial recovery than trypticase-yeast extract-cysteine sucrose-bacitracin (TYCSB) agar and the modified medium of Ritz (HLR-S). One species of MS, Streptococcus ferus (c), was not recovered on MSB medium. Chairside cultural tests displayed considerable disparity between tests in recovering bacteria from pure cultures. On the glass adherence assay (Mucount®), S. ferus was not detected and Streptococcus criceti was not detected on the dipslide assay (Carie-screen SM®) or on the plastic adherence assay (Dentocult SM Strip mutans®). The frequency of isolation of pure strains of bacteria other than MS was common. From saliva samples, the frequency of isolation of MS on HLR-S and TYCSB media and the glass adherence assay was 91–97%. The frequency of isolation on MSB medium and on the dip-slide and plastic adherence assays was significantly decreased (37, 47 and 69%, respectively). Recovery scores varied considerably among the culture methods studied and tended to be highest on the HLR-S medium and on the glass adherence assay. Conclusions Growth and recovery profiles of pure bacterial cultures and of saliva samples for the MS varied according to different media. Significance and Impact of the Study Caution should be exercised in comparing results between studies that employ different cultural methods for MS enumeration. PMID:16696682

  20. A paper-based invasion assay: assessing chemotaxis of cancer cells in gradients of oxygen.

    PubMed

    Mosadegh, Bobak; Lockett, Matthew R; Minn, Kyaw Thu; Simon, Karen A; Gilbert, Karl; Hillier, Shawn; Newsome, David; Li, Howard; Hall, Amy B; Boucher, Diane M; Eustace, Brenda K; Whitesides, George M

    2015-06-01

    This work describes a 3D, paper-based assay that can isolate sub-populations of cells based on their invasiveness (i.e., distance migrated in a hydrogel) in a gradient of concentration of oxygen (O2). Layers of paper impregnated with a cell-compatible hydrogel are stacked and placed in a plastic holder to form the invasion assay. In most assays, the stack comprises a single layer of paper containing mammalian cells suspended in a hydrogel, sandwiched between multiple layers of paper containing only hydrogel. Cells in the stack consume and produce small molecules; these molecules diffuse throughout the stack to generate gradients in the stack, and between the stack and the bulk culture medium. Placing the cell-containing layer in different positions of the stack, or modifying the permeability of the holder to oxygen or proteins, alters the profile of the gradients within the stack. Physically separating the layers after culture isolates sub-populations of cells that migrated different distances, and enables their subsequent analysis or culture. Using this system, three independent cell lines derived from A549 cancer cells are shown to produce distinguishable migration behavior in a gradient of oxygen. This result is the first experimental demonstration that oxygen acts as a chemoattractant for cancer cells. PMID:25818432

  1. The neurosphere assay applied to neural stem cells and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Galli, Rossella

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of neural stem cells (NSCs) in the mammalian brain has raised many expectations as these unique cells might recapitulate different neurological diseases, including brain tumors, both from a functional and molecular perspective. Proper in vitro culturing of NSCs has emerged as a critical methodological issue, given that it should preserve the in vivo features of NSCs, with particular emphasis on cell heterogeneity. At the same time, the methodology for NSC culturing should allow the production of large amounts of cells to be exploited not only for prospective clinical applications, but also for drug screening. Direct in vitro selection of NSCs and, very recently, cancer stem cells (CSCs) by means of defined serum-free conditions represents the most reliable methodology to obtain long-term expanding SC lines. Here we describe the methods currently employed to enrich for NSCs/CSCs based on the NeuroSphere Assay (NSA) and their adaptation to specific assays for testing the efficacy of neuroactive compounds. PMID:23436418

  2. Single-cell nanotoxicity assays of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Eustaquio, Trisha; Leary, James F

    2012-01-01

    Properly evaluating the nanotoxicity of nanoparticles involves much more than bulk-cell assays of cell death by necrosis. Cells exposed to nanoparticles may undergo repairable oxidative stress and DNA damage or be induced into apoptosis. Exposure to nanoparticles may cause the cells to alter their proliferation or differentiation or their cell-cell signaling with neighboring cells in a tissue. Nanoparticles are usually more toxic to some cell subpopulations than others, and toxicity often varies with cell cycle. All of these facts dictate that any nanotoxicity assay must be at the single-cell level and must try whenever feasible and reasonable to include many of these other factors. Focusing on one type of quantitative measure of nanotoxicity, we describe flow and scanning image cytometry approaches to measuring nanotoxicity at the single-cell level by using a commonly used assay for distinguishing between necrotic and apoptotic causes of cell death by one type of nanoparticle. Flow cytometry is fast and quantitative, provided that the cells can be prepared into a single-cell suspension for analysis. But when cells cannot be put into suspension without altering nanotoxicity results, or if morphology, attachment, and stain location are important, a scanning image cytometry approach must be used. Both methods are described with application to a particular type of nanoparticle, a superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle (SPION), as an example of how these assays may be applied to the more general problem of determining the effects of nanomaterial exposure to living cells. PMID:22975957

  3. A microfluidic live cell assay to study anthrax toxin induced cell lethality assisted by conditioned medium

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jie; Cai, Changzu; Yu, Zhilong; Pang, Yuhong; Zhou, Ying; Qian, Lili; Wei, Wensheng; Huang, Yanyi

    2015-01-01

    It is technically challenging to investigate the function of secreted protein in real time by supply of conditioned medium that contains secreted protein of interest. The internalization of anthrax toxin is facilitated by a secreted protein Dickkopf-1 (DKK1) and its receptor, and eventually leads to cell lethality. To monitor the dynamic interplay between these components in live cells, we use an integrated microfluidic device to perform the cell viability assays with real-time controlled culture microenvironment in parallel. Conditioned medium, which contains the secreted proteins from specific cell lines, can be continuously pumped towards the cells that exposed to toxin. The exogenous DKK1 secreted from distant cells is able to rescue the sensitivity to toxin for those DKK1-knocked-down cells. This high-throughput assay allows us to precisely quantify the dynamic interaction between key components that cause cell death, and provide independent evidence of the function of DKK1 in the complex process of anthrax toxin internalization. PMID:25731605

  4. Different responses in transformation of MDCK cells in 2D and 3D culture by v-Src as revealed by microarray techniques, RT-PCR and functional assays.

    PubMed

    Töyli, Mira; Rosberg-Kulha, Linda; Capra, Janne; Vuoristo, Jussi; Eskelinen, Sinikka

    2010-06-01

    Differentiation and transformation of untransformed and ts-Src-transformed canine kidney MDCK cells in 2D and 3D environment were investigated using microarray technique, RT-PCR, confocal microscopy and functional assays. Activated Src induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in 2D environment followed by translocation of junctional proteins to the cytoplasm, without significant changes in protein expression. In 3D environment untransformed MDCK cells formed cell cysts with apical domain facing a lumen, E-cadherin delineating the lateral membranes, ZO-1 at tight junctions and caspase-3 in apoptotic cells captured within the lumen. This was accompanied by reduced expression of an apoptosis inhibitor, survivin and vesicle transport effectors, rab 7 and 8, whereas rab 5 expression increased. In 3D environment activated Src induced changes in expression of over 100 genes as revealed by microarray analysis, mostly involved in cell signaling, division and energy metabolism. Only response in cytoskeletal components was decreased expression of actin and Arp2/3 by v-Src, whereas two p120catenin binding proteins Kaiso and Nanos increased their expression. Concomitantly, apoptosis was inhibited by v-Src resulting in formation of a sphere with epitheloid cells facing extracellular matrix and undifferentiated cells captured within the cluster. This was accompanied by increased expression of apoptosis inhibitor survivin, as revealed by western blotting. Mitochondrial membrane potential in untransformed MDCK cells was lower than in ts-Src-MDCK cells in early days of cluster formation correlating with the induction of apoptosis. Hence, v-Src activation in 3D environment did not induce EMT, but brought about inhibition of apoptosis and increased proliferation where increased expression of survivin and inhibition of the mitochondrial permeability have a role. PMID:20212454

  5. Ocular irritation reversibility assessment for personal care products using a porcine corneal culture assay.

    PubMed

    Donahue, Douglas A; Avalos, Javier; Kaufman, Lewis E; Simion, F Anthony; Cerven, Daniel R

    2011-04-01

    Personal care product manufacturers have used a broad spectrum of alternative ocular irritation assays during the past two decades because these tests do not require the use of live animals, they provide reliable predictive data, and they are relatively inexpensive to conduct. To complement these assays, the ex vivo Porcine Corneal Opacity Reversibility Assay (PorCORA) was recently developed using a corneal culture model to predict reversibility of ocular irritants. Three commercially available consumer products (a shampoo, a hair color glaze, and a hair colorant system containing 12% hydrogen peroxide) were each tested in two PorCORA study replicates in order to assess potential ocular damage reversibility for surfactant-, propylene carbonate-, and peroxide-based formulations, respectively. Under the exaggerated, in vitro study conditions, the surfactant-based shampoo may cause irreversible porcine corneal damage (histological changes in the epithelial squamous cell and/or basal cell layers), whereas the hair color glaze and 12% hydrogen peroxide product caused fully reversible ocular irritation (microscopic changes only in the superficial squamous cell layer). The hair color glaze and peroxide product results correlate with established in vivo data for similar compounds, but the shampoo results contradicted previous BCOP results (expected to be only a mild irritant). Therefore, although the PorCORA protocol shows promise in predicting the extent and reversibility of potential ocular damage caused by accidental consumer eye exposure to personal care products, the contradictory results for the surfactant-based shampoo indicate that more extensive validation testing of the PorCORA is necessary to definitively establish the protocol's reliability as a Draize test replacement. PMID:21172418

  6. Reference cells and ploidy in the comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Brunborg, Gunnar; Collins, Andrew; Graupner, Anne; Gutzkow, Kristine B.; Olsen, Ann-Karin

    2015-01-01

    In the comet assay single cells are analyzed with respect to their level of DNA damage. Discrimination of the individual cell or cell type based on DNA content, with concomitant scoring of the DNA damage, is useful since this may allow analysis of mixtures of cells. Different cells can then be characterized based on their ploidy, cell cycle stage, or genome size. We here describe two applications of such a cell type-specific comet assay: (i) Testicular cell suspensions, analyzed on the basis of their ploidy during spermatogenesis; and (ii) reference cells in the form of fish erythrocytes which can be included as internal standards to correct for inter-assay variations. With standard fluorochromes used in the comet assay, the total staining signal from each cell – whether damaged or undamaged – was found to be associated with the cell’s DNA content. Analysis of the fluorescence intensity of single cells is straightforward since these data are available in scoring systems based on image analysis. The analysis of testicular cell suspensions provides information on cell type specific composition, susceptibility to genotoxicants, and DNA repair. Internal reference cells, either untreated or carrying defined numbers of lesions induced by ionizing radiation, are useful for investigation of experimental factors that can cause variation in comet assay results, and for routine inclusion in experiments to facilitate standardization of methods, and comparison of comet assay data obtained in different experiments or in different laboratories. They can also be used – in combination with a reference curve – to quantify the DNA lesions induced by a certain treatment. Fish cells of a range of genome sizes, both greater and smaller than human, are suitable for this purpose, and they are inexpensive. PMID:25774164

  7. Interspecific in vitro assay for the chimera-forming ability of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Hideki; Kato-Itoh, Megumi; Umino, Ayumi; Sato, Hideyuki; Hamanaka, Sanae; Kobayashi, Toshihiro; Yamaguchi, Tomoyuki; Nishimura, Ken; Ohtaka, Manami; Nakanishi, Mahito; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-09-15

    Functional assay limitations are an emerging issue in characterizing human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs). With rodent PSCs, chimera formation using pre-implantation embryos is the gold-standard assay of pluripotency (competence of progeny to differentiate into all three germ layers). In human PSCs (hPSCs), however, this can only be monitored via teratoma formation or in vitro differentiation, as ethical concerns preclude generation of human-human or human-animal chimeras. To circumvent this issue, we developed a functional assay utilizing interspecific blastocyst injection and in vitro culture (interspecies in vitro chimera assay) that enables the development and observation of embryos up to headfold stage. The assay uses mouse pre-implantation embryos and rat, monkey and human PSCs to create interspecies chimeras cultured in vitro to the early egg-cylinder stage. Intra- and interspecific chimera assays with rodent PSC lines were performed to confirm the consistency of results in vitro and in vivo. The behavior of chimeras developed in vitro appeared to recapitulate that of chimeras developed in vivo; that is, PSC-derived cells survived and were integrated into the epiblast of egg-cylinder-stage embryos. This indicates that the interspecific in vitro chimera assay is useful in evaluating the chimera-forming ability of rodent PSCs. However, when human induced PSCs (both conventional and naïve-like types) were injected into mouse embryos and cultured, some human cells survived but were segregated; unlike epiblast-stage rodent PSCs, they never integrated into the epiblast of egg-cylinder-stage embryos. These data suggest that the mouse-human interspecies in vitro chimera assay does not accurately reflect the early developmental potential/process of hPSCs. The use of evolutionarily more closely related species as host embryos might be necessary to evaluate the developmental potency of hPSCs. PMID:26023098

  8. Assaying endothelial-mural cell interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent studies in genetically malleable embryonic model systems have enabled the identification of factors required for blood vessel formation. However, it is not possible in most in vivo systems to dissect carefully the exact cellular behaviours, as well as cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions t...

  9. Epithelial cell detachment by Porphyromonas gingivalis biofilm and planktonic cultures.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lijia; van Loveren, Cor; Ling, Junqi; Wei, Xi; Crielaard, Wim; Deng, Dong Mei

    2016-04-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis is present as a biofilm at the sites of periodontal infections. The detachment of gingival epithelial cells induced by P. gingivalis biofilms was examined using planktonic cultures as a comparison. Exponentially grown planktonic cultures or 40-h biofilms were co-incubated with epithelial cells in a 24-well plate for 4 h. Epithelial cell detachment was assessed using imaging. The activity of arginine-gingipain (Rgp) and gene expression profiles of P. gingivalis cultures were examined using a gingipain assay and quantitative PCR, respectively. P. gingivalis biofilms induced significantly higher cell detachment and displayed higher Rgp activity compared to the planktonic cultures. The genes involved in gingipain post-translational modification, but not rgp genes, were significantly up-regulated in P. gingivalis biofilms. The results underline the importance of including biofilms in the study of bacterial and host cell interactions. PMID:26963862

  10. Inflight Assay of Red Blood Cell Deformability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingram, M.; Paglia, D. E.; Eckstein, E. C.; Frazer, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    Studies on Soviet and American astronauts have demonstrated that red blood cell production is altered in response to low gravity (g) environment. This is associated with changes in individual red cells including increased mean cell volume and altered membrane deformability. During long orbital missions, there is a tendency for the red cell mass deficit to be at least partly corrected although the cell shape anomalies are not. Data currently available suggest that the observed decrease in red cell mass is the result of sudden suppression of erythropoieses and that the recovery trend observed during long missions reflects re-establishment of erythropoietic homeostasis at a "set point" for the red cell mass that is slightly below the normal level at 1 g.

  11. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl-Otto

    1998-01-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular redox state, impaired cell division, formation of giant cells and cell shrinking, swelling of mitochondria and loss of cristae as well as DNA damage.

  12. Comet assay, cloning assay, and light and electron microscopy on one preselected cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Oehring, H.; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen; Fiedler, Ursula; Bauer, Eckhard; Greulich, Karl O.

    1997-12-01

    In order to perform long-term studies up to one week on a preselected single cell after micromanipulation (e.g. UVA and NIR microbeam exposure) in comparison with non-treated neighbor cells (control cells) we applied a variety of single cell diagnostic techniques and developed a special comet assay for single preselected cells. For that purpose adherent cells were grown in low concentrations and maintained in special sterile centimeter-sized glass cell chambers. After preselection, a single cell was marked by means of diamond-produced circles on the outer cell chamber window. During exposure to microbeams, NADH-attributed autofluorescence of the chosen cell was detected by fluorescence imaging and spectroscopy. In addition, cell morphology was video-monitored (formation of pseudopodia, membrane blebbing,...). Maintaining the microchamber in the incubator, the irradiated cell was examined 24 h later for cell division (clone formation) and modifications in autofluorescence and morphology (including daughter cells). In the case that no division occurred the vitality of the light-exposed cell and of the control cells were probed by intranuclear propidium iodide accumulation. After fixation, either electron microscopy or single cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) was performed. To monitor comet formation indicating photoinduced DNA damage in the preselected single cell in comparison with the non-exposed neighbor cells the chamber was filled with low-melting gel and lysis solution and exposed to an electric field. In contrast to the conventional comet assay, where only randomly chosen cells of a suspension are investigated, the novel optimized electrophoresis technique should enhance the possibilities of DNA damage detection to a true single (preselected) cell level. The single cell techniques applied to UVA microexposed Chinese hamster ovary cells (364 nm, 1 mW, 3.5 W/cm2) revealed significant cell damage for J/cm2 fluences such as modifications of intracellular redox state, impaired cell division, formation of giant cells and cell shrinking, swelling of mitochondria and loss of cristae as well as DNA damage.

  13. DETECTION OF ANEUPLOIDY BY A MONOCHROMOSOMAL HYBRID CELL ASSAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    A short-term assay utilizing human/mouse monochromosomal hybrid cells to detect chemically-induced aneuploidy in mammalian cells is described. A single human chromosome transferred into mouse cells was used as a cytogenetic marker to quantitate abnormal chromosome segregation fol...

  14. Epithelial cells as alternative human biomatrices for comet assay

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Emilio; Lorenzo, Yolanda; Haug, Kristiane; Nicolaissen, Bjørn; Valverde, Mahara

    2014-01-01

    The comet assay is a valuable experimental tool aimed at mapping DNA damage in human cells in vivo for environmental and occupational monitoring, as well as for therapeutic purposes, such as storage prior to transplant, during tissue engineering, and in experimental ex vivo assays. Furthermore, due to its great versatility, the comet assay allows to explore the use of alternative cell types to assess DNA damage, such as epithelial cells. Epithelial cells, as specialized components of many organs, have the potential to serve as biomatrices that can be used to evaluate genotoxicity and may also serve as early effect biomarkers. Furthermore, 80% of solid cancers are of epithelial origin, which points to the importance of studying DNA damage in these tissues. Indeed, studies including comet assay in epithelial cells have either clear clinical applications (lens and corneal epithelial cells) or examine genotoxicity within human biomonitoring and in vitro studies. We here review improvements in determining DNA damage using the comet assay by employing lens, corneal, tear duct, buccal, and nasal epithelial cells. For some of these tissues invasive sampling procedures are needed. Desquamated epithelial cells must be obtained and dissociated prior to examination using the comet assay, and such procedures may induce varying amounts of DNA damage. Buccal epithelial cells require lysis enriched with proteinase K to obtain free nucleosomes. Over a 30 year period, the comet assay in epithelial cells has been little employed, however its use indicates that it could be an extraordinary tool not only for risk assessment, but also for diagnosis, prognosis of treatments and diseases. PMID:25506353

  15. A Simple High-Content Cell Cycle Assay Reveals Frequent Discrepancies between Cell Number and ATP and MTS Proliferation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Grace Ka Yan; Kleinheinz, Tracy L.; Peterson, David; Moffat, John G.

    2013-01-01

    In order to efficiently characterize both antiproliferative potency and mechanism of action of small molecules targeting the cell cycle, we developed a high-throughput image-based assay to determine cell number and cell cycle phase distribution. Using this we profiled the effects of experimental and approved anti-cancer agents with a range mechanisms of action on a set of cell lines, comparing direct cell counting versus two metabolism-based cell viability/proliferation assay formats, ATP-dependent bioluminescence, MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium) reduction, and a whole-well DNA-binding dye fluorescence assay. We show that, depending on compound mechanisms of action, the metabolism-based proxy assays are frequently prone to 1) significant underestimation of compound potency and efficacy, and 2) non-monotonic dose-response curves due to concentration-dependent phenotypic ‘switching’. In particular, potency and efficacy of DNA synthesis-targeting agents such as gemcitabine and etoposide could be profoundly underestimated by ATP and MTS-reduction assays. In the same image-based assay we showed that drug-induced increases in ATP content were associated with increased cell size and proportionate increases in mitochondrial content and respiratory flux concomitant with cell cycle arrest. Therefore, differences in compound mechanism of action and cell line-specific responses can yield significantly misleading results when using ATP or tetrazolium-reduction assays as a proxy for cell number when screening compounds for antiproliferative activity or profiling panels of cell lines for drug sensitivity. PMID:23691072

  16. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-01-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the “gold standard” for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent. PMID:27134874

  17. Cell Culture, Technology: Enhancing the Culture of Diagnosing Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Hudu, Shuaibu Abdullahi; Alshrari, Ahmed Subeh; Syahida, Ahmad; Sekawi, Zamberi

    2016-03-01

    Cell culture involves a complex of processes of cell isolation from their natural environment (in vivo) and subsequent growth in a controlled environmental artificial condition (in vitro). Cells from specific tissues or organs are cultured as short term or established cell lines which are widely used for research and diagnosis, most specially in the aspect of viral infection, because pathogenic viral isolation depends on the availability of permissible cell cultures. Cell culture provides the required setting for the detection and identification of numerous pathogens of humans, which is achieved via virus isolation in the cell culture as the "gold standard" for virus discovery. In this review, we summarized the views of researchers on the current role of cell culture technology in the diagnosis of human diseases. The technological advancement of recent years, starting with monoclonal antibody development to molecular techniques, provides an important approach for detecting presence of viral infection. They are also used as a baseline for establishing rapid tests for newly discovered pathogens. A combination of virus isolation in cell culture and molecular methods is still critical in identifying viruses that were previously unrecognized. Therefore, cell culture should be considered as a fundamental procedure in identifying suspected infectious viral agent. PMID:27134874

  18. Resistance to lipid peroxidation by cultured neoplastic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arneson, R.M.; Wander, J.D.; Cabot, M.C.; Tan, E.L.; Schenley, R.L.; Hsie, A.W.

    1982-01-01

    The membranes of murine neuroblastoma cells (C1300) and human leukemia cells (HL-60) exhibit markedly increased resistance to peroxidation and undifferentiated Friend erythroleukemia cells were highly resistant to peroxidation. These findings suggest that high resistance to peroxidation and changes in the level of resistance occur commonly in cultured cells. Both cytosolic and membrane-associated factors that can prevent the onset of lipid peroxidation are present in differentiating neuroblastoma cells. A highly sensitive, single-phase assay for antioxidant activity failed to detect the presence of an antioxidant that could be associated with increased resistance to peroxidation in neuroblastoma cells. Likewise, lipid analyses of neuroblastoma cells revealed no parameter that could be related to this increase; however, this resistance phenomenon is abolished by adding arachidonic acid to the culture medium at levels that do not affect cell growth or viability. Protective factors exist in the cytosolic fraction of rat liver homogenate, which are able to neutralize the toxic products of lipid peroxidation rather than prevent the initiation of peroxidation. These protective factors were detected, and could possibly be isolated, by a cytotoxicity assay employing Chinese hamster ovary cells. In the course of this work, we discovered an antioxidant artifact that is widely distributed in commercial tissue culture media. A simple procedure has been developed to detect this antioxidant in lots of culture media.

  19. A microfluidic device for uniform-sized cell spheroids formation, culture, harvesting and flow cytometry analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patra, Bishnubrata; Chen, Ying-Hua; Peng, Chien-Chung; Lin, Shiang-Chi; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Tung, Yi-Chung

    2013-01-01

    Culture of cells as three-dimensional (3D) aggregates, named spheroids, possesses great potential to improve in vitro cell models for basic biomedical research. However, such cell spheroid models are often complicated, cumbersome, and expensive compared to conventional Petri-dish cell cultures. In this work, we developed a simple microfluidic device for cell spheroid formation, culture, and harvesting. Using this device, cells could form uniformly sized spheroids due to strong cell–cell interactions and the spatial confinement of microfluidic culture chambers. We demonstrated cell spheroid formation and culture in the designed devices using embryonic stem cells, carcinoma cells, and fibroblasts. We further scaled up the device capable of simultaneously forming and culturing 5000 spheroids in a single chip. Finally, we demonstrated harvesting of the cultured spheroids from the device with a simple setup. The harvested spheroids possess great integrity, and the cells can be exploited for further flow cytometry assays due to the ample cell numbers. PMID:24396525

  20. Tunable layer-by-layer polyelectrolyte platforms for comparative cell assays.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jinhwa; Lee, Hyojin; Jeon, Jongho; Jang, Yeongseon; Kim, Raehyun; Char, Kookheon; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2009-08-10

    We developed a cell-based assay based on the spin-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) assembled polyelectrolyte matrix platforms. Three types of human breast epithelial cell lines including normal cells (184B5), noncancerous fibrocystic disease cells (MCF 10F), and metastatic cancerous cells (CAMA-1) were cultured, analyzed, and compared in parallel on various LbL-assembled polymer films. Poly(allylamine hydrochloride) (PAH) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) electrolyte polymers were used as the basic building units to form various LbL polyelectrolyte matrices. The mechanical rigidity, surface charge, and biorecognition property of the LbL platforms were controlled by tailoring the LbL surface, thermal cross-linking, and protein modification. Cellular phenotypic changes in adhesion, proliferation, and morphology on these LbL films were characterized and analyzed for the three different cell types. Our analysis results indicate that the cellular phenotype can be controlled by taking advantage of different surface charge, mechanical property, and biological modification (i.e., fibronectin in this case) of the LbL multilayer platforms. Importantly, cell phenotypical quantification results show that the cell spreading area per cell and optical density are useful parameters in distinguishing metastatic cancer cells from normal or fibrocystic disease cells on these LbL films. These LbL-based cell assay platforms have a potential for the development of various disease diagnostic cell assays. PMID:19572697

  1. Studying cell cycle checkpoints using Drosophila cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Siudeja, Katarzyna; de Jong, Jannie; Sibon, Ody C M

    2011-01-01

    Drosophila cell lines are valuable tools to study a number of cellular processes, including DNA damage responses and cell cycle checkpoint control. Using an in vitro system instead of a whole organism has two main advantages: it saves time and simple and effective molecular techniques are available. It has been shown that Drosophila cells, similarly to mammalian cells, display cell cycle checkpoint pathways required to survive DNA damaging events (de Vries et al. 2005, Journal of Cell Science 118, 1833-1842; Bae et al. 1995, Experimental Cell Research 217, 541-545). Moreover, a number of proteins involved in checkpoint and cell cycle control in mammals are highly conserved among different species, including Drosophila (de Vries et al. 2005, Journal of Cell Science 118, 1833-1842; Bae et al. 1995, Experimental Cell Research 217, 541-545; LaRocque et al. 2007, Genetics 175, 1023-1033; Sibon et al. 1999, Current Biology 9, 302-312; Purdy et al. 2005, Journal of Cell Science 118, 3305-3315). Because of straightforward and highly efficient methods to downregulate specific transcripts in Drosophila cells, these cells are an excellent system for genome-wide RNA interference (RNAi) screens. Thus, the following methods, assays and techniques: Drosophila cell culture, RNAi, introducing DNA damaging events, determination of cell cycle arrest, and determination of cell cycle distributions described here may well be applied to identifying new players in checkpoint mechanisms and will be helpful to investigate the function of these new players in detail. Results obtained with studies using in vitro systems can subsequently be extended to studies in the complete organism as described in the chapters provided by the Su laboratory and the Takada laboratory. PMID:21870285

  2. Cell membrane array fabrication and assay technology

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Victoria; Sirenko, Oksana; Schafer, Robert J; Nguyen, Luat; Gutsmann, Thomas; Brade, Lore; Groves, Jay T

    2005-01-01

    Background Microarray technology has been used extensively over the past 10 years for assessing gene expression, and has facilitated precise genetic profiling of everything from tumors to small molecule drugs. By contrast, arraying cell membranes in a manner which preserves their ability to mediate biochemical processes has been considerably more difficult. Results In this article, we describe a novel technology for generating cell membrane microarrays for performing high throughput biology. Our robotically-arrayed supported membranes are physiologically fluid, a critical property which differentiates this technology from other previous membrane systems and makes it useful for studying cellular processes on an industrialized scale. Membrane array elements consist of a solid substrate, above which resides a fluid supported lipid bilayer containing biologically-active molecules of interest. Incorporation of transmembrane proteins into the arrayed membranes enables the study of ligand/receptor binding, as well as interactions with live intact cells. The fluidity of these molecules in the planar lipid bilayer facilitates dimerization and other higher order interactions necessary for biological signaling events. In order to demonstrate the utility of our fluid membrane array technology to ligand/receptor studies, we investigated the multivalent binding of the cholera toxin B-subunit (CTB) to the membrane ganglioside GM1. We have also displayed a number of bona fide drug targets, including bacterial endotoxin (also referred to as lipopolysaccharide (LPS)) and membrane proteins important in T cell activation. Conclusion We have demonstrated the applicability of our fluid cell membrane array technology to both academic research applications and industrial drug discovery. Our technology facilitates the study of ligand/receptor interactions and cell-cell signaling, providing rich qualitative and quantitative information. PMID:15960850

  3. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  4. The glycophorin A assay for somatic cell mutations in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R.G.; Bigbee, W.L.; Jensen, R.H.

    1989-08-18

    In this report we briefly review our past experience and some new developments with the GPA assay. Particular emphasis will be placed on two areas that affect the utility of the GPA assay for human population monitoring. The first is our efforts to simplify the GPA assay to make it more generally available for large population studies. The second is to begin to understand some of the characteristics of human hemopoiesis which affect the accumulation and expression of mutant phenotype cells. 11 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Hydroxyethyl disulfide as an efficient metabolic assay for cell viability in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jie; Zhang, Donglan; Ward, Kathleen M.; Prendergast, George C.; Ayene, Iraimoudi S.

    2012-01-01

    Cell viability assays have a variety of well known practical and technical limitations. All the available approaches have disadvantages, such as non-linearity, high background and cumbersome protocols. Several commonly used tetrazolium chemicals rely upon generation of a colored formazan product formed by mitochondrial reduction of these compounds via phenazine methosulfate (PMS). However, sensitivity is inherently limited because their reduction relies on mitochondrial bioreduction and cellular transport of PMS, as well as accessibility to tetrazolium chemicals. In this study, we identify hydroxethyldisulfide (HEDS) as an inexpensive probe that can measure cellular metabolic activity without the need of PMS. In tissue culture medium, HEDS accurately quantitated metabolically active live cells in a linear manner superior to tetrazolium based and other assays. Cell toxicity produced by chemotherapeutics (cisplatin, etoposide), oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, acetaminophen), toxins (Phenyl arsine oxide, arsenite) or ionizing radiation was rapidly determined by the HEDS assay. We found that HEDS was superior to other commonly used assays for cell viability determinations in its solubility, membrane permeability, and intracellular conversion to a metabolic reporter that is readily transported into the extracellular medium. Our findings establish the use of HEDS in a simple, rapid and low cost assay to accurately quantify viable cells. PMID:22321380

  6. Multizone Paper Platform for 3D Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Derda, Ratmir; Hong, Estrella; Mwangi, Martin; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.; Whitesides, George M.

    2011-01-01

    In vitro 3D culture is an important model for tissues in vivo. Cells in different locations of 3D tissues are physiologically different, because they are exposed to different concentrations of oxygen, nutrients, and signaling molecules, and to other environmental factors (temperature, mechanical stress, etc). The majority of high-throughput assays based on 3D cultures, however, can only detect the average behavior of cells in the whole 3D construct. Isolation of cells from specific regions of 3D cultures is possible, but relies on low-throughput techniques such as tissue sectioning and micromanipulation. Based on a procedure reported previously (“cells-in-gels-in-paper” or CiGiP), this paper describes a simple method for culture of arrays of thin planar sections of tissues, either alone or stacked to create more complex 3D tissue structures. This procedure starts with sheets of paper patterned with hydrophobic regions that form 96 hydrophilic zones. Serial spotting of cells suspended in extracellular matrix (ECM) gel onto the patterned paper creates an array of 200 micron-thick slabs of ECM gel (supported mechanically by cellulose fibers) containing cells. Stacking the sheets with zones aligned on top of one another assembles 96 3D multilayer constructs. De-stacking the layers of the 3D culture, by peeling apart the sheets of paper, “sections” all 96 cultures at once. It is, thus, simple to isolate 200-micron-thick cell-containing slabs from each 3D culture in the 96-zone array. Because the 3D cultures are assembled from multiple layers, the number of cells plated initially in each layer determines the spatial distribution of cells in the stacked 3D cultures. This capability made it possible to compare the growth of 3D tumor models of different spatial composition, and to examine the migration of cells in these structures. PMID:21573103

  7. Microfluidic assay-based optical measurement techniques for cell analysis: A review of recent progress.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jong-Ryul; Song, Hyerin; Sung, Jong Hwan; Kim, Donghyun; Kim, Kyujung

    2016-03-15

    Since the early 2000s, microfluidic cell culture systems have attracted significant attention as a promising alternative to conventional cell culture methods and the importance of designing an efficient detection system to analyze cell behavior on a chip in real time is raised. For this reason, various measurement techniques for microfluidic devices have been developed with the development of microfluidic assays for high-throughput screening and mimicking of in vivo conditions. In this review, we discuss optical measurement techniques for microfluidic assays. First of all, the recent development of fluorescence- and absorbance-based optical measurement systems is described. Next, advanced optical detection systems are introduced with respect to three emphases: 1) optimization for long-term, real-time, and in situ measurements; 2) performance improvements; and 3) multimodal analysis conjugations. Moreover, we explore presents future prospects for the establishment of optical detection systems following the development of complex, multi-dimensional microfluidic cell culture assays to mimic in vivo tissue, organ, and human systems. PMID:26409023

  8. Radiometric macrophage culture assay for rapid evaluation of antileprosy activity of rifampin

    SciTech Connect

    Mittal, A.; Seshadri, P.S.; Prasad, H.K.; Sathish, M.; Nath, I.

    1983-10-01

    The antileprosy effect of rifampin was evaluated by a newly developed rapid in vitro assay wherein 31 human-derived strains and 1 armadillo-derived strain of Mycobacterium leprae were maintained for 2 and 3 weeks, respectively, in murine and human macrophages in the presence of (3H)thymidine. Of these strains, 27 showed significant incorporation of the radiolabel in cultures of live bacilli as compared with control cultures of heat-killed bacilli of the same strain. Consistent and significant inhibition of (3H)thymidine uptake was observed in M. leprae resident cultures with 3 to 200 ng of rifampin per ml as compared with similar cultures without the drug. In general, an increase in percent inhibition was seen from 3 to 20 ng/ml, with marginal increases at 40, 50, and 100 ng/ml. M. leprae strains appear to be remarkably susceptible to this drug in the in vitro assay.

  9. Use of a New Tetrazolium-Based Assay to Study the Production of Superoxide Radicals by Tobacco Cell Cultures Challenged with Avirulent Zoospores of Phytophthora parasitica var nicotianae1

    PubMed Central

    Able, Amanda J.; Guest, David I.; Sutherland, Mark W.

    1998-01-01

    The relationship between the production of reactive oxygen species and the hypersensitive response (HR) of tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) toward an incompatible race of the Oomycete Phytophthora parasitica var nicotianae has been investigated. A new assay for superoxide radical (O2−) production based on reduction of the tetrazolium dye sodium,3′-(1-[phenylamino-carbonyl]-3,4-tetrazolium)-bis(4-methoxy-6-nitro) benzene-sulfonic acid hydrate (XTT) has enabled the quantitative estimation of perhydroxyl/superoxide radical acid-base pair (HO2·/O2−) production during the resistant response. Tobacco suspension cells were inoculated with zoospores from compatible or incompatible races of the pathogen. Subsequent HO2·/O2− production was monitored by following the formation of XTT formazan. In the incompatible interaction only, HO2·/O2− was produced in a minor burst between 0 and 2 h and then in a major burst between 8 and 10 h postinoculation. During this second burst, rates of XTT reduction equivalent to a radical flux of 9.9 × 10−15 mol min−1 cell−1 were observed. The HO2·/O2− scavengers O2− dismutase and Mn(III)desferal each inhibited dye reduction. An HR was observed in challenged, resistant cells immediately following the second burst of radical production. Both scavengers inhibited the HR when added prior to the occurrence of either radical burst, indicating that O2− production is a necessary precursor to the HR. PMID:9625702

  10. Comparison of culture and a novel 5' Taq nuclease assay for direct detection of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in clinical specimens from cattle.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Lyle; Fordyce, Geoffry; Doogan, Vivienne J; Lew, Ala E

    2006-03-01

    A Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis-specific 5' Taq nuclease PCR assay using a 3' minor groove binder-DNA probe (TaqMan MGB) was developed based on a subspecies-specific fragment of unknown identity (S. Hum, K. Quinn, J. Brunner, and S. L. On, Aust. Vet. J. 75:827-831, 1997). The assay specifically detected four C. fetus subsp. venerealis strains with no observed cross-reaction with C. fetus subsp. fetus-related Campylobacter species or other bovine venereal microflora. The 5' Taq nuclease assay detected approximately one single cell compared to 100 and 10 cells in the conventional PCR assay and 2,500 and 25,000 cells from selective culture from inoculated smegma and mucus, respectively. The respective detection limits following the enrichments from smegma and mucus were 5,000 and 50 cells/inoculum for the conventional PCR compared to 500 and 50 cells/inoculum for the 5' Taq nuclease assay. Field sampling confirmed the sensitivity and the specificity of the 5' Taq nuclease assay by detecting an additional 40 bulls that were not detected by culture. Urine-inoculated samples demonstrated comparable detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis by both culture and the 5' Taq nuclease assay; however, urine was found to be less effective than smegma for bull sampling. Three infected bulls were tested repetitively to compare sampling tools, and the bull rasper proved to be the most suitable, as evidenced by the improved ease of specimen collection and the consistent detection of higher levels of C. fetus subsp. venerealis. The 5' Taq nuclease assay demonstrates a statistically significant association with culture (chi2 = 29.8; P < 0.001) and significant improvements for the detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis-infected animals from crude clinical extracts following prolonged transport. PMID:16517880

  11. Comparison of Culture and a Novel 5′ Taq Nuclease Assay for Direct Detection of Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in Clinical Specimens from Cattle

    PubMed Central

    McMillen, Lyle; Fordyce, Geoffry; Doogan, Vivienne J.; Lew, Ala E.

    2006-01-01

    A Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis-specific 5′ Taq nuclease PCR assay using a 3′ minor groove binder-DNA probe (TaqMan MGB) was developed based on a subspecies-specific fragment of unknown identity (S. Hum, K. Quinn, J. Brunner, and S. L. On, Aust. Vet. J. 75:827-831, 1997). The assay specifically detected four C. fetus subsp. venerealis strains with no observed cross-reaction with C. fetus subsp. fetus-related Campylobacter species or other bovine venereal microflora. The 5′ Taq nuclease assay detected approximately one single cell compared to 100 and 10 cells in the conventional PCR assay and 2,500 and 25,000 cells from selective culture from inoculated smegma and mucus, respectively. The respective detection limits following the enrichments from smegma and mucus were 5,000 and 50 cells/inoculum for the conventional PCR compared to 500 and 50 cells/inoculum for the 5′ Taq nuclease assay. Field sampling confirmed the sensitivity and the specificity of the 5′ Taq nuclease assay by detecting an additional 40 bulls that were not detected by culture. Urine-inoculated samples demonstrated comparable detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis by both culture and the 5′ Taq nuclease assay; however, urine was found to be less effective than smegma for bull sampling. Three infected bulls were tested repetitively to compare sampling tools, and the bull rasper proved to be the most suitable, as evidenced by the improved ease of specimen collection and the consistent detection of higher levels of C. fetus subsp. venerealis. The 5′ Taq nuclease assay demonstrates a statistically significant association with culture (χ2 = 29.8; P < 0.001) and significant improvements for the detection of C. fetus subsp. venerealis-infected animals from crude clinical extracts following prolonged transport. PMID:16517880

  12. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    PubMed

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown in other ILs/salts. The growth curve trends obtained by D2D matched conventional yeast culturing in microtiter wells, validating the D2D platform. We believe that our approach represents a generic platform for multi-step biochemical assays such as drug screening, digital PCR, enzyme assays, immunoassays and cell-based assays. PMID:25354549

  13. Determination of cell survival after irradiation via clonogenic assay versus multiple MTT Assay--a comparative study.

    PubMed

    Buch, Karl; Peters, Tanja; Nawroth, Thomas; Sänger, Markus; Schmidberger, Heinz; Langguth, Peter

    2012-01-01

    For studying proliferation and determination of survival of cancer cells after irradiation, the multiple MTT assay, based on the reduction of a yellow water soluble tetrazolium salt to a purple water insoluble formazan dye by living cells was modified from a single-point towards a proliferation assay. This assay can be performed with a large number of samples in short time using multi-well-plates, assays can be performed semi-automatically with a microplate reader. Survival, the calculated parameter in this assay, is determined mathematically. Exponential growth in both control and irradiated groups was proven as the underlying basis of the applicability of the multiple MTT assay. The equivalence to a clonogenic survival assay with its disadvantages such as time consumption was proven in two setups including plating of cells before and after irradiation. Three cell lines (A 549, LN 229 and F 98) were included in the experiment to study its principal and general applicability. PMID:22214341

  14. In vitro screening assay for teratogens using growth inhibition of human embryonic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, R.M.; Willis, W.D.

    1985-09-01

    The authors have tested 35 teratogenic and 20 nonteratogenic chemicals or drugs in a short-term, in vitro assay that identifies teratogens by their ability to inhibit growth of an established line of human embryonic palatal mesenchymal cells. Only those chemicals that exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of growth at concentrations less than 1 mM were classified as inhibitory. An Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9 system was effective in metabolizing cyclophosphamide to its teratogenic form in culture. The authors suggest that this assay, along with the complementary tumor cell-attachment assay of Braun may be useful as a short-term in vitro battery for assessment of the teratogenic potential in environmental agents and to prioritize those chemicals which merit further testing in vivo.

  15. [Isolation, culture and identification of human umbilical vein endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaocui; Chen, Bangdang; Yang, Yining; Zhou, Yun; Liu, Fen; Gai, Mintao; Chen, Qingjie; Ma, Yitong

    2016-03-01

    Objective To establish a simple, reliable and efficient isolation and culture method of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro. Methods Type 2 collagenase was used to digest umbilical cord and separate HUVECs. The cells were cultured in the endothelial cell culture medium (ECM). The cell morphology was observed under an inverted phase-contrast microscope. Immunofluorescence technique was applied to detect the expression of von Willebrand factor (vWF). Cell purity was determined by detecting CD31 level on cell surface with flow cytometry. Tube formation assay was used to test the function of the endothelial cells after cryopreservation in vitro. Results HUVECs successfully isolated were proved with high purity and good activity. HUVECs of primary generation could merge into a single layer one week after isolation. The cells showed a typical cobblestone-like arrangement. Immunofluorescence technique validated that the cells could widely express vWF and the expression frequency of CD31 was 93.1%. The cells were still capable of forming the lumen structure after cryopreservation, indicating that the standardized cryopreservation method could well maintain the cell function. Conclusion This is a simple, reliable and efficient method of isolating and culturing HUVECs in vitro. PMID:26927551

  16. Miniature Bioreactor System for Long-Term Cell Culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Kleis, Stanley J.; Geffert, Sandara K.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype miniature bioreactor system is designed to serve as a laboratory benchtop cell-culturing system that minimizes the need for relatively expensive equipment and reagents and can be operated under computer control, thereby reducing the time and effort required of human investigators and reducing uncertainty in results. The system includes a bioreactor, a fluid-handling subsystem, a chamber wherein the bioreactor is maintained in a controlled atmosphere at a controlled temperature, and associated control subsystems. The system can be used to culture both anchorage-dependent and suspension cells, which can be either prokaryotic or eukaryotic. Cells can be cultured for extended periods of time in this system, and samples of cells can be extracted and analyzed at specified intervals. By integrating this system with one or more microanalytical instrument(s), one can construct a complete automated analytical system that can be tailored to perform one or more of a large variety of assays.

  17. Progress in Cell Based Assays for Botulinum Neurotoxin Detection

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) are the most potent human toxins known and the causative agent of botulism, and are widely used as valuable pharmaceuticals. The BoNTs are modular proteins consisting of a heavy chain and a light chain linked by a disulfide bond. Intoxication of neuronal cells by BoNTs is a multi-step process including specific cell binding, endocytosis, conformational change in the endosome, translocation of the enzymatic light chain into the cells cytosol, and SNARE target cleavage. The quantitative and reliable potency determination of fully functional BoNTs produced as active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) requires an assay that considers all steps in the intoxication pathway. The in vivo mouse bioassay has for years been the ‘gold standard’ assay used for this purpose, but it requires the use of large numbers of mice and thus causes associated costs and ethical concerns. Cell-based assays are currently the only in vitro alternative that detect fully functional BoNTs in a single assay and have been utilized for years for research purposes. Within the last 5 years, several cell-based BoNT detection assays have been developed that are able to quantitatively determine BoNT potency with similar or greater sensitivity than the mouse bioassay. These assays now offer an alternative method for BoNT potency determination. Such quantitative and reliable BoNT potency determination is a crucial step in basic research, in the development of pharmaceutical BoNTs, and in the quantitative detection of neutralizing antibodies. PMID:23239357

  18. Transgenic Rodent Assay for Quantifying Male Germ Cell Mutant Frequency

    PubMed Central

    O'Brien, Jason M.; Beal, Marc A.; Gingerich, John D.; Soper, Lynda; Douglas, George R.; Yauk, Carole L.; Marchetti, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    De novo mutations arise mostly in the male germline and may contribute to adverse health outcomes in subsequent generations. Traditional methods for assessing the induction of germ cell mutations require the use of large numbers of animals, making them impractical. As such, germ cell mutagenicity is rarely assessed during chemical testing and risk assessment. Herein, we describe an in vivo male germ cell mutation assay using a transgenic rodent model that is based on a recently approved Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) test guideline. This method uses an in vitro positive selection assay to measure in vivo mutations induced in a transgenic λgt10 vector bearing a reporter gene directly in the germ cells of exposed males. We further describe how the detection of mutations in the transgene recovered from germ cells can be used to characterize the stage-specific sensitivity of the various spermatogenic cell types to mutagen exposure by controlling three experimental parameters: the duration of exposure (administration time), the time between exposure and sample collection (sampling time), and the cell population collected for analysis. Because a large number of germ cells can be assayed from a single male, this method has superior sensitivity compared with traditional methods, requires fewer animals and therefore much less time and resources. PMID:25145276

  19. Cell-Based Assay Design for High-Content Screening of Drug Candidates.

    PubMed

    Nierode, Gregory; Kwon, Paul S; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kwon, Seok-Joon

    2016-02-28

    To reduce attrition in drug development, it is crucial to consider the development and implementation of translational phenotypic assays as well as decipher diverse molecular mechanisms of action for new molecular entities. High-throughput fluorescence and confocal microscopes with advanced analysis software have simplified the simultaneous identification and quantification of various cellular processes through what is now referred to as highcontent screening (HCS). HCS permits automated identification of modifiers of accessible and biologically relevant targets and can thus be used to detect gene interactions or identify toxic pathways of drug candidates to improve drug discovery and development processes. In this review, we summarize several HCS-compatible, biochemical, and molecular biology-driven assays, including immunohistochemistry, RNAi, reporter gene assay, CRISPR-Cas9 system, and protein-protein interactions to assess a variety of cellular processes, including proliferation, morphological changes, protein expression, localization, post-translational modifications, and protein-protein interactions. These cell-based assay methods can be applied to not only 2D cell culture but also 3D cell culture systems in a high-throughput manner. PMID:26428732

  20. Cell-based multiwell assays for the detection of substrate accumulation and oxidation.

    PubMed

    Wensaas, A J; Rustan, A C; Lövstedt, K; Kull, B; Wikström, S; Drevon, C A; Hallén, S

    2007-04-01

    We describe multiwell assays for detecting the accumulation as well as the subsequent oxidation of (14)C-labeled substrates in cultured cells. Accumulation is monitored in real time by an established scintillation proximity assay in which the scintillator is embedded in the plate base primarily detecting cell-associated radiolabel. The substrate oxidation assay is a novel variant of previously described experimental approaches aimed at trapping (14)CO(2) produced by isolated enzymes, organelles, or intact cells. This method uses a standard 96-well tissue culture plate and, on top, an inverted filter plate immersed with NaOH that are clamped into a sandwich sealed with a silicon gasket to obtain gas-tight compartments. (14)CO(2) is captured in the filter and quantified by conventional scintillation. We demonstrate both the accumulation and subsequent oxidation of (14)C-labeled substrates in cultured human myotubes, adipocytes, and hepatocytes. Both methods are adaptable for compound screening; at the same time, these protocols provide easy-to-use and time- saving methods for in vitro studies of cellular fuel handling. PMID:17213484

  1. A Caco-2 cell-based quantitative antioxidant activity assay for antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Wan, Hongxia; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xiangying; Sun, Haiyan; Li, Yan

    2015-05-15

    A Caco-2 cell-based antioxidant activity (CAA) assay for quantitative evaluation of antioxidants was developed by optimizing seeding density and culture time of Caco-2 cells, incubation time and concentration of fluorescent probe (2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, DCFH-DA), incubation way and incubation time of antioxidants (pure phytochemicals) and DCFH-DA with cells, and detection time of fluorescence. Results showed that the CAA assay was of good reproducibility and could be used to evaluate the antioxidant activity of antioxidants at the following conditions: seeding density of 5 × 10(4)/well, cell culture time of 24h, co-incubation of 60 μM DCFH-DA and pure phytochemicals with Caco-2 cells for 20 min and fluorescence recorded for 90 min. Additionally, a significant correlation was observed between CAA values and rat plasma ORAC values following the intake of antioxidants for selected pure phytochemicals (R(2) = 0.815, p < 0.01), demonstrating the good biological relevance of CAA assay. PMID:25577125

  2. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Nathamgari, S. Shiva P.; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P.; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L.; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A.; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2015-01-01

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean’s force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (> 90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  3. Isolating single cells in a neurosphere assay using inertial microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Nathamgari, S Shiva P; Dong, Biqin; Zhou, Fan; Kang, Wonmo; Giraldo-Vela, Juan P; McGuire, Tammy; McNaughton, Rebecca L; Sun, Cheng; Kessler, John A; Espinosa, Horacio D

    2015-12-21

    Sphere forming assays are routinely used for in vitro propagation and differentiation of stem cells. Because the stem cell clusters can become heterogeneous and polyclonal, they must first be dissociated into a single cell suspension for further clonal analysis or differentiation studies. The dissociated population is marred by the presence of doublets, triplets and semi-cleaved/intact clusters which makes identification and further analysis of differentiation pathways difficult. In this work, we use inertial microfluidics to separate the single cells and clusters in a population of chemically dissociated neurospheres. In contrast to previous microfluidic sorting technologies which operated at high flow rates, we implement the spiral microfluidic channel in a novel focusing regime that occurs at lower flow rates. In this regime, the curvature-induced Dean's force focuses the smaller, single cells towards the inner wall and the larger clusters towards the center. We further demonstrate that sorting in this low flow rate (and hence low shear stress) regime yields a high percentage (>90%) of viable cells and preserves multipotency by differentiating the sorted neural stem cell population into neurons and astrocytes. The modularity of the device allows easy integration with other lab-on-a-chip devices for upstream mechanical dissociation and downstream high-throughput clonal analysis, localized electroporation and sampling. Although demonstrated in the case of the neurosphere assay, the method is equally applicable to other sphere forming assays. PMID:26511875

  4. Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Embryonic Stem Cell Test (EST) is an assay which evaluates xenobiotic-induced effects using three endpoints: mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation, mESC viability, and 3T3-cell viability. Our research goal was to develop an improved high-throughput assay by establi...

  5. An evaluation of the CHO/HGPRT mutation assay involving suspension cultures and soft agar cloning: results for 33 chemicals.

    PubMed

    Oberly, T J; Rexroat, M A; Bewsey, B J; Richardson, K K; Michaelis, K C

    1990-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary cell assay (CHO), which measures forward mutation of the HGPRT locus, is used in several laboratories for the detection of mutagens. A procedure involving treatment of CHO cells in suspension culture and mutant selection in soft agar cloning has been developed (Oberly TJ, Bewsey BJ, Probst GS (1987): Mutat Res 182:99-111). In order to evaluate the effectiveness of these modifications, 33 chemicals representing six chemical classes were tested, and the results were compared to findings obtained in other tests for genotoxicity at Lilly Research Laboratories (LRL). A positive response was obtained with 21 chemicals, all of which are recognized mutagens. Of the 12 compounds that produced negative results, 4 were considered to be mutagens and/or carcinogens. Twelve of the compounds mentioned in this report have been previously tested in the CHO/HGPRT assay by other laboratories, and the results showed strong agreement between laboratories. These findings support the conclusion that the use of suspension cultures and soft agar cloning in the CHO assay provides a sensitive test for the identification of mutagens and is a viable alternative to the traditional monolayer procedure of O'Neill et al. (O'Neill JP, Couch DB, Machanoff R, San Sebastian JR, Brimer PA, Hsie AW (1977): Mutat Res 45:103-109). PMID:2253605

  6. Cell Culture as an Alternative in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nardone, Roland M.

    1990-01-01

    Programs that are intended to inform and provide "hands-on" experience for students and to facilitate the introduction of cell culture-based laboratory exercises into the high school and college laboratory are examined. The components of the CellServ Program and the Cell Culture Toxicology Training Programs are described. (KR)

  7. Cell culture techniques in honey bee research

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cell culture techniques are indispensable in most if not all life science disciplines to date. Wherever cell culture models are lacking scientific development is hampered. Unfortunately this has been and still is the case in honey bee research because permanent honey bee cell lines have not yet been...

  8. MAMMALIAN CELL GENE MUTATION ASSAYS WORKING GROUP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian cell gene mutation assays have been used for many years and the diversity of the available systems attests to the varied methods found to grow mammalian dells and detect mutations. s part of the International Workshop on Standardization of Genotoxicity Test Procedures, ...

  9. A hybrid microfluidic platform for cell-based assays via diffusive and convective trans-membrane perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Vereshchagina, Elizaveta; Mc Glade, Declan; Glynn, Macdara; Ducrée, Jens

    2013-01-01

    We present a novel 3D hybrid assembly of a polymer microfluidic chip with polycarbonate track-etched membrane (PCTEM) enabling membrane-supported cell culture. Two chip designs have been developed to establish either diffusive or convective reagent delivery using the integrated PCTEM. While it is well suited to a range of cell-based assays, we specifically employ this platform for the screening of a common antitumor chemotoxic agent (mitomycin C – MMC) on the HL60 myeloid leukemia cell line. The toxic activity of MMC is based on the generation of severe DNA damage in the cells. Using either mode of operation, the HL60 cells were cultured on-chip before, during, and after exposure to MMC at concentrations ranging from 0 to 50 μM. Cell viability was analysed off-chip by the trypan blue dye exclusion assay. The results of the on-chip viability assay were found to be consistent with those obtained off-chip and indicated ca. 40% cell survival at MMC concentration of 50 μM. The catalogue of capabilities of the here described cell assay platform comprises of (i) the culturing of cells either under shear-free conditions or under induced through-membrane flows, (ii) the tight time control of the reagent exposure, (iii) the straightforward assembly of devices, (iv) the flexibility on the choice of the membrane, and, prospectively, (v) the amenability for large-scale parallelization. PMID:24404021

  10. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    PubMed

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual assay results in a systematic fashion and a timely manner. This microplate-based assay development strategy should result in the setting up of more robust and reliable test systems that ensure and increase the confidence in the statistical significance of the actual data generated. And, although assay miniaturisation is essential in order to achieve this, most, if not all, cell-based assays can be easily reformatted and adapted to be used in this format in a straightforward manner. This synopsis aims at summarising valuable, general observations made when implementing a diverse set of functional cellular in vitro assays at Bayer Pharma AG without claiming to deeply review all of the literature available in each and every detail. In addition, phenotypic assays (Moffat et al. 2014) or label-free detection methods (Minor 2008) are not discussed. Although this essay tries to cover the most relevant technological developments in the field, it nevertheless may express personal preferences and peculiarities of the author's approach to state-of-the-art cell-based assay development. For additional reviews covering the actual field, see Wunder et al. (2008) and Michelini et al. (2010). PMID:26424721

  11. Single cell multiplexed assay for proteolytic activity using droplet microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ng, Ee Xien; Miller, Miles A; Jing, Tengyang; Chen, Chia-Hung

    2016-07-15

    Cellular enzymes interact in a post-translationally regulated fashion to govern individual cell behaviors, yet current platform technologies are limited in their ability to measure multiple enzyme activities simultaneously in single cells. Here, we developed multi-color Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based enzymatic substrates and use them in a microfluidics platform to simultaneously measure multiple specific protease activities from water-in-oil droplets that contain single cells. By integrating the microfluidic platform with a computational analytical method, Proteolytic Activity Matrix Analysis (PrAMA), we are able to infer six different protease activity signals from individual cells in a high throughput manner (~100 cells/experimental run). We characterized protease activity profiles at single cell resolution for several cancer cell lines including breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, lung cancer cell line PC-9, and leukemia cell line K-562 using both live-cell and in-situ cell lysis assay formats, with special focus on metalloproteinases important in metastasis. The ability to measure multiple proteases secreted from or expressed in individual cells allows us to characterize cell heterogeneity and has potential applications including systems biology, pharmacology, cancer diagnosis and stem cell biology. PMID:26995287

  12. Highly Sensitive Assay for Measurement of Arenavirus-cell Attachment.

    PubMed

    Klaus, Joseph P; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses are a family of enveloped RNA viruses that cause severe human disease. The first step in the arenavirus life cycle is attachment of viral particles to host cells. While virus-cell attachment can be measured through the use of virions labeled with biotin, radioactive isotopes, or fluorescent dyes, these approaches typically require high multiplicities of infection (MOI) to enable detection of bound virus. We describe a quantitative (q)RT-PCR-based assay that measures Junin virus strain Candid 1 attachment via quantitation of virion-packaged viral genomic RNA. This assay has several advantages including its extreme sensitivity and ability to measure attachment over a large dynamic range of MOIs without the need to purify or label input virus. Importantly, this approach can be easily tailored for use with other viruses through the use of virus-specific qRT-PCR reagents. Further, this assay can be modified to permit measurement of particle endocytosis and genome uncoating. In conclusion, we describe a simple, yet robust assay for highly sensitive measurement of arenavirus-cell attachment. PMID:26966937

  13. Air pollutant production by algal cell cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, F.; Funkhouser, E. A.

    1982-01-01

    The production of phytotoxic air pollutants by cultures of Chlorella vulgaris and Euglena gracilis is considered. Algal and plant culture systems, a fumigation system, and ethylene, ethane, cyanide, and nitrogen oxides assays are discussed. Bean, tobacco, mustard green, cantaloupe and wheat plants all showed injury when fumigated with algal gases for 4 hours. Only coleus plants showed any resistance to the gases. It is found that a closed or recycled air effluent system does not produce plant injury from algal air pollutants.

  14. Limiting-dilution transplantation assays in mammary stem cell studies.

    PubMed

    Illa-Bochaca, Irineu; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Rodrigo; Shelton, Dawne N; Welm, Bryan E; Ortiz-de-Solorzano, Carlos; Barcellos-Hoff, Mary Helen

    2010-01-01

    Mammary reconstitution assays can be used to measure the stem cell frequency within an epithelial population by transplanting increasingly diluted single-cell preparations of the population of interest. There are fundamental steps in the single-cell isolation protocol which are directly related to the number of single epithelial cells obtained. Once single-cell suspensions have been obtained, serial dilutions are prepared and transplanted into the cleared fat pads of the host mice. After 8-10 weeks, the transplanted fat pads are reevaluated for the presence of epithelial outgrowths. Based on the frequency of no outgrowth for each one of the transplanted dilutions, it is possible to estimate the frequency of mammary repopulating cells present in a given cell population. Here, we give details on how to carry out all these steps. PMID:20405357

  15. Culture of Cells from Amphibian Embryos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stanisstreet, Martin

    1983-01-01

    Describes a method for in vitro culturing of cells from amphibian early embryos. Such cells can be used to demonstrate such properties of eukaryote cells as cell motility, adhesion, differentiation, and cell sorting into tissues. The technique may be extended to investigate other factors. (Author/JN)

  16. The use of human adipose-derived stem cells based cytotoxicity assay for acute toxicity test.

    PubMed

    Abud, Ana Paula Ressetti; Zych, Jaiesa; Reus, Thamile Luciane; Kuligovski, Crisciele; de Moraes, Elizabeth; Dallagiovanna, Bruno; de Aguiar, Alessandra Melo

    2015-12-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells (ADSC) were evaluated as cell culture model for cytotoxicity assay and toxicity prediction by using the neutral red uptake assay (NRU). In this study, we compared ADSC and the murine cell line BALB/c 3T3 clone A31 to predict the toxicity of 12 reference substances as recommended by the Interagency Coordinating Committee on the Validation of Alternative Methods. We predicted the LD50 for RC-rat-only weight and RC-rat-only millimole regressions for both cell culture models. For RC rat-only weight regression, both cells had the same accordance (50%), while for RC rat-only millimole regression, the accordance was 50% for ADSC and 42% for 3T3s. Thus, ADSC have similar capability for GHS class prediction as the 3T3 cell line for the evaluated reference substances. Therefore, ADSCs showed the potential to be considered a novel model for use in evaluating cytotoxicity in drug development and industry as well as for regulatory purposes to reduce or replace the use of laboratory animals with acceptable sensitivity for toxicity prediction in humans. These cells can be used to complete the results from other models, mainly because of its human origin. Moreover, it is less expensive in comparison with other existing models. PMID:26382612

  17. Autoradiographic assay of mutants resistant to diphtheria toxin in mammalian cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Ronen, A.; Gingerich, J.D.; Duncan, A.M.V.; Heddle, J.A.

    1984-10-01

    Diptheria toxin kills mammalian cells by ribosylating elongation factor 2, a protein factor necessary for protein synthesis. The frequency of cells able to form colonies in the presence of the toxin can be used as an assay for mutation to diphtheria toxin resistance. Resistance to diphtheria toxin can also be detected autoradiographically in cells exposed to (/sup 3/H)leucine after treatment with the toxin. In cultures of Chinese hamster ovary cells, the frequency of such resistant cells is increased by exposure of the cells to ..gamma..-rays, ultraviolet light, ethylnitrosourea, mitomycin c, ethidium bromide, and 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The resistant cells form discrete microcolonies if they are allowed to divide several times before intoxication which indicates that they are genuine mutants. The assay is potentially adaptable to any cell population that can be intoxicated with diphtheria toxin and labeled with (/sup 3/H)leucine, whether or not the cells can form colonies. It may be useful, therefore, for measuring mutation rates in slowly growing or nondividing cell populations such as breast, brain, and liver, as well as in cells that do divide but cannot be readily cloned, such as the colonic epithelium. 23 references, 6 figures.

  18. Cell micropatterning inside a microchannel and assays under a stable concentration gradient.

    PubMed

    Okuyama, Tomoaki; Yamazoe, Hironori; Seto, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Fukuda, Junji

    2010-08-01

    We describe the use of a microfluidic device to micropattern cells in a microchannel and investigated the behavior of these cells under a concentration gradient. The microfluidic device consisted of 3 parts: a branched channel for generating a stable concentration gradient, a main channel for culturing cells, and 2 side channels that flowed into the main channel. The main channel was coated with a cross-linked albumin that was initially cell-repellent but that could become cell-adherent by electrostatic adsorption of a polycation. A sheath flow stream, which was generated by introducing a polycation solution from the branched channel and a buffer solution from the 2 side channels, was used to change a specific region in the main channel from cell-repellent to cell-adhesive. In this way, cells attached to the central region along the main channel. The remaining surface was subsequently changed to cell-adhesive, thereby facilitating cell migration from a fixed location under a concentration gradient. We demonstrated that with this device, the gradient generator could be used to conduct simultaneous cytotoxic assays with anticancer agents; further, by combining this device with cell micropatterning, migration assays under a concentration gradient of biological factors could be conducted. PMID:20547384

  19. Single cell gel/comet assay: guidelines for in vitro and in vivo genetic toxicology testing.

    PubMed

    Tice, R R; Agurell, E; Anderson, D; Burlinson, B; Hartmann, A; Kobayashi, H; Miyamae, Y; Rojas, E; Ryu, J C; Sasaki, Y F

    2000-01-01

    Atthe International Workshop on Genotoxicity Test Procedures (IWGTP) held in Washington, DC, March 25-26, 1999, an expert panel met to develop guidelines for the use of the single-cell gel (SCG)/Comet assay in genetic toxicology. The expert panel reached a consensus that the optimal version of the Comet assay for identifying agents with genotoxic activity was the alkaline (pH > 13) version of the assay developed by Singh et al. [1988]. The pH > 13 version is capable of detecting DNA single-strand breaks (SSB), alkali-labile sites (ALS), DNA-DNA/DNA-protein cross-linking, and SSB associated with incomplete excision repair sites. Relative to other genotoxicity tests, the advantages of the SCG assay include its demonstrated sensitivity for detecting low levels of DNA damage, the requirement for small numbers of cells per sample, its flexibility, its low costs, its ease of application, and the short time needed to complete a study. The expert panel decided that no single version of the alkaline (pH > 13) Comet assay was clearly superior. However, critical technical steps within the assay were discussed and guidelines developed for preparing slides with agarose gels, lysing cells to liberate DNA, exposing the liberated DNA to alkali to produce single-stranded DNA and to express ALS as SSB, electrophoresing the DNA using pH > 13 alkaline conditions, alkali neutralization, DNA staining, comet visualization, and data collection. Based on the current state of knowledge, the expert panel developed guidelines for conducting in vitro or in vivo Comet assays. The goal of the expert panel was to identify minimal standards for obtaining reproducible and reliable Comet data deemed suitable for regulatory submission. The expert panel used the current Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) guidelines for in vitro and in vivo genetic toxicological studies as guides during the development of the corresponding in vitro and in vivo SCG assay guidelines. Guideline topics considered included initial considerations, principles of the test method, description of the test method, procedure, results, data analysis and reporting. Special consideration was given by the expert panel to the potential adverse effect of DNA degradation associated with cytotoxicity on the interpretation of Comet assay results. The expert panel also discussed related SCG methodologies that might be useful in the interpretation of positive Comet data. The related methodologies discussed included: (1) the use of different pH conditions during electrophoreses to discriminate between DNA strand breaks and ALS; (2) the use of repair enzymes or antibodies to detect specific classes of DNA damage; (3) the use of a neutral diffusion assay to identify apoptotic/necrotic cells; and (4) the use of the acellular SCG assay to evaluate the ability of a test substance to interact directly with DNA. The alkaline (pH > 13) Comet assay guidelines developed by the expert panel represent a work in progress. Additional information is needed before the assay can be critically evaluated for its utility in genetic toxicology. The information needed includes comprehensive data on the different sources of variability (e.g., cell to cell, gel to gel, run to run, culture to culture, animal to animal, experiment to experiment) intrinsic to the alkaline (pH > 3) SCG assay, the generation of a large database based on in vitro and in vivo testing using these guidelines, and the results of appropriately designed multilaboratory international validation studies. PMID:10737956

  20. A cell-based assay for screening lipoxygenase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Nair, Dileep G; Funk, Colin D

    2009-12-01

    Lipoxygenases (LOX) form a family of lipid peroxidizing enzymes within the plant and animal kingdoms. In humans, six functional lipoxygenase isoforms have been identified. 5-LOX, "platelet-type" 12-LOX (p12-LOX) and 15-LOX type 1 (15-LOX1), originally identified in leukocytes, platelets, and reticulocytes, respectively, generate lipid mediators involved in host cellular functions and in the pathophysiology of asthma, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. The pharmaceutical industry has reinvigorated their programs to develop novel LOX inhibitors in view of recent findings. However, high throughput LOX screening assays to test novel agents against these intracellular enzymes are limited. We describe a cell-based 96-well microplate fluorescence assay tested against several existing LOX inhibitors, and validate the assay by comparing known IC(50) values and HPLC analysis, which may provide a useful screen for novel LOX inhibitors. PMID:19804839

  1. Particle-induced cell migration assay (PICMA): A new in vitro assay for inflammatory particle effects based on permanent cell lines.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Götz A; Schremmer, Isabell; Rostek, Alexander; Loza, Kateryna; Rosenkranz, Nina; Brüning, Thomas; Epple, Matthias; Bünger, Jürgen

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is a decisive pathophysiologic mechanism of particle toxicity and accumulation of neutrophils in the lung is believed to be a crucial step in this process. This study describes an in vitro model for investigations of the chemotactic attraction of neutrophils in response to particles using permanent cell lines. We challenged NR8383 rat macrophages with particles that were characterized concerning chemical nature, crystallinity, and size distribution in the dry state and in the culture medium. The cell supernatants were used to investigate migration of differentiated human leukemia cells (dHL-60 cells). The dose range for the tests was determined using an impedance-based Real-Time Cell Analyzer. The challenge of NR8383 cells with 32-96 μg cm(-2) coarse and nanosized particles resulted in cell supernatants which induced strong and dose-dependent migration of dHL-60 cells. Quartz caused the strongest effects - exceeding the positive control "fetal calf serum" (FCS) several-fold, followed by silica, rutile, carbon black, and anatase. BaSO4 served as inert control and induced no cell migration. Particles caused NR8383 cells to secrete chemotactic compounds. The assay clearly distinguished between the particles of different inflammatory potential in a highly reproducible way. Specificity of the test is suggested by negative results with BaSO4. PMID:25896209

  2. A Duplex PCR-Based Assay for Measuring the Amount of Bacterial Contamination in a Nucleic Acid Extract from a Culture of Free-Living Protists

    PubMed Central

    Marron, Alan O.; Akam, Michael; Walker, Giselle

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultures of heterotrophic protists often require co-culturing with bacteria to act as a source of nutrition. Such cultures will contain varying levels of intrinsic bacterial contamination that can interfere with molecular research and cause problems with the collection of sufficient material for sequencing. Measuring the levels of bacterial contamination for the purposes of molecular biology research is non-trivial, and can be complicated by the presence of a diverse bacterial flora, or by differences in the relative nucleic acid yield per bacterial or eukaryotic cell. Principal Findings Here we describe a duplex PCR-based assay that can be used to measure the levels of contamination from marine bacteria in a culture of loricate choanoflagellates. By comparison to a standard culture of known target sequence content, the assay can be used to quantify the relative proportions of bacterial and choanoflagellate material in DNA or RNA samples extracted from a culture. We apply the assay to compare methods of purifying choanoflagellate cultures prior to DNA extraction, to determine their effectiveness in reducing bacterial contamination. Together with measurements of the total nucleic acid concentration, the assay can then be used as the basis for determining the absolute amounts of choanoflagellate DNA or RNA present in a sample. Conclusions The assay protocol we describe here is a simple and relatively inexpensive method of measuring contamination levels in nucleic acid samples. This provides a new way to establish quantification and purification protocols for molecular biology and genomics in novel heterotrophic protist species. Guidelines are provided to develop a similar protocol for use with any protistan culture. This assay method is recommended where qPCR equipment is unavailable, where qPCR is not viable because of the nature of the bacterial contamination or starting material, or where prior sequence information is insufficient to develop qPCR protocols. PMID:23593495

  3. Biomimetic macroporous hydrogel scaffolds in a high-throughput screening format for cell-based assays.

    PubMed

    Dainiak, Maria B; Savina, Irina N; Musolino, Isabella; Kumar, Ashok; Mattiasson, Bo; Galaev, Igor Yu

    2008-01-01

    Macroporous hydrogels (MHs) hold great promise as scaffolds in tissue engineering and cell-based assays. In this study, the possibility of combination of three-dimensional (3D) cell culture with a miniaturized screening format was demonstrated on human colon cancer HCT116, human acute myeloid leukemia KG-1 cells, and embryonic fibroblasts cultured on MHs (12.5 mm x 7.1 mm I.D.) in a 96-minicolumn plate format. MHs were prepared by cryogelation technique and functionalized by coating with type I collagen and by copolymerization with agmatine-based mimetic of cell adhesive peptide RGD (abRGDm). Cancer cells formed multicellular aggregates while fibroblasts formed adhesions on abRGDm-containing and collagen-MHs but not on plain MHs, as was demonstrated by scanning electron microscopy. HCT116 and KG-1 cells grown as aggregates were more resistant to the treatment with cis-diaminedichloroplatinum (II) (cisplatin) and cytosine 1-beta-D-arabinofuranoside (Ara-C), respectively, during the first 18-24 h of incubation, than single cells grown on unmodified MH. HCT116 cells grown as 2D cultures in conventional 96-well tissue culture plates were 1.5- to 3.5-fold more sensitive to the treatment with 70 microM cisplatin than cells in 3D cultures in functionalized MHs. Further development of the described experimental system including matching of a specific cell type with appropriate extracellular matrix (ECM) components and 3D cocultures on ECM-modified MHs may provide a realistic in vitro experimental model for high-throughput toxicity tests. PMID:19194952

  4. Multielectrode Array (MEA) Assay for Profiling Electrophysiological Drug Effects in Human Stem Cell-Derived Cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Clements, Mike

    2016-01-01

    More relevant and reliable preclinical cardiotoxicity tests are required to improve drug safety and reduce the cost of drug development. Human stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hSC-CMs) provide a potential model for the development of superior assays for preclinical drug safety screening. One such hSC-CM assay that has shown significant potential for enabling more predictive drug cardiac risk assessment is the MEA assay. The Multi-electrode Array (MEA) assay is an electrophysiology-based technique that uses microelectrodes embedded in the culture surface of each well to measure fluctuations in extracellular field potential (FP) generated from spontaneously beating hSC-CMs. Perturbations to the recorded FP waveform can be used as an unbiased method of predicting the identity of ion channel(s) impacted on drug exposure. Here, a higher throughput MEA assay using hSC-CMs in 48-well MEA plates is described for profiling compound-induced effects on cardiomyocyte electrophysiology. Techniques for preparing hSC-CM monolayers in MEA plates and methods to contextualize MEA assay experimental results are also covered. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27145112

  5. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference...

  6. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures. When used in conjunction with or in reference...

  7. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures....

  8. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures....

  9. 9 CFR 101.6 - Cell cultures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Cell cultures. 101.6 Section 101.6 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS DEFINITIONS § 101.6 Cell cultures....

  10. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. ell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in productiv...

  11. Polyester μ-assay chip for stem cell studies

    PubMed Central

    Piraino, Francesco; Selimović, Šeila; Adamo, Marco; Pero, Alessandro; Manoucheri, Sam; Bok Kim, Sang; Demarchi, Danilo; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-01-01

    The application of microfluidic technologies to stem cell research is of great interest to biologists and bioengineers. This is chiefly due to the intricate ability to control the cellular environment, the reduction of reagent volume, experimentation time and cost, and the high-throughput screening capabilities of microscale devices. Despite this importance, a simple-to-use microfluidic platform for studying the effects of growth factors on stem cell differentiation has not yet emerged. With this consideration, we have designed and characterized a microfluidic device that is easy to fabricate and operate, yet contains several functional elements. Our device is a simple polyester-based microfluidic chip capable of simultaneously screening multiple independent stem cell culture conditions. Generated by laser ablation and stacking of multiple layers of polyester film, this device integrates a 10 × 10 microwell array for cell culture with a continuous perfusion system and a non-linear concentration gradient generator. We performed numerical calculations to predict the gradient formation and calculate the shear stress acting on the cells inside the device. The device operation was validated by culturing murine embryonic stem cells inside the microwells for 5 days. Furthermore, we showed the ability to maintain the pluripotency of stem cell aggregates in response to concentrations of leukemia inhibitory factor ranging from 0 to ∼1000 U/ml. Given its simplicity, fast manufacturing method, scalability, and the cell-compatible nature of the device, it may be a useful platform for long-term stem cell culture and studies. PMID:24278097

  12. Dynamic culture improves cell reprogramming efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sia, Junren; Sun, Raymond; Chu, Julia; Li, Song

    2016-06-01

    Cell reprogramming to pluripotency is an inefficient process and various approaches have been devised to improve the yield of induced pluripotent stem cells. However, the effect of biophysical factors on cell reprogramming is not well understood. Here we showed that, for the first time, dynamic culture with orbital shaking significantly improved the reprogramming efficiency in adherent cells. Manipulating the viscosity of the culture medium suggested that the improved efficiency is mainly attributed to convective mixing rather than hydrodynamic shear stress. Temporal studies demonstrated that the enhancement of reprogramming efficiency required the dynamic culture in the middle but not early phase. In the early phase, fibroblasts had a high proliferation rate, but as the culture became over-confluent in the middle phase, expression of p57 was upregulated to inhibit cell proliferation and consequently, cell reprogramming. Subjecting the over confluent culture to orbital shaking prevented the upregulation of p57, thus improving reprogramming efficiency. Seeding cells at low densities to avoid over-confluency resulted in a lower efficiency, and optimal reprogramming efficiency was attained at a high seeding density with dynamic culture. Our findings provide insight into the underlying mechanisms of how dynamic culture condition regulate cell reprogramming, and will have broad impact on cell engineering for regenerative medicine and disease modeling. PMID:27031931

  13. EVALUATION OF MIXED CELL TYPES AND 5-IODO-2'-DEOXYURIDINE TREATMENT UPON PLAQUE ASSAY TITERS OF HUMAN ENTERIC VIRUSES (JOURNAL VERSION)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Four continuous cell lines BGM, L-132, HEL-299, and RD were compared both when cultured separately and as mixtures for use in plaque assay titrations of human Adenovirus 1 and six human enterovirus serotypes. The effect of incubating these cell cultures in media containing IDU (5...

  14. Vita-Assay Method of Enrichment and Identification of Circulating Cancer Cells/Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs).

    PubMed

    Tulley, Shaun; Zhao, Qiang; Dong, Huan; Pearl, Michael L; Chen, Wen-Tien

    2016-01-01

    The ability to capture, enrich, and propagate circulating cancer cells/circulating tumor cells (CTCs) for downstream analyses such as ex vivo drug-sensitivity testing of short-term cultures of CTCs, single cell sorting of CTCs by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), animal injection tumor and/or metastasis formation studies, next generation sequencing (NGS), gene expression profiling, gene copy number determination, and epigenomic analyses is of high priority and of immense importance to both the basic research and translational/clinical research communities. Vitatex Inc.'s functional cell separation technology, constructed as Vita-Assay (AG6W, AN6W, AR6W) culture plates, is based on the preferential adhesion of invasive rare blood cells of tissue origin to a tissue or tumor microenvironment mimic-the so-called cell adhesion matrix (CAM), which has a demonstrated ability to enrich viable CTCs from blood up to one-million fold.The CAM-scaffold allows for the functional capture and identification of invasive CTCs (iCTCs) including invasive tumor progenitor (TP) cells from cancer-patients' blood. CAM-captured CTCs are capable of ingesting the CAM (CAM+) itself. Green and red fluorescent versions of Vita-Assay (AG6W and AR6W) allow for direct visualization of CAM-uptake by cancer cells. Vita-Assay CAM-enrichment has allowed for sensitive multiplex flow cytometric and microscopic detection of iCTCs from patients with cancers of the breast, ovary, prostate, pancreas, colorectum, and lung; it has also been successfully utilized for ex vivo drug-sensitivity testing of ovarian-cancer patient CTCs. The CAM enrichment method is equally suitable for the separation of iCTCs and TP cells in ascites and pleural fluid. PMID:26820949

  15. Ex Vivo Assay of Electrical Stimulation to Rat Sciatic Nerves: Cell Behaviors and Growth Factor Expression.

    PubMed

    Du, Zhiyong; Bondarenko, Olexandr; Wang, Dingkun; Rouabhia, Mahmoud; Zhang, Ze

    2016-06-01

    Neurite outgrowth and axon regeneration are known to benefit from electrical stimulation. However, how neuritis and their surroundings react to electrical field is difficult to replicate by monolayer cell culture. In this work freshly harvested rat sciatic nerves were cultured and exposed to two types of electrical field, after which time the nerve tissues were immunohistologically stained and the expression of neurotrophic factors and cytokines were evaluated. ELISA assay was used to confirm the production of specific proteins. All cell populations survived the 48 h culture with little necrosis. Electrical stimulation was found to accelerate Wallerian degeneration and help Schwann cells to switch into migratory phenotype. Inductive electrical stimulation was shown to upregulate the secretion of multiple neurotrophic factors. Cellular distribution in nerve tissue was altered upon the application of an electrical field. This work thus presents an ex vivo model to study denervated axon in well controlled electrical field, bridging monolayer cell culture and animal experiment. It also demonstrated the critical role of electrical field distribution in regulating cellular activities. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1301-1312, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26516696

  16. Good Caco-2 cell culture practices.

    PubMed

    Natoli, Manuela; Leoni, Bruno D; D'Agnano, Igea; Zucco, Flavia; Felsani, Armando

    2012-12-01

    The human Caco-2 cells differentiate spontaneously in culture forming monolayers of mature intestinal enterocytes which have been used as a model of the intestinal barrier for in vitro toxicology studies. Reproducibility problems often reported in literature have been generally ascribed to different culture-related conditions, such as the type of animal serum used, the supplements added to the culture media, the passage number and the source of cell clones. The Caco-2 cell culture protocol here described has been recently optimized in our laboratory, producing a homogeneous and highly polarized monolayer of cells which display many of the characteristics of the intestinal enterocytes. This protocol differs from standard protocols mainly because Caco-2 cells are subcultured when they reach just 50% of confluence, instead of 80%, retaining a high proliferation potential. When this cell population is seeded at high density on filter inserts differentiates almost synchronously and much more homogenously. PMID:22465559

  17. Good Caco-2 cell culture practices.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Natoli M; Leoni BD; D'Agnano I; Zucco F; Felsani A

    2012-12-01

    The human Caco-2 cells differentiate spontaneously in culture forming monolayers of mature intestinal enterocytes which have been used as a model of the intestinal barrier for in vitro toxicology studies. Reproducibility problems often reported in literature have been generally ascribed to different culture-related conditions, such as the type of animal serum used, the supplements added to the culture media, the passage number and the source of cell clones. The Caco-2 cell culture protocol here described has been recently optimized in our laboratory, producing a homogeneous and highly polarized monolayer of cells which display many of the characteristics of the intestinal enterocytes. This protocol differs from standard protocols mainly because Caco-2 cells are subcultured when they reach just 50% of confluence, instead of 80%, retaining a high proliferation potential. When this cell population is seeded at high density on filter inserts differentiates almost synchronously and much more homogenously.

  18. Emulsions Containing Perfluorocarbon Support Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ju, Lu-Kwang; Lee, Jaw Fang; Armiger, William B.

    1990-01-01

    Addition of emulsion containing perfluorocarbon liquid to aqueous cell-culture medium increases capacity of medium to support mammalian cells. FC-40 Fluorinert (or equivalent) - increases average density of medium so approximately equal to that of cells. Cells stay suspended in medium without mechanical stirring, which damages them. Increases density enough to prevent cells from setting, and increases viscosity of medium so oxygen bubbled through it and nutrients stirred in with less damage to delicate cells.

  19. Constructing a High Density Cell Culture System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    An annular culture vessel for growing mammalian cells is constructed in a one piece integral and annular configuration with an open end which is closed by an endcap. The culture vessel is rotatable about a horizontal axis by use of conventional roller systems commonly used in culture laboratories. The end wall of the endcap has tapered access ports to frictionally and sealingly receive the ends of hypodermic syringes. The syringes permit the introduction of fresh nutrient and withdrawal of spent nutrients. The walls are made of conventional polymeric cell culture material and are subjected to neutron bombardment to form minute gas permeable perforations in the walls.

  20. Genotoxicity of complex mixtures: CHO cell mutagenicity assay

    SciTech Connect

    Frazier, M.E.; Samuel, J.E.

    1985-02-01

    A Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mammalian cell assay was used to evaluate the genotoxicity of complex mixtures (synthetic fuels). The genotoxicity (mutagenic potency) of the mixtures increased as the temperature of their boiling range increased. Most of the genotoxicity in the 750/sup 0/F+ boiling-range materials was associated with the neutral polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) fractions. Chemical analysis data indicate that the PAH fractions of high-boiling coal liquids contain a number of known chemical carcinogens, including five- and six-ring polyaromatics (e.g., benzo(a)pyrene) as well as four- and five-ring alkyl-substituted PAH (e.g., methylchrysene and dimethylbenzanthracenes); concentrations are a function of boiling point (bp). In vitro genotoxicity was also detected in fractions of nitrogen-containing polyaromatic compounds, as well as in those with aliphatics of hydroxy-containing PAH. Mutagenic activity of some fractions was detectable in the CHO assay in the absence of an exogenous metabolic activation system; in some instances, addition of exogenous enzymes and cofactors inhibited expression of the direct-acting mutagenic potential of the fraction. These data indicate that the organic matrix of the chemical fraction determines whether, and to what degree, various mutagens are expressed in the CHO assay. Therefore, the results of biological assays of these mixtures must be correlated with chemical analyses for proper interpretation of these data. 29 references, 16 figures, 4 tables.

  1. Determining the macropinocytic index of cancer cells through a quantitative image-based assay

    PubMed Central

    Commisso, Cosimo; Flinn, Rory J.; Bar-Sagi, Dafna

    2014-01-01

    Macropinocytosis serves as an internalization pathway for extracellular fluid and its contents and is upregulated in oncogene-expressing cells. Recently, we have revealed a functional role for macropinocytosis in fueling cancer cell growth through the internalization of extracellular albumin, which is degraded into a usable source of intracellular amino acids. Assessing macropinocytosis has been challenging in the past due to the lack of reliable assays capable of quantitatively measuring this uptake mechanism. Here, we describe a protocol for visualizing and quantifying the extent of macropinocytosis in cancer cells both in culture and in vivo. Using this approach, the ‘Macropinocytic Index’ of a particular cancer cell line or subcutaneous tumor can be ascertained within 1–2 days. The protocol can be carried out with multiple samples in parallel and can be easily adapted for a variety of cell types and xenograft/allograft mouse models. PMID:24385148

  2. Miniaturized and High-Throughput Assays for Analysis of T-Cell Immunity Specific for Opportunistic Pathogens and HIV

    PubMed Central

    Ivaldi, Federico; Starc, Nadia; Landi, Fabiola; Locatelli, Franco; Rutella, Sergio; Tripodi, Gino; Manca, Fabrizio

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring of antigen-specific T-cell responses is valuable in numerous conditions that include infectious diseases, vaccinations, and opportunistic infections associated with acquired or congenital immune defects. A variety of assays that make use of peripheral lymphocytes to test activation markers, T-cell receptor expression, or functional responses are currently available. The last group of assays calls for large numbers of functional lymphocytes. The number of cells increases with the number of antigens to be tested. Consequently, cells may be the limiting factor, particularly in lymphopenic subjects and in children, the groups that more often require immune monitoring. We have developed immunochemical assays that measure secreted cytokines in the same wells in which peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are cultured. This procedure lent itself to miniaturization and automation. Lymphoproliferation and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay have been adapted to a miniaturized format. Here we provide examples of immune profiles and describe a comparison between miniaturized assays based on cytokine secretion or proliferation. We also demonstrate that these assays are convenient for use in testing antigen specificity in established T-cell lines, in addition to analysis of PBMC. In summary, the applicabilities of miniaturization to save cells and reagents and of automation to save time and increase accuracy were demonstrated in this study using different methodological approaches valuable in the clinical immunology laboratory. PMID:24477854

  3. Miniaturized and high-throughput assays for analysis of T-cell immunity specific for opportunistic pathogens and HIV.

    PubMed

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Ivaldi, Federico; Starc, Nadia; Landi, Fabiola; Locatelli, Franco; Rutella, Sergio; Tripodi, Gino; Manca, Fabrizio

    2014-04-01

    Monitoring of antigen-specific T-cell responses is valuable in numerous conditions that include infectious diseases, vaccinations, and opportunistic infections associated with acquired or congenital immune defects. A variety of assays that make use of peripheral lymphocytes to test activation markers, T-cell receptor expression, or functional responses are currently available. The last group of assays calls for large numbers of functional lymphocytes. The number of cells increases with the number of antigens to be tested. Consequently, cells may be the limiting factor, particularly in lymphopenic subjects and in children, the groups that more often require immune monitoring. We have developed immunochemical assays that measure secreted cytokines in the same wells in which peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are cultured. This procedure lent itself to miniaturization and automation. Lymphoproliferation and the enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay have been adapted to a miniaturized format. Here we provide examples of immune profiles and describe a comparison between miniaturized assays based on cytokine secretion or proliferation. We also demonstrate that these assays are convenient for use in testing antigen specificity in established T-cell lines, in addition to analysis of PBMC. In summary, the applicabilities of miniaturization to save cells and reagents and of automation to save time and increase accuracy were demonstrated in this study using different methodological approaches valuable in the clinical immunology laboratory. PMID:24477854

  4. Interdependence of initial cell density, drug concentration and exposure time revealed by real-time impedance spectroscopic cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Caviglia, C; Zr, K; Canepa, S; Carminati, M; Larsen, L B; Raiteri, R; Andresen, T L; Heiskanen, A; Emnus, J

    2015-05-21

    We investigated the combined effect of the initial cell density (12,500, 35,000, 75,000, and 100,000 cells cm(-2)) and concentration of the anti-cancer drug doxorubicin on HeLa cells by performing time-dependent cytotoxicity assays using real-time electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. A correlation between the rate of cell death and the initial cell seeding density was found at 2.5 ?M doxorubicin concentration, whereas this was not observed at 5 or 100 ?M. By sensing the changes in the cell-substrate interaction using impedance spectroscopy under static conditions, the onset of cytotoxicity was observed 5 h earlier than when using a standard colorimetric end-point assay (MTS) which measures changes in the mitochondrial metabolism. Furthermore, with the MTS assay no cytotoxicity was observed after 15 h of incubation with 2.5 ?M doxorubicin, whereas the impedance showed at this time point cell viability that was below 25%. These results indicate that impedance detection reveals cytotoxic events undetectable when using the MTS assay, highlighting the importance of combining impedance detection with traditional drug toxicity assays towards a more in depth understanding of the effect of anti-cancer drugs on in vitro assays. Moreover, the detection of doxorubicin induced toxicity determined with impedance under static conditions proved to be 6 times faster than in perfusion culture. PMID:25868456

  5. Hamster cell line suitable for transfection assay of transforming genes.

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, T; Sasai, H; Suzuki, F; Miyoshi, J; Ohuchi, T; Takai, S; Mori, T; Kakunaga, T

    1990-01-01

    We established a subclone, SHOK, from the GHE-L cell line, an immortal line derived from a primary culture of Syrian hamster embryo cells, as a recipient cell line useful for the detection of oncogenes by transfection. SHOK cells were almost as susceptible as NIH 3T3 cells to focus formation by many oncogenes, including v-raf, v-Ha-ras, v-Ki-ras, or activated c-Ha-ras. The susceptibility of SHOK to focus formation was higher than that of NIH 3T3 for v-mos but was lower for v-fps, v-fgr, v-src, v-sis, and v-abl. When DNAs extracted from 27 human and murine tumors were tested for focus formation, 5 DNAs were positive in NIH 3T3 cells, whereas 9 were positive in SHOK cells at the primary transfection. Using SHOK cells as recipients of tumor cellular DNA, we isolated another oncogene and a c-Ki-ras2 gene mutated at codon 146 that were difficult to detect in NIH 3T3 cells. SHOK cells have a low rate of spontaneous transformation, produce easily distinguishable foci, and maintain a stable karyotype in transformed cells. In addition to being useful for the screening of human tumor DNAs, SHOK cells will be useful for the isolation of oncogenes from murine tumors because of their hamster origin. Images PMID:2181436

  6. Proximity Ligation Assay for High-content Profiling of Cell Signaling Pathways on a Microfluidic Chip*

    PubMed Central

    Blazek, Matthias; Betz, Charles; Hall, Michael Nip; Reth, Michael; Zengerle, Roland; Meier, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    Here, we present the full integration of a proximity ligation assay (PLA) on a microfluidic chip for systematic cell signaling studies. PLA is an in situ technology for the detection of protein interaction, post-translational modification, concentration, and cellular location with single-molecule resolution. Analytical performance advances on chip are achieved, including full automation of the biochemical PLA steps, target multiplexing, and reduction of antibody consumption by 2 orders of magnitude relative to standard procedures. In combination with a microfluidic cell-culturing platform, this technology allows one to gain control over 128 cell culture microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of the combined cell culture and protein analytic assay on chip by characterizing the Akt signaling pathway upon PDGF stimulation. Signal transduction is detected by monitoring the phosphorylation states of Akt, GSK-3β, p70S6K, S6, Erk1/2, and mTOR and the cellular location of FoxO3a in parallel with the PLA. Single-cell PLA results revealed for Akt and direct targets of Akt a maximum activation time of 4 to 8 min upon PDGF stimulation. Activation times for phosphorylation events downward in the Akt signaling pathway including the phosphorylation of S6, p70S6K, and mTOR are delayed by 8 to 10 min or exhibit a response time of at least 1 h. Quantitative confirmation of the Akt phosphorylation signal was determined with the help of a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line deficient for rictor. In sum, this work with a miniaturized PLA chip establishes a biotechnological tool for general cell signaling studies and their dynamics relevant for a broad range of biological inquiry. PMID:24072685

  7. Prion protein lacks robust cytoprotective activity in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Christensen, Heather M; Harris, David A

    2008-01-01

    Background The physiological function of the cellular prion protein (PrPC) remains unknown. However, PrPC has been reported to possess a cytoprotective activity that prevents death of neurons and other cells after a toxic stimulus. To explore this effect further, we attempted to reproduce several of the assays in which a protective activity of PrP had been previously demonstrated in mammalian cells. Results In the first set of experiments, we found that PrP over-expression had a minimal effect on the death of MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells treated with TNF-? and Prn-p0/0 immortalized hippocampal neurons (HpL3-4 cells) subjected to serum deprivation. In the second set of assays, we observed only a small difference in viability between cerebellar granule neurons cultured from PrP-null and control mice in response to activation of endogenous or exogenous Bax. Conclusion Taken together, our results suggest either that cytoprotection is not a physiologically relevant activity of PrPC, or that PrPC-dependent protective pathways operative in vivo are not adequately modeled by these cell culture systems. We suggest that cell systems capable of mimicking the neurotoxic effects produced in transgenic mice by N-terminally deleted forms of PrP or Doppel may represent more useful tools for analyzing the cytoprotective function of PrPC. PMID:18718018

  8. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned medium accelerates skin wound healing: An in vitro study of fibroblast and keratinocyte scratch assays

    SciTech Connect

    Walter, M.N.M.; School of Life and Health Science, Aston University, Aston Triangle, Birmingham, B4 7EJ ; Wright, K.T.; Fuller, H.R.; MacNeil, S.; Johnson, W.E.B.

    2010-04-15

    We have used in vitro scratch assays to examine the relative contribution of dermal fibroblasts and keratinocytes in the wound repair process and to test the influence of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) secreted factors on both skin cell types. Scratch assays were established using single cell and co-cultures of L929 fibroblasts and HaCaT keratinocytes, with wound closure monitored via time-lapse microscopy. Both in serum supplemented and serum free conditions, wound closure was faster in L929 fibroblast than HaCaT keratinocyte scratch assays, and in co-culture the L929 fibroblasts lead the way in closing the scratches. MSC-CM generated under serum free conditions significantly enhanced the wound closure rate of both skin cell types separately and in co-culture, whereas conditioned medium from L929 or HaCaT cultures had no significant effect. This enhancement of wound closure in the presence of MSC-CM was due to accelerated cell migration rather than increased cell proliferation. A number of wound healing mediators were identified in MSC-CM, including TGF-{beta}1, the chemokines IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1 and RANTES, and collagen type I, fibronectin, SPARC and IGFBP-7. This study suggests that the trophic activity of MSC may play a role in skin wound closure by affecting both dermal fibroblast and keratinocyte migration, along with a contribution to the formation of extracellular matrix.

  9. A cell-based screening assay for Natural Killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Blom, W Marty; van Nielen, Wim G L; de Groene, Els M; Albers, Ruud

    2009-06-01

    Natural Killer (NK) cells are important in the first response against viruses and tumours. Compounds that modulate human NK cell activity offer interesting prophylactic and therapeutic options, however, a systematic screening tool is lacking. Development of suitable NK cell lines or receptor-based assays is hindered by the highly complicated regulation of the different NK cell subsets by multiple receptors. Here, we describe a cell-based flowcytometric activity assay adapted to identify NK cell modulating compounds. Fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were incubated with NK-sensitive K562 target cells labelled with 5-(6)-carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester, followed by DNA-labelling with propidium iodide to identify dead cells. The assay demonstrated a good performance with an average Z'-factor of 0.6 and over 95% of the assays fulfilled the quality criteria, suggesting that it is possible to use a complex system with two different cell types to screen compounds. A large number of (natural) compounds and extracts were tested and normalized to the positive control, Interleukin-2. Promising and less promising compounds were distinguished. Effectiveness of compounds was based on the augmentation of NK cell activity as well as the number of responding subjects. To conclude the assay is robust, reliable and can be used for functional screening of natural compounds modulating NK cell activity. PMID:19293002

  10. Rotating Cell Culture Systems for Human Cell Culture: Human Trophoblast Cells as a Model

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Heather L.; Morris, Cindy A.; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin

    2012-01-01

    The field of human trophoblast research aids in understanding the complex environment established during placentation. Due to the nature of these studies, human in vivo experimentation is impossible. A combination of primary cultures, explant cultures and trophoblast cell lines1 support our understanding of invasion of the uterine wall2 and remodeling of uterine spiral arteries3,4 by extravillous trophoblast cells (EVTs), which is required for successful establishment of pregnancy. Despite the wealth of knowledge gleaned from such models, it is accepted that in vitro cell culture models using EVT-like cell lines display altered cellular properties when compared to their in vivo counterparts5,6. Cells cultured in the rotating cell culture system (RCCS) display morphological, phenotypic, and functional properties of EVT-like cell lines that more closely mimic differentiating in utero EVTs, with increased expression of genes mediating invasion (e.g. matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)) and trophoblast differentiation7,8,9. The Saint Georges Hospital Placental cell Line-4 (SGHPL-4) (kindly donated by Dr. Guy Whitley and Dr. Judith Cartwright) is an EVT-like cell line that was used for testing in the RCCS. The design of the RCCS culture vessel is based on the principle that organs and tissues function in a three-dimensional (3-D) environment. Due to the dynamic culture conditions in the vessel, including conditions of physiologically relevant shear, cells grown in three dimensions form aggregates based on natural cellular affinities and differentiate into organotypic tissue-like assemblies10,11,12 . The maintenance of a fluid orbit provides a low-shear, low-turbulence environment similar to conditions found in vivo. Sedimentation of the cultured cells is countered by adjusting the rotation speed of the RCCS to ensure a constant free-fall of cells. Gas exchange occurs through a permeable hydrophobic membrane located on the back of the bioreactor. Like their parental tissue in vivo, RCCS-grown cells are able to respond to chemical and molecular gradients in three dimensions (i.e. at their apical, basal, and lateral surfaces) because they are cultured on the surface of porous microcarrier beads. When grown as two-dimensional monolayers on impermeable surfaces like plastic, cells are deprived of this important communication at their basal surface. Consequently, the spatial constraints imposed by the environment profoundly affect how cells sense and decode signals from the surrounding microenvironment, thus implying an important role for the 3-D milieu13. We have used the RCCS to engineer biologically meaningful 3-D models of various human epithelial tissues7,14,15,16. Indeed, many previous reports have demonstrated that cells cultured in the RCCS can assume physiologically relevant phenotypes that have not been possible with other models10,17-21. In summary, culture in the RCCS represents an easy, reproducible, high-throughput platform that provides large numbers of differentiated cells that are amenable to a variety of experimental manipulations. In the following protocol, using EVTs as an example, we clearly describe the steps required to three-dimensionally culture adherent cells in the RCCS. PMID:22297395

  11. Cell culture processes for monoclonal antibody production

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; Vijayasankaran, Natarajan; Shen, Amy (Yijuan); Kiss, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Animal cell culture technology has advanced significantly over the last few decades and is now generally considered a reliable, robust and relatively mature technology. A range of biotherapeutics are currently synthesized using cell culture methods in large scale manufacturing facilities that produce products for both commercial use and clinical studies. The robust implementation of this technology requires optimization of a number of variables, including (1) cell lines capable of synthesizing the required molecules at high productivities that ensure low operating cost; (2) culture media and bioreactor culture conditions that achieve both the requisite productivity and meet product quality specifications; (3) appropriate on-line and off-line sensors capable of providing information that enhances process control; and (4) good understanding of culture performance at different scales to ensure smooth scale-up. Successful implementation also requires appropriate strategies for process development, scale-up and process characterization and validation that enable robust operation and ensure compliance with current regulations. This review provides an overview of the state-of-the art technology in key aspects of cell culture, e.g., generation of highly productive cell lines and optimization of cell culture process conditions. We also summarize the current thinking on appropriate process development strategies and process advances that might affect process development. PMID:20622510

  12. Understanding photoreceptor outer segment phagocytosis: Use and utility of RPE cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Mazzoni, Francesca; Safa, Hussein; Finnemann, Silvia C.

    2014-01-01

    RPE cells are the most actively phagocytic cells in the human body. In the eye, RPE cells face rod and cone photoreceptor outer segments at all times but contribute to shedding and clearance phagocytosis of distal outer segment tips only once a day. Analysis of RPE phagocytosis in situ has succeeded in identifying key players of the RPE phagocytic mechanism. Phagocytic processes comprise three distinct phases, recognition/binding, internalization, and digestion, each of which is regulated separately by phagocytes. Studies of phagocytosis by RPE cells in culture allow specifically analyzing and manipulating these distinct phases to identify their molecular mechanisms. Here, we compare similarities and differences of primary, immortalized, and stem cell-derived RPE cells in culture to RPE cells in situ with respect to phagocytic function. We discuss in particular potential pitfalls of RPE cell culture phagocytosis assays. Finally, we point out considerations for phagocytosis assay development for future studies. PMID:24780752

  13. Advances in cell culture: anchorage dependence

    PubMed Central

    Merten, Otto-Wilhelm

    2015-01-01

    Anchorage-dependent cells are of great interest for various biotechnological applications. (i) They represent a formidable production means of viruses for vaccination purposes at very large scales (in 1000–6000 l reactors) using microcarriers, and in the last decade many more novel viral vaccines have been developed using this production technology. (ii) With the advent of stem cells and their use/potential use in clinics for cell therapy and regenerative medicine purposes, the development of novel culture devices and technologies for adherent cells has accelerated greatly with a view to the large-scale expansion of these cells. Presently, the really scalable systems—microcarrier/microcarrier-clump cultures using stirred-tank reactors—for the expansion of stem cells are still in their infancy. Only laboratory scale reactors of maximally 2.5 l working volume have been evaluated because thorough knowledge and basic understanding of critical issues with respect to cell expansion while retaining pluripotency and differentiation potential, and the impact of the culture environment on stem cell fate, etc., are still lacking and require further studies. This article gives an overview on critical issues common to all cell culture systems for adherent cells as well as specifics for different types of stem cells in view of small- and large-scale cell expansion and production processes. PMID:25533097

  14. Culture and Manipulation of Embryonic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edgar, Lois G.; Goldstein, Bob

    2012-01-01

    The direct manipulation of embryonic cells is an important tool for addressing key questions in cell and developmental biology. C. elegans is relatively unique among genetic model systems in being amenable to manipulation of embryonic cells. Embryonic cell manipulation has allowed the identification of cell interactions by direct means, and it has been an important technique for dissecting mechanisms by which cell fates are specified, cell divisions are oriented, and morphogenesis is accomplished. Here, we present detailed methods for isolating, manipulating and culturing embryonic cells of C. elegans. PMID:22226523

  15. Photomicronucleus assay of phototoxic and pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals in human keratinocyte NCTC2544 cells.

    PubMed

    Horinouchi, Mayumi; Arimoto-Kobayashi, Sakae

    2011-07-14

    Photochemical genotoxicity was evaluated in human keratinocyte NCTC2544 cells. The cells were pre-treated with photogenotoxic or pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals and irradiated with a solar-simulator for 50min at a total UV dose of 5J/cm(2) or placed in the dark for the same period. After washing, the cells were cultured for 1.5-2 cell cycles with fresh culture medium. At the end of culturing, slide specimens were prepared and examined for micronucleus formation. 8-Methoxypsoralen, a photogenotoxic chemical, strongly induced micronucleated cells with UV irradiation but not under non-irradiation conditions. Therefore, NCTC2544 cells were subjected to further investigation to evaluate the possible photogenotoxicity of other chemicals. 6-Methylcoumarin, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide and protoporphyrin IX disodium salt, which are all known phototoxic substances, induced micronucleated cells with irradiation but not in the non-irradiation state. These phototoxic substances were confirmed to be photogenotoxic. Tetrabenzoporphine and 5-aminolevulinic acid, which are used for photodynamic therapy, showed phototoxicity. However, these chemicals did not induce micronucleated cells in the irradiated or non-irradiated state, suggesting a lack of photogenotoxicity. Among 3 pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals having no light absorbance at 290-700nm, neither cycloheximide nor disulfoton induced micronucleated cells with or without irradiation; zinc oxide induced micronucleated cells with irradiation and, to a lesser extent, without irradiation. Based on the results of the photogenotoxicity assays of these 9 chemicals, NCTC2544 cells are considered to be a suitable test system to evaluate the photogenotoxic potential of chemicals. PMID:21524715

  16. Photomicronucleus assay of phototoxic and pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals in human keratinocyte NCTC2544 cells.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    Horinouchi M; Arimoto-Kobayashi S

    2011-07-14

    Photochemical genotoxicity was evaluated in human keratinocyte NCTC2544 cells. The cells were pre-treated with photogenotoxic or pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals and irradiated with a solar-simulator for 50min at a total UV dose of 5J/cm(2) or placed in the dark for the same period. After washing, the cells were cultured for 1.5-2 cell cycles with fresh culture medium. At the end of culturing, slide specimens were prepared and examined for micronucleus formation. 8-Methoxypsoralen, a photogenotoxic chemical, strongly induced micronucleated cells with UV irradiation but not under non-irradiation conditions. Therefore, NCTC2544 cells were subjected to further investigation to evaluate the possible photogenotoxicity of other chemicals. 6-Methylcoumarin, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide and protoporphyrin IX disodium salt, which are all known phototoxic substances, induced micronucleated cells with irradiation but not in the non-irradiation state. These phototoxic substances were confirmed to be photogenotoxic. Tetrabenzoporphine and 5-aminolevulinic acid, which are used for photodynamic therapy, showed phototoxicity. However, these chemicals did not induce micronucleated cells in the irradiated or non-irradiated state, suggesting a lack of photogenotoxicity. Among 3 pseudophotoclastogenic chemicals having no light absorbance at 290-700nm, neither cycloheximide nor disulfoton induced micronucleated cells with or without irradiation; zinc oxide induced micronucleated cells with irradiation and, to a lesser extent, without irradiation. Based on the results of the photogenotoxicity assays of these 9 chemicals, NCTC2544 cells are considered to be a suitable test system to evaluate the photogenotoxic potential of chemicals.

  17. High throughput RNAi assay optimization using adherent cell cytometry

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background siRNA technology is a promising tool for gene therapy of vascular disease. Due to the multitude of reagents and cell types, RNAi experiment optimization can be time-consuming. In this study adherent cell cytometry was used to rapidly optimize siRNA transfection in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (AoSMC). Methods AoSMC were seeded at a density of 3000-8000 cells/well of a 96well plate. 24 hours later AoSMC were transfected with either non-targeting unlabeled siRNA (50 nM), or non-targeting labeled siRNA, siGLO Red (5 or 50 nM) using no transfection reagent, HiPerfect or Lipofectamine RNAiMax. For counting cells, Hoechst nuclei stain or Cell Tracker green were used. For data analysis an adherent cell cytometer, Celigo® was used. Data was normalized to the transfection reagent alone group and expressed as red pixel count/cell. Results After 24 hours, none of the transfection conditions led to cell loss. Red fluorescence counts were normalized to the AoSMC count. RNAiMax was more potent compared to HiPerfect or no transfection reagent at 5 nM siGLO Red (4.12 +/-1.04 vs. 0.70 +/-0.26 vs. 0.15 +/-0.13 red pixel/cell) and 50 nM siGLO Red (6.49 +/-1.81 vs. 2.52 +/-0.67 vs. 0.34 +/-0.19). Fluorescence expression results supported gene knockdown achieved by using MARCKS targeting siRNA in AoSMCs. Conclusion This study underscores that RNAi delivery depends heavily on the choice of delivery method. Adherent cell cytometry can be used as a high throughput-screening tool for the optimization of RNAi assays. This technology can accelerate in vitro cell assays and thus save costs. PMID:21518450

  18. Long Term Maintenance of Myeloid Leukemic Stem Cells Cultured with Unrelated Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sawa; Barrett, A. John; Dutra, Amalia; Pak, Evgenia; Miner, Samantha; Keyvanfar, Keyvan; Hensel, Nancy F.; Rezvani, Katayoun; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) support the growth and differentiation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Here we studied the ability of MSCs to support the growth and survival of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) in vitro. Primary leukemic blasts isolated from the peripheral blood of 8 patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) were co-cultured with equal numbers of irradiated MSCs derived from unrelated donor bone marrow, with or without cytokines for up to 6 weeks. Four samples showed CD34+CD38− predominance, and four were predominantly CD34+CD38+. CD34+ CD38− predominant leukemia cells maintained the CD34+ CD38− phenotype and were viable for 6 weeks when co-cultured with MSCs compared to co-cultures with cytokines or medium only, which showed rapid differentiation and loss of the LSC phenotype. In contrast, CD34+ CD38+ predominant leukemic cells maintained the CD34+CD38+ phenotype when co-cultured with MSCs alone, but no culture conditions supported survival beyond 4 weeks. Cell cycle analysis showed that MSCs maintained a higher proportion of CD34+ blasts in G0 than leukemic cells cultured with cytokines. AML blasts maintained in culture with MSCs for up to 6 weeks engrafted NSG mice with the same efficiency as their non-cultured counterparts, and the original karyotype persisted after co-culture. Chemosensitivity and transwell assays suggest MSCs provide pro-survival benefits to leukemic blasts through cell-cell contact. We conclude that MSCs support long-term maintenance of LSCs in vitro. This simple and inexpensive approach will facilitate basic investigation of LSCs and enable screening of novel therapeutic agents targeting LSCs. PMID:25535865

  19. Spheroid Culture of Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cesarz, Zoe; Tamama, Kenichi

    2016-01-01

    Compared with traditional 2D adherent cell culture, 3D spheroidal cell aggregates, or spheroids, are regarded as more physiological, and this technique has been exploited in the field of oncology, stem cell biology, and tissue engineering. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) cultured in spheroids have enhanced anti-inflammatory, angiogenic, and tissue reparative/regenerative effects with improved cell survival after transplantation. Cytoskeletal reorganization and drastic changes in cell morphology in MSC spheroids indicate a major difference in mechanophysical properties compared with 2D culture. Enhanced multidifferentiation potential, upregulated expression of pluripotency marker genes, and delayed replicative senescence indicate enhanced stemness in MSC spheroids. Furthermore, spheroid formation causes drastic changes in the gene expression profile of MSC in microarray analyses. In spite of these significant changes, underlying molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways triggering and sustaining these changes are largely unknown. PMID:26649054

  20. Oscillatory behavior of cells in tissue culture.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giaever, Ivar; Linton, Michael F. A.; Keese, Charles R.

    1998-03-01

    Fibroblasts and epithelial cells organize themselves in distinct patterns in tissue culture which indicates that neighboring cells communicate. A striking example of such communication is the oscillatory behavior of Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells reported here. These oscillations were discovered using a biosensor referred to as ECIS (Electric Cell-substrate Impedance Sensing). In this measurement cells are seeded out on a small electrode deposited at the bottom of a tissue culture well and immersed in ordinary culture medium. By measuring the changes in the impedance of the electrode as a function of time, many important properties of the cells on the electrode can be inferred, such as motion, morphology changes and membrane capacitance. The impedance oscillations of MDCK cells were observed with highly confluent cell layers, where the approximately 100 cells on the electrode acted in unison. The communication between cells can be demonstrated directly by a variation of the ECIS concept, where cells are cultured on two closely spaced electrodes. The impedance fluctuations are measured independently on each electrode and compared by using a cross-correlation function.

  1. Establishment, characterization, and toxicological application of loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) primary skin fibroblast cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Webb, Sarah J; Zychowski, Gregory V; Bauman, Sandy W; Higgins, Benjamin M; Raudsepp, Terje; Gollahon, Lauren S; Wooten, Kimberly J; Cole, Jennifer M; Godard-Codding, Céline

    2014-12-16

    Pollution is a well-known threat to sea turtles but its impact is poorly understood. In vitro toxicity testing presents a promising avenue to assess and monitor the effects of environmental pollutants in these animals within the legal constraints of their endangered status. Reptilian cell cultures are rare and, in sea turtles, largely derived from animals affected by tumors. Here we describe the full characterization of primary skin fibroblast cell cultures derived from biopsies of multiple healthy loggerhead sea turtles (Caretta caretta), and the subsequent optimization of traditional in vitro toxicity assays to reptilian cells. Characterization included validating fibroblast cells by morphology and immunocytochemistry, and optimizing culture conditions by use of growth curve assays with a fractional factorial experimental design. Two cell viability assays, MTT and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and an assay measuring cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) expression by quantitative PCR were optimized in the characterized cells. MTT and LDH assays confirmed cytotoxicity of perfluorooctanoic acid at 500 μM following 72 and 96 h exposures while CYP1A5 induction was detected after 72 h exposure to 0.1-10 μM benzo[a]pyrene. This research demonstrates the validity of in vitro toxicity testing in sea turtles and highlights the need to optimize mammalian assays to reptilian cells. PMID:25384208

  2. In vivo assay to monitor flavonoid uptake across plant cell membranes

    PubMed Central

    Filippi, Antonio; Petrussa, Elisa; Peresson, Carlo; Bertolini, Alberto; Vianello, Angelo; Braidot, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    Flavonoids represent one of the most important molecules of plant secondary metabolism, playing many different biochemical and physiological roles. Although their essential role in plant life and human health has been elucidated by many studies, their subcellular transport and accumulation in plant tissues remains unclear. This is due to the absence of a convenient and simple method to monitor their transport. In the present work, we suggest an assay able to follow in vivo transport of quercetin, the most abundant flavonoid in plant tissues. This uptake was monitored using 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (DPBA), a fluorescent probe, in non-pigmented Vitis vinifera cell cultures. PMID:26504740

  3. Cell-Based Lipid Flippase Assay Employing Fluorescent Lipid Derivatives.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Maria S; Costa, Sara; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; López-Marqués, Rosa L

    2016-01-01

    P-type ATPases in the P4 subfamily (P4-ATPases) are transmembrane proteins unique for eukaryotes that act as lipid flippases, i.e., to translocate phospholipids from the exofacial to the cytofacial monolayer of cellular membranes. While initially characterized as aminophospholipid translocases, studies of individual P4-ATPase family members from fungi, plants, and animals show that P4-ATPases differ in their substrate specificities and mediate transport of a broader range of lipid substrates. Here, we describe an assay based on fluorescent lipid derivatives to monitor and characterize lipid flippase activities in the plasma membrane of cells, using yeast as an example. PMID:26695048

  4. Rapid Detection of Burkholderia pseudomallei in Blood Cultures Using a Monoclonal Antibody-Based Immunofluorescent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chantratita, Narisara; Tandhavanant, Sarunporn; Wongsuvan, Gumphol; Wuthiekanun, Vanaporn; Teerawattanasook, Nittaya; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Limmathurotsakul, Direk; Peacock, Sharon J.

    2013-01-01

    Melioidosis is a severe bacterial infection caused by Burkholderia pseudomallei. Rapid antimicrobial therapy is necessary to improve patient outcome, which is aided by direct detection of B. pseudomallei in clinical samples. A drawback for all antigen assays is that the number of B. pseudomallei in blood usually falls below the achievable level of detection. We performed a prospective cohort study of 461 patients with 541 blood cultures to evaluate the utility of a pre-incubation step prior to detection of B. pseudomallei using a monoclonal antibody-based immunofluorescent assay (Mab-IFA). The Mab-IFA was positive in 74 of 76 patients with melioidosis (sensitivity = 97.4%), and negative in 385 patients who did not have blood cultures containing B. pseudomallei (specificity = 100%). The Mab-IFA could be a valuable supplementary tool for rapid detection. We recommend the use of the Mab-IFA to test blood cultures that flag positive in regions where melioidosis is endemic. PMID:24019434

  5. Culture and transfection of axolotl cells.

    PubMed

    Denis, Jean-François; Sader, Fadi; Ferretti, Patrizia; Roy, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    The use of cells grown in vitro has been instrumental for multiple aspects of biomedical research and especially molecular and cellular biology. The ability to grow cells from multicellular organisms like humans, squids, or salamanders is important to simplify the analyses and experimental designs to help understand the biology of these organisms. The advent of the first cell culture has allowed scientists to tease apart the cellular functions, and in many situations these experiments help understand what is happening in the whole organism. In this chapter, we describe techniques for the culture and genetic manipulation of an established cell line from axolotl, a species widely used for studying epimorphic regeneration. PMID:25740487

  6. Quasi-spherical microwells on superhydrophobic substrates for long term culture of multicellular spheroids and high throughput assays.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tianqing; Winter, Marnie; Thierry, Benjamin

    2014-07-01

    Multicellular tumour spheroids closely recapitulate the physiological environment of tumour tissues. However, their implementation in drug screening assays remains limited due to the technological challenges of forming large numbers of high quality spheroids in platforms compatible with high throughput screening. A simple bench-top microfabrication strategy is demonstrated here based on the principle of ice lithography carried out on superhydrophobic substrates to fabricate quasi-spherical microwells (spheriwells). The microwells shapes and dimensions are directly controlled by the hydrophobicity of the substrate and the volume of the water droplets. The prepared concave microwells enable the formation of dense and homogeneous multicellular tumour spheroids. Spheroids formed within spheriwells are trapped within the microwells, which eliminate loss during media manipulation and facilitate long-term on-chip culture. Morphological and phenotypical changes associated with the growth of MCF-7 adenocarcinoma cells in spheriwells were characterised using imaging flow cytometry and revealed the appearance of heterogeneous populations with loss of E-Cadherin expression. The compatibility of the spheriwells with an on-chip MTT assay is demonstrated. The very unusual shape of the spheriwells, prepared using materials and methods routinely used in most research laboratories, provides a straightforward and scalable platform to prepare high quality multicellular tumour spheroids compatible with high throughput biological screening assays. PMID:24797879

  7. Clonal analyses and cryopreservation of neural stem cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Gritti, Angela; Galli, Rossella; Vescovi, Angelo L

    2008-01-01

    The discovery of stem cell populations in the adult central nervous system (CNS) that continually produce neurons and glial cells, and the hypothesis that they could contribute to neural plasticity/repair, has opened new and exciting areas of research in basic cell biology and regenerative medicine. The success of these studies relies on understanding the functional features and the normal fate of neural stem cells (NSCs) in vivo as well on the development of in vitro culture conditions enabling isolation, extensive propagation, and rigorous characterization of the "putative" NSCs. The neurosphere assay (NSA) has emerged as a valuable tool for isolating embryonic and adult CNS stem cells and for studying their biology. However, because this assay may select and expand a heterogeneous stem/progenitor cell population, rigorous clonal and serial subcloning analyses are required to detect and document stem cell activity and to unequivocally identify bona fide stem cells. We illustrate and discuss methods for the isolation, propagation, cryopreservation, and functional characterization of NSCs, focusing on the essential issue of their clonogenic capacity. PMID:18369757

  8. Establishment of a New Cell-Based Assay To Measure the Activity of Sweeteners in Fluorescent Food Extracts

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Taste receptors have been defined at the molecular level in the past decade, and cell-based assays have been developed using cultured cells heterologously expressing these receptors. The most popular approach to detecting the cellular response to a tastant is to measure changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration using Ca2+-sensitive fluorescent dyes. However, this method cannot be applied to food-derived samples that contain fluorescent substances. To establish an assay system that would be applicable to fluorescent samples, we tested the use of Ca2+-sensitive photoproteins, such as aequorin and mitochondrial clytin-II, as Ca2+ indicators in a human sweet taste receptor assay. Using these systems, we successfully detected receptor activation in response to sweetener, even when fluorescent compounds coexisted. This luminescence-based assay will be a powerful tool to objectively evaluate the sweetness of food-derived samples even at an industry level. PMID:21981007

  9. Microbubble Array Diffusion Assay for the Detection of Cell Secreting Factors

    PubMed Central

    Bobo, Bryan; Phalen, Dana; Rebhahn, Jonathan; Piepenbrink, Michael S.; Zheng, Bo; Mosmann, Tim R.; Kobie, James J.; DeLouise, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) makes them an ideal tool in both clinical and research applications due to their ability to recognize and bind specific epitopes with high affinity and selectivity. While mAbs offer significant therapeutic potential, their utility is overshadowed by the cost associated with their production, which often relies on the ability to identify minority antigen specific cells out of a heterogeneous population. To address concerns with suboptimal methods for screening cells, we have developed a cell sorting array comprised of nanoliter spherical cell culture compartments, termed microbubble (MB) wells. We demonstrate a proof-of-concept system for the detection of cell secreted factors from both immortalized cell lines and primary B cell samples. Exploiting the unique ability of the MB well architecture to accumulate cell secreted factors as well as affinity capture coatings, we demonstrate on chip detection and recovery of antibody secreting cells for sequencing of immunoglobin genes. Furthermore, rapid image capture and analysis capabilities were developed for the processing of large MB arrays, thus facilitating the ability to conduct high-throughput screening of heterogeneous cell samples faster and more efficiently than ever before. The proof-of-concept assays presented herein lay the groundwork for the progression of MB well arrays as an advanced on chip cell sorting technology. PMID:25079889

  10. Quantitative and dynamic assay of single cell chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Sik; Horvath, Peter; Pelet, Serge; Hegemann, Björn; Lee, Luke P; Peter, Matthias

    2012-04-01

    We have developed a single-cell assay platform that allows quantitative analysis of single cell chemotaxis by dynamic morphogenetic gradients, subcellular microscopic imaging and automated image analysis, and have applied these to measure cellular polarization of budding yeast. The computer-controlled microfluidic device regulates the gradient profile at any given time, and allows quantitative monitoring of cell morphology and the localization and expression of specific marker proteins during the dynamic polarization process. With this integrated experimental system, we compare the polarized signaling response of wild-type and far1-H7 mutant cells, which express a truncated Far1 protein unable to interact with Cdc24. Our results confirm that Far1 functions as an adaptor that recruits polarity establishment proteins to the site of extracellular signaling. Moreover, by changing the gradient profile and estimating the number of bound surface receptors, we quantitatively address why surprisingly small differences in pheromone concentration across yeast cells can be amplified into a robust polarity axis. This integrated single cell experimental platform thus opens the possibility to quantitatively investigate the molecular regulatory mechanism of chemotaxis in yeast, which serves as a paradigm to understand the fundamental processes involved in cancer metastasis, angiogenesis and axon generation. PMID:22230969

  11. Profiling stem cells using quantitative PCR protein assays.

    PubMed

    Ruff, David; Lieu, Pauline T

    2013-01-01

    Reprogramming human somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells is an important avenue in biological research. Advances in the profiling of human stem cells have identified important pluripotency maintenance factors. The presence and relative expression levels of these essential markers are commonly used to define the pluripotency status and potential of reprogrammed stem cells. We reprogram human dermal fibroblasts with four transcription factors, OCT3/4, SOX2, KLF4, and cMYC delivered by viral vectors. We describe a real-time quantitative PCR methodology to quantify the levels of key protein factors and examine the kinetics during reprogramming as well as comparing protein expression in different iPS clones. This report describes three applications of TaqMan() Protein Assays for reprogramming studies: (1) monitoring of reprogramming proteins over the induction time course, (2) characterization of pluripotent cells by protein expression profiles, and (3) identification of potential iPSC colonies in high-throughput screening protocols. This approach is fast, simple, sensitive and generates a pluripotency scorecard for reprogrammed stem cells. PMID:23546760

  12. In vitro toxicity assay of cisplatin on mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Shabani, R; Ashtari, K; Behnam, B; Izadyar, F; Asgari, H; Asghari Jafarabadi, M; Ashjari, M; Asadi, E; Koruji, M

    2016-06-01

    Testicular cancer is the most common cancer affecting men in reproductive age, and cisplatin is one of the major helpful chemotherapeutic agents for treatment of this cancer. In addition, exposure of testes cancer cells to cisplatin could potentially eliminate tumour cells from germ cells in patients. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of cisplatin on viability of mouse acute lymphoblastic leukaemia cell line (EL-4) and neonatal mouse spermatogonial cells in vitro. In this study, the isolated spermatogonial stem cells (SSC) and EL-4 were divided into six groups including control (received medium), sham (received DMSO in medium) and experimental groups which received different doses of cisplatin (0.5, 5, 10 and 15 μg ml(-1) ). Cells viability was evaluated with MTT assay. The identity of the cultured cells was confirmed by the expression of specific markers. Our finding showed that viability of both SSC and EL-4 cells was reduced with the dose of 15 μg/ml when compared to the control group (P ≤ 0.05). Also, the differences between the IC50 in doses 10 and 15 μg/ml at different time were significant (P ≤ 0.05). The number of TUNEL-positive cells was increased, and the BAX and caspase-3 expressions were upregulated in EL4 cells for group that received an effective dose of cisplatin). In conclusion, despite the dramatic effects of cisplatin on both cells, spermatogonial stem cells could form colony in culture. PMID:26428408

  13. Patterning discrete stem cell culture environments via localized SAM replacement

    PubMed Central

    Koepsel, Justin T.; Murphy, William L.

    2009-01-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of alkanethiolates on gold have become an important tool for probing cell-material interactions. Emerging studies in stem cell biology are particularly reliant on well-defined model substrates, and rapid and highly controllable fabrication methods may be necessary to characterize the wide array of stem cell-material interactions. Therefore, this study describes a rapid method to create SAM cell culture substrates with multiple discrete regions of controlled peptide identity and density. The approach uses an NaBH4 solution to selectively remove regions of bio-inert, hydroxyl-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol) alkanethiolate SAM, then locally replace them with mixed SAMs of hydroxyl- and carboxylic acid-terminated oligo(ethylene glycol) alkanethiolates. The cell adhesion peptide Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser-Pro (RGDSP) was then covalently linked to carboxylic acid-terminated mixed SAM regions to create cell adhesive environments within a bio-inert background. SAM preparation and peptide immobilization were characterized using polarization modulation–infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (PMIRRAS), as well as assays to monitor conjugation of a fluorescently-labeled peptide. This “localized SAM replacement” method was achieved using an array of microchannels, which facilitated rapid and simple processing. Results indicate that immobilized RGDSP promoted spatially localized attachment of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) within specified regions, while maintaining a stable, bio-inert background in serum-containing cell culture conditions for up to 14 days. Cell attachment to patterned regions presenting a range of cell adhesion peptide densities demonstrated that peptide identity and density strongly influence hMSC spreading and focal adhesion density. These substrates contain discrete, well-defined microenvironments for stem cell culture, which could ultimately enable high-throughput screening for the effects of immobilized signals on stem cell phenotype. PMID:19856996

  14. Additional survey on genotoxicity of natural anthraquinones in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assay.

    PubMed

    Mori, H; Yoshimi, N; Iwata, H; Tanaka, T; Kawai, K; Sankawa, U

    1988-08-01

    Genotoxicity of fungal anthraquinones of islandicin, iridoskyrin and (-) rubroskyrin, and a colorant of insect origin, cochineal and its component, carminic acid, an anthraquinone, was examined in the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair test. The results were compared with that of versicolorin A, an anthraquinone with bisfuran ring, which had been proved to be genotoxic on this assay. All of these anthraquinones, differently from versicolorin A did not show clear response of DNA repair. The results suggest that these agents are not genotoxic carcinogens. PMID:3193483

  15. Cell based assays for anti-Plasmodium activity evaluation.

    PubMed

    Mokgethi-Morule, Thabang; N'Da, David D

    2016-03-10

    Malaria remains one of the most common and deadly infectious diseases worldwide. The severity of this global public health challenge is reflected by the approximately 198 million people, who were reportedly infected in 2013 and by the more than 584,000 related deaths in that same year. The rising emergence of drug resistance towards the once effective artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) has become a serious concern and warrants more robust drug development strategies, with the objective of eradicating malaria infections. The intricate biology and life cycle of Plasmodium parasites complicate the understanding of the disease in such a way that would enhance the development of more effective chemotherapies that would achieve radical clinical cure and that would prevent disease relapse. Phenotypic cell based assays have for long been a valuable approach and involve the screening and analysis of diverse compounds with regards to their activities towards whole Plasmodium parasites in vitro. To achieve the Millennium Development Goal (MDG) of malaria eradication by 2020, new generation drugs that are active against all parasite stages (erythrocytic (blood), exo-erythrocytic (liver stages and gametocytes)) are needed. Significant advances are being made in assay development to overcome some of the practical challenges of assessing drug efficacy, particularly in the liver and transmission stage Plasmodium models. This review discusses primary screening models and the fundamental progress being made in whole cell based efficacy screens of anti-malarial activity. Ongoing challenges and some opportunities for improvements in assay development that would assist in the discovery of effective, safe and affordable drugs for malaria treatments are also discussed. PMID:26776968

  16. Isolation and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, U S

    1984-01-01

    Methods for isolation, identification and culture of pulmonary endothelial cells are now routine. In the past, methods of isolation have used proteolytic enzymes to detach cells; thereafter, traditional methods for cell passaging have used trypsin/EDTA mixtures. Cells isolated and passaged using proteolytic enzymes have been useful in establishing the field and in verifying certain endothelial properties. However, there is a growing awareness of the role of endothelial cells in processing vasoactive substances, in responding to hormones and other agonists and in cell-cell interactions with other cell types of the vascular wall, with blood cells and with cellular products. Consequently, a new requirement has arisen for cells in vitro that maintain the differentiated properties of their counterparts in vivo. The deleterious effects of trypsin and other proteolytic enzymes commonly used in cell culture on surface structures of endothelial cells such as enzymes, receptors and junctional proteins, as well as on extracellular layers such as the glycocalyx or "endothelial fuzz," have led to the development of methods that avoid use of proteolytic enzymes at both the isolation step and during subsequent subculture. This chapter describes traditional methods for isolating pulmonary endothelial cells but emphasizes newer approaches using mechanical harvest and scale-up using microcarriers. The new methods allow maintenance of long-term, large-scale cultures of cells that retain the full complement of surface properties and that maintain the cobblestone monolayer morphology and differentiated functional properties. Methods for identification of isolated cells are therefore also considered as methods for validation of cultures during their in vitro lifespan. Images FIGURE 1. FIGURE 2. FIGURE 3. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 5. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8. FIGURE 9. FIGURE 10. PMID:6090112

  17. Digital microfluidics for automated hanging drop cell spheroid culture.

    PubMed

    Aijian, Andrew P; Garrell, Robin L

    2015-06-01

    Cell spheroids are multicellular aggregates, grown in vitro, that mimic the three-dimensional morphology of physiological tissues. Although there are numerous benefits to using spheroids in cell-based assays, the adoption of spheroids in routine biomedical research has been limited, in part, by the tedious workflow associated with spheroid formation and analysis. Here we describe a digital microfluidic platform that has been developed to automate liquid-handling protocols for the formation, maintenance, and analysis of multicellular spheroids in hanging drop culture. We show that droplets of liquid can be added to and extracted from through-holes, or "wells," and fabricated in the bottom plate of a digital microfluidic device, enabling the formation and assaying of hanging drops. Using this digital microfluidic platform, spheroids of mouse mesenchymal stem cells were formed and maintained in situ for 72 h, exhibiting good viability (>90%) and size uniformity (% coefficient of variation <10% intraexperiment, <20% interexperiment). A proof-of-principle drug screen was performed on human colorectal adenocarcinoma spheroids to demonstrate the ability to recapitulate physiologically relevant phenomena such as insulin-induced drug resistance. With automatable and flexible liquid handling, and a wide range of in situ sample preparation and analysis capabilities, the digital microfluidic platform provides a viable tool for automating cell spheroid culture and analysis. PMID:25510471

  18. Stamping vital cells - a force-based ligand receptor assay.

    PubMed

    Wienken, Uta; Gaub, Hermann E

    2013-12-17

    Gaining information about receptor profiles on cells, and subsequently finding the most efficient ligands for these signaling receptors, remain challenging tasks in stem cell and cancer research as well as drug development. We introduce a live-cell method with great potential in both screening for surface receptors and analysing binding forces of different ligands. The technique is based on the molecular force assay, a parallel-format, high-throughput experiment on a single-molecule level. On human red blood cells, we demonstrate the detection of the interaction of N-acetyl-α-D-galactosaminyl residues with the lectin helix pomatia agglutinine and of the CD47 receptor with its antibody. The measurements are performed under nearly physiological conditions and still provide a highly specific binding signal. Moreover, with a detailed comparative force analysis on two cell types with different morphology, we show that our method even allows the determination of a DNA force equivalent for the interaction of the CD47 receptor and its antibody. PMID:24359740

  19. Guidelines for the use and interpretation of assays for monitoring cell death in higher eukaryotes

    PubMed Central

    Galluzzi, L; Aaronson, SA; Abrams, J; Alnemri, ES; Andrews, DW; Baehrecke, EH; Bazan, NG; Blagosklonny, MV; Blomgren, K; Borner, C; Bredesen, DE; Brenner, C; Castedo, M; Cidlowski, JA; Ciechanover, A; Cohen, GM; De Laurenzi, V; De Maria, R; Deshmukh, M; Dynlacht, BD; El-Deiry, WS; Flavell, RA; Fulda, S; Garrido, C; Golstein, P; Gougeon, M-L; Green, DR; Gronemeyer, H; Hajn?czky, G; Hardwick, JM; Hengartner, MO; Ichijo, H; Jttel, M; Kepp, O; Kimchi, A; Klionsky, DJ; Knight, RA; Kornbluth, S; Kumar, S; Levine, B; Lipton, SA; Lugli, E; Madeo, F; Malorni, W; Marine, J-CW; Martin, SJ; Medema, JP; Mehlen, P; Melino, G; Moll, UM; Morselli, E; Nagata, S; Nicholson, DW; Nicotera, P; Nuez, G; Oren, M; Penninger, J; Pervaiz, S; Peter, ME; Piacentini, M; Prehn, JHM; Puthalakath, H; Rabinovich, GA; Rizzuto, R; Rodrigues, CMP; Rubinsztein, DC; Rudel, T; Scorrano, L; Simon, H-U; Steller, H; Tschopp, J; Tsujimoto, Y; Vandenabeele, P; Vitale, I; Vousden, KH; Youle, RJ; Yuan, J; Zhivotovsky, B; Kroemer, G

    2009-01-01

    Cell death is essential for a plethora of physiological processes, and its deregulation characterizes numerous human diseases. Thus, the in-depth investigation of cell death and its mechanisms constitutes a formidable challenge for fundamental and applied biomedical research, and has tremendous implications for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. It is, therefore, of utmost importance to standardize the experimental procedures that identify dying and dead cells in cell cultures and/or in tissues, from model organisms and/or humans, in healthy and/or pathological scenarios. Thus far, dozens of methods have been proposed to quantify cell death-related parameters. However, no guidelines exist regarding their use and interpretation, and nobody has thoroughly annotated the experimental settings for which each of these techniques is most appropriate. Here, we provide a nonexhaustive comparison of methods to detect cell death with apoptotic or nonapoptotic morphologies, their advantages and pitfalls. These guidelines are intended for investigators who study cell death, as well as for reviewers who need to constructively critique scientific reports that deal with cellular demise. Given the difficulties in determining the exact number of cells that have passed the point-of-no-return of the signaling cascades leading to cell death, we emphasize the importance of performing multiple, methodologically unrelated assays to quantify dying and dead cells. PMID:19373242

  20. Isolation of Nuclei from Skeletal Muscle Satellite Cells and Myofibers for Use in Chromatin lmmunoprecipitation Assays

    PubMed Central

    Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Mallappa, Chandrashekara; Dacwag Vallaster, Caroline S.; lmbalzano, Anthony N.

    2014-01-01

    Studies investigating mechanisms controlling gene regulation frequently examine specific DNA sequences using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays to determine whether specific regulatory factors or modified histones are present. While use of primary cells or cell line models for differentiating or differentiated tissue is widespread, the ability to assess factor binding and histone modification in tissue defines the events that occur in vivo and provides corroboration for studies in cultured cells. Many tissues can be analyzed with minimal modification to existing ChIP protocols that are designed for cultured cells; however, some tissues, such as skeletal muscle, are problematic in that accessibility of the cross-linking agent is limited. We describe a method to isolate skeletal muscle tissue nuclei suitable for use in ChIP protocols. Furthermore, we utilize a simple fractionation of digested skeletal muscle tissue that can separate mature myofibers from satellite cells, which are responsible for postnatal skeletal muscle regeneration, thereby allowing simultaneous preparation of nuclei from both cell types. PMID:22130858

  1. Human cell culture in a space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.

    1988-01-01

    Microgravity offers new ways of handling fluids, gases, and growing mammalian cells in efficient suspension cultures. In 1976 bioreactor engineers designed a system using a cylindrical reactor vessel in which the cells and medium are slowly mixed. The reaction chamber is interchangeable and can be used for several types of cell cultures. NASA has methodically developed unique suspension type cell and recovery apparatus culture systems for bioprocess technology experiments and production of biological products in microgravity. The first Space Bioreactor was designed for microprocessor control, no gaseous headspace, circulation and resupply of culture medium, and slow mixing in very low shear regimes. Various ground based bioreactors are being used to test reactor vessel design, on-line sensors, effects of shear, nutrient supply, and waste removal from continuous culture of human cells attached to microcarriers. The small Bioreactor is being constructed for flight experiments in the Shuttle Middeck to verify systems operation under microgravity conditions and to measure the efficiencies of mass transport, gas transfer, oxygen consumption and control of low shear stress on cells.

  2. Optically micropatterned culture of adherent cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Jian-Long; Pan, Huei-Jyuan; Lee, Chau-Hwang

    2012-07-01

    We used a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator to project 473 nm light patterns surrounding a region of adherent cells and achieved an arbitrarily micropatterned cell culture. For a group of ~60 cells, the cell boundaries fit the pattern of light within 15% deviation of the side length. We also demonstrated a wound-healing experiment with a definite starting temporal point by using this technique. While observing mitochondrial structures in the illuminated cells, we found that the 473 nm light damaged the integrity of mitochondria and thus prohibited cell proliferation in the illuminated region.

  3. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  4. Bovine chromaffin cell cultures as model to study organophosporus neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Quesada, E; Sogorb, M A; Vilanova, E; Carrera, V

    2004-06-15

    Based on the high level of phenyl valerate esterase activities, and in particular of neuropathy target esterase (NTE) found in bovine adrenal medulla, chromaffin cells culture have been proposed as an alternative model for the study of organophosphorus neurotoxicity. Organophosphorus-induced polyneuropathy is a syndrome related to the inhibition and further modification by organophosphorus compounds of NTE (a protein that displays phenyl valerate esterase activity resistant to mipafox and sensitive to paraoxon). Total phenyl valerate esterase activities found in homogenate, particulate and soluble fractions of bovine adrenal medulla were 5200+/-35, 5000+/-280 and 1700+/-260 mU/g tissue, respectively. Cultured chromaffin cells displayed a total hydrolysing activity of 41+/-5 mU/10(6) cells. Homogenates of bovine adrenal medulla displayed only about 6% of activity sensitive to paraoxon. Most of the phenyl valerate esterase activity inhibited by mipafox (a neuropathy inducing compound) was found in particulate fraction. Cultured chromaffin cells displayed kinetics of inhibition by mipafox similar to the kinetics displayed by homogenates of bovine adrenal medulla. We conclude that NTE could be assayed in this system by only using one inhibitor (mipafox) instead of two (paraoxon and mipafox). Also, the proposal is supported of using chromaffin cells as in vitro model for the study of the role of NTE and related esterases in organophosphorus-induced polyneuropathy. PMID:15177651

  5. Henrietta Lacks, HeLa cells, and cell culture contamination.

    PubMed

    Lucey, Brendan P; Nelson-Rees, Walter A; Hutchins, Grover M

    2009-09-01

    Henrietta Lacks died in 1951 of an aggressive adenocarcinoma of the cervix. A tissue biopsy obtained for diagnostic evaluation yielded additional tissue for Dr George O. Gey's tissue culture laboratory at Johns Hopkins (Baltimore, Maryland). The cancer cells, now called HeLa cells, grew rapidly in cell culture and became the first human cell line. HeLa cells were used by researchers around the world. However, 20 years after Henrietta Lacks' death, mounting evidence suggested that HeLa cells contaminated and overgrew other cell lines. Cultures, supposedly of tissues such as breast cancer or mouse, proved to be HeLa cells. We describe the history behind the development of HeLa cells, including the first published description of Ms Lacks' autopsy, and the cell culture contamination that resulted. The debate over cell culture contamination began in the 1970s and was not harmonious. Ultimately, the problem was not resolved and it continues today. Finally, we discuss the philosophical implications of the immortal HeLa cell line. PMID:19722756

  6. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-12-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  7. High Content Imaging (HCI) on Miniaturized Three-Dimensional (3D) Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Pranav; Lee, Moo-Yeal

    2015-01-01

    High content imaging (HCI) is a multiplexed cell staining assay developed for better understanding of complex biological functions and mechanisms of drug action, and it has become an important tool for toxicity and efficacy screening of drug candidates. Conventional HCI assays have been carried out on two-dimensional (2D) cell monolayer cultures, which in turn limit predictability of drug toxicity/efficacy in vivo; thus, there has been an urgent need to perform HCI assays on three-dimensional (3D) cell cultures. Although 3D cell cultures better mimic in vivo microenvironments of human tissues and provide an in-depth understanding of the morphological and functional features of tissues, they are also limited by having relatively low throughput and thus are not amenable to high-throughput screening (HTS). One attempt of making 3D cell culture amenable for HTS is to utilize miniaturized cell culture platforms. This review aims to highlight miniaturized 3D cell culture platforms compatible with current HCI technology. PMID:26694477

  8. The culture of mouse embryonic stem cells and formation of embryoid bodies.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Melany; Taylor, A Helen; Jones, Elizabeth A; Forrester, Lesley M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are pluripotent cells isolated from the inner cell mass of the pre-implantation blastocyst. They have the capacity to undergo indefinite rounds of self-renewing cell division and differentiate into all the cell lineages of the developing embryo. In suspension culture, ES cells will differentiate into aggregates known as embryoid bodies in a manner similar to the early embryo. This culture system therefore provides a useful model to study the relatively inaccessible stages of mammalian development. We describe methods for the routine maintenance of mouse embryonic stem cells in culture, assays of stem cell self-renewal potential in monolayer culture and the generation of embryoid bodies to study differentiation pathways. PMID:20204616

  9. High content cell-based assay for the inflammatory pathway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, Abhishek; Song, Joon Myong

    2015-07-01

    Cellular inflammation is a non-specific immune response to tissue injury that takes place via cytokine network orchestration to maintain normal tissue homeostasis. However chronic inflammation that lasts for a longer period, plays the key role in human diseases like neurodegenerative disorders and cancer development. Understanding the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the inflammatory pathways may be effective in targeting and modulating their outcome. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that effectively combines the pro-inflammatory features with the pro-apoptotic potential. Increased levels of TNF-α observed during acute and chronic inflammatory conditions are believed to induce adverse phenotypes like glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid profile. Natural products e. g., amygdalin, cinnamic acid, jasmonic acid and aspirin have proven efficacy in minimizing the TNF-α induced inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Cell lysis-free quantum dot (QDot) imaging is an emerging technique to identify the cellular mediators of a signaling cascade with a single assay in one run. In comparison to organic fluorophores, the inorganic QDots are bright, resistant to photobleaching and possess tunable optical properties that make them suitable for long term and multicolor imaging of various components in a cellular crosstalk. Hence we tested some components of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway during TNF-α induced inflammation and the effects of aspirin in HepG2 cells by QDot multicolor imaging technique. Results demonstrated that aspirin showed significant protective effects against TNF-α induced cellular inflammation. The developed cell based assay paves the platform for the analysis of cellular components in a smooth and reliable way.

  10. Campylobacter jejuni non-culturable coccoid cells.

    PubMed

    Beumer, R R; de Vries, J; Rombouts, F M

    1992-01-01

    The behaviour of Campylobacter jejuni in the environment is poorly documented. Rapid loss of viability on culture media is reported. This phenomenon is associated with the development of so-called coccoid cells. It has been suggested that these cells can be infective to animals and man. Results obtained with ATP-measurements of coccoid cells and Direct Viable Count (DVC) support this hypothesis. Introduction of coccoid cells into simulated gastric, ileal and colon environments did not result in the presence of culturable cells. Oral administration to laboratory animals and volunteers caused no typical symptoms of campylobacteriosis. Until 30 days after uptake of the cells antibodies against C. jejuni could not be detected in the blood, and the presence of this microorganism in stool samples could not be demonstrated. PMID:1622752

  11. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) concentrations from whole blood cultures correlate with isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many cellular immune assays are impractical because they require labor-intensive isolation of cells from their natural environment. The objectives of this study were to determine the relationship between cell culture supernatant TNF-alpha from isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and w...

  12. Comparison of rat and hamster hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair assays

    SciTech Connect

    Kornbrust, D.J.; Barfknect, T.R.

    1984-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated marked differences in the capacity of hepatocytes from rats or hamsters to mediate the metabolic activation of chemical carcinogens to genotoxic (i.e., mutagenic) products. Thus far, very few investigations of species differences in DNA repair have been performed. Therefore, a comparison of the relative extent of DNA repair elicited by various genotoxic chemicals in rat and hamster hepatocyes was conducted, using the hepatocyte primary culture/DNA repair (HPC/DR) assay. Of the ll chemicals tested, eight were more potent in inducing DNA repair in hamster hepatocytes than in rat hepatocytes. Dimethylnitrosamine, diethylnitrosamine, 2-acetylaminofluorene, 9-aminoacridine, pararosaniline hydrochloride, 1-naphthylamine, benzidine and 1,2,3,4-diepoxybutane were all active in hamster hepatocytes at a concentration at least ten times less than the lowest effective concentration in rat hepatocytes. The direct-acting alkylating agent, methylmethane sulfonate, was equipotent inducing DNA repair in both rat and hamster hepatocytes, indicating that the differences in DNA repair observed for the other chemicals were probably not a result of species differences in DNA repair capacities. In contrast, 1-nitropyrene produced a greater DNA repair response in rat hepatocyes than hamster hepatocytes, while the bacterial mutagen 3-(chloromethyl)pyridine hydrochloride was inactive in both hepatocyte systems. These studies demonstrate the feasibility of using hamster hepatocytes in the HPC/DR assay and illustrate the utility of performing the assay with hepatocytes from more than one species.

  13. Shock wave application to cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Mathes, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Shock waves nowadays are well known for their regenerative effects. Basic research findings showed that shock waves do cause a biological stimulus to target cells or tissue without any subsequent damage. Therefore, in vitro experiments are of increasing interest. Various methods of applying shock waves onto cell cultures have been described. In general, all existing models focus on how to best apply shock waves onto cells. However, this question remains: What happens to the waves after passing the cell culture? The difference of the acoustic impedance of the cell culture medium and the ambient air is that high, that more than 99% of shock waves get reflected! We therefore developed a model that mainly consists of a Plexiglas built container that allows the waves to propagate in water after passing the cell culture. This avoids cavitation effects as well as reflection of the waves that would otherwise disturb upcoming ones. With this model we are able to mimic in vivo conditions and thereby gain more and more knowledge about how the physical stimulus of shock waves gets translated into a biological cell signal ("mechanotransduction"). PMID:24747842

  14. Shock Wave Application to Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Holfeld, Johannes; Tepeköylü, Can; Kozaryn, Radoslaw; Mathes, Wolfgang; Grimm, Michael; Paulus, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Shock waves nowadays are well known for their regenerative effects. Basic research findings showed that shock waves do cause a biological stimulus to target cells or tissue without any subsequent damage. Therefore, in vitro experiments are of increasing interest. Various methods of applying shock waves onto cell cultures have been described. In general, all existing models focus on how to best apply shock waves onto cells. However, this question remains: What happens to the waves after passing the cell culture? The difference of the acoustic impedance of the cell culture medium and the ambient air is that high, that more than 99% of shock waves get reflected! We therefore developed a model that mainly consists of a Plexiglas built container that allows the waves to propagate in water after passing the cell culture. This avoids cavitation effects as well as reflection of the waves that would otherwise disturb upcoming ones. With this model we are able to mimic in vivo conditions and thereby gain more and more knowledge about how the physical stimulus of shock waves gets translated into a biological cell signal (“mechanotransduction"). PMID:24747842

  15. Use of nasal cells in micronucleus assays and other genotoxicity studies.

    PubMed

    Knasmueller, Siegfried; Holland, Nina; Wultsch, Georg; Jandl, Barbara; Burgaz, Sema; Misík, Miroslav; Nersesyan, Armen

    2011-01-01

    Genotoxicity experiments with exfoliated nasal mucosa cells are a promising minimally invasive approach for the detection of DNA-damaging compounds in ambient air. Results of single cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assays with individual cells and organ cultures from bioptic material show that DNA damage caused by compounds such as nitrosamines, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and pesticides can be detected. Biochemical studies indicate that enzymes involved in the metabolism of environmental mutagens are represented in nasal cells. Several protocols for experiments with nasal cells have been developed and it was shown that formaldehyde, metals, styrene and crystalline silica induce DNA damage in SCGE and/or in micronucleus studies; furthermore, it was also found that polluted urban air causes DNA instability in nasal epithelial cells. Comparisons of these data with results obtained in lymphocytes and buccal cells indicate that nasal cells are in general equally sensitive. Broad variations in the baseline levels, differences of results obtained in various studies as well as the lack of information concerning the impact of confounding factors on the outcome of experiments with these cells indicate the need for further standardisation of the experimental protocols. PMID:21164207

  16. Cell culture block array for immunocytochemical study of protein expression in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Rongshan; Ni, Jing; Bourne, Patricia A; Yeh, Shuyuan; Yao, Jorge; di Sant'Agnese, P Anthony; Huang, Jiaoti

    2005-03-01

    Immunocytochemical staining of cultured cells using specific antibodies is a powerful technique to study the expression and subcellular localization of proteins. However, this technique is associated with sample-to-sample variations because samples are handled individually and manually. Cell permeation is needed when intracytoplasmic or nuclear proteins are studied. Storage of cultured cells is difficult, and experiments must be repeated if additional studies are desired later, which introduces more variations. We developed a cell culture block array technique that converts cultured cells into a permanently fixed form identical to tissue sections prepared for pathologic examination. Cells from different cultures can be embedded in a single block. Many identical sections, each containing cells from multiple cultures, may be stained with different antibodies using an automated stainer. As a result, sample-to-sample variation is eliminated. Because cells in these blocks are sectioned by knives, all cellular proteins come into direct contact with antibodies, and cell permeation is not needed. Such blocks can be conveniently stored for years without loss of antigens, providing a constant source for future studies. We demonstrated the utility of this technique by studying the proliferation and neuroendocrine differentiation of prostate cancer-derived LNCaP cells cultured in vitro. PMID:15722799

  17. Cell culture experiments planned for the space bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Cross, John H.

    1987-01-01

    Culturing of cells in a pilot-scale bioreactor remains to be done in microgravity. An approach is presented based on several studies of cell culture systems. Previous and current cell culture research in microgravity which is specifically directed towards development of a space bioprocess is described. Cell culture experiments planned for a microgravity sciences mission are described in abstract form.

  18. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D G; Applegate, L J; Murray, A L; Purcell, M K; McKibben, C L

    2013-09-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test. PMID:23346868

  19. Bench-top validation testing of selected immunological and molecular Renibacterium salmoninarum diagnostic assays by comparison with quantitative bacteriological culture

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, D.G.; Applegate, L.J.; Murray, A.L.; Purcell, M.K.; McKibben, C.L.

    2013-01-01

    No gold standard assay exhibiting error-free classification of results has been identified for detection of Renibacterium salmoninarum, the causative agent of salmonid bacterial kidney disease. Validation of diagnostic assays for R. salmoninarum has been hindered by its unique characteristics and biology, and difficulties in locating suitable populations of reference test animals. Infection status of fish in test populations is often unknown, and it is commonly assumed that the assay yielding the most positive results has the highest diagnostic accuracy, without consideration of misclassification of results. In this research, quantification of R. salmoninarum in samples by bacteriological culture provided a standardized measure of viable bacteria to evaluate analytical performance characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and repeatability) of non-culture assays in three matrices (phosphate-buffered saline, ovarian fluid and kidney tissue). Non-culture assays included polyclonal enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), direct smear fluorescent antibody technique (FAT), membrane-filtration FAT, nested polymerase chain reaction (nested PCR) and three real-time quantitative PCR assays. Injection challenge of specific pathogen-free Chinook salmon, Oncorhynchus tshawytscha (Walbaum), with R. salmoninarum was used to estimate diagnostic sensitivity and specificity. Results did not identify a single assay demonstrating the highest analytical and diagnostic performance characteristics, but revealed strengths and weaknesses of each test.

  20. Performance evaluation of 3D polystyrene 96-well plates with human neural stem cells in a calcium assay.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yinzhi; Kisaalita, William S

    2012-08-01

    In this study, we have generated a high-throughput screening (HTS)-compatible 3D cell culture platform by chemically "welding" polystyrene scaffolds into standard 2D polystyrene 96-well plates. The variability of scaffolds was minimized by introducing automation into the fabrication process. The fabricated 3D cell culture plates were compared with several commercially available 3D cell culture platforms with light and scanning electron microscopy. Voltage-gated calcium channel functionality was used to access the Z' factors of all plates, including a 2D standard plate control. It was found that with the No-Wash Fluo-4 calcium assay and neural progenitor cells, all plates display acceptable Z' factors for use in HTS. The plates with "welded" polystyrene scaffolds have several advantages, such as being versatile and economical, and are ready to use off the shelf. These characteristics are especially desired in HTS preclinical drug discovery applications. PMID:22496208

  1. Performance of the Verigene Gram-Negative Blood Culture Assay for Rapid Detection of Bacteria and Resistance Determinants

    PubMed Central

    De Mendonça, Ricardo; Nonhoff, Claire; Roisin, Sandrine; Denis, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Nonduplicate blood cultures that were positive for Gram-negative bacilli (n = 125) were tested by the Verigene Gram-negative blood culture (BC-GN) assay; 117 (90.7%) isolates were members of the panel. For identification and resistance markers, the agreements with routine methods were 97.4% (114/117) and 92.3% (12/13). The BC-GN assay is a rapid and accurate tool for the detection of pathogens from blood cultures and could be integrated alongside conventional systems to enable faster patient management, but the clinical benefits should be further evaluated. PMID:24899026

  2. Multiplex real-time PCR assay for rapid detection of methicillin-resistant staphylococci directly from positive blood cultures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok; Uh, Young; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2014-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 10(3) CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  3. Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococci Directly from Positive Blood Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hye-young; Kim, Sunghyun; Kim, Jungho; Park, Soon-Deok

    2014-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the most prevalent cause of bloodstream infections (BSIs) and is recognized as a major nosocomial pathogen. This study aimed to evaluate a newly designed multiplex real-time PCR assay capable of the simultaneous detection of mecA, S. aureus, and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) in blood culture specimens. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays (M&D, Republic of Korea) use the TaqMan probes 16S rRNA for Staphylococcus spp., the nuc gene for S. aureus, and the mecA gene for methicillin resistance. The detection limit of the multiplex real-time PCR assay was 103 CFU/ml per PCR for each gene target. The multiplex real-time PCR assay was evaluated using 118 clinical isolates from various specimen types and a total of 350 positive blood cultures from a continuous monitoring blood culture system. The results obtained with the multiplex real-time PCR assay for the three targets were in agreement with those of conventional identification and susceptibility testing methods except for one organism. Of 350 positive bottle cultures, the sensitivities of the multiplex real-time PCR kit were 100% (166/166 cultures), 97.2% (35/36 cultures), and 99.2% (117/118 cultures) for the 16S rRNA, nuc, and mecA genes, respectively, and the specificities for all three targets were 100%. The Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays are very useful for the rapid accurate diagnosis of staphylococcal BSIs. In addition, the Real-MRSA and Real-MRCoNS multiplex real-time PCR assays could have an important impact on the choice of appropriate antimicrobial therapy, based on detection of the mecA gene. PMID:24648566

  4. Microfabricated Platforms for Mechanically Dynamic Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Moraes, Christopher; Sun, Yu; Simmons, Craig A.

    2010-01-01

    The ability to systematically probe in vitro cellular response to combinations of mechanobiological stimuli for tissue engineering, drug discovery or fundamental cell biology studies is limited by current bioreactor technologies, which cannot simultaneously apply a variety of mechanical stimuli to cultured cells. In order to address this issue, we have developed a series of microfabricated platforms designed to screen for the effects of mechanical stimuli in a high-throughput format. In this protocol, we demonstrate the fabrication of a microactuator array of vertically displaced posts on which the technology is based, and further demonstrate how this base technology can be modified to conduct high-throughput mechanically dynamic cell culture in both two-dimensional and three-dimensional culture paradigms. PMID:21206477

  5. Synthesis and antiproliferative assay of norcantharidin derivatives in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Tu, Guo Gang; Zhan, Jian Feng; Lv, Qiao Li; Wang, Jia Qi; Kuang, Bin Hai; Li, Shao Hua

    2014-06-01

    Diels-Alder reaction between furan and maleic anhydride resulted in 5,6-dehydro norcantharidin, then norcantharidin was obtained by reduction. The substituted-carboxylic acid was condensed with N-aminothiourea in presence of phosphorus oxychloride, yielding 2-amino-1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives. Novel norcantharidin derivatives were synthesized with acylation, then intramolecular condensation using norcantharidin (or 5,6-dehydro norcantharidin) and 2-amino- 1,3,4-thiadiazole derivatives. All the target compounds were confirmed by IR, (1)HNMR, ESI-MS and were reported for the first time. Norcantharidin derivatives antiproliferative assay was tested by MTT method against A549 and PC-3 cell lines. The results showed that all the norcantharidin derivatives displayed moderate inhibitory activities. PMID:23909288

  6. The Standard Scrapie Cell Assay: Development, Utility and Prospects

    PubMed Central

    van der Merwe, Jacques; Aiken, Judd; Westaway, David; McKenzie, Debbie

    2015-01-01

    Prion diseases are a family of fatal neurodegenerative diseases that involve the misfolding of a host protein, PrPC. Measuring prion infectivity is necessary for determining efficacy of a treatment or infectivity of a prion purification procedure; animal bioassays are, however, very expensive and time consuming. The Standard Scrapie Cell Assay (SSCA) provides an alternative approach. The SSCA facilitates quantitative in vitro analysis of prion strains, titres and biological properties. Given its robust nature and potential for high throughput, the SSCA has substantial utility for in vitro characterization of prions and can be deployed in a number of settings. Here we provide an overview on establishing the SSCA, its use in studies of disease dissemination and pathogenesis, potential pitfalls and a number of remaining challenges. PMID:25602372

  7. Cell Culture on MEMS Platforms: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Ming; Tong, Wen Hao; Choudhury, Deepak; Rahim, Nur Aida Abdul; Iliescu, Ciprian; Yu, Hanry

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated systems provide an excellent platform for the culture of cells, and are an extremely useful tool for the investigation of cellular responses to various stimuli. Advantages offered over traditional methods include cost-effectiveness, controllability, low volume, high resolution, and sensitivity. Both biocompatible and bio-incompatible materials have been developed for use in these applications. Biocompatible materials such as PMMA or PLGA can be used directly for cell culture. However, for bio-incompatible materials such as silicon or PDMS, additional steps need to be taken to render these materials more suitable for cell adhesion and maintenance. This review describes multiple surface modification strategies to improve the biocompatibility of MEMS materials. Basic concepts of cell-biomaterial interactions, such as protein adsorption and cell adhesion are covered. Finally, the applications of these MEMS materials in Tissue Engineering are presented. PMID:20054478

  8. An antigen-specific, four-color, B-cell FluoroSpot assay utilizing tagged antigens for detection.

    PubMed

    Jahnmatz, Peter; Bengtsson, Theresa; Zuber, Bartek; Färnert, Anna; Ahlborg, Niklas

    2016-06-01

    The FluoroSpot assay, a variant of ELISpot utilizing fluorescent detection, has so far been used primarily for assessment of T cells, where simultaneous detection of several cytokines has allowed a more qualitative analysis of functionally distinct T cells. The potential to measure multiple analytes also presents several advantages when analyzing B cells. Our aim was to develop a B-cell FluoroSpot assay adaptable to studies of a variety of antigens. The assay utilizes anti-IgG antibodies immobilized in 96-well filter membrane plates. During cell culture, IgG antibodies secreted by antibody-secreting cells (ASCs) are captured in the vicinity of each of these cells and the specificity of single ASCs is defined using antigens for detection. The antigens were labeled with biotin or peptide tags enabling secondary detection with fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin or tag-specific antibodies. The assay, utilizing up to four different tag systems and fluorophores simultaneously, was evaluated using hybridomas and immunized splenocytes as ASCs. Assay variants were developed that could: i) identify multiple ASCs with different antigen specificities; ii) detect ASCs showing cross-reactivity with different but related antigens; and iii) define the antigen-specificity and, by including anti-IgG subclass detection reagents, simultaneously determine the IgG subclass of antibodies secreted by ASCs. As demonstrated here, the B-cell FluoroSpot assay using tag-based detection systems provides a versatile and powerful tool to investigate antibody responses by individual cells that can be readily adapted to studies of a variety of antigen-specific ASCs. PMID:26930550

  9. Three-Dimensional Cultures of Mouse Mammary Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mroue, Rana; Bissell, Mina J.

    2013-01-01

    The mammary gland is an ideal “model organism” for studying tissue specificity and gene expression in mammals: it is one of the few organs that develop after birth and it undergoes multiple cycles of growth, differentiation and regression during the animal’s lifetime in preparation for the important function of lactation. The basic “functional differentiation” unit in the gland is the mammary acinus made up of a layer of polarized epithelial cells specialized for milk production surrounded by myoepithelial contractile cells, and the two-layered structure is surrounded by basement membrane. Much knowledge about the regulation of mammary gland development has been acquired from studying the physiology of the gland and of lactation in rodents. Culture studies, however, were hampered by the inability to maintain functional differentiation on conventional tissue culture plastic. We now know that the microenvironment, including the extracellular matrix and tissue architecture, plays a crucial role in directing functional differentiation of organs. Thus, in order for culture systems to be effective experimental models, they need to recapitulate the basic unit of differentiated function in the tissue or organ and to maintain its three-dimensional (3D) structure. Mouse mammary culture models evolved from basic monolayers of cells to an array of complex 3D systems that observe the importance of the microenvironment in dictating proper tissue function and structure. In this chapter, we focus on how 3D mouse mammary epithelial cultures have enabled investigators to gain a better understanding of the organization, development and function of the acinus, and to identify key molecular, structural, and mechanical cues important for maintaining mammary function and architecture. The accompanying chapter of Vidi et al. describes 3D models developed for human cells. Here, we describe how mouse primary epithelial cells and cell lines—essentially those we use in our laboratory—are cultured in relevant 3D microenvironments. We focus on the design of functional assays that enable us to understand the intricate signaling events underlying mammary gland biology, and address the advantages and limitations of the different culture settings. Finally we also discuss how advances in bioengineering tools may help towards the ultimate goal of building tissues and organs in culture for basic research and clinical studies. PMID:23097110

  10. Genotoxicity studies of methyl isocyanate in Salmonella, Drosophila, and cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, J.M.; Zeiger, E.; Haworth, S.; Ivett, J.; Valencia, R.

    1987-01-01

    The genotoxic effects of methyl isocyanate (MIC) were investigated using four short-term tests: the Salmonella reversion assay (Ames test), the Drosophila sex-linked recessive lethal assay, and the sister chromatic exchange (SCE) and chromosomal aberration assays in cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. No evidence was found for the induction of mutations in either Salmonella or Drosophila. MIC did, however, induce SCEs and chromosomal aberrations in CHO cells both in the presence and absence of Aroclor-induced rat liver S-9.

  11. Electrophoretic mobilities of cultured human embryonic kidney cells in various buffers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    Data on the electrophoretic mobility distributions of cells in the new D-1 buffer and the interlaboratory standardization of urokinase assay methods are presented. A table of cell strains and recent data on cell dispersal methods are also included. It was decided that glycerol in A-1 electrophoretic mobility data on cultured human embryonic kidney cells subjected to electrophoresis in this buffer. The buffer composition is presented.

  12. Enhanced growth medium and method for culturing human mammary epithelial cells

    DOEpatents

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Smith, Helene S.; Hackett, Adeline J.

    1983-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for isolating and culturing human mammary epithelial cells of both normal and malignant origin. Tissue samples are digested with a mixture including the enzymes collagenase and hyaluronidase to produce clumps of cells substantially free from stroma and other undesired cellular material. Growing the clumps of cells in mass culture in an enriched medium containing particular growth factors allows for active cell proliferation and subculture. Clonal culture having plating efficiencies of up to 40% or greater may be obtained using individual cells derived from the mass culture by plating the cells on appropriate substrates in the enriched media. The clonal growth of cells so obtained is suitable for a quantitative assessment of the cytotoxicity of particular treatment. An exemplary assay for assessing the cytotoxicity of the drug adriamycin is presented.

  13. [Efficiency of bacteriological culture and the immunofluorescent assay to detect Campylobacter fetus in bovine genital fluids].

    PubMed

    Marcellino, Romanela B; Morsella, Claudia G; Cano, Dora; Paolicchi, Fernando A

    2015-01-01

    Bovine genital campylobacteriosis is a reproductive disease that affects cattle production. It is caused by Campylobacter fetus subspecies, C. fetus fetus (Cff) and C. fetus venerealis (Cfv). The aim of this study was to identify the presence of C. fetus in genital fluids by bacteriological culture and direct immunofluorescence (DIF) and to compare the results. Two groups of 6 heifers and 5 bulls, one infected with Cff (Cff group) and the other with Cfv (Cfv group) were formed. Two heifers and 2 bulls, all of them uninfected, made up the control group. Samples of cervicovaginal mucus and preputial fluid were processed by culture and DIF. In the Cff group, 100% of the heifers and 80% of the bulls were infected, while in the Cfv group, 50% of the heifers and 60% of the bulls were infected. The degree of agreement (Kappa values) from benchmarking diagnostic techniques were 0.57 for heifers in the Cff group and 0.52 for heifers in the Cfv group, whereas the values for bulls were 0.17 and 0.27, respectively. Heifers yielded more positive results in the DIF assay than in the culture, exhibiting 5.6% increase in the Cff group and 7.4% in the Cfv group. The lowest percentage of positive results for DIF in bulls, 40% less for the Cff group and 5.2% for the Cfv group, could be due to improper sampling. Kappa values showed moderate agreement for the heifers and low for the bulls. PMID:26187267

  14. Agrobacterium tumefaciens Interaction with Suspension-Cultured Tomato Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Neff, Nicola T.; Binns, Andrew N.

    1985-01-01

    Adherence of Agrobacterium tumefaciens to suspension-cultured tomato cells has been characterized using a quantitative binding assay. Saturable binding of radiolabeled A. tumefaciens to plant cells resulted in 100 to 300 bacteria bound per cell. Specificity of A. tumefaciens binding was also inferred from two additional results: (a) an initial incubation of plant cells with A. tumefaciens reduced subsequent binding of radiolabeled A. tumefaciens by 60% to 75%; (b) tomato cells bound less than three E. coli per cell. Protease treatment of plant cells had no effect on subsequent bacterial binding, but prior treatment of plant cells with pectinolytic enzymes increased binding 2- to 3-fold. Pectin-enriched and neutral polymer-enriched fractions were obtained from tomato cell walls. The soluble pectin-enriched fraction inhibited binding of bacteria to plant cells by 85% to 95%, whereas the neutral polymer fraction only partially inhibited binding. Preliminary characterization of the activity showed it is heat stable, partially inactivated by protease treatment, and substantially inactivated by acid hydrolysis. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16664024

  15. Ascorbate Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis Cell Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Davey, Mark W.; Gilot, Christophe; Persiau, Geert; stergaard, Jens; Han, Yu; Bauw, Guy C.; Van Montagu, Marc C.

    1999-01-01

    The biosynthesis of l-ascorbic acid (l-AA) in an Arabidopsis (L.) Heynh. cell suspension culture was studied by quantifying the effects of incubation with a range of potential biosynthetic precursors, analogs, and inhibitors on the intracellular levels of reduced and oxidized forms of l-AA. Our results support the recently published biosynthetic pathway of l-AA from l-galactose (G.L. Wheeler, M.A. Jones, N. Smirnoff [1998] Nature 393: 365369), but suggest that Arabidopsis cell suspension culture simultaneously contains two other routes leading to l-AA. The possible physiological significance of these alternate routes is discussed. PMID:10517845

  16. Rapid Assays for Lectin Toxicity and Binding Changes that Reflect Altered Glycosylation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stanley, Pamela; Sundaram, Subha

    2014-01-01

    Glycosylation engineering is used to generate glycoproteins, glycolipids or proteoglycans with a more defined complement of glycans on their glycoconjugates. For example, a mammalian cell glycosylation mutant lacking a specific glycosyltransferase generates glycoproteins, and/or glycolipids, and/or proteoglycans, with truncated glycans missing the sugar transferred by that glycosyltransferase, and also missing those sugars that would be added subsequently. In some cases, an alternative glycosyltransferase may then use the truncated glycans as acceptors, thereby generating a new or different glycan subset in the mutant cell. Another type of glycosylation mutant arises from gain-of-function mutations that, for example, activate a silent glycosyltransferase gene. In this case, glycoconjugates will have glycans with additional sugar(s) that are more elaborate than the glycans of wild type cells. Mutations in other genes that affect glycosylation, such as nucleotide sugar synthases or transporters, will alter the glycan complement in more general ways that usually affect several types of glycoconjugates. There are now many strategies for generating a precise mutation in a glycosylation gene in a mammalian cell. Large-volume cultures of mammalian cells may also give rise to spontaneous mutants in glycosylation pathways. This article will focus on how to rapidly characterize mammalian cells with an altered glycosylation activity. The key reagents for the protocols described are plant lectins that bind mammalian glycans with varying avidities, depending on the specific structure of those glycans. Cells with altered glycosylation generally become resistant or hypersensitive to lectin toxicity, and have reduced or increased lectin or antibody binding. Here we describe rapid assays to compare the cytotoxicity of lectins in a lectin resistance test, and the binding of lectins or antibodies by flow cytometry in a glycan-binding assay. Based on these tests, glycosylation changes expressed by a cell can be revealed, and glycosylation mutants classified into phenotypic groups that may reflect a loss-of-function or gain-of-function mutation in a specific gene involved in glycan synthesis. PMID:24903886

  17. Protective Effects of Epigallocatechin Gallate after UV Irradiation in Cultured Human Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Seong-Won; Lee, Byung Rae

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the protective effects of Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) against UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells. Methods UV irradiation was produced by a UV lamp for 30 seconds with an irradiance of 3.3 mW/cm2. After 5 minutes and 1 hour, we administered different concentrations of EGCG (0, 5, 10, 15, 25, 50, 100 uM). The cell count was determined under a microscope using a counting chamber and the cell activity was evaluated by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Results The cell count of cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group, compared with the non-administrated group. The cell activity of the cultured human RPE cells after UV irradiation was markedly increased in the EGCG administration group and was increased in a dose-dependent way as determined by the MTT assay. Conclusions The administration of EGCG increased the cell count and the cell activity after UV irradiation in cultured human retinal pigment epithelial cells; this suggests that EGCG provided protection against UV damage in cultured human retinal pigmented epithelial cells. PMID:18063889

  18. Phenotypic characterization of bovine memory cells responding to mycobacteria in IFNγ enzyme linked immunospot assays.

    PubMed

    Blunt, Laura; Hogarth, Philip J; Kaveh, Daryan A; Webb, Paul; Villarreal-Ramos, Bernardo; Vordermeier, Hans Martin

    2015-12-16

    Bovine tuberculosis (bTB) remains a globally significant veterinary health problem. Defining correlates of protection can accelerate the development of novel vaccines against TB. As the cultured IFNγ ELISPOT (cELISPOT) assay has been shown to predict protection and duration of immunity in vaccinated cattle, we sought to characterize the phenotype of the responding T-cells. Using expression of CD45RO and CD62L we purified by cytometric cell sorting four distinct CD4(+) populations: CD45RO(+)CD62L(hi), CD45RO(+)CD62L(lo), CD45RO(-)CD62L(hi) and CD45RO(-)CD62L(lo) (although due to low and inconsistent cell recovery, this population was not considered further in this study), in BCG vaccinated and Mycobacterium bovis infected cattle. These populations were then tested in the cELISPOT assay. The main populations contributing to production of IFNγ in the cELISPOT were of the CD45RO(+)CD62L(hi) and CD45RO(+)CD62L(lo) phenotypes. These cell populations have been described in other species as central and effector memory cells, respectively. Following in vitro culture and flow cytometry we observed plasticity within the bovine CD4(+) T-cell phenotype. Populations switched phenotype, increasing or decreasing expression of CD45RO and CD62L within 24h of in vitro stimulation. After 14 days all IFNγ producing CD4(+) T cells expressed CD45RO regardless of the original phenotype of the sorted population. No differences were detected in behavior of cells derived from BCG-vaccinated animals compared to cells derived from naturally infected animals. In conclusion, although multiple populations of CD4(+) T memory cells from both BCG vaccinated and M. bovis infected animals contributed to cELISPOT responses, the dominant contributing population consists of central-memory-like T cells (CD45RO(+)CD62L(hi)). PMID:26549366

  19. A Fluid Membrane-Based Soluble Ligand Display System for Live CellAssays

    SciTech Connect

    Nam, Jwa-Min; Nair, Pradeep N.; Neve, Richard M.; Gray, Joe W.; Groves, Jay T.

    2005-10-14

    Cell communication modulates numerous biological processes including proliferation, apoptosis, motility, invasion and differentiation. Correspondingly, there has been significant interest in the development of surface display strategies for the presentation of signaling molecules to living cells. This effort has primarily focused on naturally surface-bound ligands, such as extracellular matrix components and cell membranes. Soluble ligands (e.g. growth factors and cytokines) play an important role in intercellular communications, and their display in a surface-bound format would be of great utility in the design of array-based live cell assays. Recently, several cell microarray systems that display cDNA, RNAi, or small molecules in a surface array format were proven to be useful in accelerating high-throughput functional genetic studies and screening therapeutic agents. These surface display methods provide a flexible platform for the systematic, combinatorial investigation of genes and small molecules affecting cellular processes and phenotypes of interest. In an analogous sense, it would be an important advance if one could display soluble signaling ligands in a surface assay format that allows for systematic, patterned presentation of soluble ligands to live cells. Such a technique would make it possible to examine cellular phenotypes of interest in a parallel format with soluble signaling ligands as one of the display parameters. Herein we report a ligand-modified fluid supported lipid bilayer (SLB) assay system that can be used to functionally display soluble ligands to cells in situ (Figure 1A). By displaying soluble ligands on a SLB surface, both solution behavior (the ability to become locally enriched by reaction-diffusion processes) and solid behavior (the ability to control the spatial location of the ligands in an open system) could be combined. The method reported herein benefits from the naturally fluid state of the supported membrane, which allows surface-linked ligands to diffuse freely in two dimensions. Ligands can become reorganized beneath cells, by reaction-diffusion processes, and may also adopt spatial configurations reflecting those of their cognate receptors on the cell surface (Figure 1B). This provides a significant benefit over conventional cell signaling and culturing systems that present inflexible distributions of signaling molecules. In this study, we observe marked differences in the response of cells to membrane surface displayed soluble ligands as a function of membrane fluidity. Tethering of soluble signaling molecules to fluid supported membranes opens up opportunities to use already developed membrane fabrication technologies to present soluble components within a surface array format.

  20. Evaluation of a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity (ACDC) assay (Keystone Sym)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Our goal is to establish an in vitro model system to evaluate chemical effects using a single stem cell culture technique that would improve throughput and provide quantitative markers of differentiation and cell number. To this end, we have used an adherent cell differentiation ...

  1. Multilayer-based lab-on-a-chip systems for perfused cell-based assays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klotzbach, Udo; Sonntag, Frank; Grünzner, Stefan; Busek, Mathias; Schmieder, Florian; Franke, Volker

    2014-12-01

    A novel integrated technology chain of laser-microstructured multilayer foils for fast, flexible, and low-cost manufacturing of lab-on-a-chip devices especially for complex cell and tissue culture applications, which provides pulsatile fluid flow within physiological ranges at low media-to-cells ratio, was developed and established. Initially the microfluidic system is constructively divided into individual layers, which are formed by separate foils or plates. Based on the functional boundary conditions and the necessary properties of each layer, their corresponding foils and plates are chosen. In the third step, the foils and plates are laser microstructured and functionalized from both sides. In the fourth and last manufacturing step, the multiple plates and foils are joined using different bonding techniques like adhesive bonding, welding, etc. This multilayer technology together with pneumatically driven micropumps and valves permits the manufacturing of fluidic structures and perfusion systems, which spread out above multiple planes. Based on the established lab-on-a-chip platform for perfused cell-based assays, a multilayer microfluidic system with two parallel connected cell culture chambers was successfully implemented.

  2. Cell-surface glycoproteins of human sarcomas: differential expression in normal and malignant tissues and cultured cells

    SciTech Connect

    Rettig, W.F.; Garin-Chesa, P.; Beresford, H.R.; Oettgen, H.F.; Melamed, M.R.; Old, L.J.

    1988-05-01

    Normal differentiation and malignant transformation of human cells are characterized by specific changes in surface antigen phenotype. In the present study, the authors have defined six cell-surface antigens of human sarcomas and normal mesenchymal cells, by using mixed hemadsorption assays and immunochemical methods for the analysis of cultured cells and immunohistochemical staining for the analysis of normal tissues and > 200 tumor specimens. Differential patterns of F19, F24, G171, G253, S5, and Thy-1 antigen expression were found to characterize (i) subsets of cultured sarcoma cell lines, (ii) cultured fibroblasts derived from various organs, (iii) normal resting and activated mesenchymal tissues, and (iv) sarcoma and nonmesenchymal tumor tissues. These results provide a basic surface antigenic map for cultured mesenchymal cells and mesenchymal tissues and permit the classification of human sarcomas according to their antigenic phenotypes.

  3. Lack of response of INT-407 cells to the presence of non-culturable Campylobacter jejuni

    PubMed Central

    VERHOEFF-BAKKENES, L.; HAZELEGER, W. C.; ZWIETERING, M. H.; De JONGE, R.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Many contradictory articles on the infectivity of non-culturable Campylobacter jejuni can be found. We studied the effect of non-culturable C. jejuni in an in vitro assay. To prevent the potential effect of a few culturable bacteria in the non-culturable suspension, INT-407 cells, which mimic the outer cell layer in the small intestines, were exposed to culturable C. jejuni suspensions with or without non-culturable C. jejuni. The number of bacteria adhering to and/or invading INT-407 cells and the IL-8 secretion were measured. No differences were found between bacterial suspensions with or without non-culturable C. jejuni added. These findings show that non-culturable C. jejuni do not adhere to or invade INT-407 cells and do not induce an immune response. As previous studies showed a correlation between the used in vitro assays and the effect in vivo, our study strongly suggests that culturability is a good indicator of the risk for C. jejuni infection. PMID:18081950

  4. Biphasic Response of Ciprofloxacin in Human Fibroblast Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hincal, Filiz; Gürbay, Aylin; Favier, Alain

    2003-01-01

    To investigate the possibility of the involvement of an oxidative stress induction in the mechanism of the cytotoxic effect of quinolone antibiotics, we examined the viability of human fibroblast cells exposed to ciprofloxacin (CPFX), and measured the levels of lipid peroxidation (LP), glutathione (GSH), and the activities of the antioxidant enzymes catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). The data showed that the effect of CPFX on the viability of cells, as determined by neutral red uptake assay, was time-dependent, and the dose-response relation was biphasic. Cytotoxicity was not observed in the concentration range 5–150 mg/l CPFX when the cells were incubated for 24 h. In contrast, lower concentrations (5 and 12.5 mg/l) of CPFX increased the cell growth in all incubation periods tested. Marked decreases in the viability of fibroblasts were observed at concentrations 50 and 75 mg/l, and ≥50 mg/l, following 48 and 72 h exposure, respectively (p < 0.05). However, when the cells were exposed to > 75 mg/l CPFX for 48 h, no cytotoxicity was observed. By exposing fibroblast cultures to 75 mg/l CPFX for 48 h, an induction of LP enhancement and a marked decrease in intracellular GSH were observed. Vitamin E pretreatment of the cells lowered the level of LP, increased the total GSH content, and provided significant protection against CPFX-induced cytotoxicity. The biphasic effect of CPFX possibly resulted from the complex dose-dependent relationships between reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell proliferation, and cell viability. It was previously reported, in fact, for several cell models that ROS exert a biphasic effect on cell growth. Furthermore, cultured fibroblasts release their own free radicals, and the inhibition of endogenous ROS inhibits the fibroblast cell proliferation, whereas the effect of exogenous ROS is biphasic. PMID:19330132

  5. Cell Cycle Progression of Human Cells Cultured in Rotating Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Kelsey

    2009-01-01

    Space flight has been shown to alter the astronauts immune systems. Because immune performance is complex and reflects the influence of multiple organ systems within the host, scientists sought to understand the potential impact of microgravity alone on the cellular mechanisms critical to immunity. Lymphocytes and their differentiated immature form, lymphoblasts, play an important and integral role in the body's defense system. T cells, one of the three major types of lymphocytes, play a central role in cell-mediated immunity. They can be distinguished from other lymphocyte types, such as B cells and natural killer cells by the presence of a special receptor on their cell surface called T cell receptors. Reported studies have shown that spaceflight can affect the expression of cell surface markers. Cell surface markers play an important role in the ability of cells to interact and to pass signals between different cells of the same phenotype and cells of different phenotypes. Recent evidence suggests that cell-cycle regulators are essential for T-cell function. To trigger an effective immune response, lymphocytes must proliferate. The objective of this project is to investigate the changes in growth of human cells cultured in rotating bioreactors and to measure the growth rate and the cell cycle distribution for different human cell types. Human lymphocytes and lymphoblasts will be cultured in a bioreactor to simulate aspects of microgravity. The bioreactor is a cylindrical culture vessel that incorporates the aspects of clinostatic rotation of a solid fluid body around a horizontal axis at a constant speed, and compensates gravity by rotation and places cells within the fluid body into a sustained free-fall. Cell cycle progression and cell proliferation of the lymphocytes will be measured for a number of days. In addition, RNA from the cells will be isolated for expression of genes related in cell cycle regulations.

  6. Proliferation assay of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas at room temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, Taichi; Ando, Ayumi; Hirano, Kazumi; Ogura, Chika; Kanazawa, Tatsuya; Ikeguchi, Masamichi; Seki, Atsushi; Nishihara, Shoko; Hamaguchi, Satoshi

    2014-11-01

    Proliferation assays of mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells have been performed with cell culture media exposed to atmospheric-pressure plasmas (APPs), which generate reactive species in the media at room temperature. It is found that serum in cell culture media functions as a scavenger of highly reactive species and tends to protect cells in the media against cellular damage. On the other hand, if serum is not present in a cell culture medium when it is exposed to APP, the medium becomes cytotoxic and cannot be detoxified by serum added afterwards. Plasma-induced cytotoxic media hinder proliferation of mouse ES cells and may even cause cell death. It is also shown by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy that organic compounds in cell culture media are in general not significantly modified by plasma exposure. These results indicate that if there is no serum in media when they are exposed to APPs, highly reactive species (such as OH radicals) generated in the media by the APP exposure are immediately converted to less reactive species (such as H2O2), which can no longer readily react with serum that is added to the medium after plasma exposure. This study has clearly shown that it is these less reactive species, rather than highly reactive species, that make the medium cytotoxic to mouse ES cells.

  7. Establishment and characterization of two cell lines derived from primary cultures of Gekko japonicus cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mei; Gu, Yun; Liu, Yan; Li, Jing; He, Jianghong; Lin, Sheyu; Gu, Xiaosong

    2010-02-01

    Adult Gekko japonicus is one of those vertebrates that are able to regenerate their missing or amputated tail. The most interesting feature of this animal lies in the ability of its spinal cord to regrow a functional tail. A fundamental question is whether the neuroglial cells play a different role compared with high vertebrates. Since in vitro studies using primary neuroglial cells are hampered by the limited lifespan and miscellaneous genetic background of these cells, we generated neuroglial cell lines from primary cell cultures of cerebral cortex of G. japonicus. The SV40 (simian-virus-40) T antigen gene was introduced into primary cell cultures. Cell cycle analysis, cell growth and proliferation, cell colony formation and contact inhibition, as well as karyotype assays were investigated. Two cell colonies, Gsn-1 and Gsn-3, were immunochemically characterized as glial fibrillary acidic protein and galactocerebroside-positive respectively. Compared with parental primary cells, the Gsn cells displayed shorter population doubling time, decreased percentage of cells in the G0/G1 phase, higher cell proliferation index, and increased cell activity. In assays of colony characteristics, Gsn cells showed increased cell activity at the lower cell densities or FBS (fetal bovine serum) supplement. The karyotype of immortalized Gsn cells exhibited transformational characteristics with hyperdiploid and polyploid chromosomes. The cell lines will provide a useful in vitro model for gecko neuroglial cells and facilitate systematic studies investigating the biological functions of specific gene products related to regeneration of the central nervous system. PMID:19947933

  8. Flow cytometric immunofluorescence assay for quantification of cyclobutyldithymine dimers in separate phases of the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Berg, R J; de Gruijl, F R; Roza, L; van der Leun, J C

    1993-01-01

    Quantitative immunofluorescence assays for the measurement of cyclobutyldithymine dimers (T <> T) based on computer-assisted immunofluorescence microscopy have recently been described. Here we present a modified assay for T <> T based on flow cytometry. This method has the advantage that T <> T can be quantified in separate phases of the cell cycle by the fluorescent counterstaining of nuclear DNA and subsequent selection on DNA content. The H3 monoclonal antibody directed at T <> T binds to partially denatured DNA in situ. The antibody is labeled with fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and DNA is stained with the intercalating dye 7-amino-actinomycin D. FITC fluorescence increases linearly with dose of UV-C radiation (up to 45 J/m2) of cultured human fibroblasts. A linear fluorescence-dose relationship was also found for epidermal cells of SKH:HR1 hairless mice after in vivo irradiation with UV-B (FS40 sunlamp, up to 3750 J/m2). This technique allows a quick assessment of UV damage levels in 10,000s of cells and makes immunofluorescence of DNA damage more accessible to other research groups. PMID:8425255

  9. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K.; Phillips, John W.; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N.

    2016-01-01

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic the MYC amplification and PTEN loss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1–transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  10. Prostate epithelial cell of origin determines cancer differentiation state in an organoid transformation assay.

    PubMed

    Park, Jung Wook; Lee, John K; Phillips, John W; Huang, Patrick; Cheng, Donghui; Huang, Jiaoti; Witte, Owen N

    2016-04-19

    The cell of origin for prostate cancer remains a subject of debate. Genetically engineered mouse models have demonstrated that both basal and luminal cells can serve as cells of origin for prostate cancer. Using a human prostate regeneration and transformation assay, our group previously demonstrated that basal cells can serve as efficient targets for transformation. Recently, a subpopulation of multipotent human luminal cells defined by CD26 expression that retains progenitor activity in a defined organoid culture was identified. We transduced primary human prostate basal and luminal cells with lentiviruses expressing c-Myc and activated AKT1 (myristoylated AKT1 or myrAKT1) to mimic theMYCamplification andPTENloss commonly detected in human prostate cancer. These cells were propagated in organoid culture before being transplanted into immunodeficient mice. We found that c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced luminal xenografts exhibited histological features of well-differentiated acinar adenocarcinoma, with strong androgen receptor (AR) and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) expression. In contrast, c-Myc/myrAKT1-transduced basal xenografts were histologically more aggressive, with a loss of acinar structures and low/absent AR and PSA expression. Our findings imply that distinct subtypes of prostate cancer may arise from luminal and basal epithelial cell types subjected to the same oncogenic insults. This study provides a platform for the functional evaluation of oncogenes in basal and luminal epithelial populations of the human prostate. Tumors derived in this fashion with defined genetics can be used in the preclinical development of targeted therapeutics. PMID:27044116

  11. A new cell-based assay to evaluate myogenesis in mouse myoblast C2C12 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kodaka, Manami; Yang, Zeyu; Nakagawa, Kentaro; Maruyama, Junichi; Xu, Xiaoyin; Sarkar, Aradhan; Ichimura, Ayana; Nasu, Yusuke; Ozawa, Takeaki; Iwasa, Hiroaki; Ishigami-Yuasa, Mari; Ito, Shigeru; Kagechika, Hiroyuki; and others

    2015-08-15

    The development of the efficient screening system of detecting compounds that promote myogenesis and prevent muscle atrophy is important. Mouse C2C12 cells are widely used to evaluate myogenesis but the procedures of the assay are not simple and the quantification is not easy. We established C2C12 cells expressing the N-terminal green fluorescence protein (GFP) and the C-terminal GFP (GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells). GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells do not exhibit GFP signals until they are fused. The signal intensity correlates with the expression of myogenic markers and myofusion. Myogenesis-promoting reagents, such as insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF1) and β-guanidinopropionic acid (GPA), enhance the signals, whereas the poly-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-FMK, suppresses it. GFP signals are observed when myotubes formed by GFP1–10 cells are fused with single nuclear GFP11 cells, and enhanced by IGF1, GPA, and IBS008738, a recently-reported myogenesis-promoting reagent. Fusion between myotubes formed by GFP1–10 and GFP11 cells is associated with the appearance of GFP signals. IGF1 and GPA augment these signals, whereas NSC23766, Rac inhibitor, decreases them. The conditioned medium of cancer cells suppresses GFP signals during myogenesis and reduces the width of GFP-positive myotubes after differentiation. Thus the novel split GFP-based assay will provide the useful method for the study of myogenesis, myofusion, and atrophy. - Highlights: • C2C12 cells expressing split GFP proteins show GFP signals when mix-cultured. • The GFP signals correlate with myogenesis and myofusion. • The GFP signals attenuate under the condition that muscle atrophy is induced.

  12. Genetic control of mast cell development in bone marrow cultures. Strain-dependent variation in cultures from inbred mice.

    PubMed Central

    Reed, N D; Wakelin, D; Lammas, D A; Grencis, R K

    1988-01-01

    A comparison was made of the capacity of bone marrow cells (BM) from genetically distinct strains of mice to develop into mast cells under defined conditions of in vitro culture. In the presence of conditioned media derived from ConA treated spleen cells from normal or Trichinella spiralis-infected mice, mast cell development occurred readily. After 21 days of culture mast cells comprised more than 90% of the total cell population. BM taken from certain strains of mice (SWR and NIH) produced large numbers of mast cells, total cell numbers increasing between 2 and 5 fold; other strains (C57BL/10 [B10] B10 congenics) produced relatively few mast cells, total cell numbers not increasing above the starting concentration or declining during culture. The genetic factors determining the strain-response phenotype (no. of mast cells in culture) were predominantly associated with the background genome. No significant differences in response were noted between the B10 congenic strains B10 [H-2b], B10.G [H-2q] or B10.BR [H-2k], which differ only at the MHC, whereas major differences were seen between B10.G and the other H-2q strains [SWR and NIH]. Response phenotype was not inherited as a simple dominant trait; F1 progeny of high x low responder strains were intermediate between the parental values. The expression of genetic influences upon mast cell response phenotype appears to be at both the level of mast cell precursor cells, as determined from limiting dilution assays of BM from high, low and F1 (high x low) strains, and at the level of mast cell proliferation, as determined by repeated sub-culture of mast cells from these strains. PMID:3208455

  13. Effect of amniotic fluid on the in vitro culture of human corneal endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Feizi, Sepehr; Soheili, Zahra-Soheila; Bagheri, Abouzar; Balagholi, Sahar; Mohammadian, Azam; Rezaei-Kanavi, Mozhgan; Ahmadieh, Hamid; Samiei, Shahram; Negahban, Kambiz

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of human amniotic fluid (HAF) on the growth of human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs) and to establish an in vitro method for expanding HCECs. HCECs were cultured in DMEM-F12 supplemented with 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). Confluent monolayer cultures were trypsinized and passaged using either FBS- or HAF-containing media. Cell proliferation and cell death ELISA assays were performed to determine the effect of HAF on cell growth and viability. The identity of the cells cultured in 20% HAF was determined using immunocytochemistry (ICC) and real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) techniques to evaluate the expression of factors that are characteristic of HCECs, including Ki-67, Vimentin, Na+/K+-ATPase and ZO-1. HCEC primary cultures were successfully established using 20% HAF-containing medium, and these cultures demonstrated rapid cell proliferation according to the cell proliferation and death ELISA assay results. The ICC and real time RT-PCR results indicated that there was a higher expression of Na+/K+-ATPase and ZO-1 in the 20% HAF cell cultures compared with the control (20% FBS) (P < 0.05). The 20% HAF-containing medium exhibited a greater stimulatory effect on HCEC growth and could represent a potential enriched supplement for HCEC regeneration studies. PMID:24726921

  14. NAC, Tiron and Trolox Impair Survival of Cell Cultures Containing Glioblastoma Tumorigenic Initiating Cells by Inhibition of Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Stigliani, Sara; Carra, Elisa; Monteghirfo, Stefano; Longo, Luca; Daga, Antonio; Dono, Mariella; Zupo, Simona; Giaretti, Walter; Castagnola, Patrizio

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are metabolism by-products that may act as signaling molecules to sustain tumor growth. Antioxidants have been used to impair cancer cell survival. Our goal was to determine the mechanisms involved in the response to antioxidants of a human cell culture (PT4) containing glioblastoma (GBM) tumorigenic initiating cells (TICs). ROS production in the absence or presence of N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), tiron, and trolox was evaluated by flow cytometry (FCM). The effects of these antioxidants on cell survival and apoptosis were evaluated by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay (MTT) and FCM. The biological processes modulated by these drugs were determined by oligonucleotide microarray gene expression profiling. Our results showed that NAC, tiron and trolox impaired PT4 cell survival, had minor effects on ROS levels and caused wide deregulation of cell cycle genes. Furthermore, tiron and trolox caused inhibition of cell survival in two additional cell cultures containing TICs, FO-1 and MM1, established from a melanoma and a mesothelioma patient, respectively. NAC, instead, impaired survival of the MM1 cells but not of the FO-1 cells. However, when used in combination, NAC enhanced the inhibitory effect of PLX4032 (BRAF V600E inhibitor) and Gefitinib (EGFR inhibitor), on FO-1 and PT4 cell survival. Collectively, NAC, tiron and trolox modulated gene expression and impaired the growth of cultures containing TICs primarily by inhibiting cell cycle progression. PMID:24587218

  15. High-Content High-Throughput Assays for Characterizing the Viability and Morphology of Human iPSC-Derived Neuronal Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Hesley, Jayne; Rusyn, Ivan; Cromwell, Evan F.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Development of quantitative high-throughput in vitro assays that enable assessment of viability and morphological changes in neuronal cells is an active area of investigation in drug discovery and environmental chemical safety assessment. High-content imaging is an emerging and efficient tool for generating multidimensional quantitative cellular readouts; in addition, human induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived neurons are a promising in vitro model system that emulates both the functionality and behavior of mature neurons, and they are available in quantities sufficient for screening workflows. The goal of this study was to develop high-content imaging and analysis methods to assess multiple phenotypes in human iPSC-derived neuronal cells. Specifically, we optimized cell culture, staining, and imaging protocols in a 384-well assay format and improved laboratory workflow by designing a one-step procedure to reduce assay time and minimize cell disturbance. Phenotypic readouts include quantitative characterization of neurite outgrowth and branching, cell number and viability, as well as measures of adverse effects on mitochondrial integrity and membrane potential. To verify the robustness of the workflow, we tested a series of compounds that are established toxicants. We report concentration–response effects of selected test compounds on human iPSC-derived neuronal cells and illustrate how the proposed methods may be used for high-content high-throughput compound toxicity screening and safety evaluation of drugs and environmental chemicals. PMID:25506803

  16. Chronic Rabies Virus Infection of Cell Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Wiktor, T. J.; Clark, H F.

    1972-01-01

    Exposure of both mammalian and reptilian cells in tissue culture to different strains of fixed rabies virus resulted in a carrier type of infection. No cytopathic effect was observed in either type of culture; infected cultures could be maintained by cell transfer for unlimited numbers of passages. A consistent pattern of cyclically rising and falling levels of viral infection was observed by fluorescent-antibody staining techniques and by titration of released infectious virus. Resistance to super-infection by vesicular stomatis virus and the production of an interferon-like substance by infected cells indicated that the maintenance of a carrier type of infection may be interferon-mediated. The degree of susceptibility of rabies-infected cells to immunolysis by antirabies antibody in the presence of complement was found to be correlated with the amount of virus maturation occurring by budding through the cell membrane and not with the presence of immunofluorescent antigen in the cytoplasm of infected cells. Images PMID:4344636

  17. THE METHODS FOR MAINTAINING INSECT CELL CULTURES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insect cell cultures are now commonly used in insect physiology, developmental biology, pathology, and molecular biology. As the field has advanced from a methods development to a standard procedure, so has the diversity of scientists using the technique. This paper describes techniques that are e...

  18. ANTHOCYANIN (ACN) STABILITY IN CELL CULTURE MEDIA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Anthocyanins (ACNs) are potential oxygen radical scavengers that have coronary vasoactive and vasoprotective properties. Cell or tissue culture systems have been used to examine the bioactivity and mechanisms of action of ACNs on the vascular system. However, due to their unique chemical structure, ...

  19. Evaluation of spheroid head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell models in comparison to monolayer cultures

    PubMed Central

    KADLETZ, LORENZ; HEIDUSCHKA, GREGOR; DOMAYER, JULIAN; SCHMID, RAINER; ENZENHOFER, ELISABETH; THURNHER, DIETMAR

    2015-01-01

    Two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models are the most common method used to investigate tumor cells in vitro. In the few last decades, a multicellular spheroid model has gained attention due to its adjacency to tumors in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate immunohistochemical differences between these two cell culture systems. The FaDu, CAL27 and SCC25 head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines were seeded out in monolayer and multicellular spheroids. The FaDu and SCC25 cells were treated with increasing doses of cisplatin and irradiation. CAL27 cells were not used in theproliferation experiments, since the spheroids of CAL27 cells were not able to process the reagent in CCK-8 assays. Furthermore, they were stained to present alterations of the following antigens: Ki-67, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epithelial growth factor and survivin. Differences in growth rates and expression patterns were detected in certain HNSCC cell lines. The proliferation rates showed a significant divergence of cells grown in the three-dimensional model compared with cells grown in the 2D model. Overall, multicellular spheroids are a promising method to reproduce the immunohistochemical aspects and characteristics of tumor cells, and may show different response rates to therapeutic options. PMID:26622664

  20. Computerized microfluidic cell culture using elastomeric channels and Braille displays

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Wei; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Futai, Nobuyuki; Cho, Brenda S.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2004-01-01

    Computer-controlled microfluidics would advance many types of cellular assays and microscale tissue engineering studies wherever spatiotemporal changes in fluidics need to be defined. However, this goal has been elusive because of the limited availability of integrated, programmable pumps and valves. This paper demonstrates how a refreshable Braille display, with its grid of 320 vertically moving pins, can power integrated pumps and valves through localized deformations of channel networks within elastic silicone rubber. The resulting computerized fluidic control is able to switch among: (i) rapid and efficient mixing between streams, (ii) multiple laminar flows with minimal mixing between streams, and (iii) segmented plug-flow of immiscible fluids within the same channel architecture. The same control method is used to precisely seed cells, compartmentalize them into distinct subpopulations through channel reconfiguration, and culture each cell subpopulation for up to 3 weeks under perfusion. These reliable microscale cell cultures showed gradients of cellular behavior from C2C12 myoblasts along channel lengths, as well as differences in cell density of undifferentiated myoblasts and differentiation patterns, both programmable through different flow rates of serum-containing media. This technology will allow future microscale tissue or cell studies to be more accessible, especially for high-throughput, complex, and long-term experiments. The microfluidic actuation method described is versatile and computer programmable, yet simple, well packaged, and portable enough for personal use. PMID:15514025

  1. Chemical Interrogation of the neuronal kinome using a primary cell-based screening assay

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Schürer, Stephan C.; Lemmon, Vance P.; Bixby, John L.

    2013-01-01

    A fundamental impediment to functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury is the lack of sufficient axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system. There is thus a need to develop agents that can stimulate axon growth to re-establish severed connections. Given the critical role played by protein kinases in regulating axon growth and the potential for pharmacological intervention, small molecule protein kinase inhibitors present a promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a robust cell-based phenotypic assay, utilizing primary rat hippocampal neurons, for identifying small molecule kinase inhibitors that promote neurite growth. The assay is highly reliable and suitable for medium throughput screening, as indicated by its Z′-factor of 0.73. A focused structurally diverse library of protein kinase inhibitors was screened, revealing several compound groups with the ability to strongly and consistently promote neurite growth. The best performing bioassay hit robustly and consistently promoted axon growth in a postnatal cortical slice culture assay. This study can serve as a jumping-off point for structure activity relationship (SAR) and other drug discovery approaches towards the development of drugs for treating SCI and related neurological pathologies. PMID:23480631

  2. Chemical interrogation of the neuronal kinome using a primary cell-based screening assay.

    PubMed

    Al-Ali, Hassan; Schürer, Stephan C; Lemmon, Vance P; Bixby, John L

    2013-05-17

    A fundamental impediment to functional recovery from spinal cord injury (SCI) and traumatic brain injury is the lack of sufficient axonal regeneration in the adult central nervous system. There is thus a need to develop agents that can stimulate axon growth to re-establish severed connections. Given the critical role played by protein kinases in regulating axon growth and the potential for pharmacological intervention, small molecule protein kinase inhibitors present a promising therapeutic strategy. Here, we report a robust cell-based phenotypic assay, utilizing primary rat hippocampal neurons, for identifying small molecule kinase inhibitors that promote neurite growth. The assay is highly reliable and suitable for medium-throughput screening, as indicated by its Z'-factor of 0.73. A focused structurally diverse library of protein kinase inhibitors was screened, revealing several compound groups with the ability to strongly and consistently promote neurite growth. The best performing bioassay hit robustly and consistently promoted axon growth in a postnatal cortical slice culture assay. This study can serve as a jumping-off point for structure activity relationship (SAR) and other drug discovery approaches toward the development of drugs for treating SCI and related neurological pathologies. PMID:23480631

  3. Prevention and Detection of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Nikfarjam, Laleh; Farzaneh, Parvaneh

    2012-01-01

    One of the main problems in cell culture is mycoplasma infection. It can extensively affect cell physiology and metabolism. As the applications of cell culture increase in research, industrial production and cell therapy, more concerns about mycoplasma contamination and detection will arise. This review will provide valuable information about: 1. the ways in which cells are contaminated and the frequency and source of mycoplasma species in cell culture; 2. the ways to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture; 3. the importance of mycoplasma tests in cell culture; 4. different methods to identify mycoplasma contamination; 5. the consequences of mycoplasma contamination in cell culture and 6. available methods to eliminate mycoplasma contamination. Awareness about the sources of mycoplasma and pursuing aseptic techniques in cell culture along with reliable detection methods of mycoplasma contamination can provide an appropriate situation to prevent mycoplasma contamination in cell culture. PMID:23508237

  4. Bioactive Copper-Doped Glass Scaffolds Can Stimulate Endothelial Cells in Co-Culture in Combination with Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Subha N.; Brandl, Andreas; Hiller, Daniel; Hoppe, Alexander; Gbureck, Uwe; Horch, Raymund E.; Boccaccini, Aldo R.; Kneser, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Bioactive glass (BG) scaffolds are being investigated for bone tissue engineering applications because of their osteoconductive and angiogenic nature. However, to increase the in vivo performance of the scaffold, including enhancing the angiogenetic growth into the scaffolds, some researchers use different modifications of the scaffold including addition of inorganic ionic components to the basic BG composition. In this study, we investigated the in vitro biocompatibility and bioactivity of Cu2+-doped BG derived scaffolds in either BMSC (bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells)-only culture or co-culture of BMSC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMEC). In BMSC-only culture, cells were seeded either directly on the scaffolds (3D or direct culture) or were exposed to ionic dissolution products of the BG scaffolds, kept in permeable cell culture inserts (2D or indirect culture). Though we did not observe any direct osteoinduction of BMSCs by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay or by PCR, there was increased vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression, observed by PCR and ELISA assays. Additionally, the scaffolds showed no toxicity to BMSCs and there were healthy live cells found throughout the scaffold. To analyze further the reasons behind the increased VEGF expression and to exploit the benefits of the finding, we used the indirect method with HDMECs in culture plastic and Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with or without BMSCs in cell culture inserts. There was clear observation of increased endothelial markers by both FACS analysis and acetylated LDL (acLDL) uptake assay. Only in presence of Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds with BMSCs, a high VEGF secretion was demonstrated by ELISA; and typical tubular structures were observed in culture plastics. We conclude that Cu2+-doped BG scaffolds release Cu2+, which in turn act on BMSCs to secrete VEGF. This result is of significance for the application of BG scaffolds in bone tissue engineering approaches. PMID:25470000

  5. Potency assay of diphtheria antitoxin in Vero cell microcultures.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Gómez, R; Gallardo y Ramos, R; González-Pacheco, M

    1996-01-01

    Laboratory conditions were established for the titration of diphtheria toxin and antitoxin in Vero Cell Cultures (CCT) and a comparison was made with the intradermal test (IDT) as currently used throughout the world. Working dilutions and cut off values were established by reading both the change in color of phenol red used as pH indicator and changes in cell viability in the microscope. CCT shows high reproducibility and higher detectability than IDT in the titration of both WHO Reference Standard and high titer horse antisera. In sera of guinea pigs immunized for potency testing of diphtheria toxoid the titre was approximately 10 times lower than in the IDT. The explanation is a subject of speculation. The Vero cell titration might be adopted as such for titration of diphtheria antitoxin. In the case of the toxoid potency test it could be used if the limit for the titration is adjusted to 0.2 IU considering the equivalence obtained between the two tests, by taking into account a ratio of 1:10 between CCT and IDT. PMID:8986109

  6. An Approach for Assessing the Signature Quality of Various Chemical Assays when Predicting the Culture Media Used to Grow Microorganisms

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Aimee E.; Sego, Landon H.; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Kreuzer, Helen W.; Anderson, Richard M.; Unwin, Stephen D.; Weimar, Mark R.; Tardiff, Mark F.; Corley, Courtney D.

    2013-02-01

    We demonstrate an approach for assessing the quality of a signature system designed to predict the culture medium used to grow a microorganism. The system was comprised of four chemical assays designed to identify various ingredients that could be used to produce the culture medium. The analytical measurements resulting from any combination of these four assays can be used in a Bayesian network to predict the probabilities that the microorganism was grown using one of eleven culture media. We evaluated combinations of the signature system by removing one or more of the assays from the Bayes network. We measured and compared the quality of the various Bayes nets in terms of fidelity, cost, risk, and utility, a method we refer to as Signature Quality Metrics

  7. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis.

    PubMed

    Timm, David M; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A; Haisler, William L; Neeley, Shane K; Raphael, Robert M; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P; Killian, T C; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  8. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    PubMed Central

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-01-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures. PMID:24141454

  9. A high-throughput three-dimensional cell migration assay for toxicity screening with mobile device-based macroscopic image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm, David M.; Chen, Jianbo; Sing, David; Gage, Jacob A.; Haisler, William L.; Neeley, Shane K.; Raphael, Robert M.; Dehghani, Mehdi; Rosenblatt, Kevin P.; Killian, T. C.; Tseng, Hubert; Souza, Glauco R.

    2013-10-01

    There is a growing demand for in vitro assays for toxicity screening in three-dimensional (3D) environments. In this study, 3D cell culture using magnetic levitation was used to create an assay in which cells were patterned into 3D rings that close over time. The rate of closure was determined from time-lapse images taken with a mobile device and related to drug concentration. Rings of human embryonic kidney cells (HEK293) and tracheal smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were tested with ibuprofen and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Ring closure correlated with the viability and migration of cells in two dimensions (2D). Images taken using a mobile device were similar in analysis to images taken with a microscope. Ring closure may serve as a promising label-free and quantitative assay for high-throughput in vivo toxicity in 3D cultures.

  10. The Effect of Spaceflight on Bone Cell Cultures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, William J.

    1999-01-01

    Understanding the response of bone to mechanical loading (unloading) is extremely important in defining the means of adaptation of the body to a variety of environmental conditions such as during heightened physical activity or in extended explorations of space or the sea floor. The mechanisms of the adaptive response of bone are not well defined, but undoubtedly they involve changes occurring at the cellular level of bone structure. This proposal has intended to examine the hypothesis that the loading (unloading) response of bone is mediated by specific cells through modifications of their activity cytoskeletal elements, and/or elaboration of their extracellular matrices. For this purpose, this laboratory has utilized the results of a number of previous studies defining molecular biological, biochemical, morphological, and ultrastructural events of the reproducible mineralization of a primary bone cell (osteoblast) culture system under normal loading (1G gravity level). These data and the culture system then were examined following the use of the cultures in two NASA shuttle flights, STS-59 and STS-63. The cells collected from each of the flights were compared to respective synchronous ground (1G) control cells examined as the flight samples were simultaneously analyzed and to other control cells maintained at 1G until the time of shuttle launch, at which point they were terminated and studied (defined as basal cells). Each of the cell cultures was assayed in terms of metabolic markers- gene expression; synthesis and secretion of collagen and non-collagenous proteins, including certain cytoskeletal components; assembly of collagen into macrostructural arrays- formation of mineral; and interaction of collagen and mineral crystals during calcification of the cultures. The work has utilized a combination of biochemical techniques (radiolabeling, electrophoresis, fluorography, Western and Northern Blotting, and light microscopic immunofluorescence) and structural methods (conventional and high voltage electron microscopy, inununocytochemistry, stereomicroscopy, and 3D image reconstruction). The studies have provided new knowledge of aspects of bone cell development and structural regulation, extracellular matrix assembly, and mineralization during spaceflight and under normal gravity. The information has contributed to insights into the means in general by which cells respond and adapt to different conditions of gravity (loading). The data may as well have suggested an underlying basis for the observed loss of bone by vertebrates, including man, in microgravity; and these scientific results may have implications for understanding bone loss following fracture healing and extended periods of inactivity such as during long-term bedrest.

  11. Rotavirus-induced fusion from without in tissue culture cells.

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, M M; Gilbert, J M; Roper, A M; Greenberg, H B; Gavora, J S

    1995-01-01

    We present the first evidence of fusion from without induced in tissue culture cells by a nonenveloped virus. Electron micrographs of two strains of rotavirus, bovine rotavirus C486 and rhesus rotavirus, show that virally mediated cell-cell fusion occurs within 1 h postinfection. Trypsin activation is necessary for rotavirus to mediate cell-cell fusion. The extent of fusion is relative to the amount of virus used, and maximum fusion occurs between pHs 6.5 and 7.5. Fusion does not require virus-induced protein synthesis, as virus from both an empty capsid preparation and from an EDTA-treated preparation, which is noninfectious, can induce fusion. Incubation of rotavirus with neutralizing and nonneutralizing monoclonal antibodies before addition to cells indicates that viral protein 4 (VP4; in the form of VP5* and VP8*) and VP7 are involved in fusion. Light and electron micrographs document this fusion, including the formation of pores or channels between adjacent fused cells. These data support direct membrane penetration as a possible route of infection. Moreover, the assay should be useful in determining the mechanisms of cell entry by rotavirus. PMID:7637004

  12. A quick and low-cost PCR-based assay for Candida spp. identification in positive blood culture bottles

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Differences in the susceptibility of Candida species to antifungal drugs make identification to the species level important for clinical management of candidemia. Molecular tests are not yet standardized or available in most clinical laboratories, although such tests can reduce the time required for species identification, as compared to the conventional culture-based methods. To decrease laboratory costs and improve diagnostic accuracy, different molecular methods have been proposed, including DNA extraction protocols to produce pure DNA free of PCR inhibitors. The objective of this study was to validate a new format of molecular method, based on the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) of the rDNA gene amplification followed by sequencing, to identify common and cryptic Candida species causing candidemia by analyzing DNA in blood culture bottles positive for yeasts. Methods For DNA extraction, an “in-house” protocol based on organic solvent extraction was tested. Additional steps of liquid nitrogen incubation followed by mechanical disruption ensured complete cell lysis, and highly pure DNA. One hundred sixty blood culture bottles positive for yeasts were processed. PCR assays amplified the ITS region. The DNA fragments of 152 samples were sequenced and these sequences were identified using the GenBank database (NCBI). Molecular yeast identification was compared to results attained by conventional method. Results The organic solvent extraction protocol showed high reproducibility in regards to DNA quantity, as well as high PCR sensitivity (10 pg of C. albicans DNA and 95% amplification on PCR). The identification of species at the molecular level showed 97% concordance with the conventional culturing method. The molecular method tested in the present study also allowed identification of species not commonly implicated in human infections. Conclusions This study demonstrated that our molecular method presents significant advantages over the conventional yeast culture identification method by providing accurate results within 24 hours, in contrast to at least 72 hours required by the automated conventional culture method. Additionally, our molecular method allowed the identification of mixed infections, as well as infections due to emergent fungal pathogens. This economical DNA extraction method developed in our laboratory provided high-quality DNA and 60% cost savings compared to commercial methods. PMID:24099320

  13. Use of an adaptable cell culture kit for performing lymphocyte and monocyte cell cultures in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Lewis, M. L.; Roquefeuil, S. B.; Chaput, D.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D. A.

    1998-01-01

    The results of experiments performed in recent years on board facilities such as the Space Shuttle/Spacelab have demonstrated that many cell systems, ranging from simple bacteria to mammalian cells, are sensitive to the microgravity environment, suggesting gravity affects fundamental cellular processes. However, performing well-controlled experiments aboard spacecraft offers unique challenges to the cell biologist. Although systems such as the European 'Biorack' provide generic experiment facilities including an incubator, on-board 1-g reference centrifuge, and contained area for manipulations, the experimenter must still establish a system for performing cell culture experiments that is compatible with the constraints of spaceflight. Two different cell culture kits developed by the French Space Agency, CNES, were recently used to perform a series of experiments during four flights of the 'Biorack' facility aboard the Space Shuttle. The first unit, Generic Cell Activation Kit 1 (GCAK-1), contains six separate culture units per cassette, each consisting of a culture chamber, activator chamber, filtration system (permitting separation of cells from supernatant in-flight), injection port, and supernatant collection chamber. The second unit (GCAK-2) also contains six separate culture units, including a culture, activator, and fixation chambers. Both hardware units permit relatively complex cell culture manipulations without extensive use of spacecraft resources (crew time, volume, mass, power), or the need for excessive safety measures. Possible operations include stimulation of cultures with activators, separation of cells from supernatant, fixation/lysis, manipulation of radiolabelled reagents, and medium exchange. Investigations performed aboard the Space Shuttle in six different experiments used Jurkat, purified T-cells or U937 cells, the results of which are reported separately. We report here the behaviour of Jurkat and U937 cells in the GCAK hardware in ground-based investigations simulating the conditions expected in the flight experiment. Several parameters including cell concentration, time between cell loading and activation, and storage temperature on cell survival were examined to characterise cell response and optimise the experiments to be flown aboard the Space Shuttle. Results indicate that the objectives of the experiments could be met with delays up to 5 days between cell loading into the hardware and initial in flight experiment activation, without the need for medium exchange. Experiment hardware of this kind, which is adaptable to a wide range of cell types and can be easily interfaced to different spacecraft facilities, offers the possibility for a wide range of experimenters successfully and easily to utilise future flight opportunities.

  14. Method of determining the number of cells in cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, D.T.

    1990-06-12

    This patent describes a color-sensitivity method for determining the number of cells in in vitro cell culture at a sensitivity as low as about 100 or about 500 cells. It comprises lysing the cells and incubating the lysate with p-nitrophenyl phosphate at acid pH for a predetermined period of time at a temperature of from about 35{degrees} to about 38{degrees}C. and then measuring the color development at 400 to 420 nanometers and correlating the color development with cell number by comparing with a control standard of known cell number.

  15. Dynamic cell culture system (7-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cogoli, Augusto

    1992-01-01

    This experiment is one of the Biorack experiments being flown on the International Microgravity Laboratory 1 (MIL-1) mission as part of an investigation studying cell proliferation and performance in space. One of the objectives of this investigation is to assess the potential benefits of bioprocessing in space with the ultimate goal of developing a bioreactor for continuous cell cultures in space. This experiment will test the operation of an automated culture chamber that was designed for use in a Bioreactor in space. The device to be tested is called the Dynamic Cell Culture System (DCCS). It is a simple device in which media are renewed or chemicals are injected automatically, by means of osmotic pumps. This experiment uses four Type I/O experiment containers. One DCCS unit, which contains a culture chamber with renewal of medium and a second chamber without a medium supply fits in each container. Two DCCS units are maintained under zero gravity conditions during the on-orbit period. The other two units are maintained under 1 gh conditions in a 1 g centrifuge. The schedule for incubator transfer is given.

  16. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  17. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  18. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  19. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  20. 21 CFR 864.2280 - Cultured animal and human cells.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cultured animal and human cells. 864.2280 Section... Cultured animal and human cells. (a) Identification. Cultured animal and human cells are in vitro cultivated cell lines from the tissue of humans or other animals which are used in various...

  1. Genomics in mammalian cell culture bioprocessing

    PubMed Central

    Wuest, Diane M.; Harcum, Sarah W.; Lee, Kelvin H.

    2013-01-01

    Explicitly identifying the genome of a host organism including sequencing, mapping, and annotating its genetic code has become a priority in the field of biotechnology with aims at improving the efficiency and understanding of cell culture bioprocessing. Recombinant protein therapeutics, primarily produced in mammalian cells, constitute a $108 billion global market. The most common mammalian cell line used in biologic production processes is the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line, and although great improvements have been made in titer production over the past 25 years, the underlying molecular and physiological factors are not well understood. Confident understanding of CHO bioprocessing elements (e.g. cell line selection, protein production, and reproducibility of process performance and product specifications) would significantly improve with a well understood genome. This review describes mammalian cell culture use in bioprocessing, the importance of obtaining CHO cell line genetic sequences, and the current status of sequencing efforts. Furthermore, transcriptomic techniques and gene expression tools are presented, and case studies exploring genomic techniques and applications aimed to improve mammalian bioprocess performance are reviewed. Finally, future implications of genomic advances are surmised. PMID:22079893

  2. Effect of antioxidants on PDT treatment of cultured tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melnikova, Vladislava; Bezdetnaya, Lina N.; Belitchenko, Irina; Potapenko, Alexander Y.; Merlin, Jean-Louis; Guillemin, Francois H.

    1998-05-01

    Lipid peroxidation (LP) is involved in cell damage induced by photodynamic treatment (PDT) sensitized by some lipophylic porphyrins. We investigated an effect of lipophylic antioxidant (alpha) -tocopherol and its water-soluble analog, trolox, on meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl)chlorin (mTHPC) sensitized PDT (413 nm) of cultured human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT29). Cell survival was measured by the 3-(4,5- dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide conversion to farmazan (MTT assay). Both antioxidants in concentrations lower than 0.1 mM did not affect photokilling of HT29 cells. These data might suggest that LP is not of crucial importance in cell damage photosensitized by mTHPC. One mM (alpha) -tocopherol or trolox decreased cell survival by ca. 15 and 13% respectively. Both antioxidants increased PDT- induced damage of HT29. Potentiation was evident as the decrease in the initial shoulder part of fluence dependence curve. We propose that antioxidants at height, pro-oxidant concentrations can potentiate PDT induced killing of tumor cells.

  3. In vitro cytotoxicity of orthodontic archwires in cortical cell cultures.

    PubMed

    David, Alexis; Lobner, Doug

    2004-08-01

    There have been a number of studies regarding the toxicity of orthodontic archwires, but little is known concerning the mechanism of their toxicity. This investigation used murine cortical cell cultures to examine the in vitro neurotoxicity of commonly used orthodontic metallic archwire alloys. The materials examined included 0.016 inch nickel-titanium (NiTi), copper-nickel-titanium, titanium-molybdenum, Elgiloy, and stainless steel archwire alloys. Standard sized samples of each material were placed on tissue culture inserts suspended above the cell cultures. Neuronal death was determined using the lactate dehydrogenase release assay 24 hours after exposure to the archwires. The results indicated that NiTi, copper-nickel-titanium and titanium-molybdenum alloys were not neurotoxic, while stainless steel and Elgiloy were significantly toxic. Washing the archwires for 7 days in a saline solution did not alter the toxicity. However, the free radical scavenger, trolox, blocked the toxicity of both stainless steel and Elgiloy, indicating that the death was free radical mediated. The caspase inhibitor, Z-VAl-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (zVAD-FMK), blocked the toxicity of stainless steel, but not Elgiloy, suggesting that stainless steel induced apoptosis. Further evidence that stainless steel induced apoptosis was provided by propidium staining which showed nuclear chromatin condensation and fragmentation into discrete spherical or irregular shapes, characteristic of apoptosis. The specific metal responsible for the toxicity was not determined; the metals common to each of the toxic archwires were nickel, iron, and chromium. PMID:15366387

  4. Effect of methisoprinol on virus replication in cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Małaczewska, J; Rotkiewicz, Z

    2004-01-01

    The effect of Methisoprinol (active substance: isoprinozine) on the replication of two animal viruses, the TK900 strain of Aujeszky's disease virus and the Roakin strain of the Newcastle disease virus was investigated. When the maximal tolerable doses of the drug were added to two cell cultures (CECC and GMK), its effect on the level of infectious titres of theviruses and their adsorption were assayed. Investigations were also performed to assess the direct effect of Methisoprinol on the viral strains used. The final stage of the experiment aimed at analysing of the replication dynamics of the viruses in the presence of Methisoprinol. Methisoprinol showed no direct effect on the viruses used in the study. Nor did it affect their adsorption. The preparation applied to the culture 24 hours before infection did not influence the replication of viruses, but administered simultaneously with the infection significantly lowered the final titres of viruses. The highest inhibitory effect of the drug was observed during the analysis of the replication dynamics of both viruses in CECC and of pseudorabies virus in GMK cell culture upon the application of the maximal tolerable doses of Methisoprinol and low infectious doses of the viruses. PMID:15230539

  5. Single cell gel electrophoresis assay: sensitivity of peripheral white blood cells in human population studies.

    PubMed

    Srám, R J; Podrazilová, K; Dejmek, J; Mracková, G; Pilcík, T

    1998-01-01

    The single cell gel electrophoresis assay (Comet assay) was selected as a biomarker of exposure to evaluate the impact of air pollution and lifestyle variables on hospitalized pregnancies in two districts with different air pollution levels in northern (Teplice) and southern (Prachatice) Bohemia. The hypothesis was that the DNA damage detected as single strand breaks would be generally higher in the district with higher air pollution levels. To undertake the study we enrolled 322 pregnancies in Teplice and 220 in Prachatice. Venous and cord blood were analysed using the original alkaline Comet assay procedure with lysis for 60 min, unwinding for 40 min and electrophoresis for 24 min. We also used a modified procedure in which unwinding was prolonged to 60 min and electrophoresis to 40 min. Peripheral white blood cells (WBC) were analysed using an image analyser system. When we analysed the results obtained for mothers and their children no differences were found between polluted and control districts. The prolongation of alkali unwinding and electrophoresis did not increase sensitivity of the assay. No effects of prematurity, ethnicity, smoking or GSTM1 polymorphism were observed for any of the Comet parameters. Multiple regression analyses were performed for the European population (n = 285). A statistical model was fitted to determine the relationship between the Comet parameters of mothers and their children. According to our results it seems that the Comet assay was not a particularly sensitive technique to determine the effects of environmental pollution at the DNA level if peripheral WBC are used. PMID:9491403

  6. Comparisons of cell culture medium using distribution of morphological features in microdevice.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hiroto; Enomoto, Junko; Ikeda, Yurika; Honda, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Junji; Kato, Ryuji

    2016-01-01

    As the number of available cell types grows, it becomes necessary to develop more effective ways to optimize the cell-culture medium for each cell line and culture condition. However, because of the vast number of parameters that must be decided, such as the combination of components, optimization is both laborious and costly. Microdevices are a cost-effective way to perform such evaluations because they use only a small volume of media and enable high-throughput analyses. However, assays performed in microdevices are themselves minimized, and each assay unit (well/chamber) commonly contains an insufficient number of cells for comprehensive evaluations such as gene-expression or flow-cytometry analyses. To address this issue, we introduced image-based analysis in conjunction with microdevice assays; this approach allows quantification of every cell in each assay unit. To quantitatively profile differences in cellular behaviors in a microdevice under different culture media conditions, we developed a non-staining image-based analysis method that utilizes cellular morphology. Our approach combines the structural advantages of microdevices, which can increase the stability of images, and the quantitative advantages of an image-based cell evaluation technique that utilizes time-course population change in several morphological features. Our results demonstrate that cellular changes due to small alterations in the concentration of serum in medium or differences in the basal medium can be profiled using only microscopic images. PMID:26149718

  7. A new adhesion assay using buoyancy to remove non-adherent cells.

    PubMed

    Goodwin, A E; Pauli, B U

    1995-12-01

    A new adhesion assay was developed that utilizes buoyancy, rather than washing or centrifugation, to remove non-adherent cells. Biotinylated cells were added to wells containing cell monolayers or purified protein substrates. Non-adherent cells were then removed by floatation on a dense Percoll solution. The adherent cells were fixed tightly to the plate with a Percoll/glutaraldehyde fixative and quantitated by streptavidin: horseradish peroxidase chemistry. In a side-by-side comparison of buoyancy and washing assays, the buoyancy method detected B16F10 binding to purified fibronectin at a 4-fold lower fibronectin concentration and human umbilical vein endothelia cell (HUVEC) binding to laminin at a 10-fold lower laminin concentration than did washing assays. In cell to cell adhesion assays, the buoyancy method was able to detect significantly greater binding of mononuclear leukocytes and KM12-L4 colon carcinoma cells to IL-1 beta treated human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). The binding of human promyelocytic leukemia HL60 cells to control and IL-1 beta treated HUVEC was the same (approximately 60%) with the buoyancy method, while a washing assay demonstrated 8-fold higher binding (51% vs. 6%) of HL60 on IL-1 beta treated cells. The buoyancy assay is useful for detecting weak cell to protein adhesion and may be useful for detecting cell to cell adhesion when background binding is sufficiently low. PMID:7499880

  8. Evaluation of new transport medium for detection of herpes simplex virus by culture and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Ogburn, J R; Hoffpauir, J T; Cole, E; Hood, K; Michael, D; Nguyen, T; Raden, S; Raju, B; Reisinger, V; Oefinger, P E

    1994-01-01

    The transport medium Multi-Microbe Media (M4) was evaluated prospectively by culture and direct enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for detection of herpes simplex virus from 473 specimens. In addition, 377 specimens in Bartels Viral Transport Medium were evaluated. By using culture as a "gold standard," the ELISA sensitivity was approximately 85%, while the specificities exceeded 96% for both media. PMID:7883909

  9. Propagation of oestrogen receptor-positive and oestrogen-responsive normal human breast cells in culture

    PubMed Central

    Fridriksdottir, Agla J.; Kim, Jiyoung; Villadsen, René; Klitgaard, Marie Christine; Hopkinson, Branden M.; Petersen, Ole William; Rønnov-Jessen, Lone

    2015-01-01

    Investigating the susceptibility of oestrogen receptor-positive (ERpos) normal human breast epithelial cells (HBECs) for clinical purposes or basic research awaits a proficient cell-based assay. Here we set out to identify markers for isolating ERpos cells and to expand what appear to be post-mitotic primary cells into exponentially growing cultures. We report a robust technique for isolating ERpos HBECs from reduction mammoplasties by FACS using two cell surface markers, CD166 and CD117, and an intracellular cytokeratin marker, Ks20.8, for further tracking single cells in culture. We show that ERpos HBECs are released from growth restraint by small molecule inhibitors of TGFβ signalling, and that growth is augmented further in response to oestrogen. Importantly, ER signalling is functionally active in ERpos cells in extended culture. These findings open a new avenue of experimentation with normal ERpos HBECs and provide a basis for understanding the evolution of human breast cancer. PMID:26564780

  10. Acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde from cultured white cells

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hye-Won; Umber, Brandon J; Meinardi, Simone; Leu, Szu-Yun; Zaldivar, Frank; Blake, Donald R; Cooper, Dan M

    2009-01-01

    Background Noninvasive detection of innate immune function such as the accumulation of neutrophils remains a challenge in many areas of clinical medicine. We hypothesized that granulocytes could generate volatile organic compounds. Methods To begin to test this, we developed a bioreactor and analytical GC-MS system to accurately identify and quantify gases in trace concentrations (parts per billion) emitted solely from cell/media culture. A human promyelocytic leukemia cell line, HL60, frequently used to assess neutrophil function, was grown in serum-free medium. Results HL60 cells released acetaldehyde and hexanaldehyde in a time-dependent manner. The mean ± SD concentration of acetaldehyde in the headspace above the cultured cells following 4-, 24- and 48-h incubation was 157 ± 13 ppbv, 490 ± 99 ppbv, 698 ± 87 ppbv. For hexanaldehyde these values were 1 ± 0.3 ppbv, 8 ± 2 ppbv, and 11 ± 2 ppbv. In addition, our experimental system permitted us to identify confounding trace gas contaminants such as styrene. Conclusion This study demonstrates that human immune cells known to mimic the function of innate immune cells, like neutrophils, produce volatile gases that can be measured in vitro in trace amounts. PMID:19402909

  11. Rapid isolation of dengue-neutralizing antibodies from single cell-sorted human antigen-specific memory B-cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Cox, Kara S; Tang, Aimin; Chen, Zhifeng; Horton, Melanie S; Yan, Hao; Wang, Xin-Min; Dubey, Sheri A; DiStefano, Daniel J; Ettenger, Andrew; Fong, Rachel H; Doranz, Benjamin J; Casimiro, Danilo R; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring antigen-specific memory B cells and the antibodies they encode is important for understanding the specificity, breadth and duration of immune response to an infection or vaccination. The antibodies isolated could further help design vaccine antigens for raising relevant protective immune responses. However, developing assays to measure and isolate antigen-specific memory B cells is technically challenging due to the low frequencies of these cells that exist in the circulating blood. Here, we describe a flow cytometry method to identify and isolate dengue envelope-specific memory B cells using a labeled dengue envelope protein. We enumerated dengue-envelope specific memory B cells from a cohort of dengue seropositive donors using this direct flow cytometry assay. A more established and conventional assay, the cultured B ELISPOT, was used as a benchmark comparator. Furthermore, we were able to confirm the single-sorted memory B-cell specificity by culturing B cells and differentiating them into plasma cells using cell lines expressing CD40L. The culture supernatants were assayed for antigen binding and the ability of the antibodies to neutralize the cognate dengue virus. Moreover, we successfully isolated the heavy and light Ig sequences and expressed them as full-length recombinant antibodies to reproduce the activity seen in culture supernatants. Mapping of these antibodies revealed a novel epitope for dengue 2 virus serotype. In conclusion, we established a reproducible methodology to enumerate antigen-specific memory B cells and assay their encoded antibodies for functional characterization. PMID:26491897

  12. Rhinacanthus nasutus protects cultured neuronal cells against hypoxia induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Brimson, James M; Tencomnao, Tewin

    2011-01-01

    Rhinacanthus nasutus (L.) Kurz (Acanthaceae) is an herb native to Thailand and Southeast Asia, known for its antioxidant properties. Hypoxia leads to an increase in reactive oxygen species in cells and is a leading cause of neuronal damage. Cell death caused by hypoxia has been linked with a number of neurodegenerative diseases including some forms of dementia and stroke, as well as the build up of reactive oxygen species which can lead to diseases such as Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease and Alzeheimer's disease. In this study we used an airtight culture container and the Mitsubishi Gas Company anaeropack along with the MTT assay, LDH assay and the trypan blue exlusion assay to show that 1 and 10 µg mL⁻¹ root extract of R. nasutus is able to significantly prevent the death of HT-22 cells subjected to hypoxic conditions, and 0.1 to 10 µg mL⁻¹ had no toxic effect on HT-22 under normal conditions, whereas 100 µg mL⁻¹ reduced HT-22 cell proliferation. We also used H₂DCFDA staining to show R. nasutus can reduce reactive oxygen species production in HT-22 cells. PMID:21792150

  13. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W.; Stringer, Brett W.; Boyd, Andrew W.; Johns, Terrance G.; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A.

    2015-01-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  14. Neurosphere and adherent culture conditions are equivalent for malignant glioma stem cell lines.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Maryam; Reyner, Karina; Deleyrolle, Loic; Millette, Sebastien; Azari, Hassan; Day, Bryan W; Stringer, Brett W; Boyd, Andrew W; Johns, Terrance G; Blot, Vincent; Duggal, Rohit; Reynolds, Brent A

    2015-03-01

    Certain limitations of the neurosphere assay (NSA) have resulted in a search for alternative culture techniques for brain tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Recently, reports have described growing glioblastoma (GBM) TICs as a monolayer using laminin. We performed a side-by-side analysis of the NSA and laminin (adherent) culture conditions to compare the growth and expansion of GBM TICs. GBM cells were grown using the NSA and adherent culture conditions. Comparisons were made using growth in culture, apoptosis assays, protein expression, limiting dilution clonal frequency assay, genetic affymetrix analysis, and tumorigenicity in vivo. In vitro expansion curves for the NSA and adherent culture conditions were virtually identical (P=0.24) and the clonogenic frequencies (5.2% for NSA vs. 5.0% for laminin, P=0.9) were similar as well. Likewise, markers of differentiation (glial fibrillary acidic protein and beta tubulin III) and proliferation (Ki67 and MCM2) revealed no statistical difference between the sphere and attachment methods. Several different methods were used to determine the numbers of dead or dying cells (trypan blue, DiIC, caspase-3, and annexin V) with none of the assays noting a meaningful variance between the two methods. In addition, genetic expression analysis with microarrays revealed no significant differences between the two groups. Finally, glioma cells derived from both methods of expansion formed large invasive tumors exhibiting GBM features when implanted in immune-compromised animals. A detailed functional, protein and genetic characterization of human GBM cells cultured in serum-free defined conditions demonstrated no statistically meaningful differences when grown using sphere (NSA) or adherent conditions. Hence, both methods are functionally equivalent and remain suitable options for expanding primary high-grade gliomas in tissue culture. PMID:25806119

  15. A detailed mammosphere assay protocol for the quantification of breast stem cell activity.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Frances L; Harrison, Hannah; Spence, Katherine; Ablett, Matthew P; Simões, Bruno M; Farnie, Gillian; Clarke, Robert B

    2012-06-01

    Since the discovery that neural tissue contains a population of stem cells that form neurospheres in vitro, sphere-forming assays have been adapted for use with a number of different tissue types for the quantification of stem cell activity and self-renewal. One tissue type widely used for stem cell investigations is mammary tissue, and the mammosphere assay has been used in both normal tissue and cancer. Although it is a relatively simple assay to learn, it can be difficult to master. There are methodological and analytical aspects to the assay which require careful consideration when interpreting the results. We describe here a detailed mammosphere assay protocol for the assessment of stem cell activity and self-renewal, and discuss how data generated by the assay can be analysed and interpreted. PMID:22665270

  16. An Immunohistochemical Method to Study Breast Cancer Cell Subpopulations and Their Growth Regulation by Hormones in Three-Dimensional Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Mauricio P.; Jacobsen, Britta M.; Horwitz, Kathryn B.

    2011-01-01

    The development of in vitro three-dimensional cell culture matrices offers physiologically relevant alternatives to traditional culture on plastic surfaces. However methods to analyze cell subpopulations therein are poor. Here we present a simple and inexpensive method to analyze cell subpopulations in mixed-cell colonies using standard immunohistochemical (IHC) techniques. Briefly, Matrigel™ blocks are sandwiched between two layers of HistoGel™, hardened by rapid cooling then processed for routine fixation, paraffin embedding, and IHC. We demonstrate the assay using mono- and co-cultured normal human breast, human breast cancer, and transformed mouse stromal cells along with hormone treated breast cancer cells. Judicious selection of specific antibodies allows different cell types within heterotypic colonies to be identified. A brief pulse of bromodeoxyuridine in living colonies allows proliferation of cell subpopulations to be quantified. This simple assay is useful for multiple cell types, species, and conditions. PMID:22649363

  17. Cell culture: Progenitor cells from human brain after death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, Theo D.; Schwartz, Philip H.; Taupin, Philippe; Kaspar, Brian; Stein, Stuart A.; Gage, Fred H.

    2001-05-01

    Culturing neural progenitor cells from the adult rodent brain has become routine and is also possible from human fetal tissue, but expansion of these cells from postnatal and adult human tissue, although preferred for ethical reasons, has encountered problems. Here we describe the isolation and successful propagation of neural progenitor cells from human postmortem tissues and surgical specimens. Although the relative therapeutic merits of adult and fetal progenitor cells still need to be assessed, our results may extend the application of these progenitor cells in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases.

  18. Cell culture metabolomics in the diagnosis of lung cancer-the influence of cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Kalluri, U; Naiker, M; Myers, M A

    2014-06-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths. Unfortunately, lung cancer is often diagnosed only when it becomes symptomatic or at an advanced stage when few treatment options are available. Hence, a diagnostic test suitable for screening widespread populations is required to enable earlier diagnosis. Analysis of exhaled breath provides a non-invasive method for early detection of lung cancer. Analysis of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) by various mass spectral techniques has identified potential biomarkers of disease. Nevertheless, the metabolic origins and the disease specificity of VOCs need further elucidation. Cell culture metabolomics can be used as a bottom-up approach to identify biomarkers of pathological conditions and can also be used to study the metabolic pathways that produce such compounds. This paper summarizes the current knowledge of lung cancer biomarkers in exhaled breath and emphasizes the critical role of cell culture conditions in determining the VOCs produced in vitro. Hypoxic culture conditions more closely mimic the conditions of cancer cell growth in vivo. We propose that since hypoxia influences cell metabolism and so potentially the VOCs that the cancer cells produce, the cell culture metabolomics projects should consider culturing cancer cells in hypoxic conditions. PMID:24861817

  19. Differentiation of mammalian skeletal muscle cells cultured on microcarrier beads in a rotating cell culture system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torgan, C. E.; Burge, S. S.; Collinsworth, A. M.; Truskey, G. A.; Kraus, W. E.

    2000-01-01

    The growth and repair of adult skeletal muscle are due in part to activation of muscle precursor cells, commonly known as satellite cells or myoblasts. These cells are responsive to a variety of environmental cues, including mechanical stimuli. The overall goal of the research is to examine the role of mechanical signalling mechanisms in muscle growth and plasticity through utilisation of cell culture systems where other potential signalling pathways (i.e. chemical and electrical stimuli) are controlled. To explore the effects of decreased mechanical loading on muscle differentiation, mammalian myoblasts are cultured in a bioreactor (rotating cell culture system), a model that has been utilised to simulate microgravity. C2C12 murine myoblasts are cultured on microcarrier beads in a bioreactor and followed throughout differentiation as they form a network of multinucleated myotubes. In comparison with three-dimensional control cultures that consist of myoblasts cultured on microcarrier beads in teflon bags, myoblasts cultured in the bioreactor exhibit an attenuation in differentiation. This is demonstrated by reduced immunohistochemical staining for myogenin and alpha-actinin. Western analysis shows a decrease, in bioreactor cultures compared with control cultures, in levels of the contractile proteins myosin (47% decrease, p < 0.01) and tropomyosin (63% decrease, p < 0.01). Hydrodynamic measurements indicate that the decrease in differentiation may be due, at least in part, to fluid stresses acting on the myotubes. In addition, constraints on aggregate size imposed by the action of fluid forces in the bioreactor affect differentiation. These results may have implications for muscle growth and repair during spaceflight.

  20. Culturing hybridoma cell lines for monoclonal antibody production.

    PubMed

    Winzeler, Alissa; Wang, Jack T

    2013-07-01

    This protocol describes how to culture hybridoma cell lines (e.g., Thy1.1) for monoclonal antibody production. Supernatants harvested from such cultures can be used to purify various rodent neural cell types by immunopanning. PMID:23818668

  1. Measuring stem cell frequency in epidermis: A quantitative in vivo functional assay for long-term repopulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, T. E.; Barland, C.; Alex, A. M.; Mancianti, M. L.; Lu, Y.; Cleaver, J. E.; Lawrence, H. J.; Ghadially, R.

    2003-09-01

    Epidermal stem cells play a central role in tissue homeostasis, wound repair, tumor initiation, and gene therapy. A major impediment to the purification and molecular characterization of epidermal stem cells is the lack of a quantitative assay for cells capable of long-term repopulation in vivo, such as exists for hematopoietic cells. The tremendous strides made in the characterization and purification of hematopoietic stem cells have been critically dependent on the availability of competitive transplantation assays, because these assays permit the accurate quantitation of long-term repopulating cells in vivo. We have developed an analogous functional assay for epidermal stem cells, and have measured the frequency of functional epidermal stem cells in interfollicular epidermis. These studies indicate that cells capable of long-term reconstitution of a squamous epithelium reside in the interfollicular epidermis. We find that the frequency of these long-term repopulating cells is 1 in 35,000 total epidermal cells, or in the order of 1 in 104 basal epidermal cells, similar to that of hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow, and much lower than previously estimated in epidermis. Furthermore, these studies establish a novel functional assay that can be used to validate immunophenotypic markers and enrichment strategies for epidermal stem cells, and to quantify epidermal stem cells in various keratinocyte populations. Thus further studies using this type of assay for epidermis should aid in the progress of cutaneous stem cell-targeted gene therapy, and in more basic studies of epidermal stem cell regulation and differentiation.

  2. In vitro toxicity testing with microplate cell cultures: Impact of cell binding.

    PubMed

    Gülden, Michael; Schreiner, Jeannine; Seibert, Hasso

    2015-06-01

    In vitro generated data on toxic potencies are generally based on nominal concentrations. However, cellular and extracellular binding and elimination processes may reduce the available free fraction of a compound. Then, nominal effective concentrations do not represent appropriate measures of toxic exposure in vitro and underestimate toxic potencies. In this study it was investigated whether cell binding can affect the availability of chemicals in microplate based toxicity assays. To this end the cytotoxicity of compounds like mercury chloride, digitonin and alcohol ethoxylates, accumulated by cells via different modes, was investigated in 96-well microplate cultures with varying concentrations of Balb/c 3T3 cells. The median effective nominal concentrations of all but one of the tested compounds depended linearly from the cell concentration. Applying a previously developed equilibrium distribution model cell concentration-independent median effective extracellular concentrations and cell burdens, respectively, could be calculated. The compounds were accumulated by the cells with bioconcentration factors, BCF, between 480 and ≥ 25,000. Cell binding of the alcohol ethoxylates was correlated with their lipophilicity. The results show that significant cell binding can occur even at the small cell volume fractions (∼ 1 × 10(-5) to 3 × 10(-3) L/L) encountered in microplate assays. To what extent cell binding affects the bioavailability depends on the BCF and the cell volume fraction. EC50 measurements in the presence of at least two different cell concentrations allow for excluding or detecting significant cell binding and for determining more appropriate measures of toxic exposure in vitro like median effective extracellular (free) concentrations or cell burdens. PMID:24291469

  3. Performance of enzymatic fuel cell in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Lamberg, P; Shleev, S; Ludwig, R; Arnebrant, T; Ruzgas, T

    2014-05-15

    Here we present the very first study of an enzymatic fuel cell (EFC) in a cell culture. An EFC with Corynascus thermophilus cellobiose dehydrogenase (CDH) based bioanode and Myrothecium verrucaria bilirubin oxidase (BOx) based biocathode was constructed at the bottom of a medusa cell culture plate. The constructed EFC had a power density of up to 25 ?W cm(-2) at 0.5 V potential in simple buffer solution and in cell culturing medium. L929 murine fibroblast cells were seeded on top of the EFC and possible effects of the EFC on the cells and vice versa were studied. It was shown that on average the power of the EFC drops by about 70% under a nearly confluent layer of cells. The EFC appeared to have a toxic effect on the L929 cell line. It was concluded that the bioanode, consisting of CDH, produced hydrogen peroxide at toxic concentrations. However, the toxic effect was circumvented by co-immobilizing catalase on the bioanode. PMID:24374299

  4. Development of primary cell culture from Scylla serrata : Primary cell cultures from Scylla serrata.

    PubMed

    Sashikumar, Anu; Desai, P V

    2008-03-01

    This paper reports for the first time, the Primary cell culture of hepatopancreas from edible crab Scylla serrata using crab saline, L-15 (Leibovitz), 1 x L-15 + crab saline, 2 x L-15 + crab saline, 3 x L-15 and citrate buffer without any serum. We could isolate and maintain E (Embryonalzellen), F (Fibrenzellen), B (Blasenzellen), R (Restzellen) and G (Granular cells). Upon seeding the hepatopancreatic E, F, B, and R cells showed different survival pattern over time than granular cells. A modified L-15 (3x) medium supported the best survival of hepatopancreatic E, F B, and R cells in in-vitro culture. However granular cells could be maintained for 184 days with L-15 (1x) + crab saline. Fetal bovine serum was not effective additive and hampered cell viability in present study. PMID:19002854

  5. Preservative cytotoxicity to cultured corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Neville, R; Dennis, P; Sens, D; Crouch, R

    1986-05-01

    Cultured human and rat corneal epithelial cells with 51Cr incorporated were used as a model to test the cytolytic action of four common preservatives. Benzalkonium chloride, chlorohexidine and thimerosol were all found to lyse greater than 40% cells when incubated for fifteen minutes at concentrations in clinical use in topical ophthalmic medications. Chlorobutanol is the only preservative tested which has a low level of cytotoxicity (10%) and which, under these conditions, can be considered a safe preservative using cytolytic activity as the means of criteria. PMID:3720343

  6. A comparison of the migration patterns of normal and malignant cells in two assay systems.

    PubMed Central

    Varani, J.; Orr, W.; Ward, P. A.

    1978-01-01

    The migration patterns of normal mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells and mouse fibrosarcoma (FS) cells were compared in two assay systems. The two assay systems used were themodified Boyden chamber (micropore membrane) assay and the agarose drop explant assay. In both assays the major population of MEF cells exhibited a greater rate of migration than the major population of FS cells. However, a small subpopulation of FS cells which had a much greater rate of migration than the major population of either MEF or FS cells was detected in the agarose drop assay. A number of drugs which are known to inhibit the migration of leukocytes were tested against the MEF and FS cells. Concentrations were found that inhibited the major population of both groups by greater than 90%. However, at concentrations which inhibited the migration of the major population of FS cells by greater than 90%, a small group of fast-moving cells was still detected. Although the fast-moving cells were relatively resistant to treatment with the various drugs, this group was sensitive to a factor in serum. When normal human serum was used in place of fetal calf serum, the migration of the major population of FS cells was inhibited very little but movement of the fast-moving population was completely eliminated. We speculate that the small subgroup of fast-moving cells may be responsible for the invasive nature of the FS cells. PMID:619691

  7. Recombinant protein production and insect cell culture and process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn (Inventor); Prewett, Tacey (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas (Inventor); Francis, Karen (Inventor); Andrews, Angela (Inventor); Oconnor, Kim (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using the cultured insect cells as host for a virus encoding the described polypeptide such as baculovirus. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  8. Production of avian influenza virus vaccine using primary cell cultures generated from host organs.

    PubMed

    Babar, Mustafeez Mujtaba; Riaz, Muhammad Suleman; Zaidi, Najam-us-Sahar Sadaf; Afzal, Farhan; Farooq, Muhammad Sabir

    2013-06-01

    The global availability of a therapeutically effective influenza virus vaccine during a pandemic remains a major challenge for the biopharmaceutical industry. Long production time, coupled with decreased supply of embryonated chicken eggs (ECE), significantly affects the conventional vaccine production. Transformed cell lines have attained regulatory approvals for vaccine production. Based on the fact that the avian influenza virus would infect the cells derived from its natural host, the viral growth characteristics were studied on chicken embryo-derived primary cell cultures. The viral propagation was determined on avian origin primary cell cultures, transformed mammalian cell lines, and in ECE. A comparison was made between these systems by utilizing various cell culture-based assays. In-vitro substrate susceptibility and viral infection characteristics were evaluated by performing hemagglutination assay (HA), 50 % tissue culture infectious dose (TCID₅₀) and monitoring of cytopathic effects (CPE) caused by the virus. The primary cell culture developed from chicken embryos showed stable growth characteristics with no contamination. HA, TCID₅₀, and CPE exhibited that these cell systems were permissive to viral infection, yielding 2-10 times higher viral titer as compared to mammalian cell lines. Though the viral output from the ECE was equivalent to the chicken cell culture, the time period for achieving it was decreased to half. Some of the prerequisites of inactivated influenza virus vaccine production include generation of higher vial titer, independence from exogenous sources, and decrease in the production time lines. Based on the tests, it can be concluded that chicken embryo primary cell culture addresses these issues and can serve as a potential alternative for influenza virus vaccine production. PMID:23515853

  9. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Collins, Tony J.; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose–response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  10. A Versatile Cell Death Screening Assay Using Dye-Stained Cells and Multivariate Image Analysis.

    PubMed

    Collins, Tony J; Ylanko, Jarkko; Geng, Fei; Andrews, David W

    2015-11-01

    A novel dye-based method for measuring cell death in image-based screens is presented. Unlike conventional high- and medium-throughput cell death assays that measure only one form of cell death accurately, using multivariate analysis of micrographs of cells stained with the inexpensive mix, red dye nonyl acridine orange, and a nuclear stain, it was possible to quantify cell death induced by a variety of different agonists even without a positive control. Surprisingly, using a single known cytotoxic agent as a positive control for training a multivariate classifier allowed accurate quantification of cytotoxicity for mechanistically unrelated compounds enabling generation of dose-response curves. Comparison with low throughput biochemical methods suggested that cell death was accurately distinguished from cell stress induced by low concentrations of the bioactive compounds Tunicamycin and Brefeldin A. High-throughput image-based format analyses of more than 300 kinase inhibitors correctly identified 11 as cytotoxic with only 1 false positive. The simplicity and robustness of this dye-based assay makes it particularly suited to live cell screening for toxic compounds. PMID:26422066

  11. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids.

    PubMed

    Massai, Diana; Isu, Giuseppe; Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A; Falvo D'Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  12. A Versatile Bioreactor for Dynamic Suspension Cell Culture. Application to the Culture of Cancer Cell Spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Madeddu, Denise; Cerino, Giulia; Falco, Angela; Frati, Caterina; Gallo, Diego; Deriu, Marco A.; Falvo D’Urso Labate, Giuseppe; Quaini, Federico; Audenino, Alberto; Morbiducci, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    A versatile bioreactor suitable for dynamic suspension cell culture under tunable shear stress conditions has been developed and preliminarily tested culturing cancer cell spheroids. By adopting simple technological solutions and avoiding rotating components, the bioreactor exploits the laminar hydrodynamics establishing within the culture chamber enabling dynamic cell suspension in an environment favourable to mass transport, under a wide range of tunable shear stress conditions. The design phase of the device has been supported by multiphysics modelling and has provided a comprehensive analysis of the operating principles of the bioreactor. Moreover, an explanatory example is herein presented with multiphysics simulations used to set the proper bioreactor operating conditions for preliminary in vitro biological tests on a human lung carcinoma cell line. The biological results demonstrate that the ultralow shear dynamic suspension provided by the device is beneficial for culturing cancer cell spheroids. In comparison to the static suspension control, dynamic cell suspension preserves morphological features, promotes intercellular connection, increases spheroid size (2.4-fold increase) and number of cycling cells (1.58-fold increase), and reduces double strand DNA damage (1.5-fold reduction). It is envisioned that the versatility of this bioreactor could allow investigation and expansion of different cell types in the future. PMID:27144306

  13. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Saet-byul; Cha, Junhoe; Kim, Im-kyung; Yoon, Joo Chun; Lee, Hyo Joon; Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan; Lee, Jae Myun; Lee, Kang Young; Kim, Jongsun

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  14. Simultaneous detection and identification of common cell culture contaminant and pathogenic mollicutes strains by reverse line blot hybridization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Kong, Fanrong; Jelfs, Peter; James, Gregory; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2004-03-01

    We have developed a reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay to detect and identify the commonest mollicutes causing cell line contamination (Mycoplasma arginini, Mycoplasma fermentans, Mycoplasma hyorhinis, Mycoplasma orale, and Acholeplasma laidlawii) and human infection (Mycoplasma pneumoniae, Mycoplasma hominis, Mycoplasma genitalium, Ureaplasma parvum, and Ureaplasma urealyticum). We developed a nested PCR assay with "universal" primers targeting the mollicute 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region. Amplified biotin-labeled PCR products were hybridized to membrane-bound species-specific oligonucleotide probes. The assay correctly identified reference strains of 10 mollicute species. Cell cultures submitted for detection of mollicute contamination, clinical specimens, and clinical isolates were initially tested by PCR assay targeting a presumed mollicute-specific sequence of the 16S rRNA gene. Any that were positive were assessed by the RLB assay, with species-specific PCR assay as the reference method. Initially, 100 clinical and 88 of 92 cell culture specimens gave concordant results, including 18 in which two or more mollicute species were detected by both methods. PCR and sequencing of the 16S-23S rRNA intergenic spacer region and subsequent retesting by species-specific PCR assay of the four cell culture specimens for which results were initially discrepant confirmed the original RLB results. Sequencing of amplicons from 12 cell culture specimens that were positive in the 16S rRNA PCR assay but negative by both the RLB and species-specific PCR assays failed to identify any mollicute species. The RLB hybridization assay is sensitive and specific and able to rapidly detect and identify mollicute species from clinical and cell line specimens. PMID:15006769

  15. Survey of culture, goldengate assay, universal biosensor assay, and 16S rRNA Gene sequencing as alternative methods of bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Brianna; Pop, Mihai; Antonio, Martin; Walker, Alan W; Mai, Volker; Ahmed, Dilruba; Oundo, Joseph; Tamboura, Boubou; Panchalingam, Sandra; Levine, Myron M; Kotloff, Karen; Li, Shan; Magder, Laurence S; Paulson, Joseph N; Liu, Bo; Ikumapayi, Usman; Ebruke, Chinelo; Dione, Michel; Adeyemi, Mitchell; Rance, Richard; Stares, Mark D; Ukhanova, Maria; Barnes, Bret; Lewis, Ian; Ahmed, Firoz; Alam, Meer Taifur; Amin, Ruhul; Siddiqui, Sabbir; Ochieng, John B; Ouma, Emmanuel; Juma, Jane; Mailu, Eunice; Omore, Richard; O'Reilly, Ciara E; Hannis, James; Manalili, Sheri; Deleon, Jonna; Yasuda, Irene; Blyn, Lawrence; Ranken, Raymond; Li, Feng; Housley, Roberta; Ecker, David J; Hossain, M Anowar; Breiman, Robert F; Morris, J Glenn; McDaniel, Timothy K; Parkhill, Julian; Saha, Debasish; Sampath, Rangarajan; Stine, O Colin; Nataro, James P

    2013-10-01

    Cultivation-based assays combined with PCR or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based methods for finding virulence factors are standard methods for detecting bacterial pathogens in stools; however, with emerging molecular technologies, new methods have become available. The aim of this study was to compare four distinct detection technologies for the identification of pathogens in stools from children under 5 years of age in The Gambia, Mali, Kenya, and Bangladesh. The children were identified, using currently accepted clinical protocols, as either controls or cases with moderate to severe diarrhea. A total of 3,610 stool samples were tested by established clinical culture techniques: 3,179 DNA samples by the Universal Biosensor assay (Ibis Biosciences, Inc.), 1,466 DNA samples by the GoldenGate assay (Illumina), and 1,006 DNA samples by sequencing of 16S rRNA genes. Each method detected different proportions of samples testing positive for each of seven enteric pathogens, enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC), enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), Shigella spp., Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella enterica, and Aeromonas spp. The comparisons among detection methods included the frequency of positive stool samples and kappa values for making pairwise comparisons. Overall, the standard culture methods detected Shigella spp., EPEC, ETEC, and EAEC in smaller proportions of the samples than either of the methods based on detection of the virulence genes from DNA in whole stools. The GoldenGate method revealed the greatest agreement with the other methods. The agreement among methods was higher in cases than in controls. The new molecular technologies have a high potential for highly sensitive identification of bacterial diarrheal pathogens. PMID:23884998

  16. Ascorbic acid transport into cultured pituitary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, E.I.; May, V.; Eipper, R.A.

    1986-05-01

    An amidating enzyme designated peptidyl-glycine ..cap alpha..-amidating monooxygenase (PAM) has been studied in a variety of tissues and is dependent on molecular oxygen and stimulated by copper and ascorbic acid. To continue investigating the relationship among cellular ascorbic acid concentrations, amidating ability, and PAM activity, the authors studied ascorbic acid transport in three cell preparations that contain PAM and produce amidated peptides: primary cultures of rat anterior and intermediate pituitary and mouse AtT-20 tumor cells. When incubated in 50 ..mu..M (/sup 14/C)ascorbic acid all three cell preparations concentrated ascorbic acid 20- to 40-fold, producing intracellular ascorbate concentrations of 1 to 2 mM, based on experimentally determined cell volumes. All three cell preparations displayed saturable ascorbic acid uptake with half-maximal initial rates occurring between 9 and 18 ..mu..M ascorbate. Replacing NaCl in the uptake buffer with choline chloride significantly diminished ascorbate uptake in all three preparations. Ascorbic acid efflux from these cells was slow, displaying half-lives of 7 hours. Unlike systems that transport dehydroascorbic acid, the transport system for ascorbic acid in these cells was not inhibited by glucose. Thus, ascorbate is transported into pituitary cells by a sodium-dependent, active transport system.

  17. Reversible gelling culture media for in-vitro cell culture in three-dimensional matrices

    DOEpatents

    An, Yuehuei H.; Mironov, Vladimir A.; Gutowska, Anna

    2000-01-01

    A gelling cell culture medium useful for forming a three dimensional matrix for cell culture in vitro is prepared by copolymerizing an acrylamide derivative with a hydrophilic comonomer to form a reversible (preferably thermally reversible) gelling linear random copolymer in the form of a plurality of linear chains having a plurality of molecular weights greater than or equal to a minimum gelling molecular weight cutoff, mixing the copolymer with an aqueous solvent to form a reversible gelling solution and adding a cell culture medium to the gelling solution to form the gelling cell culture medium. Cells such as chondrocytes or hepatocytes are added to the culture medium to form a seeded culture medium, and temperature of the medium is raised to gel the seeded culture medium and form a three dimensional matrix containing the cells. After propagating the cells in the matrix, the cells may be recovered by lowering the temperature to dissolve the matrix and centrifuging.

  18. An Introductory Undergraduate Course Covering Animal Cell Culture Techniques

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mozdziak, Paul E.; Petitte, James N.; Carson, Susan D.

    2004-01-01

    Animal cell culture is a core laboratory technique in many molecular biology, developmental biology, and biotechnology laboratories. Cell culture is a relatively old technique that has been sparingly taught at the undergraduate level. The traditional methodology for acquiring cell culture training has been through trial and error, instruction when…

  19. Cultured heart cell reaggregate model for studying cardiac toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Sperelakis, N

    1978-01-01

    This review represents a summary of the technique of using cultured heart cells as a model system for studying the physiology, pharmacology, biochemistry and toxicology of myocardial cells. The general techniques and types of culture preparations commonly used are given and some of the advantages and disadvantages of working with cultured heart cells are summarized. Images FIGURE 3. FIGURE 7. PMID:214299

  20. Triethyllead treatment of cultured brain cells. Effect on accumulation of radioactive precursors in galactolipids

    SciTech Connect

    Grundt, I.K.; Ammitzboll, T.; Clausen, J.

    1981-02-01

    Cultured cells from chick embryo brains were studied for their sensitivity to triethyllead. Triethyllead chloride (3.16 microM) was added to the nutrient medium and incubated for 48 hr with the cells. Morphological changes in light microscope and radioactive labeling of galactolipids were assayed. Triethyllead treatment reduced the number of neuronal cells with processes. Morphological changes were not observed in glial cells. The (/sup 35/S)sulfate labeling of sulfatides was reduced to 50%. The (/sup 3/H)serine labeling of cerebrosides with alpha-hydroxy fatty acids was not influenced, while the (/sup 3/H)serine labeling of cerebrosides with nonhydroxy fatty acids was inhibited 40% in one- and two- but not in three-week-old cultures. The results indicate that the nerve cell response to triethyllead in cultures is selective, since the neurons are more sensitive than the glia cells and the labeling of sulfatides is more sensitive than that of cerebrosides.

  1. Integrated processes for expansion and differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells in suspended microcarriers cultures.

    PubMed

    Lam, Alan Tin-Lun; Chen, Allen Kuan-Liang; Ting, Sherwin Qi-Peng; Reuveny, Shaul; Oh, Steve Kah-Weng

    2016-05-01

    Current methods for human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) expansion and differentiation can be limited in scalability and costly (due to their labor intensive nature). This can limit their use in cell therapy, drug screening and toxicity assays. One of the approaches that can overcome these limitations is microcarrier (MC) based cultures in which cells are expanded as cell/MC aggregates and then directly differentiated as embryoid bodies (EBs) in the same agitated reactor. This integrated process can be scaled up and eliminate the need for some culture manipulation used in common monolayer and EBs cultures. This review describes the principles of such microcarriers based integrated hPSC expansion and differentiation process, and parameters that can affect its efficiency (such as MC type and extracellular matrix proteins coatings, cell/MC aggregates size, and agitation). Finally examples of integrated process for generation cardiomyocytes (CM) and neural progenitor cells (NPC) as well as challenges to be solved are described. PMID:26385176

  2. Single-cell gel electrophoresis assays with human-derived hepatoma (Hep G2) cells.

    PubMed

    Uhl, M; Helma, C; Knasmller, S

    1999-05-17

    The purpose of the present study was the development of a protocol for detecting chemically-induced DNA damage, using the alkaline single-cell gel electrophoresis (SCGE) assay with human-derived, metabolically competent hepatoma (Hep G2) cells. Previous studies indicated that Hep G2 cells have retained the activities of certain phase I and phase II enzymes and reflect the metabolism of genotoxins in mammals better than other in vitro models which require addition of exogenous activation mixtures. The optimal trypsin concentration for the removal of the cells from the plates were found to be 0.1%. Dimethylsulfoxide, at concentrations up to 2%, was an appropriate solvent for water-insoluble compounds. To determine the optimal exposure periods for mutagen treatment, the time kinetics of comet formation was investigated with genotoxic chemicals representing various classes of promutagens namely benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), 2-amino-3-methylimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline (IQ), and N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) and with N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU). All compounds caused a statistically significant induction in DNA damage. With the promutagens, comet formation increased gradually as a function of the exposure duration, and reached maximum values between 20-24 h. With NMU, comet induction maximized already after a short exposure (1 h) and remained at a constant level for up to 24 h. Based on these results, the Hep G2/SCGE assay appears to be a suitable approach for investigating DNA damaging potential of chemicals. Further experiments with IQ and B[a]P showed that the assays are highly reproducible. Comparisons of the present results with those from earlier experiments in which other endpoints (induction of sister chromatid exchanges, micronuclei and chromosomal aberrations) were measured in Hep G2 cells, indicated that the sensitivity of the SCGE assays is more or less identical. Since the SCGE assay is less time consuming than other genotoxicity assays we anticipate that it might be a suitable approach to investigate DNA damaging effects of chemicals in the human-derived, metabolically competent cell line. PMID:10333535

  3. Artifacts by marker enzyme adsorption on nanomaterials in cytotoxicity assays with tissue cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohlleben, Wendel; Kolle, Susanne N.; Hasenkamp, Laura-Carolin; Böser, Alexander; Vogel, Sandra; von Vacano, Bernhard; van Ravenzwaay, Ben; Landsiedel, Robert

    2011-07-01

    We used precision cut lung slices (PCLS) to study the cytotoxicity of cobalt ferrite nanomaterials with and without bovine serum albumin (BSA) stabilization. Using mitochondrial activity as an indicator of cytotoxicity (WST-1 assay) increasing concentrations of cobalt ferrite nanomaterial caused increasing levels of cytotoxicity in PCLS irrespective of BSA stabilization. However, there was no increase in released lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels caused by BSA stabilized nanomaterial indicating concentration depended cytotoxictiy. Moreover, non-stabilized nanomaterial caused a decrease of background LDH levels in the PCLS culture supernatant confirmed by complementary methods. Direct characterization of the protein corona of extracted nanomaterial shows that the LDH decrease is due to adsorption of LDH onto the surface of the non-stabilized nanomaterial, correlated with strong agglomeration. Preincubation with serum protein blocks the adsorption of LDH and stabilizes the nanomaterial at low agglomeration. We have thus demonstrated the cytotoxicity of nanomaterials in PCLS does not correlate with disrupted membrane integrity followed by LDH release. Furthermore, we found that intracellular enzymes such as the marker enzyme LDH are able to bind onto surfaces of nanomaterial and thereby adulterate the detection of toxic effects. A replacement of BSA by LDH or a secondary LDH-on-BSA-corona were not observed, confirming earlier indications that the protein corona exchange rate are slow or vanishing on inorganic nanomaterial. Thus, the method(s) to assess nanomaterial-mediated effects have to be carefully chosen based on the cellular effect and possible nano-specific artifacts.

  4. Optimization of a dendritic cell-based assay for the in vitro priming of naïve human CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Moser, Janice M; Sassano, Emily R; Leistritz, Del C; Eatrides, Jennifer M; Phogat, Sanjay; Koff, Wayne; Drake, Donald R

    2010-02-28

    Methods to prime human CD4(+) T cells in vitro would be of significant value for the pre-clinical evaluation of vaccine candidates and other immunotherapeutics. However, to date, there is no reliable method for the induction of primary human T cell responses in the laboratory. Here, we optimized a culture strategy incorporating highly purified lymphocytes and dendritic cells, in the absence of any exogenous growth factors, for the in vitro sensitization of naïve CD4(+) T cells against a variety of protein antigens. This fully autologous approach, which was superior to the more traditional PBMC assay for supporting the induction of primary human T helper cell responses in culture, elicited effector cells capable of producing a variety of Th cytokines, including IFNgamma, TNFalpha, IL-2, IL-5, IL-17 and IL-21, and memory cells that could be restimulated multiple times with a specific antigen. Through simple modifications to this culture method, we evaluated the role of dendritic cell maturation state and regulatory T cells on the sensitization of naïve T helper cells, which highlights its utility for addressing basic questions of human immunobiology. Finally, using the formulated yellow fever vaccine, YF-VAX (R), we provide a proof-of-concept demonstration of the utility of the system for evaluating the T cell immunogenicity of vaccine candidates in a pre-clinical setting. PMID:19925804

  5. Unsaturated compounds induce up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells in the in vitro sensitization assay LCSA.

    PubMed

    Frohwein, Thomas Armin; Sonnenburg, Anna; Zuberbier, Torsten; Stahlmann, Ralf; Schreiner, Maximilian

    2016-04-01

    Unsaturated compounds are known to cause false-positive reactions in the local lymph node assay (LLNA) but not in the guinea pig maximization test. We have tested a panel of substances (succinic acid, undecylenic acid, 1-octyn-3-ol, fumaric acid, maleic acid, linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, squalene, and arachidonic acid) in the loose-fit coculture-based sensitization assay (LCSA) to evaluate whether unspecific activation of dendritic cells is a confounder for sensitization testing in vitro. Eight out of 10 tested substances caused significant up-regulation of CD86 on dendritic cells cocultured with keratinocytes and would have been classified as sensitizers; only succinic acid was tested negative, and squalene had to be excluded from data analysis due to poor solubility in cell culture medium. Based on human data, only undecylenic acid can be considered a true sensitizer. The true sensitizing potential of 1-octyn-3-ol is uncertain. Fumaric acid and its isomer maleic acid are not known as sensitizers, but their esters are contact allergens. A group of 18- to 20-carbon chain unsaturated fatty acids (linoleic acid, oleic acid, alpha-linolenic acid, and arachidonic acid) elicited the strongest reaction in vitro. This is possibly due to the formation of pro-inflammatory lipid mediators in the cell culture causing nonspecific activation of dendritic cells. In conclusion, both the LLNA and the LCSA seem to provide false-positive results for unsaturated fatty acids. The inclusion of T cells in dendritic cell-based in vitro sensitization assays may help to eliminate false-positive results due to nonspecific dendritic cell activation. This would lead to more accurate prediction of sensitizers, which is paramount for consumer health protection and occupational safety. PMID:25975990

  6. Development and Evaluation of a Blood Culture PCR Assay for Rapid Detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A in Clinical Samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liqing; Jones, Claire; Gibani, Malick M.; Dobinson, Hazel; Thomaides-Brears, Helena; Shrestha, Sonu; Blohmke, Christoph J.; Darton, Thomas C.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Enteric fever remains an important cause of morbidity in many low-income countries and Salmonella Paratyphi A has emerged as the aetiological agent in an increasing proportion of cases. Lack of adequate diagnostics hinders early diagnosis and prompt treatment of both typhoid and paratyphoid but development of assays to identify paratyphoid has been particularly neglected. Here we describe the development of a rapid and sensitive blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A from blood, potentially allowing for appropriate diagnosis and antimicrobial treatment to be initiated on the same day. Methods Venous blood samples from volunteers experimentally challenged orally with Salmonella Paratyphi A, who subsequently developed paratyphoid, were taken on the day of diagnosis; 10 ml for quantitative blood culture and automated blood culture, and 5 ml for blood culture PCR. In the latter assay, bacteria were grown in tryptone soy broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease for 5 hours (37°C) before bacterial DNA was isolated for PCR detection targeting the fliC-a gene of Salmonella Paratyphi A. Results An optimized broth containing 2.4% ox bile and micrococcal nuclease, as well as a PCR test was developed for a blood culture PCR assay of Salmonella Paratyphi A. The volunteers diagnosed with paratyphoid had a median bacterial burden of 1 (range 0.1–6.9) CFU/ml blood. All the blood culture PCR positive cases where a positive bacterial growth was shown by quantitative blood culture had a bacterial burden of ≥ 0.3 CFU/ ml blood. The blood culture PCR assay identified an equal number of positive cases as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood), but utilized only half the volume of specimens. Conclusions The blood culture PCR method for detection of Salmonella Paratyphi A can be completed within 9 hours and offers the potential for same-day diagnosis of enteric fever. Using 5 ml blood, it exhibited a lower limit of detection equal to 0.3 CFU/ml blood, and it performed at least as well as automated blood culture at higher bacterial loads (≥0.3 CFU/ml blood) of clinical specimens despite using half the volume of blood. The findings warrant its further study in endemic populations with a potential use as a novel diagnostic which fills the present gap of paratyphoid diagnostics. PMID:26930553

  7. Comparison of Nine Commercially Available Clostridium difficile Toxin Detection Assays, a Real-Time PCR Assay for C. difficile tcdB, and a Glutamate Dehydrogenase Detection Assay to Cytotoxin Testing and Cytotoxigenic Culture Methods▿

    PubMed Central

    Eastwood, Kerrie; Else, Patrick; Charlett, André; Wilcox, Mark

    2009-01-01

    The continuing rise in the incidence of Clostridium difficile infection is a cause for concern, with implications for patients and health care systems. Laboratory diagnosis largely relies on rapid toxin detection kits, although assays detecting alternative targets, including glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH) and toxin genes, are now available. Six hundred routine diagnostic diarrheal samples were tested prospectively using nine commercial toxin detection assays, cytotoxin assay (CYT), and cytotoxigenic culture (CYTGC) and retrospectively using a GDH detection assay and PCR for the toxin B gene. The mean sensitivity and specificity for toxin detection assays were 82.8% (range, 66.7 to 91.7%) and 95.4% (range, 90.9 to 98.8%), respectively, in comparison with CYT and 75.0% (range, 60.0 to 86.4%) and 96.1% (91.4 to 99.4%), respectively, in comparison with CYTGC. The sensitivity and specificity of the GDH assay were 90.1% and 92.9%, respectively, compared to CYT and 87.6% and 94.3%, respectively, compared to CYTGC. The PCR assay had the highest sensitivity of all the tests in comparison with CYT (92.2%) and CYTGC (88.5%), and the specificities of the PCR assay were 94.0% and 95.4% compared to CYT and CYTGC, respectively. All kits had low positive predictive values (range, 48.6 to 86.8%) compared with CYT, assuming a positive sample prevalence of 10% (representing the hospital setting), which compromises the clinical utility of single tests for the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection. The optimum rapid single test was PCR for toxin B gene, as this had the highest negative predictive value. Diagnostic algorithms that optimize test combinations for the laboratory diagnosis of C. difficile infection need to be defined. PMID:19710274

  8. Primary hemocyte culture of Penaeus monodon as an in vitro model for white spot syndrome virus titration, viral and immune related gene expression and cytotoxicity assays.

    PubMed

    Jose, Seena; Mohandas, A; Philip, Rosamma; Bright Singh, I S

    2010-11-01

    Immortal cell lines have not yet been reported from Penaeus monodon, which delimits the prospects of investigating the associated viral pathogens especially white spot syndrome virus (WSSV). In this context, a method of developing primary hemocyte culture from this crustacean has been standardized by employing modified double strength Leibovitz-15 (L-15) growth medium supplemented with 2% glucose, MEM vitamins (1×), tryptose phosphate broth (2.95 gl⁻¹), 20% FBS, N-phenylthiourea (0.2 mM), 0.06 μg ml⁻¹ chloramphenicol, 100 μg ml⁻¹ streptomycin and 100 IU ml⁻¹ penicillin and hemolymph drawn from shrimp grown under a bio-secured recirculating aquaculture system (RAS). In this medium the hemocytes remained viable up to 8 days. 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) labeling assay revealed its incorporation in 22 ± 7% of cells at 24h. Susceptibility of the cells to WSSV was confirmed by immunofluorescence assay using a monoclonal antibody against 28 kDa envelope protein of WSSV. A convenient method for determining virus titer as MTT(50)/ml was standardized employing the primary hemocyte culture. Expression of viral genes and cellular immune genes were also investigated. The cell culture could be demonstrated for determining toxicity of a management chemical (benzalkonium chloride) by determining its IC(50). The primary hemocyte culture could serve as a model for WSSV titration and viral and cellular immune related gene expression and also for investigations on cytotoxicity of aquaculture drugs and chemicals. PMID:20807537

  9. The cell-surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Donnenberg, Albert D; Meyer, E Michael; Rubin, J Peter; Donnenberg, Vera S

    2015-07-01

    In this technical note we describe a method to evaluate the cell surface proteome of human primary cell cultures and cell lines. The method utilizes the BD Biosciences lyoplate, a system covering 242 surface proteins, glycoproteins, and glycosphingolipids plus relevant isotype controls, automated plate-based flow cytometry, conventional file-level analysis and unsupervised K-means clustering of markers on the basis of percent of positive events and mean fluorescence intensity of positive and total clean events. As an example, we determined the cell surface proteome of cultured adipose stromal cells (ASC) derived from 5 independent clinical isolates. Between-sample agreement of very strongly expressed (n = 32) and strongly expressed (n =16) markers was excellent, constituting a reliable profile for ASC identification and determination of functional properties. Known mesenchymal markers (CD29, CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105) were among the identified strongly expressed determinants. Among other strongly expressed markers are several that are potentially immunomodulatory including three proteins that protect from complement mediated effects (CD46, CD55, and CD59), two that regulate apoptosis (CD77 and CD95) and several with ectoenzymatic (CD10, CD26, CD13, CD73, and CD143) or receptor tyrosine kinase (CD140b (PDGFR), CD340 (Her-2), EGFR) activity, suggesting mechanisms for the anti-inflammatory and tissue remodeling properties of ASC. Because variables are standardized for K-means clustering, results generated using this methodology should be comparable between instrumentation platforms. It is widely generalizable to human primary explant cultures and cells lines and will prove useful to determine how cell passage, culture interventions, and gene expression and silencing affect the cell-surface proteome. PMID:25929697

  10. Traditional and Modern Cell Culture in Virus Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hematian, Ali; Sadeghifard, Nourkhoda; Mohebi, Reza; Taherikalani, Morovat; Nasrolahi, Abbas; Amraei, Mansour; Ghafourian, Sobhan

    2016-01-01

    Cell cultures are developed from tissue samples and then disaggregated by mechanical, chemical, and enzymatic methods to extract cells suitable for isolation of viruses. With the recent advances in technology, cell culture is considered a gold standard for virus isolation. This paper reviews the evolution of cell culture methods and demonstrates why cell culture is a preferred method for identification of viruses. In addition, the advantages and disadvantages of both traditional and modern cell culture methods for diagnosis of each type of virus are discussed. Detection of viruses by the novel cell culture methods is considered more accurate and sensitive. However, there is a need to include some more accurate methods such as molecular methods in cell culture for precise identification of viruses. PMID:27169004

  11. [Culture of mussel Mytiuls edulis I. mantle cells].

    PubMed

    Daugavet, M A; Blinova, M I

    2015-01-01

    To date, cell lines derived from marine invertebrates have not been available. Hence primary cell cultures serve as model systems for various experiments. In present study we established primary culture of mussel Mytilus edulis L. mantle cells. Cells were isolated by means of explant culture or enzymatic dissociation of mantle tissue. They maintained viability up to 22 months regardless of culture initiation method. In course of culturing, cells, which were transferred onto new plates, successfully attached to a new surface. Physiological activity of cultured cells was also confirmed by formation of crystals, which appeared after 4-6 months. After continuous time of culturing, mantle cells can be cryopreserved using 5 % DMSO with post-freezing survival up to 50%. These results demonstrate that M. edulis mantle cells can maintain viability and physiological activity for exceptionally long time and can be cryopreserved for further examination. PMID:26035973

  12. Microelectronic cell sensor assay for detection of cytotoxicity and prediction of acute toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xing, James Z; Zhu, Lijun; Gabos, Stephan; Xie, Li

    2006-09-01

    This study reports in-house assessment of a real-time cell electronic sensing (RT-CES) system used as a test platform for both cytotoxicity assay and predicting acute toxicity. For cytotoxicity determination, the RT-CES assay displayed equal sensitivity and coefficients of variation values with good correlation to NRU assay. The IC50 values and the LD50 values for the cytotoxicity reference materials were compared in the context of the proposed prediction model for acute rodent toxicity. The results obtained from RT-CES assay fitted within the acceptance limits of the prediction model and showed that the RT-CES cytotoxicity assay met the qualification guidelines in NIH Publication #01-4500 to accurately predict acute toxicity. In addition to cell viability, the RT-CES assay provided dynamic information that can be used to identify maximum toxicity and reversibility of the toxic effects which are difficult to achieve by the endpoint assays and, therefore, the RT-CES assay is more accurate for assessment of cytotoxicity. The features of the RT-CES assay, such as labeling free, automatic detection, and easy operation, give this assay potential to replace BALB/c 3T3 NRU assay and be used as routine setting for drug monitoring in the toxicological laboratory. PMID:16481145

  13. Development of a Lentivirus Vector-Based Assay for Non-Destructive Monitoring of Cell Fusion Activity

    PubMed Central

    Neshati, Zeinab; Liu, Jia; Zhou, Guangqian; Schalij, Martin J.; de Vries, Antoine A. F.

    2014-01-01

    Cell-to-cell fusion can be quantified by endowing acceptor and donor cells with latent reporter genes/proteins and activators of these genes/proteins, respectively. One way to accomplish this goal is by using a bipartite lentivirus vector (LV)-based cell fusion assay system in which the cellular fusion partners are transduced with a flippase-activatable Photinus pyralis luciferase (PpLuc) expression unit (acceptor cells) or with a recombinant gene encoding FLPeNLS+, a nuclear-targeted and molecularly evolved version of flippase (donor cells). Fusion of both cell populations will lead to the FLPe-dependent generation of a functional PpLuc gene. PpLuc activity is typically measured in cell lysates, precluding consecutive analysis of one cell culture. Therefore, in this study the PpLuc-coding sequence was replaced by that of Gaussia princeps luciferase (GpLuc), a secretory protein allowing repeated analysis of the same cell culture. In myotubes the spread of FLPeNLS+ may be limited due to its nuclear localization signal (NLS) causing low signal outputs. To test this hypothesis, myoblasts were transduced with LVs encoding either FLPeNLS+ or an NLS-less version of FLPe (FLPeNLS−) and subsequently co-cultured in different ratios with myoblasts containing the FLPe-activatable GpLuc expression cassette. At different times after induction of cell-to-cell fusion the GpLuc activity in the culture medium was determined. FLPeNLS+ and FLPeNLS− both activated the latent GpLuc gene but when the percentage of FLPe-expressing myoblasts was limiting, FLPeNLS+ generally yielded slightly higher signals than FLPeNLS− while at low acceptor-to-donor cell ratios FLPeNLS− was usually superior. The ability of FLPeNLS+ to spread through myofibers and to induce reporter gene expression is thus not limited by its NLS. However, at high FLPe concentrations the presence of the NLS negatively affected reporter gene expression. In summary, a rapid and simple chemiluminescence assay for quantifying cell-to-cell fusion progression based on GpLuc has been developed. PMID:25028973

  14. Evaluation of 309 Environmental Chemicals Using a Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Adherent Cell Differentiation and Cytotoxicity Assay

    PubMed Central

    Chandler, Kelly J.; Barrier, Marianne; Jeffay, Susan; Nichols, Harriette P.; Kleinstreuer, Nicole C.; Singh, Amar V.; Reif, David M.; Sipes, Nisha S.; Judson, Richard S.; Dix, David J.; Kavlock, Robert; Hunter, Edward S.; Knudsen, Thomas B.

    2011-01-01

    The vast landscape of environmental chemicals has motivated the need for alternative methods to traditional whole-animal bioassays in toxicity testing. Embryonic stem (ES) cells provide an in vitro model of embryonic development and an alternative method for assessing developmental toxicity. Here, we evaluated 309 environmental chemicals, mostly food-use pesticides, from the ToxCast™ chemical library using a mouse ES cell platform. ES cells were cultured in the absence of pluripotency factors to promote spontaneous differentiation and in the presence of DMSO-solubilized chemicals at different concentrations to test the effects of exposure on differentiation and cytotoxicity. Cardiomyocyte differentiation (α,β myosin heavy chain; MYH6/MYH7) and cytotoxicity (DRAQ5™/Sapphire700™) were measured by In-Cell Western™ analysis. Half-maximal activity concentration (AC50) values for differentiation and cytotoxicity endpoints were determined, with 18% of the chemical library showing significant activity on either endpoint. Mining these effects against the ToxCast Phase I assays (∼500) revealed significant associations for a subset of chemicals (26) that perturbed transcription-based activities and impaired ES cell differentiation. Increased transcriptional activity of several critical developmental genes including BMPR2, PAX6 and OCT1 were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation. Multiple genes involved in reactive oxygen species signaling pathways (NRF2, ABCG2, GSTA2, HIF1A) were strongly associated with decreased ES cell differentiation as well. A multivariate model built from these data revealed alterations in ABCG2 transporter was a strong predictor of impaired ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results provide an initial characterization of metabolic and regulatory pathways by which some environmental chemicals may act to disrupt ES cell growth and differentiation. PMID:21666745

  15. Rotating bio-reactor cell culture apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Ray P. (Inventor); Wolf, David A. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A bioreactor system is described in which a tubular housing contains an internal circularly disposed set of blade members and a central tubular filter all mounted for rotation about a common horizontal axis and each having independent rotational support and rotational drive mechanisms. The housing, blade members and filter preferably are driven at a constant slow speed for placing a fluid culture medium with discrete microbeads and cell cultures in a discrete spatial suspension in the housing. Replacement fluid medium is symmetrically input and fluid medium is symmetrically output from the housing where the input and the output are part of a loop providing a constant or intermittent flow of fluid medium in a closed loop.

  16. Identification of multipotent luminal progenitor cells in human prostate organoid cultures

    PubMed Central

    Karthaus, Wouter R.; Iaquinta, Phillip J.; Drost, Jarno; Gracanin, Ana; van Boxtel, Ruben; Wongvipat, John; Dowling, Catherine M.; Gao, Dong; Begthel, Harry; Sachs, Norman; Vries, Robert G.J.; Cuppen, Edwin; Chen, Yu; Sawyers, Charles L.; Clevers, Hans C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The prostate gland consists of basal and luminal cells arranged as pseudo-stratified epithelium. In tissue recombination models, only basal cells reconstitute a complete prostate gland, yet murine lineage-tracing experiments show that luminal cells generate basal cells. It has remained challenging to address the molecular details of these transitions and whether they apply to humans, due to the lack of culture conditions that recapitulate prostate gland architecture. Here we describe a 3D culture system that supports long-term expansion of primary mouse and human prostate organoids, composed of fully differentiated CK5+ basal and CK8+ luminal cells. Organoids are genetically stable, reconstitute prostate glands in recombination assays and can be experimentally manipulated. Single human luminal and basal cells give rise to organoids, yet luminal cell-derived organoids more closely resemble prostate glands. These data support a luminal multilineage progenitor cell model for prostate tissue and establish a robust, scalable system for mechanistic studies. PMID:25201529

  17. A dual gradient assay for the parametric analysis of cell-surface interactions.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Paul M; Pedersen, Rasmus H; Riehle, Mathis O; Gadegaard, Nikolaj

    2012-08-20

    Cellular response to microgrooves is addressed using a new assay format, comprising orthogonal gradients of continuously varied groove pitch and depth. Dual layer etch masks are created using a combination of micropatterning and plasma polymer deposition. A silicon substrate with a constant groove width of 8 μm and with ridge width increasing from 8 μm in 0.5 μm steps across 10 mm is fabricated by photolithography. A plasma-polymerized hexane film which is 120 nm thick at one end of these grooves, and 10 nm at the other, is deposited under a diffusion mask. Reactive etching of the patterned sample transfers a gradient of groove pitch and groove depth into the silicon substrate. A silicon master with a gradient of groove depth spanning more than two orders of magnitude (less than 10 nm to over 1000 nm) is used to create an injection molding inlay for mass replication of the screening topography. Polycarbonate replicas are molded for use in cell culture studies, and the functionality of the topography as a high-throughput screening platform is investigated. The response of MDCK, h-TERT fibroblasts, and LE2 endothelial cells is examined, in terms of attachment and morphological response to the variation in topographical cues, with the aim of pinpointing the optimal combination of groove pitch and depth to elicit a tailored response from each cell type. When the range of topographical features screened on a single substrate is considered, this new assay represents a significant step forward in the parametric design and analysis of topographical cues at the biomaterial interface. PMID:22678878

  18. How do culture media influence in vitro perivascular cell behavior?

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Volz, Ann-Cathrin; Kluger, Petra Juliane

    2015-12-01

    Perivascular cells are multilineage cells located around the vessel wall and important for wall stabilization. In this study, we evaluated a stem cell media and a perivascular cell-specific media for the culture of primary perivascular cells regarding their cell morphology, doubling time, stem cell properties, and expression of cell type-specific markers. When the two cell culture media were compared to each other, perivascular cells cultured in the stem cell medium had a more elongated morphology and a faster doubling rate and cells cultured in the pericyte medium had a more typical morphology, with several filopodia, and a slower doubling rate. To evaluate stem cell properties, perivascular cells, CD146(-) cells, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were differentiated into the adipogenic, osteogenic, and chondrogenic lineages. It was seen that perivascular cells, as well as CD146(-) cells and MSCs, cultured in stem cell medium showed greater differentiation than cells cultured in pericyte-specific medium. The expression of pericyte-specific markers CD146, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β), myosin, and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) could be found in both pericyte cultures, as well as to varying amounts in CD146(-) cells, MSCs, and endothelial cells. The here presented work shows that perivascular cells can adapt to their in vitro environment and cell culture conditions influence cell functionality, such as doubling rate or differentiation behavior. Pericyte-specific markers were shown to be expressed also from cells other than perivascular cells. We can further conclude that CD146(+) perivascular cells are inhomogeneous cell population probably containing stem cell subpopulations, which are located perivascular around capillaries. PMID:26179857

  19. Liposomes and MTT cell viability assay: an incompatible affair.

    PubMed

    Angius, Fabrizio; Floris, Alice

    2015-03-01

    The 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay is commonly used to evaluate the cytotoxicity potential of drugs vehicled by liposomes. However, liposome delivering drugs could produce inconsistent values of MTT absorbance. On the basis of previous experiments demonstrating the MTT affinity for lipid droplets, this paper aims to show that empty-liposomes interfere, per se, on MTT assay due to its lipidic nature. This brings into question the use of MTT testing cytotoxicity when liposomes are involved in delivering drugs. PMID:25481524

  20. Measured Effects of Wnt3a on Proliferation of HEK293T Cells Depend on the Applied Assay

    PubMed Central

    Reischmann, Patricia; Fiebeck, Johanna; von der Weiden, Nadine; Müller, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway has been associated with many essential cell processes. This study aims to examine the effects of Wnt signaling on proliferation of cultured HEK293T cells. Cells were incubated with Wnt3a, and the activation of the Wnt pathway was followed by analysis of the level of the β-catenin protein and of the expression levels of the target genes MYC and CCND1. The level of β-catenin protein increased up to fourfold. While the mRNA levels of c-Myc and cyclin D1 increased slightly, the protein levels increased up to a factor of 1.5. Remarkably, MTT and BrdU assays showed different results when measuring the proliferation rate of Wnt3a stimulated HEK293T cells. In the BrdU assays an increase of the proliferation rate could be detected, which correlated to the applied Wnt3a concentration. Oppositely, this correlation could not be shown in the MTT assays. The MTT results, which are based on the mitochondrial activity, were confirmed by analysis of the succinate dehydrogenase complex by immunofluorescence and by western blotting. Taken together, our study shows that Wnt3a activates proliferation of HEK293 cells. These effects can be detected by measuring DNA synthesis rather than by measuring changes of mitochondrial activity. PMID:26798342

  1. Development and evaluation of an anchorage-independent agar-based clonal assay for human primary breast carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Besch, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The development and evaluation of an anchorage-independent clonal cytotoxic assay for primary human breast carcinoma cells is described in this thesis. This assay was developed in three stages which include: (1) the optimization of the production of a monodispersed cell suspension from solid breast carcinomas, (2) the systematic development of a growth medium for the clonal growth of these cells, and (3) the adaptation of these methods for use in the quantitation of cytotoxicity. The results of these studies indicated that hydrocortisone, fetal bovine serum and red blood cells stimulated the clonal growth of breast carcinoma cells. The optimal concentrations of these three factors were simultaneously determined using response surface methodology. These culture conditions were then used to develop radiation-cytotoxicity assays for both primary and recurrent breast carcinomas. The methodology developed and evaluated in this thesis may be useful to: (1) study the biology and radiobiology of human breast cancer, (2) customize the treatment of individual breast cancer patients, and (3) identify and/or develop new drugs and/or other treatment modalities for breast cancer.

  2. A Cell Lysis and Protein Purification - Single Molecule Assay Devices for Evaluation of Genetically Engineered Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakyama, Tetsuya; Tabata, Kazuhito; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yokokawa, Ryuji

    We have developed two devices applicable to evaluate genetically engineered proteins in single molecule assay: on-chip cell lysis device, and protein purification - assay device. A motor protein, F1-ATPase expressed in E.coli, was focused in this report as a target protein. Cell lysis was simply performed by applying pulse voltage between Au electrodes patterned by photolithography, and its efficiency was determined by absorptiometry. The subsequent processes, purification and assay of extracted proteins, were demonstrated in order to detect F1-ATPase and to evaluate its activity. The specific bonding between his-tag in F1-ATPase and Ni-NTA coated on a glass surface was utilized for the purification process. After immobilization of F1-ATPase, avidin-coated microspheres and adenosine tri-phosphate (ATP) solution were infused sequentially to assay the protein. Microsphere rotation was realized by activity of F1-ATPase corresponding to ATP hydrolysis. Results show that the cell lysis device, at the optimum condition, extracts enough amount of protein for single molecule assay. Once cell lysate was injected to the purification - assay device, proteins were diffused in the lateral direction in a Y-shape microchannel. The gradient of protein concentratioin provides an optimal concentration for the assay i.e. the highest density of rotating beads. Density of rotating beads is also affected by the initial concentration of protein injected to the device. The optimum concentration was achieved by our cell lysis device not by the conventional method by ultrasonic wave. Rotation speed was analyzed for several microspheres assayed in the purification - assay device, and the results were compatible to that of conventional assay in which F1-ATPase was purified in bulk scale. In conclusion, we have demonstrated on-chip cell lysis and assay appropriate for the sequential analysis without any pretreatment. On-chip devices replacing conventional bioanalytical methods will be integrated a total analysis system to evaluate engineered protein and DNA.

  3. Rapid Identification of Bacterial Pathogens in Positive Blood Culture Bottles by Use of a Broad-Based PCR Assay Coupled with High-Resolution Melt Analysis ▿

    PubMed Central

    Won, Helen; Rothman, Richard; Ramachandran, Padmini; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Kecojevic, Aleksandar; Carroll, Karen C.; Aird, Deborah; Gaydos, Charlotte; Yang, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated a broad-based PCR assay coupled with high-resolution melt analysis for rapid bacterial identification in patients with bacterial sepsis. With a reference library of 60 clinically relevant bacterial species, 52 positive blood culture samples were tested. Our assay identified 46/52 samples at the species level, with 100% concordance to culture findings. PMID:20631110

  4. Simple and Rapid F+ Coliphage Culture, Latex Agglutination, and Typing Assay To Detect and Source Track Fecal Contamination▿

    PubMed Central

    Love, David C.; Sobsey, Mark D.

    2007-01-01

    Simple, rapid, and reliable fecal indicator tests are needed to better monitor and manage ambient waters and treated waters and wastes. Antibody-coated polymeric bead agglutination assays can fulfill these needs and are inexpensive and portable for nonlaboratory settings, and their reagents can be stored at ambient temperatures for months. The goal of this study was to develop, optimize, and validate a rapid microbial water quality monitoring assay using F+ coliphage culture, latex agglutination, and typing (CLAT) to detect F+ coliphage groups with antibody-coated particles. Rapid (180 min) F+ coliphage culture gave comparable results to those with the 16- to 24-h culture time used in EPA method 1601 and was amenable to CLAT assay detection. CLAT was performed on a cardboard card by mixing a drop of coliphage enrichment culture with a drop of antibody-coated polymeric beads as the detection reagent. Visual agglutination or clumping of positive samples occurred in <60 seconds. The CLAT assay had sensitivities of 96.4% (185/192 samples) and 98.2% (161/164 samples) and specificities of 100% (34/34 samples) and 97.7% (129/132 samples) for F+ RNA and DNA coliphages, respectively. CLAT successfully classified F+ RNA coliphages into serogroups typically obtained from human (groups II and III) and animal (groups I and IV) fecal sources, in similar proportions to those obtained with a nucleic acid hybridization assay. This novel group-specific antibody-based particle agglutination technique for rapid and simple detection and grouping of F+ coliphages provides a new and improved tool for monitoring the microbiological quality of drinking, recreational, shellfishing, and other waters. PMID:17483282

  5. ASBESTOS AND GASTRO-INTESTINAL CANCER: CELL CULTURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three forms of asbestos: amosite, crocidolite, and chrysotile, were assayed for their cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in cell clture. Using embjryonic human intestine derived and adult rat liver derived epitelial cells, the order of toxicity was chrysotile > amosite = crocidolite. ...

  6. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu, Chang; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-08-01

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe.

  7. Whole cell based electrical impedance sensing approach for a rapid nanotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Hondroulis, Evangelia; Liu, Chang; Li, Chen-Zhong

    2010-08-01

    A whole cell based biosensor for rapid real-time testing of human and environmental toxicity of nanoscale materials is reported. Recent studies measuring nanoparticle cytotoxicity in vitro provide a final measurement of toxicity to a cell culture overlooking the ongoing cytotoxic effects of the nanoparticles over the desired timeframe. An array biosensor capable of performing multiple cytotoxicity assays simultaneously was designed to address the need for a consistent method to measure real-time assessments of toxicity. The impedimetric response of human lung fibroblasts (CCL-153) and rainbow trout gill epithelial cells (RTgill-W1) when exposed to gold and silver nanoparticles (AuNPs, AgNPs), single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and cadmium oxide (CdO) was tested. Exposure to CdO particles exhibited the fastest rate of cytotoxicity and demonstrated the biosensor's ability to monitor toxicity instantaneously in real time. Advantages of the present method include shorter run times, easier usage, and multi-sample analysis leading to a method that can monitor the kinetic effects of nanoparticle toxicity continuously over a desired timeframe. PMID:20622302

  8. A cell-based assay for aggregation inhibitors as therapeutics of polyglutamine-repeat disease and validation in Drosophila

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apostol, Barbara L.; Kazantsev, Alexsey; Raffioni, Simona; Illes, Katalin; Pallos, Judit; Bodai, Laszlo; Slepko, Natalia; Bear, James E.; Gertler, Frank B.; Hersch, Steven; Housman, David E.; Marsh, J. Lawrence; Michels Thompson, Leslie

    2003-05-01

    The formation of polyglutamine-containing aggregates and inclusions are hallmarks of pathogenesis in Huntington's disease that can be recapitulated in model systems. Although the contribution of inclusions to pathogenesis is unclear, cell-based assays can be used to screen for chemical compounds that affect aggregation and may provide therapeutic benefit. We have developed inducible PC12 cell-culture models to screen for loss of visible aggregates. To test the validity of this approach, compounds that inhibit aggregation in the PC12 cell-based screen were tested in a Drosophila model of polyglutamine-repeat disease. The disruption of aggregation in PC12 cells strongly correlates with suppression of neuronal degeneration in Drosophila. Thus, the engineered PC12 cells coupled with the Drosophila model provide a rapid and effective method to screen and validate compounds.

  9. Pneumocystis jirovecii Can Be Productively Cultured in Differentiated CuFi-8 Airway Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schildgen, Verena; Mai, Stephanie; Khalfaoui, Soumaya; Lüsebrink, Jessica; Pieper, Monika; Tillmann, Ramona L.; Brockmann, Michael

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although Pneumocystis jirovecii is a well-known and serious pathogen, all previous attempts to isolate, cultivate, and propagate this fungus have failed. This serious challenge in microbiology was addressed in the present study. We examined whether P. jirovecii could be cultured in a permanent three-dimensional air-liquid interface culture system formed by CuFi-8 cells, a differentiated pseudostratified airway epithelial cell line. Cultured pseudostratified cells were inoculated with bronchoalveolar fluid that had been confirmed to be positive for P. jirovecii using PCR. Five days later, the cells and basal medium were harvested and tested for P. jirovecii using quantitative PCR (qPCR), commercially available immunofluorescence detection assays, and Grocott staining of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded thin sections of infected-cell cultures. We successfully productively cultivated and propagated P. jirovecii from these P. jirovecii-positive bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) samples. Furthermore, we provide evidence that P. jirovecii induced cytopathic effects on lung epithelial cells and was even invasive in cell culture. To the best of our knowledge, the cell culture system developed herein represents the first methodology to enable molecular analyses of this pathogen’s life cycle and further in vitro studies of P. jirovecii, such as assessments of drug sensitivity and resistance as well as investigations of the pathogen’s stability against environmental factors and disinfectants. PMID:24825015

  10. Polyamines and the Cell Cycle of Catharanthus roseus Cells in Culture.

    PubMed

    Maki, H; Ando, S; Kodama, H; Komamine, A

    1991-08-01

    Investigation was made on the effect of partial depletion of polyamines (PAs), induced by treatment with inhibitors of the biosynthesis of PAs, on the distribution of cells at each phase of the cell cycle in Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don. cells in suspension cultures, using flow cytometry. More cells treated with inhibitors of arginine decarboxylase (ADC) and ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) were accumulated in the G(1) phase than those in the control, while the treatment with an inhibitor of spermidine (SPD) synthase showed no effect on the distribution of cells. The endogenous levels of the PAs, putrescine (PUT), SPD, and spermine (SPM), were determined during the cell cycle in synchronous cultures of C. roseus. Two peaks of endogenous level of PAs, in particular, of PUT and SPD, were observed during the cell cycle. Levels of PAs increased markedly prior to synthesis of DNA in the S phase and prior to cytokinesis. Activities of ADC and ODC were also assayed during the cell cycle. Activities of ADC was much higher than that of ODC throughout the cell cycle, but both activities of ODC and ADC changed in concert with changes in levels of PAs. Therefore, it is suggested that these enzymes may regulate PA levels during the cell cycle. These results indicate that inhibitors of PUT biosynthesis caused the suppression of cell proliferation by prevention of the progression of the cell cycle, probably from the G(1) to the S phase, and PUT may play more important roles in the progression of the cell cycle than other PAs. PMID:16668290

  11. Human iPSC-Derived Endothelial Cell Sprouting Assay in Synthetic Hydrogel Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Activation of vascular endothelial cells (ECs) by growth factors initiates a cascade of events in vivo consisting of EC tip cell selection, sprout formation, EC stalk cell proliferation, and ultimately vascular stabilization by support cells. Although EC functional assays can rec...

  12. Integrated optical biosensor for in-line monitoring of cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Pasche, Stéphanie; Wenger, Bernard; Ischer, Réal; Giazzon, Marta; Angeloni, Silvia; Voirin, Guy

    2010-12-15

    An analytical detection platform was developed to evaluate the induced toxicity in cell cultures exposed to foreign agents like growth factors or nanoparticles. Connecting a biosensing detection device to the cell culture flasks allows analyzing the composition of cell medium in real-time. The analysis relies on the quantification of inflammatory cytokines released by cells into the cell culture medium, by means of solid-phase immunoassays analyzed with the wavelength interrogated optical sensing (WIOS) instrument. A fluidic system for in situ measurements allows detecting cytokines in real-time, with a sensitivity of 1-100 ng/mL depending on the cytokine. In addition, integration of an in-line optical absorbance measurement unit, in combination with the standard AB cell proliferation assay, provides information on the cell viability in the culture. Fluidic connections between the cell culture flasks, the optical biosensor and the absorbance measurement unit simultaneously allow quantifying up to three cytokines (interleukin 8, interleukin 6 and the monocyte chemotactic protein), assessing cellular proliferation, and thus discriminating between naïve cells and cells exposed to foreign agents such as growth factors (tumor necrosis factor alpha) or nanoparticles. This analytical tool presents a high potential for assessing the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles and other chemicals in vitro. PMID:20732803

  13. Alternative Methods for the Detection of Emerging Marine Toxins: Biosensors, Biochemical Assays and Cell-Based Assays

    PubMed Central

    Reverté, Laia; Soliño, Lucía; Carnicer, Olga; Diogène, Jorge; Campàs, Mònica

    2014-01-01

    The emergence of marine toxins in water and seafood may have a considerable impact on public health. Although the tendency in Europe is to consolidate, when possible, official reference methods based on instrumental analysis, the development of alternative or complementary methods providing functional or toxicological information may provide advantages in terms of risk identification, but also low cost, simplicity, ease of use and high-throughput analysis. This article gives an overview of the immunoassays, cell-based assays, receptor-binding assays and biosensors that have been developed for the screening and quantification of emerging marine toxins: palytoxins, ciguatoxins, cyclic imines and tetrodotoxins. Their advantages and limitations are discussed, as well as their possible integration in research and monitoring programs. PMID:25431968

  14. A Tubing-Free Microfluidic Wound Healing Assay Enabling the Quantification of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Yuanchen; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Deyong; Jia, Xin; Wang, Junbo; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a tubing-free microfluidic wound healing assay to quantify the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), where gravity was used to generate a laminar flow within microfluidic channels, enabling cell seeding, culture, and wound generation. As the first systemic study to quantify the migration of VSMCs within microfluidic environments, the effects of channel geometries, surface modifications and chemokines on cellular migration were investigated, revealing that 1) height of the micro channels had a significant impact on cell migration; 2) the surface coating of collagen induced more migration of VSMCs than fibronectin coated surfaces and 3) platelet derived growth factor resulted in maximal cell migration compared to tumor necrosis factor alpha and fetal bovine serum. Furthermore, migrations of five types of VSMCs (e.g., the human vascular smooth muscle cell line, two types of primary vascular smooth cells, and VSMCs isolated from two human samples) were quantified, finding that VSMCs from the cell line and human samples demonstrated comparable migration distances, which were significantly lower than the migration distances of two primary cell types. As a platform technology, this wound healing assay may function as a new model to study migration of VSMCs within microfluidic environments. PMID:26365412

  15. A Tubing-Free Microfluidic Wound Healing Assay Enabling the Quantification of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuanchen; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Tao; Chen, Deyong; Jia, Xin; Wang, Junbo; Guo, Wei; Chen, Jian

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a tubing-free microfluidic wound healing assay to quantify the migration of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), where gravity was used to generate a laminar flow within microfluidic channels, enabling cell seeding, culture, and wound generation. As the first systemic study to quantify the migration of VSMCs within microfluidic environments, the effects of channel geometries, surface modifications and chemokines on cellular migration were investigated, revealing that 1) height of the micro channels had a significant impact on cell migration; 2) the surface coating of collagen induced more migration of VSMCs than fibronectin coated surfaces and 3) platelet derived growth factor resulted in maximal cell migration compared to tumor necrosis factor alpha and fetal bovine serum. Furthermore, migrations of five types of VSMCs (e.g., the human vascular smooth muscle cell line, two types of primary vascular smooth cells, and VSMCs isolated from two human samples) were quantified, finding that VSMCs from the cell line and human samples demonstrated comparable migration distances, which were significantly lower than the migration distances of two primary cell types. As a platform technology, this wound healing assay may function as a new model to study migration of VSMCs within microfluidic environments. PMID:26365412

  16. Real-time PCR assays compared to culture-based approaches for identification of aerobic bacteria in chronic wounds.

    PubMed

    Melendez, J H; Frankel, Y M; An, A T; Williams, L; Price, L B; Wang, N-Y; Lazarus, G S; Zenilman, J M

    2010-12-01

    Chronic wounds cause substantial morbidity and disability. Infection in chronic wounds is clinically defined by routine culture methods that can take several days to obtain a final result, and may not fully describe the community of organisms or biome within these wounds. Molecular diagnostic approaches offer promise for a more rapid and complete assessment. We report the development of a suite of real-time PCR assays for rapid identification of bacteria directly from tissue samples. The panel of assays targets 14 common, clinically relevant, aerobic pathogens and demonstrates a high degree of sensitivity and specificity using a panel of organisms commonly associated with chronic wound infection. Thirty-nine tissue samples from 29 chronic wounds were evaluated and the results compared with those obtained by culture. As revealed by culture and PCR, the most common organisms were methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) followed by Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The sensitivities of the PCR assays were 100% and 90% when quantitative and qualitative culture results were used as the reference standard, respectively. The assays allowed the identification of bacterial DNA from ten additional organisms that were not revealed by quantitative or qualitative cultures. Under optimal conditions, the turnaround time for PCR results is as short as 4-6 h. Real-time PCR is a rapid and inexpensive approach that can be easily introduced into clinical practice for detection of organisms directly from tissue samples. Characterization of the anaerobic microflora by real-time PCR of chronic wounds is warranted. PMID:21077984

  17. Flow perfusion culture of human mesenchymal stem cells on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with various pore sizes.

    PubMed

    Bjerre, Lea; Bünger, Cody; Baatrup, Anette; Kassem, Moustapha; Mygind, Tina

    2011-06-01

    Bone grafts are widely used in orthopaedic reconstructive surgery, but harvesting of autologous grafts is limited due to donor site complications. Bone tissue engineering is a possible alternative source for substitutes, and to date, mainly small scaffold sizes have been evaluated. The aim of this study was to obtain a clinically relevant substitute size using a direct perfusion culture system. Human bone marrowderived mesenchymal stem cells were seeded on coralline hydroxyapatite scaffolds with 200 μm or 500 μm pores, and resulting constructs were cultured in a perfusion bioreactor or in static culture for up to 21 days and analysed for cell distribution and osteogenic differentiation using histological stainings, alkaline phosphatase activity assay, and real-time RT-PCR on bone markers. We found that the number of cells was higher during static culture at most time points and that the final number of cells was higher in 500 μm constructs as compared with 200 μm constructs. Alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity assays and real time RT-PCR on seven osteogenic markers showed that differentiation occurred primarily and earlier in statically cultured constructs with 200 μm pores compared with 500 μm ones. Adhesion and proliferation of the cells was seen on both scaffold sizes, but the vitality and morphology of cells changed unfavorably during perfusion culture. In contrast to previous studies using spinner flask that show increased cellularity and osteogenic properties of cells when cultured dynamically, the perfusion culture in our study did not enhance the osteogenic properties of cell/scaffold constructs. The statically cultured constructs showed increasing cell numbers and abundant osteogenic differentiation probably because of weak initial cell adhesion due to the surface morphology of scaffolds. Our conclusion is that the specific scaffold surface microstructure and culturing system flow dynamics has a great impact on cell distribution and proliferation and on osteogenic differentiation, and the data presented warrant careful selection of in vitro culture settings to meet the specific requirements of the scaffolds and cells, especially when natural biomaterials with varying morphology are used. PMID:21442726

  18. Semicontinuous Bioreactor Production of Recombinant Butyrylcholinesterase in Transgenic Rice Cell Suspension Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Corbin, Jasmine M.; Hashimoto, Bryce I.; Karuppanan, Kalimuthu; Kyser, Zachary R.; Wu, Liying; Roberts, Brian A.; Noe, Amy R.; Rodriguez, Raymond L.; McDonald, Karen A.; Nandi, Somen

    2016-01-01

    An active and tetrameric form of recombinant butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), a large and complex human enzyme, was produced via semicontinuous operation in a transgenic rice cell suspension culture. After transformation of rice callus and screening of transformants, the cultures were scaled up from culture flask to a lab scale bioreactor. The bioreactor was operated through two phases each of growth and expression. The cells were able to produce BChE during both expression phases, with a maximum yield of 1.6 mg BChE/L of culture during the second expression phase. Cells successfully regrew during a 5-day growth phase. A combination of activity assays and Western blot analysis indicated production of an active and fully assembled tetramer of BChE. PMID:27066048

  19. Toward a cell-culture model of cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kraemer, P.M.

    1984-08-01

    The spontaneous transformation of normal Chinese hamster cells into malignant cells was studied. Hamster cells when grown in culture over an extended series of subcultivations inevitably become malignant even without exposure to a carcinogen. The study of this process using flow cytometry and the implantation of cultured cells into retrievable sponges placed under the skin of a nude mouse is described. (ACR)

  20. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained

  1. Cardiac Cells Beating in Culture: A Laboratory Exercise

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weaver, Debora

    2007-01-01

    This article describes how to establish a primary tissue culture, where cells are taken directly from an organ of a living animal. Cardiac cells are taken from chick embryos and transferred to culture dishes. These cells are not transformed and therefore have a limited life span. However, the unique characteristics of cardiac cells are maintained…

  2. Cell Co-culture Patterning Using Aqueous Two-phase Systems

    PubMed Central

    Frampton, John P.; White, Joshua B.; Abraham, Abin T.; Takayama, Shuichi

    2013-01-01

    Cell patterning technologies that are fast, easy to use and affordable will be required for the future development of high throughput cell assays, platforms for studying cell-cell interactions and tissue engineered systems. This detailed protocol describes a method for generating co-cultures of cells using biocompatible solutions of dextran (DEX) and polyethylene glycol (PEG) that phase-separate when combined above threshold concentrations. Cells can be patterned in a variety of configurations using this method. Cell exclusion patterning can be performed by printing droplets of DEX on a substrate and covering them with a solution of PEG containing cells. The interfacial tension formed between the two polymer solutions causes cells to fall around the outside of the DEX droplet and form a circular clearing that can be used for migration assays. Cell islands can be patterned by dispensing a cell-rich DEX phase into a PEG solution or by covering the DEX droplet with a solution of PEG. Co-cultures can be formed directly by combining cell exclusion with DEX island patterning. These methods are compatible with a variety of liquid handling approaches, including manual micropipetting, and can be used with virtually any adherent cell type. PMID:23567187

  3. A novel mast cell co-culture microfluidic chip for the electrochemical evaluation of food allergen.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hui; Jiang, Donglei; Zhu, Pei; Pi, Fuwei; Ji, Jian; Sun, Chao; Sun, Jiadi; Sun, Xiulan

    2016-09-15

    In this study a novel cell-to-cell electrochemical microfluidic chip was developed for qualitative and quantitative analysis of food allergen. Microfluidic cell culture, food allergen-induced cell morphological changes, and cell metabolism measurements were performed simultaneously using the aforementioned device. RBL-2H3 mast cells and ANA-1 macrophages have been used within a cell co-culture model to observe their allergic response when they are introduced to the antigen stimulus. Two cell cultivation microfluidic channels are located in the microfluidic chip, which is fabricated with four groups of gold electrodes, with an additional "capillary". In order to detect the allergic response, the cells were stimulated with dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin (DNP-BSA) without anti-DNP IgE incubation. When exocytosis occurs, the cell-secreted inflammatory cytokines were measured by enzyme-linked immuno sorbent assay (ELISA) and cell impedance changes were detected using cell-based electrochemical assay. Results indicate that the real-time cell allergic response are accurately monitored by this electrochemical microfluidic chip, which provides a general example of rapidly prototyped low-cost biosensor technology for applications in both food allergen detection and investigation. PMID:27108255

  4. An efficient method to isolate and culture mouse Kupffer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-zhi; Li, Jin-zheng; Li, Min; Gong, Jian-ping; He, Kun

    2014-01-01

    Kupffer cells (KCs) play an essential role in the physiological and pathological functions of the liver. Although the isolation methods of KCs have been well-described, most of them are sophisticated and time-consuming. In addition, these methods are mainly used for isolating the KCs of the human and rat. In this study, a three-step procedure was applied to isolate KCs in sufficient number and purity from mouse liver, including the techniques of enzymatic tissue treatment, gradient centrifugation, and selective adherence. F4/80 immunofluorescence and flow cytometry were used for cell identification. The combination method resulted in a satisfactorily high yield of 5-6×10(6) KCs per liver, over 92.0% positive for F4/80 and 98.5% viable cells. After 24h of culturing, the KCs showed typical macrophage morphologic features such as irregular shape, transparent cytoplasm and kidney-like nucleus. The phagocytic assay showed that the isolated cells exhibited strong phagocytosis activity. The KCs we isolated were functionally intact and exhibited a concentration dependent TNF-α production induced by LPS. The method we described is an effective method to isolate mouse KCs in high purity and yield, which consuming fewer collagenase and time without altering the functional capacity of the KCs. PMID:24333337

  5. Propagation of prions causing synucleinopathies in cultured cells

    PubMed Central

    Woerman, Amanda L.; Stöhr, Jan; Aoyagi, Atsushi; Rampersaud, Ryan; Krejciova, Zuzana; Watts, Joel C.; Ohyama, Takao; Patel, Smita; Widjaja, Kartika; Oehler, Abby; Sanders, David W.; Diamond, Marc I.; Seeley, William W.; Middleton, Lefkos T.; Gentleman, Steve M.; Mordes, Daniel A.; Südhof, Thomas C.; Giles, Kurt; Prusiner, Stanley B.

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, evidence argues that many neurodegenerative diseases, including progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), are caused by prions, which are alternatively folded proteins undergoing self-propagation. In earlier studies, PSP prions were detected by infecting human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells expressing a tau fragment [TauRD(LM)] fused to yellow fluorescent protein (YFP). Here, we report on an improved bioassay using selective precipitation of tau prions from human PSP brain homogenates before infection of the HEK cells. Tau prions were measured by counting the number of cells with TauRD(LM)–YFP aggregates using confocal fluorescence microscopy. In parallel studies, we fused α-synuclein to YFP to bioassay α-synuclein prions in the brains of patients who died of multiple system atrophy (MSA). Previously, MSA prion detection required ∼120 d for transmission into transgenic mice, whereas our cultured cell assay needed only 4 d. Variation in MSA prion levels in four different brain regions from three patients provided evidence for three different MSA prion strains. Attempts to demonstrate α-synuclein prions in brain homogenates from Parkinson’s disease patients were unsuccessful, identifying an important biological difference between the two synucleinopathies. Partial purification of tau and α-synuclein prions facilitated measuring the levels of these protein pathogens in human brains. Our studies should facilitate investigations of the pathogenesis of both tau and α-synuclein prion disorders as well as help decipher the basic biology of those prions that attack the CNS. PMID:26286986

  6. Equipment for large-scale mammalian cell culture.

    PubMed

    Ozturk, Sadettin S

    2014-01-01

    This chapter provides information on commonly used equipment in industrial mammalian cell culture, with an emphasis on bioreactors. The actual equipment used in the cell culture process can vary from one company to another, but the main steps remain the same. The process involves expansion of cells in seed train and inoculation train processes followed by cultivation of cells in a production bioreactor. Process and equipment options for each stage of the cell culture process are introduced and examples are provided. Finally, the use of disposables during seed train and cell culture production is discussed. PMID:24429549

  7. Characterizing the mechanics of cultured cell monolayers

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Loic; Bellis, Julien; Baum, Buzz; Kabla, Alexandre J.; Charras, Guillaume T.

    2012-01-01

    One-cell-thick monolayers are the simplest tissues in multicellular organisms, yet they fulfill critical roles in development and normal physiology. In early development, embryonic morphogenesis results largely from monolayer rearrangement and deformation due to internally generated forces. Later, monolayers act as physical barriers separating the internal environment from the exterior and must withstand externally applied forces. Though resisting and generating mechanical forces is an essential part of monolayer function, simple experimental methods to characterize monolayer mechanical properties are lacking. Here, we describe a system for tensile testing of freely suspended cultured monolayers that enables the examination of their mechanical behavior at multi-, uni-, and subcellular scales. Using this system, we provide measurements of monolayer elasticity and show that this is two orders of magnitude larger than the elasticity of their isolated cellular components. Monolayers could withstand more than a doubling in length before failing through rupture of intercellular junctions. Measurement of stress at fracture enabled a first estimation of the average force needed to separate cells within truly mature monolayers, approximately ninefold larger than measured in pairs of isolated cells. As in single cells, monolayer mechanical properties were strongly dependent on the integrity of the actin cytoskeleton, myosin, and intercellular adhesions interfacing adjacent cells. High magnification imaging revealed that keratin filaments became progressively stretched during extension, suggesting they participate in monolayer mechanics. This multiscale study of monolayer response to deformation enabled by our device provides the first quantitative investigation of the link between monolayer biology and mechanics. PMID:22991459

  8. Purification and culture of oligodendrocyte lineage cells.

    PubMed

    Dugas, Jason C; Emery, Ben

    2013-09-01

    Oligodendrocytes are the cells of the vertebrate central nervous system responsible for forming myelin sheaths, which are essential for the rapid propagation of action potential. The formation of oligodendrocytes and myelin sheaths is tightly regulated, both temporally and spatially, by a number of extracellular and intracellular factors. For example, notch ligands, thyroid hormones, and mitogens such as platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and fibroblast growth factor (FGF) can all interact with oligodendrocyte precursor cell-expressed receptors to impact proliferation, differentiation, and myelin gene expression. To facilitate oligodendrocyte biology research, we have developed a technique using immunopanning to isolate different stages of the oligodendrocyte lineage, oligodendrocyte precursor cells and/or postmitotic oligodendrocytes, from postnatal rat or mouse brains. These cells can be cultured in defined, serum-free media in conditions that either promote differentiation into mature oligodendrocytes or continued proliferation as immature oligodendrocyte precursors. These cells represent an ideal system in which to study the regulation of oligodendrocyte proliferation, migration, differentiation, myelin gene expression, or other fundamental aspects of oligodendrocyte biology. PMID:24003197

  9. Oxygenation of intensive cell-culture system.

    PubMed

    Emery, A N; Jan, D C; al-Rubeai, M

    1995-11-01

    The abilities of various methods of oxygenation to meet the demands of high-cell-density culture were investigated using a spin filter perfusion system in a bench-top bioreactor. Oxygen demand at high cell density could not be met by sparging with air inside a spin filter (oxygen transfer values in this condition were comparable with those for surface aeration). Sparging with air outside a spin filter gave adequate oxygen transfer for the support of cell concentrations above 10(7) ml-1 in fully aerobic conditions but the addition of antifoam to control foaming caused blockage of the spinfilter mesh. Bubble-free aeration through immersed silicone tubing with pure oxygen gave similar oxygen transfer rates to that of sparging with air but without the problems of bubble damage and fouling of the spin filter. A supra-optimal level of dissolved oxygen (478% air saturation) inhibited cell growth. However, cells could recover from this stress and reach high density after reduction of the dissolved oxygen level to 50% air saturation. PMID:8590652

  10. On the measurement of human osteosarcoma cell elastic modulus using shear assay experiments.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yifang; Bly, Randy; Moore, Will; Gao, Zhan; Cuitino, Alberto M; Soboyejo, Wole

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a method for determining the elastic modulus of human osteosarcoma (HOS) cells. The method involves a combination of shear assay experiments and finite element analysis. Following in-situ observations of cell deformation during shear assay experiments, a digital image correlation (DIC) technique was used to determine the local displacement and strain fields. Finite element analysis was then used to determine the Young's moduli of HOS cells. This involved a match of the maximum shear stresses estimated from the experimental shear assay measurements and those calculated from finite element simulations. PMID:17200819

  11. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-01-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays. PMID:26669749

  12. Development of a pneumatically driven active cover lid for multi-well microplates for use in perfusion three-dimensional cell culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Song-Bin; Chou, Dean; Chang, Yu-Han; Li, Ke-Cing; Chiu, Tzu-Keng; Ventikos, Yiannis; Wu, Min-Hsien

    2015-12-01

    Before microfluidic-based cell culture models can be practically utilized for bioassays, there is a need for a transitional cell culture technique that can improve conventional cell culture models. To address this, a hybrid cell culture system integrating an active cover lid and a multi-well microplate was proposed to achieve perfusion 3-D cell culture. In this system, a microfluidic-based pneumatically-driven liquid transport mechanism was integrated into the active cover lid to realize 6-unit culture medium perfusion. Experimental results revealed that the flow of culture medium could be pneumatically driven in a flow-rate uniform manner. We used the system to successfully perform a perfusion 3-D cell culture of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for up to 16 days. Moreover, we investigated the effects of various cell culture models on the physiology of MSCs. The physiological nature of MSCs can vary with respect to the cell culture model used. Using the perfusion 3-D cell culture format might affect the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of MSCs. Overall, we have developed a cell culture system that can achieve multi-well microplate-based perfusion 3-D cell culture in an efficient, cost-effective, and user-friendly manner. These features could facilitate the widespread application of perfusion cell culture models for cell-based assays.

  13. Probing Hypoxia-Induced Staurosporine Resistance in Prostate Cancer Cells with a Microfluidic Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Khanal, Grishma; Hiemstra, Scott

    2014-01-01

    A microfluidic system for cell culture and drug response studies was developed to elucidate the effects of hypoxia on drug susceptibility. Drug response studies were performed in prostate cancer cells and Ramos B cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions. A vacuum actuated microfluidic culture device was used for cell culture and PC3 cells were cultured in the chip up to 16 hours. Cells were treated with several concentrations of staurosporine and apoptosis was assayed using the fluorescent probes MitoTracker Red and Annexin-V. For hypoxic samples, the chip was placed in a hypoxia chamber and pre-conditioned at <1% oxygen before inducing the cells with staurosporine. Cells exposed to 2 μM staurosporine were 32% ± 10% apoptotic under normoxic conditions but only 1.5% ± 12% apoptotic under hypoxic conditions. As little as 1 hour of hypoxic preconditioning increased drug resistance. Cell apoptosis correlated with drug dose, although in each case hypoxia reduced the apoptotic fraction significantly. Given the rapid nature of cell adaptation to hypoxia, this chip and analysis approach can be used to identify compounds that can induce cell death in hypoxic tumor cells rapidly. PMID:24479128

  14. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, Robert E.; Schroedl, Nancy A.; Gonda, Steve R.; Hartzell, Charles R.

    1994-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by non-myocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA designed High-Aspect-Ratio-Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment which allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells in cultured in HARV's adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARV's using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar, however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissue-like organizations of cardiac cells in simulated microgravity.

  15. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akins, R. E.; Schroedl, N. A.; Gonda, S. R.; Hartzell, C. R.

    1997-01-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro.

  16. Neonatal rat heart cells cultured in simulated microgravity.

    PubMed

    Akins, R E; Schroedl, N A; Gonda, S R; Hartzell, C R

    1997-05-01

    In vitro characteristics of cardiac cells cultured in simulated microgravity are reported. Tissue culture methods performed at unit gravity constrain cells to propagate, differentiate, and interact in a two-dimensional (2D) plane. Neonatal rat cardiac cells in 2D culture organize predominantly as bundles of cardiomyocytes with the intervening areas filled by nonmyocyte cell types. Such cardiac cell cultures respond predictably to the addition of exogenous compounds, and in many ways they represent an excellent in vitro model system. The gravity-induced 2D organization of the cells, however, does not accurately reflect the distribution of cells in the intact tissue. We have begun characterizations of a three-dimensional (3D) culturing system designed to mimic microgravity. The NASA-designed High-Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactors provide a low shear environment that allows cells to be cultured in static suspension. HARV-3D cultures were prepared on microcarrier beads and compared to control-2D cultures using a combination of microscopic and biochemical techniques. Both systems were uniformly inoculated and medium exchanged at standard intervals. Cells in control cultures adhered to the polystyrene surface of the tissue culture dishes and exhibited typical 2D organization. Cells cultured in HARVs adhered to microcarrier beads, the beads aggregated into defined clusters containing 8 to 15 beads per cluster, and the clusters exhibited distinct 3D layers: myocytes and fibroblasts appeared attached to the surfaces of beads and were overlaid by an outer cell type. In addition, cultures prepared in HARVs using alternative support matrices also displayed morphological formations not seen in control cultures. Generally, the cells prepared in HARV and control cultures were similar; however, the dramatic alterations in 3D organization recommend the HARV as an ideal vessel for the generation of tissuelike organization of cardiac cells in vitro. PMID:9196891

  17. Mechanisms of the proliferation and differentiation of plant cells in cell culture systems.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, H; Ito, M; Sugiyama, M; Komamine, A

    1994-06-01

    Plant cell functions have been investigated in various cell culture systems. In this review, we summarize results obtained from investigations of gene expression during the cell cycle in synchronized cultures of Catharanthus roseus during somatic embryogenesis in suspension cultures of Daucus carota, during organogenesis in tissue cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana and during the transdifferentiation of isolated mesophyll cells to tracheary elements in single-cell cultures of Zinnia elegans. PMID:7981037

  18. Purified Culture Systems for Bovine Oviductal Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    YAMAMOTO, Yuki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshihiko; OKUDA, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Isolated stromal cells from the ampullary and isthmic parts of bovine oviductal tissues were cultured in monolayer and spheroid (cell aggregate) systems. Prostaglandin F2? (PGF) plays a crucial role in oviductal contraction and is produced by oviductal epithelial cells in cattle. Since stromal cells of many organs produce PGF, PGF production by bovine oviductal stromal cells was investigated. After PGF synthesis was confirmed, the utility of isolation and culture methods for oviductal stromal cells was evaluated by PGF production in the present study. The homogeneity of the cells was > 99%. PGF production of the cells was increased by tumor necrosis factor-?. The stromal cells aggregated and formed a spheroid by the treatments with several reagents. PGF production was higher in the spheroid culture than in the monolayer culture. The isolation and culture methods described here will facilitate studies of the physiological function of bovine oviductal stromal cells. PMID:24096613

  19. Metabolic flux rewiring in mammalian cell cultures

    PubMed Central

    Young, Jamey D.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous cell lines (CCLs) engage in “wasteful” glucose and glutamine metabolism that leads to accumulation of inhibitory byproducts, primarily lactate and ammonium. Advances in techniques for mapping intracellular carbon fluxes and profiling global changes in enzyme expression have led to a deeper understanding of the molecular drivers underlying these metabolic alterations. However, recent studies have revealed that CCLs are not necessarily entrenched in a glycolytic or glutaminolytic phenotype, but instead can shift their metabolism toward increased oxidative metabolism as nutrients become depleted and/or growth rate slows. Progress to understand dynamic flux regulation in CCLs has enabled the development of novel strategies to force cultures into desirable metabolic phenotypes, by combining fed-batch feeding strategies with direct metabolic engineering of host cells. PMID:23726154

  20. Microfluidic Probe for Single-Cell Lysis and Analysis in Adherent Tissue Culture

    PubMed Central

    Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Han, Jongyoon

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis provides information critical to understanding key disease processes that are characterized by significant cellular heterogeneity. Few current methods allow single-cell measurement without removing cells from the context of interest, which not only destroys contextual information but also may perturb the process under study. Here we present a microfluidic probe that lyses single adherent cells from standard tissue culture and captures the contents to perform single-cell biochemical assays. We use this probe to measure kinase and housekeeping protein activities, separately or simultaneously, from single human hepatocellular carcinoma cells in adherent culture. This tool has the valuable ability to perform measurements that clarify connections between extracellular context, signals and responses, especially in cases where only a few cells exhibit a characteristic of interest. PMID:24594667

  1. Data of a fluorescent imaging-based analysis of anti-cancer drug effects on three-dimensional cultures of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Itou, Junji; Tanaka, Sunao; Li, Wenzhao; Matsumoto, Yoshiaki; Sato, Fumiaki; Toi, Masakazu

    2015-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) cell culture is a powerful tool to study cell growth under 3D condition. To perform a simple test for anti-cancer drugs in 3D culture, visualization of non-proliferated cells is required. We propose a fluorescent imaging-based assay to analyze cancer cell proliferation in 3D culture. We used a pulse-labeling technique with a photoconvertible fluorescent protein Kaede to identify non-proliferated cells. This assay allows us to observe change in cell proliferation in 3D culture by simple imaging. Using this assay, we obtained the data of the effects of anti-cancer drugs, 5-fluorouracil and PD0332991 in a breast cancer cell line, MCF-7.

  2. Bioluminescent, Nonlytic, Real-Time Cell Viability Assay and Use in Inhibitor Screening

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wenhui; Meisenheimer, Poncho; Vidugiris, Gediminas; Cali, James J.; Gautam, Prson; Wennerberg, Krister; Vidugiriene, Jolanta

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Real-time continuous monitoring of cellular processes offers distinct advantages over traditional endpoint assays. A comprehensive representation of the changes occurring in live cells over the entire length of an experiment provides information about the biological status of the cell and informs decisions about the timing of treatments or the use of other functional endpoint assays. We describe a homogeneous, nonlytic, bioluminescent assay that measures cell viability in real time. This time-dependent measurement allowed us to monitor cell health for 72 h from the same test samples, distinguish differential cell growth, and investigate drug mechanism of action by analyzing time- and dose-dependent drug effects. The real-time measurements also allowed us to detect cell death immediately (>75% signal decrease within 15 min of digitonin addition), analyze drug potency versus efficacy, and identify cytostatic versus toxic drug effects. We screened an oncology compound library (Z′ = 0.7) and identified compounds with varying activity at different time points (1.6% of the library showed activity within 3 h, whereas 35.4% showed a response by 47 h). The assay compared well with orthogonal endpoint cell viability assays and additionally provided data at multiple time points and the opportunity to multiplex assays on the same cells. To test the advantage of time-dependent measurements to direct optimal timing of downstream applications, we used the real-time cell viability assay to determine the ideal time to measure caspase activity by monitoring the onset of cell death and multiplexing a luminescent caspase activation assay on the same test samples. PMID:26383544

  3. Recombinant Protein Production and Insect Cell Culture and Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spaulding, Glenn F. (Inventor); Goodwin, Thomas J. (Inventor); OConnor, Kim C. (Inventor); Francis, Karen M. (Inventor); Andrews, Angela D. (Inventor); Prewett, Tracey L. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A process has been developed for recombinant production of selected polypeptides using transformed insect cells cultured in a horizontally rotating culture vessel modulated to create low shear conditions. A metabolically transformed insect cell line is produced using the culture procedure regardless of genetic transformation. The recombinant polypeptide can be produced by an alternative process using virtually infected or stably transformed insect cells containing a gene encoding the described polypeptide. The insect cells can also be a host for viral production.

  4. Using a split luciferase assay (SLA) to measure the kinetics of cell-cell fusion mediated by herpes simplex virus glycoproteins.

    PubMed

    Saw, Wan Ting; Matsuda, Zene; Eisenberg, Roselyn J; Cohen, Gary H; Atanasiu, Doina

    2015-11-15

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) entry and cell-cell fusion require the envelope proteins gD, gH/gL and gB. We propose that receptor-activated conformational changes to gD activate gH/gL, which then triggers gB (the fusogen) into an active form. To study this dynamic process, we have adapted a dual split protein assay originally developed to study the kinetics of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) mediated fusion. This assay uses a chimera of split forms of renilla luciferase (RL) and green fluorescent protein (GFP). Effector cells are co-transfected with the glycoproteins and one of the split reporters. Receptor-bearing target cells are transfected with the second reporter. Co-culture results in fusion and restoration of RL, which can convert a membrane permeable substrate into a luminescent product, thereby enabling one to monitor initiation and extent of fusion in live cells in real time. Restoration of GFP can also be studied by fluorescence microscopy. Two sets of split reporters have been developed: the original one allows one to measure fusion kinetics over hours whereas the more recent version was designed to enhance the sensitivity of RL activity allowing one to monitor both initiation and rates of fusion in minutes. Here, we provide a detailed, step-by-step protocol for the optimization of the assay (which we call the SLA for split luciferase assay) using the HSV system. We also show several examples of the power of this assay to examine both the initiation and kinetics of cell-cell fusion by wild type forms of gD, gB, gH/gL of both serotypes of HSV as well as the effect of mutations and antibodies that alter the kinetics of fusion. The SLA can be applied to other viral systems that carry out membrane fusion. PMID:26022509

  5. Assessment of cell death studies by monitoring hydrogen peroxide in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Irina; Prell, Erik; Weiwad, Matthias

    2014-07-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) has been widely used to study the oxidative stress response. However, H2O2 is unstable and easily decomposes into H2O and O2. Consequently, a wide range of exposure times and treatment concentrations has been described in the literature. In the present study, we established a ferrous oxidation-xylenol orange (FOX) assay, which was originally described for food and body liquids, as a method for the precise quantification of H2O2 concentrations in cell culture media. We observed that the presence of FCS and high cell densities significantly accelerate the decomposition of H2O2, therefore acting as a protection against cell death by accidental necrosis. PMID:24747006

  6. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures.

    PubMed

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E A; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O'Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator. PMID:26915695

  7. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures

    PubMed Central

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E. A.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O’Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-01-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator. PMID:26915695

  8. Label-free imaging to study phenotypic behavioural traits of cells in complex co-cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suman, Rakesh; Smith, Gabrielle; Hazel, Kathryn E. A.; Kasprowicz, Richard; Coles, Mark; O'Toole, Peter; Chawla, Sangeeta

    2016-02-01

    Time-lapse imaging is a fundamental tool for studying cellular behaviours, however studies of primary cells in complex co-culture environments often requires fluorescent labelling and significant light exposure that can perturb their natural function over time. Here, we describe ptychographic phase imaging that permits prolonged label-free time-lapse imaging of microglia in the presence of neurons and astrocytes, which better resembles in vivo microenvironments. We demonstrate the use of ptychography as an assay to study the phenotypic behaviour of microglial cells in primary neuronal co-cultures through the addition of cyclosporine A, a potent immune-modulator.

  9. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Dohmen, Amy J. C.; Swartz, Justin E.; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W. M.; Willems, Stefan M.; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L.

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. PMID:26343729

  10. Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review.

    PubMed

    Dohmen, Amy J C; Swartz, Justin E; Van Den Brekel, Michiel W M; Willems, Stefan M; Spijker, René; Neefjes, Jacques; Zuur, Charlotte L

    2015-01-01

    Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. PMID:26343729

  11. Engineering and exploitation of a fluorescent HIV-1 gp120 for live cell CD4 binding assays

    SciTech Connect

    Costantini, Lindsey M.; Irvin, Susan C.; Kennedy, Steven C.; Guo, Feng; Goldstein, Harris; Herold, Betsy C.; Snapp, Erik L.

    2015-02-15

    The HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein, gp120, binds the host cell receptor, CD4, in the initial step of HIV viral entry and infection. This process is an appealing target for the development of inhibitory drugs and neutralizing antibodies. To study gp120 binding and intracellular trafficking, we engineered a fluorescent fusion of the humanized gp120 JRFL HIV-1 variant and GFP. Gp120-sfGFP is glycosylated with human sugars, robustly expressed, and secreted from cultured human cells. Protein dynamics, quality control, and trafficking can be visualized in live cells. The fusion protein can be readily modified with different gp120 variants or fluorescent proteins. Finally, secreted gp120-sfGFP enables a sensitive and easy binding assay that can quantitatively screen potential inhibitors of gp120-CD4 binding on live cells via fluorescence imaging or laser scanning cytometry. This adaptable research tool should aid in studies of gp120 cell biology and the development of novel anti-HIV drugs. - Highlights: • Development of fluorescent protein labeled HIV-1 envelope gp120. • Imaging of gp120 dynamics and trafficking in live cells. • Quantitative visual assay of antibody-mediated inhibition of gp120 binding to CD4 on live cells.

  12. Differential osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells co-cultured with human osteoblasts on polymeric microfiber scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Rozila, Ismail; Azari, Pedram; Munirah, Sha'ban; Wan Safwani, Wan Kamarul Zaman; Gan, Seng Neon; Nur Azurah, Abdul Ghani; Jahendran, Jeevanan; Pingguan-Murphy, Belinda; Chua, Kien Hui

    2016-02-01

    The osteogenic potential of human adipose-derived stem cells (HADSCs) co-cultured with human osteoblasts (HOBs) using selected HADSCs/HOBs ratios of 1:1, 2:1, and 1:2, respectively, is evaluated. The HADSCs/HOBs were seeded on electrospun three-dimensional poly[(R)-3-hydroxybutyric acid] (PHB) blended with bovine-derived hydroxyapatite (BHA). Monocultures of HADSCs and HOBs were used as control groups. The effects of PHB-BHA scaffold on cell proliferation and cell morphology were assessed by AlamarBlue assay and field emission scanning electron microscopy. Cell differentiation, cell mineralization, and osteogenic-related gene expression of co-culture HADSCs/HOBs were examined by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay, alizarin Red S assay, and quantitative real time PCR, respectively. The results showed that co-culture of HADSCs/HOBs, 1:1 grown into PHB-BHA promoted better cell adhesion, displayed a significant higher cell proliferation, higher production of ALP, extracellular mineralization and osteogenic-related gene expression of run-related transcription factor, bone sialoprotein, osteopontin, and osteocalcin compared to other co-culture groups. This result also suggests that the use of electrospun PHB-BHA in a co-culture HADSCs/HOBs system may serve as promising approach to facilitate osteogenic differentiation activity of HADSCs through direct cell-to-cell contact with HOBs. PMID:26414782

  13. Effect of KnockOut serum replacement on germ cell development of immature testis tissue culture.

    PubMed

    Liu, Feng; Cai, Chunhong; Wu, Xin; Cheng, Yanxia; Lin, Tao; Wei, Guanghui; He, Dawei

    2016-01-15

    To compare KnockOut serum replacement (KSR) and fetal bovine serum (FBS) for the development of germ cells. Testicular tissues from Sprague-Dawley rats were cultured for 4 weeks in culture media supplemented with FBS or KSR. Tissue area was measured at the beginning and end of the culturing period. Testicular histology, development of the germ cells, and the diameter of seminiferous tubules were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. After 4 weeks in culture, apoptosis and expression of the stage-specific spermatogenesis marker genes Kit, Sycp3, and Crisp1 were assayed. Tissues cultured in KSR-supplemented media were able to sustain growth and gradually increase seminiferous tubule diameter during the culture period. In addition, spermatogonia, primary spermatocytes, secondary spermatocytes, and round spermatids were observed after 4 weeks in culture, and reverse transcription-PCR confirmed expression of the marker genes. In comparison, tissues cultured in FBS-supplemented media showed dwindling testicular organization, necrotic seminiferous tubules, and expression of Kit, but inconsistent expression of Sycp3 and Crisp1 KnockOut serum replacement outperforms FBS as a growth media supplements for culturing immature spermatogonial tissue culture. PMID:26474686

  14. Three-dimensional culture may promote cell reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jin; Chen, Lei; Luo, Guanzheng; Dai, Bin; Wang, Xiujie; Dai, Jianwu

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells reside in stem cells niches, which maintain the balance of self-renewal and differentiation of stem cells. In stem cell niches, cell-cell, cell-extracellular matrix interactions and diffusible signals are important elements. However, another pivotal element is that localized and diffusible signals are all organized as three-dimensional (3-D) structures, which is easily neglected by in vitro cell biology research. Under 3-D culture conditions, the morphology of cells exhibited differently from cultured in traditional two-dimensional (2-D) conditions. Under 3-D culture conditions, the self-renewal and pluripotency of neural stem cells (NSCs) and bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) were enhanced compared with culturing under 2-D conditions. 3-D cultures could change the transcriptional profile of NSCs compared with 2-D cultures. We hypothesized that 3-D cultures could reprogram mature cells such as fibroblasts to an immature state, like the pluripotent stem cells. The primary results indicated that several ES marker genes were upregulated by 3-D cultures. Though further experiments are needed, this work may provide a method of reprogramming mature cells without gene modifications. PMID:23820263

  15. Electrochemical sensors, MTT and immunofluorescence assays for monitoring the proliferation effects of cissus populnea extracts on Sertoli cells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background We describe the development of an electrochemical sensor array for monitoring the proliferation effects of cissus populnea plant extracts on TM4 Sertoli cells. Methods The proliferation activities of the extracts on Sertoli cells were studied using a high-throughput electrochemical sensor array (DOX-96) and the analytical sensor characteristics were compared with conventional colorimetric MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) assay and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results This work shows that there is a definite positive trend in the proliferation effect of the extract of Cissus populnea on the TM4 Sertoli cells. All of the three techniques confirmed that the most effective concentration for the proliferation is 10 ppm. At this concentration, the proliferation effect was established around 120% for both DOX-96 and MTT techniques, whereas fluorescence assays showed a higher level (120-150%). DOX-96 showed a lower limit of detection (1.25 × 10(4) cells/ml); whereas the LOD recorded for both MTT and fluorescence techniques was 2.5 × 10(4) cells/ml. Visual examination of the cells by means of confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed the proliferation of Sertoli cells as was determined using the MTT assay. This investigation provides a confident interpretation of the results and proved that the most effective concentration for the proliferation using Cissus populnea plant extract is 10 ppm. Conclusions Overall, the DOX results compared well with the conventional methods of checking proliferation of cells. The fascinating feature of the sensor array is the ability to provide continuous proliferation experiments with no additional reagents including 96 simultaneous electrochemical experiments. The use of the DOX-96 could reduce a typical bioassay time by 20-fold. Thus the DOX-96 can be used as both a research tool and for practical cell culture monitoring. PMID:21575213

  16. A High-Throughput Genetic Complementation Assay in Yeast Cells Identified Selective Inhibitors of Sphingosine Kinase 1 Not Found Using a Cell-Free Enzyme Assay.

    PubMed

    Kashem, Mohammed A; Kennedy, Charles A; Fogarty, Kylie E; Dimock, Janice R; Zhang, Yunlong; Sanville-Ross, Mary L; Skow, Donna J; Brunette, Steven R; Swantek, Jennifer L; Hummel, Heidi S; Swindle, John; Nelson, Richard M

    2016-01-01

    Sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) is a lipid kinase that phosphorylates sphingosine to produce the bioactive sphingolipid, sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), and therefore represents a potential drug target for a variety of pathological processes such as fibrosis, inflammation, and cancer. We developed two assays compatible with high-throughput screening to identify small-molecule inhibitors of SphK1: a purified component enzyme assay and a genetic complementation assay in yeast cells. The biochemical enzyme assay measures the phosphorylation of sphingosine-fluorescein to S1P-fluorescein by recombinant human full-length SphK1 using an immobilized metal affinity for phosphochemicals (IMAP) time-resolved fluorescence resonance energy transfer format. The yeast assay employs an engineered strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in which the human gene encoding SphK1 replaced the yeast ortholog and quantitates cell viability by measuring intracellular adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) using a luciferase-based luminescent readout. In this assay, expression of human SphK1 was toxic, and the resulting yeast cell death was prevented by SphK1 inhibitors. We optimized both assays in a 384-well format and screened ?10(6) compounds selected from the Boehringer Ingelheim library. The biochemical IMAP high-throughput screen identified 5,561 concentration-responsive hits, most of which were ATP competitive and not selective over sphingosine kinase 2 (SphK2). The yeast screen identified 205 concentration-responsive hits, including several distinct compound series that were selective against SphK2 and were not ATP competitive. PMID:26426296

  17. Psychoneuroimmunology and natural killer cells: the chromium release whole blood assay.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, Mary Ann; Barnes, Zachary; Broderick, Gordon; Klimas, Nancy G

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are an essential component of innate immunity. These lymphocytes are also sensitive barometers of the effects of endogenous and exogenous stressors on the immune system. This chapter will describe a chromium ((51)Cr) release bioassay designed to measure the target cell killing capacity of NK cells (NKCC). Key features of the cytotoxicity assay are that it is done with whole blood and that numbers of effector cells are determined for each sample by flow cytometry and lymphocyte count. Effector cells are defined as CD3-CD56+ lymphocytes. Target cells are the K562 eyrthroleukemia cell line. Killing capacity is defined as number of target cells killed per effector cell, at an effector cell/target cell ratio of 1:1 during a 4 h in vitro assay. PMID:22933153

  18. Gelatin methacrylamide as coating material in cell culture.

    PubMed

    Egger, Michael; Tovar, Günter E M; Hoch, Eva; Southan, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Unmodified gelatin (uG) is widely used as a coating material in cell culture for improving surface properties. In this study, the authors investigated if gelatin methacrylamide (GM) with a medium degree of methacrylamide modification (GM1.5) and a high degree of methacrylamide modification (GM4) are equally suitable for this purpose. Therefore, gold surfaces were coated with uG, GM1.5, and GM4 by adsorption of the polymers on the surfaces. Coating success was confirmed by spectroscopic ellipsometry, contact angle measurements, surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy (SPRS), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The authors found that upon adsorption of uG, GM1.5, a nd GM4 on gold, thin films with thicknesses of 2.95 nm, 2.50 nm, and 2.26 nm were formed. The coated surfaces showed advancing contact angles of 46° (uG and GM1.5) and 52° (GM4) without alteration of the surface roughness determined by AFM. Protein adsorption taking place on the coated surfaces was measured during contact of the surfaces with fetal calf serum by SPRS. Protein adsorption on the coated surfaces was reduced by the factor of 6.4 (uG), 5.4 (GM1.5), and 4.6 (GM4) compared to gold surfaces. Human fibroblasts cultured on the surfaces showed excellent viability shown by water soluble tetrazolium salt assay as well as live/dead staining with propidium iodide and fluorescein diacetate. No cytotoxic effects of the GM coated surfaces were observed, giving rise to the conclusion that GMs are suitable materials as coatings in cell culture. PMID:27177620

  19. Lipoprotein binding to cultured human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Krempler, F; Kostner, G M; Friedl, W; Paulweber, B; Bauer, H; Sandhofer, F

    1987-01-01

    Binding of various 125I-lipoproteins to hepatic receptors was studied on cultured human hepatoma cells (Hep G2). Chylomicrons, isolated from a chylothorax, chylomicron remnants, hypertriglyceridemic very low-density lipoproteins, normotriglyceridemic very low-density lipoproteins (NTG-VLDL), their remnants, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), and HDL-E (an Apo E-rich high-density lipoprotein isolated from the plasma of a patient with primary biliary cirrhosis) were bound by high-affinity receptors. Chylomicron remnants and HDL-E were bound with the highest affinity. The results, obtained from competitive binding experiments, are consistent with the existence of two distinct receptors on Hep G2 cells: (a) a remnant receptor capable of high-affinity binding of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins and HDL-E, but not of Apo E free LDL, and (b) a LDL receptor capable of high-affinity binding of LDL, NTG-VLDL, and HDL-E. Specific binding of Apo E-free LDL was completely abolished in the presence of 3 mM EDTA, indicating that binding to the LDL receptor is calcium dependent. Specific binding of chylomicron remnants was not inhibited by the presence of even 10 mM EDTA. Preincubation of the Hep G2 cells in lipoprotein-containing medium resulted in complete suppression of LDL receptors but did not affect the remnant receptors. Hep G2 cells seem to be a suitable model for the study of hepatic receptors for lipoprotein in man. Images PMID:3038957

  20. [Protection of cultured mammalian cells by rebamipide].

    PubMed

    Antoku, S; Aramaki, R; Tanaka, H; Kusumoto, N

    1997-06-01

    Rebamipide which is used as a drug for gastritis and stomach ulcer has large capability for OH radical scavenging. It is expected that rebamipide has protective effect against ionizing radiations. The present paper deals with protective effect of rebamipide for cultured mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiations. As rebamipide is insoluble in water, three solvents were used to dissolve. Rebamipide dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), dimethyl formamide (DMFA) and 0.02 N NaOH was added to the cells in Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum and the cells were irradiated with X-rays. After irradiation, the cells were trypsinized, plated in MEM with 10% fetal calf serum and incubated for 7 days in a CO2 incubator to form colonies. Rebamipide dissolved in 0.02 N NaOH exhibited the protective effect expected its OH radical scavenging capability. However, the protective effect of rebamipide dissolved in DMSO was about half of that expected by its radical scavenging capability and that of rebamipide dissolved in DMFA was not observed. Uptake of rebamipide labeled with 14C increased with increasing contact time with rebamipide. These rebamipide mainly distributed in nucleous rather than cytoplasm. PMID:9248142

  1. Hydrogels as Extracellular Matrix Mimics for 3D Cell Culture

    PubMed Central

    Tibbitt, Mark W.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2010-01-01

    Methods for culturing mammalian cells ex vivo are increasingly needed to study cell and tissue physiology and to grow replacement tissue for regenerative medicine. Two-dimensional culture has been the paradigm for typical in vitro cell culture; however, it has been demonstrated that cells behave more natively when cultured in three-dimensional environments. Permissive, synthetic hydrogels and promoting, natural hydrogels have become popular as three-dimensional cell culture platforms; yet, both of these systems possess limitations. In this perspective, we discuss the use of both synthetic and natural hydrogels as scaffolds for three-dimensional cell culture as well as synthetic hydrogels that incorporate sophisticated biochemical and mechanical cues as mimics of the native extracellular matrix. Ultimately, advances in synthetic–biologic hydrogel hybrids are needed to provide robust platforms for investigating cell physiology and fabricating tissue outside of the organism. PMID:19472329

  2. Differential marker expression by cultures rich in mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells have properties that make them amenable to therapeutic use. However, the acceptance of mesenchymal stem cells in clinical practice requires standardized techniques for their specific isolation. To date, there are no conclusive marker (s) for the exclusive isolation of mesenchymal stem cells. Our aim was to identify markers differentially expressed between mesenchymal stem cell and non-stem cell mesenchymal cell cultures. We compared and contrasted the phenotype of tissue cultures in which mesenchymal stem cells are rich and rare. By initially assessing mesenchymal stem cell differentiation, we established that bone marrow and breast adipose cultures are rich in mesenchymal stem cells while, in our hands, foreskin fibroblast and olfactory tissue cultures contain rare mesenchymal stem cells. In particular, olfactory tissue cells represent non-stem cell mesenchymal cells. Subsequently, the phenotype of the tissue cultures were thoroughly assessed using immuno-fluorescence, flow-cytometry, proteomics, antibody arrays and qPCR. Results Our analysis revealed that all tissue cultures, regardless of differentiation potential, demonstrated remarkably similar phenotypes. Importantly, it was also observed that common mesenchymal stem cell markers, and fibroblast-associated markers, do not discriminate between mesenchymal stem cell and non-stem cell mesenchymal cell cultures. Examination and comparison of the phenotypes of mesenchymal stem cell and non-stem cell mesenchymal cell cultures revealed three differentially expressed markers – CD24, CD108 and CD40. Conclusion We indicate the importance of establishing differential marker expression between mesenchymal stem cells and non-stem cell mesenchymal cells in order to determine stem cell specific markers. PMID:24304471

  3. Biology on a Chip: Microfabrication for Studying the Behavior of Cultured Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nianzhen; Tourovskaia, Anna; Folch, Albert

    2013-01-01

    The ability to culture cells in vitro has revolutionized hypothesis testing in basic