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Sample records for cell repair therapy

  1. Allogenic benefit in stem cell therapy: cardiac repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Al-Daccak, R; Charron, D

    2015-09-01

    Stem cell (SC)-based therapies are a developing mean to repair, restore, maintain, or enhance organ functioning through life span. They are in particular a fast track to restore function in failing heart. Various types of SCs have been used in experimental and clinical studies showing the potential of these cells to revolutionize the treatment of heart diseases. Autologous cells have been privileged to overpass immunological barriers. The field has progressed tremendously and the hurdles, which have been largely overlooked in the excitement over the expected benefit the immunogenicity, have been revealed. Also, manufacturing of patient-specific clinical grade SC product, whether adult stem or reprogrammed induced pluripotent SCs, and the availability of these cells in sufficient amounts and status when needed is questionable. In contrast, adult SCs derived from healthy donors, thus allogeneic, have the advantage to be immediately available as an 'off-the-shelf' therapeutic product. The challenge is to overcome the immunological barriers to their transplantation. Recent research provided new insights into the mode of action and immune behavior of SCs in autologous as well as allogeneic settings. Lessons are learned and immune paradigms are changing: allogenicity, if balanced could be part of the dynamic and durable mechanisms that are critical to sustain cardiac regeneration and repair. We discuss the hurdles, lessons, and advances accomplished in the field through the progressive journey of cardiac-derived stem/progenitor cells toward allogeneic cardiac regenerative/reparative therapy. PMID:26206374

  2. [Current cell therapy strategies for repairing the central nervous system].

    PubMed

    Féron, F

    2007-09-01

    One of the chief contemporary goals of neurologists and neuroscientists is to find a way to overcome the debilitating effects of brain diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. Since very few molecules have been found to be efficient in curing the patients and even halting the progression of the symptoms, cell therapy is now seen as an attractive alternative. Two therapeutic strategies are currently under investigation: i) the "substitution" strategy, based on grafts of cells capable of differentiating in the appropriate cells and restoring lost functions and ii) the "neuroprotective" or "conservative" strategy aiming to increase the resistance of spared cells to the toxicity of their environment and to reinforce the body's own mechanisms of healing. Twenty years ago, foetal neuroblasts were the first cells to be transplanted in the brains of patients with Parkinson's or Huntington disease. A phase II clinical trial is presently conducted in France for the latter disorder. However, the numerous ethical and technical issues raised by the use of embryonic and foetal cells have directed the focus of clinicians and researchers towards substitute cell types. In this review, we summarise the main findings of the most recent basic studies and clinical trials based on: i) the grafting of surrogate adult cells such as bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and olfactory ensheathing cells; ii) the potential therapeutic applications of neuropoiesis - the persistent neurogenesis in the brain - as a source for tissue engraftment and as self-repair by a person's own indigenous population of pluripotent cells and iii) immune-based therapy (autologous activated macrophages and T cell vaccination) as well as administration of immunomodulatory molecules. Unexpectedly, it has been found that undifferentiated adult stem cells can display immune-like functions when they home in on an inflamed brain area while immune cells and immunosuppressors can improve functional and

  3. Stem cell-based therapy in neural repair.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Chen, Su-Liang; Wang, Dan-Yen; Chiu, Ing-Ming

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapy could aid in alleviating symptoms or even reversing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases and nerve injuries. Fibroblast growth factor 1 (FGF1) has been shown to maintain the survival of neurons and induce neurite outgrowth. Accumulating evidence suggests that combination of FGF1 and cell-based therapy is promising for future therapeutic application. Neural stem cells (NSCs), with the characteristics of self-renewal and multipotency, can be isolated from embryonic stem cells, embryonic ectoderm, and developing or adult brain tissues. For NSC clinical application, several critical problems remain to be resolved: (1) the source of NSCs should be personalized; (2) the isolation methods and protocols of human NSCs should be standardized; (3) the clinical efficacy of NSC transplants must be evaluated in more adequate animal models; and (4) the mechanism of intrinsic brain repair needs to be better characterized. In addition, the ideal imaging technique for tracking NSCs would be safe and yield high temporal and spatial resolution, good sensitivity and specificity. Here, we discuss recent progress and future development of cell-based therapy, such as NSCs, induced pluripotent stem cells, and induced neurons, in neurodegenerative diseases and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:23806879

  4. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Berton, Alessandra; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, surgeons try to promote a natural fibrocartilaginous response by using marrow stimulating techniques, such as microfracture, abrasion arthroplasty, and Pridie drilling, with the aim of reducing swelling and pain and improving joint function of the patients. These procedures have demonstrated to be clinically useful and are usually considered as first-line treatment for focal cartilage defects. However, fibrocartilage presents inferior mechanical and biochemical properties compared to normal hyaline articular cartilage, characterized by poor organization, significant amounts of collagen type I, and an increased susceptibility to injury, which ultimately leads to premature osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, the aim of future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage regeneration is to obtain a hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue by transplantation of tissues or cells. Further studies are required to clarify the role of gene therapy and mesenchimal stem cells for management of cartilage lesions. PMID:22481959

  5. Cardiac Repair and Regeneration: The Value of Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Lerman, Daniel Alejandro; Alotti, Nasri; Ume, Kiddy Levente; Péault, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Ischaemic heart disease is the predominant contributor to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality; one million myocardial Infarctions occur per year in the USA, while more than five million patients suffer from chronic heart failure. Recently, heart failure has been singled out as an epidemic and is a staggering clinical and public health problem associated with significant mortality, morbidity and healthcare expenditures, particularly among those aged ≥65 years. Death rates have improved dramatically over the last four decades, but new approaches are nevertheless urgently needed for those patients who go on to develop ventricular dysfunction and chronic heart failure. Over the past decade, stem cell transplantation has emerged as a promising therapeutic strategy for acute or chronic ischaemic cardiomyopathy. Multiple candidate cell types have been used in preclinical animal models and in humans to repair or regenerate the injured heart, either directly or indirectly (through paracrine effects), including: embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), neonatal cardiomyocytes, skeletal myoblasts (SKMs), endothelial progenitor cells, bone marrow mononuclear cells (BMMNCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and, most recently, cardiac stem cells (CSCs). Although no consensus has emerged yet, the ideal cell type for the treatment of heart disease should: (a) improve heart function; (b) create healthy and functional cardiac muscle and vasculature, integrated into the host tissue; (c) be amenable to delivery by minimally invasive clinical methods; (d) be available ′off the shelf′ as a standardised reagent; (e) be tolerated by the immune system; (f) be safe oncologically, i.e. not create tumours; and (g) circumvent societal ethical concerns. At present, it is not clear whether such a ′perfect′ stem cell exists; what is apparent, however, is that some cell types are more promising than others. In this brief review, we provide ongoing data on

  6. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, So-Yeon; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Doseok; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Hyongbum; Chung, Hyung-Min; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR) as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs) were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies. PMID:26584542

  7. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, So-Yeon; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Doseok; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Hyongbum; Chung, Hyung-Min; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR) as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs) were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies. PMID:26584542

  8. Cardiac repair and regeneration: the Rubik's cube of cell therapy for heart disease.

    PubMed

    Boudoulas, Konstantinos D; Hatzopoulos, Antonis K

    2009-01-01

    Acute ischemic injury and chronic cardiomyopathies damage healthy heart tissue. Dead cells are gradually replaced by a fibrotic scar, which disrupts the normal electromechanical continuum of the ventricular muscle and compromises its pumping capacity. Recent studies in animal models of ischemic cardiomyopathy suggest that transplantation of various stem cell preparations can improve heart recovery after injury. The first clinical trials in patients produced some encouraging results, showing modest benefits. Most of the positive effects are probably because of a favorable paracrine influence of stem cells on the disease microenvironment. Stem cell therapy attenuates inflammation, reduces apoptosis of surrounding cells, induces angiogenesis, and lessens the extent of fibrosis. However, little new heart tissue is formed. The current challenge is to find ways to improve the engraftment, long-term survival and appropriate differentiation of transplanted stem cells within the cardiovascular tissue. Hence, there has been a surge of interest in pluripotent stem cells with robust cardiogenic potential, as well as in the inherent repair and regenerative mechanisms of the heart. Recent discoveries on the biology of adult stem cells could have relevance for cardiac regeneration. Here, we discuss current developments in the field of cardiac repair and regeneration, and present our ideas about the future of stem cell therapy. PMID:19553696

  9. Stem Cell Therapies for Knee Cartilage Repair: The Current Status of Preclinical and Clinical Studies

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John A.; Little, Dianne; Toth, Alison P.; Moorman, Claude T.; Tucker, Bradford S.; Ciccotti, Michael G.; Guilak, Farshid

    2014-01-01

    Background Articular cartilage damage of the knee is common, causing significant morbidity worldwide. Many adult tissues contain cells that are able to differentiate into multiple cell types, including chondrocytes. These stem cells have gained significant attention over the past decade and may become frontline management for cartilage defects in the very near future. Purpose The role of stem cells in the treatment of knee osteochondral defects was reviewed. Recent animal and clinical studies were reviewed to determine the benefits and potential outcomes of using stem cells for cartilage defects. Study Design Literature review. Methods A PubMed search was undertaken. The key phrase “stem cells and knee” was used. The search included reviews and original articles over an unlimited time period. From this search, articles outlining animal and clinical trials were selected. A search of current clinical trials in progress was performed on the clinicaltrials.gov website, and “stem cells and knee” was used as the search phrase. Results Stem cells have been used in many recent in vitro and animal studies. A number of cell-based approaches for cartilage repair have progressed from preclinical animal studies into clinical trials. Conclusion The use of stem cells for the treatment of cartilage defects is increasing in animal and clinical studies. Methods of delivery of stem cells to the knee’s cartilage vary from direct injection to implantation with scaffolds. While these approaches are highly promising, there is currently limited evidence of a direct clinical benefit, and further research is required to assess the overall outcome of stem cell therapies for knee cartilage repair. PMID:24220016

  10. Cell and gene therapy for arrhythmias: Repair of cardiac conduction damage

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yong-Fu

    2011-01-01

    Action potentials generated in the sinoatrial node (SAN) dominate the rhythm and rate of a healthy human heart. Subsequently, these action potentials propagate to the whole heart via its conduction system. Abnormalities of impulse generation and/or propagation in a heart can cause arrhythmias. For example, SAN dysfunction or conduction block of the atrioventricular node can lead to serious bradycardia which is currently treated with an implanted electronic pacemaker. On the other hand, conduction damage may cause reentrant tachyarrhythmias which are primarily treated pharmacologically or by medical device-based therapies, including defibrillation and tissue ablation. However, drug therapies sometimes may not be effective or are associated with serious side effects. Device-based therapies for cardiac arrhythmias, even with well developed technology, still face inadequacies, limitations, hardware complications, and other challenges. Therefore, scientists are actively seeking other alternatives for antiarrhythmic therapy. In particular, cells and genes used for repairing cardiac conduction damage/defect have been investigated in various studies both in vitro and in vivo. Despite the complexities of the excitation and conduction systems of the heart, cell and gene-based strategies provide novel alternatives for treatment or cure of cardiac arrhythmias. This review summarizes some highlights of recent research progress in this field. PMID:22783301

  11. Immunopharmacological intervention for successful neural stem cell therapy: New perspectives in CNS neurogenesis and repair.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Dearbhaile; Vidal, Pia; Hendrix, Sven

    2014-01-01

    The pharmacological support and stimulation of endogenous and transplanted neural stem cells (NSCs) is a major challenge in brain repair. Trauma to the central nervous system (CNS) results in a distinct inflammatory response caused by local and infiltrating immune cells. This makes NSC-supported regeneration difficult due to the presence of inhibitory immune factors which are upregulated around the lesion site. The continual and dual role of the neuroinflammatory response leaves it difficult to decipher upon a single modulatory strategy. Therefore, understanding the influence of cytokines upon regulation of NSC self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation is crucial when designing therapies for CNS repair. There is a plethora of partially conflicting data in vitro and in vivo on the role of cytokines in modulating the stem cell niche and the milieu around NSC transplants. This is mainly due to the pleiotropic role of many factors. In order for cell-based therapy to thrive, treatment must be phase-specific to the injury and also be personalized for each patient, i.e. taking age, sex, neuroimmune and endocrine status as well as other key parameters into consideration. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant information concerning interleukin (IL)-1, IL-4, IL-10, IL-15, IFN-γ, the neuropoietic cytokine family and TNF-α in order to extract promising therapeutic approaches for further research. We will focus on the consequences of neuroinflammation on endogenous brain stem cells and the transplantation environment, the effects of the above cytokines on NSCs, as well as immunopharmacological manipulation of the microenvironment for potential therapeutic use. PMID:23954656

  12. Stem cell-derived angiogenic/vasculogenic cells: possible therapies for tissue repair and tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Zwaginga, J J; Doevendans, P

    2003-11-01

    1. The recent ability to isolate stem cells and study their specific capacity of self-renewal with the formation of different cell types has opened up exciting vistas to help the repair of damaged tissue and even the formation of new tissue. In the present review, we deal with the characteristics and sources that stem cells can be derived and cultured from. 2. We focus on the role that stem cell-derived vascular cells or endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) may play in (re)vascularization of ischaemic and engineered tissues. This so-called vasculogenesis resembles the embryological process in which 'haemangioblasts' differentiate in blood cells, as well as in primitive vessels. Although also derived from the blood-forming bone marrow, in adult life vasculogenic stem cells contribute only little to the regular vascular repair mechanisms: namely (i) angiogenesis (outgrowth of vessels from existing vessels); and (ii) arteriogenesis (monocyte-aided increase in the calibre of existing arteriolar collaterals). 3. Most attempts to increase vascular repair by stem cells involve the use of growth factors, which mobilize stem cells from bone marrow into the blood, sometimes combined with isolation and reinfusion of these cells after ex vivo expansion and differentiation into EPC. 4. Clear improved perfusion of ischaemic sites and new vasculature has been observed in vivo mostly in animal models. Specific homing or administration of these cells and regulated and quantitative expansion and (final) differentiation at these vascular (repair) sites are less studied, but are paramount for efficacy and safety. 5. In conclusion, the use of embryonic stem cells will still encounter ethical objections. Moreover, special attention and measures are needed to cope with the allogeneic barriers that these cells usually encounter. In general, the long and complicated ex vivo cultures to obtain sufficient offspring from the very small numbers of stem cells that can be obtained as starting

  13. Resident cardiac stem cells and their role in stem cell therapies for myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Mayfield, Audrey E; Tilokee, Everad L; Davis, Darryl R

    2014-11-01

    Despite advances in treatment, heart failure remains one of the top killers in Canada. This recognition motivated a new research focus to harness the fundamental repair properties of the human heart. Since then, cardiac stem cells (CSCs) have emerged as a promising cell candidate to regenerate damaged hearts. The rationale of this approach is simple with ex vivo amplification of CSCs from clinical-grade biopsies, followed by delivery to areas of injury, where they engraft and regenerate the heart. In this review we will summarize recent advances and discuss future developments in CSC-mediated cardiac repair to treat the growing number of Canadians living with and dying from heart failure. PMID:25092406

  14. Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Madry, Henning; Orth, Patrick; Cucchiarini, Magali

    2011-01-01

    The concept of using gene transfer strategies for cartilage repair originates from the idea of transferring genes encoding therapeutic factors into the repair tissue, resulting in a temporarily and spatially defined delivery of therapeutic molecules to sites of cartilage damage. This review focuses on the potential benefits of using gene therapy approaches for the repair of articular cartilage and meniscal fibrocartilage, including articular cartilage defects resulting from acute trauma, osteochondritis dissecans, osteonecrosis, and osteoarthritis. Possible applications for meniscal repair comprise meniscal lesions, meniscal sutures, and meniscal transplantation. Recent studies in both small and large animal models have demonstrated the applicability of gene-based approaches for cartilage repair. Chondrogenic pathways were stimulated in the repair tissue and in osteoarthritic cartilage using genes for polypeptide growth factors and transcription factors. Although encouraging data have been generated, a successful translation of gene therapy for cartilage repair will require an ongoing combined effort of orthopedic surgeons and of basic scientists. PMID:26069580

  15. Characterization of Chondrocyte Scaffold Carriers for Cell-based Gene Therapy in Articular Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wei; Yin, Liangjun; Luo, Jeffrey; Li, Ruidong; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhang, Jiye; Huang, Wei; Hu, Ning; Liang, Xi; Deng, Zhong-Liang; Hu, Zhenming; Shi, Lewis; Luu, Hue H.; Haydon, Rex C.; He, Tong-Chuan; Ho, Sherwin

    2014-01-01

    Articular cartilage lesions in the knee are common injuries. Chondrocyte transplant represents a promising therapeutic modality for articular cartilage injuries. Here, we characterize the viability and transgene expression of articular chondrocytes cultured in 3-D scaffolds provided by four types of carriers. Articular chondrocytes are isolated from rabbit knees and cultured in four types of scaffolds: type I collagen sponge, fibrin glue, hyaluronan, and Open-cell PolyLactic Acid (OPLA). The cultured cells are transduced with adenovirus expressing green fluorescence protein (AdGFP) and luciferase (AdGL3-Luc). The viability and gene expression in the chondrocytes are determined with fluorescence microscopy and luciferase assay. Cartilage matrix production is assessed by Alcian blue staining. Rabbit articular chondrocytes are effectively infected by AdGFP and exhibited sustained GFP expression. All tested scaffolds support the survival and gene expression of the infected chondrocytes. However, the highest transgene expression is observed in the OPLA carrier. At four weeks, Alcian blue-positive matrix materials are readily detected in OPLA cultures. Thus, our results indicate that, while all tested carriers can support the survival of chondrocytes, OPLA supports the highest transgene expression and is the most conductive scaffold for matrix production, suggesting that OPLA may be a suitable scaffold for cell-based gene therapy of articular cartilage repairs. PMID:23629940

  16. Concise review: Insights from normal bone remodeling and stem cell-based therapies for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Sundeep; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Mödder, Ulrike I

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair. As a major reason for normal bone remodeling is the removal of fatigue microcracks, advances in our understanding of this process may inform approaches to enhance fracture healing. Increasing evidence now indicates that physiological bone remodeling occurs in close proximity to blood vessels and that these vessels carry perivascular stem cells that differentiate into osteoblasts. Similarly, fracture healing is critically dependent on the ingrowth of blood vessels not only for a nutrient supply but also for the influx of osteoblasts. A number of animal and human studies have now shown the potential benefit of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in enhancing bone repair. However, as in other tissues, the question of whether these cells improve fracture healing directly by differentiating into osteoblasts or indirectly by secreting paracrine factors that recruit blood vessels and the accompanying perivascular stem cells remains a major unresolved issue. Moreover, CD34+ cells, which are enriched for endothelial/hematopoietic cells, have also shown efficacy in various bone repair models, at least in part due to the induction of angiogenesis and recruitment of host progenitor cells. Thus, mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal stem/progenitor cells are attractive options for bone repair. It is possible that they contribute directly to bone repair, but it is also likely that they express paracrine factors in the appropriate amounts and combinations that promote and sustain the healing process. PMID:20960512

  17. Future dentistry: cell therapy meets tooth and periodontal repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Catón, Javier; Bostanci, Nagihan; Remboutsika, Eumorphia; De Bari, Cosimo; Mitsiadis, Thimios A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Cell-based tissue repair of the tooth and – tooth-supporting – periodontal ligament (PDL) is a new attractive approach that complements traditional restorative or surgical techniques for replacement of injured or pathologically damaged tissues. In such therapeutic approaches, stem cells and/or progenitor cells are manipulated in vitro and administered to patients as living and dynamic biological agents. In this review, we discuss the clonogenic potential of human dental and periodontal tissues such as the dental pulp and the PDL and their potential for tooth and periodontal repair and/or regeneration. We propose novel therapeutic approaches using stem cells or progenitor cells, which are targeted to regenerate the lost dental or periodontal tissue. PMID:21199329

  18. Cell-based therapies for cardiac repair: a meeting report on scientific observations and European regulatory viewpoints.

    PubMed

    Schüssler-Lenz, Martina; Beuneu, Claire; Menezes-Ferreira, Margarida; Jekerle, Veronika; Bartunek, Jozef; Chamuleau, Steven; Celis, Patrick; Doevendans, Pieter; O'Donovan, Maura; Hill, Jonathan; Hystad, Marit; Jovinge, Stefan; Kyselovič, Ján; Lipnik-Stangelj, Metoda; Maciulaitis, Romaldas; Prasad, Krishna; Samuel, Anthony; Tenhunen, Olli; Tonn, Torsten; Rosano, Giuseppe; Zeiher, Andreas; Salmikangas, Paula

    2016-02-01

    In the past decade, novel cell-based products have been studied in patients with acute and chronic cardiac disease to assess whether these therapies are efficacious in improving heart function and preventing the development of end-stage heart failure. Cardiac indications studied include acute myocardial infarction (AMI), refractory angina, and chronic heart failure (CHF). Increased clinical activity, experience, and multiple challenges faced by developers have been recognized at the regulatory level. In May 2014, the Committee for Advanced Therapies (CAT) discussed in an expert meeting various cell-based medicinal products developed for cardiac repair, with a focus on non-manipulated bone marrow cells, sorted bone marrow or apheresis, and expanded cells, applied to patients with AMI or CHF. The intention was to share information, both scientific and regulatory, and to examine the challenges and opportunities in this field. These aspects were considered from the quality, and non-clinical and clinical perspectives, including current imaging techniques, with a focus on AMI and CHF. The scope of this overview is to present the European regulatory viewpoint on cell-based therapies for cardiac repair in the context of scientific observations. PMID:26470631

  19. Dual differentiation-exogenous mesenchymal stem cell therapy for traumatic spinal cord injury repair in a murine hemisection model.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has shown tremendous promise as a therapy for repair of various tissues of the musculoskeletal, vascular, and central nervous systems. Based on this success, recent research in this field has focused on complex tissue damage, such as that which occurs from traumatic spinal cord injury (TSCI). As the critical event for successful exogenous, MSC therapy is their migration to the injury site, which allows for their anti-inflammatory and morphogenic effects on fracture healing, neuronal regeneration, and functional recover. Thus, there is a need for a cost-effective in vivo model that can faithfully recapitulate the salient features of the injury, therapy, and recovery. To address this, we review the recent advances in exogenous MSC therapy for TSCI and traumatic vertebral fracture repair and the existing challenges regarding their translational applications. We also describe a novel murine model designed to take advantage of multidisciplinary collaborations between musculoskeletal and neuroscience researchers, which is needed to establish an efficacious MSC therapy for TSCI. PMID:24027587

  20. Concepts in Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Steinert, Andre F.; Nöth, Ulrich; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Once articular cartilage is injured, it has a very limited capacity for self-repair. Although current surgical therapeutic procedures to cartilage repair are clinically useful, they cannot restore a normal articular surface. Current research offers a growing number of bioactive reagents, including proteins and nucleic acids, that may be used to augment different aspects of the repair process. As these agents are difficult to administer effectively, gene transfer approaches are being developed to provide their sustained synthesis at sites of repair. To augment regeneration of articular cartilage, therapeutic genes can be delivered to the synovium, or directly to the cartilage lesion. Gene delivery to the cells of the synovial lining is generally considered more suitable for chondroprotective approaches, based on the expression of anti-inflammatory mediators. Gene transfer targeted to cartilage defects can be achieved by either direct vector administration to cells located at or surrounding the defects, or by transplantation of genetically modified chondrogenic cells into the defect. Several studies have shown that exogenous cDNAs encoding growth factors can be delivered locally to sites of cartilage damage, where they are expressed at therapeutically relevant levels. Furthermore, data is beginning to emerge indicating, that efficient delivery and expression of these genes is capable of influencing a repair response toward the synthesis of a more hyaline cartilage repair tissue in vivo. This review presents the current status of gene therapy for cartilage healing and highlights some of the remaining challenges. PMID:18313477

  1. The interplay between DNA repair and autophagy in cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dan; Tang, Bo; Xie, Xia; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Yang, Shi-Ming; Zhang, Jian-Wei

    2015-01-01

    DNA is the prime target of anticancer treatments. DNA damage triggers a series of signaling cascades promoting cellular survival, including DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and autophagy. The elevated basal and/or stressful levels of both DNA repair and autophagy observed in tumor cells, in contrast to normal cells, have been identified as the most important drug-responsive programs that impact the outcome of anticancer therapy. The exact relationship between DNA repair and autophagy in cancer cells remains unclear. On one hand, autophagy has been shown to regulate some of the DNA repair proteins after DNA damage by maintaining the balance between their synthesis, stabilization, and degradation. One the other hand, some evidence has demonstrated that some DNA repair molecular have a crucial role in the initiation of autophagy. In this review, we mainly discuss the interplay between DNA repair and autophagy in anticancer therapy and expect to enlighten some effective strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:25985143

  2. Single cell wound repair

    PubMed Central

    Abreu-Blanco, Maria Teresa; Verboon, Jeffrey M

    2011-01-01

    Cell wounding is a common event in the life of many cell types, and the capacity of the cell to repair day-to-day wear-and-tear injuries, as well as traumatic ones, is fundamental for maintaining tissue integrity. Cell wounding is most frequent in tissues exposed to high levels of stress. Survival of such plasma membrane disruptions requires rapid resealing to prevent the loss of cytosolic components, to block Ca2+ influx and to avoid cell death. In addition to patching the torn membrane, plasma membrane and cortical cytoskeleton remodeling are required to restore cell function. Although a general understanding of the cell wound repair process is in place, the underlying mechanisms of each step of this response are not yet known. We have developed a model to study single cell wound repair using the early Drosophila embryo. Our system combines genetics and live imaging tools, allowing us to dissect in vivo the dynamics of the single cell wound response. We have shown that cell wound repair in Drosophila requires the coordinated activities of plasma membrane and cytoskeleton components. Furthermore, we identified an unexpected role for E-cadherin as a link between the contractile actomyosin ring and the newly formed plasma membrane plug. PMID:21922041

  3. Can the response to a platinum-based therapy be predicted by the DNA repair status in non-small cell lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Macerelli, Marianna; Ganzinelli, Monica; Gouedard, Cedric; Broggini, Massimo; Garassino, Marina Chiara; Linardou, Helena; Damia, Giovanna; Wiesmüller, Lisa

    2016-07-01

    Preclinical evidence has been accumulating on the impact of the DNA repair status on the sensitivity/resistance to anticancer agents in different tumor types, including lung cancer. The possibility to predict the response to therapy, and specifically to platinum agents, based on tumor specific DNA repair functionality would enable to tailor its use only in those patients with maximum chances to respond, avoiding the burden of toxicity in those ones with lesser chances. We here reviewed the clinical evidence on the prognostic role of DNA repair markers and/or functional assays in predicting the response to a platinum-based chemotherapy in lung cancer patients. Consequently, we focused on those proteins involved in pathways repairing platinum induced DNA inter-strand and intra-strand crosslinks. Most promising clinical trials targeting the nucleotide repair protein ERCC1 in non-small cell lung cancer later on suffered from serious drawbacks. Nevertheless, these results spurred a variety of preclinical studies on a multitude of alternative DNA repair markers. However so far, no one of the analyzed DNA repair markers can be considered a reliable and mature biomarker for selecting patients. We discuss the reasons for such failure which discloses novel strategies for the future. PMID:27262017

  4. DNA Repair and Personalized Breast Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Shu-Xia; Sjolund, Ashley; Harris, Lyndsay; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2010-01-01

    Personalized cancer therapy is likely to be one of the next big advances in our search for a cure for cancer. To be able to treat people in an individualized manner, researchers need to know a great deal about their genetic constitution and the DNA repair status of their tumors. Specific knowledge is required regarding the polymorphisms individuals carry and how these polymorphisms influence responses to therapy. Researchers are actively engaged in biomarker discovery and validation for this purpose. In addition, the design of clinical trials must be reassessed to include new information on biomarkers and drug responses. In this review, we focus on personalized breast cancer therapy. The hypothesis we focus upon in this review is that there is connection between the DNA repair profile of individuals, their breast tumor subtypes, and their responses to cancer therapy. We first briefly review cellular DNA repair pathways that are likely to be impacted by breast cancer therapies. Next, we review the phenotypes of breast tumor subtypes with an emphasis on how a DNA repair deficiency might result in tumorigenesis itself and lead to the chemotherapeutic responses that are observed. Specific examples of breast tumor subtypes and their responses to cancer therapy are given, and we discuss possible DNA repair mechanisms that underlie the responses of tumors to various chemotherapeutic agents. Much is known about breast cancer subtypes and the way each of these subtypes responds to chemotherapy. In addition, we discuss novel design of clinical trials that incorporates rapidly emerging information on biomarkers. PMID:20872853

  5. Stem cell therapy to protect and repair the developing brain: a review of mechanisms of action of cord blood and amnion epithelial derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Melendez, Margie; Yawno, Tamara; Jenkin, Graham; Miller, Suzanne L.

    2013-01-01

    In the research, clinical, and wider community there is great interest in the use of stem cells to reduce the progression, or indeed repair brain injury. Perinatal brain injury may result from acute or chronic insults sustained during fetal development, during the process of birth, or in the newborn period. The most readily identifiable outcome of perinatal brain injury is cerebral palsy, however, this is just one consequence in a spectrum of mild to severe neurological deficits. As we review, there are now clinical trials taking place worldwide targeting cerebral palsy with stem cell therapies. It will likely be many years before strong evidence-based results emerge from these trials. With such trials underway, it is both appropriate and timely to address the physiological basis for the efficacy of stem-like cells in preventing damage to, or regenerating, the newborn brain. Appropriate experimental animal models are best placed to deliver this information. Cell availability, the potential for immunological rejection, ethical, and logistical considerations, together with the propensity for native cells to form teratomas, make it unlikely that embryonic or fetal stem cells will be practical. Fortunately, these issues do not pertain to the use of human amnion epithelial cells (hAECs), or umbilical cord blood (UCB) stem cells that are readily and economically obtained from the placenta and umbilical cord discarded at birth. These cells have the potential for transplantation to the newborn where brain injury is diagnosed or even suspected. We will explore the novel characteristics of hAECs and undifferentiated UCB cells, as well as UCB-derived endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and how immunomodulation and anti-inflammatory properties are principal mechanisms of action that are common to these cells, and which in turn may ameliorate the cerebral hypoxia and inflammation that are final pathways in the pathogenesis of perinatal brain

  6. Position Paper of the European Society of Cardiology Working Group Cellular Biology of the Heart: cell-based therapies for myocardial repair and regeneration in ischemic heart disease and heart failure.

    PubMed

    Madonna, Rosalinda; Van Laake, Linda W; Davidson, Sean M; Engel, Felix B; Hausenloy, Derek J; Lecour, Sandrine; Leor, Jonathan; Perrino, Cinzia; Schulz, Rainer; Ytrehus, Kirsti; Landmesser, Ulf; Mummery, Christine L; Janssens, Stefan; Willerson, James; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Ferdinandy, Péter; Sluijter, Joost P G

    2016-06-14

    Despite improvements in modern cardiovascular therapy, the morbidity and mortality of ischaemic heart disease (IHD) and heart failure (HF) remain significant in Europe and worldwide. Patients with IHD may benefit from therapies that would accelerate natural processes of postnatal collateral vessel formation and/or muscle regeneration. Here, we discuss the use of cells in the context of heart repair, and the most relevant results and current limitations from clinical trials using cell-based therapies to treat IHD and HF. We identify and discuss promising potential new therapeutic strategies that include ex vivo cell-mediated gene therapy, the use of biomaterials and cell-free therapies aimed at increasing the success rates of therapy for IHD and HF. The overall aim of this Position Paper of the ESC Working Group Cellular Biology of the Heart is to provide recommendations on how to improve the therapeutic application of cell-based therapies for cardiac regeneration and repair. PMID:27055812

  7. Cardiac progenitor cells for heart repair

    PubMed Central

    Le, TYL; Chong, JJH

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is being investigated as an innovative and promising strategy to restore cardiac function in patients with heart failure. Several stem cell populations, including adult (multipotent) stem cells from developed organs and tissues, have been tested for cardiac repair with encouraging clinical and pre-clinical results. The heart has been traditionally considered a post-mitotic organ, however, this view has recently changed with the identification of stem/progenitor cells residing within the adult heart. Given their cardiac developmental origins, these endogenous cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) may represent better candidates for cardiac cell therapy compared with stem cells from other organs such as the bone marrow and adipose tissue. This brief review will outline current research into CPC populations and their cardiac repair/regenerative potential. PMID:27551540

  8. Exploiting DNA repair defects for novel cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    van Gent, Dik C; Kanaar, Roland

    2016-07-15

    Most human tumors accumulate a multitude of genetic changes due to defects in the DNA damage response. Recently, small-molecule inhibitors have been developed that target cells with specific DNA repair defects, providing hope for precision treatment of such tumors. Here we discuss the rationale behind these therapies and how an important bottleneck-patient selection-can be approached. PMID:27418635

  9. DNA repair in cancer: emerging targets for personalized therapy

    PubMed Central

    Abbotts, Rachel; Thompson, Nicola; Madhusudan, Srinivasan

    2014-01-01

    Genomic deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is under constant threat from endogenous and exogenous DNA damaging agents. Mammalian cells have evolved highly conserved DNA repair machinery to process DNA damage and maintain genomic integrity. Impaired DNA repair is a major driver for carcinogenesis and could promote aggressive cancer biology. Interestingly, in established tumors, DNA repair activity is required to counteract oxidative DNA damage that is prevalent in the tumor microenvironment. Emerging clinical data provide compelling evidence that overexpression of DNA repair factors may have prognostic and predictive significance in patients. More recently, DNA repair inhibition has emerged as a promising target for anticancer therapy. Synthetic lethality exploits intergene relationships where the loss of function of either of two related genes is nonlethal, but loss of both causes cell death. Exploiting this approach by targeting DNA repair has emerged as a promising strategy for personalized cancer therapy. In the current review, we focus on recent advances with a particular focus on synthetic lethality targeting in cancer. PMID:24600246

  10. Bone Repair Cells for Craniofacial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Pagni, G; Kaigler, D; Rasperini, G; Avila-Ortiz, G; Bartel, R; Giannobile, WV

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of complex craniofacial deformities is a clinical challenge in situations of injury, congenital defects or disease. The use of cell-based therapies represents one of the most advanced methods for enhancing the regenerative response for craniofacial wound healing. Both Somatic and Stem Cells have been adopted in the treatment of complex osseous defects and advances have been made in finding the most adequate scaffold for the delivery of cell therapies in human regenerative medicine. As an example of such approaches for clinical application for craniofacial regeneration, Ixmyelocel-T or bone repair cells are a source of bone marrow derived stem and progenitor cells. They are produced through the use of single pass perfusion bioreactors for CD90+ mesenchymal stem cells and CD14+ monocyte/macrophage progenitor cells. The application of ixmyelocel-T has shown potential in the regeneration of muscular, vascular, nervous and osseous tissue. The purpose of this manuscript is to highlight cell therapies used to repair bony and soft tissue defects in the oral and craniofacial complex. The field at this point remains at an early stage, however this review will provide insights into the progress being made using cell therapies for eventual development into clinical practice. PMID:22433781

  11. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  12. Stem cells and repair of lung injuries

    PubMed Central

    Neuringer, Isabel P; Randell, Scott H

    2004-01-01

    Fueled by the promise of regenerative medicine, currently there is unprecedented interest in stem cells. Furthermore, there have been revolutionary, but somewhat controversial, advances in our understanding of stem cell biology. Stem cells likely play key roles in the repair of diverse lung injuries. However, due to very low rates of cellular proliferation in vivo in the normal steady state, cellular and architectural complexity of the respiratory tract, and the lack of an intensive research effort, lung stem cells remain poorly understood compared to those in other major organ systems. In the present review, we concisely explore the conceptual framework of stem cell biology and recent advances pertinent to the lungs. We illustrate lung diseases in which manipulation of stem cells may be physiologically significant and highlight the challenges facing stem cell-related therapy in the lung. PMID:15285789

  13. Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Wei-Zhong; Hauch, Kip; Xu, Chunhui; Laflamme, Michael A.

    2008-01-01

    The muscle lost after a myocardial infarction is replaced with non-contractile scar tissue, often initiating heart failure. Whole-organ cardiac transplantation is the only currently available clinical means of replacing the lost muscle, but this option is limited by the inadequate supply of donor hearts. Thus, cell-based cardiac repair has attracted considerable interest as an alternative means of ameliorating cardiac injury. Because of their tremendous capacity for expansion and unquestioned cardiac potential, pluripotent human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) represent an attractive candidate cell source for obtaining cardiomyocytes and other useful mesenchymal cell types for such therapies. hESC-derived cardiomyocytes (hESC-CMs) exhibit a committed cardiac phenotype and robust proliferative capacity, and recent testing in rodent infarct models indicates that they can partially remuscularize injured hearts and improve contractile function. Although the latter successes give good reason for optimism, considerable challenges remain to the successful application of hESCs to cardiac repair, including the need for preparations of high cardiac purity, improved methods of delivery, and approaches to overcome immune rejection and other causes of graft cell death. This review will describe the phenotype of hESC-CMs and preclinical experience with these cells and will consider strategies to overcoming the aforementioned challenges. PMID:18657407

  14. Targeting abnormal DNA repair in therapy-resistant breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tobin, Lisa A.; Robert, Carine; Nagaria, Pratik; Chumsri, Saranya; Twaddell, William; Ioffe, Olga B.; Greco, George E.; Brodie, Angela H.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Rassool, Feyruz V.

    2012-01-01

    Although hereditary breast cancers have defects in the DNA damage response that result in genomic instability, DNA repair abnormalities in sporadic breast cancers have not been extensively characterized. Recently we showed that, relative to non-tumorigenic breast epithelial MCF10A cells, estrogen receptor- and progesterone receptor-positive (ER/PR+) MCF7 breast cancer cells have reduced steady state levels of DNA ligase IV, a component of the major DNA-PK dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, whereas the steady state level of DNA ligase IIIα, a component of the highly error-prone alternative NHEJ (ALT NHEJ) pathway, is increased. Here we show that tamoxifen- and aromatase-resistant derivatives of MCF7 cells and ER/PR- cells have even higher steady state levels of DNA ligase IIIα and increased levels of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP1), another ALT NHEJ component. This results in increased dependence upon microhomology-mediated ALT NHEJ to repair DNA double strand breaks (DSB)s and the accumulation of chromosomal deletions. Notably, therapy-resistant derivatives of MCF7 cells and ER/PR- cells exhibited significantly increased sensitivity to a combination of PARP and DNA ligase III inhibitors that increased the number of DSBs. Biopsies from ER/PR- tumors had elevated levels of ALT NHEJ and reduced levels of DNA-PK-dependent NHEJ factors. Thus, our results show that ALT NHEJ is a novel therapeutic target in breast cancers that are resistant to frontline therapies and suggest that changes in NHEJ protein levels may serve as biomarkers to identify tumors that are candidates for this therapeutic approach. PMID:22112941

  15. Cell healing: Calcium, repair and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Moe, Alison M; Golding, Adriana E; Bement, William M

    2015-09-01

    Cell repair is attracting increasing attention due to its conservation, its importance to health, and its utility as a model for cell signaling and cell polarization. However, some of the most fundamental questions concerning cell repair have yet to be answered. Here we consider three such questions: (1) How are wound holes stopped? (2) How is cell regeneration achieved after wounding? (3) How is calcium inrush linked to wound stoppage and cell regeneration? PMID:26514621

  16. (64)Cu-ATSM therapy targets regions with activated DNA repair and enrichment of CD133(+) cells in an HT-29 tumor model: Sensitization with a nucleic acid antimetabolite.

    PubMed

    Yoshii, Yukie; Furukawa, Takako; Matsumoto, Hiroki; Yoshimoto, Mitsuyoshi; Kiyono, Yasushi; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-06-28

    (64)Cu-diacetyl-bis (N(4)-methylthiosemicarbazone) ((64)Cu-ATSM) is a potential theranostic agent targeting the over-reduced state under hypoxia within tumors. Recent clinical Cu-ATSM positron emission tomography studies have revealed a correlation between uptake and poor prognosis; however, the reason is unclear. Here, using a human colon carcinoma HT-29 model, we demonstrated that the intratumoral (64)Cu-ATSM high-uptake regions exhibited malignant characteristics, such as upregulated DNA repair and elevated %CD133(+) cancer stem-like cells. Based on this evidence, we developed a strategy to enhance the efficacy of (64)Cu-ATSM internal radiotherapy (IRT) by inhibiting DNA repair with a nucleic acid (NA) antimetabolite. The results of the analyses showed upregulation of pathways related to DNA repair along with NA incorporation (bromodeoxyuridine uptake) and elevation of %CD133(+) cells in (64)Cu-ATSM high-uptake regions. In an in vivo(64)Cu-ATSM treatment study, co-administration of an NA antimetabolite and (64)Cu-ATSM synergistically inhibited tumor growth, with little toxicity, and effectively reduced %CD133(+) cells. (64)Cu-ATSM therapy targeted malignant tumor regions with activated DNA repair and high concentrations of CD133(+) cells in the HT-29 model. NA antimetabolite co-administration can be an effective approach to enhance the therapeutic effect of (64)Cu-ATSM IRT. PMID:26996296

  17. Adult stem cells and tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Körbling, M; Estrov, Z; Champlin, R

    2003-08-01

    Recently, adult stem cells originating from bone marrow or peripheral blood have been suggested to contribute to repair and genesis of cells specific for liver, cardiac and skeletal muscle, gut, and brain tissue. The mechanism involved has been termed transdifferentiation, although other explanations including cell fusion have been postulated. Using adult stem cells to generate or repair solid organ tissue obviates the immunologic, ethical, and teratogenic issues that accompany embryonic stem cells. PMID:12931235

  18. Sublethal and potentially lethal damage repair on thermal neutron capture therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Utsumi, H.; Ichihashi, M.; Kobayashi, T.; Elkind, M.M. )

    1989-07-01

    Tonicity shock or caffeine postirradiation treatment makes evident fast-type potentially lethal damage (PLD). Caffeine expresses fast-type PLD more efficiently than tonicity shock in X-irradiated B-16 mouse melanoma cells, compared with V79 Chinese hamster cells. The survival curves of thermal neutrons for either V79 or B-16 cells exhibit no shoulder. Neither V79 nor B-16 cells show the sublethal damage (SLD) repair of thermal neutrons. Caffeine-sensitive fast-type PLD repairs exist in X-irradiated B-16 cells, as well as V79 cells. The fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells exposed to thermal neutrons alone is rather less than that of X-irradiated cells. Furthermore, an extremely low level of fast-type PLD repair of B-16 cells with 10B1-paraboronophenylalanine (BPA) preincubation (20 hours) followed by thermal neutron irradiation indicated that 10B(n,alpha)7Li reaction effectively eradicates actively growing melanoma cells. The plateau-phase B-16 cells are well able to repair the slow-type PLD of X-rays. However, cells can not repair the slow-type PLD induced by thermal neutron irradiation with or without 10B1-BPA preincubation. These results suggest that thermal neutron capture therapy can effectively kill radioresistant melanoma cells in both proliferating and quiescent phases.

  19. Mesenchymal stem cells and cardiac repair

    PubMed Central

    Nesselmann, Catharina; Ma, Nan; Bieback, Karen; Wagner, Wolfgang; Ho, Anthony; Konttinen, Yrjö T; Zhang, Hao; Hinescu, Mihail E; Steinhoff, Gustav

    2008-01-01

    Accumulating clinical and experimental evidence indicates that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cell types in the treatment of cardiac dysfunction. They may trigger production of reparative growth factors, replace damaged cells and create an environment that favours endogenous cardiac repair. However, identifying mechanisms which regulate the role of MSCs in cardiac repair is still at work. To achieve the maximal clinical benefits, ex vivo manipulation can further enhance MSC therapeutic potential. This review focuses on the mechanism of MSCs in cardiac repair, with emphasis on ex vivo manipulation. PMID:18684237

  20. Association between Genetic Variants in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair Pathways and Risk of Radiation Therapy-Induced Pneumonitis and Esophagitis in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Lina; Pu, Xia; Ye, Yuanqing; Lu, Charles; Chang, Joe Y.; Wu, Xifeng

    2016-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT)-induced pneumonitis and esophagitis are commonly developed side effects in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients treated with definitive RT. Identifying patients who are at increased risk for these toxicities would help to maximize treatment efficacy while minimizing toxicities. Here, we systematically investigated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway as potential predictive markers for radiation-induced esophagitis and pneumonitis. We genotyped 440 SNPs from 45 genes in DSB repair pathways in 250 stage I–III NSCLC patients who received definitive radiation or chemoradiation therapy, followed by internal validation in 170 additional patients. We found that 11 SNPs for esophagitis and 8 SNPs for pneumonitis showed consistent effects between discovery and validation populations (same direction of OR and reached significance in meta-analysis). Among them, rs7165790 in the BLM gene was significantly associated with decreased risk of esophagitis in both discovery (OR = 0.59, 95% CI: 0.37–0.97, p = 0.037) and validation subgroups (OR = 0.45, 95% CI: 0.22–0.94, p = 0.032). A strong cumulative effect was observed for the top SNPs, and gene-based tests revealed 12 genes significantly associated with esophagitis or pneumonitis. Our results support the notion that genetic variations within DSB repair pathway could influence the risk of developing toxicities following definitive RT in NSCLC. PMID:26901225

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Kidney Repair.

    PubMed

    Morigi, Marina; Rota, Cinzia; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Every year 13.3 million people suffer acute kidney injury (AKI), which is associated with a high risk of death or development of long-term chronic kidney disease (CKD) in a substantial percentage of patients besides other organ dysfunctions. To date, the mortality rate per year for AKI exceeds 50 % at least in patients requiring early renal replacement therapy and is higher than the mortality for breast and prostate cancer, heart failure and diabetes combined.Until now, no effective treatments able to accelerate renal recovery and improve survival post AKI have been developed. In search of innovative and effective strategies to foster the limited regeneration capacity of the kidney, several studies have evaluated the ability of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) of different origin as an attractive therapeutic tool. The results obtained in several models of AKI and CKD document that MSCs have therapeutic potential in repair of renal injury, preserving renal function and structure thus prolonging animal survival through differentiation-independent pathways. In this chapter, we have summarized the mechanisms underlying the regenerative processes triggered by MSC treatment, essentially due to their paracrine activity. The capacity of MSC to migrate to the site of injury and to secrete a pool of growth factors and cytokines with anti-inflammatory, mitogenic, and immunomodulatory effects is described. New modalities of cell-to-cell communication via the release of microvesicles and exosomes by MSCs to injured renal cells will also be discussed. The translation of basic experimental data on MSC biology into effective care is still limited to preliminary phase I clinical trials and further studies are needed to definitively assess the efficacy of MSC-based therapy in humans. PMID:27236667

  2. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis.

  3. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair.

    PubMed

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2013-12-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS. PMID:23827856

  4. The stem cell secretome and its role in brain repair

    PubMed Central

    Drago, Denise; Cossetti, Chiara; Iraci, Nunzio; Gaude, Edoardo; Musco, Giovanna; Bachi, Angela; Pluchino, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Compelling evidence exists that non-haematopoietic stem cells, including mesenchymal (MSCs) and neural/progenitor stem cells (NPCs), exert a substantial beneficial and therapeutic effect after transplantation in experimental central nervous system (CNS) disease models through the secretion of immune modulatory or neurotrophic paracrine factors. This paracrine hypothesis has inspired an alternative outlook on the use of stem cells in regenerative neurology. In this paradigm, significant repair of the injured brain may be achieved by injecting the biologics secreted by stem cells (secretome), rather than implanting stem cells themselves for direct cell replacement. The stem cell secretome (SCS) includes cytokines, chemokines and growth factors, and has gained increasing attention in recent years because of its multiple implications for the repair, restoration or regeneration of injured tissues. Thanks to recent improvements in SCS profiling and manipulation, investigators are now inspired to harness the SCS as a novel alternative therapeutic option that might ensure more efficient outcomes than current stem cell-based therapies for CNS repair. This review discusses the most recent identification of MSC- and NPC-secreted factors, including those that are trafficked within extracellular membrane vesicles (EVs), and reflects on their potential effects on brain repair. It also examines some of the most convincing advances in molecular profiling that have enabled mapping of the SCS. PMID:23827856

  5. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-03-18

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells in cartilage repair

    PubMed Central

    Lietman, Steven A

    2016-01-01

    Articular cartilage repair techniques are challenging. Human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) theoretically provide an unlimited number of specialized cells which could be used in articular cartilage repair. However thus far chondrocytes from iPSCs have been created primarily by viral transfection and with the use of cocultured feeder cells. In addition chondrocytes derived from iPSCs have usually been formed in condensed cell bodies (resembling embryoid bodies) that then require dissolution with consequent substantial loss of cell viability and phenotype. All of these current techniques used to derive chondrocytes from iPSCs are problematic but solutions to these problems are on the horizon. These solutions will make iPSCs a viable alternative for articular cartilage repair in the near future. PMID:27004161

  7. Stem cells: potential and challenges for kidney repair.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Marcela; Mirotsou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Renal damage resulting from acute and chronic kidney injury poses an important problem to public health. Currently, patients with end-stage renal disease rely solely on kidney transplantation or dialysis for survival. Emerging therapies aiming to prevent and reverse kidney damage are thus in urgent need. Although the kidney was initially thought to lack the capacity for self-repair, several studies have indicated that this might not be the case; progenitor and stem cells appear to play important roles in kidney repair under various pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the role of progenitor/stem cells on kidney repair as well as discuss their potential as a therapeutic approach for kidney diseases. PMID:24197069

  8. Stem cells: potential and challenges for kidney repair

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    Renal damage resulting from acute and chronic kidney injury poses an important problem to public health. Currently, patients with end-stage renal disease rely solely on kidney transplantation or dialysis for survival. Emerging therapies aiming to prevent and reverse kidney damage are thus in urgent need. Although the kidney was initially thought to lack the capacity for self-repair, several studies have indicated that this might not be the case; progenitor and stem cells appear to play important roles in kidney repair under various pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the role of progenitor/stem cells on kidney repair as well as discuss their potential as a therapeutic approach for kidney diseases. PMID:24197069

  9. Fanconi Anemia Proteins, DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Pathways, and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Andreassen, Paul R.; Ren, Keqin

    2016-01-01

    DNA interstrand crosslinkers, a chemically diverse group of compounds which also induce alkylation of bases and DNA intrastrand crosslinks, are extensively utilized for cancer therapy. Understanding the cellular response to DNA damage induced by these agents is critical for more effective utilization of these compounds and for the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Importantly, the repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs) involves many distinct DNA repair pathways, including nucleotide excision repair, translesion synthesis (TLS), and homologous recombination (HR). Additionally, proteins implicated in the pathophysiology of the multigenic disease Fanconi anemia (FA) have a role in the repair of ICLs that is not well understood. Cells from FA patients are hypersensitive to agents that induce ICLs, therefore FA proteins are potentially novel therapeutic targets. Here we will review current research directed at identifying FA genes and understanding the function of FA proteins in DNA damage responses. We will also examine interactions of FA proteins with other repair proteins and pathways, including signaling networks, which are potentially involved in ICL repair. Potential approaches to the modulation of FA protein function to enhance therapeutic outcome will be discussed. Also, mutation of many genes that encode proteins involved in ICL repair, including FA genes, increases susceptibility to cancer. A better understanding of these pathways is therefore critical for the design of individualized therapies tailored to the genetic profile of a particular malignancy. For this purpose, we will also review evidence for the association of mutation of FA genes with cancer in non-FA patients. PMID:19200054

  10. Mechanical injury and repair of cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyake, Katsuya; McNeil, Paul L.

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To concisely review the field of cell plasma membrane disruption (torn cell surface) and repair. MAIN POINTS: Plasma membrane disruption is a common form of cell injury under physiologic conditions, after trauma, in certain muscular dystrophies, and during certain forms of clinical intervention. Rapid repair of a disruption is essential to cell survival and involves a complex and active cell response that includes membrane fusion and cytoskeletal activation. Tissues, such as cardiac and skeletal muscle, adapt to a disruption injury by hypertrophying. Cells adapt by increasing the efficiency of their resealing response. CONCLUSION: Plasma membrane disruption is an important cellular event in both health and disease. The disruption repair mechanism is now well understood at the cellular level, but much remains to be learned at the molecular level. Cell and tissue level adaptational responses to the disruption either prevent its further occurrence or facilitate future repairs. Therapeutically useful drugs might result if, using this accumulating knowledge, chemical agents can be developed that can enhance repair or adaptive responses.

  11. Stem cell therapy without the cells

    PubMed Central

    Maguire, Greg

    2013-01-01

    As an example of the burgeoning importance of stem cell therapy, this past month the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) has approved $70 million to create a new network of stem cell clinical trial centers. Much work in the last decade has been devoted to developing the use of autologous and allogeneic adult stem cell transplants to treat a number of conditions, including heart attack, dementia, wounds, and immune system-related diseases. The standard model teaches us that adult stem cells exists throughout most of the body and provide a means to regenerate and repair most tissues through replication and differentiation. Although we have often witnessed the medical cart placed in front of the scientific horse in the development of stem cell therapies outside of academic circles, great strides have been made, such as the use of purified stem cells1 instead of whole bone marrow transplants in cancer patients, where physicians avoid re-injecting the patients with their own cancer cells.2 We most often think of stem cell therapy acting to regenerate tissue through replication and then differentiation, but recent studies point to the dramatic effects adult stem cells exert in the repair of various tissues through the release of paracrine and autocrine substances, and not simply through differentiation. Indeed, up to 80% of the therapeutic effect of adult stem cells has been shown to be through paracrine mediated actions.3 That is, the collected types of molecules released by the stem cells, called the secretome, or stem cell released molecules (SRM), number in the 100s, including proteins, microRNA, growth factors, antioxidants, proteasomes, and exosomes, and target a multitude of biological pathways through paracrine actions. The composition of the different molecule types in SRM is state dependent, and varies with cell type and conditions such as age and environment. PMID:24567776

  12. Metformin synergizes 5-fluorouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) combination therapy through impairing intracellular ATP production and DNA repair in breast cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Soo, Jaslyn Sian-Siu; Ng, Char-Hong; Tan, Si Hoey; Malik, Rozita Abdul; Teh, Yew-Ching; Tan, Boon-Shing; Ho, Gwo-Fuang; See, Mee-Hoong; Taib, Nur Aishah Mohd; Yip, Cheng-Har; Chung, Felicia Fei-Lei; Hii, Ling-Wei; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Leong, Chee-Onn

    2015-10-01

    Metformin, an AMPK activator, has been reported to improve pathological response to chemotherapy in diabetic breast cancer patients. To date, its mechanism of action in cancer, especially in cancer stem cells (CSCs) have not been fully elucidated. In this study, we demonstrated that metformin, but not other AMPK activators (e.g. AICAR and A-769662), synergizes 5-fluouracil, epirubicin, and cyclophosphamide (FEC) combination chemotherapy in non-stem breast cancer cells and breast cancer stem cells. We show that this occurs through an AMPK-dependent mechanism in parental breast cancer cell lines. In contrast, the synergistic effects of metformin and FEC occurred in an AMPK-independent mechanism in breast CSCs. Further analyses revealed that metformin accelerated glucose consumption and lactate production more severely in the breast CSCs but the production of intracellular ATP was severely hampered, leading to a severe energy crisis and impairs the ability of CSCs to repair FEC-induced DNA damage. Indeed, addition of extracellular ATP completely abrogated the synergistic effects of metformin on FEC sensitivity in breast CSCs. In conclusion, our results suggest that metformin synergizes FEC sensitivity through distinct mechanism in parental breast cancer cell lines and CSCs, thus providing further evidence for the clinical relevance of metformin for the treatment of cancers. PMID:26276035

  13. Difference in Membrane Repair Capacity Between Cancer Cell Lines and a Normal Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Frandsen, Stine Krog; McNeil, Anna K; Novak, Ivana; McNeil, Paul L; Gehl, Julie

    2016-08-01

    Electroporation-based treatments and other therapies that permeabilize the plasma membrane have been shown to be more devastating to malignant cells than to normal cells. In this study, we asked if a difference in repair capacity could explain this observed difference in sensitivity. Membrane repair was investigated by disrupting the plasma membrane using laser followed by monitoring fluorescent dye entry over time in seven cancer cell lines, an immortalized cell line, and a normal primary cell line. The kinetics of repair in living cells can be directly recorded using this technique, providing a sensitive index of repair capacity. The normal primary cell line of all tested cell lines exhibited the slowest rate of dye entry after laser disruption and lowest level of dye uptake. Significantly, more rapid dye uptake and a higher total level of dye uptake occurred in six of the seven tested cancer cell lines (p < 0.05) as well as the immortalized cell line (p < 0.001). This difference in sensitivity was also observed when a viability assay was performed one day after plasma membrane permeabilization by electroporation. Viability in the primary normal cell line (98 % viable cells) was higher than in the three tested cancer cell lines (81-88 % viable cells). These data suggest more effective membrane repair in normal, primary cells and supplement previous explanations why electroporation-based therapies and other therapies permeabilizing the plasma membrane are more effective on malignant cells compared to normal cells in cancer treatment. PMID:27312328

  14. CFTR protein repair therapy in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Quintana-Gallego, Esther; Delgado-Pecellín, Isabel; Calero Acuña, Carmen

    2014-04-01

    Cystic fibrosis is a single gene, autosomal recessive disorder, in which more than 1,900 mutations grouped into 6 classes have been described. It is an example a disease that could be well placed to benefit from personalised medicine. There are currently 2 very different approaches that aim to correct the basic defect: gene therapy, aimed at correcting the genetic alteration, and therapy aimed at correcting the defect in the CFTR protein. The latter is beginning to show promising results, with several molecules under development. Ataluren (PTC124) is a molecule designed to make the ribosomes become less sensitive to the premature stop codons responsible for class i mutations. Lumacaftor (VX-809) is a CFTR corrector directed at class ii mutations, among which Phe508del is the most frequent, with encouraging results. Ivacaftor (VX-770) is a potentiator, the only one marketed to date, which has shown good efficacy for the class iii mutation Gly551Asp in children over the age of 6 and adults. These drugs, or a combination of them, are currently undergoing various clinical trials for other less common genetic mutations. In the last 5 years, CFTR has been designated as a therapeutic target. Ivacaftor is the first drug to treat the basic defect in cystic fibrosis, but only provides a response in a small number of patients. New drugs capable of restoring the CFTR protein damaged by the most common mutations are required. PMID:24095197

  15. Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm repair.

    PubMed

    Kurzencwyg, David; Filion, Kristian B; Pilote, Louise; Nault, Patrice; Platt, Robert W; Rahme, Elham; Steinmetz, Oren; Eisenberg, Mark J

    2006-09-01

    Open abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair is a common surgical procedure associated with high mortality rates. Our objective was to describe the use of in-hospital cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing open AAA repair and to examine the effect of perioperative cardiac medical therapy on in-hospital mortality. We examined clinical data and in-hospital medication use among 223 patients who underwent open AAA repair at three North American hospitals, all of which used the Transition resource and cost accounting system. Medication use was described [angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, aspirin, ss-blockers, and statins] within the cohort at five specific periods of time: presurgery, day of surgery, 1 day after surgery, postsurgery, and discharge. We then performed a matched case-control study where cases were defined as patients who died in-hospital. We compared medication use between cases and controls to assess its impact on in-hospital mortality. Most patients were elderly (mean age 72.5 +/- 9.8 years), 70.4% were male, and in-hospital mortality within the cohort was 10.8%. Medication use in all periods of administration was low. ss-Blocker use was highest among all classes on the day of surgery, with 20.6% of patients undergoing AAA repair receiving the medication. Less than 50% of patients received any of the medications at discharge. After adjusting for baseline differences, perioperative ACE inhibitor use showed a trend toward a protective effect [odds ratio (OR) = 0.09, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.01-1.31, p = 0.08], and perioperative ss-blocker use was significantly associated with a decrease in mortality (OR = 0.07, 95% CI 0.01-0.87, p = 0.04). Cardiac medical therapy among patients undergoing AAA repair is low throughout all periods of hospitalization. ACE inhibitor and ss-blocker use may be associated with decreased in-hospital mortality. PMID:16794911

  16. DNA repair in murine embryonic stem cells and differentiated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Tichy, Elisia D. Stambrook, Peter J.

    2008-06-10

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells are rapidly proliferating, self-renewing cells that have the capacity to differentiate into all three germ layers to form the embryo proper. Since these cells are critical for embryo formation, they must have robust prophylactic mechanisms to ensure that their genomic integrity is preserved. Indeed, several studies have suggested that ES cells are hypersensitive to DNA damaging agents and readily undergo apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells from the population. Other evidence suggests that DNA damage can cause premature differentiation in these cells. Several laboratories have also begun to investigate the role of DNA repair in the maintenance of ES cell genomic integrity. It does appear that ES cells differ in their capacity to repair damaged DNA compared to differentiated cells. This minireview focuses on repair mechanisms ES cells may use to help preserve genomic integrity and compares available data regarding these mechanisms with those utilized by differentiated cells.

  17. Caspase-1 mediates hyperlipidemia-weakened progenitor cell vessel repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ya-Feng; Huang, Xiao; Li, Xinyuan; Gong, Ren; Yin, Ying; Nelson, Jun; Gao, Erhe; Zhang, Hongyu; Hoffman, Nicholas E.; Houser, Steven R.; Madesh, Muniswamy; Tilley, Douglas G.; Choi, Eric T.; Jiang, Xiaohua; Huang, Cong-Xin; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Caspase-1 activation senses metabolic danger-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) and mediates the initiation of inflammation in endothelial cells. Here, we examined whether the caspase-1 pathway is responsible for sensing hyperlipidemia as a DAMP in bone marrow (BM)-derived Stem cell antigen-1 positive (Sca-1+) stem/progenitor cells and weakening their angiogenic ability. Using biochemical methods, gene knockout, cell therapy and myocardial infarction (MI) models, we had the following findings: 1) Hyperlipidemia induces caspase-1 activity in mouse Sca-1+ progenitor cells in vivo; 2) Caspase-1 contributes to hyperlipidemia-induced modulation of vascular cell death-related gene expression in vivo; 3) Injection of Sca-1+ progenitor cells from caspase-1−/− mice improves endothelial capillary density in heart and decreases cardiomyocyte death in a mouse model of MI; and 4) Caspase-1−/− Sca-1+ progenitor cell therapy improves mouse cardiac function after MI. Our results provide insight on how hyperlipidemia activates caspase-1 in Sca-1+ progenitor cells, which subsequently weakens Sca-1+ progenitor cell repair of vasculature injury. These results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of caspase-1 inhibition in improving progenitor cell therapy for MI. PMID:26709768

  18. Stem cells and cardiac repair: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Dinsmore, Jonathan H; Dib, Nabil

    2008-03-01

    Utilizing stem cells to repair the damaged heart has seen an intense amount of activity over the last 5 years or so. There are currently multiple clinical studies in progress to test the efficacy of various different cell therapy approaches for the repair of damaged myocardium that were only just beginning to be tested in preclinical animal studies a few years earlier. This rapid transition from preclinical to clinical testing is striking and is not typical of the customary timeframe for the progress of a therapy from bench-to-bedside. Doubtless, there will be many more trials to follow in the upcoming years. With the plethora of trials and cell alternatives, there has come not only great enthusiasm for the potential of the therapy, but also great confusion about what has been achieved. Cell therapy has the potential to do what no drug can: regenerate and replace damaged tissue with healthy tissue. Drugs may be effective at slowing the progression of heart failure, but none can stop or reverse the process. However, tissue repair is not a simple process, although the idea on its surface is quite simple. Understanding cells, the signals that they respond to, and the keys to appropriate survival and tissue formation are orders of magnitude more complicated than understanding the pathways targeted by most drugs. Drugs and their metabolites can be monitored, quantified, and their effects correlated to circulating levels in the body. Not so for most cell therapies. It is quite difficult to measure cell survival except through ex vivo techniques like histological analysis of the target organ. This makes the emphasis on preclinical research all the more important because it is only in the animal studies that research has the opportunity to readily harvest the target tissues and perform the detailed analyses of what has happened with the cells. This need for detailed and usually time-intensive research in animal studies stands in contrast to the rapidity with which

  19. Nonclinical safety strategies for stem cell therapies

    SciTech Connect

    Sharpe, Michaela E.; Morton, Daniel; Rossi, Annamaria

    2012-08-01

    Recent breakthroughs in stem cell biology, especially the development of the induced pluripotent stem cell techniques, have generated tremendous enthusiasm and efforts to explore the therapeutic potential of stem cells in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies are being considered for the treatment of degenerative diseases, inflammatory conditions, cancer and repair of damaged tissue. The safety of a stem cell therapy depends on many factors including the type of cell therapy, the differentiation status and proliferation capacity of the cells, the route of administration, the intended clinical location, long term survival of the product and/or engraftment, the need for repeated administration, the disease to be treated and the age of the population. Understanding the product profile of the intended therapy is crucial to the development of the nonclinical safety study design.

  20. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Vaibhav; Gerling, Ivan C; Mahato, Ram I

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells which have self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential into several mesenchymal lineages including bones, cartilages, adipose tissues and tendons. MSCs may repair tissue injuries and prevent immune cell activation and proliferation. Immunomodulation and secretion of growth factors by MSCs have led to realizing the true potential of MSC-based cell therapy. The use of MSCs as immunomodulators has been explored in cell/organ transplant, tissue repair, autoimmune diseases, and prevention of graft vs host disease (GVHD). This review focuses on the clinical applications of MSC-based cell therapy, with particular emphasis on islet transplantation for treating type I diabetes. PMID:23215004

  1. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mundra, Vaibhav; Gerling, Ivan C.; Mahato, Ram I.

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent adult stem cells which have self-renewal capacity and differentiation potential into several mesenchymal lineages including bones, cartilages, adipose tissues and tendons. MSCs may repair tissue injuries and prevent immune cell activation and proliferation. Immunomodulation and secretion of growth factors by MSCs have led to realizing the true potential of MSC-based cell therapy. The use of MSCs as immunomdulators has been explored in cell/organ transplant, tissue repair, autoimmune diseases and prevention of graft vs. host disease (GVHD). This review focuses on the clinical applications of MSC-based cell therapy, with particular emphasis on islet transplantation for treating type I diabetes. PMID:23215004

  2. Cell elimination as a strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Kalderon, Nurit

    2005-01-01

    Following injury, as part of the wound-healing process, cell proliferation occurs mostly to replace damaged cells and to reconstitute the tissue back to normal condition/function. In the spinal cord some of the dividing cells following injury interfere with the repair processes. This interference occurs at the later stages of wound healing (the third week after injury) triggering chronic inflammation and progressive tissue decay that is the characteristic pathology of spinal cord injury. Specific cell elimination within a critical time window after injury can lead to repair in the acutely injured spinal cord. Cell proliferation events can be manipulated/modified by x-irradiation. Clinically, numerous radiation protocols (i.e., radiation therapy) have been developed that specifically eliminate the rapidly dividing cells without causing any noticeable/significant damage to the tissue as a whole. Radiation therapy when applied within the critical time window after injury prevents the onset of chronic inflammation thus leading to repair of structure and function. Various aspects of the development of this cell-elimination strategy for repair in acute spinal cord injury by utilizing radiation therapy are being reviewed. Topics reviewed here: identifying the window of opportunity; and the beneficial repair effects of radiation therapy in a transection injury model and in a model relevant to human injury, the contusion injury model. The possible involvement of cellular components of the blood-spinal cord barrier as the trigger of chronic inflammation and/or target of the radiation therapy is discussed. PMID:15853680

  3. Cell-Based Therapies for Diabetic Retinopathy

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Lynn C.; Neu, Matthew B.; Grant, Maria B.

    2013-01-01

    Autologous endothelial progenitor cell (EPC) populations represent a novel treatment for therapeutic revascularization and vascular repair for diabetic patients with complications including diabetic retinopathy. Current therapies are applicable to late-stage disease and carry significant side effects, whereas cell-based therapy may provide an alternative by repairing areas of vasodegeneration and reversing ischemia. However, EPCs from diabetic patients with vascular complications are dysfunctional. Moreover, the diabetic environment poses its own challenges and complicates the use of autologous EPCs. Before EPCs become the ideal “cell therapy,” the optimal EPC must be determined, any functional dysfunction must be corrected prior to use, and the diabetic milieu will require modification to accept the EPCs. This review describes the rationale for harnessing the vascular reparative properties of EPCs with emphasis on the molecular and phenotypic nature of healthy EPCs, how diabetes alters them, and novel strategies to improve dysfunctional EPCs. PMID:21611766

  4. Coaxing stem cells for skeletal muscle repair

    PubMed Central

    McCullagh, Karl J.A.; Perlingeiro, Rita C. R.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle has a tremendous ability to regenerate, attributed to a well-defined population of muscle stem cells called satellite cells. However, this ability to regenerate diminishes with age and can also be dramatically affected by multiple types of muscle diseases, or injury. Extrinsic and/or intrinsic defects in the regulation of satellite cells are considered to be major determinants for the diminished regenerative capacity. Maintenance and replenishment of the satellite cell pool is one focus for muscle regenerative medicine, which will be discussed. There are other sources of progenitor cells with myogenic capacity, which may also support skeletal muscle repair. However, all of these myogenic cell populations have inherent difficulties and challenges in maintaining or coaxing their derivation for therapeutic purpose. This review will highlight recent reported attributes of these cells and new bioengineering approaches to creating a supply of myogenic stem cells or implants applicable for acute and/or chronic muscle disorders. PMID:25049085

  5. Stem cells and exosomes in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Singla, Dinender K

    2016-04-01

    Cardiac diseases currently lead in the number of deaths per year, giving rise an interest in transplanting embryonic and adult stem cells as a means to improve damaged tissue from conditions such as myocardial infarction and coronary artery disease. After testing these cells as a treatment option in both animal and human models, it is believed that these cells improve the damaged tissue primarily through the release of autocrine and paracrine factors. Major concerns such as teratoma formation, immune response, difficulty harvesting cells, and limited cell proliferation and differentiation, hinder the routine use of these cells as a treatment option in the clinic. The advent of stem cell-derived exosomes circumvent those concerns, while still providing the growth factors, miRNA, and additional cell protective factors that aid in repairing and regenerating the damaged tissue. These exosomes have been found to be anti-apoptotic, anti-fibrotic, pro-angiogenic, as well as enhance cardiac differentiation, all of which are key to repairing damaged tissue. As such, stem cell derived exosomes are considered to be a potential new and novel approach in the treatment of various cardiac diseases. PMID:26848944

  6. Mesothelial cells in tissue repair and fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mutsaers, Steven E.; Birnie, Kimberly; Lansley, Sally; Herrick, Sarah E.; Lim, Chuan-Bian; Prêle, Cecilia M.

    2015-01-01

    Mesothelial cells are fundamental to the maintenance of serosal integrity and homeostasis and play a critical role in normal serosal repair following injury. However, when normal repair mechanisms breakdown, mesothelial cells take on a profibrotic role, secreting inflammatory, and profibrotic mediators, differentiating and migrating into the injured tissues where they contribute to fibrogenesis. The development of new molecular and cell tracking techniques has made it possible to examine the origin of fibrotic cells within damaged tissues and to elucidate the roles they play in inflammation and fibrosis. In addition to secreting proinflammatory mediators and contributing to both coagulation and fibrinolysis, mesothelial cells undergo mesothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process analogous to epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, and become fibrogenic cells. Fibrogenic mesothelial cells have now been identified in tissues where they have not previously been thought to occur, such as within the parenchyma of the fibrotic lung. These findings show a direct role for mesothelial cells in fibrogenesis and open therapeutic strategies to prevent or reverse the fibrotic process. PMID:26106328

  7. Mesenchymal stromal cells for cartilage repair in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Mamidi, M K; Das, A K; Zakaria, Z; Bhonde, R

    2016-08-01

    Treatment for articular cartilage damage is quite challenging as it shows limited repair and regeneration following injury. Non-operative and classical surgical techniques are inefficient in restoring normal anatomy and function of cartilage in osteoarthritis (OA). Thus, investigating new and effective strategies for OA are necessary to establish feasible therapeutic solutions. The emergence of the new discipline of regenerative medicine, having cell-based therapy as its primary focus, may enable us to achieve repair and restore the damaged articular cartilage. This review describes progress and development of employing mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapy as a promising alternative for OA treatment. The objective of this review is to first, discuss how in vitro MSC chondrogenic differentiation mimics in vivo embryonic cartilage development, secondly, to describe various chondrogenic differentiation strategies followed by pre-clinical and clinical studies demonstrating their feasibility and efficacy. However, several challenges need to be tackled before this research can be translated to the clinics. In particular, better understanding of the post-transplanted cell behaviour and learning to enhance their potency in the disease microenvironment is essential. Final objective is to underscore the importance of isolation, storage, cell shipment, route of administration, optimum dosage and control batch to batch variations to realise the full potential of MSCs in OA clinical trials. PMID:26973328

  8. Myeloid Cells in Cutaneous Wound Repair.

    PubMed

    Cash, Jenna L; Martin, Paul

    2016-06-01

    Cutaneous wound repair is a complex, dynamic process with the goal of rapidly sealing any breach in the skin's protective barrier. Myeloid cells compose a significant proportion of the inflammatory cells recruited to a wound site and play important roles in decontaminating the injured tissue of any invading microorganisms. Subsequently, myeloid cells are able to influence many aspects of the healing response, in part through their capacity to release a large array of signaling molecules that allow them to communicate with and regulate the behavior of other wound cells and in turn, be themselves exquisitely regulated by the wound microenvironment. Macrophages, for example, appear to play important, temporally changing roles in the initiation of scarring and subsequently in matrix remodeling to resolve fibrosis. In this way, myeloid cells seem to play both positive (e.g., pathogen killing and matrix remodeling) and negative (e.g., scarring) roles in wound repair. Further research is of course needed to elucidate the precise temporal and spatial myeloid cell phenotypes and behaviors and ultimately to design effective strategies to optimize the beneficial functions of these cells while minimizing their detrimental contributions to improve wound healing in the clinic. PMID:27337466

  9. Intraoperative Stem Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Mónica Beato; Cabral, Joaquim M.S.; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cells hold significant promise for regeneration of tissue defects and disease-modifying therapies. Although numerous promising stem cell approaches are advancing in clinical trials, intraoperative stem cell therapies offer more immediate hope by integrating an autologous cell source with a well-established surgical intervention in a single procedure. Herein, the major developments in intraoperative stem cell approaches, from in vivo models to clinical studies, are reviewed, and the potential regenerative mechanisms and the roles of different cell populations in the regeneration process are discussed. Although intraoperative stem cell therapies have been shown to be safe and effective for several indications, there are still critical challenges to be tackled prior to adoption into the standard surgical armamentarium. PMID:22809140

  10. Acellular Biomaterials: An Evolving Alternative to Cell-Based Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.; Gorman, Joseph H.; Gorman, Robert C.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular biomaterials can stimulate the local environment to repair tissues without the regulatory and scientific challenges of cell-based therapies. A greater understanding of the mechanisms of such endogenous tissue repair is furthering the design and application of these biomaterials. We discuss recent progress in acellular materials for tissue repair, using cartilage and cardiac tissues as examples of applications with substantial intrinsic hurdles, but where human translation is now occurring. PMID:23486777

  11. The Challenge and the Promise of Bone Marrow Cells for Human Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The cartilage repair potential of bone marrow–derived stem cells has been well described. Harnessing this potential for human articular cartilage repair remains challenging. Accessing bone marrow repair cells through marrow stimulation techniques such as microfracture is readily achieved with generally good but inconsistent results. Animal and human studies show feasibility for ex vivo processing of bone marrow to isolate, concentrate, and culture mesenchymal stem cells. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to show consistent and clinically meaningful improvement using bone marrow cell preparations above what has been achieved with microfracture. Consequently, microfracture continues to be the simplest and most commonly used method to enhance repair of focal articular cartilage defects. Emerging preclinical work in the equine model suggests a role for enhancing marrow-stimulation techniques through the use of natural scaffolds such as autologous platelet enriched fibrin as well as optimization of joint biology through localized gene therapy to support cartilage repair. In contrast to joint replacement where inert materials of known mechanical properties are used, host biology determines the relative success, failure, and durability of cartilage repair. As such, development of personalized strategies to improve the quality and durability of bone marrow cell–based articular cartilage repair represent exciting new areas of inquiry. Continued advances in stem cell biology, scaffold technologies, and methods to delineate and enhance host biology, both systemically and within the joint, hold promise for harnessing the full power of bone marrow cells to facilitate cartilage repair and regeneration.

  12. Cell Therapy in Dermatology

    PubMed Central

    Petrof, Gabriela; Abdul-Wahab, Alya; McGrath, John A.

    2014-01-01

    Harnessing the regenerative capacity of keratinocytes and fibroblasts from human skin has created new opportunities to develop cell-based therapies for patients. Cultured cells and bioengineered skin products are being used to treat patients with inherited and acquired skin disorders associated with defective skin, and further clinical trials of new products are in progress. The capacity of extracutaneous sources of cells such as bone marrow is also being investigated for its plasticity in regenerating skin, and new strategies, such as the derivation of inducible pluripotent stem cells, also hold great promise for future cell therapies in dermatology. This article reviews some of the preclinical and clinical studies and future directions relating to cell therapy in dermatology, particularly for inherited skin diseases associated with fragile skin and poor wound healing. PMID:24890834

  13. Parthenogenetic stem cells for tissue-engineered heart repair

    PubMed Central

    Didié, Michael; Christalla, Peter; Rubart, Michael; Muppala, Vijayakumar; Döker, Stephan; Unsöld, Bernhard; El-Armouche, Ali; Rau, Thomas; Eschenhagen, Thomas; Schwoerer, Alexander P.; Ehmke, Heimo; Schumacher, Udo; Fuchs, Sigrid; Lange, Claudia; Becker, Alexander; Tao, Wen; Scherschel, John A.; Soonpaa, Mark H.; Yang, Tao; Lin, Qiong; Zenke, Martin; Han, Dong-Wook; Schöler, Hans R.; Rudolph, Cornelia; Steinemann, Doris; Schlegelberger, Brigitte; Kattman, Steve; Witty, Alec; Keller, Gordon; Field, Loren J.; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    Uniparental parthenotes are considered an unwanted byproduct of in vitro fertilization. In utero parthenote development is severely compromised by defective organogenesis and in particular by defective cardiogenesis. Although developmentally compromised, apparently pluripotent stem cells can be derived from parthenogenetic blastocysts. Here we hypothesized that nonembryonic parthenogenetic stem cells (PSCs) can be directed toward the cardiac lineage and applied to tissue-engineered heart repair. We first confirmed similar fundamental properties in murine PSCs and embryonic stem cells (ESCs), despite notable differences in genetic (allelic variability) and epigenetic (differential imprinting) characteristics. Haploidentity of major histocompatibility complexes (MHCs) in PSCs is particularly attractive for allogeneic cell-based therapies. Accordingly, we confirmed acceptance of PSCs in MHC-matched allotransplantation. Cardiomyocyte derivation from PSCs and ESCs was equally effective. The use of cardiomyocyte-restricted GFP enabled cell sorting and documentation of advanced structural and functional maturation in vitro and in vivo. This included seamless electrical integration of PSC-derived cardiomyocytes into recipient myocardium. Finally, we enriched cardiomyocytes to facilitate engineering of force-generating myocardium and demonstrated the utility of this technique in enhancing regional myocardial function after myocardial infarction. Collectively, our data demonstrate pluripotency, with unrestricted cardiogenicity in PSCs, and introduce this unique cell type as an attractive source for tissue-engineered heart repair. PMID:23434590

  14. Induced DNA repair pathway in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Overberg, R.

    1985-01-01

    The survival of cultured rat kangaroo cells (PtK-2) and human xeroderma pigmentosum cells incubated with 5 ..mu..M cycloheximide subsequent to ultraviolet irradiation is lower than that of cells incubated without cycloheximide. The drop in survival is considerably larger than that produced by incubation of unirradiated cells with cycloheximide. The phenomenon was also observed when PtK-2 cells were incubated with emetine, another protein synthesis inhibitor, or with 5,6-dichloro-1-..beta..-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, a RNA synthesis inhibitor. PtK cells which received a preliminary UV treatment followed by an incubation period without cycloheximide and then a second irradiation and 24 hour incubation with cycloheximide, survived the effects of the second irradiation better than cells which were incubated in the presence of cycloheximide after the first and second UV irradiation. The application of cycloheximide for 24 hours after UV irradiation of PtK cells resulted in one-half as many 6-thioguanine resistant cells as compared to the number of 6-thioguanine resistant cells found when cycloheximide was not used. These experiments indicate that a UV-inducible cycloheximide-sensitive DNA repair pathway is present in PtK and xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which is error-prone in PtK cells.

  15. Differential cell photosensitivity following porphyrin photodynamic therapy.

    PubMed

    Gomer, C J; Rucker, N; Murphree, A L

    1988-08-15

    Experiments were performed to determine if differences in porphyrin photosensitivity could be observed for cells with varying efficiency in DNA damage repair, as well as for cells which make up components of the vasculature. Photofrin II is undergoing current clinical evaluation for photodynamic therapy of solid tumors, and therefore the retention, dark toxicity, and photosensitizing effects of this drug on human DNA repair-deficient fibroblasts (ataxia telangiectasia and xeroderma pigmentosum) were compared to normal human fibroblasts. In addition, bovine cells of endothelial, smooth muscle, and fibroblast origin were compared for porphyrin retention, toxicity, and photosensitivity. All human fibroblasts exhibited porphyrin-induced dark toxicity, but there were no significant differences in photosensitization or porphyrin retention for any of these cell lines. However, bovine endothelial cells were considerably more photosensitive than smooth muscle or fibroblast cells treated under identical conditions. All bovine cells accumulated similar levels of porphyrin, and therefore the increased sensitivity of the endothelial cells was not due to differences in porphyrin retention. These results provide additional evidence that nuclear damage and/or repair is not a dominant factor in the cytotoxicity induced by porphyrin photosensitization. In addition, these results indicate that endothelial cell photosensitivity may play a role in the vascular damage observed following photodynamic therapy. PMID:2969280

  16. Adult stem cells for cardiac repair: a choice between skeletal myoblasts and bone marrow stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Lei; Haider, Husnain Kh; Sim, Eugene K W

    2006-01-01

    The real promise of a stem cell-based approach for cardiac regeneration and repair lies in the promotion of myogenesis and angiogenesis at the site of the cell graft to achieve both structural and functional benefits. Despite all of the progress and promise in this field, many unanswered questions remain; the answers to these questions will provide the much-needed breakthrough to harness the real benefits of cell therapy for the heart in the clinical perspective. One of the major issues is the choice of donor cell type for transplantation. Multiple cell types with varying potentials have been assessed for their ability to repopulate the infarcted myocardium; however, only the adult stem cells, that is, skeletal myoblasts (SkM) and bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMC), have been translated from the laboratory bench to clinical use. Which of these two cell types will provide the best option for clinical application in heart cell therapy remains arguable. With results pouring in from the long-term follow-ups of previously conducted phase I clinical studies, and with the onset of phase II clinical trials involving larger population of patients, transplantation of stem cells as a sole therapy without an adjunct conventional revascularization procedure will provide a deeper insight into the effectiveness of this approach. The present article discusses the pros and cons of using SkM and BMC individually or in combination for cardiac repair, and critically analyzes the progress made with each cell type. PMID:16380640

  17. Nanoparticle-based monitoring of cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenjie; Mu, Luye; Roes, Isaac; Miranda-Nieves, David; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Ankrum, James A; Zhao, Weian; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2012-01-01

    Exogenous cell therapy aims to replace/repair diseased or dysfunctional cells and promises to revolutionize medicine by restoring tissue and organ function. To develop effective cell therapy, the location, distribution and long-term persistence of transplanted cells must be evaluated. Nanoparticle (NP) based imaging technologies have the potential to track transplanted cells non-invasively. Here we summarize the most recent advances in NP-based cell tracking with emphasis on (1) the design criteria for cell tracking NPs, (2) protocols for cell labeling, (3) a comparison of available imaging modalities and their corresponding contrast agents, (4) a summary of preclinical studies on NP-based cell tracking and finally (5) perspectives and future directions. PMID:22101191

  18. Functional Polymorphisms of Base Excision Repair Genes XRCC1 and APEX1 Predict Risk of Radiation Pneumonitis in Patients With Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Definitive Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yin Ming; Liao Zhongxing; Liu Zhensheng; Wang, Li-E; Gomez, Daniel; Komaki, Ritsuko; Wei Qingyi

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To explore whether functional single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of base-excision repair genes are predictors of radiation treatment-related pneumonitis (RP), we investigated associations between functional SNPs of ADPRT, APEX1, and XRCC1 and RP development. Methods and Materials: We genotyped SNPs of ADPRT (rs1136410 [V762A]), XRCC1 (rs1799782 [R194W], rs25489 [R280H], and rs25487 [Q399R]), and APEX1 (rs1130409 [D148E]) in 165 patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who received definitive chemoradiation therapy. Results were assessed by both Logistic and Cox regression models for RP risk. Kaplan-Meier curves were generated for the cumulative RP probability by the genotypes. Results: We found that SNPs of XRCC1 Q399R and APEX1 D148E each had a significant effect on the development of Grade {>=}2 RP (XRCC1: AA vs. GG, adjusted hazard ratio [HR] = 0.48, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.24-0.97; APEX1: GG vs. TT, adjusted HR = 3.61, 95% CI, 1.64-7.93) in an allele-dose response manner (Trend tests: p = 0.040 and 0.001, respectively). The number of the combined protective XRCC1 A and APEX1 T alleles (from 0 to 4) also showed a significant trend of predicting RP risk (p = 0.001). Conclusions: SNPs of the base-excision repair genes may be biomarkers for susceptibility to RP. Larger prospective studies are needed to validate our findings.

  19. Stem cells and injectable hydrogels: Synergistic therapeutics in myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Sepantafar, Mohammadmajid; Maheronnaghsh, Reihan; Mohammadi, Hossein; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Annabi, Nasim; Aghdami, Nasser; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    One of the major problems in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases is the inability of myocardium to self-regenerate. Current therapies are unable to restore the heart's function after myocardial infarction. Myocardial tissue engineering is potentially a key approach to regenerate damaged heart muscle. Myocardial patches are applied surgically, whereas injectable hydrogels provide effective minimally invasive approaches to recover functional myocardium. These hydrogels are easily administered and can be either cell free or loaded with bioactive agents and/or cardiac stem cells, which may apply paracrine effects. The aim of this review is to investigate the advantages and disadvantages of injectable stem cell-laden hydrogels and highlight their potential applications for myocardium repair. PMID:26976812

  20. New design of nucleotide excision repair (NER) inhibitors for combination cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Gentile, Francesco; Tuszynski, Jack A; Barakat, Khaled H

    2016-04-01

    Many cancer chemotherapy agents act by targeting the DNA of cancer cells, causing substantial damage within their genome and causing them to undergo apoptosis. An effective DNA repair pathway in cancer cells can act in a reverse way by removing these drug-induced DNA lesions, allowing cancer cells to survive, grow and proliferate. In this context, DNA repair inhibitors opened a new avenue in cancer treatment, by blocking the DNA repair mechanisms from removing the chemotherapy-mediated DNA damage. In particular, the nucleotide excision repair (NER) involves more than thirty protein-protein interactions and removes DNA adducts caused by platinum-based chemotherapy. The excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1)-xeroderma pigmentosum, complementation group A (XPA) protein (XPA-ERCC1) complex seems to be one of the most promising targets in this pathway. ERCC1 is over expressed in cancer cells and the only known cellular function so far for XPA is to recruit ERCC1 to the damaged point. Here, we build upon our recent advances in identifying inhibitors for this interaction and continue our efforts to rationally design more effective and potent regulators for the NER pathway. We employed in silico drug design techniques to: (1) identify compounds similar to the recently discovered inhibitors, but more effective at inhibiting the XPA-ERCC1 interactions, and (2) identify different scaffolds to develop novel lead compounds. Two known inhibitor structures have been used as starting points for two ligand/structure-hybrid virtual screening approaches. The findings described here form a milestone in discovering novel inhibitors for the NER pathway aiming at improving the efficacy of current platinum-based therapy, by modulating the XPA-ERCC1 interaction. PMID:26939044

  1. Anti-muscarinic adjunct therapy accelerates functional human oligodendrocyte repair.

    PubMed

    Abiraman, Kavitha; Pol, Suyog U; O'Bara, Melanie A; Chen, Guang-Di; Khaku, Zainab M; Wang, Jing; Thorn, David; Vedia, Bansi H; Ekwegbalu, Ezinne C; Li, Jun-Xu; Salvi, Richard J; Sim, Fraser J

    2015-02-25

    Therapeutic repair of myelin disorders may be limited by the relatively slow rate of human oligodendrocyte differentiation. To identify appropriate pharmacological targets with which to accelerate differentiation of human oligodendrocyte progenitors (hOPCs) directly, we used CD140a/O4-based FACS of human forebrain and microarray to hOPC-specific receptors. Among these, we identified CHRM3, a M3R muscarinic acetylcholine receptor, as being restricted to oligodendrocyte-biased CD140a(+)O4(+) cells. Muscarinic agonist treatment of hOPCs resulted in a specific and dose-dependent blockade of oligodendrocyte commitment. Conversely, when hOPCs were cocultured with human neurons, M3R antagonist treatment stimulated oligodendrocytic differentiation. Systemic treatment with solifenacin, an FDA-approved muscarinic receptor antagonist, increased oligodendrocyte differentiation of transplanted hOPCs in hypomyelinated shiverer/rag2 brain. Importantly, solifenacin treatment of engrafted animals reduced auditory brainstem response interpeak latency, indicative of increased conduction velocity and thereby enhanced functional repair. Therefore, solifenacin and other selective muscarinic antagonists represent new adjunct approaches to accelerate repair by engrafted human progenitors. PMID:25716865

  2. Acetylation regulates DNA repair mechanisms in human cells.

    PubMed

    Piekna-Przybylska, Dorota; Bambara, Robert A; Balakrishnan, Lata

    2016-06-01

    The p300-mediated acetylation of enzymes involved in DNA repair and replication has been previously shown to stimulate or inhibit their activities in reconstituted systems. To explore the role of acetylation on DNA repair in cells we constructed plasmid substrates carrying inactivating damages in the EGFP reporter gene, which should be repaired in cells through DNA mismatch repair (MMR) or base excision repair (BER) mechanisms. We analyzed efficiency of repair within these plasmid substrates in cells exposed to deacetylase and acetyltransferase inhibitors, and also in cells deficient in p300 acetyltransferase. Our results indicate that protein acetylation improves DNA mismatch repair in MMR-proficient HeLa cells and also in MMR-deficient HCT116 cells. Moreover, results suggest that stimulated repair of mismatches in MMR-deficient HCT116 cells is done though a strand-displacement synthesis mechanism described previously for Okazaki fragments maturation and also for the EXOI-independent pathway of MMR. Loss of p300 reduced repair of mismatches in MMR-deficient cells, but did not have evident effects on BER mechanisms, including the long patch BER pathway. Hypoacetylation of the cells in the presence of acetyltransferase inhibitor, garcinol generally reduced efficiency of BER of 8-oxoG damage, indicating that some steps in the pathway are stimulated by acetylation. PMID:27104361

  3. Inhibition of Topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1): DNA Damage Repair and Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Her, Chengtao

    2015-01-01

    Most chemotherapy regimens contain at least one DNA-damaging agent that preferentially affects the growth of cancer cells. This strategy takes advantage of the differences in cell proliferation between normal and cancer cells. Chemotherapeutic drugs are usually designed to target rapid-dividing cells because sustained proliferation is a common feature of cancer [1,2]. Rapid DNA replication is essential for highly proliferative cells, thus blocking of DNA replication will create numerous mutations and/or chromosome rearrangements—ultimately triggering cell death [3]. Along these lines, DNA topoisomerase inhibitors are of great interest because they help to maintain strand breaks generated by topoisomerases during replication. In this article, we discuss the characteristics of topoisomerase (DNA) I (TOP1) and its inhibitors, as well as the underlying DNA repair pathways and the use of TOP1 inhibitors in cancer therapy. PMID:26287259

  4. Progenitor cells for ocular surface regenerative therapy.

    PubMed

    Casaroli-Marano, Ricardo P; Nieto-Nicolau, Nuria; Martínez-Conesa, Eva M

    2013-01-01

    The integrity and normal function of the corneal epithelium are essential for maintaining the cornea's transparency and vision. The existence of a cell population with progenitor characteristics in the limbus maintains a dynamic of constant epithelial repair and renewal. Currently, cell-based therapies for bio-replacement, such as cultured limbal epithelial transplantation and cultured oral mucosal epithelial transplantation, present very encouraging clinical results for treating limbal stem cell deficiencies. Another emerging therapeutic strategy consists of obtaining and implementing human progenitor cells of different origins using tissue engineering methods. The development of cell-based therapies using stem cells, such as human adult mesenchymal stromal cells, represents a significant breakthrough in the treatment of certain eye diseases and also offers a more rational, less invasive and more physiological approach to ocular surface regeneration. PMID:23257987

  5. Mismatch Repair and Colon Cancer: Mechanisms and Therapies Explored.

    PubMed

    Li, Stephen K H; Martin, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most prevalent cancers worldwide. In sporadic CRC, mutations frequently occur in the DNA mismatch repair (MMR) pathway. In addition, germline MMR mutations have been linked to Lynch syndrome, the most common form of hereditary CRC. Although genetic mutations, diet, inflammation, and the gut microbiota can influence CRC, it is unclear how MMR deficiency relates to these factors to modulate disease. In this review, the association of MMR to the etiology of CRC is examined, particularly in the context of microRNAs (miRNAs), inflammation, and the microbiome. We also discuss the most current targeted therapies, methods of prevention, and molecular biomarkers against MMR-deficient CRC, all of which are encouraging advancements in the field. PMID:26970951

  6. Cell therapy for cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Sean V; Atala, Anthony

    2015-03-01

    Currently there is no cure for cystic fibrosis (CF). Treatments are focused on addressing the disease symptoms, with varying degrees of success. Regenerative medicine holds the promise of regenerating dysfunctional or damaged tissues and to enhance the body's own endogenous repair mechanisms. The discovery of endogenous and exogenous stem cells has provided valuable tools for development of novel treatments for CF. The ability of stem cells to differentiate into functional pulmonary cells, modulate inflammatory responses and contribute to pulmonary function has provided researchers with multiple approaches to develop effective treatment strategies. Several approaches show promise to produce viable therapeutic treatments to treat the underlying cause of CF, reduce the symptoms and mitigate long-term damage, and generate functional replacement organs for end-stage transplantation. This review provides an overview of the rapidly progressing field of cell therapy for CF, focusing on the various cell types utilized and current strategies that show promise to improve life expectancy and quality of life for CF patients. PMID:23894126

  7. A stem cell-based approach to cartilage repair.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Kristen; Zhu, Shoutian; Tremblay, Matthew S; Payette, Joshua N; Wang, Jianing; Bouchez, Laure C; Meeusen, Shelly; Althage, Alana; Cho, Charles Y; Wu, Xu; Schultz, Peter G

    2012-05-11

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a degenerative joint disease that involves the destruction of articular cartilage and eventually leads to disability. Molecules that promote the selective differentiation of multipotent mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) into chondrocytes may stimulate the repair of damaged cartilage. Using an image-based high-throughput screen, we identified the small molecule kartogenin, which promotes chondrocyte differentiation (median effective concentration = 100 nM), shows chondroprotective effects in vitro, and is efficacious in two OA animal models. Kartogenin binds filamin A, disrupts its interaction with the transcription factor core-binding factor β subunit (CBFβ), and induces chondrogenesis by regulating the CBFβ-RUNX1 transcriptional program. This work provides new insights into the control of chondrogenesis that may ultimately lead to a stem cell-based therapy for osteoarthritis. PMID:22491093

  8. TRIM72 modulates caveolar endocytosis in repair of lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja; Wang, Shaohua; Kellett, Thomas; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Deng, Jing; Nishi, Miyuki; Shilo, Konstantin; Oeckler, Richard A; Yalowich, Jack C; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Christman, John; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar epithelial and endothelial cell injury is a major feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, in particular when in conjunction with ventilation therapies. Previously we showed [Kim SC, Kellett T, Wang S, Nishi M, Nagre N, Zhou B, Flodby P, Shilo K, Ghadiali SN, Takeshima H, Hubmayr RD, Zhao X. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 307: L449-L459, 2014.] that tripartite motif protein 72 (TRIM72) is essential for amending alveolar epithelial cell injury. Here, we posit that TRIM72 improves cellular integrity through its interaction with caveolin 1 (Cav1). Our data show that, in primary type I alveolar epithelial cells, lack of TRIM72 led to significant reduction of Cav1 at the plasma membrane, accompanied by marked attenuation of caveolar endocytosis. Meanwhile, lentivirus-mediated overexpression of TRIM72 selectively increases caveolar endocytosis in rat lung epithelial cells, suggesting a functional association between these two. Further coimmunoprecipitation assays show that deletion of either functional domain of TRIM72, i.e., RING, B-box, coiled-coil, or PRY-SPRY, abolishes the physical interaction between TRIM72 and Cav1, suggesting that all theoretical domains of TRIM72 are required to forge a strong interaction between these two molecules. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that injurious ventilation-induced lung cell death was significantly increased in knockout (KO) TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) lungs compared with wild-type controls and was particularly pronounced in double KO mutants. Apoptosis was accompanied by accentuation of gross lung injury manifestations in the TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) mice. Our data show that TRIM72 directly and indirectly modulates caveolar endocytosis, an essential process involved in repair of lung epithelial cells through removal of plasma membrane wounds. Given TRIM72's role in endomembrane trafficking and cell repair, we consider this molecule an attractive therapeutic target for patients with injured lungs. PMID

  9. Regenerative cell imaging in cardiac repair.

    PubMed

    Moudgil, Rohit; Dick, Alexander J

    2014-11-01

    Heart disease continues to be a leading cause of death in the Western world. Although strides have been made in prevention and management of coronary artery disease, lost myocardium after an ischemic event remains at the core of the morbidity and the mortality. Poor regenerative capacity of the myocardium has led to the study of cell-based therapies to restore anatomical, functional, and viable myocardium. To that end, stem cells are undifferentiated cells that are self-renewing, clonogenic, and pluripotent and therefore ideal for the restorative job. However, to refine the technique of cell-based therapy, in vivo molecular assessment is imperative to monitor cell survival and their effect on myocardial restoration. Direct imaging of the behaviour of cells after implantation into living subjects can offer great insight into their mechanisms of action, and their therapeutic efficacy. In this article we explore current knowledge of various imaging modalities that have been used to assess in vivo cellular and molecular events after administration of stem cells in injured myocardium. The goal of the article is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature, highlight various imaging modalities, and suggest some of the key concepts on the horizon in cardiac stem cell imaging. PMID:25442433

  10. Targeting DNA repair by coDbait enhances melanoma targeted radionuclide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Viallard, Claire; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Mishellany, Florence; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle; Pereira, Bruno; Herbette, Aurélie; Besse, Sophie; Boudhraa, Zied; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Cayre, Anne; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie; Degoul, Françoise

    2016-01-01

    Radiolabelled melanin ligands offer an interesting strategy for the treatment of disseminated pigmented melanoma. One of these molecules, ICF01012 labelled with iodine 131, induced a significant slowing of melanoma growth. Here, we have explored the combination of [131I]ICF01012 with coDbait, a DNA repair inhibitor, to overcome melanoma radioresistance and increase targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) efficacy. In human SK-Mel 3 melanoma xenograft, the addition of coDbait had a synergistic effect on tumor growth and median survival. The anti-tumor effect was additive in murine syngeneic B16Bl6 model whereas coDbait combination with [131I]ICF01012 did not increase TRT side effects in secondary pigmented tissues (e.g. hair follicles, eyes). Our results confirm that DNA lesions induced by TRT were not enhanced with coDbait association but, the presence of micronuclei and cell cycle blockade in tumor shows that coDbait acts by interrupting or delaying DNA repair. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, the usefulness of DNA repair traps in the context of targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:26887045

  11. Targeting DNA repair by coDbait enhances melanoma targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Viallard, Claire; Chezal, Jean-Michel; Mishellany, Florence; Ranchon-Cole, Isabelle; Pereira, Bruno; Herbette, Aurélie; Besse, Sophie; Boudhraa, Zied; Jacquemot, Nathalie; Cayre, Anne; Miot-Noirault, Elisabeth; Sun, Jian-Sheng; Dutreix, Marie; Degoul, Françoise

    2016-03-15

    Radiolabelled melanin ligands offer an interesting strategy for the treatment of disseminated pigmented melanoma. One of these molecules, ICF01012 labelled with iodine 131, induced a significant slowing of melanoma growth. Here, we have explored the combination of [131I]ICF01012 with coDbait, a DNA repair inhibitor, to overcome melanoma radioresistance and increase targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) efficacy. In human SK-Mel 3 melanoma xenograft, the addition of coDbait had a synergistic effect on tumor growth and median survival. The anti-tumor effect was additive in murine syngeneic B16Bl6 model whereas coDbait combination with [131I]ICF01012 did not increase TRT side effects in secondary pigmented tissues (e.g. hair follicles, eyes). Our results confirm that DNA lesions induced by TRT were not enhanced with coDbait association but, the presence of micronuclei and cell cycle blockade in tumor shows that coDbait acts by interrupting or delaying DNA repair. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time, the usefulness of DNA repair traps in the context of targeted radionuclide therapy. PMID:26887045

  12. DNA damage induced by boron neutron capture therapy is partially repaired by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Natsuko; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Hirota, Yuki; Tanaka, Hiroki; Watanabe, Tsubasa; Nakagawa, Yosuke; Narabayashi, Masaru; Kinashi, Yuko; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Hasegawa, Masatoshi; Suzuki, Minoru; Masunaga, Shin-ichiro; Ohnishi, Takeo; Ono, Koji

    2016-03-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a particle radiation therapy that involves the use of a thermal or epithermal neutron beam in combination with a boron ((10)B)-containing compound that specifically accumulates in tumor. (10)B captures neutrons and the resultant fission reaction produces an alpha ((4)He) particle and a recoiled lithium nucleus ((7)Li). These particles have the characteristics of high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation and therefore have marked biological effects. High-LET radiation is a potent inducer of DNA damage, specifically of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of DNA ligase IV, a key player in the non-homologous end-joining repair pathway, in the repair of BNCT-induced DSBs. We analyzed the cellular sensitivity of the mouse embryonic fibroblast cell lines Lig4-/- p53-/- and Lig4+/+ p53-/- to irradiation using a thermal neutron beam in the presence or absence of (10)B-para-boronophenylalanine (BPA). The Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line had a higher sensitivity than the Lig4+/+ p53-/-cell line to irradiation with the beam alone or the beam in combination with BPA. In BNCT (with BPA), both cell lines exhibited a reduction of the 50 % survival dose (D 50) by a factor of 1.4 compared with gamma-ray and neutron mixed beam (without BPA). Although it was found that (10)B uptake was higher in the Lig4+/+ p53-/- than in the Lig4-/- p53-/- cell line, the latter showed higher sensitivity than the former, even when compared at an equivalent (10)B concentration. These results indicate that BNCT-induced DNA damage is partially repaired using DNA ligase IV. PMID:26573366

  13. Daylight vision repair by cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Postel, Kai; Stutzki, Henrike; Kurth, Thomas; Zeck, Günther; Ader, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Human daylight vision depends on cone photoreceptors and their degeneration results in visual impairment and blindness as observed in several eye diseases including age-related macular degeneration, cone-rod dystrophies, or late stage retinitis pigmentosa, with no cure available. Preclinical cell replacement approaches in mouse retina have been focusing on rod dystrophies, due to the availability of sufficient donor material from the rod-dominated mouse retina, leaving the development of treatment options for cone degenerations not well studied. Thus, an abundant and traceable source for donor cone-like photoreceptors was generated by crossing neural retina leucine zipper-deficient (Nrl(-/-) ) mice with an ubiquitous green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter line resulting in double transgenic tg(Nrl(-/-); aGFP) mice. In Nrl(-/-) retinas, all rods are converted into cone-like photoreceptors that express CD73 allowing their enrichment by CD73-based magnetic activated cell sorting prior transplantation into the subretinal space of adult wild-type, cone-only (Nrl(-/-)), or cone photoreceptor function loss 1 (Cpfl1) mice. Donor cells correctly integrated into host retinas, acquired mature photoreceptor morphology, expressed cone-specific markers, and survived for up to 6 months, with significantly increased integration rates in the cone-only Nrl(-/-) retina. Individual retinal ganglion cell recordings demonstrated the restoration of photopic responses in cone degeneration mice following transplantation suggesting, for the first time, the feasibility of daylight vision repair by cell replacement in the adult mammalian retina. PMID:25183393

  14. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  15. Stem Cells for Temporomandibular Joint Repair and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shipin; Yap, Adrian U J; Toh, Wei Seong

    2015-10-01

    Temporomandibular Disorders (TMD) represent a heterogeneous group of musculoskeletal and neuromuscular conditions involving the temporomandibular joint (TMJ), masticatory muscles and/or associated structures. They are a major cause of non-dental orofacial pain. As a group, they are often multi-factorial in nature and have no common etiology or biological explanations. TMD can be broadly divided into masticatory muscle and TMJ disorders. TMJ disorders are characterized by intra-articular positional and/or structural abnormalities. The most common type of TMJ disorders involves displacement of the TMJ articular disc that precedes progressive degenerative changes of the joint leading to osteoarthritis (OA). In the past decade, progress made in the development of stem cell-based therapies and tissue engineering have provided alternative methods to attenuate the disease symptoms and even replace the diseased tissue in the treatment of TMJ disorders. Resident mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been isolated from the synovia of TMJ, suggesting an important role in the repair and regeneration of TMJ. The seminal discovery of pluripotent stem cells including embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have provided promising cell sources for drug discovery, transplantation as well as for tissue engineering of TMJ condylar cartilage and disc. This review discusses the most recent advances in development of stem cell-based treatments for TMJ disorders through innovative approaches of cell-based therapeutics, tissue engineering and drug discovery. PMID:26123357

  16. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging. PMID:26879629

  17. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. ); Chen, D.S. . Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  18. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  19. DNA INTERSTRAND CROSSLINK REPAIR IN MAMMALIAN CELLS: STEP BY STEP

    PubMed Central

    Muniandy, Parameswary; Liu, Jia; Majumdar, Alokes; Liu, Su-ting; Seidman, Michael M.

    2009-01-01

    Interstrand DNA crosslinks (ICLs) are formed by natural products of metabolism and by chemotherapeutic reagents. Work in E. coli identified a two cycle repair scheme involving incisions on one strand on either side of the ICL (unhooking) producing a gapped intermediate with the incised oligonucleotide attached to the intact strand. The gap is filled by recombinational repair or lesion bypass synthesis. The remaining monoadduct is then removed by Nucleotide Excision Repair (NER). Despite considerable effort, our understanding of each step in mammalian cells is still quite limited. In part this reflects the variety of crosslinking compounds, each with distinct structural features, used by different investigators. Also, multiple repair pathways are involved, variably operative during the cell cycle. G1 phase repair requires functions from NER, although the mechanism of recognition has not been determined. Repair can be initiated by encounters with the transcriptional apparatus, or a replication fork. In the case of the latter, the reconstruction of a replication fork, stalled or broken by collision with an ICL, adds to the complexity of the repair process. The enzymology of unhooking, the identity of the lesion bypass polymerases required to fill the first repair gap, and the functions involved in the second repair cycle are all subjects of active inquiry. Here we will review current understanding of each step in ICL repair in mammalian cells. PMID:20039786

  20. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  1. Human Liver Progenitor Cells for Liver Repair

    PubMed Central

    Lombard, Catherine A.; Prigent, Julie; Sokal, Etienne M.

    2013-01-01

    Because of their high proliferative capacity, resistance to cryopreservation, and ability to differentiate into hepatocyte-like cells, stem and progenitor cells have recently emerged as attractive cell sources for liver cell therapy, a technique used as an alternative to orthotopic liver transplantation in the treatment of various hepatic ailments ranging from metabolic disorders to end-stage liver disease. Although stem and progenitor cells have been isolated from various tissues, obtaining them from the liver could be an advantage for the treatment of hepatic disorders. However, the techniques available to isolate these stem/progenitor cells are numerous and give rise to cell populations with different morphological and functional characteristics. In addition, there is currently no established consensus on the tests that need to be performed to ensure the quality and safety of these cells when used clinically. The purpose of this review is to describe the different types of liver stem/progenitor cells currently reported in the literature, discuss their suitability and limitations in terms of clinical applications, and examine how the culture and transplantation techniques can potentially be improved to achieve a better clinical outcome. PMID:26858860

  2. DNA damage and gene therapy of xeroderma pigmentosum, a human DNA repair-deficient disease.

    PubMed

    Dupuy, Aurélie; Sarasin, Alain

    2015-06-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) is a genetic disease characterized by hypersensitivity to ultra-violet and a very high risk of skin cancer induction on exposed body sites. This syndrome is caused by germinal mutations on nucleotide excision repair genes. No cure is available for these patients except a complete protection from all types of UV radiations. We reviewed the various techniques to complement or to correct the genetic defect in XP cells. We, particularly, developed the correction of XP-C skin cells using the fidelity of the homologous recombination pathway during repair of double-strand break (DSB) in the presence of XPC wild type sequences. We used engineered nucleases (meganuclease or TALE nuclease) to induce a DSB located at 90 bp of the mutation to be corrected. Expression of specific TALE nuclease in the presence of a repair matrix containing a long stretch of homologous wild type XPC sequences allowed us a successful gene correction of the original TG deletion found in numerous North African XP patients. Some engineered nucleases are sensitive to epigenetic modifications, such as cytosine methylation. In case of methylated sequences to be corrected, modified nucleases or demethylation of the whole genome should be envisaged. Overall, we showed that specifically-designed TALE-nuclease allowed us to correct a 2 bp deletion in the XPC gene leading to patient's cells proficient for DNA repair and showing normal UV-sensitivity. The corrected gene is still in the same position in the human genome and under the regulation of its physiological promoter. This result is a first step toward gene therapy in XP patients. PMID:26255934

  3. Systems Approaches to Preventing Transplanted Cell Death in Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Thomas E.; Saiget, Mark K; Reinecke, Hans; Murry, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation may repair the injured heart, but tissue regeneration is limited by death of transplanted cells. Most cell death occurs in the first few days post-transplantation, likely from a combination of ischemia, anoikis and inflammation. Interventions known to enhance transplanted cell survival include heat shock, over-expressing anti-apoptotic proteins, free radical scavengers, anti-inflammatory therapy and co-delivery of extracellular matrix molecules. Combinatorial use of such interventions markedly enhances graft cell survival, but death still remains a significant problem. We review these challenges to cardiac cell transplantation and present an approach to systematically address them. Most anti-death studies use histology to assess engraftment, which is time- and labor-intensive. To increase throughput, we developed two biochemical approaches to follow graft viability in the mouse heart. The first relies on LacZ enyzmatic activity to track genetically modified cells, and the second quantifies human genomic DNA content using repetitive Alu sequences. Both show linear relationships between input cell number and biochemical signal, but require correction for the time lag between cell death and loss of signal. Once optimized, they permit detection of as few as 1 graft cell in 40,000 host cells. Pro-survival effects measured biochemically at three days predict long-term histological engraftment benefits. These methods permitted identification of carbamylated erythropoietin (CEPO) as a pro-survival factor for human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte grafts. CEPO’s effects were additive to heat shock, implying independent survival pathways. This system should permit combinatorial approaches to enhance graft viability in a fraction of the time required for conventional histology. PMID:18466917

  4. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Brignier, Anne C; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2010-02-01

    There are many types of stem cells. All share the characteristics of being able to self-renew and to give rise to differentiated progeny. Over the last decades, great excitement has been generated by the prospect of being able to exploit these properties for the repair, improvement, and/or replacement of damaged organs. However, many hurdles, both scientific and ethical, remain in the path of using human embryonic stem cells for tissue-engineering purposes. In this report we review current strategies for isolating, enriching, and, most recently, inducing the development of human pluripotent stem cells. In so doing, we discuss the scientific and ethical issues associated with this endeavor. Finally, progress in the use of stem cells as therapies for type 1 diabetes mellitus, congestive heart failure, and various neurologic and immunohematologic disorders, and as vehicles for the delivery of gene therapy, is briefly discussed. PMID:20061008

  5. Stem cell therapies and regenerative medicine in China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sha; Fu, XiaoBing

    2014-02-01

    Stem cells are the core of tissue repair and regeneration, and a promising cell source for novel therapies. In recent years, research into stem cell therapies has been particularly exciting in China. The remarkable advancements in basic stem cell research and clinically effective trials have led to fresh insights into regenerative medicine, such as treatments for sweat gland injury after burns, diabetes, and liver injury. High hopes have inspired numerous experimental and clinical trials. At the same time, government investment and policy support of research continues to increase markedly. However, numerous challenges must be overcome before novel stem cell therapies can achieve meaningful clinical outcomes. PMID:24430560

  6. The repair Schwann cell and its function in regenerating nerves.

    PubMed

    Jessen, K R; Mirsky, R

    2016-07-01

    Nerve injury triggers the conversion of myelin and non-myelin (Remak) Schwann cells to a cell phenotype specialized to promote repair. Distal to damage, these repair Schwann cells provide the necessary signals and spatial cues for the survival of injured neurons, axonal regeneration and target reinnervation. The conversion to repair Schwann cells involves de-differentiation together with alternative differentiation, or activation, a combination that is typical of cell type conversions often referred to as (direct or lineage) reprogramming. Thus, injury-induced Schwann cell reprogramming involves down-regulation of myelin genes combined with activation of a set of repair-supportive features, including up-regulation of trophic factors, elevation of cytokines as part of the innate immune response, myelin clearance by activation of myelin autophagy in Schwann cells and macrophage recruitment, and the formation of regeneration tracks, Bungner's bands, for directing axons to their targets. This repair programme is controlled transcriptionally by mechanisms involving the transcription factor c-Jun, which is rapidly up-regulated in Schwann cells after injury. In the absence of c-Jun, damage results in the formation of a dysfunctional repair cell, neuronal death and failure of functional recovery. c-Jun, although not required for Schwann cell development, is therefore central to the reprogramming of myelin and non-myelin (Remak) Schwann cells to repair cells after injury. In future, the signalling that specifies this cell requires further analysis so that pharmacological tools that boost and maintain the repair Schwann cell phenotype can be developed. PMID:26864683

  7. Cell therapy for stroke.

    PubMed

    Savitz, Sean I; Dinsmore, Jonathan H; Wechsler, Lawrence R; Rosenbaum, Daniel M; Caplan, Louis R

    2004-10-01

    Increasing experimental evidence suggests that cell transplantation can enhance recovery from stroke in animal models of focal cerebral ischemia. Clinical trials have been investigating the effects of a human immortalized neuronal cell line and porcine fetal neurons in stroke victims with persistent and stable deficits. Preclinical studies are focusing on the effects of human stem cells from various sources including brain, bone marrow, umbilical cord, and adipose tissue. This review presents an overview of preclinical and clinical studies on cell therapy for stroke. We emphasize the current, limited knowledge about the biology of implant sources and discuss special conditions in stroke that will impact the potential success of neurotransplantation in clinical trials. PMID:15717044

  8. Repair of traumatized mammalian hair cells via sea anemone repair proteins.

    PubMed

    Tang, Pei-Ciao; Smith, Karen Müller; Watson, Glen M

    2016-08-01

    Mammalian hair cells possess only a limited ability to repair damage after trauma. In contrast, sea anemones show a marked capability to repair damaged hair bundles by means of secreted repair proteins (RPs). Previously, it was found that recovery of traumatized hair cells in blind cavefish was enhanced by anemone-derived RPs; therefore, the ability of anemone RPs to assist recovery of damaged hair cells in mammals was tested here. After a 1 h incubation in RP-enriched culture media, uptake of FM1-43 by experimentally traumatized murine cochlear hair cells was restored to levels comparable to those exhibited by healthy controls. In addition, RP-treated explants had significantly more normally structured hair bundles than time-matched traumatized control explants. Collectively, these results indicate that anemone-derived RPs assist in restoring normal function and structure of experimentally traumatized hair cells of the mouse cochlea. PMID:27489215

  9. Scarring, stem cells, scaffolds and skin repair.

    PubMed

    Markeson, Daniel; Pleat, Jonathon M; Sharpe, Justin R; Harris, Adrian L; Seifalian, Alexander M; Watt, Suzanne M

    2015-06-01

    The treatment of full thickness skin loss, which can be extensive in the case of large burns, continues to represent a challenging clinical entity. This is due to an on-going inability to produce a suitable tissue engineered substrate that can satisfactorily replicate the epidermal and dermal in vivo niches to fulfil both aesthetic and functional demands. The current gold standard treatment of autologous skin grafting is inadequate because of poor textural durability, scarring and associated contracture, and because of a paucity of donor sites in larger burns. Tissue engineering has seen exponential growth in recent years with a number of 'off-the-shelf' dermal and epidermal substitutes now available. Each has its own limitations. In this review, we examine normal wound repair in relation to stem/progenitor cells that are intimately involved in this process within the dermal niche. Endothelial precursors, in particular, are examined closely and their phenotype, morphology and enrichment from multiple sources are described in an attempt to provide some clarity regarding the controversy surrounding their classification and role in vasculogenesis. We also review the role of the next generation of cellularized scaffolds and smart biomaterials that attempt to improve the revascularisation of artificial grafts, the rate of wound healing and the final cosmetic and functional outcome. PMID:24668923

  10. Urine-derived stem cells for potential use in bladder repair

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Engineered bladder tissues, created with autologous bladder cells seeded on biodegradable scaffolds, are being developed for use in patients who need cystoplasty. However, in individuals with organ damage from congenital disorders, infection, irradiation, or cancer, abnormal cells obtained by biopsy from the compromised tissue could potentially contaminate the engineered tissue. Thus, an alternative cell source for construction of the neo-organ would be useful. Although other types of stem cells have been investigated, autologous mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are most suitable to use in bladder regeneration. These cells are often used as a cell source for bladder repair in three ways - secreting paracrine factors, recruiting resident cells, and trans-differentiation, inducing MSCs to differentiate into bladder smooth muscle cells and urothelial cells. Adult stem cell populations have been demonstrated in bone marrow, fat, muscle, hair follicles, and amniotic fluid. These cells remain an area of intense study, as their potential for therapy may be applicable to bladder disorders. Recently, we have found stem cells in the urine and the cells are highly expandable, and have self-renewal capacity and paracrine properties. As a novel cell source, urine-derived stem cells (USCs) provide advantages for cell therapy and tissue engineering applications in bladder tissue repair because they originate from the urinary tract system. Importantly, USCs can be obtained via a noninvasive, simple, and low-cost approach and induced with high efficiency to differentiate into bladder cells. PMID:25157812

  11. Engineered Tissue Patch for Cardiac Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianyi

    2015-01-01

    Opinion statement Cell therapy can be administered via injections delivered directly into the myocardium or as engineered cardiac tissue patches, which are the subject of this review. Engineered cardiac patches can be created from sheets of interconnected cells or by suspending the cells in a scaffold of material that is designed to mimic the native extracellular matrix. The sheet-based approach produces patches with well-aligned and electronically coupled cardiomyocytes, but cell-containing scaffolds are more readily vascularized by the host's circulatory system and, consequently, are currently more suitable for applications that require a thicker patch. Cell patches can also be modified for the co-delivery of peptides that may promote cell survival and activate endogenous repair mechanisms; nevertheless, techniques for controlling inflammation, limiting apoptosis, and improving vascular growth need continue to be developed to make it a therapeutic modality for patients with myocardial infarction. PMID:26122908

  12. Intrinsic epithelial cells repair the kidney after injury.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Benjamin D; Valerius, M Todd; Kobayashi, Akio; Mugford, Joshua W; Soeung, Savuth; Duffield, Jeremy S; McMahon, Andrew P; Bonventre, Joseph V

    2008-03-01

    Understanding the mechanisms of nephron repair is critical for the design of new therapeutic approaches to treat kidney disease. The kidney can repair after even a severe insult, but whether adult stem or progenitor cells contribute to epithelial renewal after injury and the cellular origin of regenerating cells remain controversial. Using genetic fate-mapping techniques, we generated transgenic mice in which 94%-95% of tubular epithelial cells, but no interstitial cells, were labeled with either beta-galactosidase (lacZ) or red fluorescent protein (RFP). Two days after ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), 50.5% of outer medullary epithelial cells coexpress Ki67 and RFP, indicating that differentiated epithelial cells that survived injury undergo proliferative expansion. After repair was complete, 66.9% of epithelial cells had incorporated BrdU, compared to only 3.5% of cells in the uninjured kidney. Despite this extensive cell proliferation, no dilution of either cell-fate marker was observed after repair. These results indicate that regeneration by surviving tubular epithelial cells is the predominant mechanism of repair after ischemic tubular injury in the adult mammalian kidney. PMID:18371453

  13. A novel cell permeable DNA replication and repair marker

    PubMed Central

    Herce, Henry D; Rajan, Malini; Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Fillies, Marion; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a key protein in DNA replication and repair. The dynamics of replication and repair in live cells is usually studied introducing translational fusions of PCNA. To obviate the need for transfection and bypass the problem of difficult to transfect and/or short lived cells, we have now developed a cell permeable replication and/or repair marker. The design of this marker has three essential molecular components: (1) an optimized artificial PCNA binding peptide; (2) a cell-penetrating peptide, derived from the HIV-1 Trans Activator of Transcription (TAT); (3) an in vivo cleavable linker, linking the two peptides. The resulting construct was taken up by human, hamster and mouse cells within minutes of addition to the media. Inside the cells, the cargo separated from the vector peptide and bound PCNA effectively. Both replication and repair sites could be directly labeled in live cells making it the first in vivo cell permeable peptide marker for these two fundamental cellular processes. Concurrently, we also introduced a quick peptide based PCNA staining method as an alternative to PCNA antibodies for immunofluorescence applications. In summary, we present here a versatile tool to instantaneously label repair and replication processes in fixed and live cells. PMID:25484186

  14. A novel cell permeable DNA replication and repair marker.

    PubMed

    Herce, Henry D; Rajan, Malini; Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Fillies, Marion; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen (PCNA) is a key protein in DNA replication and repair. The dynamics of replication and repair in live cells is usually studied introducing translational fusions of PCNA. To obviate the need for transfection and bypass the problem of difficult to transfect and/or short lived cells, we have now developed a cell permeable replication and/or repair marker. The design of this marker has three essential molecular components: (1) an optimized artificial PCNA binding peptide; (2) a cell-penetrating peptide, derived from the HIV-1 Trans Activator of Transcription (TAT); (3) an in vivo cleavable linker, linking the two peptides. The resulting construct was taken up by human, hamster and mouse cells within minutes of addition to the media. Inside the cells, the cargo separated from the vector peptide and bound PCNA effectively. Both replication and repair sites could be directly labeled in live cells making it the first in vivo cell permeable peptide marker for these two fundamental cellular processes. Concurrently, we also introduced a quick peptide based PCNA staining method as an alternative to PCNA antibodies for immunofluorescence applications. In summary, we present here a versatile tool to instantaneously label repair and replication processes in fixed and live cells. PMID:25484186

  15. APOBEC3G enhances lymphoma cell radioresistance by promoting cytidine deaminase-dependent DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Nowarski, Roni; Wilner, Ofer I; Cheshin, Ori; Shahar, Or D; Kenig, Edan; Baraz, Leah; Britan-Rosich, Elena; Nagler, Arnon; Harris, Reuben S; Goldberg, Michal; Willner, Itamar; Kotler, Moshe

    2012-07-12

    APOBEC3 proteins catalyze deamination of cytidines in single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), providing innate protection against retroviral replication by inducing deleterious dC > dU hypermutation of replication intermediates. APOBEC3G expression is induced in mitogen-activated lymphocytes; however, no physiologic role related to lymphoid cell proliferation has yet to be determined. Moreover, whether APOBEC3G cytidine deaminase activity transcends to processing cellular genomic DNA is unknown. Here we show that lymphoma cells expressing high APOBEC3G levels display efficient repair of genomic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by ionizing radiation and enhanced survival of irradiated cells. APOBEC3G transiently accumulated in the nucleus in response to ionizing radiation and was recruited to DSB repair foci. Consistent with a direct role in DSB repair, inhibition of APOBEC3G expression or deaminase activity resulted in deficient DSB repair, whereas reconstitution of APOBEC3G expression in leukemia cells enhanced DSB repair. APOBEC3G activity involved processing of DNA flanking a DSB in an integrated reporter cassette. Atomic force microscopy indicated that APOBEC3G multimers associate with ssDNA termini, triggering multimer disassembly to multiple catalytic units. These results identify APOBEC3G as a prosurvival factor in lymphoma cells, marking APOBEC3G as a potential target for sensitizing lymphoma to radiation therapy. PMID:22645179

  16. PERIPHERAL NERVE REGENERATION: CELL THERAPY AND NEUROTROPHIC FACTORS

    PubMed Central

    Sebben, Alessandra Deise; Lichtenfels, Martina; da Silva, Jefferson Luis Braga

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral nerve trauma results in functional loss in the innervated organ, and recovery without surgical intervention is rare. Many surgical techniques can be used for nerve repair. Among these, the tubulization technique can be highlighted: this allows regenerative factors to be introduced into the chamber. Cell therapy and tissue engineering have arisen as an alternative for stimulating and aiding peripheral nerve regeneration. Therefore, the aim of this review was to provide a survey and analysis on the results from experimental and clinical studies that used cell therapy and tissue engineering as tools for optimizing the regeneration process. The articles used came from the LILACS, Medline and SciELO scientific databases. Articles on the use of stem cells, Schwann cells, growth factors, collagen, laminin and platelet-rich plasma for peripheral nerve repair were summarized over the course of the review. Based on these studies, it could be concluded that the use of stem cells derived from different sources presents promising results relating to nerve regeneration, because these cells have a capacity for neuronal differentiation, thus demonstrating effective functional results. The use of tubes containing bioactive elements with controlled release also optimizes the nerve repair, thus promoting greater myelination and axonal growth of peripheral nerves. Another promising treatment is the use of platelet-rich plasma, which not only releases growth factors that are important in nerve repair, but also serves as a carrier for exogenous factors, thereby stimulating the proliferation of specific cells for peripheral nerve repair. PMID:27027067

  17. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  18. Perspectives on the combination of radiotherapy and targeted therapy with DNA repair inhibitors in the treatment of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shih-Hung; Kuo, Ting-Chun; Wu, Hsu; Guo, Jhe-Cyuan; Hsu, Chiun; Hsu, Chih-Hung; Tien, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Kun-Huei; Cheng, Ann-Lii; Kuo, Sung-Hsin

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic cancer is highly lethal. Current research that combines radiation with targeted therapy may dramatically improve prognosis. Cancerous cells are characterized by unstable genomes and activation of DNA repair pathways, which are indicated by increased phosphorylation of numerous factors, including H2AX, ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, DNA-PKcs, Rad51, and Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers. Radiotherapy causes DNA damage. Cancer cells can be made more sensitive to the effects of radiation (radiosensitization) through inhibition of DNA repair pathways. The synergistic effects, of two or more combined non-lethal treatments, led to co-administration of chemotherapy and radiosensitization in BRCA-defective cells and patients, with promising results. ATM/Chk2 and ATR/Chk1 pathways are principal regulators of cell cycle arrest, following DNA double-strand or single-strand breaks. DNA double-stranded breaks activate DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). It forms a holoenzyme with Ku70/Ku80 heterodimers, called DNA-PK, which catalyzes the joining of nonhomologous ends. This is the primary repair pathway utilized in human cells after exposure to ionizing radiation. Radiosensitization, induced by inhibitors of ATM, ATR, Chk1, Chk2, Wee1, PP2A, or DNA-PK, has been demonstrated in preclinical pancreatic cancer studies. Clinical trials are underway. Development of agents that inhibit DNA repair pathways to be clinically used in combination with radiotherapy is warranted for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:27621574

  19. iPS Cells for Post-myocardial Infarction Repair: Remarkable Opportunities and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Lalit, Pratik A.; Hei, Derek J.; Raval, Amish N.; Kamp, Timothy J.

    2014-01-01

    Coronary artery disease with associated myocardial infarction continues to be a major cause of death and morbidity around the world despite significant advances in therapy. Patients who suffer large myocardial infarctions are at highest risk for progressive heart failure and death, and cell-based therapies offer new hope for these patients. A recently discovered cell source for cardiac repair has emerged as a result of a breakthrough reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). The iPSCs can proliferate indefinitely in culture and can differentiate into cardiac lineages including cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, endothelial cells, and cardiac progenitors. Thus large quantities of desired cell products can be generated without being limited by cellular senescence. The iPSCs can be obtained from patients to allow autologous therapy or, alternatively, banks of HLA diverse iPSCs are possible for allogeneic therapy. Preclinical animal studies using a variety of cell preparations generated from iPSCs have shown evidence of cardiac repair. Methodology for the production of clinical grade products from human iPSCs is in place. Ongoing studies of the safety of various iPSC preparations with regard to the risk of tumor formation, immune rejection, induction of arrhythmias, and formation of stable cardiac grafts are needed as the field advances toward the first in man trials of iPSCs post-MI. PMID:24723658

  20. In Vivo Reprogramming for CNS Repair: Regenerating Neurons from Endogenous Glial Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hedong; Chen, Gong

    2016-08-17

    Neuroregeneration in the CNS has proven to be difficult despite decades of research. The old dogma that CNS neurons cannot be regenerated in the adult mammalian brain has been overturned; however, endogenous adult neurogenesis appears to be insufficient for brain repair. Stem cell therapy once held promise for generating large quantities of neurons in the CNS, but immunorejection and long-term functional integration remain major hurdles. In this Perspective, we discuss the use of in vivo reprogramming as an emerging technology to regenerate functional neurons from endogenous glial cells inside the brain and spinal cord. Besides the CNS, in vivo reprogramming has been demonstrated successfully in the pancreas, heart, and liver and may be adopted in other organs. Although challenges remain for translating this technology into clinical therapies, we anticipate that in vivo reprogramming may revolutionize regenerative medicine by using a patient's own internal cells for tissue repair. PMID:27537482

  1. Cyclosporin in cell therapy for cardiac regeneration.

    PubMed

    Jansen Of Lorkeers, S J; Hart, E; Tang, X L; Chamuleau, M E D; Doevendans, P A; Bolli, R; Chamuleau, S A J

    2014-07-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising strategy in promoting cardiac repair in the setting of ischemic heart disease. Clinical and preclinical studies have shown that cell therapy improves cardiac function. Whether autologous or allogeneic cells should be used, and the need for immunosuppression in non-autologous settings, is a matter of debate. Cyclosporin A (CsA) is frequently used in preclinical trials to reduce cell rejection after non-autologous cell therapy. The direct effect of CsA on the function and survival of stem cells is unclear. Furthermore, the appropriate daily dosage of CsA in animal models has not been established. In this review, we discuss the pros and cons of the use of CsA on an array of stem cells both in vitro and in vivo. Furthermore, we present a small collection of data put forth by our group supporting the efficacy and safety of a specific daily CsA dosage in a pig model. PMID:24831573

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy for heart disease.

    PubMed

    Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Danieli, Patrizia; Cervio, Elisabetta

    2012-08-19

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are adult stem cells with capacity for self-renewal and multi-lineage differentiation. Initially described in the bone marrow, MSC are also present in other organs and tissues. From a therapeutic perspective, because of their easy preparation and immunologic privilege, MSC are emerging as an extremely promising therapeutic agent for tissue regeneration and repair. Studies in animal models of myocardial infarction have demonstrated the ability of transplanted MSC to engraft and differentiate into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells. Most importantly, engrafted MSC secrete a wide array of soluble factors that mediate beneficial paracrine effects and may greatly contribute to cardiac repair. Together, these properties can be harnessed to both prevent and reverse remodeling in the ischemically injured ventricle. In proof-of-concept and phase I clinical trials, MSC therapy improved left ventricular function, induced reverse remodeling, and decreased scar size. In this review we will focus on the current understanding of MSC biology and MSC mechanism of action in cardiac repair. PMID:22521741

  3. Cell Therapies for Liver Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yue; Fisher, James E.; Lillegard, Joseph B.; Rodysill, Brian; Amiot, Bruce; Nyberg, Scott L.

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapies, which include bioartificial liver support and hepatocyte transplantation, have emerged as potential treatments for a variety of liver diseases. Acute liver failure (ALF), acute-on-chronic liver failure, and inherited metabolic liver diseases are examples of liver diseases that have been successfully treated with cell therapies at centers around the world. Cell therapies also have the potential for wide application in other liver diseases, including non-inherited liver diseases and liver cancer, and in improving the success of liver transplantation. Here we briefly summarize current concepts of cell therapy for liver diseases. PMID:22140063

  4. Repair mechanisms of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Wen, Zhuzhi; Zheng, Shaoxin; Zhou, Changqing; Wang, Jingfeng; Wang, Tong

    2011-05-01

    The prognosis of patients with myocardial infarction (MI) and resultant chronic heart failure remains extremely poor despite advances in optimal medical therapy and interventional procedures. Animal experiments and clinical trials using adult stem cell therapy following MI have shown a global improvement of myocardial function. Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) hold promise for cardiac repair following MI, due to their multilineage, self-renewal and proliferation potential. In addition, MSCs can be easily isolated, expanded in culture, and have immunoprivileged properties to the host tissue. Experimental studies and clinical trials have revealed that MSCs not only differentiate into cardiomyocytes and vascular cells, but also secrete amounts of growth factors and cytokines which may mediate endogenous regeneration via activation of resident cardiac stem cells and other stem cells, as well as induce neovascularization, anti-inflammation, anti-apoptosis, anti-remodelling and cardiac contractility in a paracrine manner. It has also been postulated that the anti-arrhythmic and cardiac nerve sprouting potential of MSCs may contribute to their beneficial effects in cardiac repair. Most molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in the MSC-based therapy after MI are still unclear at present. This article reviews the potential repair mechanisms of MSCs in the setting of MI. PMID:21199333

  5. Uracil excision repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Varshney, Umesh

    2011-05-01

    Uracil excision repair is ubiquitous in all domains of life and initiated by uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) which excise the promutagenic base, uracil, from DNA to leave behind an abasic site (AP-site). Repair of the resulting AP-sites requires an AP-endonuclease, a DNA polymerase, and a DNA ligase whose combined activities result in either short-patch or long-patch repair. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, has an increased risk of accumulating uracils because of its G + C-rich genome, and its niche inside host macrophages where it is exposed to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, two major causes of cytosine deamination (to uracil) in DNA. In vitro assays to study DNA repair in this important human pathogen are limited. To study uracil excision repair in mycobacteria, we have established assay conditions using cell-free extracts of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis (a fast-growing mycobacterium) and oligomer or plasmid DNA substrates. We show that in mycobacteria, uracil excision repair is completed primarily via long-patch repair. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis UdgB, a newly characterized family 5 UDG, substitutes for the highly conserved family 1 UDG, Ung, thereby suggesting that UdgB might function as backup enzyme for uracil excision repair in mycobacteria. PMID:21371942

  6. Nanomedicine Approaches to Modulate Neural Stem Cells in Brain Repair.

    PubMed

    Santos, Tiago; Boto, Carlos; Saraiva, Cláudia M; Bernardino, Liliana; Ferreira, Lino

    2016-06-01

    We explore the concept of modulating neural stem cells and their niches for brain repair using nanotechnology-based approaches. These approaches include stimulating cell proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation to functionally recover damaged areas. Nanoscale-engineered materials potentially overcome limited crossing of the blood-brain barrier, deficient drug delivery, and cell targeting. PMID:26917252

  7. 28. Embryonic and adult stem cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Henningson, Carl T; Stanislaus, Marisha A; Gewirtz, Alan M

    2003-02-01

    Stem cells are characterized by the ability to remain undifferentiated and to self-renew. Embryonic stem cells derived from blastocysts are pluripotent (able to differentiate into many cell types). Adult stem cells, which were traditionally thought to be monopotent multipotent, or tissue restricted, have recently also been shown to have pluripotent properties. Adult bone marrow stem cells have been shown to be capable of differentiating into skeletal muscle, brain microglia and astroglia, and hepatocytes. Stem cell lines derived from both embryonic stem and embryonic germ cells (from the embryonic gonadal ridge) are pluripotent and capable of self-renewal for long periods. Therefore embryonic stem and germ cells have been widely investigated for their potential to cure diseases by repairing or replacing damaged cells and tissues. Studies in animal models have shown that transplantation of fetal, embryonic stem, or embryonic germ cells may be able to treat some chronic diseases. In this review, we highlight recent developments in the use of stem cells as therapeutic agents for three such diseases: Diabetes, Parkinson disease, and congestive heart failure. We also discuss the potential use of stem cells as gene therapy delivery cells and the scientific and ethical issues that arise with the use of human stem cells. PMID:12592319

  8. Brain necrosis after fractionated radiation therapy: Is the halftime for repair longer than we thought?

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Edward T.

    2012-11-15

    Purpose: To derive a radiobiological model that enables the estimation of brain necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy rates for a variety of fractionation schemes, and to compare repair effects between brain and spinal cord. Methods: Sigmoidal dose response relationships for brain radiation necrosis and spinal cord myelopathy are derived from clinical data using nonlinear regression. Three different repair models are considered and the repair halftimes are included as regression parameters. Results: For radiation necrosis, a repair halftime of 38.1 (range 6.9-76) h is found with monoexponential repair, while for spinal cord myelopathy, a repair halftime of 4.1 (range 0-8) h is found. The best-fit alpha beta ratio is 0.96 (range 0.24-1.73)Conclusions: A radiobiological model that includes repair corrections can describe the clinical data for a variety of fraction sizes, fractionation schedules, and total doses. Modeling suggests a relatively long repair halftime for brain necrosis. This study suggests that the repair halftime for late radiation effects in the brain may be longer than is currently thought. If confirmed in future studies, this may lead to a re-evaluation of radiation fractionation schedules for some CNS diseases, particularly for those diseases where fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy is used.

  9. Exercise as Gene Therapy: BDNF and DNA Damage Repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Robin H; Nickerson, John M; Boatright, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    DNA damage is a common feature of neurodegenerative illnesses, and the ability to repair DNA strand breaks and lesions is crucial for neuronal survival, reported by Jeppesen et al (Prog Neurobiol. 2011;94:166-200) and Shiwaku et al (Curr Mol Med. 2015;15:119-128). Interventions aimed at repairing these lesions, therefore, could be useful for preventing or delaying the progression of disease. One potential strategy for promoting DNA damage repair (DDR) is exercise. Although the role of exercise in DDR is not understood, there is increasing evidence that simple physical activity may impact clinical outcomes for neurodegeneration. Here, we discuss what is currently known about the molecular mechanisms of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and how these mechanisms might influence the DDR process. PMID:27488073

  10. Effects of lubricant and autologous bone marrow stromal cell augmentation on immobilized flexor tendon repairs.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfeng; Ozasa, Yasuhiro; Shimura, Haruhiko; Reisdorf, Ramona L; Thoreson, Andrew R; Jay, Gregory; Moran, Steven L; An, Kai-Nan; Amadio, Peter C

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to test a novel treatment that carbodiimide-derivatized-hyaluronic acid-lubricin (cd-HA-lubricin) combined cell-based therapy in an immobilized flexor tendon repair in a canine model. Seventy-eight flexor tendons from 39 dogs were transected. One tendon was treated with cd-HA-lubricin plus an interpositional graft of 8 × 10(5) BMSCs and GDF-5. The other tendon was repaired without treatment. After 21 day of immobilization, 19 dogs were sacrificed; the remaining 20 dogs underwent a 21-day rehabilitation protocol before euthanasia. The work of flexion, tendon gliding resistance, and adhesion score in treated tendons were significantly less than the untreated tendons (p < 0.05). The failure strength of the untreated tendons was higher than the treated tendons at 21 and 42 days (p < 0.05). However, there is no significant difference in stiffness between two groups at day 42. Histologic analysis of treated tendons showed a smooth surface and viable transplanted cells 42 days after the repair, whereas untreated tendons showed severe adhesion formation around the repair site. The combination of lubricant and cell treatment resulted in significantly improved digit function, reduced adhesion formation. This novel treatment can address the unmet needs of patients who are unable to commence an early mobilization protocol after flexor tendon repair. PMID:26177854

  11. Progerin expression disrupts critical adult stem cell functions involved in tissue repair.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Laurin Marie; Gomez, Lourdes Adriana; Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noel M; Howard, Guy A; Schiller, Paul C

    2014-12-01

    Vascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Vascular repair, essential for tissue maintenance, is critically reduced during vascular disease and aging. Efficient vascular repair requires functional adult stem cells unimpaired by aging or mutation. One protein candidate for reducing stem cell?mediated vascular repair is progerin, an alternative splice variant of lamin A. Progerin results from erroneous activation of cryptic splice sites within the LMNA gene, and significantly increases during aging. Mutations triggering progerin overexpression cause the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), in which patients die at approximately 13-years of age due to atherosclerosis-induced disease. Progerin expression affects tissues rich in cells that can be derived from marrow stromal cells (MSCs. Studies using various MSC subpopulations and models have led to discrepant results. Using a well-defined, immature subpopulation of MSCs, Marrow Isolated Adult Multilineage Inducible (MIAMI) cells, we find progerin significantly disrupts expression and localization of self-renewal markers, proliferation, migration, and membrane elasticity. One potential treatment, farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ameliorates some of these effects. Our results confirm proposed progerin-induced mechanisms and suggest novel ways in which progerin disturbs critical stem cell functions collectively required for proper tissue repair, offering promising treatment targets for future therapies. PMID:25567453

  12. DNA repair mechanisms in dividing and non-dividing cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyama, Teruaki; Wilson, David M.

    2013-01-01

    DNA damage created by endogenous or exogenous genotoxic agents can exist in multiple forms, and if allowed to persist, can promote genome instability and directly lead to various human diseases, particularly cancer, neurological abnormalities, immunodeficiency and premature aging. To avoid such deleterious outcomes, cells have evolved an array of DNA repair pathways, which carry out what is typically a multiple-step process to resolve specific DNA lesions and maintain genome integrity. To fully appreciate the biological contributions of the different DNA repair systems, one must keep in mind the cellular context within they operate. For example, the human body is composed of non-dividing and dividing cell types, including, in the brain, neurons and glial cells. We describe herein the molecular mechanisms of the different DNA repair pathways, and review their roles in non-dividing and dividing cells, with an eye towards how these pathways may regulate the development of neurological disease. PMID:23684800

  13. Progerin expression disrupts critical adult stem cell functions involved in tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Pacheco, Laurin Marie; Gomez, Lourdes Adriana; Dias, Janice; Ziebarth, Noel M; Howard, Guy A; Schiller, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Vascular disease is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. Vascular repair, essential for tissue maintenance, is critically reduced during vascular disease and aging. Efficient vascular repair requires functional adult stem cells unimpaired by aging or mutation. One protein candidate for reducing stem cell–mediated vascular repair is progerin, an alternative splice variant of lamin A. Progerin results from erroneous activation of cryptic splice sites within the LMNA gene, and significantly increases during aging. Mutations triggering progerin overexpression cause the premature aging disorder Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria Syndrome (HGPS), in which patients die at approximately 13-years of age due to atherosclerosis-induced disease. Progerin expression affects tissues rich in cells that can be derived from marrow stromal cells (MSCs). Studies using various MSC subpopulations and models have led to discrepant results. Using a well-defined, immature subpopulation of MSCs, Marrow Isolated Adult Multilineage Inducible (MIAMI) cells, we find progerin significantly disrupts expression and localization of self-renewal markers, proliferation, migration, and membrane elasticity. One potential treatment, farnesyltransferase inhibitor, ameliorates some of these effects. Our results confirm proposed progerin-induced mechanisms and suggest novel ways in which progerin disturbs critical stem cell functions collectively required for proper tissue repair, offering promising treatment targets for future therapies. PMID:25567453

  14. Potentials of endogenous neural stem cells in cortical repair

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Bhaskar; Jaber, Mohamed; Gaillard, Afsaneh

    2012-01-01

    In the last few decades great thrust has been put in the area of regenerative neurobiology research to combat brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases. The recent discovery of neurogenic niches in the adult brain has led researchers to study how to mobilize these cells to orchestrate an endogenous repair mechanism. The brain can minimize injury-induced damage by means of an immediate glial response and by initiating repair mechanisms that involve the generation and mobilization of new neurons to the site of injury where they can integrate into the existing circuit. This review highlights the current status of research in this field. Here, we discuss the changes that take place in the neurogenic milieu following injury. We will focus, in particular, on the cellular and molecular controls that lead to increased proliferation in the Sub ventricular Zone (SVZ) as well as neurogenesis. We will also concentrate on how these cellular and molecular mechanisms influence the migration of new cells to the affected area and their differentiation into neuronal/glial lineage that initiate the repair mechanism. Next, we will discuss some of the different factors that limit/retard the repair process and highlight future lines of research that can help to overcome these limitations. A clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms and physiological changes following brain damage and the subsequent endogenous repair should help us develop better strategies to repair damaged brains. PMID:22509153

  15. Stem cell therapy: from bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Tamarat, R; Lataillade, J J; Bey, E; Gourmelon, P; Benderitter, M

    2012-10-01

    Several countries have increased efforts to develop medical countermeasures to protect against radiation toxicity due to acts of bioterrorism as well as cancer treatment. Both acute radiation injuries and delayed effects such as cutaneous effects and impaired wound repair depend, to some extent, on angiogenesis deficiency. Vascular damage influences levels of nutrients, oxygen available to skin tissue and epithelial cell viability. Consequently, the evolution of radiation lesions often becomes uncontrolled and surgery is the final option--amputation leading to a disability. Therefore, the development of strategies designed to promote healing of radiation injuries is a major therapeutic challenge. Adult mesenchymal stem cell therapy has been combined with surgery in some cases and not in others and successfully applied in patients with accidental radiation injuries. Although research in the field of radiation skin injury management has made substantial progress in the past 10 y, several strategies are still needed in order to enhance the beneficial effect of stem cell therapy and to counteract the deleterious effect of an irradiated tissue environment. This review summarises the current and evolving advances concerning basic and translational research based on stem cell therapy for the management of radiological burns. PMID:22969031

  16. Differentiated kidney epithelial cells repair injured proximal tubule.

    PubMed

    Kusaba, Tetsuro; Lalli, Matthew; Kramann, Rafael; Kobayashi, Akio; Humphreys, Benjamin D

    2014-01-28

    Whether kidney proximal tubule harbors a scattered population of epithelial stem cells is a major unsolved question. Lineage-tracing studies, histologic characterization, and ex vivo functional analysis results conflict. To address this controversy, we analyzed the lineage and clonal behavior of fully differentiated proximal tubule epithelial cells after injury. A CreER(T2) cassette was knocked into the sodium-dependent inorganic phosphate transporter SLC34a1 locus, which is expressed only in differentiated proximal tubule. Tamoxifen-dependent recombination was absolutely specific to proximal tubule. Clonal analysis after injury and repair showed that the bulk of labeled cells proliferate after injury with increased clone size after severe compared with mild injury. Injury to labeled proximal tubule epithelia induced expression of CD24, CD133, vimentin, and kidney-injury molecule-1, markers of putative epithelial stem cells in the human kidney. Similar results were observed in cultured proximal tubules, in which labeled clones proliferated and expressed dedifferentiation and injury markers. When mice with completely labeled kidneys were subject to injury and repair there was no dilution of fate marker despite substantial proliferation, indicating that unlabeled progenitors do not contribute to kidney repair. During nephrogenesis and early kidney growth, single proximal tubule clones expanded, suggesting that differentiated cells also contribute to tubule elongation. These findings provide no evidence for an intratubular stem-cell population, but rather indicate that terminally differentiated epithelia reexpress apparent stem-cell markers during injury-induced dedifferentiation and repair. PMID:24127583

  17. Postreplication repair in mammalian cells after ultraviolet irradiation: a model.

    PubMed Central

    Lavin, M F

    1978-01-01

    A model is presented for bypass of ultraviolet-induced damage in DNA during replication. The overall process is initiated by the introduction of a single-strand break into parental DNA near the point of arrest of synthesis, followed by a transient crossing-over step similar to that envisaged in genetic recombination. The mechanism proposed provides an alternative explanation to existing models and is entirely consistent with available data on postreplication repair in mammalian cells. In addition the model explains the low level of recombination repair observed in mammalian cells. PMID:687763

  18. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  19. Strategies to Optimize Adult Stem Cell Therapy for Tissue Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shan; Zhou, Jingli; Zhang, Xuan; Liu, Yang; Chen, Jin; Hu, Bo; Song, Jinlin; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy aims to replace damaged or aged cells with healthy functioning cells in congenital defects, tissue injuries, autoimmune disorders, and neurogenic degenerative diseases. Among various types of stem cells, adult stem cells (i.e., tissue-specific stem cells) commit to becoming the functional cells from their tissue of origin. These cells are the most commonly used in cell-based therapy since they do not confer risk of teratomas, do not require fetal stem cell maneuvers and thus are free of ethical concerns, and they confer low immunogenicity (even if allogenous). The goal of this review is to summarize the current state of the art and advances in using stem cell therapy for tissue repair in solid organs. Here we address key factors in cell preparation, such as the source of adult stem cells, optimal cell types for implantation (universal mesenchymal stem cells vs. tissue-specific stem cells, or induced vs. non-induced stem cells), early or late passages of stem cells, stem cells with endogenous or exogenous growth factors, preconditioning of stem cells (hypoxia, growth factors, or conditioned medium), using various controlled release systems to deliver growth factors with hydrogels or microspheres to provide apposite interactions of stem cells and their niche. We also review several approaches of cell delivery that affect the outcomes of cell therapy, including the appropriate routes of cell administration (systemic, intravenous, or intraperitoneal vs. local administration), timing for cell therapy (immediate vs. a few days after injury), single injection of a large number of cells vs. multiple smaller injections, a single site for injection vs. multiple sites and use of rodents vs. larger animal models. Future directions of stem cell-based therapies are also discussed to guide potential clinical applications. PMID:27338364

  20. Class I HDACs Affect DNA Replication, Repair, and Chromatin Structure: Implications for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stengel, Kristy R.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Significance: The contribution of epigenetic alterations to cancer development and progression is becoming increasingly clear, prompting the development of epigenetic therapies. Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDIs) represent one of the first classes of such therapy. Two HDIs, Vorinostat and Romidepsin, are broad-spectrum inhibitors that target multiple histone deacetylases (HDACs) and are FDA approved for the treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. However, the mechanism of action and the basis for the cancer-selective effects of these inhibitors are still unclear. Recent Advances: While the anti-tumor effects of HDIs have traditionally been attributed to their ability to modify gene expression after the accumulation of histone acetylation, recent studies have identified the effects of HDACs on DNA replication, DNA repair, and genome stability. In addition, the HDIs available in the clinic target multiple HDACs, making it difficult to assign either their anti-tumor effects or their associated toxicities to the inhibition of a single protein. However, recent studies in mouse models provide insights into the tissue-specific functions of individual HDACs and their involvement in mediating the effects of HDI therapy. Critical Issues: Here, we describe how altered replication contributes to the efficacy of HDAC-targeted therapies as well as discuss what knowledge mouse models have provided to our understanding of the specific functions of class I HDACs, their potential involvement in tumorigenesis, and how their disruption may contribute to toxicities associated with HDI treatment. Future Directions: Impairment of DNA replication by HDIs has important therapeutic implications. Future studies should assess how best to exploit these findings for therapeutic gain. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 23, 51–65. PMID:24730655

  1. Electroporation Formulation for Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jiemiao; Li, Shulin

    2014-01-01

    Cell transfection efficiency often determines the success of cell-based gene therapy. Cell transfection via Nucleofector technology yields high transfection efficiency and low cytotoxicity. However, owing to trade secrecy, the components in each buffer are unknown, which not only increases the cost of electroporation studies but also limits the application of Nucelofector in clinical cell-based gene therapies. Thus, we developed a three-step method to determine the optimal conditions, including buffer, program and additional polymer, in electroporation for multiple cancers and stem cell lines. This method could reduce the cost, allow researchers to find the optimal electroporation conditions for their cell lines of interest, and greatly boost the application potential of electroporation in clinical cell-based gene therapies. PMID:24510811

  2. An update on targeted gene repair in mammalian cells: methods and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Nanna M; Dalsgaard, Trine; Jakobsen, Maria; Nielsen, Roni R; Sørensen, Charlotte B; Bolund, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of full-length genes including regulatory elements has been the preferred gene therapy strategy for clinical applications. However, with significant drawbacks emerging, targeted gene alteration (TGA) has recently become a promising alternative to this method. By means of TGA, endogenous DNA repair pathways of the cell are activated leading to specific genetic correction of single-base mutations in the genome. This strategy can be implemented using single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs), small DNA fragments (SDFs), triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), adeno-associated virus vectors (AAVs) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Despite difficulties in the use of TGA, including lack of knowledge on the repair mechanisms stimulated by the individual methods, the field holds great promise for the future. The objective of this review is to summarize and evaluate the different methods that exist within this particular area of human gene therapy research. PMID:21284895

  3. An update on targeted gene repair in mammalian cells: methods and mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Transfer of full-length genes including regulatory elements has been the preferred gene therapy strategy for clinical applications. However, with significant drawbacks emerging, targeted gene alteration (TGA) has recently become a promising alternative to this method. By means of TGA, endogenous DNA repair pathways of the cell are activated leading to specific genetic correction of single-base mutations in the genome. This strategy can be implemented using single-stranded oligodeoxyribonucleotides (ssODNs), small DNA fragments (SDFs), triplex-forming oligonucleotides (TFOs), adeno-associated virus vectors (AAVs) and zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). Despite difficulties in the use of TGA, including lack of knowledge on the repair mechanisms stimulated by the individual methods, the field holds great promise for the future. The objective of this review is to summarize and evaluate the different methods that exist within this particular area of human gene therapy research. PMID:21284895

  4. Stem cell therapy independent of stemness.

    PubMed

    Lee, Techung

    2012-12-26

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy is entering a new era shifting the focus from initial feasibility study to optimization of therapeutic efficacy. However, how MSC therapy facilitates tissue regeneration remains incompletely characterized. Consistent with the emerging notion that secretion of multiple growth factors/cytokines (trophic factors) by MSC provides the underlying tissue regenerative mechanism, the recent study by Bai et al demonstrated a critical therapeutic role of MSC-derived hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in two animal models of multiple sclerosis (MS), which is a progressive autoimmune disorder caused by damage to the myelin sheath and loss of oligodendrocytes. Although current MS therapies are directed toward attenuation of the immune response, robust repair of myelin sheath likely requires a regenerative approach focusing on long-term replacement of the lost oligodendrocytes. This approach appears feasible because adult organs contain various populations of multipotent resident stem/progenitor cells that may be activated by MSC trophic factors as demonstrated by Bai et al This commentary highlights and discusses the major findings of their studies, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory function and trophic cross-talk mechanisms mediated by HGF and other MSC-derived trophic factors in sustaining the treatment benefits. Identification of multiple functionally synergistic trophic factors, such as HGF and vascular endothelial growth factor, can eventually lead to the development of efficacious cell-free therapeutic regimens targeting a broad spectrum of degenerative conditions. PMID:23516128

  5. Nanoparticles-Assisted Stem Cell Therapy for Ischemic Heart Disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Li, Jun; Wang, Yulin; Lai, Hao; Wang, Chunsheng

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell therapy has attracted increasing attention as a promising treatment strategy for cardiac repair in ischemic heart disease. Nanoparticles (NPs), with their superior physical and chemical properties, have been widely utilized to assist stem cell therapy. With the help of NPs, stem cells can be genetically engineered for enhanced paracrine profile. To further understand the fate and behaviors of stem cells in ischemic myocardium, imaging NPs can label stem cells and be tracked in vivo under multiple modalities. Besides that, NPs can also be used to enhance stem cell retention in myocardium. These facts have raised efforts on the development of more intelligent and multifunctional NPs for cellular application. Herein, an overview of the applications of NPs-assisted stem cell therapy is given. Key issues and future prospects are also critically addressed. PMID:26839552

  6. Review: Annexin-A5 and cell membrane repair.

    PubMed

    Bouter, A; Carmeille, R; Gounou, C; Bouvet, F; Degrelle, S A; Evain-Brion, D; Brisson, A R

    2015-04-01

    Annexins are soluble proteins that bind to biological membranes containing negatively charged phospholipids, principally phosphatidylserine, in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Annexin-A5 (AnxA5), the smallest member of the annexin family, presents unique properties of membrane binding and self-assembly into ordered two-dimensional (2D) arrays on membrane surfaces. We have previously reported that AnxA5 plays a central role in the machinery of membrane repair by enabling rapid resealing of plasma membrane disruption in murine perivascular cells. AnxA5 promotes membrane repair via the formation of a protective 2D bandage at membrane damaged site. Here, we review current knowledge on cell membrane repair and present recent findings on the role of AnxA5 in membrane resealing of human trophoblasts. PMID:25701430

  7. Biosilicate® and low-level laser therapy improve bone repair in osteoporotic rats.

    PubMed

    Bossini, Paulo Sérgio; Rennó, Ana Claudia Muniz; Ribeiro, Daniel Araki; Fangel, Renan; Peitl, Oscar; Zanotto, Edgar Dutra; Parizotto, Nivaldo Antonio

    2011-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of a novel bioactive material (Biosilicate®) and low-level laser therapy (LLLT) on bone fracture consolidation in osteoporotic rats. Forty female Wistar rats were submitted to ovariectomy (OVX) to induce osteopenia. Eight weeks after surgery, the animals were randomly divided into four groups of 10 animals each: a bone defect control group (CG); a bone defect filled with Biosilicate group (BG); a bone defect filled with Biosilicate and irradiated with LLLT at 60 J/cm(2) group (BG60); and a bone defect filled with Biosilicate and irradiated with LLLT at 120 J/cm(2) group (BG120). Bone defects were surgically performed on both tibias. The size of particle used for Biosilicate was 180-212 µm. Histopathological analysis showed that bone defects were predominantly filled with the biomaterial in specimens treated with Biosilicate. LLLT with either 60 or 120 J/cm(2) was able to increase collagen, Cbfa-1, VGEF and COX-2 expression in the circumjacent cells of the biomaterial. A morphometric analysis revealed that the Biosilicate + laser groups showed a higher amount of newly formed bone. Our results indicate that laser therapy improves bone repair process in contact with Biosilicate as a result of increasing bone formation, as well as COX-2 and Cbfa-1 immunoexpression, angiogenesis and collagen deposition in osteoporotic rats. PMID:20925130

  8. A fine-scale dissection of the DNA double-strand break repair machinery and its implications for breast cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Srihari, Sriganesh; Cao, Kim-Anh Lê; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Simpson, Peter T.; Ragan, Mark A.; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2014-01-01

    DNA-damage response machinery is crucial to maintain the genomic integrity of cells, by enabling effective repair of even highly lethal lesions such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Defects in specific genes acquired through mutations, copy-number alterations or epigenetic changes can alter the balance of these pathways, triggering cancerous potential in cells. Selective killing of cancer cells by sensitizing them to further DNA damage, especially by induction of DSBs, therefore requires careful modulation of DSB-repair pathways. Here, we review the latest knowledge on the two DSB-repair pathways, homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining in human, describing in detail the functions of their components and the key mechanisms contributing to the repair. Such an in-depth characterization of these pathways enables a more mechanistic understanding of how cells respond to therapies, and suggests molecules and processes that can be explored as potential therapeutic targets. One such avenue that has shown immense promise is via the exploitation of synthetic lethal relationships, for which the BRCA1–PARP1 relationship is particularly notable. Here, we describe how this relationship functions and the manner in which cancer cells acquire therapy resistance by restoring their DSB repair potential. PMID:24792170

  9. Cell memory-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-11-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers 'memory-based therapy', which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  10. Delivered growth factor therapy to improve healing after rotator cuff repair

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Emilie V; Silverio, Luz; Yao, Jeffrey

    2010-01-01

    Background Degenerative rotator cuff tears are a significant cause of shoulder pain in the aging population. Rotator cuff repair surgery may be more successful when growth factors are delivered to the repair site. This study was designed to determine the cellular processes involved in normal bone-to-tendon healing and the current approaches used for biologic augmentation of rotator cuff repair. Methods This review focuses on animal studies of rotator cuff repair and early human trials. Results Regular bone-to-tendon healing forms a fibrous junction between tendon and bone that is markedly different from the original bone-to-tendon junction. Tendon augmentation with cellular components serves as scaffolding for endogenous fibroblastic cells and a possible source of growth factors and fibroblastic cells. Extracellular matrices provide a scaffold for incoming fibroblastic cells. However, research in extracellular matrices is not conclusive due to intermanufacturer variation and the lack of human subject research. Growth factors and platelet-rich plasma are established in other fields of research and show promise, but have not yet been rigorously tested in rotator cuff repair augmentation. Conclusions Rotator cuff repair can benefit from biologic augmentation. However, research in this field is still young and has not yet demonstrated that the benefits in healing rates are significant enough to merit regular clinical use. Randomized controlled trials will elucidate the use of biologic augmentation in rotator cuff repairs. PMID:24198519

  11. Endogenous Cartilage Repair by Recruitment of Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Im, Gun-Il

    2016-04-01

    Articular cartilage has a very limited capacity for repair after injury. The adult body has a pool of stem cells that are mobilized during injury or disease. These cells exist inside niches in bone marrow, muscle, adipose tissue, synovium, and other connective tissues. A method that mobilizes this endogenous pool of stem cells will provide a less costly and less invasive alternative if these cells successfully regenerate defective cartilage. Traditional microfracture procedures employ the concept of bone marrow stimulation to regenerate cartilage. However, the regenerated tissue usually is fibrous cartilage, which has very poor mechanical properties compared to those of normal hyaline cartilage. A method that directs the migration of a large number of autologous mesenchymal stem cells toward injury sites, retains these cells around the defects, and induces chondrogenic differentiation that would enhance success of endogenous cartilage repair. This review briefly summarizes chemokines and growth factors that induce recruitment, proliferation, and differentiation of endogenous progenitor cells, endogenous cell sources for regenerating cartilage, scaffolds for delivery of bioactive factors, and bioadhesive materials that are necessary to bring about endogenous cartilage repair. PMID:26559963

  12. Stem cells of the suture mesenchyme in craniofacial bone development, repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Takamitsu; Jeong, Jaeim; Sheu, Tzong-Jen; Hsu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The suture mesenchyme serves as a growth centre for calvarial morphogenesis and has been postulated to act as the niche for skeletal stem cells. Aberrant gene regulation causes suture dysmorphogenesis resulting in craniosynostosis, one of the most common craniofacial deformities. Owing to various limitations, especially the lack of suture stem cell isolation, reconstruction of large craniofacial bone defects remains highly challenging. Here we provide the first evidence for an Axin2-expressing stem cell population with long-term self-renewing, clonal expanding and differentiating abilities during calvarial development and homeostastic maintenance. These cells, which reside in the suture midline, contribute directly to injury repair and skeletal regeneration in a cell autonomous fashion. Our findings demonstrate their true identity as skeletal stem cells with innate capacities to replace the damaged skeleton in cell-based therapy, and permit further elucidation of the stem cell-mediated craniofacial skeletogenesis, leading to revealing the complex nature of congenital disease and regenerative medicine. PMID:26830436

  13. Transplanted Bone Marrow Cells Repair Heart Tissue and Reduce Myocarditis in Chronic Chagasic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Milena B. P.; Lima, Ricardo S.; Rocha, Leonardo L.; Takyia, Christina M.; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain; Campos de Carvalho, Antonio C.; Ribeiro-dos-Santos, Ricardo

    2004-01-01

    A progressive destruction of the myocardium occurs in ∼30% of Trypanosoma cruzi-infected individuals, causing chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, a disease so far without effective treatment. Syngeneic bone marrow cell transplantation has been shown to cause repair and improvement of heart function in a number of studies in patients and animal models of ischemic cardiopathy. The effects of bone marrow transplant in a mouse model of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy, in the presence of the disease causal agent, ie, the T. cruzi, are described herein. Bone marrow cells injected intravenously into chronic chagasic mice migrated to the heart and caused a significant reduction in the inflammatory infiltrates and in the interstitial fibrosis characteristics of chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. The beneficial effects were observed up to 6 months after bone marrow cell transplantation. A massive apoptosis of myocardial inflammatory cells was observed after the therapy with bone marrow cells. Transplanted bone marrow cells obtained from chagasic mice and from normal mice had similar effects in terms of mediating chagasic heart repair. These results show that bone marrow cell transplantation is effective for treatment of chronic chagasic myocarditis and indicate that autologous bone marrow transplant may be used as an efficient therapy for patients with chronic chagasic cardiomyopathy. PMID:14742250

  14. [Comparison between gene therapy and gradual release carrier for bone morphogenetic protein-2 in repairing bone defects].

    PubMed

    Li, Jianjun; Bai, Lunhao; Cui, Shaoqian; Wang, Huan; Xu, Xinxiang

    2007-06-01

    To compare the effects between gene therapy and gradual release carrier for bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) in repairing bone defects, bone defects for 15 mm were created.on the bilateral radius in rabbits and treated with four kinds of implantations, ie, composite of transgeneic MSCs and PLA/PCL (Group A), composite of MSCs and gradual release carrier for BMP-2 (Group B), composite of MSCs and PLA/PCL (Group C), and PLA/PCL alone (Group D). After 4, 8, and 12 weeks of the operations, X-ray, histological examination, biomechanics analysis, and bone density measurement were conducted. Results showed that both osteoblasts and mesenchymal cells displayed strongly positive expression of BMP-2 in Group A after 4 weeks of the operation, the speed and quality of bone formation in Group A were much better than those in Group B. After 12 weeks of the operations, bone defects were completely repaired in Group A. BMP-2 gene therapy is really a good method to repair segmental bone defects. PMID:17713285

  15. HORSE SPECIES SYMPOSIUM: Use of mesenchymal stem cells in fracture repair in horses.

    PubMed

    Govoni, K E

    2015-03-01

    Equine bone fractures are often catastrophic, potentially fatal, and costly to repair. Traditional methods of healing fractures have limited success, long recovery periods, and a high rate of reinjury. Current research in the equine industry has demonstrated that stem cell therapy is a promising novel therapy to improve fracture healing and reduce the incidence of reinjury; however, reports of success in horses have been variable and limited. Stem cells can be derived from embryonic, fetal, and adult tissue. Based on the ease of collection, opportunity for autologous cells, and proven success in other models, adipose- or bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are often used in equine therapies. Methods for isolation, proliferation, and differentiation of MSC are well established in rodent and human models but are not well characterized in horses. There is recent evidence that equine bone marrow MSC are able to proliferate in culture for several passages in the presence of autologous and fetal bovine serum, which is important for expansion of cells. Mesenchymal stem cells have the capacity to differentiate into osteoblasts, the bone forming cells, and this complex process is regulated by a number of transcription factors including runt-related transcription factor 2 (Runx2) and osterix (Osx). However, it has not been well established if equine MSC are regulated in a similar manner. The data presented in this review support the view that equine bone marrow MSC are regulated by the same transcription factors that control the differentiation of rodent and human MSC into osteoblasts. Although stem cell therapy is promising in equine bone repair, additional research is needed to identify optimal methods for reintroduction and potential manipulations to improve their ability to form new bone. PMID:26020865

  16. MOVING STEM CELLS TO THE CLINIC: POTENTIAL AND LIMITATIONS FOR BRAIN REPAIR

    PubMed Central

    Steinbeck, Julius A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Stem cell-based therapies hold considerable promise for many currently devastating neurological disorders. Substantial progress has been made in the derivation of disease-relevant human donor cell populations. Behavioral data in relevant animal models of disease have demonstrated therapeutic efficacy for several cell-based approaches. Consequently, GMP grade cell products are currently being developed for first in human clinical trials in select disorders. Despite the therapeutic promise, the presumed mechanism of action of donor cell populations often remains insufficiently validated. It depends greatly on the properties of the transplanted cell type and the underlying host pathology. Several new technologies have become available to probe mechanisms of action in real time and to manipulate in vivo cell function and integration to enhance therapeutic efficacy. Results from such studies generate crucial insight into the nature of brain repair that can be achieved today and push the boundaries of what may be possible in the future. PMID:25856494

  17. Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A great numbers of cardiovascular disease patients all over the world are suffering in the poor outcomes. Under this situation, cardiac regeneration therapy to reorganize the postnatal heart that is defined as a terminal differentiated-organ is a very important theme and mission for human beings. However, the temporary success of several clinical trials using usual cell types with uncertain cell numbers has provided the transient effect of cell therapy to these patients. We therefore should redevelop the evidence of cell-based cardiovascular regeneration therapy, focusing on targets (disease, patient’s status, cardiac function), materials (cells, cytokines, genes), and methodology (transplantation route, implantation technology, tissue engineering). Meanwhile, establishment of the induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells is an extremely innovative technology which should be proposed as embryonic stem (ES) cellularization of post natal somatic cells, and this application have also showed the milestones of the direct conversion to reconstruct cardiomyocyte from the various somatic cells, which does not need the acquisition of the re-pluripotency. This review discusses the new advance in cardiovascular regeneration therapy from cardiac regeneration to cardiac re-organization, which is involved in recent progress of on-going clinical trials, basic research in cardiovascular regeneration, and the possibility of tissue engineering technology. PMID:23825492

  18. Activation of Type II Cells into Regenerative Stem Cell Antigen-1+ Cells during Alveolar Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Varsha Suresh; Zhang, Wei; Rehman, Jalees; Malik, Asrar B.

    2015-01-01

    The alveolar epithelium is composed of two cell types: type I cells comprise 95% of the gas exchange surface area, whereas type II cells secrete surfactant, while retaining the ability to convert into type I cells to induce alveolar repair. Using lineage-tracing analyses in the mouse model of Pseudomonas aeruginosa–induced lung injury, we identified a population of stem cell antigen (Sca)-1–expressing type II cells with progenitor cell properties that mediate alveolar repair. These cells were shown to be distinct from previously reported Sca-1–expressing bronchioalveolar stem cells. Microarray and Wnt reporter studies showed that surfactant protein (Sp)-C+Sca-1+ cells expressed Wnt signaling pathway genes, and inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling prevented the regenerative function of Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells in vitro. Thus, P. aeruginosa–mediated lung injury induces the generation of a Sca-1+ subset of type II cells. The progenitor phenotype of the Sp-C+Sca-1+ cells that mediates alveolar epithelial repair might involve Wnt signaling. PMID:25474582

  19. Identification of Novel Radiosensitizers in a High-Throughput, Cell-Based Screen for DSB Repair Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Goglia, Alexander G.; Delsite, Robert; Luz, Antonio N.; Shahbazian, David; Salem, Ahmed F.; Sundaram, Ranjini K.; Chiaravalli, Jeanne; Hendrikx, Petrus J.; Wilshire, Jennifer A.; Jasin, Maria; Kluger, Harriet; Glickman, J. Fraser; Powell, Simon N.; Bindra, Ranjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Most cancer therapies involve a component of treatment which inflicts DNA damage in tumor cells, such as double-strand breaks (DSBs), which are considered the most serious threat to genomic integrity. Complex systems have evolved to repair these lesions, and successful DSB repair is essential for tumor cell survival after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR) and other DNA damaging agents. As such, inhibition of DNA repair is a potentially efficacious strategy for chemo- and radio-sensitization. Homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) represent the two major pathways by DSBs are repaired in mammalian cells. Here, we report the design and execution of a high-throughput, cell-based small molecule screen for novel DSB repair inhibitors. We miniaturized our recently developed dual NHEJ and HR reporter system into a 384-well plate-based format and interrogated a diverse library of 20,000 compounds for molecules which selectively modulate NHEJ and HR repair in tumor cells. We identified a collection of novel hits which potently inhibit DSB repair, and we have validated their functional activity in comprehensive panel of orthogonal secondary assays. A selection of these inhibitors were found to radiosensitize cancer cell lines in vitro, which suggests they may be useful as novel chemo- and radio-sensitizers. Surprisingly, we identified several FDA-approved drugs, including the calcium channel blocker, mibefradil dihydrochloride, which demonstrated activity as DSB repair inhibitors and radiosensitizers. These findings suggest the possibility for repurposing them as tumor cell radiosensitizers in the future. Accordingly, we recently initiated a Phase I clinical trial testing mibefradil as glioma radiosensitizer. PMID:25512618

  20. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    SciTech Connect

    Ayad, K. E.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F.; El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Bekheet, A. B.

    2009-09-27

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  1. Efficacy of Low Level Laser Therapy After Hand Flexor Tendon Repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayad, K. E.; El Gohary, H. M.; Abd Elrahman, M.; Abd El Mejeed, S. F.; Bekheet, A. B.

    2009-09-01

    Flexor tendon injury is a common problem requiring suturing repair followed by early postoperative mobilization. Muscle atrophy, joint stiffness, osteoarthritis, infection, skin necrosis, ulceration of joint cartilage and tendocutaneous adhesion are familiar complications produced by prolonged immobilization of surgically repaired tendon ruptures. The purpose of this study was to clarify the importance of low level laser therapy after hand flexor tendon repair in zone II. Thirty patients aging between 20 and 40 years were divided into two groups. Patients in group A (n = 15) received a conventional therapeutic exercise program while patients in group B (n = 15) received low level laser therapy combined with the same therapeutic exercise program. The results showed a statistically significant increase in total active motion of the proximal and distal interphalangeal joints as well as maximum hand grip strength at three weeks and three months postoperative, but improvement was more significant in group B. It was concluded that the combination of low level laser therapy and early therapeutic exercises was more effective than therapeutic exercises alone in improving total active motion of proximal and distal interphalangeal joints and hand grip strength after hand flexor tendon repair.

  2. The endomembrane requirement for cell surface repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McNeil, Paul L.; Miyake, Katsuya; Vogel, Steven S.

    2003-01-01

    The capacity to reseal a plasma membrane disruption rapidly is required for cell survival in many physiological environments. Intracellular membrane (endomembrane) is thought to play a central role in the rapid resealing response. We here directly compare the resealing response of a cell that lacks endomembrane, the red blood cell, with that of several nucleated cells possessing an abundant endomembrane compartment. RBC membrane disruptions inflicted by a mode-locked Ti:sapphire laser, even those initially smaller than hemoglobin, failed to reseal rapidly. By contrast, much larger laser-induced disruptions made in sea urchin eggs, fibroblasts, and neurons exhibited rapid, Ca(2+)-dependent resealing. We conclude that rapid resealing is not mediated by simple physiochemical mechanisms; endomembrane is required.

  3. Hydrogels and Cell Based Therapies in Spinal Cord Injury Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Assunção-Silva, Rita C.; Gomes, Eduardo D.; Silva, Nuno A.; Salgado, António J.

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a central nervous system- (CNS-) related disorder for which there is yet no successful treatment. Within the past several years, cell-based therapies have been explored for SCI repair, including the use of pluripotent human stem cells, and a number of adult-derived stem and mature cells such as mesenchymal stem cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, and Schwann cells. Although promising, cell transplantation is often overturned by the poor cell survival in the treatment of spinal cord injuries. Alternatively, the therapeutic role of different cells has been used in tissue engineering approaches by engrafting cells with biomaterials. The latter have the advantages of physically mimicking the CNS tissue, while promoting a more permissive environment for cell survival, growth, and differentiation. The roles of both cell- and biomaterial-based therapies as single therapeutic approaches for SCI repair will be discussed in this review. Moreover, as the multifactorial inhibitory environment of a SCI suggests that combinatorial approaches would be more effective, the importance of using biomaterials as cell carriers will be herein highlighted, as well as the recent advances and achievements of these promising tools for neural tissue regeneration. PMID:26124844

  4. Cell Therapy in Joint Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Counsel, Peter D.; Bates, Daniel; Boyd, Richard; Connell, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Articular cartilage possesses poor natural healing mechanisms, and a variety of non-cell-based and cell-based treatments aim to promote regeneration of hyaline cartilage. Data Sources: A review of the literature to December 2013 using PubMed with search criteria including the keywords stem cell, cell therapy, cell transplantation, cartilage, chondral, and chondrogenic. Study Selection: Forty-five articles were identified that employed local mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy for joint disorders in humans. Nine comparative studies were identified, consisting of 3 randomized trials, 5 cohort studies, and 1 case-control study. Study Type: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Data Extraction: Studies were assessed for stem cell source, method of implantation, comparison groups, and concurrent surgical techniques. Results: Two studies comparing MSC treatment to autologous chondrocyte implantation found similar efficacy. Three studies reported clinical benefits with intra-articular MSC injection over non-MSC controls for cases undergoing debridement with or without marrow stimulation, although a randomized study found no significant clinical difference at 2-year follow-up but reported better 18-month magnetic resonance imaging and histologic scores in the MSC group. No human studies have compared intra-articular MSC therapy to non-MSC techniques for osteoarthritis in the absence of surgery. Conclusion: Mesenchymal stem cell–based therapies appear safe and effective for joint disorders in large animal preclinical models. Evidence for use in humans, particularly, comparison with more established treatments such as autologous chondrocyte implantation and microfracture, is limited. PMID:25553210

  5. Cell memory-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Anjamrooz, Seyed Hadi

    2015-01-01

    Current cell therapies, despite all of the progress in this field, still faces major ethical, technical and regulatory hurdles. Because these issues possibly stem from the current, restricted, stereotypical view of cell ultrastructure and function, we must think radically about the nature of the cell. In this regard, the author's theory of the cell memory disc offers ‘memory-based therapy’, which, with the help of immune system rejuvenation, nervous system control and microparticle-based biodrugs, may have substantial therapeutic potential. In addition to its potential value in the study and prevention of premature cell aging, age-related diseases and cell death, memory therapy may improve the treatment of diseases that are currently limited by genetic disorders, risk of tumour formation and the availability and immunocompatibility of tissue transplants. PMID:26256679

  6. Differential effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition on DNA break repair in human cells are revealed with Epstein-Barr virus.

    PubMed

    Ma, Wenjian; Halweg, Christopher J; Menendez, Daniel; Resnick, Michael A

    2012-04-24

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors can generate synthetic lethality in cancer cells defective in homologous recombination. However, the mechanism(s) by which they affect DNA repair has not been established. Here we directly determined the effects of PARP inhibition and PARP1 depletion on the repair of ionizing radiation-induced single- and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) in human lymphoid cell lines. To do this, we developed an in vivo repair assay based on large endogenous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) circular episomes. The EBV break assay provides the opportunity to assess quantitatively and simultaneously the induction and repair of SSBs and DSBs in human cells. Repair was efficient in G1 and G2 cells and was not dependent on functional p53. shRNA-mediated knockdown of PARP1 demonstrated that the PARP1 protein was not essential for SSB repair. Among 10 widely used PARP inhibitors, none affected DSB repair, although an inhibitor of DNA-dependent protein kinase was highly effective at reducing DSB repair. Only Olaparib and Iniparib, which are in clinical cancer therapy trials, as well as 4-AN inhibited SSB repair. However, a decrease in PARP1 expression reversed the ability of Iniparib to reduce SSB repair. Because Iniparib disrupts PARP1-DNA binding, the mechanism of inhibition does not appear to involve trapping PARP at SSBs. PMID:22493268

  7. Base excision repair intermediates are mutagenic in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Simonelli, Valeria; Narciso, Laura; Dogliotti, Eugenia; Fortini, Paola

    2005-01-01

    Base excision repair (BER) is the main pathway for repair of DNA damage in mammalian cells. This pathway leads to the formation of DNA repair intermediates which, if still unsolved, cause cell lethality and mutagenesis. To characterize mutations induced by BER intermediates in mammalian cells, an SV-40 derived shuttle vector was constructed carrying a site-specific lesion within the recognition sequence of a restriction endonuclease. The mutation spectra of abasic (AP) sites, 5′-deoxyribose-5-phosphate (5′dRp) and 3′-[2,3-didehydro-2,3-dideoxy-ribose] (3′ddR5p) single-strand breaks (ssb) in mammalian cells was analysed by RFLP/PCR and mutation frequency was estimated by quantitative PCR. Point mutations were the predominant events occurring at all BER intermediates. The AP site-induced mutation spectrum supports evidence for the ‘A-rule’ and is also consistent with the use of the 5′ neighbouring base to instruct nucleotide incorporation (5′-rule). Preferential adenine insertion was also observed after in vivo replication of 5′dRp or 3′ddR5p ssb. We provide original evidence that not only the abasic site but also its derivatives ‘faceless’ BER intermediates are mutagenic, with a similar mutation frequency, in mammalian cells. Our findings support the hypothesis that unattended BER intermediates could be a constant threat for genome integrity as well as a spontaneous source of mutations. PMID:16077026

  8. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Weingeist, David M; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K; Mutamba, James T; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A; Yaffe, Michael B; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P

    2013-03-15

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluation and in the development of novel pharmaceuticals. Currently available assays to detect double-strand breaks are limited in throughput and specificity and offer minimal information concerning the kinetics of repair. Here, we present the CometChip, a 96-well platform that enables assessment of double-strand break levels and repair capacity of multiple cell types and conditions in parallel and integrates with standard high-throughput screening and analysis technologies. We demonstrate the ability to detect multiple genetic deficiencies in double-strand break repair and evaluate a set of clinically relevant chemical inhibitors of one of the major double-strand break repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining. While other high-throughput repair assays measure residual damage or indirect markers of damage, the CometChip detects physical double-strand breaks, providing direct measurement of damage induction and repair capacity, which may be useful in developing and implementing treatment strategies with reduced side effects. PMID:23422001

  9. Single-cell microarray enables high-throughput evaluation of DNA double-strand breaks and DNA repair inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Weingeist, David M.; Ge, Jing; Wood, David K.; Mutamba, James T.; Huang, Qiuying; Rowland, Elizabeth A.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Floyd, Scott; Engelward, Bevin P.

    2013-01-01

    A key modality of non-surgical cancer management is DNA damaging therapy that causes DNA double-strand breaks that are preferentially toxic to rapidly dividing cancer cells. Double-strand break repair capacity is recognized as an important mechanism in drug resistance and is therefore a potential target for adjuvant chemotherapy. Additionally, spontaneous and environmentally induced DSBs are known to promote cancer, making DSB evaluation important as a tool in epidemiology, clinical evaluation and in the development of novel pharmaceuticals. Currently available assays to detect double-strand breaks are limited in throughput and specificity and offer minimal information concerning the kinetics of repair. Here, we present the CometChip, a 96-well platform that enables assessment of double-strand break levels and repair capacity of multiple cell types and conditions in parallel and integrates with standard high-throughput screening and analysis technologies. We demonstrate the ability to detect multiple genetic deficiencies in double-strand break repair and evaluate a set of clinically relevant chemical inhibitors of one of the major double-strand break repair pathways, non-homologous end-joining. While other high-throughput repair assays measure residual damage or indirect markers of damage, the CometChip detects physical double-strand breaks, providing direct measurement of damage induction and repair capacity, which may be useful in developing and implementing treatment strategies with reduced side effects. PMID:23422001

  10. Concise Review: The Bystander Effect: Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Mediated Lung Repair.

    PubMed

    Savukinas, Ulrika Blank; Enes, Sara Rolandsson; Sjöland, Annika Andersson; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSCs), a heterogeneous subset of adult stem/progenitor cells, have surfaced as potential therapeutic units with significant clinical benefit for a wide spectrum of disease conditions, including those affecting the lung. Although MSCs carry both self-renewal and multilineage differentiation abilities, current dogma holds that MSCs mainly contribute to tissue regeneration and repair by modulating the host tissue via secreted cues. Thus, the therapeutic benefit of MSCs is thought to derive from so called bystander effects. The regenerative mechanisms employed by MSCs in the lung include modulation of the immune system as well as promotion of epithelial and endothelial repair. Apart from secreted factors, a number of recent findings suggest that MSCs engage in mitochondrial transfer and shedding of membrane vesicles as a means to enhance tissue repair following injury. Furthermore, it is becoming increasingly clear that MSCs are an integral component of epithelial lung stem cell niches. As such, MSCs play an important role in coupling information from the environment to stem and progenitor populations, such that homeostasis can be ensured even in the face of injury. It is the aim of this review to outline the major mechanisms by which MSCs contribute to lung regeneration, synthesizing recent preclinical findings with data from clinical trials and potential for future therapy. Stem Cells 2016;34:1437-1444. PMID:26991735

  11. Mesenchymal stem cell secretome and regenerative therapy after cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerlin, Ludovic; Park, Tea Soon; Zambidis, Elias T.; Donnenberg, Vera S.; Donnenberg, Albert D.

    2013-01-01

    Cancer treatment generally relies on tumor ablative techniques that can lead to major functional or disfiguring defects. These post-therapy impairments require the development of safe regenerative therapy strategies during cancer remission. Many current tissue repair approaches exploit paracrine (immunomodulatory, pro-angiogenic, anti-apoptotic and pro-survival effects) or restoring (functional or structural tissue repair) properties of mesenchymal stem/stromal cells (MSC). Yet, a major concern in the application of regenerative therapies during cancer remission remains the possible triggering of cancer recurrence. Tumor relapse implies the persistence of rare subsets of tumor-initiating cancer cells which can escape anti-cancer therapies and lie dormant in specific niches awaiting reactivation via unknown stimuli. Many of the components required for successful regenerative therapy (revascularization, immunosuppression, cellular homing, tissue growth promotion) are also critical for tumor progression and metastasis. While bidirectional crosstalk between tumorigenic cells (especially aggressive cancer cell lines) and MSC (including tumor stroma-resident populations) has been demonstrated in a variety of cancers, the effects of local or systemic MSC delivery for regenerative purposes on persisting cancer cells during remission remain controversial. Both pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects of MSC have been reported in the literature. Our own data using breast cancer clinical isolates have suggested that dormant-like tumor-initiating cells do not respond to MSC signals, unlike actively dividing cancer cells which benefited from the presence of supportive MSC. The secretome of MSC isolated from various tissues may partially diverge, but it includes a core of cytokines (i.e. CCL2, CCL5, IL-6, TGFβ, VEGF), which have been implicated in tumor growth and/or metastasis. This article reviews published models for studying interactions between MSC and cancer cells with a focus

  12. Mathematical modeling of the cells repair regulations in Nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Adi-Kusumo, Fajar; Wiraya, Ario

    2016-07-01

    Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant cancer which is caused by the activation of Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) via some external factors. In the cells repair regulations, the p53 gene mutation can be used as the early indication of the NPC growth. The NPC growth is due to the DNA damage accumulation caused by the EBV infection. In this paper we construct the cells repair regulations model to characterize the NPC growth. The model is a 15 dimensional of first order ODE system and consists the proteins and enzymes reactions. We do some numerical simulations to show the inactivation of the phosphorylated and acetylated p53, and the chromosomal instability of p53 gene, which can be used as the earlier stage detection of NPC. PMID:27140528

  13. Cell therapy for myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yoo-Wook; Yang, Han-Mo; Cho, Hyun-Jai

    2010-05-01

    Ischemic heart disease, particularly acute myocardial infarction (MI), is the worldwide health care problem and the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The fundamental treatment of MI remains a major unmet medical need. Although recent tremendous advances have been made in the treatment for acute MI such as percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) and medical and surgical therapies, myocardial cell loss after ischemia and subsequent, adverse cardiac remodeling and heart failure are demanding for new therapeutic strategy. Since the first experimental studies of adult stem cell therapy into the ischemic heart were performed in the early 1990s, the identification and potential application of stem and/or progenitor cells has triggered attempts to regenerate damaged heart tissue and cell-based therapy is a promising option for treatment of MI. In this review, we would like to discuss the pathogenesis of acute MI, current standard treatments and their limitation, clinical results of recent stem or progenitor cell therapy which have shown a favorable safety profile with modest improvement in cardiac function, and putative mechanisms of benefits. PMID:24855535

  14. Cell therapy for autoimmune diseases

    PubMed Central

    Dazzi, Francesco; van Laar, Jacob M; Cope, Andrew; Tyndall, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Cell therapy, pioneered for the treatment of malignancies in the form of bone marrow transplantation, has subsequently been tested and successfully employed in autoimmune diseases. Autologous haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has become a curative option for conditions with very poor prognosis such as severe forms of scleroderma, multiple sclerosis, and lupus, in which targeted therapies have little or no effect. The refinement of the conditioning regimens has virtually eliminated transplant-related mortality, thus making HSCT a relatively safe choice. Although HSCT remains a nonspecific approach, the knowledge gained in this field has led to the identification of new avenues. In fact, it has become evident that the therapeutic efficacy of HSCT cannot merely be the consequence of a high-dose immuno-suppression, but rather the result of a resetting of the abnormal immune regulation underlying autoimmune conditions. The identification of professional and nonprofessional immunosuppressive cells and their biological properties is generating a huge interest for their clinical exploitation. Regulatory T cells, found abnormal in several autoimmune diseases, have been proposed as central to achieve long-term remissions. Mesenchymal stem cells of bone marrow origin have more recently been shown not only to be able to differentiate into multiple tissues, but also to exert a potent antiproliferative effect that results in the inhibition of immune responses and prolonged survival of haemopoietic stem cells. All of these potential resources clearly need to be investigated at the preclinical level but support a great deal of enthusiasm for cell therapy of autoimmune diseases. PMID:17367542

  15. Revisiting DNA damage repair, p53-mediated apoptosis and cisplatin sensitivity in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Francesca; Feldman, Darren R; Barchi, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs), ie, seminomas and nonseminomas, account for 1% to 3% of all neoplasms in men. They are the most common cancer in young white males and are unique in their responsiveness to cisplatin-based chemotherapy. For this reason, TGCTs are considered a model for curative disease. However, up to now, the molecular mechanisms behind this exceptional responsiveness to DNA-damaging agents have remained unclear. A hypersensitive apoptotic response, as well as a reduction in the proficiency to repair cisplatin-induced DNA damage might account for this behavior. In this review, building on recent findings of p53-induced apoptosis and DNA-repair mechanisms in TGCTs, we will discuss the molecular bases that drive tumor sensitivity to cisplatin, emphasizing the new therapeutic approaches proposed to eventually constrain tumor recurrence, and target TGCTs which are unresponsive to standard therapies. PMID:23784838

  16. Advances in stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SUN, RONGRONG; LI, XIANCHI; LIU, MIN; ZENG, YI; CHEN, SHUANG; ZHANG, PEYING

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease constitutes the primary cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, and represents a group of disorders associated with the loss of cardiac function. Despite considerable advances in the understanding of the pathologic mechanisms of the disease, the majority of the currently available therapies remain at best palliative, since the problem of cardiac tissue loss has not yet been addressed. Indeed, few therapeutic approaches offer direct tissue repair and regeneration, whereas the majority of treatment options aim to limit scar formation and adverse remodeling, while improving myocardial function. Of all the existing therapeutic approaches, the problem of cardiac tissue loss is addressed uniquely by heart transplantation. Nevertheless, alternative options, particularly stem cell therapy, has emerged as a novel and promising approach. This approach involves the transplantation of healthy and functional cells to promote the renewal of damaged cells and repair injured tissue. Bone marrow precursor cells were the first cell type used in clinical studies, and subsequently, preclinical and clinical investigations have been extended to the use of various populations of stem cells. This review addresses the present state of research as regards stem cell therapy for cardiovascular disease. PMID:27220939

  17. Adult mesenchymal stem cells in neural regeneration and repair: Current advances and future prospects (Review).

    PubMed

    Trzaska, Katarzyna A; Castillo, Marianne D; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive cell source for regenerative medicine as they can be easily isolated from bone marrow (BM) aspirates and expanded in culture while maintaining their 'stemness'. In addition to differentiating into mesodermal cells, MSCs have shown considerable plasticity and generate ectodermal neurons and glia, which can be used to replace cells damaged by neurological diseases and injuries. These unique stem cells also exhibit immunomodulatory functions and secrete a variety of trophic factors which support regeneration and repair. This review focuses on the therapeutic usage of MSCs for neurodegenerative diseases and traumatic injuries to the nervous system. Animal studies demonstrate great promise for MSC transplantation in neurological disorders. In fact, a few clinical trials have already been initiated and show that MSCs are a safe cellular therapy and have great potential to become a viable treatment for neural disorders in the years to come. PMID:21479411

  18. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Growth and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Kalinina, N.I.; Sysoeva, V.Yu.; Rubina, K.A.; Parfenova, Ye.V.; Tkachuk, V.A.

    2011-01-01

    It has been established in the recent several decades that stem cells play a crucial role in tissue renewal and regeneration. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are part of the most important population of adult stem cells. These cells have hereby been identified for the very first time and subsequently isolated from bone marrow stroma. Bone marrow-derived MSCs have been believed to play the role of a source of cells for the renewal and repair of connective tissues, including bone, cartilage and adipose tissues. Cells similar to bone marrow-derived MSCs have now been identified in all postnatal tissues. Data on the distribution and function of MSCsin vivocollected using novel approaches pertaining to the identification of MSCsin situ, to their isolation from tissues, and finally to the determination of their biological properties have enabled successful revision of the role of MSCs in various organs and tissues. This review summarizes our own, as well as others’, data concerning the role of MSCs in the regulation processes of tissue repair and regeneration. In our opinion, MSCs provide the connection between the blood-vascular, immune, endocrine, and nervous systems and tissue-specific stem cells in the body. PMID:22649702

  19. Electrical Stimulation Elicits Neural Stem Cells Activation: New Perspectives in CNS Repair

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yanhua; Li, YeE; Chen, Jian; Zhou, Hongxing; Tan, Sheng

    2015-01-01

    Researchers are enthusiastically concerned about neural stem cell (NSC) therapy in a wide array of diseases, including stroke, neurodegenerative disease, spinal cord injury, and depression. Although enormous evidences have demonstrated that neurobehavioral improvement may benefit from NSC-supporting regeneration in animal models, approaches to endogenous and transplanted NSCs are blocked by hurdles of migration, proliferation, maturation, and integration of NSCs. Electrical stimulation (ES) may be a selective non-drug approach for mobilizing NSCs in the central nervous system. This technique is suitable for clinical application, because it is well established and its potential complications are manageable. Here, we provide a comprehensive review of the emerging positive role of different electrical cues in regulating NSC biology in vitro and in vivo, as well as biomaterial-based and chemical stimulation of NSCs. In the future, ES combined with stem cell therapy or other cues probably becomes an approach for promoting brain repair. PMID:26539102

  20. Role of biomechanics on intervertebral disc degeneration and regenerative therapies: What needs repairing in the disc and what are promising biomaterials for its repair?

    PubMed Central

    Iatridis, James C.; Nicoll, Steven B.; Michalek, Arthur J.; Walter, Benjamin A.; Gupta, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Background Context Degeneration and injuries of the intervertebral disc result in large alterations in biomechanical behaviors. Repair strategies using biomaterials can be optimized based on biomechanical and biological requirements. Purpose To review current literature on 1) effects of degeneration, simulated degeneration, and injury on biomechanics of the intervertebral disc with special attention paid to needle puncture injuries which are a pathway for diagnostics and regenerative therapies; and 2) promising biomaterials for disc repair with a focus on how those biomaterials may promote biomechanical repair. Study Design/Setting A narrative review to evaluate the role of biomechanics on disc degeneration and regenerative therapies with a focus on what biomechanical properties need to be repaired and how to evaluate and accomplish such repairs using biomaterials. Model systems for screening of such repair strategies are also briefly described. Methods Papers were selected from two main Pubmed searches using keywords: intervertebral AND biomechanics (1823 articles) and intervertebral AND biomaterials (361 articles). Additional keywords (injury, needle puncture, nucleus pressurization, biomaterials, hydrogel, sealant, tissue engineering) were used to narrow articles to the topics most relevant to this review. Results Degeneration and acute disc injuries have the capacity to influence nucleus pulposus pressurization and annulus fibrosus integrity, which are necessary for effective disc function, and therefore, require repair. Needle injection injuries are of particular clinical relevance with potential to influence disc biomechanics, cellularity, and metabolism, yet these effects are localized or small, and more research is required to evaluate and reduce potential clinical morbidity using such techniques. NP replacement strategies, such as hydrogels, are required to restore NP pressurization or lost volume. AF repair strategies, including crosslinked hydrogels

  1. Strategies to Stimulate Mobilization and Homing of Endogenous Stem and Progenitor Cells for Bone Tissue Repair

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Marietta; Verrier, Sophie; Alini, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The gold standard for the treatment of critical-size bone defects is autologous or allogenic bone graft. This has several limitations including donor site morbidity and the restricted supply of graft material. Cell-based tissue engineering strategies represent an alternative approach. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been considered as a source of osteoprogenitor cells. More recently, focus has been placed on the use of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), since vascularization is a critical step in bone healing. Although many of these approaches have demonstrated effectiveness for bone regeneration, cell-based therapies require time consuming and cost-expensive in vitro cell expansion procedures. Accordingly, research is becoming increasingly focused on the homing and stimulation of native cells. The stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) – CXCR4 axis has been shown to be critical for the recruitment of MSCs and EPCs. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a key factor in angiogenesis and has been targeted in many studies. Here, we present an overview of the different approaches for delivering homing factors to the defect site by absorption or incorporation to biomaterials, gene therapy, or via genetically manipulated cells. We further review strategies focusing on the stimulation of endogenous cells to support bone repair. Finally, we discuss the major challenges in the treatment of critical-size bone defects and fracture non-unions. PMID:26082926

  2. Advances in corneal cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Fuest, Matthias; Yam, Gary Hin-Fai; Peh, Gary Swee-Lim; Mehta, Jodhbir S

    2016-09-01

    Corneal integrity is essential for visual function. Transplantation remains the most common treatment option for advanced corneal diseases. A global donor material shortage requires a search for alternative treatments. Different stem cell populations have been induced to express corneal cell characteristics in vitro and in animal models. Yet before their application to humans, scientific and ethical issues need to be solved. The in vitro propagation and implantation of primary corneal cells has been rapidly evolving with clinical practices of limbal epithelium transplantation and a clinical trial for endothelial cells in progress, implying cultivated ocular cells as a promising option for the future. This review reports on the latest developments in primary ocular cell and stem cell research for corneal therapy. PMID:27498943

  3. DNA Repair and Cancer Therapy: Targeting APE1/Ref-1 Using Dietary Agents

    PubMed Central

    Raffoul, Julian J.; Heydari, Ahmad R.; Hillman, Gilda G.

    2012-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated the cancer protective effects of dietary agents and other natural compounds isolated from fruits, soybeans, and vegetables on neoplasia. Studies have also revealed the potential for these natural products to be combined with chemotherapy or radiotherapy for the more effective treatment of cancer. In this paper we discuss the potential for targeting the DNA base excision repair enzyme APE1/Ref-1 using dietary agents such as soy isoflavones, resveratrol, curcumin, and the vitamins ascorbate and α-tocopherol. We also discuss the potential role of soy isoflavones in sensitizing cancer cells to the effects of radiotherapy. A comprehensive review of the dual nature of APE1/Ref-1 in DNA repair and redox activation of cellular transcription factors, NF-κB and HIF-1α, is also discussed. Further research efforts dedicated to delineating the role of APE1/Ref-1 DNA repair versus redox activity in sensitizing cancer cells to conventional treatment are warranted. PMID:22997517

  4. Delayed sternal closure after vacuum-assisted closure therapy for tracheo-innominate artery fistula repair.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ryo; Mikamo, Akihito; Kurazumi, Hiroshi; Hamano, Kimikazu

    2011-08-01

    We report a case of successful innominate artery resection with delayed sternal closure after vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy for a tracheo-innominate artery fistula (TIF). A 42-year-old woman with cerebral palsy underwent tracheostomy for respiratory assistance. On postoperative day 14, she was transferred to our hospital after an episode of massive hemoptysis. TIF was diagnosed based on the findings of multidetector computed tomography. Thus, we resected the innominate artery and started VAC therapy to control the postoperative local infection. The patient recovered uneventfully, without any infectious sequelae. Our strategy, which includes VAC therapy, for TIF repair may eliminate postoperative infective problems that could induce sequential bleeding and sternal compromise. To our knowledge, this is the first report of using VAC therapy for TIF. PMID:21628318

  5. Virus Integration and Genome Influence in Approaches to Stem Cell Based Therapy for Andro-Urology

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longkun; Zhang, Deying; Li, Peng; Damaser, Margot; Zhang, Yuanyuan

    2014-01-01

    Despite the potential of stem cells in cell-based therapy, major limitations such as cell retention, ingrowth, and trans-differentiation after implantation remain. One technique for genetic modification of cells for tissue repair is the introduction of specific genes using molecular biology techniques, such as virus integration, to provide a gene that adds new functions to enhance cellular function, and to secrete trophic factors for recruiting resident cells to participate in tissue repair. Stem cells can be labelled to track cell survival, migration, and lineage. Increasing evidence demonstrates that cell therapy and gene therapy in combination remarkably improve myogenic differentiation of implanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), revascularization, and innervation in genitourinary tissues, especially to treat urinary incontinence, erectile dysfunction, lower urinary tract reconstruction, and renal failure. This review discusses the benefits, safety, side effects, and alternatives for using genetically modified MSCs in tissue regeneration in andro-urology. PMID:25453258

  6. Non-DBS DNA Repair Genes Regulate Radiation-induced Cytogenetic Damage Repair and Cell Cycle Progression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Rohde, Larry H.; Emami, Kamal; Casey, Rachael; Wu, Honglu

    2008-01-01

    Changes of gene expression profile are one of the most important biological responses in living cells after ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. Although some studies have shown that genes up-regulated by IR may play important roles in DNA damage repair, the relationship between the regulation of gene expression by IR, particularly genes not known for their roles in DSB repair, and its impact on cytogenetic responses has not been systematically studied. In the present study, the expression of 25 genes selected on the basis of their transcriptional changes in response to IR was individually knocked down by transfection with small interfering RNA in human fibroblast cells. The purpose of this study is to identify new roles of these selected genes on regulating DSB repair and cell cycle progression , as measured in the micronuclei formation and chromosome aberration. In response to IR, the formation of MN was significantly increased by suppressed expression of 5 genes: Ku70 in the DSB repair pathway, XPA in the NER pathway, RPA1 in the MMR pathway, and RAD17 and RBBP8 in cell cycle control. Knocked-down expression of 4 genes (MRE11A, RAD51 in the DSB pathway, SESN1, and SUMO1) significantly inhibited cell cycle progression, possibly because of severe impairment of DNA damage repair. Furthermore, loss of XPA, P21, or MLH1 expression resulted in both significantly enhanced cell cycle progression and increased yields of chromosome aberrations, indicating that these gene products modulate both cell cycle control and DNA damage repair. Most of the 11 genes that affected cytogenetic responses are not known to have clear roles influencing DBS repair. Nine of these 11 genes were up-regulated in cells exposed to gamma radiation, suggesting that genes transcriptionally modulated by IR were critical to regulate the biological consequences after IR.

  7. Next Generation Mesenchymal Stem Cell (MSC)–Based Cartilage Repair Using Scaffold-Free Tissue Engineered Constructs Generated with Synovial Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimomura, Kazunori; Ando, Wataru; Moriguchi, Yu; Sugita, Norihiko; Yasui, Yukihiko; Koizumi, Kota; Fujie, Hiromichi; Hart, David A.; Yoshikawa, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Because of its limited healing capacity, treatments for articular cartilage injuries are still challenging. Since the first report by Brittberg, autologous chondrocyte implantation has been extensively studied. Recently, as an alternative for chondrocyte-based therapy, mesenchymal stem cell–based therapy has received considerable research attention because of the relative ease in handling for tissue harvest, and subsequent cell expansion and differentiation. This review summarizes latest development of stem cell therapies in cartilage repair with special attention to scaffold-free approaches. PMID:27340513

  8. Subchondral pre-solidified chitosan/blood implants elicit reproducible early osteochondral wound-repair responses including neutrophil and stromal cell chemotaxis, bone resorption and repair, enhanced repair tissue integration and delayed matrix deposition

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study we evaluated a novel approach to guide the bone marrow-driven articular cartilage repair response in skeletally aged rabbits. We hypothesized that dispersed chitosan particles implanted close to the bone marrow degrade in situ in a molecular mass-dependent manner, and attract more stromal cells to the site in aged rabbits compared to the blood clot in untreated controls. Methods Three microdrill hole defects, 1.4 mm diameter and 2 mm deep, were created in both knee trochlea of 30 month-old New Zealand White rabbits. Each of 3 isotonic chitosan solutions (150, 40, 10 kDa, 80% degree of deaceylation, with fluorescent chitosan tracer) was mixed with autologous rabbit whole blood, clotted with Tissue Factor to form cylindrical implants, and press-fit in drill holes in the left knee while contralateral holes received Tissue Factor or no treatment. At day 1 or day 21 post-operative, defects were analyzed by micro-computed tomography, histomorphometry and stereology for bone and soft tissue repair. Results All 3 implants filled the top of defects at day 1 and were partly degraded in situ at 21 days post-operative. All implants attracted neutrophils, osteoclasts and abundant bone marrow-derived stromal cells, stimulated bone resorption followed by new woven bone repair (bone remodeling) and promoted repair tissue-bone integration. 150 kDa chitosan implant was less degraded, and elicited more apoptotic neutrophils and bone resorption than 10 kDa chitosan implant. Drilled controls elicited a poorly integrated fibrous or fibrocartilaginous tissue. Conclusions Pre-solidified implants elicit stromal cells and vigorous bone plate remodeling through a phase involving neutrophil chemotaxis. Pre-solidified chitosan implants are tunable by molecular mass, and could be beneficial for augmented marrow stimulation therapy if the recruited stromal cells can progress to bone and cartilage repair. PMID:23324433

  9. Targeting of β1 integrins impairs DNA repair for radiosensitization of head and neck cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Dickreuter, E; Eke, I; Krause, M; Borgmann, K; van Vugt, M A; Cordes, N

    2016-03-17

    β1 Integrin-mediated cell-extracellular matrix interactions allow cancer cell survival and confer therapy resistance. It was shown that inhibition of β1 integrins sensitizes cells to radiotherapy. Here, we examined the impact of β1 integrin targeting on the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). β1 Integrin inhibition was accomplished using the monoclonal antibody AIIB2 and experiments were performed in three-dimensional cell cultures and tumor xenografts of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) cell lines. AIIB2, X-ray irradiation, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown and Olaparib treatment were performed and residual DSB number, protein and gene expression, non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) activity as well as clonogenic survival were determined. β1 Integrin targeting impaired repair of radiogenic DSB (γH2AX/53BP1, pDNA-PKcs T2609 foci) in vitro and in vivo and reduced the protein expression of Ku70, Rad50 and Nbs1. Further, we identified Ku70, Ku80 and DNA-PKcs but not poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 to reside in the β1 integrin pathway. Intriguingly, combined inhibition of β1 integrin and PARP using Olaparib was significantly more effective than either treatment alone in non-irradiated and irradiated HNSCC cells. Here, we support β1 integrins as potential cancer targets and highlight a regulatory role for β1 integrins in the repair of radiogenic DNA damage via classical NHEJ. Further, the data suggest combined targeting of β1 integrin and PARP as promising approach for radiosensitization of HNSCC. PMID:26073085

  10. Angiogenic activity mediates bone repair from human pluripotent stem cell-derived osteogenic cells

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li; Chen, Qingshan; Quanbeck, Zachary; Bechtold, Joan E.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells provide a standardized resource for bone repair. However, criteria to determine which exogenous cells best heal orthopedic injuries remain poorly defined. We evaluated osteogenic progenitor cells derived from both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Phenotypic and genotypic analyses demonstrated that these hESCs/hiPSCs are similar in their osteogenic differentiation efficiency and they generate osteogenic cells comparable to osteogenic cells derived from mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs). However, expression of angiogenic factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and basic fibroblast growth factor in these osteogenic progenitor cells are markedly different, suggesting distinct pro-angiogenic potential of these stem cell derivatives. Studies to repair a femur non-union fracture demonstrate only osteogenic progenitor cells with higher pro-angiogenic potential significantly enhance bone repair in vivo. Together, these studies highlight a key role of pro-angiogenic potential of transplanted osteogenic cells for effective cell-mediated bone repair. PMID:26980556

  11. Low-level laser therapy (LLLT) reduces inflammatory infiltrate and enhances skeletal muscle repair: Histomorphometric parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paiva-Oliveira, E. L.; Lima, N. C.; Silva, P. H.; Sousa, N. T. A.; Barbosa, F. S.; Orsini, M.; Silva, J. G.

    2012-09-01

    Low level laser therapy (LLLT) has been suggested as an effective therapeutics in inflammatory processes modulation and tissue repairing. However, there is a lack of studies that analyze the anti-inflammatory effects of the infrared lasers in muscular skeletal injury. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of low-level laser therapy 904 nm in the repair process of skeletal muscle tissue. Swiss mice were submitted to cryoinjury and divided in test (LLLT-treated) and control groups. Histological sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin to assess general morphology and inflammatory influx, and Picrossirus to quantify collagen fibers deposition. Our results showed significant reduction in inflammatory infiltrated in irradiated mice after 4 days of treatment compared to control ( p = 0.01). After 8 days, the irradiated group showed high levels at regenerating myofibers with significant statistically differences in relation at control group ( p < 0.01). Collagen deposition was significantly increased in the final stages of regeneration at test group, when compared with control group ( p = 0.05). Our data suggests that LLLT reduces the inflammatory response in the initial stages of injury and accelerates the process of muscular tissue repair.

  12. Moving from the laboratory bench to patients' bedside: considerations for effective therapy with stem cells.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Lauren S; Munoz, Jessian; Patel, Shyam A; Dave, Meneka A; Paige, Ilani; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2011-10-01

    Although stem cell therapy is not a new field, the field was limited to transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells. Such transplantation has provided invaluable information for the emerging field with new stem cells. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are an attractive source for therapy; reduced ethical concern, ease in expansion, as off-the-shelf stem cells. MSCs exert immune suppressive properties, providing them with the potential for immune suppressive therapy such as autoimmunity, asthma, allergic rhinitis and graft versus host disease. In addition, MSCs, as well as other stem cells, can be applied for bone and cartilage repair, cardiovascular disease, and neural repair/protection. The data thus far with MSCs are mixed. This review discusses the immune-enhancing properties of MSCs to explain the possible confounds of inflammatory microenvironment in the MSCs therapy. Although this review focuses on MSCs, the information can be extrapolated to other stem cells. The review summarizes the biology of MSCs, including multilineage differentiation potential, transdifferentiation capability, and immunological effects. We emphasize the key concepts that may predict the use of these cells in medicine, namely, the application of these cells from the bench to the bedside. Prospects on immunotherapy, neuroregeneration, and cardiovascular repair are used as examples of tissue repair. PMID:22029813

  13. Studying the organization of DNA repair by single-cell and single-molecule imaging

    PubMed Central

    Uphoff, Stephan; Kapanidis, Achillefs N.

    2014-01-01

    DNA repair safeguards the genome against a diversity of DNA damaging agents. Although the mechanisms of many repair proteins have been examined separately in vitro, far less is known about the coordinated function of the whole repair machinery in vivo. Furthermore, single-cell studies indicate that DNA damage responses generate substantial variation in repair activities across cells. This review focuses on fluorescence imaging methods that offer a quantitative description of DNA repair in single cells by measuring protein concentrations, diffusion characteristics, localizations, interactions, and enzymatic rates. Emerging single-molecule and super-resolution microscopy methods now permit direct visualization of individual proteins and DNA repair events in vivo. We expect much can be learned about the organization of DNA repair by linking cell heterogeneity to mechanistic observations at the molecular level. PMID:24629485

  14. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy and lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Samad, Sohel; Spiteri, Monica; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), a distinct population of adult stem cells, have amassed significant interest from both medical and scientific communities. An inherent multipotent differentiation potential offers a cell therapy option for various diseases, including those of the musculoskeletal, neuronal, cardiovascular and pulmonary systems. MSCs also secrete an array of paracrine factors implicated in the mitigation of pathological conditions through anti-inflammatory, anti-apoptotic and immunomodulatory mechanisms. The safety and efficacy of MSCs in human application have been confirmed through small- and large-scale clinical trials. However, achieving the optimal clinical benefit from MSC-mediated regenerative therapy approaches is entirely dependent upon adequate understanding of their healing/regeneration mechanisms and selection of appropriate clinical conditions. MSC-mediated acute alveolar injury repair. A cartoon depiction of an injured alveolus with associated inflammation and AEC apoptosis. Proposed routes of MSC delivery into injured alveoli could be by either intratracheal or intravenous routes, for instance. Following delivery a proposed mechanism of MSC action is to inhibit/reduce alveolar inflammation by abrogation of IL-1_-depenedent Tlymphocyte proliferation and suppression of TNF-_ secretion via macrophage activation following on from stimulation by MSC-secreted IL-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RN). The inflammatory environment also stimulates MSC to secrete prostaglandin-E2 (PGE2) which can stimulate activated macrophages to secrete the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. Inhibition of AEC apoptosis following injury can also be promoted via MSC stimulated up-regulation of the anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 gene. MSC-secreted KGF can stimulate AECII proliferation and migration propagating alveolar epithelial restitution. Alveolar structural engraftment of MSC is a rare event. PMID:22772131

  15. The roles of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) therapy in ischemic heart diseases

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xiao-Jun; Li, Qing-Ping . E-mail: doc_wxj@yahoo.com.cn

    2007-07-27

    Growing cell-based myocardial therapies which could lead to successful myocardial repair attracts medical interest. Even more intriguing is the observation that MSCs appears to be a more potent material among kinds of stem cells for the transplantation, the mechanism for this benefit remains unclear. However, the therapeutic contribution of MSCs to myocardial repair can be caused by multiple factors including: direct differentiation into cardiac tissue including cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cell, and vascular endothelial cells; secreting a variety of cytokines and growth factors that have paracrine activities; spontaneous cell fusion; and stimulating endogenous repair. In addition, MSCs possess local immunosuppressive properties, and MSCs mobilization is widely used clinically for transplantation. We will discusses the potential mechanisms of MSCs repair for ischemic heart diseases.

  16. The prognostic and predictive value of excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) protein in 1288 patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma treated with platinum-based therapy: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Bišof, Vesna; Zajc Petranović, Matea; Rakušić, Zoran; Samardžić, Kristina Ruža; Juretić, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1) protein has been extensively investigated as a prognostic and predictive factor for platinum-based treatment in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) but with inconsistent results. We performed the present meta-analysis to better elucidate this issue in advanced HNSCC. A literature search was conducted using the PubMed and Web of Science databases. The inclusion criteria were head and neck cancer patients with platinum-based treatment and evaluation of the correlation between ERCC1 expression and clinical outcomes [objective response rate (ORR), progression-free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS), both unadjusted and adjusted estimates]. In high vs. low pooled analyses, high ERCC1 expression was associated with unfavorable OS [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.95, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.18-3.21, p = 0.009], PFS (HR = 2.39, 95 % CI 1.74-3.28, p = 0.000) and ORR (odds ratio = 0.48, 95 % CI 0.23-0.98, p = 0.044). In the subgroup analysis of adjusted OS estimates, ERCC1 was a predictor of shorter survival in Asians (HR = 3.13, 95 % CI 2.09-4.70, p = 0.000) and Caucasians (HR = 2.02, 95 % CI 1.32-3.07, p = 0.001) but of longer survival in South Americans (HR = 0.17, 95 % CI 0.07-0.40, p = 0.000). Immunohistochemistry proved to be of predictive value irrespective of used antibody (p = 0.009). In the stratified analysis according to the tumor site, ERCC1 expression was associated with OS in nasopharyngeal cancer (HR = 2.72, 95 % CI 1.79-4.13, p = 0.000). ERCC1 has a potential to become predictive and prognostic factor enabling treatment tailoring in HNSCC patients. PMID:26179868

  17. Dystrophin Gene Replacement and Gene Repair Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy in 2016: An Interview.

    PubMed

    Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-03-01

    After years of relentless efforts, gene therapy has now begun to deliver its therapeutic promise in several diseases. A number of gene therapy products have received regulatory approval in Europe and Asia. Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited lethal muscle disease. It is caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Replacing and/or repairing the mutated dystrophin gene holds great promises to treated DMD at the genetic level. Last several years have evidenced significant developments in preclinical experimentations in murine and canine models of DMD. There has been a strong interest in moving these promising findings to clinical trials. In light of rapid progress in this field, the Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) recently interviewed me on the current status of DMD gene therapy and readiness for clinical trials. Here I summarized the interview with PPMD. PMID:27003751

  18. Adipose Stromal Cells Repair Pressure Ulcers in Both Young and Elderly Mice: Potential Role of Adipogenesis in Skin Repair

    PubMed Central

    Strong, Amy L.; Bowles, Annie C.; MacCrimmon, Connor P.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Lee, Stephen J.; Wu, Xiying; Katz, Adam J.; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Bunnell, Bruce A.

    2015-01-01

    More than 2.5 million patients in the U.S. require treatment for pressure ulcers annually, and the elderly are at particularly high risk for pressure ulcer development. Current therapy for pressure ulcers consists of conservative medical management for shallow lesions and aggressive debridement and surgery for deeper lesions. The current study uses a murine model to address the hypothesis that adipose-derived stromal/stem cell (ASC) treatment would accelerate and enhance pressure ulcer repair. The dorsal skin of both young (2 months old [mo]) and old (20 mo) C57BL/6J female mice was sandwiched between external magnets for 12 hours over 2 consecutive days to initiate a pressure ulcer. One day following the induction, mice were injected with ASCs isolated from congenic mice transgenic for the green fluorescent protein under a ubiquitous promoter. Relative to phosphate-buffered saline-treated controls, ASC-treated mice displayed a cell concentration-dependent acceleration of wound closure, improved epidermal/dermal architecture, increased adipogenesis, and reduced inflammatory cell infiltration. The ASC-induced improvements occurred in both young and elderly recipients, although the expression profile of angiogenic, immunomodulatory, and reparative mRNAs differed as a function of age. The results are consistent with clinical reports that fat grafting improved skin architecture in thermal injuries; the authors of this published study have invoked ASC-based mechanisms to account for their clinical outcomes. Thus, the current proof-of-principle study sets the stage for clinical translation of autologous and/or allogeneic ASC treatment of pressure ulcers. Significance Adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) promote the healing of pressure ulcer wounds in both young and old mice. ASCs enhance wound healing rates through adipogenic differentiation and regeneration of the underlying architecture of the skin. PMID:25900728

  19. Carriers in Cell-Based Therapies for Neurological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Francisca S. Y.; Chan, Barbara P.; Lo, Amy C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    There is a pressing need for long-term neuroprotective and neuroregenerative therapies to promote full function recovery of injuries in the human nervous system resulting from trauma, stroke or degenerative diseases. Although cell-based therapies are promising in supporting repair and regeneration, direct introduction to the injury site is plagued by problems such as low transplanted cell survival rate, limited graft integration, immunorejection, and tumor formation. Neural tissue engineering offers an integrative and multifaceted approach to tackle these complex neurological disorders. Synergistic therapeutic effects can be obtained from combining customized biomaterial scaffolds with cell-based therapies. Current scaffold-facilitated cell transplantation strategies aim to achieve structural and functional rescue via offering a three-dimensional permissive and instructive environment for sustainable neuroactive factor production for prolonged periods and/or cell replacement at the target site. In this review, we intend to highlight important considerations in biomaterial selection and to review major biodegradable or non-biodegradable scaffolds used for cell transplantation to the central and peripheral nervous system in preclinical and clinical trials. Expanded knowledge in biomaterial properties and their prolonged interaction with transplanted and host cells have greatly expanded the possibilities for designing suitable carrier systems and the potential of cell therapies in the nervous system. PMID:24933636

  20. Effect of adipose-derived stromal cells and BMP12 on intrasynovial tendon repair: A biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics study.

    PubMed

    Gelberman, Richard H; Shen, Hua; Kormpakis, Ioannis; Rothrauff, Benjamin; Yang, Guang; Tuan, Rocky S; Xia, Younan; Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly; Silva, Matthew J; Thomopoulos, Stavros

    2016-04-01

    The outcomes of flexor tendon repair are highly variable. As recent efforts to improve healing have demonstrated promise for growth factor- and cell-based therapies, the objective of the current study was to enhance repair via application of autologous adipose derived stromal cells (ASCs) and the tenogenic growth factor bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) 12. Controlled delivery of cells and growth factor was achieved in a clinically relevant canine model using a nanofiber/fibrin-based scaffold. Control groups consisted of repair-only (no scaffold) and acellular scaffold. Repairs were evaluated after 28 days of healing using biomechanical, biochemical, and proteomics analyses. Range of motion was reduced in the groups that received scaffolds compared to normal. There was no effect of ASC + BMP12 treatment for range of motion or tensile properties outcomes versus repair-only. Biochemical assays demonstrated increased DNA, glycosaminoglycans, and crosslink concentration in all repair groups compared to normal, but no effect of ASC + BMP12. Total collagen was significantly decreased in the acellular scaffold group compared to normal and significantly increased in the ASC + BMP12 group compared to the acellular scaffold group. Proteomics analysis comparing healing tendons to uninjured tendons revealed significant increases in proteins associated with inflammation, stress response, and matrix degradation. Treatment with ASC + BMP12 amplified these unfavorable changes. In summary, the treatment approach used in this study induced a negative inflammatory reaction at the repair site leading to poor healing. Future approaches should consider cell and growth factor delivery methods that do not incite negative local reactions. PMID:26445383

  1. Stem cells: sources and therapies.

    PubMed

    Monti, Manuela; Perotti, Cesare; Del Fante, Claudia; Cervio, Marila; Redi, Carlo Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The historical, lexical and conceptual issues embedded in stem cell biology are reviewed from technical, ethical, philosophical, judicial, clinical, economic and biopolitical perspectives. The mechanisms assigning the simultaneous capacity to self-renew and to differentiate to stem cells (immortal template DNA and asymmetric division) are evaluated in the light of the niche hypothesis for the stemness state. The induction of cell pluripotency and the different stem cells sources are presented (embryonic, adult and cord blood). We highlight the embryonic and adult stem cell properties and possible therapies while we emphasize the particular scientific and social values of cord blood donation to set up cord blood banks. The current scientific and legal frameworks of cord blood banks are reviewed at an international level as well as allogenic, dedicated and autologous donations. The expectations and the challenges in relation to present-day targeted diseases like diabetes mellitus type I, Parkinson's disease and myocardial infarction are evaluated in the light of the cellular therapies for regenerative medicine. PMID:23283430

  2. Human periodontal ligament stem cells repair mental nerve injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bohan; Jung, Hun-Jong; Kim, Soung-Min; Kim, Myung-Jin; Jahng, Jeong Won; Lee, Jong-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Human periodontal ligament stem cells are easily accessible and can differentiate into Schwann cells. We hypothesized that human periodontal ligament stem cells can be used as an alternative source for the autologous Schwann cells in promoting the regeneration of injured peripheral nerve. To validate this hypothesis, human periodontal ligament stem cells (1 × 106) were injected into the crush-injured left mental nerve in rats. Simultaneously, autologous Schwann cells (1 × 106) and PBS were also injected as controls. Real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction showed that at 5 days after injection, mRNA expression of low affinity nerve growth factor receptor was significantaly increased in the left trigeminal ganglion of rats with mental nerve injury. Sensory tests, histomorphometric evaluation and retrograde labeling demonstrated that at 2 and 4 weeks after injection, sensory function was significantly improved, the numbers of retrograde labeled sensory neurons and myelinated axons were significantly increased, and human periodontal ligament stem cells and autologous Schwann cells exhibited similar therapeutic effects. These findings suggest that transplantation of human periodontal ligament stem cells show a potential value in repair of mental nerve injury. PMID:25206604

  3. Novel therapies in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Induru, Raghava; Jalal, Shadia I.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the lung with a tendency to metastasize widely early in the course of the disease. The VA staging system classifies the disease into limited stage (LS) which is confined to one hemithorax and can be included into one radiation field or extensive stage (ES) which extends beyond one hemithorax. Current standard of care is concurrent chemoradiation for LS disease and chemotherapy alone for ES disease. Only a quarter of patients with LS disease will be cured with current standard treatments and majority of the patients ultimately succumb to their disease. A very complex genetic landscape of SCLC accounts for its resistance to conventional therapy and a high recurrence rate, however, at the same time this complexity can form the basis for effective targeted therapy for the disease. In recent years, several different therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in SCLC. Several of them including EGFR TKIs, BCR-ABL TKIs, mTOR inhibitors, and VEGF inhibitors have been unsuccessful in showing a survival advantage in this disease. Several others including DNA repair inhibitors, cellular developmental pathway inhibitors, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), as well as immune therapy with vaccines, immunomodulators, and immune checkpoint inhibitors are being tested. So far, none of these agents are approved for use in SCLC and the majority are in phase I/II clinical trials, with immune checkpoint inhibitors being the most promising therapeutic strategy. In this article, we will discuss these novel therapeutic agents and currently available data in SCLC. PMID:26629422

  4. Current stem cell delivery methods for myocardial repair.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Calvin C; Zhou, Li; Hao, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure commonly results from an irreparable damage due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. In recent years, the rapid advancements in stem cell research have garnered much praise for paving the way to novel therapies in reversing myocardial injuries. Cell types currently investigated for cellular delivery include embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and adult stem cell lineages such as skeletal myoblasts, bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cardiac stem cells (CSCs). To engraft these cells into patients' damaged myocardium, a variety of approaches (intramyocardial, transendocardial, transcoronary, venous, intravenous, intracoronary artery and retrograde venous administrations and bioengineered tissue transplantation) have been developed and explored. In this paper, we will discuss the pros and cons of these delivery modalities, the current state of their therapeutic potentials, and a multifaceted evaluation of their reported clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. While the issues of optimal delivery approach, the best progenitor stem cell type, the most effective dose, and timing of administration remain to be addressed, we are highly optimistic that stem cell therapy will provide a clinically viable option for myocardial regeneration. PMID:23509740

  5. Current Stem Cell Delivery Methods for Myocardial Repair

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Calvin C.; Zhou, Li; Hao, Jijun

    2013-01-01

    Heart failure commonly results from an irreparable damage due to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs), the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the United States. In recent years, the rapid advancements in stem cell research have garnered much praise for paving the way to novel therapies in reversing myocardial injuries. Cell types currently investigated for cellular delivery include embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and adult stem cell lineages such as skeletal myoblasts, bone-marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and cardiac stem cells (CSCs). To engraft these cells into patients' damaged myocardium, a variety of approaches (intramyocardial, transendocardial, transcoronary, venous, intravenous, intracoronary artery and retrograde venous administrations and bioengineered tissue transplantation) have been developed and explored. In this paper, we will discuss the pros and cons of these delivery modalities, the current state of their therapeutic potentials, and a multifaceted evaluation of their reported clinical feasibility, safety, and efficacy. While the issues of optimal delivery approach, the best progenitor stem cell type, the most effective dose, and timing of administration remain to be addressed, we are highly optimistic that stem cell therapy will provide a clinically viable option for myocardial regeneration. PMID:23509740

  6. Current focus of stem cell application in retinal repair.

    PubMed

    Alonso-Alonso, María L; Srivastava, Girish K

    2015-04-26

    The relevance of retinal diseases, both in society's economy and in the quality of people's life who suffer with them, has made stem cell therapy an interesting topic for research. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs), induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADMSCs) are the focus in current endeavors as a source of different retinal cells, such as photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial cells. The aim is to apply them for cell replacement as an option for treating retinal diseases which so far are untreatable in their advanced stage. ESCs, despite the great potential for differentiation, have the dangerous risk of teratoma formation as well as ethical issues, which must be resolved before starting a clinical trial. iPSCs, like ESCs, are able to differentiate in to several types of retinal cells. However, the process to get them for personalized cell therapy has a high cost in terms of time and money. Researchers are working to resolve this since iPSCs seem to be a realistic option for treating retinal diseases. ADMSCs have the advantage that the procedures to obtain them are easier. Despite advancements in stem cell application, there are still several challenges that need to be overcome before transferring the research results to clinical application. This paper reviews recent research achievements of the applications of these three types of stem cells as well as clinical trials currently based on them. PMID:25914770

  7. Minimally Invasive Repair of Pectus Carinatum in Patients Unsuited to Bracing Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Suh, Jee-Won; Joo, Seok; Lee, Geun Dong; Haam, Seok Jin; Lee, Sungsoo

    2016-01-01

    Background We used an Abramson technique for minimally invasive repair of pectus carinatum in patients who preferred surgery to brace therapy, had been unsuccessfully treated via brace therapy, or were unsuitable for brace therapy because of a rigid chest wall. Methods Between July 2011 and May 2015, 16 patients with pectus carinatum underwent minimally invasive surgery. Results The mean age of the patients was 24.35±13.20 years (range, 14–57 years), and all patients were male. The percentage of excellent aesthetic results, as rated by the patients, was 37.5%, and the percentage of good results was 56.25%. The preoperative and postoperative Haller Index values were 2.01±0.19 (range, 1.60–2.31), and 2.22±0.19 (range, 1.87–2.50), respectively (p-value=0.01), and the median hospital stay was 7.09±2.91 days (range, 5–15 days). Only one patient experienced postoperative complications. Conclusion Minimally invasive repair is effective for the treatment of pectus carinatum, even in adult patients. PMID:27066432

  8. The endoperoxide ascaridol shows strong differential cytotoxicity in nucleotide excision repair-deficient cells

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, Rashda; Efferth, Thomas; Kuhmann, Christine; Opatz, Till; Hao, Xiaojiang; Popanda, Odilia; Schmezer, Peter

    2012-03-15

    Targeting synthetic lethality in DNA repair pathways has become a promising anti-cancer strategy. However little is known about such interactions with regard to the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway. Therefore, cell lines with a defect in the NER genes ERCC6 or XPC and their normal counterparts were screened with 53 chemically defined phytochemicals isolated from plants used in traditional Chinese medicine for differential cytotoxic effects. The screening revealed 12 drugs that killed NER-deficient cells more efficiently than proficient cells. Five drugs were further analyzed for IC{sub 50} values, effects on cell cycle distribution, and induction of DNA damage. Ascaridol was the most effective compound with a difference of > 1000-fold in resistance between normal and NER-deficient cells (IC{sub 50} values for cells with deficiency in ERCC6: 0.15 μM, XPC: 0.18 μM, and normal cells: > 180 μM). NER-deficiency combined with ascaridol treatment led to G2/M-phase arrest, an increased percentage of subG1 cells, and a substantially higher DNA damage induction. These results were confirmed in a second set of NER-deficient and -proficient cell lines with isogenic background. Finally, ascaridol was characterized for its ability to generate oxidative DNA damage. The drug led to a dose-dependent increase in intracellular levels of reactive oxygen species at cytotoxic concentrations, but only NER-deficient cells showed a strongly induced amount of 8-oxodG sites. In summary, ascaridol is a cytotoxic and DNA-damaging compound which generates intracellular reactive oxidative intermediates and which selectively affects NER-deficient cells. This could provide a new therapeutic option to treat cancer cells with mutations in NER genes. -- Highlights: ► Thousand-fold higher Ascaridol activity in NER-deficient versus proficient cells. ► Impaired repair of Ascaridol-induced oxidative DNA damage in NER-deficient cells. ► Selective activity of Ascaridol opens new therapy

  9. Role of mesenchymal stem cells in bone regeneration and fracture repair: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin; Wang, Yu; Gou, Wenlong; Lu, Qiang; Peng, Jiang; Lu, Shibi

    2013-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are non-haematopoietic stromal stem cells that have many sources, such as bone marrow, periosteum, vessel walls, adipose, muscle, tendon, peripheral circulation, umbilical cord blood, skin and dental tissues. They are capable of self-replication and of differentiating into, and contributing to the regeneration of, mesenchymal tissues, such as bone, cartilage, ligament, tendon, muscle and adipose tissue. The homing of MSCs may play an important role in the repair of bone fractures. As a composite material, the formation and growth of bone tissue is a complex process, including molecular, cell and biochemical metabolic changes. The recruitment of factors with an adequate number of MSCs and the micro-environment around the fracture are effective for fracture repair. Several studies have investigated the functional expression of various chemokine receptors, trophic factors and adhesion molecules in human MSCs. Many external factors affect MSC homing. MSCs have been used as seed cells in building tissue-engineered bone grafts. Scaffolds seeded with MSCs are most often used in tissue engineering and include biotic and abiotic materials. This knowledge provides a platform for the development of novel therapies for bone regeneration with endogenous MSCs. PMID:23948983

  10. Stem cell therapy: the great promise in lung disease.

    PubMed

    Siniscalco, Dario; Sullo, Nikol; Maione, Sabatino; Rossi, Francesco; D'Agostino, Bruno

    2008-06-01

    Lung injuries are leading causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Pulmonary diseases such as asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease characterized by loss of lung elasticity, small airway tethers, and luminal obstruction with inflammatory mucoid secretions, or idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis characterized by excessive matrix deposition and destruction of the normal lung architecture, have essentially symptomatic treatments and their management is costly to the health care system.Regeneration of tissue by stem cells from endogenous, exogenous, and even genetically modified cells is a promising novel therapy. The use of adult stem cells to help with lung regeneration and repair could be a newer technology in clinical and regenerative medicine. In fact, different studies have shown that bone marrow progenitor cells contribute to repair and remodeling of lung in animal models of progressive pulmonary hypertension.Therefore, lung stem cell biology may provide novel approaches to therapy and could represent a great promise for the future of molecular medicine. In fact, several diseases can be slowed or even blocked by stem cell transplantation. PMID:19124369

  11. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in renal disease and kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Reinders, Marlies E J; Fibbe, Willem E; Rabelink, Ton J

    2010-01-01

    Cell therapies aim at differentiation of stem cells into the specific cell type required to repair damaged or destroyed cells or tissues. Over recent years, cell therapy has been introduced in a variety of application areas, including cardiovascular repair, diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and renal repair. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), often referred to as mesenchymal stem cells, are of particular interest as a cell therapy model, as this is one of the few cell types that are on the brink of entering the clinical arena in different areas of application. MSCs can be differentiated in vitro and in vivo into various cell types of mesenchymal origin such as bone, fat and cartilage. They have important effects on the innate and adaptive immune system and possess striking anti-inflammatory properties that make them attractive for potential use in diseases characterized by autoimmunity and inflammation. In addition, MSCs have been shown to migrate to sites of tissue injury and to enhance repair by secreting anti-fibrotic and pro-angiogenic factors. In this review, evidence for the renoprotective mechanisms of MSCs as well as their therapeutic possibilities and potential hazards in acute and chronic renal disease and allograft rejection is summarized. PMID:19861311

  12. Caveolae internalization repairs wounded cells and muscle fibers

    PubMed Central

    Corrotte, Matthias; Almeida, Patricia E; Tam, Christina; Castro-Gomes, Thiago; Fernandes, Maria Cecilia; Millis, Bryan A; Cortez, Mauro; Miller, Heather; Song, Wenxia; Maugel, Timothy K; Andrews, Norma W

    2013-01-01

    Rapid repair of plasma membrane wounds is critical for cellular survival. Muscle fibers are particularly susceptible to injury, and defective sarcolemma resealing causes muscular dystrophy. Caveolae accumulate in dystrophic muscle fibers and caveolin and cavin mutations cause muscle pathology, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show that muscle fibers and other cell types repair membrane wounds by a mechanism involving Ca2+-triggered exocytosis of lysosomes, release of acid sphingomyelinase, and rapid lesion removal by caveolar endocytosis. Wounding or exposure to sphingomyelinase triggered endocytosis and intracellular accumulation of caveolar vesicles, which gradually merged into larger compartments. The pore-forming toxin SLO was directly visualized entering cells within caveolar vesicles, and depletion of caveolin inhibited plasma membrane resealing. Our findings directly link lesion removal by caveolar endocytosis to the maintenance of plasma membrane and muscle fiber integrity, providing a mechanistic explanation for the muscle pathology associated with mutations in caveolae proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00926.001 PMID:24052812

  13. Biologicals and Fetal Cell Therapy for Wound and Scar Management

    PubMed Central

    Hirt-Burri, Nathalie; Ramelet, Albert-Adrien; Raffoul, Wassim; de Buys Roessingh, Anthony; Scaletta, Corinne; Pioletti, Dominique; Applegate, Lee Ann

    2011-01-01

    Few biopharmaceutical preparations developed from biologicals are available for tissue regeneration and scar management. When developing biological treatments with cellular therapy, selection of cell types and establishment of consistent cell banks are crucial steps in whole-cell bioprocessing. Various cell types have been used in treatment of wounds to reduce scar to date including autolog and allogenic skin cells, platelets, placenta, and amniotic extracts. Experience with fetal cells show that they may provide an interesting cell choice due to facility of outscaling and known properties for wound healing without scar. Differential gene profiling has helped to point to potential indicators of repair which include cell adhesion, extracellular matrix, cytokines, growth factors, and development. Safety has been evidenced in Phase I and II clinical fetal cell use for burn and wound treatments with different cell delivery systems. We present herein that fetal cells present technical and therapeutic advantages compared to other cell types for effective cell-based therapy for wound and scar management. PMID:22363853

  14. Preventing over-resection by DNA2 helicase/nuclease suppresses repair defects in Fanconi anemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Karanja, Kenneth K; Lee, Eu Han; Hendrickson, Eric A; Campbell, Judith L

    2014-01-01

    FANCD2 is required for the repair of DNA damage by the FA (Fanconi anemia) pathway, and, consequently, FANCD2-deficient cells are sensitive to compounds such as cisplatin and formaldehyde that induce DNA:DNA and DNA:protein crosslinks, respectively. The DNA2 helicase/nuclease is required for RNA/DNA flap removal from Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and for the resection of DSBs (double-strand breaks) during HDR (homology-directed repair) of replication stress-induced damage. A knockdown of DNA2 renders normal cells as sensitive to cisplatin (in the absence of EXO1) and to formaldehyde (even in the presence of EXO1) as FANCD2−/− cells. Surprisingly, however, the depletion of DNA2 in FANCD2-deficient cells rescues the sensitivity of FANCD2−/− cells to cisplatin and formaldehyde. We previously showed that the resection activity of DNA2 acts downstream of FANCD2 to insure HDR of the DSBs arising when replication forks encounter ICL (interstrand crosslink) damage. The suppression of FANCD2−/− by DNA2 knockdowns suggests that DNA2 and FANCD2 also have antagonistic roles: in the absence of FANCD2, DNA2 somehow corrupts repair. To demonstrate that DNA2 is deleterious to crosslink repair, we used psoralen-induced ICL damage to trigger the repair of a site-specific crosslink in a GFP reporter and observed that “over-resection” can account for reduced repair. Our work demonstrates that excessive resection can lead to genome instability and shows that strict regulatory processes have evolved to inhibit resection nucleases. The suppression of FANCD2−/− phenotypes by DNA2 depletion may have implications for FA therapies and for the use of ICL-inducing agents in chemotherapy. PMID:24626199

  15. Targeted DNA methylation by homology-directed repair in mammalian cells. Transcription reshapes methylation on the repaired gene

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Annalisa; Angrisano, Tiziana; Russo, Giusi; Landi, Rosaria; Pezone, Antonio; Bartollino, Silvia; Zuchegna, Candida; Babbio, Federica; Bonapace, Ian Marc; Allen, Brittany; Muller, Mark T.; Chiariotti, Lorenzo; Gottesman, Max E.; Porcellini, Antonio; Avvedimento, Enrico V.

    2014-01-01

    We report that homology-directed repair of a DNA double-strand break within a single copy Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) gene in HeLa cells alters the methylation pattern at the site of recombination. DNA methyl transferase (DNMT)1, DNMT3a and two proteins that regulate methylation, Np95 and GADD45A, are recruited to the site of repair and are responsible for selective methylation of the promoter-distal segment of the repaired DNA. The initial methylation pattern of the locus is modified in a transcription-dependent fashion during the 15–20 days following repair, at which time no further changes in the methylation pattern occur. The variation in DNA modification generates stable clones with wide ranges of GFP expression. Collectively, our data indicate that somatic DNA methylation follows homologous repair and is subjected to remodeling by local transcription in a discrete time window during and after the damage. We propose that DNA methylation of repaired genes represents a DNA damage code and is source of variation of gene expression. PMID:24137009

  16. Cardiac Repair by Embryonic Stem-Derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Rubart, M.

    2008-01-01

    Cell transplantation approaches offer the potential to promote regenerative growth of diseased hearts. It is well established that donor cardiomyocytes stably engraft into recipient hearts when injected directly into the myocardial wall. Moreover, the transplanted donor cardiomyocytes participate in a functional syncytium with the host myocardium. Thus, transplantation of donor cardiomyocytes resulted in at least partial restoration of lost muscle mass. It is also well established that embryonic stem (ES) cells differentiate into cells of ecto-, endo-, and mesodermal lineages when cultured under appropriate conditions in vitro. Robust cardiomyogenic differentiation was frequently observed in spontaneously differentiating ES cultures. Cellular, molecular and physiologic analyses indicated that ES-derived cells were bona fide cardiomyocytes, with in vitro characteristics typical for cells obtained from early stages of cardiac development. Thus, ES-derived cardiomyocytes constitute a viable source of donor cells for cell transplantation therapies. PMID:16370325

  17. Mesenchymal stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells as therapies for multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Juan; Yang, Rongbing; Biswas, Sangita; Qin, Xin; Zhang, Min; Deng, Wenbin

    2015-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic, autoimmune, inflammatory demyelinating disorder of the central nervous system that leads to permanent neurological deficits. Current MS treatment regimens are insufficient to treat the irreversible neurological disabilities. Tremendous progress in the experimental and clinical applications of cell-based therapies has recognized stem cells as potential candidates for regenerative therapy for many neurodegenerative disorders including MS. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSCs) derived precursor cells can modulate the autoimmune response in the central nervous system (CNS) and promote endogenous remyelination and repair process in animal models. This review highlights studies involving the immunomodulatory and regenerative effects of mesenchymal stem cells and iPSCs derived cells in animal models, and their translation into immunomodulatory and neuroregenerative treatment strategies for MS. PMID:25918935

  18. Mesenchymal stem cells for cardiac cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yeong-Hoon; Kurtz, Andreas; Stamm, Christof

    2011-01-01

    Despite refinements of medical and surgical therapies, heart failure remains a fatal disease. Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of heart failure, and only palliative measures are available to relieve symptoms and prolong the patient's life span. Because mammalian cardiomyocytes irreversibly exit the cell cycle at about the time of birth, the heart has traditionally been considered to lack any regenerative capacity. This paradigm, however, is currently shifting, and the cellular composition of the myocardium is being targeted by various regeneration strategies. Adult progenitor and stem cell treatment of diseased human myocardium has been carried out for more than 10 years (Menasche et al., 2001; Stamm et al., 2003), and it has become clear that, in humans, the regenerative capacity of hematopoietic stem cells and endothelial progenitor cells, despite potent proangiogenic effects, is limited (Stamm et al., 2009). More recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and related cell types are being evaluated in preclinical models of heart disease as well as in clinical trials (see Published Clinical Trials, below). MSCs have the capacity to self-renew and to differentiate into lineages that normally originate from the embryonic mesenchyme (connective tissues, blood vessels, blood-related organs) (Caplan, 1991; Prockop, 1997; Pittenger et al., 1999). The current definition of MSCs includes plastic adherence in cell culture, specific surface antigen expression (CD105(+)/CD90(+)/CD73(+), CD34(-)/CD45(-)/CD11b(-) or CD14(-)/CD19(-) or CD79α(-)/HLA-DR1(-)), and multilineage in vitro differentiation potential (osteogenic, chondrogenic, and adipogenic) (Dominici et al., 2006 ). If those criteria are not met completely, the term "mesenchymal stromal cells" should be used for marrow-derived adherent cells, or other terms for MSC-like cells of different origin. For the purpose of this review, MSCs and related cells are discussed in general, and cell type

  19. Loss of CtIP disturbs homologous recombination repair and sensitizes breast cancer cells to PARP inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Fujimori, Hiroaki; Motegi, Akira; Miki, Yoshio; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and therefore, new and improved approaches for the treatment of breast cancer are desperately needed. CtIP (RBBP8) is a multifunctional protein that is involved in various cellular functions, including transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair and the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. CtIP plays an important role in homologous recombination repair by interacting with tumor suppressor protein BRCA1. Here, we analyzed the expression profile of CtIP by data mining using published microarray data sets. We found that CtIP expression is frequently decreased in breast cancer patients, and the patient group with low-expressing CtIP mRNA is associated with a significantly lower survival rate. The knockdown of CtIP in breast cancer MCF7 cells reduced Rad51 foci numbers and enhanced f H2AX foci formation after f-irradiation, suggesting that deficiency of CtIP decreases homologous recombination repair and delays DNA double strand break repair. To explore the effect of CtIP on PARP inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, CtIP-depleted MCF7 cells were treated with PARP inhibitor olaparib (AZD2281) or veliparib (ABT-888). As in BRCA mutated cells, PARP inhibitors showed cytotoxicity to CtIP-depleted cells by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to decreased cell viability. Further, a xenograft tumor model in mice with MCF7 cells demonstrated significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition under CtIP deficiency. In summary, this study shows that low level of CtIP expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and provides a rationale for establishing CtIP expression as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. PMID:26713604

  20. Loss of CtIP disturbs homologous recombination repair and sensitizes breast cancer cells to PARP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junhui; Ding, Qianshan; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Motegi, Akira; Miki, Yoshio; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2016-02-16

    Breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death worldwide, and therefore, new and improved approaches for the treatment of breast cancer are desperately needed. CtIP (RBBP8) is a multifunctional protein that is involved in various cellular functions, including transcription, DNA replication, DNA repair and the G1 and G2 cell cycle checkpoints. CtIP plays an important role in homologous recombination repair by interacting with tumor suppressor protein BRCA1. Here, we analyzed the expression profile of CtIP by data mining using published microarray data sets. We found that CtIP expression is frequently decreased in breast cancer patients, and the patient group with low-expressing CtIP mRNA is associated with a significantly lower survival rate. The knockdown of CtIP in breast cancer MCF7 cells reduced Rad51 foci numbers and enhanced f H2AX foci formation after f-irradiation, suggesting that deficiency of CtIP decreases homologous recombination repair and delays DNA double strand break repair. To explore the effect of CtIP on PARP inhibitor therapy for breast cancer, CtIP-depleted MCF7 cells were treated with PARP inhibitor olaparib (AZD2281) or veliparib (ABT-888). As in BRCA mutated cells, PARP inhibitors showed cytotoxicity to CtIP-depleted cells by preventing cells from repairing DNA damage, leading to decreased cell viability. Further, a xenograft tumor model in mice with MCF7 cells demonstrated significantly increased sensitivity towards PARP inhibition under CtIP deficiency. In summary, this study shows that low level of CtIP expression is associated with poor prognosis in breast cancer, and provides a rationale for establishing CtIP expression as a biomarker of PARP inhibitor response, and consequently offers novel therapeutic options for a significant subset of patients. PMID:26713604

  1. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bielamowicz, Kevin; Khawja, Shumaila; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard of care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients (1). Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly “self,” it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer cells, natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor or αβ T cell receptor grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system toward the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts. PMID:24273748

  2. DNA Repair in Human Cells Exposed to Combinations of Carcinogenic Agents

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R. B.; Ahmed, F. E.

    1980-01-01

    Normal human and XP2 fibroblasts were treated with UV plus UV-mimetic chemicals. The UV dose used was sufficient to saturate the UV excision repair system. Excision repair after combined treatments was estimated by unscheduled DNA synthesis, BrdUrd photolysis, and the loss of sites sensitive to a UV specific endonuclease. Since the repair of damage from UV and its mimetics is coordinately controlled we expected that there would be similar rate-limiting steps in the repair of UV and chemical damage and that after a combined treatment the total amount of repair would be the same as from UV or the chemicals separately. The expectation was not fulfilled. In normal cells repair after a combined treatment was additive whereas in XP cells repair after a combined treatment was usually less than after either agent separately. The chemicals tested were AAAF, DMBA-epoxide, 4NQO, and ICR-170.

  3. Precision Medicine: Genetic Repair of Retinitis Pigmentosa in Patient-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bassuk, Alexander G.; Zheng, Andrew; Li, Yao; Tsang, Stephen H.; Mahajan, Vinit B.

    2016-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) generated from patient fibroblasts could potentially be used as a source of autologous cells for transplantation in retinal disease. Patient-derived iPSCs, however, would still harbor disease-causing mutations. To generate healthy patient-derived cells, mutations might be repaired with new gene-editing technology based on the bacterial system of clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/Cas9, thereby yielding grafts that require no patient immunosuppression. We tested whether CRISPR/Cas9 could be used in patient-specific iPSCs to precisely repair an RPGR point mutation that causes X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP). Fibroblasts cultured from a skin-punch biopsy of an XLRP patient were transduced to produce iPSCs carrying the patient’s c.3070G > T mutation. The iPSCs were transduced with CRISPR guide RNAs, Cas9 endonuclease, and a donor homology template. Despite the gene’s repetitive and GC-rich sequences, 13% of RPGR gene copies showed mutation correction and conversion to the wild-type allele. This is the first report using CRISPR to correct a pathogenic mutation in iPSCs derived from a patient with photoreceptor degeneration. This important proof-of-concept finding supports the development of personalized iPSC-based transplantation therapies for retinal disease. PMID:26814166

  4. Cell and gene therapy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Martiniello-Wilks, R; Rasko, J E J

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of human cells to produce cell therapeutic products for the treatment of disease is, with few exceptions, an experimental therapy. Because cell therapies involve a biological product, often with some genetic or other modification, they require extensive pre-clinical research and development. Cell therapy production processes and premises require licensing by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. In this review, timed to coincide with the international meetings of the ISCT and ISSCR in Australia, we describe some promising cell therapies currently under development. PMID:17464751

  5. Cell therapy of refractory Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Knyazev, O V; Parfenov, A I; Shcherbakov, P L; Ruchkina, I N; Konoplyannikov, A G

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed medium-term efficiency and safety of biological therapy of Crohn's disease, in particular transplantation of allogenic mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells and anticytokine therapy with selective immunosuppressive agents. It was found that both methods of biological therapy of refractory Crohn's disease resulted in clinical and in some cases endoscopic remission. In most cases, clinical remission was maintained without steroid hormone therapy. Thus, both methods produce comparable clinical results. It was concluded that transplantation of mesenchymal stromal bone marrow cells could be considered as a promising method in the therapy of refractory Crohn's disease comparable by its efficiency with infliximab therapy. PMID:24319711

  6. Alliance rupture and repair in conjoint family therapy: an exploratory study.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Valentín; Boogmans, Emanuelle; Loots, Gerrit; Friedlander, Myrna L

    2012-03-01

    In this article, we introduce a methodology for studying alliance rupture and repair in conjoint family therapy. Using the System for Observing Family Therapy Alliances (Friedlander, Escudero, & Heatherington, 2006), we identified rupture markers and repair interventions in a session with a single mother and her 16-year-old "rebellious" daughter. The session was selected for analysis because a severe rupture was clinically evident; however, by the end of the session, there was an emotional turnaround, which was sustained in the following session and continued until the successful, mutually agreed upon termination. The first rupture occurred when the psychotherapist suggested that the mother explore, in an individual session, how her "personal stress" may be affecting her daughter. The observational analysis showed repeated rupture markers, that is, confrontation and withdrawal behavior, hostile within-family interactions, and a seriously "split" alliance in family members' expressed feelings toward the psychotherapist. The time-stamped behavioral stream showed that the psychotherapist focused first on safety, then on enhancing his emotional connection with each client, and finally on helping mother and daughter understand each other's behavior and recognize their shared isolation. PMID:22369080

  7. [Controversies in the therapy of rotator cuff tears. Operative or nonoperative treatment, open or arthroscopic repair?].

    PubMed

    Lorbach, O

    2016-02-01

    Rotator cuff tears are a common cause of shoulder pain that may lead to severe impairment of shoulder function with significant limitation of the quality of life. Furthermore, they are associated with high direct and indirect costs.Conservative therapy and various surgical procedures for rotator cuff repair are all possible treatment options. Therefore, the correct treatment for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear is important.The conservative therapy may be considered as an alternative treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in patients with small or incomplete tears with no fatty atrophy or tendon retraction, with only slight pain, and in older patients with few functional demands. Surgical treatment is recommended after failed conservative treatment lasting 3-6 months, with the corresponding psychological strain. Moreover, surgical treatment should be considered as a primary treatment option for a symptomatic rotator cuff tear in young patients with high functional demands, patients with a high level of physical strain in their jobs, large tears, and tears where there is already significant muscle atrophy or tendon retraction.Arthroscopic treatment is considered to be the gold standard because of the better cosmetic results and treatment of concomitant pathological conditions, the lower levels of postoperative pain, the potentially lower risk of shoulder stiffness, and more focused adhesiolysis. However, arthroscopy does not improve clinical results. Because of the current financial situation, however, open rotator cuff repair is still a viable alternative. PMID:26694070

  8. TRIM72 is required for effective repair of alveolar epithelial cell wounding

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Chul; Kellett, Thomas; Wang, Shaohua; Nishi, Miyuki; Nagre, Nagaraja; Zhou, Beiyun; Flodby, Per; Shilo, Konstantin; Ghadiali, Samir N.; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Hubmayr, Rolf D.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms for lung cell repair are largely unknown. Previous studies identified tripartite motif protein 72 (TRIM72) from striated muscle and linked its function to tissue repair. In this study, we characterized TRIM72 expression in lung tissues and investigated the role of TRIM72 in repair of alveolar epithelial cells. In vivo injury of lung cells was introduced by high tidal volume ventilation, and repair-defective cells were labeled with postinjury administration of propidium iodide. Primary alveolar epithelial cells were isolated and membrane wounding and repair were labeled separately. Our results show that absence of TRIM72 increases susceptibility to deformation-induced lung injury whereas TRIM72 overexpression is protective. In vitro cell wounding assay revealed that TRIM72 protects alveolar epithelial cells through promoting repair rather than increasing resistance to injury. The repair function of TRIM72 in lung cells is further linked to caveolin 1. These data suggest an essential role for TRIM72 in repair of alveolar epithelial cells under plasma membrane stress failure. PMID:25106429

  9. Cell therapy in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Lindvall, Olle; Björklund, Anders

    2004-10-01

    The clinical studies with intrastriatal transplants of fetal mesencephalic tissue in Parkinson's disease (PD) patients have provided proof-of-principle for the cell replacement strategy in this disorder. The grafted dopaminergic neurons can reinnervate the denervated striatum, restore regulated dopamine (DA) release and movement-related frontal cortical activation, and give rise to significant symptomatic relief. In the most successful cases, patients have been able to withdraw L-dopa treatment after transplantation and resume an independent life. However, there are currently several problems linked to the use of fetal tissue: 1) lack of sufficient amounts of tissue for transplantation in a large number of patients, 2) variability of functional outcome with some patients showing major improvement and others modest if any clinical benefit, and 3) occurrence of troublesome dyskinesias in a significant proportion of patients after transplantation. Thus, neural transplantation is still at an experimental stage in PD. For the development of a clinically useful cell therapy, we need to define better criteria for patient selection and how graft placement should be optimized in each patient. We also need to explore in more detail the importance for functional outcome of the dissection and cellular composition of the graft tissue as well as of immunological mechanisms. Strategies to prevent the development of dyskinesias after grafting have to be developed. Finally, we need to generate large numbers of viable DA neurons in preparations that are standardized and quality controlled. The stem cell technology may provide a virtually unlimited source of DA neurons, but several scientific issues need to be addressed before stem cell-based therapies can be tested in PD patients. PMID:15717042

  10. XB130 promotes bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation in airway epithelial repair and regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Toba, Hiroaki; Wang, Yingchun; Bai, Xiaohui; Zamel, Ricardo; Cho, Hae-Ra; Liu, Hongmei; Lira, Alonso; Keshavjee, Shaf; Liu, Mingyao

    2015-01-01

    Proliferation of bronchioalveolar stem cells (BASCs) is essential for epithelial repair. XB130 is a novel adaptor protein involved in the regulation of epithelial cell survival, proliferation and migration through the PI3K/Akt pathway. To determine the role of XB130 in airway epithelial injury repair and regeneration, a naphthalene-induced airway epithelial injury model was used with XB130 knockout (KO) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates. In XB130 KO mice, at days 7 and 14, small airway epithelium repair was significantly delayed with fewer number of Club cells (previously called Clara cells). CCSP (Club cell secreted protein) mRNA expression was also significantly lower in KO mice at day 7. At day 5, there were significantly fewer proliferative epithelial cells in the KO group, and the number of BASCs significantly increased in WT mice but not in KO mice. At day 7, phosphorylation of Akt, GSK-3β, and the p85α subunit of PI3K was observed in airway epithelial cells in WT mice, but to a much lesser extent in KO mice. Microarray data also suggest that PI3K/Akt-related signals were regulated differently in KO and WT mice. An inhibitory mechanism for cell proliferation and cell cycle progression was suggested in KO mice. XB130 is involved in bronchioalveolar stem cell and Club cell proliferation, likely through the PI3K/Akt/GSK-3β pathway. PMID:26360608

  11. Carotid Repair Using Autologous Adipose-Derived Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Froehlich, Harald; Gulati, Rajiv; Boilson, Barry; Witt, Tyra; Harbuzariu, Adriana; Kleppe, Laurel; Dietz, Allan B.; Lerman, Amir; Simari, Robert D.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Adipose tissue is an abundant source of endothelial cells as well as stem and progenitor cells which can develop an endothelial phenotype. It has been demonstrated that these cells have distinct angiogenic properties in vitro and in vivo. However, whether these cells have the capacity to directly improve large vessel form and function following vascular injury remains unknown. To define whether delivery of adipose-derived endothelial cells (ADECs) would improve healing of injured carotid arteries, a rabbit model of acute arterial injury was employed. Methods Autologous rabbit ADECS were generated utilizing defined culture conditions. To test the ability of ADECs to enhance carotid artery repair, cells were delivered intra-arterially following acute balloon injury. Additional delivery studies were performed following functional selection of cells prior to delivery. Results Following rabbit omental fat harvest and digestion, a proliferative, homogenous, and distinctly endothelial population of ADECs was identified. Direct delivery of autologous ADECs resulted in marked re-endothelialization 48 hours following acute vascular injury as compared to saline controls (82.2 ±26.9% vs 4.2±3.0% p<0.001). Delivery of ADECs that were selected for their ability to take up acetylated LDL significantly improved vasoreactivity and decreased intimal formation following vascular injury. Conclusions Taken together, these data suggest that ADECs represent an autologous source of proliferative endothelial cells which demonstrate the capacity to rapidly improve re-endothelialization, improve vascular reactivity, and decrease intimal formation in a carotid artery injury model. PMID:19286583

  12. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases. PMID:25310691

  13. Trichinella spiralis: nurse cell formation with emphasis on analogy to muscle cell repair

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Zhiliang; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Lj; Nagano, Isao; Takahashi, Yuzo

    2008-01-01

    Trichinella infection results in formation of a capsule in infected muscles. The capsule is a residence of the parasite which is composed of the nurse cell and fibrous wall. The process of nurse cell formation is complex and includes infected muscle cell response (de-differentiation, cell cycle re-entry and arrest) and satellite cell responses (activation, proliferation and differentiation). Some events that occur during the nurse cell formation are analogous to those occurring during muscle cell regeneration/repair. This article reviews capsule formation with emphasis on this analogy. PMID:18710582

  14. Ineffective correction of PPARγ signaling in cystic fibrosis airway epithelial cells undergoing repair.

    PubMed

    Bou Saab, J; Bacchetta, M; Chanson, M

    2016-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) represents a potential target to treat airway mucus hypersecretion in cystic fibrosis (CF). We aimed to determine if PPARγ is altered in CF human airway epithelial cells (HAECs), if PPARγ contributes to mucin expression and HAEC differentiation, and if PPARγ ligand therapy corrects the CF phenotype. To this end, well-differentiated CF and NCF HAEC primary cultures were wounded to monitor the expression of key genes involved in PPARγ activation and mucus homeostasis, and to evaluate the effect of a PPARγ agonist, at different times of repair. Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (HPGD) converts prostaglandin E2 to 15-keto PGE2 (15kPGE2), an endogenous PPARγ ligand. Interestingly, PPARγ and HPGD expression dramatically decreased in CF HAECs. These changes were accompanied by an increase in the expression of MUC5B. The correlation between PPARγ and MUC5B was confirmed in an airway epithelial cell line after CFTR knock-down. Exposure of HAECs to 15kPGE2 did not correct the CF phenotype but revealed a defect in the process of basal cell (BC) differentiation. The HPGD/PPARγ axis is deregulated in primary HAEC cultures from CF patients, which may impact the maturation of BCs to differentiated luminal cells. Importantly, PPARγ therapy was inefficient in correcting the CF defect. PMID:27484450

  15. Paracrine Mechanisms of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tissue Repair.

    PubMed

    Gnecchi, Massimiliano; Danieli, Patrizia; Malpasso, Giuseppe; Ciuffreda, Maria Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Tissue regeneration from transplanted mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) either through transdifferentiation or cell fusion was originally proposed as the principal mechanism underlying their therapeutic action. However, several studies have now shown that both these mechanisms are very inefficient. The low MSC engraftment rate documented in injured areas also refutes the hypothesis that MSC repair tissue damage by replacing cell loss with newly differentiated cells. Indeed, despite evidence of preferential homing of MSC to the site of myocardial ischemia, exogenously administered MSC show poor survival and do not persist in the infarcted area. Therefore, it has been proposed that the functional benefits observed after MSC transplantation in experimental models of tissue injury might be related to the secretion of soluble factors acting in a paracrine fashion. This hypothesis is supported by pre-clinical studies demonstrating equal or even improved organ function upon infusion of MSC-derived conditioned medium (MSC-CM) compared with MSC transplantation. Identifying key MSC-secreted factors and their functional role seems a reasonable approach for a rational design of nextgeneration MSC-based therapeutics. Here, we summarize the major findings regarding both different MSC-mediated paracrine actions and the identification of paracrine mediators. PMID:27236669

  16. The Effect of Continuous Sedation Therapy on Immunomodulation, Plasma Levels of Antioxidants, and Indicators of Tissue Repair in Post-Burn Sepsis Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li; Meng, Ke; Su, Wei; Fu, Yanjie

    2015-11-01

    Our objective was to investigate the effect of continuous therapeutic sedation on the immune response, plasma levels of antioxidants, and tissue repair indicators in burn-induced sepsis patients. A total of 104 burn-induced sepsis patients hospitalized during March, 2008 to March, 2013 were selected for the study and randomly divided into the experimental and control groups, each with 53 cases. All of these patients received conventional treatment and the patients in the experimental group were given an additional therapy of continuous sedation. The number of T lymphocytes, plasma levels of tissue repair indicators, and antioxidants were measured before and after the treatment. Continuous midazolam treatment induced a significant increase in plasma levels of gelsolin, heat shock protein 70, nitric oxide, superoxide dismutase, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (p < 0.05). Likewise, the relative counts of CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+) T lymphocytes, T cells exhibiting HLA-DR and CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio were significantly increased in the patients treated with midazolam. No adverse reaction including respiratory depression, midazolam resistance, or withdrawal syndrome was observed. Continuous sedation therapy was found to enhance immune response, increase the plasma levels of antioxidants, and tissue protective/repair mediators in burn-induced sepsis patients. This therapy caused no adverse reaction or over-inhibition of the oxidative stress suggesting its effectiveness in improving the prognosis without the risk of safety. PMID:27352341

  17. Repair of gamma-ray-induced DNA base damage in xeroderma pigmentosum cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fornace, A.J. Jr.; Dobson, P.P.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1986-04-01

    The repair of DNA damage produced by /sup 137/Cs gamma irradiation was measured with a preparation from Micrococcus luteus containing DNA damage-specific endonucleases in combination with alkaline elution. The frequency of these endonuclease sensitive sites (ESS) was determined after 54 or 110 Gy of oxic irradiation in normal and xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) fibroblasts from complementation groups A, C, D, and G. Repair was rapid in all cell strains with greater than 50% repair after 1.5 h of repair incubation. At later repair times, 12-17 h, more ESS remained in XP than in normal cells. The frequency of excess ESS in XP cells was approximately 0.04 per 10(9) Da of DNA per Gy which was equivalent to 10% of the initial ESS produced. The removal of ESS was comparable in XP cells with normal radiosensitivity and XP3BR cells which have been reported to be moderately radiosensitive.

  18. Nitric oxide augments mesenchymal stem cell ability to repair liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Liver fibrosis is a major health problem worldwide and poses a serious obstacle for cell based therapies. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent and important candidate cells for future clinical applications however success of MSC therapy depends upon their homing and survival in recipient organs. This study was designed to improve the repair potential of MSCs by transplanting them in sodium nitroprusside (SNP) pretreated mice with CCl4 induced liver fibrosis. Methods SNP 100 mM, a nitric oxide (NO) donor, was administered twice a week for 4 weeks to CCl4-injured mice. MSCs were isolated from C57BL/6 wild type mice and transplanted in the left lateral lobe of the liver in experimental animals. After 4 weeks, animals were sacrificed and liver improvement was analyzed. Analysis of fibrosis by qRT-PCR and sirius red staining, homing, bilirubin and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) serum levels between different treatment groups were compared to control. Results Liver histology demonstrated enhanced MSCs homing in SNP-MSCs group compared to MSCs group. The gene expression of fibrotic markers; αSMA, collagen 1α1, TIMP, NFκB and iNOS was down regulated while cytokeratin 18, albumin and eNOS was up-regulated in SNP-MSCs group. Combine treatment sequentially reduced fibrosis in SNP-MSCs treated liver compared to the other treatment groups. These results were also comparable with reduced serum levels of bilirubin and ALP observed in SNP-MSCs treated group. Conclusion This study demonstrated that NO effectively augments MSC ability to repair liver fibrosis induced by CCl4 in mice and therefore is a better treatment regimen to reduce liver fibrosis. PMID:22533821

  19. Genesis of myocardial repair with cardiac progenitor cells and tissue engineering

    PubMed Central

    Sim, Eugene K W; Haider, Husnain Kh; Lila, Nermine; Schussler, Olivier; Chachques, Juan C; Ye, Lei

    2010-01-01

    Background There is mounting evidence to suggest that the heart has regenerative potential in the event of myocardial injury. Recent studies have shown that a resident population of cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) in the heart contains both vasculogenic and myogenic lineages. CPCs are able to migrate to the site of injury in the heart for participation in the healing process. The resident CPCs in the heart may also be activated through outside pharmacological intervention to promote their participation in the intrinsic repair process. In the light of these characteristics, CPCs provide a logical source for the heart cell therapy. During the regenerative cardiac process, stem cell niches (a specialised environment surrounding stem cells) provide crucial support needed for their maintenance. Discussion Compromised niche function may lead to the selection of stem cells that no longer depend on self-renewal factors produced by its environment. The objective of stem cell transplantation associated with tissue-engineered approaches is to create a new modality in the treatment of heart failure. The use of efficient scaffolds will aid to re-establish a favourable microenvironment for stem cell survival, multiplication, differentiation and function. Cardiac tissue engineering using natural and/or synthetic materials in this regard provides a novel possibility in cardiovascular therapeutics. PMID:27325955

  20. Initiation of DNA Interstrand Cross-link Repair in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hlavin, Erica M.; Smeaton, Michael B.; Miller, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    Interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are among the most cytotoxic DNA lesions to cells because they prevent the two DNA strands from separating, thereby precluding replication and transcription. Even though chemotherapeutic cross-linking agents are well established in clinical use, and numerous repair proteins have been implicated in the initial events of mammalian ICL repair, the precise mechanistic details of these events remain to be elucidated. This review will summarize our current understanding of how ICL repair is initiated with an emphasis on the context (replicating, transcribed or quiescent DNA) in which the ICL is recognized, and how the chemical and physical properties of ICLs influence repair. Although most studies have focused on replication-dependent repair because of the relation to highly replicative tumor cells, replication-independent ICL repair is likely to be important in the circumvention of cross-link cytotoxicity in non-dividing, terminally differentiated cells that may be challenged with exogenous or endogenous sources of ICLs. Consequently, the ICL repair pathway that should be considered ‘dominant’ appears to depend on the cell type and the DNA context in which the ICL is encountered. The ability to define and inhibit distinct pathways of ICL repair in different cell cycle phases may help in developing methods that increase cytotoxicity to cancer cells while reducing side-effects in non-dividing normal cells. This may also lead to a better understanding of pathways that protect against malignancy and aging. PMID:20658650

  1. More Than Tiny Sacks: Stem Cell Exosomes as Cell-Free Modality for Cardiac Repair.

    PubMed

    Kishore, Raj; Khan, Mohsin

    2016-01-22

    Stem cell therapy provides immense hope for regenerating the pathological heart, yet has been marred by issues surrounding the effectiveness, unclear mechanisms, and survival of the donated cell population in the ischemic myocardial milieu. Poor survival and engraftment coupled to inadequate cardiac commitment of the adoptively transferred stem cells compromises the improvement in cardiac function. Various alternative approaches to enhance the efficacy of stem cell therapies and to overcome issues with cell therapy have been used with varied success. Cell-free components, such as exosomes enriched in proteins, messenger RNAs, and miRs characteristic of parental stem cells, represent a potential approach for treating cardiovascular diseases. Recently, exosomes from different kinds of stem cells have been effectively used to promote cardiac function in the pathological heart. The aim of this review is to summarize current research efforts on stem cell exosomes, including their potential benefits and limitations to develop a potentially viable therapy for cardiovascular problems. PMID:26838317

  2. A biophysical model of cell evolution after cytotoxic treatments: Damage, repair and cell response.

    PubMed

    Tomezak, M; Abbadie, C; Lartigau, E; Cleri, F

    2016-01-21

    We present a theoretical agent-based model of cell evolution under the action of cytotoxic treatments, such as radiotherapy or chemotherapy. The major features of cell cycle and proliferation, cell damage and repair, and chemical diffusion are included. Cell evolution is based on a discrete Markov chain, with cells stepping along a sequence of discrete internal states from 'normal' to 'inactive'. Probabilistic laws are introduced for each type of event a cell can undergo during its life: duplication, arrest, senescence, damage, reparation, or death. We adjust the model parameters on a series of cell irradiation experiments, carried out in a clinical LINAC, in which the damage and repair kinetics of single- and double-strand breaks are followed. Two showcase applications of the model are then presented. In the first one, we reconstruct the cell survival curves from a number of published low- and high-dose irradiation experiments. We reobtain a very good description of the data without assuming the well-known linear-quadratic model, but instead including a variable DSB repair probability. The repair capability of the model spontaneously saturates to an exponential decay at increasingly high doses. As a second test, we attempt to simulate the two extreme possibilities of the so-called 'bystander' effect in radiotherapy: the 'local' effect versus a 'global' effect, respectively activated by the short-range or long-range diffusion of some factor, presumably secreted by the irradiated cells. Even with an oversimplified simulation, we could demonstrate a sizeable difference in the proliferation rate of non-irradiated cells, the proliferation acceleration being much larger for the global than the local effect, for relatively small fractions of irradiated cells in the colony. PMID:26549470

  3. Nucleotide excision repair in rat male germ cells: low level of repair in intact cells contrasts with high dual incision activity in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jansen, J; Olsen, A K; Wiger, R; Naegeli, H; de Boer, P; van Der Hoeven, F; Holme, J A; Brunborg, G; Mullenders, L

    2001-04-15

    The acquisition of genotoxin-induced mutations in the mammalian germline is detrimental to the stable transfer of genomic information. In somatic cells, nucleotide excision repair (NER) is a major pathway to counteract the mutagenic effects of DNA damage. Two NER subpathways have been identified, global genome repair (GGR) and transcription-coupled repair (TCR). In contrast to somatic cells, little is known regarding the expression of these pathways in germ cells. To address this basic question, we have studied NER in rat spermatogenic cells in crude cell suspension, in enriched cell stages and within seminiferous tubules after exposure to UV or N-acetoxy-2-acetylaminofluorene. Surprisingly, repair in spermatogenic cells was inefficient in the genome overall and in transcriptionally active genes indicating non-functional GGR and TCR. In contrast, extracts from early/mid pachytene cells displayed dual incision activity in vitro as high as extracts from somatic cells, demonstrating that the proteins involved in incision are present and functional in premeiotic cells. However, incision activities of extracts from diplotene cells and round spermatids were low, indicating a stage-dependent expression of incision activity. We hypothesize that sequestering of NER proteins by mispaired regions in DNA involved in synapsis and recombination may underlie the lack of NER activity in premeiotic cells. PMID:11292852

  4. Cell-based approaches to joint surface repair: a research perspective

    PubMed Central

    Roelofs, A.J.; Rocke, J.P.J.; De Bari, C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Repair of lesions of the articular cartilage lining the joints remains a major clinical challenge. Surgical interventions include osteochondral autograft transfer and microfracture. They can provide some relief of symptoms to patients, but generally fail to durably repair the cartilage. Autologous chondrocyte implantation has thus far shown the most promise for the durable repair of cartilage, with long-term follow-up studies indicating improved structural and functional outcomes. However, disadvantages of this technique include the need for additional surgery, availability of sufficient chondrocytes for implantation, and maintenance of their phenotype during culture-expansion. Mesenchymal stem cells offer an attractive alternative cell-source for cartilage repair, due to their ease of isolation and amenability to ex vivo expansion while retaining stem cell properties. Preclinical and clinical studies have demonstrated the potential of mesenchymal stem cells to promote articular cartilage repair, but have also highlighted several key challenges. Most notably, the quality and durability of the repair tissue, its resistance to endochondral ossification, and its effective integration with the surrounding host tissue. In addition, challenges exist related to the heterogeneity of mesenchymal stem cell preparations and their quality-control, as well as optimising the delivery method. Finally, as our knowledge of the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying articular cartilage repair increases, promising studies are emerging employing bioactive scaffolds or therapeutics that elicit an effective tissue repair response through activation and mobilisation of endogenous stem and progenitor cells. PMID:23598176

  5. Regenerative repair of damaged meniscus with autologous adipose tissue-derived stem cells.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jaewoo; Lee, Jung Hun; Lee, Sang Hee

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are defined as pluripotent cells found in numerous human tissues, including bone marrow and adipose tissue. Such MSCs, isolated from bone marrow and adipose tissue, have been shown to differentiate into bone and cartilage, along with other types of tissues. Therefore, MSCs represent a promising new therapy in regenerative medicine. The initial treatment of meniscus tear of the knee is managed conservatively with nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy. When such conservative treatment fails, an arthroscopic resection of the meniscus is necessary. However, the major drawback of the meniscectomy is an early onset of osteoarthritis. Therefore, an effective and noninvasive treatment for patients with continuous knee pain due to damaged meniscus has been sought. Here, we present a review, highlighting the possible regenerative mechanisms of damaged meniscus with MSCs (especially adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs)), along with a case of successful repair of torn meniscus with significant reduction of knee pain by percutaneous injection of autologous ASCs into an adult human knee. PMID:24592390

  6. DNA excision repair in cell extracts from human cell lines exhibiting hypersensitivity to DNA-damaging agents

    SciTech Connect

    Hansson, J.; Keyse, S.M.; Lindahl, T.; Wood, R.D. )

    1991-07-01

    Whole cell extracts from human lymphoid cell lines can perform in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids damaged by agents including UV or cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (cis-DDP). Extracts from xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) cells are defective in repair synthesis. We have now studied in vitro DNA repair synthesis using extracts from lymphoblastoid cell lines representing four human hereditary syndromes with increased sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents. Extracts of cell lines from individuals with the sunlight-sensitive disorders dysplastic nevus syndrome or Cockayne's syndrome (complementation groups A and B) showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids with UV photoproducts. This is consistent with in vivo measurements of the overall DNA repair capacity in such cell lines. A number of extracts were prepared from two cell lines representing the variant form of XP (XP-V). Half of the extracts prepared showed normal levels of in vitro DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing UV lesions, but the remainder of the extracts from the same cell lines showed deficient repair synthesis, suggesting the possibility of an unusually labile excision repair protein in XP-V. Fanconi's anemia (FA) cells show cellular hypersensitivity to cross-linking agents including cis-DDP. Extracts from cell lines belonging to two different complementation groups of FA showed normal DNA repair synthesis in plasmids containing cis-DDP or UV adducts. Thus, there does not appear to be an overall excision repair defect in FA, but the data do not exclude a defect in the repair of interstrand DNA cross-links.

  7. Renal replacement therapies after abdominal aortic aneurysm repair--a review.

    PubMed

    Hudorović, Narcis; Lovricević, Ivo; Brkić, Petar; Ahel, Zaky; Vicić-Hudorović, Visnja

    2011-09-01

    The objective of this review is to assess the incidence of postoperative acute renal failure that necessitates the application of hemofiltration and to determine the factors that influence the outcome in patients undergoing surgical repair of abdominal aortic aneurysm. In addition, the review aims to assess the outcomes of postoperative early hemofiltration as compared to late intensive hemofiltration. Different forms of renal replacement therapies for use in abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery patients are discussed. Electronic literature searches were performed using Pubmed, Medline, Embase, Sumsearch, Cinahil, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Excerpta Medica. The search identified 419 potentially eligible studies, of which 119 were excluded based on the title and abstract. Of the remaining 300 studies, full articles were collected and re-evaluated. Forty-five articles satisfied our inclusion criteria, of which only 12 were of the IA Level of evidence. The search results indicated that the underlying disease, its severity and stage, the etiology of acute renal failure, clinical and hemodynamic status of the patient, the resources available, and different costs of therapy might all influence the choice of the renal replacement therapy strategy. However, clear guidelines on renal replacement therapy duration are still lacking. Moreover, it is not known whether in acute renal failure patients undergoing abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery, renal replacement therapy modalities can eliminate significant amounts of clinically relevant inflammatory mediators. This review gives current information available in the literature on the possible mechanisms underlying acute renal failure and recent developments in continuous renal replacement treatment modalities. PMID:22384777

  8. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Vitamin D—Relevance for Skin Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is involved in almost all skin cancer cases, but on the other hand, it stimulates the production of pre-vitamin D3, whose active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25VD3), plays important physiological functions on binding with its receptor (vitamin D receptor, VDR). UV-induced DNA damages in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or (6-4)-pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts are frequently found in skin cancer and its precursors. Therefore, removing these lesions is essential for the prevention of skin cancer. As UV-induced DNA damages are repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), the interaction of 1,25VD3 with NER components can be important for skin cancer transformation. Several studies show that 1,25VD3 protects DNA against damage induced by UV, but the exact mechanism of this protection is not completely clear. 1,25VD3 was also shown to affect cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in several signaling pathways, so it can be considered as a potential modulator of the cellular DNA damage response, which is crucial for mutagenesis and cancer transformation. 1,25VD3 was shown to affect DNA repair and potentially NER through decreasing nitrosylation of DNA repair enzymes by NO overproduction by UV, but other mechanisms of the interaction between 1,25VD3 and NER machinery also are suggested. Therefore, the array of NER gene functioning could be analyzed and an appropriate amount of 1.25VD3 could be recommended to decrease UV-induced DNA damage important for skin cancer transformation. PMID:27058533

  9. Nucleotide Excision Repair and Vitamin D-Relevance for Skin Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Pawlowska, Elzbieta; Wysokinski, Daniel; Blasiak, Janusz

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation is involved in almost all skin cancer cases, but on the other hand, it stimulates the production of pre-vitamin D3, whose active metabolite, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25VD3), plays important physiological functions on binding with its receptor (vitamin D receptor, VDR). UV-induced DNA damages in the form of cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers or (6-4)-pyrimidine-pyrimidone photoproducts are frequently found in skin cancer and its precursors. Therefore, removing these lesions is essential for the prevention of skin cancer. As UV-induced DNA damages are repaired by nucleotide excision repair (NER), the interaction of 1,25VD3 with NER components can be important for skin cancer transformation. Several studies show that 1,25VD3 protects DNA against damage induced by UV, but the exact mechanism of this protection is not completely clear. 1,25VD3 was also shown to affect cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in several signaling pathways, so it can be considered as a potential modulator of the cellular DNA damage response, which is crucial for mutagenesis and cancer transformation. 1,25VD3 was shown to affect DNA repair and potentially NER through decreasing nitrosylation of DNA repair enzymes by NO overproduction by UV, but other mechanisms of the interaction between 1,25VD3 and NER machinery also are suggested. Therefore, the array of NER gene functioning could be analyzed and an appropriate amount of 1.25VD3 could be recommended to decrease UV-induced DNA damage important for skin cancer transformation. PMID:27058533

  10. The DNA damage/repair cascade in glioblastoma cell lines after chemotherapeutic agent treatment.

    PubMed

    Annovazzi, Laura; Caldera, Valentina; Mellai, Marta; Riganti, Chiara; Battaglia, Luigi; Chirio, Daniela; Melcarne, Antonio; Schiffer, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic resistance in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) has been linked to a subpopulation of cells with stem cell-like properties, the glioma stem cells (GSCs), responsible for cancer progression and recurrence. This study investigated the in vitro cytotoxicity of three chemotherapeutics, temozolomide (TMZ), doxorubicin (Dox) and paclitaxel (PTX) on glioma cell lines, by analyzing the molecular mechanisms leading to DNA repair and cell resistance, or to cell death. The drugs were tested on 16 GBM cell lines, grown as neurospheres (NS) or adherent cells (AC), by studying DNA damage occurrence by Comet assay, the expression by immunofluorescence and western blotting of checkpoint/repair molecules and apoptosis. The three drugs were able to provoke a genotoxic injury and to inhibit dose- and time-dependently cell proliferation, more evidently in AC than in NS. The first cell response to DNA damage was the activation of the damage sensors (p-ATM, p-53BP1, γ-H2AX), followed by repair effectors; the expression of checkpoint/repair molecules appeared higher in NS than in AC. The non-homologous repair pathway (NHEJ) seemed more involved than the homologous one (HR). Apoptosis occurred after long treatment times, but only a small percentage of cells in NS underwent death, even at high drug concentration, whereas most cells survived in a quiescent state and resumed proliferation after drug removal. In tumor specimens, checkpoint/repair proteins were constitutively expressed in GBMs, but not in low-grade gliomas. PMID:25892134