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Sample records for cell mediated hypersensitivity

  1. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  2. A plant vacuolar protease, VPE, mediates virus-induced hypersensitive cell death.

    PubMed

    Hatsugai, Noriyuki; Kuroyanagi, Miwa; Yamada, Kenji; Meshi, Tetsuo; Tsuda, Shinya; Kondo, Maki; Nishimura, Mikio; Hara-Nishimura, Ikuko

    2004-08-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) in animals depends on caspase protease activity. Plants also exhibit PCD, for example as a response to pathogens, although a plant caspase remains elusive. Here we show that vacuolar processing enzyme (VPE) is a protease essential for a virus-induced hypersensitive response that involves PCD. VPE deficiency prevented virus-induced hypersensitive cell death in tobacco plants. VPE is structurally unrelated to caspases, although VPE has a caspase-1 activity. Thus, plants have evolved a regulated cellular suicide strategy that, unlike PCD of animals, is mediated by VPE and the cellular vacuole. PMID:15297671

  3. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  4. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yun, James; Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-04-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B(*)57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B(*)57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  5. Different immune cells mediate mechanical pain hypersensitivity in male and female mice

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Robert E.; Mapplebeck, Josiane C.S.; Rosen, Sarah; Beggs, Simon; Taves, Sarah; Alexander, Jessica K.; Martin, Loren J.; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Sotocinal, Susana G.; Chen, Di; Yang, Mu; Shi, Xiang Qun; Huang, Hao; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Bilan, Philip J.; Tu, Yu Shan; Klip, Amira; Ji, Ru-Rong; Zhang, Ji; Salter, Michael W.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing body of evidence indicates that microglia-neuron signaling is essential for chronic pain hypersensitivity. Here we show using multiple approaches that microglia are not required for mechanical pain hypersensitivity in female mice; female mice achieve similar levels of pain hypersensitivity using adaptive immune cells, likely T-lymphocytes. This sexual dimorphism suggests that male mice cannot be used as proxies for females in pain research. PMID:26120961

  6. Colon distention induces persistent visceral hypersensitivity by mechanotranscription of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, You-Min; Fu, Yu; Wu, Chester C; Xu, Guang-Yin; Huang, Li-Yen; Shi, Xuan-Zheng

    2015-03-01

    Abdominal pain and distention are major complaints in irritable bowel syndrome. Abdominal distention is mainly attributed to intraluminal retention of gas or solid contents, which may cause mechanical stress to the gut wall. Visceral hypersensitivity (VHS) may account for abdominal pain. We sought to determine whether tonic colon distention causes persistent VHS and if so whether mechanical stress-induced expression (mechanotranscription) of pain mediators in colonic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) plays a role in VHS. Human colonic SMCs were isolated and stretched in vitro to investigate whether mechanical stress upregulates expression of the pain mediator cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2). Rat colon was distended with a 5-cm-long balloon, and gene expression of COX-2, visceromotor response (VMR), and sensory neuron excitability were determined. Static stretch of colonic SMCs induced marked expression of COX-2 mRNA and protein in a force- and time-dependent manner. Subnoxious tonic distention of the distal colon at ∼30-40 mmHg for 20 or 40 min induced COX-2 expression and PGE2 production in colonic smooth muscle, but not in the mucosa layer. Lumen distention also increased VMR in a force- and time-dependent manner. The increase of VMR persisted for at least 3 days. Patch-clamp experiments showed that the excitability of colon projecting sensory neurons in the dorsal root ganglia was markedly augmented, 24 h after lumen distention. Administration of COX-2 inhibitor NS-398 partially but significantly attenuated distention-induced VHS. In conclusion, tonic lumen distention upregulates expression of COX-2 in colonic SMC, and COX-2 contributes to persistent VHS. PMID:25540231

  7. CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M.; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G+CD11b+ neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) β+ T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2+Ly6Chi) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b+Ly6G− myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  8. CD11b+Ly6G- myeloid cells mediate mechanical inflammatory pain hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Ghasemlou, Nader; Chiu, Isaac M; Julien, Jean-Pierre; Woolf, Clifford J

    2015-12-01

    Pain hypersensitivity at the site of inflammation as a result of chronic immune diseases, pathogenic infection, and tissue injury is a common medical condition. However, the specific contributions of the innate and adaptive immune system to the generation of pain during inflammation have not been systematically elucidated. We therefore set out to characterize the cellular and molecular immune response in two widely used preclinical models of inflammatory pain: (i) intraplantar injection of complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) as a model of adjuvant- and pathogen-based inflammation and (ii) a plantar incisional wound as a model of tissue injury-based inflammation. Our findings reveal differences in temporal patterns of immune cell recruitment and activation states, cytokine production, and pain in these two models, with CFA causing a nonresolving granulomatous inflammatory response whereas tissue incision induced resolving immune and pain responses. These findings highlight the significant differences and potential clinical relevance of the incisional wound model compared with the CFA model. By using various cell-depletion strategies, we find that, whereas lymphocyte antigen 6 complex locus G (Ly)6G(+)CD11b(+) neutrophils and T-cell receptor (TCR) β(+) T cells do not contribute to the development of thermal or mechanical pain hypersensitivity in either model, proliferating CD11b(+)Ly6G(-) myeloid cells were necessary for mechanical hypersensitivity during incisional pain, and, to a lesser extent, CFA-induced inflammation. However, inflammatory (CCR2(+)Ly6C(hi)) monocytes were not responsible for these effects. The finding that a population of proliferating CD11b(+)Ly6G(-) myeloid cells contribute to mechanical inflammatory pain provides a potential cellular target for its treatment in wound inflammation. PMID:26598697

  9. Role of dendritic cell-mediated abnormal immune response in visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Chu, Li; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that intestinal DCs induced visceral hypersensitivity in IBS rats through mast cell (MC) activation. The IBS rat model was established by combining colorectal distension with restraint stress. The number of CD103-positive cells in colon was higher in the IBS group. Expression of PAR-2, IL-4 and IL-9 in the colonic mucosa was higher in the IBS group. Mesenteric lymph node DCs (MLNDCs) and splenic CD4+/CD8+ T cells were isolated and purified by a magnetic labeling-based technique; they were cultured alone or co-cultured (T4+DC/T8+DC). The coculture of MLNDCs and CD4+ T cells had the highest IL-4 secretion in the IBS group, while IL-9 expression was higher in the cultures containing CD8+ T cells. Our findings indicate that an increased number of DCs in the colon stimulated CD4+ T cells to secrete high levels of IL-4, which led to the activation of MCs and subsequently resulted in visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26550249

  10. IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders.

    PubMed

    Gotua, M; Lomidze, N; Dolidze, N; Gotua, T

    2008-04-01

    Food allergy has become a serious health concern especially in developed countries in the past two decades. In general population approximately 4-6% of children and 1-3% of adults experience food allergy. The article reviews IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity disorders. Epidemiology, Mechanism, Clinical manifestations, Genetically modified crops (GMOs), Diagnosis, Prevention and Treatment of IgE-mediated food allergies are discussed. The investigations show that over 90% of IgE-mediated food allergies in childhood are caused by: cow's milk, hen's egg, soy, peanuts, tree nuts, wheat, fish and shellfish. Also the causes of food allergy are food additives, genetically modified crops. Risk factors for food-dependent exercise-induced anaphylaxis include asthma and previous allergic reactions to the causative food. Food allergy is one of the most common causes of systematic anaphylaxis and anaphylactoid reactions, with an annual incidence of four cases per million populations and estimated 500 deaths annually. In addition to gastrointestinal symptoms, individuals may experience urticaria, angioedema, atopic dermatitis, oral syndrome, asthma, rhinitis, conjunctivitis, hypotension, shock and cardiac arrhythmias, caused by the massive release of mediators from mast cells and basophiles. Diagnosis of food allergy is based on history, detailed dietary analysis, skin testing, measuring specific IgE in blood serum and challenge tests. Treatment and prevention includes: avoidance diet, application of auto-injectable epinephrine, H1 and H2 antihistamines, corticosteroids, antileukotrienes, prostaglandin synthetase inhibitors, cromolyn sodium, etc. PMID:18487689

  11. Hemolysate-mediated renal vasoconstriction and hypersensitization.

    PubMed

    Burke, T J; Falk, S; Conger, J D; Voelkel, N F

    1999-01-01

    The present studies measured vessel diameter, before and after addition of hemolysate, in isolated afferent arterioles (AA) and efferent arterioles (EA) obtained from the rat kidney. Human red blood cells (RBC) were hemolyzed in distilled water and membranes were discarded after centrifugation. Hemolysate added to the bath solution caused vigorous AA and EA contraction and, after washout, hypersensitized the AA and EA to doses of angiotensin II (AII) which would normally only elicit 50% contraction (EC50). Neither the contraction nor the hypersensitization were mimicked by pure human hemoglobin. The vasoconstrictive responses in the AA and EA were accompanied by increased cytosolic-free calcium concentration. Further purification (desalting) of the hemolysate to remove substance of < or = 1000 Da (which include ATP) did not eliminate the vasoconstrictive component from the hemolysate. Finally, cultured rat aortic vascular smooth muscle cells also demonstrated a rapid increase in (Ca2+i) when exposed to hemolysate. This increase in (Ca2+i) was, in part, dependent on Ca2+ influx since it could be attenuated with diltiazem (10(-5) M). In conclusion, hemolysate contains a factor which induces contractions of the isolated rat kidney AA and EA and rapid elevations in (Ca2+i). This factor, from hemolyzed RBC, is not hemoglobin itself. PMID:10048115

  12. CD22 expression mediates the regulatory functions of peritoneal B-1a cells during the remission phase of contact hypersensitivity reactions1

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Hiroko; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Watanabe, Rei; Ishiura, Nobuko; Kuwano, Yoshihiro; Okochi, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Tamaki, Kunihiko; Sato, Shinichi; Tedder, Thomas F.; Fujimoto, Manabu

    2013-01-01

    While contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered a prototype of T cell-mediated immune reactions, recently a significant contribution of regulatory B cell subsets in the suppression of CHS has been demonstrated. CD22, one of the Siglecs, is a B cell-specific molecule that negatively regulates B cell receptor signaling. To clarify the roles of B cells in CHS, CHS in CD22-/- mice was investigated. CD22-/- mice showed delayed recovery from CHS reactions compared with wild type mice. Transfer of wild type peritoneal B-1a cells reversed the prolonged CHS reaction seen in CD22-/- mice, and this was blocked by the simultaneous injection with IL-10 receptor Ab. While CD22-/- peritoneal B-1a cells were capable of producing IL-10 at wild type levels, intraperitoneal injection of differentially labeled wild type/CD22-/- B cells demonstrated that a smaller number of CD22-/- B cells resided in lymphoid organs 5 days after CHS elicitation, suggesting a defect in survival or retention in activated CD22-/- peritoneal B-1 cells. Thus, our current study reveals a regulatory role for peritoneal B-1a cells in CHS. Two distinct regulatory B cell subsets cooperatively inhibit CHS responses. While splenic CD1dhiCD5+ B cells have a crucial role in suppressing the acute exacerbating phase of CHS, peritoneal B-1a cells are likely to suppress the late remission phase as “regulatory B cells”. CD22 deficiency results in disturbed CHS remission by impaired retention or survival of peritoneal B-1a cells that migrate into lymphoid organs. PMID:20335532

  13. The antinociception of oxytocin on colonic hypersensitivity in rats was mediated by inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Liping; Li, Jing; Tang, Yan; Han, Ting; Wei, Chuanfei; Yu, Xiao; Li, Jingxin; Wang, Rong; Ma, Xuelian; Liu, Kejing; Geng, Lingyun; Liu, Shaozhuang; Yan, Bing; Liu, Chuanyong

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of oxytocin (OT) on visceral hypersensitivity/pain and mast cell degranulation and the underlying mechanisms. We found that oxytocin receptor (OTR) was expressed in colonic mast cells in humans and rats, as well as in human mast cell line-1 (HMC-1), rat basophilic leukemia cell line (RBL-2H3) and mouse mastocytoma cell line (P815). OT decreased 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-induced visceral hypersensitivity, colonic mast cell degranulation and histamine release after mast cell degranulation in rats. Also, OT attenuated the compound 48/80 (C48/80)-evoked histamine release in P815 cells and inward currents, responsible for the mast cell degranulation, in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells. Moreover, these protective effects of OT against visceral hypersensitivity and mast cell degranulation were eliminated by coadministration of OTR antagonist atosiban or a nonselective inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS), NG-Methyl-L-arginine acetate salt (L-NMMA). Notably, OT evoked a concentration-dependent increase of intracellular Ca2+ in HMC-1, RBL-2H3 and P815 cells, which was responsible for the activation of neuronal NOS (NOS1) and endothelial NOS (NOS3). Our findings strongly suggest that OT might exert the antinociception on colonic hypersensitivity through inhibition of mast cell degranulation via Ca2+-NOS pathway. PMID:27538454

  14. Nude mice produce a T cell-derived antigen-binding factor that mediates the early component of delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W R; Meade, R; Pettinicchi, A; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1989-03-15

    The elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in mice is caused by the sequential action of two different T cells. An early-acting, DTH-initiating T cell produces an Ag-specific T cell factor, that is analogous to IgE antibody and initiates DTH by sensitizing the local tissues for release of the vasoactive amine serotonin. In picryl chloride or oxazolone contact sensitivity, this T cell factor is Ag-specific, but MHC unrestricted. We, therefore, hypothesized that DTH-initiating T cells are primitive T cells with Ag receptors that can bind Ag without MHC restriction. In order to characterize the origin of this DTH-initiating T cell and the conditions that are necessary for its development, we contact-sensitized various strains of immunodeficient mice. Surprisingly, we found that the early phase of DTH was present in athymic nude mice. In contrast, the early component of DTH was absent in mice with severe combined immunodeficiency. These mice lack T and B cells, but have NK cells. These findings suggested that the early component of DTH was not caused by NK cells, and was caused by cells belonging to a lineage from a rearranging gene family. The early component of DTH in nude mice was Ag specific, was caused by MHC unrestricted Thy-1+ T cells, and was mediated by Ag-binding, Ag-specific T cell factors. We found that DTH-initiating, T cell-derived, Ag-binding molecules from nude mice and normal CBA/J mice had the same functional properties. The early component of DTH was elicited in two different systems (contact sensitivity and SRBC-specific DTH) in two strains of nude mice (BALB/c athymic nudes and CByB6F1/J-nu) from two different suppliers, but not in BALB/c and athymic nudes from a third supplier. From these findings we concluded that DTH-initiating T cells, which produce IgE-like Ag-specific T cell factors, are present in some strains of athymic nude mice and thus are relatively thymic independent T cells. PMID:2466077

  15. Hypersensitivity of A8344G MERRF mutated cybrid cells to staurosporine-induced cell death is mediated by calcium-dependent activation of calpains.

    PubMed

    Rommelaere, Guillaume; Michel, Sébastien; Malaisse, Jérémy; Charlier, Sophie; Arnould, Thierry; Renard, Patricia

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the mitochondrial DNA can lead to the development of mitochondrial diseases such as Myoclonic Epilepsy with Ragged Red Fibers (MERRF) or Mitochondrial Encephalomyopathy, Lactic Acidosis and Stroke-like episodes (MELAS). We first show that human 143B-derived cybrid cells harboring either the A8344G (MERRF) or the A3243G (MELAS) mutation, are more prone to undergo apoptosis then their wild-type counterpart, when challenged with various apoptotic inducers such as staurosporine, etoposide and TRAIL. In addition, investigating the mechanisms underlying A8344G cybrid cells hypersensitivity to staurosporine-induced cell death, we found that staurosporine treatment activates caspases independently of cytochrome c release in both wild-type and mutated cells. Caspases are activated, at least partly, through the activation of calcium-dependent calpain proteases, a pathway that is more strongly activated in mutated cybrid cells than in wild-type cells exposed to staurosporine. These results suggest that calcium homeostasis perturbation induced by mitochondrial dysfunction could predispose cells to apoptosis, a process that could take part into the progressive cell degeneration observed in MERRF syndrome, and more generally in mitochondrial diseases. PMID:22037425

  16. Loss of Calmodulin Binding to Bax Inhibitor-1 Affects Pseudomonas-mediated Hypersensitive Response-associated Cell Death in Arabidopsis thaliana*

    PubMed Central

    Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Hori, Zenta; Ogawa, Taro; Ihara-Ohori, Yuri; Tamura, Katsunori; Nagano, Minoru; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Uchimiya, Hirofumi

    2009-01-01

    Bax inhibitor-1 (BI-1) is a cell death suppressor protein conserved across a variety of organisms. The Arabidopsis atbi1-1 plant is a mutant in which the C-terminal 6 amino acids of the expressed BI-1 protein have been replaced by T-DNA insertion. This mutant BI-1 protein (AtBI-CM) produced in Escherichia coli can no longer bind to calmodulin. A promoter-reporter assay demonstrated compartmentalized expression of BI-1 during hypersensitive response, introduced by the inoculation of Pseudomonas syringae possessing the avrRTP2 gene, Pst(avrRPT2). In addition, both BI-1 knockdown plants and atbi1-1 showed increased sensitivity to Pst(avrRPT2)-induced cell death. The results indicated that the loss of calmodulin binding reduces the cell death suppressor activity of BI-1 in planta. PMID:19674971

  17. Flare-up reactions in severe drug hypersensitivity: infection or ongoing T-cell hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Jörg-Walther, Lukas; Schnyder, Benno; Helbling, Arthur; Helsing, Karin; Schüller, Alexandra; Wochner, Annette; Pichler, Werner

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message “Flare-up” reactions are late manifestations of severe T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. Management is anti-inflammatory treatment and avoiding unnecessary medicines. Symptoms like fever, lymph node swelling, and blood count abnormalities may lead to confusion with bacterial infections. For prompt recognition it is important to keep the differential diagnosis in mind. PMID:26509009

  18. Cytotoxicity Is Mandatory for CD8+ T Cell–mediated Contact Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Kehren, Jeanne; Desvignes, Cyril; Krasteva, Maya; Ducluzeau, Marie-Thérèse; Assossou, Olga; Horand, Françoise; Hahne, Michael; Kägi, David; Kaiserlian, Dominique; Nicolas, Jean-François

    1999-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell–mediated skin inflammation induced by epicutaneous exposure to haptens in sensitized individuals. We have previously reported that CHS to dinitrofluorobenzene in mice is mediated by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–restricted CD8+ T cells. In this study, we show that CD8+ T cells mediate the skin inflammation through their cytotoxic activity. The contribution of specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) to the CHS reaction was examined both in vivo and in vitro, using mice deficient in perforin and/or Fas/Fas ligand (FasL) pathways involved in cytotoxicity. Mice double deficient in perforin and FasL were able to develop hapten-specific CD8+ T cells in the lymphoid organs but did not show CHS reaction. However, they did not generate hapten-specific CTLs, demonstrating that the CHS reaction is dependent on cytotoxic activity. In contrast, Fas-deficient lpr mice, FasL-deficient gld mice, and perforin-deficient mice developed a normal CHS reaction and were able to generate hapten-specific CTLs, suggesting that CHS requires either the Fas/FasL or the perforin pathway. This was confirmed by in vitro studies showing that the hapten-specific CTL activity was exclusively mediated by MHC class I–restricted CD8+ T cells which could use either the perforin or the Fas/FasL pathway for their lytic activity. Thus, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells, commonly implicated in the host defence against tumors and viral infections, could also mediate harmful delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:10049941

  19. CD8+ T cell migration to the skin requires CD4+ help in a murine model of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Nanna; Wolff, Henrik; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in contact hypersensitivity responses have not been fully solved, and remain an important question. Using an adoptive transfer model, we investigated the role of the respective T cell subset. Magnetic bead separated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from oxazolone sensitized C57BL/6 mice were transferred into RAG-/- mice, followed by hapten challenge and analysis of inflammatory parameters at 24 hours post exposure. The CD4+ T cell recipient mice developed partial contact hypersensitivity responses to oxazolone. CD8+ T cells caused significant amplification of the response in recipients of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells including ear swelling, type 1 inflammatory mediators, and cell killing. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were not sufficient to mediate contact hypersensitivity, although abundantly present in the lymph nodes in the CD8+ T cell reconstituted mice. There were no signs of inflammation at the site of hapten exposure, indicating impaired recruitment of CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD4+ T cells. These data show that CD4+ T cells mediate contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone, but CD8+ T cells contribute with the most potent effector mechanisms. Moreover, our results suggest that CD4+ T cell function is required for the mobilization of CD8+ effector T cells to the site of hapten exposure. The results shed new light on the relative importance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the effector phase of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:22916101

  20. Peripheral NMDA Receptors Mediate Antidromic Nerve Stimulation-Induced Tactile Hypersensitivity in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jun Ho; Nam, Taick Sang; Jun, Jaebeom; Jung, Se Jung; Kim, Dong-Wook; Leem, Joong Woo

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the role of peripheral NMDA receptors (NMDARs) in antidromic nerve stimulation-induced tactile hypersensitivity outside the skin area innervated by stimulated nerve. Tetanic electrical stimulation (ES) of the decentralized L5 spinal nerve, which induced enlargement of plasma extravasation, resulted in tactile hypersensitivity in the L4 plantar dermatome of the hind-paw. When intraplantar (i.pl.) injection was administered into the L4 dermatome before ES, NMDAR and group-I metabotropic Glu receptor (mGluR) antagonists and group-II mGluR agonist but not AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. I.pl. injection of PKA or PKC inhibitors also prevented ES-induced hypersensitivity. When the same injections were administered after establishment of ES-induced hypersensitivity, hypersensitivity was partially reduced by NMDAR antagonist only. In naïve animals, i.pl. Glu injection into the L4 dermatome induced tactile hypersensitivity, which was blocked by NMDAR antagonist and PKA and PKC inhibitors. These results suggest that the peripheral release of Glu, induced by antidromic nerve stimulation, leads to the expansion of tactile hypersensitive skin probably via nociceptor sensitization spread due to the diffusion of Glu into the skin near the release site. In addition, intracellular PKA- and PKC-dependent mechanisms mediated mainly by NMDAR activation are involved in Glu-induced nociceptor sensitization and subsequent hypersensitivity. PMID:26770021

  1. Transcription factor NFAT1 controls allergic contact hypersensitivity through regulation of activation induced cell death program

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ho-Keun; Kim, Gi-Cheon; Hwang, Ji Sun; Kim, Young; Chae, Chang-Suk; Nam, Jong Hee; Jun, Chang-Duk; Rudra, Dipayan; Surh, Charles D.; Im, Sin-Hyeog

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is an inflammatory skin disease mediated by allergen specific T cells. In this study, we investigated the role of transcription factor NFAT1 in the pathogenesis of contact hypersensitivity. NFAT1 knock out (KO) mice spontaneously developed CHS-like skin inflammation in old age. Healthy young NFAT1 KO mice displayed enhanced susceptibility to hapten-induced CHS. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from NFAT1 KO mice displayed hyper-activated properties and produced significantly enhanced levels of inflammatory T helper 1(Th1)/Th17 type cytokines. NFAT1 KO T cells were more resistant to activation induced cell death (AICD), and regulatory T cells derived from these mice showed a partial defect in their suppressor activity. NFAT1 KO T cells displayed a reduced expression of apoptosis associated BCL-2/BH3 family members. Ectopic expression of NFAT1 restored the AICD defect in NFAT1 KO T cells and increased AICD in normal T cells. Recipient Rag2−/− mice transferred with NFAT1 KO T cells showed more severe CHS sensitivity due to a defect in activation induced hapten-reactive T cell apoptosis. Collectively, our results suggest the NFAT1 plays a pivotal role as a genetic switch in CD4+/CD8+ T cell tolerance by regulating AICD process in the T cell mediated skin inflammation. PMID:26777750

  2. CD8+ T Cell Migration to the Skin Requires CD4+ Help in a Murine Model of Contact Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fyhrquist, Nanna; Wolff, Henrik; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in contact hypersensitivity responses have not been fully solved, and remain an important question. Using an adoptive transfer model, we investigated the role of the respective T cell subset. Magnetic bead separated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from oxazolone sensitized C57BL/6 mice were transferred into RAG−/− mice, followed by hapten challenge and analysis of inflammatory parameters at 24 hours post exposure. The CD4+ T cell recipient mice developed partial contact hypersensitivity responses to oxazolone. CD8+ T cells caused significant amplification of the response in recipients of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells including ear swelling, type 1 inflammatory mediators, and cell killing. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were not sufficient to mediate contact hypersensitivity, although abundantly present in the lymph nodes in the CD8+ T cell reconstituted mice. There were no signs of inflammation at the site of hapten exposure, indicating impaired recruitment of CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD4+ T cells. These data show that CD4+ T cells mediate contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone, but CD8+ T cells contribute with the most potent effector mechanisms. Moreover, our results suggest that CD4+ T cell function is required for the mobilization of CD8+ effector T cells to the site of hapten exposure. The results shed new light on the relative importance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the effector phase of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:22916101

  3. p53 Hypersensitivity Is the Predominant Mechanism of the Unique Responsiveness of Testicular Germ Cell Tumor (TGCT) Cells to Cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Gutekunst, Matthias; Oren, Moshe; Weilbacher, Andrea; Dengler, Michael A.; Markwardt, Christiane; Thomale, Jürgen; Aulitzky, Walter E.; van der Kuip, Heiko

    2011-01-01

    Consistent with the excellent clinical results in testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT), most cell lines derived from this cancer show an exquisite sensitivity to Cisplatin. It is well accepted that the high susceptibility of TGCT cells to apoptosis plays a central role in this hypersensitive phenotype. The role of the tumor suppressor p53 in this response, however, remains controversial. Here we show that siRNA-mediated silencing of p53 is sufficient to completely abrogate hypersensitivity not only to Cisplatin but also to non-genotoxic inducers of p53 such as the Mdm2 antagonist Nutlin-3 and the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib. The close relationship between p53 protein levels and induction of apoptosis is lost upon short-term differentiation, indicating that this predominant pro-apoptotic function of p53 is unique in pluripotent embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells. RNA interference experiments as well as microarray analysis demonstrated a central role of the pro-apoptotic p53 target gene NOXA in the p53-dependent apoptotic response of these cells. In conclusion, our data indicate that the hypersensitivity of TGCT cells is a result of their unique sensitivity to p53 activation. Furthermore, in the very specific cellular context of germ cell-derived pluripotent EC cells, p53 function appears to be limited to induction of apoptosis. PMID:21532991

  4. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated (“allergic”) and non-immune-mediated (“pseudo allergic”) reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  5. In vitro Models to Evaluate Drug-Induced Hypersensitivity: Potential Test Based on Activation of Dendritic Cells.

    PubMed

    Galbiati, Valentina; Papale, Angela; Kummer, Elena; Corsini, Emanuela

    2016-01-01

    Hypersensitivity drug reactions (HDRs) are the adverse effect of pharmaceuticals that clinically resemble allergy. HDRs account for approximately 1/6 of drug-induced adverse effects, and include immune-mediated ("allergic") and non-immune-mediated ("pseudo allergic") reactions. In recent years, the severe and unpredicted drug adverse events clearly indicate that the immune system can be a critical target of drugs. Enhanced prediction in preclinical safety evaluation is, therefore, crucial. Nowadays, there are no validated in vitro or in vivo methods to screen the sensitizing potential of drugs in the pre-clinical phase. The problem of non-predictability of immunologically-based hypersensitivity reactions is related to the lack of appropriate experimental models rather than to the lack of -understanding of the adverse phenomenon. We recently established experimental conditions and markers to correctly identify drug associated with in vivo hypersensitivity reactions using THP-1 cells and IL-8 production, CD86 and CD54 expression. The proposed in vitro method benefits from a rationalistic approach with the idea that allergenic drugs share with chemical allergens common mechanisms of cell activation. This assay can be easily incorporated into drug development for hazard identification of drugs, which may have the potential to cause in vivo hypersensitivity reactions. The purpose of this review is to assess the state of the art of in vitro models to assess the allergenic potential of drugs based on the activation of dendritic cells. PMID:27462271

  6. In vitro diagnosis of immediate IgE-mediated drug hypersensitivity: warnings and (unmet) needs.

    PubMed

    Uyttebroek, Astrid P; Sabato, Vito; Bridts, Chris H; Ebo, Didier G

    2014-08-01

    Immediate drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) constitute an important health condition, with serious consequences of inadequate diagnosis. In this article, some of the most important issues related to in vitro diagnosis of IgE-mediated allergies are discussed. In vitro diagnostics will benefit from expanded and novel insights and understandings in drug chemical reactivity, protein binding, biotransformation, degradation, identification of (cross-reactive) drug antigenic determinants, and deeper understanding of sensitization routes. Collective efforts should be undertaken to activate fundamental and clinical investigations. PMID:25017685

  7. Langerhans cell function dictates induction of contact hypersensitivity or unresponsiveness to DNFB in Syrian hamsters

    SciTech Connect

    Streilein, J.W.; Bergstresser, P.R.

    1981-09-01

    The relationship between distribution and function of Langerhans cells within the epidermis and the capacity of cutaneous surfaces to promote the induction of contact hypersensitivity to DNFB have been examined in inbred Syrian hamsters. In a manner very similar to previous findings in mice, the results indicate that hamster cutaneous surfaces deficient in normally functioning Langerhans cells, naturally (cheek pouch epithelium) or artificially (after perturbation with ultraviolet light), are inefficient at promoting DNFB sensitization. Instead, DNFB applied to these regions of skin results in the induction of a state of specific unresponsiveness. Viable lymphoid cells from unresponsive hamsters can transfer the unresponsiveness to naive hamsters suggesting that active suppression is at least partly responsible, probably mediated by T lymphocytes.

  8. Immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction after intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Mun-Ju; Do, Jun-Young; Choi, Eun-Woo; Seo, Joon-Hyuk; Nam, Yoon-Jung; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Park, Jong-Won; Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Kang, Seok-Hui; Jin, Hyun-Jung

    2015-03-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) vancomycin is widely used to treat Gram-positive peritonitis associated with peritoneal dialysis. There have been two cases of red man syndrome (RMS), a vancomycin-specific nonimmunologic reaction, associated with IP vancomycin. However, immune-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin has not yet been reported. A 49 year old woman on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis developed her first peritonitis episode. The patient was treated with IP vancomycin once/wk for 4 weeks. She experienced mild itching and flushing throughout her body for 1 day after the second treatment. Whenever vancomycin was administered, generalized urticaria and a prickling sensation developed, and the intensity increased gradually; however, these symptoms improved after vancomycin was discontinued. An allergic skin test was performed 6 weeks after the previous urticarial episode, and an intradermal skin test revealed a positive response to vancomycin. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin administration. PMID:26484021

  9. Immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction after intraperitoneal administration of vancomycin

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Mun-Ju; Do, Jun-Young; Choi, Eun-Woo; Seo, Joon-Hyuk; Nam, Yoon-Jung; Yoon, Kyung-Woo; Park, Jong-Won; Cho, Kyu-Hyang; Kang, Seok-Hui; Jin, Hyun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) vancomycin is widely used to treat Gram-positive peritonitis associated with peritoneal dialysis. There have been two cases of red man syndrome (RMS), a vancomycin-specific nonimmunologic reaction, associated with IP vancomycin. However, immune-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin has not yet been reported. A 49 year old woman on continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis developed her first peritonitis episode. The patient was treated with IP vancomycin once/wk for 4 weeks. She experienced mild itching and flushing throughout her body for 1 day after the second treatment. Whenever vancomycin was administered, generalized urticaria and a prickling sensation developed, and the intensity increased gradually; however, these symptoms improved after vancomycin was discontinued. An allergic skin test was performed 6 weeks after the previous urticarial episode, and an intradermal skin test revealed a positive response to vancomycin. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of immunoglobulin E-mediated hypersensitivity reaction to IP vancomycin administration. PMID:26484021

  10. Blast cells transfer experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Schuyler, M.; Cook, C.; Listrom, M.; Fengolio-Preiser, C.

    1988-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) can be transferred by lymph node cells (LNC) cultured in vitro with antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the cells responsible for transfer and to determine if pulmonary cells can transfer HP. We cultured LNC from sensitized Strain 2 guinea pigs with a soluble extract of Micropolyspora faeni for 72 h, separated lymphoblasts from small lymphocytes, and transferred both subpopulations intravenously to syngeneic recipients. We also transferred irradiated lymphoblasts (1,500 rads), macrophage-depleted, lymphoblast-enriched populations, and pulmonary cells either without culture or after culture with M. faeni. Control animals received an equal volume of medium. All recipient animals were challenged intratracheally (i.t.) with M. faeni 48 h after the cell transfer, and they were killed 4 days after i.t. challenge. Randomly selected microscopic fields of the lung (250/animal) were judged to be normal or abnormal without knowledge of treatment. This measurement was reproducible (r = 0.95 for duplicate measurements, n = 55). All guinea pigs were maintained in HEPA-filtered air. There was a low level of pulmonary response to an i.t. challenge of M. faeni in animals that received medium. Animals that received pulmonary cells, either cultured or noncultured, did not differ from those in the control group. There was a substantial increase (p less than 0.01) in the extent of pulmonary abnormalities in the recipients of the lymphoblast population, with significant correlation (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01) between the number of lymphoblasts transferred and the extent of pulmonary abnormalities.

  11. Malaria-Induced NLRP12/NLRP3-Dependent Caspase-1 Activation Mediates Inflammation and Hypersensitivity to Bacterial Superinfection

    PubMed Central

    Ataide, Marco A.; Andrade, Warrison A.; Zamboni, Dario S.; Wang, Donghai; Souza, Maria do Carmo; Franklin, Bernardo S.; Elian, Samir; Martins, Flaviano S.; Pereira, Dhelio; Reed, George; Fitzgerald, Katherine A.; Golenbock, Douglas T.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic paroxysm and high fever are hallmarks of malaria and are associated with high levels of pyrogenic cytokines, including IL-1β. In this report, we describe a signature for the expression of inflammasome-related genes and caspase-1 activation in malaria. Indeed, when we infected mice, Plasmodium infection was sufficient to promote MyD88-mediated caspase-1 activation, dependent on IFN-γ-priming and the expression of inflammasome components ASC, P2X7R, NLRP3 and/or NLRP12. Pro-IL-1β expression required a second stimulation with LPS and was also dependent on IFN-γ-priming and functional TNFR1. As a consequence of Plasmodium-induced caspase-1 activation, mice produced extremely high levels of IL-1β upon a second microbial stimulus, and became hypersensitive to septic shock. Therapeutic intervention with IL-1 receptor antagonist prevented bacterial-induced lethality in rodents. Similar to mice, we observed a significantly increased frequency of circulating CD14+CD16−Caspase-1+ and CD14dimCD16+Caspase-1+ monocytes in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from febrile malaria patients. These cells readily produced large amounts of IL-1β after stimulation with LPS. Furthermore, we observed the presence of inflammasome complexes in monocytes from malaria patients containing either NLRP3 or NLRP12 pyroptosomes. We conclude that NLRP12/NLRP3-dependent activation of caspase-1 is likely to be a key event in mediating systemic production of IL-1β and hypersensitivity to secondary bacterial infection during malaria. PMID:24453977

  12. Ten Weeks of Infection with a Tissue-Invasive Helminth Protects against Local Immune Complex-Mediated Inflammation, but Not Cutaneous Type I Hypersensitivity, in Previously Sensitized Mice.

    PubMed

    Evans, Holly; Killoran, Kristin E; Mitre, Blima K; Morris, C Paul; Kim, So-Young; Mitre, Edward

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we evaluated the effect chronic helminth infection has on allergic disease in mice previously sensitized to OVA. Ten weeks of infection with Litomosoides sigmodontis reduced immunological markers of type I hypersensitivity, including OVA-specific IgE, basophil activation, and mast cell degranulation. Despite these reductions, there was no protection against immediate clinical hypersensitivity following intradermal OVA challenge. However, late-phase ear swelling, due to type III hypersensitivity, was significantly reduced in chronically infected animals. Levels of total IgG2a, OVA-specific IgG2a, and OVA-specific IgG1 were reduced in the setting of infection. These reductions were most likely due to increased Ab catabolism as ELISPOT assays demonstrated that infected animals do not have suppressed Ab production. Ear histology 24 h after challenge showed infected animals have reduced cellular infiltration in the ear, with significant decreases in numbers of neutrophils and macrophages. Consistent with this, infected animals had less neutrophil-specific chemokines CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 in the ear following challenge. Additionally, in vitro stimulation with immune complexes resulted in significantly less CXCL-1 and CXCL-2 production by eosinophils from chronically infected mice. Expression of FcγRI was also significantly reduced on eosinophils from infected animals. These data indicate that chronic filarial infection suppresses eosinophilic responses to Ab-mediated activation and has the potential to be used as a therapeutic for pre-existing hypersensitivity diseases. PMID:26324775

  13. Hapten-Induced Contact Hypersensitivity, Autoimmune Reactions, and Tumor Regression: Plausibility of Mediating Antitumor Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Erkes, Dan A.; Selvan, Senthamil R.

    2014-01-01

    Haptens are small molecule irritants that bind to proteins and elicit an immune response. Haptens have been commonly used to study allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) using animal contact hypersensitivity (CHS) models. However, extensive research into contact hypersensitivity has offered a confusing and intriguing mechanism of allergic reactions occurring in the skin. The abilities of haptens to induce such reactions have been frequently utilized to study the mechanisms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) to induce autoimmune-like responses such as autoimmune hemolytic anemia and to elicit viral wart and tumor regression. Hapten-induced tumor regression has been studied since the mid-1900s and relies on four major concepts: (1) ex vivo haptenation, (2) in situ haptenation, (3) epifocal hapten application, and (4) antigen-hapten conjugate injection. Each of these approaches elicits unique responses in mice and humans. The present review attempts to provide a critical appraisal of the hapten-mediated tumor treatments and offers insights for future development of the field. PMID:24949488

  14. Subjective food hypersensitivity: assessment of enterochromaffin cell markers in blood and gut lavage fluid

    PubMed Central

    Gregersen, Kine; Valeur, Jørgen; Lillestøl, Kristine; Frøyland, Livar; Araujo, Pedro; Lied, Gülen Arslan; Berstad, Arnold

    2011-01-01

    Background: Food hypersensitivity is commonly suspected, but seldom verified. Patients with subjective food hypersensitivity suffer from both intestinal and extraintestinal health complaints. Abnormalities of the enterochromaffin cells may play a role in the pathogenesis. The aim of this study was to investigate enterochromaffin cell function in patients with subjective food hypersensitivity by measuring serum chromogranin A (CgA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT, serotonin) in gut lavage fluid. Methods: Sixty-nine patients with subjective food hypersensitivity were examined. Twenty-three patients with inflammatory bowel disease and 35 healthy volunteers were included as comparison groups. CgA was measured in serum by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Gut lavage fluid was obtained by administering 2 L of polyethylene glycol solution intraduodenally. The first clear fluid passed per rectum was collected and 5-HT was analyzed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Results: Serum levels of CgA were significantly lower in patients with subjective food hypersensitivity than in healthy controls (P = 0.04). No differences were found in 5-HT levels in gut lavage fluid between patients with subjective food hypersensitivity and the control groups. There was no correlation between serum CgA and gut lavage 5-HT. Conclusion: Decreased blood levels of CgA suggest neuroendocrine alterations in patients with subjective food hypersensitivity. However, 5-HT levels in gut lavage fluid were normal. PMID:21887108

  15. IgE-Mediated Hypersensitivity and Desensitisation with Recombinant Enzymes in Pompe Disease and Type I and Type VI Mucopolysaccharidosis.

    PubMed

    Capanoglu, Murat; Dibek Misirlioglu, Emine; Azkur, Dilek; Vezir, Emine; Guvenir, Hakan; Gunduz, Mehmet; Toyran, Muge; Civelek, Ersoy; Kocabas, Can Naci

    2016-01-01

    Enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) is important for the treatment of lysosomal storage disorders. Hypersensitivity reactions with ERT have been reported, and in these cases, desensitisation with the enzyme is necessary. Here we report the cases of 3 patients with lysosomal storage disorders, including Pompe disease and mucopolysaccharidosis type I and VI, who had IgE-mediated hypersensitivity reactions and positive skin tests. Successful desensitisation protocols with the culprit enzyme solution were used for these patients. All 3 patients were able to safely receive ERT with the desensitisation protocol. PMID:27144408

  16. TRPA1 in mast cell activation-induced long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal afferent C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shaoyong; Gao, Guofeng; Peterson, Blaise Z; Ouyang, Ann

    2009-07-01

    Sensitization of esophageal sensory afferents by inflammatory mediators plays an important role in esophageal nociception. We have shown esophageal mast cell activation induces long-lasting mechanical hypersensitivity in vagal nodose C-fibers. However, the roles of mast cell mediators and downstream ion channels in this process are unclear. Mast cell tryptase via protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2)-mediated pathways sensitizes sensory nerves and induces hyperalgesia. Transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1) plays an important role in mechanosensory transduction and nociception. Here we tested the hypothesis that mast cell activation via a PAR2-dependent mechanism sensitizes TRPA1 to induce mechanical hypersensitivity in esophageal vagal C-fibers. The expression profiles of PAR2 and TRPA1 in vagal nodose ganglia were determined by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Extracellular recordings from esophageal nodose neurons were performed in ex vivo guinea pig esophageal-vagal preparations. Action potentials evoked by esophageal distention and chemical perfusion were compared. Both PAR2 and TRPA1 expressions were identified in vagal nodose neurons by immunostaining, Western blot, and RT-PCR. Ninety-one percent of TRPA1-positive neurons were of small and medium diameters, and 80% coexpressed PAR2. Esophageal mast cell activation significantly enhanced the response of nodose C-fibers to esophageal distension (mechanical hypersensitivity). This was mimicked by PAR2-activating peptide, which sustained for 90 min after wash, but not by PAR2 reverse peptide. TRPA1 inhibitor HC-030031 pretreatment significantly inhibited mechanical hypersensitivity induced by either mast cell activation or PAR2 agonist. Collectively, our data provide new evidence that sensitizing TRPA1 via a PAR2-dependent mechanism plays an important role in mast cell activation-induced mechanical hypersensitivity of vagal nodose C-fibers in guinea pig esophagus. PMID:19423751

  17. Cell-mediated immunity in experimental Nocardia asteroides infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, T; Agarwal, S C

    1977-01-01

    Experimental mycetoma-like lesions developed in guinea pigs after subcutaneous injection of Nocardia asteroides. Although delayed hypersensitivity appeared earlier, increased macrophage migration inhibition and microbicidal activity appeared after 7 weeks. When the lesions healed, high cell-mediated immunity was present. Cell-mediated immunity was transferred to normal recipient guinea pigs from healed donor guinea pigs by spleen cell transfer. Recipient guinea pigs showed marked protection against challenge with N. asteroides. PMID:321348

  18. Role of mast cell in the late phase of contact hypersensitivity induced by trimellitic anhydride

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Ok Hee

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are known as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic responses, but role of mast cells in contact hypersensitivity (CHS) has been considered controversial. In this study, we investigated role of mast cell in trimellitic anhydride (TMA)-induced CHS. The mice were sensitized to TMA on the back and repeatedly challenged with TMA on the left ear at 1-week intervals. The ear after challenge showed biphasic responses. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of early and late phase reactions in proportion to the frequency of TMA challenges in C57BL/6 mice. In late phase reaction, peak of ear response by single challenge showed at 24 hours after challenge, but the peak by repeat challenges at 8 hours after the last challenge. Number of mast cells and eosinophils per unit area increased in proportion to frequency of TMA challenges. However, mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice developed the late phase reaction without the early phase reaction. The repetition of TMA challenge shifted in time course of ear response and enlarged the extent of ear response and the infiltration of eosinophils. The magnitude of these responses observed according to the frequency of the TMA challenge in mast cell-deficient WBB6F1/J-KitW/KitW-v mice was significantly lower than that in C57BL/6 mice. Also TMA elicited mast cell degranulation and histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Conclusively, TMA induces the early and late phase reactions in CHS, and mast cells may be required for TMA-induced CHS. PMID:26770872

  19. TRPV1, but not TRPA1, in primary sensory neurons contributes to cutaneous incision-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mechanisms underlying postoperative pain remain poorly understood. In rodents, skin-only incisions induce mechanical and heat hypersensitivity similar to levels observed with skin plus deep incisions. Therefore, cutaneous injury might drive the majority of postoperative pain. TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels are known to mediate inflammatory and nerve injury pain, making them key targets for pain therapeutics. These channels are also expressed extensively in cutaneous nerve fibers. Therefore, we investigated whether TRPA1 and TRPV1 contribute to mechanical and heat hypersensitivity following skin-only surgical incision. Results Behavioral responses to mechanical and heat stimulation were compared between skin-incised and uninjured, sham control groups. Elevated mechanical responsiveness occurred 1 day post skin-incision regardless of genetic ablation or pharmacological inhibition of TRPA1. To determine whether functional changes in TRPA1 occur at the level of sensory neuron somata, we evaluated cytoplasmic calcium changes in sensory neurons isolated from ipsilateral lumbar 3–5 DRGs of skin-only incised and sham wild type (WT) mice during stimulation with the TRPA1 agonist cinnamaldehyde. There were no changes in the percentage of neurons responding to cinnamaldehyde or in their response amplitudes. Likewise, the subpopulation of DRG somata retrogradely labeled specifically from the incised region of the plantar hind paw showed no functional up-regulation of TRPA1 after skin-only incision. Next, we conducted behavior tests for heat sensitivity and found that heat hypersensitivity peaked at day 1 post skin-only incision. Skin incision-induced heat hypersensitivity was significantly decreased in TRPV1-deficient mice. In addition, we conducted calcium imaging with the TRPV1 agonist capsaicin. DRG neurons from WT mice exhibited sensitization to TRPV1 activation, as more neurons (66%) from skin-incised mice responded to capsaicin compared to controls (46%), and the

  20. Virus-induced gene silencing reveals signal transduction components required for the Pvr9-mediated hypersensitive response in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    PubMed

    Tran, Phu-Tri; Choi, Hoseong; Choi, Doil; Kim, Kook-Hyung

    2016-08-01

    Resistance to pathogens mediated by plant resistance (R) proteins requires different signaling transduction components and pathways. Our previous studies revealed that a potyvirus resistance gene in pepper, Pvr9, confers a hypersensitive response (HR) to pepper mottle virus in Nicotiana benthamiana. Our results show that the Pvr9-mediated HR against pepper mottle virus infection requires HSP90, SGT1, NDR1, but not EDS1. These results suggest that the Pvr9-mediated HR is possibly related to the SA pathway but not the ET, JA, ROS or NO pathways. PMID:27236305

  1. Resolvin E1 inhibits dendritic cell migration in the skin and attenuates contact hypersensitivity responses.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Yu; Honda, Tetsuya; Hanakawa, Sho; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Murata, Teruasa; Ueharaguchi-Tanada, Yuri; Ono, Sachiko; Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Egawa, Gyohei; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kitoh, Akihiko; Dainichi, Teruki; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Arita, Makoto; Nakamura, Motonobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki; Kabashima, Kenji

    2015-10-19

    Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is a lipid mediator derived from ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that exerts potent antiinflammatory roles in several murine models. The antiinflammatory mechanism of RvE1 in acquired immune responses has been attributed to attenuation of cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we newly investigated the effect of RvE1 on DC motility using two-photon microscopy in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model and found that RvE1 impaired DC motility in the skin. In addition, RvE1 attenuated T cell priming in the draining lymph nodes and effector T cell activation in the skin, which led to the reduced skin inflammation in CHS. In contrast, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced actin filament reorganization in DCs and increased DC motility by activating Cdc42 and Rac1 via BLT1, which was abrogated by RvE1. Collectively, our results suggest that RvE1 attenuates cutaneous acquired immune responses by inhibiting cutaneous DC motility, possibly through LTB4-BLT1 signaling blockade. PMID:26438363

  2. Resolvin E1 inhibits dendritic cell migration in the skin and attenuates contact hypersensitivity responses

    PubMed Central

    Sawada, Yu; Hanakawa, Sho; Nakamizo, Satoshi; Murata, Teruasa; Ueharaguchi-Tanada, Yuri; Ono, Sachiko; Amano, Wataru; Nakajima, Saeko; Egawa, Gyohei; Tanizaki, Hideaki; Otsuka, Atsushi; Kitoh, Akihiko; Dainichi, Teruki; Ogawa, Narihito; Kobayashi, Yuichi; Yokomizo, Takehiko; Arita, Makoto; Nakamura, Motonobu; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2015-01-01

    Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is a lipid mediator derived from ω3 polyunsaturated fatty acids that exerts potent antiinflammatory roles in several murine models. The antiinflammatory mechanism of RvE1 in acquired immune responses has been attributed to attenuation of cytokine production by dendritic cells (DCs). In this study, we newly investigated the effect of RvE1 on DC motility using two-photon microscopy in a contact hypersensitivity (CHS) model and found that RvE1 impaired DC motility in the skin. In addition, RvE1 attenuated T cell priming in the draining lymph nodes and effector T cell activation in the skin, which led to the reduced skin inflammation in CHS. In contrast, leukotriene B4 (LTB4) induced actin filament reorganization in DCs and increased DC motility by activating Cdc42 and Rac1 via BLT1, which was abrogated by RvE1. Collectively, our results suggest that RvE1 attenuates cutaneous acquired immune responses by inhibiting cutaneous DC motility, possibly through LTB4-BLT1 signaling blockade. PMID:26438363

  3. IL-1β-dependent activation of dendritic epidermal T cells in contact hypersensitivity1

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten M.; Lovato, Paola; MacLeod, Amanda S.; Witherden, Deborah A.; Skov, Lone; Dyring-Andersen, Beatrice; Dabelsteen, Sally; Woetmann, Anders; Ødum, Niels; Havran, Wendy L.; Geisler, Carsten; Bonefeld, Charlotte M.

    2014-01-01

    Substances that penetrate the skin surface can act as allergens and induce a T cell-mediated inflammatory skin disease called contact hypersensitivity (CHS). IL-17 is a key cytokine in CHS and was originally thought to be produced solely by CD4+ T cells. However, it is now known that several cell types including γδ T cells can produce IL-17. Here, we determine the role of γδ T cells, especially the dendritic epidermal T cells (DETC), in CHS. By use of a well-established model for CHS where dinitroflourobenzen (DNFB) is used as allergen, we found that γδ T cells are important players in CHS. Thus, an increased number of IL-17 producing DETC appear in the skin following exposure to DNFB in WT mice, and DNFB-induced ear-swelling is reduced by approximately 50% in TCRδ−/− mice compared to WT mice. In accordance, DNFB-induced ear-swelling was reduced by approximately 50% in IL-17−/− mice. We show that DNFB triggers DETC activation and IL-1β production in the skin, and that keratinocytes produce IL-1β when stimulated with DNFB. We find that DETC activated in vitro by incubation with anti-CD3 and IL-1β produce IL-17. Importantly, we demonstrate that the IL-1 receptor antagonist anakinra significantly reduces CHS responses as measured by decreased ear-swelling, inhibition of local DETC activation and a reduction in the number of IL-17+ γδ T cells and DETC in the draining lymph nodes. Taken together, we show that DETC become activated and produce IL-17 in an IL-1β-dependent manner during CHS suggesting a key role for DETC in CHS. PMID:24600030

  4. Animal models of complement-mediated hypersensitivity reactions to liposomes and other lipid-based nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, János; Alving, Carl R; Rosivall, László; Bünger, Rolf; Baranyi, Lajos; Bedöcs, Péter; Tóth, Miklós; Barenholz, Yezheckel

    2007-01-01

    Intravenous injection of some liposomal drugs, diagnostic agents, micelles and other lipid-based nanoparticles can cause acute hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) in a high percentage (up to 45%) of patients, with hemodynamic, respiratory and cutaneous manifestations. The phenomenon can be explained with activation of the complement (C) system on the surface of lipid particles, leading to anaphylatoxin (C5a and C3a) liberation and subsequent release reactions of mast cells, basophils and possibly other inflammatory cells in blood. These reactions can be reproduced and studied in pigs, dogs and rats, animal models which differ from each other in sensitivity and spectrum of symptoms. In the most sensitive pig model, a few miligrams of liposome (phospholipid) can cause anaphylactoid shock, characterized by pulmonary hypertension, systemic hypotension, decreased cardiac output and major cardiac arrhythmias. Pigs also display cutaneous symptoms, such as flushing and rash. The sensitivity of dogs to hemodynamic changes is close to that of pigs, but unlike pigs, dogs also react to micellar lipids (such as Cremophor EL) and their response includes pronounced blood cell and vegetative neural changes (e.g., leukopenia followed by leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, fluid excretions). Rats are relatively insensitive inasmuch as hypotension, their most prominent response to liposomes, is induced only by one or two orders of magnitude higher phospholipid doses (based on body weight) compared to the reactogenic dose in pigs and dogs. It is suggested that the porcine and dog models are applicable for measuring and predicting the (pseudo)allergic activity of particulate "nanodrugs". PMID:17613700

  5. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are consumed during allergic inflammation and affect T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-mediated hypersensitivity differently.

    PubMed

    Johansson, S; Lönnqvist, A; Ostman, S; Sandberg, A-S; Wold, A E

    2010-06-01

    Studies have shown that atopic individuals have decreased serum levels of n-3 fatty acids. Indicating these compounds may have a protective effect against allergic reaction and/or are consumed during inflammation. This study investigated whether fish (n-3) or sunflower (n-6) oil supplementation affected T helper type 1 (Th1)- and Th2-mediated hypersensitivity in the skin and airways, respectively, and whether the fatty acid serum profile changed during the inflammatory response. Mice were fed regular chow, chow + 10% fish oil or chow + 10% sunflower oil. Mice were immunized with ovalbumin (OVA) resolved in Th1 or Th2 adjuvant. For Th1 hypersensitivity, mice were challenged with OVA in the footpad. Footpad swelling, OVA-induced lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine production in the draining lymph node were evaluated. In the airway hypersensitivity model (Th2), mice were challenged intranasally with OVA and the resulting serum immunoglobulin (Ig)E and eosinophilic lung infiltration were measured. In the Th1 model, OVA-specific T cells proliferated less and produced less interferon (IFN)-gamma, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin (IL)-6 in fish oil-fed mice versus controls. Footpad swelling was reduced marginally. In contrast, mice fed fish oil in the Th2 model produced more OVA-specific IgE and had slightly higher proportions of eosinophils in lung infiltrate. A significant fall in serum levels of long-chain n-3 fatty acids accompanied challenge and Th2-mediated inflammation in Th2 model. Fish oil supplementation affects Th1 and Th2 immune responses conversely; significant consumption of n-3 fatty acids occurs during Th2-driven inflammation. The latter observation may explain the association between Th2-mediated inflammation and low serum levels of n-3 fatty acids. PMID:20148912

  6. Endogenous opioids mediate the sexual inhibition but not the drug hypersensitivity induced by sexual satiation in male rats.

    PubMed

    Garduño-Gutiérrez, René; Guadarrama-Bazante, Lorena; León-Olea, Martha; Rodríguez-Manzo, Gabriela

    2013-06-01

    Ejaculation promotes endogenous opioid release. Copulation to exhaustion produces several enduring behavioral and physiological changes, among which a long-lasting sexual behavior inhibition and generalized drug hypersensitivity are the most conspicuous. Because copulation to exhaustion involves multiple successive ejaculations, in this work we hypothesized that the endogenous opioids released by multiple ejaculations during the copulation to exhaustion process might mediate the abovementioned sexual satiation-induced changes. To test this hypothesis, sexually experienced male rats were injected with the opioid receptor antagonist naltrexone before copulation to exhaustion and were tested for sexual behavior or drug hypersensitivity 24 h later. The latter was assessed by the appearance of the flat body posture sign of the serotonergic syndrome, in response to doses of the 5-hydroxytryptamine-1A (5-HT1A) receptor agonist 8-hydroxy-2-di-n-propylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT), lower than those normally inducing this sign. The effect of administering naltrexone to already sexually exhausted animals (i.e., 24 h after the sexual satiation process) on both responses was also tested. Results showed that endogenous opioids mediate the establishment and maintenance of the long-lasting sexual behavior inhibition but not the drug hypersensitivity (to 8-OH-DPAT) characteristic of sexually exhausted male rats. It is concluded that although both phenomena appear as a consequence of copulation to satiation and follow a same time course of recovery, they are produced by distinct mechanisms. PMID:23544597

  7. Role of the potassium chloride cotransporter isoform 2-mediated spinal chloride homeostasis in a rat model of visceral hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Tang, Dong; Qian, Ai-Hua; Song, Dan-Dan; Ben, Qi-Wen; Yao, Wei-Yan; Sun, Jing; Li, Wei-Guang; Xu, Tian-Le; Yuan, Yao-Zong

    2015-05-01

    Visceral hypersensitivity represents an important hallmark in the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), of which the mechanisms remain elusive. The present study was designed to examine whether cation-chloride cotransporter (CCC)-mediated chloride (Cl(-)) homeostasis of the spinal cord is involved in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. Chronic visceral hypersensitivity was induced by exposing male Wistar rats to water avoidance stress (WAS). RT-PCR, Western blotting, and immunohistochemistry were used to assess the expression of CCCs in the spinal cord. Patch-clamp recordings were performed on adult spinal cord slices to evaluate Cl(-) homeostasis and Cl(-) extrusion capacity of lamina I neurons. Visceral sensitivity was estimated by measuring the abdominal withdrawal reflex in response to colorectal distension (CRD). After 10 days of WAS exposure, levels of both total protein and the oligomeric form of the K(+)-Cl(-) cotransporter isoform 2 (KCC2), but not Na(+)-K(+)-2Cl(-) transporter isoform 1 (NKCC1), were significantly decreased in the dorsal horn of the lumbosacral spinal cord. The downregulation of KCC2 resulted in a depolarizing shifted equilibrium potential of GABAergic inhibitory postsynaptic current and impaired Cl(-) extrusion capacity in lamina I neurons of the lumbosacral spinal cord from WAS rats. Acute noxious CRD disrupted spinal KCC2 expression and function 2 h after the final distention in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. Pharmacological blockade of KCC2 activity by intrathecal injection of a KCC2 inhibitor [(dihydroindenyl)oxy] alkanoic acid enhanced visceral nociceptive sensitivity in sham rats, but not in WAS rats. These results suggest that KCC2 downregulation-mediated impairment of spinal cord Cl(-) homeostasis may play an important role in chronic stress-induced visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:25792562

  8. Real-time PCR mapping of DNaseI-hypersensitive sites using a novel ligation-mediated amplification technique

    PubMed Central

    Follows, George A.; Janes, Mary E.; Vallier, Ludovic; Green, Anthony R.; Gottgens, Berthold

    2007-01-01

    Mapping sites within the genome that are hypersensitive to digestion with DNaseI is an important method for identifying DNA elements that regulate transcription. The standard approach to locating these DNaseI-hypersensitive sites (DHSs) has been to use Southern blotting techniques, although we, and others, have recently published alternative methods using a range of technologies including high-throughput sequencing and genomic array tiling paths. In this article, we describe a novel protocol to use real-time PCR to map DHS. Advantages of the technique reported here include the small cell numbers required for each analysis, rapid, relatively low-cost experiments with minimal need for specialist equipment. Presented examples include comparative DHS mapping of known TAL1/SCL regulatory elements between human embryonic stem cells and K562 cells. PMID:17389645

  9. Lactobacillus farciminis treatment suppresses stress induced visceral hypersensitivity: a possible action through interaction with epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction

    PubMed Central

    Ait‐Belgnaoui, A; Han, W; Lamine, F; Eutamene, H; Fioramonti, J; Bueno, L; Theodorou, V

    2006-01-01

    Background Stress induced increase in colonic paracellular permeability results from epithelial cell cytoskeleton contraction and is responsible for stress induced hypersensitivity to colorectal distension (CRD). The probiotic Lactobacillus farciminis releases spontaneously nitric oxide (NO) in the colonic lumen in vivo and exerts anti‐inflammatory effects. This study aimed: (i) to evaluate the effects of L farciminis on stress induced hypersensitivity to CRD and increase in colonic paracellular permeability; and (ii) to ascertain whether these effects are NO mediated and related to changes in colonocyte myosin light chain phosphorylation (p‐MLC). Methods Female Wistar rats received either 1011 CFU/day of L farciminis or saline orally over 15 days before partial restraint stress (PRS) or sham‐PRS application. Visceral sensitivity to CRD and colonic paracellular permeability was assessed after PRS or sham‐PRS. Haemoglobin was used as an NO scavenger. Western blotting for MLC kinase, MLC, and p‐MLC were performed in colonic mucosa from L farciminis treated and control rats after PRS or sham‐PRS. Results PRS significantly increased the number of spike bursts for CRD pressures of 30–60 mm Hg as well as colonic paracellular permeability. L farciminis treatment prevented both effects, while haemoglobin reversed the protective effects of L farciminis. p‐MLC expression increased significantly from 15 to 45 minutes after PRS, and L farciminis treatment prevented this increase. Conclusion L farciminis treatment prevents stress induced hypersensitivity, increase in colonic paracellular permeability, and colonocyte MLC phosphorylation. This antinociceptive effect occurs via inhibition of contraction of colonic epithelial cell cytoskeleton and the subsequent tight junction opening, and may also involve direct or indirect effects of NO produced by this probiotic. PMID:16507583

  10. L-selectin or ICAM-1 deficiency reduces an immediate-type hypersensitivity response by preventing mast cell recruitment in repeated elicitation of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Yuka; Hasegawa, Minoru; Kaburagi, Yuko; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Komura, Kazuhiro; Saito, Eriko; Takehara, Kazuhiko; Steeber, Douglas A; Tedder, Thomas F; Sato, Shinichi

    2003-04-15

    Repeated Ag exposure results in a shift in the time course of contact hypersensitivity (CH) from a typical delayed-type to an immediate-type response followed by a late phase reaction. Chronic CH responses are clinically relevant to human skin allergic diseases, such as atopic dermatitis, that are usually caused by repeated stimulation with environmental Ags. Chronic inflammatory responses result in part from infiltrating leukocytes. To determine the role of leukocyte adhesion molecules in chronic inflammation, chronic CH responses were assessed in mice lacking L-selectin, ICAM-1, or both adhesion molecules. Following repeated hapten sensitization for 24 days at 2-day intervals, wild-type littermates developed an immediate-type response at 30 min after elicitation, followed by a late phase reaction. By contrast, loss of ICAM-1, L-selectin, or both, eliminated the immediate-type response and inhibited the late phase reaction. Similar results were obtained when wild-type littermates repeatedly exposed to hapten for 22 days were treated with mAbs to L-selectin and/or ICAM-1 before the elicitation on day 24. The lack of an immediate-type response on day 24 paralleled a lack of mast cell accumulation after 30 min of elicitation and decreased serum IgE production. Repeated Ag exposure in wild-type littermates resulted in increased levels of serum L-selectin, a finding also observed in atopic dermatitis patients. The current study demonstrates that L-selectin and ICAM-1 cooperatively regulate the induction of the immediate-type response by mediating mast cell accumulation into inflammatory sites and suggests that L-selectin and ICAM-1 are potential therapeutic targets for regulating human allergic reactions. PMID:12682269

  11. Azuki bean cells are hypersensitive to cadmium and do not synthesize phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Inouhe, M; Ito, R; Ito, S; Sasada, N; Tohoyama, H; Joho, M

    2000-07-01

    Suspension-cultured cells of azuki bean (Vigna angularis) as well as the original root tissues were hypersensitive to Cd (<10 microM). Repeated subculturings with a sublethal level of Cd (1-10 microM) did not affect the subsequent response of cells to inhibitory levels of Cd (10-100 microM). The azuki bean cells challenged to Cd did not contain phytochelatin (PC) peptides, unlike tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) cells that have a substantial tolerance to Cd (>100 microM). Both of the cell suspensions contained a similar level of reduced glutathione (GSH) when grown in the absence of Cd. Externally applied GSH to azuki bean cells recovered neither Cd tolerance nor PC synthesis of the cells. Furthermore, enzyme assays in vitro revealed that the protein extracts of azuki bean cells had no activity converting GSH to PCs, unlike tomato. These results suggest that azuki bean cells are lacking in the PC synthase activity per se, hence being Cd hypersensitive. We concluded that the PC synthase has an important role in Cd tolerance of suspension-cultured cells. PMID:10889252

  12. Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Vatti, Rani R; Ali, Fatima; Teuber, Suzanne; Chang, Christopher; Gershwin, M Eric

    2014-08-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids (CS) are rare in the general population, but they are not uncommon in high-risk groups such as patients who receive repeated doses of CS. Hypersensitivity reactions to steroids are broadly divided into two categories: immediate reactions, typically occurring within 1 h of drug administration, and non-immediate reactions, which manifest more than an hour after drug administration. The latter group is more common. We reviewed the literature using the search terms "hypersensitivity to steroids, adverse effects of steroids, steroid allergy, allergic contact dermatitis, corticosteroid side effects, and type I hypersensitivity" to identify studies or clinical reports of steroid hypersensitivity. We discuss the prevalence, mechanism, presentation, evaluation, and therapeutic options in corticosteroid hypersensitivity reactions. There is a paucity of literature on corticosteroid allergy, with most reports being case reports. Most reports involve non-systemic application of corticosteroids. Steroid hypersensitivity has been associated with type I IgE-mediated allergy including anaphylaxis. The overall prevalence of type I steroid hypersensitivity is estimated to be 0.3-0.5%. Allergic contact dermatitis (ACD) is the most commonly reported non-immediate hypersensitivity reaction and usually follows topical CS application. Atopic dermatitis and stasis dermatitis of the lower extremities are risk factors for the development of ACD from topical CS. Patients can also develop hypersensitivity reactions to nasal, inhaled, oral, and parenteral CS. A close and detailed evaluation is required for the clinician to confirm the presence of a true hypersensitivity reaction to the suspected drug and choose the safest alternative. Choosing an alternative CS is not only paramount to the patient's safety but also ameliorates the worry of developing an allergic, and potentially fatal, steroid hypersensitivity reaction. This evaluation becomes

  13. Analysis of T cells recruited during delayed-type hypersensitivity to purified protein derivative (PPD) versus challenge with tuberculosis infection.

    PubMed Central

    Pais, T F; Silva, R A; Smedegaard, B; Appelberg, R; Andersen, P

    1998-01-01

    The delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) to purified protein derivative (PPD) test has been used to infer about protective immunity to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and to diagnose tuberculosis. We showed that in memory tuberculosis-immune mice both DTH to PPD and resistance to M. tuberculosis could be effectively elicited in the footpad and both reactions led to the accumulation of reactive T cells in the regional lymph nodes with a CD4+ phenotype and characterized by the secretion of high levels of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) and no IL-4. By adoptive transfer into nude mice of highly purified CD4+ T cells harvested during the recall of protective immunity it was confirmed that this population mediated both manifestations. However, the specificity of the T cells recruited during these processes were found to differ markedly; T cells involved in protection to a challenge with live tuberculosis bacilli recognized predominantly low-mass culture filtrate antigens below 15 000 MW, while cells recruited during DTH to PPD were directed to molecular mass fractions between 15 000 and 31 000. Using single purified antigens we showed that the latter cells recognized the secreted mycobacterial protein Ag85B and the heat-shock proteins, DnaK and GroEL. Protective T cells, in contrast, were characterized by a very high frequency of T cells directed to the ESAT-6 peptide 1-20. Images Figure 2 PMID:9767459

  14. Cutting Edge: Redox signaling hypersensitivity distinguishes human germinal center B cells

    PubMed Central

    Polikowsky, Hannah G.; Wogsland, Cara E.; Diggins, Kirsten E.

    2015-01-01

    Differences in the quality of B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. Here, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naïve B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells. PMID:26157177

  15. Trichloroethylene Hypersensitivity Syndrome Is Potentially Mediated through Its Metabolite Chloral Hydrate

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yongshun; Xia, Lihua; Wu, Qifeng; Zeng, Zifang; Huang, Zhenlie; Zhou, Shanyu; Jin, Jiachun; Huang, Hanlin

    2015-01-01

    Background We documented previously the entity of trichloroethylene (TCE) hypersensitivity syndrome (THS) in occupational workers. Objectives To identify the culprit causative compound, determine the type of hypersensitivity of THS, and establish a screening test for subjects at risk of THS. Methods TCE and its main metabolites chloral hydrate (CH), trichloroethanol (TCOH) and trichloroacetic acid (TCA) were used as allergens at different concentrations in skin patch tests. The study included 19 case subjects diagnosed with occupational THS, 22 control healthy workers exposed to TCE (exposure >12 weeks), and 20 validation new workers exposed to TCE for <12 weeks free of THS. All subjects were followed-up for 12 weeks after the patch test. Results The highest patch test positive rate in subjects with THS was for CH, followed by TCOH, TCA and TCE. The CH patch test positive rate was 100% irrespective of CH concentrations (15%, 10% and 5%). The TCOH patch test positive rate was concentration-dependent (89.5%, 73.7% and 52.6% for 5%, 0.5% and 0.05%, respectively). Lower patch test positive rates were noted for TCA and TCE. All patch tests (including four allergens) were all negative in each of the 22 control subjects. None of the subjects of the validation group had a positive 15% CH patch test. Conclusions Chloral hydrate seems to be the culprit causative compound of THS and type IV seems to be the major type of hypersensitivity of THS. The CH patch test could be potentially useful for screening workers at risk of THS. PMID:26020924

  16. Cutting Edge: Redox Signaling Hypersensitivity Distinguishes Human Germinal Center B Cells.

    PubMed

    Polikowsky, Hannah G; Wogsland, Cara E; Diggins, Kirsten E; Huse, Kanutte; Irish, Jonathan M

    2015-08-15

    Differences in the quality of BCR signaling control key steps of B cell maturation and differentiation. Endogenously produced H2O2 is thought to fine tune the level of BCR signaling by reversibly inhibiting phosphatases. However, relatively little is known about how B cells at different stages sense and respond to such redox cues. In this study, we used phospho-specific flow cytometry and high-dimensional mass cytometry (CyTOF) to compare BCR signaling responses in mature human tonsillar B cells undergoing germinal center (GC) reactions. GC B cells, in contrast to mature naive B cells, memory B cells, and plasmablasts, were hypersensitive to a range of H2O2 concentrations and responded by phosphorylating SYK and other membrane-proximal BCR effectors in the absence of BCR engagement. These findings reveal that stage-specific redox responses distinguish human GC B cells. PMID:26157177

  17. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  18. Genotyping for Severe Drug Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Karlin, Eric; Phillips, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in our understanding of the immunopathogenesis and pharmacogenomics of severe immunologically-mediated adverse drug reactions. Such T-cell-mediated adverse drug reactions such as Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), drug-induced liver disease (DILI) and other drug hypersensitivity syndromes have more recently been shown to be mediated through interactions with various class I and II HLA alleles. Key examples have included the associations of HLA-B*15:02 and carbamazepine induced SJS/TEN in Southeast Asian populations and HLA-B*57:01 and abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*57:01 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity exemplifies a successful translational roadmap from pharmacogenomic discovery through to widespread clinical implementation. Ultimately, our increased understanding of the interaction between drugs and the MHC could be used to inform drug design and drive pre-clinical toxicity programs to improve drug safety. PMID:24429903

  19. Use of lymphoblastoid cell lines to evaluate the hypersensitivity to ultraviolet radiation in Cockayne syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Otsuka, F.; Tarone, R.E.; Cayeux, S.; Robbins, J.H.

    1984-05-01

    Cockayne syndrome (CS) is a rare autosomal recessive disease characterized by acute sun sensitivity, cachectic dwarfism, and neurologic and skeletal abnormalities. Cultured skin fibroblasts from patients with this disease are known to be hypersensitive to the lethal effects of 254-nm UV radiation. The authors have studied the sensitivity of 254-nm UV radiation of lymphoblastoid lines derived from 3 typical CS patients, 1 atypical CS patient who had a very late age of onset of clinical manifestations, 2 patients who had both xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) and typical CS, and 3 heterozygous parents of these patients. Post-UV survival was determined by the trypan-blue dye-exclusion method. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 3 typical CS patients, the atypical CS patient, and the 2 patients with both CS and XP had decreased post-UV viability in comparison with lines from normal donors. Lines from the heterozygous parents had normal post-UV viability. The post-UV viability of the typical CS lines was similar to that of a XP complementation group C line. The relative post-UV viability of lymphoblastoid lines from the typical CS patients was similar to the relative post-UV survival of their fibroblast lines. The lymphoblastoid line from the atypical CS patient had a post-UV viability similar to that of the typical CS patients. Thus, the relative hypersensitivity of CS patients cells in vitro does not reflect the severity or age of onset of the patients clinical manifestations. The lymphoblastoid lines from the 2 patients who had both CS and XP were significantly more sensitive to the UV radiation than those from patients with only CS. Our studies demonstrate that lymphoblastoid lines from patients with CS are appropriate and useful cell lines for the study of the inherited hypersensitivity to UV radiation.

  20. An ITAM-Syk-CARD9 signalling axis triggers contact hypersensitivity by stimulating IL-1 production in dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Yasukawa, Shinsuke; Miyazaki, Yoshiyuki; Yoshii, Chika; Nakaya, Mako; Ozaki, Naoko; Toda, Shuji; Kuroda, Etsushi; Ishibashi, Ken-ichi; Yasuda, Tomoharu; Natsuaki, Yohei; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Iizasa, Ei'ichi; Nakahara, Takeshi; Yamazaki, Masanori; Kabashima, Kenji; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Takai, Toshiyuki; Saito, Takashi; Kurosaki, Tomohiro; Malissen, Bernard; Ohno, Naohito; Furue, Masutaka; Yoshida, Hiroki; Hara, Hiromitsu

    2014-01-01

    A variety of reactive organic compounds, called haptens, can cause allergic contact dermatitis. However, the innate immune mechanisms by which haptens stimulate dendritic cells (DCs) to sensitize T cells remain unclear. Here we show that the coupling of ITAM-Syk-CARD9 signalling to interleukin-1 (IL-1) secretion in DCs is crucial for allergic sensitization to haptens. Both MyD88 and Caspase recruitment domain-containing protein 9 (CARD9) signalling are required for contact hypersensitivity (CHS). Naïve T cells require signals received through IL-1R1-MyD88 for effector differentiation, whereas DCs require CARD9 and spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) signalling for hapten-induced IL-1α/β secretion and their ability to prime T cells. DC-specific deletion of CARD9, DAP12, Syk or NLRP3, but not MyD88, is sufficient to abolish CHS. All tested haptens, but not irritants, can induce Syk activation, leading to both the CARD9/BCL10-dependent pro-IL-1 synthesis (signal1) and reactive oxygen species-mediated NLRP3 inflammasome activation (signal2), required for IL-1 secretion. These data unveil an innate immune mechanism crucial for allergic contact sensitization to chemical compounds. PMID:24806599

  1. Classification and pathophysiology of radiocontrast media hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut; Ring, Johannes

    2010-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media (RCM) are unpredictable and are a concern for radiologists and cardiologists. Immediate hypersensitivity reactions manifest as anaphylaxis, and an allergic IgE-mediated mechanism has been continuously discussed for decades. Non-immediate reactions clinically are exanthemas resembling other drug-induced non-immediate hypersensitivities. During the past years, evidence is increasing that some of these reactions may be immunological. Repeated reactions after re-exposure, positive skin tests, and presence of specific IgE antibodies as well as positive basophil activation tests in some cases, and positive lymphocyte transformation or lymphocyte activation tests in others, indicate that a subgroup of both immediate and non-immediate reactions are of an allergic origin, although many questions remain unanswered. Recently reported cases highlight that pharmacological premedication is not safe to prevent RCM hypersensitivity in patients with previous severe reactions. These insights may have important consequences. A large multicenter study on the value of skin tests in RCM hypersensitivity concluded that skin testing is a useful tool for diagnosis of RCM allergy. It may have a role for the selection of a safe product in previous reactors, although confirmatory validation data is still scarce. In vitro tests to search for RCM-specific cell activation still are in development. In conclusion, recent data indicate that RCM hypersensitivity may have an allergic mechanism and that allergological testing is useful and may indicate tolerability. PMID:20519888

  2. In Vivo Expansion of Endogenous Regulatory T Cell Populations Induces Long-Term Suppression of Contact Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    El Beidaq, Asmaa; Link, Christopher W M; Hofmann, Katharina; Frehse, Britta; Hartmann, Karin; Bieber, Katja; Martin, Stefan F; Ludwig, Ralf J; Manz, Rudolf A

    2016-09-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) of murine skin serves as a model of allergic contact dermatitis. Hapten-specific CD8 T cells and neutrophils represent the major effector cells driving this inflammatory reaction whereas Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) control the severity of inflammation. However, whether in vivo expansion of endogenous Tregs can downregulate CHS-mediated inflammation remains to be elucidated. In this study, we addressed this issue by using injection of an IL-2/anti-IL-2 mAb JES6-1 complex (IL-2/JES6-1) as a means of Treg induction in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene-induced CHS. IL-2/JES6-1 injection before or after hapten sensitization led to a considerable reduction of skin inflammation, even when rechallenged up to 3 wk after the last treatment. Conversely, Treg depletion re-established the CHS response in IL-2/JES6-1-treated mice. IL-2/JES6-1 injection resulted in increased frequencies of natural and peripheral Tregs in spleen and draining lymph nodes (LNs), elevated IL-10 and TGF-β production by CD4 T cells, reduced CD86 expression by dendritic cells, and led to lower numbers of hapten-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T effector cells in LNs. Neutrophil and CD8 T cell infiltration was reduced in inflamed ear tissue, whereas CTLA-4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg frequencies were augmented. Adoptive transfer of LN cells of sensitized mice into recipients treated with IL-2/JES6-1 showed impaired CHS. Our results show that in vivo Treg expansion results in a prolonged CHS suppression, a sustained reduction of hapten-specific CD8 T cells, and a decrease in effector cell influx in inflamed tissue. PMID:27439515

  3. NADPH Oxidase-Derived ROS Induced by Chronic Intermittent Hypoxia Mediates Hypersensitivity of Lung Vagal C Fibers in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chang-Huan; Zhuang, Wei-Ling; Shen, Yan-Jhih; Lai, Ching Jung; Kou, Yu Ru

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), manifested by exposure to chronic intermittent hypoxia (CIH) and excess production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in the airways, is associated with hyperreactive airway diseases. ROS, particularly when created by NADPH oxidase, are known to sensitize lung vagal C fibers (LVCFs), which may contribute to airway hypersensitivity pathogenesis. We investigated whether CIH augments the reflex and afferent responses of LVCFs to chemical stimulants and the roles of ROS and NADPH oxidase in such airway hypersensitivity. Rats were exposed to room air (RA) or CIH with/without daily treatment with MnTMPyP (a superoxide anion scavenger), apocynin (an NADPH oxidase inhibitor), or vehicle. At 16 h after their last exposure, intravenous capsaicin, adenosine, or α,β-methylene-ATP evoked an augmented apneic response in anesthetized rats with 14-days CIH exposure, compared to anesthetized rats with 14-days RA exposure. The augmented apneic responses to these LVCF stimulants were abolished by bilateral vagotomy or perivagal capsaicin treatment, which block LVCFs neural conduction and were significantly suppressed by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin, but not vehicle. Electrophysiological studies revealed that 14-days CIH exposure potentiated the responses of LVCFs to these stimulants. This effect was inhibited by treatment with MnTMPyP or apocynin treatment and was not seen in rats who received 7-days of CIH exposure. Biochemical analysis indicated that 14-days CIH exposure increased both lung lipid peroxidation, which is indicative of oxidative stress, and expression of the p47phox subunit in the membrane fraction of lung tissue, which is an index of NADPH oxidase activation. The former was prevented by treatment with either MnTMPyP or apocynin, while the later was prevented by treatment with apocynin only. These results suggest that 14-days CIH exposure sensitizes LVCFs in rats, leading to an exaggerated reflex and afferent responses to

  4. Identification, characterization, and purification of a tobacco endonuclease activity induced upon hypersensitive response cell death.

    PubMed Central

    Mittler, R; Lam, E

    1995-01-01

    Programmed cell death (pcd) is activated during the hypersensitive response (HR) of plants to avirulent pathogens. We have recently shown that, similar to pcd in animal cells, nuclei of cells undergoing HR cell death contain fragmented nuclear DNA (nDNA). Here, we report that cell death occurring during the HR is accompanied by an increase in the activity of several deoxyribonucleases. Induction of nuclease activities was coordinated with cell death and may account for the degradation of nDNA during the HR. HR-associated nuclease activities were not induced during senescence, following necrotic cell death resulting from abiotic stress, or in response to induction of plant defense mechanisms by salicylic acid. HR-associated nuclease activities were stimulated by Ca2+ and inhibited by EGTA, EDTA, and Zn2+. At least one of the HR-associated nuclease activities was detected in nuclei purified from leaves undergoing pcd. A nuclease with an electrophoretic mobility similar to that of the nuclease activity found in nuclei isolated from leaves undergoing HR cell death was purified. Our findings are in accordance with some of the biochemical events that occur during pcd in animal cells. However, further analysis of the pattern of nDNA fragmentation and the corresponding structural changes that occur in the nuclei of tobacco cells undergoing HR cell death revealed that these features may have differences from those that take place during apoptosis in animal cells. PMID:8535145

  5. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Simona; Doubell, Tim P.; Leslie, Tabi; Woolf, Clifford J.

    1996-11-01

    PAIN is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold Aδ and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of Aδ and C fibres at the site of inflammation1. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons2,3, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold Aβ fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres4, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P5-7. Here we show that inflammation results in Aβ fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. Aβ fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli.

  6. Inflammatory pain hypersensitivity mediated by phenotypic switch in myelinated primary sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Doubell, T P; Leslie, T; Woolf, C J

    1996-11-28

    Pain is normally evoked only by stimuli that are sufficiently intense to activate high-threshold A(delta) and C sensory fibres, which relay the signal to the spinal cord. Peripheral inflammation leads to profoundly increased pain sensitivity: noxious stimuli generate a greater response and stimuli that are normally innocuous elicit pain. Inflammation increases the sensitivity of the peripheral terminals of A(delta) and C fibres at the site of inflammation. It also increases the excitability of spinal cord neurons, which now amplify all sensory inputs including the normally innocuous tactile stimuli that are conveyed by low-threshold A(beta) fibres. This central sensitization has been attributed to the enhanced activity of C fibres, which increase the excitability of their postsynaptic targets by releasing glutamate and the neuropeptide substance P. Here we show that inflammation results in A(beta) fibres also acquiring the capacity to increase the excitability of spinal cord neurons. This is due to a phenotypic switch in a subpopulation of these fibres so that they, like C-fibres, now express substance P. A(beta) fibres thus appear to contribute to inflammatory hypersensitivity by switching their phenotype to one resembling pain fibres, thereby enhancing synaptic transmission in the spinal cord and exaggerating the central response to innocuous stimuli. PMID:8934522

  7. Disruption of Microtubular Cytoskeleton Induced by Cryptogein, an Elicitor of Hypersensitive Response in Tobacco Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Binet, Marie-Noëlle; Humbert, Claude; Lecourieux, David; Vantard, Marylin; Pugin, Alain

    2001-01-01

    The dynamics of microtubular cytoskeleton were studied in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) cells in response to two different plant defense elicitors: cryptogein, a protein secreted by Phytophthora cryptogea and oligogalacturonides (OGs), derived from the plant cell wall. In tobacco plants cryptogein triggers a hypersensitive-like response and induces systemic resistance against a broad spectrum of pathogens, whereas OGs induce defense responses, but fail to trigger cell death. The comparison of the microtubule (MT) dynamics in response to cryptogein and OGs in tobacco cells indicates that MTs appear unaffected in OG-treated cells, whereas cryptogein treatment caused a rapid and severe disruption of microtubular network. When hyperstabilized by the MT depolymerization inhibitor, taxol, the MT network was still disrupted by cryptogein treatment. On the other hand, the MT-depolymerizing agent oryzalin and cryptogein had different and complementary effects. In addition to MT destabilization, cryptogein induced the death of tobacco cells, whereas OG-treated cells did not die. We demonstrated that MT destabilization and cell death induced by cryptogein depend on calcium influx and that MT destabilization occurs independently of active oxygen species production. The molecular basis of cryptogein-induced MT disruption and its potential significance with respect to cell death are discussed. PMID:11161014

  8. BHK cell lines with increased rates of gene amplification are hypersensitive to ultraviolet light

    SciTech Connect

    Giulotto, E.; Bertoni, L.; Attolini, C.; Rainaldi, G.; Anglana, M. )

    1991-04-15

    Four cell lines (MP1, -4, -5, -7), isolated from baby hamster kidney cells after simultaneous selection with N-(phosphonacetyl)-L-aspartate and methotrexate, have previously been shown to amplify their DNA at an increased rate. We now show that all four lines are hypersensitive to killing by UV light and mitomycin C. At high doses of UV light or mitomycin C, the MP lines survived less than 10% or less than 5% as well as parental cells, respectively. After UV irradiation, inhibition of DNA and RNA synthesis was greater in MP than in parental cells, and recovery was slower or absent. A 2- to 3.5-fold increase in the frequency of UV-induced sister chromatid exchange was also seen in the four cell lines. In MP5, unscheduled DNA replication after treatment with UV light was only approximately 70% as great as in parental cells and the other MP lines. In MP4 and MP7 cells S phase was elongated. Although their individual properties confirm that the four cell lines are independent, their common properties suggest a relationship between tolerance of DNA damage and gene amplification.

  9. Cancer Cells with Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres Do Not Display a General Hypersensitivity to ATR Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Deeg, Katharina I; Chung, Inn; Bauer, Caroline; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer as it provides cancer cells with cellular immortality. A significant fraction of tumors uses the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to elongate their telomeres and to gain an unlimited proliferation potential. Since the ALT pathway is unique to cancer cells, it represents a potentially valuable, currently unexploited target for anti-cancer therapies. Recently, it was proposed that ALT renders cells hypersensitive to ataxia telangiectasia- and RAD3-related (ATR) protein inhibitors (Flynn et al., Science 347, 273). Here, we measured the response of various ALT- or telomerase-positive cell lines to the ATR inhibitor VE-821. In addition, we compared the effect of the inhibitor on cell viability in isogenic cell lines, in which ALT was active or suppressed. In these experiments, a general ATR inhibitor sensitivity of cells with ALT could not be confirmed. We rather propose that the observed variations in sensitivity reflect differences between cell lines that are unrelated to ALT. PMID:27602331

  10. Cancer Cells with Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres Do Not Display a General Hypersensitivity to ATR Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Deeg, Katharina I.; Chung, Inn; Bauer, Caroline; Rippe, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    Telomere maintenance is a hallmark of cancer as it provides cancer cells with cellular immortality. A significant fraction of tumors uses the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to elongate their telomeres and to gain an unlimited proliferation potential. Since the ALT pathway is unique to cancer cells, it represents a potentially valuable, currently unexploited target for anti-cancer therapies. Recently, it was proposed that ALT renders cells hypersensitive to ataxia telangiectasia- and RAD3-related (ATR) protein inhibitors (Flynn et al., Science 347, 273). Here, we measured the response of various ALT- or telomerase-positive cell lines to the ATR inhibitor VE-821. In addition, we compared the effect of the inhibitor on cell viability in isogenic cell lines, in which ALT was active or suppressed. In these experiments, a general ATR inhibitor sensitivity of cells with ALT could not be confirmed. We rather propose that the observed variations in sensitivity reflect differences between cell lines that are unrelated to ALT. PMID:27602331

  11. Modulation of visceral hypersensitivity by glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family receptor α-3 in colorectal afferents

    PubMed Central

    Shinoda, M.; Feng, B.; Albers, K. M.; Gebhart, G. F.

    2011-01-01

    Irritable bowel syndrome is characterized by colorectal hypersensitivity and contributed to by sensitized mechanosensitive primary afferents and recruitment of mechanoinsensitive (silent) afferents. Neurotrophic factors are well known to orchestrate dynamic changes in the properties of sensory neurons. Although pain modulation by proteins in the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family has been documented in various pathophysiological states, their role in colorectal hypersensitivity remains unexplored. Therefore, we investigated the involvement of the GDNF family receptor α-3 (GFRα3) signaling in visceral hypersensitivity by quantifying visceromotor responses (VMR) to colorectal distension before and after intracolonic treatment with 2,4,6-trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS). Baseline responses to colorectal distension did not differ between C57BL/6 and GFRα3 knockout (KO) mice. Relative to intracolonic saline treatment, TNBS significantly enhanced the VMR to colorectal distension in C57BL/6 mice 2, 7, 10, and 14 days posttreatment, whereas TNBS-induced visceral hypersensitivity was significantly suppressed in GFRα3 KO mice. The proportion of GFRα3 immunopositive thoracolumbar and lumbosacral colorectal dorsal root ganglion neurons was significantly elevated 2 days after TNBS treatment. In single fiber recordings, responses to circumferential stretch of colorectal afferent endings in C57BL/6 mice were significantly increased (sensitized) after exposure to an inflammatory soup, whereas responses to stretch did not sensitize in GFRα3 KO mice. These findings suggest that enhanced GFRα3 signaling in visceral afferents may contribute to development of colorectal hypersensitivity. PMID:21193524

  12. Genome-wide detection of DNase I hypersensitive sites in single cells and FFPE tissue samples.

    PubMed

    Jin, Wenfei; Tang, Qingsong; Wan, Mimi; Cui, Kairong; Zhang, Yi; Ren, Gang; Ni, Bing; Sklar, Jeffrey; Przytycka, Teresa M; Childs, Richard; Levens, David; Zhao, Keji

    2015-12-01

    DNase I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) provide important information on the presence of transcriptional regulatory elements and the state of chromatin in mammalian cells. Conventional DNase sequencing (DNase-seq) for genome-wide DHSs profiling is limited by the requirement of millions of cells. Here we report an ultrasensitive strategy, called single-cell DNase sequencing (scDNase-seq) for detection of genome-wide DHSs in single cells. We show that DHS patterns at the single-cell level are highly reproducible among individual cells. Among different single cells, highly expressed gene promoters and enhancers associated with multiple active histone modifications display constitutive DHS whereas chromatin regions with fewer histone modifications exhibit high variation of DHS. Furthermore, the single-cell DHSs predict enhancers that regulate cell-specific gene expression programs and the cell-to-cell variations of DHS are predictive of gene expression. Finally, we apply scDNase-seq to pools of tumour cells and pools of normal cells, dissected from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue slides from patients with thyroid cancer, and detect thousands of tumour-specific DHSs. Many of these DHSs are associated with promoters and enhancers critically involved in cancer development. Analysis of the DHS sequences uncovers one mutation (chr18: 52417839G>C) in the tumour cells of a patient with follicular thyroid carcinoma, which affects the binding of the tumour suppressor protein p53 and correlates with decreased expression of its target gene TXNL1. In conclusion, scDNase-seq can reliably detect DHSs in single cells, greatly extending the range of applications of DHS analysis both for basic and for translational research, and may provide critical information for personalized medicine. PMID:26605532

  13. Mast Cell-Derived Tumor Necrosis Factor Can Promote Nerve Fiber Elongation in the Skin during Contact Hypersensitivity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kakurai, Maki; Monteforte, Rossella; Suto, Hajime; Tsai, Mindy; Nakae, Susumu; Galli, Stephen J.

    2006-01-01

    In humans, lesions of contact eczema or atopic dermatitis can exhibit increases in epidermal nerves, but the mechanism resulting in such nerve elongation are not fully understood. We found that contact hypersensitivity reactions to oxazolone in mice were associated with significant increases in the length of nerves in the epidermis and dermis. Using genetically mast cell-deficient c-kit mutant mice selectively repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency with either wild-type or tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-deficient mast cells, we found that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, significantly contributed to the elongation of epidermal and dermal PGP 9.5+ nerves and dermal CGRP+ nerves, as well as to the inflammation observed at sites of contact hypersensitivity in response to oxazolone. Moreover, the percentage of mast cells in close proximity to dermal PGP 9.5+ nerve fibers was significantly higher in wild-type mice and in c-kit mutant mice repaired of their dermal mast cell deficiency by the adoptive transfer of wild-type mast cells than in TNF-deficient mice or in TNF−/− mast cell-engrafted c-kit mutant mice. These observations show that mast cells, and mast cell-derived TNF, can promote the elongation of cutaneous nerve fibers during contact hypersensitivity in the mouse. PMID:17071594

  14. Lactoferrin, a glycoprotein with immunomodulatory and mast cell stabilising properties, in skin of horses suffering from Culicoides hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Kolm, Gabriela; Knapp, Elzbieta; Wagner, Regina; Klein, Dieter

    2007-10-01

    Lactoferrin (LF), a glycogen of the transferrin family with anti-bacterial and immunomodulatory properties, is expressed in various secretions and tissues. Cutaneous LF serves as a mast cell stabilising compound, modulates T cell activity and is found during IgE-mediated late phase reactions at allergen challenged sites. Culicoides hypersensitivity (CHS) in horses is a common IgE-mediated allergic dermatitis, characterised by an early and late phase cutaneous reaction upon allergen challenge. The aim of the study presented here was to examine whether LF mRNA expression in skin biopsies from horses affected by CHS prior to and 4h following intradermal challenge with a commercial C. nubeculosus extract is modified in comparison to skin biopsies from non-affected horses. In order to obtain reliable data, real time PCR was performed and genes of interest were normalized using three different housekeeping genes, beta-actin, GAPDH, beta-2-microglobulin. In comparison to non-affected horses, higher variation in LF mRNA levels both prior to and post-intradermal challenge with C. nubeculosus extract was seen in horses affected by CHS. However, the statistical analysis demonstrated that LF mRNA expression was not significantly different between CHS affected and non-affected horses prior to intradermal challenge with C. nubeculosus extract. Intradermal injection of C. nubeculosus extract did not result in local upregulation of LF mRNA at 4h post-injection. LF mRNA expression was therefore not significantly different pre- or post-intradermal challenge with C. nubeculosus extract in either group. Our data indicate that clinically normal skin of horses affected by CHS is not characterized by modified maintenance levels of LF mRNA. In contrast to human skin allergen challenged sites, LF mRNA levels in horses affected by CHS are not significantly different to that of control sites at 4h post-injection of C. nubeculosus extract. PMID:17222435

  15. Rapid and unambiguous detection of DNase I hypersensitive site in rare population of cells.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Ping; McFarland, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites are important for understanding cis regulation of gene expression. However, existing methods for detecting DHS sites in small numbers of cells can lead to ambiguous results. Here we describe a simple new method, in which DNA fragments with ends generated by DNase I digestion are isolated and used as templates for two PCR reactions. In the first PCR, primers are derived from sequences up- and down-stream of the DHS site. If the DHS site exists in the cells, the first PCR will not produce PCR products due to the cuts of the templates by DNase I between the primer sequences. In the second PCR, one primer is derived from sequence outside the DHS site and the other from the adaptor. This will produce a smear of PCR products of different sizes due to cuts by DNase I at different positions at the DHS site. With this design, we detected a DHS site at the CD4 gene in two CD4 T cell populations using as few as 2×10(4) cells. We further validated this method by detecting a DHS site of the IL-4 gene that is specifically present in type 2 but not type 1 T helper cells. Overall, this method overcomes the interference by genomic DNA not cut by DNase I at the DHS site, thereby offering unambiguous detection of DHS sites in the cells. PMID:24465674

  16. Involvement of calcitonin gene-related peptide and CCL2 production in CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity in a model of neuropathic pain

    PubMed Central

    MALON, JENNIFER T.; MADDULA, SWATHI; BELL, HARMONY; CAO, LING

    2014-01-01

    The neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) is known to play a pro-nociceptive role after peripheral nerve injury upon its release from primary afferent neurons in preclinical models of neuropathic pain. We previously demonstrated a critical role for spinal cord microglial CD40 in the development of spinal nerve L5 transection (L5Tx)-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. Herein, we investigated whether CGRP is involved in the CD40-mediated behavioral hypersensitivity. First, L5Tx was found to significantly induce CGRP expression in wild-type (WT) mice up to 14 days post-L5Tx. This increase in CGRP expression was reduced in CD40 knockout (KO) mice at day 14 post-L5Tx. Intrathecal injection of the CGRP antagonist CGRP8–37 significantly blocked L5Tx-induced mechanical hypersensitivity. In vitro, CGRP induced glial IL-6 and CCL2 production, and CD40 stimulation added to the effects of CGRP in neonatal glia. Further, there was decreased CCL2 production in CD40 KO mice compared to WT mice 21 days post-L5Tx. However, CGRP8–37 did not significantly affect spinal cord CCL2 production following L5Tx in WT mice. Altogether, these data suggest that CD40 contributes to the maintenance of behavioral hypersensitivity following peripheral nerve injury in part through two distinct pathways, the enhancement of CGRP expression and spinal cord CCL2 production. PMID:22377050

  17. Oral allergy syndrome (OAS): symptoms of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity to foods.

    PubMed

    Amlot, P L; Kemeny, D M; Zachary, C; Parkes, P; Lessof, M H

    1987-01-01

    Eighty highly atopic patients were selected for study because they had either atopic eczema (fifty cases) or atopic reactivity to foods, as judged by a positive skin-prick test (thirty cases). In all, sixty-five out of eighty subjects (81%) described symptoms of some kind provoked by foods, but correspondingly positive skin tests were found in only half of these, thirty-three out of eighty (41%). The symptoms experienced by thirty-one of the thirty-three patients with positive skin tests were immediate in onset (within 1 hr) and were at first confined to the upper gastrointestinal tract, the most frequent symptoms being oral irritation and throat tightness. In a proportion of these patients, further symptoms such as urticaria, asthma or anaphylaxis developed following the initial oral symptoms, which suggested the term 'oral allergy syndrome'. In the absence of the oral allergy, symptoms such as asthma, urticaria, migraine or eczema starting later than 1 hr after food were seldom associated with positive skin tests. In the oral allergy syndrome, the characteristic symptoms (strong association with positive skin tests and RAST, time of onset and sites at which symptoms are expressed) suggest a causative relationship between exposure to food antigens and specific IgE-induced release of mediators. In cases of food intolerance that lack a characteristic symptom pattern and a positive skin test or radio-allergo-sorbent test, it seems appropriate to consider non-IgE-mediated causes. PMID:3829369

  18. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  19. Eosinophilic esophagitis is characterized by a non-IgE-mediated food hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Simon, D; Cianferoni, A; Spergel, J M; Aceves, S; Holbreich, M; Venter, C; Rothenberg, M E; Terreehorst, I; Muraro, A; Lucendo, A J; Schoepfer, A; Straumann, A; Simon, H-U

    2016-05-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE) is a chronic disease characterized clinically by symptoms of esophageal dysfunction and histologically by eosinophil-predominant inflammation. EoE is frequently associated with concomitant atopic diseases and immunoglobulin E (IgE) sensitization to food allergens in children as well as to aeroallergens and cross-reactive plant allergen components in adults. Patients with EoE respond well to elemental and empirical food elimination diets. Recent research has, however, indicated that the pathogenesis of EoE is distinct from IgE-mediated food allergy. In this review, we discuss the individual roles of epithelial barrier defects, dysregulated innate and adaptive immune responses, and of microbiota in the pathogenesis of EoE. Although food has been recognized as a trigger factor of EoE, the mechanism by which it initiates or facilitates eosinophilic inflammation appears to be largely independent of IgE and needs to be further investigated. Understanding the pathogenic role of food in EoE is a prerequisite for the development of specific diagnostic tools and targeted therapeutic procedures. PMID:26799684

  20. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis usually occurs in people who work in places where there are high levels of organic dusts, fungus, or molds. Long-term exposure can lead to lung inflammation and acute lung disease . ...

  1. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis Also known as extrinsic allergic alveolitis, bird fancier’s lung, farmer’s lung, hot tub lung, and ... May 27, 2016 Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX ACCESSIBILITY PRIVACY STATEMENT FOIA OIG CONTACT US National ...

  2. Immunosuppressive Effect of Litsea cubeba L. Essential Oil on Dendritic Cell and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Chun; Chang, Wen-Te; Hseu, You-Cheng; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chuang, Cheng Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Lin, Ming-Kuem

    2016-01-01

    Litsea cubeba L., also named as Makauy, is a traditional herb and has been used as cooking condiment or tea brewing to treat diseases for aborigines. The present study was undertaken to explore the chemical compositions of the fruit essential oil of L. cubeba (LCEO) and the immunomodulatory effect of LCEO on dendritic cells and mice. The LCEO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with direct injection (DI/GC) or headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME/GC). In total, 56 components were identified, of which 48 were detected by DI/GC and 49 were detected by HS-SPME/GC. The principal compounds were citral (neral and geranial). An immunosuppressive activity of LCEO was investigated with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) which have a critical role to trigger the adaptive immunity. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of LCEO on immune response was elucidated by performing the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses in mice. Our results clearly showed that LCEO decreases the production of TNF-α and cytokine IL-12 in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. CHS response and the infiltrative T cells were inhibited in the tested ears of the mice co-treated with LCEO. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the LCEO mainly containing citral exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DCs and mice, indicating that LCEO can potentially be applied in the treatment of CHS, inflammatory diseases, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27529236

  3. Immunosuppressive Effect of Litsea cubeba L. Essential Oil on Dendritic Cell and Contact Hypersensitivity Responses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Chun; Chang, Wen-Te; Hseu, You-Cheng; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chuang, Cheng Hsuan; Lin, Chi-Chen; Lee, Meng-Shiou; Lin, Ming-Kuem

    2016-01-01

    Litsea cubeba L., also named as Makauy, is a traditional herb and has been used as cooking condiment or tea brewing to treat diseases for aborigines. The present study was undertaken to explore the chemical compositions of the fruit essential oil of L. cubeba (LCEO) and the immunomodulatory effect of LCEO on dendritic cells and mice. The LCEO was analyzed using gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) with direct injection (DI/GC) or headspace-solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME/GC). In total, 56 components were identified, of which 48 were detected by DI/GC and 49 were detected by HS-SPME/GC. The principal compounds were citral (neral and geranial). An immunosuppressive activity of LCEO was investigated with bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DCs) which have a critical role to trigger the adaptive immunity. Additionally, the inhibitory effect of LCEO on immune response was elucidated by performing the contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses in mice. Our results clearly showed that LCEO decreases the production of TNF-α and cytokine IL-12 in a dose-dependent manner in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated DCs. CHS response and the infiltrative T cells were inhibited in the tested ears of the mice co-treated with LCEO. We demonstrate, for the first time, that the LCEO mainly containing citral exhibits an immunosuppressive effect on DCs and mice, indicating that LCEO can potentially be applied in the treatment of CHS, inflammatory diseases, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:27529236

  4. Cell division in Escherichia coli BS-12 is hypersensitive to deoxyribonucleic acid damage by ultraviolet light.

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, B A; Mottershead, R P; Green, M H

    1977-01-01

    Escherichia coli BS-12 uvrA lon is hypersensitive to ultraviolet light. On minimal agar plates at densities in excess of about 10(7) bacteria per plate, as few as one or two photoreversible pyrimidine dimers in the entire genome are sufficient to cause inhibition of cell division. Most of the resulting filaments are unable to divide or form a viable colony. Inhibition of cell division appears to be a rapid consequence of replication of deoxyribonucleic acid containing a pyrimidine dimer. Photoreversibility of the inhibition of cell division persists indefinitely, indicating that the continued presence of the pyrimidine dimers (or the continued generation of daughter strand gaps) is necessary to maintain the division-inhibited state. In view of the kinetics for the production of filamentation by ultraviolet light and the extremely low average inducing fluence (0.03 J/m2), it is concluded that the initiating signal is not the same as that causing other inducible phenomena such as prophage induction or Weigle reactivation. PMID:400790

  5. Transcription of the hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer in erythroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tuan, D.; Suming Kong; Hu, K. )

    1992-12-01

    In the human genome, the erythroid-specific hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer regulates the transcription of the downstream [beta]-like globin genes 10-50 kilobases away. The mechanism of HS2 enhancer function is not known. The present study employs RNA protection assays to analyze the transcriptional status of the HS2 enhancer in transfected recombinant chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) plasmids. In erythroid K562 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is active, the HS2 sequence directs the synthesis of long enhancer transcripts that are initiated apparently from within the enhancer and elongated through the intervening DNA into the cis-linked CAT gene. In nonerythroid HL-60 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is inactive, long enhancer transcripts are not detectable. Splitting the HS2 enhancer between two tandem Ap1 sites abolishes the synthesis of a group of long enhancer transcripts and results in loss of enhancer function and transcriptional silencing of the cis-linked CAT gene. In directing the synthesis of RNA through the intervening DNA and the gene by a tracking and transcription mechanism, the HS2 enhancer may (i) open up the chromatin structure of a gene domain and (ii) deliver enhancer binding proteins to the promoter sequence where they may stimulate the transcription of the gene at the cap site. 42 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Chronological changes of delayed-type hypersensitivity in mice immunised with testicular germ cells alone.

    PubMed

    Qu, N; Naito, M; Terayama, H; Hirai, S; Musha, M; Itoh, M

    2014-06-01

    Experimental autoimmune orchitis (EAO), comprising a breakdown of the testicular immune privilege, is one of the models of immunological male infertility. EAO is characterised by CD4 + T-cell-dependent lymphocytic inflammation and augmented delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) against testicular antigens. We previously established an EAO model in mice by immunisation with viable syngeneic testicular germ cells (TGC) alone. However, the sequential change of DTH during development of this EAO has not been analysed yet. In this study, the DTH response during TGC-induced EAO was investigated by the injection of syngeneic TGC protein into the ears of mice. The results showed that a significant DTH response was observed on injection of 20 μg TGC protein, but not on that of 0.2 or 2 μg TGC protein. Also, the level of the DTH response to 20 μg TGC protein was highly relevant to the pathology of EAO development. These results indicate that the DTH response on injection of 20 μg TGC protein into the ears of mice is effective for predicting the pathology of EAO development. PMID:23710595

  7. Transcription of the hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer in erythroid cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tuan, D; Kong, S; Hu, K

    1992-01-01

    In the human genome, the erythroid-specific hypersensitive site HS2 enhancer regulates the transcription of the downstream beta-like globin genes 10-50 kilobases away. The mechanism of HS2 enhancer function is not known. The present study employs RNA protection assays to analyze the transcriptional status of the HS2 enhancer in transfected recombinant chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) plasmids. In erythroid K562 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is active, the HS2 sequence directs the synthesis of long enhancer transcripts that are initiated apparently from within the enhancer and elongated through the intervening DNA into the cis-linked CAT gene. In nonerythroid HL-60 cells in which the HS2 enhancer is inactive, long enhancer transcripts are not detectable. Splitting the HS2 enhancer between two tandem Ap1 sites abolishes the synthesis of a group of long enhancer transcripts and results in loss of enhancer function and transcriptional silencing of the cis-linked CAT gene. In directing the synthesis of RNA through the intervening DNA and the gene by a tracking and transcription mechanism, the HS2 enhancer may (i) open up the chromatin structure of a gene domain and (ii) deliver enhancer binding proteins to the promoter sequence where they may stimulate the transcription of the gene at the cap site. Images PMID:1454801

  8. Production of endocannabinoids by activated T cells and B cells modulates inflammation associated with delayed-type hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sido, Jessica M; Nagarkatti, Prakash S; Nagarkatti, Mitzi

    2016-06-01

    Endocannabinoids are endogenous ligands for the cannabinoid (CB) receptors which include anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonyl glycerol (2-AG). 2-AG has been linked to inflammation due to its elevated expression in animal models of autoimmunity and hypersensitivity. However, administration of exogenous 2-AG has been shown to suppress inflammation making its precise role unclear. In the current study, we investigated the role of 2-AG following immunization of C57BL/6 (BL6) mice with methylated BSA (mBSA) antigen, which triggers both delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and antibody response. We found that while naïve T cells and B cells expressed low levels of 2-AG, expression significantly increased upon activation. Furthermore, mBSA-immunized mice exhibited higher 2-AG concentration than naïve mice. Exogenous 2-AG treatment (40 mg/kg) in mBSA-immunized mice led to reduced DTH response, and decreased Th1 and Th17-associated cytokines including IL-6, IL-2, TNF-α, and the IgG response. Addition of 2-AG to activated popliteal lymph node (PopLN) cell cultures also inhibited lymphocyte proliferation. Together, these data show for the first time that activated T and B cells produce 2-AG, which plays a negative regulatory role to decrease DTH via inhibition of T-cell activation and proliferation. Moreover, these findings suggest that exogenous 2-AG treatment can be used therapeutically in Th1- or Th17-driven disease. PMID:27064137

  9. Enhanced reactive oxygen species metabolism of air space cells in hypersensitivity pneumonitis

    SciTech Connect

    Calhoun, W.J. )

    1991-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced by phagocytic cells as part of host defense mechanisms, but these same products released by air space cells have been shown to contribute to pulmonary inflammation in interstitial lung diseases and likely represent a general mechanism of lung injury. However, the possible contribution of these compounds to lung inflammation in hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) has yet to be reported. We performed 11 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) studies in six patients with HP and compared the results with results from studies in 21 healthy normal volunteers. In patients with HP, spontaneous and stimulated measures of ROS metabolism by air space cells were significantly higher than those seen in normal volunteers. When alveolar macrophages were purified by depleting neutrophils and eosinophils on density gradients of Percoll (specific gravity 1.075 gm/ml), ROS metabolism remained elevated when compared with that in cells obtained from healthy controls, confirming that alveolar macrophage ROS metabolism is enhanced in patients with HP. Further, we found significant elevations in BAL total protein, lymphocytes, eosinophils, and neutrophils in patients with HP when they were compared with normal volunteers, with an increased proportion of BAL T lymphocytes expressing CD8 and natural killer surface antigens, consistent with previous work. Lavage samples from patients with HP with clinically active disease had higher proportions of BAL eosinophils and concentrations of total protein, lower forced expiratory volume in 1 second, lower forced vital capacity, and lower arterial oxygen tensions, and higher indices of ROS metabolism than samples from patients with HP with inactive disease. HP is associated with evidence of air space inflammation, to which alveolar macrophage-derived ROS may contribute.

  10. Two phenotypically distinct T cells are involved in ultraviolet-irradiated urocanic acid-induced suppression of the efferent delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.

    1987-09-01

    When UVB-irradiated urocanic acid, the putative photoreceptor/mediator for UVB suppression, is administered to mice it induces a dose-dependent suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus, type 1 (HSV-1), of similar magnitude to that induced by UV irradiation of mice. In this study, the efferent suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity by UV-irradiated urocanic acid is demonstrated to be due to 2 phenotypically distinct T cells, (Thy1+, L3T4-, Ly2+) and (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-). The suppression is specific for HSV-1. This situation parallels the generation of 2 distinct T-suppressor cells for HSV-1 by UV irradiation of mice and provides further evidence for the involvement of urocanic acid in the generation of UVB suppression.

  11. Formulated extract from multiple citrus peels impairs dendritic cell functions and attenuates allergic contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Li, Shiming; Lin, Yi-Chin; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lin, Ping-Yi; Suzawa, Michiko; Wang, Hsin-Chieh; Chu, Ching-Liang; Chen, Der-Yuan; Lin, Chi-Chen

    2014-05-01

    It has been reported that gold lotion (GL), a formulated product made from the peels of six citrus fruits, has many pharmacological properties, such as anti-tumor, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory activities. In this study, we investigated the immunomodulatory effect of GL on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulated mouse bone marrow-derived DC maturation and function. Our experimental results have shown that GL significantly impaired the pro-inflammatory cytokine and chemokine secretion, suppressed the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I/II and costimulatory molecules (CD40, CD80 and CD86), increased phagocytic capacity, and reduced propensity to stimulate the autologous CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell proliferation of LPS-induced DCs. Furthermore, we found that oral administration of GL attenuated the 2,4-Dinitro-1-fluorobenzene induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in animal models. Subsequently, our molecular mechanism studies showed that GL interfered with LPS-induced MAPK-JNK, p38 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB p65. In an essence, these findings are the first report to provide new insight in the immunopharmacological role of GL in terms of its effects on DC. PMID:24566093

  12. Identification of genes required for Cf-dependent hypersensitive cell death by combined proteomic and RNA interfering analyses

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiu-Fang; Cheng, Wei-Shun; Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Xu, You-Ping; Zhou, Xue-Ping; Cai, Xin-Zhong

    2012-01-01

    Identification of hypersensitive cell death (HCD) regulators is essential to dissect the molecular mechanisms underlying plant disease resistance. In this study, combined proteomic and RNA interfering (RNAi) analyses were employed to identify genes required for the HCD conferred by the tomato resistance gene Cf-4 and the Cladosporium fulvum avirulence gene Avr4. Forty-nine proteins differentially expressed in the tomato seedlings mounting and those not mounting Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD were identified through proteomic analysis. Among them were a variety of defence-related proteins including a cysteine protease, Pip1, an operative target of another C. fulvum effector, Avr2. Additionally, glutathione-mediated antioxidation is a major response to Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD. Functional analysis through tobacco rattle virus-induced gene silencing and transient RNAi assays of the chosen 16 differentially expressed proteins revealed that seven genes, which encode Pip1 homologue NbPip1, a SIPK type MAP kinase Nbf4, an asparagine synthetase NbAsn, a trypsin inhibitor LeMir-like protein NbMir, a small GTP-binding protein, a late embryogenesis-like protein, and an ASR4-like protein, were required for Cf-4/Avr4-dependent HCD. Furthermore, the former four genes were essential for Cf-9/Avr9-dependent HCD; NbPip1, NbAsn, and NbMir, but not Nbf4, affected a nonadaptive bacterial pathogen Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae-induced HCD in Nicotiana benthamiana. These data demonstrate that Pip1 and LeMir may play a general role in HCD and plant immunity and that the application of combined proteomic and RNA interfering analyses is an efficient strategy to identify genes required for HCD, disease resistance, and probably other biological processes in plants. PMID:22275387

  13. CD34 Is Required for Dendritic Cell Trafficking and Pathology in Murine Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Blanchet, Marie-Renée; Bennett, Jami L.; Gold, Matthew J.; Levantini, Elena; Tenen, Daniel G.; Girard, Melissa; Cormier, Yvon

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Although recent work has shown that CD34 plays an important role in the trafficking of inflammatory cells during Th2-biased inflammatory responses, its role in Th1/Th17-biased disease as well as dendritic cell (DC) trafficking is unknown. Objectives: We used CD34-deficient mice (Cd34−/−) to investigate the role of CD34 in the Th1/Th17-biased lung inflammatory disease, hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP). Methods: HP was induced in wild-type (wt) and Cd34−/− mice by repeated intranasal administration of Saccharopolyspora rectivirgula antigen. Lung inflammation was assessed by histology and analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage cells. Primary and secondary immune responses were evaluated by cytokine recall responses of pulmonary inflammatory cells as well as draining lymph node cells. Measurements and Main Results: Cd34−/− mice were highly resistant to the development of HP and exhibited an inflammatory pattern more reflective of a primary response to S. rectivirgula rather than the chronic lymphocytosis that is typical of this disease. Cytokine recall responses from Cd34−/− lymph node cells were dampened and consistent with a failure of antigen-loaded Cd34−/− DCs to deliver antigen and prime T cells in the draining lymph nodes. In agreement with this interpretation, adoptive transfer of wt DCs into Cd34−/− mice was sufficient to restore normal sensitivity to HP. CD34 was found to be expressed by wt DCs, and Cd34−/− DCs exhibited an impaired ability to chemotax toward a subset of chemokines in vitro. Finally, expression of human CD34 in Cd34−/− mice restored normal susceptibility to HP. Conclusions: We conclude that CD34 is expressed by mucosal DCs and plays an important role in their trafficking through the lung and to the lymph nodes. Our data also suggest that CD34 may play a selective role in the efficient migration of these cells to a subset of chemokines. PMID:21642249

  14. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It’s reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  15. TRPV1-mediated presynaptic transmission in basolateral amygdala contributes to visceral hypersensitivity in adult rats with neonatal maternal deprivation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Ying; Chen, Xiaoqi; Zhang, Ping-An; Xu, Qiya; Zheng, Hang; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2016-01-01

    The central mechanisms of visceral hypersensitivity remain largely unknown. It's reported that there are highest densities of TRPV1 labeled neurons within basolateral amygdala (BLA). The aim of this study was to explore the role and mechanisms of TRPV1 in BLA in development of visceral hypersensitivity. Visceral hypersensitivity was induced by neonatal maternal deprivation (NMD) and was quantified by abdominal withdrawal reflex. Expression of TRPV1 was determined by Western blot. The synaptic transmission of neurons in BLA was recorded by patch clamping. It was found that the expression of TRPV1 in BLA was significantly upregulated in NMD rats; glutamatergic synaptic activities in BLA were increased in NMD rats; application of capsazepine (TRPV1 antagonist) decreased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in NMD slices through a presynaptic mechanism; application of capsaicin (TRPV1 agonist) increased glutamatergic synaptic activities of BLA neurons in control slices through presynaptic mechanism without affecting GABAergic synaptic activities; microinjecting capsazepine into BLA significantly increased colonic distension threshold both in control and NMD rats. Our data suggested that upregulation of TRPV1 in BLA contributes to visceral hypersensitivity of NMD rats through enhancing excitation of BLA, thus identifying a potential target for treatment of chronic visceral pain. PMID:27364923

  16. Hypersensitivity Pneumonitis.

    PubMed

    Wysong, Kristi; Phillips, Jennan A; Hammond, Stephanie

    2016-06-01

    Chronic exposure to a broad array of antigens after workers inhale aerosolized organic dust particles from mold, animal dander, bird droppings, and chemicals, especially pesticides or herbicides, increases risk for hypersensitivity pneumonitis. Several demographic characteristics of immigrant workers in farming, poultry processing, construction, and landscaping increase this worker population's risk. PMID:27067273

  17. Changes in mast cell infiltration: a possible mechanism in detrusor overactivity induced by visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Nian-zhao; Ma, Lin; Jun, Chen; Guo, Yan-xia; Yuan, Hui-qing

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To establish the detrusor overactivity (DO) model induced by visceral hypersensitivity (VH) and investigate the relationship between mast cell (MC) infiltration and DO. Materials and Methods: Sixty rats are divided into 4 groups randomly: Group 1:Baseline group; Group 2: DO group; Group 3: CON group; Group 4: VH group. The colorectal distension (CRD) and abdominal withdral reflex (AWR) scores are performed to evaluate VH. The cystometric investigation and histological test of MC infiltration are assessed. Results: The threshold pressure of CRD in the VH group is significantly lower than that in the CON group (P<0.001). At the distension pressure ≥20 mmHg, the AWR scores of the VH group are significantly higher than those of the CON group (10 mmHg: P=0.33; 20 mmHg: P=0.028; 40 mmHg: P<0.001; 60 mmHg: P<0.001; 80 mmHg: P<0.001). DO model is successfully established in the VH group (DO rate=100%). Compared with the CON group, the numbers of MC infiltration are significantly increased in the VH group, including submucosa of bladder (P<0.001), mucosa lamina propria/mesentery of small intestine (P<0.001), and mucosa lamina propria/mesentery of large intestine (P<0.001). Furthermore, more MC activation as well as degranulation are observed in the VH group. Conclusions: It is indicated that DO model can be established in the VH rats. The MC infiltration may play an important role in DO induced by VH, and may be helpful to understand the mechanisms of DO in VH patients. PMID:27256194

  18. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  19. Alternative lengthening of telomeres renders cancer cells hypersensitive to ATR inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Rachel Litman; Cox, Kelli E; Jeitany, Maya; Wakimoto, Hiroaki; Bryll, Alysia R; Ganem, Neil J; Bersani, Francesca; Pineda, Jose R; Suvà, Mario L; Benes, Cyril H; Haber, Daniel A; Boussin, Francois D; Zou, Lee

    2015-01-16

    Cancer cells rely on telomerase or the alternative lengthening of telomeres (ALT) pathway to overcome replicative mortality. ALT is mediated by recombination and is prevalent in a subset of human cancers, yet whether it can be exploited therapeutically remains unknown. Loss of the chromatin-remodeling protein ATRX associates with ALT in cancers. Here, we show that ATRX loss compromises cell-cycle regulation of the telomeric noncoding RNA TERRA and leads to persistent association of replication protein A (RPA) with telomeres after DNA replication, creating a recombinogenic nucleoprotein structure. Inhibition of the protein kinase ATR, a critical regulator of recombination recruited by RPA, disrupts ALT and triggers chromosome fragmentation and apoptosis in ALT cells. The cell death induced by ATR inhibitors is highly selective for cancer cells that rely on ALT, suggesting that such inhibitors may be useful for treatment of ALT-positive cancers. PMID:25593184

  20. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  1. Notch-Mediated Cell Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Murata, Akihiko; Hayashi, Shin-Ichi

    2016-01-01

    Notch family members are generally recognized as signaling molecules that control various cellular responses in metazoan organisms. Early fly studies and our mammalian studies demonstrated that Notch family members are also cell adhesion molecules; however, information on the physiological roles of this function and its origin is limited. In this review, we discuss the potential present and ancestral roles of Notch-mediated cell adhesion in order to explore its origin and the initial roles of Notch family members dating back to metazoan evolution. We hypothesize that Notch family members may have initially emerged as cell adhesion molecules in order to mediate multicellularity in the last common ancestor of metazoan organisms. PMID:26784245

  2. Sensitization of P2X3 receptors by cystathionine β-synthetase mediates persistent pain hypersensitivity in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qianliang; Zhu, Hongyan; Zou, Kang; Yuan, Bo; Zhou, You-Lang; Jiang, Xinghong; Yan, Jun; Xu, Guang-Yin

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a major cause of discogenic low back pain and sciatica, but the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is becoming recognized for its involvement in a wide variety of processes including inflammation and nociception. The present study was designed to investigate the roles of the H2S signaling pathway in the regulation of expression and function of purinergic receptors (P2XRs) in dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from rats with LDH. LDH was induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP), harvested from rat tail, in lumbar 5 and 6 spinal nerve roots. Implantation of autologous NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity, which was partially reversed by an intrathecal injection of A317491, a potent inhibitor of P2X3Rs and P2X2/3Rs. The NP induced persistent pain hypersensitivity was associated with the increased expression of P2X3Rs, but not P2X1Rs and P2X2Rs, receptors in L5-6 DRGs. NP implantation also produced a 2-fold increase in ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons when compared to those of controls (P < 0.05). Interestingly, NP implantation significantly enhanced expression of the endogenous hydrogen sulfide producing enzyme, cystathionine-β-synthetase (CBS). Systematic administration of O-(Carboxymethyl) hydroxylamine hemihydrochloride (AOAA), an inhibitor of CBS, suppressed the upregulation of P2X3R expression and the potentiation of ATP-induced intracellular calcium signals in DRG neurons (P < 0.05). Intrathecal injection of AOAA markedly attenuated NP induced- persistent pain hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that sensitization of P2X3Rs, which is likely mediated by CBS-H2S signaling in primary sensory neurons, contributes to discogenic pain. Targeting CBS/H2S-P2X3R signaling may represent a potential treatment for neuropathic pain caused by LDH. PMID:25885215

  3. Loss of ubiquitin E2 Ube2w rescues hypersensitivity of Rnf4 mutant cells to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Maure, Jean-François; Moser, Sandra C.; Jaffray, Ellis G.; F. Alpi, Arno; Hay, Ronald T.

    2016-01-01

    SUMO and ubiquitin play important roles in the response of cells to DNA damage. These pathways are linked by the SUMO Targeted ubiquitin Ligase Rnf4 that catalyses transfer of ubiquitin from a ubiquitin loaded E2 conjugating enzyme to a polySUMO modified substrate. Rnf4 can functionally interact with multiple E2s, including Ube2w, in vitro. Chicken cells lacking Rnf4 are hypersensitive to hyroxyurea, DNA alkylating drugs and DNA crosslinking agents, but this sensitivity is suppressed by simultaneous depletion of Ube2w. Cells depleted of Ube2w alone are not hypersensitive to the same DNA damaging agents. Similar results were also obtained in human cells. These data indicate that Ube2w does not have an essential role in the DNA damage response, but is deleterious in the absence of Rnf4. Thus, although Rnf4 and Ube2w functionally interact in vitro, our genetic experiments indicate that in response to DNA damage Ube2w and Rnf4 function in distinct pathways. PMID:27185577

  4. Loss of ubiquitin E2 Ube2w rescues hypersensitivity of Rnf4 mutant cells to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Maure, Jean-François; Moser, Sandra C; Jaffray, Ellis G; F Alpi, Arno; Hay, Ronald T

    2016-01-01

    SUMO and ubiquitin play important roles in the response of cells to DNA damage. These pathways are linked by the SUMO Targeted ubiquitin Ligase Rnf4 that catalyses transfer of ubiquitin from a ubiquitin loaded E2 conjugating enzyme to a polySUMO modified substrate. Rnf4 can functionally interact with multiple E2s, including Ube2w, in vitro. Chicken cells lacking Rnf4 are hypersensitive to hyroxyurea, DNA alkylating drugs and DNA crosslinking agents, but this sensitivity is suppressed by simultaneous depletion of Ube2w. Cells depleted of Ube2w alone are not hypersensitive to the same DNA damaging agents. Similar results were also obtained in human cells. These data indicate that Ube2w does not have an essential role in the DNA damage response, but is deleterious in the absence of Rnf4. Thus, although Rnf4 and Ube2w functionally interact in vitro, our genetic experiments indicate that in response to DNA damage Ube2w and Rnf4 function in distinct pathways. PMID:27185577

  5. Pharmacogenetics of drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Elizabeth J; Mallal, Simon A

    2010-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions and severe cutaneous adverse drug reactions, such as Stevens–Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis, are examples of serious adverse drug reactions mediated through a combination of metabolic and immunological mechanisms that could traditionally not have been predicted based on the pharmacological characteristics of the drug alone. The discovery of new associations between these syndromes and specific HLA has created the promise that risk for these reactions could be predicted through pharmacogenetic screening, thereby avoiding serious morbidity and mortality associated with these types of drug reactions. Despite this, several hurdles exist in the translation of these associations into pharmacogenetic tests that could be routinely used in the clinical setting. HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent abacavir hypersensitivity syndrome is an example of a test now in widespread routine clinical use in the developed world. PMID:20602616

  6. Intact subepidermal nerve fibers mediate mechanical hypersensitivity via the activation of protein kinase C gamma in spared nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Miau-Hwa; Yang, Ming-Ling; Youn, Su-Chung; Tseng, To-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Background Spared nerve injury is an important neuropathic pain model for investigating the role of intact primary afferents in the skin on pain hypersensitivity. However, potential cellular mechanisms remain poorly understood. In phosphoinositide-3 kinase pathway, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase 1 (PDK1) participates in the regulation of neuronal plasticity for central sensitization. The downstream cascades of PDK1 include: (1) protein kinase C gamma (PKCγ) controls the trafficking and phosphorylation of ionotropic glutamate receptor; (2) protein kinase B (Akt)/the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling is responsible for local protein synthesis. Under these statements, we therefore hypothesized that an increase of PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis in intact primary afferents after SNI might contribute to pain hypersensitivity. Results The variants of spared nerve injury were performed in Sprague-Dawley rats by transecting any two of the three branches of the sciatic nerve, leaving only one branch intact. Following SNIt (spared tibial branch), mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia, but not thermal hyperalgesia, were significantly induced. In the first footpad, normal epidermal innervations were verified by the protein gene product 9.5 (PGP9.5)- and growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43)-immunoreactive (IR) intraepidermal nerve fibers (IENFs) densities. Furthermore, the rapid increases of phospho-PKCγ- and phospho-mTOR-IR subepidermal nerve fibers (SENFs) areas were distinct gathered from the results of PGP9.5-, GAP43-, and neurofilament 200 (NF200)-IR SENFs areas. The efficacy of PKC inhibitor (GF 109203X) or mTOR complex 1 inhibitor (rapamycin) for attenuating mechanical hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia by intraplantar injection was dose-dependent. Conclusions From results obtained in this study, we strongly recommend that the intact SENFs persistently increase PKCγ activation and mTOR-dependent PKCγ synthesis participate

  7. Blocking T cell co-stimulation using a CD80 blocking small molecule reduces delayed type hypersensitivity responses in rhesus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Haanstra, K G; Endell, J; Estévâo, D; Kondova, I; Jonker, M

    2009-01-01

    Blockade of co-stimulation signals between T cells and antigen-presenting cells could be an important approach for treatment of autoimmune diseases and transplant rejection. Recently a series of small compound inhibitors which bind human CD80 (B7-1) and inhibit T cell co-stimulation has been described. To investigate their potency for clinical use, one of these compounds, RhuDex™, was evaluated for reactivity with rhesus monkey CD80. The in vitro biological effect on rhesus monkey lymphocytes, the potency for suppression of an inflammatory recall response and the protein-induced delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in the skin were studied. In a rhesus monkey T cell co-stimulation assay RhuDex™ inhibited proinflammatory cytokine release and cellular proliferation with micromolar potency. Systemic administration of RhuDex™ to rhesus monkeys inhibited the DTH response significantly, indicating that this compound may inhibit autoimmune mediated inflammatory processes where the target, CD80, is up-regulated. PMID:19737235

  8. Pharmacogenetic determinants of immediate and delayed reactions of drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Guéant, J L; Guéant-Rodriguez, R M; Gastin, I Aimone; Cornejo-García, J A; Viola, M; Barbaud, A; Mertes, P M; Blanca, M; Romano, A

    2008-01-01

    Drug allergy refers to a hypersensitivity reaction for which either an IgE or T-cell-mediated mechanism is demonstrated. The recognition of the drug by B and T cells is influenced by variants of HLA genes. The genetic factors involved in IgE-mediated mechanisms have been studied mainly in beta-lactam reactions, and they appear to be related to human leukocyte antigen presentation (HLA A2 and DRw52), TNFA -308G>A, class switching to IgE by B cells (variants of IL-13 and of IL-4RA), and expression of IgE receptors on target cells (variant of the FcepsilonRIbeta gene). Delayed T-cell-mediated reactions are also associated with HLA alleles. Studies have reported an association of HLA-B*1502 and HLA-B*5801 in patients with the Stevens-Johnson syndrome or toxic epidermal necrolysis provoked by carbamazepine, as well as of HLA-B*5701 with abacavir hypersensitivity. HLA-B*5701 seems to be a strong predictor in whites, but not in Hispanics or Africans. Carbamazepine hypersensitivity is also influenced by gene variants of cytochrome P450 enzymes on the generation of reactive metabolites, while CYP2C9*2 and CYP2C9*3 polymorphisms influence the bioactivation of sulfamethoxazole in prohapten. Pharmacogenetic studies on aspirin hypersensitivity have identified distinct types of predictors, such as HLA genotypes, a polymorphism in the promoter of the FcepsilonRIalpha gene, and variants in genes of enzymes from the arachidonic acid pathway. In the future, identification of genetic predictors will benefit from genomewide association studies that also take ethnic differences into account. Ideally, predictors will help to prevent adverse reactions, as suggested by a recent study on the effectiveness of prospective HLA-B*5701 screening to prevent hypersensitivity reactions to abacavir in HIV patients. PMID:18991696

  9. Immunohistochemical appearance of corticosteroid contact hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M; Andrew, S M; Maseruka, H; Beck, M H

    1994-11-01

    We have studied, immunohistochemically, hypersensitivity reactions to corticosteroids and compared them with allergic contact dermatitis from nickel and appropriate controls. We could find no qualitative differences between nickel and corticosteroid contact reactions, providing further evidence that hypersensitivity to corticosteroids is an immunologically mediated reaction. PMID:7532558

  10. Peripheral T-cell lymphoma mimicking 5-aminosalicylate hypersensitivity in ulcerative colitis.

    PubMed

    Kong, L M; Fok, K C; Tsui, A; Qian, C; Fisher, L

    2013-10-01

    5-aminosalicylates (5-ASA) remain an important strategy in the induction and maintenance of remission of inflammatory bowel diseases especially in ulcerative colitis. The prototypical drug of this class, sulfasalazine is generally well tolerated with severe hypersensitivity reactions and hepatotoxicity also described within the literature. When approaching a patient with an adverse reaction to 5-ASA, it can be difficult to differentiate clinically between a sulfa allergy versus a 5-ASA allergy versus a malignancy. We report on a case with initial signs and symptoms suggestive of a sulfa/5-ASA allergy that was subsequently found to be malignant in nature. PMID:24134170

  11. IL-1 alpha, but not IL-1 beta, is required for contact-allergen-specific T cell activation during the sensitization phase in contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Nakae, S; Naruse-Nakajima, C; Sudo, K; Horai, R; Asano, M; Iwakura, Y

    2001-12-01

    Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated cellular immune response caused by epicutaneous exposure to contact allergens. In this reaction, after the first epicutaneous allergen sensitization, Langerhans cells (LC) catch allergens and migrate from the skin to draining lymph nodes (LN) and activate naive T cells. Although IL-1 is suggested to be involved in these processes, the mechanisms have not been elucidated completely. In this report, to elucidate roles of IL-1alpha and IL-1beta in CHS, we analyzed ear swelling in 2,4,6-trinitrochlorobenzene (TNCB)-induced CHS using gene-targeted mice. We found that ear swelling was suppressed in IL-1alpha-deficient (IL-1alpha(-/-)) mice but not in IL-1beta(-/-) mice. LC migration from the skin into LN was delayed in both IL-1alpha(-/-) and IL-1beta(-/-) mice, suggesting that this defect was not the direct cause for the reduced CHS in these mice. However, we found that the proliferative response of trinitrophenyl (TNP)-specific T cells after sensitization with TNCB was specifically reduced in IL-1alpha(-/-) mice. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of TNP-conjugated IL-1-deficient epidermal cells (EC) into wild-type mice indicated that only IL-1alpha, but not IL-1beta, produced by antigen-presenting cells in EC could prime allergen-specific T cells. These observations indicate that IL-1alpha, but not IL-1beta, plays a crucial role in TNCB-induced CHS by sensitizing TNP-specific T cells. PMID:11717188

  12. DWD HYPERSENSITIVE TO UV-B 1 is negatively involved in UV-B mediated cellular responses in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Kim, Hani; Seo, Kyoung-In; Kim, Soon-Hee; Chung, Sunglan; Huang, Xi; Yang, Panyu; Deng, Xing Wang; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2014-12-01

    Among T-DNA insertion mutants of various cullin4-RING ubiquitin E3 ligase (CRL4) substrate receptors, one mutant that exhibits enhanced sensitivity in response to ultraviolet-B (UV-B) illumination has been isolated and its corresponding gene has been named DWD HYPERSENSITIVE TO UV-B 1 (DHU1) in Arabidopsis. dhu1 lines showed much shorter hypocotyls than those in wild type under low doses of UV-B. Other light did not alter hypocotyl growth patterns in dhu1, indicating the hypersensitivity of dhu1 is restricted to UV-B. DHU1 was upregulated by more than two times in response to UV-B application of 1.5 μmol m(-2) s(-1), implying its possible involvement in UV-B signaling. DHU1 is able to bind to DDB1, an adaptor of CRL4; accordingly, DHU1 is thought to act as a substrate receptor of CRL4. Microarray data generated from wild-type and dhu1 under low doses of UV-B revealed that 209 or 124 genes were upregulated or downregulated by more than two times in dhu1 relative to wild type, respectively. About 23.4 % of the total upregulated genes in dhu1 were upregulated by more than five times in response to UV-B based on the AtGenExpress Visualization Tool data, while only about 1.4 % were downregulated to the same degree by UV-B, indicating that loss of DHU1 led to the overall enhancement of the upregulation of UV-B inducible genes. dhu1 also showed altered responsiveness under high doses of UV-B. Taken together, these findings indicate that DHU1 is a potent CRL4 substrate receptor that may function as a negative regulator of UV-B response in Arabidopsis. PMID:25193399

  13. Aspirin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Borges, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions to acetylsalicylic acid and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs constitute a major medical concern worldwide. This article presents an overview of the observations that led to the discovery of cyclooxygenase inhibitors, as a prerequisite to better understand the basic concepts supporting seminal investigations carried out in order to elucidate the clinical features, pathogenic mechanisms, diagnosis and modern management of these common conditions. There are some unmet needs in this clinical area which will have to be solved in the future, especially concerning the pathogenesis of these reactions and the availability of novel in vitro diagnostic methods sparing both patient and physician of the risks inherent to in vivo provocation tests. PMID:24925393

  14. Coronatine inhibits stomatal closure and delays hypersensitive response cell death induced by nonhost bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seonghee; Ishiga, Yasuhiro; Clermont, Kristen

    2013-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae is the most widespread bacterial pathogen in plants. Several strains of P. syringae produce a phytotoxin, coronatine (COR), which acts as a jasmonic acid mimic and inhibits plant defense responses and contributes to disease symptom development. In this study, we found that COR inhibits early defense responses during nonhost disease resistance. Stomatal closure induced by a nonhost pathogen, P. syringae pv. tabaci, was disrupted by COR in tomato epidermal peels. In addition, nonhost HR cell death triggered by P. syringae pv. tabaci on tomato was remarkably delayed when COR was supplemented along with P. syringae pv. tabaci inoculation. Using isochorismate synthase (ICS)-silenced tomato plants and transcript profiles of genes in SA- and JA-related defense pathways, we show that COR suppresses SA-mediated defense during nonhost resistance. PMID:23638370

  15. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents.

    PubMed

    Castells, M C

    2008-01-01

    The need to offer first line therapy for primary and recurrent cancers has spurred the clinical development of rapid desensitizations for chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. Rapid desensitizations allow patients to be treated with medications to which they have presented with hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs), including anaphylaxis. Rapid desensitization achieves temporary tolerization to full therapeutic doses by slow administration of incremental doses of the drug inducing the HSR. Protocols are available for most chemotherapy agents, including taxanes, platins, doxorubicin, monoclonal antibodies, and others. Candidate patients include those who present with type I HSRs, mast cell/IgE dependent, including anaphylaxis, and non-IgE mediated HSRs, during the chemotherapy infusion or shortly after. Idiosyncratic reactions, erythema multiforme, Stevens-Johnson syndrome and toxic epidermal necrolysis are not amenable to rapid desensitization. The recommendation for rapid desensitization can only be made by allergy and immunology specialists and can only be performed in settings with one-to-one nurse-patient care and where resuscitation personnel and resources are readily available. Repeated desensitizations can be safely performed in outpatient settings with similar conditions, which allow cancer patients to remain in clinical studies. We have generated a universal 12-step protocol that was applied to 413 cases of intravenous and intraperitoneal rapid desensitizations using taxanes, platins, liposomal doxorubicin, doxorubicin, rituximab, and other chemotherapy drugs. Under this protocol all patients were able to complete their target dose, and 94% of the patients had limited or no reactions. No deaths or codes were reported, indicating that the procedure was safe and effective in delivering first line chemotherapy drugs. PMID:18991707

  16. A single gene, AIN, in Medicago truncatula mediates a hypersensitive response to both bluegreen aphid and pea aphid, but confers resistance only to bluegreen aphid

    PubMed Central

    Klingler, John P.; Nair, Ramakrishnan M.; Edwards, Owain R.; Singh, Karam B.

    2009-01-01

    Biotic stress in plants frequently induces a hypersensitive response (HR). This distinctive reaction has been studied intensively in several pathosystems and has shed light on the biology of defence signalling. Compared with microbial pathogens, relatively little is known about the role of the HR in defence against insects. Reference genotype A17 of Medicago truncatula Gaertn., a model legume, responds to aphids of the genus Acyrthosiphon with necrotic lesions resembling a HR. In this study, the biochemical nature of this response, its mode of inheritance, and its relationship with defence against aphids were investigated. The necrotic lesion phenotype and resistance to the bluegreen aphid (BGA, Acyrthosiphon kondoi Shinji) and the pea aphid (PA, Acyrthosiphon pisum (Harris)) were analysed using reference genotypes A17 and A20, their F2 progeny and recombinant inbred lines. BGA-induced necrotic lesions co-localized with the production of H2O2, consistent with an oxidative burst widely associated with hypersensitivity. This HR correlated with stronger resistance to BGA in A17 than in A20; these phenotypes cosegregated as a semi-dominant gene, AIN (Acyrthosiphon-induced necrosis). In contrast to BGA, stronger resistance to PA in A17, compared with A20, did not cosegregate with a PA-induced HR. The AIN locus resides in a cluster of sequences predicted to encode the CC-NBS-LRR subfamily of resistance proteins. AIN-mediated resistance presents a novel opportunity to use a model plant and model aphid to study the role of the HR in defence responses to phloem-feeding insects. PMID:19690018

  17. Chemokine-dependent T cell migration requires aquaporin-3–mediated hydrogen peroxide uptake

    PubMed Central

    Chikuma, Shunsuke; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Kabashima, Kenji; Verkman, Alan S.; Inoue, Shintaro; Miyachi, Yoshiki

    2012-01-01

    Chemokine-dependent trafficking is indispensable for the effector function of antigen-experienced T cells during immune responses. In this study, we report that the water/glycerol channel aquaporin-3 (AQP3) is expressed on T cells and regulates their trafficking in cutaneous immune reactions. T cell migration toward chemokines is dependent on AQP3-mediated hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) uptake but not the canonical water/glycerol transport. AQP3-mediated H2O2 transport is essential for the activation of the Rho family GTPase Cdc42 and the subsequent actin dynamics. Coincidentally, AQP3-deficient mice are defective in the development of hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity, which is attributed to the impaired trafficking of antigen-primed T cells to the hapten-challenged skin. We therefore suggest that AQP3-mediated H2O2 uptake is required for chemokine-dependent T cell migration in sufficient immune response. PMID:22927550

  18. Physiological effects of RF exposure on hypersensitive people by a cell phone.

    PubMed

    Kim, Deok Won; Lee, Ju Hyung; Ji, Hyo Chul; Kim, Soo Chan; Nam, Ki Chang; Cha, Eun Jong

    2008-01-01

    Persons with electromagnetic hypersensitivity (EHS) complain of subjective symptoms such as headaches, insomnia, memory loss etc. resulting from radio frequency (RF) radiation by cellular phones. There have been various EHS provocation studies on heart rate, blood pressure, and subjective symptoms using GSM phones. However, there are few provocation studies on case-control study investigating simultaneously physiological parameters from CDMA phones. In this study, two volunteer groups of 18 self-declared EHS and 19 controls were exposed to both sham and real RF exposures by a CDMA cellular phone for half an hour each. We investigated the physiological parameters such as heart rates, respiration rates, and hear rate variability (HRV). In conclusion, the RF exposure by a CDMA cellular phone did not have any effects on the physiological parameters for both groups. PMID:19163166

  19. Phospholipase D-mediated hypersensitivity at central synapses is associated with abnormal behaviours and pain sensitivity in rats exposed to prenatal stress.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liting; Gooding, Hayley L; Brunton, Paula J; Russell, John A; Mitchell, Rory; Fleetwood-Walker, Sue

    2013-11-01

    Adverse events at critical stages of development can lead to lasting dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS). To seek potential underlying changes in synaptic function, we used a newly developed protocol to measure alterations in receptor-mediated Ca(2+) fluorescence responses of synaptoneurosomes, freshly isolated from selected regions of the CNS concerned with emotionality and pain processing. We compared adult male controls and offspring of rats exposed to social stress in late pregnancy (prenatal stress, PS), which showed programmed behavioural changes indicating anxiety, anhedonia and pain hypersensitivity. We found corresponding increases, in PS rats compared with normal controls, in responsiveness of synaptoneurosomes from frontal cortex to a glutamate receptor (GluR) agonist, and from spinal cord to activators of nociceptive afferents. Through a combined pharmacological and biochemical strategy, we found evidence for a role of phospholipase D1 (PLD1)-mediated signalling, that may involve 5-HT2A receptor (5-HT2AR) activation, at both levels of the nervous system. These changes might participate in underpinning the enduring alterations in behaviour induced by PS. PMID:23932932

  20. Cultured diploid fibroblasts from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, G.L.; Little, J.B.

    1983-04-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disease. About 20% of the gene carriers studied developed medulloblastoma before the age of 5 years. Clinical follow-up of these patients, treated with radiotherapy, revealed a predisposition to radiogenic basal cell carcinomas with an unusually short latent period of 6 months to 3 years. The authors have therefore cultured skin fibroblasts from 5 NBCCS patients and measured their radiosensitivity in terms of clonogenic survival. Our results showed that, compared with 6 normal controls, the NBCCS cells were hypersensitive to X-rays. The average D0 (the inverse of the slope of the survival curve) for the NBCCS cells was 98 rads, compared with 142 rads for the normal controls and 44 rads for an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) strain. The average D10 values (the dose required to reduce survival to 10%) were 258, 351, and 123 rads for the NBCCS, normal, and AT strains, respectively. Unscheduled DNA synthesis measurements showed that NBCCS cells were not defective in excision repair of X-ray-damaged DNA. Pulse labeling index measurements showed that NBCCS cells were abnormally inhibited in the initiation of DNA synthesis following X-irradiation. The mechanisms underlying the radiosensitivity of NBCCS differ in several respects from those of AT. NBCCS appears to be potentially a useful model for studying the cellular processes that are important in radiation carcinogenesis.

  1. The Effect of Docetaxel (Taxotere®) on Human Gastric Cancer Cells Exhibiting Low-Dose Radiation Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Balcer-Kubiczek, Elizabeth K.; Attarpour, Mona; Wang, Jian Z.; Regine, William F.

    2008-01-01

    Low-dose radiation hypersensitivity (HRS) describes a phenomenon of excessive sensitivity to X ray doses <0.5 Gy. Docetaxel is a taxane shown to arrest cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Some previous studies suggested that HRS might result from the abrogation of the early G2 checkpoint arrest. First we tested whether HRS occurs in gastric cancer—derived cells, and whether pre-treatment of cells with low docetaxel concentrations can enhance the magnitude of HRS in gastric cancer cells. The results demonstrated HRS at ~0.3 Gy and the synergy between 0.3 Gy and docetaxel (3 nM for 24 h), and the additivity of other drug/dose combinations. The synergistic effect was associated with a significant docetaxel-induced G2 accumulation. Next, we evaluated in time-course experiments ATM kinase activity and proteins associated with the induction and maintenance of the early G2 checkpoint. The results of multi-immunoblot analysis demonstrate that HRS does not correlate with the ATM-dependent early G2 checkpoint arrest. We speculate that G2 checkpoint adaptation, a phenomenon associated with a prolonged cell cycle arrest, might be involved in HRS. Our results also suggest a new approach for the improvement the effectiveness of docetaxel-based radiotherapy using low doses per fraction. PMID:21892291

  2. Cultured diploid fibroblasts from patients with the nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome are hypersensitive to killing by ionizing radiation.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, G. L.; Little, J. B.

    1983-01-01

    Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS) is an autosomal dominant disease. About 20% of the gene carriers studied developed medulloblastoma before the age of 5 years. Clinical follow-up of these patients, treated with radiotherapy, revealed a predisposition to radiogenic basal cell carcinomas with an unusually short latent period of 6 months to 3 years. The authors have therefore cultured skin fibroblasts from 5 NBCCS patients and measured their radiosensitivity in terms of clonogenic survival. Our results showed that, compared with 6 normal controls, the NBCCS cells were hypersensitive to X-rays. The average D0 (the inverse of the slope of the survival curve) for the NBCCS cells was 98 rads, compared with 142 rads for the normal controls and 44 rads for an ataxia telangiectasia (AT) strain. The average D10 values (the dose required to reduce survival to 10%) were 258, 351, and 123 rads for the NBCCS, normal, and AT strains, respectively. Unscheduled DNA synthesis measurements showed that NBCCS cells were not defective in excision repair of X-ray-damaged DNA. Pulse labeling index measurements showed that NBCCS cells were abnormally inhibited in the initiation of DNA synthesis following X-irradiation. The mechanisms underlying the radiosensitivity of NBCCS differ in several respects from those of AT. NBCCS appears to be potentially a useful model for studying the cellular processes that are important in radiation carcinogenesis. PMID:6837723

  3. Contrast media hypersensitivity--scope of the problem.

    PubMed

    Brockow, Knut

    2005-04-15

    Hypersensitivity reactions to contrast media (CM) are frequent causes of anaphylactically induced fatalities. Adverse events after CM exposure are classified into immediate and non-immediate reactions, with differing pathomechanisms. In the majority of patients with immediate reactions, IgE-mediated allergy can not be demonstrated and the underlying mechanism remains unknown. However, recent data has provided evidence for skin test positivity and/or specific IgE in some patients with severe reactions. Cell-mediated hypersensitivity is the responsible mechanism for the majority of non-immediate skin eruptions. Skin tests have been employed to confirm this hypersensitivity. Previous reactors have an increased risk to develop new reactions upon repeated exposure, however, other risk factors are poorly defined. The use of skin tests for the selection of a "safe" CM is controversially discussed; information on sensitivity and specificity is lacking. New in-vitro assays have to be developed and/or validated. Premedication of previous reactors is common practice among radiologists, however, its precise role in the prevention of severe CM reactions to lower-osmolality CM has not been demonstrated. Thus, the main future tasks are to develop and validate allergic tests procedures, which may identify patients at risk and/or may confirm CM tolerance, and to reassess the value of different premedications in the prevention of hypersensitivity reactions. PMID:15767034

  4. Isolation of a mutant cell line derived from ICR 2A frog cells hypersensitive to the induction of non-dimer DNA damage by solar ultraviolet radiation.

    PubMed

    Rosenstein, B S; Chao, C C

    1985-07-01

    A mutant cell line DRP 36, hypersensitive to nondimer DNA damage induced by exposure of cells to the Mylar-filtered solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation produced by a fluorescent sunlamp plus photoreactivating light (PRL) was isolated from the haploid ICR 2A frog cell line. The DO for mutant cells exposed to this solar UV source was 3.3 kJ/m2 compared with a DO of 7.3 kJ/m2 for the parental ICR 2A cells. In contrast, DRP 36 and ICR 2A cells exhibited similar levels of survival following 254-nm irradiation which causes the induction primarily of pyrimidine dimers. The cross-sensitivity to additional DNA damaging agents was examined, and it was determined that the DRP 36 cells are also hypersensitive to treatment with gamma-rays, ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS), cis-dichlorodiammine platinum (II) (DDP), and 4-nitroquinoline oxide (4-NQO) while exhibiting normal sensitivity to L-phenylalanine mustard (L-PAM), 1,3-bis-(2-chloroethyl)-1-nitrosourea (BCNU) and mitomycin C (MMC). PMID:3860965

  5. Investigation of immune and CNS-mediated effects of fingolimod in the focal delayed-type hypersensitivity multiple sclerosis model.

    PubMed

    Anthony, Daniel C; Sibson, Nicola R; Losey, Patrick; Meier, Daniela Piani; Leppert, David

    2014-04-01

    We examined the effect of fingolimod (0.1 and 0.3 mg/kg/day orally) on blood-brain barrier (BBB) function, demyelination and leukocyte recruitment at different stages of the focal delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) multiple sclerosis model in Lewis rats using immunohistochemistry and gadolinium (Gd)-enhancing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). During DTH lesion formation, fingolimod reduced BBB breakdown (52%; p = 0.05), and lymphocyte (53%; p = 0.016) and macrophage/activated microglia (49%; p = 0.002) recruitment to the DTH lesion compared with vehicle-treated controls. Following DTH lesion establishment, fingolimod reduced the area of BBB breakdown (75%; p = 0.04), lymphocyte recruitment to the DTH lesion (41%; p = 0.01) and activated microglia outside of the lesion core (p = 0.01), but did not reduce recruitment of macrophages/activated microglia within the DTH lesion. During the chronic disease phase, when the BBB was resealed, fingolimod reduced the area of demyelination by 43% (p = 0.019) compared with vehicle-treated controls, while not affecting lymphocyte recruitment within the lesion. Fingolimod had different beneficial effects during different stages of DTH, reducing BBB breakdown and lesion development/brain tissue damage whilst reducing lymphocyte recruitment when BBB breakdown was apparent, but reducing demyelination independent of lymphocyte infiltration behind an intact BBB. These results suggest a direct CNS effect of fingolimod in this model. PMID:24412675

  6. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression. PMID:19726579

  7. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  8. Lesions in the mRNA cap-binding gene ABA HYPERSENSITIVE 1 suppress FRIGIDA-mediated delayed flowering in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Isabel C; Michaels, Scott D; Schomburg, Fritz M; Amasino, Richard M

    2004-10-01

    Recessive mutations that suppress the late-flowering phenotype conferred by FRIGIDA (FRI) and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and which also result in serrated leaf morphology were identified in T-DNA and fast-neutron mutant populations. Molecular analysis showed that the mutations are caused by lesions in the gene encoding the large subunit of the nuclear mRNA cap-binding protein, ABH1 (ABA hypersensitive1). The suppression of late flowering is caused by the inability of FRI to increase FLC mRNA levels in the abh1 mutant background. The serrated leaf morphology of abh1 is similar to the serrate (se) mutant and, like abh1, se is also a suppressor of FRI-mediated late flowering although it is a weaker suppressor than abh1. Unlike se, in abh1 the rate of leaf production and the number of juvenile leaves are not altered. The abh1 lesion affects several developmental processes, perhaps because the processing of certain mRNAs in these pathways is more sensitive to loss of cap-binding activity than the majority of cellular mRNAs. PMID:15361145

  9. Spinal 5-HT3 receptors mediate descending facilitation and contribute to behavioral hypersensitivity via a reciprocal neuron-glial signaling cascade

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background It has been recently recognized that the descending serotonin (5-HT) system from the rostral ventromedial medulla (RVM) in the brainstem and the 5-HT3 receptor subtype in the spinal dorsal horn are involved in enhanced descending pain facilitation after tissue and nerve injury. However, the mechanisms underlying the activation of the 5-HT3 receptor and its contribution to facilitation of pain remain unclear. Results In the present study, activation of spinal 5-HT3 receptors by intrathecal injection of a selective 5-HT3 receptor agonist SR 57227 induced spinal glial hyperactivity, neuronal hyperexcitability and pain hypersensitivity in rats. We found that there was neuron-to-microglia signaling via the chemokine fractalkine, microglia to astrocyte signaling via cytokine IL-18, astrocyte to neuronal signaling by IL-1β, and enhanced activation of NMDA receptors in the spinal dorsal horn. Glial hyperactivation in spinal dorsal horn after hindpaw inflammation was also attenuated by molecular depletion of the descending 5-HT system by intra-RVM Tph-2 shRNA interference. Conclusions These findings offer new insights into the cellular and molecular mechanisms at the spinal level responsible for descending 5-HT-mediated pain facilitation during the development of persistent pain after tissue and nerve injury. New pain therapies should focus on prime targets of descending facilitation-induced glial involvement, and in particular the blocking of intercellular signaling transduction between neurons and glia. PMID:24913307

  10. Chronic loss of noradrenergic tone produces β-arrestin2-mediated cocaine hypersensitivity and alters cellular D2 responses in the nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Gaval-Cruz, Meriem; Goertz, Richard B; Puttick, Daniel J; Bowles, Dawn E; Meyer, Rebecca C; Hall, Randy A; Ko, Daijin; Paladini, Carlos A; Weinshenker, David

    2016-01-01

    Cocaine blocks plasma membrane monoamine transporters and increases extracellular levels of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE) and serotonin (5-HT). The addictive properties of cocaine are mediated primarily by DA, while NE and 5-HT play modulatory roles. Chronic inhibition of dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH), which converts DA to NE, increases the aversive effects of cocaine and reduces cocaine use in humans, and produces behavioral hypersensitivity to cocaine and D2 agonism in rodents, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. We found a decrease in β-arrestin2 (βArr2) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) following chronic genetic or pharmacological DBH inhibition, and overexpression of βArr2 in the NAc normalized cocaine-induced locomotion in DBH knockout (Dbh -/-) mice. The D2/3 agonist quinpirole decreased excitability in NAc medium spiny neurons (MSNs) from control, but not Dbh -/- animals, where instead there was a trend for an excitatory effect. The Gαi inhibitor NF023 abolished the quinpirole-induced decrease in excitability in control MSNs, but had no effect in Dbh -/- MSNs, whereas the Gαs inhibitor NF449 restored the ability of quinpirole to decrease excitability in Dbh -/- MSNs, but had no effect in control MSNs. These results suggest that chronic loss of noradrenergic tone alters behavioral responses to cocaine via decreases in βArr2 and cellular responses to D2/D3 activation, potentially via changes in D2-like receptor G-protein coupling in NAc MSNs. PMID:25123018

  11. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  12. ABA-HYPERSENSITIVE BTB/POZ PROTEIN 1 functions as a negative regulator in ABA-mediated inhibition of germination in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hani; Kim, Soon-Hee; Seo, Dong Hye; Chung, Sunglan; Kim, Sang-Woo; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Kim, Woo Taek; Lee, Jae-Hoon

    2016-02-01

    To elucidate the contribution of CRL3-ABA-mediated responses, we attempted to find CRL3 substrate receptors involved in ABA signaling. One gene named ABA-HYPERSENSITIVE BTB/POZ PROTEIN 1 (AHT1) was upregulated more than 2.5 times by ABA, and its coding region possessed a BTB/POZ domain, which is the common feature of CRL3 substrate receptors. Loss of AHT1 led to retardation of the germination process, not inhibition of root growth. AHT1 transcripts also increased in response to mannitol, NaCl and drought treatments at the seedling stage and in dry seeds. High expression of AHT1 in dry seeds was inhibited by the defect of ABA signaling components such as ABI1, ABI3 and SRKs indicating that the expression of AHT1 is dependent on ABA signaling. Among bZIP transcription factors participating in ABA signaling, the losses of ABI5/DPBF1, AREB1/ABF2, EEL/DPBF4 and DPBF2/bZIP67 resulted in reduced AHT1 expression, showing that these transcription factors play a positive role in ABA-induced AHT1 expression. While loss of AHT1 did not affect the expression pattern of NCED3, ABI2, SRKs and AREB/ABF genes, it led to hyperinduction of ABI5/DPBF genes such as ABI5/DPBF1, EEL/DPBF4 and AREB3/DPBF3, which are mainly involved in seed development and germination, as well as ABA-inducible genes transactivated by ABI5. Overall, these findings indicate that AHT1 negatively regulates ABA-mediated inhibition of germination, possibly by repressing the expression of a subset of ABI5/DPBF subfamily genes, and that AHT1 may be regulated by a negative feedback process through its linkage with a part of ABI5/DPBF proteins. PMID:26667153

  13. Hypersensitivity to topical corticosteroids.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, S M

    1994-01-01

    Contact hypersensitivity from topical corticosteroids is becoming increasingly recognized; it is present in 2-5% of the patients attending contact dermatitis clinics. The use of a corticosteroid series containing tixocortal pivalate 1% (petrolatum), to detect hypersensitivity to hydrocortisone, and other steroids 1% (ethanol), depending on local corticosteroid usage, detects the majority of cases of corticosteroid hypersensitivity. In selected cases, the use of intradermal tests further improves the diagnosis of corticosteroid hypersensitivity. Corticosteroid hypersensitivity occurs most frequently among patients with stasis dermatitis. However, corticosteroid hypersensitivity is also common in other types of dermatitis, occurring as frequently as hypersensitivity to several allergens (e.g. wool alcohols and colophony) in the European standard battery. Although hypersensitivity has mainly been reported with corticosteroids applied to the skin, reactions may also occur on mucosal surfaces, following systemic administration and with sex steroids. PMID:8313630

  14. Lack of TAK1 in dendritic cells inhibits the contact hypersensitivity response induced by trichloroethylene in local lymph node assay.

    PubMed

    Yao, Pan; Hongqian, Chu; Qinghe, Meng; Lanqin, Shang; Jianjun, Jiang; Xiaohua, Yang; Xuetao, Wei; Weidong, Hao

    2016-09-15

    Trichloroethylene (TCE) is a ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Occupational TCE exposure has been associated with severe, generalized contact hypersensitivity (CHS) skin disorder. The development of CHS depends on innate and adaptive immune functions. Transforming growth factor-β activated kinase-1 (TAK1) controls the survival of dendritic cells (DCs) that affect the immune system homeostasis. We aimed to investigate the role of TAK1 activity in DC on TCE-induced CHS response. Control mice and DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice were treated with 80% (v/v) TCE using local lymph node assay (LLNA) to establish a TCE-induced CHS model. The draining lymph nodes (DLNs) were excised and the lymphocytes were measure for proliferation by BrdU-ELISA, T-cell phenotype analysis by flow cytometry and signaling pathway activation by western blot. The ears were harvested for histopathological analysis. Control mice in the 80% TCE group displayed an inflammatory response in the ears, increased lymphocyte proliferation, elevated regulatory T-cell and activated T-cell percentages, and more IFN-γ producing CD8(+) T cells in DLNs. In contrast to control mice, DC-specific TAK1 deletion mice in the 80% TCE group showed an abolished CHS response and this was associated with defective T-cell expansion, activation and IFN-γ production. This effect may occur through Jnk and NF-κB signaling pathways. Overall, this study demonstrates a pivotal role of TAK1 in DCs in controlling TCE-induced CHS response and suggests that targeting TAK1 function in DCs may be a viable approach to preventing and treating TCE-related occupational health hazards. PMID:27473013

  15. Localization of hydrogen peroxide accumulation during the hypersensitive reaction of lettuce cells to Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola.

    PubMed Central

    Bestwick, C S; Brown, I R; Bennett, M H; Mansfield, J W

    1997-01-01

    The active oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was detected cytochemically by its reaction with cerium chloride to produce electron-dense deposits of cerium perhydroxides. In uninoculated lettuce leaves, H2O2 was typically present within the secondary thickened walls of xylem vessels. Inoculation with wild-type cells of Pseudomonas syringae pv phaseolicola caused a rapid hypersensitive reaction (HR) during which highly localized accumulation of H2O2 was found in plant cell walls adjacent to attached bacteria. Quantitative analysis indicated a prolonged burst of H2O2 occurring between 5 to 8 hr after inoculation in cells undergoing the HR during this example of non-host resistance. Cell wall alterations and papilla deposition, which occurred in response to both the wild-type strain and a nonpathogenic hrpD mutant, were not associated with intense staining for H2O2, unless the responding cell was undergoing the HR. Catalase treatment to decompose H2O2 almost entirely eliminated staining, but 3-amino-1,2,4-triazole (catalase inhibitor) did not affect the pattern of distribution of H2O2 detected. H2O2 production was reduced more by the inhibition of plant peroxidases (with potassium cyanide and sodium azide) than by inhibition of neutrophil-like NADPH oxidase (with diphenylene iodonium chloride). Results suggest that CeCl3 reacts with excess H2O2 that is not rapidly metabolized during cross-linking reactions occurring in cell walls; such an excess of H2O2 in the early stages of the plant-bacterium interaction was only produced during the HR. The highly localized accumulation of H2O2 is consistent with its direct role as an antimicrobial agent and as the cause of localized membrane damage at sites of bacterial attachment. PMID:9061952

  16. Loss and Gain of Elicitor Function of Soybean Mosaic Virus G7 Provoking Rsv1-Mediated Lethal Systemic Hypersensitive Response Maps to P3

    PubMed Central

    Hajimorad, M. R.; Eggenberger, A. L.; Hill, J. H.

    2005-01-01

    Rsv1, a single dominant resistance gene in soybean PI 96983 (Rsv1), confers extreme resistance against all known American strains of Soybean mosaic virus (SMV), except G7 and G7d. SMV-G7 provokes a lethal systemic hypersensitive response (LSHR), whereas SMV-G7d, an experimentally evolved variant of SMV-G7, induces systemic mosaic. To identify the elicitor of Rsv1-mediated LSHR, chimeras were constructed by exchanging fragments between the molecularly cloned SMV-G7 (pSMV-G7) and SMV-G7d (pSMV-G7d), and their elicitor functions were assessed on PI 96983 (Rsv1). pSMV-G7-derived chimeras containing only P3 of SMV-G7d lost the elicitor function, while the reciprocal chimera of pSMV-G7d gained the function. The P3 regions of the two viruses differ by six nucleotides, of which two are translationally silent. The four amino acid differences are located at positions 823, 915, 953, and 1112 of the precursor polypeptide. Analyses of the site-directed point mutants of both the viruses revealed that nucleotide substitutions leading to translationally silent mutations as well as reciprocal amino acid substitution at position 915 did not influence the loss or gain of the elicitor function. pSMV-G7-derived mutants with amino acid substitutions at any of the other three positions lost the ability to provoke LSHR but induced SHR instead. Two concomitant amino acid substitutions at positions 823 (V to M) and 953 (K to E) abolished pSMV-G7 elicitor function, provoking Rsv1-mediated SHR. Conversely, pSMV-G7d gained the elicitor function of Rsv1-mediated LSHR by a single amino acid substitution at position 823 (M to V), and mutants with amino acid substitutions at position 953 or 1112 induced SHR instead of mosaic. Taken together, the data suggest that strain-specific P3 of SMV is the elicitor of Rsv1-mediated LSHR. PMID:15613348

  17. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  18. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Dai, Shaodong

    2013-03-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  19. Structural basis of metal hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yang

    2014-01-01

    Metal hypersensitivity is a common immune disorder. Human immune systems mount the allergic attacks on metal ions through skin contacts, lung inhalation and metal-containing artificial body implants. The consequences can be simple annoyances to life-threatening systemic illness. Allergic hyper-reactivities to nickel (Ni) and beryllium (Be) are the best-studied human metal hypersensitivities. Ni-contact dermatitis affects 10 % of the human population, whereas Be compounds are the culprits of chronic Be disease (CBD). αβ T cells (T cells) play a crucial role in these hypersensitivity reactions. Metal ions work as haptens and bind to the surface of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and peptide complex. This modifies the binding surface of MHC and triggers the immune response of T cells. Metal-specific αβ T cell receptors (TCRs) are usually MHC restricted, especially MHC class II (MHCII) restricted. Numerous models have been proposed, yet the mechanisms and molecular basis of metal hypersensitivity remain elusive. Recently, we determined the crystal structures of the Ni and Be presenting human MHCII molecules, HLA-DR52c (DRA*0101, DRB3*0301) and HLA-DP2 (DPA1*0103, DPB1*0201). These structures revealed unusual features of MHCII molecules and shed light on how metal ions are recognized by T cells. PMID:22983897

  20. Virus Infections Incite Pain Hypersensitivity by Inducing Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase.

    PubMed

    Huang, Lei; Ou, Rong; Rabelo de Souza, Guilherme; Cunha, Thiago M; Lemos, Henrique; Mohamed, Eslam; Li, Lingqian; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Randall, Janice; Munn, David H; Mellor, Andrew L

    2016-05-01

    Increased pain sensitivity is a comorbidity associated with many clinical diseases, though the underlying causes are poorly understood. Recently, chronic pain hypersensitivity in rodents treated to induce chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues was linked to enhanced tryptophan catabolism in brain mediated by indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Here we show that acute influenza A virus (IAV) and chronic murine leukemia retrovirus (MuLV) infections, which stimulate robust IDO expression in lungs and lymphoid tissues, induced acute or chronic pain hypersensitivity, respectively. In contrast, virus-induced pain hypersensitivity did not manifest in mice lacking intact IDO1 genes. Spleen IDO activity increased markedly as MuLV infections progressed, while IDO1 expression was not elevated significantly in brain or spinal cord (CNS) tissues. Moreover, kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan catabolite made by cells expressing IDO, incited pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient mice and Kyn potentiated pain hypersensitivity due to MuLV infection. MuLV infection stimulated selective IDO expression by a discreet population of spleen cells expressing both B cell (CD19) and dendritic cell (CD11c) markers (CD19+ DCs). CD19+ DCs were more susceptible to MuLV infection than B cells or conventional (CD19neg) DCs, proliferated faster than B cells from early stages of MuLV infection and exhibited mature antigen presenting cell (APC) phenotypes, unlike conventional (CD19neg) DCs. Moreover, interactions with CD4 T cells were necessary to sustain functional IDO expression by CD19+ DCs in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes from MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice induced pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient recipient mice, while selective in vivo depletion of DCs alleviated pain hypersensitivity in MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice and led to rapid reduction in splenomegaly, a hallmark of MuLV immune pathogenesis. These findings reveal critical roles for CD19+ DCs

  1. Virus Infections Incite Pain Hypersensitivity by Inducing Indoleamine 2,3 Dioxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lei; Ou, Rong; Rabelo de Souza, Guilherme; Cunha, Thiago M.; Lemos, Henrique; Mohamed, Eslam; Li, Lingqian; Pacholczyk, Gabriela; Randall, Janice; Munn, David H.; Mellor, Andrew L.

    2016-01-01

    Increased pain sensitivity is a comorbidity associated with many clinical diseases, though the underlying causes are poorly understood. Recently, chronic pain hypersensitivity in rodents treated to induce chronic inflammation in peripheral tissues was linked to enhanced tryptophan catabolism in brain mediated by indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase (IDO). Here we show that acute influenza A virus (IAV) and chronic murine leukemia retrovirus (MuLV) infections, which stimulate robust IDO expression in lungs and lymphoid tissues, induced acute or chronic pain hypersensitivity, respectively. In contrast, virus-induced pain hypersensitivity did not manifest in mice lacking intact IDO1 genes. Spleen IDO activity increased markedly as MuLV infections progressed, while IDO1 expression was not elevated significantly in brain or spinal cord (CNS) tissues. Moreover, kynurenine (Kyn), a tryptophan catabolite made by cells expressing IDO, incited pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient mice and Kyn potentiated pain hypersensitivity due to MuLV infection. MuLV infection stimulated selective IDO expression by a discreet population of spleen cells expressing both B cell (CD19) and dendritic cell (CD11c) markers (CD19+ DCs). CD19+ DCs were more susceptible to MuLV infection than B cells or conventional (CD19neg) DCs, proliferated faster than B cells from early stages of MuLV infection and exhibited mature antigen presenting cell (APC) phenotypes, unlike conventional (CD19neg) DCs. Moreover, interactions with CD4 T cells were necessary to sustain functional IDO expression by CD19+ DCs in vitro and in vivo. Splenocytes from MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice induced pain hypersensitivity in uninfected IDO1-deficient recipient mice, while selective in vivo depletion of DCs alleviated pain hypersensitivity in MuLV-infected IDO1-sufficient mice and led to rapid reduction in splenomegaly, a hallmark of MuLV immune pathogenesis. These findings reveal critical roles for CD19+ DCs

  2. DOLICHOL PHOSPHATE MANNOSE SYNTHASE1 Mediates the Biogenesis of Isoprenyl-Linked Glycans and Influences Development, Stress Response, and Ammonium Hypersensitivity in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Jadid, Nurul; Mialoundama, Alexis Samba; Heintz, Dimitri; Ayoub, Daniel; Erhardt, Mathieu; Mutterer, Jérôme; Meyer, Denise; Alioua, Abdelmalek; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Rahier, Alain; Camara, Bilal; Bouvier, Florence

    2011-01-01

    The most abundant posttranslational modification in nature is the attachment of preassembled high-mannose-type glycans, which determines the fate and localization of the modified protein and modulates the biological functions of glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored and N-glycosylated proteins. In eukaryotes, all mannose residues attached to glycoproteins from the luminal side of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) derive from the polyprenyl monosaccharide carrier, dolichol P-mannose (Dol-P-Man), which is flipped across the ER membrane to the lumen. We show that in plants, Dol-P-Man is synthesized when Dol-P-Man synthase1 (DPMS1), the catalytic core, interacts with two binding proteins, DPMS2 and DPMS3, that may serve as membrane anchors for DPMS1 or provide catalytic assistance. This configuration is reminiscent of that observed in mammals but is distinct from the single DPMS protein catalyzing Dol-P-Man biosynthesis in bakers’ yeast and protozoan parasites. Overexpression of DPMS1 in Arabidopsis thaliana results in disorganized stem morphology and vascular bundle arrangements, wrinkled seed coat, and constitutive ER stress response. Loss-of-function mutations and RNA interference–mediated reduction of DPMS1 expression in Arabidopsis also caused a wrinkled seed coat phenotype and most remarkably enhanced hypersensitivity to ammonium that was manifested by extensive chlorosis and a strong reduction of root growth. Collectively, these data reveal a previously unsuspected role of the prenyl-linked carrier pathway for plant development and physiology that may help integrate several aspects of candidate susceptibility genes to ammonium stress. PMID:21558543

  3. Mast cell degranulation mediates compound 48/80-induced hyperalgesia in mice

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjea, Devavani; Wetzel, Abigail; Mack, Madison; Engblom, Camilla; Allen, Juliann; Mora-Solano, Carolina; Paredes, Luisa; Balsells, Evelyn; Martinov, Tijana

    2012-01-01

    Mast cells mediate allergies, hypersensitivities, host defense, and venom neutralization. An area of recent interest is the contribution of mast cells to inflammatory pain. Here we found that specific, local activation of mast cells produced plantar hyperalgesia in mice. Basic secretagogue compound 48/80 induced plantar mast cell degranulation accompanied by thermal hyperalgesia, tissue edema, and neutrophil influx in the hindpaws of ND4 Swiss mice. Blocking mast cell degranulation, neutrophil extravasation, and histamine signaling abrogated these responses. Compound 48/80 also produced edema, pain, and neutrophil influx in WT C57BL/6 but not in genetically mast cell-deficient C57BL/6-KitW-sh/W-sh mice. These responses were restored following plantar reconstitution with bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells. PMID:22828511

  4. Giant cell myocarditis in a patient with a spondyloarthropathy after a drug hypersensitivity reaction.

    PubMed

    Mitoff, Peter R; Mesana, Thierry G; Mielniczuk, Lisa M; Grenon, Jackie; Veinot, John P; Cooper, Leslie T; Davies, Ross A

    2013-09-01

    A young woman thought to have seronegative rheumatoid arthritis developed Stevens-Johnson syndrome after treatment with sulfasalazine; this resolved with prednisone. Later she was found to be HLA-B27-positive in keeping with a spondyloarthropathy. Soon afterward, she developed clinical myopericarditis and cardiogenic shock that responded initially to methylprednisolone and intravenous immunoglobulin, but recurred. An endomyocardial biopsy demonstrated active myocarditis with a mixed cell composition including rare giant cells, but not enough to classify it as giant cell myocarditis. Heart failure symptoms returned and she eventually required a heart transplant; the explanted heart showed giant cell myocarditis. PMID:23474137

  5. Harpin Mediates Cell Aggregation in Erwinia chrysanthemi 3937

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Mee-Ngan; Rojas, Clemencia M.; Yang, Ching-Hong; Charkowski, Amy O.

    2006-01-01

    The hypersensitive response elicitor harpin (HrpN) of soft rot pathogen Erwinia chrysanthemi strains 3937 and EC16 is secreted via the type III secretion system and remains cell surface bound. Strain 3937 HrpN is essential for cell aggregation, but the C-terminal one-third of the protein is not required for aggregative activity. PMID:16513758

  6. Modelling the hypersensitivity of cancer cells to infra-red laser pulse: breaking ROS defence machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolovski, S. G.; Goltsov, A.; Rafailov, E. U.

    2013-03-01

    Infra-red lasers (1268 nm) were reported to induce irreversible oxidative stress in cancer cells through direct triplet-->single oxygen transition designating a novel cancer treatment equally with photodynamic therapy. We using in vitro and in silico approaches revealed that main impact on the cell oxidative state makes cascade of secondary reactive oxygen species triggered by primary laser-pulse-induced singlet oxygen and irreversible depletion of cellular antioxidative thioredoxin system in tumour. Based on these cancer cell features we can propose laser impulse strategy of killing cancer cells where initial impulse(s) may deplete antioxidant system making cancer cells deadly vulnerable to the next cascade of ROS by following impulse(s) at non-thermal doses.

  7. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:26459128

  8. Drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Rashmi; Timshina, Dependra K; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2011-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity syndrome (DHS) is an adverse drug reaction commonly associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), viz., phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), lamotrigine, primidone, etc. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, gold derivatives, cyclosporine, captopril, diltiazem, terbinafine, azathioprine and allopurinol. Diagnosis of DHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic or collagen vascular disorders. The risk for developing hypersensitivity within 60 days of the first or second prescription in new users of PHT or CBZ was estimated to be 2.3-4.5 per 10,000 and 1-4.1 per 10,000, respectively. The syndrome is defined by the fever, skin rash, lymphadenopathy and internal organ involvement within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis and myositis. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Cross-reactivity among PHT, CBZ and PB is as high as 70%-80%. Management mainly includes immediate withdrawal of the culprit drug, symptomatic treatment and systemic steroids or immunoglobulins. PMID:21220873

  9. Inhibition of Glutathione Peroxidase Mediates the Collateral Sensitivity of Multidrug-resistant Cells to Tiopronin*

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Matthew D.; Marshall, Travis S.; Kwit, Alexandra D. T.; Miller Jenkins, Lisa M.; Dulcey, Andrés E.; Madigan, James P.; Pluchino, Kristen M.; Goldsborough, Andrew S.; Brimacombe, Kyle R.; Griffiths, Gary L.; Gottesman, Michael M.

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR) is a major obstacle to the successful chemotherapy of cancer. MDR is often the result of overexpression of ATP-binding cassette transporters following chemotherapy. A common ATP-binding cassette transporter that is overexpressed in MDR cancer cells is P-glycoprotein, which actively effluxes drugs against a concentration gradient, producing an MDR phenotype. Collateral sensitivity (CS), a phenomenon of drug hypersensitivity, is defined as the ability of certain compounds to selectively target MDR cells, but not the drug-sensitive parent cells from which they were derived. The drug tiopronin has been previously shown to elicit CS. However, unlike other CS agents, the mechanism of action was not dependent on the expression of P-glycoprotein in MDR cells. We have determined that the CS activity of tiopronin is mediated by the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and that CS can be reversed by a variety of ROS-scavenging compounds. Specifically, selective toxicity of tiopronin toward MDR cells is achieved by inhibition of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and the mode of inhibition of GPx1 by tiopronin is shown in this report. Why MDR cells are particularly sensitive to ROS is discussed, as is the difficulty in exploiting this hypersensitivity to tiopronin in the clinic. PMID:24930045

  10. New approaches for predicting T cell-mediated drug reactions: A role for inducible and potentially preventable autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron W; Ostrov, David A

    2015-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are commonplace and occur when a drug binds to its intended pharmacologic target (type A ADR) or an unintended target (type B ADR). Immunologically mediated type B ADRs, such as drug hypersensitivity syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, can be severe and result in a diverse set of clinical manifestations that include fever and rash, as well as multiple organ failure (liver, kidney, lungs, and/or heart) in the case of drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There is increasing evidence that specific HLA alleles influence the risk of drug reactions. Several features of T cell-mediated ADRs are strikingly similar to those displayed by patients with autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, such as strong HLA association, organ-specific adaptive immune responses, viral involvement, and activation of innate immunity. There is a need to better predict patient populations at risk for immunologically mediated type B ADRs. Because methods to predict type 1 diabetes by using genetic and immunologic biomarkers have been developed to a high level of accuracy (predicting 100% of subjects likely to progress), new research strategies based on these methods might also improve the ability to predict drug hypersensitivity. PMID:26254052

  11. RAGE mediates a novel proinflammatory axis: a central cell surface receptor for S100/calgranulin polypeptides.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, M A; Drury, S; Fu, C; Qu, W; Taguchi, A; Lu, Y; Avila, C; Kambham, N; Bierhaus, A; Nawroth, P; Neurath, M F; Slattery, T; Beach, D; McClary, J; Nagashima, M; Morser, J; Stern, D; Schmidt, A M

    1999-06-25

    S100/calgranulin polypeptides are present at sites of inflammation, likely released by inflammatory cells targeted to such loci by a range of environmental cues. We report here that receptor for AGE (RAGE) is a central cell surface receptor for EN-RAGE (extracellular newly identified RAGE-binding protein) and related members of the S100/calgranulin superfamily. Interaction of EN-RAGEs with cellular RAGE on endothelium, mononuclear phagocytes, and lymphocytes triggers cellular activation, with generation of key proinflammatory mediators. Blockade of EN-RAGE/RAGE quenches delayed-type hypersensitivity and inflammatory colitis in murine models by arresting activation of central signaling pathways and expression of inflammatory gene mediators. These data highlight a novel paradigm in inflammation and identify roles for EN-RAGEs and RAGE in chronic cellular activation and tissue injury. PMID:10399917

  12. Effect of microencapsulated ampicillin on cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Kopydlowski, K M; Burge, J R; Setterstrom, J A

    1997-11-01

    The effects of free ampicillin, microencapsulated ampicillin anhydrate (MEAA) and antibiotic-free microspheres on the cell-mediated immune response in Balb/c mice were measured by lymphoproliferation assay, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cytokine production. Injection into mice for seven consecutive days with equivalent subcutaneous doses of ampicillin, MEAA or placebo microspheres did not produce any consistent change in lymphocyte proliferation nor did it affect DTH responses or interleukin-2 production. Although the production of interleukin-4 in mice treated with ampicillin or MEAA increased compared with the control mice, this increase was not statistically significant. These results indicate that ampicillin and MEAA have similar effects on cell-mediated immunity in mice. PMID:9421323

  13. Suppression of BCG cell wall induced delayed-type hypersensitivity by BCG pre-treatment. I. Induction of adherent suppressor cells by live BCG injection and their characterization.

    PubMed Central

    Kato, K; Yamamoto, K I; Kakinuma, M; Ishihara, C; Azuma, I

    1981-01-01

    Previous injections of live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) in mice produced a suppression of delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) induced by oil-treated BCG cell walls (CW). This phenomenon was analysed by the macrophage migration inhibition (MI) test in which peritoneal exudate cells (PEC) from live BCG-injected mice were mixed with PEC from BCG CW-immunized mice, with the result that the former cells suppressed the MI activity in the latter. We considered the Mi test to be a reliable method for demonstrating the existence of suppressor cells induced by the injection of live BCG. Moreover, we found that the adherent cells of PEC possessed a suppressive effect which was retained even after treatment with either anti-mouse Ig or anti-brain associated theta (BA theta) antigen; that the PEC from mice injected with live BCG on at least the 12th day before cell harvesting showed the suppression; and that the suppression operated across the H-2 barrier. PMID:6450731

  14. A genome-wide association study of the maize hypersensitive defense response identifies genes that cluster in related pathways

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much remains unknown of molecular events controling the plant hypersensitive response (HR), a rapid localized cell death that limits pathogen spread and is mediated by resistance (R-) genes. Natural modifiers of the ectopic HR phenotype induced by an aberrant auto-active R-gene (Rp1-D21), were mappe...

  15. Hypersensitivity to antineoplastic agents: mechanisms and treatment with rapid desensitization.

    PubMed

    Castells, Mariana; Sancho-Serra, Maria del Carmen; Simarro, Maria

    2012-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions (HSRs) to chemotherapy drugs, such as taxanes and platins, and to monoclonal antibodies limit their therapeutic use due to the severity of some reactions and the fear of inducing a potentially lethal reaction in highly sensitized patients. Patients who experience hypersensitivity reactions face the prospect of abandoning first-line treatment and switching to a second-line, less effective therapy. Some of these reactions are mast cell-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, a subset of which occur through an immunoglobulin (IgE)-dependent mechanism, and are thus true allergies. Others involve mast cells without a demonstrable IgE mechanism. Whether basophils can participate in these reactions has not been demonstrated. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a procedure that induces temporary tolerance to a drug, allowing a medication allergic patient to receive the optimal agent for his or her disease. Through RDD, patients with IgE and non-IgE HSRs can safely be administered important medications while minimizing or completely inhibiting adverse reactions. Due to the clinical expansion and success of RDD, the molecular mechanisms inducing the temporary tolerization have been investigated and are partially understood, allowing for safer and more effective protocols. This article reviews the current literature on molecular mechanisms of RDD with an emphasis in our recent contributions to this field as well as the indications, methods and outcomes of RDD for taxanes, platins, and monoclonal antibodies. PMID:22576054

  16. Hypersensitivity of skin fibroblasts from basal cell nevus syndrome patients to killing by ultraviolet B but not by ultraviolet C radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Applegate, L.A.; Goldberg, L.H.; Ley, R.D.; Ananthaswamy, H.N. )

    1990-02-01

    Basal cell nevus syndrome (BCNS) is an autosomal dominant genetic disorder in which the afflicted individuals are extremely susceptible to sunlight-induced skin cancers, particularly basal cell carcinomas. However, the cellular and molecular basis for BCNS is unknown. To ascertain whether there is any relationship between genetic predisposition to skin cancer and increased sensitivity of somatic cells from BCNS patients to killing by UV radiation, we exposed skin fibroblasts established from unexposed skin biopsies of several BCNS and age- and sex-matched normal individuals to either UV-B (280-320 nm) or UV-C (254 nm) radiation and determined their survival. The results indicated that skin fibroblasts from BCNS patients were hypersensitive to killing by UV-B but not UV-C radiation as compared to skin fibroblasts from normal individuals. DNA repair studies indicated that the increased sensitivity of BCNS skin fibroblasts to killing by UV-B radiation was not due to a defect in the excision repair of pyrimidine dimers. These results indicate that there is an association between hypersensitivity of somatic cells to killing by UV-B radiation and the genetic predisposition to skin cancer in BCNS patients. In addition, these results suggest that DNA lesions (and repair processes) other than the pyrimidine dimer are also involved in the pathogenesis of sunlight-induced skin cancers in BCNS patients. More important, the UV-B sensitivity assay described here may be used as a diagnostic tool to identify presymptomatic individuals with BCNS.

  17. Induction of suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity to herpes simplex virus by epidermal cells exposed to UV-irradiated urocanic acid in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, J.A.; Howie, S.E.; Norval, M.; Maingay, J.P. )

    1987-01-01

    Urocanic acid (UCA), the putative photoreceptor for ultraviolet radiation (UV)-induced suppression, undergoes a UV-dependent trans to cis isomerisation. Epidermal cells from mice painted with UCA, containing a known proportion of the cis-isomer, generate suppression of the delayed type hypersensitivity response to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) when transferred to naive syngeneic recipients at the same time and site as infection with HSV-1. One T suppressor cell subset, of phenotype (Thy1+, L3T4+, Ly2-), is induced by the cis-UCA modified epidermal cell transfer. Flow cytometric analysis of the epidermal cells from skin treated with UV or cis-UCA indicates an overall reduction from normal in the number of cells expressing MHC Class II antigens, but no alteration in the number expressing I-J antigens.

  18. Optimistic Expectancies and Cell-Mediated Immunity: The Role of Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimistic expectancies affect many psychosocial outcomes and may also predict immune system changes and health, but the nature and mechanisms of any such physiological effects have not been identified. The present study related law-school expectancies to cell-mediated immunity (CMI), examining the within- and between-person components of this relationship and affective mediators. First-year law students (N = 124) completed questionnaire measures of expectancies and affect and received delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests at five time points. A positive relationship between optimistic expectancies and CMI occurred, in which that changes in optimism correlated with changes in CMI. Likewise, changes in optimism predicted changes in positive and, to a lesser degree, negative affect, but the relationship between optimism and immunity was partially accounted for only by positive affect. This dynamic relationship between expectancies and immunity has positive implications for psychological interventions to improve health, particularly those that increase positive affect. PMID:20424083

  19. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  20. Cells Deficient in the Fanconi Anemia Protein FANCD2 are Hypersensitive to the Cytotoxicity and DNA Damage Induced by Coffee and Caffeic Acid.

    PubMed

    Burgos-Morón, Estefanía; Calderón-Montaño, José Manuel; Orta, Manuel Luis; Guillén-Mancina, Emilio; Mateos, Santiago; López-Lázaro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have found a positive association between coffee consumption and a lower risk of cardiovascular disorders, some cancers, diabetes, Parkinson and Alzheimer disease. Coffee consumption, however, has also been linked to an increased risk of developing some types of cancer, including bladder cancer in adults and leukemia in children of mothers who drink coffee during pregnancy. Since cancer is driven by the accumulation of DNA alterations, the ability of the coffee constituent caffeic acid to induce DNA damage in cells may play a role in the carcinogenic potential of this beverage. This carcinogenic potential may be exacerbated in cells with DNA repair defects. People with the genetic disease Fanconi Anemia have DNA repair deficiencies and are predisposed to several cancers, particularly acute myeloid leukemia. Defects in the DNA repair protein Fanconi Anemia D2 (FANCD2) also play an important role in the development of a variety of cancers (e.g., bladder cancer) in people without this genetic disease. This communication shows that cells deficient in FANCD2 are hypersensitive to the cytotoxicity (clonogenic assay) and DNA damage (γ-H2AX and 53BP1 focus assay) induced by caffeic acid and by a commercial lyophilized coffee extract. These data suggest that people with Fanconi Anemia, or healthy people who develop sporadic mutations in FANCD2, may be hypersensitive to the carcinogenic activity of coffee. PMID:27399778

  1. Chronic cough hypersensitivity syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Chronic cough has been suggested to be due to three conditions, asthma, post nasal drip, and reflux disease. A different paradigm has evolved in which cough is viewed as the primary condition characterised by afferent neuronal hypersensitivity and different aspects of this syndrome are manifest in the different phenotypes of cough. There are several advantages to viewing cough hypersensitivity as the unifying diagnosis; Communication with patients is aided, aetiology is not restricted and therapeutic avenues opened. Cough Hypersensitivity Syndrome is a more applicable label to embrace the clinical manifestations of this disabling disease. PMID:23668427

  2. Fibronectin mediates mesendodermal cell fate decisions

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Paul; Andersen, Peter; Hassel, David; Kaynak, Bogac L.; Limphong, Pattraranee; Juergensen, Lonny; Kwon, Chulan; Srivastava, Deepak

    2013-01-01

    Non-cell-autonomous signals often play crucial roles in cell fate decisions during animal development. Reciprocal signaling between endoderm and mesoderm is vital for embryonic development, yet the key signals and mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we show that endodermal cells efficiently promote the emergence of mesodermal cells in the neighboring population through signals containing an essential short-range component. The endoderm-mesoderm interaction promoted precardiac mesoderm formation in mouse embryonic stem cells and involved endodermal production of fibronectin. In vivo, fibronectin deficiency resulted in a dramatic reduction of mesoderm accompanied by endodermal expansion in zebrafish embryos. This event was mediated by regulation of Wnt signaling in mesodermal cells through activation of integrin-β1. Our findings highlight the importance of the extracellular matrix in mediating short-range signals and reveal a novel function of endoderm, involving fibronectin and its downstream signaling cascades, in promoting the emergence of mesoderm. PMID:23715551

  3. X-ray induction of persistent hypersensitivity to mutation

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, J.P.; Williams, J.R.

    1982-04-16

    The progeny of x-irradiated V79 cells are hypersensitive to PUVA-(8-methoxypsoralen plus longwave ultraviolet light) induced mutation at the locus for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl transferase. This hypersensitivity is most evident at low doses of pUVA that do not induce mutation in non-x-irradiated cells. The hypersensitivity is evoked by x-irradiation delivered as a single dose or as multiple fractions over a long period and persists for at least 108 days of exponential growth. This radiation-induced hypersensitivity to subsequent mutation is a new phenomenon that may be relevant to multistage carcinogenesis.

  4. Carmine hypersensitivity masquerading as azithromycin hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Greenhawt, Matthew; McMorris, Marc; Baldwin, James

    2009-01-01

    Macrolide hypersensitivity is a rarely reported event. However, carmine dye has become increasingly important as a provocative agent. We present a case of a woman with documented carmine hypersensitivity, who reported anaphylaxis 90 minutes after ingestion of a generic azithromycin. Our investigations revealed that this was an allergy to the carmine dye in the tablet's coating rather than to the antibiotic. Seven extracts were prepared including carmine dye, crushed dried female cochineal insects, crushed tablets of Zithromax (Pfizer Inc.) and generic azithromycin (Teva Pharmaceuticals), and the crushed colored coatings from both tablets. These were suspended in preservative-free normal saline, and then applied as a skin-prick test and read at 30 minutes. The skin-prick skin test results were 4+ to histamine and carmine dye, but negative to cochineal insect extract, Pfizer crushed tablets, and negative control. The patient was 1+ to the Teva crushed tablet, but was 4+ to the Teva brand coating and negative to the Pfizer brand coating, which did not contain carmine. The patient subsequently ingested Pfizer Zithromax without any sequelae. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of carmine anaphylaxis attributed to carmine-containing medication. Careful history and skin-prick testing to the appropriate agents allowed elucidation of the subtlety of the true offending agent without unnecessary avoidance of the medication class. Patients with a carmine hypersensitivity should actively check with their pharmacy or prescribing physician to verify their medications are free of this offending agent. PMID:19331724

  5. TRPA1 Contributes to Cold Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Camino, Donato del; Murphy, Sarah; Heiry, Melissa; Barrett, Lee B.; Earley, Taryn J.; Cook, Colby A.; Petrus, Matt J.; Zhao, Michael; D'Amours, Marc; Deering, Nate; Brenner, Gary J.; Costigan, Michael; Hayward, Neil J.; Chong, Jayhong A.; Fanger, Christopher M.; Woolf, Clifford J.; Patapoutian, Ardem; Moran, Magdalene M.

    2010-01-01

    TRPA1 is a non-selective cation channel expressed by nociceptors. While it is widely accepted that TRPA1 serves as a broad irritancy receptor for a variety of reactive chemicals, its role in cold sensation remains controversial. Here, we demonstrate that mild cooling markedly increases agonist-evoked rat TRPA1 currents. In the absence of an agonist, even noxious cold only increases current amplitude slightly. These results suggest that TRPA1 is a key mediator of cold hypersensitivity in pathological conditions where reactive oxygen species and pro-inflammatory activators of the channel are present, but likely plays a comparatively minor role in acute cold sensation. Supporting this, cold hypersensitivity can be induced in wild-type but not Trpa1-/- mice by subcutaneous administration of a TRPA1 agonist. Furthermore, the selective TRPA1 antagonist HC-030031 reduces cold hypersensitivity in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain. PMID:21068322

  6. Antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, R G; Shear, N H

    1998-01-01

    The antiepileptic drug hypersensitivity syndrome (AHS) is an adverse drug reaction associated with the aromatic antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) phenytoin (PHT), carbamazepine (CBZ), phenobarbital (PB), and primidone. The syndrome is defined by the triad of fever, skin rash, and internal organ involvement. It can also be caused by other drugs, such as sulfonamides, dapsone, minocycline, terbinafine, azathioprine, and allopurinol. Diagnosis of AHS may be difficult because of the variety of clinical and laboratory abnormalities and manifestations and because the syndrome may mimic infectious, neoplastic, or collagen vascular disorders. The incidence is approximately 1 in 3,000 exposures. AHS starts with fever, rash, and lymphadenopathy, within the first 2-8 weeks after initiation of therapy. Internal manifestations include, among others, agranulocytosis, hepatitis, nephritis, and myostitis. AHS is associated with a relative excess of reactive oxidative metabolites of the AED. Insufficient detoxification may lead to cell death or contribute to the formation of antigen that triggers an immune reaction. Crossreactivity among PHT, CBZ, and PB is as high as 70-80%. PMID:9798755

  7. Topoisomerase II-Mediated DNA Damage Is Differently Repaired during the Cell Cycle by Non-Homologous End Joining and Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    de Campos-Nebel, Marcelo; Larripa, Irene; González-Cid, Marcela

    2010-01-01

    Topoisomerase II (Top2) is a nuclear enzyme involved in several metabolic processes of DNA. Chemotherapy agents that poison Top2 are known to induce persistent protein-mediated DNA double strand breaks (DSB). In this report, by using knock down experiments, we demonstrated that Top2α was largely responsible for the induction of γH2AX and cytotoxicity by the Top2 poisons idarubicin and etoposide in normal human cells. As DSB resulting from Top2 poisons-mediated damage may be repaired by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) or homologous recombination (HR), we aimed to analyze both DNA repair pathways. We found that DNA-PKcs was rapidly activated in human cells, as evidenced by autophosphorylation at serine 2056, following Top2-mediated DNA damage. The chemical inhibition of DNA-PKcs by wortmannin and vanillin resulted in an increased accumulation of DNA DSB, as evaluated by the comet assay. This was supported by a hypersensitive phenotype to Top2 poisons of Ku80- and DNA-PKcs- defective Chinese hamster cell lines. We also showed that Rad51 protein levels, Rad51 foci formation and sister chromatid exchanges were increased in human cells following Top2-mediated DNA damage. In support, BRCA2- and Rad51C- defective Chinese hamster cells displayed hypersensitivity to Top2 poisons. The analysis by immunofluorescence of the DNA DSB repair response in synchronized human cell cultures revealed activation of DNA-PKcs throughout the cell cycle and Rad51 foci formation in S and late S/G2 cells. Additionally, we found an increase of DNA-PKcs-mediated residual repair events, but not Rad51 residual foci, into micronucleated and apoptotic cells. Therefore, we conclude that in human cells both NHEJ and HR are required, with cell cycle stage specificity, for the repair of Top2-mediated reversible DNA damage. Moreover, NHEJ-mediated residual repair events are more frequently associated to irreversibly damaged cells. PMID:20824055

  8. Airway Inflammation and Hypersensitivity Induced by Chronic Smoking

    PubMed Central

    Kou, Yu Ru; Kwong, Kevin; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2011-01-01

    Airway hypersensitivity, characterized by enhanced excitability of airway sensory nerves, is a prominent pathophysiological feature in patients with airway inflammatory diseases. Although the underlying pathogenic mechanism is not fully understood, chronic airway inflammation is believed to be primarily responsible. Cigarette smoking is known to cause chronic airway inflammation, accompanied by airway hyperresponsiveness. Experimental evidence indicates that enhanced excitability of vagal bronchopulmonary sensory nerves and increased tachykinin synthesis in these nerves resulting from chronic inflammation are important contributing factors to the airway hyperresponsiveness. Multiple inflammatory mediators released from various types of structural and inflammatory cells are involved in the smoking-induced airway inflammation, which is mainly regulated by redox-sensitive signaling pathways and transcription factors. Furthermore, recent studies have reported potent sensitizing and stimulatory effects of these inflammatory mediators such as prostanoids and reactive oxygen species on these sensory nerves. In summary, these studies using cigarette smoking as an experimental approach have identified certain potentially important cell signaling pathways and underlying mechanisms of the airway hypersensitivity induced by chronic airway inflammation. PMID:21397052

  9. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  10. Regulation of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy by IL-9 Producing Mucosal Mast Cells and Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence and number of life-threatening cases, food allergy has emerged as a major health concern. The classic immune response seen during food allergy is allergen-specific IgE sensitization and hypersensitivity reactions to foods occur in the effector phase with often severe and deleterious outcomes. Recent research has advanced understanding of the immunological mechanisms occurring during the effector phase of allergic reactions to ingested food. Therefore, this review will not only cover the mucosal immune system of the gastrointestinal tract and the immunological mechanisms underlying IgE-mediated food allergy, but will also introduce cells recently identified to have a role in the hypersensitivity reaction to food allergens. These include IL-9 producing mucosal mast cells (MMC9s) and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). The involvement of these cell types in potentiating the type 2 immune response and developing the anaphylactic response to food allergens will be discussed. In addition, it has become apparent that there is a collaboration between these cells that contributes to an individual's susceptibility to IgE-mediated food allergy. PMID:27574500

  11. Regulation of IgE-Mediated Food Allergy by IL-9 Producing Mucosal Mast Cells and Type 2 Innate Lymphoid Cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jee-Boong

    2016-08-01

    Due to the increasing prevalence and number of life-threatening cases, food allergy has emerged as a major health concern. The classic immune response seen during food allergy is allergen-specific IgE sensitization and hypersensitivity reactions to foods occur in the effector phase with often severe and deleterious outcomes. Recent research has advanced understanding of the immunological mechanisms occurring during the effector phase of allergic reactions to ingested food. Therefore, this review will not only cover the mucosal immune system of the gastrointestinal tract and the immunological mechanisms underlying IgE-mediated food allergy, but will also introduce cells recently identified to have a role in the hypersensitivity reaction to food allergens. These include IL-9 producing mucosal mast cells (MMC9s) and type 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s). The involvement of these cell types in potentiating the type 2 immune response and developing the anaphylactic response to food allergens will be discussed. In addition, it has become apparent that there is a collaboration between these cells that contributes to an individual's susceptibility to IgE-mediated food allergy. PMID:27574500

  12. Nonthermal-plasma-mediated animal cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Wanil; Woo, Kyung-Chul; Kim, Gyoo-Cheon; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2011-01-01

    Animal cell death comprising necrosis and apoptosis occurred in a well-regulated manner upon specific stimuli. The physiological meanings and detailed molecular mechanisms of cell death have been continuously investigated over several decades. Necrotic cell death has typical morphological changes, such as cell swelling and cell lysis followed by DNA degradation, whereas apoptosis shows blebbing formation and regular DNA fragmentation. Cell death is usually adopted to terminate cancer cells in vivo. The current strategies against tumour are based on the induction of cell death by adopting various methods, including radiotherapy and chemotherapeutics. Among these, radiotherapy is the most frequently used treatment method, but it still has obvious limitations. Recent studies have suggested that the use of nonthermal air plasma can be a prominent method for inducing cancer cell death. Plasma-irradiated cells showed the loss of genomic integrity, mitochondrial dysfunction, plasma membrane damage, etc. Tumour elimination with plasma irradiation is an emerging concept in cancer therapy and can be accelerated by targeting certain tumour-specific proteins with gold nanoparticles. Here, some recent developments are described so that the mechanisms related to plasma-mediated cell death and its perspectives in cancer treatment can be understood.

  13. Hypersensitivity to fluoroquinolones

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Tahia D.; Ariza, Adriana; Palomares, Francisca; Montañez, María I.; Salas, María; Martín-Serrano, Angela; Fernández, Rubén; Ruiz, Arturo; Blanca, Miguel; Mayorga, Cristobalina; Torres, María J.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Although fluoroquinolones (FQs) are generally well-tolerated antibiotics, increasing numbers of hypersensitivity reactions have been reported. These can be evaluated in vitro by basophil activation tests (BATs); however, sensitivity is not optimal. Many factors could influence sensitivity such as basophil activation markers. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of 2 different activations markers, CD63 and CD203c, on the sensitivity of BAT to FQ. We studied 17 patients with immediate allergic reactions to FQ. BAT was performed with moxifloxacin and ciprofloxacin using CD193 (CCR3) for basophil selection and CD203c or CD63 as activation markers. Stimulation with ciprofloxacin induced a significantly higher expression of CD63 in ciprofloxacin-allergic patients compared to moxifloxacin-allergic patients (P = 0.002). In patients allergic to moxifloxacin with anaphylactic shock, we have observed an increase in the percentage of cells that upregulate CD203c, whereas patients with anaphylaxis preferentially upregulate CD63. The best sensitivity–specificity was obtained using a cutoff of 3 and the culprit FQ, using CD203c for moxifloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 36.4%; specificity = 94.4%), and CD63 for ciprofloxacin-allergic patients (sensitivity = 83.3%; specificity = 88.9%). A negative correlation was found between the upregulation of CD63 and CD203c and the time interval between the reaction occurrence and the performance of the test (Spearman r = −0.446; P < 0.001 for CD63 and Spearman r = −0.386; P < 0.001 for CD203c). The performance of BAT for FQ allergy must be optimized for each drug, taking into account possible differences in the stimulation mechanism that leads to the upregulation of different activation markers. PMID:27281069

  14. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  15. Redox polymer mediation for enzymatic biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallaway, Joshua

    Mediated biocatalytic cathodes prepared from the oxygen-reducing enzyme laccase and redox-conducting osmium hydrogels were characterized for use as cathodes in enzymatic biofuel cells. A series of osmium-based redox polymers was synthesized with redox potentials spanning the range from 0.11 V to 0.85 V (SHE), and the resulting biocatalytic electrodes were modeled to determine reaction kinetic constants using the current response, measured osmium concentration, and measured apparent electron diffusion. As in solution-phase systems, the bimolecular rate constant for mediation was found to vary greatly with mediator potential---from 250 s-1M-1 when mediator and enzyme were close in potential to 9.4 x 10 4 s-1M-1 when this overpotential was large. Optimum mediator potential for a cell operating with a non-limiting platinum anode and having no mass transport limitation from bulk solution was found to be 0.66 V (SHE). Redox polymers were synthesized under different concentrations, producing osmium variation. An increase from 6.6% to 7.2% osmium increased current response from 1.2 to 2.1 mA/cm2 for a planar film in 40°C oxygen-saturated pH 4 buffer, rotating at 900 rpm. These results translated to high surface area electrodes, nearly doubling current density to 13 mA/cm2, the highest to date for such an electrode. The typical fungal laccase from Trametes versicolor was replaced by a bacterially-expressed small laccase from Streptomyces coelicolor, resulting in biocatalytic films that reduced oxygen at increased pH, with full functionality at pH 7, producing 1.5 mA/cm 2 in planar configuration. Current response was biphasic with pH, matching the activity profile of the free enzyme in solution. The mediated enzyme electrode system was modeled with respect to apparent electron diffusion, mediator concentration, and transport of oxygen from bulk solution, all of which are to some extent controlled by design. Each factor was found to limit performance in certain circumstances

  16. Sunscreens and T4N5 liposomes differ in their ability to protect against ultraviolet-induced sunburn cell formation, alterations of dendritic epidermal cells, and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Wolf, P; Cox, P; Yarosh, D B; Kripke, M L

    1995-02-01

    Exposure of skin to ultraviolet (UV) radiation can lead to diverse biologic effects, including inflammation, sunburn cell formation, alterations of cutaneous immune cells, and impaired induction of contact hypersensitivity responses. The molecular mechanisms of these UV-induced effects are not completely understood. We investigated the ability of sunscreens and liposomes containing the DNA excision repair enzyme T4 endonuclease V to prevent these effects of UV radiation. The use of T4N5 liposomes, which increase the repair of cyclobutyl pyrimidine dimers, provides an approach for assessing the role of DNA damage in the effects of UV radiation on the skin. Exposing C3H mice to 500 mJ/cm2 UVB radiation from FS40 sunlamps resulted in skin edema, sunburn cell formation, and morphologic alterations and decreased numbers of Langerhans cells and Thy-1+ dendritic epidermal T cells. In addition, the induction of contact hypersensitivity after application of 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene on UV-irradiated skin was diminished by 80%. Applying sunscreens containing octyl-N-dimethyl-p-aminobenzoate, 2-ethylhexyl-p-methoxycinnamate, or benzophenone-3 before this dose of UV irradiation gave nearly complete protection against all of these effects of UV irradiation. In contrast, topical application of T4N5 liposomes after UV irradiation had no effect on UV-induced skin edema and only partially protected against sunburn cell formation and local suppression of contact hypersensitivity, although its ability to protect against alterations in dendritic immune cells was comparable to that of the sunscreens. These results suggest that DNA damage is involved in only some of the local effects of UV radiation on the skin. In addition, T4N5 liposomes may be a useful adjunct to sunscreens because they can reduce some of the deleterious effects of UV radiation on skin even after a sunburn has been initiated. PMID:7829886

  17. A novel regulatory mechanism of naringenin through inhibition of T lymphocyte function in contact hypersensitivity suppression

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Feng; Tang, Yijun; Gao, Zhe; Xu, Qiang

    2010-06-25

    Naringenin, a flavonoid in grapefruits and citrus fruits, has been reported to exhibit anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative activities. Contact hypersensitivity (CHS) is a T cell-mediated immune reaction, and the factors released from macrophages also contribute to this response. Previous studies showed that naringenin suppressed CHS by inhibiting activation and migration of macrophages. However, little is known about naringenin's effects on T lymphocytes. Our study indicated that naringenin potently suppressed picryl chloride (PCl)-induced contact hypersensitivity by inhibiting the proliferation and activation of T lymphocytes. In vitro, both of the activated hapten-specific T cells and the T cells stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 showed growth arrest after naringenin treatment. Furthermore, naringenin reduced CD69 (the protein level) and cytokines such as IL-2, TNF-{alpha}, and IFN-{gamma} (the mRNA level) expressions which highly expressed by activated T cells. Meanwhile, naringenin also induced T cell apoptosis by upregulation of Bax, Bad, PARP, cleaved-caspase 3 and downregulation of phosphorylated Akt, Bcl-2. These findings suggest that, besides its anti-inflammatory activities in macrophages, naringenin also showed inhibitory effects on the activation and proliferation of T cells to alleviate symptoms of contact hypersensitivity.

  18. Predisposition to abacavir hypersensitivity conferred by HLA-B*5701 and a haplotypic Hsp70-Hom variant.

    PubMed

    Martin, Annalise M; Nolan, David; Gaudieri, Silvana; Almeida, Coral Ann; Nolan, Richard; James, Ian; Carvalho, Filipa; Phillips, Elizabeth; Christiansen, Frank T; Purcell, Anthony W; McCluskey, James; Mallal, Simon

    2004-03-23

    Susceptibility to a clinically significant drug hypersensitivity syndrome associated with abacavir use seems to have a strong genetic component. We have previously shown that the presence of HLA-B*5701 strongly predicts abacavir hypersensitivity and have identified a potential susceptibility locus within a 300-kb region between the MEGT1 and C4A6 loci in the central MHC. We now report the results of fine recombinant genetic mapping in an expanded patient population of 248 consecutive, fully ascertained, abacavir-exposed individuals in the Western Australian HIV Cohort Study, in which 18 cases of definite abacavir hypersensitivity (7.3%) and 230 tolerant controls were identified. Haplotype mapping within patients with allelic markers of the 57.1 ancestral haplotype suggests a susceptibility locus within the 14-kb Hsp70 gene cluster. HLA-B*5701 was present in 94.4% of hypersensitive cases compared with 1.7% of controls (odds ratio, 960; P < 0.00001). A haplotypic nonsynonymous polymorphism of Hsp70-Hom (HspA1L, resulting from the substitution of residue M493T in the peptide-binding subunit) was found in combination with HLA-B*5701 in 94.4% of hypersensitive cases and 0.4% of controls (odds ratio, 3,893; P < 0.00001). Individuals with abacavir hypersensitivity demonstrated increased monocyte tumor necrosis factor expression in response to ex vivo abacavir stimulation, which was abrogated with CD8(+) T cell depletion. These data indicate that the concurrence of HLA-B*5701 and Hsp70-Hom M493T alleles is necessary for the development of abacavir hypersensitivity, which is likely to be mediated by an HLA-B*5701-restricted immune response to abacavir. PMID:15024131

  19. Oral immunotherapy induces IgG antibodies that act via FcγRIIb to suppress IgE-mediated hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Oliver T.; Logsdon, Stephanie L.; Zhou, Joseph S.; Medina-Tamayo, Jaciel; Abdel-Gadir, Azza; Rivas, Magali Noval; Koleoglou, Kyle J.; Chatila, Talal A.; Schneider, Lynda C.; Rachid, Rima; Umetsu, Dale T.; Oettgen, Hans C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Food anaphylaxis is triggered by specific IgE antibodies. Paradoxically, some individuals with significant IgE levels can ingest allergenic foods without incident. Similarly, subjects completing oral immunotherapy (OIT) tolerate food challenges despite persistent high-titer food-specific IgE. Objective To test whether IgG antibodies induced by food immunotherapy prevent food-induced anaphylaxis, and whether this occurs via the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIb. Methods Food allergy-susceptible Il4raF709 mice were enterally sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA). Similarly sensitized IgE-deficient Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice, which can ingest OVA without anaphylaxis, were subjected to a high-dose enteral OVA desensitization protocol (OIT). Sera from both groups were tested for the ability to activate or inhibit bone marrow mast cells (BMMC) exposed to allergen, or to passively transfer allergy to naïve hosts. In parallel experiments, sera obtained from peanut allergic patients before and after undergoing OIT were interrogated for their ability to enhance or suppress peanut-induced activation in an indirect assay using basophils from non-allergic donors. Results Il4raF709 mice exhibited strong OVA-specific IgE responses. Their sera efficiently sensitized BMMC for activation by antigen challenge. Sera from Il4raF709/IgE−/− mice subjected to OVA OIT suppressed BMMC responses. This inhibition was IgG-mediated and FcγRIIb-dependent. Similarly, pre-OIT, but not post-OIT sera from patients efficiently sensitized basophils for peanut-induced activation. IgG antibodies in post-OIT sera suppressed basophil activation by pre-OIT sera. This inhibition was blocked by antibodies against FcγRII. Conclusion Food-specific IgG antibodies, such as those induced during OIT, inhibit IgE-mediated reactions. Strategies that favor IgG responses might prove useful in the management of food allergy. PMID:25042981

  20. Interleukin 2-diphtheria toxin fusion protein can abolish cell-mediated immunity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, V E; Bacha, P; Pankewycz, O; Nichols, J C; Murphy, J R; Strom, T B

    1988-01-01

    De novo expression of the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) is a critical and pivotal event in initiation of an immune response. Targeting the low-affinity IL-2-binding p55 subunit of the high-affinity IL-2R with the rat anti-mouse IgM monoclonal antibody M7/20 suppresses a variety of T-cell-mediated reactions, including transplant rejection, autoimmunity, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). A hybrid IL-2-toxin gene was constructed from the diphtheria toxin gene by replacing the DNA encoding the diphtheria toxin receptor-binding domain with the DNA encoding the receptor-binding domain of IL-2, and the fusion protein encoded by the hybrid gene was expressed in Escherichia coli [Williams, D.P., Parker, K., Bacha, P., Bishai, W., Borowski, M., Genbauffe, F., Strom, T.B. & Murphy, J.R. (1987) Protein Eng. 1, 493-498]. We examined the action of the chimeric IL-2-toxin fusion protein on an in vivo T-cell mediated response, DTH. The IL-2-toxin fusion protein was found to be a potent immunosuppressive agent. Treatment of mice with the IL-2-toxin blocks DTH and prevents expansion of IL-2R+ T cells. Indeed, IL-2-toxin treatment targets IL-2R+ T cells in vivo and is shown to selectively eliminate their appearance in draining lymph nodes. DTH suppression was observed even in mice possessing high titers of antibodies to diphtheria toxoid. PMID:3131768

  1. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  2. Cancer resistance in the blind mole rat is mediated by concerted necrotic cell death mechanism.

    PubMed

    Gorbunova, Vera; Hine, Christopher; Tian, Xiao; Ablaeva, Julia; Gudkov, Andrei V; Nevo, Eviatar; Seluanov, Andrei

    2012-11-20

    Blind mole rats Spalax (BMR) are small subterranean rodents common in the Middle East. BMR is distinguished by its adaptations to life underground, remarkable longevity (with a maximum documented lifespan of 21 y), and resistance to cancer. Spontaneous tumors have never been observed in spalacids. To understand the mechanisms responsible for this resistance, we examined the growth of BMR fibroblasts in vitro of the species Spalax judaei and Spalax golani. BMR cells proliferated actively for 7-20 population doublings, after which the cells began secreting IFN-β, and the cultures underwent massive necrotic cell death within 3 d. The necrotic cell death phenomenon was independent of culture conditions or telomere shortening. Interestingly, this cell behavior was distinct from that observed in another long-lived and cancer-resistant African mole rat, Heterocephalus glaber, the naked mole rat in which cells display hypersensitivity to contact inhibition. Sequestration of p53 and Rb proteins using SV40 large T antigen completely rescued necrotic cell death. Our results suggest that cancer resistance of BMR is conferred by massive necrotic response to overproliferation mediated by p53 and Rb pathways, and triggered by the release of IFN-β. Thus, we have identified a unique mechanism that contributes to cancer resistance of this subterranean mammal extremely adapted to life underground. PMID:23129611

  3. CIS is a potent checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Delconte, Rebecca B; Kolesnik, Tatiana B; Dagley, Laura F; Rautela, Jai; Shi, Wei; Putz, Eva M; Stannard, Kimberley; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Teh, Charis; Firth, Matt; Ushiki, Takashi; Andoniou, Christopher E; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Sharp, Phillip P; Sanvitale, Caroline E; Infusini, Giuseppe; Liau, Nicholas P D; Linossi, Edmond M; Burns, Christopher J; Carotta, Sebastian; Gray, Daniel H D; Seillet, Cyril; Hutchinson, Dana S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Webb, Andrew I; Alexander, Warren S; Li, Shawn S; Bullock, Alex N; Babon, Jeffery J; Smyth, Mark J; Nicholson, Sandra E; Huntington, Nicholas D

    2016-07-01

    The detection of aberrant cells by natural killer (NK) cells is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory ligands and from cytokines such as IL-15. We identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS, encoded by Cish) as a critical negative regulator of IL-15 signaling in NK cells. Cish was rapidly induced in response to IL-15, and deletion of Cish rendered NK cells hypersensitive to IL-15, as evidenced by enhanced proliferation, survival, IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity toward tumors. This was associated with increased JAK-STAT signaling in NK cells in which Cish was deleted. Correspondingly, CIS interacted with the tyrosine kinase JAK1, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and targeting JAK for proteasomal degradation. Cish(-/-) mice were resistant to melanoma, prostate and breast cancer metastasis in vivo, and this was intrinsic to NK cell activity. Our data uncover a potent intracellular checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity and suggest possibilities for new cancer immunotherapies directed at blocking CIS function. PMID:27213690

  4. Hypersensitivity of Ku80-deficient cell lines and mice to DNA damage: The effects of ionizing radiation on growth, survival, and development

    PubMed Central

    Nussenzweig, André; Sokol, Karen; Burgman, Paul; Li, Ligeng; Li, Gloria C.

    1997-01-01

    We recently have shown that mice deficient for the 86-kDa component (Ku80) of the DNA-dependent protein kinase exhibit growth retardation and a profound deficiency in V(D)J (variable, diversity, and joining) recombination. These defects may be related to abnormalities in DNA metabolism that arise from the inability of Ku80 mutant cells to process DNA double-strand breaks. To further characterize the role of Ku80 in DNA double-strand break repair, we have generated embryonic stem cells and pre-B cells and examined their response to ionizing radiation. Ku80−/− embryonic stem cells are more sensitive than controls to γ-irradiation, and pre-B cells derived from Ku80 mutant mice display enhanced spontaneous and γ-ray-induced apoptosis. We then determined the effects of ionizing radiation on the survival, growth, and lymphocyte development in Ku80-deficient mice. Ku80−/− mice display a hypersensitivity to γ-irradiation, characterized by loss of hair pigmentation, severe injury to the gastrointestinal tract, and enhanced mortality. Exposure of newborn Ku80−/− mice to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation enhances their growth retardation and results in the induction of T cell-specific differentiation. However, unlike severe combined immunodeficient mice, radiation-induced T cell development in Ku80−/− mice is not accompanied by extensive thymocyte proliferation. The response of Ku80-deficient cell lines and mice to DNA-damaging agents provides important insights into the role of Ku80 in growth regulation, lymphocyte development, and DNA repair. PMID:9391070

  5. Hypersensitivity of Ku80-deficient cell lines and mice to DNA damage: the effects of ionizing radiation on growth, survival, and development.

    PubMed

    Nussenzweig, A; Sokol, K; Burgman, P; Li, L; Li, G C

    1997-12-01

    We recently have shown that mice deficient for the 86-kDa component (Ku80) of the DNA-dependent protein kinase exhibit growth retardation and a profound deficiency in V(D)J (variable, diversity, and joining) recombination. These defects may be related to abnormalities in DNA metabolism that arise from the inability of Ku80 mutant cells to process DNA double-strand breaks. To further characterize the role of Ku80 in DNA double-strand break repair, we have generated embryonic stem cells and pre-B cells and examined their response to ionizing radiation. Ku80(-/-) embryonic stem cells are more sensitive than controls to gamma-irradiation, and pre-B cells derived from Ku80 mutant mice display enhanced spontaneous and gamma-ray-induced apoptosis. We then determined the effects of ionizing radiation on the survival, growth, and lymphocyte development in Ku80-deficient mice. Ku80(-/-) mice display a hypersensitivity to gamma-irradiation, characterized by loss of hair pigmentation, severe injury to the gastrointestinal tract, and enhanced mortality. Exposure of newborn Ku80(-/-) mice to sublethal doses of ionizing radiation enhances their growth retardation and results in the induction of T cell-specific differentiation. However, unlike severe combined immunodeficient mice, radiation-induced T cell development in Ku80(-/-) mice is not accompanied by extensive thymocyte proliferation. The response of Ku80-deficient cell lines and mice to DNA-damaging agents provides important insights into the role of Ku80 in growth regulation, lymphocyte development, and DNA repair. PMID:9391070

  6. A MYB transcription factor regulates very-long-chain fatty acid biosynthesis for activation of the hypersensitive cell death response in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Raffaele, Sylvain; Vailleau, Fabienne; Léger, Amandine; Joubès, Jérôme; Miersch, Otto; Huard, Carine; Blée, Elisabeth; Mongrand, Sébastien; Domergue, Frédéric; Roby, Dominique

    2008-03-01

    Plant immune responses to pathogen attack include the hypersensitive response (HR), a form of programmed cell death occurring at invasion sites. We previously reported on Arabidopsis thaliana MYB30, a transcription factor that acts as a positive regulator of a cell death pathway conditioning the HR. Here, we show by microarray analyses of Arabidopsis plants misexpressing MYB30 that the genes encoding the four enzymes forming the acyl-coA elongase complex are putative MYB30 targets. The acyl-coA elongase complex synthesizes very-long-chain fatty acids (VLCFAs), and the accumulation of extracellular VLCFA-derived metabolites (leaf epidermal wax components) was affected in MYB30 knockout mutant and overexpressing lines. In the same lines, a lipid extraction procedure allowing high recovery of sphingolipids revealed changes in VLCFA contents that were amplified in response to inoculation. Finally, the exacerbated HR phenotype of MYB30-overexpressing lines was altered by the loss of function of the acyl-ACP thioesterase FATB, which causes severe defects in the supply of fatty acids for VLCFA biosynthesis. Based on these findings, we propose a model in which MYB30 modulates HR via VLCFAs by themselves, or VLCFA derivatives, as cell death messengers in plants. PMID:18326828

  7. Astaxanthin stimulates cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in cats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jean Soon; Mathison, Bridget D; Hayek, Michael G; Massimino, Stefan; Reinhart, Gregory A; Chew, Boon P

    2011-12-15

    Astaxanthin is a potent antioxidant carotenoid and may play a role in modulating immune response in cats. Blood was taken from female domestic shorthair cats (8-9 mo old; 3.2 ± 0.04 kg body weight) fed 0, 1, 5 or 10mg astaxanthin daily for 12 wk to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation response, leukocyte subpopulations, natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity, and plasma IgG and IgM concentration. Cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against concanavalin A and an attenuated polyvalent vaccine was assessed on wk 8 (prior to vaccination) and 12 (post-vaccination). There was a dose-related increase in plasma astaxanthin concentrations, with maximum concentrations observed on wk 12. Dietary astaxanthin enhanced DTH response to both the specific (vaccine) and nonspecific (concanavalin A) antigens. In addition, cats fed astaxanthin had heightened PBMC proliferation and NK cell cytotoxic activity. The population of CD3(+) total T and CD4(+) T helper cells were also higher in astaxanthin-fed cats; however, no treatment difference was found with the CD8(+) T cytotoxic and MHC II(+) activated lymphocyte cell populations. Dietary astaxanthin increased concentrations of plasma IgG and IgM. Therefore, dietary astaxanthin heightened cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in cats. PMID:21930306

  8. Possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Yosuke; Kobori, Hiroko; Piao, Jinhua; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Sachiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2009-11-13

    B7-H4, a newly identified B7 family molecule, is reported to regulate T cell activation. However, the expression and function of B7-H4 remain controversial. Here, we demonstrated that B7-H4 expression in immune cells was undetectable at both the transcription and cell-surface protein levels. B7-H4 transfectants augmented anti-CD3 mAb-induced re-directed cytotoxicity and this was inhibited by anti-B7-H4 mAb. In a hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity model, treatment with anti-B7-H4 mAb at sensitization, but not at challenge, efficiently suppressed the ear swelling and CD8(+) T cell activation assessed by CD25 expression and IFN-gamma production. We found that cells expressing B7-H4 secreted soluble B7-H4 and the serum B7-H4 level increased with disease progression in lupus-prone and collagen-induced arthritis autoimmune mice and after the antigen challenge in allergic inflammatory diseases. Our results suggest a different action of B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory responses and the possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in inflammatory immune responses. PMID:19723502

  9. Dentin Hypersensitivity and Oxalates

    PubMed Central

    Cunha-Cruz, J.; Stout, J.R.; Heaton, L.J.; Wataha, J.C.

    2011-01-01

    Treatment of dentin hypersensitivity with oxalates is common, but oxalate efficacy remains unclear. Our objective was to systematically review clinical trials reporting an oxalate treatment compared with no treatment or placebo with a dentin hypersensitivity outcome. Risk-of-bias assessment and data extraction were performed independently by two reviewers. Standardized mean differences (SMD) were estimated by random-effects meta-analysis. Of 677 unique citations, 12 studies with high risk-of-bias were included. The summary SMD for 3% monohydrogen-monopotassium oxalate (n = 8 studies) was -0.71 [95% Confidence Interval: -1.48, 0.06]. Other treatments, including 30% dipotassium oxalate (n = 1), 30% dipotassium oxalate plus 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 3), 6% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate (n = 1), 6.8% ferric oxalate (n = 1), and oxalate-containing resin (n = 1), also were not statistically significantly different from placebo treatments. With the possible exception of 3% monohydrogen monopotassium oxalate, available evidence currently does not support the recommendation of dentin hypersensitivity treatment with oxalates. PMID:21191127

  10. Cell-mediated immunity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, healthy control subjects and patients with major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, A; Hickie, I; Hickie, C; Dwyer, J; Wakefield, D

    1992-01-01

    The chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by severe persistent fatigue and neuropsychiatric symptoms. It has been proposed that the abnormalities in cell-mediated immunity which have been documented in patients with CFS may be attributable to a clinical depression, prevalent in patients with this disorder. Cell-mediated immune status was evaluated in patients with carefully defined CFS and compared with that of matched subjects with major depression (non-melancholic, non-psychotic) as well as healthy control subjects. Patients with CFS demonstrated impaired lymphocyte responses to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, and reduced or absent delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin responses when compared either with subjects with major depression or with healthy control subjects (P less than 0.05 for each analysis). Although depression is common in patients with CFS, the disturbances of cell-mediated immunity in this disorder differ in prevalence and magnitude from those associated with major depression. These observations strengthen the likelihood of a direct relationship between abnormal cell-mediated immunity and the etiology of CFS. PMID:1733640

  11. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-05-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  12. What we know about nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Duy Le; Kim, Ji-Hye; Trinh, Tu Hoang Kim; Park, Hae-Sim

    2016-01-01

    Nonsteroidal anti-inf lammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely prescribed for the treatment of inflammatory diseases, but their use is frequently related to hypersensitivity reactions. This review outlines our current knowledge of NSAID hypersensitivity (NHS) with regard to its pathogenic, molecular, and genetic mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment. The presentation of NHS varies from a local (skin and/or airways) reaction to systemic reactions, including anaphylaxis. At the molecular level, NHS reactions can be classified as cross-reactive (mediated by cyclooxygenase inhibition) or selective (specific activation of immunoglobulin E antibodies or T cells). Genetic polymorphisms and epigenetic factors have been shown to be closely associated with NHS, and may be useful as predictive markers. To diagnose NHS, inhalation or oral challenge tests are applied, with the exclusion of any cross-reactive NSAIDs. For patients diagnosed with NHS, absolute avoidance of NSAIDs/aspirin is essential, and pharmacological treatment, including biologics, is often used to control their respiratory and cutaneous symptoms. Finally, desensitization is recommended only for selected patients with NHS. However, further research is required to develop new diagnostic methods and more effective treatments against NHS. PMID:27030979

  13. Ndfip1 mediates peripheral tolerance to self and exogenous antigen by inducing cell cycle exit in responding CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Altin, John A.; Daley, Stephen R.; Howitt, Jason; Rickards, Helen J.; Batkin, Alison K.; Horikawa, Keisuke; Prasad, Simon J.; Nelms, Keats A.; Kumar, Sharad; Wu, Lawren C.; Tan, Seong-Seng; Cook, Matthew C.; Goodnow, Christopher C.

    2014-01-01

    The NDFIP1 (neural precursor cell expressed, developmentally down-regulated protein 4 family-interacting protein 1) adapter for the ubiquitin ligase ITCH is genetically linked to human allergic and autoimmune disease, but the cellular mechanism by which these proteins enable foreign and self-antigens to be tolerated is unresolved. Here, we use two unique mouse strains—an Ndfip1-YFP reporter and an Ndfip1-deficient strain—to show that Ndfip1 is progressively induced during T-cell differentiation and activation in vivo and that its deficiency causes a cell-autonomous, Forkhead box P3-independent failure of peripheral CD4+ T-cell tolerance to self and exogenous antigen. In small cohorts of antigen-specific CD4+ cells responding in vivo, Ndfip1 was necessary for tolerogen-reactive T cells to exit cell cycle after one to five divisions and to abort Th2 effector differentiation, defining a step in peripheral tolerance that provides insights into the phenomenon of T-cell anergy in vivo and is distinct from the better understood process of Bcl2-interacting mediator of cell death-mediated apoptosis. Ndfip1 deficiency precipitated autoimmune pancreatic destruction and diabetes; however, this depended on a further accumulation of nontolerant anti-self T cells from strong stimulation by exogenous tolerogen. These findings illuminate a peripheral tolerance checkpoint that aborts T-cell clonal expansion against allergens and autoantigens and demonstrate how hypersensitive responses to environmental antigens may trigger autoimmunity. PMID:24520172

  14. Azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fenaux, S; Tintillier, M; Cuvelier, Ch; Migali, G; Pochet, J M

    2013-01-01

    We report here the case of a 51-year-old man presenting to the Emergency Department with a febrile cutaneous eruption with diffuse arthralgia 10 days after the onset of azathioprine therapy. The clinical examination did not reveal any inflammatory syndrome and the results of all bacteriological tests were negative. A skin biopsy was performed, which revealed a granulocytary pustula with superficial dermal oedema and a neutrophil infiltration without sign of vasculitis. A side effect of azathioprine was suspected, and treatment was discontinued. Fortunately, the patient recovered within a few days. Azathioprine hypersensitivity syndrome is a rare side effect of azathioprine. Hypersensitivity syndrome is an idiosyncratic, non-IgE-mediated reaction that appears to be unrelated to thiopurine methyltransferase levels. Diagnosis is mainly clinical and requires an exclusion of other processes. The only treatment option available is to stop azathioprine intake. PMID:24156226

  15. Laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough.

    PubMed

    Hull, J H; Menon, A

    2015-12-01

    Patients with chronic cough often report symptoms arising in the throat, in response to non-specific stimuli. Accordingly, the concept of a 'hypersensitivity' of the larynx in chronic cough has evolved over the past ten years. Patients with cough and laryngeal hypersensitivity frequently report features that overlap other laryngeal dysfunction syndromes, including a tendency for the vocal cords to inappropriately adduct. The mechanisms underlying laryngeal hypersensitivity in chronic cough are currently unclear, however recent studies provide new clinical and physiological techniques to aid detection and monitoring of laryngeal hypersensitivity. This review provides an overview of the current state of knowledge in this field. PMID:26325433

  16. The atopic heart: a curious case of coronary hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Arora, S; Patel, R; Fadila, M; Wool, K

    2016-03-01

    Kounis syndrome is a coronary hypersensitivity disorder involving coronary vasospasm secondary to inflammatory mediators released primarily from mast cells. We report a case of the type I variant of Kounis syndrome manifesting as angioedema with significant inferolateral ST elevation (2 mm) and raised cardiac biomarkers. Diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion and treatment is tactical. Caution should be exercised before using beta-blockers, morphine and epinephrine, which are empiric in cases of acute coronary syndrome and anaphylaxis, respectively. Our patient was treated with intravenous steroids and histamine blockers given the angioedema at presentation. The purpose of our case is to emphasise the importance of including Kounis syndrome in the differential diagnosis for acute coronary syndrome, and formulation of standard treatment guidelines for this under-recognised condition. PMID:27020993

  17. Immunologic Evaluation of Immediate Hypersensitivity to Cefaclor

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hye-Soo; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Kwon, Hyouk-Soo; Kim, Tae-Bum; Nam, Young-Hee; Ye, Young-Min

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cefaclor is widely prescribed for various infectious diseases. As its consumption increases, the number of hypersensitivity reactions to cefaclor has increased. This study aimed to evaluate the immunologic findings of immediate hypersensitivity to cefaclor. Materials and Methods We enrolled 47 patients with immediate hypersensitivity to cefaclor from Ajou University Hospital and Asan Medical Center. Serum specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 antibodies to cefaclor-human serum albumin (HSA) conjugate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results The most common phenotype was anaphylaxis (Group I, 78.7%), followed by urticaria (Group II, 21.3%). The detection of specific IgE, IgG1, and IgG4 to cefaclor-HSA conjugate by ELISA tended to be higher in Group I (40.5%, 41.7%, 21.6%) than in Group II (20.0%, 20.0%, 0%) with no statistical significance. Significant associations were found between specific IgE and IgG1 or IgG4 (p<0.001, p=0.019). ELISA inhibition tests showed significant inhibitions by both free cefaclor and cefaclor-HSA conjugate. For basophil activation tests in patients having no specific IgE antibody, the CD63 expression level on basophils increased with incubations of free cefaclor. Conclusion The most common manifestation of immediate hypersensitivity to cefaclor was anaphylaxis, most of which was mediated by IgE; however, a non-IgE mediated direct basophil activation mechanism was suggested in a subset of anaphylaxis patients. PMID:25323882

  18. Cell-mediated immunity in epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Gliński, W; Jablonska, S; Langner, A; Obalek, S; Haftek, M; Proniewska, M

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were performed in 6 cases of epidermodysplasia verruciformis and 2 healthy family members. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was studied by measuring response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), percentrages of E- and EAC-rosette-forming lymphocytes, bacterial skin tests, and allergic reactions to dinitrochloro-benzene (DNCB). Impairment of CMI was manifested by reduction in the percentage of E rosettes, and lowered response to PHA, and- to a lesser degree- to Con A. The immune response to DNCB sensitization was invariably negative. Impairment of CMI was greater in cases of long duration and with extensive lesions. The cases of similar duration and extent of lesions, which never showed tendency to tumor formation, were not different in CMI in comparison with cases with numerous tumors. Only in cases with very advanced tumors CMI was impaired parallel to the gravity of the patient's general condition. PMID:1017532

  19. Pathogenesis and diagnosis of delayed-type drug hypersensitivity reactions, from bedside to bench and back.

    PubMed

    Schrijvers, Rik; Gilissen, Liesbeth; Chiriac, Anca Mirela; Demoly, Pascal

    2015-01-01

    Drug hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) have been present since the advent of drugs. In particular T-cell mediated delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions represent a heterogeneous clinical entity with a diverse pathogenesis and result in a considerable burden of morbidity and mortality not only driven by the reactions themselves but also by the use of alternatives which are sometimes less effective or even more dangerous. Diagnostic procedures rely on clinical history, skin testing and potential provocation testing, whereas validated in vitro diagnostic procedures are still lacking for most of them. Recent work in the field of pharmacogenomics combined with basic scientific research has provided insights in the pathogenesis of abacavir and carbamazepine hypersensitivities linked with certain human leucocyte antigen risk alleles. Nevertheless, important scientific questions on how other DHR arise and how host-drug interactions occur, remain unanswered. Recent work indicates an intricate relation between host, drug and pathogens in severe cutaneous and systemic reactions and provides more insights in the role of regulatory T-cells and viral reactivation in these reactions. In this review we focus on type IV delayed-type DHR, and address recent advances in the pathogenesis, pharmacogenomics, and diagnosis of these reactions with an emphasis on the understandings arising from basic research. PMID:26339470

  20. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  1. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  2. Mast Cells Condition Dendritic Cells to Mediate Allograft Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    de Vries, Victor C.; Pino-Lagos, Karina; Nowak, Elizabeth C.; Bennett, Kathy A.; Oliva, Carla; Noelle, Randolph J.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Peripheral tolerance orchestrated by regulatory T cells, dendritic cells (DCs), and mast cells (MCs) has been studied in several models including skin allograft tolerance. We now define a role for MCs in controlling DC behavior (“conditioning”) to facilitate tolerance. Under tolerant conditions, we show that MCs mediated a marked increase in tumor necrosis factor (TNFα)-dependent accumulation of graft-derived DCs in the dLN compared to nontolerant conditions. This increase of DCs in the dLN is due to the local production of granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) by MCs that induces a survival advantage of graft-derived DCs. DCs that migrated to the dLN from the tolerant allograft were tolerogenic; i.e., they dominantly suppress T cell responses and control regional immunity. This study underscores the importance of MCs in conditioning DCs to mediate peripheral tolerance and shows a functional impact of peripherally produced TNFα and GM-CSF on the migration and function of tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22035846

  3. High glutathione and glutathione peroxidase-2 levels mediate cell-type-specific DNA damage protection in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Dannenmann, Benjamin; Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G; Kübler, Ayline; Grondona, Paula; Schmid, Vera; Holzer, Katharina; Fröschl, Mirjam; Essmann, Frank; Rothfuss, Oliver; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2015-05-12

    Pluripotent stem cells must strictly maintain genomic integrity to prevent transmission of mutations. In human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that genome surveillance is achieved via two ways, namely, a hypersensitivity to apoptosis and a very low accumulation of DNA lesions. The low apoptosis threshold was mediated by constitutive p53 expression and a marked upregulation of proapoptotic p53 target genes of the BCL-2 family, ensuring the efficient iPSC removal upon genotoxic insults. Intriguingly, despite the elevated apoptosis sensitivity, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesions induced by genotoxins were less frequent in iPSCs compared to fibroblasts. Gene profiling identified that mRNA expression of several antioxidant proteins was considerably upregulated in iPSCs. Knockdown of glutathione peroxidase-2 and depletion of glutathione impaired protection against DNA lesions. Thus, iPSCs ensure genomic integrity through enhanced apoptosis induction and increased antioxidant defense, contributing to protection against DNA damage. PMID:25937369

  4. High Glutathione and Glutathione Peroxidase-2 Levels Mediate Cell-Type-Specific DNA Damage Protection in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Dannenmann, Benjamin; Lehle, Simon; Hildebrand, Dominic G.; Kübler, Ayline; Grondona, Paula; Schmid, Vera; Holzer, Katharina; Fröschl, Mirjam; Essmann, Frank; Rothfuss, Oliver; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells must strictly maintain genomic integrity to prevent transmission of mutations. In human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we found that genome surveillance is achieved via two ways, namely, a hypersensitivity to apoptosis and a very low accumulation of DNA lesions. The low apoptosis threshold was mediated by constitutive p53 expression and a marked upregulation of proapoptotic p53 target genes of the BCL-2 family, ensuring the efficient iPSC removal upon genotoxic insults. Intriguingly, despite the elevated apoptosis sensitivity, both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA lesions induced by genotoxins were less frequent in iPSCs compared to fibroblasts. Gene profiling identified that mRNA expression of several antioxidant proteins was considerably upregulated in iPSCs. Knockdown of glutathione peroxidase-2 and depletion of glutathione impaired protection against DNA lesions. Thus, iPSCs ensure genomic integrity through enhanced apoptosis induction and increased antioxidant defense, contributing to protection against DNA damage. PMID:25937369

  5. Food hypersensitivity by inhalation

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Daniel A; Bahna, Sami L

    2009-01-01

    Though not widely recognized, food hypersensitivity by inhalation can cause major morbidity in affected individuals. The exposure is usually more obvious and often substantial in occupational environments but frequently occurs in non-occupational settings, such as homes, schools, restaurants, grocery stores, and commercial flights. The exposure can be trivial, as in mere smelling or being in the vicinity of the food. The clinical manifestations can vary from a benign respiratory or cutaneous reaction to a systemic one that can be life-threatening. In addition to strict avoidance, such highly-sensitive subjects should carry self-injectable epinephrine and wear MedicAlert® identification. Asthma is a strong predisposing factor and should be well-controlled. It is of great significance that food inhalation can cause de novo sensitization. PMID:19232116

  6. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  7. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Janney, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  8. Depletion of regulatory T cells leads to an exacerbation of delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis in C57BL/6 mice that can be counteracted by IL-17 blockade

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sara Marie; Hoffmann, Ute; Hamann, Alf; Bach, Emil; Danneskiold-Samsøe, Niels Banhos; Kristiansen, Karsten; Serikawa, Kyle; Fox, Brian; Kruse, Kim; Haase, Claus; Skov, Søren; Nansen, Anneline

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rodent models of arthritis have been extensively used in the elucidation of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) pathogenesis and are instrumental in the development of therapeutic strategies. Here we utilise delayed-type hypersensitivity arthritis (DTHA), a model in C57BL/6 mice affecting one paw with synchronised onset, 100% penetrance and low variation. We investigate the role of regulatory T cells (Tregs) in DTHA through selective depletion of Tregs and the role of IL-17 in connection with Treg depletion. Given the relevance of Tregs in RA, and the possibility of developing Treg-directed therapies, this approach could be relevant for advancing the understanding of Tregs in inflammatory arthritis. Selective depletion of Tregs was achieved using a Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse, which expresses the diphtheria toxin receptor (DTR) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) under control of the Foxp3 gene. Anti-IL-17 monoclonal antibody (mAb) was used for IL-17 blockade. Numbers and activation of Tregs increased in the paw and its draining lymph node in DTHA, and depletion of Tregs resulted in exacerbation of disease as shown by increased paw swelling, increased infiltration of inflammatory cells, increased bone remodelling and increased production of inflammatory mediators, as well as increased production of anti-citrullinated protein antibodies. Anti-IL-17 mAb treatment demonstrated that IL-17 is important for disease severity in both the presence and absence of Tregs, and that IL-17 blockade is able to rescue mice from the exacerbated disease caused by Treg depletion and caused a reduction in RANKL, IL-6 and the number of neutrophils. We show that Tregs are important for the containment of inflammation and bone remodelling in DTHA. To our knowledge, this is the first study using the Foxp3-DTR-eGFP mouse on a C57BL/6 background for Treg depletion in an arthritis model, and we here demonstrate the usefulness of the approach to study the role of Tregs and IL-17 in arthritis

  9. Sulfite hypersensitivity. A critical review

    SciTech Connect

    Gunnison, A.F.; Jacobsen, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    Sulfiting agents (sulfur dioxide and the sodium and potassium salts of bisulfite, sulfite, and metabisulfite) are widely used as preservatives in foods, beverages, and pharmaceuticals. Within the past 5 years, there have been numerous reports of adverse reactions to sulfiting agents. This review presents a comprehensive compilation and discussion of reports describing reactions to ingested, inhaled, and parenterally administered sulfite. Sulfite hypersensitivity is usually, but not exclusively, found within the chronic asthmatic population. Although there is some disagreement on its prevalence, a number of studies have indicated that 5 to 10% of all chronic asthmatics are sulfite hypersensitive. This review also describes respiratory sulfur dioxide sensitivity which essentially all asthmatics experience. Possible mechanisms of sulfite hypersensitivity and sulfur dioxide sensitivity are discussed in detail. Sulfite metabolism and the role of sulfite oxidase in the detoxification of exogenous sulfite are reviewed in relationship to the etiology of sulfite hypersensitivity. 147 references.

  10. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nageswari, K S; Sarma, K R; Rajvanshi, V S; Sharan, R; Sharma, M; Barathwal, V; Singh, V

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoic chambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months (P less than 0.01, delta % 21.5%) and during follow-up (P less than 0.01, delta % 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (delta mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (delta % +12.4 vs. +7.54). The animals were sacrificed and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1743776

  11. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  12. Angiotensin II receptor type 2 activation is required for cutaneous sensory hyperinnervation and hypersensitivity in a rat hind paw model of inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Liao, Zhaohui; Smith, Peter G.

    2014-01-01

    Many pain syndromes are associated with abnormal proliferation of peripheral sensory fibers. We showed previously that angiotensin II, acting through its type 2 receptor (AT2), stimulates axon outgrowth by cultured dorsal root ganglion neurons. In this study, we assessed whether AT2 mediates nociceptor hyperinnervation in the rodent hind paw model of inflammatory pain. Plantar injection of complete Freund’s adjuvant (CFA), but not saline, produced marked thermal and mechanical hypersensitivity through 7 days. This was accompanied by proliferation of dermal and epidermal PGP9.5- and calcitonin gene-related peptide-immunoreactive (CGRP-ir) axons, and dermal axons immunoreactive for GFRα2 but not tyrosine hydroxylase or neurofilament H. Continuous infusion of the AT2 antagonist PD123319 beginning with CFA injection completely prevented hyperinnervation as well as hypersensitivity over a 7 day period. A single PD123319 injection 7 days after CFA also reversed thermal hypersensitivity and partially reversed mechanical hypersensitivity 3 hours later, without affecting cutaneous innervation. Angiotensin II synthesizing proteins renin and angiotensinogen were largely absent after saline but abundant in T-cells and macrophages in CFA-injected paws with or without PD123319. Thus, emigrant cells at the site of inflammation apparently establish a renin-angiotensin system, and AT2 activation elicits nociceptor sprouting and heightened thermal and mechanical sensitivity. Perspective Short-term AT2 activation is a potent contributor to thermal hypersensitivity, while long-term effects (such as hyperinnervation) also contribute to mechanical hypersensitivity. Pharmacological blockade of AT2 signaling represents a potential therapeutic strategy aimed at biological mechanisms underlying chronic inflammatory pain. PMID:23726047

  13. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  14. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  15. Vitamin D Deficiency Promotes Skeletal Muscle Hypersensitivity and Sensory Hyperinnervation

    PubMed Central

    Tague, Sarah E.; Clarke, Gwenaëlle L.; Winter, Michelle K.; McCarson, Kenneth E.; Wright, Douglas E.; Smith, Peter G.

    2012-01-01

    Musculoskeletal pain affects nearly half of all adults, most of whom are vitamin D deficient. Previous findings demonstrated that putative nociceptors (“pain-sensing” nerves) express vitamin D receptors (VDRs), suggesting responsiveness to 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. In the present study, rats receiving vitamin D-deficient diets for 2– 4 weeks showed mechanical deep muscle hypersensitivity, but not cutaneous hypersensitivity. Muscle hypersensitivity was accompanied by balance deficits and occurred before onset of overt muscle or bone pathology. Hypersensitivity was not due to hypocalcemia and was actually accelerated by increased dietary calcium. Morphometry of skeletal muscle innervation showed increased numbers of presumptive nociceptor axons (peripherin-positive axons containing calcitonin gene-related peptide), without changes in sympathetic or skeletal muscle motor innervation. Similarly, there was no change in epidermal innervation. In culture, sensory neurons displayed enriched VDR expression in growth cones, and sprouting was regulated by VDR-mediated rapid response signaling pathways, while sympathetic outgrowth was not affected by different concentrations of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. These findings indicate that vitamin D deficiency can lead to selective alterations in target innervation, resulting in presumptive nociceptor hyperinnervation of skeletal muscle, which in turn is likely to contribute to muscular hypersensitivity and pain. PMID:21957236

  16. Senescence and programmed cell death in plants: polyamine action mediated by transglutaminase

    PubMed Central

    Del Duca, Stefano; Serafini-Fracassini, Donatella; Cai, Giampiero

    2014-01-01

    Research on polyamines (PAs) in plants laps a long way of about 50 years and many roles have been discovered for these aliphatic cations. PAs regulate cell division, differentiation, organogenesis, reproduction, dormancy-break and senescence, homeostatic adjustments in response to external stimuli and stresses. Nevertheless, the molecular mechanisms of their multiple activities are still matter of research. PAs are present in free and bound forms and interact with several important cell molecules; some of these interactions may occur by covalent linkages catalyzed by transglutaminase (TGase), giving rise to “cationization” or cross-links among specific proteins. Senescence and programmed cell death (PCD) can be delayed by PAs; in order to re-interpret some of these effects and to obtain new insights into their molecular mechanisms, their conjugation has been revised here. The TGase-mediated interactions between proteins and PAs are the main target of this review. After an introduction on the characteristics of this enzyme, on its catalysis and role in PCD in animals, the plant senescence and PCD models in which TGase has been studied, are presented: the corolla of naturally senescing or excised flowers, the leaves senescing, either excised or not, the pollen during self-incompatible pollination, the hypersensitive response and the tuber storage parenchyma during dormancy release. In all the models examined, TGase appears to be involved by a similar molecular mechanism as described during apoptosis in animal cells, even though several substrates are different. Its effect is probably related to the type of PCD, but mostly to the substrate to be modified in order to achieve the specific PCD program. As a cross-linker of PAs and proteins, TGase is an important factor involved in multiple, sometimes controversial, roles of PAs during senescence and PCD. PMID:24778637

  17. Epidermal NLRP10 contributes to contact hypersensitivity responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Damm, Anna; Giebeler, Nives; Zamek, Jan; Zigrino, Paola; Kufer, Thomas A

    2016-08-01

    The nucleotide binding and oligomerization domain-like receptor (NLR) protein NLRP10 is highly expressed in the epidermis and contributes to cell-autonomous responses against invasive bacteria. To investigate the role of NLRP10 in inflammatory responses of the skin we analyzed the effect of full-body and keratinocyte-specific depletion of NLRP10 in croton oil-induced irritant contact dermatitis (ICD) and 1-fluoro-2,4-dinitrobenzene (DNFB)-induced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) in mice. Nlrp10(-/-) mice were phenotypically normal and skin repair after wounding was not affected by lack of NLRP10. Similarly, we did not detect a contribution of NLRP10 to the ICD response induced by croton oil. In contrast, Nlrp10(-/-) mice showed significantly reduced inflammation in the DNFB-induced CHS response as compared to control animals. Microscopic analysis revealed significantly reduced numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the infiltrates of animals lacking NLRP10 expression after CHS challenge. Epidermis-specific deletion of Nlrp10 by keratin-14 promotor driven Cre-recombinase was sufficient to account for this phenotype, although lymphocyte recruitment seemed to be unaltered in animals lacking NLRP10 expression in keratinocytes. Taken together, we provide evidence that NLRP10 contributes to T-cell-mediated inflammatory responses in the skin and highlight a physiological role of NLRP10 in epidermal keratinocytes. PMID:27221772

  18. Equine insect bite hypersensitivity: what do we know?

    PubMed

    Schaffartzik, A; Hamza, E; Janda, J; Crameri, R; Marti, E; Rhyner, C

    2012-06-30

    Insect bite hypersensitivity (IBH) is an allergic dermatitis of the horse caused by bites of insects of the genus Culicoides and is currently the best characterized allergic disease of horses. This article reviews knowledge of the immunopathogenesis of IBH, with a particular focus on the causative allergens. Whereas so far hardly any research has been done on the role of antigen presenting cells in the pathogenesis of IBH, recent studies suggest that IBH is characterized by an imbalance between a T helper 2 (Th2) and regulatory T cell (T(reg)) immune response, as shown both locally in the skin and with stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Various studies have shown IBH to be associated with IgE-mediated reactions against salivary antigens from Culicoides spp. However, until recently, the causative allergens had not been characterized at the molecular level. A major advance has now been made, as 11 Culicoides salivary gland proteins have been identified as relevant allergens for IBH. Currently, there is no satisfactory treatment of IBH. Characterization of the main allergens for IBH and understanding what mechanisms induce a healthy or allergic immune response towards these allergens may help to develop new treatment strategies, such as immunotherapy. PMID:22575371

  19. Structural Basis of Chronic Beryllium Disease: Linking Allergic Hypersensitivity and Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Clayton, Gina M.; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T.; Kieft, Jeffrey S.; Falta, Michael T.; Bowerman, Natalie A.; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P.; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY T cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. We show here that the T cell ligand is created when a Be2+ cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be2+ itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be2+ and an accompanying Na+ cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of pre-existing self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:24995984

  20. Structural basis of chronic beryllium disease: linking allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Clayton, Gina M; Wang, Yang; Crawford, Frances; Novikov, Andrey; Wimberly, Brian T; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Falta, Michael T; Bowerman, Natalie A; Marrack, Philippa; Fontenot, Andrew P; Dai, Shaodong; Kappler, John W

    2014-07-01

    T-cell-mediated hypersensitivity to metal cations is common in humans. How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) recognizes these cations bound to a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) protein and self-peptide is unknown. Individuals carrying the MHCII allele, HLA-DP2, are at risk for chronic beryllium disease (CBD), a debilitating inflammatory lung condition caused by the reaction of CD4 T cells to inhaled beryllium. Here, we show that the T cell ligand is created when a Be(2+) cation becomes buried in an HLA-DP2/peptide complex, where it is coordinated by both MHC and peptide acidic amino acids. Surprisingly, the TCR does not interact with the Be(2+) itself, but rather with surface changes induced by the firmly bound Be(2+) and an accompanying Na(+) cation. Thus, CBD, by creating a new antigen by indirectly modifying the structure of preexisting self MHC-peptide complex, lies on the border between allergic hypersensitivity and autoimmunity. PMID:24995984

  1. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis: an EAACI position paper.

    PubMed

    Quirce, S; Vandenplas, O; Campo, P; Cruz, M J; de Blay, F; Koschel, D; Moscato, G; Pala, G; Raulf, M; Sastre, J; Siracusa, A; Tarlo, S M; Walusiak-Skorupa, J; Cormier, Y

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this document was to provide a critical review of the current knowledge on hypersensitivity pneumonitis caused by the occupational environment and to propose practical guidance for the diagnosis and management of this condition. Occupational hypersensitivity pneumonitis (OHP) is an immunologic lung disease resulting from lymphocytic and frequently granulomatous inflammation of the peripheral airways, alveoli, and surrounding interstitial tissue which develops as the result of a non-IgE-mediated allergic reaction to a variety of organic materials or low molecular weight agents that are present in the workplace. The offending agents can be classified into six broad categories that include bacteria, fungi, animal proteins, plant proteins, low molecular weight chemicals, and metals. The diagnosis of OHP requires a multidisciplinary approach and relies on a combination of diagnostic tests to ascertain the work relatedness of the disease. Both the clinical and the occupational history are keys to the diagnosis and often will lead to the initial suspicion. Diagnostic criteria adapted to OHP are proposed. The cornerstone of treatment is early removal from exposure to the eliciting antigen, although the disease may show an adverse outcome even after avoidance of exposure to the causal agent. PMID:26913451

  2. CD13 mediates phagocytosis in human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Licona-Limón, Ileana; Garay-Canales, Claudia A; Muñoz-Paleta, Ofelia; Ortega, Enrique

    2015-07-01

    CD13 is a membrane-bound ectopeptidase, highly expressed on monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. CD13 is involved in diverse functions, including degradation of peptide mediators, cellular adhesion, migration, viral endocytosis, signaling, and positive modulation of phagocytosis mediated by FcγRs and other phagocytic receptors. In this work, we explored whether besides acting as an accessory receptor, CD13 by itself is a primary phagocytic receptor. We found that hCD13 mediates efficient phagocytosis of large particles (erythrocytes) modified so as to interact with the cell only through CD13 in human macrophages and THP-1 monocytic cells. The extent of this phagocytosis is comparable with the phagocytosis mediated through the canonical phagocytic receptor FcγRI. Furthermore, we demonstrated that hCD13 expression in the nonphagocytic cell line HEK293 is sufficient to enable these cells to internalize particles bound through hCD13. CD13-mediated phagocytosis is independent of other phagocytic receptors, as it occurs in the absence of FcγRs, CR3, and most phagocytic receptors. Phagocytosis through CD13 is independent of its enzymatic activity but is dependent on actin rearrangement and activation of PI3K and is partially dependent on Syk activation. Moreover, the cross-linking of CD13 with antibodies rapidly induced pSyk in human macrophages. Finally, we observed that antibody-mediated cross-linking of hCD13, expressed in the murine macrophage-like J774 cell line, induces production of ROS. These results demonstrate that CD13 is a fully competent phagocytic receptor capable of mediating internalization of large particles. PMID:25934926

  3. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin

    PubMed Central

    Indu, T. H.; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-01-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  4. Hypersensitivity reaction associated with phenytoin.

    PubMed

    Indu, T H; Basutkar, Roopa Satyanarayan

    2015-09-01

    Hypersensitivity reactions with antiepileptic drugs (AEDs) are generally associated with aromatic AEDs. We present a case of hypersensitivity reactions followed by administration of phenytoin with diazepam and ranitidine in a patient with generalized tonic-clonic seizures. Antigen-antibody reactions or decreased levels of epoxide hydrolase are well known with phenytoin. Increased level of serum phenytoin causing toxicities due to competitive inhibition with diazepam on co-administration was also reported in the literature. Prevention of the adverse effects with AEDs is a multi-stage process, which requires implementation of preventive measures through careful monitoring and prompts interventions. PMID:26692739

  5. Studies on the mechanism of systemic suppression of contact hypersensitivity by UVB radiation. II. Differences in the suppression of delayed and contact hypersensitivity in mice.

    PubMed

    Kripke, M L; Morison, W L

    1986-05-01

    Exposing mice to UV radiation in the UVB range (280-320 nm) causes a selective immune suppression that contributes to the development of UVB-induced skin cancers. Among the immune responses suppressed by UVB irradiation are contact and delayed hypersensitivity reactions to haptens administered at unexposed sites. In these studies we provide evidence that delayed and contact hypersensitivity to the same hapten are not equivalent reactions and that they are suppressed in UVB-irradiated mice by 2 different mechanisms. This conclusion is based on the findings that: suppression of contact hypersensitivity could not be overcome by immunizing UVB-irradiated mice with hapten-coupled antigen-presenting cells derived from normal donors; and treatment of UVB-irradiated mice with methylprednisolone before immunization prevented the suppression of delayed hypersensitivity but had no effect on the suppression of contact hypersensitivity. The decreased ability to induce contact hypersensitivity in UVB-irradiated mice could be transferred to x-irradiated mice by reconstituting them with spleen cells from UVB-irradiated donors. The induction of hapten-specific suppressor cells, however, required both UVB irradiation and priming with hapten. Based on these results, we postulate that UVB irradiation induces a population of suppressor-inducer cells with specificity for a modified skin antigen and that this antigen serves as a carrier molecule for haptens that induce contact hypersensitivity and for tumor-specific transplantation antigens on UVB-induced tumors. PMID:3745963

  6. The Late Endosomal Adaptor Molecule p14 (LAMTOR2) Regulates TGFβ1-Mediated Homeostasis of Langerhans Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sparber, Florian; Tripp, Christoph H.; Komenda, Kerstin; Scheffler, Julia M.; Clausen, Björn E.; Huber, Lukas A.; Romani, Nikolaus; Stoitzner, Patrizia

    2014-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs), a sub-population of dendritic cells (DCs) in the skin, participate in the regulation of immunity and peripheral tolerance. The adaptor molecule p14 is part of the late endosomal/lysosomal adaptor and mitogen-activated protein kinase and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) activator/regulator (LAMTOR) complex, which mediates the activation of lysosome-associated extracellular signaling-regulated kinase (ERK) and the mTOR cascade. In previous work, we demonstrated that CD11c-specific deficiency of p14 disrupts LC homeostasis by affecting the LAMTOR-mediated ERK and mTOR signaling. In this study, we extended our analysis on p14 deficiency specifically in LCs. Langerin-specific ablation of p14 caused a complete loss of LCs, accompanied by an increased maturational phenotype of LCs. The absence of LCs in p14-deficient mice reduced contact hypersensitivity (CHS) responses to the contact sensitizer trinitrochlorobenzene. Analysis using bone marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) revealed that p14 deficiency in DCs/LCs interfered with the LC-relevant transforming growth factor β1 (TGFβ1) pathway, by lowering TGFβ receptor II expression on BMDCs and LCs, as well as surface binding of TGFβ1 on BMDCs. We conclude that p14 deficiency affects TGFβ1 sensitivity of LCs, which is mandatory for their homeostasis and subsequently for their immunological function during CHS. PMID:25078666

  7. Optically absorbing nanoparticle mediated cell membrane permeabilization.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Mehta, Smit; Viator, John

    2012-11-01

    Membrane permeabilization is imperative for gene and drug delivery systems, along with other cell manipulation methods, since the average eukaryotic cell membrane is not permeable to polar and large nonpolar molecules. Antibody conjugated optically absorbing gold nanospheres are targeted to the cell membrane of T47D breast cancer cell line and irradiated with 5 ns pulse, 20 Hz, 532 nm light to increase membrane permeability. Up to 90% permeabilization with less than 6% death is reported at radiant exposures up to 10 times lower than those of other comparable studies. PMID:23114334

  8. Dye-mediated photosensitization of murine neuroblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sieber, F.; Sieber-Blum, M.

    1986-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if photosensitization mediated by the fluorescent dye, merocyanine 540, could be used to preferentially kill murine neuroblastoma cells in simulated autologous remission marrow grafts. Simultaneous exposure of Neuro 2a or NB41A3 neuroblastoma cells to merocyanine 540 and white light reduced the concentration of in vitro-clonogenic tumor cells 50,000-fold. By contrast, the same treatment had little effect on the graft's ability to rescue lethally irradiated syngeneic hosts. Lethally irradiated C57BL/6J X A/J F1 mice transplanted with photosensitized mixtures of neuroblastoma cells and normal marrow cells (1:100 or 1:10) survived without developing neuroblastomas. It is conceivable that merocyanine 540-mediated photosensitization will prove useful for the extracorporeal purging of residual neuroblastoma cells from human autologous remission marrow grafts.

  9. Regulation of cell proliferation and apoptosis by bioactive lipid mediators.

    PubMed

    Clària, Joan

    2006-11-01

    Bioactive lipid mediators are increasingly being recognized as important endogenous regulators of cell activation, signaling, apoptosis and proliferation. Most of these lipid mediators are originated from cleavage of constituents of cellular membranes under the activity of phospholipases and sphingomyelinases. One of the major cascades of bioactive lipid mediator production involves the release of arachidonic acid from membrane phospholipids followed by the formation of eicosanoids (i.e. prostaglandins, leukotrienes and lipoxins). These biologically active metabolites of arachidonic acid are emerging as key regulators of cell proliferation and neo-angiogenesis and agents that specifically target these lipid mediators are being investigated as potential anticancer drugs. On the other hand, the lysophospholipid family, which includes members of the sphingomyelin-ceramide-sphingosine-1-phosphate and lysophosphatidic acid subfamilies, has evolved as an important group of lipid signaling molecules implicated in cellular differentiation, cell growth and apoptosis. This article reviews the most recent patents in this field of research, covering the following strategies based on the modulation of bioactive lipid mediators: (1) prostaglandin H synthase-2 inhibitors, (2) lipoxin analogs and aspirin-triggered lipid mediators, and (3) lysophosphatidic acid and other lysophospholipids. PMID:18221047

  10. LLLT in treating dentinary hypersensitivity: new concepts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brugnera, Aldo, Jr.; Zanin, Fatima; Ladalardo, Thereza C.; Pinheiro, Antonio; Pecora, Jesus D.

    2006-02-01

    Dental hypersensitivity has been studied for several years and it is reported as a strikingly painful condition originating from the exposition of dentinal tubuli . The exposed area is subjected to several kinds of stimuli, resulting in a rapid sharp acute pain. LLLT has been shown to have antiinflammatory, analgesic and cellular effects in both hyperemia and inflammation of the dental pulp. Our previous histological study showed that irradiated animals presented an increased production of dentine and shutting of dentinal tubuli. On the other hand, non-irradiated subjects still showed signals of intense inflammatory reaction and even necrosis at the same experimental times. Irradiated teeth did not show cell degeneration. The LLLT was shown to be efficient in the stimulation of odontoblast cells, producing reparative dentin and closing dentin tubuli. Our clinical studies with 660nm, 790nm and 830nm diode laser, and the total dose per tooth of 4J/cm was shown effective in treating dentinal hypersensitivity as it quickly reduces pain and maintains a prolonged painless status in 91.27 % to 97% of the cases. In a recent study our team observed that significant levels of dentinal desensitization were only found in patients belonging to the 25-35 age group. In conclusion, the results demonstrated indeed that LLLT, when based on the use of correct irradiations parameters is effective in treating hypersensitivity, but the age of patients is one of the factors that may alter the success of treatment due to dentinal sclerosis, which makes the penetration of light more difficult.

  11. Cytoskeleton mediated spreading dynamics of immune cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hui, King-Lam; Wayt, Jessica; Grooman, Brian; Upadhyaya, Arpita

    2009-03-01

    We have studied the spreading of Jurkat T-cells on anti-CD3 antibody-coated substrates as a model of immune synapse formation. Cell adhesion area versus time was measured via interference reflection contrast microscopy. We found that the spread area exhibited a sigmoidal growth as a function of time in contrast to the previously proposed universal power-law growth for spreading cells. We used high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy of these cells transfected with GFP-actin to study cytoskeletal dynamics during the spreading process. Actin filaments spontaneously organized into a variety of structures including traveling waves, target patterns, and mobile clusters emanating from an organizing center. We quantify these dynamic structures and relate them to the spreading rates. We propose that the spreading kinetics are determined by active rearrangements of the cytoskeleton initiated by signaling events upon antibody binding by T-cell receptors. Membrane deformations induced by such wavelike organization of the cytoskeleton may be a general phenomenon that underlies cell movement and cell-substrate interactions.

  12. Ion mediated targeting of cells with nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maheshwari, Vivek; Fu, Jinlong

    2010-03-01

    In eukaryotic cells, Ca^2+ ions are necessary for intracellular signaling, in activity of mitochondria and a variety of other cellular process that have been linked to cell apoptosis, proteins synthesis and cell-cycle regulation. Here we show that Ca^2+ ions, serving as the bio-compatible interface can be used to target Saccharomyces cerevisiae (SaC, baker's yeast), a model eukaryotic cell, with Au nanoparticles (10 nm). The Ca^2+ ions bind to the carboxylic acid groups in the citrate functionalized Au nanoparticles. This transforms the nanoparticles into micron long 1-D branched chain assemblies due to inter-particle dipole-dipole interaction and inter-particle bonding due to the divalent nature of the Ca^2+ ion. A similar transformation is observed with the use of divalent ions Mg^2+, Cd^2+ and Fe^2+. The 1-D assembly aids the interfacing of ion-nanoparticles on the cell by providing multiple contact points. Further monovalent ions such as Na^+ are also effective for the targeting of the cell with nanoparticles. However Na-Au nanoparticles are limited in their deposition as they exist in solution as single particles. The cells remain alive after the deposition process and their vitality is unaffected by the interfacing with ion-nanoparticles.

  13. Hypersensitivity pneumonitis in a high school teacher.

    PubMed

    Moniodis, A; Hamilton, T; Racila, E; Cockrill, B; McCunney, R

    2015-10-01

    Hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) is an inflammatory lung disease mediated by an immunological response to an inhaled antigen. Outbreaks of HP have been reported in industrial settings where manufacturing workers are exposed to water-based metalworking fluids (MWFs). Water-based MWFs promote growth of microorganisms and can be easily aerosolized and are thus potential aetiological agents of HP. We present a case of HP caused by exposure to water-based MWF in a vocational high school teacher. Culture of MWF used at his school grew Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes. This is the first known report of MWF-induced HP outside an industrial setting. The growth of Pseudomonas spp in this case recalls the earliest reports of the microbiology of MWF-induced HP and suggests that routine bacterial culture may be useful in the diagnosis of HP in workplaces without standard cleaning and biocide regulations. PMID:26136595

  14. Sphingolipid mediators in cardiovascular cell biology and pathology.

    PubMed

    Levade, T; Augé, N; Veldman, R J; Cuvillier, O; Nègre-Salvayre, A; Salvayre, R

    2001-11-23

    Sphingolipids have emerged as a new class of lipid mediators. In response to various extracellular stimuli, sphingolipid turnover can be stimulated in vascular cells and cardiac myocytes. Subsequent generation of sphingolipid molecules such as ceramide, sphingosine, and sphingosine-1-phosphate, is followed by regulation of ion fluxes and activation of various signaling pathways leading to smooth muscle cell proliferation, endothelial cell differentiation or apoptotic cell death, cell contraction, retraction, or migration. The importance of sphingolipids in cardiovascular signaling is illustrated by recent observations implicating them in physiological processes such as vasculogenesis as well as in frequent pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis and its complications. PMID:11717151

  15. SUMOylation-mediated regulation of cell cycle progression and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eifler, Karolin; Vertegaal, Alfred C.O.

    2016-01-01

    SUMOylation plays critical roles during cell cycle progression. Many important cell cycle regulators, including many oncogenes and tumor suppressors, are functionally regulated via SUMOylation. The dynamic SUMOylation pattern observed throughout the cell cycle is ensured via distinct spatial and temporal regulation of the SUMO machinery. Additionally, SUMOylation cooperates with other post-translational modifications to mediate cell cycle progression. Deregulation of these SUMOylation and deSUMOylation enzymes causes severe defects in cell proliferation and genome stability. Different types of cancers were recently shown to be dependent on a functioning SUMOylation system, a finding that could potentially be exploited in anti-cancer therapies. PMID:26601932

  16. Effect of Premedications in a Murine Model of Asparaginase Hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Christian A.; Smith, Colton; Karol, Seth E.; Ramsey, Laura B.; Liu, Chengcheng; Pui, Ching-Hon; Jeha, Sima; Evans, William E.; Finkelman, Fred D.

    2015-01-01

    A murine model was developed that recapitulates key features of clinical hypersensitivity to Escherichia coli asparaginase. Sensitized mice developed high levels of anti-asparaginase IgG antibodies and had immediate hypersensitivity reactions to asparaginase upon challenge. Sensitized mice had complete inhibition of plasma asparaginase activity (P = 4.2 × 10−13) and elevated levels of mouse mast cell protease 1 (P = 6.1 × 10−3) compared with nonsensitized mice. We investigated the influence of pretreatment with triprolidine, cimetidine, the platelet activating factor (PAF) receptor antagonist CV-6209 [2-(2-acetyl-6-methoxy-3,9-dioxo-4,8-dioxa-2,10-diazaoctacos-1-yl)-1-ethyl-pyridinium chloride], or dexamethasone on the severity of asparaginase-induced allergies. Combining triprolidine and CV-6209 was best for mitigating asparaginase-induced hypersensitivity compared with nonpretreated, sensitized mice (P = 1.2 × 10−5). However, pretreatment with oral dexamethasone was the only agent capable of mitigating the severity of the hypersensitivity (P = 0.03) and partially restoring asparaginase activity (P = 8.3 × 10−4). To rescue asparaginase activity in sensitized mice without requiring dexamethasone, a 5-fold greater dose of asparaginase was needed to restore enzyme activity to a similar concentration as in nonsensitized mice. Our results suggest a role of histamine and PAF in asparaginase-induced allergies and indicate that mast cell–derived proteases released during asparaginase allergy may be a useful marker of clinical hypersensitivity. PMID:25573198

  17. Mast cells mediate malignant pleural effusion formation

    PubMed Central

    Giannou, Anastasios D.; Marazioti, Antonia; Spella, Magda; Kanellakis, Nikolaos I.; Apostolopoulou, Hara; Psallidas, Ioannis; Prijovich, Zeljko M.; Vreka, Malamati; Zazara, Dimitra E.; Lilis, Ioannis; Papaleonidopoulos, Vassilios; Kairi, Chrysoula A.; Patmanidi, Alexandra L.; Giopanou, Ioanna; Spiropoulou, Nikolitsa; Harokopos, Vaggelis; Aidinis, Vassilis; Spyratos, Dionisios; Teliousi, Stamatia; Papadaki, Helen; Taraviras, Stavros; Snyder, Linda A.; Eickelberg, Oliver; Kardamakis, Dimitrios; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Feyerabend, Thorsten B.; Rodewald, Hans-Reimer; Kalomenidis, Ioannis; Blackwell, Timothy S.; Agalioti, Theodora; Stathopoulos, Georgios T.

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) have been identified in various tumors; however, the role of these cells in tumorigenesis remains controversial. Here, we quantified MCs in human and murine malignant pleural effusions (MPEs) and evaluated the fate and function of these cells in MPE development. Evaluation of murine MPE-competent lung and colon adenocarcinomas revealed that these tumors actively attract and subsequently degranulate MCs in the pleural space by elaborating CCL2 and osteopontin. MCs were required for effusion development, as MPEs did not form in mice lacking MCs, and pleural infusion of MCs with MPE-incompetent cells promoted MPE formation. Once homed to the pleural space, MCs released tryptase AB1 and IL-1β, which in turn induced pleural vasculature leakiness and triggered NF-κB activation in pleural tumor cells, thereby fostering pleural fluid accumulation and tumor growth. Evaluation of human effusions revealed that MCs are elevated in MPEs compared with benign effusions. Moreover, MC abundance correlated with MPE formation in a human cancer cell–induced effusion model. Treatment of mice with the c-KIT inhibitor imatinib mesylate limited effusion precipitation by mouse and human adenocarcinoma cells. Together, the results of this study indicate that MCs are required for MPE formation and suggest that MC-dependent effusion formation is therapeutically addressable. PMID:25915587

  18. Epithelial cell adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) modulates cell-cell interactions mediated by classic cadherins.

    PubMed

    Litvinov, S V; Balzar, M; Winter, M J; Bakker, H A; Briaire-de Bruijn, I H; Prins, F; Fleuren, G J; Warnaar, S O

    1997-12-01

    The contribution of noncadherin-type, Ca2+-independent cell-cell adhesion molecules to the organization of epithelial tissues is, as yet, unclear. A homophilic, epithelial Ca2+-independent adhesion molecule (Ep-CAM) is expressed in most epithelia, benign or malignant proliferative lesions, or during embryogenesis. Here we demonstrate that ectopic Ep-CAM, when expressed in cells interconnected by classic cadherins (E- or N-cadherin), induces segregation of the transfectants from the parental cell type in coaggregation assays and in cultured mixed aggregates, respectively. In the latter assay, Ep-CAM-positive transfectants behave like cells with a decreased strength of cell-cell adhesion as compared to the parental cells. Using transfectants with an inducible Ep-CAM-cDNA construct, we demonstrate that increasing expression of Ep-CAM in cadherin-positive cells leads to the gradual abrogation of adherens junctions. Overexpression of Ep-CAM has no influence on the total amount of cellular cadherin, but affects the interaction of cadherins with the cytoskeleton since a substantial decrease in the detergent-insoluble fraction of cadherin molecules was observed. Similarly, the detergent-insoluble fractions of alpha- and beta-catenins decreased in cells overexpressing Ep-CAM. While the total beta-catenin content remains unchanged, a reduction in total cellular alpha-catenin is observed as Ep-CAM expression increases. As the cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions diminish, Ep-CAM-mediated intercellular connections become predominant. An adhesion-defective mutant of Ep-CAM lacking the cytoplasmic domain has no effect on the cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions. The ability of Ep-CAM to modulate the cadherin-mediated cell-cell interactions, as demonstrated in the present study, suggests a role for this molecule in development of the proliferative, and probably malignant, phenotype of epithelial cells, since an increase of Ep-CAM expression was observed in vivo in association

  19. Acquired cancer stem cell phenotypes through Oct4-mediated dedifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Suresh M.; Liu, Shujing; Lu, Hezhe; Zhang, Hongtao; Zhang, Paul J.; Gimotty, Phyllis A.; Guerra, Matthew; Guo, Wei; Xu, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    There is enormous interest to target cancer stem cells (CSCs) for clinical treatment because these cells are highly tumorigenic and resistant to chemotherapy. Oct4 is expressed by CSC-like cells in different types of cancer. However, function of Oct4 in tumor cells is unclear. In this study, we showed that expression of Oct4 gene or transmembrane delivery of Oct4 protein promoted dedifferentiation of melanoma cells to CSC-like cells. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells showed significantly decreased expression of melanocytic markers and acquired the ability to form tumor spheroids. They showed markedly increased resistance to chemotherapeutic agents and hypoxic injury. In the subcutaneous xenograft and tail vein injection assays, these cells had significantly increased tumorigenic capacity. The dedifferentiated melanoma cells acquired features associated with CSCs such as multipotent differentiation capacity and expression of melanoma CSC markers such as ABCB5 and CD271. Mechanistically, Oct4 induced dedifferentiation was associated with increased expression of endogenous Oct4, Nanog and Klf4, and global gene expression changes that enriched for transcription factors. RNAi mediated knockdown of Oct4 in dedifferentiated cells led to diminished CSC phenotypes. Oct4 expression in melanoma was regulated by hypoxia and its expression was detected in a subpopulation of melanoma cells in clinical samples. Our data indicate that Oct4 is a positive regulator of tumor dedifferentiation. The results suggest that CSC phenotype is dynamic and may be acquired through dedifferentiation. Oct4 mediated tumor cell dedifferentiation may play an important role during tumor progression. PMID:22286766

  20. Hypersensitivity reactions to radiocontrast media: the role of complement activation.

    PubMed

    Szebeni, Janos

    2004-01-01

    Although intravenous use of radiocontrast media (RCM) for a variety of radiographic procedures is generally safe, clinically significant acute hypersensitivity reactions still occur in a significant percentage of patients. The mechanism of these anaphylactoid, or "pseudoallergic," reactions is complex, involving complement activation, direct degranulation of mast cells and basophils, and modulation of enzymes and proteolytic cascades in plasma. In this review, basic information on different RCMs and their reactogenicity is summarized and updated, and the prevalence, pathomechanism, prediction, prevention, treatment, and economic impact of hypersensitivity reactions are discussed. Particular attention is paid to the in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting complement activation as an underlying cause of RCM reactions. PMID:14680617

  1. Glioma cell dispersion is driven by α5 integrin-mediated cell-matrix and cell-cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Blandin, Anne-Florence; Noulet, Fanny; Renner, Guillaume; Mercier, Marie-Cécile; Choulier, Laurence; Vauchelles, Romain; Ronde, Philippe; Carreiras, Franck; Etienne-Selloum, Nelly; Vereb, Gyorgy; Lelong-Rebel, Isabelle; Martin, Sophie; Dontenwill, Monique; Lehmann, Maxime

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma multiform (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain tumor. The fibronectin receptor, α5 integrin is a pertinent novel therapeutic target. Despite numerous data showing that α5 integrin support tumor cell migration and invasion, it has been reported that α5 integrin can also limit cell dispersion by increasing cell-cell interaction. In this study, we showed that α5 integrin was involved in cell-cell interaction and gliomasphere formation. α5-mediated cell-cell cohesion limited cell dispersion from spheroids in fibronectin-poor microenvironment. However, in fibronectin-rich microenvironment, α5 integrin promoted cell dispersion. Ligand-occupied α5 integrin and fibronectin were distributed in fibril-like pattern at cell-cell junction of evading cells, forming cell-cell fibrillar adhesions. Activated focal adhesion kinase was not present in these adhesions but was progressively relocalized with α5 integrin as cell migrates away from the spheroids. α5 integrin function in GBM appears to be more complex than previously suspected. As GBM overexpressed fibronectin, it is most likely that in vivo, α5-mediated dissemination from the tumor mass overrides α5-mediated tumor cell cohesion. In this respect, α5-integrin antagonists may be useful to limit GBM invasion in brain parenchyma. PMID:27063097

  2. Chrysin suppresses mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation: Involvement of calcium, caspase-1 and nuclear factor-{kappa}B

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Yunju; Lee, Soyoung; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2011-07-01

    A great number of people are suffering from allergic inflammatory diseases such as asthma, atopic dermatitis, and sinusitis. Therefore discovery of drugs for the treatment of these diseases is an important subject in human health. Chrysin (5,7-dihydroxyflavone) is a natural flavonoid contained in propolis, blue passion flower, and fruits. Several studies reported that chrysin has beneficial effects including anti-tumor and anti-oxidant activities. The aim of the present study was to elucidate whether chrysin modulates the allergic inflammatory reaction and to study its possible mechanisms of action using mast cell-based in vitro and in vivo models. Chrysin inhibited immediate-type systemic hypersensitivity and serum histamine release. Chrysin attenuated immunoglobulin E-mediated local anaphylaxis. These inhibitory effects of chrysin on the systemic and local allergic reaction were more potent than cromolyn, a known anti-allergic drug. Chrysin reduced histamine release from mast cells. The inhibitory effect of chrysin on the histamine release was mediated by the modulation of intracellular calcium. In addition, chrysin decreased gene expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as, tumor necrosis factor-{alpha}, IL (interleukin)-1{beta}, IL-4, and IL-6 in mast cells. The inhibitory effect of chrysin on the pro-inflammatory cytokine was nuclear factor-{kappa}B and caspase-1 dependent. Our findings provide evidence that chrysin inhibits mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions by blocking histamine release and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, and suggest the mechanisms of action. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic inflammatory effect of chrysin suggests a possible therapeutic application of this agent in allergic inflammatory diseases. - Research Highlights: > Discovery of drugs for the allergic inflammation is important in human health. > Chrysin is a natural flavonoid contained in propolis, blue passion flower, and fruits. > Chrysin

  3. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  4. Outer hair cells as potential targets of inflammatory mediators.

    PubMed

    Huang, M; Dulon, D; Schacht, J

    1990-06-01

    Inner ear sequelae with temporary or permanent sensorineural hearing loss can result from inflammatory processes in the middle ear. Loss of outer hair cells in the base of the cochlea has been noted in otitis media, but it is not known how this damage occurs. Evidence supports the permeability of the round window membrane to substances mediating inflammation in the middle ear, and the presence of white blood cells has been reported in the perilymph. In the present study, the potential cytotoxic effects of two representative inflammatory mediators, endotoxin and free radicals, have been evaluated by use of short-term culture of isolated outer hair cells from the guinea pig cochlea model. Incubation with endotoxins from two gram-negative pathogens increased the rate of hair cell death fourfold to sixfold. Free radicals (generated by exposure of cells to UV light or by excitation of intracellular fluorescent dyes) produced morphologic damage to hair cells within 60 seconds. These latter effects were delayed by addition of free-radical scavengers. It is concluded that inflammatory mediators are cytotoxic to hair cells and therefore are potentially ototoxic if permeating the round window membrane. PMID:2112361

  5. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel M; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T S Karin; Simon, M Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-08-16

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm(3)) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1-6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  6. Taxanes enhance trastuzumab-mediated ADCC on tumor cells through NKG2D-mediated NK cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Di Modica, Martina; Sfondrini, Lucia; Regondi, Viola; Varchetta, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia Valeria; Generali, Daniele; Balsari, Andrea; Triulzi, Tiziana; Tagliabue, Elda

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicate a synergistic therapeutic effect between trastuzumab and taxanes in neoadjuvantly treated HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) patients. In HER2+ BC experimental models and patients, we investigated whether this synergy depends on the ability of drug-induced stress to improve NK cell effectiveness and thus trastuzumab-mediated ADCC. HER2+ BC cell lines BT474 and MDAMB361 treated with docetaxel showed up-modulation of NK activator ligands both in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by a 15-40% increase in in vitro trastuzumab-mediated ADCC; antibodies blocking the NKG2D receptor significantly reduced this enhancement. NKG2D receptor expression was increased by docetaxel treatment in circulating and splenic NK cells from mice xenografted with tumor cells, an increase related to expansion of the CD11b+Ly6G+ cell population. Accordingly, NK cells derived from HER2+ BC patients after treatment with taxane-containing therapy expressed higher levels of NKG2D receptor than before treatment. Moreover, plasma obtained from these patients recapitulated the modulation of NKG2D on healthy donors' NK cells, improving their trastuzumab-mediated activity in vitro. This enhancement occurred mainly using plasma from patients with low NKG2D basal expression. Our results indicate that taxanes increase tumor susceptibility to ADCC by acting on tumor and NK cells, and suggest that taxanes concomitantly administered with trastuzumab could maximize the antibody effect, especially in patients with low basal immune effector cytotoxic activity. PMID:26595802

  7. Taxanes enhance trastuzumab-mediated ADCC on tumor cells through NKG2D-mediated NK cell recognition

    PubMed Central

    Regondi, Viola; Varchetta, Stefania; Oliviero, Barbara; Mariani, Gabriella; Bianchi, Giulia Valeria; Generali, Daniele; Balsari, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Recent clinical data indicate a synergistic therapeutic effect between trastuzumab and taxanes in neoadjuvantly treated HER2-positive breast cancer (BC) patients. In HER2+ BC experimental models and patients, we investigated whether this synergy depends on the ability of drug-induced stress to improve NK cell effectiveness and thus trastuzumab-mediated ADCC. HER2+ BC cell lines BT474 and MDAMB361 treated with docetaxel showed up-modulation of NK activator ligands both in vitro and in vivo, accompanied by a 15–40% increase in in vitro trastuzumab-mediated ADCC; antibodies blocking the NKG2D receptor significantly reduced this enhancement. NKG2D receptor expression was increased by docetaxel treatment in circulating and splenic NK cells from mice xenografted with tumor cells, an increase related to expansion of the CD11b+Ly6G+ cell population. Accordingly, NK cells derived from HER2+ BC patients after treatment with taxane-containing therapy expressed higher levels of NKG2D receptor than before treatment. Moreover, plasma obtained from these patients recapitulated the modulation of NKG2D on healthy donors' NK cells, improving their trastuzumab-mediated activity in vitro. This enhancement occurred mainly using plasma from patients with low NKG2D basal expression. Our results indicate that taxanes increase tumor susceptibility to ADCC by acting on tumor and NK cells, and suggest that taxanes concomitantly administered with trastuzumab could maximize the antibody effect, especially in patients with low basal immune effector cytotoxic activity. PMID:26595802

  8. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  9. Mast cell mediators in the blood of patients with asthma.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, S I

    1985-01-01

    Mast cell activation occurs in allergic asthma and may play a role in a variety of nonallergic asthmatic states. The defined mast cell constituent histamine has been identified in blood of antigen-sensitive challenged asthma patients, while other mediators, whose cell of origin is not fully defined, accompany this amine in blood (Table 1). Due to technical difficulty in accurate assessment, the rapid metabolism of various constituents, and the need for biologic rather than chemical assay of some mediators, it is not yet possible to assess blood constituents for the unequivocal attribution of asthma to activation of a particular cell type. Likewise, the usefulness of blood studies in the prediction of the course of asthma or as serial measurements to define the severity of asthma remains limited. However, it is only with analysis of the appropriate biologic fluids, blood and/or bronchoalveolar lavage materials, that it will be possible to define which potential mediators are, in fact, present and active in asthma. Until such analysis is completed, it is not possible to assign a function in this disease to the numerous potent inflammatory mediators known to be active in in vitro or in vivo models of asthma. PMID:3880526

  10. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of lead and cadmium on cell-mediated immunity was studied in peritoneal macrophages, B-, and T-lymphocytes of mice. Lead and cadmium were administered in drinking water for 10 weeks in short-term experiments and up to 18 months to deal with immune responses in aged mic...