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Sample records for cell immunoreactivity treatment

  1. Somatostatin immunoreactive cells in lesional psoriatic human skin during peptide T treatment.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Talme, T; Marcusson, J A; Wetterberg, L

    1994-03-01

    Peptide T has been shown to be an effective treatment in psoriasis. The mechanism through which peptide T works in psoriasis is at present unknown. Furthermore, a clearance of psoriasis has also been registered using the inhibitory peptide somatostatin. These observations all focus on the fact that peptide T, somatostatin, and/or other peptides, might provide a clue to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of psoriasis. Therefore, the effect of peptide T administration on somatostatin containing cutaneous cell populations was investigated. Ten psoriatic patients were treated with peptide T (D-Ala-peptide T amide; 2 mg/day i.v.) for 28 days. Serial biopsies were obtained from the psoriatic lesions before, once weekly during and 4 weeks after discontinuation of the peptide T treatment. An indirect immunofluorescence procedure was performed using a polyclonal antiserum against somatostatin. Clinically, most of the patients responded successfully to the treatment. Immunohistochemical investigations of the serial biopsies revealed the appearance of extensive changes in the number of dermal somatostatin immunoreactive dendritic cells. We believe that peptide T may stimulate the local synthesis and/or release of somatostatin, or proliferation and/or migration of certain dendritic cell populations in psoriatic lesions during healing. Since the benefits of peptide T treatment of psoriatic patients parallel earlier investigations using somatostatin infusions, it is likely that somatostatin given exogenously or synthesized/released endogenously plays a vital role in inducing the healing process.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7911613

  2. Unexpected maspin immunoreactivity in Merkel cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Turdean, Sabin Gligore; Gurzu, Simona; Jung, Ioan; Neagoe, Radu Mircea; Sala, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a rare but aggressive cutaneous neuroendocrine tumor, which multifactorial etiopathogenesis seems to be related to ultraviolet radiation, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), and immunosuppression. In this paper, we present three cases of diagnosed MCC in apparently healthy Caucasians, two of them located in a sun-exposed area. They represented 0.25 % of all cutaneous malignant tumors diagnosed in our department. In the first case, MCC was diagnosed in the frontal region of a 67-year-old male, the second case was located in the right thigh of a 55-year-old female, whereas the third case involved the upper trunk of a 62-year-old female. All of these cases were diagnosed in the pT1 stage, having a diameter smaller than 2 cm, but the invasion depth involved the hypodermis. Microscopically, they consisted of small cells with round-oval nuclei having finely dispersed chromatin and well-defined nucleoli. Immunohistochemically, the tumor cells displayed positivity for keratin 20 and neuroendocrine markers, being negative for keratin 7 and S100 protein. Maspin immunoreactivity was seen in cases 1 and 3. Not one of the cases expressed DOG-1 or even TTF-1. Furthermore, this is the first report in literature about maspin positivity in MCC that might be related to sun exposure. PMID:26607425

  3. Localization of Neuropeptide Y1 Receptor Immunoreactivity in the Rat Retina and the Synaptic Connectivity of Y1 Immunoreactive Cells

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Iona; Oh, Su-Ja; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY), an inhibitory neuropeptide expressed by a moderately dense population of wide-field amacrine cells in the rat retina, acts through multiple (Y1–y6) G-protein–coupled receptors. This study determined the cellular localization of Y1 receptors and the synaptic connectivity of Y1 processes in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) of the rat retina. Specific Y1 immunoreactivity was localized to horizontal cell bodies in the distal inner nuclear layer and their processes in the outer plexiform layer. Immunoreactivity was also prominent in cell processes located in strata 2 and 4, and puncta in strata 4 and 5 of the IPL. Double-label immunohistochemical experiments with calbindin, a horizontal cell marker, confirmed Y1 immunostaining in all horizontal cells. Double-label immunohistochemical experiments, using antibodies to choline acetyltransferase and vesicular acetylcholine transporter to label cholinergic amacrine cell processes, demonstrated that Y1 immunoreactivity in strata 2 and 4 of the IPL was localized to cholinergic amacrine cell processes. Electron microscopic studies of the inner retina showed that Y1-immunostained amacrine cell processes and puncta received synaptic inputs from unlabeled amacrine cell processes (65.2%) and bipolar cell axon terminals (34.8%). Y1-immunoreactive amacrine cell processes most frequently formed synaptic outputs onto unlabeled amacrine cell processes (34.0%) and ganglion cell dendrites (54.1%). NPY immunoreactivity in the rat retina is distributed primarily to strata 1 and 5 of the IPL, and the present findings, thus, suggest that NPY acts in a paracrine manner on Y1 receptors to influence both horizontal and amacrine cells. PMID:12455004

  4. Robust syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity in mammalian horizontal cell processes

    PubMed Central

    HIRANO, ARLENE A.; BRANDSTÄTTER, JOHANN HELMUT; VILA, ALEJANDRO; BRECHA, NICHOLAS C.

    2009-01-01

    Horizontal cells mediate inhibitory feed-forward and feedback communication in the outer retina; however, mechanisms that underlie transmitter release from mammalian horizontal cells are poorly understood. Toward determining whether the molecular machinery for exocytosis is present in horizontal cells, we investigated the localization of syntaxin-4, a SNARE protein involved in targeting vesicles to the plasma membrane, in mouse, rat, and rabbit retinae using immunocytochemistry. We report robust expression of syntaxin-4 in the outer plexiform layer of all three species. Syntaxin-4 occurred in processes and tips of horizontal cells, with regularly spaced, thicker sandwich-like structures along the processes. Double labeling with syntaxin-4 and calbindin antibodies, a horizontal cell marker, demonstrated syntaxin-4 localization to horizontal cell processes; whereas, double labeling with PKC antibodies, a rod bipolar cell (RBC) marker, showed a lack of co-localization, with syntaxin-4 immunolabeling occurring just distal to RBC dendritic tips. Syntaxin-4 immunolabeling occurred within VGLUT-1-immunoreactive photoreceptor terminals and underneath synaptic ribbons, labeled by CtBP2/RIBEYE antibodies, consistent with localization in invaginating horizontal cell tips at photoreceptor triad synapses. Vertical sections of retina immunostained for syntaxin-4 and peanut agglutinin (PNA) established that the prominent patches of syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity were adjacent to the base of cone pedicles. Horizontal sections through the OPL indicate a one-to-one co-localization of syntaxin-4 densities at likely all cone pedicles, with syntaxin-4 immunoreactivity interdigitating with PNA labeling. Pre-embedding immuno-electron microscopy confirmed the subcellular localization of syntaxin-4 labeling to lateral elements at both rod and cone triad synapses. Finally, co-localization with SNAP-25, a possible binding partner of syntaxin-4, indicated co-expression of these SNARE proteins in

  5. Menin immunoreactivity in secretory granules of human pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Debelenko, Larisa V; Agarwal, Sunita; Du, Qiang; Yan, Wusheng; Erickson, Heidi S; Abu-Asab, Mones; Raffeld, Mark A; Libutti, Steven K; Marx, Stephen J; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The protein product of the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1) gene is thought to be involved in predominantly nuclear functions; however, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis data on cellular localization are conflicting. To further investigate menin expression, we analyzed human pancreas (an MEN1 target organ) using IHC analyses and 6 antibodies raised against full-length menin or its peptides. In 10 normal pancreas specimens, 2 independently raised antibodies showed unexpected cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in peripheral cells in each islet examined (over 100 total across all 10 patients). The staining exhibited a distinct punctate pattern and subsequent immunoelectron microscopy indicated the target antigen was in secretory granules. Exocrine pancreas and pancreatic stroma were not immunoreactive. In MEN1 patients, unaffected islets stained similar to those in normal samples but with a more peripheral location of positive cells, whereas hyperplastic islets and tumorlets showed increased and diffuse cytoplasmic staining, respectively. Endocrine tumors from MEN1 patients were negative for menin, consistent with a 2-hit loss of a tumor suppressor gene. Secretory granule localization of menin in a subset of islet cells suggests a function of the protein unique to a target organ of familial endocrine neoplasia, although the IHC data must be interpreted with some caution because of the possibility of antibody cross-reaction. The identity, cellular trafficking, and role of this putative secretory granule-form of menin warrant additional investigation. PMID:25153502

  6. Vasopressin-immunoreactive cell bodies in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis of the rat.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, F; Caffé, R

    1983-01-01

    In the dorsal and ventral portions of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis of the rat numerous cell bodies immunoreactive for vasopressin and neurophysin II were found after colchicin pretreatment. These cells are predominantly multipolar but sometimes also bipolar, and have a width and length of approximately 9 and 16 microns, respectively. In the homozygous Brattleboro rat, which is deficient in vasopressin, no immunoreactive vasopressin was found in these cells. Following incubation with anti-oxytocin and anti-bovine neurophysin I, only magnocellular immunoreactive cell bodies were found in the septal region. The consequences of these results concerning the vasopressin fiber pathways in the brain are discussed. PMID:6339062

  7. Rearrangement of S-100 immunoreactive Langerhans' cells in human psoriatic skin treated with peptide T.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Hilliges, M; Talme, T; Marcusson, J A; Wetterberg, L; Johansson, O

    1995-01-01

    Dendritic cells marked by protein S-100 (S-100) antiserum in the suprabasal layers of the epidermis have previously been identified to be Langerhans' cells. In this study, S-100 immunoreactive cells have been investigated in psoriatic lesioned skin during and after peptide T treatment. Peptide T is an octapeptide with affinity for the CD4 receptor. Nine patients were intravenously infused with peptide T, 2 mg in 500 ml saline per day for 28 days. Sections from involved skin before, every week during, and after the treatment were processed by indirect immunofluorescence using S-100 antiserum. Before the treatment the epidermal Langerhans' cells were numerically decreased or even completely gone in the involved skin of psoriasis as compared to skin from normal healthy controls, while the dermal dendritic cells instead were increased and gathered in cell clusters around vascular structures. Four of the nine patients had histopathological improvements after the peptide T treatment, and, in those cases, the dendritic cells in the dermis were reduced in number, and the Langerhans' cells in the epidermis were numerically increased as well as even reversed to normal position and morphology. These changes in the distribution and density of Langerhans' cells represent their rearrangement during the course of psoriasis and/or the remission after peptide T treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7727353

  8. Effects of heat and high-pressure treatments on the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Jieqiong; Sheng, Wei; Wang, Shuo; Fu, Tong-Jen

    2016-05-15

    The effects of dry and moist heat, autoclave sterilization and high-pressure treatment on the biochemical characteristics and immunological properties of almond proteins were investigated. Changes in the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins extracted from treated almond flour were evaluated using a total protein assay, indirect competitive inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (IC-ELISA), and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). Almond proteins were stable during dry-heat treatment at temperatures below 250°C. Dry heat at 400°C, boiling, autoclave sterilization and high-pressure treatment in the presence of water at ⩾ 500 MPa greatly reduced the solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins. SDS-PAGE revealed that the protein profiles of almond flour samples treated under these conditions also changed significantly. The synergistic effects of heat, pressure and the presence of water contributed to significant changes in solubility and immunoreactivity of almond proteins. PMID:26776044

  9. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M.; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  10. Rett Syndrome Mutant Neural Cells Lacks MeCP2 Immunoreactive Bands.

    PubMed

    Bueno, Carlos; Tabares-Seisdedos, Rafael; Moraleda, Jose M; Martinez, Salvador

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunctions of MeCP2 protein lead to various neurological disorders such as Rett syndrome and Autism. The exact functions of MeCP2 protein is still far from clear. At a molecular level, there exist contradictory data. MeCP2 protein is considered a single immunoreactive band around 75 kDa by western-blot analysis but several reports have revealed the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands above and below the level where MeCP2 is expected. MeCP2 immunoreactive bands have been interpreted in different ways. Some researchers suggest that multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands are unidentified proteins that cross-react with the MeCP2 antibody or degradation product of MeCP2, while others suggest that MeCP2 post-transcriptional processing generates multiple molecular forms linked to cell signaling, but so far they have not been properly analyzed in relation to Rett syndrome experimental models. The purpose of this study is to advance understanding of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control neural cells and p.T158M MeCP2e1 mutant cells. We have generated stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Application of N- and C- terminal MeCP2 antibodies, and also, RFP antibody minimized concerns about nonspecific cross-reactivity, since they react with the same antigen at different epitopes. We report the existence of multiple MeCP2 immunoreactive bands in control cells, stable wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Also, MeCP2 immunoreactive bands differences were found between wild-type and p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. Slower migration phosphorylated band around 70kDa disappeared in p.T158M MeCP2e1-RFP mutant expressing cells. These data suggest that threonine 158 could represent an important phosphorylation site potentially involved in protein function. Our results clearly indicate that MeCP2 antibodies have no cross-reactivity with similar epitopes on others proteins, supporting the idea that MeCP2 may

  11. Gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone-like immunoreactivity in blood cells of human eosinophilic patients.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Virtanen, M; Hilliges, M; Hansson, L O

    1991-01-01

    The immunohistochemical localization of the peptide gamma-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (gamma-MSH) within human polymorphonuclear leucocytes of blood from eosinophilic patients is described. The gamma-MSH immunoreactivity was observed only in neutrophilic granulocytes leaving all other cell types immuno-negative. PMID:1805488

  12. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity is found in dendritic guard cells of human sweat ducts.

    PubMed

    Johansson, O; Hilliges, M; Wang, L

    1993-01-01

    Somatostatin is reported in a new population of human sweat duct cells. The epithelial content of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in normal human skin from various sites of the body was investigated using indirect immunofluorescence. With this methodology we found round-to-oval somatostatin-immunoreactive cells situated outside the lining sweat duct cells at the level of the stratum spinosum. The cells had processes that were clearly directed towards the duct lumen, passing between the lining duct cells. This finding raises new questions and ideas about somatostatin's role in the skin, and could point to a possible involvement of somatostatin in immune defense, sweat secretion modification, antiproliferation, or other actions. PMID:8097870

  13. NUT protein immunoreactivity in ovarian germ cell tumours.

    PubMed

    Iacobelli, J F; Charles, A K; Crook, M; Stewart, C J R

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate NUT (nuclear protein in the testis) expression in ovarian germ cell tumours (GCTs). Immunostaining for NUT protein was performed in 10 mature cystic teratomas and in 49 malignant ovarian GCTs including 15 pure dysgerminomas, six dysgerminomas associated with gonadoblastoma, nine yolk sac tumours, 12 immature teratomas, and seven mixed malignant tumours. Only nuclear staining was considered a positive finding although cytoplasmic staining was noted when present. Thirty-seven (76%) malignant GCTs were NUT positive but staining was usually of weak to moderate intensity and observed in a relatively small proportion of neoplastic cells. Staining in immature teratomas and yolk sac tumours was restricted to foci of hepatoid and intestinal/glandular differentiation, where both nuclear and cytoplasmic reactivity were observed. In dysgerminoma associated with gonadoblastoma only the in situ and invasive germ cell elements were NUT positive. Nuclear staining was not seen in benign teratomas. Most malignant ovarian GCTs express NUT protein, albeit focally, and this should be considered when evaluating immunostaining in the differential diagnosis of poorly differentiated malignancies, particularly NUT midline carcinoma. Since NUT protein appears to play a role in normal germ cell maturation it may influence intestinal or hepatoid differentiation within malignant GCTs. PMID:25551299

  14. Castration reversibly alters levels of cholecystokinin immunoreactivity within cells of three interconnected sexually dimorphic forebrain nuclei in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Simerly, R B; Swanson, L W

    1987-01-01

    Three sexually dimorphic cell groups in the forebrain of the rat--the central part of the medial preoptic nucleus, the encapsulated part of the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and the posterodorsal part of the medial nucleus of the amygdala--are larger in males, contain a high density of gonadal-steroid-concentrating cells, and are thought to play important roles in the control of reproductive behavior and physiology. Since each of these regions contains a large number of cholecystokinin-immunoreactive cells, we used an indirect immunohistochemical method to examine the possibility that levels of this peptide are modulated by circulating gonadal steroids in adult male rats. Rats were castrated at 60 days of age, and one group each was pretreated with colchicine and then killed 3, 7, and 14 days after gonadectomy. Castration clearly decreased CCK immunoreactivity within cells of each region, with the most dramatic effects occurring 7 and 14 days after gonadectomy, and these effects were reversed by treatment with testosterone over a 14-day period. The results suggest that CCK levels within individual cells in each of the interconnected sexually dimorphic nuclei examined here are regulated by circulating gonadal steroids and may be related to the hormonal modulation of reproductive functions thought to be mediated by these cell groups. Images PMID:3550806

  15. Immunohistochemical study on localization of serotonin immunoreactive cells in the gastrointestinal tract of the European catfish (Silurus glanis, L.).

    PubMed

    Köprücü, S; Yaman, M

    2015-02-01

    In this study, it was aimed to identify the distribution of serotonin immunoreactive cells within the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) of European catfish (Silurus glanis). For this purpose, the tissue samples were taken from the stomach (cardia, fundus and pylorus region) and intestine (anterior, middle and posterior region). They were examined by applying the avidin-biotin-immunoperoxidase method. The serotonin containing immunoreactive cells are presented in all regions of the GIT. It was determined to be localized generally in different distribution within the stomachs and intestines of S. glanis. It was found that the most intensive regions of immunoreactive cells were the cardia stomach and posterior of intestine. PMID:25041659

  16. Protein gene product 9.5-immunoreactive nerve fibres and cells in human skin.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Hilliges, M; Jernberg, T; Wiegleb-Edström, D; Johansson, O

    1990-07-01

    Sections of human skin were processed according to the indirect immunofluorescence technique with a rabbit antiserum against human protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5). Immunoreactivity was detected in intraepidermal and dermal nerve fibres and cells. The intraepidermal nerves were varicose or smooth with different diameters, running as single processes or branched, straight or bent, projecting in various directions and terminating in the stratum basale, spinosum or granulosum. The density of the intraepidermal nerves varied between the different skin areas investigated. PGP 9.5-containing axons of the lower dermis were found in large bundles. They separated into smaller axon bundles within the upper dermis, entering this portion of the skin perpendicular to the surface. Then they branched into fibres mainly arranged parallel to the epidermal-dermal junctional zone. However, the fibres en route to the epidermis traversed the upper dermis more or less perpendicularly. Furthermore, immunoreactive dermal nerve fibres were found in the Meissner corpuscles, the arrector pili muscles, hair follicles, around the eccrine and apocrine sweat glands and around certain blood vessels. Such fibres were also observed around most subcutaneous blood vessels, sometimes heavily innervating these structures. Numerous weakly-to-strongly PGP 9.5-immunoreactive cells were found both in the epidermis and in the dermis. PMID:2143435

  17. Localization of neuropeptide-Y immunoreactivity in estradiol-concentrating cells in the hypothalamus

    SciTech Connect

    Sar, M.; Sahu, A.; Crowley, W.R.; Kalra, S.P. )

    1990-12-01

    Considerable evidence shows that gonadal steroids exert a facilitatory influence on levels and release of neuropeptide-Y (NPY) from the hypothalamus. However, it is not known whether gonadal steroids act directly on NPY-producing cells in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) of the hypothalamus to produce these facilitatory effects on NPY or whether they act on other cells that have a modulatory influence via synapses on ARC NPY cells. We applied the combined method of steroid autoradiography and immunocytochemistry to assess the localization of (3H)estradiol in relation to NPY-producing cells in the hypothalamus. Rats (n = 6) were bilaterally ovariectomized and injected intracerebroventricularly with colchicine. Twenty-four hours later each rat received an iv injection of 17 beta-(2,4,6,7,16,17(-3)H)estradiol (SA, 166 Ci/mmol) at a dose of 5.0 micrograms/kg BW. One hour after the injection of (3H)estradiol, the rats were perfused with 4% paraformaldehyde; brains were removed, frozen in isopentane precooled in liquid nitrogen (-190 C), sectioned, and processed for autoradiography. The autoradiograms were then incubated with specific antibodies for NPY immunostaining by the avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. The results revealed NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC, striatum, hippocampus, amygdala, and cerebral cortex and a few cells in the median eminence. NPY-immunoreactive fibers were also detected in the internal layer of the median eminence. The largest number of neurons showing NPY immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm was detected in the ARC, and only in this nucleus did we observed colocalization of (3H)estradiol and NPY immunoreactivity in neurons. A population of NPY-immunopositive cells in the ARC (10-20%) exhibited nuclear (3H)estradiol; the majority of these cells were located in the lateral and ventral portions of the ARC.

  18. Insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor immunoreactive cells are selectively maintained in the paraventricular hypothalamus of calorically restricted mice.

    PubMed

    Saeed, O; Yaghmaie, F; Garan, S A; Gouw, A M; Voelker, M A; Sternberg, H; Timiras, P S

    2007-02-01

    The mammalian lifespan is dramatically extended by both caloric restriction (CR) and insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) suppression. Both interventions involve neuroendocrine alterations directed by the hypothalamus. Yet, it remains unclear whether CR exerts its affects by altering central IGF-1 sensitivity. With this question in mind, we investigated the influence of CR and normal aging on hypothalamic IGF-1 sensitivity, by measuring the changes in IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) populations. Taking IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) immunoreactivity as an index of sensitivity to IGF-1, we counted IGF-1R immunoreactive and non-immunoreactive cells in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of Young-ad libitum fed (Young-Al, 6 weeks old), Old-ad libitum fed (Old-Al, 22 months old), and old calorically restricted (Old-CR, 22 months old) female B6D2F1 mice. An automated imaging microscopy system (AIMS) was used to generate cell counts for each cross-section of PVN hypothalamus. Ad libitum fed mice show a 37% reduction in IGF-1R immunoreactive cells and a 12% reduction in the total cell population of the PVN with aging. In comparison, caloric-restricted mice show a 33% reduction in IGF-1R immunoreactive cells and a notable 24% decrease in the total cell population with aging. This selective maintenance of IGF-1R expressing cells coupled with the simultaneous loss of non-immunoreactive cells, results in a higher percentage of IGF-1R immunoreactive cells in the PVNs of CR mice. Thus, the decline in the percentage of IGF-1 sensitive cells in the PVN with age is attenuated by CR. PMID:17194562

  19. Absent and abundant MET immunoreactivity is associated with poor prognosis of patients with oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    De Herdt, Maria J.; Willems, Stefan M.; van der Steen, Berdine; Noorlag, Rob; Verhoef, Esther I.; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; van Es, Robert J.J.; Koljenović, Senada; de Jong, Robert J. Baatenburg; Looijenga, Leendert H.J.

    2016-01-01

    Although the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) MET is widely expressed in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), its prognostic value remains unclear. This might be due to the use of a variety of antibodies and scoring systems. Here, the reliability of five commercial C-terminal MET antibodies (D1C2, CVD13, SP44, C-12 and C-28) was evaluated before examining the prognostic value of MET immunoreactivity in HNSCC. Using cancer cell lines, it was shown that D1C2 and CVD13 specifically detect MET under reducing, native and formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) conditions. Immunohistochemical staining of routinely FFPE oral SCC with D1C2 and CVD13 demonstrated that D1C2 is most sensitive in the detection of membranous MET. Examination of membranous D1C2 immunoreactivity with 179 FFPE oral and oropharyngeal SCC – represented in a tissue microarray – illustrated that staining is either uniform (negative or positive) across tumors or differs between a tumor's center and periphery. Ultimately, statistical analysis revealed that D1C2 uniform staining is significantly associated with poor 5-year overall and disease free survival of patients lacking vasoinvasive growth (HR = 3.019, p < 0.001; HR = 2.559, p < 0.001). These findings might contribute to reliable stratification of patients eligible for treatment with biologicals directed against MET. PMID:26909606

  20. Reduction of immunoreactivity of bovine beta-lactoglobulin upon combined physical and proteolytic treatment.

    PubMed

    Bonomi, Francesco; Fiocchi, Alessandro; Frøkiaer, Hanne; Gaiaschi, Antonella; Iametti, Stefania; Poiesi, Claudio; Rasmussen, Patrizia; Restani, Patrizia; Rovere, Pierpaolo

    2003-02-01

    Bovine beta-lactoglobulin was hydrolyzed with trypsin or chymotrypsin before, during and after treatment at 600 MPa and pH 6.8 for 10 min at 30, 37 and 44 degrees C. The extent of beta-lactoglobulin hydrolysis under pressure was noticeably higher than at atmospheric pressure, particularly when chymotrypsin was used. Addition of proteases at ambient pressure to previously pressure-treated beta-lactoglobulin gave only a modest increase in proteolysis with respect to the untreated protein. Products of enzyme hydrolysis under pressure were separated by reverse-phase HPLC, and were found to be different from those obtained at atmospheric pressure when chymotrypsin was used. The residual immunochemical reactivity of the products of combined pressure-enzyme treatment was assessed on the unresolved hydrolysates by ELISA tests using polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies, and on individual hydrolytic fractions by Western Blotting using sera of paediatric patients allergic to whey proteins in cow milk. The immunoreactivity of the whole hydrolysates was related to their content of residual intact beta-lactoglobulin, and no immunochemical reactivity was found for all the products of chymotrypsin hydrolysis under pressure. The results indicate that chymotrypsin effectively hydrolysed hydrophobic regions of beta-lactoglobulin that were transiently exposed during the pressure treatments and that were not accessible in the native protein or in the protein that had been previously pressure treated. PMID:12617393

  1. Light microscopic image analysis system to quantify immunoreactive terminal area apposed to nerve cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, L. C.; D'Amelio, F.; Fox, R. A.; Polyakov, I.; Daunton, N. G.

    1997-01-01

    The present report describes a desktop computer-based method for the quantitative assessment of the area occupied by immunoreactive terminals in close apposition to nerve cells in relation to the perimeter of the cell soma. This method is based on Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) routines incorporated in NIH-Image public domain software. Pyramidal cells of layer V of the somatosensory cortex outlined by GABA immunolabeled terminals were chosen for our analysis. A Leitz Diaplan light microscope was employed for the visualization of the sections. A Sierra Scientific Model 4030 CCD camera was used to capture the images into a Macintosh Centris 650 computer. After preprocessing, filtering was performed on the power spectrum in the frequency domain produced by the FFT operation. An inverse FFT with filter procedure was employed to restore the images to the spatial domain. Pasting of the original image to the transformed one using a Boolean logic operation called 'AND'ing produced an image with the terminals enhanced. This procedure allowed the creation of a binary image using a well-defined threshold of 128. Thus, the terminal area appears in black against a white background. This methodology provides an objective means of measurement of area by counting the total number of pixels occupied by immunoreactive terminals in light microscopic sections in which the difficulties of labeling intensity, size, shape and numerical density of terminals are avoided.

  2. Localization of melanopsin-immunoreactive cells in the Mongolian gerbil retina.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Mi-Jin; Jeon, Chang-Jin

    2015-11-01

    Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are involved in circadian rhythm and pupil responses. The purpose of this study was to reveal the organization of melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) neurons in the Mongolian gerbil retina using immunocytochemistry. Melanopsin-IR cells were primarily located in the ganglion cell layer (GCL; M1c; 75.15%). Many melanopsin-IR cells were also observed in the inner nuclear layer (INL; M1d; 22.28%). The M1c and M1d cell types extended their dendritic processes into the OFF sublayer of the inner plexiform layer (IPL). We rarely observed bistratified cells (M3; 2.56%) with dendrites in both the ON and OFF sublayers of the IPL. Surprisingly, we did not observe M2 cells which are well observed in other rodents. Melanopsin-IR cell somas were small to medium in size and had large dendritic fields. They had 2-5 primary dendrites that branched sparingly and had varicosities. Melanopsin-IR cell density was very low: they comprised 0.50% of the total ganglion cell population. Moreover, none of the melanopsin-IR cells expressed calbindin-D28K, calretinin, or parvalbumin. These results suggest that in the Mongolian gerbil, melanopsin-IR cells are expressed in a very small RGC subpopulation, and are independent of calcium-binding proteins-containing RGCs. PMID:26083722

  3. Vasopressin-immunoreactive cells in the dorsomedial hypothalamic region, medial amygdaloid nucleus and locus coeruleus of the rat.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; van Leeuwen, F W

    1983-01-01

    Recently, the existence of a vasopressin-immunoreactive cell group was described in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (van Leeuwen and Caffé 1983). In the present investigation additional nuclei containing vasopressin-immunoreactive cells were found, after colchicine pretreatment, in the dorsomedial hypothalamus, medial amygdaloid nucleus and the locus coeruleus. Vasopressin-immunoreactive cells in the dorsomedial hypothalamus and medial amygdaloid nucleus are small (8--14 micrometers and 10--14 micrometers, respectively), while those in the locus coeruleus are medium-sized (20--25 micrometers). Incubation with anti-bovine neurophysin II and anti-rat neurophysin revealed staining of the same cell group in the above-mentioned areas. None of these cell groups show stained cells after incubation with anti-oxytocin and anti-bovine neurophysin I. When sections of the homozygous Brattleboro rat, which shows a deficiency in vasopressin synthesis, are incubated with anti-vasopressin, anti-bovine neurophysin II, or anti-rat neurophysin, no immunoreactivity can be observed in these brain regions. The above-mentioned cell groups may contribute to the vasopressinergic innervation of brain sites that have been reported to persist after lesioning of the suprachiasmatic, paraventricular and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis. PMID:6616564

  4. Immunoreactivity of glucose transporter 8 is localized in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and in ependymal cells.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Ryuta; Chiba, Yoichi; Tsuboi, Kazuhito; Matsumoto, Koichi; Kawauchi, Machi; Fujihara, Ryuji; Mashima, Masato; Kanenishi, Kenji; Yamamoto, Tetsuji; Ueno, Masaki

    2016-08-01

    High fructose intake is known to be associated with increased plasma triglyceride concentration, impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance, and high blood pressure. In addition, excess fructose intake is also thought to be a risk factor for dementia. Previous immunohistochemical studies have shown the presence of glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5), a major transporter of fructose, in the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and ependymal cells in the brains of humans, rats, and mice, while GLUT2, a minor transporter of fructose, was localized in the ependymal cells of rat brain. In this study, immunoreactivity for the fructose transporter GLUT8 was observed in the cytoplasm of the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus and in the ependymal cells of the brains of humans and mice. These structures were not immunoreactive for GLUT7, GLUT11, and GLUT12. Our findings support the hypothesis of the transport of intravascular fructose through the epithelial cells of the choroid plexus and the ependymal cells. PMID:27160096

  5. Increased density of DISC1-immunoreactive oligodendroglial cells in fronto-parietal white matter of patients with paranoid schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Jauch, Esther; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Mawrin, Christian; Steiner, Johann; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2016-09-01

    Profound white matter abnormalities have repeatedly been described in schizophrenia, which involve the altered expression of numerous oligodendrocyte-associated genes. Transcripts of the disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) gene, a key susceptibility factor in schizophrenia, have recently been shown to be expressed by oligodendroglial cells and to negatively regulate oligodendrocyte differentiation and maturation. To learn more about the putative role(s) of oligodendroglia-associated DISC1 in schizophrenia, we analyzed the density of DISC1-immunoreactive oligodendrocytes in the fronto-parietal white matter in postmortem brains of patients with schizophrenia. Compared with controls (N = 12) and cases with undifferentiated/residual schizophrenia (N = 6), there was a significantly increased density of DISC1-expressing glial cells in paranoid schizophrenia (N = 12), which unlikely resulted from neuroleptic treatment. Pathophysiologically, over-expression of DISC1 protein(s) in white matter oligodendrocytes might add to the reduced levels of two myelin markers, 2',3'-cyclic-nucleotide 3'-phosphodiesterase and myelin basic protein in schizophrenia. Moreover, it might significantly contribute to cell cycle abnormalities as well as to deficits in oligodendroglial cell differentiation and maturation found in schizophrenia. PMID:26315603

  6. Cells showing immunoreactivity for calcitonin or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the central nervous system of some invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Y; Katoh, A; Oguro, C; Kambegawa, A; Yoshizawa, H

    1991-09-01

    In the central nervous system of some species of several invertebrate phyla, including land planarians (Platyhelminthes), ribbon worms (Nemertina), slugs (Mollusca), polychaetes, earthworms and leeches (Annelida), pill bugs (Arthropoda), and beard worms (Pogonophora), salmon calcitonin-immunoreactive cells and rat calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP)-immunoreactive cells were found by immunohistochemistry. These immunoreactive cells were located in the region surrounding the neuropile, although the sizes of the cells varied according to species. Some of them were round or polygonal and regarded as apolar nerve cells because of their lack of cytoplasmic processes, whereas others were spindle-shaped or elongated, being comparable with unipolar nerve cells because of extension of their cytoplasmic processes in the direction of the neuropile. In some cases, it was noted that the cytoplasmic processes had complicated branches or formed loop-like structures at their ends. These observations suggest that a calcitonin-like or CGRP-like substance is extensively present in invertebrates as well as vertebrates. PMID:1936921

  7. Hormonal regulation of delta opioid receptor immunoreactivity in interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Tanya J.; Torres-Reveron, Annelyn; Chapleau, Jeanette D.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical and preclinical studies indicate that women and men differ in relapse vulnerability to drug-seeking behavior during abstinence periods. As relapse is frequently triggered by exposure of the recovered addict to objects previously associated with drug use and the formation of these associations requires memory systems engaged by the hippocampal formation (HF), studies exploring ovarian hormone modulation of hippocampal function are warranted. Previous studies revealed that ovarian steroids alter endogenous opioid peptide levels and trafficking of mu opioid receptors in the HF, suggesting cooperative interaction between opioids and estrogens in modulating hippocampal excitability. However, whether ovarian steroids affect the levels or trafficking of delta opioid receptors (DORs) in the HF is unknown. Here, hippocampal sections of adult male and normal cycling female Sprague-Dawley rats were processed for quantitative immunoperoxidase light microscopy and dual label fluorescence or immunoelectron microscopy using antisera directed against the DOR and neuropeptide Y (NPY). Consistent with previous studies in males, DOR-immunoreactivity (-ir) localized to select interneurons and principal cells in the female HF. In comparison to males, females, regardless of estrous cycle phase, show reduced DOR-ir in the granule cell layer of the dentate gyrus and proestrus (high estrogen) females, in particular, display reduced DOR-ir in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer. Ultrastructural analysis of DOR-labeled profiles in CA1 revealed that while females generally show fewer DORs in the distal apical dendrites of pyramidal cells, proestrus females, in particular, exhibit DOR internalization and trafficking towards the soma. Dual label studies revealed that DORs are found in NPY-labeled interneurons in the hilus, CA3, and CA1. While DOR colocalization frequency in NPY-labeled neuron somata was similar between animals in the hilus, proestrus females had fewer NPY-labeled neurons that

  8. Coexistence of vasopressin, neurophysin and noradrenaline immunoreactivity in medium-sized cells of the locus coeruleus and subcoeruleus in the rat.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; van Leeuwen, F W; Buijs, R M; de Vries, G J; Geffard, M

    1985-07-01

    Vasopressin-and neurophysin-immunoreactive cells have recently been demonstrated in the rat locus coeruleus (A6) and subcoeruleus (A7). Using consecutive 5 microns thick frozen sections, medium-sized cells throughout the locus coeruleus area, but predominantly in the posterior parts of the A6 displayed coexistence for vasopressin and noradrenaline or neurophysin and noradrenaline immunoreactivity. The putative projection areas of putative fibers from vasopressin-containing cells in the locus coeruleus still remain to be elucidated. PMID:3896392

  9. Some enkephalin- or VIP-immunoreactive hippocampal pyramidal cells contain neurofibrillary tangles in the brains of aged humans and persons with Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Kulmala, H K

    1985-01-01

    Neurofibrillary tangles are one of the histopathological neuronal abnormalities present in normal aging and especially in Alzheimer's Disease. We have utilized immunocytochemical staining for neuropeptides followed by Congo red with gallocyanin counterstaining and polarized illumination to determine whether enkephalin (Enk), somatostatin (Som), cholecystokinin (CCK), or vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) are contained in neurons afflicted with such tangles. A few Enk- or VIP-immunoreactive pyramidal cells in field hl and subiculum were found to contain tangles. Many such Enk- or VIP-immunoreactive neurons and cells containing Som- or CCK-like immunoreactivity did not contain such tangles. PMID:2410823

  10. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance.

    PubMed

    Mazzawi, Tarek; El-Salhy, Magdy

    2016-05-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3-9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9 ± 31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9 ± 9.8 and 103.7 ± 16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4 ± 8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4 ± 8.1 and 17.9 ± 4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms. PMID:26987104

  11. Changes in small intestinal chromogranin A-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with irritable bowel syndrome after receiving dietary guidance

    PubMed Central

    MAZZAWI, TAREK; EL-SALHY, MAGDY

    2016-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a common marker for enteroendocrine cells in the gut, and CgA-immunoreactive cell densities are abnormal in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). The majority of patients with IBS report that their symptoms develop after consuming certain foodstuffs. In the present study, we investigated the effects of dietary guidance on the total enteroendocrine cell densities in the small intestine, as detected by CgA. A total of 14 patients with IBS underwent a gastroscopy with duodenal biopsies and 11 of them also underwent a colonoscopy, with biopsy samples obtained from the ileum. Fourteen control subjects were also included. Each patient received 3 sessions of dietary guidance. Gastroscopies and colonoscopies were performed on both the controls and patients with IBS (at baseline and at 3–9 months after receiving guidance). Biopsy samples obtained from the duodenum and ileum were immunostained for CgA using the avidin-biotin complex (ABC) method and were quantified using computerized image analysis. The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the duodenum (mean ± SEM values) in the control subjects was 235.9±31.9 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 36.9±9.8 and 103.7±16.9 cells/mm2 before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.007). The density of CgA-immunoreactive cells in the ileum in the control subjects was 47.4±8.3 cells/mm2; in the patients with IBS, the density was 48.4±8.1 and 17.9±4.4 cells/mm2, before and after they received dietary guidance, respectively (P=0.0006). These data indicate that changes in CgA-immunoreactive cell densities in patients with IBS after receiving dietary guidance may reflect a change in the densities of the small intestinal enteroendocrine cells, which may contribute to an improvement in the IBS symptoms. PMID:26987104

  12. Differential distribution of ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT) immunoreactive cells in the mouse and rat gastric oxyntic mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette; Sachs, George; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.

    2013-01-01

    The enzyme that acylates ghrelin was recently identified in mice as the fourth member of the membrane-bound O-acyltransferases superfamily (MBOAT4) and named ghrelin-O-acyltransferase (GOAT). Only one report showed GOAT mRNA expression in ghrelin-expressing cells of the mouse stomach. We investigated the distribution of GOAT protein in peripheral tissues and co-expression with endocrine markers in the gastric mucosa using a custom-made anti-GOAT antibody. Tissues were collected from male Sprague-Dawley rats and C57BL/6 mice. Western blot revealed two immunoreactive bands in rat and mouse gastric corpus mucosal proteins, a 50 kDa band corresponding to the GOAT protein and a 100 kDa band likely corresponding to a dimer. Western blot also detected GOAT in the plasma and levels were strongly increased after 24-h fasting in mice and slightly in rats. GOAT-immunoreactive cells were located in the gastric corpus mucosa and the anterior pituitary gland, whereas other peripheral tissues of rats and mice examined were negative. In mice, GOAT-immunoreactive cells were mainly distributed throughout the middle portion of the oxyntic glands, whereas in rats they were localized mainly in the lower portion of the glands. Double labeling showed that 95±1% of GOAT-immunoreactive cells in mice co-labeled with ghrelin, whereas in rats only 56±4% of GOAT-positive cells showed co-expression of ghrelin. The remainder of the GOAT-immunopositive cells in rats co-expressed histidine decarboxylase (44±3%). No co-localization was observed with somatostatin in rats or mice. These data suggest species differences between rats and mice in gastric GOAT expression perhaps resulting in a different role of the MBOAT4 enzyme in the rat stomach. Detection of GOAT in the plasma raises the possibility that ghrelin octanoylation may occur in the circulation and the fasting-induced increase in GOAT may contribute to the increase of acylated ghrelin after fasting. PMID:20059966

  13. Neuroanatomy and immunocytochemistry of the median neuroendocrine cells of the subesophageal ganglion of the tobacco hawkmoth, Manduca sexta: immunoreactivities to PBAN and other neuropeptides.

    PubMed

    Davis, N T; Homberg, U; Teal, P E; Altstein, M; Agricola, H J; Hildebrand, J G

    1996-10-15

    The median neuroendocrine cells of the subesophageal ganglion, important components of the neuroendocrine system of the tobacco hawkmoth, Manduca sexta, have not been well investigated. Therefore, we studied the anatomy of these cells by axonal backfills and characterized their peptide immunoreactivities. Both larvae and adults were examined, and developmental changes in these neuroendocrine cells were followed. Processes of the median neuroendocrine cells project to terminations in the corpora cardiaca via the third and the ventral nerves of this neurohemal organ, but the ventral nerve of the corpus cardiacum is the principal neurohemal surface for this system. Cobalt backfills of the third cardiacal nerves revealed lateral cells in the maxillary neuromere and a ventro-median pair in the labial neuromere. Backfills of the ventral cardiacal nerves revealed two ventro-median pairs of cells in the mandibular neuromere and two ventro-median triplets in the maxillary neuromere. The efferent projections of these cells are contralateral. The anatomy of the system is basically the same in larvae and adults. The three sets of median neuroendocrine cells are PBAN- and FMRFamide-immunoreactive, but only the mandibular and maxillary cells are proctolin-immunoreactive. During metamorphosis, the mandibular and maxillary cells also acquire CCK-like immunoreactivity and the labial cells become SCP- and sulfakinin-immunoreactive. Characteristics of FMRFamide-like immunostaining suggest that the median neuroendocrine cells may contain one or more of the FLRFamides that have been identified in M. sexta. The mandibular and maxillary neuroendocrine cells appear to produce the same set of hormones, and a somewhat different set of hormones is produced by the labial neuroendocrine cells. Two pairs of interneurons immunologically related to the neurosecretory cells are associated with the median maxillary neuroendocrine cells. These cells are PBAN-, FMRFamide-, SCP-, and sulfakinin-immunoreactive

  14. Hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity is reduced during induction of pituitary tumors by chronic estrogen treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, D.A.; Borgundvaag, B.; Sturtridge, W.C.; George, S.R.

    1987-11-02

    The role that estrogen plays in the regulation of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) is not known. A radioimmunoassay specific for rat CRF was utilized to measure the CRF-like immunoreactivity (CRF-ir) in the hypothalamus of ovariectomized rats treated with estradiol for periods up to 12 weeks. Compared to ovariectomized controls, estradiol treatment resulted in significantly reduced CRF-ir after 3 and 12 weeks, although no significant change was seen after 8 weeks. Anterior pituitary (AP) weight was greatly increased by estradiol treatment at all time points studied. Bromocriptine treatment for the last 3 weeks of the 12-week period, or removal of estradiol for 3 weeks after 9 weeks of treatment did not reverse the changes in CRF-ir even though significant regressions of tumor size was achieved. There was no correlation between AP weight and CRF-ir in individual animals. These data show that chronic treatment with estrogen reduced hypothalamic CRF-ir content. Neither a direct estrogenic effect or an indirect effect mediated through alterations in the adenohypophysis could be ruled out. 21 references, 3 figures.

  15. Identification and Characterization of Nesfatin-1 Immunoreactivity in Endocrine Cell Types of the Rat Gastric Oxyntic Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Yakubov, Iskandar; Wang, Lixin; Witcher, Derrick; Coskun, Tamer; Taché, Yvette; Sachs, George; Lambrecht, Nils W. G.

    2009-01-01

    Hypothalamic nesfatin-1, derived from the nucleobindin2 (NUCB2) precursor, inhibits nocturnal food intake and body weight gain in rats. Nesfatin-1 is able to cross the blood-brain barrier, suggesting a peripheral source of nesfatin-1. Many centrally acting food intake regulatory neuropeptides are also produced in the periphery, especially in the gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, we investigated the gene expression of NUCB2 and distribution of nesfatin-1-immunoreactive cells in the stomach. Microarray mRNA expression profiles in purified small endocrine cells of the gastric mucosa substantiated by quantitative RT-PCR showed significantly higher NUCB2 mRNA expression compared with brain and heart. Western blot confirmed the expression of NUCB2 protein and its transport into a secretory soluble fraction of gastric mucosal endocrine cell homogenates. Immunohistochemical colabeling for nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, histidine decarboxylase, or somatostatin revealed two subtypes of nesfatin-1-positive endocrine cells. Cells in the midportion of the glands coexpressed nesfatin-1 and ghrelin, whereas few cells in the glandular base coexpressed nesfatin-1 and somatostatin or histidine decarboxylase. High-resolution three-dimensional volume imaging revealed two separate populations of intracytoplasmic vesicles in these cells, one containing nesfatin-1 and the other ghrelin immunoreactivity. Microarray rat genome expression data of NUCB2 in small gastric endocrine cells confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR showed significant down-regulation of NUCB2 after 24 h fasting. In summary, NUCB2 mRNA expression as well as protein content is present in a specific subset of gastric endocrine cells, most of which coexpress ghrelin. NUCB2 gene expression is significantly regulated by nutritional status, suggesting a regulatory role of peripheral nesfatin-1 in energy homeostasis. PMID:18818289

  16. Effects of sex and reproductive experience on the number of orexin A-immunoreactive cells in the prairie vole brain.

    PubMed

    Donlin, Michael; Cavanaugh, Breyanna L; Spagnuolo, Olivia S; Yan, Lily; Lonstein, Joseph S

    2014-07-01

    Large populations of cells synthesizing the neuropeptide orexin (OX) exist in the caudal hypothalamus of all species examined and are implicated in physiological and behavioral processes including arousal, stress, anxiety and depression, reproduction, and goal-directed behaviors. Hypothalamic OX expression is sexually dimorphic in different directions in laboratory rats (F>M) and mice (M>F), suggesting different roles in male and female physiology and behavior that are species-specific. We here examined if the number of hypothalamic cells immunoreactive for orexin A (OXA) differs between male and female prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster), a socially monogamous species that pairbonds after mating and in which both sexes care for offspring, and if reproductive experience influences their number of OXA-immunoreactive (OXA-ir) cells. It was found that the total number of OXA-ir cells did not differ between the sexes, but females had more OXA-ir cells than males in anterior levels of the caudal hypothalamus, while males had more OXA-ir cells posteriorly. Sexually experienced females sacrificed 12 days after the birth of their first litter, or one day after birth of a second litter, had more OXA-ir cells in anterior levels but not posterior levels of the caudal hypothalamus compared to females housed with a brother (incest avoidance prevents sibling mating). Male prairie voles showed no effect of reproductive experience but showed an unexpected effect of cohabitation duration regardless of mating. The sex difference in the distribution of OXA-ir cells, and their increased number in anterior levels of the caudal hypothalamus of reproductively experienced female prairie voles, may reflect a sex-specific mechanism involved in pairbonding, parenting, or lactation in this species. PMID:24874707

  17. Retinal ganglion cell projections to the hamster suprachiasmatic nucleus, intergeniculate leaflet, and visual midbrain: bifurcation and melanopsin immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morin, Lawrence P.; Blanchard, Jane H.; Provencio, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    The circadian clock in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) receives direct retinal input via the retinohypothalamic tract (RHT), and the retinal ganglion cells contributing to this projection may be specialized with respect to direct regulation of the circadian clock. However, some ganglion cells forming the RHT bifurcate, sending axon collaterals to the intergeniculate leaflet (IGL) through which light has secondary access to the circadian clock. The present studies provide a more extensive examination of ganglion cell bifurcation and evaluate whether ganglion cells projecting to several subcortical visual nuclei contain melanopsin, a putative ganglion cell photopigment. The results showed that retinal ganglion cells projecting to the SCN send collaterals to the IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, and superior colliculus, among other places. Melanopsin-immunoreactive (IR) ganglion cells are present in the hamster retina, and some of these cells project to the SCN, IGL, olivary pretectal nucleus, or superior colliculus. Triple-label analysis showed that melanopsin-IR cells bifurcate and project bilaterally to each SCN, but not to the other visual nuclei evaluated. The melanopsin-IR cells have photoreceptive characteristics optimal for circadian rhythm regulation. However, the presence of moderately widespread bifurcation among ganglion cells projecting to the SCN, and projection by melanopsin-IR cells to locations distinct from the SCN and without known rhythm function, suggest that this ganglion cell type is generalized, rather than specialized, with respect to the conveyance of photic information to the brain. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Protein S100 immunoreactivity in glial cells and neurons of the Japanese quail brain.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Claudia; Viglietti-Panzica, Carla; Carlo Panzica, Gian

    2003-03-01

    In mammals, sparse data illustrated the neuronal expression of S100 protein in central and peripheral nervous system. Similar studies have not been performed in other vertebrate species, in particular in birds. We provide here a detailed description of the distribution of the calcium-binding protein S100 in neuronal and glial elements in the central nervous system of an avian species, the Japanese quail (Coturnix japonica) largely used for neuroanatomical and functional studies. The distribution of S100-like immunoreactivity was analyzed by three different antisera: a polyclonal, against S100 protein, and two monoclonals, against the beta-subunit (S100beta) and the alpha-subunit (S100alpha) of this protein. All sera showed glial positive elements, which were more abundant in the brainstem than in the prosencephalon. Moreover, the polyclonal and the monoclonal antibodies against the beta-subunit evidenced a neuronal population with a wide distribution, variable morphology and staining intensity. In the telencephalon and diencephalon a few S100-positive neurons were observed in basal ganglia, nucleus paraventricularis hypothalami, nucleus rotundus and nucleus geniculatus lateralis, pars ventralis. In the mesencephalon and pons a wide S100-immunoreactive neuronal population was detected in several regions, including motor and sensory nuclei of most cranial nerves (i.e. oculomotoris, abducens, trigeminus, cochlearis, trochlearis and vestibularis nuclei). This distribution appears very similar to that previously described in the rat hindbrain by both immunocytochemistry and in situ hybridization, as well as to sparse observations on different vertebrates. Therefore, our results suggest that the distribution pattern of this protein (both in glial and in neuronal elements) is highly conserved throughout the phylogeny. PMID:12706207

  19. Chronic desipramine treatment alters tyrosine hydroxylase but not norepinephrine transporter immunoreactivity in norepinephrine axons in the rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Susan L.; Gandhi, Anjalika R.; Asafu-Adjei, Josephine K.; Sampson, Allan R.; Miner, LeeAnn; Blakely, Randy D.; Sesack, Susan R.

    2011-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade of norepinephrine (NE) reuptake is clinically effective in treating several mental disorders. Drugs that bind to the NE transporter (NET) alter both protein levels and activity of NET and also the catecholamine synthetic enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). We examined the rat prefrontal cortex (PFC) by electron microscopy to determine whether the density and subcellular distribution of immunolabeling for NET and colocalization of NET with TH within individual NE axons were altered by chronic treatment with the selective NE uptake inhibitor desipramine (DMI). Following DMI treatment (21 days, 15 mg/kg/day), NET-immunoreactive (-ir) axons were significantly less likely to colocalize TH. This finding is consistent with reports of reduced TH levels and activity in the locus coeruleus after chronic DMI and indicates a reduction of NE synthetic capacity in the PFC. Measures of NET expression and membrane localization, including the number of NET-ir profiles per tissue area sampled, the number of gold particles per NET-ir profile area, and the proportion of gold particles associated with the plasma membrane, were similar in DMI and vehicle treated rats. These findings were verified using two different antibodies directed against distinct epitopes of the NET protein. The results suggest that chronic DMI treatment does not reduce NET expression within individual NE axons in vivo or induce an overall translocation of NET protein away from the plasma membrane in the PFC as measured by ultrastructural immunogold labeling. Our findings encourage consideration of possible postranslational mechanisms for regulating NET activity in antidepressant-induced modulation of NE clearance. PMID:21208501

  20. Increased number of TH-immunoreactive cells in the ventral tegmental area after deep brain stimulation of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus.

    PubMed

    Dela Cruz, J A D; Hescham, S; Adriaanse, B; Campos, F L; Steinbusch, H W M; Rutten, B P F; Temel, Y; Jahanshahi, A

    2015-09-01

    Dopamine (DA) has been long implicated with the processes of memory. In long-term memory, the hippocampus and ventral tegmental area (VTA) use DA to enhance long-term potentiation, while prefrontal DA D1 receptors are involved in working memory. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of specific brain areas have been shown to affect memory impairments in animal models. Here, we tested the hypothesis that DBS could reverse memory impairments by increasing the number of dopaminergic cells in the VTA. Rats received DBS at the level of the mammillothalamic tract, the anterior nucleus of the thalamus, and entorhinal cortex before euthanasia. These regions are part of the so-called memory circuit. Brain sections were processed for c-Fos and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunocytochemistry in the VTA and the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc). c-Fos, TH and c-Fos/TH immunoreactive cells were analyzed by means of stereology and confocal microscopy. Our results showed that DBS of the anterior nucleus of the thalamus induced substantial higher numbers of TH-immunoreactive cells in the VTA, while there were no significant differences between the experimental groups in the number of TH immunoreactive cells in the SNc, c-Fos immunoreactive cells and c-Fos/TH double-labeled cells in both the SNc and VTA. Our findings suggest a phenotypic switch, or neurotransmitter respecification, of DAergic cells specifically in the VTA which may be induced by DBS in the anterior nucleus of the thalamus. PMID:25074751

  1. Distribution of α-transducin and α-gustducin immunoreactive cells in the chicken (Gallus domesticus) gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Mazzoni, M; Bombardi, C; Vallorani, C; Sirri, F; De Giorgio, R; Caio, G; Grandis, A; Sternini, C; Clavenzani, P

    2016-07-01

    The expression and distribution patterns of the taste signaling molecules, α-gustducin (Gαgust) and α-transducin (Gαtran) G-protein subunits, were studied in the gastrointestinal tract of the chicken (Gallus domesticus) using the immunohistochemical method. Gαgust and Gαtran immunoreactive (-IR) cells were observed in the mucosal layer of all examined segments, except the esophagus, crop, and the saccus cranialis of the gizzard. The highest numbers of Gαgust and Gαtran-IR cells were found in the proventriculus glands and along the villi of the pyloric, duodenum, and rectal mucosa. Gαgust and Gαtran-IR cells located in the villi of the jejunum, ileum, and cloaca were much less numerous, while only a few Gαgust and Gαtran-IR cells were detected in the mucosa of the proventriculus and cecum. In the crypts, IR cells were observed in the small and large intestine as well as in the cloaca. Gαgust and Gαtran-IR cells displayed elongated ("bottle-" or "pear-like") or rounded shape. The demonstration of Gαgust and Gαtran expression provides evidence for taste receptor mediated mucosal chemosensitivity in the chicken gastrointestinal tract. PMID:26957624

  2. Effect of tunicamycin on the activity and immunoreactivity of ascorbate oxidase (Cucurbita pepo medullosa) expressed in cultured green zucchini cells.

    PubMed

    Pitari, G; D'Andrea, G; Salucci, M L; Rossi, A; Avigliano, L

    1998-08-01

    Ascorbate oxidase activity and immunoreactivity were evaluated in crude tissue extracts obtained from callus cell cultures induced by green zucchini sarcocarp and grown in the presence of tunicamycin, a powerful N-glycosylation inhibitor. Tunicamycin at 2 or 4 microg ml(-1) blocked cell growth within a couple of weeks, although a sustained cell viability was observed in the same period. A significant inhibition of total protein synthesis was observed at 10 and 15 days of culture time, with a decrease of 30% and 43% respectively when cells were grown in the presence of 2 microg ml(-1) tunicamycin, and of 48% and 57% respectively when the tunicamycin concentration was 4 microg ml(-1). After the same culture times ascorbate oxidase specific activity assayed in crude tissue extracts showed increases of about 1.9-fold and 3.5-fold (10 days) and 1.7-fold and 3.1-fold (15 days) at 2 and 4 microg ml(-1) tunicamycin, respectively. Ascorbate oxidase mRNA levels, however, did not appreciably differ between control and treated samples, measured at the same growing times. Lectin-blot, based on the use of concanavalin A, indicated a marked decrease of glycosylated proteins in tunicamycin-treated cultures. As judged by immunoblot, anti-native ascorbate oxidase antibodies scarcely recognized the enzyme expressed in tunicamycin-treated cells; on the contrary, anti-deglycosylated ascorbate oxidase antibodies were more reactive to the enzyme expressed in tunicamycin-treated cultures. PMID:9870353

  3. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in myocytes and chromaffin cells of the heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T H; Helle, K B; Saetersdal, T

    1994-07-01

    The heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus, was examined for immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) as markers for hormone secreting myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively. Specific antibodies raised against rat alpha-ANP and rat D beta H were used for immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. D beta H-immunoreactive cells were restricted to subendocardial areas of the atrium whereas ANP immunoreactivity occurred throughout both the atrial and the ventricular myocardium, showing particularly strong staining intensity in the atrial myocytes. The granular ANP immunostaining in the atrial myocytes was frequently accumulated in the sarcoplasm. In the ventricular myocytes ANP immunoreactivity occurred as scattered granular staining throughout the sarcoplasm. ANP and D beta H immunofluorescence staining coincided with the presence of immunoreactive specific granules and secretory vesicles in the cardiac myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively, as revealed by electron microscopy. The number of ANP-containing specific granules was generally high in the atrial myocytes, and they were frequently observed in clusters in subsarcolemmal areas. Granular frequency was considerably lower and the mean granular diameter was smaller (0.142 +/- 0.045 micron versus 0.213 +/- 0.049 micron) in the ventricular than in the atrial myocytes. The present results indicate that ANP and D beta H are phylogenetically highly conserved proteins from the dipnoi to the rat. The large amounts of ANP and of specific granules are consistent with an endocrine myocardium in the Protopterus heart. The presence of D beta H and secretory vesicles in the subendocardial chromaffin cells of the atrium suggests a local production of catecholamines from dopamine in the heart of this dipnoan. PMID:7926645

  4. Distribution of Purkinje cell-specific Zebrin-II/aldolase C immunoreactivity in the mouse, rat, rabbit, and human retina.

    PubMed

    Caffé, A R; Von Schantz, M; Szél, A; Voogd, J; Van Veen, T

    1994-10-01

    The developmental, genetic, and biochemical similarities that have been observed between the cerebellum and retina form the basis for ongoing investigations into retinal expression of cerebellar-specific proteins. We have examined the mouse, rat, rabbit, and human retina for expression of a protein that is present in parasagittal Purkinje cell strips and that is recognized by the antibody Zebrin-II. This protein has recently been identified as a member of the aldolase C isoenzymes. Western blotting and immunocytochemistry have been used. The monoclonal antibody Zebrin-II recognized a prominent 36 kDa protein band on immunoblots of both the cerebellum and the retina of the examined species. Immunocytochemistry showed that, in the three nonhuman species, cells were stained in the ganglion cell layer (GCL). In addition, in the mouse and rabbit, cells in the inner nuclear layer (INL) were also labeled. Except for the visual streak, there were more immunopositive cells in the rabbit GCL and INL than in corresponding areas of the mouse retina. In the human, in contrast to the other species, the photoreceptor cell layer was strongly aldolase C immunoreactive. In all species except for the rat, the photoreceptor inner segments also displayed a weak labeling. The results show that this aldolase C isoenzyme is another protein that is selectively expressed by the cerebellum and retina. Furthermore, the retinal expression is species specific, and this pattern seems to show a good correlation with the oxygenation level of the individual compartments. The indication that this aldolase C isoenzyme has specific developmental functions in the retina provides additional clues for our understanding of cerebellar organization. PMID:7814693

  5. A case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma associated with long-term dialysis showing false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 as Xp11 translocation renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kurisaki-Arakawa, Aiko; Saito, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Michiko; Mitani, Keiko; Fukumura, Yuki; Nagashima, Yoji; Argani, Pedrum; Yao, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    Renal carcinomas associated with Xp11.2 translocations/transcription factor 3 (TFE3) gene fusion (Xp11 translocation RCC) are a rare subtype of renal cell carcinoma. A middle-aged Japanese man, who had a medical history of dialysis for more than 12 years, had bilateral renal cancers with a background of acquired cystic disease of the kidney and remarkable deposition of calcium oxalate in the tumorous area. The right renal tumor showed papillary architecture of clear cells with diffuse and strong immunoreactivity for TFE3 and focal and weak positivity for cathepsin K, suggesting a possibility of Xp11 translocation RCC. However, RT-PCR failed to detect any type of the reported fusion genes involving TFE3. Thus, the sample was sent for a TFE3 break-apart FISH assay in a renal tumor consultation service, which reported no evidence of TFE3 gene rearrangement. The right renal tumor was finally diagnosed as papillary renal cell carcinoma with cystic change. We report here a case of bilateral renal cell carcinoma in a patient undergoing long-term dialysis, which showed false-positive immunoreactivity for TFE3 immunostaining. Titration of TFE3 immunohistochemical staining (IHC) should be performed and cross-referenced with the FISH or RT-PCR results to avoid the misinterpretation of TFE3 IHC results. PMID:24228124

  6. Neurochemical Phenotype of Reelin Immunoreactive Cells in the Piriform Cortex Layer II

    PubMed Central

    Carceller, Hector; Rovira-Esteban, Laura; Nacher, Juan; Castrén, Eero; Guirado, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Reelin, a glycoprotein expressed by Cajal-Retzius neurons throughout the marginal layer of developing neocortex, has been extensively shown to play an important role during brain development, guiding neuronal migration and detachment from radial glia. During the adult life, however, many studies have associated Reelin expression to enhanced neuronal plasticity. Although its mechanism of action in the adult brain remains mostly unknown, Reelin is expressed mainly by a subset of mature interneurons. Here, we confirm the described phenotype of this subpopulation in the adult neocortex. We show that these mature interneurons, although being in close proximity, lack polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) expression, a molecule expressed by a subpopulation of mature interneurons, related to brain development and involved in neuronal plasticity of the adult brain as well. However, in the layer II of Piriform cortex there is a high density of cells expressing Reelin whose neurochemical phenotype and connectivity has not been described before. Interestingly, in close proximity to these Reelin expressing cells there is a numerous subpopulation of immature neurons expressing PSA-NCAM and doublecortin (DCX) in this layer of the Piriform cortex. Here, we show that Reelin cells express the neuronal marker Neuronal Nuclei (NeuN), but however the majority of neurons lack markers of mature excitatory or inhibitory neurons. A detail analysis of its morphology indicates these that some of these cells might correspond to semilunar neurons. Interestingly, we found that the majority of these cells express T-box brain 1 (TBR-1) a transcription factor found not only in post-mitotic neurons that differentiate to glutamatergic excitatory neurons but also in Cajal-Retzius cells. We suggest that the function of these Reelin expressing cells might be similar to that of the Cajal-Retzius cells during development, having a role in the maintenance of the immature phenotype of the

  7. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade

    PubMed Central

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J. S.; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A.; Birkbak, Nicolai J.; Hiley, Crispin T.; Watkins, Thomas B. K.; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U.; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y.; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A.; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A.; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D.; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D.; Shukla, Sachet A.; Wu, Catherine J.; Peggs, Karl S.; Chan, Timothy A.; Hadrup, Sine R.; Quezada, Sergio A.; Swanton, Charles

    2016-01-01

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non–small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy–induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  8. Clonal neoantigens elicit T cell immunoreactivity and sensitivity to immune checkpoint blockade.

    PubMed

    McGranahan, Nicholas; Furness, Andrew J S; Rosenthal, Rachel; Ramskov, Sofie; Lyngaa, Rikke; Saini, Sunil Kumar; Jamal-Hanjani, Mariam; Wilson, Gareth A; Birkbak, Nicolai J; Hiley, Crispin T; Watkins, Thomas B K; Shafi, Seema; Murugaesu, Nirupa; Mitter, Richard; Akarca, Ayse U; Linares, Joseph; Marafioti, Teresa; Henry, Jake Y; Van Allen, Eliezer M; Miao, Diana; Schilling, Bastian; Schadendorf, Dirk; Garraway, Levi A; Makarov, Vladimir; Rizvi, Naiyer A; Snyder, Alexandra; Hellmann, Matthew D; Merghoub, Taha; Wolchok, Jedd D; Shukla, Sachet A; Wu, Catherine J; Peggs, Karl S; Chan, Timothy A; Hadrup, Sine R; Quezada, Sergio A; Swanton, Charles

    2016-03-25

    As tumors grow, they acquire mutations, some of which create neoantigens that influence the response of patients to immune checkpoint inhibitors. We explored the impact of neoantigen intratumor heterogeneity (ITH) on antitumor immunity. Through integrated analysis of ITH and neoantigen burden, we demonstrate a relationship between clonal neoantigen burden and overall survival in primary lung adenocarcinomas. CD8(+)tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes reactive to clonal neoantigens were identified in early-stage non-small cell lung cancer and expressed high levels of PD-1. Sensitivity to PD-1 and CTLA-4 blockade in patients with advanced NSCLC and melanoma was enhanced in tumors enriched for clonal neoantigens. T cells recognizing clonal neoantigens were detectable in patients with durable clinical benefit. Cytotoxic chemotherapy-induced subclonal neoantigens, contributing to an increased mutational load, were enriched in certain poor responders. These data suggest that neoantigen heterogeneity may influence immune surveillance and support therapeutic developments targeting clonal neoantigens. PMID:26940869

  9. Composition and immunoreactivity of the A60 complex and other cell fractions from Mycobacterium bovis BCG.

    PubMed

    Cocito, C; Vanlinden, F

    1995-02-01

    Surface static cultures of Mycobacterium bovis BCG contained cells embedded in an extracellular matrix, whose mechanical removal yielded free cells that were pressure disrupted and fractionated into cytoplasm and walls. Cell envelopes were either mechanically disrupted or extracted with detergents. Intracellular and extracellular fractions were analysed for proteins, polysaccharides, and antigen 6O (A60), a major complex immunodominant in tuberculosis. A60 was present in extracellular matrix, cytoplasm and walls: it represented a substantial portion of the proteins and polysaccharides of these fractions. While the protein/polysaccharide ratio varied according to the origin of A60 preparations, the electrophoretic patterns of A60 proteins (which accounted for the immunogenicity of the complex) remained unchanged. Western blots pointed to the proteins present within the 29-45 kDa range as the A60 components endowed with the highest immunogenicity level. Since the most heavily stained protein bands in SDS-PAGE patterns were located outside the region best recognized by antisera, a striking discordance was found between concentration and immunogenicity patterns of A60 proteins. The electrophoretic patterns of A60- and non-A60-proteins from cytoplasm were also different. A60 complexes in dot blots and some electrophoresed A60 proteins reacted with monoclonal antibodies directed against lipoarabinomannan (LAM), a highly immunogenic polymer of cell envelope. This contaminating compound was removed from A60 with organic solvents and detergents. SDS-PAGE and Western blot patterns of proteins from delipidated A60 were similar to those of native A60 proteins. PMID:7863264

  10. Localization of amylin-like immunoreactivity in melanocyte-stimulating hormone-containing cells of the pars intermedia but not those of the pars distalis in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Hirohumi; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-04-01

    Immunohistochemical techniques were employed to investigate the distribution of amylin-like immunoreactivity in the axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) pituitary. Amylin-immunoreactive cells were observed in the pars intermedia, and these cells were found to be immunoreactive for α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (αMSH) as well. In contrast, αMSH-immunoreactive cells in the pars distalis were immuno-negaitive for amylin. These light microscopic findings were confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy. Amylin-immunoreactive signals were located on the haloes of presumable secretory granules in association with αMSH-immunoreactive signals in the amylin-positive cells. However, in the pars distalis, the αMSH-positive cells did not contain amylin-immunoreactive secretory granules. Western blot analysis of axolotl pituitary extracts revealed the labeling of a protein band at approximately 10.5-kDa by the anti-rat amylin serum, which was not labeled by the anti-αMSH antibody. These findings indicate that amylin secreted from MSH-producing cells in the pars intermedia may modulate MSH secretion in an autocrine fashion and may participate in MSH functions such as fatty homeostasis together with MSH. PMID:26797189

  11. Quantitative changes of GABA-immunoreactive cells in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14-day hindlimb unloading by tail suspension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Fox, R. A.; Wu, L. C.; Daunton, N. G.

    1996-01-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating quantitatively gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) immunoreactivity in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14 days of hindlimb unloading by tail suspension. A reduction in the number of GABA-immunoreactive cells with respect to the control animals was observed in layer Va and Vb. GABA-containing terminals were also reduced in the same layers, particularly those terminals surrounding the soma and apical dendrites of pyramidal cells in layer Vb. On the basis of previous morphological and behavioral studies of the neuromuscular system of hindlimb-suspended animals, it is suggested that the unloading due to hindlimb suspension alters afferent signaling and feedback information from intramuscular receptors to the cerebral cortex due to modifications in the reflex organization of hindlimb muscle groups. We propose that the reduction in immunoreactivity of local circuit GABAergic neurons and terminals is an expression of changes in their modulatory activity to compensate for the alterations in the afferent information.

  12. Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Duodenum of Individuals Diagnosed with Myalgic Encephalomyelitis Are Uniquely Immunoreactive to Antibodies to Human Endogenous Retroviral Proteins

    PubMed Central

    De Meirleir, Kenny L.; Khaiboullina, Svetlana F.; Frémont, Marc; Hulstaert, Jan; Rizvanov, Albert A.; Palotás, András; Lombardi, Vincent C.

    2013-01-01

    Myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME) is a debilitating illness of unknown etiology characterized by neurocognitive dysfunction, inflammation, immune abnormalities and gastrointestinal distress. An increasing body of evidence suggests that disruptions in the gut may contribute to the induction of neuroinflammation. Therefore, reports of human endogenous retroviral (HERV) expression in association with neuroinflammatory diseases prompted us to investigate the gut of individuals with ME for the presence of HERV proteins. In eight out of 12 individuals with ME, immunoreactivity to HERV proteins was observed in duodenal biopsies. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was detected in any of the eight controls. Immunoreactivity to HERV Gag and Env proteins was uniquely co-localized in hematopoietic cells expressing the C-type lectin receptor CLEC4C (CD303/BDCA2), the co-stimulatory marker CD86 and the class II major histocompatibility complex HLA-DR, consistent with plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs). Although the significance of HERVs present in the pDCs of individuals with ME has yet to be determined, these data raise the possibility of an involvment of pDCs and HERVs in ME pathology. To our knowledge, this report describes the first direct association between pDCs and HERVs in human disease. PMID:23422476

  13. Melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) immunoreactivity in non-neuronal cells within the raphe nuclei and subventricular region of the brainstem of the cat.

    PubMed

    Torterolo, Pablo; Lagos, Patricia; Sampogna, Sharon; Chase, Michael H

    2008-05-19

    Neurons that utilize melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) as a neuromodulator are localized within the postero-lateral hypothalamus and zona incerta. These neurons project diffusely throughout the central nervous system and have been implicated in critical physiological processes such as energy homeostasis and sleep. In the present report, we examined the distribution of MCH immunoreactivity in the brainstem of the cat. In addition to MCH+ axons, we found MCH-immunoreactive cells that have not been previously described either in the midbrain raphe nuclei or in the periaqueductal and periventricular areas. These MCH+ cells constituted: 1. ependymal cells that lined the fourth ventricle and aqueduct, 2. ependymal cells with long basal processes that projected deeply into the subventricular (subaqueductal) parenchyma, and, 3. cells in subventricular regions and the midbrain raphe nuclei. The MCH+ cells in the midbrain raphe nuclei were closely related to neuronal processes of serotonergic neurons. Utilizing Neu-N and GFAP immunohistochemistry we determined that the preceding MCH+ cells were neither neurons nor astrocytes. However, we found that vimentin, an intermediate-filament protein that is used as a marker for tanycytes, was specifically co-localized with MCH in these cells. We conclude that MCH is present in tanycytes whose processes innervate the midbrain raphe nuclei and adjacent subependymal regions. Because tanycytes are specialized cells that transport substances from the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) to neural parenchyma, we suggest that MCH is absorbed from the CSF by tanycytes and subsequently liberate to act upon neurons of brainstem nuclei. PMID:18410908

  14. Presence of calcitonin-like immunoreactivity (iCT) in human prostate gland: evidence for iCT secretion by cultured prostate cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, G V; Noble, M J; Austenfeld, M; Weigel, J; Deftos, L J; Mebust, W K

    1992-01-01

    Immunoreactive calcitonin (iCT) has been detected in human prostate tissue extracts as well as seminal plasma. The present studies were undertaken to examine whether iSCT (immunoreactive salmon CT-like human peptide) co-exists with iHCT (thyroid CT-like substance) in human prostate tissue extracts, and whether these substances are secreted by primary prostate cells in culture. Since the local secretion of these substances seems to increase in some neoplasms, a second objective of the study was to examine whether basal secretion of iCTs from primary prostate cells is increased in carcinoma. The present results have shown that both iHCT and iSCT were present in prostate tissue extracts. The mean iHCT levels in extracts of benign hyperplastic prostates (BPH) were 0.59 ng/g prostate, and these were significantly lower than iHCT concentrations in prostatic carcinoma (PC) (2.53 ng/g). No significant differences in their iSCT contents were observed. However, the results from culture of over 90 individual prostate tissue specimens from BPH or PC indicate that primary prostate cells secreted detectable quantities of iSCT and the basal release of this material from PC prostate cultures was almost four-fold higher than that from BPH prostate cultures. These results suggest that a CT-like immunoreactive material is secreted by primary prostate cells in culture, and the basal secretion of this material is significantly higher in PC cells as compared to BPH cells. Endogenous secretion of prostatic CT, and the elevation of its expression in PC suggest that it may serve as a regulatory factor in the pathophysiology of the prostate gland. PMID:1409122

  15. Diffuse perineuronal nets and modified pyramidal cells immunoreactive for glutamate and the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit form a unique entity in rat cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Wegner, Florian; Härtig, Wolfgang; Bringmann, Andreas; Grosche, Jens; Wohlfarth, Kai; Zuschratter, Werner; Brückner, Gert

    2003-12-01

    Perineuronal nets (PNs) consisting of polyanionic chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans (CSPG) and other extracellular matrix components create an exceptional microenvironment around certain types of neurons. In rat neocortex, three types of PNs can be distinguished after staining with Wisteria floribunda agglutinin (WFA) by their different morphological structure: lattice-like PNs associated with subpopulations of nonpyramidal neurons, weakly labeled PNs showing a pyramidal morphology, and diffuse PNs that possess a thick, strongly labeled matrix sheath located mainly in layer VIb above the white matter. The type of neuron surrounded by diffuse nets has not been described so far. This study is focused on the cytochemical and morphological characteristics of neurons associated with diffusely contoured PNs in rat parietal cortex using immunocytochemical staining, intracellular injection, and retrograde tracing methods. Cells surrounded by diffuse PNs were glutamate-immunoreactive in contrast to nonpyramidal, net-associated neurons that showed immunoreactivity for GABA, the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin and the potassium channel subunit Kv3.1b. Both groups of PN-ensheathed cells were mostly immunoreactive for the GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit. Lucifer Yellow-injected neurons surrounded by diffuse PNs displayed the morphological properties of modified pyramidal cells with intracortical main axons. Many neurons with diffuse PNs were retrogradely labeled over a long distance after Fluoro-Gold tracer injection in the parietal cortex, but remained unlabeled after intrathalamic injection. We conclude that neurons associated with diffuse PNs are a subpopulation of glutamatergic modified pyramidal cells that could act as excitatory long-range intracortically projecting neurons. PMID:14769362

  16. A bombesin immunoreactive peptide in milk.

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, G D; Lazarus, L H

    1984-01-01

    Immunoreactivity to the amphibian peptide bombesin was found in instant nonfat dry milk (ca. 0.7 ng/ml) and in the whey of whole or skim bovine milk (ca. 1.2 ng/ml) even after ultracentrifugation. The soluble immunoreactivity was associated with a peptide exhibiting the following characteristics: (i) parallel displacement in an immunoassay using an antiserum recognizing bombesin amino acid residues 5-8; (ii) separation from both gastrin-releasing peptide and amphibian bombesin by gel filtration--the approximate Mr was 3,200; (iii) denaturation in urea, reduction by dithiothreitol, and acetylation by iodoacetamide had no effect on its elution profile by gel-filtration chromatography and the aggregation of added bombesin to milk proteins or peptides was not observed; (iv) reversed-phase HPLC separated milk immunoreactivity from gastrin-releasing peptide and bombesin; (v) digestion by trypsin yielded a smaller immunoreactive peptide fragment, whereas nearly all immunoreactivity was lost by treatment with alpha-chymotrypsin; and (vi) the level of immunoreactivity was unaffected by boiling. These data show that milk is an exogenous source of bombesin-like immunoreactivity, which may account for the increase of gastric acid and gastrointestinal hormone levels after the consumption of milk. PMID:6582513

  17. Immunohistowax processing, a new fixation and embedding method for light microscopy, which preserves antigen immunoreactivity and morphological structures: visualisation of dendritic cells in peripheral organs

    PubMed Central

    Pajak, B.; De Smedt, T.; Moulin, V.; De Trez, C.; Maldonado-Lopez, R.; Vansanten, G.; Briend, E.; Urbain, J.; Leo, O.; Moser, M.

    2000-01-01

    Aims—To describe a new fixation and embedding method for tissue samples, immunohistowax processing, which preserves both morphology and antigen immunoreactivity, and to use this technique to investigate the role of dendritic cells in the immune response in peripheral tissues. Methods—This technique was used to stain a population of specialised antigen presenting cells (dendritic cells) that have the unique capacity to sensitise naive T cells, and therefore to induce primary immune responses. The numbers of dendritic cells in peripheral organs of mice either untreated or injected with live Escherichia coli were compared. Results—Numbers of dendritic cells were greatly decreased in heart, kidney, and intestine after the inoculation of bacteria. The numbers of dendritic cells in the lung did not seem to be affected by the injection of E coli. However, staining of lung sections revealed that some monocyte like cells acquired morphological and phenotypic features of dendritic cells, and migrated into blood vessels. Conclusions—These observations suggest that the injection of bacteria induces the activation of dendritic cells in peripheral organs, where they play the role of sentinels, and/or their movement into lymphoid organs, where T cell priming is likely to occur. Key Words: dendritic cell • Escherichia coli • immunohistochemistry PMID:10961175

  18. Effects of intracerebroventricular infusion of genistein on gonadotrophin subunit mRNA and immunoreactivity of gonadotrophins and oestrogen receptor-alpha in the pituitary cells of the anoestrous ewe.

    PubMed

    Polkowska, Jolanta; Ridderstråle, Yvonne; Wańkowska, Marta; Romanowicz, Katarzyna; Misztal, Tomasz; Madej, Andrzej

    2004-12-01

    The present study was designed to demonstrate whether genistein, a synthetic phytoestrogen, infused into the third ventricle of the brain could affect the gonadotrophic cells regarding the presence of oestrogen receptor-alpha immunoreactivity and gonadotrophin subunit mRNA hybridising reaction in the ewe. Ewes (n=7), aged 2 years, in early anoestrous season were infused with Ringer-Locke solution (control, n=3) or 10 microg/100 microl/h of genistein (n=4) into the third ventricle over a 5 h period and slaughtered the following morning. Immunoreactivity of luteinizing hormone (LH), follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) and oestrogen receptor-alpha (ERalpha) was determined in the adenohypophysis by immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against LHbeta, FSHbeta, and ERalpha. Messenger RNA analyses were performed by non-isotope in situ hybridisation using sense and antisense riboprobes produced from beta subunits of LH and FSH cDNA clones. Computer image analysis was used to determine the percent of cells exhibiting immunohistochemical and/or hybridising reaction. It was found that in ewes infused with genistein, the percentage of LH-positive cells and the density of immunoreactive-LHbeta material decreased significantly (Pcells and the intensity of the hybridisation signal increased significantly (Pimmunoreactivity of FSH cells or on the expression of mRNA for FSHbeta. The percentage of ERalpha-positive cells increased significantly after genistein infusions (Pcells (Pimmunoreactive ERalpha in the pituitary LH-cells but not in FSH-cells and change the endocrine activity of LH-producing cells of anoestral ewes. PMID:15531133

  19. Glial fibrillary acidic protein and vimentin immunoreactivity of astroglial cells in the central nervous system of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens (Dipnoi: Lepidosirenidae).

    PubMed

    Lazzari, Maurizio; Franceschini, Valeria

    2004-12-01

    The distribution of glial intermediate filament molecular markers, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and vimentin, in the brain and spinal cord of the African lungfish, Protopterus annectens, was examined by light microscopy immunoperoxidase cytochemistry. Glial fibrillary acidic protein immunoreactivity is clear and is evident in a radial glial system. It consists of fibers of different lengths and thicknesses that are arranged in a regular radial pattern throughout the central nervous system (CNS). They emerge from generally immunopositive radial ependymoglia (tanycytes), lining the ventricular surface, and are directed from the ventricular wall to the meningeal surface. These fibers give rise to endfeet that are apposed to the subpial surface and to blood vessel walls forming the glia limitans externa and the perivascular glial layer, respectively. GFAP-immunopositive star-shaped astrocytes were not found in P. annectens CNS. In the gray matter of the spinal cord, cell bodies of immunopositive radial glia are displaced from the ependymal layer. Vimentin-immunopositive structures are represented by thin fibers mostly localized in the peripheral zones of the brain and the spinal cord. While a few stained fibers appear in the gray matter, the ependymal layer shows no antivimentin immunostaining. In P. annectens the immunocytochemical response of the astroglial intermediate filaments is typical of a mature astroglia cell lineage, since they primarily express GFAP immunoreactivity. This immunocytochemical study shows that the glial pattern of the African lungfish resembles that found in tetrapods such as urodeles and reptiles. The glial pattern of lungfishes is comparable to that of urodeles and reptiles but is not as complex as that of teleosts, birds, and mammals. PMID:15487019

  20. Hydrogen peroxide-induced production of a 40 kDa immunoreactive thyroglobulin fragment in human thyroid cells: the onset of thyroid autoimmunity?

    PubMed Central

    Duthoit, C; Estienne, V; Giraud, A; Durand-Gorde, J M; Rasmussen, A K; Feldt-Rasmussen, U; Carayon, P; Ruf, J

    2001-01-01

    We recently reported that, during in vitro thyroid-hormone synthesis, H(2)O(2) stress cleaved thyroglobulin (Tg) into C-terminal peptides. These peptides were found to contain the immunodominant region of Tg recognized by Tg autoantibodies from patients with an autoimmune thyroid disease. To test the hypothesis that Tg fragmentation is an early upstream initiating event involved in Tg autoimmune response and the consequence of oxidative injuries, we studied the effect of H(2)O(2) stress on human thyroid cells. In culture conditions allowing Tg synthesis and iodine organification by the cells, we found that bolus addition of increasing millimolar doses of H(2)O(2) induced a dose-response appearance of floating cells in the culture medium. These cells apparently resulted from a necrotic process, and they bore iodinated Tg fragments. These fragments were found to be similar to those previously obtained in vitro from purified Tg. In both cases, Tg peptides were recognized by a well-defined monoclonal antibody directed to the immunodominant region of Tg. The smallest immunoreactive Tg peptide had a molecular mass of 40 kDa and entered human thyrocytes more efficiently than the entire Tg. These data suggest that thyrocytes exposed to locally increased H(2)O(2) doses accumulate fragmented Tg for further delivery into surrounding living thyrocytes in the course of an autoimmune response. PMID:11736644

  1. Increased doublecortin (DCX) expression and incidence of DCX-immunoreactive multipolar cells in the subventricular zone-olfactory bulb system of suicides

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Marissa E.; Devorak, Julia; Freibauer, Alexander; Davoli, Maria Antonietta; Turecki, Gustavo; Mechawar, Naguib

    2015-01-01

    Postmortem studies have confirmed the occurrence of adult hippocampal neurogenesis in humans and implicated this process in antidepressant response, yet neurogenesis in other regions remains to be examined in the context of depression. Here we assess the extent of subventricular zone-olfactory bulb (SVZ-OB) neurogenesis in adult humans having died by suicide. Protein expression of proliferative and neurogenic markers Sox2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and doublecortin (DCX) were examined in postmortem SVZ and OB samples from depressed suicides and matched sudden-death controls. In the SVZ, DCX-immunoreactive (IR) cells displayed phenotypes typical of progenitors, whereas in the olfactory tract (OT), they were multipolar with variable size and morphologies suggestive of differentiating cells. DCX expression was significantly increased in the OB of suicides, whereas SVZ DCX expression was higher among unmedicated, but not antidepressant-treated, suicides. Although very few DCX-IR cells were present in the control OT, they were considerably more common in suicides and correlated with OB DCX levels. Suicides also displayed higher DCX-IR process volumes. These results support the notion that OB neurogenesis is minimal in adult humans. They further raise the possibility that the differentiation and migration of SVZ-derived neuroblasts may be altered in unmedicated suicides, leading to an accumulation of ectopically differentiating cells in the OT. Normal SVZ DCX expression among suicides receiving antidepressants suggests a potentially novel mode of action of antidepressant medication. Given the modest group sizes and rarity of DCX-IR cells assessed here, a larger-scale characterization will be required before firm conclusions can be made regarding the identity of these cells. PMID:26082689

  2. Effects of food nutrient content, insect age and stage in the feeding cycle on the FMRFamide immunoreactivity of diffuse endocrine cells in the locust gut.

    PubMed

    Zudaire, E; Simpson, S J; Montuenga, L M

    1998-11-01

    We have studied the influence of variations in dietary protein and digestible carbohydrate content, of insect age and of time during the feeding cycle on the endocrine cells of the ampullar region of the midgut in the African migratory locust Locusta migratoria L. Morphometric analysis of FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity was used as an indirect measure of the amount of FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs) stored in the gut endocrine cells. There was a highly significant correlation between FaRP content and the nutritional quality of the food, measured relative to the concentrations and ratio of protein to digestible carbohydrate in a nutritionally optimal diet. The direction of the relationship between FaRP content and diet quality varied with age during the fifth stadium. On day 1, FaRP levels increased with the nutritional quality of the food, while on day 4 the opposite relationship was observed. Release of peptide was triggered by the onset of a meal during ad libitum feeding, with cell FaRP levels returning to premeal values within 15 min of the meal ending. The results also suggested that cell contents were released during food deprivation beyond the normal intermeal interval. Locusts switched for a single meal during ad libitum feeding on day 4 from a low- to a high-carbohydrate food did not respond by reducing endocrine cell FaRP content. Our results show a relationship between the diffuse gut endocrine system and feeding and nutrition in locusts. The ampullar endocrine cells are in three-way contact with the midgut luminal contents, with the primary urine from the Malpighian tubules and with the haemolymph. They are thus ideally positioned to play an integrative receptor-secretory function in the regulation of a variety of post-ingestive processes, such as enzyme secretion, absorption, gut motility or nutrient metabolism. PMID:9866881

  3. Hypergravity exposure decreases gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity in axon terminals contacting pyramidal cells in the rat somatosensory cortex: a quantitative immunocytochemical image analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Wu, L. C.; Fox, R. A.; Daunton, N. G.; Corcoran, M. L.; Polyakov, I.

    1998-01-01

    Quantitative evaluation of gamma-aminobutyric acid immunoreactivity (GABA-IR) in the hindlimb representation of the rat somatosensory cortex after 14 days of exposure to hypergravity (hyper-G) was conducted by using computer-assisted image processing. The area of GABA-IR axosomatic terminals apposed to pyramidal cells of cortical layer V was reduced in rats exposed to hyper-G compared with control rats, which were exposed either to rotation alone or to vivarium conditions. Based on previous immunocytochemical and behavioral studies, we suggest that this reduction is due to changes in sensory feedback information from muscle receptors. Consequently, priorities for muscle recruitment are altered at the cortical level, and a new pattern of muscle activity is thus generated. It is proposed that the reduction observed in GABA-IR of the terminal area around pyramidal neurons is the immunocytochemical expression of changes in the activity of GABAergic cells that participate in reprogramming motor outputs to achieve effective movement control in response to alterations in the afferent information.

  4. Apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinoma and in liver cell dysplasia is correlated with p53 protein immunoreactivity.

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, M; Zimmermann, A

    1997-01-01

    AIMS: To investigate the prevalence of apoptosis in human hepatocellular carcinomas (HCC) of different types and grades and in liver cell dysplasia, and to test whether the apoptotic rate is correlated with the p53 protein status. METHODS: 37 HCC and 66 six liver samples with liver cell dysplasia were analysed for apoptosis using in situ DNA end labelling (ISEL), and for p53 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. In HCCs, proliferative activity was quantitatively assessed using proliferating cell nuclear antigen labelling. RESULTS: The apoptotic index in HCC as based on ISEL ranged from 0.1 to 13.5 per 1000 cells analysed and was not related to type or grade. No nuclear staining was observed in multinuclear tumour cells. There was a significant correlation between the apoptotic rate and both the proliferative activity and p53 protein reactivity. In liver samples containing p53 protein positive liver cell dysplasia cells, there was a significantly higher apoptotic rate of these cells. CONCLUSIONS: Apoptosis is detectable in HCC, and is not related to type and grade. There is a highly significant positive correlation between the apoptotic rate in HCC and both the proliferative activity and p53 protein expression. A similar phenomenon occurs for putative cancer precursors. The findings support the role of p53 in regulating apoptosis in preneoplastic and neoplastic liver lesions. Images PMID:9215122

  5. Mossy cells and different subpopulations of pyramidal neurons are immunoreactive for cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in the hippocampal formation of non-human primates and tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri).

    PubMed

    Abrahám, H; Czéh, B; Fuchs, E; Seress, L

    2005-01-01

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide mRNA was discovered in the rat striatum following cocaine and amphetamine administration. Since both psychostimulants elicit memory-related effects, localization of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in the hippocampal formation may have functional importance. Previous studies demonstrated different cellular localizations of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide in humans and in rodents. Mossy cells were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-positive in the human dentate gyrus, whereas granule cells contained this peptide in the rat. In the present study, the localization of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript peptide was examined using immunohistochemistry in the hippocampal formation of the rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta), the common marmoset monkey (Callithrix jacchus) and in the tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri). In these species principal neurons of the hippocampal formation were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunoreactive. In both monkeys and tree shrews, mossy cells of the hilus were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-positive whereas granule cells of the dentate gyrus were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-negative. The dense cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunoreactive axonal plexus of the associational pathway outlined the inner one-third of the dentate molecular layer. In the hippocampus of the tree shrew and marmoset monkey, a subset of CA3 pyramidal cells were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunoreactive. In the marmoset monkey, cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript labeling was found only in layer V pyramidal cells of the entorhinal cortex, while in the rhesus monkey, pyramidal cells of layers II and III were cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript-immunopositive. Our results show that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript positive neurons in the dentate

  6. Prenatal valproate treatment produces autistic-like behavior and increases metabotropic glutamate receptor 1A-immunoreactivity in the hippocampus of juvenile rats.

    PubMed

    Peralta, Francisco; Fuentealba, Constanza; Fiedler, Jenny; Aliaga, Esteban

    2016-09-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a heterogeneous neurodevelopmental disorder characterized by deficits in social communication and social interaction, and repetitive and stereotypical patterns of behavior. Previously, a common physiopathological pathway, involving the control of synaptic protein synthesis, was proposed as a convergence point in ASD. In particular, a role for local mRNA translation activated by class I metabotropic glutamate receptor type 5 (mGluR5) was suggested in genetic syndromes with autistic signs and in the prenatal exposition to the valproate model of autism. However, the role of the other members of class I metabotropic glutamate receptors, including mGluR1, has been poorly studied. The present study analyzed the immunoreactivity for mGluR1a in the hippocampus of rats prenatally treated with valproate. Pregnant dams (embryonic day 12.5) were injected with valproate (450 mg/kg) and subsequently, the behavior and mGluR1a were evaluated at postnatal day 30. Experimental rats exhibited social deficit, repetitive conduct and anxious behaviors compared with that of the control animals. Additionally, the present study observed an increased level of mGluR1a-immunoreactivity in the hilus of dentate gyrus and in the CA1 alveus region of the hippocampus. These results suggested an over‑functioning of mGluR1a signaling in the hippocampus, induced in the valproate model of autism, which may serve a role in cognitive and behavioral signs of ASD. PMID:27430241

  7. Somatostatin-14-like immunoreactive neurons and fibres in the human olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Ohm, T G; Braak, E; Probst, A

    1988-01-01

    This study describes the morphological features and the distribution pattern of neurons in the human olfactory bulb which are immunoreactive for an antiserum against the neuropeptide somatostatin-14. Immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were mainly found in the white matter surrounding the cell clusters of the anterior olfactory nucleus. Some immunoreactive neurons were also found scattered throughout the anterior olfactory nucleus and the deeper parts of the inner granule cell layer. Only a few immunoreactive neurons were localized in the glomerular layer and the outer granule cell layer. Immunoreactive fibres were found in all layers of the olfactory bulb. In addition, an impressive number of coiled and kinked immunoreactive fibres were localized within the anterior olfactory nucleus forming a dense plexus. Accumulations of twisted and coiled branches of immunoreactive fibres were rarely found either surrounding or within the olfactory glomerula. The characteristics of somatostatin-14 immunoreactive neurons as seen in the combined pigment-Nissl preparation were studied after decolourizing the chromogen and restaining the preparations with aldehydefuchsin in order to demonstrate the lipofuscin pigment and gallocyanin chrome alum for Nissl material. About 90% of the immunoreactive neurons studied in this manner turned out to be devoid of lipofuscin granules. The remaining 10% displayed different patterns of pigmentation. These findings suggest the presence of different types of somatostatin-14-like immunoreactive neurons in the olfactory bulb of the human adult. PMID:2906788

  8. Effect of 7-nitroindazole, a selective neuronal nitric oxide synthase inhibitor, on parvalbumin immunoreactivity after cerebral ischaemia in the hippocampus of the Mongolian gerbil.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Y B; Yoon, Y S; Han, H J; Lee, J H

    1999-12-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-ir) neurones is observed in the hippocampus after transient cerebral ischaemia. However, whether the loss of parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity is related to the over-production of nitric oxide (NO) during cerebral ischaemia has not been evaluated. This study was designed to test the effect of 7-nitroindazole pre-treatment (7-NI, 50 mg/kg), a selective neuronal NO synthase inhibitor, on PV immunoreactivity and its cellular activity following forebrain ischaemia. PV-ir neurones in the hippocampus of the control group were widely distributed in the pyramidal cell layer and stratum oriens of CA1 and CA3, and the granular cell layer of dentate gyrus. 7-NI pre-treatment completely suppressed the reduction of PV immunoreactivity in CA1 that was observed in the ischaemia-induced group. Subsequently, 7-NI pre-treatment also protected against the structural loss of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) immunoreactivity in CA1 after ischaemic insult. In addition, the Fos-defined neuronal activity of PV-ir neurones was slightly increased by the 7-NI pre-treatment 3 h after ischaemia. Based on these data, we conclude that the neuronal toxicity of NO may be involved in the loss of PV-ir neurones after cerebral ischaemia. PMID:10652828

  9. FUS/TLS-immunoreactive neuronal and glial cell inclusions increase with disease duration in familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with an R521C FUS/TLS mutation.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Naoki; Kato, Shinsuke; Kato, Masako; Warita, Hitoshi; Mizuno, Hideki; Kato, Masaaki; Shimakura, Naoko; Akiyama, Haruhiko; Kobayashi, Zen; Konno, Hidehiko; Aoki, Masashi

    2012-09-01

    Basophilic inclusions (BIs) are pathological features of a subset of frontotemporal lobar degeneration disorders, including sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and familial ALS (FALS). Mutations in the fused in sarcoma/translocated in liposarcoma (FUS/TLS) gene have recently been identified as a cause of FALS. The FUS/TLS-immunoreactive inclusions are consistently found in cases of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with BIs; however, the association between ALS cases with BIs and FUS/TLS accumulation is not well understood. We used immunohistochemistry to analyze 3 autopsy cases of FALS with the FUS/TLS mutation and with BIs using anti-FUS/TLS antibodies. The disease durations were 1, 3, and 9 years. As the disease duration becomes longer, there were broader distributions of neuronal and glial FUS/TLS-immunoreactive inclusions. As early as 1 year after the onset, BIs, neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions and glial cytoplasmic inclusions were found in the substantia nigra in addition to the anterior horn of the spinal cord. Glial cytoplasmic inclusions are found earlier and in a wider distribution than neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions. The distribution of FUS/TLS-immunoreactive inclusions in FUS/TLS-mutated FALS with BIs was broader than that of BIs alone, suggesting that the pathogenetic mechanism may have originated from the FUS/TLS proteinopathy. PMID:22878663

  10. Kir7.1 immunoreactivity in canine choroid plexus tumors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Eun Ju; Sloma, Erica A; Miller, Andrew D

    2016-07-01

    Choroid plexus neoplasms are uncommon brain tumors in dogs. Choroid plexus carcinomas often spread diffusely throughout the ventricular system and subarachnoid space and, in aggressive forms, can mimic histologic patterns of other carcinomas, including being embedded in a desmoplastic reaction. Although choroid plexus tumors (CPTs) heterogeneously express pan-cytokeratin, little is known about other markers to identify choroid plexus and their associated tumors. Kir7.1, an inward-rectifier potassium channel, is reported to have high diagnostic utility in human neuropathology to distinguish CPTs from other primary brain tumors and cerebral metastases. To determine Kir7.1 expression in the dog brain, we analyzed the immunoreactivity of Kir7.1 in normal brain, gliomas, ependymomas, CPTs, meningiomas, and carcinomas. In normal brain tissue, the immunostaining was restricted to the choroid plexus where there was robust membrane immunoreactivity along the apical border of the cells with less intense cytoplasmic staining. Similar strong immunoreactivity was detected in 12 of 12 CPTs, whereas 5 of 5 gliomas, 4 of 5 ependymomas, 5 of 5 meningiomas, and 5 of 6 carcinomas had no immunoreactivity. One ependymoma and 1 nasal carcinoma with squamous metaplasia were up to 75% immunopositive, with moderate cytoplasmic and membranous immunoreactivity, but lacking the robust apical immunoreactivity pattern. Analysis for immunoreactivity in a tissue microarray failed to yield any other locations in which immunoreactivity was detected. These results, including the distinctive pattern of immunostaining in CPTs, suggest that Kir7.1 is an excellent marker for CPTs in the dog. PMID:27216721

  11. Sexually Dimorphic Effects of Melatonin on Brain Arginine Vasotocin Immunoreactivity in Green Treefrogs (Hyla cinerea)

    PubMed Central

    Lutterschmidt, Deborah I.; Wilczynski, Walter

    2012-01-01

    Arginine vasotocin (AVT) and its mammalian homologue, arginine vasopressin (AVP), regulate a variety of social and reproductive behaviors, often with complex species-, sex-, and context-dependent effects. Despite extensive evidence documenting seasonal variation in brain AVT/AVP, relatively few studies have investigated the environmental and/or hormonal factors mediating these seasonal changes. In the present study, we investigated whether the pineal hormone melatonin alters brain AVT immunoreactivity in green treefrogs (Hyla cinerea). Reproductively active male and female frogs were collected during the summer breeding season and a melatonin-filled or blank silastic capsule was surgically implanted subcutaneously. The duration of hormone treatment was 4 weeks, at which time frogs were euthanized and the brains and blood collected and processed for AVT immunohistochemistry and steroid hormone assay. We quantified AVT-immunoreactive (AVT-ir) cell bodies in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc), caudal striatum and amygdala (AMG), anterior preoptic area (POA), suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN), and infundibular region of the ventral hypothalamus (VH). Sex differences in AVT-ir cell number were observed in all brain regions except the anterior POA and VH, with males having more AVT-ir cells than females in the NAcc, AMG, and SCN. Brain AVT was sensitive to melatonin signaling during the breeding season, and the effects of melatonin varied significantly with both region and sex. Treatment with melatonin decreased AVT immunoreactivity in both the NAcc and SCN in male H. cinerea. In contrast, brain AVT was relatively insensitive to melatonin signaling in females, indicating that the regulation of the AVT/AVP neuropeptide system by melatonin may be sexually dimorphic. Finally, melatonin did not significantly influence testosterone or estradiol concentrations of male or female frogs, respectively, suggesting that the effects of melatonin on AVT immunoreactivity are independent of

  12. Effect of Chitosan Properties on Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Koppolu, Bhanu prasanth; Smith, Sean G.; Zaharoff, David A.

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is a widely investigated biopolymer in drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering and vaccine development. However, the immune response to chitosan is not clearly understood due to contradicting results in literature regarding its immunoreactivity. Thus, in this study, we analyzed effects of various biochemical properties, namely degree of deacetylation (DDA), viscosity/polymer length and endotoxin levels, on immune responses by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chitosan solutions from various sources were treated with mouse and human APCs (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) and the amount of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) released by the cells was used as an indicator of immunoreactivity. Our results indicate that only endotoxin content and not DDA or viscosity influenced chitosan-induced immune responses. Our data also indicate that low endotoxin chitosan (<0.01 EU/mg) ranging from 20 to 600 cP and 80% to 97% DDA is essentially inert. This study emphasizes the need for more complete characterization and purification of chitosan in preclinical studies in order for this valuable biomaterial to achieve widespread clinical application. PMID:27187416

  13. Effect of Chitosan Properties on Immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Ravindranathan, Sruthi; Koppolu, Bhanu Prasanth; Smith, Sean G; Zaharoff, David A

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan is a widely investigated biopolymer in drug and gene delivery, tissue engineering and vaccine development. However, the immune response to chitosan is not clearly understood due to contradicting results in literature regarding its immunoreactivity. Thus, in this study, we analyzed effects of various biochemical properties, namely degree of deacetylation (DDA), viscosity/polymer length and endotoxin levels, on immune responses by antigen presenting cells (APCs). Chitosan solutions from various sources were treated with mouse and human APCs (macrophages and/or dendritic cells) and the amount of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) released by the cells was used as an indicator of immunoreactivity. Our results indicate that only endotoxin content and not DDA or viscosity influenced chitosan-induced immune responses. Our data also indicate that low endotoxin chitosan (<0.01 EU/mg) ranging from 20 to 600 cP and 80% to 97% DDA is essentially inert. This study emphasizes the need for more complete characterization and purification of chitosan in preclinical studies in order for this valuable biomaterial to achieve widespread clinical application. PMID:27187416

  14. Tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity is common in the enteric nervous system in teleosts.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Catharina

    2016-05-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of catecholamines and TH immunoreactivity is indicative of cells synthesising either adrenaline/noradrenaline or dopamine. In this study, the distribution of TH immunoreactivity was examined in two distantly related teleost species, zebrafish (Danio rerio) and shorthorn sculpin (Myoxocephalus scorpius). In both species, TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies and varicose nerve fibres were common in the myenteric plexus of the intestine. However, no TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were seen in the sculpin stomach. The TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies seemed to constitute a larger proportion of the total enteric population in shorthorn sculpin (50 ± 5 %, n = 3067 cells) compared with zebrafish (14 ± 2 %, n = 10,163 cells). In contrast, in sculpin, the TH-immunoreactive cells were smaller than the average enteric nerve cell bodies, whereas in zebrafish, the relationship was the opposite. In developing zebrafish larvae, TH-immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were common (approx. 75 % of the total population) at 3 days post-fertilization (dpf), but decreased in numbers between 3 and 7 dpf. In conclusion, in contrast to previous studies, TH-immunoreactive intrinsic neurons are common in the fish gut. Their role and function need to be further characterized in order to understand the potential importance of this enteric subpopulation in controlling various gut functions. PMID:26572541

  15. P2P-R protein localizes to the nucleolus of interphase cells and the periphery of chromosomes in mitotic cells which show maximum P2P-R immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Sizhi; Witte, Michael M; Scott, Robert E

    2002-05-01

    P2P-R is a nuclear protein that can bind both p53 and Rb1. Its functions include roles in the control of RNA metabolism, apoptosis, and p53-dependent transcription. The expression of P2P-R also is repressed in G1 arrested terminally differentiated cells. The current studies therefore evaluated if P2P-R undergoes cell cycle-associated changes in its abundance and/or localization. Western blots show that relative to G0 quiescent cells, P2P-R protein levels are higher in populations of G2/M cells prepared by the physiological parasynchronization technique of serum deprivation followed by serum stimulation. More striking is the > 10-fold enrichment of P2P-R protein in specimens of highly purified mitotic cells prepared by the mitotic shake-select technique, or by synchrony with the mitotic spindle disruption agents nocodazole or vinblastine. These changes in P2P-R protein occur without a concomitant change in P2P-R mRNA expression suggesting that P2P-R immunoreactivity increases during mitosis. Confocal microscopy next established the localization of P2P-R to nucleoli in interphase cells and at the periphery of chromosomes in mitotic cells that lack nucleoli. The high levels of P2P-R localized to the periphery of chromosomes in mitotic cells suggest that P2P-R shares characteristics with other nucleolar proteins that associate with the periphery of chromosomes during mitosis. These include: nucleolin, B23, Ki67, and fibrillarin. PMID:12064457

  16. Immunoreactive opioid peptides in human breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Scopsi, L.; Balslev, E.; Brünner, N.; Poulsen, H. S.; Andersen, J.; Rank, F.; Larsson, L. I.

    1989-01-01

    Opioid peptides have a variety of actions on inter alia pituitary hormone secretion and the immune system. Release of endogenous opioids has been found to stimulate growth of experimental breast cancers and opiate receptor blockers have reduced the growth of chemically induced rat breast tumors. Opioid peptides may therefore play a role in human breast cancer. Invasive ductal carcinomas from 61 premenopausal women were immunocytochemically analyzed for the presence of opioid peptide immunoreactivity. Positive staining was unambiguously identified in 34 of the tumors (56%). In addition, a medullary carcinoma was positive. In a smaller series of tumors, opioid peptide immunoreactive cells were detected in both primary tumors and metastases. Positive tumor cells were usually few and scattered. Therefore, underestimates of their true frequency of occurrence are likely to have occurred, making accurate correlations with clinical behavior and estrogen receptor status difficult. No correlations with estrogen receptors were established for the unambiguously opioid peptide-positive tumors. Many of the positive tumors also stained with antibodies to gamma-endorphin and alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone, suggesting the presence of proopiomelanocortin-derived peptides in them. However, peptides derived from other opioid precursors also may be present in breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:2464945

  17. Glyoxalase I activity and immunoreactivity in the aging human lens

    PubMed Central

    Mailankot, Maneesh; Padmanabha, Smitha; Pasupuleti, NagaRekha; Major, Denice; Howell, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Glyoxalase I (GLOI) is the first enzyme of the glyoxalase system that catalyzes the metabolism of reactive dicarbonyls, such as methylglyoxal (MGO). During aging and cataract development, human lens proteins are chemically modified by MGO, which is likely due to inadequate metabolism of MGO by the glyoxalase system. In this study, we have determined the effect of aging on GLOI activity and the immunoreactivity and morphological distribution of GLOI in the human lens. A monoclonal antibody was developed against human GLOI. GLOI immunoreactivity was strongest in the anterior epithelial cells and weaker in rest of the lens. Cultured human lens epithelial cells showed immunostaining throughout the cytoplasm. In the human lens, GLOI activity and immunoreactivity both decreased with age. We believe that this would lead to promotion of MGO-modification in aging lens proteins. PMID:19238574

  18. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression. PMID:15694461

  19. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  20. Somatomedin C immunoreactivity in the Achilles tendon varies in a dynamic manner with the mechanical load.

    PubMed

    Hansson, H A; Engström, A M; Holm, S; Rosenqvist, A L

    1988-10-01

    Distribution of the trophic peptide somatomedin C (Sm-C; insulin-like growth factor I; IGF-I) immunoreactivity was mapped in normal Achilles and tibialis anterior tendons. The spindle-shaped tendon fibroblasts showed faint perinuclear staining. Fibroblasts in the paratenon mostly had a more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity, i.e. faint to moderate. When analysing either tendon in detail, areas with more intense IGF-I immunoreactivity could be recognized and seemed to correlate with areas of high mechanical stress. Increased mechanical load induced over 3 days elevated IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of tendon fibroblasts. Peak intensity was reached in 7 days, and thereafter the IGF-I immunoreactivity seemed to decrease irrespective of persistent high mechanical load. Training the animals on a treadmill for from 20 up to 60 min per day for 5 days induced after 3-5 days increased IGF-I immunoreactivity throughout the cytoplasm of the tendon and paratenon fibroblasts. Sudden curtailment of loading the Achilles tendon resulted in a marked reduction of the IGF-I immunoreactivity in most fibroblasts within 3 days. After a week only a small number of tendon fibroblasts showed any IGF-I immunoreactivity. The IGF-I immunoreactivity of tendon fibroblasts thus correlates to mechanical loading of the tendon. It is proposed that IGF-I may have a trophic influence on tendon and paratenon cells by autocrine and/or paracrine mechanisms. PMID:3067520

  1. 21 CFR 862.1405 - Immunoreactive insulin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Immunoreactive insulin test system. 862.1405... Systems § 862.1405 Immunoreactive insulin test system. (a) Identification. An immunoreactive insulin test system is a device intended to measure immunoreactive insulin in serum and plasma. Immunoreactive...

  2. 21 CFR 862.1405 - Immunoreactive insulin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Immunoreactive insulin test system. 862.1405... Systems § 862.1405 Immunoreactive insulin test system. (a) Identification. An immunoreactive insulin test system is a device intended to measure immunoreactive insulin in serum and plasma. Immunoreactive...

  3. 21 CFR 862.1405 - Immunoreactive insulin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Immunoreactive insulin test system. 862.1405... Systems § 862.1405 Immunoreactive insulin test system. (a) Identification. An immunoreactive insulin test system is a device intended to measure immunoreactive insulin in serum and plasma. Immunoreactive...

  4. 21 CFR 862.1405 - Immunoreactive insulin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Immunoreactive insulin test system. 862.1405... Systems § 862.1405 Immunoreactive insulin test system. (a) Identification. An immunoreactive insulin test system is a device intended to measure immunoreactive insulin in serum and plasma. Immunoreactive...

  5. Environmental enrichment: effects on spatial memory and hippocampal CREB immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Williams, B M; Luo, Y; Ward, C; Redd, K; Gibson, R; Kuczaj, S A; McCoy, J G

    2001-07-01

    Environmental enrichment has been shown to improve performance in tests of spatial memory, induce neurogenesis in the hippocampus, enhance survival of newly formed granule cells, and inhibit spontaneous apoptosis. Although neuroplasticity of the mammalian brain declines with age, recent evidence suggests that the adult brain exhibits significant plasticity in response to environmental stimulation. The present study was designed to evaluate the effect of environmental enrichment on spatial memory and on immunoreactivity to cAMP response element binding protein (CREB) from the hippocampus. C57/BL/6 mice were trained in a Morris water maze after exposure to an enriched environment, either from 35 to 94 days or from 100 to 159 days of age. Hippocampal tissue from representative animals was later analyzed by Western blot for CREB immunoreactivity. Results indicate that environmental enrichment (particularly during the earlier period) improved performance on the Morris water maze and tended to increase immunoreactivity to CREB in the hippocampus. Social interaction by itself did not result in significant differences in navigational performance. Results with regard to social interaction and CREB immunoreactivity were mixed. Results are discussed in terms of evaluating the construct of enrichment, the correlation of CREB transcription and behavior change, and the importance of the developmental period for enrichment. PMID:11495671

  6. Distribution and Origin of VIP-, SP-, and Phospholipase Cβ2 -Immunoreactive Nerves in the Tongue of the Bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana.

    PubMed

    Tadokoro, Osamu; Ando, Hiroshi; Kawahara, Ichiro; Asanuma, Naokazu; Okumura, Masayo; Kitagawa, Junichi; Kondo, Eiji; Yagasaki, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Previous studies have found a few intralingual ganglionic cells that were immunoreactive to vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) in the frog. A recent study reported a large number of such cells, and the possibility of the release of substance P (SP) from these. The aim of the present study was to investigate the distribution, origin, and colocalization of VIP- and SP- immunoreactive nerves in the tongue of the bullfrog, R. catesbeiana. In addition, the study also examined the colocalization of SP and phospholipase Cβ2 (PLCβ2 ) in the tongue and jugular ganglion. VIP immunoreactivity was seen in unipolar cells that were sparse in nerve bundles in the submucosal and muscle layers. The density of VIP-immunoreactive cells was approximately 4.8 cells/mm(3) . Their fibers terminated in the vicinity of the epithelial basal layer of the fungiform papillae. SP immunoreactivity was not seen in the VIP-immunoreactive cells, but was observed in pseudounipolar cells in the jugular ganglion. The SP fibers terminated close to the free surface, showing spindle- and button-like profiles. Transection of glossopharyngeal nerve resulted in the persistence of VIP-immunoreactive cells and the disappearance of SP-immunoreactive fibers in the tongue. SP immunoreactivity was co-expressed with PLCβ2 in both the tongue and jugular ganglia. No PLCβ2 immunoreactivity was seen in cells comprising the epithelial taste disk. These findings indicate that the origin of VIP nerve fibers are unipolar cells in the tongue, and SP and PLCβ2 fibers originate from pseudounipolar cells that may be able to release SP primarily in the jugular ganglion. Anat Rec, 299:929-942, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26916909

  7. Individual cells in the raphe nuclei of the medulla oblongata in rat that contain immunoreactivities for both serotonin and enkephalin project to the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Verhofstad, A A; Terenius, L

    1989-01-01

    The ventral medulla oblongata of rats was analyzed with a double-labelling immunofluorescence technique using guinea pig antibodies directed against serotonin (5-HT) and rabbit antisera directed against enkephalin (ENK). Numerous cells in the region of nucleus raphe obscurus, nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus showed immunostaining for either 5-HT or ENK. A substantial number of cells showed positive immunostaining for both 5-HT and ENK. 5-HT/ENK double-labelled cells were most frequently encountered in an area that extended from the rostral aspect of the inferior olivary nucleus to the pontomedullary border. This region corresponds anatomically to nucleus raphe magnus/nucleus paragigantocellularis. In addition, a number of the 5-HT/ENK-containing cells were retrogradely labelled with Fluoro-Gold dye that had been injected into the thoracic spinal cord several days prior to perfusion. Schematic drawings showing the anatomical distribution of 5-HT/ENK colocalization are provided. PMID:2744110

  8. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Hairy ...

  9. Osteopontin Immunoreactivity in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells, Ileum, and Ileocecal Lymph Node of Dairy Cows Naturally Infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteopontin (Opn), a highly acidic glycoprotein, plays an early role in initiating the innate immune response to mycobacterial infections by promoting cellular adhesion and recruitment of inflammatory cells from the peripheral blood. The formation of granulomas at the site of Mycobacterium avium s...

  10. Sequence- and Structure-Based Immunoreactive Epitope Discovery for Burkholderia pseudomallei Flagellin

    PubMed Central

    Nithichanon, Arnone; Rinchai, Darawan; Gori, Alessandro; Lassaux, Patricia; Peri, Claudio; Conchillio-Solé, Oscar; Ferrer-Navarro, Mario; Gourlay, Louise J.; Nardini, Marco; Vila, Jordi; Daura, Xavier; Colombo, Giorgio; Bolognesi, Martino; Lertmemonkolchai, Ganjana

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for melioidosis, a serious and often fatal infectious disease that is poorly controlled by existing treatments. Due to its inherent resistance to the major antibiotic classes and its facultative intracellular pathogenicity, an effective vaccine would be extremely desirable, along with appropriate prevention and therapeutic management. One of the main subunit vaccine candidates is flagellin of Burkholderia pseudomallei (FliCBp). Here, we present the high resolution crystal structure of FliCBp and report the synthesis and characterization of three peptides predicted to be both B and T cell FliCBp epitopes, by both structure-based in silico methods, and sequence-based epitope prediction tools. All three epitopes were shown to be immunoreactive against human IgG antibodies and to elicit cytokine production from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, two of the peptides (F51-69 and F270-288) were found to be dominant immunoreactive epitopes, and their antibodies enhanced the bactericidal activities of purified human neutrophils. The epitopes derived from this study may represent potential melioidosis vaccine components. PMID:26222657

  11. Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in non-pyramidal neurons of the human isocortex.

    PubMed

    Braak, E; Braak, H; Weindl, A

    1985-01-01

    The distribution of somatostatin-immunoreactive cell bodies and axons throughout the human isocortex and subjacent white matter was examined. Vibratome sections of cortical tissue (30-40 micrometers thick) obtained at surgery were treated to reveal the antigen by the unlabelled antibody enzyme method. Two types of somatostatin-immunoreactive axons were present: short, coiled axons and extended ones that follow a straight course in various directions. Somatostatin immunoreactive nerve cell bodies were encountered in layers II-VI and in the subjacent white matter. The majority of labelled cells were found in the white matter and layer VI, and then in layers II and III. The immunoreactive perikarya were fusiform, triangular or multipolar in shape and did not show preferential orientation of their long axis. Frequently, the fusiform neurons in layer VI and in the white matter were aligned parallel to radiate bundles of myelinated fibres. The immunoreactive neurons gave rise to a few thick dendrites. Often thin axon-like processes could also be recognized, originating either from the cell body or from a thicker dendrite. After destaining of the chromogen and counterstaining with aldehydefuchsin and gallocyanin chromealum, the formerly immunoreactive neurons displayed a light and eccentrically located nucleus. The soma contained only a sparse amount of basophilic substance and was nearly devoid of lipofuscin granules. In electron micrographs, the cisterns of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) were localized near the periphery of the soma. Immunoreactivity occurred along membranes of the RER cistern, outer mitochondrial membrane, and in particles 120-150 micrometers in diameter. Rounded areas (up to a diameter of 1 micrometer) lacked immunoreactivity. Furthermore, there were a few tiny lysosomes. PMID:2867717

  12. Sympathectomies lead to transient substance P-immunoreactive sensory fibre plasticity in the rat skin.

    PubMed

    Ruocco, I; Cuello, A C; Shigemoto, R; Ribeiro-da-Silva, A

    2001-01-01

    Research using animal models of neuropathic pain has revealed sympathetic sprouting onto dorsal root ganglion cells. More recently, sensory fibre sprouting onto dorsal root ganglion cells has also been observed. Previous work in our laboratory demonstrated persistent sympathetic fibre sprouting in the skin of the rat lower lip following sensory denervation of this region. Therefore, we applied immunocytochemistry to determine the effects of sympathectomies on the terminal fields of sensory fibres. The superior cervical ganglia were removed bilaterally and the effects on the innervation of the skin of the rat lower lip were observed 1, 2, 3, 4, 6 and 8 weeks post-surgery. Substance P and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase immunoreactivities were used to identify a subset of sensory and sympathetic fibres, respectively. We also assessed neurokinin-1 receptor immunoreactivity. Quantitative data was obtained with the aid of an image analysis system. In controls, the epidermis and upper dermis were innervated by substance P-immunoreactive fibres only and upper dermal blood vessels possessed the highest density of neurokinin-1 receptor immunoreactivity. Blood vessels in the lower dermis were innervated by both substance P- and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive fibres. Following sympathectomies, substance P-immunoreactive fibres in the epidermis and upper dermis were more intensely labelled only 1 and 2 weeks post-surgery when compared to sham controls. The length of substance P-immunoreactive fibres in this region was also increased only on the second week. Neurokinin-1 receptor immunoreactivity in the upper dermis was slightly decreased 1 and 2 weeks post-surgery. In the lower dermis, substance P-immunoreactive fibres associated with blood vessels were more intensely labelled only 1 and 2 weeks post-surgery, and at all post-surgical time points studied, blood vessels in this region were devoid of dopamine-beta-hydroxylase-immunoreactive fibres. The length of substance P-immunoreactive

  13. Quinolinic acid-immunoreactivity in the naïve mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Yara Pujol; Kenis, Gunter; Rutten, Bart P F; Myint, Aye M; Steinbusch, Harry W M; van den Hove, Daniel L A

    2016-01-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) has been suggested to be involved in infections, inflammatory neurological disorders and in the development of psychiatric disorders. In this view, several studies have been performed to investigate QUIN localization in the brain and its neurotoxic effects. However, evidence is lacking regarding QUIN in healthy, control conditions. The aim of this study was to investigate the region-specific distribution and pattern of QUIN expression in the naïve mouse brain. In addition, possible sex differences in QUIN-immunoreactivity and its link with affect-related behavioural observations were assessed. For this purpose, naïve mice were subjected to the forced swim test (FST) and 20 min open field (OF) testing to measure affect-related behaviour. Afterwards, brains were assessed for QUIN-immunoreactivity. QUIN-immunoreactivity was particularly observed in the cingulate cortex (CC), highlighting clearly delineated cells, and the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), showing a more diffuse staining pattern. Subsequently, QUIN-positive cells in the CC were counted, while QUIN-immunoreactivity in the TRN was examined using gray value measurements. No significant differences between sexes were observed for the number of QUIN-positive cells in the CC, neither in levels of QUIN-immunoreactivity in the TRN. A direct correlation was found between QUIN-positive cells in the CC and QUIN-immunoreactivity in the TRN. Moreover, in male mice, a very strong correlation (rsp=.943; p<.01) between QUIN-immunoreactivity at the level of the TRN and motor activity in the OF was observed. Thus, our results suggest that QUIN - detected in the CC and the TRN - may play a role in regulating motor activity in normal conditions. PMID:26686288

  14. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive neurons in the human olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Ohm, T G; Braak, E; Probst, A; Weindl, A

    1988-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y-like (NPY) immunoreactivity was localized in the adult human olfactory bulb by the unlabeled antibody enzyme (peroxidase anti-peroxidase; PAP) technique in vibratome sections. The majority of NPY-immunoreactive somata was localized in the white matter surrounding the anterior olfactory nucleus. Immunoreactive neurons were less numerous within the anterior olfactory nucleus and within the olfactory bulb layers. NPY-immunoreactive fibres were present in the white matter, the anterior olfactory nucleus, and in the olfactory bulb layers. Fibres within the white matter were generally aligned in a straight path parallel to the long axis of the olfactory bulb and tract. Fibres within the anterior olfactory nucleus showed no clear orientation and displayed numerous branching points. Coiled plexus of NPY-immunoreactive fibres were present in the glomerular layer of the olfactory bulb. Additional characteristics of the NPY-immunoreactive neurons were studied after decolouring the chromogen and restaining the sections with aldehydefuchsin to demonstrate the presence of lipofuscin granules and also with gallocyanin chrome alum to stain the Nissl substance. This analysis showed that the neurons belong to the class of non-pigmented nerve cells. PMID:3251589

  15. Ambient Temperature and 17β-Estradiol Modify Fos Immunoreactivity in the Median Preoptic Nucleus, a Putative Regulator of Skin Vasomotion

    PubMed Central

    Dacks, Penny A.; Krajewski, Sally J.

    2011-01-01

    Estrogen has pronounced effects on thermoregulation, but the anatomic sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes are unknown. In this study, we tested whether estradiol-17β (E2) treatment would alter the activity of thermoregulatory brain regions responding to mild changes in ambient temperature (TAMBIENT). Core and tail skin temperatures were recorded at the ambient temperatures of 20, 24, or 31 C in ovariectomized (OVX) rats with and without E2. Neuronal activity was evaluated by counting the number of Fos-immunoreactive cells in the brains of rats killed 90 min after exposure to one of the three ambient temperatures. Of 14 brain areas examined, the median preoptic nucleus (MnPO) was the only site that exhibited increased Fos immunoreactivity at the high TAMBIENT of 31 C. At 24 C, OVX rats exhibited increased numbers of MnPO Fos-immunoreactive cells, compared with OVX + E2 rats. Interestingly, tail skin vasomotion and MnPO Fos expression were affected in a similar manner by TAMBIENT and E2 treatment. In the arcuate nucleus and anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV), Fos immunoreactivity was highest at the low TAMBIENT of 20 C, with inhibitory (arcuate nucleus) and stimulatory (AVPV) effects of E2. No other areas responded to both TAMBIENT and E2 treatment. These results implicate the MnPO, the arcuate nucleus, and the AVPV as sites of integration between the reproductive and thermoregulatory axes. Combined with studies showing the importance of MnPO neurons in heat-defense pathways, the MnPO emerges as a likely site for E2 modulation of thermoregulatory vasomotion. PMID:21521752

  16. Allopregnanolone Reinstates Tyrosine Hydroxylase Immunoreactive Neurons and Motor Performance in an MPTP-Lesioned Mouse Model of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Adeosun, Samuel O.; Hou, Xu; Jiao, Yun; Zheng, Baoying; Henry, Sherry; Hill, Rosanne; He, Zhi; Pani, Amar; Kyle, Patrick; Ou, Xiaoming; Mosley, Thomas; Farley, Jerry M.; Stockmeier, Craig; Paul, Ian; Bigler, Steven; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Smeyne, Richard; Wang, Jun Ming

    2012-01-01

    Restorative/protective therapies to restore dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc) are greatly needed to effectively change the debilitating course of Parkinson's disease. In this study, we tested the therapeutic potential of a neurogenic neurosteroid, allopregnanolone, in the restoration of the components of the nigrostriatal pathway in MPTP-lesioned mice by measuring striatal dopamine levels, total and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neuron numbers and BrdU-positive cells in the SNpc. An acute treatment (once/week for two weeks) with allopregnanolone restored the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive and total cell numbers in the SNpc of MPTP-lesioned mice, even though this did not increase striatal dopamine. It was also noted that MPTP treated mice to which allopregnanolone was administered had an increase in BrdU-positive cells in the SNpc. The effects of allopregnanolone in MPTP-lesioned mice were more apparent in mice that underwent behavioral tests. Interestingly, mice treated with allopregnanolone after MPTP lesion were able to perform at levels similar to that of non-lesioned control mice in a rotarod test. These data demonstrate that allopregnanolone promotes the restoration of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons and total cells in the nigrostriatal tract, improves the motor performance in MPTP-treated mice, and may serve as a therapeutic strategy for Parkinson's disease. PMID:23209637

  17. Context Modulates the Expression of Conditioned Motor Sensitization, Cellular Activation, and Synaptophysin Immunoreactivity

    PubMed Central

    Rademacher, David J.; Celeste Napier, T.; Meredith, Gloria E.

    2007-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that amphetamine- (AMPH) induced conditioned motor sensitization is accompanied by cellular activation (measured by Fos immunoreactivity) and synaptophysin immunoreactivity in reward-related brain areas. Forty-eight rats were tested for conditioned motor sensitization using a conditioning paradigm that was performed in a three-chambered apparatus. Rats underwent two drug pairings with 1.0 mg/kg AMPH in one outer chamber and, on alternate days, were paired with saline in the other. On the fifth day, relative to the first AMPH treatment, AMPH administration increased motor activity in the AMPH-paired context but not in the saline-paired context. Relative to the first saline treatment, saline on the fifth day produced a conditioned increase in motor activity when given in the chamber previously paired with AMPH, and saline given in the saline-paired context produced a conditioned decrease in motor activity. AMPH administered in the AMPH-paired context increased the density of both Fos and synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the dentate gyrus, cornu ammonis (CA)1, CA3, basolateral amygdala, and dorsolateral striatum. This pairing between context and drug increased Fos but not synaptophysin immunoreactivity in the nucleus accumbens core and shell. Saline administered in the AMPH-paired context increased the density of Fos immunoreactivity in the basolateral amygdala and nucleus accumbens core. These data indicate that the basolateral amygdala-nucleus accumbens core pathway is necessary for the context-elicited conditioned motor responses, while the hippocampus encodes the spatial context. PMID:17970739

  18. Abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1 immunoreactive brain nuclei in rats.

    PubMed

    Stengel, Andreas; Goebel, Miriam; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2010-02-01

    Abdominal surgery-induced postoperative gastric ileus is well established to induce Fos expression in specific brain nuclei in rats within 2-h after surgery. However, the phenotype of activated neurons has not been thoroughly characterized. Nesfatin-1 was recently discovered in the rat hypothalamus as a new anorexigenic peptide that also inhibits gastric emptying and is widely distributed in rat brain autonomic nuclei suggesting an involvement in stress responses. Therefore, we investigated whether abdominal surgery activates nesfatin-1-immunoreactive (ir) neurons in the rat brain. Two hours after abdominal surgery with cecal palpation under short isoflurane anesthesia or anesthesia alone, rats were transcardially perfused and brains processed for double immunohistochemical labeling of Fos and nesfatin-1. Abdominal surgery, compared to anesthesia alone, induced Fos expression in neurons of the supraoptic nucleus (SON), paraventricular nucleus (PVN), locus coeruleus (LC), Edinger-Westphal nucleus (EW), rostral raphe pallidus (rRPa), nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) and ventrolateral medulla (VLM). Double Fos/nesfatin-1 labeling showed that of the activated cells, 99% were nesfatin-1-immunoreactive in the SON, 91% in the LC, 82% in the rRPa, 74% in the EW and VLM, 71% in the anterior parvicellular PVN, 47% in the lateral magnocellular PVN, 41% in the medial magnocellular PVN, 14% in the NTS and 9% in the medial parvicellular PVN. These data established nesfatin-1 immunoreactive neurons in specific nuclei of the hypothalamus and brainstem as part of the neuronal response to abdominal surgery and suggest a possible implication of nesfatin-1 in the alterations of food intake and gastric transit associated with such a stressor. PMID:19944727

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  20. Estrogen Receptor Immunoreactivity in Late-Gestation Fetal Lambs1

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, Lori M.; Mahoney, Megan M.; Magorien, Julie E.; Lee, Theresa M.; Wood, Ruth I.

    2009-01-01

    Prenatal androgens masculinize postnatal reproductive neuroendocrine function and behavior in sheep. Testosterone treatment of pregnant ewes during midgestation masculinizes sexual behavior and luteinizing hormone secretion in female lambs, presumably in part via aromatization and estrogen receptor (ESR) binding in the brain. We hypothesized that male and female sheep also differ in the number and distribution of ESR-containing neurons. If so, ESR expression should be sensitive to prenatal hormones delivered exogenously or in situ. ESR alpha (ESR1) was compared by immunocytochemistry in male and female lambs at the end of gestation, as well as in fetal females exposed prenatally to testosterone or dihydrotestosterone. ESR1-positive neurons were abundant in the posteromedial bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BSTpm), medial preoptic area (MPOA), posterior medial amygdaloid nucleus (MeP), amygdalohippocampal area (AHi), ventromedial hypothalamic nuclei (VMH), and arcuate hypothalamic nuclei (ARC). In females, the ARC had the largest number of stained cells (mean ± SEM, 475.6 ± 57.4 cells/0.173 mm2), while staining intensity was greatest in the MPOA (mean ± SEM gray level, 31.3 ± 5.3). The mean ± SEM integrated gray level (IGL) was high in the ARC (0.63 ± 0.13) and in the MPOA (0.51 ± 0.08). The mean ± SEM IGL was low in the MeP (0.31 ± 0.10) and in the BSTpm (0.21 ± 0.06), while it was intermediate in the AHi (0.36 ± 0.10) and in the VMH (0.37 ± 0.07). ESR immunostaining was not significantly different in male and female fetal lambs, nor in females fetuses exposed prenatally to androgens (P > 0.05). However, ESR1 staining was significantly increased in the ARC, MPOA, and AHi of adult rams vs. adult ewes. These results suggest that brain ESR immunoreactivity in fetal lambs is unlikely to account for postnatal sex differences in reproductive function. Instead, sex differences in ESR emerge postnatally. PMID:19164175

  1. Immunoreactive intensity of FXPRL amide neuropeptides in response to environmental conditions in the silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Hagino, Ayako; Kitagawa, Norio; Imai, Kunio; Yamashita, Okitsugu; Shiomi, Kunihiro

    2010-12-01

    In the silkworm Bombyx mori, the diapause hormone-pheromone biosynthesis activating neuropeptide gene, DH-PBAN, is a neuropeptide gene that encodes a polypeptide precursor consisting in five Phe-X-Pro-Arg-Leu-NH(2) (FXPRL) amide (FXPRLa) neuropeptides; DH (diapause hormone), PBAN (pheromone-biosynthesis-activating neuropeptide) and α-, β- and γ-SGNPs (subesophageal ganglion neuropeptides). These neuropeptides are synthesized in DH-PBAN-producing neurosecretory cells contained within three neuromeres, four mandibular cells, six maxillary cells, two labial cells (SLb) and four lateral cells of the subesophageal ganglion. DH is solely responsible, among the FXPRLa peptide family, for embryonic diapause. Functional differentiation has been previously suggested to occur at each neuromere, with the SLb cells releasing DH through brain innervation in order to induce embryonic diapause. We have investigated the immunoreactive intensity of DH in the SLb when thermal (25°C or 15°C) and light (continuous illumination or darkness) conditions are altered and following brain surgery that induces diapause or non-diapause eggs in the progeny. We have also examined the immunoreactivity of the other FXPRLa peptides by using anti-β-SGNP and anti-PBAN antibodies. Pupal SLb somata immunoreactivities seem to be affected by both thermal and light conditions during embryogenesis. Thus, we have been able to identify a close correlation between the immunoreactive intensity of neuropeptides and environmental conditions relating to the determination of embryonic diapause in B. mori. PMID:21103995

  2. Muscarinic Acetylcholine Receptors in Macaque V1 Are Most Frequently Expressed by Parvalbumin-Immunoreactive Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Disney, Anita A.; Aoki, Chiye

    2010-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is believed to underlie mechanisms of arousal and attention in mammals. ACh also has a demonstrated functional effect in visual cortex that is both diverse and profound. We have reported previously that cholinergic modulation in V1 of the macaque monkey is strongly targeted toward GABAergic interneurons. Here we examine the localization of m1 and m2 muscarinic receptor subtypes across subpopulations of GABAergic interneurons—identified by their expression of the calcium-binding proteins parvalbumin, calbindin, and calretinin—using dual-immunofluorescence confocal microscopy in V1 of the macaque monkey. In doing so, we find that the vast majority (87%) of parvalbumin-immunoreactive neurons express m1-type muscarinic ACh receptors. m1 receptors are also expressed by 60% of calbindin-immunoreactive neurons and 40% of calretinin-immunoreactive neurons. m2 AChRs, on the other hand, are expressed by only 31% of parvalbumin neurons, 23% of calbindin neurons, and 25% of calretinin neurons. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive cells comprise ≈75% of the inhibitory neuronal population in V1 and included in this large subpopulation are neurons known to veto and regulate the synchrony of principal cell spiking. Through the expression of m1 ACh receptors on nearly all of these PV cells, the cholinergic system avails itself of powerful control of information flow through and processing within the network of principal cells in the cortical circuit. PMID:18265004

  3. Cellular and subcellular localization of estrogen and progestin receptor immunoreactivities in the mouse hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Mitterling, Katherine L.; Spencer, Joanna L.; Dziedzic, Noelle; Shenoy, Sushila; McCarthy, Katharine; Waters, Elizabeth M.; McEwen, Bruce S.; Milner, Teresa A.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen receptor-α (ERα), -β (ERβ) and progestin receptor (PR) immunoreactivities are localized to extranuclear sites in the rat hippocampal formation. Since rats and mice respond differently to estradiol treatment at a cellular level, the present study examined the distribution of ovarian hormone receptors in the dorsal hippocampal formation of mice. For this, antibodies to ERα, ERβ, and PR were localized by light and electron immunomicroscopy in male and female mice across the estrous cycle. Light microscopic examination of the mouse hippocampal formation showed sparse nuclear ERα–, and PR-immunoreactivity (-ir) most prominent in the CA1 region and diffuse ERβ-ir primarily in the CA1 pyramidal cell layer as well as in a few interneurons. Ultrastructural analysis additionally revealed discrete extranuclear ERα-, ERβ- and PR-ir in neuronal and glial profiles throughout the hippocampal formation. While extranuclear profiles were detected in all animal groups examined, the amount and types of profiles varied with sex and estrous cycle phase. ERα-ir was highest in diestrus females, particularly in dendritic spines, axons and glia. Similarly, ERβ-ir was highest in estrus and diestrus females, mainly in dendritic spines and glia. Conversely, PR-ir was highest during proestrus, and mostly in axons. Except for very low levels of extranuclear ERβ-ir in mossy fiber terminals in mice, the labeling patterns in the mice for all three antibodies were similar to the ultrastructural labeling found previously in rats, suggesting that regulation of these receptors is well conserved across the two species. PMID:20506473

  4. Clinicopathological Characteristics, Treatment, and Prognosis of 21 Patients with Primary Gastric Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Cao, Yidan; Gu, Xingting; Wan, Yuming

    2016-01-01

    We performed a retrospective analysis of 21 patients with primary gastric squamous cell carcinoma (PGSCC) who were admitted to our hospital from October 2008 to October 2014. The median age was 67 years and male predominance was observed, the most common tumor locations were the upper third of the stomach, most of the clinical manifestations were identical to those of other types of gastric tumors, and the tumor cells had positive immunoreactivity for p63 and CK5/6. In terms of treatments, surgery (R0 resection) is the main treatment; the effect of other treatments is unclear. The median survival time for the surgery group and nonsurgery group was 46 and 4.5 months, respectively. Probably due to limited number of cases, no significant difference in median survival time was observed between the surgery alone group and the surgery plus adjuvant therapy group (46 versus 51 months, P = 0.310). A standard chemotherapy regimen for this disease has not yet been established; the choice of its chemotherapy regimens tends to follow the principle of the treatment of gastric adenocarcinoma or esophageal cancer. PGSCC generally had a poor prognosis, and early detection, early diagnosis, and early surgical treatment are beneficial to patients. PMID:27478431

  5. Parvalbumin immunoreactive neurons in the main olfactory bulb of the house musk shrew, Suncus murinus.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, S; Oda, S; Takayanagi, M; Kishi, K

    1998-01-01

    The distribution, morphological features, and postnatal development of parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactive neurons in the main olfactory bulb (MOB) of the house musk shrew, Suncus murinus, were studied to report for the first time on PV positive bulbar interneurons in the order Insectivora. In adult animals, PV neurons are distributed in the glomerular layer (GL), the external plexiform layer (EPL), the internal plexiform layer (IPL) and the granule cell layer (GCL) of the MOB. These neurons were identified as a subpopulation of periglomerular cells and perinidal cells [Alonso et al., 1995] in the GL and at the GL-EPL border, respectively, and as bipolar and multipolar neurons in the EPL and four types of the interneurons (horizontal cells, Cajal cells, Golgi cells, and bitufted cells) in the layers deeper than the mitral cell layer. During development of PV neurons, neurons exhibiting extremely faint PV immunoreactivity first appeared in the GCL at postnatal day 14 and increased markedly in number and intensity of their PV immunoreactivity from postnatal days 14 to 28. At postnatal day 21, PV neurons were identified as periglomerular cells in the GL, perinidal cells at the GL-EPL border, and morphologically unidentifiable neurons in the EPL, IPL and GCL. At postnatal day 28, PV neurons exhibited a nearly adult pattern with respect to distribution and structural features. The present results strongly suggest that a wide variety of PV positive neurons in the MOB of the house musk shrew may develop postnatally. PMID:9807013

  6. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease☆

    PubMed Central

    Mead, Ben; Berry, Martin; Logan, Ann; Scott, Robert A.H.; Leadbeater, Wendy; Scheven, Ben A.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs) and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs), MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC), adipose tissues (ADSC) and dental pulp (DPSC), together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment. PMID:25752437

  7. Stem Cell Treatment of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Paolo; Markwald, Roger R.

    2005-01-01

    Stem cells are multipotent, undifferentiated cells capable of multiplication and differentiation. Preliminary experimental evidence suggests that stem cells derived from embryonic or adult tissues (especially bone marrow) may develop into myocardial cells. Some experts believe that this phenomenon occurs naturally in human beings, specifically during recovery from a myocardial infarction. Recently, stem cells have been used with the therapeutic intention of regenerating damaged tissues. Cardiac experiments, mainly with adult homologous stem cells, have proved that this therapy is safe and may improve myocardial vascularization and pump function. We review current fundamental concepts regarding the normal development of embryonic stem cells into myocardial tissue and the heart as a whole. We describe the multiple conditions that naturally enable a stem cell to become a myocardial cell and a group of stem cells to become a heart. We also discuss the challenge of translating basic cellular and molecular mechanisms into effective, clinically relevant treatment options. PMID:16429891

  8. Androgen inhibits the increases in hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and CRH-immunoreactivity following gonadectomy.

    PubMed

    Bingaman, E W; Magnuson, D J; Gray, T S; Handa, R J

    1994-03-01

    To characterize the effect of androgens on the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis we examined the regulation of corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) following gonadectomy and hormone replacement. Three-month-old male Fischer 344 (F344) rats were gonadectomized (GDX) or sham GDX. Control animals remained intact. Animals were sacrificed 1, 4, 7, 10, or 21 days following surgery. GDX rats had significantly elevated (p < 0.05) levels of hypothalamic CRH 21 days after surgery compared to intact and sham-operated rats. In a second study, 3-month-old male F344 rats were GDX and treated with the non-aromatizable androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), using a Silastic capsule containing crystalline DHT propionate subcutaneously implanted in each animal's back. Control animals were GDX and sham-treated or left intact (INT). Three weeks following gonadectomy, CRH levels in the hypothalamus of GDX rats showed a significant increase (p < 0.05) compared to intact animals. DHT treatment, beginning at the time of gonadectomy prevented this increase. CRH or arginine vasopressin (AVP) immunoreactivity was examined using immunocytochemistry. The number of CRH-immunoreactive (IR) cells in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) of GDX, DHT-treated animals was significantly decreased (p < 0.05) compared to GDX rats. No differences were seen between treatment groups in CRH-IR cell numbers in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis or the central amygdaloid nucleus or in AVP-IR cell numbers in the PVN. These data demonstrate that long-term castration increases hypothalamic CRH content and CRH-IR cell numbers in the PVN by removal of an androgen-dependent repression. PMID:8159272

  9. Dithranol abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the nerve fibers of the rat orofacial skin.

    PubMed

    Orojan, Ivan; Szigeti, Csaba; Varszegi, Szilvia; Dobo, Endre; Gulya, Karoly

    2006-11-22

    Dithranol has been used to treat psoriasis for decades. Although its beneficial effect may involve the induction of cutaneous inflammation, and inflammation often leads to damages in nerve fibers, these alterations are not well documented. Therefore, we investigated the effects of dithranol on the immunohistochemical characteristics of the cutaneous nerve fibers in the rat skin. Epidermal nerve fiber staining was achieved with ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase L1 (UCH-L1) immunohistochemistry in the orofacial skin of control rats, rats treated with (a) dithranol for 5 days, (b) corticosteroid for 5 days following dithranol treatment for 5 days, and (c) corticosteroid for 5 days. The results revealed a complete loss of UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the dithranol-treated animals. Topical application of corticosteroid onto the inflamed skin for 5 days reversed this effect: the UCH-L1 immunoreactivity was almost completely restored. Steroid treatment for 5 days did not change the appearance of the UCH-L1-immunoreactive nerve fibers. These findings were supported by Western blot analyses. We conclude that dithranol, incidentally similarly to psoriasis, causes inflammation and abolishes UCH-L1 immunoreactivity in the rat orofacial skin in a corticosteroid-reversible manner. This phenomenon may be due to the ability of dithranol to cause oxidative damage to the UCH-L1 protein, and to the antioxidant activity of the corticosteroids countering this effect. PMID:17011532

  10. MRI evaluation of axonal reorganization after bone marrow stromal cell treatment of traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Quan; Qu, Changsheng; Chopp, Michael; Ding, Guang Liang; Nejad-Davarani, Siamak P.; Helpern, Joseph A.; Jensen, Jens H.; Zhang, Zheng Gang; Li, Lian; Lu, Mei; Kaplan, David; Hu, Jiani; Shen, Yimin; Kou, Zhifeng; Li, Qingjiang; Wang, Shiyang; Mahmood, Asim

    2012-01-01

    We treated traumatic brain injury (TBI) with human bone marrow stromal cells (hMSCs) and evaluated the effect of treatment on white matter reorganization using MRI. We subjected male Wistar rats (n = 17) to controlled cortical impact and either withheld treatment (controls; n = 9) or inserted collagen scaffolds containing hMSCs (n = 8). Six weeks later, the rats were sacrificed and MRI revealed selective migration of grafted neural progenitor cells towards the white matter reorganized boundary of the TBI-induced lesion. Histology confirmed that the white matter had been reorganized, associated with increased fractional anisotropy (FA; p <0.01) in the recovery regions relative to the injured core region in both treated and control groups. Treatment with hMSCs increased FA in the recovery regions, lowered T2 in the core region, decreased lesion volume and improved functional recovery relative to untreated controls. Immunoreactive staining showed axonal projections emanating from neurons and extruding from the corpus callosum into the ipsilateral cortex at the boundary of the lesion. Fiber tracking (FT) maps derived from diffusion tensor imaging confirmed the immunohistological data and provided information on axonal rewiring. The apparent kurtosis coefficient (AKC) detected additional axonal remodeling regions with crossing axons, confirmed by immunohistological staining, compared with FA. Our data demonstrate that AKC, FA, FTand T2 can be used to evaluate treatment-induced white matter recovery, which may facilitate restorative therapy in patients with TBI. PMID:21432927

  11. Endothelial nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivity in early gestation and in trophoblastic disease.

    PubMed Central

    Ariel, I; Hochberg, A; Shochina, M

    1998-01-01

    AIMS: To study the localisation of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in the normal placenta, with special emphasis on the implantation site in the first trimester of pregnancy, and in the different subtypes of trophoblastic cells in gestational trophoblastic disease. METHODS: The immunoperoxidase technique with an antibody directed against eNOS was applied to paraffin sections from first and second trimester placentas, placenta accreta, partial and complete hydatidiform moles, and choriocarcinoma. Immunoperoxidase staining for human placental lactogen (hPL) was performed on parallel sections. RESULTS: Prominent immunoreactivity for eNOS was found to be present in the intermediate trophoblastic cells of the cell columns of the anchoring villi and in trophoblastic cells at the implantation site. Staining was also present in the syncytiotrophoblast, most conspicuous at the apical cell border. In trophoblastic disease, proliferating large mononuclear cells, which were strongly positive for hPL, were found to be immunoreactive for eNOS. CONCLUSIONS: eNOS immunoreactivity is strongly positive in the extravillous trophoblastic cells and to a lesser extent in the syncytiotrophoblast. In the former it may play a role in implantation and vascular invasion. Cells with differentiation to intermediate trophoblast in complete hydatidiform mole and choriocarcinoma also show high levels of eNOS, which may be associated with the haematogenous mode of spread of trophoblastic disease. Images PMID:9771440

  12. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hCG and LDH may be at any level. Poor prognosis A nonseminoma extragonadal germ cell tumor is in the poor prognosis group if: the tumor is in the ... extragonadal germ cell tumor does not have a poor prognosis group. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There ...

  13. c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in the CNS of the adult rat: basal and transynaptically induced expression of an immediate-early gene.

    PubMed

    Herdegen, T; Leah, J D; Manisali, A; Bravo, R; Zimmermann, M

    1991-01-01

    An immunocytochemical study of dorsal root ganglia, spinal cord and medulla oblongata was performed with antisera against the c-jun proto-oncogene encoded protein. The c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was restricted to the cell nucleus. In the CNS of untreated rats a basal c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was present in the nuclei of two types of neurons: motor and autonomic. Labelled nuclei could be seen in many motoneurons of the ventral horn of the entire length of spinal cord and the lower medulla oblongata, as well as in the area of the nucleus hypoglossus, the dorsal motor nucleus of nucleus vagus, nucleus ambiguus, nucleus facialis, nucleus abducens and motor nucleus of nucleus trigeminus. Additionally, labelled nuclei were found in the preganglionic sympathetic and preganglionic parasympathetic cells of the nucleus intermediolateralis and nucleus intercalatus in the spinal cord. In the medulla oblongata we found a cluster of cells with c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in an area between the dorsomedial part of the oral nucleus spinalis trigeminalis and the lateral border of the knee of facial nerve. Additionally, a second cluster of c-JUN-like immunoreactivity cells was visible between the ventromedial part of the oral nucleus spinalis trigeminalis and the lateral border of the rostral nucleus facialis. Examination of the characteristics of all cell groups with a basal c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in the spinal cord and lower brainstem revealed an overlapping distribution with cholinergic cell groups. Basal c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was also seen in the dorsal root ganglion cells. We examined the factors which can effect the expression of the c-JUN protein. Maximal expression of c-JUN-like immunoreactivity was observed after electrical stimulation of primary afferents. Stimulation of sciatic nerve at a strength sufficient to recruit A delta- and C-fibres produced c-JUN-like immunoreactivity in many nuclei of the ipsilateral dorsal horn of the lumbar spinal cord. c

  14. CZTSSe thin film solar cells: Surface treatments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joglekar, Chinmay Sunil

    Chalcopyrite semiconducting materials, specifically CZTS, are a promising alternative to traditional silicon solar cell technology. Because of the high absorption coefficient; films of the order of 1 micrometer thickness are sufficient for the fabrication of solar cells. Liquid based synthesis methods are advantageous because they are easily scalable using the roll to roll manufacturing techniques. Various treatments are explored in this study to enhance the performance of the selenized CZTS film based solar cells. Thiourea can be used as a sulfur source and can be used to tune band gap of CZTSSe. Bromine etching can be used to manipulate the thickness of sintered CZTSSe film. The etching treatment creates recombination centers which lead to poor device performance. Various after treatments were used to improve the performance of the devices. It was observed that the performance of the solar cell devices could not be improved by any of the after treatment steps. Other surface treatment processes are explored including KCN etching and gaseous H2S treatments. Hybrid solar cells which included use of CIGS nanoparticles at the interface between CZTSSe and CdS are also explored.

  15. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Neoplasms for more information. High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell transplant This treatment is a way of giving ... blood -forming cells destroyed by the cancer treatment. Stem cells (immature blood cells) are removed from the blood ...

  17. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  18. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-01-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment. PMID:26165830

  19. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper

    2014-01-01

    We report on a multifunctional nucleic acid, termed AptamiR, composed of an aptamer domain and an antimiR domain. This composition mediates cell specific delivery of antimiR molecules for silencing of endogenous micro RNA. The introduced multifunctional molecule preserves cell targeting, anti-proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting and treatment. PMID:24494617

  20. Distribution of beacon immunoreactivity in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Tian, De-Run; Tian, Nan; Chen, Hui; Shi, Yu-Shun; Chang, Jaw-Kang; Yang, Jun; Yuan, Lan; Han, Ji-Sheng

    2006-01-01

    Beacon is a novel peptide isolated from the hypothalamus of Israeli sand rat. In the present study, we determined the distribution of beacon in the rat brain using immunohistochemical approach with a polyclonal antiserum directed against the synthetic C-terminal peptide fragment (47-73). The hypothalamus represented the major site of beacon-immunoreactive (IR) cell bodies that were concentrated in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN) and the supraoptic nucleus (SON). Additional immunostained cells were found in the septum, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, subfornical organ and subcommissural organ. Beacon-IR fibers were seen with high density in the internal layer of the median eminence and low to moderate density in the external layer. Significant beacon-IR fibers were also seen in the nucleus of the solitary tract and lateral reticular formation. The beacon neurons found in the PVN were further characterized by double label immunohistochemistry. Several beacon-IR neurons that resided in the medial PVN were shown to coexpress corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and most labeled beacon fibers in the external layer of median eminence coexist with CRH. The topographical distribution of beacon-IR in the brain suggests multiple biological activities for beacon in addition to its proposed roles in modulating feeding behaviors and pituitary hormone release. PMID:16157417

  1. Effect of Acute and Chronic Electroconvulsive Shock on 5-Hydroxytrypamine 6 Receptor Immunoreactivity in Rat Hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun Jung; Kang, Seungwoo; Kim, Hyun Ju; Choi, Sun-Hye; Shin, Seungkeun; Lee, Hyung Ha

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive shock (ECS) induces not only an antidepressant effect but also adverse effects such as amnesia. One potential mechanism underlying both the antidepressant and amnesia effect of ECS may involve the regulation of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine) 6 (5-HT6) receptor, but less is known about the effects of acute ECS on the changes in 5-HT6 receptor expression in the hippocampus. In addition, as regulation of 5-HT receptor expression is influenced by the number of ECS treatment and by interval between ECS treatment and sacrifice, it is probable that magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 receptor expression could be influenced by repeated ECS exposure. To explore this possibility, we observed and compared the changes of 5-HT6 receptor immunoreactivity (5-HT6 IR) in rat hippocampus at 1, 8, 24, or 72 h after the treatment with either a single ECS (acute ECS) or daily ECS for 10 days (chronic ECS). We found that acute ECS increased 5-HT6 IR in the CA1, CA3, and granule cell layer of hippocampus, reaching peak levels at 8 h and returning to basal levels 72 h later. The magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 IR observed after acute ECS were not affected by chronic ECS. These results demonstrate that both acute and chronic ECS transiently increase the 5-HT6 IR in rat hippocampus, and suggest that the magnitude and time-dependent changes in 5-HT6 IR in the hippocampus appear not to be influenced by repeated ECS treatment. PMID:25258570

  2. Adipokinetic hormone-immunoreactive peptide in the endocrine and central nervous system of several insect species: a comparative immunocytochemical approach.

    PubMed

    Schooneveld, H; Romberg-Privee, H M; Veenstra, J A

    1985-02-01

    The distribution of intrinsic glandular cells containing adipokinetic hormone (AKH)-like material in the corpora cardiaca (CC) and the occurrence of immunoreactive neurons in the nervous system in 19 species belonging to nine insect orders was studied by means of an immunocytochemical method (peroxidase-antiperoxidase), with antisera raised against an AKH analogue [( Tyr1]-AKH). The CC gland cells in Locusta migratoria migratorioides and Schistocerca americana gregaria were strongly immunoreactive. Those in other orders showed less or no immunoreactivity indicating that AKH has a very restricted distribution. Neurons containing immunoreactive material were found in the brain and ventral ganglia in all species investigated. As the specificity of the antiserum has not been determined, it is not known whether this peptide is identical to AKH. Considering the distribution of their axons, these neurons may be involved with one or more of the following functions: (1) nervous communication within the central nervous system; (2) communication with the stomatogastric nervous system; (3) possible release of peptide from the CC; (4) release of neuropeptide in or from the corpus allatum. A combination of these features has been found in only a few of the species investigated. The immunocytochemical study demonstrated significant differences among species belonging to Apterygota, Hemi-, and Holometabola in the number of neurons, the length and degree of branching of their axon, and the amount of immunoreactive peptide stored therein. PMID:3979801

  3. [Glioma treatment strategies using mesenchymal stem cells].

    PubMed

    Namba, Hiroki

    2010-10-01

    Because of the growth characteristics of malignant gliomas that are highly invasive and deeply infiltrate the surrounding brain area; the surgical resection of these gliomas with preservation of neural functions is almost always noncurative. The residual tumor cells are usually resistant to standard adjuvant radiochemotherapy, and therefore, the tumors inevitably recur after a certain period and finally cause the death of the patients. Neural and mesenchymal stem cells have been extensively studied for the development of new strategies for treating malignant gliomas because of these cells possess the intrinsic property of homing toward tumor cells. By using neural and mesenchymal stem cells as vehicles for drug carriers, it is possible to deliver anticancer drugs to the tumor cells that infiltrate functioning normal brain tissue and are difficult to remove. Several cytokines and suicide genes have been tested, and promising results have been reported in animal brain tumor models. However, further studies involving safety issues such as secondary cancer formation are required before human trials of stem cell therapies. In the present paper, the author has reviewed the recent concepts involved in the treatment of malignant gliomas with stem cells, especially mesenchymal stem cells that are much easier to obtain from the patients themselves. PMID:20940507

  4. Cell-based treatments for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jones, Peter M; Courtney, Monica L; Burns, Christopher J; Persaud, Shanta J

    2008-10-01

    In Type 1 diabetes mellitus the insulin-secreting beta-cells in pancreatic islets of Langerhans are selectively destroyed by autoimmune assault. Because diabetes is caused by the loss of a single cell type it is amenable to treatment by cell replacement therapy. Advances in islet transplantation procedures have demonstrated that people with Type 1 diabetes can be cured by human islet transplantation, but the severely limited availability of donor islets has restricted the widespread application of this approach, and driven the search for substitute transplant tissues. Recent experimental studies suggest that three separate sources of tissue show therapeutic potential--xenografts from other species, tissue stem cells and embryonic stem cells. Of these, xenografts are closest to clinical application but there are still major obstacles to be overcome. Insulin-expressing cells have been derived from a number of different stem cell populations but embryonic stem cells offer the major advantage of being able, in principle, to provide the vast numbers of cells required for transplantation therapy. PMID:18652911

  5. In vitro digestibility and immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Do, Andrew B; Williams, Kristina; Toomer, Ondulla T

    2016-01-01

    Current models of digestibility solely utilize pepsin stability to assess the safety of allergenic food proteins. However, in vivo complete protein digestion requires acid denaturation and pepsin, trypsin, and/or chymotrypsin cleavage. This study aimed to identify the immunoreactivity and allergenicity of stable bovine milk proteins, using an improved digestibility model to simulate physiological gastric and intestinal conditions in vitro. Gel electrophoresis and immunoblot analysis were used to determine protein stability and immunoreactivity, respectively. Immunoreactivity of bovine milk proteins, β-lactoglobulin (β-LG) and casein (CN) was greatly diminished with gastric simulation (0-60 min), but some proteins were stable and immunoreactive with simulated intestinal digestive conditions (0-60 min). This study demonstrates the need for improved digestibility models for more accurate assessment of the behavior of food allergens in vivo. PMID:26213013

  6. Blockade of capsaicin-induced reduction of GABA-immunoreactivity by spantide in cat spinal superficial dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Wei, F; Zhao, Z Q

    1996-03-01

    In our previous study, perineural application of capsaicin not only produced release and depletion of substance P from primary nociceptive afferent terminals, but also reduced GABA immunoreactivity in the superficial dorsal horn. The aim of the present study was to determine whether the release of GABA is triggered by substance P released from primary nociceptive afferent terminals by capsaican. GABA and substance P immunoreactivity in the lumbar dorsal horn was examined in two groups: in the first group the tibial nerve was treated with 3% capsaicin, and in the second group the dorsal surface of the lumbar cord was infused with spantide (50 nM), a substance P receptor antagonist, before application of capsaicin to the tibial nerve. Following perineural treatment of capsaicin for 30 min, both the GABA-immunostaining density and the number of GABA immunoreactive neurons were reduced significantly in the ipsilateral laminae I-II at L5 through L7. GABA immunoreactivity was reduced by 54.12%, 44.46% and 31.0% in the medial, central and lateral parts of the ipsilateral laminae I-II at L7, respectively. With pre-application of spantide to the spinal cord, GABA immunoreactivity was reduced only to 14.4%, 16.4% and 10.16%, respectively, in the medial, central and lateral parts of laminae I-II at L7 and no reduction of GABA immunoreactive neurons was observed. Additionally, capsaicin-induced reduction of substance P immunoreactivity was partially blocked by spantide. These results suggest that capsaicin produces substance P release from primary nociceptive afferent terminals, and that substance P, in turn, activates the second-order GABAergic interneurons in the dorsal horn. The functional significance of capsaicin-induced activation of GABAergic neurons in modulation of spinal nociception is discussed. PMID:8834409

  7. Growth hormone releasing factor-like immunoreactivity in human milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1986-03-28

    The presence of immunoreactive growth hormone-releasing factor (GRF) in human milk has been demonstrated. By using sequential high performance liquid chromatography, it has been shown that most of the immunoreactivity co-elutes with the synthetic, hypothalamic-like, GRF (1-40). The concentrations of GRF detected (between 152 and 432 pg GRF/ml milk) exceed several fold its values in plasma. PMID:3083812

  8. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase

    SciTech Connect

    Rothenbery, S.P.; Iqbal, M.P.

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahdrofolate:NADP/sup +/ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of (/sup 3/H)methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme.

  9. Human leukemia and normal leukocytes contain a species of immunoreactive but nonfunctional dihydrofolate reductase.

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, S P; Iqbal, M P

    1982-01-01

    A quantitative radioimmunoassay has been developed for human dihydrofolate reductase (tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase; 5,6,7,8-tetrahydrofolate:NADP+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.5.1.3) by using antiserum raised in rabbits against the active enzyme purified from calf liver. An immunoreactive protein could be identified in the cytoplasm of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, which contained no functional dihydrofolate reductase activity. Its concentration was stoichiometric to the volume of cytoplasm assayed and paralleled the standard curve obtained with purified enzyme, indicating that this protein in the human cells is antigenically similar to the homologous antigen. The concentration of this immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm of human leukemia and normal leukocytes in all instances greatly exceeded the concentration of functional dihydrofolate reductase, which was measured by the binding of [3H]methotrexate. This nonfunctional immunoreactive protein in the cytoplasm and cytosol from two different samples of chronic myelogenous leukemia cells analyzed by gel filtration had an apparent molecular weight of 41,000, which is twice the molecular weight of the functional enzyme. Images PMID:6952216

  10. The distribution of neuropeptide Y and dynorphin immunoreactivity in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, from birth to sexual maturity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cepriano, L. M.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y and dynorphin have been localized in the brain and pituitary gland of the platyfish, Xiphophorus maculatus, at different ages and stages of development from birth to sexual maturity. Immunoreactive neuropeptide Y was found in perikarya and tracts of the nucleus olfactoretinalis, telencephalon, ventral tegmentum and in the neurohypophysis and in the three regions of the adenohypophysis. Immunoreactive dynorphin was found in nerve tracts in the olfactory bulb and in cells of the pars intermedia and the rostral pars distalis of the pituitary gland.

  11. Somatostatin-Like Immunoreactivity in Rat Blood

    PubMed Central

    Berelowitz, M.; Kronheim, S.; Pimstone, B.; Shapiro, B.

    1978-01-01

    Somatostatin-like immunoreactivity (SLI) has been demonstrated by radioimmunoassay (RIA) in rat serum using an antiserum specific for somatostatin and cross-reacting maximally with the biologically important area on the peptide. The RIA has a sensitivity of 35 pg/ml. SLI dilutes in parallel with synthetic somatostatin standard in the RIA and shows characteristics similar to synthetic somatostatin on Sephadex G-25 (f) gel chromatography eluting largely as a single peak with 1 M acetic acid. Significant regional differences in serum SLI are present. A positive gradient was found in paired samples from aorta (mean±SEM, 0.304±0.024 ng/ml) and portal vein (0.495±0.047 ng/ml) consistent with the known presence of somatostatin in gut and pancreas, and a negative gradient was noted between paired samples from portal vein (0.523±0.076 ng/ml) and hepatic vein (0.290±0.048 ng/ml) indicating hepatic clearance. No significant differences were demonstrated between aorta and confluence of cerebral venous sinuses or between aorta and inferior vena cava (IVC). After intragastric glucose, a significant and marked elevation of portal SLI was observed, maximal at 5 min (0.416±0.137 vs. 1.55±0.30 ng/ml at 5 min). A significant biphasic elevation of portal SLI also occurred after intravenous glucose. After both routes of glucose administration, the patterns of portal SLI followed closely those of portal glucose and insulin. By contrast, IVC SLI failed to reflect these changes. Thus, SLI in the rat shows chromatographic similarity with synthetic somatostatin. Regional differences in serum levels are marked; the highest concentrations being found in the portal venous effluent of pancreas and gut. Furthermore, glucose causes elevation of portal SLI in a pattern similar to portal insulin and glucose and without concomitant elevation in IVC. This differential elevation of SLI after glucose is consistent with a hormonal action within the portal system as a direct effect of somatostatin

  12. Immunoreactive and biologically active somatostatin in human and sheep milk.

    PubMed

    Werner, H; Amarant, T; Millar, R P; Fridkin, M; Koch, Y

    1985-04-15

    The presence of immunoreactive and biologically active somatostatin in sheep and human milk has been demonstrated. Milk somatostatin exhibits similar chromatographic behavior to that of synthetic somatostatin-14 on both reversed-phase C18 and cation-exchange high-performance liquid chromatography columns. Milk, in contrast to plasma, contains only somatostatin-14-like material. Milk somatostatin was capable of inhibiting the basal and the prostaglandin-induced release of growth hormone from anterior pituitary cell cultures in a pattern similar to synthetic somatostatin-14. The concentrations of the peptide, as determined by radioimmunoassay, were found to be 113 pg/ml in human milk and 150 +/- 4.8 pg/ml (mean +/- range) in sheep milk. These values are severalfold higher than the corresponding concentration of the peptide in the plasma of these species. These findings are analogous to our previous observations concerning two other hypothalamic hormones, luliberin and thyroliberin [Baram, T., Koch, Y., Hazum, E. and Fridkin, M. (1977) Science (Wash. DC) 198, 300-302]. The high concentration of somatostatin and other neuropeptides in milk implies either an active concentrating mechanism in the mammary gland or an additional extrahypothalamic source for the synthesis and release of these peptides. PMID:2859195

  13. Glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5)-like immunoreactivity is localized in subsets of neurons and glia in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Kojo, Akiko; Yamada, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Toshiharu

    2016-07-01

    This study aimed at examining the distribution of glucose transporter 5 (GLUT5), which preferentially transports fructose, in the rat brain by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Small immunoreactive puncta (less than 0.7μm) were sparsely distributed all over the brain, some of which appeared to be associated with microglial processes detected by an anti-ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1 (Iba-1) monoclonal antibody. In addition, some of these immunoreactive puncta seemed to be associated with tanycyte processes that were labeled with anti-glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) monoclonal antibody. Ependymal cells were also found to be immunopositive for GLUT5. Furthermore, several noticeable GLUT5 immunoreactive profiles were observed. GLUT5 immunoreactive neurons, confirmed by double staining with neuronal nuclei (NeuN), were seen in the entopeduncular nucleus and lateral hypothalamus. Cerebellar Purkinje cells were immunopositve for GLUT5. Dense accumulation of immunoreactive puncta, some of which were neuronal elements (confirmed by immunoelectron microscopy), were observed in the optic tract and their terminal fields, namely, superior colliculus, pretectum, nucleus of the optic tract, and medial terminal nucleus of the optic tract. In addition to the associated areas of the visual system, the vestibular and cochlear nuclei also contained dense GLUT5 immunoreactive puncta. Western blot analysis of the cerebellum indicated that the antibody used recognized the 33.5 and 37.0kDa bands that were also contained in jejunum and kidney extracts. Thus, these results suggest that GLUT5 may transport fructose in subsets of the glia and neurons for an energy source of these cells. PMID:27036089

  14. Choline acetyltransferase-like immunoreactivity in a physiologically distinct subtype of olfactory nonspiking local interneurons in the cockroach (periplaneta americana).

    PubMed

    Fusca, Debora; Husch, Andreas; Baumann, Arnd; Kloppenburg, Peter

    2013-10-15

    Behavioral and physiological studies have shown that local interneurons are pivotal for processing odor information in the insect antennal lobe. They mediate inhibitory and excitatory interactions between the glomerular pathways and ultimately shape the tuning profile of projection neurons. To identify putative cholinergic local interneurons in the antennal lobe of Periplaneta americana, an antibody raised against the biosynthetic enzyme choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was applied to individual morphologically and electrophysiologically characterized local interneurons. In nonspiking type IIa1 local interneurons, which were classified in this study, we found ChAT-like immunoreactivity suggesting that they are most likely excitatory. This is a well-defined population of neurons that generates Ca(2+) -driven spikelets upon depolarization and stimulation with odorants, but not Na(+) -driven action potentials, because they lack voltage-activated transient Na(+) currents. The nonspiking type IIa2 and type IIb local interneurons, in which Ca(2+) -driven spikelets were absent, had no ChAT-like immunoreactivity. The GABA-like immunoreactive, spiking type I local interneurons had no ChAT-like immunoreactivity. In addition, we showed that uniglomerular projection neurons with cell bodies located in the ventral portion of the ventrolateral somata group and projections along the inner antennocerebral tract exhibited ChAT-like immunoreactivity. Assigning potential transmitters and neuromodulators to distinct morphological and electrophysiological types of antennal lobe neurons is an important prerequisite for a detailed understanding of odor information processing in insects. PMID:23749599

  15. Neoadjuvant treatment for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baba, Yoshifumi; Watanabe, Masayuki; Yoshida, Naoya; Baba, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma are types of esophageal cancer, one of the most aggressive malignant diseases. Since both histological types present entirely different diseases with different epidemiology, pathogenesis and tumor biology, separate therapeutic strategies should be developed against each type. While surgical resection remains the dominant therapeutic intervention for patients with operable esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC), alternative strategies are actively sought to reduce the frequency of post-operative local or distant disease recurrence. Such strategies are particularly sought in the preoperative setting. Currently, the optimal management of resectable ESCC differs widely between Western and Asian countries (such as Japan). While Western countries focus on neoadjuvant or definitive chemoradiotherapy, neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by surgery is the standard treatment in Japan. Importantly, each country and region has established its own therapeutic strategy from the results of local randomized control trials. This review discusses the current knowledge, available data and information regarding neoadjuvant treatment for operable ESCC. PMID:24834142

  16. Presumptive FMRF-amide-like immunoreactive retinopetal fibres in Crocodylus niloticus.

    PubMed

    Médina, Monique; Repérant, Jacques; Ward, Roger; Miceli, Dom

    2004-10-29

    A small contingent of 30-50 of centrifugal visual fibres, showing FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity, has been identified in C. niloticus; these fibres extend from the chiasmatic region into the retina. They do not take the marginal optic tract, but pass medially to the chiasmatic fascicles, from the preoptic region. The cells of origin of these fibres have not been identified. However, none of the retinopetal neurons of the brainstem [M. Medina, J. Reperant, R. Ward, D. Miceli, Centrifugal visual system of Crocodylus niloticus : a hodological, histochemical and immunocytochemical study, J. Comp. Neurol. 468 (2004) 65-85], labelled by retrograde transport of rhodamine beta-isothiocyanate after intraocular injection of this tracer, show FMRF-amide-like immunoreactivity; neither are any of the FMRF-amide-like immunopositive neurons in the crocodile brain, particularly those of the complex involving the terminal nerve and the septo-preoptic region, labelled by rhodamine after its intraocular injection. PMID:15464765

  17. Calretinin-immunoreactivity in the oro-facial and pharyngeal regions of the rat.

    PubMed

    Ichikawa, H; Jacobowitz, D M; Sugimoto, T

    1992-11-01

    Calretinin-immunoreactivity (CR-ir) was examined in the rat oro-facial and pharyngeal tissues using an immunofluorescence method. CR-ir was distributed in the entire size range of trigeminal ganglion neurons. CR-ir was also observed in nerve fibers surrounding neuronal cell bodies in autonomic ganglia, and in nerve endings in the lip, tongue, incisal papilla, soft palate, pharynx and epiglottis. CR-immunoreactive nerve endings were all in close proximity to the epithelium, and classified into 2 types; simple (free nerve ending) and taste-bud-related types. In the salivary gland, positive nerve fibers were seen around large excretory ducts. The present study indicates that viscerosensory (probably including gustatory) nerve fibers innervating the oral and pharyngeal tissues contain CR, while somotosensory nerve fibers innervating the facial skin are devoid of CR. PMID:1491782

  18. Expressions of caspase-3, Tunel, and Hsp72 immunoreactivities in cultured spinal cord neurons of rat after exposure to glutamate, nitric oxide, or peroxynitrite.

    PubMed

    Manabe, Y; Wang, J; Warita, H; Shiro, Y; Abe, K

    2001-07-01

    Although excitotoxic and oxidative stress play important roles in spinal neuron death, the exact mechanisms are not fully understood. We examined cell damage of primary culture of 11 day-old rat spinal cord by addition of glutamate, nitric oxice (NO) or peroxynitrite (PN) with detection of caspase-3, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin in situ nick end labeling (TUNEL) or 72 kDa heat shock protein (HSP72). With addition of glutamate, NOC18 (a slow NO releaser) or PN, immunoreactivity for caspase-3 became stronger in the cytoplasm of large motor neurons in the ventral horn at 6 to 24 hr. TUNEL positive nuclei were found in spinal large motor neurons from 24 h and the positive cell proportion greatly increased at 48 h in contrast to the vehicle. On the other hand, the immunoreactivity of HSP72 in the ventral horn was already positive at 0 h, and gradually decreased in the course of time with glutamate, NOC18 or PN than vehicle treatment. In the dorsal horn, the proportion of caspase-3 positive small neurons greatly increased at 6 to 48 h after addition of glutamate. The present results suggest that both excitotoxic and oxidative stress play important roles in the apoptotic pathway in cultured spinal neurons. PMID:15111253

  19. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  20. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  1. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactive neurons in the suprachiasmatic-subparaventricular region in the hedgehog-tenrec.

    PubMed

    Künzle, H; Unger, J W

    1992-04-01

    The distribution of the neuropeptide Y (NPY) was studied in geniculate and peri-chiasmatic regions in the lesser hedgehog-tenrec, Echinops telfairi (Insectivora). Only few neurons demonstrated NPY-like immunoreactivity in the ventral lateral geniculate nucleus. In contrast, NPY-immunoreactive perikarya were clearly present in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCh) and dorsal and caudal to it. The latter region might correspond to the subparaventricular zone (SPV), recently identified in the rat as an additional area involved in processing circadian rhythms. While the distribution of a distinct cell population across nuclear boundries in both SCh and SPV might conform to the present idea of processing circadian rhythms, the presence of NPY-like immunoreactive neurons in these areas is rather unusual. In mammals, such neurons have only been demonstrated so far in the mentioned insectivore as well as in man. PMID:1515927

  2. Novel treatments for T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cheah, Chan Yoon; Oki, Yasuhiro; Fanale, Michelle A

    2015-01-01

    T-cell lymphomas are a biologically and clinically diverse collection of diseases that collectively account for 10% to 15% of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Unlike B-cell lymphomas, the response of T-cell lymphomas to standard anthracycline-containing chemotherapy regimens is suboptimal and the prognosis of patients is accordingly poor. To address these shortcomings, there has been a proliferation in biologic agents with novel mechanisms of action that target surface antigens, signaling pathways, or cellular processes. Given the large number of candidate molecules showing preclinical promise and the rarity of these diseases, drug development for peripheral T-cell lymphoma is challenging. We provide an overview of agents that have recently been approved for relapsed/refractory T-cell lymphoma and highlight efforts to introduce these agents into front-line treatment protocols in combination with chemotherapy. We discuss biologic doublets currently being evaluated as "chemotherapy-free" salvage regimens and highlight some of the most promising investigational agents in early clinical development. PMID:25993211

  3. Valosin-containing protein immunoreactivity in tauopathies, synucleinopathies, polyglutamine diseases and intranuclear inclusion body disease.

    PubMed

    Mori, Fumiaki; Tanji, Kunikazu; Toyoshima, Yasuko; Sasaki, Hidenao; Yoshida, Mari; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Takahashi, Hitoshi; Wakabayashi, Koichi

    2013-12-01

    Valosin-containing protein (VCP) is associated with multiple cellular functions, including ubiquitin-dependent protein degradation. Mutations in VCP are known to cause inclusion body myopathy with Paget's disease and frontotemporal dementia and familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (fALS; ALS14), both of which are characterized by trans-activation response DNA protein 43 (TDP-43)-positive neuronal cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions. Recently, immunoreactivity for fALS-associated proteins (TDP-43, fused in sarcoma (FUS), optineurin and ubiquilin-2) were reported to be present in cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions in various neurodegenerative diseases. However, the extent and frequency of VCP-immunoreactive structures in these neurodegenerative diseases are uncertain. We immunohistochemically examined the brains of 72 cases with neurodegenerative diseases and five control cases. VCP immunoreactivity was present in Lewy bodies in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies, and neuronal nuclear inclusions in five polyglutamine diseases and intranuclear inclusion body disease, as well as in Marinesco bodies in aged control subjects. However, other neuronal and glial cytoplasmic inclusions in tauopathies and TDP-43 proteinopathies were unstained. These findings suggest that VCP may have common mechanisms in the formation or degradation of cytoplasmic and nuclear inclusions of neurons, but not of glial cells, in several neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:23782134

  4. Brain interleukin 1 and S-100 immunoreactivity are elevated in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed Central

    Griffin, W S; Stanley, L C; Ling, C; White, L; MacLeod, V; Perrot, L J; White, C L; Araoz, C

    1989-01-01

    Interleukin 1, an immune response-generated cytokine that stimulates astrocyte proliferation and reactivity (astrogliosis), was present in up to 30 times as many glial cells in tissue sections of brain from patients with Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with age-matched control subjects. Most interleukin 1-immunoreactive glia in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease were classified as microglia. The number of interleukin 1 immunoreactive neurons did not appear to differ in Down syndrome and Alzheimer disease compared with control brain. Numerous temporal lobe astrocytes in Alzheimer disease and postnatal Down syndrome were intensely interleukin 1-, S-100-, and glial fibrillary acidic protein-immunoreactive and had reactive structure. Interleukin 1 levels in Alzheimer disease temporal lobe homogenates were elevated, as were the levels of S-100 and glial fibrillary acidic protein, two proteins reportedly elevated in reactive astrocytes. These data suggest that increased expression of S-100 in Down syndrome, resulting from duplication of the gene on chromosome 21 that encodes the beta subunit of S-100, may be augmented by elevation of interleukin 1. As a corollary, the astrogliosis in Alzheimer disease may be promoted by elevation of interleukin 1. Images PMID:2529544

  5. Dopamine- and Tyrosine Hydroxylase-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Brain of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Minoura, Run; Nishino, Hiroshi; Miura, Toru; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The catecholamine dopamine plays several vital roles in the central nervous system of many species, but its neural mechanisms remain elusive. Detailed neuroanatomical characterization of dopamine neurons is a prerequisite for elucidating dopamine's actions in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of dopaminergic neurons in the brain of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, using two antisera: 1) an antiserum against dopamine, and 2) an antiserum against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, an enzyme required for dopamine synthesis), and identified about 250 putatively dopaminergic neurons. The patterns of dopamine- and TH-immunoreactive neurons were strikingly similar, suggesting that both antisera recognize the same sets of "dopaminergic" neurons. The dopamine and TH antibodies intensively or moderately immunolabeled prominent brain neuropils, e.g. the mushroom body (memory center), antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) and central complex (motor coordination center). All subdivisions of the mushroom body exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. Comparison of immunolabeled neurons with those filled by dye injection revealed that a group of immunolabeled neurons with cell bodies near the calyx projects into a distal region of the vertical lobe, which is a plausible site for olfactory memory formation in insects. In the antennal lobe, ordinary glomeruli as well as macroglomeruli exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. It is noteworthy that the dopamine antiserum labeled tiny granular structures inside the glomeruli whereas the TH antiserum labeled processes in the marginal regions of the glomeruli, suggesting a different origin. In the central complex, all subdivisions excluding part of the noduli and protocerebral bridge exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. These anatomical findings will accelerate our understanding of dopaminergic systems, specifically in neural circuits underlying aversive memory formation

  6. Dopamine- and Tyrosine Hydroxylase-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Brain of the American Cockroach, Periplaneta americana

    PubMed Central

    Hamanaka, Yoshitaka; Minoura, Run; Nishino, Hiroshi; Miura, Toru; Mizunami, Makoto

    2016-01-01

    The catecholamine dopamine plays several vital roles in the central nervous system of many species, but its neural mechanisms remain elusive. Detailed neuroanatomical characterization of dopamine neurons is a prerequisite for elucidating dopamine’s actions in the brain. In the present study, we investigated the distribution of dopaminergic neurons in the brain of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana, using two antisera: 1) an antiserum against dopamine, and 2) an antiserum against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, an enzyme required for dopamine synthesis), and identified about 250 putatively dopaminergic neurons. The patterns of dopamine- and TH-immunoreactive neurons were strikingly similar, suggesting that both antisera recognize the same sets of “dopaminergic” neurons. The dopamine and TH antibodies intensively or moderately immunolabeled prominent brain neuropils, e.g. the mushroom body (memory center), antennal lobe (first-order olfactory center) and central complex (motor coordination center). All subdivisions of the mushroom body exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. Comparison of immunolabeled neurons with those filled by dye injection revealed that a group of immunolabeled neurons with cell bodies near the calyx projects into a distal region of the vertical lobe, which is a plausible site for olfactory memory formation in insects. In the antennal lobe, ordinary glomeruli as well as macroglomeruli exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. It is noteworthy that the dopamine antiserum labeled tiny granular structures inside the glomeruli whereas the TH antiserum labeled processes in the marginal regions of the glomeruli, suggesting a different origin. In the central complex, all subdivisions excluding part of the noduli and protocerebral bridge exhibit both dopamine and TH immunoreactivity. These anatomical findings will accelerate our understanding of dopaminergic systems, specifically in neural circuits underlying aversive memory

  7. The effective treatment of basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Lucy Anne

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) accounts for 75% of all skin cancers and its incidence is rising by between 3-8% each year (Szeimies and Karrer, 2006). As a result, the development of new therapeutic strategies and treatment methods for the removal of BCC is crucial in combating what is a growing problem. Surgical techniques, such as Mohs micrographic surgery, cryotherapy/cryosurgery, curettage and carbon dioxide laser therapy, as well as non-surgical techniques, such as radiotherapy, are recognized as potential options. The aim of this article is to critically review some of the current literature in order to substantiate the efficacy of destructive and non-surgical techniques as reliable alternatives to surgery for the management/removal of BCCs. The success rate, cosmetic outcome, pain and discomfort, recurrence rates, and the cost associated with each method are explored and discussed. Results of the review indicate that no one treatment is completely superior. According to the research, simple excision and Mohs micrographic surgery provide the lowest recurrence rates. However, in relation to success rates, patients tolerance of the treatment and cosmetic outcomes, and depending on the type of BCC involved, other treatment methods do offer reliable alternatives. PMID:19329898

  8. Sickle cell retinopathy: diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Maria Teresa Brizzi Chizzotti; Lavezzo, Marcelo Mendes

    2013-10-01

    Hemoglobinopathies are a group of inherited disorders characterized by quantitative or qualitative malformations of hemoglobin (Hb). Some of these diseases present vaso-occlusive phenomena that are responsible for high morbidity in clinical and/or ophthalmologic terms. Diagnosis of hemoglobinopathies is performed exclusively through hemoglobin electrophoresis. From the ophthalmologic perspective, the most important representative of this group of diseases is sickle cell retinopathy, which presents a wide spectrum of fundus manifestations and may even lead to irreversible vision loss if not properly diagnosed and treated. The aim of this review is to present the classification of sickle cell retinopathy and to describe current management and future perspectives for its treatment, taking into consideration the clinical management of these patients. PMID:24232951

  9. Increased neuronal and astroglial aquaporin-1 immunoreactivity in rat striatum by chemical preconditioning with 3-nitropropionic acid.

    PubMed

    Hoshi, Akihiko; Tsunoda, Ayako; Yamamoto, Teiji; Tada, Mari; Kakita, Akiyoshi; Ugawa, Yoshikazu

    2016-07-28

    Aquaporin-1 (AQP1) is a water channel expressed in the choroid plexus and participates in forming cerebrospinal fluid. Interestingly, reactive astrocytes also express AQP1 in the central nervous system under some pathological conditions. On the other hand, 3-nitropropionic acid (3NP) is a mitochondrial toxin that causes selective degeneration of striatum; however, its chemical preconditioning is neuroprotective against cerebral ischemia. We previously reported that mild 3NP application is accompanied with numerous reactive astrocytes in rat striatum devoid of typical necrotic lesions. Therefore, we studied whether AQP1 in the rat striatum could be upregulated with reactive astrocytosis using the 3NP model. Immunohistochemical or immunofluorescence analysis showed that reactive astrocytosis in the striatum, which upregulates glial fibrillary acidic protein and glutamine synthetase, was induced by mild doses of 3NP administration. Intriguingly, after 3NP treatment, AQP1 was intensely expressed not only by the subpopulation of astroglia but also by neurons. The AQP1 immunoreactivity became more intensified at the early-subtoxic stage (ES: 24-48h), but not as much in the delayed-subtoxic stage (DS: 96-120h). In contrast, AQP4 expression in the striatum was downregulated after 3NP treatment, in particular during the ES stage. AQP1 upregulation/AQP4 downregulation induced under subtoxic 3NP treatment may play a pivotal role in water homeostasis and cell viability in the striatum. PMID:27181510

  10. Comparison of immunoreactive serum trypsinogen and lipase in Cystic Fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Lloyd-Still, J.D.; Weiss, S.; Wessel, H.; Fong, L.; Conway, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The incidence of Cystic Fibrosis (CF) is 1 in 2,000. Early detection and treatment of CF may necessitate newborn screening with a reliable and cost-effective test. Serum immunoreactive trypsinogen (IRT) an enzyme produced by the pancreas, is detectable by radioimmunoassay (RIA) techniques. Recently, it has been shown that IRT is elevated in CF infants for the first few months of life and levels become subnormal as pancreatic insufficiency progresses. Other enzymes produced by the pancreas, such as lipase, are also elevated during this time. The author's earlier work confirmed previous reports of elevated IRT levels in CF infants. The development of a new RIA for lipase (nuclipase) has enabled comparison of these 2 pancreatic enzymes in C.F. Serum IRT and lipase determinations were performed on 2 groups of CF patients; infants under 1 year of age, and children between 1 and 18 years of age. Control populations of the same age groups were included. The results showed that both trypsin (161 +- 92 ng/ml, range 20 to 400) and lipase (167 +- 151 ng/ml, range 29 to 500) are elevated in CF in the majority of infants. Control infants had values of IRT ranging from 20 to 29.5 ng/ml and lipase values ranging from 23 to 34 ng/ml. IRT becomes subnormal in most CF patients by 8 years of age as pancreatic function insufficiency increases. Lipase levels and IRT levels correlate well in infancy, but IRT is a more sensitive indicator of pancreatic insufficiency in older patients with CF.

  11. Induction of Fos protein immunoreactivity by spinal cord contusion.

    PubMed

    Del-Bel, E A; Borges, C A; Defino, H L; Guimarães, F S

    2000-05-01

    The objective of the present study was to identify neurons in the central nervous system that respond to spinal contusion injury in the rat by monitoring the expression of the nuclear protein encoded by the c-fos gene, an activity-dependent gene, in spinal cord and brainstem regions. Rats were anesthetized with urethane and the injury was produced by dropping a 5-g weight from 20.0 cm onto the exposed dura at the T10-L1 vertebral level (contusion group). The spinal cord was exposed but not lesioned in anesthetized control animals (laminectomy group); intact animals were also subjected to anesthesia (intact control). Behavioral alterations were analyzed by Tarlov/Bohlman scores, 2 h after the procedures and the animals were then perfused for immunocytochemistry. The patterns of Fos-like immunoreactivity (FLI) which were site-specific, reproducible and correlated with spinal laminae that respond predominantly to noxious stimulation or injury: laminae I-II (outer substantia gelatinosa) and X and the nucleus of the intermediolateral cell column. At the brain stem level FLI was detected in the reticular formation, area postrema and solitary tract nucleus of lesioned animals. No Fos staining was detected by immunocytochemistry in the intact control group. However, detection of FLI in the group submitted to anesthesia and surgical procedures, although less intense than in the lesion group, indicated that microtraumas may occur which are not detected by the Tarlov/Bohlman scores. There is both a local and remote effect of a distal contusion on the spinal cord of rats, implicating sensory neurons and centers related to autonomic control in the reaction to this kind of injury. PMID:10775883

  12. Effects of ischemic preconditioning on VEGF and pFlk-1 immunoreactivities in the gerbil ischemic hippocampus after transient cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoo Seok; Cho, Jun Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Cho, Geum-Sil; Cho, Jeong-Hwi; Park, Joon Ha; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Chen, Bai Hui; Shin, Bich-Na; Shin, Myoung Cheol; Tae, Hyun-Jin; Cho, Young Shin; Lee, Yun Lyul; Kim, Young-Myeong; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Jae-Chul

    2014-12-15

    Ischemia preconditioning (IPC) displays an important adaptation of the CNS to sub-lethal ischemia. In the present study, we examined the effect of IPC on immunoreactivities of VEGF-, and phospho-Flk-1 (pFlk-1) following transient cerebral ischemia in gerbils. The animals were randomly assigned to four groups (sham-operated-group, ischemia-operated-group, IPC plus (+) sham-operated-group, and IPC+ischemia-operated-group). IPC was induced by subjecting gerbils to 2 min of ischemia followed by 1 day of recovery. In the ischemia-operated-group, a significant loss of neurons was observed in the stratum pyramidale (SP) of the hippocampal CA1 region (CA1) alone 5 days after ischemia-reperfusion, however, in all the IPC+ischemia-operated-groups, pyramidal neurons in the SP were well protected. In immunohistochemical study, VEGF immunoreactivity in the ischemia-operated-group was increased in the SP at 1 day post-ischemia and decreased with time. Five days after ischemia-reperfusion, strong VEGF immunoreactivity was found in non-pyramidal cells, which were identified as pericytes, in the stratum oriens (SO) and radiatum (SR). In the IPC+sham-operated- and IPC+ischemia-operated-groups, VEGF immunoreactivity was significantly increased in the SP. pFlk-1 immunoreactivity in the sham-operated- and ischemia-operated-groups was hardly found in the SP, and, from 2 days post-ischemia, pFlk-1 immunoreactivity was strongly increased in non-pyramidal cells, which were identified as pericytes. In the IPC+sham-operated-group, pFlk-1 immunoreactivity was significantly increased in both pyramidal and non-pyramidal cells; in the IPC+ischemia-operated-groups, the similar pattern of VEGF immunoreactivity was found in the ischemic CA1, although the VEGF immunoreactivity was strong in non-pyramidal cells at 5 days post-ischemia. In brief, our findings show that IPC dramatically augmented the induction of VEGF and pFlk-1 immunoreactivity in the pyramidal cells of the CA1 after ischemia

  13. Histamine Immunoreactive Elements in the Central and Peripheral Nervous Systems of the Snail, Biomphalaria spp., Intermediate Host for Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Mohamed R.; Mohamed, Azza H.; Osman, Gamalat Y.; Sharaf El-Din, Ahmed T.; Mossalem, Hanan S.; Delgado, Nadia; Torres, Grace; Rolón-Martínez, Solymar; Miller, Mark W.; Croll, Roger P.

    2015-01-01

    Histamine appears to be an important transmitter throughout the Animal Kingdom. Gastropods, in particular, have been used in numerous studies establishing potential roles for this biogenic amine in the nervous system and showing its involvement in the generation of diverse behaviours. And yet, the distribution of histamine has only previously been described in a small number of molluscan species. The present study examined the localization of histamine-like immunoreactivity in the central and peripheral nervous systems of pulmonate snails of the genus Biomphalaria. This investigation demonstrates immunoreactive cells throughout the buccal, cerebral, pedal, left parietal and visceral ganglia, indicative of diverse regulatory functions in Biomphalaria. Immunoreactivity was also present in statocyst hair cells, supporting a role for histamine in graviception. In the periphery, dense innervation by immunoreactive fibers was observed in the anterior foot, perioral zone, and other regions of the body wall. This study thus shows that histamine is an abundant transmitter in these snails and its distribution suggest involvement in numerous neural circuits. In addition to providing novel subjects for comparative studies of histaminegic neurons in gastropods, Biomphalaria is also the major intermediate host for the digenetic trematode parasite, which causes human schistosomiasis. The study therefore provides a foundation for understanding potential roles for histamine in interactions between the snail hosts and their trematode parasites. PMID:26086611

  14. 21 CFR 862.1405 - Immunoreactive insulin test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Immunoreactive insulin test system. 862.1405 Section 862.1405 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  15. Emerging surgical treatments for renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Husain, Fatima Z; Badani, Ketan K; Sfakianos, John P; Mehrazin, Reza

    2016-04-01

    Treatment of renal cell carcinoma has evolved considerably over the last few years. While total nephrectomy is necessary at times, nephron-sparing surgery, with a goal of renal function preservation, should always be considered. Although open partial nephrectomy is considered the gold standard approach for nephron-sparing surgery, laparoscopic- or robotic-assisted techniques allow urologists to perform renal surgery less invasively, with excellent long-term oncological outcomes. Cryotherapy and radiofrequency ablation are less invasive management approaches for carefully selected patients with small renal masses. Active surveillance should be considered in elderly or patients who are unfit for surgery. Ultimately, the method chosen for management of a renal mass is an informed decision made by the physician and patient. PMID:26892144

  16. Will stem cells bring hope to pathological skin scar treatment?

    PubMed

    Li, Qiankun; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-08-01

    Pathological skin scars, such as keloids, aesthetically and psychosocially affect patients. The quest for scar reduction and the increasing recognition of patient satisfaction has led to the continued exploration of scar treatment. Stem cells are a promising source for tissue repair and regeneration. The multi-potency and secretory functions of these cells could offer possible treatments for pathological scars and have been examined in recent studies. Here, we analyze the factors that influence the formation of pathological skin scars, summarize recent research on pathological scar treatment with stem cells and elaborate on the possible mechanisms of this treatment. Additionally, other effects of stem cell treatments are also presented while evaluating potential side effects of stem cell-based pathological scar treatments. Thus, this review may provide meaningful guidance in the clinic for scar treatments with stem cells. PMID:27293205

  17. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  18. GABAergic neurons immunoreactive for calcium binding proteins are reduced in the prefrontal cortex in major depression.

    PubMed

    Rajkowska, Grazyna; O'Dwyer, Gillian; Teleki, Zsofia; Stockmeier, Craig A; Miguel-Hidalgo, Jose Javier

    2007-02-01

    Post-mortem morphometric studies report reductions in the average density and size of cortical neurons in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC) and orbitofrontal cortex (ORB) in major depressive disorder (MDD). The contribution of specific neuronal phenotypes to this general pathology in depression is still unclear. Post-mortem sections from the dlPFC and ORB regions of 14 subjects with MDD and 11 controls were immunostained to visualize calbindin-immunoreactive (CB-IR) and parvalbumin-immunoreactive (PV-IR) presumptive GABAergic neurons. A three-dimensional cell counting probe was used to assess the cell packing density and size of CB-IR neurons in layers II+IIIa and PV-IR neurons in layers III-VI. The density of CB-IR neurons was significantly reduced by 50% in depression in the dlPFC and there was a trend toward reduction in the ORB. The size of CB-IR somata was significantly decreased (18%) in depression in the dlPFC with a trend toward reduction in the ORB. In contrast, there was no difference in the density of PV-IR neurons between the depressed and control groups in the dlPFC. The size of PV-IR neuronal soma was unchanged in depressed compared to control subjects in either dlPFC or ORB. In depression, subpopulations of GABAergic neurons may be affected differently in dlPFC and ORB. A significant reduction in the density and size of GABAergic interneurons immunoreactive for calcium binding proteins was found predominantly in the dlPFC region. These cellular changes are consistent with recent neuroimaging studies revealing a reduction in the cortical levels of GABA in depression. PMID:17063153

  19. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  20. Localization of cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivity in isolated nerve terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Pinget, M; Straus, E; Yalow, R S

    1978-01-01

    Subcellular fractionation of the rat cerebral cortex demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive cholecystokinin in the pellet identified by electron microscopy as containing a high proportion of synaptic vesicles. The recovery in this pellet of 40% of the total immunoreactivity in the initial cortical extract is quite comparable to the recovery of other peptides such as vasoactive intestinal polypeptide and somatostatin, which are also located in synaptosomes and for which roles as neuroregulators or transmitters have been suggested. The evidence of concentration of cholecystokinin-like peptides in the synaptosomal pellet is consistent with our earlier demonstration by immunohistochemical techniques of cholecystokinin's presence in rabbit cerebral cortical neurons. These observations and the evidence for diminished concentration of cholecystokinin-like peptides in the brains of hyperphagic mice are consistent with cholecystolinin's suggested role as a neuroregulator for appetite. Images PMID:282649

  1. Transport of cholecystokinin-octapeptide-like immunoreactivity toward the gut in afferent vagal fibres in cat and dog.

    PubMed Central

    Dockray, G J; Gregory, R A; Tracy, H J; Zhu, W Y

    1981-01-01

    1. The distributions of gastrin- and cholecystokinin-like immunoreactivities in the dog and cat vagus nerves have been studied after nerve section and ligation. 2. In dogs, there was an increase in cholecystokinin-octapeptide-like immunoreactive material on the cranial side of ligatures on the thoracic or cervical vagi. When pairs of ligatures were tied on the cervical vagi there was accumulation proximal, and a slight decrease distal to, the upper ligature. There was also a modest increase distal to the lower ligature. 3. In cats, section of the vagus above the nodose ganglion, and hence degeneration of the efferent fibres, did not prevent increases in cholecystokinin-octapeptide-like immunoreactivity on the cranial side of ligatures which were later tied below the ganglion. Removal of the superior cervical ganglion had no effect on the accumulation of immunoreactive material above the ligatures. Section of the vagus below the nodose ganglion, and hence degeneration of both afferent and efferent fibres, abolished the accumulation on the cranial side of ligatures which were later tied below the section. Cholecystokinin-octapeptide-like material is therefore localized to afferent fibres with cell bodies in the nodose ganglion. 4. Immunoreactive forms were characterized by gel filtration and ion exchange chromatography, and the use of region-specific antisera. In all cats, and all but one dog, a molecule with the properties of sulphated cholecystokinin octapeptide was found to predominate. In some cats (30%) and dogs (26%) a molecule with the properties of heptadecapeptide gastrin (G17) was identified; concentrations of G17 were generally low compared with cholecystokinin octapeptide. In three dogs (20%) there was an accumulation of heptadecapeptide gastrin above the ligatures. 5. Axonal transport of cholecystokinin octapeptide in the vagus is consistent with a neuro-regulatory role for this peptide. However, the functional significance of its localization in

  2. Correlation between Ocular Demodex Infestation and Serum Immunoreactivity to Bacillus Proteins in Patients with Facial Rosacea

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jianjing; O'Reilly, Niamh; Sheha, Hosam; Katz, Raananah; Raju, Vadrevu K.; Kavanagh, Kevin; Tseng, Scheffer C. G.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To investigate correlation between ocular Demodex infestation and serum. Design A prospective study to correlate clinical findings with laboratory data. Participants We consecutively enrolled 59 patients: 34 men and 25 women with a mean age of 60.4±17.6 years (range, 17–93). Methods Demodex counting was performed based on lash sampling. Serum immunoreactivity to two 62-kDa and 83-kDa proteins derived from B oleronius was determined by Western blot analysis. Facial rosacea, lid margin, and ocular surface inflammation were documented by photography and graded in a masked fashion. Main Outcome Measures Statistical significance based on correlative analyses of clinical and laboratory data. Results These 59 patients were age matched, but not gender matched, regarding serum immunoreactivity, ocular Demodex infestation, or facial rosacea. There was a significant correlation between serum immunoreactivity and facial rosacea (P = 0.009), lid margin inflammation (P = 0.040), and ocular Demodex infestation (P = 0.048), but not inferior bulbar conjunctival inflammation (P = 0.573). The Demodex count was significantly higher in patients with positive facial rosacea (6.6±9.0 vs. 1.9±2.2; P = 0.014). There was a significant correlation of facial rosacea with lid margin inflammation (P = 0.016), but not with inferior bulbar conjunctival inflammation (P = 0.728). Ocular Demodex infestation was less prevalent in patients with aqueous tear-deficiency dry eye than those without (7/38 vs. 12/21; P = 0.002). Conclusions The strong correlation provides a better understanding of comorbidity between Demodex mites and their symbiotic B oleronius in facial rosacea and blepharitis. Treatments directed to both warrant future investigation. PMID:20079929

  3. Nesfatin-1 immunoreactivity in rat brain and spinal cord autonomic nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Goebel, Miriam; Stengel, Andreas; Lambrecht, Nils W.G.; Wang, Lixin; Taché, Yvette

    2009-01-01

    Nesfatin-1 is one of the peptide products of posttranslational processing of the nucleobindin-2 (NUCB2) gene, suggested to have physiological relevance to suppress food intake and body weight gain in rats. Nesfatin-1-immunoreactive cells have been found in distinct nuclei in the rat brain related to circuitries regulating food intake. Here, we report novel yet undescribed localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 at the mRNA and protein level in the rat central nervous system. Immunohistochemical staining revealed the localization of NUCB2/nesfatin-1 in the piriform and insular cortex, endopiriform nucleus, nucleus accumbens, lateral septum, bed nucleus of stria terminalis, central amygdaloid nucleus, medial preoptic area, dorsal raphe nucleus, ambiguus nucleus, ventrolateral medulla and gigantocellular reticular nucleus, as well as Purkinje-cells of the cerebellum. In the spinal cord, nesfatin-1 immunoreactivity (IR) was found in both sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neuronal groups and in the dorsal area X from lower thoracic to sacral segments. The immunohistochemical results were confirmed by RT-PCR in the central amygdaloid nucleus, nucleus accumbens, cerebellum and lumbar spinal cord microdissected by punch technique. The features and distributions of nesfatin-1 IR and mRNA expression in the brain and spinal cord suggest that NUCB2/nesfatin-1 could play a wider role in autonomic regulation of visceral-endocrine functions besides food intake. PMID:19348732

  4. Activated caspase-9 immunoreactivity in glial and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions in multiple system atrophy.

    PubMed

    Kawamoto, Yasuhiro; Ayaki, Takashi; Urushitani, Makoto; Ito, Hidefumi; Takahashi, Ryosuke

    2016-08-15

    The mitochondria play an important role in apoptotic cell death, and the released cytochrome c from the mitochondria promotes the formation of the apoptosome, which contains cytochrome c, Apaf-1 and caspase-9, resulting in the activation of caspase-9 and the promotion of the apoptotic cascade. To investigate the role of mitochondria-dependent apoptotic cell death in patients with multiple system atrophy (MSA), we performed immunohistochemical studies on apoptosome-related proteins in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded sections from 8 normal subjects and 10 patients with MSA. We then performed double-labeling immunohistochemistry for activated caspase-9 and α-synuclein in some sections from 10 patients with MSA. In the brains with MSA, glial cytoplasmic inclusions (GCIs) and neuronal cytoplasmic inclusions (NCIs) were intensely immunoreactive for cytochrome c, Apaf-1 and caspase-9. Activated caspase-9 immunoreactivities were also confirmed to be densely localized to both GCIs and NCIs using two types of anti-cleaved caspase-9 antibodies. The semiquantitative analyses using the upper pontine sections double-immunostained with cleaved caspase-9 and α-synuclein demonstrated that approximately 80% of GCIs and NCIs were immunopositive for cleaved caspase-9. Our results suggest that the formation of the apoptosome accompanied by the activation of caspase-9 may occur in brains affected by MSA, and that a mitochondria-dependent apoptotic pathway may be partially associated with the pathogenesis of MSA. PMID:27345387

  5. HNK-1 immunoreactivity during early morphogenesis of the head region in a nonmodel vertebrate, crocodile embryo.

    PubMed

    Kundrát, Martin

    2008-11-01

    The present study examines HNK-1 immunoidentification of a population of the neural crest (NC) during early head morphogenesis in the nonmodel vertebrate, the crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus) embryos. Although HNK-1 is not an exclusive NC marker among vertebrates, temporospatial immunoreactive patterns found in the crocodile are almost consistent with NC patterns derived from gene expression studies known in birds (the closest living relatives of crocodiles) and mammals. In contrast to birds, the HNK-1 epitope is immunoreactive in NC cells at the neural fold level in crocodile embryos and therefore provides sufficient base to assess early migratory events of the cephalic NC. I found that crocodile NC forms three classic migratory pathways in the head: mandibular, hyoid, and branchial. Further, I demonstrate that, besides this classic phenotype, there is also a forebrain-derived migratory population, which consolidates into a premandibular stream in the crocodile. In contrast to the closely related chick model, crocodilian premandibular and mandibular NC cells arise from the open neural tube suggesting that species-specific heterochronic behavior of NC may be involved in the formation of different vertebrate facial phenotypes. PMID:18668221

  6. HNK-1 immunoreactivity during early morphogenesis of the head region in a nonmodel vertebrate, crocodile embryo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundrát, Martin

    2008-11-01

    The present study examines HNK-1 immunoidentification of a population of the neural crest (NC) during early head morphogenesis in the nonmodel vertebrate, the crocodile ( Crocodylus niloticus) embryos. Although HNK-1 is not an exclusive NC marker among vertebrates, temporospatial immunoreactive patterns found in the crocodile are almost consistent with NC patterns derived from gene expression studies known in birds (the closest living relatives of crocodiles) and mammals. In contrast to birds, the HNK-1 epitope is immunoreactive in NC cells at the neural fold level in crocodile embryos and therefore provides sufficient base to assess early migratory events of the cephalic NC. I found that crocodile NC forms three classic migratory pathways in the head: mandibular, hyoid, and branchial. Further, I demonstrate that, besides this classic phenotype, there is also a forebrain-derived migratory population, which consolidates into a premandibular stream in the crocodile. In contrast to the closely related chick model, crocodilian premandibular and mandibular NC cells arise from the open neural tube suggesting that species-specific heterochronic behavior of NC may be involved in the formation of different vertebrate facial phenotypes.

  7. Dopamine D1 and D2 Receptor Immunoreactivities in the Arcuate-Median Eminence Complex and their Link to the Tubero-Infundibular Dopamine Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Romero-Fernandez, W.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Vargas-Barroso, V.; Narváez, M.; Di Palma, M.; Agnati, L.F.; Sahd, J. Larriva

    2014-01-01

    Dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunohistochemistry and Golgi techniques were used to study the structure of the adult rat arcuate-median eminence complex, and determine the distribution of the dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities therein, particularly in relation to the tubero-infundibular dopamine neurons. Punctate dopamine D1 and D2 receptor immunoreactivities, likely located on nerve terminals, were enriched in the lateral palisade zone built up of nerve terminals, while the densities were low to modest in the medial palisade zone. A codistribution of dopamine D1 receptor or dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactive puncta with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve terminals was demonstrated in the external layer. Dopamine D1 receptor but not dopamine D2 receptor immnunoreactivites nerve cell bodies were found in the ventromedial part of the arcuate nucleus and in the lateral part of the internal layer of the median eminence forming a continuous cell mass presumably representing neuropeptide Y immunoreactive nerve cell bodies. The major arcuate dopamine/ tyrosine hydroxylase nerve cell group was found in the dorsomedial part. A large number of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive nerve cell bodies in this region demonstrated punctate dopamine D1 receptor immunoreactivity but only a few presented dopamine D2 receptor immunoreactivity which were mainly found in a substantial number of tyrosine hydroxylase cell bodies of the ventral periventricular hypothalamic nucleus, also belonging to the tuberoinfundibular dopamine neurons. Structural evidence for projections of the arcuate nerve cells into the median eminence was also obtained. Distal axons formed horizontal axons in the internal layer issuing a variable number of collaterals classified into single or multiple strands located in the external layer increasing our understanding of the dopamine nerve terminal networks in this region. Dopamine D1 and D2 receptors may therefore directly and differentially

  8. Prognostic value of aspartyl (asparaginyl)-β-hydroxylase/humbug expression in non–small cell lung carcinoma☆

    PubMed Central

    Luu, Martin; Sabo, Edmond; de la Monte, Suzanne M.; Greaves, Wesley; Wang, JiYi; Tavares, Rosemarie; Simao, Lelia; Wands, Jack R.; Resnick, Murray B.; Wang, LiJuan

    2010-01-01

    Summary Despite improvements in the detection and use of biomarkers, including epidermal growth factor receptor, ERCC1, and p16, the 5-year survival rate with non–small cell lung cancer remains at 15%. This suggests that additional biomarkers are needed to better prognosticate clinical course and guide therapeutic approaches. Previous studies showed that increased levels of aspartyl (asparaginyl)-β-hydroxylase and a highly related molecule, humbug, correlate with clinical course and survival with hepatic, biliary, pancreatic, and colon carcinomas. We now characterize the prognostic use of aspartyl (asparaginyl)-β-hydroxylase/humbug immunoreactivity in different subtypes of non–small cell lung cancer. Tissue microarrays including 375 paraffin-embedded non–small cell lung cancers (195 adenocarcinomas; 18 bronchioloalveolar carcinomas; 113 squamous cell carcinomas; and 49 large cell carcinomas) were immunostained with FB50 monoclonal antibody, which recognizes human aspartyl (asparaginyl)-β-hydroxylase/humbug. Immunoreactivity (intensity and distribution) in neoplastic cells were scored under code, and data were subjected to univariate and Cox multivariate analyses, adjusting for age, stage, and treatment. High levels of FB50 immunoreactivity were more often detected in adenocarcinomas (28% for adenocarcinoma, 17% for bronchioloalveolar carcinoma), compared with squamous cell carcinomas (10%) and large cell carcinomas (10%). Univariate analysis demonstrated inverse relationships between intensity of FB50 immunoreactivity and survival with squamous cell carcinoma (P = .004), and a strong trend with respect to large cell carcinoma (P = .057). Cox multivariate test showed that FB50 immunoreactivity (P = .025), clinical stage (P = .029), and tumor size (P = .0001) were all independent predictors of survival with squamous cell carcinoma. High levels of FB50 immunohistochemical staining correlate with poor prognosis in non–small cell lung cancer, particularly

  9. Antifungal Treatment in Stem Cell Transplantation Centers in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Hamdi; Atilla, Erden

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of various guidelines, the approach to antifungal treatment in stem cell transplantation centers differs according to country or even between centers. This led to the development of another survey that aims to understand the antifungal treatment policies of Turkish stem cell transplantation centers. Although there has been an increasing trend towards the use of diagnostic-based treatments in Turkey in the last few years, empirical treatment is still the main approach. The practices of the stem cell transplantation centers reflect the general trends and controversies in this area, while there is a considerable use of antifungal combination therapy. PMID:25913124

  10. Engineered T cells for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Anurathapan, Usanarat; Leen, Ann M.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Vera, Juan F.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptively transferred T cells have the capacity to traffic to distant tumor sites, infiltrate even fibrotic tissue and kill antigen-expressing tumor cells. A variety of groups have investigated different genetic engineering strategies designed to enhance tumor specificity, increase T cell potency, improve proliferation, persistence, or migratory capacity, and increase safety. In this review we focus on recent developments in the T cell engineering arena, discuss the application of these engineered cell products clinically, and outline future prospects for this therapeutic modality. PMID:24239105

  11. Verbascoside promotes the regeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian-qing; Wang, Li; He, Jian-cheng; Hua, Xian-dong

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine hydroxylase is a key enzyme in dopamine biosynthesis. Change in tyrosine hydroxylase expression in the nigrostriatal system is closely related to the occurrence and development of Parkinson's disease. Verbascoside, an extract from Radix Rehmanniae Praeparata has been shown to be clinically effective in treating Parkinson's disease. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. It is hypothesized that the effects of verbascoside on Parkinson's disease are related to tyrosine hydroxylase expression change in the nigrostriatal system. Rat models of Parkinson's disease were established and verbascoside (60 mg/kg) was administered intraperitoneally once a day. After 6 weeks of verbascoside treatment, rat rotational behavior was alleviated; tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein expression and the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the rat right substantia nigra were significantly higher than the Parkinson's model group. These findings suggest that the mechanism by which verbascoside treats Parkinson's disease is related to the regeneration of tyrosine hydroxylase-immunoreactive neurons in the substantia nigra. PMID:26981096

  12. 78 FR 44575 - Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-24

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration... Services (HHS). ACTION: Request for Class Deviation for Non-Competitive Extension: Sickle Cell Disease... nine programs that are funded through competitive grant awards under the Sickle Cell Disease...

  13. Genetically Modified T Cells for the Treatment of Malignant Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wieczorek, Agnieszka; Uharek, Lutz

    2013-01-01

    Summary The broaden application of adoptive T-cell transfer has been constrained by the technical abilities to isolate and expand antigen-specific T cells potent to selectively kill tumor cells. With the recent progress in the design and manufacturing of cellular products, T cells used in the treatment of malignant diseases may be regarded as anticancer biopharmaceuticals. Genetical manipulation of T cells has given T cells desired specificity but also enable to tailor their activation and proliferation potential. Here, we summarize the recent developments in genetic engineering of T-cell-based biopharmaceuticals, covering criteria for their clinical application in regard to safety and efficacy. PMID:24474888

  14. Studies on rat and human thymus to demonstrate immunoreactivity of calcitonin gene-related peptide, tyrosine hydroxylase and neuropeptide Y

    PubMed Central

    KRANZ, ANDREA; KENDALL, MARION D.; VON GAUDECKER, BRITA

    1997-01-01

    The peptidergic and noradrenergic innervation of rat and human thymus was investigated by immunohistochemistry at the light and electron microscopical level (avidin-biotin-complex, sucrose-phosphate-glyoxylic-acid, and immunogold techniques). The distribution of noradrenergic neural profiles, and positive immunoreactivity for calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neuropeptide Y (NPY) is described in female rats during ageing, and in human children. In the neonatal rat thymus, the arteries and septa are well supplied by fine varicose nerves. In older animals (2 wk–1 y) the number of septa and blood vessels increase and consequently also the innervation. No nerves were found in the cortex. Apart from the innervation of the septal areas, immunoreactivity for CGRP and TH was present in thymic cells. Except for the young rats (neonatal–14 d), all rats showed CGRP positivity in subcapsular/perivascular epithelial cells (type 1 cells). All rat thymuses also contained a few TH positive cells in the medulla, which could only be confirmed as epithelial cells (type 6 cells) in children. Type 1 cells in the human thymus were not CGRP positive, but as in the rat, there were similar TH positive cells in the medulla. It was concluded that in addition to nerves containing CGRP, noradrenaline or dopamine, epithelial cells also contain these transmitters. They could therefore act on different cells (compared with neural targets) in a paracrine manner. PMID:9419001

  15. Stem Cell Treatments: What to Ask

    MedlinePlus

    ... a result of taking part in this study? Cost In a clinical trial, typically the cost of the test treatment and trial monitoring is ... government funding. Learn more here . What are the costs of the treatment? What does this include? What ...

  16. Sickle cell disease and dental treatment.

    PubMed

    Piccin, Andrea; Fleming, Pádraig; Eakins, Elva; McGovern, Eleanor; Smith, Owen P; McMahon, Corrina

    2008-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) and sickle cell trait (SCT) are found most frequently in individuals of African, Middle Eastern and Indian ethnicity. Population migration has made this disease more common worldwide, including Ireland. We present an overview of this disease, focusing on management and practical implications for dental practitioners. PMID:18578383

  17. Effectiveness of plasma treatment on pancreatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    HATTORI, NORIFUMI; YAMADA, SUGURU; TORII, KOJI; TAKEDA, SHIGEOMI; NAKAMURA, KAE; TANAKA, HIROMASA; KAJIYAMA, HIROAKI; KANDA, MITSURO; FUJII, TSUTOMU; NAKAYAMA, GORO; SUGIMOTO, HIROYUKI; KOIKE, MASAHIKO; NOMOTO, SHUJI; FUJIWARA, MICHITAKA; MIZUNO, MASAAKI; HORI, MASARU; KODERA, YASUHIRO

    2015-01-01

    Non-equilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma (NEAPP) has attracted attention in cancer therapy. We explored the indirect effect of NEAPP through plasma-activated medium (PAM) on pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, four pancreatic cancer cell lines were used and the antitumor effects of PAM treatment were evaluated using a cell proliferation assay. To explore functional mechanisms, morphological change and caspase-3/7 activation in cells were also assessed. Furthermore, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation in cells was examined and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC), an intracellular ROS scavenger, was tested. Finally, the antitumor effect of local injection of PAM was investigated in a mouse xenograft model. We found that PAM treatment had lethal effect on pancreatic cancer cells. Typical morphological findings suggestive of apoptosis such as vacuolization of cell membranes, small and round cells and aggregation of cell nuclei, were observed in the PAM treated cells. Caspase-3/7 activation was detected in accordance with the observed morphological changes. Additionally, ROS uptake was observed in all cell lines tested, while the antitumor effects of PAM were completely inhibited with NAC. In the mouse xenograft model, the calculated tumor volume on day 28 in the PAM treatment group was significantly smaller compared with the control group [28±22 vs. 89±38 (mm3 ± SD), p=0.0031]. These results show that PAM treatment of pancreatic cancer might be a promising therapeutic strategy. PMID:26351772

  18. FMRFamide-like immunoreactive nervus terminalis innervation to the pituitary in the catfish, Clarias batrachus (Linn.): demonstration by lesion and immunocytochemical techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishna, N. S.; Subhedar, N.; Schreibman, M. P.

    1992-01-01

    Certain thick FMRFamide-like immunoreactive fibers arising from the ganglion cells of nervus terminalis in the olfactory bulb of Clarias batrachus can be traced centripetally through the medial olfactory tract, telencephalon, lateral preoptic area, tuberal area, and hypothalamohypophysial tract to the pituitary. Following 6 days of bilateral olfactory tract transection, the immunoreactivity in the thick fibers, caudal to the lesion site, was partially eliminated, whereas after 10 and 14 days, it was totally abolished in the processes en route to the pituitary. The results indicate a direct innervation of the pituitary gland by the FMRFamide-like peptide containing fibers of the nervus terminalis.

  19. Ionomycin Treatment Renders NK Cells Hyporesponsive.

    PubMed

    Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Thomas, L Michael; Lopez-Cobo, Sheila; García-Cuesta, Eva M; Long, Eric O; Reyburn, Hugh T

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes important in immune responses to cancer and multiple pathogens. However, chronic activation of NK cells can induce a hyporesponsive state. The molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of this hyporesponsive condition are unknown, thus an easy and reproducible mechanism able to induce hyporesponsiveness on human NK cells would be very useful to gain understanding of this process. Human NK cells treated with ionomycin lose their ability to degranulate and secrete IFN-γ in response to a variety of stimuli, but IL-2 stimulation can compensate these defects. Apart from reductions in the expression of CD11a/CD18, no great changes were observed in the activating and inhibitory receptors expressed by these NK cells, however their transcriptional signature is different to that described for other hyporesponsive lymphocytes. PMID:27007115

  20. Ionomycin Treatment Renders NK Cells Hyporesponsive

    PubMed Central

    Romera-Cárdenas, Gema; Thomas, L. Michael; Lopez-Cobo, Sheila; García-Cuesta, Eva M.; Long, Eric O.; Reyburn, Hugh T.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer cells are cytotoxic lymphocytes important in immune responses to cancer and multiple pathogens. However, chronic activation of NK cells can induce a hyporesponsive state. The molecular basis of the mechanisms underlying the generation and maintenance of this hyporesponsive condition are unknown, thus an easy and reproducible mechanism able to induce hyporesponsiveness on human NK cells would be very useful to gain understanding of this process. Human NK cells treated with ionomycin lose their ability to degranulate and secrete IFN-γ in response to a variety of stimuli, but IL-2 stimulation can compensate these defects. Apart from reductions in the expression of CD11a/CD18, no great changes were observed in the activating and inhibitory receptors expressed by these NK cells, however their transcriptional signature is different to that described for other hyporesponsive lymphocytes. PMID:27007115

  1. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Ocular Disorders.

    PubMed

    Sivan, Padma Priya; Syed, Sakinah; Mok, Pooi-Ling; Higuchi, Akon; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A; Munusamy, Murugan A; Awang Hamat, Rukman; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Sustenance of visual function is the ultimate focus of ophthalmologists. Failure of complete recovery of visual function and complications that follow conventional treatments have shifted search to a new form of therapy using stem cells. Stem cell progenitors play a major role in replenishing degenerated cells despite being present in low quantity and quiescence in our body. Unlike other tissues and cells, regeneration of new optic cells responsible for visual function is rarely observed. Understanding the transcription factors and genes responsible for optic cells development will assist scientists in formulating a strategy to activate and direct stem cells renewal and differentiation. We review the processes of human eye development and address the strategies that have been exploited in an effort to regain visual function in the preclinical and clinical state. The update of clinical findings of patients receiving stem cell treatment is also presented. PMID:27293447

  2. Stem Cell Therapy for Treatment of Ocular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sivan, Padma Priya; Syed, Sakinah; Mok, Pooi-Ling; Higuchi, Akon; Murugan, Kadarkarai; Alarfaj, Abdullah A.; Munusamy, Murugan A.; Awang Hamat, Rukman; Umezawa, Akihiro; Kumar, Suresh

    2016-01-01

    Sustenance of visual function is the ultimate focus of ophthalmologists. Failure of complete recovery of visual function and complications that follow conventional treatments have shifted search to a new form of therapy using stem cells. Stem cell progenitors play a major role in replenishing degenerated cells despite being present in low quantity and quiescence in our body. Unlike other tissues and cells, regeneration of new optic cells responsible for visual function is rarely observed. Understanding the transcription factors and genes responsible for optic cells development will assist scientists in formulating a strategy to activate and direct stem cells renewal and differentiation. We review the processes of human eye development and address the strategies that have been exploited in an effort to regain visual function in the preclinical and clinical state. The update of clinical findings of patients receiving stem cell treatment is also presented. PMID:27293447

  3. Secretion of alpha-immunoreactive inhibin by human pre-embryos cultured in vitro.

    PubMed

    Phocas, I; Sarandakou, A; Rizos, D; Dimitriadou, F; Mantzavinos, T; Zourlas, P A

    1992-04-01

    alpha-Immunoreactive inhibin was measured using an enzyme immunoassay kit in the culture medium (Ham's F-10 medium supplemented with 14% heat-inactivated human serum) from day 3 or 4 to day 14 post-fertilization of 31 surplus pre-embryos from eight women participating in an in-vitro fertilization programme. Inhibition secretion was demonstrated in all of them from the fourth day after fertilization (mean +/- SEM: 3.0 +/- 0.7 U) and was independent of the morphological development of pre-embryos (2-4 cells, n = 4; 6-8 cells, n = 4; 8-10 cells, n = 9; 10-12 cells, n = 4; morulae, n = 5 and blastocysts, n = 4). On days 7, 10, 13 and 14 post-fertilization, mean inhibin values +/- SEM for non-disintegrated pre-embryos were respectively: 6.5 +/- 0.9 U, 12.3 +/- 2.0 U, 16.8 +/- 3.2 U and 20.2 +/- 3.7 U; however, when disintegration was noted on days 10 and 13 after fertilization, inhibin mean values were 9.0 +/- 1.4 U and 8.4 +/- 1.7 U respectively. Inhibin levels were significantly correlated with human chorionic gonadotrophin levels in the same culture media only on day 13, while correlation with pregnancy specific beta 1-glycoprotein occurred on day 7 post-fertilization. In conclusion, early human pre-embryos secrete alpha-immunoreactive inhibin before the cytotrophoblast is formed. This secretion increases significantly with time when development is continued, while disintegration is followed by a net decline in the rate of inhibin release. PMID:1522200

  4. Choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive cortical interneurons do not occur in all rodents: a study of the phylogenetic occurrence of this neural characteristic.

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Adhil; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    The present study was designed to provide results aimed at testing whether the interneurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChAT), probably representing GABA interneurons, found in the cerebral cortex of the rat represent a common feature of the order Rodentia. Initially we verified the presence of ChAT immunoreactive bipolar cell bodies, axons and terminal-like fibres in pigmented (Long-Evans) and non-pigmented (Sprague-Dawley) strains of Rattus norvegicus, confirming that the ChAT polyclonal antibodies (AB144P and AB143, Chemicon; VChAT, Sigma) with the immunohistochemical techniques used provided the same staining as previously described for this species. We then examined pigmented (AKR3) and non-pigmented (C3H) strains of Mus musculus, wild caught striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), bushveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii), greater canerat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and common molerat (Cryptomys hottentotus). The AB144P antibody revealed cortical interneurons in both strains of M. musculus and in R. pumilio, but not in the other species. In all species/strains cortical ChAT immunoreactive axons and terminal-like fibres were localized with the AB144P antibody. In the non-Rattus species/strains there was no evidence for localization of ChAT immunoreactivity in any cortical cell bodies using the AB143 and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VChAT) antibodies despite extensive localization in axons and terminal-like fibres. It is concluded that bipolar cortical GABA interneurons in certain rodent species may develop ChAT immunoreactivity but not VChAT immunoreactivity making the cholinergic relevance of ChAT in the GABA interneurons uncertain and may exclude these neurons from being part of the traditionally defined cholinergic system. PMID:17049807

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other organs . Sun exposure and having a weak immune system can affect the risk of Merkel cell carcinoma. ... ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy for psoriasis . Having an immune system weakened by disease, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia ...

  6. Treatment Option Overview (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    MedlinePlus

    ... other organs . Sun exposure and having a weak immune system can affect the risk of Merkel cell carcinoma. ... ultraviolet A (PUVA) therapy for psoriasis . Having an immune system weakened by disease, such as chronic lymphocytic leukemia ...

  7. Immunoreactivity, sensory and physicochemical properties of fermented soy protein isolate.

    PubMed

    Meinlschmidt, Pia; Ueberham, Elke; Lehmann, Jörg; Schweiggert-Weisz, Ute; Eisner, P

    2016-08-15

    The effect of induced liquid state fermentation (Bacillus subtilis, Rhizopus oryzae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus helveticus) on the immunoreactivity, physicochemical and sensory properties of soy protein isolate (SPI) was studied. L. helveticus revealed the most abundant reduction in terms of immunoreactivity within soluble protein fractions, up to 100%, which could be measured by in vitro sandwich ELISA using mouse monoclonal anti-Glym5 antibodies (mAbs). Almost no binding was found in western blot analysis using mouse monoclonal mAbs and sera from soy sensitive individuals. Fermentation increased water- and oil-binding capacity as well as protein solubility at pH 4.0. Foaming activity was nearly doubled compared to non-fermented SPI. A decreased emulsifying capacity, foaming density, and quantity of soluble proteins at pH 7.0 were observed. Principal component analysis (PCA) confirmed decreased bitter and beany off-flavors of fermented samples compared to non-fermented SPI. Consequently, fermentation might be a promising method to produce tasty low-allergen food ingredients with good physicochemical properties. PMID:27006235

  8. Integrating emerging treatment options in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Kahl, Brad S; Fowler, Nathan H; Czuczman, Myron S

    2013-12-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma is an uncommon lymphoma subtype that is currently considered incurable and lacks a single standard of care. Choice of treatment is complicated by the disease’s clinical heterogeneity. The course of the disease may be indolent, moderately aggressive, or aggressive. A translocation between chromosomes 11 and 14 is observed in the majority of mantle cell lymphoma patients, and the diseased cells may develop a variety of other genetic aberrations. Although the disease tends to respond well to treatment, patients almost invariably relapse, with many becoming chemotherapy refractory over time. The development of new treatment strategies has improved the prognosis for these patients. Novel approaches include intensive chemotherapy, often in combination with stem cell transplantation; maintenance therapy with extended duration; and new targeted treatments such as ibrutinib, bendamustine, bortezomib, lenalidomide, and idelalisib. Many of these new agents have shown promising activity, both as single agents and in combination regimens. PMID:24893155

  9. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system. PMID:25258664

  10. A robust data treatment approach for fuel cells system analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, D; Zhen, Y

    2012-11-01

    This paper describes the implementation of a practical approach for fuel cells system data analysis. A number of data treatment techniques such as data management and treatment, data synchronization, and data reconciliation are introduced and discussed in order to solve the issues raised in the practical case. These techniques are integrated in a software environment which provides user a fast, efficient, and rational electrochemical investigation. The performance of the approach is illustrated using an industrial fuel cell stack test system. PMID:22721565

  11. Stem cells for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kearns-Jonker, Mary; Dai, Wangde; Kloner, Robert A

    2010-08-01

    An increasing number of clinical trials are enrolling patients in studies designed to examine the safety and efficacy of autologous stem cells for cardiac repair. Recent reports suggest that most patients receiving autologous cell-based therapies after myocardial infarction, or as a treatment for ischemic cardiomyopathy, benefit from a modest increase in global left ventricular function. Despite a significant amount of variability in efficacy reported among different treatment centers, most studies demonstrate an improvement in the ejection fraction that ranges between 2 and 7% after stem cell treatment. The validation of long-term clinical benefit will first require well-controlled studies in appropriate preclinical animal models to develop procedures that enhance cell retention, integration and viability. This review highlights new developments that will benefit long-term cardiomyocyte survival and function of human cardiovascular progenitors as a prelude to achieving clinically significant outcomes in stem cell therapies for cardiac repair. PMID:20677094

  12. Distribution of immunoreactive GABA and glutamate receptors in the gustatory portion of the nucleus of the solitary tract in rat.

    PubMed

    King, Michael S

    2003-05-15

    The distribution of glutamate (GLU) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors within the gustatory portion of the rat nucleus of the solitary tract (gNST) was investigated using immunohistochemical, histological and neural tract tracing techniques. Numerous somata throughout the gNST were immunoreactive for alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) and N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, while few were labeled for kainate receptors. AMPA and NMDA receptors were particularly abundant in the rostral central (RC) subdivision of the gNST, which receives most of the primary afferent input from the oral cavity and contains most of the gNST neurons that project to the parabrachial nuclei (PBN). This finding supports electrophysiological evidence that AMPA and NMDA receptors are involved in responses to orosensory input and indicates that their action may influence ascending taste signals as well. Compared to the ionotropic GLU receptors, few cell bodies were immunoreactive for metabotropic GLU receptors. Somata immunoreactive for GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors were located throughout the nucleus. The densest neuropil labeling was for GABA(A) receptors in the ventral (V) subnucleus, the gNST subdivision that sends output to brainstem oromotor centers. The distributions of immunolabeling for GLU and GABA receptors imply that different functional roles may exist for specific receptors within this nucleus. PMID:12754086

  13. 5-Azacytidine treatment of HA-A melanoma cells induces Sp1 activity and concomitant transforming growth factor alpha expression.

    PubMed Central

    Shin, T H; Paterson, A J; Grant, J H; Meluch, A A; Kudlow, J E

    1992-01-01

    Evidence indicates DNA methylation as a part of the regulatory machinery controlling mammalian gene expression. The human melanoma cell line HA-A expresses low levels of transforming growth factor alpha (TGF-alpha). TGF-alpha mRNA accumulated, however, in response to DNA demethylation induced by a nucleoside analog, 5-azacytidine (5-azaC). The importance of DNA methylation in the TGF-alpha promoter region was examined by a transient transfection assay with luciferase reporter plasmids containing a portion of the TGF-alpha promoter. 5-azaC treatment of HA-A cells before the transfection caused a significant increase in the luciferase activity. Since input plasmids were confirmed to remain unmethylated, DNA demethylation of the TGF-alpha promoter itself does not account for the observed increase in TGF-alpha mRNA. Using an electrophoretic mobility shift assay, enhanced formation of protein-TGF-alpha promoter complex was detected in response to 5-azaC treatment. This 5-azaC-induced complex was shown to contain the transcription factor Sp1 by the following criteria: the protein-DNA complex formed on the TGF-alpha promoter contained immunoreactive Sp1; the mobility of the complex in an electrophoretic mobility shift assay was similar to that formed by recombinant Sp1; and DNase I footprinting analysis demonstrated that the 5-azaC-induced complex produced a footprint on the TGF-alpha promoter identical to that of authentic Sp1. These observations suggest that 5-azaC induces TGF-alpha expression by augmenting the Sp1 activity. However, neither the Sp1 mRNA nor its protein was induced by 5-azaC. These results suggest that in HA-A cells, TGF-alpha expression is down-modulated by DNA methylation. In addition, this process may involve the specific regulation of Sp1 activity without altering the amount of the transcription factor. Images PMID:1380648

  14. Neuro-peptide treatment with Cerebrolysin improves the survival of neural stem cell grafts in an APP transgenic model of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rockenstein, Edward; Desplats, Paula; Ubhi, Kiren; Mante, Michael; Florio, Jazmin; Adame, Anthony; Winter, Stefan; Brandstaetter, Hemma; Meier, Dieter; Masliah, Eliezer

    2015-07-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been considered as potential therapy in Alzheimer's disease (AD) but their use is hampered by the poor survival of grafted cells. Supply of neurotrophic factors to the grafted cells has been proposed as a way to augment survival of the stem cells. In this context, we investigated the utility of Cerebrolysin (CBL), a peptidergic mixture with neurotrophic-like properties, as an adjunct to stem cell therapy in an APP transgenic (tg) model of AD. We grafted murine NSCs into the hippocampus of non-tg and APP tg that were treated systemically with CBL and analyzed after 1, 3, 6 and 9months post grafting. Compared to vehicle-treated non-tg mice, in the vehicle-treated APP tg mice there was considerable reduction in the survival of the grafted NSCs. Whereas, CBL treatment enhanced the survival of NSCs in both non-tg and APP tg with the majority of the surviving NSCs remaining as neuroblasts. The NSCs of the CBL treated mice displayed reduced numbers of caspase-3 and TUNEL positive cells and increased brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and furin immunoreactivity. These results suggest that CBL might protect grafted NSCs and as such be a potential adjuvant therapy when combined with grafting. PMID:26209890

  15. Bortezomib for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma: an update

    PubMed Central

    Hambley, Bryan; Caimi, Paolo F.; William, Basem M.

    2016-01-01

    Bortezomib is a first in class proteasome inhibitor, initially approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of plasma cell myeloma. Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed and refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and, more recently, in the upfront setting as well. Treatment algorithms for MCL have rapidly evolved over the past two decades, and the optimal regimen remains to be defined. The choice of treatment regimen is based on disease risk stratification models, the expected toxicity of antineoplastic agents, the perceived patient ability to tolerate the planned treatments and the availability of novel agents. As new drugs with novel mechanisms of action and variable toxicity profiles come into use, treatment decisions for a given patient have become increasingly complex. This article provides an overview of the evolving use of bortezomib in the rapidly changing management landscape of MCL PMID:27493710

  16. Bortezomib for the treatment of mantle cell lymphoma: an update.

    PubMed

    Hambley, Bryan; Caimi, Paolo F; William, Basem M

    2016-08-01

    Bortezomib is a first in class proteasome inhibitor, initially approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of plasma cell myeloma. Bortezomib has been approved for the treatment of relapsed and refractory mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) and, more recently, in the upfront setting as well. Treatment algorithms for MCL have rapidly evolved over the past two decades, and the optimal regimen remains to be defined. The choice of treatment regimen is based on disease risk stratification models, the expected toxicity of antineoplastic agents, the perceived patient ability to tolerate the planned treatments and the availability of novel agents. As new drugs with novel mechanisms of action and variable toxicity profiles come into use, treatment decisions for a given patient have become increasingly complex. This article provides an overview of the evolving use of bortezomib in the rapidly changing management landscape of MCL. PMID:27493710

  17. Plasma needle: treatment of living cells and tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoffels, Eva

    2003-10-01

    Non-thermal plasmas are capable of refined treatment of heat sensitive surfaces. Recently, many non-thermal sources working under atmospheric pressure have been constructed. Their main applications are various surface treatments: cleaning, etching, changing the wettability/adhesion, and bacterial decontamination. A new research at the Eindhoven University of Technology focuses on in vivo treatment by means of a novel non-thermal plasma source (the plasma needle). At present, a fundamental study has been undertaken to identify all possible responses of living objects exposed to the plasma. Plasma treatment does not lead to cell death (necrosis), which is a cause of inflammation. On the contrary, we observe various sophisticated reactions of mammalian cells, e.g. cell detachment (loss of cell contact) and programmed cell death (apoptosis). Moreover, under certain conditions the plasma is capable of killing bacteria, while eukaryotic cells remain unharmed. These findings may result in development of new techniques, like bacterial sterilization of infected (living) tissues or removal of cells without inflammatory response, and on a longer time scale to new methods in the health care. Possible applications include treatment of skin ailments, aiding wound healing and sterilization of dental cavities.

  18. Volume changes of human endothelial cells induced by photodynamic treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leunig, Andreas; Staub, Frank; Plesnila, Nick; Peters, Jurgen; Feyh, Jens; Gutmann, Ralph; Goetz, Alwin E.

    1996-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) has shown promising results in treatment of malignant tumors. However, the mechanisms leading to tumor destruction during PDT are still not completely understood. In addition to effects on the microcirculation, damage to cellular structures has been observed following exposure of cells to PDT. A phenomenon preceding these events might possibly be cell swelling. We therefore studied the influence of treatment with Photofrin (PF) and laser light on volume changes and cell viability of endothelial cells. Endothelial cells were obtained from human umbilical cord veins (HUVEC) by an adaption of the method of Maruyama (1963). After subcultivation the cells were harvested and transferred as a cell suspension into a specially designed incubation chamber. Cells received either PF in concentrations of 1.5 or 3.0 (mu) g/ml and laser illumination (630 nm; 40 mW/cm2, 4 Joule), PF alone, or laser treatment only. Following start of PF incubation and after phototreatment cell samples were taken for volume measurements using flow cytometry and for studies of cellular morphology using scanning electron microscopy. Simultaneously, cell viability was monitored by the trypan blue exclusion test and colorimetric MTT assay. (abstract truncated)

  19. [Cell technologies in complex treatment of venous trophic ulcers].

    PubMed

    Gavrilenko, A V; Pavlova, O V; Ivanov, A A; Vakhrat'ian, P E; Dashinimaev, É B; Li, R A

    2011-01-01

    Live skin equivalent and fibroblasts in gel were used in complex treatment of venous trophic ulcers to evaluate efficacy of cell transplants. Their efficacy depended on extent of trophic ulcer and time of their existence. Cell culture method is minimally traumatic, can be used in elder patients and seniors and gives positive results in 85% of cases. PMID:21350400

  20. Stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Stem cells offer an enormous pool of resources for the understanding of the human body. One proposed use of stem cells has been as an autologous therapy. The use of stem cells for neurodegenerative diseases has become of interest. Clinical applications of stem cells for Alzheimer disease, Parkinson disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and multiple sclerosis will increase in the coming years, and although great care will need to be taken when moving forward with prospective treatments, the application of stem cells is highly promising. PMID:21144012

  1. Significance of apoptosis related proteins on malignant transformation of ovarian tumors: A comparison between Bcl-2/Bax ratio and p53 immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Zeren, Tamer; Inan, Sevinc; Vatansever, H Seda; Sayhan, Sevil

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we compared the immunoreactivities of Bcl-2, Bax and p53 proteins in ovarian tumors and related the immunohistochemical findings to the histological type of the tumors. Formalin-fixed, paraffin wax-embedded tissue sections from 40 patients who had serous-mucinous borderline tumors and serous-mucinous adenocarcinoma of the ovary (n=10 each) were stained with hematoxylin-eosin (H&E). After histopathological examination, serial sections were stained immunohistochemically with primary antibodies to Bcl-2, Bax and p53 using an avidin-biotin-peroxidase method. A semi-quantitative grading system was used to compare the immunohistochemical staining intensities. The nuclear DNA fragmentation of apoptosis was determined using TUNEL method. As a result of immunohistochemical staining, increased immunoreactivity of Bcl-2 was observed in adenocarcinomas when compared to borderline tumors (P<0.001). Strong immunoreactivity of Bcl-2 and mild immunoreactivities of Bax and p53 were detected in ovarian adenocarcinomas. There were no significant statistical differences in the immunoreactivity of Bax among the histological type of ovarian tumors. Whereas a balance was observed between the immunoreactivities of Bcl-2 and Bax in the borderline cases, and this balance was strongly changed toward the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein in patients with adenocarcinoma. TUNEL staining of sections indicated apoptotic cells in the serous borderline tumors were about 8-fold higher than in the serous adenocarcinoma. The results of this study on apoptosis-related factors might help to develop novel protective and therapeutic approaches, such as isoflavonoids and isothiocyanates, which were associated with decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio, against the malignant epithelial ovarian tumors. PMID:25108507

  2. Aerosol-Based Cell Therapy for Treatment of Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kardia, Egi; Halim, Nur Shuhaidatul Sarmiza Abdul; Yahaya, Badrul Hisham

    2016-01-01

    Aerosol-based cell delivery technique via intratracheal is an effective route for delivering transplant cells directly into the lungs. An aerosol device known as the MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer is invented to transform liquid into an aerosol form, which then can be applied via intratracheal administration for drug delivery. The device produces a uniform and concentrated distribution of aerosolized liquid. Using the capability of MicroSprayer(®) Aerosolizer to transform liquid into aerosol form, our group has designed a novel method of cell delivery using an aerosol-based technique. We have successfully delivered skin-derived fibroblast cells and airway epithelial cells into the airway of a rabbit with minimum risk of cell loss and have uniformly distributed the cells into the airway. This chapter illustrates the application of aerosol device to deliver any type of cells for future treatment of lung diseases. PMID:27062596

  3. Distribution of vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity in the taste organs of teleost fish and frog.

    PubMed

    Witt, M

    1995-02-01

    Using immunohistochemistry, vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) was visualized in taste bud cells of the carp, Cyprinus carpio, and the European catfish, Silurus glanis, by means of light and electron microscopy. Intracellular membrane systems, presumably smooth endoplasmic reticulum, of light (sensory) cells, but not of dark (supporting) cells and basal cells, were densely labelled with antibody. In the frog (four species: Rana temporaria, R. ridibunda, R. arvalis, R. pipiens), taste bud cells did not label. However, the dense basal nerve fibre plexus, some subepithelial ganglionic cells, but no ascending intragemmal fibres, were immunoreactive. In fish, the results support evidence that VIP is involved in the modulation of taste transduction at the level of receptor cells. In the frog, an indirect, possibly vasodilatatory effect on taste perception may be considered. PMID:7775201

  4. Mesenchymal stem cells are sensitive to bleomycin treatment

    PubMed Central

    Nicolay, Nils H.; Rühle, Alexander; Perez, Ramon Lopez; Trinh, Thuy; Sisombath, Sonevisay; Weber, Klaus-Josef; Ho, Anthony D.; Debus, Jürgen; Saffrich, Rainer; Huber, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been shown to attenuate pulmonary damage induced by bleomycin-based anticancer treatments, but the influence of bleomycin on the stem cells themselves remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that human bone marrow-derived MSCs are relatively sensitive to bleomycin exposure compared to adult fibroblasts. MSCs revealed increased levels of apoptosis after bleomycin treatment, while cellular morphology, stem cell surface marker expression and the ability for adhesion and migration remained unchanged. Bleomycin treatment also resulted in a reduced adipogenic differentiation potential of these stem cells. MSCs were found to efficiently repair DNA double strand breaks induced by bleomycin, mostly through non-homologous end joining repair. Low mRNA and protein expression levels of the inactivating enzyme bleomycin hydrolase were detected in MSCs that may contribute to the observed bleomycin-sensitive phenotype of these cells. The sensitivity of MSCs against bleomycin needs to be taken into consideration for ongoing and future treatment protocols investigating these stem cells as a potential treatment option for bleomycin-induced pulmonary damage in the clinic. PMID:27215195

  5. Hypothalamic CRF immunoreactivity in genetically hypothyroid (hyt/hyt) mice.

    PubMed

    Meserve, L A

    1987-07-01

    The induction of hypothyroidism in young rats by feeding thiouracil to their mothers during pregnancy has been shown to depress hypothalamic content of bioactive and immunoactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF). The present study was done to determine whether genetically hypothyroid young mice (hyt/hyt) born to euthyroid mothers (+/hyt) exhibited a similar depression in hypothalamic CRF immunoreactivity. Young euthyroid and hypothyroid littermate mice were examined by radioimmunoassay for hypothalamic CRF content at 15, 20, 25, or 30 days of age. Mean CRF content was depressed insignificantly (to about 80% of normal) by hypothyroidism, at 15-25 days of age. However, after weaning by the mother, 30-day-old hypothyroid pups demonstrated significantly depressed hypothalamic CRF levels (71%). It is suggested that maternal factors may be assisting in the maintenance of hypothalamic CRF until after weaning. Furthermore, genetic hypothyroidism does not appear to have nearly as marked an influence as thiouracil feeding on hypothalamic CRF levels. PMID:3496606

  6. Identification of sperm immunoreactive antigens for immunocontraceptive purposes: a review

    PubMed Central

    Domagala, Alina; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2004-01-01

    Antisperm antibodies (ASA) may be a reason of infertility in some individuals. They may affect pre- as well as post-fertilization stages of the reproductive process. There is ongoing progress in the identification of sperm antigens related to fertilization. The employed methods for this purpose include recombinant DNA technology and the most advanced proteomic analysis. This paper enlists the different approaches undertaken in order to identify and characterize the immunoreactive sperm antigens. We have mainly focused on those, which have been already studied in regard of their immunocontraceptive potential, although it has been impossible to include all published data concerning the topic in a single article. Few novel sperm auto- and isoantigens, discovered recently, have also been reviewed even if their role in fertilization has not been yet established. PMID:15035665

  7. [Immunoreaction and blood transfusion--chairmen's introductory remarks].

    PubMed

    Kawabe, Tsutomu; Matsushita, Tadashi

    2013-05-01

    Although blood transfusion is an extremely important therapeutic procedure that usually proceeds without complications, there are some risks associated with donated blood. Investigations into the causes of transfusion reactions and their prevention are important issues for transfusion therapy. In addition to nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT) for infectious diseases and the irradiation of blood to prevent post-transfusion GVHD, prestorage leukocyte reduction and diversion of the first part of the donation of blood were recently introduced into transfusion therapy. This symposium, entitled "Immunoreaction and blood transfusion", reviewed the immune responses associated with blood transfusion, which is probably the most frequent medical procedure performed in allogeneic organ transplantation, with four themes provided by the four featured invited speakers: transfusion-related acute lung injury (TRALI) and transfusion-associated circulatory overload (TACO), high-dose intravenous immunoglobulin therapy for chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy, transfusion-transmitted infectious disease surveillance, and transfusion-related immunomodulation. PMID:23947177

  8. Dynamic rendering of the heterogeneous cell response to anticancer treatments.

    PubMed

    Falcetta, Francesca; Lupi, Monica; Colombo, Valentina; Ubezio, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The antiproliferative response to anticancer treatment is the result of concurrent responses in all cell cycle phases, extending over several cell generations, whose complexity is not captured by current methods. In the proposed experimental/computational approach, the contemporary use of time-lapse live cell microscopy and flow cytometric data supported the computer rendering of the proliferative process through the cell cycle and subsequent generations during/after treatment. The effects of treatments were modelled with modules describing the functional activity of the main pathways causing arrest, repair and cell death in each phase. A framework modelling environment was created, enabling us to apply different types of modules in each phase and test models at the complexity level justified by the available data. We challenged the method with time-course measures taken in parallel with flow cytometry and time-lapse live cell microscopy in X-ray-treated human ovarian cancer cells, spanning a wide range of doses. The most suitable model of the treatment, including the dose-response of each effect, was progressively built, combining modules with a rational strategy and fitting simultaneously all data of different doses and platforms. The final model gave for the first time the complete rendering in silico of the cycling process following X-ray exposure, providing separate and quantitative measures of the dose-dependence of G1, S and G2M checkpoint activities in subsequent generations, reconciling known effects of ionizing radiations and new insights in a unique scenario. PMID:24146610

  9. Interleukin (IL)-8 immunoreactivity of injured axons and surrounding oligodendrocytes in traumatic head injury.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ago, Kazutoshi; Nakamae, Takuma; Higo, Eri; Ogata, Mamoru

    2016-06-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 has been suggested to be a positive regulator of myelination in the central nervous system, in addition to its principal role as a chemokine for neutrophils. Immunostaining for beta-amyloid precursor protein (AβPP) is an effective tool for detecting traumatic axonal injury, although AβPP immunoreactivity can also indicate axonal injury due to hypoxic causes. In this study, we examined IL-8 and AβPP immunoreactivity in sections of corpus callosum obtained from deceased patients with blunt head injury and from equivalent control tissue. AβPP immunoreactivity was detected in injured axons, such as axonal bulbs and varicose axons, in 24 of 44 head injury cases. These AβPP immunoreactive cases had survived for more than 3h. The AβPP immunostaining pattern can be classified into two types: traumatic (Pattern 1) and non-traumatic (Pattern 2) axonal injuries, which we described previously [Hayashi et al. Int. J. Legal Med. 129 (2015) 1085-1090]. Three of 44 control cases also showed AβPP immunoreactive injured axons as Pattern 2. In contrast, IL-8 immunoreactivity was detected in 7 AβPP immunoreactive and in 2 non-AβPP immunoreactive head injury cases, but was not detected in any of the 44 control cases, including the 3 AβPP immunoreactive control cases. The IL-8 immunoreactive cases had survived from 3 to 24 days, whereas those cases who survived less than 3 days (n=29) and who survived 90 days (n=1) were not IL-8 immunoreactive. Moreover, IL-8 was detected as Pattern 1 axons only. In addition, double immunofluorescence analysis showed that IL-8 is expressed by oligodendrocytes surrounding injured axons. In conclusion, our results suggest that immunohistochemical detection of IL-8 may be useful as a complementary diagnostic marker of traumatic axonal injury. PMID:27065055

  10. An alternative means of retaining ocular structure and improving immunoreactivity for light microscopy studies

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ning; Shibata, Brad; Hess, John F.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Several properties of ocular tissue make fixation for light microscopy problematic. Because the eye is spherical, immersion fixation necessarily results in a temporal gradient of fixation, with surfaces fixing more rapidly and thoroughly than interior structures. The problem is compounded by the fact that the layers of the eye wall are compositionally quite different, resulting in different degrees of fixation-induced shrinkage and distortion. Collectively, these result in non-uniform preservation, as well as buckling and/or retinal detachment. This gradient problem is most acute for the lens, where the density of proteins can delay fixation of the central lens for days, and where the fixation gradient parallels the age gradient of lens cells, which complicates data interpretation. Our goal was to identify a simple method for minimizing some of the problems arising from immersion fixation, which avoided covalent modification of antigens, retained high quality structure, and maintained tissue in a state that is amenable to common cytochemical techniques. Methods A simple and inexpensive derivative of the freeze-substitution approach was developed and compared to fixation by immersion in formalin. Preservation of structure, immunoreactivity, GFP and tdTomato fluorescence, lectin reactivity, outer segment auto fluorescence, Click-iT chemistry, compatibility with in situ hybdrdization, and the ability to rehydrate eyes after fixation by freeze substitution for subsequent cryo sectioning were assessed. Results An inexpensive and simple variant of the freeze substitution approach provides excellent structural preservation for light microscopy, and essentially eliminates ocular buckling, retinal detachment, and outer segment auto-fluorescence, without covalent modification of tissue antigens. The approach shows a notable improvement in preservation of immunoreactivity. TdTomato intrinsic fluorescence is also preserved, as is compatibility with in situ

  11. Cell-Specific Multifunctional Processing of Heterogeneous Cell Systems in a Single Laser Pulse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Mutonga, Martin B. G.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    Current methods of cell processing for gene and cell therapies use several separate procedures for gene transfer and cell separation or elimination, because no current technology can offer simultaneous multi-functional processing of specific cell sub-sets in highly heterogeneous cell systems. Using the cell-specific generation of plasmonic nanobubbles of different sizes around cell-targeted gold nanoshells and nanospheres, we achieved simultaneous multifunctional cell-specific processing in a rapid single 70 ps laser pulse bulk treatment of heterogeneous cell suspension. This method supported the detection of cells, delivery of external molecular cargo to one type of cells and the concomitant destruction of another type of cells without damaging other cells in suspension, and real-time guidance of the two above cellular effects. PMID:23167546

  12. Is TIMP-1 immunoreactivity alone or in combination with other markers a predictor of benefit from anthracyclines in the BR9601 adjuvant breast cancer chemotherapy trial?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Predictive cancer biomarkers to guide the right treatment to the right patient at the right time are strongly needed. The purpose of the present study was to validate prior results that tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) alone or in combination with either HER2 or TOP2A copy number can be used to predict benefit from epirubicin (E) containing chemotherapy compared with cyclophosphamide, methotrexate and fluorouracil (CMF) treatment. Methods For the purpose of this study, formalin fixed paraffin embedded tumor tissue from women recruited into the BR9601 clinical trial, which randomized patients to E-CMF versus CMF, were analyzed for TIMP-1 immunoreactivity. Using previously collected data for HER2 amplification and TOP2A gene aberrations, we defined patients as "anthracycline non-responsive", that is, 2T (TIMP-1 immunoreactive and TOP2A normal) and HT (TIMP-1 immunoreactive and HER2 negative) and anthracycline responsive (all other cases). Results In total, 288 tumors were available for TIMP-1 analysis with (183/274) 66.8%, and (181/274) 66.0% being classed as 2T and HT responsive, respectively. TIMP-1 was neither associated with patient prognosis (relapse free survival or overall survival) nor with a differential effect of E-CMF and CMF. Also, TIMP-1 did not add to the predictive value of HER2, TOP2A gene aberrations, or to Ki67 immunoreactivity. Conclusion This study could not confirm the predictive value of TIMP-1 immunoreactivity in patients randomized to receive E-CMF versus CMF as adjuvant treatment for primary breast cancer. PMID:23570501

  13. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease: Implications for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kathryn; Lima, John

    2011-01-01

    Objective. To review issues related to asthma in sickle cell disease and management strategies. Data Source. A systematic review of pertinent original research publications, reviews, and editorials was undertaken using MEDLlNE, the Cochrane Library databases, and CINAHL from 1947 to November 2010. Search terms were [asthma] and [sickle cell disease]. Additional publications considered relevant to the sickle cell disease population of patients were identified; search terms included [sickle cell disease] combined with [acetaminophen], [pain medications], [vitamin D], [beta agonists], [exhaled nitric oxide], and [corticosteroids]. Results. The reported prevalence of asthma in children with sickle cell disease varies from 2% to approximately 50%. Having asthma increases the risk for developing acute chest syndrome , death, or painful episodes compared to having sickle cell disease without asthma. Asthma and sickle cell may be linked by impaired nitric oxide regulation, excessive production of leukotrienes, insufficient levels of Vitamin D, and exposure to acetaminophen in early life. Treatment of sickle cell patients includes using commonly prescribed asthma medications; specific considerations are suggested to ensure safety in the sickle cell population. Conclusion. Prospective controlled trials of drug treatment for asthma in patients who have both sickle cell disease and asthma are urgently needed. PMID:21490765

  14. Keratin immunoreactivity as an aid to the diagnosis of persistent adenocarcinoma in irradiated human prostates

    SciTech Connect

    Brawer, M.K.; Nagle, R.B.; Pitts, W.; Freiha, F.; Gamble, S.L.

    1989-02-01

    Postirradiation prostatic biopsy is believed by many to be the best measure of radiation effectiveness in prostatic cancer. Therapeutic irradiation may induce prostatic glandular atypia, which in its severe form can be confused with persistent adenocarcinoma on prostatic biopsies. In the current study, 37 postirradiation prostate biopsy specimens were evaluated by immunohistochemistry using a specific monoclonal anticytokeratin antibody (KA1) that reacts with the basal cells of normal or hyperplastic glands, but is nonreactive with the lumenal cells or with prostatic carcinoma cells. Persistent carcinoma was observed in 19 cases in which antibody staining was absent. The noncarcinomatous glands retained reactivity, but this reactivity appeared in a new and previously undescribed pattern. The irradiated lesion was characterized by cellular pleomorphisism, with enlargement of nuclei and loss of polarity. The immunoreactivity was seen in the enlarged basal cells and was seen to focally extend to involve the lumenal cell layer. In five of 37 cases, glands were seen that were so atypical on the routinely stained sections that a distinction from cancer could not be made. These same glands in the adjacent section reacted with KA1 in each case allowing us to conclude that the changes were benign. We conclude that the interpretation of postirradiation prostatic biopsy specimens may be aided by immunohistochemistry with this anticytokeratin antibody.

  15. Bone marrow stem cell as a potential treatment for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Ikehara, Susumu

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a group of metabolic diseases in which a person has high blood glucose levels resulting from defects in insulin secretion and insulin action. The chronic hyperglycemia damages the eyes, kidneys, nerves, heart, and blood vessels. Curative therapies mainly include diet, insulin, and oral hypoglycemic agents. However, these therapies fail to maintain blood glucose levels in the normal range all the time. Although pancreas or islet-cell transplantation achieves better glucose control, a major obstacle is the shortage of donor organs. Recently, research has focused on stem cells which can be classified into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and tissue stem cells (TSCs) to generate functional β cells. TSCs include the bone-marrow-, liver-, and pancreas-derived stem cells. In this review, we focus on treatment using bone marrow stem cells for type 1 and 2 DM. PMID:23671865

  16. Histone H1.2 is a substrate for denitrase, an activity that reduces nitrotyrosine immunoreactivity in proteins

    PubMed Central

    Irie, Yasuyuki; Saeki, Makio; Kamisaki, Yoshinori; Martin, Emil; Murad, Ferid

    2003-01-01

    Several reports have described an activity that modifies nitrotyrosine-containing proteins and their immunoreactivity to nitrotyrosine Abs. Without knowing the product of the reaction, this new activity has been called a “denitrase.” In those studies, some nonspecific proteins, which have multiple tyrosine residues, e.g., albumin, were used as a substrate. Therefore, the studies were based on an unknown mechanism of reaction and potentially a high background. To solve these problems, one of the most important things is to find a more suitable substrate for assay of the enzyme. We developed an assay strategy for determining the substrate for denitrase combining 2D-gel electrophoresis and an on-blot enzyme assay. The resulting substrate from RAW 264.7 cells was Histone H1.2, an isoform protein of linker histone. Histone H1.2 has only one tyrosine residue in the entire molecule, which ensures the exact position of the substrate to be involved. It has been reported that Histones are the most prominent nitrated proteins in cancer tissues. It was also demonstrated that tyrosine nitration of Histone H1 occurs in vivo. These findings lead us to the idea that Histone H1.2 might be an intrinsic substrate for denitrase. We nitrated recombinant and purified Histone H1.2 chemically and subjected it to an on-blot enzyme assay to characterize the activity. Denitrase activity behaved as an enzymatic activity because the reaction was time dependent and was destroyed by heat or trypsin treatment. The activity was shown to be specific for Histone H1.2, to differ from proteasome activity, and to require no additional cofactors. PMID:12719531

  17. Nicotinic receptor blockade decreases fos immunoreactivity within orexin/hypocretin-expressing neurons of nicotine-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Steven J; Gentile, Taylor A; Mo, Lili; Tran, Fionya H; Ma, Sisi; Muschamp, John W

    2016-11-01

    Tobacco smoking is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States. Nicotine is the principal psychoactive ingredient in tobacco that causes addiction. The structures governing nicotine addiction, including those underlying withdrawal, are still being explored. Nicotine withdrawal is characterized by negative affective and cognitive symptoms that enhance relapse susceptibility, and suppressed dopaminergic transmission from ventral tegmental area (VTA) to target structures underlies behavioral symptoms of nicotine withdrawal. Agonist and partial agonist therapies help 1 in 4 treatment-seeking smokers at one-year post-cessation, and new targets are needed to more effectively aid smokers attempting to quit. Hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin neurons send excitatory projections to dopamine (DA)-producing neurons of VTA and modulate mesoaccumbal DA release. The effects of nicotinic receptor blockade, which is commonly used to precipitate withdrawal, on orexin neurons remain poorly investigated and present an attractive target for intervention. The present study sought to investigate the effects of nicotinic receptor blockade on hypothalamic orexin neurons using mecamylamine to precipitate withdrawal in rats. Separate groups of rats were treated with either chronic nicotine or saline for 7-days at which point effects of mecamylamine or saline on somatic signs and anxiety-like behavior were assessed. Finally, tissue from rats was harvested for immunofluorescent analysis of Fos within orexin neurons. Results demonstrate that nicotinic receptor blockade leads to reduced orexin cell activity, as indicated by lowered Fos-immunoreactivity, and suggest that this underlying cellular activity may be associated with symptoms of nicotine withdrawal as effects were most prominently observed in rats given chronic nicotine. We conclude from this study that orexin transmission becomes suppressed in rats upon nicotinic receptor blockade, and that behavioral symptoms associated

  18. The effects of cysteamine on thyrotropin and immunoreactive beta-endorphin secretion in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Millard, W.J.; Sagar, S.M.; Badger, T.M.; Carr, D.B.; Arnold, M.A.; Spindel, E.; Kasting, N.W.; Martin, J.B.

    1983-02-01

    We examined the effects of the thiol agent cysteamine (CSH), which is known to deplete the hypothalamus of immunoreactive somatostatin, on physiological TSH and beta- endorphin secretion in the adult male rat. CSH at doses of 90 and 300 mg/kg CSH produced a rapid decline in plasma TSH, whereas a dose of 30 mg/kg did not alter plasma TSH levels. After the higher doses of CSH, TSH levels in the blood remained lower than control values on day 2, but returned to normal by 1 week. This decrease in TSH within the plasma was not associated with a reduction in hypothalamic TRH concentrations. The TSH response to 500 ng/kg TRH was normal in CSH-treated animals. Blockade of norepinephrine synthesis with diethyldithiocarbamate (500 mg/kg) or fusaric acid (100 mg/kg) inhibited TSH secretion in a manner similar to that of CSH. beta-Endorphin-like immunoreactivity (bet-End-LI) was elevated in the plasma immediately after CSH (300 mg/kg) administration. This was associated with a 58% reduction in anterior pituitary beta-End-LI and no change in hypothalmic beta-End-LI. Plasma beta-End-LI returned to normal on day 2. The increase in plasma beta-End-LI induced by immobilization stress was not compromised by CSH treatment. The observed effects of CSH on both TSH and beta-End-LI are consistent with a reduction in central norepinephrine neurotransmission through the known actin of CSH to inhibit dopamine-beta-hydroxylase. Acute stress may play a role as well in the observed changes in TSH and beta-End-LI secretion.

  19. Cross-species immunoreactivity of airway mucin as revealed by monoclonal antibodies directed against mucins from human, hamster, and rat.

    PubMed

    Shin, C Y; Lee, W J; Kim, D J; Park, C S; Choi, E Y; Ko, K H

    2000-10-01

    Airway mucin plays crucial role in host-defense and has been implicated in pathophysiology of various airway diseases including asthma and cystic fibrosis. The analysis of airway mucin has been hampered mostly by the lack of specific and efficient methods for the detection of mucin. Recent production of antibodies against airway mucin from several species and also the development of immunoassay procedures make it more efficient to study the airway mucin. However, the cross-species immunoreactivity of antibodies against airway mucin has not been clearly demonstrated and this prompted us to investigate the cross-species immunoreactivity of monoclonal antibodies against human (HM02), hamster (HTA), and rat airway mucin (RT03), which is three most widely used species in the study of mucin. All the monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) used in this study is IgM isotype and recognizes N-acetyl-galactosamine-linked carbohydrate core or backbone portion of airway mucin. In enzyme-linked immunoadsorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, immunoprecipitation, and immunohistochemical staining experiments, it was demonstrated that human and hamster airway mucin showed strong cross-species immunoreactivity. However, rat airway mucin did not show any cross-species immunoreactivity against human and hamster airway mucin. Endotoxin-induced secretory cell metaplasia and hence the increase in mucin release from hamster airway mucin could be detected with antibodies against hamster and human airway mucin in vivo and in vitro. However, the same increase from rat airway could only be detected with antibody against rat airway mucin but not with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin. In addition, the increase in mucin release from asthmatic patients could be detected with antibodies against human and hamster airway mucin but not with the antibody against rat airway mucin. The data from the present study implicates that the carbohydrate chain of human and hamster airway mucin, but not that

  20. Neurotrophin-receptor immunoreactive neurons in mesopontine regions involved in the control of behavioral states.

    PubMed

    Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; Chase, M H

    2000-06-01

    The microinjection of nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3) into the rostral pontine tegmentum of adult cats rapidly induces long-lasting episodes of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep [J. Yamuy, F.R. Morales, M.H. Chase, Induction of rapid eye movement sleep by the microinjection of nerve growth factor into the pontine reticular formation of the cat, Neuroscience 66 (1995) 9-13]. Because this effect may be mediated by neurotrophin receptors, we sought to determine the distribution of neurons that contain low- and high-affinity neurotrophin receptors in regions of the feline pons and mesencephalon which are involved in the generation of REM sleep as well as neuronal groups that are involved in the control of REM sleep-related patterns of physiological activity. Using antibodies directed against p75, trkA, trkB and trkC, immunolabeled neurons were present in the latero-dorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmental nuclei, the peribrachial nuclei, medial and lateral pontine reticular formation, the raphe nuclei, and the locus coeruleus. Giant reticular cells and large neurons in the mesencephalic trigeminal nucleus were immunoreactive for p75 and all trk receptors. Neurons that were devoid of neurotrophin-receptor immunoreactivity were intermingled with immunostained neurons in all explored structures. Thus, both low- and high-affinity neurotrophin receptors are conspicuously present in neurons located in mesopontine regions of adult cats. These data underscore the importance of neurotrophin-induced trophic actions on mesopontine neurons. Furthermore, the results support the hypothesis that NGF and NT-3 may modulate the electrical activity of neurons in the rostral pontine tegmentum that are responsible for the generation of REM sleep by acting on one or more of the neurotrophin receptors. PMID:10825475

  1. Loss of parvalbumin-immunoreactivity in mouse brain regions after repeated intermittent administration of esketamine, but not R-ketamine.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; Han, Mei; Zhang, Ji-Chun; Ren, Qian; Hashimoto, Kenji

    2016-05-30

    Clinical use of the rapid antidepressant drug ketamine is limited, due to psychotomimetic side effects. R-ketamine appears to be a potent, long-lasting and safer antidepressant, relative to S-ketamine (esketamine), since it is free of psychotomimetic side effects. Repeated, intermittent administration of esketamine (10mg/kg, once per week for 8-weeks), but not R-ketamine, caused loss of parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactivity in the medial prefrontal cortex and hippocampus of mouse brains, regions associated with psychosis. This study suggests that repeated intermittent use of R-ketamine is safer than esketamine in the treatment of depression. PMID:27043274

  2. Acid-sensing ion channel immunoreactivities in the cephalic neuromasts of adult zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Abbate, F; Madrigrano, M; Scopitteri, T; Levanti, M; Cobo, J L; Germanà, A; Vega, J A; Laurà, R

    2016-09-01

    The neuromasts are the morphofunctional unit of the lateral line system serving as mechanosensors for water flow and movement. The mechanisms underlying the detection of the mechanical stimuli in the vertebrate mechanosensory cells remain poorly understood at the molecular level, and no information is available on neuromasts. Mechanotransduction is the conversion of a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal via activation of ion channels. The acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) are presumably involved in mechanosensation, and therefore are expected to be expressed in the mechanoreceptors. Here we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the occurrence and distribution of ASICs in the cephalic neuromasts of the adult zebrafish. Specific immunoreactivity for ASIC1 and ASIC4 was detected in the hair cells while ASIC2 was restricted to the nerves supplying neuromasts. Moreover, supporting and mantle cells; i.e., the non-sensory cells of the neuromasts, also displayed ASIC4. For the first time, these results demonstrate the presence of the putative mechanoproteins ASIC1, ASIC2 and ASIC4 in neuromasts, suggesting a role for these ion channels in mechanosensation. PMID:27443821

  3. ATF-2 immunoreactivity in post-mitotic and terminally differentiated human odontoblasts.

    PubMed

    Keklikoglu, Nurullah; Akinci, Sevtap

    2015-09-01

    Activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2/CRE-BP1; cAMP-responsive element binding protein 1) is a member of nuclear transcription factor activator protein-1 (AP-1) family. AP-1 regulates cellular processes including growth, proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. However, biological relationship of cellular process to each member of the AP-1 family is not clear yet. The objective of the present study was to compare the ATF-2 immunoreactivity in the post-mitotic and terminally differentiated odontoblasts and in the pulpal fibroblasts which can be divided by mitosis when required. Fibroblasts at various stages of differentiation co-exist in the human dental pulp. ATF-2 was investigated immunohistochemically in 20 permanent human teeth. According to the findings obtained, the mean percentage of ATF-2 positive cells was 68.5 ± 19.2% in the odontoblasts and 22.8 ± 13.7% in the pulpal fibroblasts. The comparison of ATF-2 positivity revealed a statistically significant difference between odontoblasts and pulpal fibroblasts. These findings have suggested that ATF-2 is more associated with cell survival rather than cell proliferation, and revealed much of effectiveness in maintaining terminal differentiation than the various differentiation stages of the cells. PMID:25417007

  4. Botulinum Toxin Type A Induces Changes in the Chemical Coding of Substance P-Immunoreactive Dorsal Root Ganglia Sensory Neurons Supplying the Porcine Urinary Bladder

    PubMed Central

    Bossowska, Agnieszka; Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Mazur, Urszula; Janikiewicz, Paweł; Markiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2015-01-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is a potent neurotoxin which blocks acetylcholine release from nerve terminals, and therefore leads to cessation of somatic motor and/or parasympathetic transmission. Recently it has been found that BTX also interferes with sensory transmission, thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical characterization of substance P-immunoreactive (SP-IR) bladder-projecting sensory neurons (BPSN) after the toxin treatment. Investigated neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labelling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), galanin (GAL), calbindin (CB), and somatostatin (SOM). In the control group (n = 6), 45% of the total population of BPSN were SP-IR. Nearly half of these neurons co-expressed PACAP or CGRP (45% and 35%, respectively), while co-localization of SP with GAL, nNOS, SOM or CB was found less frequently (3.7%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 0.7%, respectively). In BTX-treated pigs (n = 6), toxin-injections caused a decrease in the number of SP-IR cells containing CGRP, SOM or CB (16.2%, 0.5%, and 0%, respectively) and a distinct increase in these nerve cells immunopositive to GAL (27.2%). The present study demonstrates that BTX significantly modifies the chemical phenotypes of SP-IR BPSN. PMID:26580655

  5. Botulinum toxin type A induces changes in the chemical coding of substance P-immunoreactive dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons supplying the porcine urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Bossowska, Agnieszka; Lepiarczyk, Ewa; Mazur, Urszula; Janikiewicz, Paweł; Markiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2015-11-01

    Botulinum toxin (BTX) is a potent neurotoxin which blocks acetylcholine release from nerve terminals, and therefore leads to cessation of somatic motor and/or parasympathetic transmission. Recently it has been found that BTX also interferes with sensory transmission, thus, the present study was aimed at investigating the neurochemical characterization of substance P-immunoreactive (SP-IR) bladder-projecting sensory neurons (BPSN) after the toxin treatment. Investigated neurons were visualized with retrograde tracing method and their chemical profile was disclosed with double-labelling immunohistochemistry using antibodies against SP, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide (PACAP), neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), galanin (GAL), calbindin (CB), and somatostatin (SOM). In the control group (n = 6), 45% of the total population of BPSN were SP-IR. Nearly half of these neurons co-expressed PACAP or CGRP (45% and 35%, respectively), while co-localization of SP with GAL, nNOS, SOM or CB was found less frequently (3.7%, 1.8%, 1.2%, and 0.7%, respectively). In BTX-treated pigs (n = 6), toxin-injections caused a decrease in the number of SP-IR cells containing CGRP, SOM or CB (16.2%, 0.5%, and 0%, respectively) and a distinct increase in these nerve cells immunopositive to GAL (27.2%). The present study demonstrates that BTX significantly modifies the chemical phenotypes of SP-IR BPSN. PMID:26580655

  6. Genetically engineered T cells for the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Essand, M; Loskog, A S I

    2013-01-01

    T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to treat disseminated cancer. However, it has been limited by the ability to isolate and expand T cells restricted to tumour-associated antigens. Using ex vivo gene transfer, T cells from patients can be genetically engineered to express a novel T cell receptor or chimeric antigen receptor to specifically recognize a tumour-associated antigen and thereby selectively kill tumour cells. Indeed, genetically engineered T cells have recently been successfully used for cancer treatment in a small number of patients. Here we review the recent progress in the field, and summarize the challenges that lie ahead and the strategies being used to overcome them. PMID:23198862

  7. Stem Cells for the Treatment of Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Staack, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) is highly prevalent. As of now, there is no minimally invasive long-term treatment available. Adult stem cells are nonimmunogenic and have the ability to self-renew and to differentiate into multiple cell types. Over the past decade, in vivo studies have described periurethral injections of adult-derived stem cells for the treatment of SUI. The ultimate goal has been to achieve a permanent cure for SUI by restoration of the intrinsic and extrinsic urethral sphincter and the surrounding connective tissue, including peripheral nerves and blood vessels. For this purpose, future studies need to focus on delivery systems, cell survival, and functional improvement of the urethral closure mechanism, including improvement of innervation and vascularization. PMID:21113694

  8. Light responses and morphology of bNOS-immunoreactive neurons in the mouse retina

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2010-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), produced by NO synthase (NOS), modulates the function of all retinal neurons and ocular blood vessels and participates in the pathogenesis of ocular diseases. To further understand the regulation of ocular NO release, we systematically studied the morphology, topography and light responses of NOS-containing amacrine cells (NOACs) in dark-adapted mouse retina. Immunohistological staining for neuronal NOS (bNOS), combined with retrograde labeling of ganglion cells (GCs) with Neurobiotin (NB, a gap junction permeable dye) and Lucifer yellow (LY, a less permeable dye), was used to identify NOACs. The light responses of ACs were recorded under whole-cell voltage clamp conditions and cell morphology was examined with a confocal microscope. We found that in dark-adapted conditions bNOS-immunoreactivity (IR) was present primarily in the inner nuclear layer and the ganglion cell layer. bNOS-IR somas were negative for LY, thus they were identified as ACs; nearly 6 % of the cells were labeled by NB but not by LY, indicating that they were dye-coupled with GCs. Three morphological subtypes of NOACs (NI, NII and displaced) were identified. The cell density, inter-cellular distance and the distribution of NOACs were studied in whole retinas. Light evoked depolarizing highly sensitive ON-OFF responses in NI cells and less sensitive OFF responses in NII cells. Frequent (1 to 2 Hz) or abrupt change of light-intensity evoked larger peak responses. The possibility for light to modify NO release from NOACs is discussed. PMID:20503422

  9. Social novelty increases tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the extended olfactory amygdala of female prairie voles

    PubMed Central

    Cavanaugh, Breyanna L.; Lonstein, Joseph S.

    2010-01-01

    The monogamous social behaviors of prairie voles (Microtus ochrogaster) require olfactory inputs, which are processed by the posterodorsal medial amygdala (MeApd) and principal bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (pBST). The male prairie vole MeApd and pBST contain hundreds of cells densely immunoreactive for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir). Female prairie voles have relatively few of these cells, but we previously found that the number of these TH-ir cells is greatly increased in females by exogenous estradiol. We here hypothesized that the number of TH-ir cells in the MeApd and pBST would also increase during the natural hormone surges associated with females’ induced estrus. We found that the number of TH-ir cells in both sites did significantly increase after females cohabitated for two days with an unfamiliar male. However, this increase did not require the presence of ovaries and even tended to occur in the pBST of females cohabitating for two days with unfamiliar females. We then determined if the greater number of TH-ir cells after heterosexual pairing was transient by examining two groups of long-term pairbonded females (primiparous and multiparous), and found these females also had significantly more TH-ir cells in the pBST and/or MeApd compared to unmated controls. Thus, social novelty arising from cohabitation with unfamiliar conspecifics produces a reoccurring increase in the number of TH-ir cells in the female prairie vole extended olfactory amygdala. Ovarian hormones are not necessarily required. This increase in catecholaminergic cells may facilitate acquisition and retention of olfactory memories necessary for social recognition in this species. PMID:20381508

  10. Proliferative enteropathy (PE)-induced changes in the calbindin-immunoreactive (CB-IR) neurons of inferior mesenteric ganglion supplying the descending colon in the pig.

    PubMed

    Wojtkiewicz, Joanna; Równiak, Maciej; Gonkowski, Sławomir; Crayton, Robert; Majewski, Mariusz; Robak, Anna; Białkowska, Joanna; Barczewska, Monika

    2012-11-01

    A subpopulation of the pig inferior mesenteric ganglia (IMG) neurons projecting to the colon exhibit calbindin-like immunoreactivity. It is not known if there are any changes in the chemical coding patterns of these neurons during porcine proliferative enteropathy (PE). To answer this question, juvenile Large White Polish pigs with clinically diagnosed Lawsonia intracellularis infection (PE; n = 3) and a group of uninfected controls (C; n = 3) were compared. The retrograde tracer fast blue (FB) was injected into the descending colons of all animals and then tissue comprising IMGs from both groups was processed for double-labeling immunofluorescence with calbindin-D28k (CB) in combination with either tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), neuropeptide Y (NPY), somatostatin (SOM), vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), nitric oxide synthase, Leu-enkephalin, substance P, vesicular acetylcholine transporter, galanin, or pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide. Immunohistochemistry revealed changes in the chemical coding pattern of calbindin-immunoreactive neurons in the inferior mesenteric ganglia of the pig. In control animals, FB/CB-positive neurons were immunoreactive to TH, NPY, SOM, and VIP. In the experimental group, TH-expressing neurons were unaffected, NPY-expressing neurons were increased, whereas the number of neurons immunoreactive to SOM or VIP was reduced. Changes in chemical coding of CB neurons during PE may play an important role in adaptation of these IMG cells under pathological conditions. PMID:22170039

  11. Microbial fuel cells as pollutant treatment units: Research updates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a device that can convert chemical energy in influent substances to electricity via biological pathways. Based on the consent that MFC technology should be applied as a waste/wastewater treatment unit rather than a renewable energy source, this mini-review discussed recent R&D efforts on MFC technologies for pollutant treatments and highlighted the challenges and research and development needs. Owing to the low power density levels achievable by larger-scale MFC, the MFC should be used as a device other than energy source such as being a pollutant treatment unit. PMID:26906446

  12. Expression of dynamin immunoreactivity in experimental pancreatic tumors induced in rat by mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea.

    PubMed

    Valentich, M A; Cook, T; Urrutia, R

    1996-04-19

    Dynamins are GTPases which support receptor-mediated endocytosis and bind to several tyrosine kinase receptor-associated proteins known to mediate cell proliferation and differentiation. We have recently established that dynamin expression correlates with normal neuronal (Torre et al., J. Biol. Chem., 269 (1994) 32411-32417) and acinar pancreatic cell differentiation (Cook et al., Mol. Biol. Cell, 6 (1995) 405a). To begin to understand the role of dynamin in neoplastic pancreatic cell differentiation, we have followed the expression of this protein by immunohistochemistry during the development of pancreatic tumors in a mancozeb-nitrosomethylurea (NMU)-based carcinogenesis model recently developed in our laboratory (Monis and Valentich, Carcinogenesis, 14 (1993) 929-933). After a single intraperitoneal injection (50 mg/g body wt) of this carcinogen, rats fed with mancozeb develop pancreatic focal acinar hyperplasia (FACH), dysplastic foci (DYF) displaying acinar-like and ductular-like structures, and ductular-like carcinoma in situ (CIS). After histochemical staining using a monoclonal anti-dynamin antibody, high levels of this protein are consistently observed in well-differentiated acinar tumors (FACH). In contrast, dynamin immunoreactivity is almost undetectable in more advanced lesions showing a ductular-like phenotype (ductular-like DYF and CIS). This change in the expression pattern of dynamin during the progression of acinar into ductular-like DYF and CIS lesions correlates with recent findings from our laboratory showing a differential expression pattern for dynamin in pancreatic cells during embryonic development, with ductular-like precursor cells expressing low levels of this protein. Based upon these results, we conclude that more advanced ductular-like neoplastic cells induced by the carcinogen NMU in rat pancreas behave phenotypically like pancreatic precursor cells in their pattern of expression for dynamin. PMID:8603375

  13. Glycine-immunoreactive neurons in the brain of a shark (Scyliorhinus canicula L.).

    PubMed

    Anadón, Ramón; Rodríguez-Moldes, Isabel; Adrio, Fátima

    2013-09-01

    The glycinergic cell populations in the brain of the lesser spotted dogfish were studied by a glycine immunofluorescence method. Numerous glycine-immunoreactive (Gly-ir) neurons were observed in different brain nuclei. In the telencephalon, Gly-ir cells were observed in the olfactory bulb, telencephalic hemispheres, and preoptic region. In the hypothalamus, cerebrospinal fluid-contacting Gly-ir neurons were observed in the lateral and posterior recess nuclei. Coronet cells of the saccus vasculosus were Gly-ir. In the diencephalon, Gly-ir neurons were observed in the prethalamus and pretectum. In the midbrain, both the optic tectum and lateral mesencephalic nucleus contained numerous Gly-ir neurons. In the cerebellum, many Golgi cells were Gly-ir. In the rhombencephalon, Gly-ir cells were observed in the medial and ventral octavolateral nuclei, vagal lobe, visceromotor nuclei, and reticular formation, including the inferior raphe nucleus. In the spinal cord, some neurons of the marginal nucleus and some cells of the dorsal and ventral horns were Gly-ir. Comparison of dogfish Gly-ir cell populations with those reported for the sea lamprey, Siberian sturgeon, and zebrafish revealed some shared features but also notable differences. For example, Gly-ir cells were observed in the dogfish cerebellum, unlike the case in the Siberian sturgeon and zebrafish, whereas the absence of Gly-ir neurons in the isthmus is shared by all these species, except for lampreys. Gly-ir populations in the dogfish hypothalamus and telencephalon are notable in comparison with those of the other jawed vertebrates investigated to date. Together, these results reveal a complex and divergent evolution of glycinergic systems in the major groups of fishes. PMID:23630026

  14. Immunoreactivity for IL-1 beta and TNF alpha in human lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Ruco, L. P.; Stoppacciaro, A.; Pomponi, D.; Boraschi, D.; Santoni, A.; Tagliabue, A.; Uccini, S.; Baroni, C. D.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against two non-cross-reacting antigens of human IL-1 beta (Vhp20 and BRhC3) and human TNF alpha (B154.2 and B154.7) were applied to identify cytokine-containing cells in tissue sections and in cell suspensions. IL-1 beta- or TNF alpha-positive cells were not present in immunostained cytocentrifuge smears prepared from freshly isolated peripheral blood leukocytes, spleen, and lymph node cells. After 18 hours of culture with bacterial endotoxin (LPS), 80% to 90% of blood monocytes, 30% of spleen macrophages, and 2% to 28% of lymph node macrophages were strongly positive for IL-1 beta with either of the MAbs. Furthermore, 25% to 35% of blood monocytes and 6% to 60% of lymph node macrophages were stained for TNF alpha. Cells positive for IL-1 beta or TNF alpha were extremely rare in sections of normal thymus, spleen, and lymph nodes. Immunoreactivity for IL-1 beta or TNF alpha was frequently observed in sections of granulomatous lymphadenitis (N = 11). IL-1 beta or TNF alpha staining was confined to the epithelioid macrophages forming the granuloma, and the intensity of TNF alpha reactivity was generally stronger. The high frequency of cytokine-containing cells in this pathologic condition was confirmed in a cell suspension study showing that 20% of epithelioid macrophages were weakly positive for IL-1 beta and 80% were strongly positive for TNF alpha. The presence of cytokine-containing cells was investigated in cryostat sections of several nonlymphoid organs with normal histologic appearance. IL-1 beta reactivity was not observed in any of the tissues. TNF alpha reactivity was frequently demonstrated in isolated macrophages embedded in the interstitial connective tissue. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:2683798

  15. The high dosage of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Earthworm extract has shown anticancer characteristics. In the present study, we examined the effect of chronic treatment with a high dose of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract (EE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of 3-week-old mice using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry for neuroblast differentiation, respectively. BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells were easily detected in the subgranular zone of the DG in vehicle (saline)-treated mice. However, BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells in the 500 mg/kg EE-treated mice decreased distinctively compared to those in the vehicle-treated mice. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity and its protein level decreased markedly in the DG of the EE-treated group compared to those in the vehicle-treated group. These results indicate that chronic treatment with high dose EE decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and that BDNF immunoreactivity decreased in the DG of EE-treated mice. PMID:22025974

  16. The high dosage of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract decreases cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the mouse hippocampal dentate gyrus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing Chun; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Park, Joon Ha; Lee, Choong Hyun; Choi, Jung Hoon; Won, Moo-Ho

    2011-09-01

    Earthworm extract has shown anticancer characteristics. In the present study, we examined the effect of chronic treatment with a high dose of earthworm (Eisenia andrei) extract (EE) on cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation in the hippocampal dentate gyrus (DG) of 3-week-old mice using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and Ki-67 immunohistochemistry for cell proliferation and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry for neuroblast differentiation, respectively. BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells were easily detected in the subgranular zone of the DG in vehicle (saline)-treated mice. However, BrdU-, Ki-67-, and DCX-immunoreactive cells in the 500 mg/kg EE-treated mice decreased distinctively compared to those in the vehicle-treated mice. In addition, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) immunoreactivity and its protein level decreased markedly in the DG of the EE-treated group compared to those in the vehicle-treated group. These results indicate that chronic treatment with high dose EE decreased cell proliferation and neuroblast differentiation, and that BDNF immunoreactivity decreased in the DG of EE-treated mice. PMID:22025974

  17. Allatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the stomatogastric nervous system and the pericardial organs of the crab Cancer pagurus, the lobster Homarus americanus, and the crayfish Cherax destructor and Procambarus clarkii.

    PubMed

    Skiebe, P

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of allatostatin (AST)-like immunoreactivity was studied in the stomatogastric nervous system (STNS) and the neurosecretory pericardial organs (PO) of four decapod crustacean species by using wholemount immunocytochemical techniques and confocal microscopy. AST-like immunoreactivity was found within the STNS of all four species; its distribution in each was unique. In all four species, AST-like immunoreactivity was present in the paired commissural ganglia (CoG), in the esophageal ganglion (OG), in the stomatogastric ganglion (STG), and in their connecting nerves. Within the CoGs, numerous cell bodies and neuropil were stained. In the OG, two cell bodies were immunoreactive, although their branching pattern varies between species. In the STG of C. pagurus and H. americanus, neuropil was stained extensively, but no labeled cell bodies were found. Surprisingly, in C. destructor and P. clarkii, cell bodies were stained in the STG, one brightly stained cell body in both species and an additional two to five weakly stained cell bodies in P. clarkii. In all four species, stained gastropyloric receptor cells were present. In contrast to the variable staining within the STNS, all four species have a similar pattern of AST-like immunoreactivity within the PO. Only in C. destructor, AST-immunoreactive varicosities occur on the surface of the circumesophageal connectives and on the postesophageal commissure and suggest another neurohaemal source for AST-like peptides in this species. The pattern of this staining suggests that AST-like peptides are likely utilized as both neurohormones and as neuromodulators in the STNS of decapod crustacea. PMID:10075445

  18. Potential of stem cell treatment in detrusor dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Andersson, Karl-Erik

    2015-03-01

    The current treatments of bladder dysfunctions, such as bladder overactivity and impaired ability to empty, have limitations, and new treatment alternatives are needed. Stem cell transplantation and tissue engineering have shown promising results in preclinical studies. Stem cells were originally thought to act by differentiating into various cell types, thereby replacing damaged cells and restoring functional deficits. Even if such a mechanism cannot be excluded, the current belief is that a main action is exerted by the stem cells secreting bioactive factors that direct other stem cells to the target organ. In addition, stem cells may exert a number of other effects that can improve bladder dysfunction, since they may have antiapoptotic, antifibrotic, and immunomodulatory properties, and can induce neovascularization. Tissue engineering for bladder replacement, which has had varying success in different animal species, has reached the proof-of-concept state in humans, but recent research suggests that the present approaches may not be optimal. Further studies on new approaches, using animal models with translational predictability, seem necessary for further progress. PMID:25453263

  19. Morphological changes of V-79 cells after equinatoxin II treatment.

    PubMed

    Batista, U; Jezernik, K

    1992-02-01

    Morphological observations on the V-79-379 A cells after treatment with equinatoxin II (EqT II), isolated from the sea anemone Actina equina L., and fetal calf serum (FCS) treated toxin were examined by transmission electron microscopy. Our results showed that the cells incubated with FCS treated EqT II were almost ultrastructurally unaltered. When the cells were treated with low concentrations of EqT II alone cell ultrastructure was altered with the evidence of numerous blebs and decreased microvilli number on the cell surface and appearance of numerous vesicles in the Golgi regions. High concentrations of EqT II caused disintegration of plasmalemma and intracellular membranes as well as degradation of cytosol. PMID:1348018

  20. Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cell Treatment of Experimental Stroke Promotes Functional Recovery after Stroke in Young Adult and Older Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shehadah, Amjad; Chen, Jieli; Pal, Ajai; He, Shuyang; Zeitlin, Andrew; Cui, Xu; Zacharek, Alex; Cui, Yisheng; Roberts, Cynthia; Lu, Mei; Hariri, Robert; Chopp, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Background Human Placenta-Derived Adherent Cells (PDAC®) are a novel mesenchymal-like cell population derived from normal human placental tissue. PDA-001 is a clinical formulation of PDAC® developed for intravenous administration. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of PDA-001 treatment in a rat model of transient middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAo) in young adult (2–3 month old) and older rats (10–12 months old). Methods To evaluate efficacy and determine the optimal number of transplanted cells, young adult Wistar rats were subjected to MCAo and treated 1 day post MCAo with 1×106, 4×106 or 8×106 PDA-001 cells (i.v.), vehicle or cell control. 4×106 or 8×106 PDA-001 cells were also tested in older rats after MCAo. Treatment response was evaluated using a battery of functional outcome tests, consisting of adhesive-removal test, modified Neurological Severity Score (mNSS) and foot-fault test. Young adult rats were sacrificed 56 days after MCAo, older rats were sacrificed 29 days after MCAo, and lesion volumes were measured using H&E. Immunohistochemical stainings for bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and von Willebrand Factor (vWF), and synaptophysin were performed. Results In young adult rats, treatment with 4×106 PDA-001 cells significantly improved functional outcome after stroke (p<0.05). In older rats, significant functional improvement was observed with PDA-001 cell therapy in both of the 4×106 and 8×106 treatment groups. Functional benefits in young adult and older rats were associated with significant increases in the number of BrdU immunoreactive endothelial cells, vascular density and perimeter in the ischemic brain, as well as significantly increased synaptophysin expression in the ischemic border zone (p<0.05). Conclusion PDA-001 treatment significantly improved functional outcome after stroke in both young adult and older rats. The neurorestorative effects induced by PDA-001 treatment may be related to increased vascular density and

  1. Hair cell recovery in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Burton, M. D.; Fashena, D. S.; Naeger, R. A.

    2000-01-01

    Hair cells in many nonmammalian vertebrates are regenerated by the mitotic division of supporting cell progenitors and the differentiation of the resulting progeny into new hair cells and supporting cells. Recent studies have shown that nonmitotic hair cell recovery after aminoglycoside-induced damage can also occur in the vestibular organs. Using hair cell and supporting cell immunocytochemical markers, we have used confocal and electron microscopy to examine the fate of damaged hair cells and the origin of immature hair cells after gentamicin treatment in mitotically blocked cultures of the bullfrog saccule. Extruding and fragmenting hair cells, which undergo apoptotic cell death, are replaced by scar formations. After losing their bundles, sublethally damaged hair cells remain in the sensory epithelium for prolonged periods, acquiring supporting cell-like morphology and immunoreactivity. These modes of damage appear to be mutually exclusive, implying that sublethally damaged hair cells repair their bundles. Transitional cells, coexpressing hair cell and supporting cell markers, are seen near scar formations created by the expansion of neighboring supporting cells. Most of these cells have morphology and immunoreactivity similar to that of sublethally damaged hair cells. Ultrastructural analysis also reveals that most immature hair cells had autophagic vacuoles, implying that they originated from damaged hair cells rather than supporting cells. Some transitional cells are supporting cells participating in scar formations. Supporting cells also decrease in number during hair cell recovery, supporting the conclusion that some supporting cells undergo phenotypic conversion into hair cells without an intervening mitotic event.

  2. Stem Cell Therapy: A New Treatment for Burns?

    PubMed Central

    Arno, Anna; Smith, Alexandra H.; Blit, Patrick H.; Shehab, Mohammed Al; Gauglitz, Gerd G.; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has emerged as a promising new approach in almost every medicine specialty. This vast, heterogeneous family of cells are now both naturally (embryonic and adult stem cells) or artificially obtained (induced pluripotent stem cells or iPSCs) and their fates have become increasingly controllable, thanks to ongoing research in this passionate new field. We are at the beginning of a new era in medicine, with multiple applications for stem cell therapy, not only as a monotherapy, but also as an adjunct to other strategies, such as organ transplantation or standard drug treatment. Regrettably, serious preclinical concerns remain and differentiation, cell fusion, senescence and signalling crosstalk with growth factors and biomaterials are still challenges for this promising multidisciplinary therapeutic modality. Severe burns have several indications for stem cell therapy, including enhancement of wound healing, replacement of damaged skin and perfect skin regeneration – incorporating skin appendages and reduced fibrosis –, as well as systemic effects, such as inflammation, hypermetabolism and immunosuppression. The aim of this review is to describe well established characteristics of stem cells and to delineate new advances in the stem cell field, in the context of burn injury and wound healing.

  3. Nelarabine in the Treatment of Refractory T-Cell Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Roecker, Andrew M.; Stockert, Amy; Kisor, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Nelarabine is a nucleoside analog indicated for the treatment of adult and pediatric patients with T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma (T-LBL) that is refractory or has relapsed after treatment with at least two chemotherapy regimens. After being first synthesized in the late 1970s and receiving FDA approval in 2005, the appropriate use of nelarabine for refractory hematologic malignancies is still being elucidated. Nelarabine is the prodrug of 9-β-D-arabinofuranosylguanine (ara-G) which when phosphorylated intracellularly to ara-G triphosphate (ara-GTP), preferentially accumulates in cancerous T-cells. Dose-dependent toxicities, including neurotoxicity and myelosuppression, have been documented and may, in turn, limit the ability to appropriately treat the diagnosed malignancy. This article will summarize the pharmacologic properties of nelarabine and will address the current place in therapy nelarabine holds based upon the results of the available clinical trials to date. PMID:21151585

  4. Cell therapy: the final frontier for treatment of neurological diseases.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Susmita; Singh, Gurbind; Sreejith, Sailaja; Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Husin, Juani Mazmin; Datta, Indrani; Pal, Rajarshi; Das, Anjan Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are devastating because they cause increasing loss of cognitive and physical functions and affect an estimated 1 billion individuals worldwide. Unfortunately, no drugs are currently available to halt their progression, except a few that are largely inadequate. This mandates the search of new treatments for these progressively degenerative diseases. Neural stem cells (NSCs) have been successfully isolated, propagated, and characterized from the adult brains of mammals, including humans. The confirmation that neurogenesis occurs in the adult brain via NSCs opens up fresh avenues for treating neurological problems. The proof-of-concept studies demonstrating the neural differentiation capacity of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo have raised widespread enthusiasm toward cell-based interventions. It is anticipated that cell-based neurogenic drugs may reverse or compensate for deficits associated with neurological diseases. The increasing interest of the private sector in using human stem cells in therapeutics is evidenced by launching of several collaborative clinical research activities between Pharma giants and research institutions or small start-up companies. In this review, we discuss the major developments that have taken place in this field to position stem cells as a prospective candidate drug for the treatment of neurological disorders. PMID:23253099

  5. Immunocytochemical localization of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and substance P in neural areas mediating motion-induced emesis: Effects of vagal stimulation on GAD immunoreactivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Damelio, F.; Gibbs, M. A.; Mehler, W. R.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Immunocytochemical methods were employed to localize the neurotransmitter amino acid gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by means of its biosynthetic enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and the neuropeptide substance P in the area postrema (AP), area subpostrema (ASP), nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS), and gelatinous nucleus (GEL). In addition, electrical stimulation was applied to the night vagus nerve at the cervical level to assess the effects on GAD-immunoreactivity (GAR-IR). GAD-IR terminals and fibers were observed in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. They showed pronounced density at the level of the ASP and gradual decrease towards the solitary complex. Nerve cells were not labelled in our preparations. Ultrastructural studies showed symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contracts between labelled terminals and non-immunoreactive dendrites, axons, or neurons. Some of the labelled terminals contained both clear- and dense-core vesicles. Our preliminary findings, after electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve, revealed a bilateral decrease of GAD-IR that was particularly evident at the level of the ASP. SP-immunoreactive (SP-IR) terminals and fibers showed varying densities in the AP, ASP, NTS, and GEL. In our preparations, the lateral sub-division of the NTS showed the greatest accumulation. The ASP showed medium density of immunoreactive varicosities and terminals and the AP and GEL displayed scattered varicose axon terminals. The electron microscopy revealed that all immunoreactive terminals contained clear-core vesicles which make symmetric or asymmetric synaptic contact with unlabelled dendrites. It is suggested that the GABAergic terminals might correspond to vagal afferent projections and that GAD/GABA and substance P might be co-localized in the same terminal allowing the possibility of a regulated release of the transmitters in relation to demands.

  6. Cell injury, retrodifferentiation and the cancer treatment paradox.

    PubMed

    Uriel, José

    2015-09-01

    This "opinion article" is an attempt to take an overview of some significant changes that have happened in our understanding of cancer status during the last half century and its evolution under the progressive influence of molecular biology. As an active worker in cancer research and developmental biology during most of this period, I would like to comment briefly on these changes and to give my critical appreciation of their outcome as it affects our knowledge of cancer development as well as the current treatment of the disease. A recall of my own contribution to the subject is also included. Two subjects are particularly developed: cell injury and cell-killing therapies. Cell injury, whatever its origin, has acquired the status of a pivotal event for the initiation of cancer emergence. It is postulated that cell injury, a potential case of cellular death, may also be the origin of a process of stepwise cell reversion (retrodifferentiation or retroprogrammation) leading, by division, mature or stem cells to progressive immaturity. The genetic instability and mutational changes that accompanies this process of cell injury and rejuvenation put normal cells in a status favourable to neoplastic transformation or may evolve cancer cells toward clones with higher malignant potentiality. Thus, cell injury suggests lifestyle as the major upstream initiator of cancer development although this not exclude randomness as an unavoidable contributor to the disease. Cell-killing agents (mainly cytotoxic drugs and radiotherapy) are currently used to treat cancer. At the same time, it is agreed that agents with high cell injury potential (ultraviolet light, ionising radiations, tobacco, environmental pollutants, etc.) contribute to the emergence of malignant tumours. This represents a real paradox. In spite of the progress accomplished in cancer survival, one is tempted to suggest that we have very few chances of really cure cancer as long as we continue to treat malignancies

  7. Purification, characterization and immunoreactivity of β'-component, a major allergen from the roe of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea).

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Yun; Cao, Min-Jie; Zhang, Ming-Li; Hu, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Yong-Xia; Zhang, Ling-Jing; Liu, Guang-Ming

    2014-10-01

    Fish roe, a nutritious food, is favored by consumers, but has also been confirmed to be allergenic in salmonid fish. However, little information is available in other fish species. To determine the allergen in the roe of large yellow croaker (Pseudosciaena crocea), crude extracts were incubated with sera of allergic patients. The major allergen was purified by column chromatography methods, revealing a single band with 16 kDa and was confirmed as β'-component (β'-c) by mass spectrometry. The results of physicochemical characterization showed that β'-c was a glycoprotein and was relatively stable following thermal or acid/alkali treatment. Furthermore, β'-c was easily degraded by pepsin, but was resistant to trypsin and α-chymotrypsin. After treatment with different processing methods, including Maillard reaction (MR), ultraviolet radiation (UVR), ultrasound-heat (UH), and retorting (RT), the IgG-binding activity of β'-c decreased obviously by MR, but decreased slightly by UVR and UH. Cross-immunoreactivity results of the allergens in the roes of different species revealed that β'-c was a specific allergen in teleostean, and the cross-immunoreactivity between the roe of large yellow croaker and other kinds of fish roe was relatively strong. PMID:25046389

  8. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  9. Endogenous cardiac stem cells for the treatment of heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Tania; Kearns-Jonker, Mary

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies hold promise for regenerating the myocardium after injury. Recent data obtained from phase I clinical trials using endogenous cardiovascular progenitors isolated directly from the heart suggest that cell-based treatment for heart patients using stem cells that reside in the heart provides significant functional benefit and an improvement in patient outcome. Methods to achieve improved engraftment and regeneration may extend this therapeutic benefit. Endogenous cardiovascular progenitors have been tested extensively in small animals to identify cells that improve cardiac function after myocardial infarction. However, the relative lack of large animal models impedes translation into clinical practice. This review will exclusively focus on the latest research pertaining to humans and large animals, including both endogenous and induced sources of cardiovascular progenitors. PMID:24426784

  10. Calbindin-D28k immunoreactivity in the mice thoracic spinal cord after space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porseva, Valentina V.; Shilkin, Valentin V.; Krasnov, Igor B.; Masliukov, Petr M.

    2015-10-01

    The aim of the work was to analyse changes in the location and morphological characteristics of calbindin (CB)-immunoreactive (IR) neurons of the thoracic spinal cord of C57BL/6N male mice after completion of a 30-day space flight on board the BION-M1 biosatellite (Russia, 2013). Space flight induced multidirectional changes of the number and morphological parameters of CB-positive neurons. The number of IR neurons increased in laminae I (from 10 to 17 neurons per section), II (from 42 to 67 cells per section) and IX (from two neurons per segment to two neurons per section), but CB disappeared in neurons of lamina VIII. Weightlessness did not affect the number of CB-IR neurons in laminae III-V and VII, including preganglionic sympathetic neurons. The cross-sectional area of CB-IR neurons decreased in lamina II and VII (group of partition cells) and increased in laminae III-V and IX. After a space flight, few very large neurons with long dendrites appeared in lamina IV. The results obtained give evidence about substantial changes in the calcium buffer system and imbalance of different groups of CB-IR neurons due to reduction of afferent information under microgravity.

  11. Sclerostin Immunoreactivity Increases in Cortical Bone Osteocytes and Decreases in Articular Cartilage Chondrocytes in Aging Mice.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Michelle L; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; Mantyh, Patrick W

    2016-03-01

    Sclerostin is a 24-kDa secreted glycoprotein that has been identified as a negative modulator of new bone formation and may play a major role in age-related decline in skeletal function. Although serum levels of sclerostin markedly increase with age, relatively little is known about whether cells in the skeleton change their expression of sclerostin with aging. Using immunohistochemistry and confocal microscopy, we explored sclerostin immunoreactivity (sclerostin-IR) in the femurs of 4-, 9-, and 24-month-old adult C3H/HeJ male mice. In the femur, the only two cell types that expressed detectable levels of sclerostin-IR were bone osteocytes and articular cartilage chondrocytes. At three different sites along the diaphysis of the femur, only a subset of osteocytes expressed sclerostin-IR and the percentage of osteocytes that expressed sclerostin-IR increased from approximately 36% to 48% in 4- vs. 24-month-old mice. In marked contrast, in the same femurs, there were ~40% fewer hypertrophic chondrocytes of articular cartilage that expressed sclerostin-IR when comparing 24- vs. 4-month-old mice. Understanding the mechanism(s) that drive these divergent changes in sclerostin-IR may provide insight into understanding and treating the age-related decline of the skeleton. PMID:26701970

  12. Strongly reduced number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive projection neurons in the mammillary bodies in schizophrenia: further evidence for limbic neuropathology.

    PubMed

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Krause, Stephanie; Krell, Dieter; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Wolter, Marion; Stauch, Renate; Ranft, Karin; Danos, Peter; Jirikowski, Gustav F; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2007-01-01

    The mammillary bodies (MB) are important relay nuclei within limbic and extralimbic connections. They are known to play important roles in memory formation and are affected in alcoholism and vitamin B1 deficiency. Their strategic position linking temporo-limbic to cortico-thalamic brain structures make the MB a candidate brain structure for alterations in schizophrenia. We studied 15 postmortem brains of schizophrenics and 15 matched control brains. Brain sections were stained either with Heidenhain-Woelcke, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), calretinin, or parvalbumin. We determined the volumes of the MB and performed cell countings using stereological principles and a computerized image analysis system. The volumes of MB do not differ between schizophrenics and controls. However, in schizophrenia the number of neurons as well as the resulting neuronal densities was significantly reduced on both sides (on left side by 38.9%, on right side by 22%). No changes were seen in the number of GAD-expressing or calretinin-containing neurons, whereas the number of parvalbumin-immunoreactive MB neurons was reduced by more than 50% in schizophrenia. This cell loss (as a result of developmental malformation and/or neurodegeneration) points to a prominent involvement of the MB in the pathomorphology of schizophrenia. Parvalbumin-immunoreactive GABAergic interneurons have been reported to be diminished in schizophrenia. However, in the MB parvalbumin labels a subpopulation of glutamate/aspartate-containing neurons projecting mainly to the anterior thalamus. Thus, our data provide new evidence for impaired limbic circuits in schizophrenia. PMID:17405923

  13. Selective hydrolysis of milk proteins to facilitate the elimination of the ABBOS epitope of bovine serum albumin and other immunoreactive epitopes.

    PubMed

    Alting, A C; Meijer, R J; van Beresteijn, E C

    1998-08-01

    Milk proteins are hydrolyzed to prevent immunological reactions, but immunoreactive epitopes, including the ABBOS epitope of bovine serum albumin (BSA), can still be detected in commercially available milk protein hydrolysates. We used lactococcal cell-envelope proteinase (CEP) for the hydrolysis of the individual milk proteins and of mixtures thereof, or for the hydrolysis of sodium caseinate (contaminated with whey proteins). CEP exclusively degraded casein, leaving the four major whey proteins intact. This property facilitated the removal of the intact whey proteins from the casein fragments by ultrafiltration. Depending on the molecular mass of the whey protein to be removed, membranes with cutoff values between 3 and 30 kDa were used, resulting in casein hydrolysates free of protein fragments with cross-reactive whey-protein-specific IgE (immunoglobulin E) or ABBOS antibody-binding sites. Even the casein itself was degraded in such a way by CEP that cross-reactive casein-specific IgE antibody-binding sites could be eliminated. The product could find application in infant formulas for therapeutic and preventive treatment of children with cow's milk allergy; in addition, the preventive use of such formulas in children genetically susceptible to the development of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) should be considered if a relationship between the consumption of BSA and IDDM were to become more apparent. The method is also applicable for preparing casein-free whey protein preparations. PMID:9713762

  14. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liu; Guo, Geng; Niu, Xiao-yuan; Liu, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant glioma and patients diagnosed with this disease had poor outcomes even treated with the combination of conventional treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation). Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful antigen presenting cells and DC-based vaccination has the potential to target and eliminate GBM cells and enhance the responses of these cells to the existing therapies with minimal damage to the healthy tissues around them. It can enhance recognition of GBM cells by the patients' immune system and activate vast, potent, and long-lasting immune reactions to eliminate them. Therefore, this therapy can prolong the survival of GBM patients and has wide and bright future in the treatment of GBM. Also, the efficacy of this therapy can be strengthened in several ways at some degree: the manipulation of immune regulatory components or costimulatory molecules on DCs; the appropriate choices of antigens for loading to enhance the effectiveness of the therapy; regulation of positive regulators or negative regulators in GBM microenvironment. PMID:26167495

  15. Distribution of hypocretin (orexin) immunoreactivity in the feline pons and medulla.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian Hua; Sampogna, Sharon; Morales, Francisco R; Chase, Michael H

    2004-01-01

    The distribution of hypocretin-1 (hcrt-1) and hypocretin-2 (hcrt-2) immunoreactivities in the cat brainstem was examined using immunohistochemical techniques. Hcrt-1- and hcrt-2-positive fibers with varicosities were detected in almost all brainstem regions. However, no hcrt-1- or hcrt-2-immunoreactive neuronal somata were observed in the cat brainstem. Both hcrt-1- and hcrt-2-labeled fibers exhibited different densities in distinct regions of the brainstem. In most brainstem regions, the intensity of hcrt-1 immunoreactivity was higher than that of hcrt-2 immunoreactivity. The highest densities of hcrt-1- and hcrt-2-positive fibers were found in the nucleus raphe dorsalis (RD), the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus (LDT) and the locus coeruleus (LC), suggesting an important role for these peptides in functions related to sleep-wake behavior. PMID:14672810

  16. GnRH-immunoreactive centrifugal visual fibers in the Nile crocodile (Crocodylus niloticus).

    PubMed

    Médina, Monique; Repérant, Jacques; Miceli, Dom; Ward, Roger; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2005-08-01

    Thin varicose centrifugal visual fibers, between 30-45 in number and displaying cGnRH-I immunoreactivity, were identified in Crocodylus niloticus. Approximately 80% of these fibers were also FMRF-amide-like immunoreactive. The cGnRH-I fibers extended from the preoptic region to the retina where they appeared to terminate in the external portion of the inner plexiform layer. The location of their neurons of origin could not be determined precisely following the intraocular injection of the retrograde axonal tracer RITC. Nevertheless, the presence of cGnRH-I-immunoreactive neurons exclusively within the complex comprising the terminal nerve and the septo-preoptic region, and of several retinopetal fibers labelled retrogradely with the axonal tracer at the septo-preoptic junction, indicates that the cGnRH-immunoreactive centrifugal visual system originates from within this complex. PMID:16002052

  17. The safety of human pluripotent stem cells in clinical treatment.

    PubMed

    Simonson, Oscar E; Domogatskaya, Anna; Volchkov, Pavel; Rodin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have practically unlimited proliferation potential and a capability to differentiate into any cell type in the human body. Since the first derivation in 1998, they have been an attractive source of cells for regenerative medicine. Numerous ethical, technological, and regulatory complications have been hampering hPSC use in clinical applications. Human embryonic stem cells (ESCs), parthenogenetic human ESCs, human nuclear transfer ESCs, and induced pluripotent stem cells are four types of hPSCs that are different in many clinically relevant features such as propensity to epigenetic abnormalities, generation methods, and ability for development of autologous cell lines. Propensity to genetic mutations and tumorigenicity are common features of all pluripotent cells that complicate hPSC-based therapies. Several recent advances in methods of derivation, culturing, and monitoring of hPSCs have addressed many ethical concerns and technological challenges in development of clinical-grade hPSC lines. Generation of banks of such lines may be useful to minimize immune rejection of hPSC-derived allografts. In this review, we discuss different sources of hPSCs available at the moment, various safety risks associated with them, and possible solutions for successful use of hPSCs in the clinic. We also discuss ongoing clinical trials of hPSC-based treatments. PMID:26140342

  18. The MSHA strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa activated TLR pathway and enhanced HIV-1 DNA vaccine immunoreactivity.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jue; Liu, Yong; Liu, Ying; Shao, Yiming

    2012-01-01

    The mannose-sensitive hemagglutination pilus strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (PA-MSHA) has been shown to trigger naïve immune responses through the activation of monocytes, macrophages, natural killer cells (NK cells) and antigen presenting cells (APCs). Based on the hypothesis that PA-MSHA activates natural immunity through the Toll-like receptor (TLR) pathway, we scanned several critical TLR pathway molecules in mouse splenocytes using high-throughput real-time QRT-PCR and co-stimulatory molecule in bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDCs) following in vitro stimulation by PA-MSHA. PA-MSHA enabled activation of the TLR pathway mediated by NF-κB and JNK signaling in splenocytes, and the co-stimulatory molecule CD86 was up-regulated in BMDCs. We then assessed the adjuvant effect of PA-MSHA for HIV-1 DNA vaccines. In comparison to DNA inoculation alone, co-inoculation with low dosage of PA-MSHA enhanced specific immunoreactivity against HIV-1 Env in both cellular and humoral responses, and promoted antibody avidity maturation. However, high doses of adjuvant resulted in an immunosuppressive effect; a two- or three-inoculation regimen yielded low antibody responses and the two-inoculation regimen exhibited only a slight cellular immunity response. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating the utility of PA-MSHA as an adjuvant to a DNA vaccine. Further research is needed to investigate the exact mechanisms through which PA-MSHA achieves its adjuvant effects on innate immune responses, especially on dendritic cells. PMID:23077664

  19. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC. PMID:10217615

  20. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  1. Life cycle assessment of high-rate anaerobic treatment, microbial fuel cells, and microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jeffrey M; Rozendal, René A; Hertle, Christopher K; Lant, Paul A; Rabaey, Korneel

    2010-05-01

    Existing wastewater treatment options are generally perceived as energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Much attention has been focused on two new approaches in the past years, (i) microbial fuel cells and (ii) microbial electrolysis cells, which directly generate electrical current or chemical products, respectively, during wastewater treatment. These systems are commonly denominated as bioelectrochemical systems, and a multitude of claims have been made in the past regarding the environmental impact of these treatment options. However, an in-depth study backing these claims has not been performed. Here, we have conducted a life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare the environmental impact of three industrial wastewater treatment options, (i) anaerobic treatment with biogas generation, (ii) a microbial fuel cell treatment, with direct electricity generation, and (iii) a microbial electrolysis cell, with hydrogen peroxide production. Our analysis showed that a microbial fuel cell does not provide a significant environmental benefit relative to the "conventional" anaerobic treatment option. However, a microbial electrolysis cell provides significant environmental benefits through the displacement of chemical production by conventional means. Provided that the target conversion level of 1000 A.m(-3) can be met, the decrease in greenhouse gas emissions and other environmentally harmful emissions (e.g., aromatic hydrocarbons) of the microbial electrolysis cell will be a key driver for the development of an industrial standard for this technology. Evidently, this assessment is highly dependent on the underlying assumptions, such as the used reactor materials and target performance. This provides a challenge and an opportunity for researchers in the field to select and develop appropriate and environmentally benign materials of construction, as well as demonstrate the required 1000 A.m(-3) performance at pilot and full scale. PMID:20356090

  2. Where do injectable stem cell treatments apply in treatment of muscle, tendon, and ligament injuries?

    PubMed

    Mautner, Kenneth; Blazuk, Joseph

    2015-04-01

    Treatment options for muscle, tendon, and ligament injuries span a constantly evolving spectrum. For years, treatments focused on symptomatic relief. Closer scrutiny of symptomatic treatment suggests that the provision of transient relief of symptoms may have caused more harm than good. Cortisone injections provide a trade-off of short-term relief for poorer long-term outcomes. When conventional treatment failed, patients have faced limited options including surgery, which has increased risk and limited efficacy. Regenerative injections offer a more robust option for soft tissue disease. Basic science and clinical studies show conflicting results to support the use of platelet-rich plasma injections for soft tissue disorders, and even fewer trials have focused on injectable stem cells with limited findings. Additional studies are needed to determine the potential benefits of this regenerative therapy. PMID:25864658

  3. Prolonged treatment response in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Osuji, N; Matutes, E; Morilla, A; Del Giudice, I; Wotherspoon, A; Catovsky, D

    2005-05-01

    We describe a case of natural killer (NK) cell leukemia with acute presentation, systemic symptoms and hepatosplenomegaly. The uniform and aberrant phenotype of NK cells with infiltration of bone marrow and spleen was in keeping with a malignant diagnosis. Aggressive presentation was demonstrated by marked constitutional symptoms and significant tumor burden (liver, spleen, blood, bone marrow). The subsequent clinical course has been indolent, but this may have been influenced by treatment. Treatment consisted sequentially of splenectomy, intravenous pentostatin and the combination of cyclosporine A and recombinant human erythropoietin and has resulted in survival of over 48 months. We discuss the difficulties in the diagnosis of this condition, explore possible causes of cytopenia(s), and highlight the role of immunosuppression in controlling disease manifestations in large granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders. PMID:16019515

  4. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R.

    2011-05-20

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  5. Glutamine synthetase immunoreactivity is present in oligodendroglia of various regions of the central nervous system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Amelio, F.; Eng, L. F.; Gibbs, M. A.

    1990-01-01

    Glutamine synthetase immunoreactive oligodendrocytes were identified in the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, brain stem, and spinal cord. They were mostly confined to the gray matter, particularly close to neurons and processes. The white matter showed few immunoreactive oligodendroglia. It was suggested that some type of oligodendrocytes, specially those in perineuronal location, might fulfill a functional role more akin to astrocytes than to the normally myelinating oligodendroglia.

  6. Serotonin immunoreactive interneurons in the brain of the Remipedia: new insights into the phylogenetic affinities of an enigmatic crustacean taxon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Remipedia, a group of homonomously segmented, cave-dwelling, eyeless arthropods have been regarded as basal crustaceans in most early morphological and taxonomic studies. However, molecular sequence information together with the discovery of a highly differentiated brain led to a reconsideration of their phylogenetic position. Various conflicting hypotheses have been proposed including the claim for a basal position of Remipedia up to a close relationship with Malacostraca or Hexapoda. To provide new morphological characters that may allow phylogenetic insights, we have analyzed the architecture of the remipede brain in more detail using immunocytochemistry (serotonin, acetylated α-tubulin, synapsin) combined with confocal laser-scanning microscopy and image reconstruction techniques. This approach allows for a comprehensive neuroanatomical comparison with other crustacean and hexapod taxa. Results The dominant structures of the brain are the deutocerebral olfactory neuropils, which are linked by the olfactory globular tracts to the protocerebral hemiellipsoid bodies. The olfactory globular tracts form a characteristic chiasm in the center of the brain. In Speleonectes tulumensis, each brain hemisphere contains about 120 serotonin immunoreactive neurons, which are distributed in distinct cell groups supplying fine, profusely branching neurites to 16 neuropilar domains. The olfactory neuropil comprises more than 300 spherical olfactory glomeruli arranged in sublobes. Eight serotonin immunoreactive neurons homogeneously innervate the olfactory glomeruli. In the protocerebrum, serotonin immunoreactivity revealed several structures, which, based on their position and connectivity resemble a central complex comprising a central body, a protocerebral bridge, W-, X-, Y-, Z-tracts, and lateral accessory lobes. Conclusions The brain of Remipedia shows several plesiomorphic features shared with other Mandibulata, such as deutocerebral olfactory neuropils with a

  7. Immunoreactivity of lactic acid-treated mare's milk after simulated digestion.

    PubMed

    Fotschki, Joanna; Szyc, Anna; Wróblewska, Barbara

    2015-02-01

    The similarity of mare's milk to breast milk makes it an interesting substrate for the creation of dairy beverages. The aim of this study was to determine the immunoreactivity of the digested mare's milk products carried out by lactic acid fermentation with Lactobacillus casei LCY, Streptococcus thermophilus MK10 and Bifidobacterium animalis Bi30. Simulation of digestion with saliva, pepsin and pancreatin/bile salts was carried out. The immunoreactivity of the milk proteins was assessed by competitive ELISA. The separation of proteins was studied using a tricine SDS-PAGE method. It has been demonstrated that lactic acid fermentation significantly decreases the immunoreactivity of β-lactoglobulin, β-casein, κ-casein and bovine serum albumin. The level of reduction was connected to the type of bacterial strain. The simulated digestion processes caused the decline of immunoreactivity, and the decreases obtained in the experiment were as follows: lactoferrin: 95%, β-lactoglobulin: 94%, β-casein: 93%, α-lactalbumin: 82%, α-casein: 82%, bovine serum albumin: 76% and κ-casein: 37%. The results of the study indicated that microbial fermentation with tested strains is a valuable method for reducing the immunoreactivity of mare's milk proteins. However, further studies with other bacterial strains are needed to gain a higher level of elimination or total reduction of mare's milk immunoreactivity to possibly introduce fermented mare's milk into the diet of patients with immune-mediated digestive problems. PMID:25391267

  8. Current and emerging treatment options for hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    López-Rubio, Montserrat; Garcia-Marco, Jose Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Hairy cell leukemia (HCL) is a lymphoproliferative B-cell disorder characterized by pancytopenia, splenomegaly, and characteristic cytoplasmic hairy projections. Precise diagnosis is essential in order to differentiate classic forms from HCL variants, such as the HCL-variant and VH4-34 molecular variant, which are more resistant to available treatments. The current standard of care is treatment with purine analogs (PAs), such as cladribine or pentostatin, which provide a high rate of long-lasting clinical remissions. Nevertheless, ~30%–40% of the patients relapse, and moreover, some of these are difficult-to-treat refractory cases. The use of the monoclonal antibody rituximab in combination with PA appears to produce even higher responses, and it is often employed to minimize or eliminate residual disease. Currently, research in the field of HCL is focused on identifying novel therapeutic targets and potential agents that are safe and can universally cure the disease. The discovery of the BRAF mutation and progress in understanding the biology of the disease has enabled the scientific community to explore new therapeutic targets. Ongoing clinical trials are assessing various treatment strategies such as the combination of PA and anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies, recombinant immunotoxins targeting CD22, BRAF inhibitors, and B-cell receptor signal inhibitors. PMID:26316784

  9. Sustainable wastewater treatment: how might microbial fuel cells contribute.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sung T; Kim, Jung Rae; Premier, Giuliano C; Lee, Tae Ho; Kim, Changwon; Sloan, William T

    2010-01-01

    The need for cost-effective low-energy wastewater treatment has never been greater. Clean water for our expanding and predominantly urban global population will be expensive to deliver, eats into our diminishing carbon-based energy reserves and consequently contributes to green house gases in the atmosphere and climate change. Thus every potential cost and energy cutting measure for wastewater treatment should be explored. Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) could potentially yield such savings but, to achieve this, requires significant advances in our understanding in a few critical areas and in our designs of the overall systems. Here we review the research which might accelerate our progress towards sustainable wastewater treatment using MFCs: system control and modelling and the understanding of the ecology of the microbial communities that catalyse the generation of electricity. PMID:20688144

  10. Cutaneous primary B-cell lymphomas: from diagnosis to treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of mature B-cells neoplasms with tropism for the skin, whose biology and clinical course differ significantly from the equivalent nodal lymphomas. The most indolent forms comprise the primary cutaneous marginal zone and follicle center B-cell lymphomas that despite the excellent prognosis have cutaneous recurrences very commonly. The most aggressive forms include the primary cutaneous large B-cell lymphomas, consisting in two major groups: the leg type, with poor prognosis, and others, the latter representing a heterogeneous group of lymphomas from which specific entities are supposed to be individualized over time, such as intravascular large B-cell lymphomas. Treatment may include surgical excision, radiotherapy, antibiotics, corticosteroids, interferon, monoclonal antibodies and chemotherapy, depending on the type of lymphoma and on the type and location of the skin lesions. In subtypes with good prognosis is contraindicated overtreatment and in those associated with a worse prognosis the recommended therapy relies on CHOP-like regimens associated with rituximab, assisted or not with local radiotherapy. We review the primary cutaneous B-cell lymphomas, remembering the diagnostic criteria, differential diagnosis, classification, and prognostic factors and presenting the available therapies. PMID:26560215

  11. Enhancement of cell viability after treatment with polyunsaturated fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Bartl, J; Walitza, S; Grünblatt, E

    2014-01-24

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is highly prevalent in children and adolescents and both environmental and genetic factors play major roles. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) are postulated to contribute to the development of the infant brain and an imbalance in these may increase the risk of ADHD. In recent clinical studies, supplementation with PUFAs improved symptoms of ADHD in some cases. Similarly, some beneficial effects were observed with PUFA treatment in neuronal cell cultures. Therefore, in this study, we hypothesized that a specific PUFA combination (available on the market as Equazen™ [Vifor Pharma, Switzerland]) along with iron, zinc, or vitamin B5 (vitB5) would produce an additive beneficial effect on the viability of rat pheochromocytoma-12 dopaminergic cells. The specific PUFA combination alone, as well as added to each of the three nutrients, was tested in a dose-response manner. The specific PUFAs significantly improved cell viability, starting at very low doses (100pM) from 60h up to 90h; while the combined treatment with vitB5 and minerals did not provide additional benefit. Our results confirmed the beneficial effect of the specific PUFAs on neuronal cell viability; although supplementation with minerals and vitB5 did not enhance this effect. PMID:24269370

  12. Fluconazole treatment hyperpolarizes the plasma membrane of Candida cells.

    PubMed

    Elicharova, Hana; Sychrova, Hana

    2013-11-01

    Five pathogenic Candida species were compared in terms of their osmotolerance, tolerance to toxic sodium and lithium cations, and resistance to fluconazole. The species not only differed, in general, in their tolerance to high osmotic pressure (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis being the most osmotolerant) but exhibited distinct sensitivities to toxic sodium and lithium cations, with C. parapsilosis and C. tropicalis being very tolerant but C. krusei and C. dubliniensis sensitive to LiCl. The treatment of both fluconazole-susceptible (C. albicans and C. parapsilosis) and fluconazole-resistant (C. dubliniensis, C. krusei and C. tropicalis) growing cells with subinhibitory concentrations of fluconazole resulted in substantially elevated intracellular Na(+) levels. Using a diS-C3(3) assay, for the first time, to monitor the relative membrane potential (ΔΨ) of Candida cells, we show that the fluconazole treatment of growing cells of all five species results in a substantial hyperpolarization of their plasma membranes, which is responsible for an increased non-specific transport of toxic alkali metal cations and other cationic drugs (e.g., hygromycin B). Thus, the combination of relatively low doses of fluconazole and drugs, whose import into the tested Candida strains is driven by the cell membrane potential, might be especially potent in terms of its ability to inhibit the growth of or even kill various Candida species. PMID:23547882

  13. Treatment of CMV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Enrico; Giaccone, Luisa; Festuccia, Moreno; Brunello, Lucia; Busca, Alessandro; Bruno, Benedetto

    2016-06-01

    Despite a remarkable reduction in the past decades, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients remains a feared complication, still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Today, first line treatment of CMV infection/reactivation is still based on dated antiviral compounds Ganciclovir (GCV), Foscarnet (FOS) and Cidofovir (CDF) with their burdensome weight of side effects. Maribavir (MBV), Letermovir (LMV) and Brincidofovir (BDF) are three new promising anti-CMV drugs without myelosuppressive properties or renal toxic effects that are under investigation in randomized phase II and III trials. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT) in CMV infection possesses a strong rationale, demonstrated by several proof of concept studies; its feasibility is currently under investigation by clinical trials. ATCT from third-party and naïve donors could meet the needs of HSCT recipients of seronegative donors and cord blood grafts. In selected patients such as recipients of T-cell depleted grafts, ATCT, based on CMV-specific host T-cells reconstitution kinetics, would be of value in the prophylactic and/or preemptive CMV treatment. Vaccine-immunotherapy has the difficult task to reduce the incidence of CMV reactivation/infection in highly immunocompromised HSCT patients. Newer notions on CMV biology may represent the base to flush out the Troll of transplantation. PMID:27043241

  14. Automated detection of dual p16/Ki67 nuclear immunoreactivity in liquid-based Pap tests for improved cervical cancer risk stratification

    PubMed Central

    Gertych, Arkadiusz; Joseph, Anika O.; Walts, Ann E.; Bose, Shikha

    2012-01-01

    The Papanicolau (Pap) test is a routine cytological procedure for early detection of dysplastic lesions in cervical epithelium. A reliable screening method is crucial for triage of women at risk; however manual screening and interpretation are associated with relatively low sensitivity and substantial interobserver diagnostic variability. P16 and Ki67 biomarkers have been recently proposed as adjunctive tools in the diagnosis of high-risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) associated dysplasias to supplement the morphological characteristics of cells by additional colorimetric features. In this study, an automated technique for the evaluation of dual p16/Ki67 immunoreactivity in cervical cell nuclei is introduced. Smears stained with p16 and Ki67 antibodies were digitized, and analyzed by algorithms we developed. Gradient-based radial symmetry operator and adaptive processing of symmetry image were employed to obtain the nuclear mask. This step was followed by the extraction of features including pixel data and immunoreactivity signature from each nucleus. The features were analyzed by two support vector machine classifiers to assign a nucleus into one of four types of immunoreactivity: p16 positive (p16+/Ki67-), Ki67 positive (p16-/Ki67+), dual p16/Ki67 positive (p16+/Ki67+) and negative (p16-/Ki67-) respectively. Results obtained by our method correlated well with readings by two cytopathologists (n=18068 cells); p16+/Ki67+ nuclei were classified with respective precisions of 77.1% and 82.6%. Specificity in identification of p16-/Ki67- nuclei was better than 99.5%, and the sensitivity in detection of all immunopositive nuclei was 86.3% and 89.4% respectively. We found that the quantitative characterization of immunoreactivity provided by the additional highlighting of classified nuclei can positively impact the efficacy and screening outcome of the Pap test. PMID:22215277

  15. Stem cells in stroke treatment: the promise and the challenges.

    PubMed

    Sinden, John D; Muir, Keith W

    2012-07-01

    Stroke, for some years now the neglected major indication in the pharmaceutical development cupboard, has recently become one of the hot areas for stem cell therapy development. This is driven by better understanding of potential therapeutic opportunities both in the acute and chronic phases and the launch of a series of new early phase clinical trials in a number of countries, driven by positive data in relevant animal models. In addition, the impetus for stem cell product development is motivated by patient demand, with thousands of victims seeking unproven treatments abroad. This article looks at the many challenges facing the development of a stem cell therapy for stroke. These range from product characterization and banking, through nonclinical safety and efficacy to the regulatory requirements for starting patient trials and beyond to maximizing value from carefully designed efficacy trials. PMID:22712742

  16. Pulse mode of laser photodynamic treatment induced cell apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Klimenko, Vladimir V; Knyazev, Nickolay A; Moiseenko, Fedor V; Rusanov, Anatoliy A; Bogdanov, Alexey A; Dubina, Michael V

    2016-03-01

    One of the factors limiting photodynamic therapy (PDT) is hypoxia in tumor cells during photodynamic action. PDT with pulse mode irradiation and appropriate irradiation parameters could be more effective in the singlet oxygen generation and tissue re-oxygenation than continuous wave (CW) mode. We theoretically demonstrate differences between the cumulative singlet oxygen concentration in PDT using pulse mode and CW mode of laser irradiation. In vitro experimental results show that photodynamic treatment with pulse mode irradiation has similar cytotoxicity to CW mode and induces mainly cell apoptosis, whereas CW mode induces necrotic cell death. We assume that the cumulative singlet oxygen concentration and the temporal distribution of singlet oxygen are important in photodynamic cytotoxicity and apoptosis initiation. We expect our research may improve irradiation protocols and photodynamic therapy efficiency. PMID:26790610

  17. Clearance of Immunoreactive Somatostatin by Perfused Rat Liver

    PubMed Central

    Sacks, Harold; Terry, L. Cass

    1981-01-01

    Other investigators have demonstrated that concentrations of immunoreactive somatostatin (IRS) are higher in blood from the hepatic portal vein or its tributaries than in blood from the hepatic or peripheral systemic veins of man and animals. This suggests that there is hepatic extraction of IRS from the portal system in vivo. In the rat, portal vein plasma IRS is reported to be heterogeneous and to contain, in part, a 1,600 mol wt form of IRS which is immunochemically similar to synthetic somatostatin and not significantly bound to high molecular weight plasma protein. Our study was undertaken to determine directly whether unbound synthetic cyclic somatostatin was cleared by the rat liver perfused through the hepatic portal vein in vitro with a recirculating, plasma-free, erythrocyte-containing perfusate. At 37°C and pH 7.40, perfusate IRS, at initial concentrations (1,728 pg/ml) within the range previously reported in rat portal venous blood, was removed by the liver at a rate commensurate with first-order kinetics. Hepatic clearance was 0.84±0.04 ml/min per g postperfusion wet weight (SE). Hepatic extraction was 36±2%, and t½ was 20.0±1.3 min. Recovery of IRS from the perfusate without the liver was >85%, excluding significant degradation by the medium. Clearance, extraction, and t½ of IRS were not changed by an unphysiologic IRS concentration (621,500 pg/ml), or by pharmacologic concentrations of insulin (8.2 μM) or glucagon (2.9 μM). The t½ was prolonged significantly to 28.2±1.9 and 45.6±4.7 min during perfusions at liver temperatures of 25° and 16°C, respectively. At 37°C, the t½ was also significantly increased to 28.7±3.2 and 24.2±1.1 min at perfusate pH 7.06 and 6.78, respectively. These studies indicate that the rat liver clears unbound IRS from the perfusate by a first-order kinetic process that is (a) unsaturable at pharmacologic concentrations, (b) temperature-sensitive and, to a lesser extent, influenced by lowered pH, and (c) not

  18. Localization of GABA-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Ríos, M; Suess, E; Miller, M W

    1999-10-18

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is present in the central nervous system of Aplysia californica (Gastropoda, Opisthobranchia) where its role as a neurotransmitter is supported by pharmacological, biochemical, and anatomical investigations. In this study, the distribution of GABA-immunoreactive (GABAi) neurons and fiber systems in Aplysia was examined by using wholemount immunohistochemistry and nerve backfill methods. GABAi neurons were located in the buccal, cerebral, and pedal ganglia. Major commissural fiber systems were present in each of these ganglia, whereas more limited fiber systems were observed in the ganglionic connectives. Some of the interganglionic fibers were found to originate from two unpaired GABAi neurons, one in the buccal ganglion and one in the right pedal ganglion, each of which exhibited bilateral projections. No GABAi fibers were found in the nerves that innervate peripheral sensory, motor, or visceral organs. Although GABAi cells were not observed in the pleural or abdominal ganglia, these ganglia did receive limited projections of GABAi fibers originating from neurons in the pedal ganglia. The distribution of GABAi neurons suggests that this transmitter system may be primarily involved in coordinating certain bilateral central pattern generator (CPG) systems related to feeding and locomotion. In addition, the presence of specific interganglionic GABAi projections also suggests a role in the regulation or coordination of circuits that produce components of complex behaviors. PMID:10524338

  19. Proteomic analysis of Ascaridia galli. Identification of immunoreactive proteins in naturally and experimentally infected hens.

    PubMed

    González-Miguel, Javier; Marcos-Atxutegi, Cristina; de Castello, Roberta Bottari; Carpani, Sara; Morchón, Rodrigo; Simón, Fernando

    2013-09-23

    Ascaridia galli, intestinal parasite of domestic fowl, is responsible of economic losses in avian exploitations. However, molecular mechanisms that govern avian ascaridiasis remain largely unknown. The aim of the present work was to identify proteins of A. galli recognized by the immune system of naturally and experimentally infected hens, using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) and mass spectrometry (MS). Sixteen immunoreactive proteins of A. galli were identified. These proteins are mainly related to different metabolic processes, cell motility and binding activities. The timing evolution of this recognition pattern was studied using serum samples from experimentally infected hens, allowing us to observe an early recognition of many of these antigens. Many of them were isoforms from lipid and plasminogen-binding proteins. Moreover, plasminogen-binding activity has been related in other parasites with the facilitation of intra-organic migration, which represents an important fact in avian ascaridiasis. This work represents the first proteomic study of A. galli and could contribute to explain some aspects of parasite/host relationships of avian ascaridiasis. PMID:23578998

  20. CuZnSOD and MnSOD immunoreactivity in brain stem motor neurons from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Brooks, B R; Taniguchi, N; Hartmann, H A

    1998-01-01

    Motor neurons from the brain stems of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and control patients were examined with immunoantibodies to CuZn-superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and Mn-superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). We found that there was a marked staining for CuZnSOD in all the motor nuclei, the hypoglossus, ambiguus, facialis and trigeminus from the ALS patients, but not in the controls. The same neurons from the ALS patients also stained very intensely for MnSOD, whereas the neurons from the control patients stained weakly or not at all. Loss of neurons was also a very consistent finding and was noted in all the motor nuclei from the ALS patients. There was a proliferation of glial cells which stained strongly both for CuZnSOD and for MnSOD accompanying the loss of the neurons. These results indicated that there was an apparent increase of superoxide dismutase immunoreactivity in motor neurons of ALS patients. We conclude that CuZnSOD and MnSOD immunoreactivity is increased in motor neurons and glia in the brain stems of patients with ALS, specific for the terminal phase of this disease. PMID:9452823

  1. The spatial relationship between the musculature and the NADPH-diaphorase activity, 5-HT and FMRFamide immunoreactivities in redia, cercaria and adult Echinoparyphium aconiatum (Digenea).

    PubMed

    Terenina, N B; Tolstenkov, O; Fagerholm, H-P; Serbina, E A; Vodjanitskaja, S N; Gustafsson, M K S

    2006-04-01

    The spatial relationship between the musculature and the NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d) activity, 5-HT and FMRFamide immunoreactivities in redia, cercaria and adult Echinoparyphium aconiatum was studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), NADPH-d histochemistry, immunocytochemistry, and confocal scanning laser microscopy (CSLM). TRITC-conjugated phalloidin was used to stain the musculature. Staining for NADPH-d was observed in the central (CNS) and peripheral nervous system (PNS) of all three stages. NADPH-d positive nerves occurred very close to muscle fibres. 5-HT-immunoreactive (5-HT-IR) nerve cells and fibres occurred in the CNS and PNS and close to muscle fibres. FMRFamide-IR nerve fibres were observed in the CNS and PNS of adult worms. This is the first time, the presence of the NADPH-d has been demonstrated in the larval as well as the adult stages of a fluke. PMID:16494908

  2. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  3. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF.

    PubMed

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia; Tongiorgi, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5'UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3'UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3'UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism. PMID:27256407

  4. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF

    PubMed Central

    Polacchini, Alessio; Albani, Clara; Baj, Gabriele; Colliva, Andrea; Carpinelli, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB) is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF); thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5′UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3′UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3′UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism. PMID:27256407

  5. Novel neuritic clusters with accumulations of amyloid precursor protein and amyloid precursor-like protein 2 immunoreactivity in brain regions damaged by thiamine deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Calingasan, N. Y.; Gandy, S. E.; Baker, H.; Sheu, K. F.; Smith, J. D.; Lamb, B. T.; Gearhart, J. D.; Buxbaum, J. D.; Harper, C.; Selkoe, D. J.; Price, D. L.; Sisodia, S. S.; Gibson, G. E.

    1996-01-01

    Experimental thiamine deficiency (TD) is a classical model of a nutritional deficit associated with a generalized impairment of oxidative metabolism and selective cell loss in the brain. In rats, TD-induced cell degeneration is accompanied by an accumulation of amyloid precursor protein (APP)/amyloid precursor-like protein 2 (APLP2) immunoreactivity in abnormal neurites and perikarya along the periphery of, or scattered within, the lesion. Prompted by these data and our previous findings of a genetic variation in the development of TD symptoms, we extended our studies to mice. C57BL/6, ApoE knockout, and APP YAC transgenic mice received thiamine-deficient diet and pyrithiamine injections. Unlike rats, APP/APLP2-immunoreactive neurites in all strains of mice were sparsely scattered within damaged areas and did not delimit the thalamic lesion. In addition, abnormal clusters of intensely immunoreactive neurites occurred only in areas of damage including the thalamus, mammillary body, and inferior colliculus. The clusters appeared as either irregular clumps or round or oval rosettes that strikingly resembled the neuritic component of Alzheimer amyloid plaques. However, immunostaining using various antisera to synthetic amyloid beta-protein (A beta 1-40) and thioflavine S histochemistry failed to show evidence of a component of A beta Neither APP/APLP2-immunoreactive clusters nor amyloid plaques were observed in the brain from patients with Wernicke-Korsakoff syndrome, the clinical manifestation of TD in man. Our results demonstrate species (i.e., genetic) differences in the response to TD-induced damage and support a role for APP and APLP2 in the response to brain injury. This is the first report that chronic oxidative deficits can lead to this novel pathology. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:8780408

  6. Serotonin-immunoreactive neurons in the ventral nerve cord of Remipedia (Crustacea): support for a sister group relationship of Remipedia and Hexapoda?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    -ladder-like structure and principal architecture of the segmental ganglia in Remipedia corresponds closely to that of other Euarthropoda. A comparison of the serotonin-immunoreactive cell arrangement of Remipedia to reconstructed ground patterns of major euarthropod taxa supports a homology of the anterior and posterior neurons in Pancrustacea. These neurons in Remipedia possess unbranched projections across the midline, pointing towards similarities to the hexapod pattern. Our findings are in line with a growing number of phylogenetic investigations proposing Remipedia to be a rather derived crustacean lineage that perhaps has close affinities to Hexapoda. PMID:23758940

  7. Treatment of elderly patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zanardi, Elisa; Grassi, Paolo; Cavo, Alessia; Verzoni, Elena; Maggi, Claudia; De Braud, Filippo; Boccardo, Francesco; Procopio, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    The risk of developing renal cell carcinoma (RCC) increases with age, and given the constant gain in life expectancy of the general population, both localized RCC and metastatic RCC (mRCC) are more frequently observed in the elderly population. The elderly are a heterogeneous group of patients often characterized by the presence of comorbidities, different compliance to treatment and polypharmacy. Here we review the available data with the aim to analyze the safety and efficacy of new targeted therapies (TTs) in elderly mRCC patients. TTs seem to be effective in both older and younger patients, but elderly patients appear to show reduced tolerance to treatments compared to younger patients. Prospective trials are needed to better understand how to manage mRCC in elderly patients. PMID:26654225

  8. Dermatocosmetologic aspects of treatment of basal-cell skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geinitz, A. V.; Stranadko, Ye. F.; Yusupova, Zh. M.; Tkachenko, S. B.

    2005-08-01

    The obtained clinical findings demonstrate excellent results after surgical MSC treatment with the application of modem laser surgical technologies. All the operated patients were under oncologist"s control during 1.5-2.5 years. In 6 cases we observed topical recurrences which needed a repeated intervention. Thus, our experience of applying LPh for surgical treatment of basal-cell carcinomas of the head and neck dem- onstrate that in the analysed cases it is more reasonable to use two models of laser devices different in their physical parameters. These devices are used at different surgical stages so as to provide a precise effect in laser tumour va- porization within the borders of the healthy tissue, to make better vascular coagulation and laser smoothing of wound surface. Immediate, direct and long-term results of modern surgical lasers" application for treating skin BSC almost in all cases give good and excellent cosmetic effect after such intenventions.

  9. Treatment of prostate cancer cell lines and primary cells using low temperature plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Connell, Deborah; Hirst, Adam; Frame, Fiona F.; Maitland, Norman J.

    2014-10-01

    The mechanisms of cell death after plasma treatment of both benign and cancerous prostate epithelial cells are investigated. Prostate cancer tissue was obtained with patient consent from targeted needle core biopsies following radical prostatectomy. Primary cells were cultured from cancer tissue and plated onto a chamber slide at a density of 10,000 cells per well in 200 microliter of stem cell media (SCM). The treated sample was previously identified as Gleason grade 7 cancer through tissue histo-pathology. A dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) jet configuration, with helium as a carrier gas, and 0.3% O2 admixture was used for treating the cells. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) produced by the plasma are believed to be the main mediators of the plasma-cell interaction and response. We found the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced inside the cells increased with plasma exposure. Exposure to the plasma for >3 minutes showed high levels of DNA damage compared to untreated and hydrogen peroxide controls. Cell viability and cellular recovery are also investigated and will be presented. All findings were common to both cell lines, suggesting the potential of LTP therapy for both benign and malignant disease.

  10. Stem cells in the treatment of inflammatory arthritis.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M

    2010-08-01

    Autologous haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) resulted in a positive short-term outcome clinically with low treatment-related toxicity. However, early conditioning regimens were of low immunoablative intensity and most patients relapsed. Mechanistic studies suggest that residual lesional effector cells may have been responsible for the relapses. The introduction of biopharmaceuticals has, for the moment, reduced the need for further experimental studies. Juvenile idiopathic arthritis patients, mostly of the systemic subgroup, have shown nearly 33% durable drug-free remission, but with significant toxicity, including fatal macrophage-activation syndrome early in the programme. Later modifications to the protocol have reduced this toxicity. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), derived from several sources including bone marrow and adipose tissue, are being tested as tissue-regenerative and immunomodulating agents in many autoimmune diseases and animal models of inflammatory arthritis have been positive. MSCs and other stromal cells derived from actively inflamed synovium and peripheral blood of RA patients do not always demonstrate a full range of differentiation potential compared with healthy MSCs, although their immunomodulalatory capacity is unimpaired. PMID:20732653

  11. Diagnosis and treatment of mast cell disorders: practical recommendations.

    PubMed

    Sandes, Alex Freire; Medeiros, Raphael Salles Scortegagna; Rizzatti, Edgar Gil

    2013-01-01

    CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE The term mastocytosis covers a group of rare disorders characterized by neoplastic proliferation and accumulation of clonal mast cells in one or more organs. The aim of this study was to assess the principal elements for diagnosing and treating these disorders. DESIGN AND SETTING Narrative review of the literature conducted at Grupo Fleury, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS This study reviewed the scientific papers published in the PubMed, Embase (Excerpta Medica Database), Lilacs (Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde) and Cochrane Library databases that were identified using the search term "mastocytosis." RESULTS The clinical presentation of mastocytosis is remarkably heterogeneous and ranges from skin lesions that may regress spontaneously to aggressive forms associated with organ failure and short survival. Currently, seven subtypes of mastocytosis are recognized through the World Health Organization classification system for hematopoietic tumors. These disorders are diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and on identification of neoplastic mast cells using morphological, immunophenotypic, genetic and molecular methods. Abnormal mast cells display atypical and frequently spindle-shaped morphology, and aberrant expression of the CD25 and CD2 antigens. Elevation of serum tryptase is a common finding in some subtypes, and more than 90% of the patients present the D816V KIT mutation in mast cells. CONCLUSION Here, we described the most common signs and symptoms among patients with mastocytosis and suggested a practical approach for the diagnosis, classification and initial clinical treatment of mastocytosis. PMID:24141298

  12. Photodynamic therapy in the treatment of basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Matei, C; Tampa, M; Poteca, T; Panea-Paunica, G; Georgescu, SR; Ion, RM; Popescu, SM; Giurcaneanu, C

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a medical procedure based on the activation of the molecules of various exogenous or endogenous chemical substances called photosensitizers by a light source emitting radiation of an adequate wavelength, usually situated in the visible spectrum; photosensitizers are chemical compounds bearing the capacity to selectively concentrate in the neoplastic cells. The energy captured by the molecules of these substances pervaded in the tumor cells is subsequently discharged in the surrounding tissue, triggering certain photodynamic reactions that result in the destruction of the tumor. The procedure is applicable in numerous medical fields. Skin basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the most frequent type of cancer of the human species, is a cutaneous tumor that responds very well to this innovative treatment method. By reviewing numerous recent studies in the field, this article aims to present the role and the indications of photodynamic therapy in the management of basal cell carcinoma, as well as the most important results achieved so far by this therapy in the field of dermato-oncology. PMID:23599819

  13. An immunoreactive, water-soluble conidial wall fraction of Coccidioides immitis.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, G T; Kirkland, T N; Sun, S H

    1987-01-01

    Arthroconidia stripped of their outer, hydrophobic wall layer release an immunoreactive, water-soluble fraction (SCWF), the composition of which is examined in this paper. The immunogenicity of SCWF was determined by its reactivity with anti-Coccidioides immitis complement-fixing antibody and tube precipitin antibody in a standardized immunodiffusion assay as well as reactivity in a lymphocyte proliferation assay. SCWF was shown to be more immunoreactive for immune lymphocytes than selected cytosol and culture supernatant fractions of C. immitis. Rabbit antisera raised against SCWF were used in immunoelectron-microscopic and immunofluorescence studies to confirm that the immunoreactive components of SCWF are primarily associated with the inner conidial wall. The antigenic composition of the conidial wall fraction was characterized by advancing-line immunoelectrophoresis with the previously established coccidioidin reference system. Protein composition was characterized by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Chromatographic fractionation of SCWF was performed on a Sephacryl S-300 preparative column. Selected fractions which showed significantly higher immunoreactivity and less complex antigenic composition than whole SCWF were characterized. Two heat-sensitive antigens of Sephacryl fraction 3a were identified. One or both of these antigens may correspond to the complement-fixing antigen, which is potentially important as an immunodiagnostic antigen. Fraction 4 contained a previously described wall-associated antigen (AgCS) which may also be of immunodiagnostic value. We conclude that the conidial envelope is a reservoir of immunoreactive macromolecules which may play significant roles in early stages of infection. Images PMID:3102379

  14. Serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neurons in the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Hidehiro; Shimohigashi, Miki; Yokohari, Fumio

    2014-02-01

    The antennae of insects contain a vast array of sensory neurons that process olfactory, gustatory, mechanosensory, hygrosensory, and thermosensory information. Except those with multimodal functions, most sensory neurons use acetylcholine as a neurotransmitter. Using immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde staining of antennal sensory neurons in the cockroach Periplaneta americana, we found serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neurons in the antenna. These were selectively distributed in chaetic and scolopidial sensilla and in the scape, the pedicel, and first 15 segments of the flagellum. In a chaetic sensillum, A single serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neuron cohabited with up to four serotonin-negative sensory neurons. Based on their morphological features, serotonin-immunopositive and -negative sensory neurons might process mechanosensory and contact chemosensory modalities, respectively. Scolopidial sensilla constitute the chordotonal and Johnston's organs within the pedicel and process antennal vibrations. Immunoelectron microscopy clearly revealed that serotonin-immunoreactivities selectively localize to a specific type of mechanosensory neuron, called type 1 sensory neuron. In a chordotonal scolopidial sensillum, a serotonin-immunoreactive type 1 neuron always paired with a serotonin-negative type 1 neuron. Conversely, serotonin-immunopositive and -negative type 1 neurons were randomly distributed in Johnston's organ. In the deutocerebrum, serotonin-immunoreactive sensory neuron axons formed three different sensory tracts and those from distinct types of sensilla terminated in distinct brain regions. Our findings indicate that a biogenic amine, serotonin, may act as a neurotransmitter in peripheral mechanosensory neurons. PMID:23852943

  15. Alpha-7 and alpha-4 nicotinic receptor subunit immunoreactivity in genioglossus muscle motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Dehkordi, Ozra; Millis, Richard M; Dennis, Gary C; Coleman, Bernell R; Johnson, Sheree M; Changizi, Loubat; Ovid Trouth, C

    2005-02-15

    In the present study, immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde labeling techniques were used to determine if hypoglossal motoneurons (HMNs), retrogradely labeled after cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) injection to the genioglossus muscle in rats, show immunoreactivity for alpha-7 and alpha-4 subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). CTB-positive HMNs projecting to the genioglossus muscle were consistently labeled throughout the rostrocaudal extent of the hypoglossal nuclei with the greatest labeling at and caudal to area postrema. Alpha-7 subunit immunoreactivity was found in 39.44+/-5.10% of 870 CTB-labeled motoneurons and the alpha-4 subunit in 51.01+/-3.71% of 983 CTB-positive neurons. Rostrally, the number of genioglossal motoneurons demonstrating immunoreactivity for the alpha-7 subunit was 45.85+/-10.04% compared to 34.96+/-5.11% at and caudal to area postrema (P>0.1). The number of genioglossal motoneurons that showed immunoreactivity for the alpha-4 subunit was 55.03+/-4.83% at and caudal to area postrema compared to 42.98+/-3.90% in rostral areas (P=0.074). These results demonstrate that nAChR immunoreactivity is present in genioglossal motoneurons and suggest a role for alpha-7 and alpha-4 subunits containing nAChRs in the regulation of upper airway patency. PMID:15705531

  16. Reduced density of glutamine synthetase immunoreactive astrocytes in different cortical areas in major depression but not in bipolar I disorder

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Hans-Gert; Meyer-Lotz, Gabriela; Dobrowolny, Henrik; Bannier, Jana; Steiner, Johann; Walter, Martin; Bogerts, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing evidence for disturbances within the glutamate system in patients with affective disorders, which involve disruptions of the glutamate–glutamine-cycle. The mainly astroglia-located enzyme glutamine synthetase (GS) catalyzes the ATP-dependent condensation of ammonia and glutamate to form glutamine, thus playing a central role in glutamate and glutamine homoeostasis. However, GS is also expressed in numerous oligodendrocytes (OLs), another class of glial cells implicated in mood disorder pathology. To learn more about the role of glia-associated GS in mental illnesses, we decided to find out if numerical densities of glial cells immunostained for the enzyme protein differ between subjects with major depressive disorder, bipolar disorder (BD), and psychically healthy control cases. Counting of GS expressing astrocytes (ACs) and OLs in eight cortical and two subcortical brain regions of subjects with mood disorder (N = 14), BD (N = 15), and controls (N = 16) revealed that in major depression the densities of ACs were significantly reduced in some cortical but not subcortical gray matter areas, whereas no changes were found for OLs. In BD no alterations of GS-immunoreactive glia were found. From our findings we conclude that (1) GS expressing ACs are prominently involved in glutamate-related disturbances in major depression, but not in BD and (2) GS expressing OLs, though being present in significant numbers in prefrontal cortical areas, play a minor (if any) role in mood disorder pathology. The latter assumption is supported by findings of others showing that – at least in the mouse brain cortex – GS immunoreactive oligodendroglial cells are unable to contribute to the glutamate–glutamine-cycle due to the complete lack of amino acid transporters (Takasaki et al., 2010). PMID:26321908

  17. Variation in macrophage migration inhibitory factor [MIF] immunoreactivity during bovine gestation.

    PubMed

    Paulesu, L; Pfarrer, C; Romagnoli, R; Ietta, F; Callesen, H; Hambruch, N; Dantzer, V

    2012-03-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine involved in several aspects of the immune response. MIF appears to play important roles in materno-fetal immuno-tolerance during placental establishment, modulation and growth as studied in epitheliochorial porcine and hemochorial human and mouse placentae. Here we studied the bovine placenta being multiplex, villous and synepitheliochorial with a low degree of invasion, to see if MIF could be involved. Placental tissues sampled from 12 cows at 9 stages of gestation (days 18-250), and endometrial tissues from two non-pregnant animals were processed for immunohistochemistry. Bovine MIF was detected by Western blot using anti-human MIF monoclonal antibodies. An immunoreactive band of approximately 12kDa confirmed similarities between bovine and human MIFs. Compared to the non-pregnant stage with very faint staining, the caruncular epithelium during pregnancy showed stronger staining for MIF. The intercaruncular epithelium in non-pregnant endometrium showed some reaction apically with increasing intensity at uterine gland openings; in contrast, at day 18 of gestation this staining was markedly increased. During gestation both caruncular and trophoblast epithelium of the placentomes were positive with different intensity in relation to the gestational stage. In the uterine glands, some strongly stained cells were present. The mature binucleated trophoblast giant cells were negative throughout pregnancy. During reestablishment of vascularisation, the vasculature in the caruncular area showed MIF reactivity. While supporting involvement of MIF in different placental types, the spatio-temporal variation in the bovine placenta suggests a regulatory role for MIF mainly in the interhemal barrier and during vascular development. PMID:22200576

  18. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhe; Wen, Yan; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-03-15

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 10(6) cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  19. Smooth Muscle Precursor Cells Derived from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Stress Urinary Incontinence

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhe; Li, Yan Hui; Wei, Yi; Green, Morgaine; Wani, Prachi; Zhang, Pengbo; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in using stem cells (SC) to regenerate a deficient urethral sphincter in patients with urinary incontinence. The smooth muscle component of the sphincter is a significant contributor to sphincter function. However, current translational efforts for sphincter muscle restoration focus only on skeletal muscle regeneration because they rely on adult mesenchymal SC as cell source. These adult SC do not yield sufficient smooth muscle cells (SMCs) for transplantation. We may be able to overcome this limitation by using pluripotent stem cell (PSC) to derive SMCs. Hence, we sought to investigate whether smooth muscle precursor cells (pSMCs) derived from human PSCs can restore urethral function in an animal model generated by surgical urethrolysis and ovariectomy. Rats were divided into four groups: control (no intervention), sham saline (surgery + saline injection), bladder SMC (surgery + human bladder SMC injection), and treatment (surgery + pSMC injection, which includes human embryonic stem cell (hESC) H9-derived pSMC, episomal reprogrammed induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs)-derived pSMC, or viral reprogrammed iPSC-derived pSMC). pSMCs (2 × 106 cells/rat) were injected periurethrally 3 weeks postsurgery. Leak point pressure (LPP) and baseline external urethral sphincter electromyography were measured 5 weeks postinjection. Both iPSC-derived pSMC treatment groups showed significantly higher LPP compared to the sham saline group, consistent with restoration of urethral sphincter function. While the difference between the H9-derived pSMC treatment and sham saline group was not significant, it did show a trend toward restoration of the LPP to the level of intact controls. Our data indicate that pSMCs derived from human PSCs (hESC and iPSC) can restore sphincter function. PMID:26785911

  20. Genesis of squamous cell lung carcinoma. Sequential changes of proliferation, DNA ploidy, and p53 expression.

    PubMed Central

    Hirano, T.; Franzén, B.; Kato, H.; Ebihara, Y.; Auer, G.

    1994-01-01

    Squamous cell lung carcinomas (SCCs) represent a highly malignant group of tumors, and effective treatment is greatly dependent upon early diagnosis. However, objective diagnosis of atypia is difficult and useful markers need to be defined. In this study, genomic instability, cell proliferation, and cellular accumulation of mutant p53, as reflected by DNA aneuploidy, proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and p53 immunoreactivity, respectively, were evaluated in bronchial squamous metaplasia without atypia (n = 4), bronchial squamous metaplasia with low-grade atypia (n = 12), bronchial squamous metaplasia with high-grade atypia (n = 15), early-stage SCC (n = 15), and advanced-stage SCC (n = 33). Our results suggest that hyperproliferation is an early event followed by DNA aneuploidy, which in turn precedes p53 immunoreactivity in the genesis of SCC. We conclude that routine assessment of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, DNA ploidy, and p53 may be valuable for the early diagnosis of SCC. Images Figure 2 PMID:7906095

  1. Apoptosis in vascular cells induced by cold atmospheric plasma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sladek, Raymond; Stoffels, Eva

    2006-10-01

    Apoptosis is a natural mechanism of cellular self-destruction. It can be triggered by moderate, yet irreversible damage. Apoptosis plays a major role in tissue renewal. Artificial apoptosis induction will become a novel therapy that meets all requirements for tissue-saving surgery. Diseased tissues can disappear without inflammation and scarring. This is particularly important in treatment of blockages in body tracts (e.g. cardiovascular diseases). Artificial induction of apoptosis can be achieved by means of cold plasma treatment. In this work an atmospheric micro-plasma operated in helium/air has been used to induce apoptosis in vascular cells. Parametric studies of apoptosis induction have been conducted; the efficiency is almost 100%. The apoptotic factors are ROS/RNS (reactive oxygen and nitrogen species). Their densities in the plasma have been measured by mass spectrometry. For apoptosis induction, RNS seem to be more important than ROS, because of their relative abundance. Moreover, addition of a ROS scavenger (ascorbic acid) to the cell culture medium does not reduce the occurrence of apoptosis. Cold plasma is a very efficient tool for fundamental studies of apoptosis, and later, for controlled tissue removal in vivo.

  2. Pharmacological treatment options for mast cell activation disease.

    PubMed

    Molderings, Gerhard J; Haenisch, Britta; Brettner, Stefan; Homann, Jürgen; Menzen, Markus; Dumoulin, Franz Ludwig; Panse, Jens; Butterfield, Joseph; Afrin, Lawrence B

    2016-07-01

    Mast cell activation disease (MCAD) is a term referring to a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by aberrant release of variable subsets of mast cell (MC) mediators together with accumulation of either morphologically altered and immunohistochemically identifiable mutated MCs due to MC proliferation (systemic mastocytosis [SM] and MC leukemia [MCL]) or morphologically ordinary MCs due to decreased apoptosis (MC activation syndrome [MCAS] and well-differentiated SM). Clinical signs and symptoms in MCAD vary depending on disease subtype and result from excessive mediator release by MCs and, in aggressive forms, from organ failure related to MC infiltration. In most cases, treatment of MCAD is directed primarily at controlling the symptoms associated with MC mediator release. In advanced forms, such as aggressive SM and MCL, agents targeting MC proliferation such as kinase inhibitors may be provided. Targeted therapies aimed at blocking mutant protein variants and/or downstream signaling pathways are currently being developed. Other targets, such as specific surface antigens expressed on neoplastic MCs, might be considered for the development of future therapies. Since clinicians are often underprepared to evaluate, diagnose, and effectively treat this clinically heterogeneous disease, we seek to familiarize clinicians with MCAD and review current and future treatment approaches. PMID:27132234

  3. Treatment of canine oral squamous cell carcinomas with photodynamic therapy

    PubMed Central

    McCaw, D L; Pope, E R; Payne, J T; West, M K; Tompson, R V; Tate, D

    2000-01-01

    Eleven dogs with naturally occurring oral squamous cell carcinomas were treated with photodynamic therapy (PDT) using Photochlor (HPPH) as the photosensitizer. The largest length of the tumours measured in a two-dimensional plane ranged from 0.9 to 6.8 cm. Seven of the tumours invaded underlying bone as determined by radiograph appearance. Photochlor was injected intravenously at a dose of 0.3 mg kg–1. Forty-eight hours later the tumours were treated. Tumours with a surface to base depth of greater than 1 cm were surgically reduced to less than 1 cm. Irradiation with 665 nm light with an energy density of 100 J cm–2was administered. Eight dogs were considered cured with no tumour recurrence for at least 17 months after treatment. Local treatment of oral squamous cell carcinomas with PDT appears to give results similar to those obtained with surgical removal of large portions of the mandible or maxilla. The cosmetic results with PDT are superior to those of radical surgical removal. The new sensitizer, Photochlor, appears effective for oral squamous carcinomas with results similar to those reported for other sensitizers. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10755404

  4. Performance in an escape task induces fos-like immunoreactivity in a specific area of the motor cortex of the rat.

    PubMed

    Castro-Alamancos, M A; Borrell, J; García-Segura, L M

    1992-07-01

    The expression of the c-fos proto-oncogene was studied in two different areas of the motor cortex and in the hippocampus of the rat after performance in an escape task in a Skinner box. Performance in this task caused an increase in the number of cells showing fos-like immunoreactivity in layers V and VI of the forelimb motor-sensory cortex with respect to yoked animals which had received the same amount, frequency and duration of aversive stimulation and manipulation as the trained animals. Therefore, this increase is the specific effect of performing the behavioral task. In the hindlimb motor-sensory cortex there were no differences between the trained and the yoked animals in any of the cortical layers. No differences were observed in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus between trained and yoked animals, while the control animals showed a much lower fos-like immunoreactivity. In conclusion, infragranular layers in the forelimb representation of the primary motor cortex become activated with respect to the expression of fos-like immunoreactivity after performance in an escape task in a Skinner box. This result is consistent with the idea that even in complex structures such as the cerebral cortex, specific trace systems become activated for the performance of complex behavioral tasks. PMID:1407543

  5. Immunoreactivity of progesterone receptor isoform B, nuclear factor kappaB, and IkappaBalpha in adenomyosis.

    PubMed

    Nie, Jichan; Lu, Yuan; Liu, Xishi; Guo, Sun-Wei

    2009-09-01

    Compared with normal endometrium, progesterone receptor isoform B (PR-B) and IkappaBalpha immunoreactivity were statistically significantly reduced in ectopic as well as eutopic endometrium from women with adenomyosis while nuclear p65, p50, and p52 immunoreactivity were statistically significantly increased in ectopic and eutopic endometrium. Nuclear p65 immunoreactivity was positively associated with heavier menses, and decreased PR-B and increased nuclear p65 immunoreactivity in ectopic endometrium were statistically significantly associated with the severity of dysmenorrhea in women with adenomyosis. PMID:19296948

  6. Stress Hyperglycemia, Insulin Treatment, and Innate Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Fangming; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Hyperglycemia (HG) and insulin resistance are the hallmarks of a profoundly altered metabolism in critical illness resulting from the release of cortisol, catecholamines, and cytokines, as well as glucagon and growth hormone. Recent studies have proposed a fundamental role of the immune system towards the development of insulin resistance in traumatic patients. A comprehensive review of published literatures on the effects of hyperglycemia and insulin on innate immunity in critical illness was conducted. This review explored the interaction between the innate immune system and trauma-induced hypermetabolism, while providing greater insight into unraveling the relationship between innate immune cells and hyperglycemia. Critical illness substantially disturbs glucose metabolism resulting in a state of hyperglycemia. Alterations in glucose and insulin regulation affect the immune function of cellular components comprising the innate immunity system. Innate immune system dysfunction via hyperglycemia is associated with a higher morbidity and mortality in critical illness. Along with others, we hypothesize that reduction in morbidity and mortality observed in patients receiving insulin treatment is partially due to its effect on the attenuation of the immune response. However, there still remains substantial controversy regarding moderate versus intensive insulin treatment. Future studies need to determine the integrated effects of HG and insulin on the regulation of innate immunity in order to provide more effective insulin treatment regimen for these patients. PMID:24899891

  7. Reduction in brain immunoreactive corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, K.; Hattori, T.; Murakami, K.; Suemaru, S.; Kawada, Y.; Kageyama, J.; Ota, Z.

    1985-02-18

    The brain CRF concentration of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and normotensive Wistar Kyoto rats (WKY) was examined by rat CRF radioimmunoassay. Anti-CRF serum was developed by immunizing rabbits with synthetic rat CRF. Synthetic rat CRF was also used as tracer and standard. The displacement of /sup 125/I-rat CRF by serially diluted extracts of male Wistar rats hypothalamus, thalamus, midbrain, pons, medulla oblongata, cerebral cortex, cerebellum and neurointermediate lobe was parallel to the displacement of synthetic rat CRF. In both WKY and SHR the highest levels of CRF immunoreactivity were shown by the hypothalamus and neurointermediate lobe, and considerable CRF immunoreactivity was also detected in other brain regions. The CRF immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus, neurointermediate lobe, midbrain, medulla oblongata and cerebral cortex was significantly reduced in SHR and it may suggest that CRF abnormality may be implicated in the reported abnormalities in the pituitary-adrenal axis, autonomic response and behavior of SHR.

  8. Galanin immunoreactivity in the brain of the desert lizard Uromastyx acanthinura during activity season.

    PubMed

    Hammouche, Sadjia Benmansour; Bennis, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The distribution of galanin immunoreactive perikarya and nerve fibers in the brain of the desert lizard U. acanthinura was studied by means of immunofluorescence using an antiserum against rabbit galanin. The animals were captured during the activity season in March (wet season) just before reproduction period and in June (arid season) after ovulation period. Immunoreactive neurons were mostly detected in the mediobasal and the infundibular recess nuclei, the nucleus of the paraventricular organ, the paraventricular organ, the periventricular nucleus and in the anterior hypothalamus at the level of the periventricular nucleus, the paraventricular nucleus and the supraoptic nucleus. The differences in brain galanin expression between animals collected under both sets of environmental conditions indicated changes which occur during the annual and reproductive cycles. The wide hypothalamic and extrahypothalamic distribution of galanin immunoreactive fibers suggests that this peptide may have hypophysiotropic, neuromodulator and neurotransmitter roles in the lizard U. acanthinura. PMID:23690217

  9. [Research and application of cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus: a review].

    PubMed

    Wei, Lingling; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2009-10-01

    In the conventional treatments of type I diabetes, there are various problems. As a new adequate treatment of diabetes, cell replacement therapy of diabetes has been applied and given research priority. We have investigated the applications of cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes and have retrieved the relevant articles on cells transplantation for the treatment of diabetes. In this paper, we review the history, development, merits and demerits of cell transplantation and the recent advances in pancreatic islet transplantation research. The latest progress in the induction of stem cell to differentiate into the insulin-producing cells was also introduced. PMID:19947503

  10. Morphine for the Treatment of Pain in Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ballas, Samir K.

    2015-01-01

    Pain is a hallmark of sickle cell disease (SCD) and its treatment remains challenging. Opioids are the major family of analgesics that are commonly used for treating severe pain. However, these are not always effective and are associated with the liabilities of their own. The pharmacology and multiorgan side effects of opioids are rapidly emerging areas of investigation, but there remains a scarcity of clinical studies. Due to opioid-induced endothelial-, mast cell-, renal mesangial-, and epithelial-cell-specific effects and proinflammatory as well as growth influencing signaling, it is likely that when used for analgesia, opioids may have organ specific pathological effects. Experimental and clinical studies, even though extremely few, suggest that opioids may exacerbate existent organ damage and also stimulate pathologies of their own. Because of the recurrent and/or chronic use of large doses of opioids in SCD, it is critical to evaluate the role and contribution of opioids in many complications of SCD. The aim of this review is to initiate inquiry to develop strategies that may prevent the inadvertent effect of opioids on organ function in SCD, should it occur, without compromising analgesia. PMID:25654130

  11. Apoptotic cell death in rat epididymis following epichlorohydrin treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, I-C; Kim, K-H; Kim, S-H; Baek, H-S; Moon, C; Kim, S-H; Yun, W-K; Nam, K-H; Kim, H-C; Kim, J-C

    2013-06-01

    Epichlorohydrin (ECH) is an antifertility agent that acts both as an epididymal toxicant and an agent capable of directly affecting sperm motility. This study identified the time course of apoptotic cell death in rat epididymides after ECH treatment. Rats were administrated with a single oral dose of ECH (50 mg/kg). ECH-induced apoptotic changes were evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay and its related mechanism was confirmed by Western blot analysis and colorimetric assay. The TUNEL assay showed that the number of apoptotic cells increased at 8 h, reached a maximum level at 12 h, and then decreased progressively. The Western blot analysis demonstrated no significant changes in proapoptotic Bcl-2-associated X (Bax) and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 expression during the time course of the study. However, phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-p38 MAPK) and phospho-c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (p-JNK) expression increased at 8-24 h. Caspase-3 and caspase-8 activities also increased at 8-48 h and 12-48 h, respectively, in the same manner as p-p38 MAPK and p-JNK expression. These results indicate that ECH induced apoptotic changes in rat epididymides and that the apoptotic cell death may be related more to the MAPK pathway than to the mitochondrial pathway. PMID:23386780

  12. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    PubMed

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony. PMID:26549470

  13. Effect of sex chromosome complement on sodium appetite and Fos-immunoreactivity induced by sodium depletion.

    PubMed

    Dadam, Florencia M; Caeiro, Ximena E; Cisternas, Carla D; Macchione, Ana F; Cambiasso, María J; Vivas, Laura

    2014-02-01

    Previous studies indicate a sex chromosome complement (SCC) effect on the angiotensin II-sexually dimorphic hypertensive and bradycardic baroreflex responses. We sought to evaluate whether SCC may differentially modulate sexually dimorphic-induced sodium appetite and specific brain activity due to physiological stimulation of the rennin angiotensin system. For this purpose, we used the "four core genotype" mouse model, in which the effect of gonadal sex and SCC is dissociated, allowing comparisons of sexually dimorphic traits between XX and XY females as well as in XX and XY males. Gonadectomized mice were sodium depleted by furosemide (50 mg/kg) and low-sodium diet treatment; control groups were administered with vehicle and maintained on normal sodium diet. Twenty-one hours later, the mice were divided into two groups: one group was submitted to the water-2% NaCl choice intake test, while the other group was perfused and their brains subjected to the Fos-immunoreactivity (FOS-ir) procedure. Sodium depletion, regardless of SCC (XX or XY), induced a significantly lower sodium and water intake in females than in males, confirming the existence in mice of sexual dimorphism in sodium appetite and the organizational involvement of gonadal steroids. Moreover, our results demonstrate a SCC effect on induced brain FOS-ir, showing increased brain activity in XX-SCC mice at the paraventricular nucleus, nucleus of the solitary tract, and lateral parabrachial nucleus, as well as an XX-SCC augmented effect on sodium depletion-induced brain activity at two circumventricular organs, the subfornical organ and area postrema, nuclei closely involved in fluid and blood pressure homeostasis. PMID:24259464

  14. Enkephalin-immunoreactive interneurons extensively innervate sympathetic preganglionic neurons regulating the pelvic viscera.

    PubMed

    Llewellyn-Smith, Ida J; Dicarlo, Stephen E; Collins, Heidi L; Keast, Janet R

    2005-08-01

    Enkephalin (ENK)-immunoreactive (IR) axons occur in regions containing spinal autonomic neurons and endogenous opiates contribute to spinal regulation of bladder function. To identify possible spinal sites of opiate action, we used immunocytochemistry for ENK with retrograde tracing from the major pelvic ganglion (MPG), a key location for postganglionic neurons controlling pelvic viscera, with cholera toxin B subunit (CTB) or CTB-horseradish peroxidase (CTB-HRP). We compared the relationship of ENK-IR axons with sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) projecting to the MPG between intact spinal cords and cords with 2- or 11-week complete transections between thoracic segments 4 and 5. By light microscopy, sections of intact cord showed dense networks of ENK-IR axons surrounding CTB-IR SPNs in the intermediolateral cell column (IML), intercalated nucleus, and central autonomic area of lower thoracic and upper lumbar cord. This staining pattern was similar in rats with 2- or 11-week transections. Ultrastructurally, ENK-IR axons formed synapses on SPNs in all three autonomic subnuclei of intact cord. In the IML, ENK-IR varicosities contributed 52% of the synapses on the somata of MPG-projecting SPNs. In 2-week transected cord, synapses from ENK-IR axons persisted on SPNs and the proportion of input to IML SPNs had increased to 67%, probably reflecting loss of supraspinal input. These results suggest that endogenous opioids could play a major role in controlling sympathetic outflow to the bladder through a direct action on SPNs. The persistence of the dense ENK innervation after complete cord transection indicates that the ENK-IR input to SPNs arises predominantly from intraspinal sources. PMID:15952166

  15. Plasma immunoreactive gamma melanotropin in patients with idiopathic hyperaldosteronism, aldosterone-producing adenomas, and essential hypertension.

    PubMed Central

    Griffing, G T; Berelowitz, B; Hudson, M; Salzman, R; Manson, J A; Aurrechia, S; Melby, J C; Pedersen, R C; Brownie, A C

    1985-01-01

    A non-ACTH aldosterone-stimulating factor(s) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA). Although this factor has not been fully characterized, some evidence suggests that it may be related to a pro-gamma-melanotropin (pro-gamma-MSH), derived from the NH2-terminal region of pro-opiomelanocortin. In the present study, plasma immunoreactive (IR-) gamma-MSH levels at 0800 h in patients with IHA were evaluated (90 +/- 17 fmol/ml; range: 13-173 fmol/ml) and found to be significantly higher (P less than 0.05) than those in subjects with aldosterone-producing adenomas (33 +/- 8 fmol/ml), essential hypertension (33 +/- 6 fmol/ml), and normotensive controls (19 +/- 2 fmol/ml). Seven of nine IHA subjects had circulating IR-gamma-MSH levels above the normal range (greater than 35 fmol/ml). In plasmas sampled at 1200 h, IR-gamma-MSH was significantly higher in patients with IHA (95 +/- 26 fmol/ml) and adenomas (63 +/- 23 fmol/ml), as compared with essential hypertensives (31 +/- 6 fmol/ml) and normotensives (19 +/- 3 fmol/ml). Mean plasma IR-ACTH, plasma cortisol, and urinary cortisol levels did not differ significantly between any of these groups. In order to evaluate the effect of a pro-gamma-MSH in vitro, adrenal adenoma tissue was obtained from two patients, one with elevated IR-gamma-MSH (61 fmol/ml) and a second with low IR-gamma-MSH (12 fmol/ml). Aldosterone secretion by dispersed adenoma cells from the former, but not the latter, underwent a fourfold dose-dependent (10(-14)-10(-9) M) increase in response to human Lys-gamma 3-MSH. These data suggest that a pro-gamma-MSH may be implicated as a pathogenic factor in a subset of patients with primary aldosteronism, particularly among those differentially diagnosed as having IHA. Images PMID:4019776

  16. Vesicular γ-Aminobutyric Acid Transporter Expression in Amacrine and Horizontal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cueva, Juan G.; Haverkamp, Silke; Reimer, Richard J.; Edwards, Robert; Wässle, Heinz; Brecha, Nicholas C.

    2010-01-01

    The vesicular γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) transporter (VGAT), which transports the inhibitory amino acid transmitters GABA and glycine, is localized to synaptic vesicles in axon terminals. The localization of VGAT immunoreactivity to mouse and rat retina was evaluated with light and electron microscopy by using well-characterized VGAT antibodies. Specific VGAT immunoreactivity was localized to numerous varicose processes in all laminae of the inner plexiform layer (IPL) and to the outer plexiform layer (OPL). Amacrine cell somata characterized by weak VGAT immunoreactivity in the cytoplasm were located in the ganglion cell layer and proximal inner nuclear layer (INL) adjacent to the IPL. In rat retina, VGAT-immunoreactive cell bodies also contained GABA, glycine, or parvalbumin (PV) immunoreactivity, suggesting vesicular uptake of GABA or glycine by these cells. A few varicose VGAT-immunoreactive processes entered the OPL from the IPL. VGAT immunoreactivity in the OPL was predominantly localized to horizontal cell processes. VGAT and calcium binding protein-28K immunoreactivities (CaBP; a marker for horizontal cells) were colocalized in processes and terminals distributed to the OPL. Furthermore, VGAT immunoreactivity overlapped or was immediately adjacent to postsynaptic density-95 (PSD-95) immunoreactivity, which is prominent in photoreceptor terminals. Preem-bedding immunoelectron microscopy of mouse and rat retinae showed that VGAT immunoreactivity was localized to horizontal cell processes and their terminals. Immunoreactivity was distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the horizontal cell processes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate VGAT immunoreactivity in both amacrine and horizontal cell processes, suggesting these cells contain vesicles that accumulate GABA and glycine, possibly for vesicular release. PMID:11920703

  17. Adipose-derived stem cells: A novel source of parathyroid cells for treatment of hypoparathyroidism.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Luo, Bin

    2016-08-01

    Hypoparathyroidism is characterized by decreased function of the parathyroid glands with underproduction of parathyroid hormone (PTH), which can lead to low levels of calcium in the blood, often causing cramping and twitching of muscles or tetany, and several other symptoms. Severe hypocalcemia is a life-threatening condition. At present, both medical and surgical treatments are offered to improve the blood calcium, but they are not a cure. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs), derived from the adipose tissue, are confirmed to be multipotent with adipogenic, chondrogenic, neurogenic, myogenic and osteogenic capabilities. Our hypothesis is that human ADSCs in culture can be differentiated into parathyroid cells, and used to reconstitute function. PMID:27372875

  18. A comparative analysis of the distribution of immunoreactive orexin A and B in the brains of nocturnal and diurnal rodents

    PubMed Central

    Nixon, Joshua P; Smale, Laura

    2007-01-01

    Background The orexins (hypocretins) are a family of peptides found primarily in neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Although the orexinergic system is generally thought to be the same across species, the orexins are involved in behaviors which show considerable interspecific variability. There are few direct cross-species comparisons of the distributions of cells and fibers containing these peptides. Here, we addressed the possibility that there might be important species differences by systematically examining and directly comparing the distribution of orexinergic neurons and fibers within the forebrains of species with very different patterns of sleep-wake behavior. Methods We compared the distribution of orexin-immunoreactive cell bodies and fibers in two nocturnal species (the lab rat, Rattus norvegicus and the golden hamster, Mesocricetus auratus) and two diurnal species (the Nile grass rat, Arvicanthis niloticus and the degu, Octodon degus). For each species, tissue from the olfactory bulbs through the brainstem was processed for immunoreactivity for orexin A and orexin B (hypocretin-1 and -2). The distribution of orexin-positive cells was noted for each species. Orexin fiber distribution and density was recorded and analyzed using a principal components factor analysis to aid in evaluating potential species differences. Results Orexin-positive cells were observed in the lateral hypothalamic area of each species, though there were differences with respect to distribution within this region. In addition, cells positive for orexin A but not orexin B were observed in the paraventricular nucleus of the lab rat and grass rat, and in the supraoptic nucleus of the lab rat, grass rat and hamster. Although the overall distributions of orexin A and B fibers were similar in the four species, some striking differences were noted, especially in the lateral mammillary nucleus, ventromedial hypothalamic nucleus and flocculus. Conclusion The orexin cell and fiber

  19. Research highlights on stem cell therapy for the treatment of Peyronie's disease.

    PubMed

    Sangkum, Premsant

    2016-06-01

    New treatment modalities have been developed to improve the treatment outcomes of Peyronie's disease (PD). Stem cells are undifferentiated cell populations that are capable of self-renewal and of differentiation into various kinds of cells or new tissues. In addition, stem cells also have antiapoptotic, antifibrotic, and immunomodulatory properties. The results from preclinical studies support the potential role of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) therapy for both the prevention and treatment of PD. However, there are several limitations of the animal model used in the studies. Further animal and clinical studies are still needed to validate the therapeutic effects and clinical application of ADSCs for the treatment of PD. PMID:27298783

  20. Immunoreactivity for Choline Acetyltransferase of Peripheral-Type (pChAT) in the Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons of the Non-Human Primate Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tsuneyuki; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Transcripts of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene reveal a number of different splice variants including ChAT of a peripheral type (pChAT). Immunohistochemical staining of the brain using an antibody against pChAT clearly revealed peripheral cholinergic neurons, but failed to detect cholinergic neurons in the central nervous system. In rodents, pChAT-immunoreactivity has been detected in cholinergic parasympathetic postganglionic and enteric ganglion neurons. In addition, pChAT has been observed in non-cholinergic neurons such as peripheral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. The common type of ChAT (cChAT) has been investigated in many parts of the brain and the spinal cord of non-human primates, but little information is available about the localization of pChAT in primate species. Here, we report the detection of pChAT immunoreactivity in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and its co-localization with Substance P (SP) and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis. Neurons positive for pChAT were observed in a rather uniform pattern in approximately half of the trigeminal neurons throughout the TG. Most pChAT-positive neurons had small or medium-sized cell bodies. Double-immunofluorescence staining showed that 85.1% of SP-positive cells and 74.0% of CGRP-positive cells exhibited pChAT immunoreactivity. Most pChAT-positive cells were part of a larger population of neurons that co-expressed SP and/or CGRP. PMID:23720604

  1. Dermis mechanical behaviour after different cell removal treatments.

    PubMed

    Terzini, Mara; Bignardi, Cristina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Audenino, Alberto L

    2016-09-01

    Human acellular dermal matrices (HADMs) are used in reconstructive surgery as scaffolds promoting autologous tissue regeneration. Critical to the HADM ability to remodel and integrate into the host tissue is the removal of cells while maintaining an intact extracellular architecture. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to analyse the mechanical properties of HADMs after decellularization to identify its ideal form of treatment and its duration. Two different decellularization techniques were used as a benchmark: the first is a well-established technique (incubation in NaOH for 1-7 weeks), and the second is an innovative technique developed by this research group (incubation in DMEM (Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium) for 1-7 weeks). After decellularization, the specimens underwent uniaxial tensile tests, and experimental data were represented with stress strain curves, calculating both engineering and true values. Mechanical tests have led to the identification of the optimal method (NaOH or DMEM) and duration for the decellularization treatment; differences between engineering and true values can reach 84%, but the engineering values remain useful to make comparisons, providing reliable indications with a simpler experimental set up and data processing. PMID:26997564

  2. Pathophysiology and treatment of pulmonary hypertension in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Gordeuk, Victor R; Castro, Oswaldo L; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-02-18

    Pulmonary hypertension affects ∼10% of adult patients with sickle cell disease (SCD), particularly those with the homozygous genotype. An increase in pulmonary artery systolic pressure, estimated noninvasively by echocardiography, helps identify SCD patients at risk for pulmonary hypertension, but definitive diagnosis requires right-heart catheterization. About half of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension patients have precapillary pulmonary hypertension with potential etiologies of (1) a nitric oxide deficiency state and vasculopathy consequent to intravascular hemolysis, (2) chronic pulmonary thromboembolism, or (3) upregulated hypoxic responses secondary to anemia, low O2 saturation, and microvascular obstruction. The remainder have postcapillary pulmonary hypertension secondary to left ventricular dysfunction. Although the pulmonary artery pressure in SCD patients with pulmonary hypertension is only moderately elevated, they have a markedly higher risk of death than patients without pulmonary hypertension. Guidelines for diagnosis and management of SCD-related pulmonary hypertension were published recently by the American Thoracic Society. Management of adults with sickle-related pulmonary hypertension is based on anticoagulation for those with thromboembolism; oxygen therapy for those with low oxygen saturation; treatment of left ventricular failure in those with postcapillary pulmonary hypertension; and hydroxyurea or transfusions to raise the hemoglobin concentration, reduce hemolysis, and prevent vaso-occlusive events that cause additional increases in pulmonary pressure. Randomized trials have not identified drugs to lower pulmonary pressure in SCD patients with precapillary pulmonary hypertension. Patients with hemodynamics of pulmonary arterial hypertension should be referred to specialized centers and considered for treatments known to be effective in other forms of pulmonary arterial hypertension. There have been reports that some of these treatments

  3. Epigenetic therapy overcomes treatment resistance in T cell prolymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hasanali, Zainul S; Saroya, Bikramajit Singh; Stuart, August; Shimko, Sara; Evans, Juanita; Vinod Shah, Mithun; Sharma, Kamal; Leshchenko, Violetta V; Parekh, Samir; Loughran, Thomas P; Epner, Elliot M

    2015-06-24

    T cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL) is a rare, mature T cell neoplasm with distinct features and an aggressive clinical course. Early relapse and short overall survival are commonplace. Use of the monoclonal anti-CD52 antibody alemtuzumab has improved the rate of complete remission and duration of response to more than 50% and between 6 and 12 months, respectively. Despite this advance, without an allogeneic transplant, resistant relapse is inevitable. We report seven complete and one partial remission in eight patients receiving alemtuzumab and cladribine with or without a histone deacetylase inhibitor. These data show that administration of epigenetic agents can overcome alemtuzumab resistance. We also report epigenetically induced expression of the surface receptor protein CD30 in T-PLL. Subsequent treatment with the anti-CD30 antibody-drug conjugate brentuximab vedotin overcame organ-specific (skin) resistance to alemtuzumab. Our findings demonstrate activity of combination epigenetic and immunotherapy in the incurable illness T-PLL, particularly in the setting of previous alemtuzumab therapy. PMID:26109102

  4. Clinical outcome of surgical treatment for periorbital basal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kakudo, Natsuko; Ogawa, Yutaka; Suzuki, Kenji; Kushida, Satoshi; Kusumoto, Kenji

    2009-11-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) has a predilection for the periorbital region, which is a special, prominent, cosmetic, functional area to protect the eyeball. For squamous cell carcinoma and melanoma, extensive resection with reconstruction is performed. In contrast, for BCC, resection is often confined to a small to medium-sized area, necessitating higher-quality reconstructive surgery. We analyze the surgical outcomes of treatment for periorbital BCC, and evaluate reconstruction method after resection. Forty-nine patients with periorbital BCC had surgery in our hospital over 20 years. Age, gender of the patients, and size, localization, and histology of the tumor, and surgical procedures, and their early and late complications were analyzed retrospectively. BCC was most frequently occurred in the lower lid (55%), followed by inner canthus (19%), upper lid (17%), and outer canthus (9%). The histologic classifications were solid (80%), morphea (7%), mix (7%), superficial (2%), keratotic (2%), and adenoid (2%). Recurrence of the tumor was observed in 2 advanced cases in patients treated with resection of the tumor including surrounding tissue 5 mm from the margin. A rotation advancement cheek flap procedure was most frequently applied. Horizontal shift of the skin was most effective to prevent postoperative lagophthalmos. BCC occurred most frequently in the lower lid within the periorbital area. Rotation advancement of cheek flap with horizontal shift of the skin is most effective procedure in both appearance and function of the eyelid. PMID:19801921

  5. Sickle cell anaemia: progress in pathogenesis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ballas, Samir K

    2002-01-01

    The phenotypic expression of sickle cell anaemia varies greatly among patients and longitudinally in the same patient. It influences all aspects of the life of affected individuals including social interactions, intimate relationships, family relations, peer interactions, education, employment, spirituality and religiosity. The clinical manifestations of sickle cell anaemia are protean and fall into three major categories: anaemia and its sequelae;pain and related issues; andorgan failure including infection. Recent studies on the pathogenesis of sickle cell anaemia have centred on the sequence of events that occur between polymerisation of deoxy haemoglobin (Hb) S and vaso-occlusion. Cellular dehydration, inflammatory response and reperfusion injury seem to be important pathophysiological mechanisms. Management of sickle cell anaemia continues to be primarily palliative in nature, including supportive, symptomatic and preventative approaches to therapy. Empowerment and education are the major aspects of supportive care. Symptomatic management includes pain management, blood transfusion and treatment of organ failure. Pain managment should follow certain priniciples that include assessment, individualisation of therapy and proper utilisation of opioid and nonopioid analgesics in order to acheive adequate pain relief. Blood selected for transfusion should be leuko-reduced and phenotypically matched for the C, E and Kell antigens. Exchange transfusion is indicated in patients who are transfused chronically in order to prevent or delay the onset of iron-overload. Acute chest syndrome is the most common form of organ failure and its management should be agressive, including adequate ventilation, multiple antibacterials and simple or exchange blood transfusion depending on its severity. Preventitive therapy includes prophylactic penicillin in infants and children, blood transfusion (preferably exchange transfusion) in patients with stroke, and hydroxyurea in patients

  6. Orexin and neuropeptide Y: tissue specific expression and immunoreactivity in the hypothalamus and preoptic area of the cichlid fish Cichlasoma dimerus.

    PubMed

    Pérez Sirkin, D I; Suzuki, H; Cánepa, M M; Vissio, P G

    2013-12-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) and orexin are neuropeptides involved in the regulation of feeding in vertebrates. In this study we determined the NPY and orexin mRNA tissue expression and their immunoreactivity distribution in both preoptic area and hypothalamus, regions involved in the regulation of feeding behavior. Both peptides presented a wide expression in all tissues examined. The NPY-immunoreactive (ir) cells were localized in the ventral nucleus posterioris periventricularis (NPPv) and numerous ir-NPY fibers were found in the nucleus lateralis tuberis (NLT), the nucleus recess lateralis (NRL) and the neurohypophysis. Ir-orexin cells were observed in the NPPv, dorsal NLT, ventral NLT, lateral NLT (NLTl) and the lateral NRL. Ir-orexin fibers were widespread distributed along all the hypothalamus, especially in the NLTl. Additionally, we observed the presence of ir-orexin immunostaining in adenohypophyseal cells, especially in somatotroph cells and the presence of a few ir-orexin-A fibers in the neurohypophysis. In conclusion, both peptides have an ubiquitous mRNA tissue expression and are similarly distributed in the hypothalamus and preoptic area of Cichlasoma dimerus. The presence of ir-orexin in adenohypohyseal cells and the presence of ir-orexin and NPY fibers in the neurohypophysis suggest that both peptides may play an important neuroendocrine role in anterior pituitary. PMID:24138942

  7. [Xenogeneic cell therapeutics: Treatment of type 1 diabetes using porcine pancreatic islets and islet cells].

    PubMed

    Godehardt, Antonia W; Schilling-Leiß, Dagmar; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Tönjes, Ralf R

    2015-11-01

    In view of the existing shortage of human donor organs and tissues, xenogeneic cell therapeutics (xCT) offer an alternative for adequate treatment. In particular, porcine pancreatic islets and islet cells have already entered the field of experimental therapy for type-1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) patients. Thereby, xCT depict challenging products with a glance on medical, ethical, and regulatory questions. With cross-species transplantation (xenotransplantation), the risk of immunological graft rejection as well as the risk of infectious transmission of microbial and viral pathogens must be considered. This includes the bidirectional transmission of microorganisms from graft to host as well as from host to graft. Crossing the border of species requires a critical risk-benefit evaluation as well as a thorough longtime surveillance of transplant recipients after treatment. The international legal and regulatory requirements for xCT are inter alia based on the World Health Organization criteria summarized in the Changsha Communiqué (2008). In the European Union, they were reflected by the European Medicines Agency (EMA) Guideline on Xenogeneic Cell-based Medicinal Products following the implementation of the Regulation on Advanced Therapies (ATMP). On the basis of this regulation, the first non-clinical and clinical experiences were obtained for porcine islets. The results suggest that supportive treatment of T1DM risk patients with xCT may be an alternative to established allogeneic organ transplantation in the future. PMID:26369761

  8. Cell-to-cell pollution reduction effectiveness of subsurface domestic treatment wetlands.

    PubMed

    Steer, David N; Fraser, Lauchlan H; Seibert, Beth A

    2005-05-01

    Quarterly water quality data from 1998 to 2003 for eight single-family domestic systems serving 2-7 people in Ohio, USA, were studied to determine the cell-to-cell and system wide pathogen reduction efficiency and effectiveness of these systems in meeting compliance standards. Two-cell domestic wastewater treatment systems displayed significant variability in their cell-to-cell performance that directly impacted the overall ability of systems to meet effluent compliance standards. Fecal coliform was effectively reduced (approximately 99%) in these systems while two-thirds of the input biochemical oxygen demand was mitigated in each of the cells of these systems. Fecal coliform and biochemical oxygen demand were typically reduced below 2000 counts per 100 ml and 15 mg/l (respectively) before discharge to surface waters. Total suspended solids were reduced by approximately 80% overall with cell one retaining the majority of the solids (approximately 70%). These systems discharged more than 18 mg/l of suspended solids in less than 5% of the samples thus displaying a very high compliance rate. Ammonia and total phosphorus were less effectively treated (approximately 30-40% reductions in each cell) and exceeded standards (1.5 mg/l) more frequently. Analyses based on the number of occupants indicated that the two-cell design used here was most effective for smaller occupancy systems. More study is required to determine the value of this design for large occupancy systems. In the future, wetlands should be evaluated based on the total loads delivered to the watershed rather than by effluent concentrations. PMID:15627569

  9. Fusion proteins containing the A2 domain of cholera toxin assemble with B polypeptides of cholera toxin to form immunoreactive and functional holotoxin-like chimeras.

    PubMed

    Jobling, M G; Holmes, R K

    1992-11-01

    Cholera enterotoxin (CT) is produced by Vibrio cholerae and excreted into the culture medium as an extracellular protein. CT consists of one A polypeptide and five B polypeptides associated by noncovalent bonds, and CT-B interacts with CT-A primarily via the A2 domain. Treatment of CT with trypsin cleaves CT-A into A1 and A2 fragments that are linked by a disulfide bond. CT-B binds to ganglioside GM1, which functions as the plasma membrane receptor for CT, and the enzymatic activity of A1 causes the toxic effects of CT on target cells. We constructed translational fusions that joined foreign proteins via their carboxyl termini to the A2 domain of CT-A, and we studied the interactions of the fusion proteins with CT-B. The A2 domain was necessary and sufficient to enable bacterial alkaline phosphatase (BAP), maltose-binding protein (MBP) or beta-lactamase (BLA) to associate with CT-B to form stable, immunoreactive, holotoxin-like chimeras. Each holotoxin-like chimera was able to bind to ganglioside GM1. Holotoxin-like chimeras containing the BAP-A2 and BLA-A2 fusion proteins had BAP activity and BLA activity, respectively. We constructed BAP-A2 mutants with altered carboxyl-terminal sequences and tested their ability to assemble into holotoxin-like chimeras. Although the carboxyl-terminal QDEL sequence of the BAP-A2 fusion protein was not required for interaction with CT-B, most BAP-A2 mutants with altered carboxyl termini did not form holotoxin-like chimeras. When holotoxin-like chimeras containing BAP-A2, MBP-A2, or BLA-A2 were synthesized in V. cholerae, they were found predominantly in the periplasm. The toxin secretory apparatus of V. cholerae was not able, therefore, to translocate these holotoxin-like chimeras across the outer membrane. PMID:1399002

  10. Transamidation of gluten proteins during the bread-making process of wheat flour to produce breads with less immunoreactive gluten.

    PubMed

    Heredia-Sandoval, Nina Gisella; Islas-Rubio, Alma Rosa; Cabrera-Chávez, Francisco; Calderón de la Barca, Ana María

    2014-08-01

    Due to an increasing incidence of celiac disease (CD) and other gluten-related disorders, different gluten-free breads have been developed using starches and additives as a substitute for gluten. Thus, patients miss not only the taste and aroma of wheat bread but also risk their sensitive intestines. Therefore, modifying gluten to avoid an immune response in CD and its application to baking is in progress. The aim of the study was to enzymatically modify gluten on wheat flour, during bread-making avoiding the use of additives, to reduce immunoreactivity, preserving its properties. Microbial transglutaminase (mTG) or chymotrypsin (ChT) was used to bind lysine or valine to gluten proteins in a model system. The best conditions were directly applied to wheat flour for bread-making with and without punching at 45 min. Subsequently, the rheological properties of the doughs, specific volume of the loaves, immunoreactive gluten content and modification of the extracted proteins were evaluated. ChT-treated breads presented a better appearance with a more homogeneous crumb, higher specific volume values (3.34-4.25 cm(3) g(-1)) and higher reactive gluten reduction (up to 71%) than the mTG-treated ones (1.23-2.66 cm(3) g(-1)) with only a 42% reactive gluten reduction. Thus, transpeptidation during bread-making is a promising technology, although it is necessary to improve the modification process to obtain the reactive gluten reduction required in breads for the treatment of CD patients and other gluten-related disorders. PMID:24917417

  11. Distribution of presumptive chemosensory afferents with FMRFamide- or substance P-like immunoreactivity in decapod crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, M

    1997-01-23

    In five species of decapod crustaceans--Cherax destructor (crayfish), Carcinus maenas (crab), Homarus americanus (clawed lobster), Eriocheir sinensis (crab), Macrobrachium rosenbergii (shrimp)--immunocytochemical stainings revealed the presence of sensory afferents with FMRFamide-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system. These afferents were extremely thin, very numerous, and innervated all sensory neuropils except the optic and olfactory lobes. In their target neuropils they gave rise to condensed net- or ball-like terminal structures. Only in Homarus americanus but not in any other studied species immunocytochemistry revealed a separate, non-overlapping class of sensory afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity. Also the afferents with substance P-like immunoreactivity were very thin and numerous, innervated all sensory neuropils except optic and olfactory lobes, and gave rise to condensed terminal structures. From their morphological characteristics it can be concluded that likely both classes of afferents are chemosensory. The substance P-like immunoreactivity suggests a link with the nociceptor afferents of vertebrates, with which both classes of afferents share several other morphological features. PMID:9037486

  12. Optoelectrofluidic enhanced immunoreaction based on optically-induced dynamic AC electroosmosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongsik; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-03-23

    We report a novel optoelectrofluidic immunoreaction system based on electroosmotic flow for enhancing antibody-analyte binding efficiency on a surface-based sensing system. Two conventional indium tin oxide glass slides are assembled to provide a reaction chamber for a tiny volume of sample droplet (∼5 μL), in which the top layer is employed as an antibody-immobilized substrate and the bottom layer acts as a photoconductive layer of an optoelectrofluidic device. Under the application of an AC voltage, an illuminated light pattern on the photoconductive layer causes strong counter-rotating vortices to transport analytes from the bulk solution to the vicinity of the assay spot on the glass substrate. This configuration overcomes the slow immunoreaction problem of a diffusion-based sensing system, resulting in the enhancement of binding efficiency via an optoelectrofluidic method. Furthermore, we investigate the effect of optically-induced dynamic AC electroosmotic flow on optoelectrofluidic enhancement for surface-based immunoreaction with a mathematical simulation study and real experiments using immunoglobulin G (IgG) and anti-IgG. As a result, dynamic light patterns provided better immunoreaction efficiency than static light patterns due to effective mass transport of the target analyte, resulting in an achievement of 2.18-fold enhancement under a growing circular light pattern compared to the passive mode. PMID:26926571

  13. Serotonin-like immunoreactivity in the central nervous system of two Ixodid tick species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Immunocytochemistry was used to detect the presence of serotonin-like immunoreactive (5HT-IR) neurons and neuronal processes in the central nervous system (CNS), the synganglion, of two Ixodid tick species; the winter tick, Dermacentor albipictus and the lone star tick, Amblyomma americanum. Seroto...

  14. Relationship between phospholipase C zeta immunoreactivity and DNA fragmentation and oxidation in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ju Hee; Kim, Seul Ki; Kim, Jayeon; Kim, Ji Hee; Chang, Jae Hoon; Kim, Seok Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Objective The study aimed to evaluate the feasibility and reproducibility of measuring phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ) using immunostaining in human sperm and to investigate the relationship between PLCζ immunoreactivity and DNA fragmentation and oxidation in human sperm. Methods Semen samples were obtained from participants (n=44) and processed by the conventional swim-up method. Sperm concentration, motility, normal form by strict morphology, DNA fragmentation index assessed by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling method and immunofluorescent expression for 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) and PLCζ were assessed. Results When duplicate PLCζ tests were performed on two sperm samples from each of the 44 participants, similar results were obtained (74.1±9.4% vs. 75.4±9.7%). Two measurements of PLCζ were found to be highly correlated with each other (r=0.759, P<0.001). Immunoreactivity of PLCζ was not associated with donor's age, sperm concentration, motility, and the percentage of normal form as well as DNA fragmentation index. However, immunoreactivity of PLCζ showed a significant negative relationship with 8-OHdG immunoreactivity (r=-0.404, P=0.009). Conclusion Measurement of PLCζ by immunostaining is feasible and reproducible. Lower expression of PLCζ in human sperm may be associated with higher sperm DNA oxidation status. PMID:26023673

  15. Reduction of IgE immunoreactivity of whole peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) after pulsed light illumination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pulsed light (PL), a novel food processing and preservation technology, has been shown in literature to reduce allergen levels on peanut, soybean, almond, and shrimp protein extracts. This study investigated how PL affected the immunoreactivity of whole peanut kernels at two sample-to-lamp distance...

  16. Effects of Ca2+ channel blockers on cortical hypoperfusion and expression of c-Fos-like immunoreactivity after cortical spreading depression in rats.

    PubMed Central

    Shimazawa, M.; Hara, H.; Watano, T.; Sukamoto, T.

    1995-01-01

    the ipsilateral frontoparietal cortex. 6. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effects of KB-2796 and flunarizine on the cortical hypoperfusion and expression of c-Fos-like immunoreactivity induced by spreading depression are mediated via the effects of Ca(2+)-entry blockade, which may include an increase in cerebral blood flow and the prevention of excessive Ca2+ influx into brain cells. KB-2796 and flunarizine may prove useful as inhibitors of cortical spreading depression in migraine. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:8564192

  17. Structural characterization by transmission electron microscopy and immunoreactivity of recombinant Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein expressed and purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lesley A; Yu, Meng; Waddington, Lynne J; Barr, Jennifer A; Scoble, Judith A; Crameri, Gary S; McKinstry, William J

    2015-12-01

    Hendra virus (family Paramyxoviridae) is a negative sense single-stranded RNA virus (NSRV) which has been found to cause disease in humans, horses, and experimentally in other animals, e.g. pigs and cats. Pteropid bats commonly known as flying foxes have been identified as the natural host reservoir. The Hendra virus nucleocapsid protein (HeV N) represents the most abundant viral protein produced by the host cell, and is highly immunogenic with naturally infected humans and horses producing specific antibodies towards this protein. The purpose of this study was to express and purify soluble, functionally active recombinant HeV N, suitable for use as an immunodiagnostic reagent to detect antibodies against HeV. We expressed both full-length HeV N, (HeV NFL), and a C-terminal truncated form, (HeV NCORE), using a bacterial heterologous expression system. Both HeV N constructs were engineered with an N-terminal Hisx6 tag, and purified using a combination of immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC) and size exclusion chromatography (SEC). Purified recombinant HeV N proteins self-assembled into soluble higher order oligomers as determined by SEC and negative-stain transmission electron microscopy. Both HeV N proteins were highly immuno-reactive with sera from animals and humans infected with either HeV or the closely related Nipah virus (NiV), but displayed no immuno-reactivity towards sera from animals infected with a non-pathogenic paramyxovirus (CedPV), or animals receiving Equivac® (HeV G glycoprotein subunit vaccine), using a Luminex-based multiplexed microsphere assay. PMID:26196500

  18. Quantitative image analysis of laminin immunoreactivity in skin basement membrane irradiated with 1 GeV/nucleon iron particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costes, S.; Streuli, C. H.; Barcellos-Hoff, M. H.

    2000-01-01

    We previously reported that laminin immunoreactivity in mouse mammary epithelium is altered shortly after whole-body irradiation with 0.8 Gy from 600 MeV/nucleon iron ions but is unaffected after exposure to sparsely ionizing radiation. This observation led us to propose that the effect could be due to protein damage from the high ionization density of the ion tracks. If so, we predicted that it would be evident soon after radiation exposure in basement membranes of other tissues and would depend on ion fluence. To test this hypothesis, we used immunofluorescence, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and image segmentation techniques to quantify changes in the basement membrane of mouse skin epidermis. At 1 h after exposure to 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions with doses from 0.03 to 1.6 Gy, neither the visual appearance nor the mean pixel intensity of laminin in the basement membrane of mouse dorsal skin epidermis was altered compared to sham-irradiated tissue. This result does not support the hypothesis that particle traversal directly affects laminin protein integrity. However, the mean pixel intensity of laminin immunoreactivity was significantly decreased in epidermal basement membrane at 48 and 96 h after exposure to 0.8 Gy 1 GeV/nucleon iron ions. We confirmed this effect with two additional antibodies raised against affinity-purified laminin 1 and the E3 fragment of the long-arm of laminin 1. In contrast, collagen type IV, another component of the basement membrane, was unaffected. Our studies demonstrate quantitatively that densely ionizing radiation elicits changes in skin microenvironments distinct from those induced by sparsely ionizing radiation. Such effects may might contribute to the carcinogenic potential of densely ionizing radiation by altering cellular signaling cascades mediated by cell-extracellular matrix interactions.

  19. Successful Interferon Therapy Reverses Enhanced Hepatic Progenitor Cell Activation in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C.

    PubMed

    Noritake, Hidenao; Kobayashi, Yoshimasa; Ooba, Yukimasa; Matsunaga, Erika; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Shimoyama, Shin; Yamazaki, Satoru; Chida, Takeshi; Kawata, Kazuhito; Sakaguchi, Takanori; Suda, Takafumi

    2015-12-01

    The enhanced accumulation of hepatic progenitor cells (HPCs) is related to the risk of progression to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Interferon (IFN) treatment reduces HCC risk in patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. However, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of IFN treatment on HPC activation in HCV patients. Immunohistochemical detection and computer-assisted quantitative image analyses of cytokeratin 7 (CK7) were performed to evaluate HPC activation in paired pre- and post-treatment liver biopsies from 18 HCV patients with sustained virological response (SVR) to IFN-based therapy and from 23 patients without SVR, as well as normal liver tissues obtained from surgical resection specimens of 10 patients. Pretreatment HCV livers showed increased CK7 immunoreactivity, compared with normal livers (HCV: median, 1.38%; normal: median, 0.69%, P=0.006). IFN treatment reduced hepatic CK7 immunoreactivity (median, 1.57% pre-IFN vs. 0.69% post-IFN, P=0.006) in SVR patients, but not in non-SVR patients. The development of HCC following IFN treatment was encountered in 3 non-SVR patients who showed high post-IFN treatment CK7 immunoreactivity (>4%). Successful IFN therapy can reverse enhanced HPC activation in HCV patients, which may contribute to the reduced risk of HCC development in these patients. PMID:26308703

  20. Direct reticular projections of trigeminal sensory fibers immunoreactive to CGRP: potential monosynaptic somatoautonomic projections

    PubMed Central

    Panneton, W. Michael; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Few trigeminal sensory fibers project centrally beyond the trigeminal sensory complex, with only projections of fibers carried in its sensory anterior ethmoidal (AEN) and intraoral nerves described. Fibers of the AEN project into the brainstem reticular formation where immunoreactivity against substance P and CGRP are found. We investigated whether the source of these peptides could be from trigeminal ganglion neurons by performing unilateral rhizotomies of the trigeminal root and looking for absence of label. After an 8–14 days survival, substance P immunoreactivity in the trigeminal sensory complex was diminished, but we could not conclude that the sole source of this peptide in the lateral parabrachial area and lateral reticular formation arises from primary afferent fibers. Immunoreactivity to CGRP after rhizotomy however was greatly diminished in the trigeminal sensory complex, confirming the observations of others. Moreover, CGRP immunoreactivity was nearly eliminated in fibers in the lateral parabrachial area, the caudal ventrolateral medulla, both the peri-ambiguus and ventral parts of the rostral ventrolateral medulla, in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus, and diminished in the caudal pressor area. The nearly complete elimination of CGRP in the lateral reticular formation after rhizotomy suggests this peptide is carried in primary afferent fibers. Moreover, the arborization of CGRP immunoreactive fibers in these areas mimics that of direct projections from the AEN. Since electrical stimulation of the AEN induces cardiorespiratory adjustments including an apnea, peripheral vasoconstriction, and bradycardia similar to those seen in the mammalian diving response, we suggest these perturbations of autonomic behavior are enhanced by direct somatic primary afferent projections to these reticular neurons. We believe this to be first description of potential direct somatoautonomic projections to brainstem neurons regulating autonomic activity. PMID

  1. Direct reticular projections of trigeminal sensory fibers immunoreactive to CGRP: potential monosynaptic somatoautonomic projections.

    PubMed

    Panneton, W Michael; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    Few trigeminal sensory fibers project centrally beyond the trigeminal sensory complex, with only projections of fibers carried in its sensory anterior ethmoidal (AEN) and intraoral nerves described. Fibers of the AEN project into the brainstem reticular formation where immunoreactivity against substance P and CGRP are found. We investigated whether the source of these peptides could be from trigeminal ganglion neurons by performing unilateral rhizotomies of the trigeminal root and looking for absence of label. After an 8-14 days survival, substance P immunoreactivity in the trigeminal sensory complex was diminished, but we could not conclude that the sole source of this peptide in the lateral parabrachial area and lateral reticular formation arises from primary afferent fibers. Immunoreactivity to CGRP after rhizotomy however was greatly diminished in the trigeminal sensory complex, confirming the observations of others. Moreover, CGRP immunoreactivity was nearly eliminated in fibers in the lateral parabrachial area, the caudal ventrolateral medulla, both the peri-ambiguus and ventral parts of the rostral ventrolateral medulla, in the external formation of the nucleus ambiguus, and diminished in the caudal pressor area. The nearly complete elimination of CGRP in the lateral reticular formation after rhizotomy suggests this peptide is carried in primary afferent fibers. Moreover, the arborization of CGRP immunoreactive fibers in these areas mimics that of direct projections from the AEN. Since electrical stimulation of the AEN induces cardiorespiratory adjustments including an apnea, peripheral vasoconstriction, and bradycardia similar to those seen in the mammalian diving response, we suggest these perturbations of autonomic behavior are enhanced by direct somatic primary afferent projections to these reticular neurons. We believe this to be first description of potential direct somatoautonomic projections to brainstem neurons regulating autonomic activity. PMID

  2. Immunoreactivity of anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies to human heart valves. Evidence for multiple cross-reactive epitopes.

    PubMed Central

    Gulizia, J. M.; Cunningham, M. W.; McManus, B. M.

    1991-01-01

    Association of group A streptococci with acute rheumatic fever and valvular heart disease is well established; however the basis of valve injury remains unclear. In this study, anti-streptococcal monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) cross-reactive with myocardium were reacted with sections from 22 rheumatic valves, nine normal, five endocarditic, one 'floppy,' and one Marfan valve. In immunohistochemical studies, MAb reactivity was observed with cardiac myocytes, smooth muscle cells, cell surface and cytoplasm of endothelial cells lining valves, and valvular interstitial cells. Endothelial basement membrane and elastin fibrils reacted with the MAbs, whereas collagen was unreactive. Similar reactivity was seen with sera from acute rheumatic fever patients. The anti-streptococcal MAbs reacted with intravalvular myosin and vimentin in Western blots, and purified elastin competitively inhibited the binding of the anti-streptococcal MAbs to whole group A streptococci. The data show that human heart valves have numerous sites of immunoreactivity with anti-streptococcal MAbs and acute rheumatic fever sera of potential importance in the pathogenesis of rheumatic valvular injury. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14 PMID:1704188

  3. The goldfish nervus terminalis: a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone and molluscan cardioexcitatory peptide immunoreactive olfactoretinal pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Stell, W K; Walker, S E; Chohan, K S; Ball, A K

    1984-01-01

    Antisera to two putative neurotransmitters, luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) and molluscan cardioexcitatory tetrapeptide (H-Phe-Met-Arg-Phe-NH2; FMRF-amide), bind specifically to neurites in the inner nuclear and inner plexiform layers of the goldfish retina. Retrograde labeling showed that intraocular axon terminals originate from the nervus terminalis, whose cell bodies are located in the olfactory nerves. Double immunocytochemical and retrograde labeling showed that some terminalis neurons project to the retina; others may project only within the brain. All terminalis neurons having proven retinal projections were both LHRH- and FMRF-amide-immunoreactive. The activity of retinal ganglion cells was recorded with microelectrodes in isolated superfused goldfish retinas. In ON- and OFF-center double-color-opponent cells, micromolar FMRF-amide and salmon brain gonadotropin-releasing factor ( [Trp7, Leu8] LHRH) caused increased spontaneous activity in the dark, loss of light-induced inhibition, and increased incidence of light-entrained pulsatile response. The nervus terminalis is therefore a putatively peptidergic retinopetal projection. Sex-related olfactory stimuli may act through it, thereby modulating the output of ganglion cells responsive to color contrast. Images PMID:6199789

  4. Neuroanatomical relationships between FMRFamide-immunoreactive components of the nervus terminalis and the topology of olfactory bulbs in teleost fish.

    PubMed

    D'Aniello, Biagio; Polese, Gianluca; Luongo, Luciano; Scandurra, Anna; Magliozzi, Laura; Aria, Massimo; Pinelli, Claudia

    2016-04-01

    The nervus terminalis (NT) is the most anterior of the vertebrate cranial nerves. In teleost fish, the NT runs across all olfactory components and shows high morphological variability within this taxon. We compare the anatomical distribution, average number and size of the FMRFamide-immunoreactive (ir) NT cells of fourteen teleost species with different positions of olfactory bulbs (OBs) with respect to the ventral telencephalic area. Based on the topology of the OBs, three different neuroanatomical organizations of the telencephalon can be defined, viz., fish having sessile (Type I), pseudosessile (short stalked; Type II) or stalked (Type III) OBs. Type III topology of OBs appears to be a feature associated with more basal species, whereas Types I and II occur in derived and in basal species. The displacement of the OBs is positively correlated with the peripheral distribution of the FMRFamide-ir NT cells. The number of cells is negatively correlated with the size of the cells. A dependence analysis related to the type of OB topology revealed a positive relationship with the number of cells and with the size of the cells, with Type I and II topologies of OBs showing significantly fewer cells and larger cells than Type III. A dendrogram based on similarities obtained by taking into account all variables under study, i.e., the number and size of the FMRFamide-ir NT cells and the topology of OBs, does not agree with the phylogenetic relationships amongst species, suggesting that divergent or convergent evolutionary phenomena produced the olfactory components studied. PMID:26453401

  5. Combinatorial treatment of mammospheres with trastuzumab and salinomycin efficiently targets HER2-positive cancer cells and cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Oak, Prajakta S; Kopp, Florian; Thakur, Chitra; Ellwart, Joachim W; Rapp, Ulf R; Ullrich, Axel; Wagner, Ernst; Knyazev, Pjotr; Roidl, Andreas

    2012-12-15

    A major obstacle in the successful treatment of cancer is the occurrence of chemoresistance. Cancer cells surviving chemotherapy and giving rise to a recurrence of the tumor are termed cancer stem cells and can be identified by elevated levels of certain stem cell markers. Eradication of this cell population is a priority objective in cancer therapy. Here, we report elevated levels of stem cell markers in MCF-7 mammospheres. Likewise, an upregulation of HER2 and its differential expression within individual cells of mammospheres was observed. Sorting for HER2(high) and HER2(low) cells revealed an upregulation of stem cell markers NANOG, OCT4 and SOX2 in the HER2(low) cell fraction. Accordingly, HER2(low) cells also showed reduced proliferation, ductal-like outgrowths and an increased number of colonies in matrigel. Xenografts from subcutaneously injected HER2(low) sorted cells exihibited earlier onset but slower growth of tumors and an increase in stem cell markers compared to tumors developed from the HER2(high) fraction. Treatment of mammospheres with salinomycin reduced the expression of SOX2 indicating a selective targeting of cancer stem cells. Trastuzumab however, did not reduce the expression of SOX2 in mammospheres. Furthermore, a combinatorial treatment of mammospheres with trastuzumab and salinomycin was superior to single treatment with each drug. Thus, targeting HER2 expressing tumors with anti-HER2 therapies will not necessarily eliminate cancer stem cells and may lead to a more aggressive cancer cell phenotype. Our study demonstrates efficient killing of both HER2 positive cells and cancer stem cells, hence opening a possibility for a new combinatorial treatment strategy. PMID:22511343

  6. Application and Progress of Combined Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ping; Liu, Jian-Yang; Tao, Jun; Yang, Song-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy caused by myocardial infarction (MI) using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a widely researched field, with promising clinical application. However, the low survival rate of transplanted cells has a severe impact on treatment outcome. Currently, research is focused on investigating the strategy of combining genetic engineering, tissue engineering materials, and drug/hypoxia preconditioning to improve ischemic cardiomyopathy treatment outcome using MSC transplantation treatment (MSCTT). This review discusses the application and progress of these techniques. PMID:26295041

  7. Pure red cell aplasia secondary to treatment with erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Locatelli, Francesco; Del Vecchio, Lucia

    2003-01-01

    Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) is a rare condition defined as severe anemia secondary to the virtual absence of red blood cell precursors in the bone marrow. In the setting of patients treated with rHuEPO, the disease is generated by epoetin-induced antibodies that neutralise all the exogenous rHuEPO and cross-react with endogenous erythropoietin. As a result, serum erythropoietin levels are undetectable and erythropoiesis becomes ineffective. Only 4 cases of PRCA associated with rh-EPO have been reported before 1998. Thereafter, a sharp increase in the incidence of this rare condition has been reported, mainly associated with epoetin alpha use outside the United States. A number of possible mechanisms leading to PRCA development have been identified. Among these, modification of drug formulation and down stream processing probably has had a major role. Indeed, in 1998 the formulation of epoetin alpha in Europe was modified because of the fear of the "mad cow" syndrome. However, differences in molecule structure and glycosylation among different epoetins can not be excluded. It should also be underlined that the rise in the incidence of PRCA cases has been coincident with a major shift from intravenous to subcutaneous administration of rHuEPO. The abrupt rise in the incidence of PRCA cases observed in the last few years, deserves particular attention; however, we have to balance its severity, but extreme rarity, with the high number of chronic kidney disease patients who die each year because of cardiovascular disease that could partially be reduced by anemia treatment. PMID:14696747

  8. Childhood Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumors Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer will come back, is called adjuvant therapy . High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue High-dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue is a way of giving high doses of chemotherapy and replacing blood -forming cells ...

  9. Impact of non-thermal plasma treatment on MAPK signaling pathways of human immune cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bundscherer, Lena; Wende, Kristian; Ottmüller, Katja; Barton, Annemarie; Schmidt, Anke; Bekeschus, Sander; Hasse, Sybille; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Masur, Kai; Lindequist, Ulrike

    2013-10-01

    In the field of wound healing research non-thermal plasma (NTP) increasingly draws attention. Next to its intensely studied antibacterial effects, some studies already showed stimulating effects on eukaryotic cells. This promises a unique potential in healing of chronic wounds, where effective therapies are urgently needed. Immune cells do play an important part in the process of wound healing and their reaction to NTP treatment has yet been rarely examined. Here, we studied the impact of NTP treatment using the kinpen on apoptotic and proliferative cell signaling pathways of two human immune cell lines, the CD4(+)T helper cell line Jurkat and the monocyte cell line THP-1. Depending on NTP treatment time the number of apoptotic cells increased in both investigated cell types according to a caspase 3 assay. Western blot analysis pointed out that plasma treatment activated pro-apoptotic signaling proteins like p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1 and 2 (JNK 1/2) in both cell types. Stronger signals were detected in Jurkat cells at comparable plasma treatment times. Intriguingly, exposure of Jurkat and THP-1 cells to plasma also activated the pro-proliferative signaling molecules extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2) and MAPK/ERK kinase 1 and 2 (MEK 1/2). In contrast to Jurkat cells, the anti-apoptotic heat shock protein 27 (HSP27) was activated in THP-1 cells after plasma treatment, indicating a possible mechanism how THP-1 cells may reduce programmed cell death. In conclusion, several signaling cascades were activated in the examined immune cell lines after NTP treatment and in THP-1 monocytes a possible defense mechanism against plasma impacts could be revealed. Therefore, plasma might be a treatment option for wound healing. PMID:23735483

  10. Effects of intraduodenal administration of HCl and glucose on circulating immunoreactive secretin and insulin concentrations.

    PubMed

    Boden, G; Essa, N; Owen, O E; Reichle, F A

    1974-04-01

    A new radioimmunoassay for secretin was used to investigate (a) serum secretin responses to intraduodenally infused HCl and glucose, (b) the metabolic half-life and the volume of distribution of exogenous secretin and (c) the effect of endogenously released secretin on insulin secretion in 25 anesthetized dogs. Portal and femoral venous blood samples were taken simultaneously before, during, and after intraduodenal infusion of HCl (21 meq/30 min) and glucose (131 ml/30 min). Control experiments were performed with intraduodenal infusion of saline. Mean portal venous immunoreactive secretin concentration of six dogs rose from 313 muU/ml before to 1,060 muU/ml 10 min after initiation of the intestinal acidification (P < 0.005). Femoral venous immunoreactive secretin concentration rose from 220 muU/ml before to 567 muU/ml 15 min after intestinal acidification (P < 0.01). Secretin concentrations remained elevated during the remainder of the infusion. In the same six dogs mean portal venous immunoreactive insulin concentration rose from 38 muU/ml before to 62 muU/ml at the end of the infusion (P < 0.05). Peripheral immunoreactive insulin, glucose, and free fatty acid concentrations, however, did not change significantly. Pancreatic exocrine function was studied in four dogs. The rise in secretin concentration was followed promptly by a highly significant increase in exocrine pancreatic flow rate and bicarbonate secretion, indicating biological activity of the circulating immunoreactive secretin. The effect of intraduodenal infusion of glucose on immunoreactive secretin concentration was studied in 12 dogs. Glucose in concentrations ranging from 2.5% to 10% had no detectable influence on portal or peripheral secretin concentration. Infusion of 50% glucose caused a slight decline in secretin concentration. The metabolic clearance rate, half-life of disappearance, and volume of distribution of exogenous secretin was studied in three dogs by the constant infusion technic

  11. Effects of Intraduodenal Administration of HCl and Glucose on Circulating Immunoreactive Secretin and Insulin Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Boden, Guenther; Essa, Noorjehan; Owen, Oliver E.; Reichle, Frederick A.; Saraga, Walter

    1974-01-01

    A new radioimmunoassay for secretin was used to investigate (a) serum secretin responses to intraduodenally infused HCl and glucose, (b) the metabolic half-life and the volume of distribution of exogenous secretin and (c) the effect of endogenously released secretin on insulin secretion in 25 anesthetized dogs. Portal and femoral venous blood samples were taken simultaneously before, during, and after intraduodenal infusion of HCl (21 meq/30 min) and glucose (131 ml/30 min). Control experiments were performed with intraduodenal infusion of saline. Mean portal venous immunoreactive secretin concentration of six dogs rose from 313 μU/ml before to 1,060 μU/ml 10 min after initiation of the intestinal acidification (P < 0.005). Femoral venous immunoreactive secretin concentration rose from 220 μU/ml before to 567 μU/ml 15 min after intestinal acidification (P < 0.01). Secretin concentrations remained elevated during the remainder of the infusion. In the same six dogs mean portal venous immunoreactive insulin concentration rose from 38 μU/ml before to 62 μU/ml at the end of the infusion (P < 0.05). Peripheral immunoreactive insulin, glucose, and free fatty acid concentrations, however, did not change significantly. Pancreatic exocrine function was studied in four dogs. The rise in secretin concentration was followed promptly by a highly significant increase in exocrine pancreatic flow rate and bicarbonate secretion, indicating biological activity of the circulating immunoreactive secretin. The effect of intraduodenal infusion of glucose on immunoreactive secretin concentration was studied in 12 dogs. Glucose in concentrations ranging from 2.5% to 10% had no detectable influence on portal or peripheral secretin concentration. Infusion of 50% glucose caused a slight decline in secretin concentration. The metabolic clearance rate, half-life of disappearance, and volume of distribution of exogenous secretin was studied in three dogs by the constant infusion technic

  12. Estrogen treatment induces MLL aberrations in human lymphoblastoid cells

    PubMed Central

    Schnyder, Sabine; Du, Nga T.; Le, Hongan B.; Singh, Sheetal; Loredo, Grace A.; Vaughan, Andrew T.

    2009-01-01

    Epidemiological data indicates increased risk of infant acute leukemia involving MLL gene aberrations with use of oral contraceptives. To determine whether estrogens might be implicated, we examined the effect of estradiol (E2) or 4-OH-E2 in an in vitro model of translocation susceptibility. Genomic DNA from the TK6 human lymphoblastoid cell line was screened by ligation mediated PCR and inverse PCR at a rearrangement hot spot within the MLL breakpoint cluster region to detect DNA aberrations. An increase in DNA double strand breaks was observed within this region after exposure to either E2 or 4-OH-E2. An increase in the frequency of MLL translocations was only found after exposure to E2. Induction of cleavage due to increased activation of apoptotic nucleases was excluded by pre-treatment with the pancaspase inhibitor, zVAD.fmk. We conclude that concentrations of E2 and 4-OH-E2 that may occur during pregnancy, or during use of oral contraceptives, can cause aberrations of the MLL gene and could thus be a factor in the early events of leukemogenesis occurring in utero. PMID:19264358

  13. Outcome of treatment of human HeLa cervical cancer cells with roscovitine strongly depends on the dosage and cell cycle status prior to the treatment.

    PubMed

    Wesierska-Gadek, Józefa; Borza, Andreea; Walzi, Eva; Krystof, Vladimir; Maurer, Margarita; Komina, Oxana; Wandl, Stefanie

    2009-04-01

    Exposure of asynchronously growing human HeLa cervical carcinoma cells to roscovitine (ROSC), a selective cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) inhibitor, arrests their progression at the transition between G(2)/M and/or induces apoptosis. The outcome depends on the ROSC concentration. At higher dose ROSC represses HPV-encoded E7 oncoprotein and initiates caspase-dependent apoptosis. Inhibition of the site-specific phosphorylation of survivin and Bad, occurring at high-dose ROSC treatment, precedes the onset of apoptosis and seems to be a prerequisite for cell death. Considering the fact that in HeLa cells the G(1)/S restriction checkpoint is abolished by E7, we addressed the question whether the inhibition of CDKs by pharmacological inhibitors in synchronized cells would be able to block the cell-cycle in G(1) phase. For this purpose, we attempted to synchronize cells by serum withdrawal or by blocking of the mitotic apparatus using nocodazole. Unlike human MCF-7 cells, HeLa cells do not undergo G(1) block after serum starvation, but respond with a slight increase of the ratio of G(1) population. Exposure of G(1)-enriched HeLa cells to ROSC after re-feeding does not block their cell-cycle progression at G(1)-phase, but increases the ratio of S- and G(2)-phase, thereby mimicking the effect on asynchronously growing cells. A quite different impact is observed after treatment of HeLa cells released from mitotic block. ROSC prevents their cell cycle progression and cells transiently accumulate in G(1)-phase. These results show that inhibition of CDKs by ROSC in cells lacking the G(1)/S restriction checkpoint has different outcomes depending on the cell-cycle status prior to the onset of treatment. PMID:19180585

  14. An Analysis of Immunoreactive Signatures in Early Stage Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Yu; Long, Jiang; Li, Hai; Chen, Shuhong; Liu, Qiqi; Zhang, Bei; He, Xiaomin; Wang, Yan; Li, Hongyi; Li, Yimei; Zhang, Tao; Lu, Chenzhen; Yan, Hao; Zhang, Minli; Li, Qing; Cao, Bangwei; Bai, Zhigang; Wang, Jin; Zhang, Zhongtao; Zhu, Shengtao; Zheng, Jiasheng; Ou, Xiaojuan; Ma, Hong; Jia, Jidong; You, Hong; Wang, Shengqi; Huang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is prevalent worldwide and early diagnosis of HCC is critical for effective treatment and optimal prognosis. Methods Serum was screened first by immunoproteomic analysis for HCC-related tumor associated antigens (TAAs). Selected TAAs were clinically evaluated retrospectively in patients with HCC, liver cirrhosis, chronic hepatitis and healthy controls. Levels of autoantibody to the selected TAAs were measured by protein microarrays containing protein antigens of the candidate TAAs. Analyses were done by using receiver operating characteristics (ROC) to calculate diagnostic accuracy. Findings Twenty-two candidate TAAs were assessed by protein microarray analysis in 914 participants with serum α-fetoprotein (AFP) available. Twelve candidate TAAs were statistically different in signal intensity between HCC and controls. Among them, CENPF, HSP60 and IMP-2 showed AUC (area under the curve) values of 0.826, 0.764 and 0.796 respectively for early HCC. The highest prevalence of autoantibody positivity was observed in HCC cases with BCLC tumor stage A, well-differentiated histology and Child-Pugh grade C. Specifically, 73.6% or 79.3% cases of early HCC with negative AFP were positive for autoantibody to CENPF or HSP60. Interpretation Tumor-associated autoimmune reactions may be triggered by early stage HCCs. Measurement of serum autoantibody to TAAs may be complementary to AFP measurements and improve diagnosis of early HCC. PMID:26137588

  15. Examination of PACAP-Like Immunoreactivity in Urogenital Tumor Samples.

    PubMed

    Tamas, Andrea; Javorhazy, Andras; Reglodi, Dora; Sarlos, Donat Peter; Banyai, Daniel; Semjen, David; Nemeth, Jozsef; Lelesz, Beata; Fulop, Daniel Balazs; Szanto, Zalan

    2016-06-01

    Numerous studies investigated the localization of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) and its receptors in different tumors and described the effects of analogs on tumor growth to show its potential role in oncogenesis. Recently, our research group has found significantly lower levels of PACAP27-like immunorreactivity (LI) and PACAP38-LI in different human samples of primary small cell lung cancer and colon cancer compared to normal healthy tissues. There are only few human studies showing the presence of PACAP and its receptors in urogenital tumors; therefore, the aim of the present study was to compare PACAP-LI in different healthy and pathological human samples from urogenital organs (kidney, urinary bladder, prostate, testis) with radioimmunoassay (RIA) method. Similar to our earlier observations, the PACAP27-LI was significantly lower compared to PACAP38-LI in all samples. We did not find significant alterations in PACAP-LI between healthy and tumoral samples from the urinary bladder and testis. On the other hand, we found significantly lower PACAP38-LI level in kidney tumors compared with healthy tissue samples, and we showed higher PACAP27-LI in prostatic cancer compared to samples from benign prostatic hyperplasia. These data indicate that PACAP levels of different tissue samples are altered under pathological conditions suggesting a potential role of PACAP in the development of different urogenital tumors. PMID:26454744

  16. Hypoxia and electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve induce Fos-like immunoreactivity within catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons of the rat brainstem.

    PubMed

    Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    A complete understanding of the neural mechanisms responsible for the chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes requires precise knowledge of the locations and chemical phenotypes of higher-order neurons within these reflex pathways. In the present study, the protein product (Fos) of the c-fos protooncogene was used as a metabolic marker to trace central neural pathways following activation of carotid sinus nerve afferent fibers. In addition, immunohistochemical double-labeling techniques were used to define the chemical phenotypes of activated neurons. Both electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve and physiological stimulation of the carotid bodies by hypoxia induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in catecholaminergic neurons containing tyrosine hydroxylase or phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase in the ventrolateral medulla oblongata and, to a lesser degree, in the dorsal vagal complex. Tyrosine hydroxylase/Fos colocalization was also observed in the locus coeruleus and the A5 noradrenergic cell group in pons. Many serotoninergic neurons in nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and along the ventral medullary surface contained Fos-like immunoreactivity. In pons and midbrain, Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed in the lateral parabrachial and Kölliker-Fuse nuclei, the inferior colliculus, the cuneiform nucleus, and in the vicinity of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, but no catecholaminergic or serotoninergic colocalization was observed in these regions. Although Fos-labeled cells were observed within and lateral to the dorsal raphe nucleus, few were catecholaminergic or serotoninergic. This study further defines a potential central neuroanatomical substrate for the chemoreceptor and/or baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:7814687

  17. Localization of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) immunoreactivity in the brain of a caecilian amphibian, Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    González, Agustín; López, Jesús M; Sánchez-Camacho, Cristina; Marín, Oscar

    2002-07-01

    The organization of the cholinergic system in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians was recently studied, and significant differences were noted between both amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the limbless gymnophionans (caecilians). To further assess general and derived features of the cholinergic system in amphibians, we have investigated the distribution of choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive (ChAT-ir) cell bodies and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. This distribution showed particular features of gymnophionans such as the existence of a particularly large cholinergic population in the striatum, the presence of ChAT-ir cells in the mesencephalic tectum, and the organization of the cranial nerve motor nuclei. These peculiarities probably reflect major adaptations of gymnophionans to a fossorial habit. Comparison of our results with those in other vertebrates, including a segmental approach to correlate cell populations across species, shows that the general pattern of organization of cholinergic systems in vertebrates can be modified in certain species in response to adaptative processes that lead to morphological and behavioral modifications of members of a given class of vertebrates, as shown for gymnophionans. PMID:12115707

  18. Synaptic interactions of retrogradely labeled hypoglossal motoneurons with substance P-like immunoreactive nerve terminals in the cat: a dual-labeling electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Gatti, P J; Coleman, W C; Shirahata, M; Johnson, T A; Massari, V J

    1996-07-01

    This study has investigated the synaptic interactions between hypoglossal motoneurons and substance P (SP)-immunoreactive terminals. Cholera toxin B conjugated to horseradish peroxidase was injected into the tip of the tongue on the right side of six ketamine-anesthetized cats. Two to five days later, the animals were killed. Cells containing HRP were labeled with a histochemical reaction utilizing tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) as the chromogen. TMB forms crystalline reaction products that are very distinct at the electron microscopic level. The tissues were then processed for immunocytochemistry using an antiserum against SP. The chromogen used in this case, diaminobenzidine, yields amorphous reaction products. At the light microscopic level, labeled cells were observed primarily ipsilaterally in both intermediate and ventrolateral subdivisions of the hypoglossal nucleus. The majority of these labeled cells were seen at the level of obex. At the electron microscopic level, both asymmetric and symmetric synapses were observed. SP-immunoreactive nerve terminals formed asymmetric synapses with labeled dendrites and symmetric synapses with labeled perikarya. SP-labeled terminals also synapsed on unlabeled dendrites and somata. These are the first ultrastructural studies demonstrating synaptic interactions between hypoglossal motoneurons and SP terminals. These studies demonstrate that hypoglossal motoneurons that innervate intrinsic tongue muscles are modulated by SP and that SP may play a role in the control of fine movements of the tongue. PMID:8836682

  19. Stem cell technology for the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure

    PubMed Central

    Pino, Christopher J.; Humes, H. David

    2010-01-01

    Acute and chronic renal failure are disorders with high rates of morbidity and mortality. Current treatment is based upon conventional dialysis to provide volume regulation and small solute clearance. There is growing recognition that renal failure is a complex disease state requiring a multifactorial therapy to address the short-comings of the conventional monofactorial approach. Kidney transplantation remains the most effective treatment, however, organ availability lags far behind demand. Many key kidney functions including gluconeogenesis, ammoniagenesis, metabolism of glutathione, catabolism of important peptide hormones, growth factors, and cytokines critical to multiorgan homeostasis and immunomodulation are provided by renal tubule cells. Therefore, cell-based therapies are promising multifactorial treatment approaches. In this review, current stem cell technologies including adult stem cells, embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells will be discussed as cell sources for the treatment of acute and chronic renal failure. PMID:20801413

  20. Serotonin-immunoreactive and dopamine-immunoreactive neurones in the terminal ganglion of the cricket, Acheta domestica: Light- and electron-microscopic immunocytochemistry.

    PubMed

    Elekes, K; Hustert, R; Geffard, M

    1987-10-01

    The distribution and ultrastructure of serotonin- and dopamine-immunoreactive (5-HTi and DAi) neurones have been investigated in the terminal ganglion of the cricket, Acheta domestica, using a pre-embedding chopper technique. Special attention has been paid to the immunoreactive structures in the neuropil. 5-HTi structures are extensively distributed and densely packed throughout the 5 neuromeres of the terminal ganglion and originate from several interneurones and efferent neurones. In contrast, DAi fibres are distributed sparsely although they extend to all neuromeres of the ganglion and originate from 6 interneurons only. For both 5-HTi and DAi neurones characteristic axonal projections and branching patterns can be distinguished. The 5-HTi axons exhibit rich varicose arborizations, whereas DAi neurones possess fewer varicosities in the neuropil. Electron microscopy shows that 5-HTi varicosities contain small (∼ 60 nm) and large (∼ 100 nm) agranular vesicles, and large (∼ 100 nm) granular vesicles, whereas in DAi varicosities small (∼ 60 nm) agranular and large (∼ 100 nm) granular vesicles are seen. Both 5-HTi and DAi varicosities form synaptic contacts. We conclude that both serotonin and dopamine may be used as neurotransmitters in the terminal ganglion of the cricket. PMID:21253768

  1. Immunoreactivity reduction of soybean meal by fermentation, effect on amino acid composition and antigenicity of commercial soy products.

    PubMed

    Song, Y-S; Frias, J; Martinez-Villaluenga, C; Vidal-Valdeverde, C; de Mejia, E Gonzalez

    2008-05-15

    Food allergy has become a public health problem that continues to challenge both the consumer and the food industry. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the reduction of immunoreactivity by natural and induced fermentation of soybean meal (SBM) with Lactobacillus plantarum, Bifidobacterium lactis, Saccharomyces cereviseae, and to assess the effect on amino acid concentration. Immunoreactivity of commercially available fermented soybean products and ingredients was also evaluated. ELISA and western blot were used to measure IgE immunoreactivity using plasma from soy sensitive individuals. Commercial soy products included tempeh, miso and yogurt. Fermented SBM showed reduced immunoreactivity to human plasma, particularly if proteins were <20kDa. S. cereviseae and naturally fermented SBM showed the highest reduction in IgE immunoreactivity, up to 89% and 88%, respectively, against human pooled plasma. When SBM was subjected to fermentation with different microorganisms, most of the total amino acids increased significantly (p<0.05) and only few of them suffered a decrease depending on the type of fermentation. All commercial soy containing products tested showed very low immunoreactivity. Thus, fermentation can decrease soy immunoreactivity and can be optimized to develop nutritious hypoallergenic soy products. However, the clinical relevance of these findings needs to be determined by human challenge studies. PMID:26059135

  2. A longitudinal study of maternal digoxin-like immunoreactive substances in normotensive pregnancy and pregnancy-induced hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kerkez, S A; Poston, L; Wolfe, C D; Quartero, H W; Carabelli, P; Petruckevitch, A; Hilton, P J

    1990-03-01

    The serum of women in the third trimester of pregnancy demonstrates cross-reactivity with some commercially available antibodies to digoxin. A number of studies have suggested that levels of this digoxin-like immunoreactive substance(s) are further increased in patients with pregnancy-induced hypertension, and some have proposed that the digoxin-like immunoreactive substance could be useful as a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension. We measured digoxin-like immunoreactive substance levels every 2 weeks throughout the third trimester in 170 women; of these, 20 developed hypertension. Digoxin-like immunoreactive substance levels rose with gestational age. A graph of the slope of digoxin-like immunoreactive substance plotted against gestational age was fitted for the results obtained from each woman. There was no significant difference in the mean rate of increase of digoxin-like immunoreactive substance level per week between pregnancy-induced hypertension and normotensive pregnancy, nor was there any difference between these two groups at any gestational age studied. These results suggest that measuring digoxin-like immunoreactive substance levels is not useful as a predictor of pregnancy-induced hypertension. PMID:2316589

  3. Effect of stem cell-based therapy for ischemic stroke treatment: A meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Duan, Feng; Wang, Ming-Xin; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Liu, Peng; Ma, Li-Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Stroke is a major cause of death and long-term disability worldwide. Cell-based therapies improve neural functional recovery in pre-clinical studies, but clinical results require evaluation. We aimed to assess the effects of mesenchymal stem cells on ischemic stroke treatment. We searched the PubMed, Embase and Cochrane databases until July 2015 and selected the controlled trials using mesenchymal stem cells for ischemic stroke treatment compared with cell-free treatment. We assessed the results by meta-analysis using the error matrix approach, and we assessed the association of mesenchymal stem cell counts with treatment effect by dose-response meta-analysis. Seven trials were included. Manhattan plots revealed no obvious advantage of the application of stem cells to treat ischemic stroke. For the comprehensive evaluation index, stem cell treatment did not significantly reduce the mortality of ischemic stroke patients (relative risk (RR) 0.59, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.29-1.19; ln(RR) 0.54, 95% CI -0.18 to 1.25, p=0.141). The National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale was also not significantly improved by stem cell treatment (standardized mean difference (SMD) 0.94, 95% CI -0.13 to 2.01, p=0.072). The European Stroke Scale was significantly improved using the stem cell treatment (SMD 1.15, 95% CI 0.37-1.92). The dose-response meta-analysis did not reveal a significant linear regression relationship between the number of stem cells and therapeutic effect, except regarding the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale index. In conclusion, our assessments indicated no significant difference between stem cell and cell-free treatments. Further research is needed to discover more effective stem cell-based therapies for ischemic stroke treatment. PMID:27131124

  4. Distribution of somatostatin-like immunoreactivity in the brain of the caecilian Dermophis mexicanus (Amphibia: Gymnophiona): comparative aspects in amphibians.

    PubMed

    López, Jesús M; Moreno, Nerea; Morona, Ruth; Muñoz, Margarita; Domínguez, Laura; González, Agustín

    2007-03-20

    The organization of the somatostatin-like-immunoreactive (SOM-ir) structures in the brain of anuran and urodele amphibians has been well documented, and significant differences were noted between the two amphibian orders. However, comparable data are not available for the third order of amphibians, the gymnophionans (caecilians). In the present study, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of SOM-ir cells and fibers in the brain of the gymnophionan Dermophis mexicanus. In addition, because of its known relationship with catecholamines in other vertebrates, double immunostaining for SOM and tyrosine hydroxylase was used to investigate this situation in the gymnophionan. Abundant SOM-ir cell bodies and fibers were widely distributed throughout the brain. In the telencephalon, pallial and subpallial cells were labeled, being most numerous in the medial pallium and amygdaloid region. Most of the SOM-ir neurons were found in the preoptic area and hypothalamus and showed a clear projection to the median eminence. Less conspicuously, SOM-ir structures were found in the thalamus, tectum, tegmentum, and reticular formation. Both SOM-ir cells and fibers were demonstrated in the spinal cord. The double-immunohistofluorescence technique revealed that catecholaminergic neurons and SOM-ir cells are largely intermingled in many brain regions but form totally separated populations. Many differences were found between the distribution of SOM-ir structures in Dermophis and that in anurans or urodeles. Some features were shared only with anurans, such as the abundant pallial SOM-ir cells, whereas others were common only to urodeles, such as the organization of the hypothalamohypophysial SOM-ir system. In addition, some characteristics were found only in Dermophis, such as the localization of the SOM-ir spinal cells and the lack of colocalization of catecholamines and SOM throughout the brain. Therefore, any conclusions concerning the SOM system in amphibians are incomplete without

  5. Sexually-dimorphic expression of tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in the brain of a vocal teleost fish (Porichthys notatus).

    PubMed

    Goebrecht, Geraldine K E; Kowtoniuk, Robert A; Kelly, Brenda G; Kittelberger, J Matthew

    2014-03-01

    Vocal communication has emerged as a powerful model for the study of neural mechanisms of social behavior. Modulatory neurochemicals postulated to play a central role in social behavior, related to motivation, arousal, incentive and reward, include the catecholamines, particularly dopamine and noradrenaline. Many questions remain regarding the functional mechanisms by which these modulators interact with sensory and motor systems. Here, we begin to address these questions in a model system for vocal and social behavior, the plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus). We mapped the distribution of immunoreactivity for the catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) in the midshipman brain. The general pattern of TH(+) cell groups in midshipman appears to be highly conserved with other teleost fish, with a few exceptions, including the apparent absence of pretectal catecholamine cells. Many components of the midshipman vocal and auditory systems were innervated by TH(+) fibers and terminals, including portions of the subpallial area ventralis, the preoptic complex, and the anterior hypothalamus, the midbrain periaqueductal gray and torus semicircularis, several hindbrain auditory nuclei, and parts of the hindbrain vocal pattern generator. These areas thus represent potential sites for catecholamine modulation of vocal and/or auditory behavior. To begin to test functionally whether catecholamines modulate vocal social behaviors, we hypothesized that male and female midshipman, which are sexually dimorphic in both their vocal-motor repertoires and in their responses to hearing conspecific vocalizations, should exhibit sexually dimorphic expression of TH immunoreactivity in their vocal and/or auditory systems. We used quantitative immunohistochemical techniques to test this hypothesis across a number of brain areas. We found significantly higher levels of TH expression in male midshipman relative to females in the TH cell population in the

  6. Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

    2012-03-01

    Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

  7. Sofosbuvir and Simeprevir Treatment of a Stem Cell Transplanted Teenager With Chronic Hepatitis C Infection.

    PubMed

    Fischler, Björn; Priftakis, Peter; Sundin, Mikael

    2016-06-01

    There have been no previous reports on the use of interferon-free combinations in pediatric patients with chronic hepatitis C infection. An infected adolescent with severe sickle cell disease underwent stem cell transplantation and subsequent treatment with sofosbuvir and simeprevir during ongoing immunosuppression. Despite the emergence of peripheral edema as a side effect, treatment was continued with sustained antiviral response. PMID:26928522

  8. Treatment of Basal Cell Carcinoma with Curettage Followed by Imiquimod 3.75% Cream

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rita V.; Birge, Miriam B.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer in the United States. Treatment modalities include both surgical, medical, or combination therapy. In the following case, the authors report the successful treatment of a basal cell carcinoma on the nose with curettage followed by topical imiquimod 3.75% cream. PMID:21607193

  9. Stackable and submergible microbial fuel cell modules for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Cha, Jaehwan; Yu, Jaecheul; Kim, Changwon

    2016-08-01

    The stackable and submergible microbial fuel cell (SS-MFC) system was fabricated consisting of three MFC modules (#1, #2 and #3) that were immersed in an anaerobic tank as a 30 L anode compartment. Each module consisted of the anion exchange membrane-membrane electrode assembly (A-MEA) and cation exchange membrane-MEA (C-MEA). Two MEAs shared a cathode compartment in the module and the three modules shared a anode compartment The SS-MFC system was operated with two phase. After batch feeding (phase I), the system was operated under continuous mode (phase II) with different organic concentrations (from 50 to 1000 mg/L) and different hydraulic retention times (HRT; from 3.4 to 7.2 h). The SS-MFC system successfully produced a stable voltage. A-MEA generated a lower power density than the C-MEA because of the former's high activation and resistance loss. C-MEA showed a higher average maximum power density (3.16 W/m(3)) than A-MEA (2.82 W/m(3)) at 70 mL/min (HRT of 7.2 h). The current density increased as the organic concentration was increased from 70 to 1000 mg/L in a manner consistent with Monod kinetics. When the HRT was increased from 3.4 to 7.2 h, the power densities of the C-MEAs increased from 34.3-40.9 to 40.7-45.7 mW/m(2), but those of the A-MEAs decreased from 25.3-48.0 to 27.7-40.9 mW/m(2). Although power generation was affected by HRT, organic concentrations, and separator types, the proposed SS-MFC modules can be applied to existing wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27033857

  10. Stem cell approaches for the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Ryan T; Lewis, Jennifer; Cooney, Austin; Chan, Lawrence

    2010-09-01

    Type 1 diabetes is characterized by near total absence of pancreatic b cells. Current treatments consisting of insulin injections and islet transplantation are clinically unsatisfactory. In order to develop a cure for type 1 diabetes, we must find a way to reverse autoimmunity, which underlies b cell destruction, as well as an effective strategy to generate new b cells. This article reviews the different approaches that are being taken to produce new b cells. Much emphasis has been placed on selecting the right non-b cell population, either in vivo or in vitro, as the starting material. Different cell types, including adult stem cells, other types of progenitor cells in situ, and even differentiated cell populations, as well as embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, will require different methods for islet and b cell induction. We discussed the pros and cons of the different strategies that are being used to re-invent the pancreatic b cell. PMID:20801414

  11. Diabetes treatment: A rapid review of the current and future scope of stem cell research

    PubMed Central

    Sheik Abdulazeez, Sheriff

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a major health concern of the developing and developed nations across the globe. This devastating disease accounts for the 5% deaths around the world annually. The current treatment methods do not address the underlying causes of the disease and have severe limitations. Stem cells are unique cells with the potential to differentiate into any type of specialized cells. This feature of both adult and embryonic stem cells was explored in great detail by the scientists around the world and are successful in producing insulin secreting cells. The different type of stem cells (induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and adult stem cells) proves to be potent in treating diabetes with certain limitations. This article precisely reviews the resources and progress made in the field of stem cell research for diabetic treatment. PMID:27134533

  12. Changes in the plasma concentration of immunoreactive arginine vasotocin during oviposition in the domestic fowl.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, K; Goto, K; Yoshioka, T; Terao, T; Koga, O

    1984-10-01

    The plasma concentrations of immunoreactive arginine vasotocin (AVT) were measured during oviposition and shortly before ovulation of the first egg (Cl) of a clutch. Immunoreactive AVT was determined on bentonite extracts of 0.5 ml plasma samples using the method of Rosenbloom and Fisher (1974). The R-70 antiserum used to measure AVT cross reacted with arginine vasopressin (AVP), however the fowl pituitary does not synthesise AVP. Over a period of 10 to 90 min before oviposition the plasma AVT concentration was about 20 pg/ml; during oviposition it increased four-fold. Measurements made at frequent intervals showed that plasma AVT concentration increased 5 to 6 min before oviposition, reached a peak during oviposition itself and decreased rapidly in the following 5 to 6 min. The surge in plasma AVT occurred on average 48 min before Cl ovulation. PMID:6518411

  13. Identification of immunoreactive antigens in membrane proteins enriched fraction from Francisella tularensis LVS.

    PubMed

    Janovská, Sylva; Pávková, Ivona; Hubálek, Martin; Lenco, Juraj; Macela, Ales; Stulík, Jirí

    2007-02-15

    Francisella tularensis is a Gram-negative, facultative intracellular bacterium causing disease in many mammalian species. The low infectious dose of F. tularensis and the ease of air-borne transmission are the main features responsible for the classification of this bacterium as a potential biological weapon. The live attenuated strain of F. tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) is currently only effective vaccine against tularemia, however, this type of vaccine has not been approved for human use. In the presented study, sub-immunoproteome analysis was performed to search for new immunogenic proteins of Francisella tularensis LVS grown under different conditions. By this approach 35 immunoreactive antigens were identified, 19 of them showed to be novel immunogens. In conclusion, sub-immunoproteome analysis resulted in successful identification of novel immunoreactive proteins. PMID:17241671

  14. Response of Human Prostate Cancer Cells to Mitoxantrone Treatment in Simulated Microgravity Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ye; Wu, Honglu

    2012-07-01

    RESPONSE OF HUMAN PROSTATE CANCER CELLS TO MITOXANTRONE TREATMENT IN SIMULATED MICROGRAVITY ENVIRONMENT Ye Zhang1,2, Christopher Edwards3, and Honglu Wu1 1 NASA-Johnson Space Center, Houston, TX 2 Wyle Integrated Science and Engineering Group, Houston, TX 3 Oregon State University, Corvallis, OR This study explores the changes in growth of human prostate cancer cells (LNCaP) and their response to the treatment of an antineoplastic agent, mitoxantrone, under the simulated microgravity condition. In comparison to static 1g, microgravity and simulated microgravity have been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in various cultured cell models or animals. However, very little is known about the effect of altered gravity on the responses of cells to the treatment of drugs, especially chemotherapy drugs. To test the hypothesis that zero gravity would result in altered regulations of cells in response to antineoplastic agents, we cultured LNCaP cells in either a High Aspect Ratio Vessel (HARV) bioreactor at the rotating condition to model microgravity in space or in the static condition as control, and treated the cells with mitoxantrone. Cell growth, as well as expressions of oxidative stress related genes, were analyzed after the drug treatment. Compared to static 1g controls, the cells cultured in the simulated microgravity environment did not present significant differences in cell viability, growth rate, or cell cycle distribution. However, after mitoxantrone treatment, a significant proportion of bioreactor cultured cells became apoptotic or was arrested in G2. Several oxidative stress related genes also showed a higher expression level post mitoxantrone treatment. Our results indicate that simulated microgravity may alter the response of LNCaP cells to mitoxantrone treatment. Understanding the mechanisms by which cells respond to drugs differently in an altered gravity environment will be useful for the improvement of cancer treatment on

  15. 5-Azacytidine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity and modulates NK cells in patients with myeloid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gang, A O; Frøsig, T M; Brimnes, M K; Lyngaa, R; Treppendahl, M B; Grønbæk, K; Dufva, I H; Straten, P Thor; Hadrup, S R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine leads to prolonged survival for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the demethylation induces upregulation of cancer-testis antigens. Cancer-testis antigens are well-known targets for immune recognition in cancer, and the immune system may have a role in this treatment regimen. We show here that 5-Azacytidine treatment leads to increased T-cell recognition of tumor cells. T-cell responses against a large panel of cancer-testis antigens were detected before treatment, and these responses were further induced upon initiation of treatment. These characteristics point to an ideal combination of 5-Azacytidine and immune therapy to preferentially boost T-cell responses against cancer-testis antigens. To initiate such combination therapy, essential knowledge is required about the general immune modulatory effect of 5-Azacytidine. We therefore examined potential treatment effects on both immune stimulatory (CD8 and CD4 T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells) and immune inhibitory cell subsets (myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells). We observed a minor decrease and modulation of NK cells, but for all other populations no effects could be detected. Together, these data support a strategy for combining 5-Azacytidine treatment with immune therapy for potential clinical benefit. PMID:24681961

  16. 5-Azacytidine treatment sensitizes tumor cells to T-cell mediated cytotoxicity and modulates NK cells in patients with myeloid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Gang, A O; Frøsig, T M; Brimnes, M K; Lyngaa, R; Treppendahl, M B; Grønbæk, K; Dufva, I H; Straten, P thor; Hadrup, S R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment with the demethylating agent 5-Azacytidine leads to prolonged survival for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome, and the demethylation induces upregulation of cancer-testis antigens. Cancer-testis antigens are well-known targets for immune recognition in cancer, and the immune system may have a role in this treatment regimen. We show here that 5-Azacytidine treatment leads to increased T-cell recognition of tumor cells. T-cell responses against a large panel of cancer-testis antigens were detected before treatment, and these responses were further induced upon initiation of treatment. These characteristics point to an ideal combination of 5-Azacytidine and immune therapy to preferentially boost T-cell responses against cancer-testis antigens. To initiate such combination therapy, essential knowledge is required about the general immune modulatory effect of 5-Azacytidine. We therefore examined potential treatment effects on both immune stimulatory (CD8 and CD4 T cells and Natural Killer (NK) cells) and immune inhibitory cell subsets (myeloid-derived suppressor cells and regulatory T cells). We observed a minor decrease and modulation of NK cells, but for all other populations no effects could be detected. Together, these data support a strategy for combining 5-Azacytidine treatment with immune therapy for potential clinical benefit. PMID:24681961

  17. Pre- and postnatal bisphenol A treatment does not alter the number of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive cells in the anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) of weanling male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherry A; Paule, Merle G; He, Zhen

    2015-10-22

    Exposure to Bisphenol A (BPA) may interfere with brain sexual differentiation. Altered numbers of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) cells in the rodent anteroventral periventricular nucleus (AVPV) after developmental BPA treatment have been reported; however, definitive conclusions are lacking. The current study incorporated many of the guidelines suggested for endocrine disrupter research. Specifically, ethinyl estradiol (EE2) served as a reference estrogen, exogenous environmental estrogen exposure was controlled, BPA was administered orally, and subjects consumed a low phytoestrogen diet. Here, on gestational days 6-21, Sprague-Dawley rats (10-15/group) were gavaged with 2.5 or 25.0 µg BPA/kg/day or 5.0 or 10.0 µg EE2/kg/day or the vehicle (5 ml of 0.3% aqueous carboxymethylcellulose/kg/day). A naïve control group was weighed and restrained, but not gavaged. Beginning on postnatal day (PND) 1 and continuing until PND 21, the 4 pups/sex/litter were orally treated with the same dose their dam had received. On PND 21, 1/sex/litter was perfused and the brain removed. TH immunoreactivity (TH-ir) was counted in 8 images/pup by a technician blind to treatment status. ANOVA results indicated significantly higher TH-ir cells/mm(2) in females (main effect of sex: p<0.01); however, there was no significant effect of treatment or a significant interaction of treatment with sex. In a separate untreated group of PND 21 Sprague-Dawley pups, AVPV volume was quantified and no significant sexual dimorphism was apparent. Similar to our reported results of behavioral assessments, the BPA treatment paradigm used here (2.5 or 25.0 µg BPA/kg/day administered orally) does not appear to cause significant alterations in AVPV TH-ir. PMID:26206302

  18. Orexin (hypocretin)-like immunoreactivity in the cat hypothalamus: a light and electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    2001-02-01

    Orexin-A-like immunoreactive (OrA-ir) neurons and terminals in the cat hypothalamus were examined using immunohistochemical techniques. OrA-ir neurons were found principally in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) at the level of the tuberal cinereum and in the dorsal and posterior hypothalamic areas. In the LHA the majority of the neurons were located dorsal and lateral to the fornix; a small number of OrA-ir neurons were also present in other regions of the hypothalamus. OrA-ir fibers with varicose terminals were detected in almost all hypothalamic regions. The high density of fibers was located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus, the infundibular nucleus (INF), the tuberomamillary nucleus (TM) and the supra- and pre-mamillary nuclei. Ultrastructural analysis revealed that OrA-ir neurons in the LHA receive abundant input from non-immunoreactive terminals. These terminals, which contained many small, clear, round vesicles with a few large, dense core vesicles, made asymmetrical synaptic contacts with OrA-ir dendrites, indicating that the activity of orexin neurons is under excitatory control. On the other hand, the terminals of OrA-ir neurons also made asymmetrical synaptic contact with dendrites in the LHA, the INF and the TM. The dendrites in the LHA were both non-immunoreactive and OrA-ir; conversely, the dendrites in the INF and the TM were non-immunoreactive. In these regions, OrA-ir terminals contained many small, clear, round vesicles with few large, dense core vesicles, suggesting that orexinergic neurons also provide excitatory input to other neurons in these regions. PMID:11204055

  19. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang; Choe, Soo Young; Hong, Young Mi

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  20. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  1. Diagnosis and treatment in primary bladder small cell carcinoma: Literature review.

    PubMed

    Celik, Orcun; Ekin, Gokhan; Ipekci, Tumay; Budak, Salih; Ilbey, Yusuf Ozlem

    2016-03-01

    Small cell bladder carcinoma is a rare and frequently fatal disease. It can be distinguished from classical urothelial carcinoma microscopically and immunohistochemically. Small cell bladder carcinoma has histologically similar properties with other small cell carcinomas in other organs. It has a worse prognosis when compared to urothelial bladder cancer. Multimodal treatments are recommended although there is no widely accepted consensus regarding to the treatment algorithm because of its rarity. In this review, clinical properties and diagnosis of small cell bladder carcinoma, its histopathological and immunohistochemical properties and treatment modalities are examined. PMID:27072176

  2. Simultaneous detection of Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii based on microsphere immunoreaction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Fan; Li, Jinfeng; Zou, Mingqiang; Chen, Yan; Wang, Yanfei; Qi, Xiaohua

    2013-04-01

    Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis (Cmn) and Pantoea stewartii subsp. stewartii (Pss) are two plant pathogens that can cause tremendous agricultural economic losses. This novel method based on microsphere immunoreaction was developed for the simultaneous detection of Cmn and Pss in maize. This multiplex method was constructed based on microsphere immunodetection with fluorescent labels such as quantum dots (QDs) and R-phycoerythrin (R-PE) for the detection of Cmn and Pss. Captured QDs and R-PE serve as signal reporters for fluorescent readout. The principle of this method is based on a sandwich immunoreaction. Cmn and Pss captured by the microspheres were detected using flow cytometry. The limit of detection of this method was 10 times lower than the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and its analysis time (1 h) was much shorter compared with ELISA (6-8 h). The method, which has been proven to be an effective approach to multiplex detection of plant bacteria (Cmn and Pss as models), not only increased the varieties but also improved the sensitivity. The microsphere immunoreaction provides a universal method for the multiplex determination of microbes because of its high sensitivity, specificity, and speed. In the future, the method will be more fully validated in vivo to detect diversiform bacteria. PMID:23169888

  3. Neurocalcin-immunoreactive neurons in the mammalian dorsal root ganglia, including humans.

    PubMed

    Galeano, R; Germanà, A; Abbate, F; Calvo, D; Naves, F J; Hidaka, H; Germanà, G; Vega, J A

    2000-07-01

    Neurocalcin (NC) is a recently characterized EF-hand calcium-binding protein present in a discrete population of sensory neurons and their peripheral mechanoreceptors, but its presence in peripheral nervous system neurons other than in the rat is still unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the occurrence of NC in the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) of several mammalian species (horse, buffalo, cow, sheep, pig, dog, and rat), including humans. DRG were fixed, embedded in paraffin, and processed for immunohistochemistry using a polyclonal antibody against NC. The size of the immunoreactive neurons was measured. In all species examined, NC immunoreactivity (IR) was restricted to neurons but the percentage, as well as the size of the immunoreactive neurons, varied among different species. As a rule, small neurons (diameter <20 microm) lack NC IR. In some species (pig, dog, buffalo, cow), only the largest neurons showed IR, whereas in others (sheep, horse, rat, and humans) they covered the entire range of neuron sizes. The pattern of immunostaining was cytoplasmic, although in some species (cow and buffalo), it formed a peripheral "ring." The present results demonstrate that mammalian DRG contain a subpopulation of NC-positive neurons, which varies from one species to another. Based on the neuron size, the possible function of the NC-containing neurons is discussed. PMID:10861367

  4. Evaluation of residual immunoreactivity in red and white wines clarified with gluten or gluten derivatives.

    PubMed

    Cattaneo, A; Ballabio, C; Bertelli, A A E; Fiocchi, A; Galli, C L; Isoardi, P; Terracciano, L; Restani, P

    2003-01-01

    Gluten or hydrolyzed gluten could be a suitable alternative to animal proteins in the wine clarification process, but their residues could represent a risk for individuals suffering from coeliac disease or allergic to cereal proteins. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of gluten in wines treated with gluten or its hydrolysate in the clarification process and to assess its antigenicity in commercial products. The presence of residual immunoreactive gluten was evaluated by electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and immunoblotting. Data obtained in several red and white wine samples showed that no residue was detectable in any of the red wines. In white wines, gluten reduced the protein content less completely, but most samples showed no immunoreactivity after the wine had been treated with gluten or its derivatives, either alone or combined with bentonite, silica gel or tannins. The use of gluten derivatives coupled with bentonite was the most effective method of removing immunoreactive protein in white wines. In conclusion, the use of gluten derivatives in wine clarification seems to exclude a risk for subjects susceptible to coeliac disease or gluten allergy. However, it is recommended that wine producers continuously monitor the clarification process in order to protect the most sensitive individuals. PMID:14518594

  5. Technetium-99m-labeled monoclonal antibody with preserved immunoreactivity and high in vivo stability

    SciTech Connect

    Arano, Y.; Yokoyama, A.; Furukawa, T.; Horiuchi, K.; Yahata, T.; Saji, H.; Sakahara, H.; Nakashima, T.; Koizumi, M.; Endo, K.

    1987-06-01

    Recent availability of monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) and their radiolabeling through the use of the bifunctional chelating agents (BCA) have become an alternative procedure for in vivo radioimmunodetection. Using a newly synthesized BCA, a p-carboxyethylphenylglyoxal-di(N-methylthiosemicarbazone) (CE-DTS), the coupling and technetium-99m (/sup 99m/Tc) labeling of monoclonal IgG against hCG were carried out. In the system presented, factors affecting stability and immunoreactivity were examined. Immunoreactivity of the original IgG (56C) was preserved by conjugating one CE-DTS molecule per molecule of IgG (56C) using the phosphorylazide method, however, /sup 99m/Tc labeling pH affected the immunoreactivity and limited the /sup 99m/Tc labeling reaction between pH 4.5 and 6.2. A screening of labeling conditions, such as pH, reaction time, and reducing agent system were then carried out. Technetium-99m-labeled IgG (56C), (/sup 99m/Tc)CE-DTS-IgG (56C), showed good stability upon incubation with mice sera and comparable mice biodistribution to that of indium-111 (/sup 111/In) DTPA-IgG (56C). Thus, these results indicate the excellent potential of CE-DTS as a BCA for labeling MoAb with /sup 99m/Tc.

  6. Inhibition of Sindbis virus maturation after treatment of infected cells with trypsin.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, R H; Brown, D T

    1982-01-01

    Brief treatment of Sindbis virus-infected BHK-21 or Vero cells with low concentrations of trypsin irreversibly blocked further production of progeny virions after removal of the enzyme. The inhibitory effects of the trypsin treatment could only be demonstrated in cells in which virus infection was established; optimal inhibition occurred at ca. 3 h postinfection. Production of virus structural proteins PE2, E1, and C occurred at normal levels in inhibited cells. PE2 and E1 were also transported to the cell plasma membrane during inhibition; however, PE2 was not cleaved to E2, and little capsid protein became membrane associated relative to control cells. Although trypsin treatment had no effect on Sindbis protein synthesis, the production of both 26S and 42S RNA was greatly reduced. Similar trypsin treatment of BHK cells infected with vesicular stomatitis virus had no detectable effect on the course of virus infection. Images PMID:6281478

  7. Stem cells for the treatment of neurological disorders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindvall, Olle; Kokaia, Zaal

    2006-06-01

    Many common neurological disorders, such as Parkinson's disease, stroke and multiple sclerosis, are caused by a loss of neurons and glial cells. In recent years, neurons and glia have been generated successfully from stem cells in culture, fuelling efforts to develop stem-cell-based transplantation therapies for human patients. More recently, efforts have been extended to stimulating the formation and preventing the death of neurons and glial cells produced by endogenous stem cells within the adult central nervous system. The next step is to translate these exciting advances from the laboratory into clinically useful therapies.

  8. Radioimmunotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation for the treatment of B-cell lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Cilley, Jeffrey; Winter, Jane N

    2006-01-01

    Relapse continues to be the primary cause of treatment failure in patients with non-Hodgkin's lymphomas (NHL) undergoing high-dose therapy and autologous stem cell transplantation. The anti-CD20 radioimmunoconjugates, Y-90 ibritumomab tiuxetan (Zevalin; Biogen Idec, Inc., Cambridge, MA, USA) and I-131 tositumomab (Bexxar; Corixa, Seattle, WA; and Glaxo Smith Kline; Philadelphia, PA, USA) have been associated with high response rates, durable remissions and limited toxicity apart from myelosuppression, making them ideal candidates for use in autotransplantation. Tested first as single agents in relapsed patients with indolent and transformed NHL, and then at much higher doses with stem cell support, these agents have now been combined with high-dose chemotherapy prior to autologous stem cell transplant. Radioimmunoconjugates have been used to replace total body irradiation (TBI) in some studies and to augment standard chemotherapy regimens in others. Thus far the results are promising, with combinations of radioimmunoconjugates and chemotherapy producing long-lasting responses in high-risk patients with no more toxicity than that caused by standard conditioning regimens. These results are notable in light of the fact that the dose of radiation delivered to the tumor is 10-fold higher than the dose achievable with TBI. Whether this increase in radiation dose to the targeted lymphoma translates into more durable remissions and an improvement in overall survival requires further investigation. PMID:16434379

  9. Generation of regulatory dendritic cells after treatment with paeoniflorin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Li, Yingxi; Wang, Xiaodong; Li, Keqiu; Jing, Yaqing; He, Jinghua; Qiang, Zhaoyan; Tong, Jingzhi; Sun, Ke; Ding, Wen; Kang, Yi; Li, Guang

    2016-08-01

    Regulatory dendritic cells are a potential therapeutic tool for assessing a variety of immune overreaction diseases. Paeoniflorin, a bioactive glucoside extracted from the Chinese herb white paeony root, has been shown to be effective at inhibiting the maturation and immunostimulatory function of murine bone marrow-derived dendritic cells. However, whether paeoniflorin can program conventional dendritic cells toward regulatory dendritic cells and the underlying mechanism remain unknown. Here, our study demonstrates that paeoniflorin can induce the production of regulatory dendritic cells from human peripheral blood monocyte-derived immature dendritic cells in the absence or presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not from mature dendritic cells, thereby demonstrating the potential of paeoniflorin as a specific immunosuppressive drug with fewer complications and side effects. These regulatory dendritic cells treated with paeoniflorin exhibited high CD11b/c and low CD80, CD86 and CD40 expression levels as well as enhanced abilities to capture antigen and promote the proliferation of CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells and reduced abilities to migrate and promote the proliferation of CD4(+) T cells, which is associated with the upregulation of endogenous transforming growth factor (TGF)-β-mediated indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) expression. Collectively, paeoniflorin could program immature dendritic cells (imDCs) and imDCs stimulated with LPS toward a regulatory DC fate by upregulating the endogenous TGF-β-mediated IDO expression level, thereby demonstrating its potential as a specific immunosuppressive drug. PMID:26721806

  10. Artemisinin: an alternative treatment for oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamachika, Eiki; Habte, Temesgen; Oda, Dolphine

    2004-01-01

    Artemisinin (AR) is a widely used antimalarial drug. Recently, additional uses for AR as an anticancer drug were discovered. Using TUNEL, immunohistochemistry (IHS) markers and flow cytometry techniques, we evaluated the effect of AR and 5-FU on HPV 16 immortalized and transformed human gingival epithelial (IHGK) cells. The results of TUNEL showed that AR-treated IHGK cells consisted of 82% positive cells, while 5-FU-treated cells consisted of 18% positive cells. The IHS markers demonstrated positive staining with Bax p53, CD40 and CD40L in AR-treated cells and negative staining with Bcl-2. 5-FU-treated cells demonstrated a profile similar to AR but with less intensity. Cell cycle by flow cytometry results showed that only 5-FU-treated cells demonstrated a significant S-phase rate increase to 45%. In conclusion, our results indicate that AR is cytotoxic to transformed oral epithelial cells through apoptosis, while 5-FU is cytotoxic primarily through cell toxicity. PMID:15330155

  11. ENERGY PRODUCTION AND POLLUTION PREVENTION AT SEWAGE TREATMENT PLANTS USING FUEL CELL POWER PLANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper discusses energy production and pollution prevention at sewage treatment plants using fuel cell power plants. Anaerobic digester gas (ADG) is produced at waste water treatment plants during the anaerobic treatment of sewage to reduce solids. The major constituents are...

  12. Repeated cisplatin treatment can lead to a multiresistant tumor cell population with stem cell features and sensitivity to 3-bromopyruvate.

    PubMed

    Wintzell, My; Löfstedt, Lina; Johansson, Joel; Pedersen, Anne B; Fuxe, Jonas; Shoshan, Maria

    2012-12-01

    Cisplatin is used in treatment of several types of cancer, including epithelial ovarian carcinoma (EOC). In order to mimic clinical treatment and to investigate longterm effects of cisplatin in surviving cancer cells, two EOC cell lines were repeatedly treated with low doses. In the SKOV-3 cell line originating from malignant ascites, but not in A2780 cells from a primary tumor, this led to emergence of a stable population (SKOV-3-R) which in the absence of cisplatin showed increased motility, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and expression of cancer stem cell markers CD117, CD44 and ALDH1. Accordingly, the cells formed self-renewing spheres in serum-free stem cell medium. Despite upregulation of mitochondrial mass and cytochrome c, and no upregulation of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL, SKOV-3-R were multiresistant to antineoplastic drugs. Cancer stem cells, or tumor-initiating cells (TICs) are highly chemoresistant and are believed to cause relapse into disseminated and resistant EOC. Our second aim was therefore to target resistance in these TIC-like cells. Resistance could be correlated with upregulation of hexokinase-II and VDAC, which are known to form a survival-promoting mitochondrial complex. The cells were thus sensitive to 3-bromopyruvate, which dissociates hexokinase-II from this complex, and were particularly sensitive to combination treatment with cisplatin at doses down to 0.1 x IC 50. 3-bromopyruvate might thus be of use in targeting the especially aggressive TIC populations. PMID:22954696

  13. Distribution of vasotocin- and vasoactive intestinal peptide-like immunoreactivity in the brain of blue tit (Cyanistes coeruleus)

    PubMed Central

    Montagnese, Catherine M.; Székely, Tamás; Csillag, András; Zachar, Gergely

    2015-01-01

    Blue tits (Cyanistes coeruleus) are songbirds, used as model animals in numerous studies covering a wide field of research. Nevertheless, the distribution of neuropeptides in the brain of this avian species remains largely unknown. Here we present some of the first results on distribution of Vasotocine (AVT) and Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) in the brain of males and females of this songbird species, using immunohistochemistry mapping. The bulk of AVT-like cells are found in the hypothalamic supraoptic, paraventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, and along the lateral forebrain bundle. Most AVT-like fibers course toward the median eminence, some reaching the arcopallium, and lateral septum. Further terminal fields occur in the dorsal thalamus, ventral tegmental area and pretectal area. Most VIP-like cells are in the lateral septal organ and arcuate nucleus. VIP-like fibers are distributed extensively in the hypothalamus, preoptic area, lateral septum, diagonal band of Broca. They are also found in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis, amygdaloid nucleus of taenia, robust nucleus of the arcopallium, caudo-ventral hyperpallium, nucleus accumbens and the brainstem. Taken together, these results suggest that both AVT and VIP immunoreactive structures show similar distribution to other avian species, emphasizing evolutionary conservatism in the history of vertebrates. The current study may enable future investigation into the localization of AVT and VIP, in relation to behavioral and ecological traits in the brain of tit species. PMID:26236200

  14. The effects of ILLLI on peripheral blood T lymphocytes subpopulation & NK cells in psoriasis treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing; Nie, Fan

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To research the effects of Intravascular low level laser irradiation (ILLLI) on the immulogic function of cells in treatment of psoriasis. Method: 49 patients suffered from psoriasis were treated by Intravascular low level laser irradiation (laser output power: 4-5mw, 1 hour per day, a course of treatment is 10 days). We checked the function of T lymphocyte subgroup and NK cell in peripheral blood between pre and post treatment. Results: 1.The mean value of CD3+ in post treatment is higher. P<0.05. Significant difference is showed between pre and post treatment 2. The mean value of CD4+ in post treatment dropped slightly while the mean value of CD4/CD8, NK cell in post treatment increased little, nearly approach the mean value of natural person. 3.The mean value of CD4+,CD8+,NK cell which is under 30% increased the percent obviously after the treatment; The mean value of CD4+,CD8+ u higher than 30% obviously drop the percent, P#0.05 and <0.01. Related statistical analysis showed significant and much significant difference between pre and post treatment. Conclusions: The low level laser irradiation (ILLLI) in treatment of psoriasis has bidirectional ajustive effect which can balance the immulogic function of cell.

  15. Age-related alterations in immunoreactivity of the midsized neurofilament subunit in the brainstem reticular formation of the cat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, J H; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1997-09-19

    In the present study, we compared the immunoreactivity of the midsized subunit of neurofilaments (NF-M) in the brainstem reticular formation of adult and old cats. There was a dramatic decrease in immunoreactivity in most reticular nuclei in the old cats. The most obvious reduction in these regions occurred in dendritic arborizations. In contrast, a small number of nuclei showed a slight increase in immunoreactivity in the aged animals. The age-related changes in immunoreactivity indicate that there is an alteration of NF-M content in reticular neurons and their processes in old age. Such changes in NF-M content may be the basis for the alterations in the morphology of reticular neurons in aged animals. PMID:9374292

  16. Effects of peripheral nerve injuries and tissue inflammation on the levels of neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat primary afferent neurons.

    PubMed

    Wakisaka, S; Kajander, K C; Bennett, G J

    1992-12-11

    Changes in neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity (NPYir) in the rat L4 and L5 spinal cord and dorsal root ganglia (DRG) were examined after different sciatic nerve injuries (transection, loose ligation, and crush) and a localized, painful inflammation of the hind paw. Inflammation had no effect on NPYir. All the nerve injuries produced comparable increases in NPYir in ipsilateral laminae III-V axons and varicosities, and induction of NPYir in many DRG cells. Most NPYir DRG cells were medium to large (mean diameters: 40-45 microns); less than 2% of the cells had diameters of 25 microns or less. We conclude that the nerve injury-evoked increase in NPYir occurs mostly in the somata and intraspinal arbors of low-threshold mechanoreceptors; very few, if any, C-fiber afferents are involved. Nerve injury, rather than a painful condition, appears to be the stimulus for the induction of NPYir synthesis. PMID:1486499

  17. Evaluation of microalgae cell disruption by ultrasonic treatment.

    PubMed

    Gerde, Jose A; Montalbo-Lomboy, Melissa; Yao, Linxing; Grewell, David; Wang, Tong

    2012-12-01

    Microalgae are a promising feedstock for biofuels because of their capability to produce lipids. Cell disruption is necessary to maximize lipid extraction. Sonication conditions were evaluated for breaking heterotrophic (Schizochytrium limacinum) and autotrophic (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) microalgae cells. Cell disruption was estimated by Nile red-lipids fluorescence quantification in S. limacinum and by the release of intracellular chlorophyll and carotenoids in green microalga C. reinhardtii. In both species, approximately 800 J/10 mL was the energy input necessary to maximize cell disruption, regardless of the cell concentrations studied. Increasing sonication time produced increasing amount of free radicals, quantified by the formation of hydroxyterephthalate. Sonication energy beyond the level needed for cell disruption induced oxidation of arachidonic acid, a polyunsaturated fatty acid typically found in marine lipids. Careful control of sonication conditions is necessary to maximize oil extraction at the lowest operational cost and to prevent oil from free radical-induced degradation. PMID:23026331

  18. Ferroptosis is induced following siramesine and lapatinib treatment of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ma, S; Henson, E S; Chen, Y; Gibson, S B

    2016-01-01

    Ferroptosis is an iron-dependent, oxidative cell death, and is distinct from apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. In this study, we demonstrated that lysosome disrupting agent, siramesine and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, lapatinib synergistically induced cell death and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in MDA MB 231, MCF-7, ZR-75 and SKBr3 breast cancer cells over a 24 h time course. Furthermore, the iron chelator deferoxamine (DFO) significantly reduced cytosolic ROS and cell death following treatment with siramesine and lapatinib. Furthermore, we determined that FeCl3 levels were elevated in cells treated with siramesine and lapatinib indicating an iron-dependent cell death, ferroptosis. To confirm this, we treated cells with a potent inhibitor of ferroptosis, ferrastatin-1 that effectively inhibited cell death following siramesine and lapatinib treatment. The increase levels of iron could be due to changes in iron transport. We found that the expression of transferrin, which is responsible for the transport of iron into cells, is increased following treatment with lapatinib alone or in combination with siramesine. Knocking down of transferrin resulted in decreased cell death and ROS after treatment. In addition, ferroportin-1 (FPN) is an iron transport protein, responsible for removal of iron from cells. We found its expression is decreased after treatment with siramesine alone or in combination with lapatinib. Overexpression FPN resulted in decreased ROS and cell death whereas knockdown of FPN increased cell death after siramesine and lapatinib treatment. This indicates a novel induction of ferroptosis through altered iron regulation by treating breast cancer cells with a lysosome disruptor and a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. PMID:27441659

  19. Cancer Cell Invasion: Treatment and Monitoring Opportunities in Nanomedicine

    PubMed Central

    Veiseh, Omid; Kievit, Forrest; Ellenbogen, Richard G.; Zhang, Miqin

    2011-01-01

    Cell invasion is an intrinsic cellular pathway whereby cells respond to extracellular stimuli to migrate through and modulate the structure of their extracellular matrix (ECM) in order to develop, repair, and protect the body’s tissues. In cancer cells this process can become aberrantly regulated and lead to cancer metastasis. This cellular pathway contributes to the vast majority of cancer related fatalities, and therefore has been identified as a critical therapeutic target. Researchers have identified numerous potential molecular therapeutic targets of cancer cell invasion, yet delivery of therapies remains a major hurdle. Nanomedicine is a rapidly emerging technology which may offer a potential solution for tackling cancer metastasis by improving the specificity and potency of therapeutics delivered to invasive cancer cells. In this review we examine the biology of cancer cell invasion, its role in cancer progression and metastasis, molecular targets of cell invasion, and therapeutic inhibitors of cell invasion. We then discuss how the field of nanomedicine can be applied to monitor and treat cancer cell invasion. We aim to provide a perspective on how the advances in cancer biology and the field of nanomedicine can be combined to offer new solutions for treating cancer metastasis. PMID:21295093

  20. Stem cells for the treatment of heart failure.

    PubMed

    Menasché, P; Vanneaux, V

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is currently tested in several trials of chronic heart failure. The main question is to determine how its implementation could be extended to standard clinical practice. To answer this question, it is helpful to capitalize on the three main lessons drawn from the accumulated experience, both in the laboratory and in the clinics. Regarding the cell type, the best outcomes seem to be achieved by cells the phenotype of which closely matches that of the target tissue. This argues in favor of the use of cardiac-committed cells among which the pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiac progeny is particularly attractive. Regarding the mechanism of action, there has been a major paradigm shift whereby cells are no longer expected to structurally integrate within the recipient myocardium but rather to release biomolecules that foster endogenous repair processes. This implies to focus on early cell retention, rather than on sustained cell survival, so that the cells reside in the target tissue long enough and in sufficient amounts to deliver the factors underpinning their action. Biomaterials are here critical adjuncts to optimize this residency time. Furthermore, the paracrine hypothesis gives more flexibility for using allogeneic cells in that targeting an only transient engraftment requires to delay, and no longer to avoid, rejection, which, in turn, should simplify immunomodulation regimens. Regarding manufacturing, a broad dissemination of cardiac cell therapy requires the development of automated systems allowing to yield highly reproducible cell products. This further emphasizes the interest of allogeneic cells because of their suitability for industrially-relevant and cost-effective scale-up and quality control procedures. At the end, definite confirmation that the effects of cells can be recapitulated by the factors they secrete could lead to acellular therapies whereby factors alone (possibly clustered in extracellular vesicles) would be

  1. Modeling the Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme and Cancer Stem Cells with Ordinary Differential Equations

    PubMed Central

    Abernathy, Kristen; Burke, Jeremy

    2016-01-01

    Despite improvements in cancer therapy and treatments, tumor recurrence is a common event in cancer patients. One explanation of recurrence is that cancer therapy focuses on treatment of tumor cells and does not eradicate cancer stem cells (CSCs). CSCs are postulated to behave similar to normal stem cells in that their role is to maintain homeostasis. That is, when the population of tumor cells is reduced or depleted by treatment, CSCs will repopulate the tumor, causing recurrence. In this paper, we study the application of the CSC Hypothesis to the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme by immunotherapy. We extend the work of Kogan et al. (2008) to incorporate the dynamics of CSCs, prove the existence of a recurrence state, and provide an analysis of possible cancerous states and their dependence on treatment levels. PMID:27022405

  2. Hair Regeneration Treatment Using Adipose-Derived Stem Cell Conditioned Medium: Follow-up With Trichograms

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hirotaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Adipose-derived stem cells secrete various growth factors that promote hair growth. This study examined the effects of adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium on alopecia. Methods: Adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium was intradermally injected in 22 patients (11 men and 11 women) with alopecia. Patients received treatment every 3 to 5 weeks for a total of 6 sessions. Hair numbers were counted using trichograms before and after treatment. A half-side comparison study was also performed in 10 patients (8 men and 2 women). Results: Hair numbers were significantly increased after treatment in both male (including those without finasteride administration) and female patients. In the half-side comparison study, the increase in hair numbers was significantly higher on the treatment side than on the placebo side. Conclusion: Treatment using adipose-derived stem cell-conditioned medium appears highly effective for alopecia and may represent a new therapy for hair regeneration. PMID:25834689

  3. Analytic considerations and axiomatic approaches to the concept cell death and cell survival functions in biology and cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Haranas, Ioannis; Austerlitz, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    This study contains a discussion on the connection between current mathematical and biological modeling systems in response to the main research need for the development of a new mathematical theory for study of cell survival after medical treatment and cell biological behavior in general. This is a discussion of suggested future research directions and relations with interdisciplinary science. In an effort to establish the foundations for a possible framework that may be adopted to study and analyze the process of cell survival during treatment, we investigate the organic connection among an axiomatic system foundation, a predator-prey rate equation, and information theoretic signal processing. A new set theoretic approach is also introduced through the definition of cell survival units or cell survival units indicating the use of "proper classes" according to the Zermelo-Fraenkel set theory and the axiom of choice, as the mathematics appropriate for the development of biological theory of cell survival. PMID:25416979

  4. Research highlights on stem cell therapy for the treatment of Peyronie’s disease

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    New treatment modalities have been developed to improve the treatment outcomes of Peyronie’s disease (PD). Stem cells are undifferentiated cell populations that are capable of self-renewal and of differentiation into various kinds of cells or new tissues. In addition, stem cells also have antiapoptotic, antifibrotic, and immunomodulatory properties. The results from preclinical studies support the potential role of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) therapy for both the prevention and treatment of PD. However, there are several limitations of the animal model used in the studies. Further animal and clinical studies are still needed to validate the therapeutic effects and clinical application of ADSCs for the treatment of PD. PMID:27298783

  5. [Recent progress of diagnosis and treatment in NK cell neoplasms].

    PubMed

    Ishida, Fumihiro

    2015-06-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a malignant disorder of mature NK cells that is relatively common in East Asia. It is associated with Epstein-Barr virus in more than 80% of patients. The median survival is not more than three months after diagnosis. In a recent survey of 34 cases with ANKL, the median patient age was 40 years and the age distribution followed a bimodal pattern. Morphologically, the ANKL cells varied from large granular lymphocytes to atypical cells with pleomorphic-like appearances. Clinical characteristics include fever, liver dysfunction, hemophagocytic syndrome, and a rapidly progressive course. In one third of patients, tumor cells in peripheral blood or the bone marrow are below 20% at initial presentation, which might lead to diagnostic delay. L-asparaginase-based chemotherapy plus allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a potential therapeutic option with curative intent.  As for extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type, HSCT could be anticipated to provide survival benefit or a chance of cure for patients in clinical stage II to IV with complete remission at transplantation. However, the optimal stem cell source, timing of transplantation, and preconditioning regimen require further elucidation. PMID:26256874

  6. Development of pigment-dispersing hormone-immunoreactive neurons in the American lobster: homology to the insect circadian pacemaker system?

    PubMed Central

    Dircksen, Heinrich; Beltz, Barbara S.

    2011-01-01

    We have examined the development of pigment-dispersing hormone (PDH)-immunoreactive neurons in embryos of the American lobster Homarus americanus Milne Edwards, 1837 (Decapoda, Reptantia, Homarida) by using an antiserum against β-PDH. This peptide is detectable in the terminal medulla of the eyestalks and the protocerebrum where PDH immunoreactivity is present as early as 20% of embryonic development. During ontogenesis, an elaborate system of PDH-immunoreactive neurons and fibres develops in the eyestalks and the protocerebrum, whereas less labelling is present in the deuto- and tritocerebrum and the ventral nerve cord. The sinus gland is innervated by PDH neurites at hatching. This pattern of PDH immunoreactivity has been compared with that found in various insect species. Neurons immunoreactive to pigment-dispersing factor in the medulla have been shown to be a central component of the system that generates the circadian rhythm in insects. Our results indicate that, in view of the position of the neuronal somata and projection patterns of their neurites, the immunolabelled medulla neurons in insects have homologous counterparts in the crustacean eyestalk. Since locomotory and other activities in crustaceans follow distinct circadian rhythms comparable with those observed in insects, we suggest that PDH-immunoreactive medulla neurons in crustaceans are involved in the generation of these rhythms. PMID:19034522

  7. Neuropeptide Y-like immunoreactivity in rat cranial parasympathetic neurons: coexistence with vasoactive intestinal peptide and choline acetyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Leblanc, G.C.; Trimmer, B.A.; Landis, S.C.

    1987-05-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is widely distributed in the sympathetic nervous system, where it is colocalized with norepinephrine. The authors report here that NPY-immunoreactive neurons are also abundant in three cranial parasympathetic ganglia, the otic, sphenopalatine, and ciliary, in the rat measured by radioimmunoassay. High-performance liquid chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material present in the otic ganglion indicates that this material is very similar to porcine NPY and indistinguishable from the NPY-like immunoreactivity present in rat sympathetic neurons. These findings raise the possibility that NPY acts as a neuromodulator in the parasympathetic as well as the sympathetic nervous system. In contrast to what had been observed for sympathetic neurons, NPY-immunoreactive neurons in cranial parasympathetic ganglia do not contain detectable catecholamines or tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity, and many do contain immunoreactivity for vasoactive intestinal peptide and/or choline acetyltransferase. These findings suggest that there is no simple rule governing coexpression of NPY with norepinephrine, acetylcholine, or vasoactive intestinal peptide in autonomic neurons. Further, while functional studies have indicated that NPY exerts actions on the peripheral vasculature which are antagonistic to those of acetylcholine and vasoactive intestinal peptide, the present results raise the possibility that these three substances may have complementary effects on other target tissues.

  8. A Comparative Systematic Review of the Optimal CD4 Cell Count Threshold for HIV Treatment Initiation

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell-Fearon, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    HIV infection is no longer characterized by high morbidity, rapid progression to AIDS, and death as when the infection was first identified. While anti-retroviral drugs have improved the outcome of AIDS patients, clinical research on the appropriate time to initiate therapy continues to evolve. Optimal therapy initiation would maximize the benefits of these drugs, while minimizing side effects and drug resistance. Recent 2013 WHO guidelines changed HIV therapy initiation from 350 cells/μL to 500 cells/μL. This systematic review provides an evidence-based comparison of starting treatment at >500 cells/μL with starting treatment at the range between 350 cells/μL and 500 cells/μL. An 11% increase in risk was detected from initiation therapy at the 350–500 cells/μL range (0.37 [0.26, 0.53]), when compared with starting treatment before 500 cells/μL (0.33 [0.22, 0.48]). Most individual study comparisons showed a benefit for starting treatment at 500 cells/μL in comparison with starting at the 350–500 cells/μL range with risks ranging from 19% to 300%, though a number of comparisons were not statistically significant. Overall, the study provides evidence based support for initiating anti retroviral therapy at cell counts >500 cells/μL wherever possible to prevent AIDS mortality and morbidity. PMID:24778646

  9. Frequency of cell treatment with cold microwave argon plasma is important for the final outcome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sysolyatina, E.; Vasiliev, M.; Kurnaeva, M.; Kornienko, I.; Petrov, O.; Fortov, V.; Gintsburg, A.; Petersen, E.; Ermolaeva, S.

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to establish the influence of a regime of cold microwave argon plasma treatments on the physiological characteristics of human fibroblasts and keratinocytes. We used three regimes of plasma application: a single treatment, double treatment with a 48 h interval, and daily treatments for 3 d. Cell proliferation after plasma application was quantified in real time, and immunohistochemistry was used to establish the viability of the cells and determine changes in their physiology. It was established that the frequency of cell treatments is important for the outcome. In the samples treated with single plasma application and double plasma applications with a 48 h interval, a 42.6% and 32.0% increase was observed in the number of cells, respectively. In addition, there were no signs of deoxyribonucleic acid breaks immediately after plasma application. In contrast, plasma application increased the accumulation of cells in the active phases of the cell cycle. The activation of proliferation correlated with a decrease in the level of β-galactosidase, a senescence marker. This could be due to cell renovation after plasma application. Daily treatment decreased cell proliferation up to 29.1% in comparison with the control after 3 d.

  10. Immunologic profiles of multiple sclerosis treatments reveal shared early B cell alterations

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, James; Pauwels, Ine; Franckaert, Dean; Smets, Ide; Garcia-Perez, Josselyn E.; Hilven, Kelly; Danso-Abeam, Dina; Terbeek, Joanne; Nguyen, Anh T.L.; De Muynck, Louis; Decallonne, Brigitte; Dubois, Bénédicte

    2016-01-01

    Objective: We undertook a systems immunology approach of the adaptive immune system in multiple sclerosis (MS), overcoming tradeoffs between scale and level of detail, in order to identify the immunologic signature of MS and the changes wrought by current immunomodulatory treatments. Methods: We developed a comprehensive flow cytometry platform measuring 38 immunologic cell types in the peripheral blood of 245 individuals in a routine clinical setting. These include patients with MS, untreated or receiving any of 4 current immunomodulatory treatments (interferon-β, glatiramer acetate, natalizumab, or fingolimod), patients with autoimmune thyroid disease, and healthy controls. Results: An increase in memory CD8+ T cells and B cells was observed in untreated patients with MS. Interferon-β and fingolimod induce significant changes upon multiple aspects of the peripheral immune system, with an unexpectedly prominent alteration of B cells. Overall, both treatments push the immune system in different directions, with only 2 significant effects shared across these treatments—an increase in transitional B cells and a decrease in class-switched B cells. We further identified heightened B cell-activating factor (BAFF) levels as regulating this shared B cell pathway. Conclusions: A systems immunology approach established different immunologic profiles induced by current immunomodulatory MS treatments, offering perspectives for personalized medicine. Pathways shared between the immunologic architecture of existing efficacious treatments identify targets for future treatment design. PMID:27231713

  11. Proliferation enhancement of budding yeast and mammalian cells with periodic oxygen radical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Yosuke; Kobayashi, Jun; Murata, Tomiyasu; Hahizume, Hiroshi; Hori, Masaru; Ito, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    Recently, nonequilibrium atmospheric-pressure plasmas have been intensively studied for biological applications. However, the each effect of species in plasmas to biological tissue has not been clarified yet because various factors exist in the plasmas. Accordingly, we have studied effects of atomic oxygen dose on cell growth such as budding yeast and mouse NIH3T3 fibroblasts of mammalian cells. Both of cells were suspended with PBS, and treated using oxygen radical source. In order to prevent the radicals from reacting with the ambient air, the treatment region was surrounded by a plastic cover and purged with Ar. The proliferative effect of 15 % was observed at the O3Pj dose of around 1 . 0 ×1017 cm-3 in NIH3T3 cells as well as in yeast cells. Moreover, periodic oxygen treatment enhanced the effect in budding yeast cells. The best interval of periodic oxygen radical treatment was around 2 hours, which is almost the same period as that of their cell cycle. With the optimum interval time, we have investigated the effect of the number of the treatments. As the number of treatments increases, the growth rate of budding yeast cells was gradually enhanced and saturated at thrice treatments. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant Numbers 26286072 and project for promoting Research Center in Meijo University.

  12. Long and short term effects of plasma treatment on meristematic plant cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puač, N.; Živković, S.; Selaković, N.; Milutinović, M.; Boljević, J.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-05-01

    In this paper, we will present results of plasma treatments of meristematic cells of Daucus carota. Plasma needle was used as an atmospheric pressure/gas composition source of non-equilibrium plasma in all treatments. Activity of antioxidant enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase was measured immediately after plasma treatment and after two weeks following the treatment. Superoxide dismutase activity was increased in samples immediately after the plasma treatment. On the other hand, catalase activity was much higher in treated samples when measured two weeks after plasma treatment. These results show that there is a direct proof of the triggering of signal transduction in the cells by two reactive oxygen species H2O2 and O2-, causing enzyme activity and short and long term effects even during the growth of calli, where the information is passed to newborn cells over the period of two weeks.

  13. Evaluation of Biofield Treatment Dose and Distance in a Model of Cancer Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Shrikant; Dave, Umang; Alves-dos-Santos, Leonardo; Gon, Kimberly; Arauz, Robert; Rachlin, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective This study assessed the potential influence of biofield treatment on cultured human cancer cells and whether such influence was affected by varying the duration of the treatment (dose) or the distance between the biofield practitioner and the target cells. Design Biofield treatment dosage was assessed from a short distance (0.25 meters) in three independent experiments involving 1, 2, or 5 treatments, along with another set of three independent and comparable mock experiments. Biofield treatment distance was assessed at 0.25, 25, and ∼ 2000 meters involving two treatments in three independent experiments along with another set of three mock experiments. Intervention Biofield treatments were delivered by a highly acclaimed biofield practitioner with the intention of diminishing growth of the cells or inducing cancer-cell death. Outcome measure Cell viability was quantified 20 hours after treatments, using a spectrophotometric assay for live-cell counting. The dependent measure for each experiment was the log ratio of the cell viability values of treated samples (biofield or mock) over the values of untreated control samples. Results A trend of decreasing cell viability with increasing biofield dose was evident in the first set of experiments assessing dose–response; however, no such effect was evident in the second set of experiments evaluating biofield treatment distance. Mock experiments yielded relatively stable viability ratios in both sets of experiments. Linear regression analysis and hypothesis testing of the data taken as a whole did not yield statistical significance at p<0.05. Conclusions These results represent the first indication of a biofield treatment dose–response in a controlled laboratory setting. The data are inconclusive because of the inability of reproduce the cellular response in a replicate experiment. PMID:22732075

  14. CD52-Negative NK Cells Are Abundant in the Liver and Less Susceptible to Alemtuzumab Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matsuura, Toshiharu; Muraoka, Izumi; Tryphonopoulos, Panagiotis; Fan, Ji; Tekin, Akin; Selvaggi, Gennaro; Levi, David; Ruiz, Phillip; Ricordi, Camillo; Vianna, Rodrigo; Ohdan, Hideki; Waldmann, Herman; Tzakis, Andreas G.; Nishida, Seigo

    2016-01-01

    Background T-cell depleting strategies have become an integral part of immunosuppressive regimens in organ transplantation. Alemtuzumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody against CD52, a cell-surface antigen on several immune cells. It has been suggested that lymphocyte depletion increases the risk of serious infections. However, this has not been observed with short-term alemtuzumab treatment in an organ transplant setting. For induction therapy using alemtuzumab following liver transplantation, we found that T- and B-cell numbers declined rapidly after alemtuzumab therapy; however, the natural killer (NK) cell number was sustained. NK cells are important effectors of innate immunity. Since the effects of alemtuzumab on NK cell functions, especially those of liver NK cells, are unknown, this study aimed to investigate this in detail. Methods To assess the effect of alemtuzumab on NK cells, samples were obtained from 7 organ donors and examined by flow cytometry using Annexin V and propidium iodide. Phenotypical and functional differences within subsets of NK cells with different levels of CD52 expression were determined by flow cytometry and in vitro cytotoxicity assays. Results CD52 expression on NK cells was lower than that on other lymphocyte subsets. The liver contained a large number of CD52− NK cells compared with the peripheral blood. In vitro treatment of liver-derived NK cells with alemtuzumab did not result in cell death. In contrast, co-incubation with alemtuzumab induced cell death in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and non-NK cells in the liver. Furthermore, CD52− liver NK cells were more cytotoxic and produced more IFN-γ than CD52+ NK cells after cytokine activation. Conclusion The liver contains a large number of CD52− NK cells. These cells are refractory to alemtuzumab and have robust activity. These findings indicate that CD52− NK cells persist and could protect against infection after alemtuzumab-based lymphocyte depletion. PMID

  15. Prolonged insulin treatment sensitizes apoptosis pathways in pancreatic β cells.

    PubMed

    Bucris, E; Beck, A; Boura-Halfon, S; Isaac, R; Vinik, Y; Rosenzweig, T; Sampson, S R; Zick, Y

    2016-09-01

    Insulin resistance results from impaired insulin signaling in target tissues that leads to increased levels of insulin required to control plasma glucose levels. The cycle of hyperglycemia and hyperinsulinemia eventually leads to pancreatic cell deterioration and death by a mechanism that is yet unclear. Insulin induces ROS formation in several cell types. Furthermore, death of pancreatic cells induced by oxidative stress could be potentiated by insulin. Here, we investigated the mechanism underlying this phenomenon. Experiments were done on pancreatic cell lines (Min-6, RINm, INS-1), isolated mouse and human islets, and on cell lines derived from nonpancreatic sources. Insulin (100nM) for 24h selectively increased the production of ROS in pancreatic cells and isolated pancreatic islets, but only slightly affected the expression of antioxidant enzymes. This was accompanied by a time- and dose-dependent decrease in cellular reducing power of pancreatic cells induced by insulin and altered expression of several ER stress response elements including a significant increase in Trb3 and a slight increase in iNos The effect on iNos did not increase NO levels. Insulin also potentiated the decrease in cellular reducing power induced by H2O2 but not cytokines. Insulin decreased the expression of MCL-1, an antiapoptotic protein of the BCL family, and induced a modest yet significant increase in caspase 3/7 activity. In accord with these findings, inhibition of caspase activity eliminated the ability of insulin to increase cell death. We conclude that prolonged elevated levels of insulin may prime apoptosis and cell death-inducing mechanisms as a result of oxidative stress in pancreatic cells. PMID:27411561

  16. Islet amyloid polypeptide in proliferating pancreatic B cells during development, hyperplasia, and neoplasia in humans and mice.

    PubMed Central

    Rindi, G.; Terenghi, G.; Westermark, G.; Westermark, P.; Moscoso, G.; Polak, J. M.

    1991-01-01

    The occurrence of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP) immunoreactivity was investigated in fetal pancreas, islet cell hyperplasia, and tumors in humans and mice. Transgenic mice heritably developing endocrine tumors of the pancreas (AVP/SV40, Rip 1 Tag2/Rip2PyST1 and Glu2-Tag strains) were used as murine models of islet cells proliferative disease. In the mouse, IAPP immunoreactivity was found in B cells at embryonic day 12 (E12), paralleling the onset of insulin immunoreactivity. In hyperplastic/dysplastic islets and in B-cell tumors of transgenic mice (n = 16), IAPP immunoreactivity was localized consistently to insulin-immunoreactive cells. Ultrastructural single- and double-immunogold labeling of transgenic mice B-cell tumors (n = 3) showed insulin and IAPP to be colocalized in beta granules. In human fetuses, IAPP immunoreactivity was found in insulin-immunoreactive B cells, but at a later gestational age than the onset of insulin immunoreactivity. In pancreatic specimens of infantile/neonatal persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia (11 cases) and in pancreatic endocrine tumors (21 cases, 10 of which were functioning insulinomas), IAPP immunoreactivity was found consistently in insulin-immunoreactive B cells. Congo-red-positive amyloid deposits present in tumors also were IAPP immunoreactive. Ultrastructural single and double immunogold labeling of infantile/neonatal persistent hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia cases (n = 3) and functioning insulinomas (n = 2) showed IAPP and insulin to be colocalized in beta granules. In addition, IAPP immunoreactivity was observed in amyloidlike fibrils. These findings indicate that IAPP is a constitutive component of B cells. Possible relationships between IAPP and insulin expression and interspecies differences are suggested and discussed. Images Figure 2 Figure 1 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 PMID:1647136

  17. Ultrasound-stimulated microbubble enhancement of radiation treatments: endothelial cell function and mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Al-Mahrouki, Azza A.; Wong, Emily; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2015-01-01

    Endothelial cell death caused by novel microbubble-enhanced ultrasound cancer therapy leads to secondary tumour cell death. In order to characterize and optimize these treatments, the molecular mechanisms resulting from the interaction with endothelial cells were investigated here. Endothelial cells (HUVEC) were treated with ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles (US/MB), radiation (XRT), or a combination of US/MB+XRT. Effects on cells were evaluated at 0, 3, 6, and 24 hours after treatment. Experiments took place in the presence of modulators of sphingolipid-based signalling including ceramide, fumonisin B1, monensin, and sphingosine-1-phosphate. Experimental outcomes were evaluated using histology, TUNEL, clonogenic survival methods, immuno-fluorescence, electron microscopy, and endothelial cell blood-vessel-like tube forming assays. Fewer cells survived after treatment using US/MB+XRT compared to either the control or XRT. The functional ability to form tubes was only reduced in the US/ MB+XRT condition in the control, the ceramide, and the sphingosine-1-phosphate treated groups. The combined treatment had no effect on tube forming ability in either the fumonisin B1 or in the monensin exposed groups, since both interfere with ceramide production at different cellular sites. In summary, experimental results supported the role of ceramide signalling as a key element in cell death initiation with treatments using US/MB+XRT to target endothelial cells. PMID:26909363

  18. Controlled Payload Release by Magnetic Field Triggered Neural Stem Cell Destruction for Malignant Glioma Treatment.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Morshed, Ramin A; Cheng, Yu; Vemulkar, Tarun; Mansell, Rhodri; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S; Cowburn, Russell P; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have recently garnered attention as drug and particle carriers to sites of tumors, due to their natural ability to track to the site of interest. Specifically, neural stem cells (NSCs) have demonstrated to be a promising candidate for delivering therapeutics to malignant glioma, a primary brain tumor that is not curable by current treatments, and inevitably fatal. In this article, we demonstrate that NSCs are able to internalize 2 μm magnetic discs (SD), without affecting the health of the cells. The SD can then be remotely triggered in an applied 1 T rotating magnetic field to deliver a payload. Furthermore, we use this NSC-SD delivery system to deliver the SD themselves as a therapeutic agent to mechanically destroy glioma cells. NSCs were incubated with the SD overnight before treatment with a 1T rotating magnetic field to trigger the SD release. The potential timed release effects of the magnetic particles were tested with migration assays, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis. After the magnetic field triggered SD release, glioma cells were added and allowed to internalize the particles. Once internalized, another dose of the magnetic field treatment was administered to trigger mechanically induced apoptotic cell death of the glioma cells by the rotating SD. We are able to determine that NSC-SD and magnetic field treatment can achieve over 50% glioma cell death when loaded at 50 SD/cell, making this a promising therapeutic for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26734932

  19. Controlled Payload Release by Magnetic Field Triggered Neural Stem Cell Destruction for Malignant Glioma Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Muroski, Megan E.; Morshed, Ramin A.; Cheng, Yu; Vemulkar, Tarun; Mansell, Rhodri; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Aboody, Karen S.; Cowburn, Russell P.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have recently garnered attention as drug and particle carriers to sites of tumors, due to their natural ability to track to the site of interest. Specifically, neural stem cells (NSCs) have demonstrated to be a promising candidate for delivering therapeutics to malignant glioma, a primary brain tumor that is not curable by current treatments, and inevitably fatal. In this article, we demonstrate that NSCs are able to internalize 2 μm magnetic discs (SD), without affecting the health of the cells. The SD can then be remotely triggered in an applied 1 T rotating magnetic field to deliver a payload. Furthermore, we use this NSC-SD delivery system to deliver the SD themselves as a therapeutic agent to mechanically destroy glioma cells. NSCs were incubated with the SD overnight before treatment with a 1T rotating magnetic field to trigger the SD release. The potential timed release effects of the magnetic particles were tested with migration assays, confocal microscopy and immunohistochemistry for apoptosis. After the magnetic field triggered SD release, glioma cells were added and allowed to internalize the particles. Once internalized, another dose of the magnetic field treatment was administered to trigger mechanically induced apoptotic cell death of the glioma cells by the rotating SD. We are able to determine that NSC-SD and magnetic field treatment can achieve over 50% glioma cell death when loaded at 50 SD/cell, making this a promising therapeutic for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26734932

  20. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. Methods 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. Results This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. Conclusion DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013. PMID:24720900

  1. Treatment-induced cell cycle kinetics dictate tumor response to chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Hallett, Robin M.; Huang, Cheng; Motazedian, Ali; Auf der Mauer, Stefanie; Pond, Gregory R.; Hassell, John A.; Nordon, Robert E.; Draper, Jonathan S.

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy fails to provide durable cure for the majority of cancer patients. To identify mechanisms associated with chemotherapy resistance, we identified genes differentially expressed before and after chemotherapeutic treatment of breast cancer patients. Treatment response resulted in either increased or decreased cell cycle gene expression. Tumors in which cell cycle gene expression was increased by chemotherapy were likely to be chemotherapy sensitive, whereas tumors in which cell cycle gene transcripts were decreased by chemotherapy were resistant to these agents. A gene expression signature that predicted these changes proved to be a robust and novel index that predicted the response of patients with breast, ovarian, and colon tumors to chemotherapy. Investigations in tumor cell lines supported these findings, and linked treatment induced cell cycle changes with p53 signaling and G1/G0 arrest. Hence, chemotherapy resistance, which can be predicted based on dynamics in cell cycle gene expression, is associated with TP53 integrity. PMID:25749523

  2. Dimethyloxalylglycine may be enhance the capacity of neural-like cells in treatment of Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi Moravej, Fahimeh; Vahabian, Mehrangiz; Soleimani Asl, Sara

    2016-06-01

    Although using differentiated stem cells is the best proposed option for the treatment of Alzheimer disease (AD), an efficient differentiation and cell therapy require enhanced cell survival and homing and decreased apoptosis. It seems that hypoxia preconditioning via Dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG) may increase the capacity of MSC to induce neural like stem cells (NSCs). Furthermore, it can likely improve the viability of NSCs when transplanted into the brain of AD rats. PMID:27005959

  3. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency: Current Treatment Options and Emerging Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Haagdorens, Michel; Van Acker, Sara Ilse; Van Gerwen, Veerle; Ní Dhubhghaill, Sorcha; Koppen, Carina; Tassignon, Marie-José; Zakaria, Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Severe ocular surface disease can result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD), a condition leading to decreased visual acuity, photophobia, and ocular pain. To restore the ocular surface in advanced stem cell deficient corneas, an autologous or allogenic limbal stem cell transplantation is performed. In recent years, the risk of secondary LSCD due to removal of large limbal grafts has been significantly reduced by the optimization of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation (CLET). Despite the great successes of CLET, there still is room for improvement as overall success rate is 70% and visual acuity often remains suboptimal after successful transplantation. Simple limbal epithelial transplantation reports higher success rates but has not been performed in as many patients yet. This review focuses on limbal epithelial stem cells and the pathophysiology of LSCD. State-of-the-art therapeutic management of LSCD is described, and new and evolving techniques in ocular surface regeneration are being discussed, in particular, advantages and disadvantages of alternative cell scaffolds and cell sources for cell based ocular surface reconstruction. PMID:26788074

  4. Neuropeptide Y administration acutely increases hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity: lack of effect in other rat brain regions

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, D.A.; George, S.R.

    1987-12-21

    The effect of acute central administration of Neuropeptide Y (NPY) to adult male rats on the brain content of corticotropin-releasing factor immunoreactivity (CRF-ir) was investigated. The brain regions studied included frontal cortex, hippocampus, medulla-pons, midbrain-thalamus, cerebellum, neurointermediate lobe of pituitary, median eminence and the remaining hypothalamus. CRF-ir was determined in each of these regions using radioimmunoassay specific for rat CRF. CRF-ir was found to be significantly increased in the major site of CRF localization in the brain, the hypothalamus, in NPY-treated rats as compared to vehicle-treated controls either 15 minutes (p<0.025) or 45 minutes (p<0.005) post-injection. This increase was localized to the median eminence (p<0.05 after 15 minutes, p<0.01 after 45 minutes). No statistically significant differences were noted in any of the other brain regions assessed. Plasma adrenocorticotropin levels were also found to increase following NPY treatment, an effect which became significant after 45 minutes (p<0.05). These data show that NPY can alter the content of hypothalamic CRF and may play a role in its regulation. 33 references, 4 figures.

  5. DCE-MRI for Pre-Treatment Prediction and Post-Treatment Assessment of Treatment Response in Sites of Squamous Cell Carcinoma in the Head and Neck

    PubMed Central

    King, Ann D.; Chow, Steven Kwok Keung; Yu, Kwok-Hung; Mo, Frankie Kwok Fai; Yeung, David K. W.; Yuan, Jing; Law, Benjamin King Hong; Bhatia, Kunwar S.; Vlantis, Alexander C.; Ahuja, Anil T.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose It is important to identify patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) who fail to respond to chemoradiotherapy so that they can undergo post-treatment salvage surgery while the disease is still operable. This study aimed to determine the diagnostic performance of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE)-MRI using a pharmacokinetic model for pre-treatment predictive imaging, as well as post-treatment diagnosis, of residual SCC at primary and nodal sites in the head and neck. Material and Methods Forty-nine patients with 83 SCC sites (primary and/or nodal) underwent pre-treatment DCE-MRI, and 43 patients underwent post-treatment DCE-MRI, of which 33 SCC sites had a residual mass amenable to analysis. Pre-treatment, post-treatment and % change in the mean Ktrans, kep, ve and AUGC were obtained from SCC sites. Logistic regression was used to correlate DCE parameters at each SCC site with treatment response at the same site, based on clinical outcome at that site at a minimum of two years. Results None of the pre-treatment DCE-MRI parameters showed significant correlations with SCC site failure (SF) (29/83 sites) or site control (SC) (54/83 sites). Post-treatment residual masses with SF (14/33) had significantly higher kep (p = 0.05), higher AUGC (p = 0.02), and lower % reduction in AUGC (p = 0.02), than residual masses with SC (19/33), with the % change in AUGC remaining significant on multivariate analysis. Conclusion Pre-treatment DCE-MRI did not predict which SCC sites would fail treatment, but post-treatment DCE-MRI showed potential for identifying residual masses that had failed treatment. PMID:26657972

  6. Sensitivity of proliferating human breast epithelial cells to hypotonic treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstone, S.E.; Stanyon, R.; Lan, S.

    1982-12-01

    An assay for colony-forming cells of breast epithelia derived from normal and malignant surgical specimens is described using an IMR 90 fibroblast feeder layer. Their radiosensitivity (DO: 120-172) is consistent with the proliferative origin of the colonies. Distilled water inhibits proliferation of a proportion of the colony-forming cells after a 1-minute exposure. Continued detection of colonies after 10 minutes of exposure indicates that it is an inefficient way of completely eradicating proliferating epithelial cells of normal and malignant origin.

  7. Mast Cell Targeted Chimeric Toxin Can Be Developed as an Adjunctive Therapy in Colon Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shan; Li, Linmei; Shi, Renren; Liu, Xueting; Zhang, Junyan; Zou, Zehong; Hao, Zhuofang; Tao, Ailin

    2016-01-01

    The association of colitis with colorectal cancer has become increasingly clear with mast cells being identified as important inflammatory cells in the process. In view of the relationship between mast cells and cancer, we studied the effect and mechanisms of mast cells in the development of colon cancer. Functional and mechanistic insights were gained from ex vivo and in vivo studies of cell interactions between mast cells and CT26 cells. Further evidence was reversely obtained in studies of mast cell targeted Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin. Experiments revealed mast cells could induce colon tumor cell proliferation and invasion. Cancer progression was found to be related to the density of mast cells in colonic submucosa. The activation of MAPK, Rho-GTPase, and STAT pathways in colon cancer cells was triggered by mast cells during cell-to-cell interaction. Lastly, using an Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin we constructed, we confirmed the promoting effect of mast cells in development of colon cancer. Mast cells are a promoting factor of colon cancer and thus also a potential therapeutic target. The Fcε-PE40 chimeric toxin targeting mast cells could effectively prevent colon cancer in vitro and in vivo. Consequently, these data may demonstrate a novel immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of tumors. PMID:26978404

  8. Tanshinone I Enhances Neurogenesis in the Mouse Hippocampal Dentate Gyrus via Increasing Wnt-3, Phosphorylated Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β and β-Catenin Immunoreactivities.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bai Hui; Park, Joon Ha; Cho, Jeong Hwi; Kim, In Hye; Lee, Jae Chul; Lee, Tae-Kyeong; Ahn, Ji Hyeon; Tae, Hyun Jin; Shin, Bich Na; Kim, Jong-Dai; Kang, Il Jun; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, Yun Lyul

    2016-08-01

    Tanshinone I (TsI), a lipophilic diterpene extracted from Danshan (Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae), exerts neuroprotection in cerebrovascular diseases including transient ischemic attack. In this study, we examined effects of TsI on cell proliferation and neuronal differentiation in the subgranular zone (SGZ) of the mouse dentate gyrus (DG) using Ki-67, BrdU and doublecortin (DCX) immunohistochemistry. Mice were treated with 1 and 2 mg/kg TsI for 28 days. In the 1 mg/kg TsI-treated-group, distribution patterns of BrdU, Ki-67 and DCX positive ((+)) cells in the SGZ were similar to those in the vehicle-treated-group. However, in the 2 mg/kg TsI-treated-group, double labeled BrdU(+)/NeuN(+) cells, which are mature neurons, as well as Ki-67(+), DCX(+) and BrdU(+) cells were significantly increased compared with those in the vehicle-treated-group. On the other hand, immunoreactivities and protein levels of Wnt-3, β-catenin and serine-9-glycogen synthase kinase-3β (p-GSK-3β), which are related with morphogenesis, were significantly increased in the granule cell layer of the DG only in the 2 mg/kg TsI-treated-group. Therefore, these findings indicate that TsI can promote neurogenesis in the mouse DG and that the neurogenesis is related with increases of Wnt-3, p-GSK-3β and β-catenin immunoreactivities. PMID:27053301

  9. Akt inhibition improves irinotecan treatment and prevents cell emergence by switching the senescence response to apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Vétillard, Alexandra; Jonchère, Barbara; Moreau, Marie; Toutain, Bertrand; Henry, Cécile; Fontanel, Simon; Bernard, Anne-Charlotte; Campone, Mario; Guette, Catherine; Coqueret, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Activated in response to chemotherapy, senescence is a tumor suppressive mechanism that induces a permanent loss of proliferation. However, in response to treatment, it is not really known how cells can escape senescence and how irreversible or incomplete this pathway is. We have recently described that cells that escape senescence are more transformed than non-treated parental cells, they resist anoikis and rely on Mcl-1. In this study, we further characterize this emergence in response to irinotecan, a first line treatment used in colorectal cancer. Our results indicate that Akt was activated as a feedback pathway during the early step of senescence. The inhibition of the kinase prevented cell emergence and improved treatment efficacy, both in vitro and in vivo. This improvement was correlated with senescence inhibition, p21waf1 downregulation and a concomitant activation of apoptosis due to Noxa upregulation and Mcl-1 inactivation. The inactivation of Noxa prevented apoptosis and increased the number of emergent cells. Using either RNA interference or p21waf1-deficient cells, we further confirmed that an intact p53-p21-senescence pathway favored cell emergence and that its downregulation improved treatment efficacy through apoptosis induction. Therefore, although senescence is an efficient suppressive mechanism, it also generates more aggressive cells as a consequence of apoptosis inhibition. We therefore propose that senescence-inducing therapies should be used sequentially with drugs favoring cell death such as Akt inhibitors. This should reduce cell emergence and tumor relapse through a combined induction of senescence and apoptosis. PMID:26485768

  10. Monocytes and macrophages, implications for breast cancer migration and stem cell-like activity and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ward, Rebecca; Sims, Andrew H; Lee, Alexander; Lo, Christina; Wynne, Luke; Yusuf, Humza; Gregson, Hannah; Lisanti, Michael P; Sotgia, Federica; Landberg, Göran; Lamb, Rebecca

    2015-06-10

    Macrophages are a major cellular constituent of the tumour stroma and contribute to breast cancer prognosis. The precise role and treatment strategies to target macrophages remain elusive. As macrophage infiltration is associated with poor prognosis and high grade tumours we used the THP-1 cell line to model monocyte-macrophage differentiation in co-culture with four breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, T47D, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468) to model in vivo cellular interactions. Polarisation into M1 and M2 subtypes was confirmed by specific cell marker expression of ROS and HLA-DR, respectively. Co-culture with all types of macrophage increased migration of ER-positive breast cancer cell lines, while M2-macrophages increased mammosphere formation, compared to M1-macrophages, in all breast cancer cells lines. Treatment of cells with Zoledronate in co-culture reduced the "pro-tumourigenic" effects (increased mammospheres/migration) exerted by macrophages. Direct treatment of breast cancer cells in homotypic culture was unable to reduce migration or mammosphere formation.Macrophages promote "pro-tumourigenic" cellular characteristics of breast cancer cell migration and stem cell activity. Zoledronate targets macrophages within the microenvironment which in turn, reduces the "pro-tumourigenic" characteristics of breast cancer cells. Zoledronate offers an exciting new treatment strategy for both primary and metastatic breast cancer. PMID:26008983

  11. Bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-label-retaining cells in mouse terminal bronchioles.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Hiroki; Kudoh, Shinji; Udaka, Naoko; Kagayama, Motoko; Hassan, Wael; Hasegawa, Kohki; Niimori-Kita, Kanako; Ito, Takaaki

    2014-05-01

    Adult male mice were continuously treated with bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) for 1, 2, or 4 weeks by an osmotic pump. To detect BrdU-label-retaining cells (LRCs), putative progenitor/stem cells, other animals were continuously treated with BrdU for 2 weeks, and were then kept without any treatments for 2, 6, or 18 months. The lungs were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde, and were paraffin-embedded. We observed terminal bronchioles with BrdU immunostaining alone or with BrdU immunostaining accompanying immunostaining for Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), forkhead box protein J1 (FoxJ1), or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). The average incidences of BrdU-incorporated cells in the terminal bronchioles after 1, 2, and 4 weeks of continuous BrdU infusion were 6.2%, 11.9%, and 23.1%, respectively. Most BrdU-incorporated cells in these periods were CCSP-immunoreactive (91.7%, 91.3%, and 88.2%, respectively), which means progenitor function of Clara cells. FoxJ1-immunoreactive BrdU-incorporated cells were fewer (5.4%, 3.0%, 2.7%, respectively). The average incidences of BrdU-LRCs in the terminal bronchioles after 2, 6, and 18 months were 7.2%, 4.3, and 2.7%, respectively. Most BrdU-LRCs were CCSP-immunoreactive (91.0%, 92.7%, and 89.6%, respectively), and FoxJ1-immunoreactive BrdU-LRCs were fewer (6.0%, 5.7%, and 2.1%, respectively). CGRP-positive BrdU-incorporated cells were occasional. CGRP-positive BrdU-LRCs were detected in 17.6% of neuroepithelial bodies (NEBs) at 2 months, but disappeared at 6 months. BrdU-positive stem cell candidates, which locate at the brochiolo-alveolar duct junction or cover NEB, were few throughout this study. In conclusion, in the lungs treated only with BrdU, CCSP-immunoreactive cells are important to maintain homeostasis in the terminal bronchiolar epithelium. PMID:24301684

  12. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    MedlinePlus

    ... are not supported by a current understanding of science Stem cells have tremendous promise to help us ... do to treat a specific condition. 5 The science behind a disease should match the science behind ...

  13. Curative treatment for severe sickle cell disease: allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Talano, Julie-An

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hematologic disorder that in its severe form can result in substantial morbidity and early mortality. Patients with this disorder can suffer from severe pain, lung disease, and strokes, resulting in chronic debilitating conditions, end organ dysfunction, and organ failure. The health care costs of caring for these chronically ill patients are substantial. Allogeneic transplantation is a modality that has the potential to cure these patients. To date, matched sibling donor transplantation is widely accepted as a standard of care for pediatric patients. Utilizing alternative donors for transplant is still under investigation, as is transplant for adult patients with sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the most recent data for hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:26352583

  14. Alteration of the electrophoretic mobility of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Skrabut, E.M.; Catsimpoolas, N.; Kurtz, S.R.; Griffith, A.L.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-12-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine the effects of DMSO and freezing on the electrophoretic distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Sodium (/sup 51/Cr)chromate was used to label the cells, and the distributions of cell number and cell-associated radioactivity were determined. Cells treated with DMSO had a narrower distribution of electrophoretic mobilities when compared with those not treated. DMSO-treated cells also demonstrated a more homogeneous distribution of radioactivity relative to the cell distribution than did the nontreated cells. The freezing of DMSO-treated cells did not result in any additional alteration of electrophoretic pattern compared to DMSO treatment alone. Analysis by linear categorization techniques indicated that the DMSO-treated and nontreated cells were completely distinguished by their electrophoretic behavior.

  15. iPS cell technology-based research for the treatment of diabetic nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Osafune, Kenji

    2012-09-01

    Regenerative medicine strategies using induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are among the candidate approaches to treat diabetic nephropathy caused by type 1 diabetes. Cell transplantation therapy and disease modeling with patient-derived iPS cells should be examined for diabetic renal disease. Considerable work already has been performed with regard to the generation of renal lineage cells from mouse embryonic stem cells, however, few reports have described research with human embryonic stem cells or iPS cells. Further elucidation of the mechanisms of kidney development and establishing the method for directed differentiation from human iPS cells into renal lineage cells will be required for the development of iPS cell technology-based treatment for diabetic nephropathy. PMID:23062989

  16. The innervation of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) liver: protein gene product 9.5 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivities

    PubMed Central

    ESTEBAN, F. J.; JIMÉNEZ, A.; BARROSO, J. B.; PEDROSA, J. A.; DEL MORAL, M. L.; RODRIGO, J.; PEINADO, M. A.

    1998-01-01

    We have explored the innervation of the rainbow trout (O. mykiss) liver using immunohistochemical procedures and light microscopy to detect in situ protein gene product 9.5 and neuronal nitric oxide synthase immunoreactivities (PGP-IR and NOS-IR). The results showed PGP-IR nerve fibres running with the extralobular biliary duct (EBD), hepatic artery (EHA) and portal vein (EPV) that form the hepatic hilum, as well as following the spatial distribution of the intrahepatic blood vessel and biliary channels. These nerve fibres appear as single varicose processes, thin bundles, or thick bundles depending on their diameter and location in the wall of the blood vessel or biliary duct. No PGP-IR fibres were detected in the liver parenchyma. NOS-IR nerve fibres were located only in the vessels and ducts that form the hepatic hilum (EBD, EHA, EPV); in addition, NOS-IR nerve cell bodies were found isolated or forming ganglionated plexuses in the peribiliary fibromuscular tissue of the EBD. No PGP-IR ganglionated plexuses were detected in the EBD. The location of the general (PGP-IR) and nitrergic (nNOS-IR) intrinsic nerves of the trout liver suggest a conserved evolutionary role of the nervous control of hepatic blood flow and hepatobiliary activity. PMID:9827640

  17. Apoptosis by Direct Current Treatment in Tumor Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongbae; Sim, Sungbo; Ahn, Saeyoung

    2003-10-01

    Electric field induces cell fusion, electroporation on biological cells, including apoptosis. Apoptosis is expressed in a series of natural enzymatic reactions for the natural elimination of unhealthy, genetically damaged, or otherwise aberrant cells that are not needed or not advantageous to the well-being of the organism. Its markers involve cell shrinkage, activation of intracellular caspase proteases, externalization of phosphatidylserine at the plasma membrane, and fragmentation of DNA. Direct electric fields using direct current have been exploited recently to investigate its effects on tumor cells and tissues, but the mechanism of direct electric fields has not been exhibited clearly other than by electroosmosis or pH changes. Direct electric field induces apoptosis in tumor cells cultured and tumor tissues as indicated by cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and tumor suppression. In our experiment that direct electric field was applied to tumor tissues via two needle electrodes inserted into tumor tissue 5mm at distance in parallel, pH changes resulted from electrochemical reaction, exhibiting about pH 9.0, 1.83, 2.0 in the vicinity of cathodic and anodic electrode, and at their mid-point, respectively. DNA fragmentation of tumor tissues destructed by direct electric field was analyzed by Tunel assay by ApopTag technology. As a result of this analysis, it showed that apoptosis in tumor tissue destructed was increased up to 59.1normal(control) tissues, showing 41.1, 31.1cathodic tissues. In vitro cell survival was exhibited that it was decreased with enhancing electric current intensity in the same condition of electrical charge 5C having different time applied. We will show results of apoptosis analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro.

  18. Human immunodeficiency virus contains an epitope immunoreactive with thymosin. cap alpha. /sub 1/ and the 30-amino acid synthetic p17 group-specific antigen peptide HGP-30

    SciTech Connect

    Naylor, P.H.; Naylor, C.W.; Badamchian, M.; Wada, S.; Goldstein, A.L.; Wang, S.S.; Sun, D.K.; Thornton, A.H.; Sarin, P.S.

    1987-05-01

    The authors have reported that an antiserum prepared against thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ (which shares a region of homology with the p17 protein of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated human immunodeficiency virus) effectively neutralized the AIDs virus and prevented its replication in H9 cells. Using HPLC and immunoblot analysis, they have identified from a clone B, type III human T-lymphotropic virus (HTLV-IIIB) extracts a protein with a molecular weight of 17,000 that is immunoreactive with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/. In contrast, no immunoreactivity was found in retroviral extracts from a number of nonhuman species including feline, bovine, simian, gibbon, and murine retroviruses. Heterologous antiserum prepared against a 30-amino acid synthetic peptide analogue (HGP-30) does not cross-react with thymosin ..cap alpha../sub 1/ but does react specifically with the p17 protein of the AIDS virus in a manner identical to that seen with an HTLV-IIIB p17-specific monoclonal antibody. The demonstration that this synthetic analogue is immunogenic and that antibodies to HGP-30 cross-react not only with synthetic peptide but also with the HTLV-IIIB p17 viral protein provides an additional, and potentially more specific, candidate for development of a synthetic peptide vaccine for AIDS. In addition, the p17 synthetic peptide (HGP-3) may prove to be useful in a diagnostic assay for the detection of AIDS virus infection in seronegative individuals.

  19. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies.

    PubMed

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-06-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  20. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell therapy in ischemic stroke: mechanisms of action and treatment optimization strategies

    PubMed Central

    Li, Guihong; Yu, Fengbo; Lei, Ting; Gao, Haijun; Li, Peiwen; Sun, Yuxue; Huang, Haiyan; Mu, Qingchun

    2016-01-01

    Animal and clinical studies have confirmed the therapeutic effect of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells on cerebral ischemia, but their mechanisms of action remain poorly understood. Here, we summarize the transplantation approaches, directional migration, differentiation, replacement, neural circuit reconstruction, angiogenesis, neurotrophic factor secretion, apoptosis, immunomodulation, multiple mechanisms of action, and optimization strategies for bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of ischemic stroke. We also explore the safety of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation and conclude that bone marrow mesenchymal stem cell transplantation is an important direction for future treatment of cerebral ischemia. Determining the optimal timing and dose for the transplantation are important directions for future research. PMID:27482235

  1. [Denosumab may be a supplement to the surgical treatment of giant cell tumours of bone].

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Anna Lynge; Hansen, Rehne Lessmann; Jørgensen, Peter Holmberg

    2016-09-01

    Giant cell tumour of bone (GCTB) is an aggressive bone tumour causing bone destruction. GCTB requires surgical treatment, and severe cases have a high risk of functional morbidity. GCTB consists of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B (RANK)-positive osteoclast-like giant cells. The formation and activity of these cells are mediated by the interaction with RANK ligand (RANKL) released from neoplastic stromal cells. Denosumab is a human monoclonal antibody which inhibits RANKL and impairs the growth of the GCTB. Several studies have described the ability of denosumab to downgrade the extent of surgical treatment and improve the functional outcome. PMID:27593237

  2. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  3. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  4. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  5. Potential of Adipose-Derived Stem Cells for Treatment of Erectile Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Guiting; Banie, Lia; Ning, Hongxiu; Bella, Anthony J.; Lin, Ching-Shwun; Lue, Tom F

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) are a somatic stem cell population contained in fat tissue that possess the ability for self-renewal, differentiation into one or more phenotypes and functional regeneration of damaged tissue, which will benefit the recovery of erectile function by using a stem cell based therapy. Aim To review available evidence concerning adipose derived stem cell availability, differentiation into functional cells, and the potential of these cells for the treatment of erectile dysfunction (ED). Methods We examined the current data associated with the definition and characterization of adipose derived stem cells, including the differentiation of these cells and the initial effects of adipose derived stem cell therapy in a rat model of erectile dysfunction. Main Outcome Measures There is strong evidence supporting the concept that ADSCs are a potential stem cell therapy source for treatment of erectile dysfunction. Results The adipose derived stem cells are paravascularly localized in the adipose tissue. Under specific induction medium conditions, these cells differentiated into neuron-like cells, smooth muscle cells and endothelium in vitro. The insulin-like growth factor/insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF/IGFR) pathway participates in neuronal differentiation while the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) pathway is involved in endothelium differentiation. In addition, the internal ribosomal entry sites (IRES) regulated gene translation is related to these types of differentiation. In a preliminary in-vivo experiment, the adipose derived stem cells functionally recovered the damaged erectile function. Therefore, the underlying mechanism needs be further examined. Conclusion The adipose derived stem cells are a potential source of stem cells for treatment of erectile dysfunction, which highlights the possibility of an effective clinical therapy for ED in the near future. PMID:19267855

  6. Knockdown of hTERT and Treatment with BIBR1532 Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Weimin; Lv, Nenan; Wysham, Weiya Z.; Roque, Dario R.; Zhang, Tongqing; Jiao, Simeng; Song, Dan; Chen, Jiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L.; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase activity and expression of the catalytic protein hTERT are associated with cell proliferation and advanced stage in endometrial cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of inhibition of hTERT by siRNA and BIBR1532 on cell growth, apoptosis and invasion in endometrial cancer cells. Knockdown of hTERT or treatment of the cells with BIBR1532 decreased telomerase activity, inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and reduced cell invasion in Ishikawa and ECC-1 cells. Either hTERT siRNA or BIBR1532 in combination with paclitaxel promoted a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth through induction of Annexin V expression and a remarkable reduction in cell invasion through reduction of protein expression of MMP9, MMP2, and MMP3. Increased telomerase activity and hTERT protein expression by transfections enhanced the protein expression of MMPs and increased the cell invasion ability. BIBR1532 significantly antagonized cell invasion induced by increased hTERT expression. These findings suggest that telomerase and hTERT facilitate cell invasion via MMP family in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:26640594

  7. Knockdown of hTERT and Treatment with BIBR1532 Inhibit Cell Proliferation and Invasion in Endometrial Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Kong, Weimin; Lv, Nenan; Wysham, Weiya Z; Roque, Dario R; Zhang, Tongqing; Jiao, Simeng; Song, Dan; Chen, Jiao; Bae-Jump, Victoria L; Zhou, Chunxiao

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase activity and expression of the catalytic protein hTERT are associated with cell proliferation and advanced stage in endometrial cancer. Our objective was to evaluate the effect of inhibition of hTERT by siRNA and BIBR1532 on cell growth, apoptosis and invasion in endometrial cancer cells. Knockdown of hTERT or treatment of the cells with BIBR1532 decreased telomerase activity, inhibited cell proliferation, induced apoptosis, and reduced cell invasion in Ishikawa and ECC-1 cells. Either hTERT siRNA or BIBR1532 in combination with paclitaxel promoted a synergistic inhibitory effect on cell growth through induction of Annexin V expression and a remarkable reduction in cell invasion through reduction of protein expression of MMP9, MMP2, and MMP3. Increased telomerase activity and hTERT protein expression by transfections enhanced the protein expression of MMPs and increased the cell invasion ability. BIBR1532 significantly antagonized cell invasion induced by increased hTERT expression. These findings suggest that telomerase and hTERT facilitate cell invasion via MMP family in human endometrial cancer cells. PMID:26640594

  8. Serum antibody immunoreactivity to equine zona protein after SpayVac vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mask, Tracy A; Schoenecker, Kathryn A; Kane, Albert J; Ransom, Jason I; Bruemmer, Jason E

    2015-07-15

    Immunocontraception with porcine ZP (pZP) can be an effective means of fertility control in feral horses. Previous studies suggest that antibodies produced after pZP vaccination may both inhibit fertilization and cause follicular dysgenesis. Zonastat-H, PZP-22, and SpayVac are three pZP vaccines proposed for use in horses. Although all these vaccines contain the pZP antigen, variations in antigen preparation and vaccine formulation lead to differences in antigenic properties among them. Likewise, despite numerous efficacy and safety studies of Zonastat-H and PZP-22, the contraceptive mechanisms of SpayVac remain unclear. The preparation of pZP for SpayVac is thought to include more nonzona proteins, making it less pure than the other two vaccines. This may result in increased antigenicity of the vaccine. We therefore investigated the immunoreactivity of serum antibodies from SpayVac-vaccinated mares to equine zona protein. Western blot analyses revealed an immunoreactivity of these antibodies to protein isolated from mature equine oocytes, ZP, follicular tissues, and ovarian tissues. Immunohistochemical analyses were used to locate the binding of serum antibodies to the ZP of immature oocytes in ovarian stromal tissue. We also found serum antibodies from SpayVac-treated mares to be predominantly specific for zona protein 3. Collectively, our results suggest a model where serum antibodies produced in response to SpayVac vaccination are immunoreactive to equine zona protein in vitro. Our study lends insight into the contraceptive mechanisms underlying the infertility observed after SpayVac vaccination. PMID:25922172

  9. Increased immunoreactive 11-ketotestosterone concentrations in sheep feces after acth challenge.

    PubMed

    Sid-Ahmed, Omer; Arias, Nino; Palme, Rupert; Möstl, Erich

    2013-06-01

    11-Oxoetiocholanolone and related substances are important metabolites of cortisol and are excreted via feces in ruminants. To investigate whether 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) or its immunoreactive metabolites are formed and excreted in ruminant feces, an enzyme immunoassay (EIA) was developed and validated. The antibody was raised in rabbits against 11-KT-3-CMO:bovine serum albumin with biotinylated 11-KT as a label. The assay showed a sensitivity of 0.3 pg/well. To validate the assay biologically, 6 rams were injected with a synthetic analogue of the adrenocorticotropic hormone (Synacthen, 2 µg/kg body wt). An aliquot was collected of each fecal portion spontaneously defecated 8 h before Synacthen injection to 24 h after injection and stored at -20 °C until analysis. Samples (0.5 g) were extracted using 80% methanol and immunoreactive metabolites measured using the 11-KT EIA and an already established 11,17-dioxoandrostane (11,17-DOA) EIA. High-performance liquid chromatography separation revealed no peak in the same elution position as authentic 11-KT; therefore, reacting substances were referred to as 11-KT equivalents. In the case of 11-KT immunoreactive substances, the values increased from baseline (median, 136 ng/g feces) to a peak concentration (median, 424 ng/g) 10 to 14 h after Synacthen injection and declined afterwards. Concentrations of 11,17-DOA showed the same pattern, but the values were 2 to 4 times higher. From this data, the authors conclude that 11-KT-like substances, specifically C19 O3 -androgens with a 17ß-hydroxy group, were present in the feces. These substances originate from the adrenals and are most likely cortisol metabolites. PMID:23404733

  10. Clusterin/Apolipoprotein J immunoreactivity is associated with white matter damage in cerebral small vessel diseases

    PubMed Central

    Craggs, Lucinda; Taylor, Julie; Slade, Janet Y.; Chen, Aiqing; Hagel, Christian; Kuhlenbaeumer, Gregor; Borjesson‐Hanson, Anne; Viitanen, Matti; Kalimo, Hannu; Deramecourt, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Brain clusterin is known to be associated with the amyloid‐β deposits in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We assessed the distribution of clusterin immunoreactivity in cerebrovascular disorders, particularly focusing on white matter changes in small vessel diseases. Methods Post‐mortem brain tissues from the frontal or temporal lobes of a total of 70 subjects with various disorders including cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL), cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and AD were examined using immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence. We further used immunogold electron microscopy to study clusterin immunoreactivity in extracellular deposits in CADASIL. Results Immunostaining with clusterin antibodies revealed strong localization in arterioles and capillaries, besides cortical neurones. We found that clusterin immunostaining was significantly increased in the frontal white matter of CADASIL and pontine autosomal dominant microangiopathy and leukoencephalopathy subjects. In addition, clusterin immunostaining correlated with white matter pathology severity scores. Immunostaining in axons ranged from fine punctate deposits in single axons to larger confluent areas with numerous swollen axon bulbs, similar to that observed with known axon damage markers such as non‐phosphorylated neurofilament H and the amyloid precursor protein. Immunofluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy experiments showed that whereas clusterin immunoreactivity was closely associated with vascular amyloid‐β in CAA, it was lacking within the granular osmiophilic material immunolabelled by NOTCH3 extracelluar domain aggregates found in CADASIL. Conclusions Our results suggest a wider role for clusterin associated with white matter damage in addition to its ability to chaperone proteins for clearance via the perivascular drainage pathways in several disease states. PMID:25940137

  11. Aberrant cell cycle regulation in rat liver cells induced by post-initiation treatment with hepatocarcinogens/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoters.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Masayuki; Mizukami, Sayaka; Watanabe, Yousuke; Onda, Nobuhiko; Yoshida, Toshinori; Shibutani, Makoto

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to determine the onset time of hepatocarcinogen/hepatocarcinogenic tumor promoter-specific cell proliferation, apoptosis and aberrant cell cycle regulation after post-initiation treatment. Six-week-old rats were treated with the genotoxic hepatocarcinogen, carbadox (CRB), the marginally hepatocarcinogenic leucomalachite green (LMG), the tumor promoter, β-naphthoflavone (BNF) or the non-carcinogenic hepatotoxicant, acetaminophen, for 2, 4 or 6 weeks during the post-initiation phase using a medium-term liver bioassay. Cell proliferation activity, expression of G2 to M phase- and spindle checkpoint-related molecules, and apoptosis were immunohistochemically analyzed at week 2 and 4, and tumor promotion activity was assessed at week 6. At week 2, hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific aberrant cell cycle regulation was not observed. At week 4, BNF and LMG increased cell proliferation together with hepatotoxicity, while CRB did not. Additionally, BNF and CRB reduced the number of cells expressing phosphorylated-histone H3 in both ubiquitin D (UBD)(+) cells and Ki-67(+) proliferating cells, suggesting development of spindle checkpoint dysfunction, regardless of cell proliferation activity. At week 6, examined hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increased preneoplastic hepatic foci expressing glutathione S-transferase placental form. These results suggest that some hepatocarcinogens/tumor promoters increase their toxicity after post-initiation treatment, causing regenerative cell proliferation. In contrast, some genotoxic hepatocarcinogens may disrupt the spindle checkpoint without facilitating cell proliferation at the early stage of tumor promotion. This suggests that facilitation of cell proliferation and disruption of spindle checkpoint function are induced by different mechanisms during hepatocarcinogenesis. Four weeks of post-initiation treatment may be sufficient to induce hepatocarcinogen/tumor promoter-specific cellular responses. PMID

  12. Sickle Cell Research: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Recent Developments | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Sickle Cell Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment and Recent Developments Past Issues / Winter 2011 Table of Contents Symptoms ... identify children at high risk for strokes. Recent Developments Research on bone marrow transplants, gene therapy, and ...

  13. Mantle cell lymphoma: biological insights and treatment advances.

    PubMed

    Leonard, John P; Williams, Michael E; Goy, Andre; Grant, Steven; Pfreundschuh, Michael; Rosen, Steve T; Sweetenham, John W

    2009-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) exhibits considerable molecular heterogeneity and complexity, and is regarded as one of the most challenging lymphomas to treat. With increased understanding of the pathobiology of MCL, it is proposed that MCL is the result of 3 major converging factors, namely, deregulated cell cycle pathways, defects in DNA damage responses, and dysregulation of cell survival pathways. In the present era of targeted therapies, these biologic insights have resulted in the identification of several novel rational targets for therapeutic intervention in MCL that are undergoing active clinical testing. To date, there is no standard of care in MCL. Several approaches including conventional anthracycline-based therapies and intensive high-dose strategies with and without stem cell transplantation have failed to produce durable remissions for most patients. Moreover, considering the heterogeneity of MCL, it is increasingly being recognized that risk-adapted therapy might be a relevant therapeutic approach in this disease. At the first and second Global Workshops on Mantle Cell Lymphoma, questions addressing advances in the pathobiology of MCL, optimization of existing therapies, assessment of current data with novel therapeutic strategies, and the identification of molecular or phenotypic risk factors for utilization in risk-adapted therapies were discussed and will be summarized herein. PMID:19717376

  14. Intrinsic caspase-8 activation mediates sensitization of erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to erlotinib/cell-cycle inhibitors combination treatment

    PubMed Central

    Orzáez, M; Guevara, T; Sancho, M; Pérez-Payá, E

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitors of the tyrosine kinase activity of epidermal growth factor receptor, as erlotinib, have an established role in treating several cancer types. However, resistance to erlotinib, particularly in breast cancer cell lines, and erlotinib treatment-associated disorders have also been described. Also, methods and combination therapies that could reverse resistance and ameliorate non-desirable effects represent a clinical challenge. Here, we show that the ATP non-competitive CDK2/cyclin A inhibitor NBI1 sensitizes erlotinib-resistant tumor cells to the combination treatment (co-treatment) for apoptosis-mediated cell death. Furthermore, in erlotinib-sensitive cells, the effective dose of erlotinib was lower in the presence of NBI1. The analysis in the breast cancer MDA-MB-468 erlotinib-resistant and in lung cancer A549 cell lines of the molecular mechanism underlying the apoptosis induced by co-treatment highlighted that the accumulation of DNA defects and depletion of cIAP and XIAP activates the ripoptosome that ultimately activates caspases-8 and -10 and apoptosis. This finding could have significant implications for future treatment strategies in clinical settings. PMID:23096116

  15. Resveratrol Treatment Inhibits Proliferation of and Induces Apoptosis in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Miao; Zhong, Lu-Xing; Zhan, Zheng-Yu; Huang, Zhi-Hao; Xiong, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Background Resveratrol, a natural isolate from plant sources, has a long and important history in traditional Chinese medicine. In the present study we investigated the effect of resveratrol on human colon cancer cell lines. Material/Methods We used the Cell Counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for determination of colon cancer cell viability. Apoptosis induction was analyzed using the DeadEnd™ Colorimetric TUNEL System (Promega, Madison, WI, USA). The siRNA Transfection Reagent kit (Santa Cruz Biotechnology, Inc.) was used for the administration of COX-2 silencer RNA (siRNA) into the colon cancer cells. Primer Express® software for Real-Time PCR ver. 3.0 (Applied Biosystems, Foster City, CA, USA) was used to prepare the primers for RT-PCR. Results The results revealed that exposure of colon cancer cells to resveratrol inhibited cell viability. Resveratrol exhibited a significant inhibitory effect on cell viability at 30 μM concentration after 48 h of exposure. We observed that 30-μM doses of resveratrol for 72 h led to 18, 29, and 34% reduction in the viability of HCA-17, SW480, and HT29 cells, respectively. It also significantly induced apoptosis in both of the tested carcinoma cell lines. The population of apoptotic cells in HCA-17 and SW480 cell lines after 48 h of resveratrol treatment was 59.8±4 and 67.2±4%, respectively, compared to 2.3±1% in the control cells. The colon cancer cells exposed to resveratrol showed significantly lower cyclooxygenase-2 and prostaglandin receptor expression. Treatment of colon cancer cells with the inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2, indomethacin, and administration of silencer RNA for cyclooxygenase-2 also produced similar results. Conclusions These findings suggest that resveratrol treatment can be a promising strategy for the treatment of colon cancer. PMID:27040803

  16. Decreased galectin-1 immunoreactivity of the skin in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Wada, Manabu; Ono, Seiitsu; Kadoya, Toshihiko; Kawanami, Toru; Kurita, Keiji; Kato, Takeo

    2003-04-15

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease involving motor neurons. In addition to motor neuron signs and symptoms, a lack of bedsores has been considered a feature of ALS. Recently, we revealed that galectin-1 is a component of the axonal spheroid, which is an early pathological change of the spinal cord in ALS. To investigate whether galectin-1 is associated with skin changes in ALS, we performed an immunohistochemical investigation using anti-galectin-1 antibodies. The present study revealed that galectin-1 immunoreactivity is reduced in the skin of patients with ALS, suggesting that cutaneous galectin-1 is involved in the pathological process of ALS. PMID:12639727

  17. Presence of dynorphin-like immunoreactivity but not opiate binding in Walker-256 tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, H.U.; Conroy, W.G.; Isom, G.E.; Malven, P.V.; Yim, G.K.W.

    1985-07-15

    Walker-256 tumor tissue was removed from rats on day 8 of tumor growth. An acidified methanol extract of the tumor tissue was assayed for immunoreactive (ir) dynorphin-A 1-17 (DYN-17) and ir-dynorphin-A (DYN-8). Levels of ir-DYN-17 and ir-DYN-8 were nearly 4- and 8-fold higher, respectively, in tumors versus normal muscle. However, tumor homogenates did not exhibit specific /sup 3/H-naloxone binding. These results indicate that although the Walker-256 carcinosarcoma may produce opioids, it is unlikely that these ectopic substances have direct opioid actions on the tumor itself. 34 references, 1 figure.

  18. Distribution and Chemical Coding of Corticotropin Releasing Factor-Immunoreactive Neurons in the Guinea-Pig Enteric Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Sumei; Gao, Na; Hu, Hong-Zhen; Wang, Xiyu; Wang, Guo-Du; Fang, Xiucai; Gao, Xiang; Xia, Yun; Wood, Jackie D.

    2008-01-01

    Immunofluorescence was used to study immunoreactivity (IR) for corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) in the guinea-pig enteric nervous system. CRF-IR was expressed in both the myenteric and submucosal plexuses of all regions of the large and small intestine and the myenteric plexus of the stomach. CRF-IR-nerve fibers were present in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses, in the circular muscle coat and surrounding submucosal arterioles. Most of the CRF-IR fibers persisted in the myenteric and submucosal plexuses after 7 days in organotypic culture. CRF-IR was not co-expressed with tyrosine hydroxylase-IR or calcitonin gene-related peptide-IR fibers. The proportions of CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus increased progressively from the stomach (0.6%) to the distal colon (2.8%). Most of the CRF-IR myenteric neurons (95%) had uniaxonal morphology; the remainder had Dogiel type II multipolar morphology. CRF-IR cell bodies in the myenteric plexus of the ileum expressed IR for choline acetyltransferase (56.9%), substance P (55.0%), and nitric oxide synthase (37.9%). CRF-IR never co-localized with IR for calbindin, calretinin, neuropeptide Y, serotonin or somatostatin in the myenteric plexus. CRF-IR cell bodies were more abundant in the submucosal plexus (29.9-38.0%) than in the myenteric plexus. All CRF-IR neurons in submucosal ganglia expressed vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR and were likely to be secretomotor/vasodilator neurons. CRF-IR neurons did not express IR for the CRF1 receptor. CRF1-IR was expressed in neuronal neighbors of those with CRF-IR. Collective evidence suggests that VIPergic secretomotor neurons might provide synaptic input to neighboring cholinergic neurons. PMID:16304680

  19. Aromatase immunoreactivity in the bluehead wrasse brain, Thalassoma bifasciatum: Immunolocalization and co-regionalization with arginine vasotocin and tyrosine hydroxylase

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, K. Erica; Creutz, Lela M.; Hawkins, M. Beth; Godwin, John

    2007-01-01

    Sex steroid hormones regulate various neural functions that regulate vertebrate sociosexual behavior. A number of sex steroids can be synthesized de novo in the brain, including estrogens by the enzyme aromatase. Aromatase, the neuropeptides arginine vasotocin/vasopressin, and the monoamine neurotransmitter dopamine have all been implicated in the control of male sexual and aggressive behavior in a variety of vertebrates. This study examined the expression of brain aromatase in a teleost fish, the bluehead wrasse (Thalassoma bifasciatum), a teleost fish that exhibits socially-controlled behavioral and gonadal sex change. We used immunocytochemistry (ICC) to characterize distributions of aromatase-immunoreactive (ir) cells, and to examine their relationship with AVT-ir neurons, and tyrosine hydroxylase-ir (TH-ir) neurons in the key sensory and integrative areas of the brain of this species. Aromatase-ir appeared to be in glial cell populations, and was found in the dorsal and ventral telencephalon, the preoptic area of the hypothalamus, and the lateral recess of the third ventricle, among other brain areas. Aromatase-ir fibers are closely associated with AVT-ir neurons throughout the preoptic area, indicating the potential for functional interactions. Aromatase-ir cell bodies and fibers were also co-regionalized with TH-ir neurons, suggesting possible interaction between the dopaminergic system and neural estrogen production. The presence of aromatase in brain regions important in the regulation of sexual and aggressive behavior suggests local estrogen synthesis could regulate sex change through effects on signaling systems that subserve reproductive behavior and function. PMID:17045250

  20. Organisation and tyrosine hydroxylase and calretinin immunoreactivity in the main olfactory bulb of paca (Cuniculus paca): a large caviomorph rodent.

    PubMed

    Sasahara, Tais Harumi de Castro; Leal, Leonardo Martins; Spillantini, Maria Grazia; Machado, Márcia Rita Fernandes

    2015-04-01

    The majority of neuroanatomical and chemical studies of the olfactory bulb have been performed in small rodents, such as rats and mice. Thus, this study aimed to describe the organisation and the chemical neuroanatomy of the main olfactory bulb (MOB) in paca, a large rodent belonging to the Hystricomorpha suborder and Caviomorpha infraorder. For this purpose, histological and immunohistochemical procedures were used to characterise the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and calretinin (CR) neuronal populations and their distribution. The paca MOB has eight layers: the olfactory nerve layer (ONL), the glomerular layer (GL), the external plexiform layer (EPL; subdivided into the inner and outer sublayers), the mitral cell layer (MCL), the internal plexiform layer (IPL), the granule cell layer (GCL), the periventricular layer and the ependymal layer. TH-ir neurons were found mostly in the GL, and moderate numbers of TH-ir neurons were scattered in the EPL. Numerous varicose fibres were distributed in the IPL and in the GCL. CR-ir neurons concentrated in the GL, around the base of the olfactory glomeruli. Most of the CR-ir neurons were located in the MCL, IPL and GCL. Some of the granule cells had an apical dendrite with a growth cone. The CR immunoreactivity was also observed in the ONL with olfactory nerves strongly immunostained. This study has shown that the MOB organisation in paca is consistent with the description in other mammals. The characterisation and distribution of the population of TH and CR in the MOB is not exclusively to this species. This large rodent shares common patterns to other caviomorph rodent, as guinea pig, and to the myomorph rodents, as mice, rats and hamsters. PMID:25622576

  1. Mycobacterial cell walls. I. Methods of preparation and treatment with various chemicals.

    PubMed

    TAKEYA, K; HISATSUNE, K

    1963-01-01

    Takeya, Kenji (Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan) and Kazuhito Hisatsune. Mycobacterial cell walls. I. Methods of preparation and treatment with various chemicals. J. Bacteriol. 85:16-23. 1963.-Several methods of preparation of mycobacterial cell walls were examined, and the grinding method with glass powder, using Dry Ice, was found to give fairly good cell-wall preparations. "Paired fibrous structures" were clearly seen on the purified cell wall. The appearance of the cell wall as revealed by the electron microscope was not altered by digestion with trypsin, pronase, or pronase in 5% alcoholic solution, nor by treatment with 95% alcohol, acetone-alcohol mixture, or ether-alcohol mixture. By treatment with alcoholic KOH solution, the fibrous structure was removed. The remaining thin layer of the cell wall was tentatively designated the "basal layer" of the mycobacterial cell wall. The fibers appeared also to be removed by chloroform treatment. Nagarse digestion seemed to solubilize some constituents of the cell wall. The cell wall lost its shape and rigidity after lysozyme digestion. PMID:13984703