Science.gov

Sample records for cell generator development

  1. Development of first generation aerospace NiMH cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Lawrence; Dell, Dan; Wu, Tony; Rampel, Guy

    1993-01-01

    Gates Aerospace Batteries in conjunction with Gates Energy Products (GEP) has been developing NiMH technology for aerospace use since 1990. GEP undertook the development of NiMH technology for commercial cell applications in 1987. This program focused on wound cell technology for replacement of current NiCd technology. As an off shoot of this program small, wound cells were used to evaluate initial design options for aerospace prismatic cell designs. Early in 1991, the first aerospace prismatic cell designs were built in a 6 Ah cell configuration. These cells were used to initially characterize performance in prismatic configurations and begin early life cycle testing. Soon after the 6 Ah cells were on test, several 22 Ah cells were built to test other options. The results of testing of these cells were used to identify potential problem areas for long lived cells and develop solutions to those problems. Following these two cell builds, a set of 7 Ah cells was built to evaluate improvements to the technology. To date results from these tests are very promising. Cycle lives in excess of 2,200 LEO cycles at 50 percent DoD were achieved with cells continuing on test. Results from these cell tests are discussed and data presented to demonstrate feasibility of this technology for aerospace programs.

  2. High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph Pierre

    2007-09-30

    This report describes the results of the tubular SOFC development program from August 22, 1997 to September 30, 2007 under the Siemens/U.S. Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement. The technical areas discussed include cell manufacturing development, cell power enhancement, SOFC module and system cost reduction and technology advancement, and our field unit test program. Whereas significant progress has been made toward commercialization, significant effort remains to achieve our cost, performance and reliability targets for successful commercialization.

  3. High Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Generator Development

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph F. Pierre

    2006-08-21

    Work performed during the period February 21, 2006 through August 21, 2006 is summarized herein. During this period, efforts were focused on 5 kWe bundle testing, development of on-cell reformation, the conceptual design of an advanced module, and the development of a manufacturing roadmap for cells and bundles. A 5 kWe SOFC system was built and delivered to the Pennsylvania State University; fabrication of a second 5 kWe SOFC for delivery to Montana State University was initiated. Cell testing and microstructural analysis in support of these efforts was also conducted.

  4. Generation of Functional Thymic Epithelium from Human Embryonic Stem Cells that Supports Host T Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Parent, Audrey V.; Russ, Holger A.; Khan, Imran S.; LaFlam, Taylor N.; Metzger, Todd C.; Anderson, Mark S.; Hebrok, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Inducing immune tolerance to prevent rejection is a key step toward successful engraftment of stem-cell-derived tissue in a clinical setting. Using human pluripotent stem cells to generate thymic epithelial cells (TECs) capable of supporting T cell development represents a promising approach to reach this goal; however, progress toward generating functional TECs has been limited. Here, we describe a robust in vitro method to direct differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into thymic epithelial progenitors (TEPs) by precise regulation of TGFβ, BMP4, RA, Wnt, Shh, and FGF signaling. The hESC-derived TEPs further mature into functional TECs that support T cell development upon transplantation into thymus-deficient mice. Importantly, the engrafted TEPs produce T cells capable of in vitro proliferation as well as in vivo immune responses. Thus, hESC-derived TEP grafts may have broad applications for enhancing engraftment in cell-based therapies as well as restoring age-and stress-related thymic decline. PMID:23684540

  5. HIGH-TEMPERATURE TUBULAR SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL GENERATOR DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    S.E. Veyo

    1998-09-01

    During the Westinghouse/USDOE Cooperative Agreement period of November 1, 1990 through November 30, 1997, the Westinghouse solid oxide fuel cell has evolved from a 16 mm diameter, 50 cm length cell with a peak power of 1.27 watts/cm to the 22 mm diameter, 150 cm length dimensions of today's commercial prototype cell with a peak power of 1.40 watts/cm. Accompanying the increase in size and power density was the elimination of an expensive EVD step in the manufacturing process. Demonstrated performance of Westinghouse's tubular SOFC includes a lifetime cell test which ran for a period in excess of 69,000 hours, and a fully integrated 25 kWe-class system field test which operated for over 13,000 hours at 90% availability with less than 2% performance degradation over the entire period. Concluding the agreement period, a 100 kW SOFC system successfully passed its factory acceptance test in October 1997 and was delivered in November to its demonstration site in Westervoort, The Netherlands.

  6. Development of planar solid oxide fuel cells for power generation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Minh, N.Q.

    1996-04-01

    Planar solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are presently being developed for a variety of electric power generation application. The planar design offers simple cell geometry, high power density, and multiple fabrication and gas manifolding options. Planar SOFC technology has received much attention recently, and significant progress has been made in this area. Recent effort at AlliedSignal has focused on the development of high-performance, lightweight planar SOFCs, having thin-electrolyte films, that can be operated efficiently at reduced temperatures (< 1000{degrees}C). The advantages of reduced-temperature operation include wider material choice (including use of metallic interconnects), expected longer cell life, reduced thermal stress, improved reliability, and reduced fuel cell cost. The key aspect in the development of thin-film SIFCs is to incorporate the thin electrolyte layer into the desired structure of cells in a manner that yields the required characteristics. AlliedSignal has developed a simple and cost-effective method based on tape calendering for the fabrication of thin-electrolyte SOFCs. Thin-electrolyte cells made by tape calendering have shown extraordinary performance, e.g., producing more than 500mW/cm{sup 2} at 700{degrees}C and 800mW/cm{sup 2} at 800{degrees}C with hydrogen as fuel and air is oxidant. thin-electrolyte single cells have been incorporated into a compliant metallic stack structure and operated at reduced and operated at reduced-temperature conditions.

  7. Generation of Recombinant Arenavirus for Vaccine Development in FDA-Approved Vero Cells

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Sobrido, Luis

    2013-01-01

    The development and implementation of arenavirus reverse genetics represents a significant breakthrough in the arenavirus field 4. The use of cell-based arenavirus minigenome systems together with the ability to generate recombinant infectious arenaviruses with predetermined mutations in their genomes has facilitated the investigation of the contribution of viral determinants to the different steps of the arenavirus life cycle, as well as virus-host interactions and mechanisms of arenavirus pathogenesis 1, 3, 11 . In addition, the development of trisegmented arenaviruses has permitted the use of the arenavirus genome to express additional foreign genes of interest, thus opening the possibility of arenavirus-based vaccine vector applications 5 . Likewise, the development of single-cycle infectious arenaviruses capable of expressing reporter genes provides a new experimental tool to improve the safety of research involving highly pathogenic human arenaviruses 16 . The generation of recombinant arenaviruses using plasmid-based reverse genetics techniques has so far relied on the use of rodent cell lines 7,19 , which poses some barriers for the development of Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-licensed vaccine or vaccine vectors. To overcome this obstacle, we describe here the efficient generation of recombinant arenaviruses in FDA-approved Vero cells. PMID:23928556

  8. A Mathematical Model of Granule Cell Generation During Mouse Cerebellum Development.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Shoshana R; Legué, Emilie; Aristizábal, Orlando; Joyner, Alexandra L; Peskin, Charles S; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2016-05-01

    Determining the cellular basis of brain growth is an important problem in developmental neurobiology. In the mammalian brain, the cerebellum is particularly amenable to studies of growth because it contains only a few cell types, including the granule cells, which are the most numerous neuronal subtype. Furthermore, in the mouse cerebellum granule cells are generated from granule cell precursors (gcps) in the external granule layer (EGL), from 1 day before birth until about 2 weeks of age. The complexity of the underlying cellular processes (multiple cell behaviors, three spatial dimensions, time-dependent changes) requires a quantitative framework to be fully understood. In this paper, a differential equation-based model is presented, which can be used to estimate temporal changes in granule cell numbers in the EGL. The model includes the proliferation of gcps and their differentiation into granule cells, as well as the process by which granule cells leave the EGL. Parameters describing these biological processes were derived from fitting the model to histological data. This mathematical model should be useful for understanding altered gcp and granule cell behaviors in mouse mutants with abnormal cerebellar development and cerebellar cancers. PMID:27125657

  9. Imidacloprid Exposure Suppresses Neural Crest Cells Generation during Early Chick Embryo Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao-Jie; Wang, Guang; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Liu, Meng; Chuai, Manli; Lee, Kenneth Ka Ho; He, Xiao-Song; Lu, Da-Xiang; Yang, Xuesong

    2016-06-15

    Imidacloprid is a neonicotinoid pesticide that is widely used in the control pests found on crops and fleas on pets. However, it is still unclear whether imidacloprid exposure could affect early embryo development-despite some studies having been conducted on the gametes. In this study, we demonstrated that imidacloprid exposure could lead to abnormal craniofacial osteogenesis in the developing chick embryo. Cranial neural crest cells (NCCs) are the progenitor cells of the chick cranial skull. We found that the imidacloprid exposure retards the development of gastrulating chick embryos. HNK-1, PAX7, and Ap-2α immunohistological stainings indicated that cranial NCCs generation was inhibited after imidacloprid exposure. Double immunofluorescent staining (Ap-2α and PHIS3 or PAX7 and c-Caspase3) revealed that imidacloprid exposure inhibited both NCC proliferation and apoptosis. In addition, it inhibited NCCs production by repressing Msx1 and BMP4 expression in the developing neural tube and by altering expression of EMT-related adhesion molecules (Cad6B, E-Cadherin, and N-cadherin) in the developing neural crests. We also determined that imidacloprid exposure suppressed cranial NCCs migration and their ability to differentiate. In sum, we have provided experimental evidence that imidacloprid exposure during embryogenesis disrupts NCCs development, which in turn causes defective cranial bone development. PMID:27195532

  10. High-temperature solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) generator development project: Environmental Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-08-01

    The proposed project involves research, development, fabrication, and testing of solid oxide fuel cells/generators. All of the work, with the exception of various SOFC generator tests, would be conducted at two existing permitted Westinghouse facilities in the greater metropolitan Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania area. The DOE has prepared this Environmental Assessment (EA). This site-specific analysis addresses the two existing permitted Westinghouse facilities. The sources of information for this EA include the following: the technical proposal submitted as part of the assistance application by the Westinghouse Electric Corporation; discussions with the Westinghouse staff and information provided on the sites to be utilized; and site visits during work conducted under the prior Westinghouse effort with DOE.

  11. Neural commitment of human pluripotent stem cells under defined conditions recapitulates neural development and generates patient-specific neural cells.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Tiago G; Duarte, Sofia T; Ghazvini, Mehrnaz; Gaspar, Cláudia; Santos, Diana C; Porteira, Ana R; Rodrigues, Gonçalo M C; Haupt, Simone; Rombo, Diogo M; Armstrong, Judith; Sebastião, Ana M; Gribnau, Joost; Garcia-Cazorla, Àngels; Brüstle, Oliver; Henrique, Domingos; Cabral, Joaquim M S; Diogo, Maria Margarida

    2015-10-01

    Standardization of culture methods for human pluripotent stem cell (PSC) neural differentiation can greatly contribute to the development of novel clinical advancements through the comprehension of neurodevelopmental diseases. Here, we report an approach that reproduces neural commitment from human induced pluripotent stem cells using dual-SMAD inhibition under defined conditions in a vitronectin-based monolayer system. By employing this method it was possible to obtain neurons derived from both control and Rett syndrome patients' pluripotent cells. During differentiation mutated cells displayed alterations in the number of neuronal projections, and production of Tuj1 and MAP2-positive neurons. Although investigation of a broader number of patients would be required, these observations are in accordance with previous studies showing impaired differentiation of these cells. Consequently, our experimental methodology was proved useful not only for the generation of neural cells, but also made possible to compare neural differentiation behavior of different cell lines under defined culture conditions. This study thus expects to contribute with an optimized approach to study the neural commitment of human PSCs, and to produce patient-specific neural cells that can be used to gain a better understanding of disease mechanisms. PMID:26123315

  12. Generation model of positional values as cell operation during the development of multicellular organisms.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Ken-ichiro; Miyake, Yoshihiro

    2011-03-01

    Many conventional models have used the positional information hypothesis to explain each elementary process of morphogenesis during the development of multicellular organisms. Their models assume that the steady concentration patterns of morphogens formed in an extracellular environment have an important property of positional information, so-called "robustness". However, recent experiments reported that a steady morphogen pattern, the concentration gradient of the Bicoid protein, during early Drosophila embryonic development is not robust for embryo-to-embryo variability. These reports encourage a reconsideration of a long-standing problem in systematic cell differentiation: what is the entity of positional information for cells? And, what is the origin of the robust boundary of gene expression? To address these problems at a cellular level, in this article we pay attention to the re-generative phenomena that show another important property of positional information, "size invariance". In view of regenerative phenomena, we propose a new mathematical model to describe the generation mechanism of a spatial pattern of positional values. In this model, the positional values are defined as the values into which differentiable cells transform a spatial pattern providing positional information. The model is mathematically described as an associative algebra composed of various terms, each of which is the multiplication of some fundamental operators under the assumption that the operators are derived from the remarkable properties of cell differentiation on an amputation surface in regenerative phenomena. We apply this model to the concentration pattern of the Bicoid protein during the anterior-posterior axis formation in Drosophila, and consider the conditions needed to establish the robust boundary of the expression of the hunchback gene. PMID:21167904

  13. Development of a hydrogen generator for fuel cells based on the partial oxidation of methane

    SciTech Connect

    Recupero, V.; Torre, T.; Saija, G.; Fiordano, N.

    1996-12-31

    As well known, the most acknowledged process for generation of hydrogen for fuel cells is based upon the steam reforming of methane or natural gas (SRM). The reaction is endothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= 206 kJ/mole) and high H{sub 2}O/CH{sub 4} ratios are required in order to limit coke formation at T higher than 1000 K. Moreover, it is a common practice that the process`s fuel economy is highly sensitive to proper heat fluxes and reactor design (tubular type) and to operational conditions. Efficient heat recovery can be accomplished only on large scale units (> 40,000 Nm{sup 3}/h), far from the range of interest of {open_quotes}on-site{close_quotes} fuel cells. Even if, to fit the needs of the fuel cell technology, medium sized external reforming units (50-200 Nm{sup 3} H{sub 2}/h) have been developed and/or planned for integration with both the first and the second generation fuel cells, amelioration in their heat recovery and efficiency is at the expense of an increased sophistication and therefore at higher per unit costs. In all cases, SRM requires an extra {open_quotes}fuel{close_quotes} supply (to substain the endothermicity of the reaction) in addition to stoichiometric requirements ({open_quotes}feed{close_quotes} gas). A valid alternative could be a process based on catalytic partial oxidation of CH{sub 4} (CSPOM), since the process is mildly exothermic ({Delta}H{sub 298}= -35.6 kJ/mole) and therefore not energy intensive. Consequently, great interest is expected from conversion of methane into syngas, if an autothermal, low energy intensive, compact and reliable process could be developed.

  14. Laboratory development TPV generator

    SciTech Connect

    Holmquist, G.A.; Wong, E.M.; Waldman, C.H.

    1996-02-01

    A laboratory model of a TPV generator in the kilowatt range was developed and tested. It was based on methane/oxygen combustion and a spectrally matched selective emitter/collector pair (ytterbia emitter-silicon PV cell). The system demonstrated a power output of 2.4 kilowatts at an overall efficiency of 4.5{percent} without recuperation of heat from the exhaust gases. Key aspects of the effort include: (1) process development and fabrication of mechanically strong selective emitter ceramic textile materials; (2) design of a stirred reactor emitter/burner capable of handling up to 175,000 Btu/hr fuel flows; (3) support to the developer of the production silicon concentrator cells capable of withstanding TPV environments; (4) assessing the apparent temperature exponent of selective emitters; and (5) determining that the remaining generator efficiency improvements are readily defined combustion engineering problems that do not necessitate breakthrough technology. The fiber matrix selective emitter ceramic textile (felt) was fabricated by a relic process with the final heat-treatment controlling the grain growth in the porous ceramic fiber matrix. This textile formed a cylindrical cavity for a stirred reactor. The ideal stirred reactor is characterized by constant temperature combustion resulting in a uniform reactor temperature. This results in a uniform radiant emission from the emitter. As a result of significant developments in the porous emitter matrix technology, a TPV generator burner/emitter was developed that produced kilowatts of radiant energy. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Genetic mutation analysis at early stages of cell line development using next generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Wright, Chapman; Groot, Joost; Swahn, Samantha; McLaughlin, Helen; Liu, Mei; Xu, Chongfeng; Sun, Chao; Zheng, Eric; Estes, Scott

    2016-05-01

    A central goal for most biopharmaceutical companies is to reduce the development timeline to reach clinical proof of concept. This objective requires the development of tools that ensure the quality of biotherapeutic material destined for the clinic. Recent advances in high throughput protein analytics provide confidence in our ability to assess productivity and product quality attributes at early stages of cell line development. However, one quality attribute has, until recently, been absent from the standard battery of analytical tests facilitating informed choices early in cell line selection: genetic sequence confirmation. Techniques historically used for mutation analysis, such as detailed mass spectrometry, have limitations on the sample number and turnaround times making it less attractive at early stages. Thus, we explored the utility of Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) as a solution to address these limitations. Amplicon sequencing is one such NGS technique that is robust, rapid, sensitive, and amenable to multiplexing, all of which are essential attributes for our purposes. Here we report a NGS method based upon amplicon sequencing that has been successfully incorporated into our cell line development workflow alongside other high-throughput protein analytical assays. The NGS method has demonstrated its value by identifying at least one Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) clone expressing a variant form of the biotherapeutic in each of the four clinical programs in which it has been utilized. We believe this sequence confirmation method is essential to safely accelerating the time to clinical proof of concept of biotherapeutics, and guard against delays related to sequence mutations. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:813-817, 2016. PMID:27004436

  16. Olig2 regulates Purkinje cell generation in the early developing mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Jun; Liu, Qian; Zhang, Yang; Liu, Yuanxiu; Jiang, Mei; Zhang, Liguo; He, Xuelian; Peng, Chenchen; Zheng, Tao; Lu, Q. Richard; Li, Hedong

    2016-01-01

    The oligodendrocyte transcription factor Olig2 plays a crucial role in the neurogenesis of both spinal cord and brain. In the cerebellum, deletion of both Olig2 and Olig1 results in impaired genesis of Purkinje cells (PCs) and Pax2+ interneurons. Here, we perform an independent study to show that Olig2 protein is transiently expressed in the cerebellar ventricular zone (VZ) during a period when PCs are specified. Further analyses demonstrate that Olig2 is expressed in both cerebellar VZ progenitors and early-born neurons. In addition, unlike in the ganglionic eminence of the embryonic forebrain where Olig2 is mostly expressed in proliferating progenitors, Olig2+ cells in the cerebellar VZ are in the process of leaving the cell cycle and differentiating into postmitotic neurons. Functionally, deletion of Olig2 alone results in a preferential reduction of PCs in the cerebellum, which is likely mediated by decreased neuronal generation from their cerebellar VZ progenitors. Furthermore, our long-term lineage tracing experiments show that cerebellar Olig gene-expressing progenitors produce PCs but rarely Pax2+ interneurons in the developing cerebellum, which opposes the “temporal identity transition” model of the cerebellar VZ progenitors stating that majority of Pax2+ interneuron progenitors are transitioned from Olig2+ PC progenitors. PMID:27469598

  17. Analgesic exposure in pregnant rats affects fetal germ cell development with inter-generational reproductive consequences

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Afshan; van den Driesche, Sander; Wang, Yili; McKinnell, Chris; Macpherson, Sheila; Eddie, Sharon L.; Kinnell, Hazel; Hurtado-Gonzalez, Pablo; Chambers, Tom J.; Stevenson, Kerrie; Wolfinger, Elke; Hrabalkova, Lenka; Calarrao, Ana; Bayne, Rosey AL; Hagen, Casper P.; Mitchell, Rod T.; Anderson, Richard A.; Sharpe, Richard M.

    2016-01-01

    Analgesics which affect prostaglandin (PG) pathways are used by most pregnant women. As germ cells (GC) undergo developmental and epigenetic changes in fetal life and are PG targets, we investigated if exposure of pregnant rats to analgesics (indomethacin or acetaminophen) affected GC development and reproductive function in resulting offspring (F1) or in the F2 generation. Exposure to either analgesic reduced F1 fetal GC number in both sexes and altered the tempo of fetal GC development sex-dependently, with delayed meiotic entry in oogonia but accelerated GC differentiation in males. These effects persisted in adult F1 females as reduced ovarian and litter size, whereas F1 males recovered normal GC numbers and fertility by adulthood. F2 offspring deriving from an analgesic-exposed F1 parent also exhibited sex-specific changes. F2 males exhibited normal reproductive development whereas F2 females had smaller ovaries and reduced follicle numbers during puberty/adulthood; as similar changes were found for F2 offspring of analgesic-exposed F1 fathers or mothers, we interpret this as potentially indicating an analgesic-induced change to GC in F1. Assuming our results are translatable to humans, they raise concerns that analgesic use in pregnancy could potentially affect fertility of resulting daughters and grand-daughters. PMID:26813099

  18. Development of Novel Nanocrystal-based Solar Cell to Exploit Multiple Exciton Generation: Cooperative Research and Development Final Report, CRADA Number CRD-07-00227

    SciTech Connect

    Ellingson, R.

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of the project was to develop new design and fabrication techniques for NC solar cells with the goal of demonstrating enhanced photocurrent and efficiency by exploiting multiple exciton generation and to investigate multiple exciton generation and charge carrier dynamics in semiconductor NC films used in NC-based solar cells.

  19. Fuel from plant cell walls: recent developments in second generation bioethanol research.

    PubMed

    Cook, Charis; Devoto, Alessandra

    2011-08-15

    As bioethanol from sugarcane and wheat falls out of favour due to concerns about food security, research is ongoing into genetically engineering model plants and microorganisms to find the optimum cell wall structure for the ultimate second generation bioethanol crop. Charis Cook and Alessandra Devoto highlight here the progress made to tailor the plant cell wall to improve the accessibility of cellulose by acting on the regulation, the structure or the relative composition of other cell wall components to ultimately improve saccharification efficiency. They also consider possible side effects of cell wall modification and focus on the latest advances made to improve the efficiency of digestion of lignocellulosic materials by cell wall degrading microorganisms. PMID:21681755

  20. Evolutionary process development towards next generation crystalline silicon solar cells : a semiconductor process toolbox application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, J.; Prajapati, V.; Vermang, B.; Lorenz, A.; Allebe, C.; Rothschild, A.; Tous, L.; Uruena, A.; Baert, K.; Poortmans, J.

    2012-08-01

    Bulk crystalline Silicon solar cells are covering more than 85% of the world's roof top module installation in 2010. With a growth rate of over 30% in the last 10 years this technology remains the working horse of solar cell industry. The full Aluminum back-side field (Al BSF) technology has been developed in the 90's and provides a production learning curve on module price of constant 20% in average. The main reason for the decrease of module prices with increasing production capacity is due to the effect of up scaling industrial production. For further decreasing of the price per wattpeak silicon consumption has to be reduced and efficiency has to be improved. In this paper we describe a successive efficiency improving process development starting from the existing full Al BSF cell concept. We propose an evolutionary development includes all parts of the solar cell process: optical enhancement (texturing, polishing, anti-reflection coating), junction formation and contacting. Novel processes are benchmarked on industrial like baseline flows using high-efficiency cell concepts like i-PERC (Passivated Emitter and Rear Cell). While the full Al BSF crystalline silicon solar cell technology provides efficiencies of up to 18% (on cz-Si) in production, we are achieving up to 19.4% conversion efficiency for industrial fabricated, large area solar cells with copper based front side metallization and local Al BSF applying the semiconductor toolbox.

  1. Fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Makiel, Joseph M.

    1985-01-01

    A high temperature solid electrolyte fuel cell generator comprising a housing means defining a plurality of chambers including a generator chamber and a combustion products chamber, a porous barrier separating the generator and combustion product chambers, a plurality of elongated annular fuel cells each having a closed end and an open end with the open ends disposed within the combustion product chamber, the cells extending from the open end through the porous barrier and into the generator chamber, a conduit for each cell, each conduit extending into a portion of each cell disposed within the generator chamber, each conduit having means for discharging a first gaseous reactant within each fuel cell, exhaust means for exhausting the combustion product chamber, manifolding means for supplying the first gaseous reactant to the conduits with the manifolding means disposed within the combustion product chamber between the porous barrier and the exhaust means and the manifolding means further comprising support and bypass means for providing support of the manifolding means within the housing while allowing combustion products from the first and a second gaseous reactant to flow past the manifolding means to the exhaust means, and means for flowing the second gaseous reactant into the generator chamber.

  2. FGF/FGFR2 Signaling Regulates the Generation and Correct Positioning of Bergmann Glia Cells in the Developing Mouse Cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Faus-Kessler, Theresa; Matheus, Friederike; Simeone, Antonio; Hölter, Sabine M.; Kühn, Ralf; Weisenhorn, Daniela M. Vogt.; Wurst, Wolfgang; Prakash, Nilima

    2014-01-01

    The normal cellular organization and layering of the vertebrate cerebellum is established during embryonic and early postnatal development by the interplay of a complex array of genetic and signaling pathways. Disruption of these processes and of the proper layering of the cerebellum usually leads to ataxic behaviors. Here, we analyzed the relative contribution of Fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2)-mediated signaling to cerebellar development in conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice. We show that during embryonic mouse development, Fgfr2 expression is higher in the anterior cerebellar primordium and excluded from the proliferative ventricular neuroepithelium. Consistent with this finding, conditional Fgfr2 single mutant mice display the most prominent defects in the anterior lobules of the adult cerebellum. In this context, FGFR2-mediated signaling is required for the proper generation of Bergmann glia cells and the correct positioning of these cells within the Purkinje cell layer, and for cell survival in the developing cerebellar primordium. Using cerebellar microexplant cultures treated with an FGFR agonist (FGF9) or antagonist (SU5402), we also show that FGF9/FGFR-mediated signaling inhibits the outward migration of radial glia and Bergmann glia precursors and cells, and might thus act as a positioning cue for these cells. Altogether, our findings reveal the specific functions of the FGFR2-mediated signaling pathway in the generation and positioning of Bergmann glia cells during cerebellar development in the mouse. PMID:24983448

  3. Development of reversible solid oxide fuel cell for power generation and hydrogen production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, G. B.; Chen, J. Y.; Lin, C. Y.; Chan, S. H.

    2011-06-01

    A reversible solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) provides the dual function of performing energy storage and power generation, all in one unit. When functioning as an energy storage device, the RSOFC acts like an electrolyzer in water electrolysis mode; whereby the electric energy is stored as (electrolyzed) hydrogen and oxygen gases. While hydrogen is useful as a transportation fuel and in other industrial applications, the RSOFC also acts as a fuel cell in power generation mode to produce electricity when needed. The RSOFC would be a competitive technology in the upcoming hydrogen economy on the basis of its low cost, simple structure, and high efficiency. This paper reports on the design and manufacturing of its membrane electrode assembly using commercially available materials. Also reported are the resulting performance, both in electrolysis and fuel cell modes, as a function of its operating parameters such as temperature and current density. We found that the RSOFC performance improved with increasing temperature and its fuel cell mode had a better performance than its electrolysis mode due to a limited humidity inlet causing concentration polarization.

  4. Process Developed for Generating Ceramic Interconnects With Low Sintering Temperatures for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhong, Zhi-Min; Goldsby, Jon C.

    2005-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) have been considered as premium future power generation devices because they have demonstrated high energy-conversion efficiency, high power density, and extremely low pollution, and have the flexibility of using hydrocarbon fuel. The Solid-State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) initiative, supported by the U.S. Department of Energy and private industries, is leading the development and commercialization of SOFCs for low-cost stationary and automotive markets. The targeted power density for the initiative is rather low, so that the SECA SOFC can be operated at a relatively low temperature (approx. 700 C) and inexpensive metallic interconnects can be utilized in the SOFC stack. As only NASA can, the agency is investigating SOFCs for aerospace applications. Considerable high power density is required for the applications. As a result, the NASA SOFC will be operated at a high temperature (approx. 900 C) and ceramic interconnects will be employed. Lanthanum chromite-based materials have emerged as a leading candidate for the ceramic interconnects. The interconnects are expected to co-sinter with zirconia electrolyte to mitigate the interface electric resistance and to simplify the processing procedure. Lanthanum chromites made by the traditional method are sintered at 1500 C or above. They react with zirconia electrolytes (which typically sinter between 1300 and 1400 C) at the sintering temperature of lanthanum chromites. It has been envisioned that lanthanum chromites with lower sintering temperatures can be co-fired with zirconia electrolyte. Nonstoichiometric lanthanum chromites can be sintered at lower temperatures, but they are unstable and react with zirconia electrolyte during co-sintering. NASA Glenn Research Center s Ceramics Branch investigated a glycine nitrate process to generate fine powder of the lanthanum-chromite-based materials. By simultaneously doping calcium on the lanthanum site, and cobalt and aluminum on the

  5. Fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Isenberg, Arnold O.

    1983-01-01

    High temperature solid oxide electrolyte fuel cell generators which allow controlled leakage among plural chambers in a sealed housing. Depleted oxidant and fuel are directly reacted in one chamber to combust remaining fuel and preheat incoming reactants. The cells are preferably electrically arranged in a series-parallel configuration.

  6. Effects of spaced learning in the water maze on development of dentate granule cells generated in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Trinchero, Mariela F; Koehl, Muriel; Bechakra, Malik; Delage, Pauline; Charrier, Vanessa; Grosjean, Noelle; Ladeveze, Elodie; Schinder, Alejandro F; Abrous, D Nora

    2015-11-01

    New dentate granule cells (GCs) are generated in the hippocampus throughout life. These adult-born neurons are required for spatial learning in the Morris water maze (MWM). In rats, spatial learning shapes the network by regulating their number and dendritic development. Here, we explored whether such modulatory effects exist in mice. New GCs were tagged using thymidine analogs or a GFP-expressing retrovirus. Animals were exposed to a reference memory protocol for 10-14 days (spaced training) at different times after newborn cells labeling. Cell proliferation, cell survival, cell death, neuronal phenotype, and dendritic and spine development were examined using immunohistochemistry. Surprisingly, spatial learning did not modify any of the parameters under scrutiny including cell number and dendritic morphology. These results suggest that although new GCs are required in mice for spatial learning in the MWM, they are, at least for the developmental intervals analyzed here, refractory to behavioral stimuli generated in the course of learning in the MWM. PMID:25740272

  7. Generating human intestinal tissues from pluripotent stem cells to study development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Sinagoga, Katie L; Wells, James M

    2015-01-01

    As one of the largest and most functionally complex organs of the human body, the intestines are primarily responsible for the breakdown and uptake of macromolecules from the lumen and the subsequent excretion of waste from the body. However, the intestine is also an endocrine organ, regulating digestion, metabolism, and feeding behavior. Intricate neuronal, lymphatic, immune, and vascular systems are integrated into the intestine and are required for its digestive and endocrine functions. In addition, the gut houses an extensive population of microbes that play roles in digestion, global metabolism, barrier function, and host–parasite interactions. With such an extensive array of cell types working and performing in one essential organ, derivation of functional intestinal tissues from human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) represents a significant challenge. Here we will discuss the intricate developmental processes and cell types that are required for assembly of this highly complex organ and how embryonic processes, particularly morphogenesis, have been harnessed to direct differentiation of PSCs into 3-dimensional human intestinal organoids (HIOs) in vitro. We will further describe current uses of HIOs in development and disease research and how additional tissue complexity might be engineered into HIOs for better functionality and disease modeling. PMID:25792515

  8. Fuel cell generator energy dissipator

    DOEpatents

    Veyo, Stephen Emery; Dederer, Jeffrey Todd; Gordon, John Thomas; Shockling, Larry Anthony

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel

  9. Multiple Exciton Generation Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luther, J. M.; Semonin, O. E.; Beard, M. C.; Gao, J.; Nozik, A. J.

    2012-01-01

    Heat loss is the major factor limiting traditional single junction solar cells to a theoretical efficiency of 32%. Multiple Exciton Generation (MEG) enables efficient use of the solar spectrum yielding a theoretical power conversion efficiency of 44% in solar cells under 1-sun conditions. Quantum-confined semiconductors have demonstrated the ability to generate multiple carriers but present-day materials deliver efficiencies far below the SQ limit of 32%. Semiconductor quantum dots of PbSe and PbS provide an active testbed for developing high-efficiency, inexpensive solar cells benefitting from quantum confinement effects. Here, we will present recent work of solar cells employing MEG to yield external quantum efficiencies exceeding 100%.

  10. Development of a UBFC biocatalyst fuel cell to generate power and treat industrial wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Sukkasem, Chontisa; Laehlah, Sunee

    2013-10-01

    Agro-industry wastewaters normally contain high levels of organic matter and require suitable treatment before discharge. The use of Microbial fuel cells, a novel wastewater treatment, can provide advantages over existing treatment methods. In this study, an up-flow bio-filter circuit (UBFC) for treating wastewaters without chemical treatment or nutrient supplement, was developed to solve a clogging problem. The optimal conditions included an organic loading rate of 30.0 g COD/L-d, hydraulic retention time of 1.04 day, pH level of 5.6-6.5 and aeration at 2.0 L/min. External resistance of the circuit was tested. COD removal levels of 8.08, 20.1 and 26.67 g COD/L-d were obtained, while fed with sea food, biodiesel and palm oil mill wastewater, respectively. These rates are higher than for conventional technologies. The carbon fiber brush immobilized base increased the performance of the new UBFC by 17.54% over that obtained in a previous study, while the cost was slightly decreased about 4.48%. PMID:23932287

  11. Innate lymphoid cell development requires TOX-dependent generation of a common ILC progenitor

    PubMed Central

    Seehus, Corey R.; Aliahmad, Parinaz; de la Torre, Brian; Iliev, Iliyan D.; Spurka, Lindsay; Funari, Vincent A.; Kaye, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Diverse innate lymphoid cell (ILC) subtypes have been defined, based on effector function and transcription factor expression. ILCs derive from common lymphoid progenitors, although the transcriptional pathways leading to ILC lineage specification remain poorly characterized. Here we demonstrate that transcriptional regulator TOX is required for the in vivo differentiation of common lymphoid progenitors to ILC lineage-restricted cells. In vitro modeling demonstrates that TOX deficiency results in early defects in progenitor cell survival or expansion as well as later stage ILC differentiation. In addition, comparative transcriptome analysis of bone marrow progenitors reveals that TOX-deficient cells fail to upregulate many aspects of the ILC gene program, including Notch gene targets, implicating TOX as a key determinant of early ILC lineage specification. PMID:25915732

  12. Spectroscopic Analysis of Red Fluorescent Proteins and Development of a Microfluidic Cell Sorter for the Generation of Improved Variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lubbeck, Jennifer L.

    The discovery of the green fluorescent protein (GFP) launched the development of a wide variety of fluorescent protein (FP) mutants whose spectral and photophysical diversity revolutionized in vivo imaging. The excitation and emission spectra of red fluorescent proteins (RFPs), in particular, have been ideally tuned to a window optically favorable for in vivo work. However, their quantum yields, photostabilities and fluorescence intermittency properties require improvement if they are to be broadly employed for low-copy or single-molecule measurements. Attempts to engineer improved RFPs often result in optimization of one photophysical property at the expense of others. We developed a microfluidic-based cytometer for screening HeLa cell-based genetic RFP-libraries simultaneously on the basis of fluorescence lifetime (a proxy for quantum yield), photostability, and brightness. Ten 532 nm excitation beams interrogate each cell in flow. The first is electro-optically modulated (30 MHz) to enable lifetime measurement with phase fluorimetry. The remaining beams act as a pulse sequence for isolating the irreversible photobleaching time constant. Optical-force switching is employed to sort cells based on any combination of the photophysical parameters. Screening with this instrument enables identification of regions of the structure that synergistically affect quantum yield and photostability and the sorting capability provides a new tool for accelerating the development of next generation RFPs.

  13. Fuel cell generator energy dissipator

    SciTech Connect

    Veyo, S.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Gordon, J.T.; Shockling, L.A.

    2000-02-15

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a fuel cell generator when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated. During a generator shut down condition, electrically resistive elements are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator. The invention provides a safety function in eliminating the fuel energy, and also provides protection to the fuel cell stack by eliminating overheating.

  14. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, Robert; George, Raymond A.; Shockling, Larry A.

    1993-01-01

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  15. Solid oxide fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Draper, R.; George, R.A.; Shockling, L.A.

    1993-04-06

    A solid oxide fuel cell generator has a pair of spaced apart tubesheets in a housing. At least two intermediate barrier walls are between the tubesheets and define a generator chamber between two intermediate buffer chambers. An array of fuel cells have tubes with open ends engaging the tubesheets. Tubular, axially elongated electrochemical cells are supported on the tubes in the generator chamber. Fuel gas and oxidant gas are preheated in the intermediate chambers by the gases flowing on the other side of the tubes. Gas leakage around the tubes through the tubesheets is permitted. The buffer chambers reentrain the leaked fuel gas for reintroduction to the generator chamber.

  16. Solar Power Generation Development

    SciTech Connect

    Robert L. Johnson Jr.; Gary E. Carver

    2011-10-28

    This project centered on creating a solar cell prototype enabling significant reductions in module cost and increases in module efficiency. Low cost was addressed by using plentiful organic materials that only comprise 16% of the total module cost, and by leveraging building integrated PV concepts that reduce the cost of key module components to zero. High efficiency was addressed by implementing multiband organic PV, low cost spectral splitting, and possibly integrating photovoltaic and photothermal mechanisms. This research has contributed to the design of multiband organic PV, and the sealing of organic PV cells. If one assumes that the aggregate multiband efficiency can reach 12%, projected cost would be $0.97/W. If the sealing technology enables 10 to 20 year lifetimes, the LCOE will match that of domestic coal. The final report describes progress towards these goals.

  17. Microfluidic fuel cells for energy generation.

    PubMed

    Safdar, M; Jänis, J; Sánchez, S

    2016-08-01

    Sustainable energy generation is of recent interest due to a growing energy demand across the globe and increasing environmental issues caused by conventional non-renewable means of power generation. In the context of microsystems, portable electronics and lab-on-a-chip based (bio)chemical sensors would essentially require fully integrated, reliable means of power generation. Microfluidic-based fuel cells can offer unique advantages compared to conventional fuel cells such as high surface area-to-volume ratio, ease of integration, cost effectiveness and portability. Here, we summarize recent developments which utilize the potential of microfluidic devices for energy generation. PMID:27367869

  18. Development of low-cost technology for the next generation of high efficiency solar cells composed of earth abundant elements

    SciTech Connect

    Agrawal, Rakesh

    2014-09-28

    The development of renewable, affordable, and environmentally conscious means of generating energy on a global scale represents a grand challenge of our time. Due to the “permanence” of radiation from the sun, solar energy promises to remain a viable and sustainable power source far into the future. Established single-junction photovoltaic technologies achieve high power conversion efficiencies (pce) near 20% but require complicated manufacturing processes that prohibit the marriage of large-scale throughput (e.g. on the GW scale), profitability, and quality control. Our approach to this problem begins with the synthesis of nanocrystals of semiconductor materials comprising earth abundant elements and characterized by material and optoelectronic properties ideal for photovoltaic applications, namely Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe). Once synthesized, such nanocrystals are formulated into an ink, coated onto substrates, and processed into completed solar cells in such a way that enables scale-up to high throughput, roll-to-roll manufacturing processes. This project aimed to address the major limitation to CZTSSe solar cell pce’s – the low open-circuit voltage (Voc) reported throughout literature for devices comprised of this material. Throughout the project significant advancements have been made in fundamental understanding of the CZTSSe material and device limitations associated with this material system. Additionally, notable improvements have been made to our nanocrystal based processing technique to alleviate performance limitations due to the identified device limitations. Notably, (1) significant improvements have been made in reducing intra- and inter-nanoparticle heterogeneity, (2) improvements in device performance have been realized with novel cation substitution in Ge-alloyed CZTGeSSe absorbers, (3) systematic analysis of absorber sintering has been conducted to optimize the selenization process for large grain CZTSSe absorbers, (4) novel electrical

  19. Electricity generation from cattle dung using microbial fuel cell technology during anaerobic acidogenesis and the development of microbial populations.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guang; Ma, Fang; Wei, Li; Chua, Hong; Chang, Chein-Chi; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2012-09-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) was constructed to investigate the possible generation of electricity using cattle dung as a substrate. After 30 days of operation, stable electricity was generated, and the maximum volumetric power density was 0.220 W/m(3). The total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal and coulombic efficiency (CE) of the MFC reached 73.9±1.8% and 2.79±0.6%, respectively, after 120 days of operation. Acetate was the main metabolite in the anolyte, and other volatile fatty acids (VFAs) (propionate and butyrate) were present in minor amounts. The PCR-DGGE analysis indicated that the following five groups of microbes were present: Proteobacteria, Bacteroides, Chloroflexi, Actinobacteria and Firmicutes. Proteobacteria and Firmicutes were the dominant phyla in the sample; specifically, 36.3% and 24.2% of the sequences obtained were Proteobacteria and Firmicutes, respectively. Clostridium sp., Pseudomonas luteola and Ochrobactrum pseudogrignonense were the most dominant groups during the electricity generation process. The diversity of archaea dramatically decreased after 20 days of operation. The detected archaea were hydrogenotrophic methanogens, and the Methanobacterium genus disappeared during the periods of stable electricity generation via acidogenesis. PMID:22595839

  20. The Development of Fuel Cell Technology for Electric Power Generation - From Spacecraft Applications to the Hydrogen Economy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, John H.

    2005-01-01

    The fuel cell uses a catalyzed reaction between a fuel and an oxidizer to directly produce electricity. Its high theoretical efficiency and low temperature operation made it a subject of much study upon its invention ca. 1900, but its relatively high life cycle costs kept it as "solution in search of a problem" for its first half century. The first problem for which fuel cells presented a cost effective solution was, starting in the 1960's that of a power source for NASA's manned spacecraft. NASA thus invested, and continues to invest, in the development of fuel cell power plants for this application. However, starting in the mid-1990's, prospective environmental regulations have driven increased governmental and industrial interest in "green power" and the "Hydrogen Economy." This has in turn stimulated greatly increased investment in fuel cell development for a variety of terrestrial applications. This investment is bringing about notable advances in fuel cell technology, but these advances are often in directions quite different from those needed for NASA spacecraft applications. This environment thus presents both opportunities and challenges for NASA's manned space program.

  1. Generating kidney tissue from pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Little, MH

    2016-01-01

    With the isolation of human pluripotent stem cells came the possibility of generating specific cell types for regenerative medicine. This has required the development of protocols for directed differentiation into many distinct cell types. One of the more complicated tissue types to recreate is the kidney. Here we review recent progress towards the recreation of not only specific kidney cell types but complex kidney organoids, models of the developing human organ, in vitro. We will also discuss potential short and long term applications of these approaches. PMID:27551541

  2. Generation and Purification of Tetraploid Cells.

    PubMed

    Shenk, Elizabeth M; Ganem, Neil J

    2016-01-01

    Tetraploid cells are genetically unstable and have the capacity to promote the development and/or progression of human malignancies. It is now estimated that ~40 % of all solid tumors have passed through a tetraploid intermediate stage at some point during their development. Understanding the biological characteristics of tetraploid cells that impart oncogenic properties is therefore a highly relevant and fundamentally important aspect of cancer biology. Here, we describe strategies to efficiently generate and purify tetraploid cells for use in cell biological studies. PMID:27193862

  3. Developing a New Two-Step Protocol to Generate Functional Hepatocytes from Wharton's Jelly-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells under Hypoxic Condition

    PubMed Central

    Prasajak, Patcharee

    2013-01-01

    The shortage of donor livers and hepatocytes is a major limitation of liver transplantation. Thus, generation of hepatocyte-like cells may provide alternative choice for therapeutic applications. In this study, we developed a new method to establish hepatocytes from Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs) cell lines named WJMSCs-SUT1 and WJMSCs-SUT2 under hypoxic condition. This new method could rapidly drive both WJ-MSCs cell lines into hepatic lineage within 18 days. The achievement of hepatogenic differentiation was confirmed by the characterization of both phenotypes and functions. More than 80% MSCs-derived hepatocyte-like cells (MSCDHCs) achieved functional hepatocytes including hepatic marker expressions both at gene and protein levels, glycogen storage, low-density lipoprotein uptake, urea production, and albumin secretion. This study highlights the establishment of new hepatogenic induction protocol under hypoxic condition in order to mimic hypoxic microenvironment in typical cell physiology. In conclusion, we present a simple, high-efficiency, and time saving protocol for the generation of functional hepatocyte-like cells from WJ-MSCs in hypoxic condition. The achievement of this method may overcome the limitation of donor hepatocytes and provides a new avenue for therapeutic value in cell-based therapy for life-threatening liver diseases, regenerative medicine, toxicity testing for pharmacological drug screening, and other medical related applications. PMID:23818908

  4. Development and Demonstration of a New Generation High Efficiency 10kW Stationary Fuel Cell System

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, Thomas Russell

    2013-04-30

    The overall project objective is to develop and demonstrate a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell combined heat and power (PEMFC CHP) system that provides the foundation for commercial, mass produced units which achieve over 40% electrical efficiency (fuel to electric conversion) from 50-100% load, greater than 70% overall efficiency (fuel to electric energy + usable waste heat energy conversion), have the potential to achieve 40,000 hours durability on all major process components, and can be produced in high volumes at under $400/kW (revised to $750/kW per 2011 DOE estimates) capital cost.

  5. Generation of Mouse Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kasinski, Andrea L.; Slack, Frank J.

    2016-01-01

    Although in vivo models are excellent for assessing various facets of whole organism physiology, pathology, and overall response to treatments, evaluating basic cellular functions, and molecular events in mammalian model systems is challenging. It is therefore advantageous to perform these studies in a refined and less costly setting. One approach involves utilizing cells derived from the model under evaluation. The approach to generate such cells varies based on the cell of origin and often the genetics of the cell. Here we describe the steps involved in generating epithelial cells from the lungs of KrasLSL-G12D/+; p53LSL-R172/+ mice (Kasinski and Slack, 2012). These mice develop aggressive lung adenocarcinoma following cre-recombinase dependent removal of a stop cassette in the transgenes and subsequent expression of Kra-G12D and p53R172. While this protocol may be useful for the generation of epithelial lines from other genetic backgrounds, it should be noted that the Kras; p53 cell line generated here is capable of proliferating in culture without any additional genetic manipulation that is often needed for less aggressive backgrounds.

  6. Discharge cell for ozone generator

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsuka, Suguru

    2000-01-01

    A discharge cell for use in an ozone generator is provided which can suppress a time-related reduction in ozone concentration without adding a catalytic gas such as nitrogen gas to oxygen gas as a raw material gas. The discharge cell includes a pair of electrodes disposed in an opposed spaced relation with a discharge space therebetween, and a dielectric layer of a three-layer structure consisting of three ceramic dielectric layers successively stacked on at least one of the electrodes, wherein a first dielectric layer of the dielectric layer contacting the one electrode contains no titanium dioxide, wherein a second dielectric layer of the dielectric layer exposed to the discharge space contains titanium dioxide in a metal element ratio of not lower than 10 wt %.

  7. mTORC1 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Thymopoiesis, T-Cell Generation, and Temporal Control of γδT17 Development and TCRγ/δ Recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Shin, Jinwook; Wang, Shang; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lin, Xingguang; Gao, Jimin; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-02-01

    Thymus is crucial for generation of a diverse repertoire of T cells essential for adaptive immunity. Although thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are crucial for thymopoiesis and T cell generation, how TEC development and function are controlled is poorly understood. We report here that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in TECs plays critical roles in thymopoiesis and thymus function. Acute deletion of mTORC1 in adult mice caused severe thymic involution. TEC-specific deficiency of mTORC1 (mTORC1KO) impaired TEC maturation and function such as decreased expression of thymotropic chemokines, decreased medullary TEC to cortical TEC ratios, and altered thymic architecture, leading to severe thymic atrophy, reduced recruitment of early thymic progenitors, and impaired development of virtually all T-cell lineages. Strikingly, temporal control of IL-17-producing γδT (γδT17) cell differentiation and TCRVγ/δ recombination in fetal thymus is lost in mTORC1KO thymus, leading to elevated γδT17 differentiation and rearranging of fetal specific TCRVγ/δ in adulthood. Thus, mTORC1 is central for TEC development/function and establishment of thymic environment for proper T cell development, and modulating mTORC1 activity can be a strategy for preventing thymic involution/atrophy. PMID:26889835

  8. mTORC1 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Is Critical for Thymopoiesis, T-Cell Generation, and Temporal Control of γδT17 Development and TCRγ/δ Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Shin, Jinwook; Wang, Shang; Gorentla, Balachandra; Lin, Xingguang; Gao, Jimin; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Thymus is crucial for generation of a diverse repertoire of T cells essential for adaptive immunity. Although thymic epithelial cells (TECs) are crucial for thymopoiesis and T cell generation, how TEC development and function are controlled is poorly understood. We report here that mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) in TECs plays critical roles in thymopoiesis and thymus function. Acute deletion of mTORC1 in adult mice caused severe thymic involution. TEC-specific deficiency of mTORC1 (mTORC1KO) impaired TEC maturation and function such as decreased expression of thymotropic chemokines, decreased medullary TEC to cortical TEC ratios, and altered thymic architecture, leading to severe thymic atrophy, reduced recruitment of early thymic progenitors, and impaired development of virtually all T-cell lineages. Strikingly, temporal control of IL-17-producing γδT (γδT17) cell differentiation and TCRVγ/δ recombination in fetal thymus is lost in mTORC1KO thymus, leading to elevated γδT17 differentiation and rearranging of fetal specific TCRVγ/δ in adulthood. Thus, mTORC1 is central for TEC development/function and establishment of thymic environment for proper T cell development, and modulating mTORC1 activity can be a strategy for preventing thymic involution/atrophy. PMID:26889835

  9. Generator configuration for solid oxide fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed are improvements in a solid oxide fuel cell generator 1 having a multiplicity of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells 2, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen-containing gas is passed over the other side of said cells resulting in the generation of heat and electricity. The improvements comprise arranging the cells in the configuration of a circle, a spiral, or folded rows within a cylindrical generator, and modifying the flow rate, oxygen concentration, and/or temperature of the oxygen-containing gases that flow to those cells that are at the periphery of the generator relative to those cells that are at the center of the generator. In these ways, a more uniform temperature is obtained throughout the generator.

  10. Development of feeder-free culture systems for generation of ckit+sca1+ progenitors from mouse iPS cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jian; Fernandez, Irina; Roy, Krishnendu

    2011-09-01

    Patient-specific therapeutic cells derived from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells may bypass the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells and avoid potential immunological reactions associated with allogenic transplantation. It is critical, for the ultimate clinical applicability of iPS cell-derived therapies, to establish feeder-free cultures that ensure efficient differentiation of iPS cells into therapeutic progenitors. It is also necessary to understand if iPS cell-derived progenitors differ from those derived from ES cells. In this study, we compared the efficiency of three different feeder-free cultures for differentiating mouse iPS cells into ckit+sca1+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) and compared how differentiation and functionality varies between ES and iPS cells. Our results indicated that both iPS and ES cells can be efficiently differentiated into HPCs in suspension cultures supplemented with secretion factors from mouse bone marrow stromal cells (OP9-DL1 conditioned medium). The functionality of these cells was demonstrated by differentiation into CD11c+ dendritic cells (DCs). Both ES and iPS-derived DCs expressed activation molecules (CD86, CD80) in response to LPS stimulation and stimulated T cell proliferation in a mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR). Extensive quantitative RT-PCR studies were used to study the differences in gene expression profiles of ckit+sca1+ cells generated from the various culture systems as well as differences between ES-derived and iPS-derived cells. We conclude that a feeder-free system using stromal conditioned medium can efficiently generate HPCs as well as functional DCs from iPS cells and the generated cells have similar gene expression profile as those from ES cells. PMID:21188655

  11. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Deyle, David R

    2015-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) are generated from somatic cells that have been reprogrammed by the ectopic expression of defined embryonic transcription factors. This technology has provided investigators with a powerful tool for modelling disease and developing treatments for human disorders. This chapter provides the researcher with some background on iPSCs and details on how to produce MEF-conditioned medium, prepare mitotically arrested mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs), create iPSCs using viral vectors, passage iPSCs, and cryopreserve iPSCs. The methods offered here have been used in many laboratories around the world and the reader can initially follow these methods. However, not all cell types are easily transduced using viral vectors and other methods of delivering the reprogramming transcription factors may need to be tested. PMID:25331042

  12. Force Generation upon T Cell Receptor Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Husson, Julien; Chemin, Karine; Bohineust, Armelle; Hivroz, Claire; Henry, Nelly

    2011-01-01

    T cells are major players of adaptive immune response in mammals. Recognition of an antigenic peptide in association with the major histocompatibility complex at the surface of an antigen presenting cell (APC) is a specific and sensitive process whose mechanism is not fully understood. The potential contribution of mechanical forces in the T cell activation process is increasingly debated, although these forces are scarcely defined and hold only limited experimental evidence. In this work, we have implemented a biomembrane force probe (BFP) setup and a model APC to explore the nature and the characteristics of the mechanical forces potentially generated upon engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) and/or lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1). We show that upon contact with a model APC coated with antibodies towards TCR-CD3, after a short latency, the T cell developed a timed sequence of pushing and pulling forces against its target. These processes were defined by their initial constant growth velocity and loading rate (force increase per unit of time). LFA-1 engagement together with TCR-CD3 reduced the growing speed during the pushing phase without triggering the same mechanical behavior when engaged alone. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored simultaneously to verify the cell commitment in the activation process. [Ca2+]i increased a few tens of seconds after the beginning of the pushing phase although no strong correlation appeared between the two events. The pushing phase was driven by actin polymerization. Tuning the BFP mechanical properties, we could show that the loading rate during the pulling phase increased with the target stiffness. This indicated that a mechanosensing mechanism is implemented in the early steps of the activation process. We provide here the first quantified description of force generation sequence upon local bidimensional engagement of TCR-CD3 and discuss its potential role in a T cell mechanically

  13. Fuel dissipater for pressurized fuel cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Basel, Richard A.; King, John E.

    2003-11-04

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for eliminating the chemical energy of fuel remaining in a pressurized fuel cell generator (10) when the electrical power output of the fuel cell generator is terminated during transient operation, such as a shutdown; where, two electrically resistive elements (two of 28, 53, 54, 55) at least one of which is connected in parallel, in association with contactors (26, 57, 58, 59), a multi-point settable sensor relay (23) and a circuit breaker (24), are automatically connected across the fuel cell generator terminals (21, 22) at two or more contact points, in order to draw current, thereby depleting the fuel inventory in the generator.

  14. Next generation vertical electrode cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Craig

    2001-05-01

    The concept of the vertical electrode cell (VEC) for aluminum electrowinning is presented with reference to current research. Low-temperature electrolysis allows nonconsumable metal-alloy anodes to show ongoing promise in laboratory tests. The economic and environmental advantages of the VEC are surveyed. The unique challenges of bringing VEC technology into practice are discussed. The current status of laboratory research is summarized. New results presented show that commercial purity aluminum can be produced with promisingly high current efficiency.

  15. National Development Generates National Identities

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the article is to test the relationship between national identities and modernisation. We test the hypotheses that not all forms of identity are equally compatible with modernisation as measured by Human Development Index. The less developed societies are characterised by strong ascribed national identities based on birth, territory and religion, but also by strong voluntarist identities based on civic features selected and/or achieved by an individual. While the former decreases with further modernisation, the latter may either decrease or remain at high levels and coexist with instrumental supranational identifications, typical for the most developed countries. The results, which are also confirmed by multilevel regression models, thus demonstrate that increasing modernisation in terms of development contributes to the shifts from classical, especially ascribed, identities towards instrumental identifications. These findings are particularly relevant in the turbulent times increasingly dominated by the hardly predictable effects of the recent mass migrations. PMID:26841050

  16. Spontaneous generation of germline characteristics in mouse fibrosarcoma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Zhan; Hu, Yao; Jiang, Guoying; Hou, Jun; Liu, Ruilai; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Chunfang

    2012-10-01

    Germline/embryonic-specific genes have been found to be activated in somatic tumors. In this study, we further showed that cells functioning as germline could be present in mouse fibrosarcoma cells (L929 cell line). Early germline-like cells spontaneously appeared in L929 cells and further differentiated into oocyte-like cells. These germline-like cells can, in turn, develop into blastocyst-like structures in vitro and cause teratocarcinomas in vivo, which is consistent with natural germ cells in function. Generation of germline-like cells from somatic tumors might provide a novel way to understand why somatic cancer cells have strong features of embryonic/germline development. It is thought that the germline traits of tumors are associated with the central characteristics of malignancy, such as immortalization, invasion, migration and immune evasion. Therefore, germline-like cells in tumors might provide potential targets to tumor biology, diagnosis and therapy.

  17. High Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have used photovoltaic arrays for power generation. If future mission to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. In this paper, we derive the optimum bandgap as a function of the operating temperature.

  18. Efficient Generation of Nonhuman Primate Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Bonan; Trobridge, Grant D.; Zhang, Xiaobing; Watts, Korashon L.; Ramakrishnan, Aravind; Wohlfahrt, Martin; Adair, Jennifer E.

    2011-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have great potential for regenerative medicine and gene therapy. Thus far, iPS cells have typically been generated using integrating viral vectors expressing various reprogramming transcription factors; nonintegrating methods have been less effective and efficient. Because there is a significant risk of malignant transformation and cancer involved with the use of iPS cells, careful evaluation of transplanted iPS cells will be necessary in small and large animal studies before clinical application. Here, we have generated and characterized nonhuman primate iPS cells with the goal of evaluating iPS cell transplantation in a clinically relevant large animal model. We developed stable Phoenix-RD114-based packaging cell lines that produce OCT4, SOX2, c-MYC, and KLF4 (OSCK) expressing gammaretroviral vectors. Using these vectors in combination with small molecules, we were able to efficiently and reproducibly generate nonhuman primate iPS cells from pigtailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina). The established nonhuman primate iPS cells exhibited pluripotency and extensive self-renewal capacity. The facile and reproducible generation of nonhuman primate iPS cells using defined producer cells as a source of individual reprogramming factors should provide an important resource to optimize and evaluate iPS cell technology for studies involving stem cell biology and regenerative medicine. PMID:21058905

  19. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, R.E.

    1988-03-08

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream 1 and spent fuel stream 2. Spent fuel stream 1 is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream 1 and exhaust stream 2, and exhaust stream 1 is vented. Exhaust stream 2 is mixed with spent fuel stream 2 to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells. 1 fig.

  20. Reforming of fuel inside fuel cell generator

    DOEpatents

    Grimble, Ralph E.

    1988-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved method of reforming a gaseous reformable fuel within a solid oxide fuel cell generator, wherein the solid oxide fuel cell generator has a plurality of individual fuel cells in a refractory container, the fuel cells generating a partially spent fuel stream and a partially spent oxidant stream. The partially spent fuel stream is divided into two streams, spent fuel stream I and spent fuel stream II. Spent fuel stream I is burned with the partially spent oxidant stream inside the refractory container to produce an exhaust stream. The exhaust stream is divided into two streams, exhaust stream I and exhaust stream II, and exhaust stream I is vented. Exhaust stream II is mixed with spent fuel stream II to form a recycle stream. The recycle stream is mixed with the gaseous reformable fuel within the refractory container to form a fuel stream which is supplied to the fuel cells. Also disclosed is an improved apparatus which permits the reforming of a reformable gaseous fuel within such a solid oxide fuel cell generator. The apparatus comprises a mixing chamber within the refractory container, means for diverting a portion of the partially spent fuel stream to the mixing chamber, means for diverting a portion of exhaust gas to the mixing chamber where it is mixed with the portion of the partially spent fuel stream to form a recycle stream, means for injecting the reformable gaseous fuel into the recycle stream, and means for circulating the recycle stream back to the fuel cells.

  1. Quantitative methods for analyzing cell-cell adhesion in development.

    PubMed

    Kashef, Jubin; Franz, Clemens M

    2015-05-01

    During development cell-cell adhesion is not only crucial to maintain tissue morphogenesis and homeostasis, it also activates signalling pathways important for the regulation of different cellular processes including cell survival, gene expression, collective cell migration and differentiation. Importantly, gene mutations of adhesion receptors can cause developmental disorders and different diseases. Quantitative methods to measure cell adhesion are therefore necessary to understand how cells regulate cell-cell adhesion during development and how aberrations in cell-cell adhesion contribute to disease. Different in vitro adhesion assays have been developed in the past, but not all of them are suitable to study developmentally-related cell-cell adhesion processes, which usually requires working with low numbers of primary cells. In this review, we provide an overview of different in vitro techniques to study cell-cell adhesion during development, including a semi-quantitative cell flipping assay, and quantitative single-cell methods based on atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS) or dual micropipette aspiration (DPA). Furthermore, we review applications of Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based molecular tension sensors to visualize intracellular mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion sites. Finally, we describe a recently introduced method to quantitate cell-generated forces directly in living tissues based on the deformation of oil microdroplets functionalized with adhesion receptor ligands. Together, these techniques provide a comprehensive toolbox to characterize different cell-cell adhesion phenomena during development. PMID:25448695

  2. Fuel cell using a hydrogen generation system

    DOEpatents

    Dentinger, Paul M.; Crowell, Jeffrey A. W.

    2010-10-19

    A system is described for storing and generating hydrogen and, in particular, a system for storing and generating hydrogen for use in an H.sub.2/O.sub.2 fuel cell. The hydrogen storage system uses beta particles from a beta particle emitting material to degrade an organic polymer material to release substantially pure hydrogen. In a preferred embodiment of the invention, beta particles from .sup.63Ni are used to release hydrogen from linear polyethylene.

  3. Advanced fuel cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. D.; Baumert, B.; Claar, T. D.; Fousek, R. J.; Huang, H. S.; Kaun, T. D.; Krumpelt, M.; Minh, N.; Mrazek, F. C.; Poeppel, R. B.

    1985-01-01

    Fuel cell research and development activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) during the period January through March 1984 are described. These efforts have been directed principally toward seeking alternative cathode materials to NiO for molten carbonate fuel cells. Based on an investigation of the thermodynamically stable phases formed under cathode conditions, a number of prospective alternative cathode materials have been identified. From the list of candidates, LiFeO2, Li2MnO3, and ZnO were selected for further investigation. During this quarter, they were doped to promote conductivity and tested for solubility and ion migration in the cell environment. An investigation directed to understanding in cell densification of anode materials was initiated. In addition, calculations were made to evaluate the practicality of controlling sulfur accumulation in molten carbonate fuel cells by bleed off of a portion of the anode gas that could be recycled to the cathode. In addition, a model is being developed to predict the performance of solid oxide fuel cells as a function of cell design and operation.

  4. Generation of new islets from stem cells.

    PubMed

    Roche, Enrique; Soria, Bernat

    2004-01-01

    Spain ranks number one in organ donors (35 per million per yr). Although the prevalence of diabetes is low (100,000 type 1 diabetic patients and 2 million type 2 diabetic patients), the expected number of patients receiving islet transplants should be estimated at 200 per year. Islet replacement represents a promising cure for diabetes and has been successfully applied in a limited number of type 1 diabetic patients, resulting in insulin independence for periods longer than 3 yr. However, it has been difficult to obtain sufficient numbers of islets from cadaveric donors. Interesting alternatives include acquiring renewable sources of cells using either embryonic or adult stem cells to overcome the islet scarcity problem. Stem cells are capable of extensive proliferation rates and are capable of differentiating into other cell types of the body. In particular, totipotent stem cells are capable of differentiating into all cell types in the body, whereas pluripotent stem cells are limited to the development of a certain number of differentiated cell types. Insulin-producing cells have been obtained from both embryonic and adult stem cells using several approaches. In animal models of diabetes, the therapeutic application of bioengineered insulin-secreting cells derived from stem cells has delivered promising results. This review will summarize the different approaches that have been used to obtain insulin-producing cells from embryonic and adult stem cells and highlights the key points that will allow in vitro differentiation and subsequent transplantation in the future. PMID:15289648

  5. High Efficiency Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    The specific activity was to improve the tandem junction Cell (TJC) as a high efficiency solar cell. The TJC development was to be consistent with module assembly and should contribute to the overall goals of the Low-Cost Solar Array Project. During 1978, TJC efficiency improved from approximately 11 percent to approximately 16 percent (AMI). Photogenerated current densities in excess of 42 mA/sq cm were observed at AMO. Open circuit voltages as high as 0.615 V were measured at AMO. Fill factor was only 0.68 - 0.75 due to a nonoptimum metal contact design. A device model was conceived in which the solar cell is modelled as a transitor. There are virtually no interconnect or packaging factor systems and the TJC is compatible with all conventional module fabrication systems. A modification of the TJC, the Front Surface Field (FSF) cell, was also explored.

  6. Power generation properties of Direct Flame Fuel Cell (DFFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, S.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by small-jet flame on the power generation performance of Direct Flame Fuel Cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small flame and heated product gas is impinged toward it and this system is the simplest and smallest unit of the power generation device to be developed. Equivalence ratio (phi) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as main experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage (OCV) increases linearly with the increase of temperature in wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically at which the equivalence ratio became small (phi <= 2.0) showing inner flame clearly. This result suggests that OCV depends on not only cell temperature but also the species concentration exposed to the cell. It is suggested that Nernst equation might work satisfactory to predict OCV of DFFC.

  7. CML Mouse Model Generated from Leukemia Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder with a high number of well-differentiated neutrophils in peripheral blood and myeloid cells in bone marrow (BM). CML is derived from the hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph(+), t(9;22)-(q34;q11)), resulting in generating a fusion oncogene, BCR/ABL1. HSCs with Ph(+) are defined as leukemia stem cells (LSCs), a subpopulation cell at the apex of hierarchies in leukemia cells and responsible for the disease continuous propagation. Several kinds of CML models have been developed to reveal the mechanism of CML pathogenesis and evaluate therapeutic drugs in the past three decades. Here, we describe the procedures to generate a CML mouse model by introducing BCR/ABL1 into Lin(-)Sca1(+) cKit(+) population cells purified from mouse bone marrow. In CML retroviral transduction/transplantation mouse models, this modified model can mimic CML pathogenesis on high fidelity. PMID:27581136

  8. Compact neutron generator development at LBNL

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; English, G.; Firestone, R.; Giquel, F.; King, M.; Leung, K-N.; Sun, M.

    2003-12-31

    A wide variety of applications ranging from medical (BNCT, Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) and basic science (neutron imaging, material studies) to homeland security (explosive detection and nuclear material non-proliferation) are in need of compact, high flux neutron generators. The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group in the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing various neutron generators for these applications. These neutron generators employed either the D-D or the D-T fusion reaction for the neutron production. The deuterium or deuterium-tritium gas mixture is ionized in an RF-driven plasma source. The ions are then accelerated to {approx}100 keV energy using high current, high voltage DC-power supply to a target where the 2.45 MeV (for D-D reaction) or 14 MeV (for the D-T reaction) neutrons are generated. The development of two different types of neutron tubes are being discussed in this presentation, namely compact, pulsed operation neutron generators and cw, high yield neutron generators. These generators are currently operating at D-D neutron yields of 108 n/s and 109 n/s respectively. A facility, incorporating the larger neutron generator, has been constructed for Prompt Gamma Activation Analysis (PGAA) and Neutron Activation Analysis (NAA) measurements.

  9. Generation of enteroendocrine cell diversity in midgut stem cell lineages

    PubMed Central

    Beehler-Evans, Ryan; Micchelli, Craig A.

    2015-01-01

    The endocrine system mediates long-range peptide hormone signaling to broadcast changes in metabolic status to distant target tissues via the circulatory system. In many animals, the diffuse endocrine system of the gut is the largest endocrine tissue, with the full spectrum of endocrine cell subtypes not yet fully characterized. Here, we combine molecular mapping, lineage tracing and genetic analysis in the adult fruit fly to gain new insight into the cellular and molecular mechanisms governing enteroendocrine cell diversity. Neuropeptide hormone distribution was used as a basis to generate a high-resolution cellular map of the diffuse endocrine system. Our studies show that cell diversity is seen at two distinct levels: regional and local. We find that class I and class II enteroendocrine cells can be distinguished locally by combinatorial expression of secreted neuropeptide hormones. Cell lineage tracing studies demonstrate that class I and class II cells arise from a common stem cell lineage and that peptide profiles are a stable feature of enteroendocrine cell identity during homeostasis and following challenge with the enteric pathogen Pseudomonas entomophila. Genetic analysis shows that Notch signaling controls the establishment of class II cells in the lineage, but is insufficient to reprogram extant class I cells into class II enteroendocrine cells. Thus, one mechanism by which secretory cell diversity is achieved in the diffuse endocrine system is through cell-cell signaling interactions within individual adult stem cell lineages. PMID:25670792

  10. Development of Fuel Cell Co-generation System with Heat-pump System in Consideration of Transient Response of Electric Power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obara, Shinya; Kudo, Kazuhiko

    The transient response characteristics of electric power output of the fuel cell system for individual houses were investigated, and relation between system control parameters and transient response characteristics were clarified. Furthermore, the transient response characteristics of coefficient of performance (COP) and electric power output of the system which makes heat pump an auxiliary heat source were investigated. Moreover, the relation between COP of heat pump and the transient response characteristics of the system were considered. Analysis of operation cost of system components and annual operation cost balance was performed supposing introducing a fuel cell co-generation system installs to individual house in Sapporo and Tokyo. Relation between COP of heat pump and operation cost, relation of reformer time-constant and operation cost, operation cost of the system with town gas boiler instead of heat pump, were investigated. The fuel cell cogeneration system introduced into Tokyo does not have the necessity of using heat pump and boiler, and it is thought that energy demand is filled with installing a thermal storage tank of small capacity. Moreover, it is more advantageous for operation cost to introduce a town gas boiler rather than introduces about COP=2. 0 heat pump into Sapporo.

  11. Force propagation and force generation in cells.

    PubMed

    Jonas, Oliver; Duschl, Claus

    2010-09-01

    Determining how forces are produced by and propagated through the cytoskeleton (CSK) of the cell is of great interest as dynamic processes of the CSK are intimately correlated with many molecular signaling pathways. We are presenting a novel approach for integrating measurements on cell elasticity, transcellular force propagation, and cellular force generation to obtain a comprehensive description of dynamic and mechanical properties of the CSK under force loading. This approach uses a combination of scanning force microscopy (SFM) and Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy. We apply well-defined loading schemes onto the apical cell membrane of fibroblasts using the SFM and simultaneously use TIRF microscopy to image the topography of the basal cell membrane. The locally distinct changes of shape and depth of the cytoskeletal imprints onto the basal membrane are interpreted as results of force propagation through the cytoplasm. This observation provides evidence for the tensegrity model and demonstrates the usefulness of our approach that does not depend on potentially disturbing marker compounds. We confirm that the actin network greatly determines cell stiffness and represents the substrate that mediates force transduction through the cytoplasm of the cell. The latter is an essential feature of tensegrity. Most importantly, our new finding that, both intact actin and microtubule networks are required for enabling the cell to produce work, can only be understood within the framework of the tensegrity model. We also provide, for the first time, a direct measurement of the cell's mechanical power output under compression at two femtowatts. PMID:20607861

  12. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for bioelectricity generation from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M Azizul; Omine, Kiyoshi; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakata, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained a lot of attention recently as a mode of converting organic matter into electricity. In this study, a compost-based microbial fuel cell that generates bioelectricity by biodegradation of organic matter is developed. Grass cuttings, along with leaf mold, rice bran, oil cake (from mustard plants) and chicken droppings (waste from chickens) were used as organic waste. The electric properties of the MFC under anaerobic fermentation condition were investigated along with the influence of different types of membranes, the mixing of fly ash, and different types of electrode materials. It is observed that the maximum voltage was increased by mixing fly ash. Cellophane showed the highest value of voltage (around 350mV). Bamboo charcoal is good for anode material; however carbon fiber is better for the cathode material in terms of optimization of power generated. This developed MFC is a simple cell to generate electricity from organic waste. PMID:23962448

  13. Internal and ancestral controls of cell-generation times

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubitschek, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Lateral and longitudinal correlations between related cells reveal associations between the generation times of cells for an intermediate period /three generations in bacteral cultures/. Generation times of progeny are influenced by nongenetic factors transmitted from their ancestors.

  14. Vortex Generator Model Developed for Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chima, Rodrick V.

    2002-01-01

    A computational model was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to investigate possible uses of vortex generators (VG's) for improving the performance of turbomachinery. A vortex generator is a small, winglike device that generates vortices at its tip. The vortices mix high-speed core flow with low-speed boundary layer flow and, thus, can be used to delay flow separation. VG's also turn the flow near the walls and, thus, can be used to control flow incidence into a turbomachinery blade row or to control secondary flows.

  15. Fourth-generation photovoltaic concentrator system development

    SciTech Connect

    O`Neill, M.J.; McDanal, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    In 1991, under a contract with Sandia for the Concentrator Initiative, the ENTECH team initiated the design and development of a fourth-generation concentrator module. In 1992, Sandia also contracted with ENTECH to develop a new control and drive system for the ENTECH array. This report documents the design and development work performed under both contracts. Manufacturing processes for the new module were developed at the same time under a complementary PVMaT contract with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory. Two 100-kW power plants were deployed in 1995 in Texas using the newly developed fourth-generation concentrator technology, one at the CSW Solar Park near Ft. Davis and one at TUE Energy Park in Dallas. Technology developed under the Sandia contracts has made a successful transition from the laboratory to the production line to the field.

  16. The role of the low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP1) in Alzheimer's A beta generation: development of a cell-based model system.

    PubMed

    Goto, Joy J; Tanzi, Rudolph E

    2002-01-01

    The clearance and degradation of extracellular A beta is critical for regulating beta-amyloid deposition, a major hallmark of brains of patients with A beta in Alzheimer's Disease. The low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein, LRP1, is a large endocytic receptor that significantly contributes to the balance between degradation and production of A beta. An extracellular portion of the LRP, known as the cluster II region can bind to the secreted form of APP (sAPP-KPI). We show here that a GST fusion protein containing the cluster II region of LRP can be used as a 'mini-receptor' that specifically binds to sAPP-KPI from conditioned cultured medium. The binding between the GST-LRP-cluster II fusion protein and sAPP-KPI can be inhibited with the strong binding ligand of LRP1, called receptor-associated protein (RAP). Furthermore, a cell-based in vitro assay system has been developed to monitor the production of total A beta and A beta(1-42) in the presence and absence of RAP in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell lines both deficient in LRP and expressing LRP. A 3-day treatment of the L2 (CHO cells deficient in LRP and overexpressing APP751) and L3 (CHO cells expressing LRP and overexpressing APP751) cell lines with RAP showed a decrease in total A beta and, interestingly, also a decrease in the ratio of A beta42/A beta(total). This cell-based model system and LRP-cluster II mini-receptor will be very useful for screening novel compounds that can reduce A beta accumulation by inhibiting binding of APP-KPI to LRP1. PMID:12212791

  17. Generation of avian cells resembling osteoclasts from mononuclear phagocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarez, J. I.; Teitelbaum, S. L.; Blair, H. C.; Greenfield, E. M.; Athanasou, N. A.; Ross, F. P.

    1991-01-01

    Several lines of indirect evidence suggest that a monocyte family precursor gives rise to the osteoclast, although this hypothesis is controversial. Starting with a uniform population of nonspecific esterase positive, tartrate-sensitive, acid phosphatase-producing, mannose receptor-bearing mononuclear cells, prepared from dispersed marrow of calcium-deprived laying hens by cell density separation and selective cellular adherence, we generated multinucleated cells in vitro. When cultured with devitalized bone, these cells show, by electron microscopy, the characteristic osteoclast morphology in that they are mitochondria-rich, multinucleated, and, most importantly, develop characteristic ruffled membranes at the matrix attachment site. Moreover, as documented by scanning electron microscopy, these cells pit bone slices in a manner identical to freshly isolated osteoclasts. In addition, isoenzymes of acid phosphatase from generated osteoclasts, separated by 7.5% polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis at pH 4, are identical to those of mature osteoclasts in migration pattern and tartrate resistance, although the precursor cells from which the osteoclasts are generated produce an entirely different isoenzyme, which is tartrate-sensitive and migrates less rapidly at pH 4. The fused cells also exhibit a cAMP response to prostaglandin E2. Therefore, osteoclast-like cells can be derived by in vitro culture of a marrow-derived monocyte cell population.

  18. [Generation of functional organs from pluripotent stem cells].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuyuki; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu

    2015-10-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have played a major role in stem cell biology, providing many conceptual ideas and models. Among them is the concept of the "niche", a special bone-marrow microenvironment that by exchanging cues regulates stem-cell fate. The HSC niche also plays an important role in HSC transplantation. Successful engraftment of donor HSCs depends on myeloablative pretreatment to empty the niche. The concept of the stem-cell niche has now been extended to the generation of organs. We postulated that an empty "organ niche" exists in a developing animal when development of an organ is genetically disabled. This organ niche should be developmentally compensated by blastocyst complementation using wild-type primary stem cells (PSCs). We proved the principle of organogenesis from xenogeneic PSCs in an embryo unable to form a specific organ, demonstrating the generation of functionally normal rat pancreas by injecting rat PSCs into pancreatogenesis-disabled mouse embryos. This principle has held in pigs. When pancreatogenesis-disabled pig embryos underwent complementation with blastomeres from wild-type pig embryos to produce chimeric pigs, the chimeras had normal pancreata and survived to adulthood. Demonstration of the generation of a functional organ from PSCs in pigs is a very important step toward generation of human cells, tissues, and organs from individual patients' own PSCs in large animals. PMID:26458462

  19. Quantifying cell-generated mechanical forces within living embryonic tissues

    PubMed Central

    Campàs, Otger; Mammoto, Tadanori; Hasso, Sean; Sperling, Ralph A; O’Connell, Daniel; Bischof, Ashley G; Maas, Richard; Weitz, David A; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan; Ingber, Donald E

    2014-01-01

    Cell-generated mechanical forces play a critical role during tissue morphogenesis and organ formation in the embryo. However, little is known about how these forces shape embryonic organs, mainly because it has not been possible to measure cellular forces within developing three-dimensional (3D) tissues in vivo. Here we present a method to quantify cell-generated mechanical stresses that are exerted locally within living embryonic tissues using fluorescent, cell-sized, oil microdroplets with defined mechanical properties and coated with surface integrin or cadherin receptor ligands. After introducing a droplet between cells in a tissue, local stresses are determined from the droplet shape deformations, which are obtained via fluorescence microscopy and computerized image analysis. Using this method, we quantify the anisotropic stresses generated by mammary epithelial cells cultured within 3D aggregates and confirm that these stresses (3.4 nN/µm2) are dependent on myosin II activity and more than two-fold larger than the stresses generated by cells of embryonic tooth mesenchyme when analyzed within similar cultured aggregates or in developing whole mouse mandibles. PMID:24317254

  20. Unequal distribution of plastids during generative cell formation in Impatiens.

    PubMed

    van Went, J L

    1984-07-01

    This paper describes the unequal distribution of plastids in the developing microspores of Impatiens walleriana and Impatiens glandulifera which leads to the exclusion of plastids from the generative cell. During the development from young microspore to the onset of mitosis a change in the organization of the cytoplasm and distribution of organelles is gradually established. This includes the formation of vacuoles at the poles of the elongate-shaped microspores, the movement of the nucleus to a position near the microspore wall in the central part of the cell, and the accumulation of the plastids to a position near the wall at the opposite side of the cell. In Impatiens walleriana, the accumulated plastids are separated from each other by ER cisterns, and some mitochondria are also accumulated. In both Impatiens species, the portion of the microspore in which the generative cell will be formed is completely devoid of plastids at the time mitosis starts. PMID:24257638

  1. Methods for generating hydroelectric power development alternatives

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Shoou-yuh; Liaw, Shu-liang; Sale, M.J.; Railsback, S.F.

    1989-01-01

    Hydropower development on large rivers can result in a number of environmental impacts, including potential reductions in dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations. This study presents a methodology for generating different hydropower development alternatives for evaluation. This methodology employs a Streeter-Phelps model to simulate DO, and the Bounded Implicit Enumeration algorithm to solve an optimization model formulated to maximize hydroelectric energy production subject to acceptable DO limits. The upper Ohio River basin was used to illustrate the use and characteristics of the methodology. The results indicate that several alternatives which meet the specified DO constraints can be generated efficiently, meeting both power and environmental objectives. 17 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Compact neutron generator developement and applications

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Gicquel, Frederic; Hahto, Sami; Lou, Tak-Pui

    2004-01-18

    The Plasma and Ion Source Technology Group at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory has been engaging in the development of high yield compact neutron generators for the last ten years. Because neutrons in these generators are formed by using either D-D, T-T or D-T fusion reaction, one can produce either mono-energetic (2.4 MeV or 14 MeV) or white neutrons. All the neutron generators being developed by our group utilize 13.5 MHz RF induction discharge to produce a pure deuterium or a mixture of deuterium-tritium plasma. As a result, ion beams with high current density and almost pure atomic ions can be extracted from the plasma source. The ion beams are accelerated to {approx}100 keV and neutrons are produced when the beams impinge on a titanium target. Neutron generators with different configurations and sizes have been designed and tested at LBNL. Their applications include neutron activation analysis, oil-well logging, boron neutron capture therapy, brachytherapy, cargo and luggage screening. A novel small point neutron source has recently been developed for radiography application. The source size can be 2 mm or less, making it possible to examine objects with sharper images. The performance of these neutron generators will be described in this paper.

  3. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2004-07-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the January to June 2004 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  4. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2004-01-04

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the July 2003 to December 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. Also, another activity included in this program focuses on the development of SOFC scale up strategies.

  5. U.S. Distributed Generation Fuel Cell Program

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Mark C.; Strakey, Joseph P.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    2004-05-14

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is the largest funder of fuel cell technology in the U.S. The DOE Office of Fossil Energy (FE) is developing high temperature fuel cells for distributed generation. It has funded the development of tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power systems operating at up to 60% efficiency on natural gas. The remarkable environmental performance of these fuel cells makes them likely candidates to help mitigate pollution. DOE is now pursuing more widely applicable solid oxide fuel cells for 2010 and beyond. DOE estimates that a 5 kW solid oxide fuel cell system can reach $400/kW at reasonable manufacturing volumes. SECA - the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance - was formed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to accelerate the commercial readiness of planar and other solid oxide fuel cell systems utilizing 3-10 kW size modules by taking advantage of the projected economies of production from a mass customization approach. In addition, if the modular 3-10 kW size units can be ganged or scaled up to larger sizes with no increase in cost, then commercial, microgrid and other distributed generation markets will become attainable. Further scale-up and hybridization of SECA SOFCs with gas turbines could result in penetration of the bulk power market. This paper reviews the current status of the solid oxide and molten carbonate fuel cells in the U.S.

  6. Stabilization of apoptotic cells: generation of zombie cells.

    PubMed

    Oropesa-Ávila, M; Andrade-Talavera, Y; Garrido-Maraver, J; Cordero, M D; de la Mata, M; Cotán, D; Paz, M V; Pavón, A D; Alcocer-Gómez, E; de Lavera, I; Lema, R; Zaderenko, A P; Rodríguez-Moreno, A; Sánchez-Alcázar, J A

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is characterized by degradation of cell components but plasma membrane remains intact. Apoptotic microtubule network (AMN) is organized during apoptosis forming a cortical structure beneath plasma membrane that maintains plasma membrane integrity. Apoptotic cells are also characterized by high reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that can be potentially harmful for the cell. The aim of this study was to develop a method that allows stabilizing apoptotic cells for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. By using a cocktail composed of taxol (a microtubule stabilizer), Zn(2+) (a caspase inhibitor) and coenzyme Q10 (a lipid antioxidant), we were able to stabilize H460 apoptotic cells in cell cultures for at least 72 h, preventing secondary necrosis. Stabilized apoptotic cells maintain many apoptotic cell characteristics such as the presence of apoptotic microtubules, plasma membrane integrity, low intracellular calcium levels and mitochondrial polarization. Apoptotic cell stabilization may open new avenues in apoptosis detection and therapy. PMID:25118929

  7. Stabilization of apoptotic cells: generation of zombie cells

    PubMed Central

    Oropesa-Ávila, M; Andrade-Talavera, Y; Garrido-Maraver, J; Cordero, M D; de la Mata, M; Cotán, D; Paz, M V; Pavón, A D; Alcocer-Gómez, E; de Lavera, I; Lema, R; Zaderenko, A P; Rodríguez-Moreno, A; Sánchez-Alcázar, J A

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis is characterized by degradation of cell components but plasma membrane remains intact. Apoptotic microtubule network (AMN) is organized during apoptosis forming a cortical structure beneath plasma membrane that maintains plasma membrane integrity. Apoptotic cells are also characterized by high reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that can be potentially harmful for the cell. The aim of this study was to develop a method that allows stabilizing apoptotic cells for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. By using a cocktail composed of taxol (a microtubule stabilizer), Zn2+ (a caspase inhibitor) and coenzyme Q10 (a lipid antioxidant), we were able to stabilize H460 apoptotic cells in cell cultures for at least 72 h, preventing secondary necrosis. Stabilized apoptotic cells maintain many apoptotic cell characteristics such as the presence of apoptotic microtubules, plasma membrane integrity, low intracellular calcium levels and mitochondrial polarization. Apoptotic cell stabilization may open new avenues in apoptosis detection and therapy. PMID:25118929

  8. Next Generation Drivetrain Development and Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Jonathan; Erdman, Bill; Blodgett, Doug; Halse, Chris; Grider, Dave

    2015-11-03

    This presentation was given at the Wind Energy IQ conference in Bremen, Germany, November 30 through December 2, 2105. It focused on the next-generation drivetrain architecture and drivetrain technology development and testing (including gearbox and inverter software and medium-voltage inverter modules.

  9. Pancreatic Islet Cell Development and Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Romer, Anthony I.; Sussel, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Purpose This review will discuss recent advances in understanding mouse and human pancreatic islet cell development, novel concepts related to β cell dysfunction and improved approaches for replenishing β cells to treat diabetes. Recent Findings Considerable knowledge about pancreatic islet development and function has been gained using model systems with subsequent validation in human tissues. Recently, several rodent studies have revealed that differentiated adult islet cells retain remarkable plasticity and can be converted to other islet cell types by perturbing their transcription factor profiles. Furthermore, significant advances have been made in the generation of β-like cells from stem cell populations. Therefore, the generation of functionally mature β cells by the in situ conversion of non-β cell populations or by the directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells could represent novel mechanisms for replenishing β cells in diabetic patients. Summary The overall conservation between mouse and human pancreatic development, islet physiology and etiology of diabetes encourages the translation of novel β cell replacement therapies to humans. Further deciphering the molecular mechanisms that direct islet cell regeneration, plasticity and function could improve and expand the β cell replacement strategies for treating diabetes. PMID:26087337

  10. The new generation of vehicles: market opportunities for fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalk, Steven G.; Patil, Pandit G.; Venkateswaran, S. R.

    The Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a historic US Government-auto industry partnership initiated in 1993, is pursuing three specific, interrelated goals, including the development of the next generation of vehicles capable of achieving up to three times the fuel efficiency of today's comparable vehicles. Fuel cells have been identified as one of three primary propulsion system candidates to meet this triple fuel efficiency goal, since they can dramatically increase automotive propulsion efficiency combined with very low to zero emissions. The US Government is working closely with industry and research institutions in pursuing a strategy of aggressive research and development (R&D) to accelerate the commercialization of fuel cell vehicles. The US Department of Energy has a major role in this fuel cell technology development effort. R&D activities are focused on overcoming the major technical, economic, and infrastructure-related hurdles. The high efficiency, very low emissions, and other favorable characteristics of fuel cells (such as fuel flexibility, low noise, and vibration) create significant market opportunities for fuel cells over the entire spectrum of transportation applications. While the focus of near-term markets for fuel cell vehicles will be urban areas having severe air-quality problems, long-term market prospects are encouraging since fuel cell vehicles can compete on an even ground with conventional vehicles in all key aspects, including vehicle range and refueling. This paper will discuss near- and long-term market opportunities for fuel cells in transportation and provide an update on driving regulatory developments in the USA at the federal and state level. The paper also provides an introduction to the PNGV (focusing on the role and prospects for fuel cells) and discusses the status of fuel cell vehicle development projects.

  11. Multiple Exciton Generation in Quantum Dot Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semonin, O. E.

    Photovoltaics are limited in their power conversion efficiency (PCE) by very rapid relaxation of energetic carriers to the band edge. Therefore, photons from the visible and ultraviolet parts of the spectrum typically are not efficiently converted into electrical energy. One approach that can address this is multiple exciton generation (MEG), where a single photon of sufficient energy can generate multiple excited electron-hole pairs. This process has been shown to be more efficient in quantum dots than bulk semiconductors, but it has never been demonstrated in the photocurrent of a solar cell. In order to demonstrate that multiple exciton generation can address fundamental limits for conventional photovoltaics, I have developed prototype devices from colloidal PbS and PbSe quantum dot inks. I have characterized both the colloidal suspensions and films of quantum dots with the goal of understanding what properties determine the efficiency of the solar cell and of the MEG process. I have found surface chemistry effects on solar cells, photoluminescence, and MEG, and I have found some chemical treatments that lead to solar cells showing MEG. These devices show external quantum efficiency (EQE) greater than 100% for certain parts of the solar spectrum, and I extract internal quantum efficiency (IQE) consistent with previous measurements of colloidal suspensions of quantum dots. These findings are a small first step toward breaking the single junction Shockley-Queisser limit of present-day first and second generation solar cells, thus moving photovoltaic cells toward a new regime of efficiency.

  12. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    David Deangelis; Rich Depuy; Debashis Dey; Georgia Karvountzi; Nguyen Minh; Max Peter; Faress Rahman; Pavel Sokolov; Deliang Yang

    2004-09-30

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC (HPGS) during the April to October 2004 reporting period in Task 2.3 (SOFC Scaleup for Hybrid and Fuel Cell Systems) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL), entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. This study analyzes the performance and economics of power generation systems for central power generation application based on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) technology and fueled by natural gas. The main objective of this task is to develop credible scale up strategies for large solid oxide fuel cell-gas turbine systems. System concepts that integrate a SOFC with a gas turbine were developed and analyzed for plant sizes in excess of 20 MW. A 25 MW plant configuration was selected with projected system efficiency of over 65% and a factory cost of under $400/kW. The plant design is modular and can be scaled to both higher and lower plant power ratings. Technology gaps and required engineering development efforts were identified and evaluated.

  13. Development of W-Ta generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    This research program was used to further develop the existing W-Ta generator and to evaluate alternative adsorbents, preferably inorganic materials, as supports for the generator. During the first half year, combinations of non-complexing eluents and a variety of adsorbents, both inorganic and organic, were evaluated. Some of these adsorbents were synthetic, such as chelate resins that could be specific for tungsten. In the second half of the year, the stress was mainly on the use of complexing eluents because of the high affinity of hydrous oxides for tantalum, on the synthesis of chelate resins and on the use novel techniques (electrolytic) to solve the tantalum-adsorption problem.

  14. High-temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Merritt, Danielle; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Scheiman, David

    2005-01-01

    The vast majority of space probes to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions designed to probe environments close to the sun (Figure 1) will be able to use such power generation, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. The significant problem is that solar cells lose performance at high temperatures.

  15. Development of a nitrogen generation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppner, D. B.; Marshall, R. D.; Powell, J. D., III; Schubert, F. H.

    1980-01-01

    An eight-stage nitrogen generation module was developed. The design integrated a hydrazine catalytic dissociator, three ammonia dissociation stages and four palladium/silver hydrogen separator stages. Alternating ammonia dissociation and hydrogen separation stages are used to remove hydrogen and ammonia formed in the dissociation of hydrazine which results in negligible ammonia and hydrogen concentrations in the product nitrogen stream. An engineering breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was also developed. It was developed as an integratable subsystem for a central spacecraft air revitalization system. The subsystem consists of the hydrazine storage and feed mechanism, the nitrogen generation module, the peripheral mechanical and electrical components required to control and monitor subsystem performance, and the instrumentation required to interface with other subsystems of an air revitalization system. The breadboard nitrogen supply subsystem was integrated and tested with a one-person capacity experimental air revitalization system. The integration, checkout and testing was successfully accomplished.

  16. Development of portable fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatou, K.; Sumi, S.; Nishizawa, N.

    1996-12-31

    Sanyo Electric has been concentrating on developing a marketable portable fuel cell using phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC). Due to the fact that this power source uses PAFC that operate at low temperature around 100{degrees} C, they are easier to handle compared to conventional fuel cells that operate at around 200{degrees} C , they can also be expected to provide extended reliable operation because corrosion of the electrode material and deterioration of the electrode catalyst are almost completely nonexistent. This power source is meant to be used independently and stored at room temperature. When it is started up, it generates electricity itself using its internal load to raise the temperature. As a result, the phosphoric acid (the electolyte) absorbs the reaction water when the temperature starts to be raised (around room temperature). At the same time the concentration and volume of the phosphoric acid changes, which may adversely affect the life time of the cell. We have studied means for starting, operating PAFC stack using methods that can simply evaluate changes in the concentration of the electrolyte in the stack with the aim of improving and extending cell life and report on them in this paper.

  17. Generating Cell Targeting Aptamers for Nanotheranostics Using Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Yifan; Chen, Guang; Shangguan, Dihua; Zhang, Liqin; Wan, Shuo; Wu, Yuan; Zhang, Hui; Duan, Lian; Liu, Chao; You, Mingxu; Wang, Jie; Tan, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and understanding changes in cell conditions on the molecular level is of great importance for the accurate diagnosis and timely therapy of diseases. Cell-based SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment), a foundational technology used to generate highly-specific, cell-targeting aptamers, has been increasingly employed in studies of molecular medicine, including biomarker discovery and early diagnosis/targeting therapy of cancer. In this review, we begin with a mechanical description of the cell-SELEX process, covering aptamer selection, identification and identification, and aptamer characterization; following this introduction is a comprehensive discussion of the potential for aptamers as targeting moieties in the construction of various nanotheranostics. Challenges and prospects for cell-SELEX and aptamer-based nanotheranostic are also discussed. PMID:27375791

  18. Generation and In Vitro Expansion of Hepatic Progenitor Cells from Human iPS Cells.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, Ayaka; Nakauchi, Hiromitsu; Kamiya, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have the unique properties of self-renewal and multipotency (producing progeny belonging to two or more lineages). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be generated from somatic cells by simultaneous expression of pluripotent factors (Oct3/4, Klf4, Sox2, and c-Myc). They share the same properties as embryonic stem (ES) cells and can differentiate into several tissue cells, i.e., neurons, hematopoietic cells, and liver cells. Therefore, iPS cells are suitable candidate cells for regenerative medicine and analyses of disease mechanisms.The liver is the major organ that regulates a multitude of metabolic functions. Hepatocytes are the major cell type populating the liver parenchyma and express several metabolic enzymes that are necessary for liver functions. Although hepatocytes are essential for maintaining homeostasis, it is difficult to alter artificial and transplanted cells because of their multifunctionality, donor shortage, and immunorejection risk. During liver development, hepatic progenitor cells in the fetal liver differentiate into both mature hepatocytes and cholangiocytes. As hepatic progenitor cells have bipotency and high proliferation ability, they could present a potential source for generating transplantable cells or as a liver study model. Here we describe the induction and purification of hepatic progenitor cells derived from human iPS cells. These cells can proliferate for a long term under suitable culture conditions. PMID:25697415

  19. Cross-Generational Reproductive Fitness Enforced by Microchimeric Maternal Cells.

    PubMed

    Kinder, Jeremy M; Jiang, Tony T; Ertelt, James M; Xin, Lijun; Strong, Beverly S; Shaaban, Aimen F; Way, Sing Sing

    2015-07-30

    Exposure to maternal tissue during in utero development imprints tolerance to immunologically foreign non-inherited maternal antigens (NIMA) that persists into adulthood. The biological advantage of this tolerance, conserved across mammalian species, remains unclear. Here, we show maternal cells that establish microchimerism in female offspring during development promote systemic accumulation of immune suppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) with NIMA specificity. NIMA-specific Tregs expand during pregnancies sired by males expressing alloantigens with overlapping NIMA specificity, thereby averting fetal wastage triggered by prenatal infection and non-infectious disruptions of fetal tolerance. Therefore, exposure to NIMA selectively enhances reproductive success in second-generation females carrying embryos with overlapping paternally inherited antigens. These findings demonstrate that genetic fitness, canonically thought to be restricted to Mendelian inheritance, is enhanced in female placental mammals through vertically transferred maternal cells that promote conservation of NIMA and enforce cross-generational reproductive benefits. PMID:26213383

  20. Requirement for CD4 T Cell Help in Generating Functional CD8 T Cell Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Shen, Hao

    2003-04-01

    Although primary CD8 responses to acute infections are independent of CD4 help, it is unknown whether a similar situation applies to secondary responses. We show that depletion of CD4 cells during the recall response has minimal effect, whereas depletion during the priming phase leads to reduced responses by memory CD8 cells to reinfection. Memory CD8 cells generated in CD4+/+ mice responded normally when transferred into CD4-/- hosts, whereas memory CD8 cells generated in CD4-/- mice mounted defective recall responses in CD4+/+ adoptive hosts. These results demonstrate a previously undescribed role for CD4 help in the development of functional CD8 memory.

  1. Molecular Culprits Generating Brain Tumor Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Se-Yeong

    2013-01-01

    Despite current advances in multimodality therapies, such as surgery, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy, the outcome for patients with high-grade glioma remains fatal. Understanding how glioma cells resist various therapies may provide opportunities for developing new therapies. Accumulating evidence suggests that the main obstacle for successfully treating high-grade glioma is the existence of brain tumor stem cells (BTSCs), which share a number of cellular properties with adult stem cells, such as self-renewal and multipotent differentiation capabilities. Owing to their resistance to standard therapy coupled with their infiltrative nature, BTSCs are a primary cause of tumor recurrence post-therapy. Therefore, BTSCs are thought to be the main glioma cells representing a novel therapeutic target and should be eliminated to obtain successful treatment outcomes. PMID:24904883

  2. Cell cycle control and seed development

    PubMed Central

    Dante, Ricardo A.; Larkins, Brian A.; Sabelli, Paolo A.

    2014-01-01

    Seed development is a complex process that requires coordinated integration of many genetic, metabolic, and physiological pathways and environmental cues. Different cell cycle types, such as asymmetric cell division, acytokinetic mitosis, mitotic cell division, and endoreduplication, frequently occur in sequential yet overlapping manner during the development of the embryo and the endosperm, seed structures that are both products of double fertilization. Asymmetric cell divisions in the embryo generate polarized daughter cells with different cell fates. While nuclear and cell division cycles play a key role in determining final seed cell numbers, endoreduplication is often associated with processes such as cell enlargement and accumulation of storage metabolites that underlie cell differentiation and growth of the different seed compartments. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of different cell cycle mechanisms operating during seed development and their impact on the growth, development, and function of seed tissues. Particularly, the roles of core cell cycle regulators, such as cyclin-dependent-kinases and their inhibitors, the Retinoblastoma-Related/E2F pathway and the proteasome-ubiquitin system, are discussed in the contexts of different cell cycle types that characterize seed development. The contributions of nuclear and cellular proliferative cycles and endoreduplication to cereal endosperm development are also discussed. PMID:25295050

  3. Generation of Neuronal Progenitor Cells and Neurons from Mouse Sleeping Beauty Transposon–Generated Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klincumhom, Nuttha; Pirity, Melinda K.; Berzsenyi, Sara; Ujhelly, Olga; Muenthaisong, Suchitra; Rungarunlert, Sasitorn; Tharasanit, Theerawat; Techakumphu, Mongkol

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Mouse embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells can be used as models of neuronal differentiation for the investigation of mammalian neurogenesis, pharmacological testing, and development of cell-based therapies. Recently, mouse iPS cell lines have been generated by Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon-mediated transgenesis (SB-iPS). In this study, we determined for the first time the differentiation potential of mouse SB-iPS cells to form neuronal progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons. Undifferentiated SB-iPS and ES cells were aggregated into embryoid bodies (EBs) and cultured in neuronal differentiation medium supplemented with 5 μM all-trans retinoic acid. Thereafter, EBs were dissociated and plated to observe further neuronal differentiation. Samples were fixed on days 10 and 14 for immunocytochemistry staining using the NPC markers Pax6 and Nestin and the neuron marker βIII-tubulin/Tuj1. Nestin-labeled cells were analyzed further by flow cytometry. Our results demonstrated that SB-iPS cells can generate NPCs and differentiate further into neurons in culture, although SB-iPS cells produced less nestin-positive cells than ESCs (6.12±1.61 vs. 74.36±1.65, respectively). In conclusion, the efficiency of generating SB-iPS cells–derived NPCs needs to be improved. However, given the considerable potential of SB-iPS cells for drug testing and as therapeutic models in neurological disorders, continuing investigation of their neuronal differentiation ability is required. PMID:22917491

  4. Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells generated from human embryonic stem cells support pluripotent cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Varga, Nora; Vereb, Zoltan; Rajnavoelgyi, Eva; Nemet, Katalin; Uher, Ferenc; Sarkadi, Balazs; Apati, Agota

    2011-10-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSC like cells were derived from hESC by a simple and reproducible method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Differentiation and immunosuppressive features of MSCl cells were similar to bmMSC. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MSCl cells as feeder cells support the undifferentiated growth of hESC. -- Abstract: Mesenchymal stem cell like (MSCl) cells were generated from human embryonic stem cells (hESC) through embryoid body formation, and isolated by adherence to plastic surface. MSCl cell lines could be propagated without changes in morphological or functional characteristics for more than 15 passages. These cells, as well as their fluorescent protein expressing stable derivatives, efficiently supported the growth of undifferentiated human embryonic stem cells as feeder cells. The MSCl cells did not express the embryonic (Oct4, Nanog, ABCG2, PODXL, or SSEA4), or hematopoietic (CD34, CD45, CD14, CD133, HLA-DR) stem cell markers, while were positive for the characteristic cell surface markers of MSCs (CD44, CD73, CD90, CD105). MSCl cells could be differentiated toward osteogenic, chondrogenic or adipogenic directions and exhibited significant inhibition of mitogen-activated lymphocyte proliferation, and thus presented immunosuppressive features. We suggest that cultured MSCl cells can properly model human MSCs and be applied as efficient feeders in hESC cultures.

  5. Development of a novel protocol for generating flavivirus reporter particles.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Igor Velado; Okamoto, Natsumi; Ito, Aki; Fukuda, Miki; Someya, Azusa; Nishino, Yosii; Sasaki, Nobuya; Maeda, Akihiko

    2014-11-01

    Infection with West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a growing public and animal health concern worldwide. Prevention, diagnosis and treatment strategies for the infection are urgently required. Recently, viral reverse genetic systems have been developed and applied to clinical WNV virology. We developed a protocol for generating reporter virus particles (RVPs) of WNV with the aim of overcoming two major problems associated with conventional protocols, the difficulty in generating RVPs due to the specific skills required for handling RNAs, and the potential for environmental contamination by antibiotic-resistant genes encoded within the genome RNA of the RVPs. By using the proposed protocol, cells were established in which the RVP genome RNA is replicated constitutively and does not encode any antibiotic-resistant genes, and used as the cell supply for RVP genome RNA. Generation of the WNV RVPs requires only the simple transfection of the expression vectors for the viral structural proteins into the cells. Therefore, no RNA handling is required in this protocol. The WNV RVP yield obtained using this protocol was similar that obtained using the conventional protocol. According to these results, the newly developed protocol appears to be a good alternative for the generation of WNV RVPs, particularly for clinical applications. PMID:25116200

  6. Circulation control lift generation experiment: Hardware development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panontin, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    A circulation control airfoil and its accompanying hardware were developed to allow the investigation of lift generation that is independent of airfoil angle of attack and relative flow velocity. The test equipment, designed for use in a water tunnel, includes the blown airfoil, the support systems for both flow visualization and airfoil load measurement, and the fluid control system, which utilizes hydraulic technology. The primary design tasks, the selected solutions, and the unforseen problems involved in the development of these individual components of hardware are described.

  7. Generation and characterization of regulatory dendritic cells derived from murine induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Fujino, Masayuki; Iwasaki, Shizue; Hirano, Hiroshi; Cai, Songjie; Kitajima, Yuya; Xu, Jinhua; Li, Xiao-Kang

    2014-01-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells (DCregs) represent a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction conditions; however, current approaches for generating DCregs for therapeutic purposes are limited. We attempted to generate and characterize DCregs from murine induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. The iPS cells co-cultured with OP9 cells displayed mesodermally differentiated flat colonies. GM-CSF drove most of the colonies exhibiting a differentiated morphology. Thereafter, cells became morphologically heterologous under the effects of TGF-β and IL-10. Most of the floating cells developed an irregular shape with areas of protrusion. The generated iPS-DCregs demonstrated high CD11b/c and low CD40, CD80, CD86 and MHC-II expressions with a high antigen uptake ability and poor T-cell stimulatory function. Importantly, iPS-DCregs showed immune responsiveness regulation effects both in vitro and in vivo and the ability to generate regulatory T-cells in vitro. Our result illustrates a feasible approach for generating functional DCregs from murine iPS cells. PMID:24496181

  8. Dust devil vortex generation from convective cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishchenko, O.; Pokhotelov, O.; Horton, W.; Fedun, V.

    2015-11-01

    We have developed a hydrodynamic theory of the nonlinear stage of dust devil generation in a convectively unstable atmosphere with large-scale seed vertical vorticity. It is shown that convective motion in such an atmosphere transforms into dust devils extremely fast. The strong vortical structure of the dust devils can be formed in a few minutes or even in a fraction of a minute. The formation process strongly depends on the convective instability growth rate and horizontal vorticity.

  9. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys.

    PubMed

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-10-20

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal's ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the "stepwise peristaltic ureter" (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  10. Urine excretion strategy for stem cell-generated embryonic kidneys

    PubMed Central

    Yokote, Shinya; Matsunari, Hitomi; Iwai, Satomi; Yamanaka, Shuichiro; Uchikura, Ayuko; Fujimoto, Eisuke; Matsumoto, Kei; Nagashima, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Eiji; Yokoo, Takashi

    2015-01-01

    There have been several recent attempts to generate, de novo, a functional whole kidney from stem cells using the organogenic niche or blastocyst complementation methods. However, none of these attempts succeeded in constructing a urinary excretion pathway for the stem cell-generated embryonic kidney. First, we transplanted metanephroi from cloned pig fetuses into gilts; the metanephroi grew to about 3 cm and produced urine, although hydronephrosis eventually was observed because of the lack of an excretion pathway. Second, we demonstrated the construction of urine excretion pathways in rats. Rat metanephroi or metanephroi with bladders (developed from cloacas) were transplanted into host rats. Histopathologic analysis showed that tubular lumina dilation and interstitial fibrosis were reduced in kidneys developed from cloacal transplants compared with metanephroi transplantation. Then we connected the host animal’s ureter to the cloacal-developed bladder, a technique we called the “stepwise peristaltic ureter” (SWPU) system. The application of the SWPU system avoided hydronephrosis and permitted the cloacas to differentiate well, with cloacal urine being excreted persistently through the recipient ureter. Finally, we demonstrated a viable preclinical application of the SWPU system in cloned pigs. The SWPU system also inhibited hydronephrosis in the pig study. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the SWPU system may resolve two important problems in the generation of kidneys from stem cells: construction of a urine excretion pathway and continued growth of the newly generated kidney. PMID:26392557

  11. An Entirely Cell-based System to Generate Single-Chain Antibodies Against Cell Surface Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lipes, Barbara D.; Chen, Yu-Hsun; Ma, HongZheng; Staats, Herman F.; Kenan, Daniel J.; Gunn, Michael Dee

    2008-01-01

    Summary The generation of recombinant antibodies (Abs) using phage display is a proven method to obtain a large variety of Abs that bind with high affinity to a given antigen (Ag). Traditionally, the generation of single chain Abs depends on the use of recombinant proteins in several stages of the procedure. This can be a problem, especially in the case of cell surface receptors, because Abs generated and selected against recombinant proteins may not bind the same protein expressed on a cell surface in its native form and because the expression of some receptors as recombinant proteins is problematic. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a strategy to generate single chain Abs that does not require the use of recombinant protein at any stage of the procedure. In this strategy, stably transfected cells are used for the immunization of mice, measuring Ab responses to immunization, panning the phage library, high throughput screening of arrayed phage clones, and characterization of recombinant single chain variable regions (scFvs). This strategy was used to generate a panel of single chain Abs specific for the innate immunity receptor Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Once generated, individual scFvs were subcloned into an expression vector allowing the production of recombinant Abs in insect cells, thus avoiding the contamination of recombinant Abs with microbial products. This cell-based system efficiently generates Abs that bind to native molecules on the cell surface, bypasses the requirement of recombinant protein production, and avoids risks of microbial component contamination. PMID:18455737

  12. Adaptation of core mechanisms to generate cell polarity

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, W. James

    2012-01-01

    Cell polarity is defined as asymmetry in cell shape, protein distributions and cell functions. It is characteristic of single-cell organisms, including yeast and bacteria, and cells in tissues of multi-cell organisms such as epithelia in worms, flies and mammals. This diversity raises several questions: do different cell types use different mechanisms to generate polarity, how is polarity signalled, how do cells react to that signal, and how is structural polarity translated into specialized functions? Analysis of evolutionarily diverse cell types reveals that cell-surface landmarks adapt core pathways for cytoskeleton assembly and protein transport to generate cell polarity. PMID:12700771

  13. Expression Profiling of Developing Zebrafish Retinal Cells.

    PubMed

    Mullally, Madelyn; Albrecht, Caitlin; Horton, Mary; Laboissonniere, Lauren A; Goetz, Jillian J; Chowdhury, Rebecca; Manning, Alicia; Wester, Andrea K; Bose, Quinton; Trimarchi, Jeffrey M

    2016-08-01

    During retinal development, a variety of different types of neurons are produced. Understanding how each of these types of retinal nerve cells is generated is important from a developmental biology perspective. It is equally important if one is interested in how to regenerate cells after an injury or a disease. To gain more insight into how retinal neurons develop in the zebrafish, we performed single-cell mRNA profiling and in situ hybridizations (ISHs) on retinal sections and whole-mount zebrafish. Through the series of ISHs, designed and performed solely by undergraduate students in the laboratory, we were able to retrospectively identify our single-cell mRNA profiles as most likely coming from developing amacrine cells. Further analysis of these profiles will reveal genes that can be mutated using genome editing techniques. Together these studies increase our knowledge of the genes driving development of different cell types in the zebrafish retina. PMID:26982811

  14. SNAP-8 electrical generating system development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The SNAP-8 program has developed the technology base for one class of multikilowatt dynamic space power systems. Electrical power is generated by a turbine-alternator in a mercury Rankine-cycle loop to which heat is transferred and removed by means of sodium-potassium eutectic alloy subsystems. Final system overall criteria include a five-year operating life, restartability, man rating, and deliverable power in the 90 kWe range. The basic technology was demonstrated by more than 400,000 hours of major component endurance testing and numerous startup and shutdown cycles. A test system, comprised of developed components, delivered up to 35 kWe for a period exceeding 12,000 hours. The SNAP-8 system baseline is considered to have achieved a level of technology suitable for final application development for long-term multikilowatt space missions.

  15. Future development of large superconducting generators

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, S.K.; Mole, C.J.

    1989-03-01

    Large superconducting generators are being developed worldwide. The use of superconductors to reduce the electrical power dissipation in power equipment has been a technological possibility ever since the discovery of superconductivity, even though their use in power equipment remained an impractical dream for a long time. However, scientific and technological progress in superconductivity and cryogenics has brought this dream much closer to reality. Results obtained so far establish the technical feasibility of these machines. Analytical developments have been providing a sound basis for the design of superconducting machines and results of these design studies have shown improvements in power density of up to a factor of 10 higher than the power density for conventional machines. This paper describes the recently completed USA programs, the current foreign and USA programs, and then proposes a USA development program to maintain leadership in the field.

  16. SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL HYBRID SYSTEM FOR DISTRIBUTED POWER GENERATION

    SciTech Connect

    Faress Rahman; Nguyen Minh

    2003-07-01

    This report summarizes the work performed by Hybrid Power Generation Systems, LLC during the January 2003 to June 2003 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a micro-turbine. In addition, an activity included in this program focuses on the development of an integrated coal gasification fuel cell system concept based on planar SOFC technology. This report summarizes the results obtained to date on: System performance analysis and model optimization; Reliability and cost model development; System control including dynamic model development; Heat exchanger material tests and life analysis; Pressurized SOFC evaluation; and Pre-baseline system definition for coal gasification fuel cell system concept.

  17. U.S. distributed generation fuel cell program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M. C.; Strakey, J. P.; Singhal, Subhash C.

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is the largest funder of fuel cell technology in the U.S. The Department of Energy—Office of Fossil Energy (FE) is developing high temperature fuel cells for distributed generation. It has funded the development of tubular solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) and molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) power systems operating at up to 60% efficiency on natural gas. The remarkable environmental performance of these fuel cells makes them likely candidates to help mitigate pollution. DOE is now pursuing more widely applicable solid oxide fuel cells for 2010 and beyond. DOE estimates that a 5 kW solid oxide fuel cell system can reach $400 per kW at reasonable manufacturing volumes. SECA—the Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance—was formed by the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to accelerate the commercial readiness of planar and other solid oxide fuel cell systems utilizing 3-10 kW size modules by taking advantage of the projected economies of production from a "mass customization" approach. In addition, if the modular 3-10 kW size units can be "ganged" or "scaled-up" to larger sizes with no increase in cost, then commercial, microgrid, and other distributed generation markets will become attainable. Further scale-up and hybridization of SECA SOFCs with gas turbines could result in penetration of the bulk power market. This paper reviews the current status of the solid oxide and molten carbonate fuel cells in the U.S.

  18. Development of a downhole steam generator system

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-04-01

    This report describes the development of a downhole steam generator system for use in enhanced oil recovery. The system is composed of four major components: A state-of-the-art review indicated that advances in technology would be necessary in two areas (high pressure combustion and high temperature packer seals) in order to fabricate a field-worthy system. As a result, two tasks were undertaken which resulted in the development of a novel ceramic-lined combustor and a unique all-metal packer. These elements were incorporated into an overall system design. Key system components were built and tested in the laboratory. The program culminated in a successful simulated downhole test of the entire system, less tube string, at Sandia National Laboratories. 5 references, 41 figures, 9 tables.

  19. Local biofuels power plants with fuel cell generators

    SciTech Connect

    Lindstroem, O.

    1996-12-31

    The fuel cell should be a most important option for Asian countries now building up their electricity networks. The fuel cell is ideal for the schemes for distributed generation which are more reliable and efficient than the centralized schemes so far favoured by the industrialized countries in the West. Not yet developed small combined cycle power plants with advanced radial gas turbines and compact steam turbines will be the competition. Hot combustion is favoured today but cold combustion may win in the long run thanks to its environmental advantages. Emission standards are in general determined by what is feasible with available technology. The simple conclusion is that the fuel cell has to prove that it is competitive to the turbines in cost engineering terms. A second most important requirement is that the fuel cell option has to be superior with respect to electrical efficiency.

  20. Regenerative medicine in Parkinson's disease: generation of mesencephalic dopaminergic cells from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Hannah; Minger, Stephen L

    2005-10-01

    Cell replacement therapy has been proposed as a means of replacing specific populations of cells lost through trauma, disease or ageing. Parkinson's disease is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder caused by the loss of midbrain dopaminergic neurons. Intrastriatal transplants of human foetal mesencephalic tissue in Parkinson's patients have demonstrated clinical efficacy, but the limited availability of tissue precludes systematic use of this treatment. Human embryonic stem cells are capable of unlimited self-renewal and can differentiate into cells representative of all three germ layers, including cells of the central nervous system. These cells may thus provide a relatively unlimited source of cells for transplantation, if appropriate differentiation protocols to generate highly enriched and specific populations of neural cells can be developed. PMID:16143504

  1. Advanced-fuel-cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. D.; Arons, R. M.; Dusek, J. T.; Fraioli, A. V.; Kucera, G. H.; Sim, J. W.; Smith, J. L.

    1982-08-01

    Fuel cell research and development activities are described. The efforts are directed toward: (1) understanding of component behavior in molten carbonate fuel cells, and (2) developing alternative concepts for components. The principal focus was on the development of sintered gamma LiAlO2 electrolyte supports, stable NiO cathodes, and hydrogen diffusion barriers. Cell tests were performed to assess diffusion barriers and to study cathode voltage relaxation following current interruption.

  2. Asymmetric cell division in plant development.

    PubMed

    Heidstra, Renze

    2007-01-01

    Plant embryogenesis creates a seedling with a basic body plan. Post-embryonically the seedling elaborates with a lifelong ability to develop new tissues and organs. As a result asymmetric cell divisions serve essential roles during embryonic and postembryonic development to generate cell diversity. This review highlights selective cases of asymmetric division in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana and describes the current knowledge on fate determinants and mechanisms involved. Common themes that emerge are: 1. role of the plant hormone auxin and its polar transport machinery; 2. a MAP kinase signaling cascade and; 3. asymmetric segregating transcription factors that are involved in several asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:17585494

  3. A Progenitor Cell Expressing Transcription Factor RORγt Generates All Human Innate Lymphoid Cell Subsets.

    PubMed

    Scoville, Steven D; Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L; Zhang, Michael H; Chen, Li; Zhang, Xiaoli; Keller, Karen A; Hughes, Tiffany; Chen, Luxi; Cheng, Stephanie; Bergin, Stephen M; Mao, Hsiaoyin C; McClory, Susan; Yu, Jianhua; Carson, William E; Caligiuri, Michael A; Freud, Aharon G

    2016-05-17

    The current model of murine innate lymphoid cell (ILC) development holds that mouse ILCs are derived downstream of the common lymphoid progenitor through lineage-restricted progenitors. However, corresponding lineage-restricted progenitors in humans have yet to be discovered. Here we identified a progenitor population in human secondary lymphoid tissues (SLTs) that expressed the transcription factor RORγt and was unique in its ability to generate all known ILC subsets, including natural killer (NK) cells, but not other leukocyte populations. In contrast to murine fate-mapping data, which indicate that only ILC3s express Rorγt, these human progenitor cells as well as human peripheral blood NK cells and all mature ILC populations expressed RORγt. Thus, all human ILCs can be generated through an RORγt(+) developmental pathway from a common progenitor in SLTs. These findings help establish the developmental signals and pathways involved in human ILC development. PMID:27178467

  4. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  5. Entropy and heat generation of lithium cells/batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Songrui, Wang

    2016-01-01

    The methods and techniques commonly used in investigating the change of entropy and heat generation in Li cells/batteries are introduced, as are the measurements, calculations and purposes. The changes of entropy and heat generation are concomitant with the use of Li cells/batteries. In order to improve the management and the application of Li cells/batteries, especially for large scale power batteries, the quantitative investigations of the change of entropy and heat generating are necessary.

  6. Next-Generation Ion Propulsion Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Michael J.; Soulas, George C.; Foster, John E.; Haag, Thomas W.; Pinero, Luis R.; Rawlin, Vincent K.; Doehne, S. Michelle

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Glenn Research Center ion-propulsion program addresses the need for high specific-impulse systems and technology across a broad range of mission applications and power levels. One activity is the development of the next-generation ion-propulsion system as a follow-on to the successful Deep Space 1 system. The system is envisioned to incorporate a lightweight ion engine that can operate over 1 to 10 kW, with a 550-kg propellant throughput capacity. The engine concept under development has a 40-cm beam diameter, twice the effective area of the Deep Space 1 engine. It incorporates mechanical features and operating conditions to maximize the design heritage established by the Deep Space 1 engine, while incorporating new technology where warranted to extend the power and throughput capability. Prototype versions of the engine have been fabricated and are under test at NASA, with an engineering model version in manufacturing. Preliminary performance data for the prototype engine have been documented over 1.1- to 7.3-kW input power. At 7.3 kW, the engine efficiency is 0.68, at 3615-sec specific impulse. Critical component temperatures, including those of the discharge cathode assembly and magnets, have been documented and are within established limits, with significant margins relative to the Deep Space 1 engine. The 1- to 10-kW ion thruster approach described here was found to provide the needed power and performance improvement to enable important NASA missions. The Integrated In-Space Transportation Planning (IISTP) studies compared many potential technologies for various NASA, Government, and commercial missions. These studies indicated that a high-power ion propulsion system is the most important technology for development because of its outstanding performance versus perceived development and recurring costs for interplanetary solar electric propulsion missions. One of the best applications of a highpower electric propulsion system was as an integral part

  7. Developing instrumentation to characterize thermoelectric generator modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Li, Qiming; Peng, Wenbo; Zhu, Lianjun; Gao, Hu; Meng, Qingsen; Jin, A. J.

    2015-03-01

    Based on the law of physics, known as "Seebeck effect," a thermoelectric generator (TEG) produces electricity when the temperature differential is applied across the TEG. This article reports a precision method in characterizing TEG modules. A precision instrument is constructed to study thermoelectric conversion in terms of output power and efficiency of TEG modules. The maximum allowable TEG module size is 150 mm, and the preferred size is from 30 mm to 60 mm. During measurements, the highest hot side temperature is 500 °C and the cold side temperature can be adjusted from room temperature to 100 °C. A mechanical structure is developed to control the pressure and parallelism of the clamping force of the TEG on both its hot and cold sides. A heat flux measurement module is installed at its cold side, and the heat flux through TEGs can be measured in position. Finally, the energy conversion efficiency of TEGs is calculated from experimental data of both an output power and a heat flux.

  8. Developing instrumentation to characterize thermoelectric generator modules.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dawei; Li, Qiming; Peng, Wenbo; Zhu, Lianjun; Gao, Hu; Meng, Qingsen; Jin, A J

    2015-03-01

    Based on the law of physics, known as "Seebeck effect," a thermoelectric generator (TEG) produces electricity when the temperature differential is applied across the TEG. This article reports a precision method in characterizing TEG modules. A precision instrument is constructed to study thermoelectric conversion in terms of output power and efficiency of TEG modules. The maximum allowable TEG module size is 150 mm, and the preferred size is from 30 mm to 60 mm. During measurements, the highest hot side temperature is 500 °C and the cold side temperature can be adjusted from room temperature to 100 °C. A mechanical structure is developed to control the pressure and parallelism of the clamping force of the TEG on both its hot and cold sides. A heat flux measurement module is installed at its cold side, and the heat flux through TEGs can be measured in position. Finally, the energy conversion efficiency of TEGs is calculated from experimental data of both an output power and a heat flux. PMID:25832254

  9. Development of tungsten-tantalum generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, A.; Babich, J.; Jhingran, S. G.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to develop a useable tungsten (W)/tantalum (Ta) generator. Ta-178 is formed following the decay of its parent, W-178 (half-life: 21.7d) and has a half life of 9.3 minutes in turn yielding stable Hf-178. The decay of the parent isotope (W-178) occurs entirely by electron capture to the 9.3 minute Ta-178 state, without feeding the high spin Ta-178 isomer (half life 2.2 hours). In Ta-178 decay, 99.2% of the disintegrations proceed by electron capture and 0.18% by positron emission. Electron capture results in a 61.2% branch to the ground state of Hf-178 and 33.7% to the first excited state at 93 1KeV. The most prominent features of the radionuclide's energy spectrum are the hafnium characteristic radiation peaks with energies between 54.6 and 65.0 KeV. The radiation exposure dose of Ta-118 was calculated to be approximately one-twentieth that of Tc-99m on a per millicurie basis. A twenty-fold reduction in radiation exposure from Ta-178 compared with Tc-99m means that the usual administered dose can be increased three or four times, greatly increasing statistical accuracy while reducing radiation exposure by a factor of five.

  10. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen Minh

    2002-03-31

    This report summarizes the work performed by Honeywell during the January 2002 to March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT40779 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Hybrid System for Distributed Power Generation''. The main objective of this project is to develop and demonstrate the feasibility of a highly efficient hybrid system integrating a planar Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC) and a turbogenerator. For this reporting period the following activities have been carried out: {lg_bullet} Conceptual system design trade studies were performed {lg_bullet} System-level performance model was created {lg_bullet} Dynamic control models are being developed {lg_bullet} Mechanical properties of candidate heat exchanger materials were investigated {lg_bullet} SOFC performance mapping as a function of flow rate and pressure was completed

  11. Collective cell migration in development

    PubMed Central

    Scarpa, Elena

    2016-01-01

    During embryonic development, tissues undergo major rearrangements that lead to germ layer positioning, patterning, and organ morphogenesis. Often these morphogenetic movements are accomplished by the coordinated and cooperative migration of the constituent cells, referred to as collective cell migration. The molecular and biomechanical mechanisms underlying collective migration of developing tissues have been investigated in a variety of models, including border cell migration, tracheal branching, blood vessel sprouting, and the migration of the lateral line primordium, neural crest cells, or head mesendoderm. Here we review recent advances in understanding collective migration in these developmental models, focusing on the interaction between cells and guidance cues presented by the microenvironment and on the role of cell–cell adhesion in mechanical and behavioral coupling of cells within the collective. PMID:26783298

  12. Retinoic Acid Promotes the Generation of Pancreatic Endocrine Progenitor Cells and Their Further Differentiation into β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Öström, Maria; Loffler, Kelly A.; Edfalk, Sara; Selander, Lars; Dahl, Ulf; Ricordi, Camillo; Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Diez, Juan; Edlund, Helena

    2008-01-01

    The identification of secreted factors that can selectively stimulate the generation of insulin producing β-cells from stem and/or progenitor cells represent a significant step in the development of stem cell-based β-cell replacement therapy. By elucidating the molecular mechanisms that regulate the generation of β-cells during normal pancreatic development such putative factors may be identified. In the mouse, β-cells increase markedly in numbers from embryonic day (e) 14.5 and onwards, but the extra-cellular signal(s) that promotes the selective generation of β-cells at these stages remains to be identified. Here we show that the retinoic acid (RA) synthesizing enzyme Raldh1 is expressed in developing mouse and human pancreas at stages when β-cells are generated. We also provide evidence that RA induces the generation of Ngn3+ endocrine progenitor cells and stimulates their further differentiation into β-cells by activating a program of cell differentiation that recapitulates the normal temporal program of β-cell differentiation. PMID:18665267

  13. Induced pluripotent stem cells generated without viral integration.

    PubMed

    Stadtfeld, Matthias; Nagaya, Masaki; Utikal, Jochen; Weir, Gordon; Hochedlinger, Konrad

    2008-11-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by viral expression of the transcription factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. A major limitation of this technology is the use of potentially harmful genome-integrating viruses. We generated mouse induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from fibroblasts and liver cells by using nonintegrating adenoviruses transiently expressing Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. These adenoviral iPS (adeno-iPS) cells show DNA demethylation characteristic of reprogrammed cells, express endogenous pluripotency genes, form teratomas, and contribute to multiple tissues, including the germ line, in chimeric mice. Our results provide strong evidence that insertional mutagenesis is not required for in vitro reprogramming. Adenoviral reprogramming may provide an improved method for generating and studying patient-specific stem cells and for comparing embryonic stem cells and iPS cells. PMID:18818365

  14. Development of a generator stator insulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buritz, R. S.

    1983-04-01

    The insulation of stator windings in generators is an old technology, dating to the turn of the century with kraft paper insulated, oil filled cables. Recently, two new classes of machines requiring much more advanced techniques of insulation have emerged. These generators are designed for relatively short duty in situations where light weight and small size are crucial to the overall mission, and mobility is a must. One class of machines uses superconducting windings to achieve small size. The other class consists of conventional generators designed to have extremely high power densities and specific powers. These machines represent a considerable engineering achievement, being significantly smaller than any previous generator. In one of these generators, manufactured by Bendix, substantial problems have been encountered in the stator winding insulation, because of the high fields dictated by the extremely high power density. This report presents the Hughes Aircraft Company approach and solution to these problems.

  15. Development of an Influenza A Master Virus for Generating High-Growth Reassortants for A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9) Vaccine Production in Qualified MDCK Cells.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Nobusawa, Eri

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the first case of human infection with an avian influenza A virus (H7N9) was reported in China, and the human infection with this virus has continued as of 2016. At the request of the WHO, we have successfully developed candidate reassortant vaccine virus using A/Anhui/1/2013 and the high egg-growth master virus A/PR/8/1934. Recent plans regarding influenza vaccine production include using cell-cultured systems in Japan and several other countries. However, egg-based vaccine viruses are not always suitable for cell-cultured vaccine production due to potential issues with growth, protein yield and antigenic stability. Therefore, in this study, we have developed a high-growth master virus (hg-PR8) adapted to qualified NIID-MDCK cells that are competent for vaccine production. The virus hg-PR8 was obtained after 20 serial passages of A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) in NIID-MDCK cells. The viral titer of hg-PR8 was 108.6 plaque-forming units per milliliter (PFU/mL). Seven amino acid substitutions were identified in the amino acid sequences of PB2, PB1, PA, NA, M and NS of hg-PR8 compared to the sequence of the original PR8 (org-PR8) strain. The growth capacities of the reassortant viruses, which possess heterologous internal genes from hg-PR8 or org-PR8, indicated that the amino acid changes in PB2 and NS2 similarly affected growth capacity in NIID-MDCK cells. To assess the suitability of hg-PR8 as a master virus, we generated 6:2 reassortant viruses possessing the HA and NA segments from A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and the remaining segments from hg-PR8. The virus titers of the reassortant strains were 107-108 PFU/mL. The antigenicity of the viruses was stable during ten passages of the viruses in NIID-MDCK cells. In comparison with the egg-based reassortant vaccine viruses with identical HA and NA segments, the hg-PR8-based viruses showed 1.5- to 2-fold higher protein yields in NIID-MDCK cells. PMID:27454606

  16. Development of an Influenza A Master Virus for Generating High-Growth Reassortants for A/Anhui/1/2013(H7N9) Vaccine Production in Qualified MDCK Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Yasushi; Odagiri, Takato; Tashiro, Masato; Nobusawa, Eri

    2016-01-01

    In 2013, the first case of human infection with an avian influenza A virus (H7N9) was reported in China, and the human infection with this virus has continued as of 2016. At the request of the WHO, we have successfully developed candidate reassortant vaccine virus using A/Anhui/1/2013 and the high egg-growth master virus A/PR/8/1934. Recent plans regarding influenza vaccine production include using cell-cultured systems in Japan and several other countries. However, egg-based vaccine viruses are not always suitable for cell-cultured vaccine production due to potential issues with growth, protein yield and antigenic stability. Therefore, in this study, we have developed a high-growth master virus (hg-PR8) adapted to qualified NIID-MDCK cells that are competent for vaccine production. The virus hg-PR8 was obtained after 20 serial passages of A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) in NIID-MDCK cells. The viral titer of hg-PR8 was 108.6 plaque-forming units per milliliter (PFU/mL). Seven amino acid substitutions were identified in the amino acid sequences of PB2, PB1, PA, NA, M and NS of hg-PR8 compared to the sequence of the original PR8 (org-PR8) strain. The growth capacities of the reassortant viruses, which possess heterologous internal genes from hg-PR8 or org-PR8, indicated that the amino acid changes in PB2 and NS2 similarly affected growth capacity in NIID-MDCK cells. To assess the suitability of hg-PR8 as a master virus, we generated 6:2 reassortant viruses possessing the HA and NA segments from A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9) and the remaining segments from hg-PR8. The virus titers of the reassortant strains were 107−108 PFU/mL. The antigenicity of the viruses was stable during ten passages of the viruses in NIID-MDCK cells. In comparison with the egg-based reassortant vaccine viruses with identical HA and NA segments, the hg-PR8-based viruses showed 1.5- to 2-fold higher protein yields in NIID-MDCK cells. PMID:27454606

  17. A simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator for quantum dot cytotoxicity assay.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing; Chen, Qiushui; Liu, Wu; Lin, Jin-Ming

    2013-05-21

    In this work, a simple and versatile microfluidic cell density gradient generator was successfully developed for cytotoxicity of quantum dots (QDs) assay. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator is composed of eight parallel channels which are respectively surrounded by 1-8 microwells with optimized length and width. The cells fall into microwells by gravity and the cell densities are obviously dependent of microwell number. In a case study, HepG2 and MCF-7 cells were successfully utilized for generating cell density gradients on the microfluidic chip. The microfluidic cell density gradient generator was proved to be easily handled, cell-friendly and could be used to conduct the subsequent cell-based assay. As a proof-of-concept, QD cytotoxicity was evaluated and the results exhibited obvious cell density-dependence. For comparison, QD cytotoxicity was also investigated with a series of cell densities infused by pipette tips. Higher reproducibility was observed on the microfluidic cell density gradient generator and cell density was demonstrated to be a vital factor in cytotoxic study. With higher efficiency, controllability and reproducibility, the microfluidic cell density gradient generator could be integrated into microfluidic analysis systems to promote chip-based biological assay. PMID:23538998

  18. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from domestic goats.

    PubMed

    Sandmaier, Shelley E S; Nandal, Anjali; Powell, Anne; Garrett, Wesley; Blomberg, Leann; Donovan, David M; Talbot, Neil; Telugu, Bhanu P

    2015-09-01

    The creation of genetically modified goats provides a powerful approach for improving animal health, enhancing production traits, animal pharming, and for ensuring food safety all of which are high-priority goals for animal agriculture. The availability of goat embryonic stem cells (ESCs) that are characteristically immortal in culture would be of enormous benefit for developing genetically modified animals. As an alternative to long-sought goat ESCs, we generated induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) by forced expression of bovine POU5F1, SOX2, MYC, KLF4, LIN-28, and NANOG reprogramming factors in combination with a MIR302/367 cluster, delivered by lentiviral vectors. In order to minimize integrations, the reprogramming factor coding sequences were assembled with porcine teschovirus-1 2A (P2A) self-cleaving peptides that allowed for tri-cistronic expression from each vector. The lentiviral-transduced cells were cultured on irradiated mouse feeder cells in a semi-defined, serum-free medium containing fibroblast growth factor (FGF) and/or leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF). The resulting goat iPSC exhibit cell and colony morphology typical of human and mouse ESCs-that is, well-defined borders, a high nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio, a short cell-cycle interval, alkaline phosphatase expression, and the ability to generate teratomas in vivo. Additionally, these goat iPSC demonstrated the ability to differentiate into directed lineages in vitro. These results constitute the first steps in establishing integration and footprint-free iPSC from ruminants. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 82: 709-721, 2015. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26118622

  19. Generation of polyhormonal and multipotent pancreatic progenitor lineages from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Korytnikov, Roman; Nostro, Maria Cristina

    2016-05-15

    Generation of pancreatic β-cells from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) has enormous importance in type 1 diabetes (T1D), as it is fundamental to a treatment strategy based on cellular therapeutics. Being able to generate β-cells, as well as other mature pancreatic cells, from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) will also enable the development of platforms that can be used for disease modeling and drug testing for a variety of pancreas-associated diseases, including cystic fibrosis. For this to occur, it is crucial to develop differentiation strategies that are robust and reproducible across cell lines and laboratories. In this article we describe two serum-free differentiation protocols designed to generate specific pancreatic lineages from hPSCs. Our approach employs a variety of cytokines and small molecules to mimic developmental pathways active during pancreatic organogenesis and allows for the in vitro generation of distinct pancreatic populations. The first protocol is designed to give rise to polyhormonal cells that have the potential to differentiate into glucagon-producing cells. The second protocol is geared to generate multipotent pancreatic progenitor cells, which harbor the potential to generate all pancreatic lineages including: monohormonal endocrine cells, acinar, and ductal cells. PMID:26515645

  20. Advanced-fuel-cell development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierce, R. D.; Arons, R. M.; Dusek, J. T.; Fraioli, A. V.; Kucera, G. H.; Sim, J. W.; Smith, J. L.

    1982-06-01

    The fuel cell research and development activities at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) for the period October through December 1980. These efforts have been directed toward (1) developing alternative concepts for components of molten carbonate fuel cells, and (2) improving understanding of component behavior. The principal focus has been on development of gamma-LiAlO2 sinters as electrolyte structures. Green bodies were prepared by tape casting and then sintering beta-LiAlO2; this has produced gamma-LiAlO2 sinters of 69% porosity. In addition, a cathode prepared by sintering lithiated nickel oxide was tested in a 10-cm square cell.

  1. EIDA Next Generation: ongoing and future developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strollo, Angelo; Quinteros, Javier; Sleeman, Reinoud; Trani, Luca; Clinton, John; Stammler, Klaus; Danecek, Peter; Pedersen, Helle; Ionescu, Constantin

    2015-04-01

    The European Integrated Data Archive (EIDA; http://www.orfeus-eu.org/eida/eida.html) is the distributed Data Centre system within ORFEUS, providing transparent access and services to high quality, seismic data across (currently) 9 large data archives in Europe. EIDA is growing, in terms of the number of participating data centres, the size of the archives, the variability of the data in the archives, the number of users, and the volume of downloads. The on-going success of EIDA is thus providing challenges that are the driving force behind the design of the next generation (NG) of EIDA, which is expected to be implemented within EPOS IP. EIDA ORFEUS must cope with further expansion of the system and more complex user requirements by developing new techniques and extended services. The EIDA NG is being designed to work on standard FDSN web services and two additional new web services: Routing Service and QC (quality controlled) service. This presentation highlights the challenges EIDA needs to address during the EPOS IP and focuses on these 2 new services. The Routing Service can be considered as the core of EIDA NG. It was designed to assist users and clients to locate data within a federated, decentralized data centre (e.g. EIDA). A detailed, FDSN-compliant specification of the service has been developed. Our implementation of this service will run at every EIDA node, but is also capable of running on a user's computer, allowing anyone to define virtual or integrate existing data centres. This (meta)service needs to be queried in order to locate the data. Some smart clients (in a beta status) have been also provided to offer the user an integrated view of the whole EIDA, hiding the complexity of its internal structure. The service is open and able to be queried by anyone without the need of credentials or authentication. The QC Service is developed to cope with user requirements to query for relevant data only. The web service provides detailed information on the

  2. The in vitro generation of lung and airway progenitor cells from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sarah X L; Green, Michael D; de Carvalho, Ana Toste; Mumau, Melanie; Chen, Ya-Wen; D’Souza, Sunita L.; Snoeck, Hans-Willem

    2015-01-01

    Lung and airway epithelial cells generated in vitro from human pluripotent stem cells have applications in regenerative medicine, modeling of lung disease, drug screening and studies of human lung development. Here we describe a strategy for directed differentiation of human pluripotent stem cells into developmental lung progenitors, and their subsequent differentiation into predominantly distal lung epithelial cells. The protocol entails four stages that recapitulate lung development and takes approximately 50 days. First, definitive endoderm is induced in the presence of high concentrations of Activin A. Subsequently, lung-biased anterior foregut endoderm is specified by sequential inhibition of BMP, TGF-β and Wnt signaling. Anterior foregut endoderm is then ventralized by applying Wnt, BMP, FGF and RA signaling to obtain lung and airway progenitors. Finally, these are further differentiated into more mature epithelial cells types using Wnt, FGF, c-AMP and glucocorticoid agonism. This protocol is conducted in defined conditions, does not involve genetic manipulation of the cells, and results in cultures where the majority of the cells express markers of various lung and airway epithelial cells, with a predominance of cells identifiable as functional type II alveolar epithelial cells. PMID:25654758

  3. 2nd Generation ELT Performance Specification Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stimson, Chad M.

    2015-01-01

    NASA Search And Rescue is supporting RTCA SC-229 with research and recommendations for performance specifications for the 2nd generation of emergency locator transmitters. Areas for improvement and methods for collecting data will be presented.

  4. Fuel cells: a survey of current developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cropper, Mark A. J.; Geiger, Stefan; Jollie, David M.

    Since the first practical uses of fuel cells were developed, it has become clear that they could find use in many products over a wide power range of milliwatts to tens of megawatts. Throughout the 1990s, and later, there has been significant work carried out on adapting the various different fuel cell technologies for use in targetted consumer and industrial applications. This paper discusses these developments and gives details on the specific market segments for providing power to vehicles, portable devices and large- and small-scale stationary power generation.

  5. Generation of Glycosylphosphatidylinositol Anchor Protein-Deficient Blood Cells From Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xuan; Braunstein, Evan M.; Ye, Zhaohui; Liu, Cyndi F.; Chen, Guibin; Zou, Jizhong; Cheng, Linzhao

    2013-01-01

    PIG-A is an X-linked gene required for the biosynthesis of glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors; thus, PIG-A mutant cells have a deficiency or absence of all GPI-anchored proteins (GPI-APs). Acquired mutations in hematopoietic stem cells result in the disease paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, and hypomorphic germline PIG-A mutations lead to severe developmental abnormalities, seizures, and early death. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) can differentiate into cell types derived from all three germ layers, providing a novel developmental system for modeling human diseases. Using PIG-A gene targeting and an inducible PIG-A expression system, we have established, for the first time, a conditional PIG-A knockout model in human iPSCs that allows for the production of GPI-AP-deficient blood cells. PIG-A-null iPSCs were unable to generate hematopoietic cells or any cells expressing the CD34 marker and were defective in generating mesodermal cells expressing KDR/VEGFR2 (kinase insert domain receptor) and CD56 markers. In addition, PIG-A-null iPSCs had a block in embryonic development prior to mesoderm differentiation that appears to be due to defective signaling through bone morphogenetic protein 4. However, early inducible PIG-A transgene expression allowed for the generation of GPI-AP-deficient blood cells. This conditional PIG-A knockout model should be a valuable tool for studying the importance of GPI-APs in hematopoiesis and human development. PMID:24113066

  6. Cell death in mammalian development.

    PubMed

    Penaloza, C; Orlanski, S; Ye, Y; Entezari-Zaher, T; Javdan, M; Zakeri, Z

    2008-01-01

    During embryogenesis there is an exquisite orchestration of cellular division, movement, differentiation, and death. Cell death is one of the most important aspects of organization of the developing embryo, as alteration in timing, level, or pattern of cell death can lead to developmental anomalies. Cell death shapes the embryo and defines the eventual functions of the organs. Cells die using different paths; understanding which path a dying cell takes helps us define the signals that regulate the fate of the cell. Our understanding of cell death in development stems from a number of observations indicating genetic regulation of the death process. With today's increased knowledge of the pathways of cell death and the identification of the genes whose products regulate the pathways we know that, although elimination of some of these gene products has no developmental phenotype, alteration of several others has profound effects. In this review we discuss the types and distributions of cell death seen in developing mammalian embryos as well as the gene products that may regulate the process. PMID:18220829

  7. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Doddapaneni, N.; Ingersoll, D.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternative power sources for transportation and stationary applications. The degradation of commonly used electrode catalysts (e.g. Pt, Ag, and others) and corrosion of carbon substrates are making commercialization of fuel cells incorporating present day technologies economically problematic. Furthermore, due to the instability of the Pt catalyst, the performance of fuel cells declines on long-term operation. When methanol is used as the fuel, a voltage drop, as well as significant thermal management problems can be encountered, the later being due to chemical oxidation of methanol at the platinized carbon at the cathode. Though extensive work was conducted on platinized electrodes for both the oxidation and reduction reactions, due to the problems mentioned above, fuel cells have not been fully developed for widespread commercial use. Several investigators have previously evaluated metal macrocyclic complexes as alternative catalysts to Pt and Pt/Ru in fuel cells. Unfortunately, though they have demonstrated catalytic activity, these materials were found to be unstable on long term use in the fuel cell environment. In order to improve the long-term stability of metal macrocyclic complexes, we have chemically bonded these complexes to the carbon substrate, thereby enhancing their catalytic activity as well as their chemical stability in the fuel cell environment. We have designed, synthesized, and evaluated these catalysts for O{sub 2} reduction, H{sub 2} oxidation, and direct methanol oxidation in Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) and aqueous carbonate fuel cells. These catalysts exhibited good catalytic activity and long-term stability. In this paper we confine our discussion to the initial performance results of some of these catalysts in H{sub 2}/O{sub 2} PEM fuel cells, including their long-term performance characteristics as well as CO poisoning effects on these catalysts.

  8. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  9. Endocrine Cell Clustering During Human Pancreas Development

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jongmin; Correa-Medina, Mayrin; Ricordi, Camillo; Edlund, Helena; Diez, Juan A.

    2009-01-01

    The development of efficient, reproducible protocols for directed in vitro differentiation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells into insulin-producing β cells will benefit greatly from increased knowledge regarding the spatiotemporal expression profile of key instructive factors involved in human endocrine cell generation. Human fetal pancreases 7 to 21 weeks of gestational age, were collected following consent immediately after pregnancy termination and processed for immunostaining, in situ hybridization, and real-time RT-PCR expression analyses. Islet-like structures appear from approximately week 12 and, unlike the mixed architecture observed in adult islets, fetal islets are initially formed predominantly by aggregated insulin- or glucagon-expressing cells. The period studied (7–22 weeks) coincides with a decrease in the proliferation and an increase in the differentiation of the progenitor cells, the initiation of NGN3 expression, and the appearance of differentiated endocrine cells. The present study provides a detailed characterization of islet formation and expression profiles of key intrinsic and extrinsic factors during human pancreas development. This information is beneficial for the development of efficient protocols that will allow guided in vitro differentiation of hES cells into insulin-producing cells. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:811–824, 2009) PMID:19365093

  10. Generating pancreatic beta-cells from embryonic stem cells by manipulating signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Champeris Tsaniras, Spyridon; Jones, Peter M

    2010-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from an insufficiency of insulin production as a result of autoimmune destruction of the insulin-secreting pancreatic beta-cells. It can be treated by transplantation of islets of Langerhans from human donors, but widespread application of this therapy is restricted by the scarcity of donor tissue. Generation of functional beta-cells from embryonic stem (ES) cells in vitro could provide a source of an alternative graft material. Several ES cell differentiation protocols have reported the production of insulin-producing cells by mimicking the in vivo developmental stages of pancreatic organogenesis in which cells are transitioned through mesendoderm, definitive endoderm, foregut endoderm, pancreatic endoderm, and the endocrine precursor stage, until mature beta-cells are obtained. These studies provide proof of concept that recapitulating pancreatic development in vitro offers a useful strategy for generating beta-cells, but current differentiation protocols employ a bewildering variety of growth factors, mitogens, and pharmacological agents. In this review, we will attempt to clarify the functions of these agents in in vitro differentiation strategies by focusing on the intracellular signaling pathways through which they operate - phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, transforming growth factor beta, Wnt/beta-catenin, Hedgehog, and Notch. PMID:20385725

  11. Successful differentiation to T cells, but unsuccessful B-cell generation, from B-cell-derived induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, Haruka; Kojo, Satoshi; Kusama, Chie; Okamoto, Naoki; Sato, Yorino; Ishizuka, Bunpei; Seino, Ken-ichiro

    2011-01-01

    Forced expression of certain transcription factors in somatic cells results in generation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, which differentiate into various cell types. We investigated T-cell and B-cell lineage differentiation from iPS cells in vitro. To evaluate the impact of iPS cell source, murine splenic B-cell-derived iPS (B-iPS) cells were generated after retroviral transduction of four transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4 and c-Myc). B-iPS cells were identical to embryonic stem (ES) cells and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF)-derived iPS cells in morphology, ES cell marker expression as well as teratoma and chimera mouse formation. Both B-iPS and MEF-derived iPS cells differentiated into lymphocytes in OP9 co-culture systems. Both efficiently differentiated into T-cell lineage that produced IFN-γ on T-cell receptor stimulation. However, iPS cells including B-iPS cells were relatively resistant to B-cell lineage differentiation. One of the reasons of the failure of B-cell lineage differentiation seemed due to a defect of Pax5 expression in the differentiated cells. Therefore, current in vitro differentiation systems using iPS cells are sufficient for inducing T-cell but not B-cell lineage. PMID:21135032

  12. Distributed generation system using wind/photovoltaic/fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buasri, Panhathai

    This dissertation investigates the performance and the operation of a distributed generation (DG) power system using wind/photovoltaic/fuel cell (W/PV/FC). The power system consists of a 2500 W photovoltaic array subsystem, a 500 W proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) stack subsystem, 300 W wind turbine, 500 W wind turbine, and 1500 W wind energy conversion subsystems. To extract maximum power from the PV, a maximum power point tracker was designed and fabricated. A 4 kW single phase inverter was used to convert the DC voltage to AC voltage; also a 44 kWh battery bank was used to store energy and prevent fluctuation of the power output of the DG system. To connect the fuel cell to the batteries, a DC/DC controller was designed and fabricated. To monitor and study the performance of the DG system under variable conditions, a data acquisition system was designed and installed. The fuel cell subsystem performance was evaluated under standalone operation using a variable resistance and under interactive mode, connected to the batteries. The manufacturing data and the experimental data were used to develop an electrical circuit model to the fuel cell. Furthermore, harmonic analysis of the DG system was investigated. For an inverter, the AC voltage delivered to the grid changed depending on the time, load, and electronic equipment that was connected. The quality of the DG system was evaluated by investigating the harmonics generated by the power electronics converters. Finally, each individual subsystem of the DG system was modeled using the neuro-fuzzy approach. The model was used to predict the performance of the DG system under variable conditions, such as passing clouds and wind gust conditions. The steady-state behaviors of the model were validated by the experimental results under different operating conditions.

  13. Generation of Murine Sympathoadrenergic Progenitor-Like Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells and Postnatal Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Shobhit; Wahl, Joachim; Huber-Lang, Markus S.; Stadel, Dominic; Braubach, Peter; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Beltinger, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Sympathoadrenergic progenitor cells (SAPs) of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) are important for normal development of the sympathetic PNS and for the genesis of neuroblastoma, the most common and often lethal extracranial solid tumor in childhood. However, it remains difficult to isolate sufficient numbers of SAPs for investigations. We therefore set out to improve generation of SAPs by using two complementary approaches, differentiation from murine embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and isolation from postnatal murine adrenal glands. We provide evidence that selecting for GD2 expression enriches for ESC-derived SAP-like cells and that proliferating SAP-like cells can be isolated from postnatal adrenal glands of mice. These advances may facilitate investigations about the development and malignant transformation of the sympathetic PNS. PMID:23675538

  14. Corner heating in rectangular solid oxide electrochemical cell generators

    DOEpatents

    Reichner, Philip

    1989-01-01

    Disclosed is an improvement in a solid oxide electrochemical cell generator 1 having a rectangular design with four sides that meet at corners, and containing multiplicity of electrically connected fuel cells 11, where a fuel gas is passed over one side of said cells and an oxygen containing gas is passed into said cells, and said fuel is burned to form heat, electricity, and an exhaust gas. The improvement comprises passing the exhaust gases over the multiplicity of cells 11 in such a way that more of the heat in said exhaust gases flows at the corners of the generator, such as through channels 19.

  15. Microscale Strategies for Generating Cell-Encapsulating Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Selimović, Šeila; Oh, Jonghyun; Bae, Hojae; Dokmeci, Mehmet; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Hydrogels in which cells are encapsulated are of great potential interest for tissue engineering applications. These gels provide a structure inside which cells can spread and proliferate. Such structures benefit from controlled microarchitectures that can affect the behavior of the enclosed cells. Microfabrication-based techniques are emerging as powerful approaches to generate such cell-encapsulating hydrogel structures. In this paper we introduce common hydrogels and their crosslinking methods and review the latest microscale approaches for generation of cell containing gel particles. We specifically focus on microfluidics-based methods and on techniques such as micromolding and electrospinning. PMID:23626908

  16. Single module pressurized fuel cell turbine generator system

    DOEpatents

    George, Raymond A.; Veyo, Stephen E.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.

    2001-01-01

    A pressurized fuel cell system (10), operates within a common pressure vessel (12) where the system contains fuel cells (22), a turbine (26) and a generator (98) where preferably, associated oxidant inlet valve (52), fuel inlet valve (56) and fuel cell exhaust valve (42) are outside the pressure vessel.

  17. ARPA advanced fuel cell development

    SciTech Connect

    Dubois, L.H.

    1995-08-01

    Fuel cell technology is currently being developed at the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) for several Department of Defense applications where its inherent advantages such as environmental compatibility, high efficiency, and low noise and vibration are overwhelmingly important. These applications range from man-portable power systems of only a few watts output (e.g., for microclimate cooling and as direct battery replacements) to multimegawatt fixed base systems. The ultimate goal of the ARPA program is to develop an efficient, low-temperature fuel cell power system that operates directly on a military logistics fuel (e.g., DF-2 or JP-8). The absence of a fuel reformer will reduce the size, weight, cost, and complexity of such a unit as well as increase its reliability. In order to reach this goal, ARPA is taking a two-fold, intermediate time-frame approach to: (1) develop a viable, low-temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell that operates directly on a simple hydrocarbon fuel (e.g., methanol or trimethoxymethane) and (2) demonstrate a thermally integrated fuel processor/fuel cell power system operating on a military logistics fuel. This latter program involves solid oxide (SOFC), molten carbonate (MCFC), and phosphoric acid (PAFC) fuel cell technologies and concentrates on the development of efficient fuel processors, impurity scrubbers, and systems integration. A complementary program to develop high performance, light weight H{sub 2}/air PEM and SOFC fuel cell stacks is also underway. Several recent successes of these programs will be highlighted.

  18. Generation of functional cholangiocyte-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells and HepaRG cells

    PubMed Central

    Dianat, Noushin; Dubois-Pot-Schneider, Hélène; Steichen, Clara; Desterke, Christophe; Leclerc, Philippe; Raveux, Aurélien; Combettes, Laurent; Weber, Anne; Corlu, Anne; Dubart-Kupperschmitt, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocytes are biliary epithelial cells, which, like hepatocytes, originate from hepatoblasts during embryonic development. In this study we investigated the potential of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) to differentiate into cholangiocytes and we report a new approach, which drives differentiation of hESCs toward the cholangiocytic lineage using feeder-free and defined culture conditions. After differentiation into hepatic progenitors, hESCs were differentiated further into cholangiocytes using growth hormone, epidermal growth factor, interleukin-6, and then sodium taurocholate. These conditions also allowed us to generate cholangiocytes from HepaRG-derived hepatoblasts. hESC- and HepaRG-derived cholangiocyte-like cells expressed markers of cholangiocytes including cytokeratin 7 and osteopontin, and the transcription factors SOX9 and hepatocyte nuclear factor 6. The cells also displayed specific proteins important for cholangiocyte functions including cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator, secretin receptor, and nuclear receptors. They formed primary cilia and also responded to hormonal stimulation by increase of intracellular Ca2+. We demonstrated by integrative genomics that the expression of genes, which signed hESC- or HepaRG-cholangiocytes, separates hepatocytic lineage from cholangiocyte lineage. When grown in a 3D matrix, cholangiocytes developed epithelial/apicobasal polarity and formed functional cysts and biliary ducts. In addition, we showed that cholangiocyte-like cells could also be generated from human induced pluripotent stem cells, demonstrating the efficacy of our approach with stem/progenitor cells of diverse origins. Conclusion: We have developed a robust and efficient method for differentiating pluripotent stem cells into cholangiocyte-like cells, which display structural and functional similarities to bile duct cells in normal liver. These cells will be useful for the in vitro study of the molecular mechanisms of bile duct

  19. Next generation limb development and evolution: old questions, new perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zuniga, Aimée

    2015-11-15

    The molecular analysis of limb bud development in vertebrates continues to fuel our understanding of the gene regulatory networks that orchestrate the patterning, proliferation and differentiation of embryonic progenitor cells. In recent years, systems biology approaches have moved our understanding of the molecular control of limb organogenesis to the next level by incorporating next generation 'omics' approaches, analyses of chromatin architecture, enhancer-promoter interactions and gene network simulations based on quantitative datasets into experimental analyses. This Review focuses on the insights these studies have given into the gene regulatory networks that govern limb development and into the fin-to-limb transition and digit reductions that occurred during the evolutionary diversification of tetrapod limbs. PMID:26577204

  20. High-Temperature Solar Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Merritt, Danielle

    2004-01-01

    The vast majority of satellites and near-earth probes developed to date have relied upon photovoltaic power generation. If future missions to probe environments close to the sun will be able to use photovoltaic power, solar cells that can function at high temperatures, under high light intensity, and high radiation conditions must be developed. For example, the equilibrium temperature of a Mercury surface station will be about 450 C, and the temperature of solar arrays on the proposed "Solar Probe" mission will extend to temperatures as high as 2000 C (although it is likely that the craft will operate on stored power rather than solar energy during the closest approach to the sun). Advanced thermal design principles, such as replacing some of the solar array area with reflectors, off-pointing, and designing the cells to reflect rather than absorb light out of the band of peak response, can reduce these operating temperature somewhat. Nevertheless, it is desirable to develop approaches to high-temperature solar cell design that can operate under temperature extremes far greater than today's cells. Solar cells made from wide bandgap (WBG) compound semiconductors are an obvious choice for such an application. In order to aid in the experimental development of such solar cells, we have initiated a program studying the theoretical and experimental photovoltaic performance of wide bandgap materials. In particular, we have been investigating the use of GaP, SiC, and GaN materials for space solar cells. We will present theoretical results on the limitations on current cell technologies and the photovoltaic performance of these wide-bandgap solar cells in a variety of space conditions. We will also give an overview of some of NASA's cell developmental efforts in this area and discuss possible future mission applications.

  1. Lithium-Air Cell Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Concha M.; Dobley, Arthur; Seymour, Frasier W.

    2014-01-01

    Lithium-air (Li-air) primary batteries have a theoretical specific capacity of 11,400 Wh/kg, the highest of any common metal-air system. NASA is developing Li-air technology for a Mobile Oxygen Concentrator for Spacecraft Emergencies, an application which requires an extremely lightweight primary battery that can discharge over 24 hours continuously. Several vendors were funded through the NASA SBIR program to develop Li-air technology to fulfill the requirements of this application. New catalysts and carbon cathode structures were developed to enhance the oxygen reduction reaction and increase surface area to improve cell performance. Techniques to stabilize the lithium metal anode surface were explored. Experimental results for prototype laboratory cells are given. Projections are made for the performance of hypothetical cells constructed from the materials that were developed.

  2. Advance crew procedures development techniques: Procedures generation program requirements document

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbet, J. D.; Benbow, R. L.; Hawk, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    The Procedures Generation Program (PGP) is described as an automated crew procedures generation and performance monitoring system. Computer software requirements to be implemented in PGP for the Advanced Crew Procedures Development Techniques are outlined.

  3. Nanostructured photovoltaic devices for next generation solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Jin

    2008-10-01

    As the search for alternative sources of energy other than petroleum continues to expand, solar energy conversion has already been identified as one of the most promising technologies. In the past few years there has been extensive research focused on the next generation solar cells that can exceed the Shockley-Queisser limit (a model that predicts the maximum achievable efficiency for a given material with a given bandgap). Moreover, nanoengineering approaches to enhance solar power conversion efficiency have started to receive considerable interest. Even in the most efficient commercially available solar devices utilizing crystalline silicon, a major portion of the absorbed ultraviolet photon energy is wasted as heat. Furthermore, this heat is detrimental to device reliability. Colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots (NQDs) offer the exciting prospect of simultaneously manipulating device and material structures and processes to enable more efficient solar energy conversion. Most importantly, these colloidal nanocrystal quantum dots are amenable to inexpensive fabrication techniques such as dip coating or spray coating of the constituent nanoscale materials onto various substrates. This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured photovoltaic devices, that exhibit multiple exciton generation, and that exploit the wide absorption spectra enabled by the quantum dots for next generation highly efficient, low cost, solar cells. Firstly, multiple exciton generation and subsequent electrical extraction from a thin film photoconductive device constructed from PbSe NQDs is demonstrated. As an extension of this work, this PbSe NQD photoconductor was used in a tandem structure with a polymer solar cell to demonstrate multiple carrier extraction the application of an external electric field. This structure exhibited improved device durability from UV irradiation due to the self-passivating effect provided by the PbSe layer. In order to achieve better exciton

  4. Cellular interactions via conditioned media induce in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells or mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Machiguchi, Toshihiko Nakamura, Tatsuo

    2013-06-07

    Highlights: •We have attempted in vivo nephron generation using conditioned media. •Vascular and tubular cells do cross-talks on cell proliferation and tubular changes. •Tubular cells suppress these changes in mesenchymal stem cells. •Tubular cells differentiate mesenchymal stem cells into tubular cells. •Nephrons can be created from implanted tubular cells or mesenchymal stem cells. -- Abstract: There are some successful reports of kidney generation by utilizing the natural course of kidney development, namely, the use of an artificially treated metanephros, blastocyst or ureteric bud. Under a novel concept of cellular interactions via conditioned media (CMs), we have attempted in vivo nephron generation from tubular epithelial cells (TECs) or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Here we used 10× CMs of vascular endothelial cells (VECs) and TECs, which is the first to introduce a CM into the field of organ regeneration. We first present stimulative cross-talks induced by these CMs between VECs and TECs on cell proliferation and morphological changes. In MSCs, TEC-CM suppressed these changes, however, induced cytokeratin expression, indicating the differentiation of MSCs into TECs. As a result, glomerular and tubular structures were created following the implantation of TECs or MSCs with both CMs. Our findings suggest that the cellular interactions via CMs might induce in vivo nephron generation from TECs or MSCs. As a promoting factor, CMs could also be applied to the regeneration of other organs and tissues.

  5. Design and development of thermoelectric generator

    SciTech Connect

    Prem Kumar, D. S. Mahajan, Ishan Vardhan Anbalagan, R. Mallik, Ramesh Chandra

    2014-04-24

    In this paper we discuss the fabrication, working and characteristics of a thermoelectric generator made up of p and n type semiconductor materials. The device consists of Fe{sub 0.2}Co{sub 3.8}Sb{sub 11.5}Te{sub 0.5} (zT = 1.04 at 818 K) as the n-type and Zn4Sb3 (zT=0.8 at 550 K) as the p-type material synthesized by vacuum hot press method. Carbon paste has been used to join the semiconductor legs to metal (Molybdenum) electrodes to reduce the contact resistance. The multi-couple (4 legs) generator results a maximum output power of 1.083 mW at a temperature difference of 240 K between the hot and cold sides. In this investigation, an I-V characteristic, maximum output power of the thermoelectric module is presented. The efficiency of thermoelectric module is obtained as η = 0.273 %.

  6. Generation of Avian Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yangqing; West, Franklin D; Jordan, Brian J; Beckstead, Robert B; Jordan, Erin T; Stice, Steven L

    2015-01-01

    Avian species are among the most diverse vertebrates on our planet and significantly contribute to the balance of the ecology. They are also important food source and serve as a central animal model to decipher developmental biology and disease principles. Derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from avian species would enable conservation of genetic diversity as well as offer a valuable cell source that facilitates the use of avian models in many areas of basic and applied research. In this chapter, we describe methods used to successfully reprogram quail fibroblasts into iPSCs by using human transcription factors and the techniques critical to the characterization of their pluripotency. PMID:26621592

  7. Gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumai, Kazuma; Miyashiro, Hajime; Kobayashi, Yo; Takei, Katsuhito; Ishikawa, Rikio

    To elucidate the gas generation mechanism due to electrolyte decomposition in commercial lithium-ion cells after long cycling, we developed a device which can accurately determine the volume of generated gas in the cell. Experiments on Li xC 6/Li 1- xCoO 2 cells using electrolytes such as 1 M LiPF 6 in propylene carbonate (PC), dimethyl carbonate (DMC), ethyl methyl carbonate (EMC), and diethyl carbonate (DEC) are presented and discussed. In the nominal voltage range (4.2-2.5 V), compositional change due mainly to ester exchange reaction occurs, and gaseous products in the cell are little. Generated gas volume and compositional change in the electrolyte are detected largely in overcharged cells, and we discussed that gas generation due to electrolyte decomposition involves different decomposition reactions in overcharged and overdischarged cells.

  8. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from the prairie vole.

    PubMed

    Manoli, Devanand S; Subramanyam, Deepa; Carey, Catriona; Sudin, Erik; Van Westerhuyzen, Julie A; Bales, Karen L; Blelloch, Robert; Shah, Nirao M

    2012-01-01

    The vast majority of animals mate more or less promiscuously. A few mammals, including humans, utilize more restrained mating strategies that entail a longer term affiliation with a single mating partner. Such pair bonding mating strategies have been resistant to genetic analysis because of a lack of suitable model organisms. Prairie voles are small mouse-like rodents that form enduring pair bonds in the wild as well as in the laboratory, and consequently they have been used widely to study social bonding behavior. The lack of targeted genetic approaches in this species however has restricted the study of the molecular and neural circuit basis of pair bonds. As a first step in rendering the prairie vole amenable to reverse genetics, we have generated induced pluripotent stem cell (IPSC) lines from prairie vole fibroblasts using retroviral transduction of reprogramming factors. These IPSC lines display the cellular and molecular hallmarks of IPSC cells from other organisms, including mice and humans. Moreover, the prairie vole IPSC lines have pluripotent differentiation potential since they can give rise to all three germ layers in tissue culture and in vivo. These IPSC lines can now be used to develop conditions that facilitate homologous recombination and eventually the generation of prairie voles bearing targeted genetic modifications to study the molecular and neural basis of pair bond formation. PMID:22675440

  9. Generating AC With Rotating Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flanagan, David T.

    1993-01-01

    Rotating solar photovoltaic cells or batteries connected to suitable mechanical and/or electronic commutators produce nearly sinusoidal alternating current. Eliminates need for inverter circuitry and its attendant power-consumption and heat-dissipation problems, but imposes need for low-power-consumption rotary mechanism. Intended for use aboard spacecraft, also useful in special terrestrial situations where solar electric power must be transmitted over powerlines from one remote location to another.

  10. Generation of ESC-derived Mouse Airway Epithelial Cells Using Decellularized Lung Scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Shojaie, Sharareh; Lee, Joyce; Wang, Jinxia; Ackerley, Cameron; Post, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Lung lineage differentiation requires integration of complex environmental cues that include growth factor signaling, cell-cell interactions and cell-matrix interactions. Due to this complexity, recapitulation of lung development in vitro to promote differentiation of stem cells to lung epithelial cells has been challenging. In this protocol, decellularized lung scaffolds are used to mimic the 3-dimensional environment of the lung and generate stem cell-derived airway epithelial cells. Mouse embryonic stem cell are first differentiated to the endoderm lineage using an embryoid body (EB) culture method with activin A. Endoderm cells are then seeded onto decellularized scaffolds and cultured at air-liquid interface for up to 21 days. This technique promotes differentiation of seeded cells to functional airway epithelial cells (ciliated cells, club cells, and basal cells) without additional growth factor supplementation. This culture setup is defined, serum-free, inexpensive, and reproducible. Although there is limited contamination from non-lung endoderm lineages in culture, this protocol only generates airway epithelial populations and does not give rise to alveolar epithelial cells. Airway epithelia generated with this protocol can be used to study cell-matrix interactions during lung organogenesis and for disease modeling or drug-discovery platforms of airway-related pathologies such as cystic fibrosis. PMID:27214388

  11. Generation of diverse neural cell types through direct conversion

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Gayle F; Strappe, Padraig M

    2016-01-01

    A characteristic of neurological disorders is the loss of critical populations of cells that the body is unable to replace, thus there has been much interest in identifying methods of generating clinically relevant numbers of cells to replace those that have been damaged or lost. The process of neural direct conversion, in which cells of one lineage are converted into cells of a neural lineage without first inducing pluripotency, shows great potential, with evidence of the generation of a range of functional neural cell types both in vitro and in vivo, through viral and non-viral delivery of exogenous factors, as well as chemical induction methods. Induced neural cells have been proposed as an attractive alternative to neural cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells, with prospective roles in the investigation of neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative disease modelling, drug screening, and cellular replacement for regenerative medicine applications, however further investigations into improving the efficacy and safety of these methods need to be performed before neural direct conversion becomes a clinically viable option. In this review, we describe the generation of diverse neural cell types via direct conversion of somatic cells, with comparison against stem cell-based approaches, as well as discussion of their potential research and clinical applications. PMID:26981169

  12. Hamiltonian Description of Convective-cell Generation

    SciTech Connect

    J.A. Krommes and R.A. Kolesnikov

    2004-03-11

    The nonlinear statistical growth rate eq for convective cells driven by drift-wave (DW) interactions is studied with the aid of a covariant Hamiltonian formalism for the gyrofluid nonlinearities. A statistical energy theorem is proven that relates eq to a second functional tensor derivative of the DW energy. This generalizes to a wide class of systems of coupled partial differential equations a previous result for scalar dynamics. Applications to (i) electrostatic ion-temperature-gradient-driven modes at small ion temperature, and (ii) weakly electromagnetic collisional DW's are noted.

  13. Generation of Human iNKT Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiangming; Tsuji, Moriya; Schneck, Jonathan; Webb, Tonya J.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells comprise an important immunoregulatory T cell subset and express cell surface proteins characteristic of both natural killer cells and T cells. Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells are activated by lipid antigen presented in the context of CD1d molecules, in contrast to classic T cell subsets, which recognize peptide antigens presented by MHC molecules. Following activation, iNKT cells rapidly secrete large amounts of cytokines and can lyse tumor cells and virally infected cells; however, iNKT cells are reduced in patients with autoimmune disease and cancer. The potential to characterize and investigate the prospective use of iNKT cells for therapeutic purposes has significantly increased with the ability to stimulate and expand human iNKT cells. In this protocol, we describe a method to generate and propagate primary human iNKT cells. Specifically, primary iNKT cells were isolated from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), and then expanded periodically with irradiated α-GalCer loaded autologous immature dendritic cells (DC) in the presence of human IL-2.

  14. Generation of cardiac pacemaker cells by programming and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Husse, Britta; Franz, Wolfgang-Michael

    2016-07-01

    A number of diseases are caused by faulty function of the cardiac pacemaker and described as "sick sinus syndrome". The medical treatment of sick sinus syndrome with electrical pacemaker implants in the diseased heart includes risks. These problems may be overcome via "biological pacemaker" derived from different adult cardiac cells or pluripotent stem cells. The generation of cardiac pacemaker cells requires the understanding of the pacing automaticity. Two characteristic phenomena the "membrane-clock" and the "Ca(2+)-clock" are responsible for the modulation of the pacemaker activity. Processes in the "membrane-clock" generating the spontaneous pacemaker firing are based on the voltage-sensitive membrane ion channel activity starting with slow diastolic depolarization and discharging in the action potential. The influence of the intracellular Ca(2+) modulating the pacemaker activity is characterized by the "Ca(2+)-clock". The generation of pacemaker cells started with the reprogramming of adult cardiac cells by targeted induction of one pacemaker function like HCN1-4 overexpression and enclosed in an activation of single pacemaker specific transcription factors. Reprogramming of adult cardiac cells with the transcription factor Tbx18 created cardiac cells with characteristic features of cardiac pacemaker cells. Another key transcription factor is Tbx3 specifically expressed in the cardiac conduction system including the sinoatrial node and sufficient for the induction of the cardiac pacemaker gene program. For a successful cell therapeutic practice, the generated cells should have all regulating mechanisms of cardiac pacemaker cells. Otherwise, the generated pacemaker cells serve only as investigating model for the fundamental research or as drug testing model for new antiarrhythmics. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel

  15. Electrolysis cell functions as water vapor dehumidifier and oxygen generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clifford, J. E.

    1971-01-01

    Water vapor is absorbed in hygroscopic electrolyte, and oxygen generated by absorbed water electrolysis at anode is added simultaneously to air stream. Cell applications include on-board aircraft oxygen systems, portable oxygen generators, oxygen concentration requirements, and commercial air conditioning and dehumidifying systems.

  16. Developing the next generation of nurse scientists.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Patricia V; Hall, Lynne A

    2015-01-01

    This article describes an undergraduate nursing research internship program in which students are engaged in research with a faculty mentor. Since 2002, more than 130 undergraduate nursing students have participated. Interns coauthored publications, presented papers and posters at conferences, and received awards. This highly successful program provides a model that can be easily replicated to foster the development of future nurse scientists. PMID:25581434

  17. Generation of Gene Knockout Mice by ES Cell Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Glenn; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    This unit lists and describes protocols used in the production of chimeric mice leading to the generation of gene knockout mice. These protocols include the collection of blastocyst embryos, ES cell injection, and uterine transfer of injected blastocysts. Support protocols in the superovulation of blastocyst donor mice, generation of pseudopregnant recipients, fabrication of glass pipettes, and generation of germline mice are also included. Practical tips and solutions are mentioned to help troubleshoot problems that may occur. PMID:19731226

  18. ZERO EMISSION POWER GENERATION TECHNOLOGY DEVELOPMENT

    SciTech Connect

    Ronald Bischoff; Stephen Doyle

    2005-01-20

    Clean Energy Systems (CES) was previously funded by DOE's ''Vision 21'' program. This program provided a proof-of-concept demonstration that CES' novel gas generator (combustor) enabled production of electrical power from fossil fuels without pollution. CES has used current DOE funding for additional design study exercises which established the utility of the CES-cycle for retrofitting existing power plants for zero-emission operations and for incorporation in zero-emission, ''green field'' power plant concepts. DOE funding also helped define the suitability of existing steam turbine designs for use in the CES-cycle and explored the use of aero-derivative turbines for advanced power plant designs. This work is of interest to the California Energy Commission (CEC) and the Norwegian Ministry of Petroleum & Energy. California's air quality districts have significant non-attainment areas in which CES technology can help. CEC is currently funding a CES-cycle technology demonstration near Bakersfield, CA. The Norwegian government is supporting conceptual studies for a proposed 40 MW zero-emission power plant in Stavager, Norway which would use the CES-cycle. The latter project is called Zero-Emission Norwegian Gas (ZENG). In summary, current engineering studies: (1) supported engineering design of plant subsystems applicable for use with CES-cycle zero-emission power plants, and (2) documented the suitability and availability of steam turbines for use in CES-cycle power plants, with particular relevance to the Norwegian ZENG Project.

  19. D-D neutron generator development at LBNL.

    PubMed

    Reijonen, J; Gicquel, F; Hahto, S K; King, M; Lou, T-P; Leung, K-N

    2005-01-01

    The plasma and ion source technology group in Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is developing advanced, next generation D-D neutron generators. There are three distinctive developments, which are discussed in this presentation, namely, multi-stage, accelerator-based axial neutron generator, high-output co-axial neutron generator and point source neutron generator. These generators employ RF-induction discharge to produce deuterium ions. The distinctive feature of RF-discharge is its capability to generate high atomic hydrogen species, high current densities and stable and long-life operation. The axial neutron generator is designed for applications that require fast pulsing together with medium to high D-D neutron output. The co-axial neutron generator is aimed for high neutron output with cw or pulsed operation, using either the D-D or D-T fusion reaction. The point source neutron generator is a new concept, utilizing a toroidal-shaped plasma generator. The beam is extracted from multiple apertures and focus to the target tube, which is located at the middle of the generator. This will generate a point source of D-D, T-T or D-T neutrons with high output flux. The latest development together with measured data will be discussed in this article. PMID:15975804

  20. Career Development in Generation X. Myths and Realities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lankard, Bettina A.

    Several myths relate to the question of whether Generation X, the population cohort following the Baby Boomers, has different values, work ethics, and attitudes toward work and career development. The first myth is that individuals in Generation X are slackers, lacking career drive and ambition. The reality is that Generation X may just view the…

  1. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) Cells by Nuclear Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Dilip; Evans, Gregory R. D.

    2011-01-01

    During embryonic development pluripotency is progressively lost irreversibly by cell division, differentiation, migration and organ formation. Terminally differentiated cells do not generate other kinds of cells. Pluripotent stem cells are a great source of varying cell types that are used for tissue regeneration or repair of damaged tissue. The pluripotent stem cells can be derived from inner cell mass of blastocyte but its application is limited due to ethical concerns. The recent discovery of iPS with defined reprogramming factors has initiated a flurry of works on stem cell in various laboratories. The pluripotent cells can be derived from various differentiated adult cells as well as from adult stem cells by nuclear reprogramming, somatic cell nuclear transfer etc. In this review article, different aspects of nuclear reprogramming are discussed. PMID:22007240

  2. Germline Competent Pluripotent Mouse Stem Cells Generated by Plasmid Vectors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chien-Hong; Su, Yu-Hsiu; Lee, Kun-Hsiung; Chuang, Chin-Kai

    2016-07-01

    We developed nonintegrated methods to reprogram mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) using pig pOct4, pSox2, and pc-Myc as well as human hKLF4, hAID, and hTDG that were carried by plasmid vectors. The 4F method employed pOct4, pSox2, pc-Myc, and hKLF4 to derive iPSC clones with naive embryonic stem cell (ESC)-like morphology. These 4F clones expressed endogenous mouse Nanog protein and could generate chimeras. In addition to the four conventional reprogramming factors used in the 4F method, hAID and hTDG were utilized in a 6F method to increase the conversion efficiency of reprogramming by approximately five-fold. One of the 6F plasmid derived iPSC (piPSC) clones was shown to be germline transmission competent. PMID:26980563

  3. Generation of kidney organoids from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takasato, Minoru; Er, Pei X; Chiu, Han S; Little, Melissa H

    2016-09-01

    The human kidney develops from four progenitor populations-nephron progenitors, ureteric epithelial progenitors, renal interstitial progenitors and endothelial progenitors-resulting in the formation of maximally 2 million nephrons. Until recently, the reported methods differentiated human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) into either nephron progenitor or ureteric epithelial progenitor cells, consequently forming only nephrons or collecting ducts, respectively. Here we detail a protocol that simultaneously induces all four progenitors to generate kidney organoids within which segmented nephrons are connected to collecting ducts and surrounded by renal interstitial cells and an endothelial network. As evidence of functional maturity, proximal tubules within organoids display megalin-mediated and cubilin-mediated endocytosis, and they respond to a nephrotoxicant to undergo apoptosis. This protocol consists of 7 d of monolayer culture for intermediate mesoderm induction, followed by 18 d of 3D culture to facilitate self-organizing renogenic events leading to organoid formation. Personnel experienced in culturing hPSCs are required to conduct this protocol. PMID:27560173

  4. Solution processing of next-generation nanocrystal solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Embden, J.; Chesman, A. S. R.; Duffy, N. W.; Della Gaspera, E.; Jasieniak, J. J.

    2013-12-01

    Next-generation solar cells will be fabricated from low-cost and earth abundant elements, using processes that are amenable to printing on a variety of light-weight substrates. The utilization of compositionally and structurally controlled colloidal nanocrystals as building blocks for such devices fulfills these criteria. Our recent efforts in developing kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals, one of the most promising materials to emerge in this area, enable the deposition of CZTS thin-films directly from a variety of solution-processed methods. Nanocrystalline thin films possess poor electronic properties, which precludes their use in solar cell devices. In order to overcome this, thermal treatment steps under an atmosphere of vaporous selenium are applied to induce large scale crystallite growth and the production of selenized CZTSSe films. This process results in a highly photoactive p-type layer. The n-type cadmium sulfide layer is also deposited from solution using chemical bath deposition. We will discuss each of these accomplishments in detail, highlighting the significant challenges that need to be overcome in order to fabricate working CZTSSe thin film solar cells.

  5. Spiral actin-polymerization waves can generate amoeboidal cell crawling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreher, A.; Aranson, I. S.; Kruse, K.

    2014-05-01

    Amoeboidal cell crawling on solid substrates is characterized by protrusions that seemingly appear randomly along the cell periphery and drive the cell forward. For many cell types, it is known that the protrusions result from polymerization of the actin cytoskeleton. However, little is known about how the formation of protrusions is triggered and whether the appearance of subsequent protrusions is coordinated. Recently, the spontaneous formation of actin-polymerization waves was observed. These waves have been proposed to orchestrate the cytoskeletal dynamics during cell crawling. Here, we study the impact of cytoskeletal polymerization waves on cell migration using a phase-field approach. In addition to directionally moving cells, we find states reminiscent of amoeboidal cell crawling. In this framework, new protrusions are seen to emerge from a nucleation process, generating spiral actin waves in the cell interior. Nucleation of new spirals does not require noise, but occurs in a state that is apparently displaying spatio-temporal chaos.

  6. Microbes and B cell development.

    PubMed

    Wesemann, Duane R

    2015-01-01

    Animals and many of their chronic microbial inhabitants form relationships of symbiotic mutualism, which occurs when coexisting life-forms derive mutual benefit from stable associations. While microorganisms receive a secure habitat and constant food source from vertebrate hosts, they are required for optimal immune system development and occupy niches otherwise abused by pathogens. Microbes have also been shown to provide vertebrate hosts with metabolic capabilities that enhance energy and nutrient uptake from the diet. The immune system plays a central role in the establishment and maintenance of host-microbe homeostasis, and B lineage cells play a key role in this regulation. Here, I reviewed the structure and function of the microbiota and the known mechanisms of how nonpathogenic microbes influence B cell biology and immunoglobulin repertoire development early in life. I also discuss what is known about how B lineage cells contribute to the process of shaping the composition of commensal/mutualistic microbe membership. PMID:25591467

  7. Generation of Human Melanocytes from Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Yohei; Akamatsu, Wado; Kuwahara, Reiko; Ohyama, Manabu; Amagai, Masayuki; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Yamanaka, Shinya; Okano, Hideyuki; Kawakami, Yutaka

    2011-01-01

    Epidermal melanocytes play an important role in protecting the skin from UV rays, and their functional impairment results in pigment disorders. Additionally, melanomas are considered to arise from mutations that accumulate in melanocyte stem cells. The mechanisms underlying melanocyte differentiation and the defining characteristics of melanocyte stem cells in humans are, however, largely unknown. In the present study, we set out to generate melanocytes from human iPS cells in vitro, leading to a preliminary investigation of the mechanisms of human melanocyte differentiation. We generated iPS cell lines from human dermal fibroblasts using the Yamanaka factors (SOX2, OCT3/4, and KLF4, with or without c-MYC). These iPS cell lines were subsequently used to form embryoid bodies (EBs) and then differentiated into melanocytes via culture supplementation with Wnt3a, SCF, and ET-3. Seven weeks after inducing differentiation, pigmented cells expressing melanocyte markers such as MITF, tyrosinase, SILV, and TYRP1, were detected. Melanosomes were identified in these pigmented cells by electron microscopy, and global gene expression profiling of the pigmented cells showed a high similarity to that of human primary foreskin-derived melanocytes, suggesting the successful generation of melanocytes from iPS cells. This in vitro differentiation system should prove useful for understanding human melanocyte biology and revealing the mechanism of various pigment cell disorders, including melanoma. PMID:21249204

  8. Extrathymic development of murine T cells after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Hanash, Alan M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Smith, Odette M.; West, Mallory L.; Singer, Natalie V.; Brill, Jessie; Sun, Joseph C.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Restoring T cell competence is a significant clinical challenge in patients whose thymic function is severely compromised due to age or cytoreductive conditioning. Here, we demonstrate in mice that mesenteric LNs (MLNs) support extrathymic T cell development in euthymic and athymic recipients of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Furthermore, in aged murine BMT recipients, the contribution of the MLNs to the generation of T cells was maintained, while the contribution of the thymus was significantly impaired. Thymic impairment resulted in a proportional increase in extrathymic-derived T cell progenitors. Extrathymic development in athymic recipients generated conventional naive TCRαβ T cells with a broad Vβ repertoire and intact functional and proliferative potential. Moreover, in the absence of a functional thymus, immunity against known pathogens could be augmented using engineered precursor T cells with viral specificity. These findings demonstrate the potential of extrathymic T cell development for T cell reconstitution in patients with limited thymic function. PMID:23160195

  9. Method for generating hydrogen for fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Lee, Sheldon H. D.; Carter, John David; Krumpelt, Michael

    2004-03-30

    A method of producing a H.sub.2 rich gas stream includes supplying an O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel to an inner reforming zone of a fuel processor that includes a partial oxidation catalyst and a steam reforming catalyst or a combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst. The method also includes contacting the O.sub.2 rich gas, steam, and fuel with the partial oxidation catalyst and the steam reforming catalyst or the combined partial oxidation and stream reforming catalyst in the inner reforming zone to generate a hot reformate stream. The method still further includes cooling the hot reformate stream in a cooling zone to produce a cooled reformate stream. Additionally, the method includes removing sulfur-containing compounds from the cooled reformate stream by contacting the cooled reformate stream with a sulfur removal agent. The method still further includes contacting the cooled reformate stream with a catalyst that converts water and carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide and H.sub.2 in a water-gas-shift zone to produce a final reformate stream in the fuel processor.

  10. Teaching Generation Text: Using Cell Phones to Enhance Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nielsen, Lisa; Webb, Willyn

    2011-01-01

    "Teaching Generation Text" shows how teachers can turn cell phones into an educational opportunity instead of an annoying distraction. With a host of innovative ideas, activities, lessons, and strategies, Nielsen and Webb offer a unique way to use students' preferred method of communication in the classroom. Cell phones can remind students to…

  11. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Generation Strategy and Epigenetic Mystery behind Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Pengfei; Manupipatpong, Sasicha; Xie, Nina; Li, Yujing

    2016-01-01

    Possessing the ability of self-renewal with immortalization and potential for differentiation into different cell types, stem cells, particularly embryonic stem cells (ESC), have attracted significant attention since their discovery. As ESC research has played an essential role in developing our understanding of the mechanisms underlying reproduction, development, and cell (de)differentiation, significant efforts have been made in the biomedical study of ESC in recent decades. However, such studies of ESC have been hampered by the ethical issues and technological challenges surrounding them, therefore dramatically inhibiting the potential applications of ESC in basic biomedical studies and clinical medicine. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), generated from the reprogrammed somatic cells, share similar characteristics including but not limited to the morphology and growth of ESC, self-renewal, and potential differentiation into various cell types. The discovery of the iPSC, unhindered by the aforementioned limitations of ESC, introduces a viable alternative to ESC. More importantly, the applications of iPSC in the development of disease models such as neurodegenerative disorders greatly enhance our understanding of the pathogenesis of such diseases and also facilitate the development of clinical therapeutic strategies using iPSC generated from patient somatic cells to avoid an immune rejection. In this review, we highlight the advances in iPSCs generation methods as well as the mechanisms behind their reprogramming. We also discuss future perspectives for the development of iPSC generation methods with higher efficiency and safety. PMID:26880993

  12. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M A; Yoshitake, J; Bushra, Q S; Hyodo, M; Omine, K; Strik, David

    2015-02-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) in soil mixed with compost. A total of six buckets filled with the same soil were used with carbon fiber as the electrodes for the test. Rice plants were planted in five of the buckets, with the sixth bucket containing only soil and an external resistance of 100 ohm was used for all cases. It was observed that the cells with rice plants and compost showed higher values of voltage and power density with time. The highest value of voltage showed around 700 mV when a rice plant with 1% compost mixed soil was used, however it was more than 95% less in the case of no rice plant and without compost. Comparing cases with and without compost but with the same number of rice plants, cases with compost depicted higher voltage to as much as 2 times. The power density was also 3 times higher when the compost was used in the paddy PMFCs which indicated the influence of compost on bio-electricity generation. PMID:25443096

  13. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    SciTech Connect

    J. E. O'Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O'Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  14. Cell adhesion molecules involved in intrathymic T cell development.

    PubMed

    Patel, D D; Haynes, B F

    1993-08-01

    During stem cell migration to the thymus, intrathymic maturation of T cells, and emigration of mature T cells out of the thymus, intercellular interactions of developing T cells with a myriad of cell types are required for normal T cell development. Intercellular interactions of T cell precursors with endothelial cells, thymic epithelial cells, fibroblasts, thymic macrophages and dendritic cells are all mediated by adhesion molecules on immature T cells binding to ligands on thymic microenvironment cells. While many receptor-ligand interactions that are important in intrathymic T cell development are known, the adhesion molecules that are important for migration of T cell precursors to the thymus and for emigration of mature thymocytes from the thymus are poorly understood. An emerging concept is that select adhesion molecules at discrete stages of T cell maturation participate in and regulate the complex processes of T cell development. PMID:7693023

  15. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood. PMID:25403468

  16. Developing the Next Generation of Geoscientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sparrow, E. B.; Kopplin, M. R.

    2012-12-01

    The Monitoring Seasons Through Global Learning Communities (Seasons and Biomes), an inquiry- and project- based program, works with K-12 teachers and their students worldwide to increase awareness and understanding of the Earth as a system, and the science process. Seasons and Biomes is one of four GLOBE (Global learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment, www.globe.gov) earth system science projects. Seasons and Biomes engage students in ongoing research investigations as way of learning science. We do this by conducting for teachers, professional development workshops that incorporate science content, best teaching practices (that include inquiry, integrating science with math, language and art, authentic assessments, concept mapping), a model for student scientific research, and an earth system science approach. Teachers learn and practice standardized measurement protocols developed by GLOBE in the following areas of investigations: atmosphere, hydrology, soils, phenology and land cover/biology, as well as those developed by Seasons and Biomes on ice seasonality (freeze-up and break-up of rivers and lakes), active layer/depth of soil freezing (frost tube), mosquitoes (larvae abundance and identification of mosquito vectors for malaria and dengue fever) and plant invasive species. They also learn how to enter data as well as access data on the GLOBE website. Teachers in turn teach and work with their students in doing authentic science, contribute data to ongoing research as well as conduct their own studies. During the workshops we also provide guidance and opportunity for early career scientists to share their research, work with teachers and mentor them as well as to develop measurement protocols pertinent to their research. Similarly we work with GLOBE Alumni, students who were in the GLOBE program when they were in primary and/or secondary schools and have graduated from college, yet are still very much inspired and dedicated to working with

  17. Next Generation Bipolar Plates for Automotive PEM Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adrianowycz, Orest; Norley, Julian; Stuart, David J; Flaherty, David; Wayne, Ryan; Williams, Warren; Tietze, Roger; Nguyen, Yen-Loan H; Zawodzinski, Tom; Pietrasz, Patrick

    2010-04-15

    The results of a successful U.S. Department of Energy (DoE) funded two-year $2.9 MM program lead by GrafTech International Inc. (GrafTech) are reported and summarized. The program goal was to develop the next generation of high temperature proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell bipolar plates for use in transportation fuel cell applications operating at temperatures up to 120 °C. The bipolar plate composite developed during the program is based on GrafTech’s GRAFCELL resin impregnated flexible graphite technology and makes use of a high temperature Huntsman Advanced Materials resin system which extends the upper use temperature of the composite to the DoE target. High temperature performance of the new composite is achieved with the added benefit of improvements in strength, modulus, and dimensional stability over the incumbent resin systems. Other physical properties, including thermal and electrical conductivity of the new composite are identical to or not adversely affected by the new resin system. Using the new bipolar plate composite system, machined plates were fabricated and tested in high temperature single-cell fuel cells operating at 120 °C for over 1100 hours by Case Western Reserve University. Final verification of performance was done on embossed full-size plates which were fabricated and glued into bipolar plates by GrafTech. Stack testing was done on a 10-cell full-sized stack under a simulated drive cycle protocol by Ballard Power Systems. Freeze-thaw performance was conducted by Ballard on a separate 5-cell stack and shown to be within specification. A third stack was assembled and shipped to Argonne National Laboratory for independent performance verification. Manufacturing cost estimate for the production of the new bipolar plate composite at current and high volume production scenarios was performed by Directed Technologies Inc. (DTI). The production cost estimates were consistent with previous DoE cost estimates performed by DTI for the

  18. Generation of induced pluripotent stem cells from human blood.

    PubMed

    Loh, Yuin-Han; Agarwal, Suneet; Park, In-Hyun; Urbach, Achia; Huo, Hongguang; Heffner, Garrett C; Kim, Kitai; Miller, Justine D; Ng, Kitwa; Daley, George Q

    2009-05-28

    Human dermal fibroblasts obtained by skin biopsy can be reprogrammed directly to pluripotency by the ectopic expression of defined transcription factors. Here, we describe the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells from CD34+ mobilized human peripheral blood cells using retroviral transduction of OCT4/SOX2/KLF4/MYC. Blood-derived human induced pluripotent stem cells are indistinguishable from human embryonic stem cells with respect to morphology, expression of surface antigens, and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, DNA methylation status at pluripotent cell-specific genes, and the capacity to differentiate in vitro and in teratomas. The ability to reprogram cells from human blood will allow the generation of patient-specific stem cells for diseases in which the disease-causing somatic mutations are restricted to cells of the hematopoietic lineage. PMID:19299331

  19. Status of the development of solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis for large scale hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. H.

    1982-02-01

    Solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis for large scale hydrogen generation is reported. The program was aimed at performance improvement. Reductions in cell impedance were demonstrated which improve cell performance by over 100 mV. A prototype 500 SCFH system for field evaluation was developed.

  20. Indomethacin augments lymphokine-activated killer cell generation by patients with malignant mesothelioma

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, L.S.; Bowman, R.V.; Davis, M.R.; Musk, A.W.; Robinson, B.W. )

    1989-10-01

    Human malignant mesothelioma (MM) cells are resistant to natural killer (NK) cell lysis but susceptible to lysis by lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from control individuals. The present study was performed to determine the capacity of patients with MM (n = 22) and individuals occupationally exposed to asbestos (the major population at risk of developing this disease, n = 52) to generate LAK cells capable of effectively lysing human mesothelioma cells. Compared to controls (n = 20), both patient groups demonstrated significantly depressed LAK cell activity against mesothelioma tumor cell targets (55 +/- 3% lysis by controls vs 34 +/- 3% lysis by patients with MM, P less than 0.005; and 45 +/- 3% lysis by asbestos-exposed individuals, P less than 0.025). Addition of 10 micrograms/ml indomethacin during LAK cell generation restored normal LAK cell activity for patients with MM (52 +/- 6% lysis of cultured human MM cells, P = NS compared to controls), suggesting that the defective cytolytic cell function observed in some patients with MM is a result of prostaglandin-induced immunosuppression. The ability of indomethacin to restore suppressed LAK cell activity in patients with MM suggests that the concomitant use of this agent in ex vivo LAK cell generation and in patients undergoing interleukin/LAK cell therapy may be beneficial.

  1. Development of concentrator solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-08-01

    A limited pilot production run on PESC silicon solar cells for use at high concentrations (200 to 400 suns) is summarized. The front contact design of the cells was modified for operation without prismatic covers. The original objective of the contract was to systematically complete a process consolidation phase, in which all the, process improvements developed during the contract would be combined in a pilot production run. This pilot run was going to provide, a basis for estimating cell costs when produced at high throughput. Because of DOE funding limitations, the Photovoltaic Concentrator Initiative is on hold, and Applied Solar`s contract was operated at a low level of effort for most of 1993. The results obtained from the reduced scope pilot run showed the effects of discontinuous process optimization and characterization. However, the run provided valuable insight into the technical areas that can be optimized to achieve the original goals of the contract.

  2. Development of alkaline fuel cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Hibbs, Michael R.; Jenkins, Janelle E.; Alam, Todd Michael; Janarthanan, Rajeswari; Horan, James L.; Caire, Benjamin R.; Ziegler, Zachary C.; Herring, Andrew M.; Yang, Yuan; Zuo, Xiaobing; Robson, Michael H.; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Patterson, Wendy; Atanassov, Plamen Borissov

    2013-09-01

    This project focuses on the development and demonstration of anion exchange membrane (AEM) fuel cells for portable power applications. Novel polymeric anion exchange membranes and ionomers with high chemical stabilities were prepared characterized by researchers at Sandia National Laboratories. Durable, non-precious metal catalysts were prepared by Dr. Plamen Atanassov's research group at the University of New Mexico by utilizing an aerosol-based process to prepare templated nano-structures. Dr. Andy Herring's group at the Colorado School of Mines combined all of these materials to fabricate and test membrane electrode assemblies for single cell testing in a methanol-fueled alkaline system. The highest power density achieved in this study was 54 mW/cm2 which was 90% of the project target and the highest reported power density for a direct methanol alkaline fuel cell.

  3. Generating patterns from fields of cells. Examples from Drosophila segmentation.

    PubMed

    Sanson, B

    2001-12-01

    In Drosophila, a cascade of maternal, gap, pair-rule and segment polarity genes subdivides the antero/posterior axis of the embryo into repeating segmental stripes. This review summarizes what happens next, i.e. how an intrasegmental pattern is generated and controls the differentiation of specific cell types in the epidermis. Within each segment, cells secreting the signalling molecules Wingless (the homologue of vertebrate Wnt-1) and Hedgehog are found in narrow stripes on both sides of the parasegmental boundary. The Wingless and Hedgehog organizing activities help to establish two more stripes per segment that localize ligands for the Epidermal Growth Factor and the Notch signalling pathways, respectively. These four signals then act at short range and in concert to control epidermal differentiation at the single cell level across the segment. This example from Drosophila provides a paradigm for how organizers generate precise patterns, and ultimately different cell types, in a naïve field of cells. PMID:11743020

  4. Dynamics of Cell Generation and Turnover in the Human Heart.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Olaf; Zdunek, Sofia; Felker, Anastasia; Salehpour, Mehran; Alkass, Kanar; Bernard, Samuel; Sjostrom, Staffan L; Szewczykowska, Mirosława; Jackowska, Teresa; Dos Remedios, Cris; Malm, Torsten; Andrä, Michaela; Jashari, Ramadan; Nyengaard, Jens R; Possnert, Göran; Jovinge, Stefan; Druid, Henrik; Frisén, Jonas

    2015-06-18

    The contribution of cell generation to physiological heart growth and maintenance in humans has been difficult to establish and has remained controversial. We report that the full complement of cardiomyocytes is established perinataly and remains stable over the human lifespan, whereas the numbers of both endothelial and mesenchymal cells increase substantially from birth to early adulthood. Analysis of the integration of nuclear bomb test-derived (14)C revealed a high turnover rate of endothelial cells throughout life (>15% per year) and more limited renewal of mesenchymal cells (<4% per year in adulthood). Cardiomyocyte exchange is highest in early childhood and decreases gradually throughout life to <1% per year in adulthood, with similar turnover rates in the major subdivisions of the myocardium. We provide an integrated model of cell generation and turnover in the human heart. PMID:26073943

  5. IL-10-producing regulatory B10 cells ameliorate collagen-induced arthritis via suppressing Th17 cell generation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Deng, Jun; Liu, Yang; Ko, King-Hung; Wang, Xiaohui; Jiao, Zhijun; Wang, Shengjun; Hua, Zichun; Sun, Lingyun; Srivastava, Gopesh; Lau, Chak-Sing; Cao, Xuetao; Lu, Liwei

    2012-06-01

    IL-10-producing CD1d(hi)CD5(+) B cells, also known as B10 cells, have been shown to possess a regulatory function in the inhibition of immune responses, but whether and how B10 cells suppress the development of autoimmune arthritis remain largely unclear. In this study, we detected significantly decreased numbers of IL-10-producing B cells, but increased IL-17-producing CD4(+) T (Th17) cells in both spleen and draining lymph nodes of mice during the acute stage of collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) when compared with adjuvant-treated control mice. On adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded B10 cells, collagen-immunized mice showed a marked delay of arthritis onset with reduced severity of both clinical symptoms and joint damage, accompanied by a substantial reduction in the number of Th17 cells. To determine whether B10 cells directly inhibit the generation of Th17 cells in culture, naive CD4(+) T cells labeled with carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester (CFSE) were co-cultured with B10 cells. These B10 cells suppressed Th17 cell differentiation via the reduction of STAT3 phosphorylation and retinoid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression. Moreover, Th17 cells showed significantly decreased proliferation when co-cultured with B10 cells. Although adoptive transfer of Th17 cells triggered the development of collagen-induced arthritis in IL-17(-/-)DBA/1J mice, co-transfer of B10 cells with Th17 cells profoundly delayed the onset of arthritis. Thus, our findings suggest a novel regulatory role of B10 cells in arthritic progression via the suppression of Th17 cell generation. PMID:22538089

  6. Generating a Non-Integrating Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Bank from Urine-Derived Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yanting; Cai, Xiujuan; Wang, Linli; Liao, Baojian; Zhang, Hui; Shan, Yongli; Chen, Qianyu; Zhou, Tiancheng; Li, Xirui; Hou, Jundi; Chen, Shubin; Luo, Rongping; Qin, Dajiang; Pei, Duanqing; Pan, Guangjin

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS cell) holds great potential for applications in regenerative medicine, drug discovery, and disease modeling. We describe here a practical method to generate human iPS cells from urine-derived cells (UCs) under feeder-free, virus-free, serum-free condition and without oncogene c-MYC. We showed that this approach could be applied in a large population with different genetic backgrounds. UCs are easily accessible and exhibit high reprogramming efficiency, offering advantages over other cell types used for the purpose of iPS generation. Using the approach described in this study, we have generated 93 iPS cell lines from 20 donors with diverse genetic backgrounds. The non-viral iPS cell bank with these cell lines provides a valuable resource for iPS cells research, facilitating future applications of human iPS cells. PMID:23940595

  7. mTORC2 in Thymic Epithelial Cells Controls Thymopoiesis and T Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Cheng, Joyce S; Chu, Shuai; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-07-01

    Thymic epithelial cells (TECs) play important roles in T cell generation. Mechanisms that control TEC development and function are still not well defined. The mammalian or mechanistic target of rapamycin complex (mTORC)2 signals to regulate cell survival, nutrient uptake, and metabolism. We report in the present study that mice with TEC-specific ablation of Rictor, a critical and unique adaptor molecule in mTORC2, display thymic atrophy, which accompanies decreased TEC numbers in the medulla. Moreover, generation of multiple T cell lineages, including conventional TCRαβ T cells, regulatory T cells, invariant NKT cells, and TCRγδ T cells, was reduced in TEC-specific Rictor-deficient mice. Our data demonstrate that mTORC2 in TECs is important for normal thymopoiesis and efficient T cell generation. PMID:27233961

  8. Development of endosperm transfer cells in barley

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells (ETCs) are positioned at the intersection of maternal and filial tissues in seeds of cereals and represent a bottleneck for apoplasmic transport of assimilates into the endosperm. Endosperm cellularization starts at the maternal-filial boundary and generates the highly specialized ETCs. During differentiation barley ETCs develop characteristic flange-like wall ingrowths to facilitate effective nutrient transfer. A comprehensive morphological analysis depicted distinct developmental time points in establishment of transfer cell (TC) morphology and revealed intracellular changes possibly associated with cell wall metabolism. Embedded inside the grain, ETCs are barely accessible by manual preparation. To get tissue-specific information about ETC specification and differentiation, laser microdissection (LM)-based methods were used for transcript and metabolite profiling. Transcriptome analysis of ETCs at different developmental stages by microarrays indicated activated gene expression programs related to control of cell proliferation and cell shape, cell wall and carbohydrate metabolism reflecting the morphological changes during early ETC development. Transporter genes reveal distinct expression patterns suggesting a switch from active to passive modes of nutrient uptake with the onset of grain filling. Tissue-specific RNA-seq of the differentiating ETC region from the syncytial stage until functionality in nutrient transfer identified a high number of novel transcripts putatively involved in ETC differentiation. An essential role for two-component signaling (TCS) pathways in ETC development of barley emerged from this analysis. Correlative data provide evidence for abscisic acid and ethylene influences on ETC differentiation and hint at a crosstalk between hormone signal transduction and TCS phosphorelays. Collectively, the data expose a comprehensive view on ETC development, associated pathways and identified candidate genes for ETC

  9. Generation of folliculogenic human epithelial stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Burrows, Michelle; Liu, Shujing; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Guo, Wei; Kumar, Suresh; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) in the hair follicle bulge are required for hair follicle growth and cycling. The isolation and propagation of human EpSCs for tissue engineering purposes remains a challenge. Here we develop a strategy to differentiate human iPSCs (hiPSCs) into CD200+/ITGA6+ EpSCs that can reconstitute the epithelial components of the hair follicle and interfollicular epidermis. The hiPSC-derived CD200+/ITGA6+ cells show a similar gene expression signature as EpSCs directly isolated from human hair follicles. Human iPSC-derived CD200+/ITGA6+ cells are capable of generating all hair follicle lineages including the hair shaft, and the inner and outer root sheaths in skin reconstitution assays. The regenerated hair follicles possess a KRT15+ stem cell population and produce hair shafts expressing hair specific keratins. These results suggest an approach for generating large numbers of human EpSCs for tissue engineering and new treatments for hair loss, wound healing and other degenerative skin disorders. PMID:24468981

  10. Generation of folliculogenic human epithelial stem cells from induced pluripotent stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ruifeng; Zheng, Ying; Burrows, Michelle; Liu, Shujing; Wei, Zhi; Nace, Arben; Guo, Wei; Kumar, Suresh; Cotsarelis, George; Xu, Xiaowei

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial stem cells (EpSCs) in the hair follicle bulge are required for hair follicle growth and cycling. The isolation and propagation of human EpSCs for tissue engineering purposes remains a challenge. Here we develop a strategy to differentiate human iPSCs (hiPSCs) into CD200+/ITGA6+ EpSCs that can reconstitute the epithelial components of the hair follicle and interfollicular epidermis. The hiPSC-derived CD200+/ITGA6+ cells show a similar gene expression signature as EpSCs directly isolated from human hair follicles. Human iPSC-derived CD200+/ITGA6+ cells are capable of generating all hair follicle lineages including the hair shaft, and the inner and outer root sheaths in skin reconstitution assays. The regenerated hair follicles possess a KRT15+ stem cell population and produce hair shafts expressing hair-specific keratins. These results suggest an approach for generating large numbers of human EpSCs for tissue engineering and new treatments for hair loss, wound healing and other degenerative skin disorders.

  11. Generation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Conjunctiva

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin; Li, Yao; Erol, Deniz; Wu, Wen-Hsuan; Tsai, Yi-Ting; Li, Xiao-Rong; Davis, Richard J.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The objective of this study was to determine whether cells from the conjunctiva could be reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, providing an alternative source of stem cells. Methods We employed a doxycycline induced reprogrammable mouse strain to generate iPS cells from conjunctiva. The identity of the stem cells was confirmed by Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and immunofluorescence assays. Immunocytochemistry and teratoma assays are established means for scoring stem cell pluripotency. The reprogramming efficiencies of conjunctiva cells and ear fibroblasts were compared. Results We confirmed the identity of the stem cells and demonstrated expression of pluripotency markers (OCT4, SOX2, NANOG, and SSEA1), as tested by RT-PCR and immunofluorescence assays. In addition, derived iPS cells differentiated successfully into embryoid bodies and showed teratoma formation when injected into immunodeficient mice. Reprogramming conjunctival tissue is as efficient as reprogramming ear fibroblasts. Conjunctiva-iPS exhibited classic features of embryonic stem (ES) cells with respect to morphology, expression of surface antigens and pluripotency-associated transcription factors, capacity to differentiate in vitro, and the ability to form all three germ layers in vivo. Conclusion The present study demonstrated that conjunctival cells, which are readily obtained during the course of many routine conjunctival biopsies and ophthalmic procedures, can be another reliable source of iPS cells. PMID:24492934

  12. Development status of solid polymer electrolyte water electrolysis for large scale hydrogen generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, J. H.

    1981-03-01

    Solid polymer water electrolysis technology for large scale hydrogen generation is reviewed. A hydrogen generator module, capable of producing 2000 SCFH, was operated successfully for over 700 hours in the 200 kW system. Test results and further information are presented. Technology development was continued in support of improving both capital cost and conversion efficiency. Progress made in the development of the 10 sq ft active area cell included completion of the initial design, the beginning of fabrication development, and installation of new facilities for cell manufacture.

  13. Inactivation of Geminin in neural crest cells affects the generation and maintenance of enteric progenitor cells, leading to enteric aganglionosis.

    PubMed

    Stathopoulou, Athanasia; Natarajan, Dipa; Nikolopoulou, Pinelopi; Patmanidi, Alexandra L; Lygerou, Zoi; Pachnis, Vassilis; Taraviras, Stavros

    2016-01-15

    Neural crest cells comprise a multipotent, migratory cell population that generates a diverse array of cell and tissue types, during vertebrate development. Enteric Nervous System controls the function of the gastrointestinal tract and is mainly derived from the vagal and sacral neural crest cells. Deregulation on self-renewal and differentiation of the enteric neural crest cells is evident in enteric nervous system disorders, such as Hirschsprung disease, characterized by the absence of ganglia in a variable length of the distal bowel. Here we show that Geminin is essential for Enteric Nervous System generation as mice that lacked Geminin expression specifically in neural crest cells revealed decreased generation of vagal neural crest cells, and enteric neural crest cells (ENCCs). Geminin-deficient ENCCs showed increased apoptosis and decreased cell proliferation during the early stages of gut colonization. Furthermore, decreased number of committed ENCCs in vivo and the decreased self-renewal capacity of enteric progenitor cells in vitro, resulted in almost total aganglionosis resembling a severe case of Hirschsprung disease. Our results suggest that Geminin is an important regulator of self-renewal and survival of enteric nervous system progenitor cells. PMID:26658318

  14. Development and Test of a Prototype 100MVA Superconducting Generator

    SciTech Connect

    Fogarty, James M.; Bray, James W.

    2007-05-25

    In 2002, General Electric and the US Department of Energy (DOE) entered into a cooperative agreement for the development of a commercialized 100 MVA generator using high temperature superconductors (HTS) in the field winding. The intent of the program was to: • Identify and develop technologies that would be needed for such a generator. • Develop conceptual designs for generators with ratings of 100 MVA and higher using HTS technology. • Perform proof of concept tests at the 1.5 MW level for GE’s proprietary warm iron rotor HTS generator concept. • Design, build, and test a prototype of a commercially viable 100 MVA generator that could be placed on the power grid. This report summarizes work performed during the program and is provided as one of the final program deliverables.

  15. Neoplastic development in plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Potter, Michael

    2003-08-01

    An increasing number of model systems of plasma cell tumor (PCT) formation have been and are being developed. Discussed here are six models in mice and multiple myeloma (MM) in humans. Each model illustrates a unique set of biological factors. There are two general types of model systems: those that depend upon naturally arising mutagenic changes (pristane-induced PCTs, 5TMM, and MM) and those that are associated with oncogenes (Emu-v-abl), growth factors [interleukin-6 (IL-6)], and anti-apoptotic factors (Bcl-xL/Bcl-2). PCTs develop in several special tissue microenvironments that provide essential cytokines (IL-6) and cell-cell interactions. In mice, the activation and deregulation of c-myc by chromosomal translocations is a major feature in many of the models. This mechanism is much less a factor in MM and the 5T model in mice. Genetically determined susceptibility is involved in many of the mouse models, but only a few genes have been implicated thus far. PMID:12846815

  16. Generation of Megakaryocytes and Platelets from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Pick, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) have the potential to produce any tissue type in the body and thus represent a source of cells for regenerative medicine. Here we have shown that human platelets can be produced from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells in a defined culture system. We describe a serum- and feeder-free culture system that enabled the generation of megakaryocyte (Mk) progenitors and functional platelets from hPSCs. After 13 days the differentiated population included precursor cells that formed colonies containing differentiated Mks, and after 20 days these Mks were able to fragment into platelet-like particles that were functional. This protocol represents an important step towards the generation of human platelets for therapeutic use. PMID:24297316

  17. Exo70 Generates Membrane Curvature for Morphogenesis and Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yuting; Liu, Jianglan; Yang, Changsong; Capraro, Benjamin R.; Baumgart, Tobias; Bradley, Ryan P.; Ramakrishnan, N.; Xu, Xiaowei; Radhakrishnan, Ravi; Svitkina, Tatyana; Guo, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic shape changes of the plasma membrane are fundamental to many processes ranging from morphogenesis and cell migration to phagocytosis and viral propagation. Here we demonstrate that Exo70, a component of the exocyst complex, induces tubular membrane invaginations towards the lumen of synthetic vesicles in vitro and generates protrusions on the surface of cells. Biochemical analyses using Exo70 mutants and independent molecular dynamics simulations based on Exo70 structure demonstrate that Exo70 generates negative membrane curvature through an oligomerization-based mechanism. In cells, the membrane-deformation function of Exo70 is required for protrusion formation and directional cell migration. Exo70 thus represents a membrane-bending protein that may couple actin dynamics and plasma membrane remodeling for morphogenesis. PMID:23948253

  18. Developments and trends in three-dimensional mesh generation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, Timothy J.

    1989-01-01

    An intense research effort over the last few years has produced several competing and apparently diverse methods for generating meshes. Recent progress is reviewed and the central themes are emphasized which form a solid foundation for future developments in mesh generation.

  19. INTERFERON REGULATORY FACTOR 4 AND 8 IN B CELL DEVELOPMENT

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Runqing

    2010-01-01

    IRF4 and 8 are members of the interferon regulatory factor family of transcription factors and have been shown to be essential for the development and function of T cells, macrophages and dendritic cells. A series of recent studies have further demonstrated critical functions for IRF4 and 8 at several stages of B cell development including pre-B cell development, receptor editing, germinal center reaction and plasma cell generation. Collectively, these new studies provide molecular insights into the function of IRF4 and 8 and underscore a requirement for IRF4 and 8 throughout B cell development. This review focuses on the recent advances on roles of IRF4 and 8 in B cell development. PMID:18775669

  20. Efficient Generation of Cardiac Purkinje Cells from ESCs by Activating cAMP Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Su-Yi; Maass, Karen; Lu, Jia; Fishman, Glenn I.; Chen, Shuibing; Evans, Todd

    2015-01-01

    Summary Dysfunction of the specialized cardiac conduction system (CCS) is associated with life-threatening arrhythmias. Strategies to derive CCS cells, including rare Purkinje cells (PCs), would facilitate models for mechanistic studies and drug discovery and also provide new cellular materials for regenerative therapies. A high-throughput chemical screen using CCS:lacz and Contactin2:egfp (Cntn2:egfp) reporter embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines was used to discover a small molecule, sodium nitroprusside (SN), that efficiently promotes the generation of cardiac cells that express gene profiles and generate action potentials of PC-like cells. Imaging and mechanistic studies suggest that SN promotes the generation of PCs from cardiac progenitors initially expressing cardiac myosin heavy chain and that it does so by activating cyclic AMP signaling. These findings provide a strategy to derive scalable PCs, along with insight into the ontogeny of CCS development. PMID:26028533

  1. Electrochemical machining development for turbine generator rotor slots. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-03-01

    The Electrochemical Machining Development for Turbine Generator Rotor Slots was initiated to provide a viable alternative to conventional machining of slots in conventional rotor forging materials and in advanced metallurgical alloys. ECM was selected because it is a stress-free machining process and is insensitive to material hardness. ECM concepts were developed and reviewed with ECM consultants prior to development work.

  2. Cell fate control in the developing central nervous system

    SciTech Connect

    Guérout, Nicolas; Li, Xiaofei; Barnabé-Heider, Fanie

    2014-02-01

    The principal neural cell types forming the mature central nervous system (CNS) are now understood to be diverse. This cellular subtype diversity originates to a large extent from the specification of the earlier proliferating progenitor populations during development. Here, we review the processes governing the differentiation of a common neuroepithelial cell progenitor pool into mature neurons, astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells and adult stem cells. We focus on studies performed in mice and involving two distinct CNS structures: the spinal cord and the cerebral cortex. Understanding the origin, specification and developmental regulators of neural cells will ultimately impact comprehension and treatments of neurological disorders and diseases. - Highlights: • Similar mechanisms regulate cell fate in different CNS cell types and structures. • Cell fate regulators operate in a spatial–temporal manner. • Different neural cell types rely on the generation of a diversity of progenitor cells. • Cell fate decision is dictated by the integration of intrinsic and extrinsic signals.

  3. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    SciTech Connect

    Doddapaneni, N.

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  4. Cyclic AMP Signaling through Epac Axis Modulates Human Hemogenic Endothelium and Enhances Hematopoietic Cell Generation.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Shobhit; Rönn, Roger E; Guibentif, Carolina; Moraghebi, Roksana; Woods, Niels-Bjarne

    2016-05-10

    Hematopoietic cells emerge from hemogenic endothelium in the developing embryo. Mechanisms behind human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell development remain unclear. Using a human pluripotent stem cell differentiation model, we report that cyclic AMP (cAMP) induction dramatically increases HSC-like cell frequencies. We show that hematopoietic cell generation requires cAMP signaling through the Exchange proteins activated by cAMP (cAMP-Epac) axis; Epac signaling inhibition decreased both hemogenic and non-hemogenic endothelium, and abrogated hematopoietic cell generation. Furthermore, in hematopoietic progenitor and stem-like cells, cAMP induction mitigated oxidative stress, created a redox-state balance, and enhanced C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) expression, benefiting the maintenance of these primitive cells. Collectively, our study provides insights and mechanistic details on the previously unrecognized role of cAMP signaling in regulating human hematopoietic development. These findings advance the mechanistic understanding of hematopoietic development toward the development of transplantable human hematopoietic cells for therapeutic needs. PMID:27117782

  5. Dynamic ordering of early generated striatal cells destined to form the striosomal compartment of the striatum.

    PubMed

    Newman, Helen; Liu, Fu-Chin; Graybiel, Ann M

    2015-04-15

    The mature striatum is divided into a labyrinthine system of striosomes embedded in a surrounding matrix compartment. We pulse-labeled striosomal cells (S cells) and matrix cells (M cells) in cats with (3) H-thymidine and followed their distributions during fetal and postnatal development. We identified three maturational phases in S-cell distributions. The early phase (sampled at embryonic day [E]27-E35 following E24-E28 (3) H-thymidine) was characterized by a transient medial accumulation of synchronously generated S cells within the caudate nucleus adjoining the ganglionic eminence, potentially a waiting compartment. Band-like arrangements of synchronously generated S cells then formed beyond this medial band. During the second phase (sampled at E38-E45), the loosely banded S-cell distributions were transformed into clustered arrangements typical of developing striosomes. In the third phase (sampled from E52 into the postnatal period), these developed into the typical mature striosomal architecture. At adulthood, gentle mediolateral birthdate-gradients in S cells were still evident, but M cells, produced over mid to late prenatal ages, became broadly distributed, without apparent gradients or banding arrangements. These findings suggest that the maturational histories of the striosomal and matrix neurons are influenced by their generation times and local environments, and that future S cells have transient, nonstriosomal distributions prior to their aggregation into striosomal clusters, including a putative waiting compartment. Further, the eventual patterning of the striosomal compartment reflects outside-in, band-like gradient patterns of settling of synchronously generated S cells, patterns that could be related both to neural processing in the mature striatum and to patterns of vulnerability of striatal neurons. PMID:25521072

  6. Functional development of mechanosensitive hair cells in stem cell-derived organoids parallels native vestibular hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Koehler, Karl R.; Mikosz, Andrew M.; Hashino, Eri; Holt, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear sensory epithelia contain mechanosensitive hair cells that transmit information to the brain through innervation with bipolar neurons. Mammalian hair cells do not regenerate and are limited in number. Here we investigate the potential to generate mechanosensitive hair cells from mouse embryonic stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. The system faithfully recapitulates mouse inner ear induction followed by self-guided development into organoids that morphologically resemble inner ear vestibular organs. We find that organoid hair cells acquire mechanosensitivity equivalent to functionally mature hair cells in postnatal mice. The organoid hair cells also progress through a similar dynamic developmental pattern of ion channel expression, reminiscent of two subtypes of native vestibular hair cells. We conclude that our 3D culture system can generate large numbers of fully functional sensory cells which could be used to investigate mechanisms of inner ear development and disease as well as regenerative mechanisms for inner ear repair. PMID:27215798

  7. Functional development of mechanosensitive hair cells in stem cell-derived organoids parallels native vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiao-Ping; Koehler, Karl R; Mikosz, Andrew M; Hashino, Eri; Holt, Jeffrey R

    2016-01-01

    Inner ear sensory epithelia contain mechanosensitive hair cells that transmit information to the brain through innervation with bipolar neurons. Mammalian hair cells do not regenerate and are limited in number. Here we investigate the potential to generate mechanosensitive hair cells from mouse embryonic stem cells in a three-dimensional (3D) culture system. The system faithfully recapitulates mouse inner ear induction followed by self-guided development into organoids that morphologically resemble inner ear vestibular organs. We find that organoid hair cells acquire mechanosensitivity equivalent to functionally mature hair cells in postnatal mice. The organoid hair cells also progress through a similar dynamic developmental pattern of ion channel expression, reminiscent of two subtypes of native vestibular hair cells. We conclude that our 3D culture system can generate large numbers of fully functional sensory cells which could be used to investigate mechanisms of inner ear development and disease as well as regenerative mechanisms for inner ear repair. PMID:27215798

  8. Generation of BAC reporter cell lines for drug discovery.

    PubMed

    Kao, Betty R; McColl, Bradley; Vadolas, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) reporter cell lines are generated through stable transfection of a BAC reporter construct wherein the gene of interest is tagged with a reporter gene such as eGFP. The large capacity of BACs (up to 350 kb of genomic sequence) enables the inclusion of all regulatory elements that ensure appropriate regulation of the gene of interest. Furthermore, the reporter gene allows the expression of the gene of interest to be readily detected by flow cytometry. Cell lines can also be easily cultured for extended periods with minimal cost. These features of BAC reporter cell lines make them highly amenable for use in high-throughput screening of large drug libraries for compounds that induce the expression of the gene of interest. This chapter describes a method for generation of BAC reporter cell lines that are suitable as cellular assay systems in high-throughput screening. Briefly, this method involves (A) generation of cell clones stably transfected with a BAC reporter construct, (B) selection of "candidate" cell clones based on the responsiveness to known inducers, (C) confirmation of the integrity of the BAC reporter construct integrated within the candidate clones, and (D) assessment of the developmental regulation of the BAC reporter construct. As an example, we describe the generation of a BAC reporter cell line containing the human β-globin locus modified to express γ-globin as eGFP for use as a cellular reporter assay for screening of drugs that can reactivate expression of developmentally silenced γ-globin for the treatment of β-hemoglobin disorders. PMID:25239756

  9. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-03-01

    Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  10. Functional Neurons Generated from T Cell-Derived Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells for Neurological Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Takuya; Fujimori, Koki; Andoh-Noda, Tomoko; Ando, Takayuki; Kuzumaki, Naoko; Toyoshima, Manabu; Tada, Hirobumi; Imaizumi, Kent; Ishikawa, Mitsuru; Yamaguchi, Ryo; Isoda, Miho; Zhou, Zhi; Sato, Shigeto; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ohtaka, Manami; Nishimura, Ken; Kurosawa, Hiroshi; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Takahashi, Takuya; Nakanishi, Mahito; Ohyama, Manabu; Hattori, Nobutaka; Akamatsu, Wado; Okano, Hideyuki

    2016-01-01

    Summary Modeling of neurological diseases using induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) derived from the somatic cells of patients has provided a means of elucidating pathogenic mechanisms and performing drug screening. T cells are an ideal source of patient-specific iPSCs because they can be easily obtained from samples. Recent studies indicated that iPSCs retain an epigenetic memory relating to their cell of origin that restricts their differentiation potential. The classical method of differentiation via embryoid body formation was not suitable for T cell-derived iPSCs (TiPSCs). We developed a neurosphere-based robust differentiation protocol, which enabled TiPSCs to differentiate into functional neurons, despite differences in global gene expression between TiPSCs and adult human dermal fibroblast-derived iPSCs. Furthermore, neurons derived from TiPSCs generated from a juvenile patient with Parkinson's disease exhibited several Parkinson's disease phenotypes. Therefore, we conclude that TiPSCs are a useful tool for modeling neurological diseases. PMID:26905201

  11. Generation of leukotrienes by purified human lung mast cells.

    PubMed Central

    MacGlashan, D W; Schleimer, R P; Peters, S P; Schulman, E S; Adams, G K; Newball, H H; Lichtenstein, L M

    1982-01-01

    Although mediator release from mast cells and basophils plays a central role in the pathogenesis of human allergic disease, biochemical studies have been restricted to rat peritoneal mast cells and basophilic leukemia cells because they could be easily purified. We have used two new techniques of cell separation to purify human lung mast cells to 98% homogeneity. Lung cell suspensions were obtained by dispersion of chopped lung tissue with proteolytic enzymes. Mast cells were then purified from the suspensions by countercurrent centrifugal elutriation and affinity chromatography. The purified mast cells released both histamine and slow-reacting substance of anaphylaxis (SRS-A) (leukotriene C and D) during stimulation with goat anti-human IgE antibody. Moreover, these preparations were able to generate significant quantities of SRS-A (32 +/- 7 x 10(-17) LTD mole-equivalents/mast cell) at all stages of purification, indicating that a secondary cell is not necessary for the antigen-induced release of SRS. Images PMID:7119113

  12. Generation of Mouse Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells by Protein Transduction

    PubMed Central

    Nemes, Csilla; Varga, Eszter; Polgar, Zsuzsanna; Klincumhom, Nuttha; Pirity, Melinda K.

    2014-01-01

    Somatic cell reprogramming has generated enormous interest after the first report by Yamanaka and his coworkers in 2006 on the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from mouse fibroblasts. Here we report the generation of stable iPSCs from mouse fibroblasts by recombinant protein transduction (Klf4, Oct4, Sox2, and c-Myc), a procedure designed to circumvent the risks caused by integration of exogenous sequences in the target cell genome associated with gene delivery systems. The recombinant proteins were fused in the frame to the glutathione-S-transferase tag for affinity purification and to the transactivator transcription-nuclear localization signal polypeptide to facilitate membrane penetration and nuclear localization. We performed the reprogramming procedure on embryonic fibroblasts from inbred (C57BL6) and outbred (ICR) mouse strains. The cells were treated with purified proteins four times, at 48-h intervals, and cultured on mitomycin C treated mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells in complete embryonic stem cell (ESC) medium until colonies formed. The iPSCs generated from the outbred fibroblasts exhibited similar morphology and growth properties to ESCs and were sustained in an undifferentiated state for more than 20 passages. The cells were checked for pluripotency-related markers (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, cMyc, Nanog) by immunocytochemistry and by reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction. The protein iPSCs (piPSCs) formed embryoid bodies and subsequently differentiated towards all three germ layer lineages. Importantly, the piPSCs could incorporate into the blastocyst and led to variable degrees of chimerism in newborn mice. These data show that recombinant purified cell-penetrating proteins are capable of reprogramming MEFs to iPSCs. We also demonstrated that the cells of the generated cell line satisfied all the requirements of bona fide mouse ESCs: form round colonies with defined boundaries; have a tendency to attach together with

  13. Generation of functional hepatocytes from human spermatogonial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-02-23

    To generate functional human hepatocytes from stem cells and/or extra-hepatic tissues could provide an important source of cells for treating liver diseases. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have an unlimited plasticity since they can dedifferentiate and transdifferentiate to other cell lineages. However, generation of mature and functional hepatocytes from human SSCs has not yet been achieved. Here we have for the first time reported direct transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature and functional hepatocytes by three-step induction using the defined condition medium. Human SSCs were first transdifferentiated to hepatic stem cells, as evidenced by their morphology and biopotential nature of co-expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers but not hallmarks for embryonic stem cells. Hepatic stem cells were further induced to differentiate into mature hepatocytes identified by their morphological traits and strong expression of CK8, CK18, ALB, AAT, TF, TAT, and cytochrome enzymes rather than CK7 or CK19. Significantly, mature hepatocytes derived from human SSCs assumed functional attributes of human hepatocytes, because they could produce albumin, remove ammonia, and uptake and release indocyanine green. Moreover, expression of β-CATENIN, HNF4A, FOXA1 and GATA4 was upregulated during the transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature hepatocytes. Collectively, human SSCs could directly transdifferentiate to mature and functional hepatocytes. This study could offer an invaluable source of human hepatocytes for curing liver disorders and drug toxicology screening and provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying human liver regeneration. PMID:26840458

  14. Generation of functional hepatocytes from human spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zheng; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Niu, Minghui; Yao, Chencheng; Hou, Jingmei; Wang, Hong; Wen, Liping; Liu, Yun; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2016-01-01

    To generate functional human hepatocytes from stem cells and/or extra-hepatic tissues could provide an important source of cells for treating liver diseases. Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have an unlimited plasticity since they can dedifferentiate and transdifferentiate to other cell lineages. However, generation of mature and functional hepatocytes from human SSCs has not yet been achieved. Here we have for the first time reported direct transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature and functional hepatocytes by three-step induction using the defined condition medium. Human SSCs were first transdifferentiated to hepatic stem cells, as evidenced by their morphology and biopotential nature of co-expressing hepatocyte and cholangiocyte markers but not hallmarks for embryonic stem cells. Hepatic stem cells were further induced to differentiate into mature hepatocytes identified by their morphological traits and strong expression of CK8, CK18, ALB, AAT, TF, TAT, and cytochrome enzymes rather than CK7 or CK19. Significantly, mature hepatocytes derived from human SSCs assumed functional attributes of human hepatocytes, because they could produce albumin, remove ammonia, and uptake and release indocyanine green. Moreover, expression of β-CATENIN, HNF4A, FOXA1 and GATA4 was upregulated during the transdifferentiation of human SSCs to mature hepatocytes. Collectively, human SSCs could directly transdifferentiate to mature and functional hepatocytes. This study could offer an invaluable source of human hepatocytes for curing liver disorders and drug toxicology screening and provide novel insights into mechanisms underlying human liver regeneration. PMID:26840458

  15. Large-scale generation of cell-derived nanovesicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, W.; Kim, J.; Yoon, J.; Jeong, D.; Cho, S.; Jeong, H.; Yoon, Y. J.; Kim, S. C.; Gho, Y. S.; Park, J.

    2014-09-01

    Exosomes are enclosed compartments that are released from cells and that can transport biological contents for the purpose of intercellular communications. Research into exosomes is hindered by their rarity. In this article, we introduce a device that uses centrifugal force and a filter with micro-sized pores to generate a large quantity of cell-derived nanovesicles. The device has a simple polycarbonate structure to hold the filter, and operates in a common centrifuge. Nanovesicles are similar in size and membrane structure to exosomes. Nanovesicles contain intracellular RNAs ranging from microRNA to mRNA, intracellular proteins, and plasma membrane proteins. The quantity of nanovesicles produced using the device is 250 times the quantity of naturally secreted exosomes. Also, the quantity of intracellular contents in nanovesicles is twice that in exosomes. Nanovesicles generated from murine embryonic stem cells can transfer RNAs to target cells. Therefore, this novel device and the nanovesicles that it generates are expected to be used in exosome-related research, and can be applied in various applications such as drug delivery and cell-based therapy.

  16. Modelling Action Potential Generation and Propagation in Fibroblastic Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, J. J.; Cornelisse, L. N.; Harks, E. G. A.; Theuvenet, A. P. R.; Ypey, D. L.

    2003-04-01

    Using a standard Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) formalism, we present a mathematical model for action potential (AP) generation and intercellular AP propagation in quiescent (serum-deprived) normal rat kidney (NRK) fibroblasts [1], based on the recent experimental identification of the ion channels involved [2]. The principal ion channels described are those of an inwardly rectifying K+ conductance (GKIR), an L-type calcium conductance (GCaL), an intracellular calcium activated Cl- conductance (GCl(Ca)), a residual leak conductance Gleak, and gap junctional channels between the cells (Ggj). The role of each one of these components in the particular shape of the AP wave-form has been analyzed and compared with experimental observations. In addition, we have studied the role of subcellular processes like intracellular calcium dynamics and calcium buffering in AP generation. AP propagation between cells was reconstructed in a hexagonal model of cells coupled by Ggj with physiological conductance values. The model revealed an excitability mechanism of quiescent NRK cells with a particular role of intracellular calcium dynamics. It allows further explorations of the mechanism of signal generation and transmission in NRK cell cultures and its dependence on growth conditions.

  17. Optimized Sleeping Beauty transposons rapidly generate stable transgenic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Kowarz, Eric; Löscher, Denise; Marschalek, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Stable gene expression in mammalian cells is a prerequisite for many in vitro and in vivo experiments. However, either the integration of plasmids into mammalian genomes or the use of retro-/lentiviral systems have intrinsic limitations. The use of transposable elements, e.g. the Sleeping Beauty system (SB), circumvents most of these drawbacks (integration sites, size limitations) and allows the quick generation of stable cell lines. The integration process of SB is catalyzed by a transposase and the handling of this gene transfer system is easy, fast and safe. Here, we report our improvements made to the existing SB vector system and present two new vector types for robust constitutive or inducible expression of any gene of interest. Both types are available in 16 variants with different selection marker (puromycin, hygromycin, blasticidin, neomycin) and fluorescent protein expression (GFP, RFP, BFP) to fit most experimental requirements. With this system it is possible to generate cell lines from stable transfected cells quickly and reliably in a medium-throughput setting (three to five days). Cell lines robustly express any gene-of-interest, either constitutively or tightly regulated by doxycycline. This allows many laboratory experiments to speed up generation of data in a rapid and robust manner. PMID:25650551

  18. Quantum Dot Solar Cells with Multiple Exciton Generation

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M. C.; Beard, M. C.; Johnson, J. C.; Murphy, J.; Ellingson, R. J.; Nozik, A. J.

    2005-11-01

    We have measured the quantum yield of the multiple exciton generation (MEG) process in quantum dots (QDs) of the lead-salt semiconductor family (PbSe, PbTe, and PbS) using fs pump-probe transient absorption measurements. Very high quantum yields (up to 300%) for charge carrier generation from MEG have been measured in all of the Pb-VI QDs. We have calculated the potential maximum performance of various MEG QD solar cells in the detailed balance limit. We examined a two-cell tandem PV device with singlet fission (SF), QD, and normal dye (N) absorbers in the nine possible series-connected combinations to compare the tandem combinations and identify the combinations with the highest theoretical efficiency. We also calculated the maximum efficiency of an idealized single-gap MEG QD solar cell with M multiplications and its performance under solar concentration.

  19. 3D molecular models of whole HIV-1 virions generated with cellPACK

    PubMed Central

    Goodsell, David S.; Autin, Ludovic; Forli, Stefano; Sanner, Michel F.; Olson, Arthur J.

    2014-01-01

    As knowledge of individual biological processes grows, it becomes increasingly useful to frame new findings within their larger biological contexts in order to generate new systems-scale hypotheses. This report highlights two major iterations of a whole virus model of HIV-1, generated with the cellPACK software. cellPACK integrates structural and systems biology data with packing algorithms to assemble comprehensive 3D models of cell-scale structures in molecular detail. This report describes the biological data, modeling parameters and cellPACK methods used to specify and construct editable models for HIV-1. Anticipating that cellPACK interfaces under development will enable researchers from diverse backgrounds to critique and improve the biological models, we discuss how cellPACK can be used as a framework to unify different types of data across all scales of biology. PMID:25253262

  20. Increased generation of Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R; Dustin, Michael L; Lafaille, Juan J

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  1. Increased generation of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells by manipulating antigen presentation in the thymus

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jiqiang; Yang, Lu; Silva, Hernandez Moura; Trzeciak, Alissa; Choi, Yongwon; Schwab, Susan R.; Dustin, Michael L.; Lafaille, Juan J.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cell (Treg) selection in the thymus is essential to prevent autoimmune diseases. Although important rules for Treg selection have been established, there is controversy regarding the degree of self-reactivity displayed by T-cell receptors expressed by Treg cells. In this study we have developed a model of autoimmune skin inflammation, to determine key parameters in the generation of skin-reactive Treg cells in the thymus (tTreg). tTreg development is predominantly AIRE dependent, with an AIRE-independent component. Without the knowledge of antigen recognized by skin-reactive Treg cells, we are able to enhance skin-specific tTreg cell generation using three approaches. First, we increase medullary thymic epithelial cells by using mice lacking osteoprotegerin or by adding TRANCE (RANKL, Tnfsf11). Second, we inject intrathymically peripheral dendritic cells from skin-draining sites. Finally, we inject skin tissue lysates intrathymically. These findings have implications for enhancing the generation of organ-specific Treg cells in autoimmune diseases. PMID:26923114

  2. Generation and characterization of human insulin-releasing cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Labriola, Leticia; Peters, Maria G; Krogh, Karin; Stigliano, Iván; Terra, Letícia F; Buchanan, Cecilia; Machado, Marcel CC; Joffé, Elisa Bal de Kier; Puricelli, Lydia; Sogayar, Mari C

    2009-01-01

    Background The in vitro culture of insulinomas provides an attractive tool to study cell proliferation and insulin synthesis and secretion. However, only a few human beta cell lines have been described, with long-term passage resulting in loss of insulin secretion. Therefore, we set out to establish and characterize human insulin-releasing cell lines. Results We generated ex-vivo primary cultures from two independent human insulinomas and from a human nesidioblastosis, all of which were cultured up to passage number 20. All cell lines secreted human insulin and C-peptide. These cell lines expressed neuroendocrine and islets markers, confirming the expression profile found in the biopsies. Although all beta cell lineages survived an anchorage independent culture, none of them were able to invade an extracellular matrix substrate. Conclusion We have established three human insulin-releasing cell lines which maintain antigenic characteristics and insulin secretion profiles of the original tumors. These cell lines represent valuable tools for the study of molecular events underlying beta cell function and dysfunction. PMID:19545371

  3. Thymus medulla fosters generation of natural Treg cells, invariant γδ T cells, and invariant NKT cells: What we learn from intrathymic migration

    PubMed Central

    Cowan, Jennifer E; Jenkinson, William E; Anderson, Graham

    2015-01-01

    The organization of the thymus into distinct cortical and medullary regions enables it to control the step-wise migration and development of immature T-cell precursors. Such a process provides access to specialized cortical and medullary thymic epithelial cells at defined stages of maturation, ensuring the generation of self-tolerant and MHC-restricted conventional CD4+ and CD8+ αβ T cells. The migratory cues and stromal cell requirements that regulate the development of conventional αβ T cells have been well studied. However, the thymus also fosters the generation of several immunoregulatory T-cell populations that form key components of both innate and adaptive immune responses. These include Foxp3+ natural regulatory T cells, invariant γδ T cells, and CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). While less is known about the intrathymic requirements of these nonconventional T cells, recent studies have highlighted the importance of the thymus medulla in their development. Here, we review recent findings on the mechanisms controlling the intrathymic migration of distinct T-cell subsets, and relate this to knowledge of the microenvironmental requirements of these cells. PMID:25615828

  4. Generation of L-cells in mouse and human small intestine organoids

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Natalia; Reimann, Frank; Bartfeld, Sina; Farin, Henner F.; Ringnalda, Femke C.; Vries, Robert G. J.; van den Brink, Stieneke; Clevers, Hans; Gribble, Fiona M.; de Koning, Eelco J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Upon a nutrient challenge, L-cells produce glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), a powerful stimulant of insulin release. Strategies to augment endogenous GLP-1 production include promoting L-cell differentiation and increasing L-cell number. Here we present a novel in vitro platform to generate functional L-cells from 3D cultures of mouse and human intestinal crypts. We show that short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) selectively increase the number of L-cells resulting in an elevation of GLP-1 release. This is accompanied by up-regulation of transcription factors, associated with the endocrine lineage of intestinal stem cell development. Thus, our platform allows us to study and modulate the development of L-cells in mouse and human crypts as a potential basis for novel therapeutic strategies in type 2 diabetes. PMID:24130334

  5. Human purified CD8+ T cells: Ex vivo expansion model to generate a maximum yield of functional cytotoxic cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Shanti, Nasser; Aldahoudi, Ziyad

    2007-01-01

    CD8+ T cells are a critical component of the cellular immune response. They play an important role in the control of viral infection and eliminating cells with malignant potential. However, attempts to generate and expand human CD8+ T cells in vitro for an adoptive immunotherapy have been conducted with limitation of the very low frequency of CD8+ T cells in blood. Therefore, several expansion protocols have been developed to obtain large and efficient numbers of human CD8+ T cells for use in adoptive immunotherapies. In this study various common culture conditions using different cytokines IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-10, IL-12 and IL-15 and autologous feeders and sera were investigated to expand human purified CD8+ T cells. The importance and the influence of these factors on the growth and phenotype of CD8+ T cell were assessed by serially sampling cultures using flow cytometry. We demonstrated that combination of IL-2 (50 U/ml) and autologous feeders induced maximal CD8+ T cell proliferation (40-50 folds) compared to other cytokines. Immunophenotypic analysis of cultured cells showed that expanded CD8+ T cells were activated and differentiated. Furthermore our expansion model also demonstrated that expanded CD8+ T cells are functionally cytotoxic active by killing Allogeneic LCLs cells. In conclusion, we have developed a reliable, simple method that uses minimal cell numbers to generate a high yield of functional cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, which can be used for the development of cellular immunotherapies. PMID:17190652

  6. A developmentally plastic adult mouse kidney cell line spontaneously generates multiple adult kidney structures

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Carol F.; Wirsig-Wiechmann, Celeste R.; Lakiza, Olga; Obara, Tomoko

    2015-01-01

    Despite exciting new possibilities for regenerative therapy posed by the ability to induce pluripotent stem cells, recapitulation of three-dimensional kidneys for repair or replacement has not been possible. ARID3a-deficient mouse tissues generated multipotent, developmentally plastic cells. Therefore, we assessed the adult mouse ARID3a−/− kidney cell line, KKPS5, which expresses renal progenitor surface markers as an alternative cell source for modeling kidney development. Remarkably, these cells spontaneously developed into multicellular nephron-like structures in vitro, and engrafted into immunocompromised medaka mesonephros, where they formed mouse nephron structures. These data implicate KKPS5 cells as a new model system for studying kidney development. PMID:26111446

  7. Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pellegrino, James W., Ed.; Wilson, Mark R., Ed.; Koenig, Judith A., Ed.; Beatty, Alexandra S., Ed.

    2014-01-01

    Assessments, understood as tools for tracking what and how well students have learned, play a critical role in the classroom. "Developing Assessments for the Next Generation Science Standards" develops an approach to science assessment to meet the vision of science education for the future as it has been elaborated in "A Framework…

  8. Monolithic fuel cell based power source for burst power generation

    SciTech Connect

    Fee, D.C.; Blackburn, P.E.; Busch, D.E.; Dees, D.W.; Dusek, J.; Easler, T.E.; Ellingson, W.A.; Flandermeyer, B.K.; Fousek, R.J.; Heiberger, J.J.; Majumdar, S.; McPheeters, C.C.; Mrazek, F.C.; Picciolo, J.J.; Singh, J.P.; Poeppel, R.B.

    1988-01-01

    A unique fuel cell coupled with a low power nuclear reactor presents an attractive approach for SDI burst power requirements. The requisite high power, long-duration bursts appear achievable with appropriate development of the concept. A monolithic fuel cell/nuclear reactor system clearly possesses several advantages. Fabrication methods, performance advantages, and applications are discussed in this report.

  9. Generating realistic environments for cyber operations development, testing, and training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berk, Vincent H.; Gregorio-de Souza, Ian; Murphy, John P.

    2012-06-01

    Training eective cyber operatives requires realistic network environments that incorporate the structural and social complexities representative of the real world. Network trac generators facilitate repeatable experiments for the development, training and testing of cyber operations. However, current network trac generators, ranging from simple load testers to complex frameworks, fail to capture the realism inherent in actual environments. In order to improve the realism of network trac generated by these systems, it is necessary to quantitatively measure the level of realism in generated trac with respect to the environment being mimicked. We categorize realism measures into statistical, content, and behavioral measurements, and propose various metrics that can be applied at each level to indicate how eectively the generated trac mimics the real world.

  10. The Molecular Control of Blood Cell Development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachs, Leo

    1987-12-01

    The establishment of a cell culture system for the clonal development of blood cells has made it possible to identify the proteins that regulate the growth and differentiation of different blood cell lineages and to discover the molecular basis of normal and abnormal cell development in blood forming tissues. A model system with myeloid blood cells has shown that (i) normal blood cells require different proteins to induce cell multiplication (growth inducers) and cell differentiation (differentiation inducers), (ii) there is a hierarchy of growth inducers as cells become more restricted in their developmental program, and (iii) a cascade of interactions between proteins determines the correct balance between immature and mature cells in normal blood cell development. Gene cloning has shown that there is a family of different genes for these proteins. Normal protein regulators of blood cell development can control the abnormal growth of certain types of leukemic cells and suppress malignancy by incuding differentiation to mature nondividing cells. Chromosome abnormalities that give rise to malignancy in these leukemic cells can be bypassed and their effects nullified by inducing differentiation, which stops cells from multiplying. These blood cell regulatory proteins are active in culture and in the body, and they can be used clinically to correct defects in blood cell development.