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Sample records for cell secretory granules

  1. Mast cell secretory granules: armed for battle.

    PubMed

    Wernersson, Sara; Pejler, Gunnar

    2014-07-01

    Mast cells are important effector cells of the immune system and recent studies show that they have immunomodulatory roles in diverse processes in both health and disease. Mast cells are distinguished by their high content of electron-dense secretory granules, which are filled with large amounts of preformed and pre-activated immunomodulatory compounds. When appropriately activated, mast cells undergo degranulation, a process by which these preformed granule compounds are rapidly released into the surroundings. In many cases, the effects that mast cells have on an immune response are closely associated with the biological actions of the granule compounds that they release, as exemplified by the recent studies showing that mast cell granule proteases account for many of the protective and detrimental effects of mast cells in various inflammatory settings. In this Review, we discuss the current knowledge of mast cell secretory granules. PMID:24903914

  2. Ultrastructural similarity between bat and human mast cell secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Oliani, S M; Vugman, I; Jamur, M C

    1993-01-01

    Mast cells in the tongue of the bat (Artibeus lituratus) show a well-developed Golgi area and abundant mitochondria in the granule-free perinuclear cytoplasm. Rough endoplasmic reticulum profiles, free ribosomes, mitochondria, bundles of filaments and a great number of secretory granules are found throughout the remaining cytoplasm. The granules, of various shapes and sizes, are simple containing an electron-dense, homogeneous matrix, coarse particles or cylindrical scrolls, or combinations (cylindrical scrolls with either electron-dense, homogeneous matrix or coarse particle contents). Up to now, scroll-containing granules have been considered to be a unique feature of human mast cells. PMID:8453310

  3. Characterization of Mast Cell Secretory Granules and Their Cell Biology

    PubMed Central

    Azouz, Nurit Pereg; Hammel, Ilan

    2014-01-01

    Exocytosis and secretion of secretory granule (SG) contained inflammatory mediators is the primary mechanism by which mast cells exert their protective immune responses in host defense, as well as their pathological functions in allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Despite their central role in mast cell function, the molecular mechanisms underlying the biogenesis and secretion of mast cell SGs remain largely unresolved. Early studies have established the lysosomal nature of the mast cell SGs and implicated SG homotypic fusion as an important step occurring during both their biogenesis and compound secretion. However, the molecular mechanisms that account for key features of this process largely remain to be defined. A novel high-resolution imaging based methodology allowed us to screen Rab GTPases for their phenotypic and functional impact and identify Rab networks that regulate mast cell secretion. This screen has identified Rab5 as a novel regulator of homotypic fusion of the mast cell SGs that thereby regulates their size and cargo composition. PMID:24988214

  4. Menin immunoreactivity in secretory granules of human pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Debelenko, Larisa V; Agarwal, Sunita; Du, Qiang; Yan, Wusheng; Erickson, Heidi S; Abu-Asab, Mones; Raffeld, Mark A; Libutti, Steven K; Marx, Stephen J; Emmert-Buck, Michael R

    2014-01-01

    The protein product of the Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type I (MEN1) gene is thought to be involved in predominantly nuclear functions; however, immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis data on cellular localization are conflicting. To further investigate menin expression, we analyzed human pancreas (an MEN1 target organ) using IHC analyses and 6 antibodies raised against full-length menin or its peptides. In 10 normal pancreas specimens, 2 independently raised antibodies showed unexpected cytoplasmic immunoreactivity in peripheral cells in each islet examined (over 100 total across all 10 patients). The staining exhibited a distinct punctate pattern and subsequent immunoelectron microscopy indicated the target antigen was in secretory granules. Exocrine pancreas and pancreatic stroma were not immunoreactive. In MEN1 patients, unaffected islets stained similar to those in normal samples but with a more peripheral location of positive cells, whereas hyperplastic islets and tumorlets showed increased and diffuse cytoplasmic staining, respectively. Endocrine tumors from MEN1 patients were negative for menin, consistent with a 2-hit loss of a tumor suppressor gene. Secretory granule localization of menin in a subset of islet cells suggests a function of the protein unique to a target organ of familial endocrine neoplasia, although the IHC data must be interpreted with some caution because of the possibility of antibody cross-reaction. The identity, cellular trafficking, and role of this putative secretory granule-form of menin warrant additional investigation. PMID:25153502

  5. Abnormal ion content, hydration and granule expansion of the secretory granules from cystic fibrosis airway glandular cells

    SciTech Connect

    Baconnais, S.; Delavoie, F. |; Zahm, J.M.; Milliot, M.; Castillon, N.; Terryn, C.; Banchet, V.; Michel, J.; Danos, O.; Merten, M.; Chinet, T.; Zierold, K.; Bonnet, N.; Puchelle, E. , E-Mail: edith.puchelle@univ-reims.fr; Balossier, G.

    2005-10-01

    The absence or decreased expression of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) induces increased Na{sup +} absorption and hyperabsorption of the airway surface liquid (ASL) resulting in a dehydrated and hyperviscous ASL. Although the implication of abnormal airway submucosal gland function has been suggested, the ion and water content in the Cystic Fibrosis (CF) glandular secretory granules, before exocytosis, is unknown. We analyzed, in non-CF and CF human airway glandular cell lines (MM-39 and KM4, respectively), the ion content in the secretory granules by electron probe X-ray microanalysis and the water content by quantitative dark field imaging on freeze-dried cryosections. We demonstrated that the ion content (Na{sup +}, Mg{sup 2+}, P, S and Cl{sup -}) is significantly higher and the water content significantly lower in secretory granules from the CF cell line compared to the non-CF cell line. Using videomicroscopy, we observed that the secretory granule expansion was deficient in CF glandular cells. Transfection of CF cells with CFTR cDNA or inhibition of non-CF cells with CFTR{sub inh}-172, respectively restored or decreased the water content and granule expansion, in parallel with changes in ion content. We hypothesize that the decreased water and increased ion content in glandular secretory granules may contribute to the dehydration and increased viscosity of the ASL in CF.

  6. The glycosylation pattern of secretory granules in binucleate trophoblast cells is highly conserved in ruminants.

    PubMed

    Klisch, K; Wooding, F B P; Jones, C J P

    2010-01-01

    The binucleate trophoblast cells (BNCs) in the ruminant placenta are a unique feature of this taxon. These cells produce several secretory proteins and transfer these across the fetomaternal barrier into the dam. We used lectin histochemistry with a panel of 24 lectins to characterise the glycosylation pattern of BNC secretory granules in a variety of ruminants. Seven species out of three ruminant families were thus investigated: greater malayan chevrotain (Tragulidae); fallow deer, red deer, chinese water deer (Cervidae); and domestic goat, springbok, impala (Bovidae). BNC granules in all species studied strongly expressed tri-/tetraantennary complex N-glycans and bisecting N-acetylglucosamine [GlcNAc] as shown by binding of leuco- and erythroagglutins of Phaseolus vulgaris respectively. The presence of terminal N-acetylgalactosamine [GalNAc]) in BNC granules is shown by intense staining with lectins from Dolichos biflorus, Vicia villosa and Wisteria floribunda. Terminal galactose or GalNAc was also present, bound by Glycine max agglutinin. Treatment of slides with neuraminidase strongly intensified staining of Erythrina cristagalli lectin (ECA) to terminal lactosamine in all species studied; this was otherwise absent except in goat. Sambucus nigra-1 lectin bound to BNC granules in all species except in Impala, indicating the presence of abundant alpha2,6 linked sialic acid. These results indicate that these unusual highly branched glycans, with bisecting GlcNAc and terminal GalNAc are a general feature of BNC granules in Ruminants, including the most basal Tragulid branch. It therefore appears that the specific glycosylation pattern of BNC granules evolved early in ruminant phylogenesis, together with the appearance of BNC. The conserved glycan structure in BNC secretory granules indicates that this pattern of glycosylation is likely to be of considerable functional importance for the secretory glycoproteins of ruminant BNC. PMID:19959226

  7. Myosin Va facilitates the distribution of secretory granules in the F-actin rich cortex of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Rudolf, Rüdiger; Kögel, Tanja; Kuznetsov, Sergei A; Salm, Thorsten; Schlicker, Oliver; Hellwig, Andrea; Hammer, John A; Gerdes, Hans-Hermann

    2003-04-01

    Neuroendocrine secretory granules, the storage organelles for neuropeptides and hormones, are formed at the trans-Golgi network, stored inside the cell and exocytosed upon stimulation. Previously, we have reported that newly formed secretory granules of PC12 cells are transported in a microtubule-dependent manner from the trans-Golgi network to the F-actin-rich cell cortex, where they undergo short directed movements and exhibit a homogeneous distribution. Here we provide morphological and biochemical evidence that myosin Va is associated with secretory granules. Expression of a dominant-negative tail domain of myosin Va in PC12 cells led to an extensive clustering of secretory granules close to the cell periphery, a loss of their cortical restriction and a strong reduction in their motility in the actin cortex. Based on this data we propose a model that implies a dual transport system for secretory granules: after microtubule-dependent delivery to the cell periphery, secretory granules exhibit a myosin Va-dependent transport leading to their restriction and even dispersal in the F-actin-rich cortex of PC12 cells. PMID:12615975

  8. Serglycin determines secretory granule repertoire and regulates natural killer cell and cytotoxic T lymphocyte cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Sutton, Vivien R; Brennan, Amelia J; Ellis, Sarah; Danne, Jill; Thia, Kevin; Jenkins, Misty R; Voskoboinik, Ilia; Pejler, Gunnar; Johnstone, Ricky W; Andrews, Daniel M; Trapani, Joseph A

    2016-03-01

    The anionic proteoglycan serglycin is a major constituent of secretory granules in cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)/natural killer (NK) cells, and is proposed to promote the safe storage of the mostly cationic granule toxins, granzymes and perforin. Despite the extensive defects of mast cell function reported in serglycin gene-disrupted mice, no comprehensive study of physiologically relevant CTL/NK cell populations has been reported. We show that the cytotoxicity of serglycin-deficient CTL and NK cells is severely compromised but can be partly compensated in both cell types when they become activated. Reduced intracellular granzyme B levels were noted, particularly in CD27(+) CD11b(+) mature NK cells, whereas serglycin(-/-) TCR-transgenic (OTI) CD8 T cells also had reduced perforin stores. Culture supernatants from serglycin(-/-) OTI T cells and interleukin-2-activated NK contained increased granzyme B, linking reduced storage with heightened export. By contrast, granzyme A was not significantly reduced in cells lacking serglycin, indicating differentially regulated trafficking and/or storage for the two granzymes. A quantitative analysis of different granule classes by transmission electronmicroscopy showed a selective loss of dense-core granules in serglycin(-/-) CD8(+) CTLs, although other granule types were maintained quantitatively. The findings of the present study show that serglycin plays a critical role in the maturation of dense-core cytotoxic granules in cytotoxic lymphocytes and the trafficking and storage of perforin and granzyme B, whereas granzyme A is unaffected. The skewed retention of cytotoxic effector molecules markedly reduces CTL/NK cell cytotoxicity, although this is partly compensated for as a result of activating the cells by physiological means. PMID:26756195

  9. Final steps in exocytosis observed in a cell with giant secretory granules.

    PubMed Central

    Breckenridge, L J; Almers, W

    1987-01-01

    Secretion by single mast cells was studied in normal and beige mice, a mutant with grossly enlarged secretory vesicles or granules. During degranulation, the membrane capacitance increased in steps, as single secretory vesicles fused with the cell membrane. The average step size was 10 times larger in beige than in normal mice, in agreement with the different granule sizes measured microscopically in the two preparations. Following individual capacitance steps in beige mice, individual granules of the appropriate size were observed to swell rapidly. Capacitance steps are frequently followed by the stepwise loss of a fluorescent dye loaded into the vesicles. Stepwise capacitance increases were occasionally intermittent before they became permanent, indicating the existence of an early, reversible, and incomplete state of vesicle fusion. During such "capacitance flicker," loss of fluorescent dye from vesicles did not occur, suggesting that the earliest aqueous connection between vesicle interior and cell exterior is a narrow channel. Our results support the view that the reversible formation of such a channel, which we term the fusion pore, is an early step in exocytosis. Images PMID:3470768

  10. BACE2 is stored in secretory granules of mouse and rat pancreatic beta cells.

    PubMed

    Finzi, Giovanna; Franzi, Francesca; Placidi, Claudia; Acquati, Francesco; Palumbo, Elisa; Russo, Antonella; Taramelli, Roberto; Sessa, Fausto; La Rosa, Stefano

    2008-01-01

    BACE2 is a protease homologous to BACE1 protein, an enzyme involved in the amyloid formation of Alzheimer disease (AD). However, despite the high homology between these two proteins, the biological role of BACE2 is still controversial, even though a few studies have suggested a pathogenetic role in sporadic inclusion-body myositis and hereditary inclusion-body myopathy, which are characterized by vacuolization of muscular fibers with intracellular deposits of proteins similar to those found in the brain of AD patients. Although BACE2 has also been identified in the pancreas, its function remains unknown and its specific localization in different pancreatic cell types has not been definitively ascertained. For these reasons, the authors have investigated the cellular and subcellular localization of BACE2 in normal rodent pancreases. BACE2 immunoreactivity was found in secretory granules of beta cells, co-stored with insulin and IAPP, while it was lacking in the other endocrine and exocrine cell types. The presence of BACE2 in secretory granules of beta cells suggests that it may play a role in diabetes-associated amyloidogenesis. PMID:19117266

  11. Protein mobility within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Annita Ngatchou; Bittner, Mary A; Holz, Ronald W; Axelrod, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    We investigated the basis for previous observations that fluorescent-labeled neuropeptide Y (NPY) is usually released within 200 ms after fusion, whereas labeled tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is often discharged over many seconds. We found that tPA and NPY are endogenously expressed in small and different subpopulations of bovine chromaffin cells in culture. We measured the mobility of these proteins (tagged with fluorophore) within the lumen of individual secretory granules in living chromaffin cells, and related their mobilities to postfusion release kinetics. A method was developed that is not limited by standard optical resolution, in which a bright flash of strongly decaying evanescent field (∼64 nm exponential decay constant) produced by total internal reflection (TIR) selectively bleaches cerulean-labeled protein proximal to the glass coverslip within individual granules. Fluorescence recovery occurred as unbleached protein from distal regions within the 300 nm granule diffused into the bleached proximal regions. The fractional bleaching of tPA-cerulean (tPA-cer) was greater when subsequently probed with TIR excitation than with epifluorescence, indicating that tPA-cer mobility was low. The almost equal NPY-cer bleaching when probed with TIR and epifluorescence indicated that NPY-cer equilibrated within the 300 ms bleach pulse, and therefore had a greater mobility than tPA-cer. TIR-fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed a significant recovery of tPA-cer (but not NPY-cer) fluorescence within several hundred milliseconds after bleaching. Numerical simulations, which take into account bleach duration, granule diameter, and the limited number of fluorophores in a granule, are consistent with tPA-cer being 100% mobile, with a diffusion coefficient of 2 × 10(-10) cm(2)/s (∼1/3000 of that for a protein of similar size in aqueous solution). However, the low diffusive mobility of tPA cannot alone explain its slow postfusion release. In the

  12. Toxoplasma secretory granules: one population or more?

    PubMed

    Mercier, Corinne; Cesbron-Delauw, Marie-France

    2015-02-01

    In Toxoplasma gondii, dense granules are known as the storage secretory organelles of the so-called GRA proteins (for dense granule proteins), which are destined to the parasitophorous vacuole (PV) and the PV-derived cyst wall. Recently, newly annotated GRA proteins targeted to the host cell nucleus have enlarged this view. Here we provide an update on the latest developments on the Toxoplasma secreted proteins, which to date have been mainly studied at both the tachyzoite and bradyzoite stages, and we point out that recent discoveries could open the issue of a possible, yet uncharacterized, distinct secretory pathway in Toxoplasma. PMID:25599584

  13. SORCS1 is necessary for normal insulin secretory granule biogenesis in metabolically stressed β cells

    PubMed Central

    Kebede, Melkam A.; Oler, Angie T.; Gregg, Trillian; Balloon, Allison J.; Johnson, Adam; Mitok, Kelly; Rabaglia, Mary; Schueler, Kathryn; Stapleton, Donald; Thorstenson, Candice; Wrighton, Lindsay; Floyd, Brendan J.; Richards, Oliver; Raines, Summer; Eliceiri, Kevin; Seidah, Nabil G.; Rhodes, Christopher; Keller, Mark P.; Coon, Joshua L.; Audhya, Anjon; Attie, Alan D.

    2014-01-01

    We previously positionally cloned Sorcs1 as a diabetes quantitative trait locus. Sorcs1 belongs to the Vacuolar protein sorting-10 (Vps10) gene family. In yeast, Vps10 transports enzymes from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the vacuole. Whole-body Sorcs1 KO mice, when made obese with the leptinob mutation (ob/ob), developed diabetes. β Cells from these mice had a severe deficiency of secretory granules (SGs) and insulin. Interestingly, a single secretagogue challenge failed to consistently elicit an insulin secretory dysfunction. However, multiple challenges of the Sorcs1 KO ob/ob islets consistently revealed an insulin secretion defect. The luminal domain of SORCS1 (Lum-Sorcs1), when expressed in a β cell line, acted as a dominant-negative, leading to SG and insulin deficiency. Using syncollin-dsRed5TIMER adenovirus, we found that the loss of Sorcs1 function greatly impairs the rapid replenishment of SGs following secretagogue challenge. Chronic exposure of islets from lean Sorcs1 KO mice to high glucose and palmitate depleted insulin content and evoked an insulin secretion defect. Thus, in metabolically stressed mice, Sorcs1 is important for SG replenishment, and under chronic challenge by insulin secretagogues, loss of Sorcs1 leads to diabetes. Overexpression of full-length SORCS1 led to a 2-fold increase in SG content, suggesting that SORCS1 is sufficient to promote SG biogenesis. PMID:25157818

  14. Mast cell procarboxypeptidase A. Molecular modeling and biochemical characterization of its processing within secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Springman, E B; Dikov, M M; Serafin, W E

    1995-01-20

    Previously, we characterized murine mast cell procarboxypeptidase A (MC-proCPA) as an inactive zymogen. To investigate the mechanisms for this lack of enzymatic activity and the processing of the zymogen to the active form, we now have performed molecular modeling of the tertiary structure of murine MC-proCPA based on the x-ray crystallographic structures of porcine pancreatic procarboxypeptidases A and B. Our model predicts that MC-proCPA retains a high degree of structural similarity to its pancreatic homologues. The globular propeptide physically blocks access to the fully formed active site of the catalytic domain and contains a salt bridge to the substrate-binding region that precludes docking of even small substrates. Based on consideration of the predicted tertiary structure and charge field characteristics of the model, the activation site (between GluA94 and Ile1) appears to be highly exposed even after MC-proCPA binds to secretory granule proteoglycans. Based on the steady-state levels of MC-proCPA versus MC-CPA, cycloheximide inhibition of protein synthesis, and brefeldin A blockage of protein sorting, we show that MC-proCPA is processed rapidly in murine mast cell line KiSV-MC14 with a half-life of 26 +/- 5 min (mean +/- S.D., n = 3), and the processing occurs within the secretory granules. The enzyme responsible for this processing may be a thiol protease since treatment of the KiSV-MC14 with 200 microM E-64d, a selective thiol-protease inhibitor, increases MC-proCPA by 2.7 +/- 0.2-fold (mean +/- S.D., n = 3) within 6 h of application. PMID:7836395

  15. A method for detailed analysis of the structure of mast cell secretory granules by negative contrast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Shotaro; Takakuwa, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Secretory granules (SGs) in mast cells contain various molecules that elicit allergy symptoms and are generally considered therapeutic targets. However, the biogenesis, maintenance, regulation, and recycling of these granules remain controversial, mainly due to the lack of suitable live-cell imaging methods. In this study, we applied negative contrast imaging with soluble green fluorescent protein (GFP) expressed in the cytoplasm as a method to validate structural information of mast cell SGs. We evaluated the accuracy of the method in detail, and we demonstrated that it can be used for quantitative analysis. Using this technique, secretory granules, the nucleus, mitochondria, and the cell body were visualized in individual RBL-2H3 mast cells without any influence. When combined with conventional multicolor fluorescence imaging, visualization of SG-associated proteins and SG–SG fusion was achieved. Moreover, 3D images were constructed based on this method, and detailed information on the number, size, and shape of individual SGs was obtained. We found that cell volume was correlated with SG number. In summary, the technique provides valuable and unique data, and will therefore advance SG research. PMID:26997316

  16. Morphometric studies of secretory granule formation in mouse pancreatic acinar cells. Dissecting the early structural changes following pilocarpine injection

    PubMed Central

    HAMMEL, ILAN; SHOR-HAZAN, OSNAT; ELDAR, TORA; AMIHAI, DINA; LEW, SYLVIA

    1999-01-01

    Secretory granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells is known to involve massive membrane flow. In previous studies we have undertaken morphometry of the regranulation mechanism in these cells and in mast cells as a model for cellular membrane movement. In our current work, electron micrographs of pancreatic acinar cells from ICR mice were taken at several time points after extensive degranulation induced by pilocarpine injection in order to investigate the volume changes of rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), nucleus, mitochondria and autophagosomes. At 2–4 h after stimulation, when the pancreatic cells demonstrated a complete loss of granules, this was accompanied by an increased proportion of autophagosomal activity. This change primarily reflected a greatly increased proportion of profiles retaining autophagic vacuoles containing recognisable cytoplasmic structures such as mitochondria, granule profiles and fragments of RER. The mitochondrial structures reached a significant maximal size 4 h following injection (before degranulation 0.178±0.028 μm3; at 4 h peak value, 0.535±0.109 μm3). Nucleus size showed an early volume increase approaching a maximum value 2 h following degranulation. The regranulation span was thus divided into 3 stages. The first was the membrane remodelling stage (0–2 h). During this period the volume of the RER and secretory granules was greatly decreased. At the intermediate stage (2–4 h) a significant increase of the synthesis zone was observed within the nucleus. The volume of the mitochondria was increasing. At the last step, the major finding was a significant granule accumulation in parallel with an active Golgi zone. PMID:10227666

  17. The Rab27 effector Rabphilin, unlike Granuphilin and Noc2, rapidly exchanges between secretory granules and cytosol in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Handley, Mark T W; Burgoyne, Robert D

    2008-08-22

    Rab proteins are GTPases that transit between GTP- and GDP-bound states. In the GTP-bound form they can recruit specific effector to membrane domains. It is possible that the exchange of Rab effectors between membranes and cytosol would be determined by the exchange of the particular Rab partner. We have compared the cycling of three Rab3/27 effectors, Granuphilin, Noc2, and Rabphilin, in PC12 cells using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching of EGFP-tagged proteins. All three effectors become localised to secretory granules. Granuphilin and Noc2 showed little or no exchange between secretory granules and cytosol whereas Rabphilin showed rapid and complete exchange. Both Noc2 and Rabphilin were found to be recruited to granules by Rab27 but the data suggest that Rabphilin did not form stable complexes with Rab27 on secretory granules and so Rab effector cycling between membranes and cytosol can be independent of that of the Rab protein. PMID:18573236

  18. Difference in distribution of membrane proteins between low- and high-density secretory granules in parotid acinar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko . E-mail: yoshigaki.junko@nihon-u.ac.jp; Katsumata, Osamu; Matsuki, Miwako; Yoshigaki, Tomoyoshi; Furuyama, Shunsuke; Sugiya, Hiroshi

    2006-05-26

    Secretory granules (SGs) are considered to be generated as immature granules and to mature by condensation of their contents. In this study, SGs of parotid gland were separated into low-, medium-, and high-density granule fractions by Percoll-density gradient centrifugation, since it was proposed that the density corresponds to the degree of maturation. The observation with electron microscopy showed that granules in the three fractions were very similar. The average diameter of high-density granules was a little but significantly larger than that of low-density granules. Although the three fractions contained amylase, suggesting that they are all SGs, distribution of membrane proteins was markedly different. Syntaxin6 and VAMP4 were localized in the low-density granule fraction, while VAMP2 was concentrated in the high-density granule fraction. Immunoprecipitation with anti-syntaxin6 antibody caused coprecipitation of VAMP2 from the medium-density granule fraction without solubilization, but not from Triton X-100-solubilized fraction, while VAMP4 was coprecipitated from both fractions. Therefore, VAMP2 is present on the same granules, but is separated from syntaxin6 and VAMP4, which are expected to be removed from immature granules. These results suggest that the medium-density granules are intermediates from low- to high-density granules, and that the membrane components of SGs dynamically change by budding and fusion during maturation.

  19. Age-Dependent Labeling and Imaging of Insulin Secretory Granules

    PubMed Central

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  20. Age-dependent labeling and imaging of insulin secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, Anna; Kalaidzidis, Yannis; Dirkx, Ronald; Sarov, Mihail; Gerlach, Michael; Schroth-Diez, Britta; Müller, Andreas; Liu, Yanmei; Andree, Cordula; Mulligan, Bernard; Münster, Carla; Kurth, Thomas; Bickle, Marc; Speier, Stephan; Anastassiadis, Konstantinos; Solimena, Michele

    2013-11-01

    Insulin is stored within the secretory granules of pancreatic β-cells, and impairment of its release is the hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Preferential exocytosis of newly synthesized insulin suggests that granule aging is a key factor influencing insulin secretion. Here, we illustrate a technology that enables the study of granule aging in insulinoma cells and β-cells of knock-in mice through the conditional and unequivocal labeling of insulin fused to the SNAP tag. This approach, which overcomes the limits encountered with previous strategies based on radiolabeling or fluorescence timer proteins, allowed us to formally demonstrate the preferential release of newly synthesized insulin and reveal that the motility of cortical granules significantly changes over time. Exploitation of this approach may enable the identification of molecular signatures associated with granule aging and unravel possible alterations of granule turnover in diabetic β-cells. Furthermore, the method is of general interest for the study of membrane traffic and aging. PMID:23929935

  1. Characterization of Phospholipids in Insulin Secretory Granules and Mitochondria in Pancreatic Beta Cells and Their Changes with Glucose Stimulation*

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Michael J.; Ade, Lacmbouh; Ntambi, James M.; Ansari, Israr-Ul H.; Stoker, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    The lipid composition of insulin secretory granules (ISG) has never previously been thoroughly characterized. We characterized the phospholipid composition of ISG and mitochondria in pancreatic beta cells without and with glucose stimulation. The phospholipid/protein ratios of most phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids were higher in ISG than in whole cells and in mitochondria. The concentrations of negatively charged phospholipids, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylinositol in ISG were 5-fold higher than in the whole cell. In ISG phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylethanolamine, and sphingomyelin, fatty acids 12:0 and 14:0 were high, as were phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol containing 18-carbon unsaturated FA. With glucose stimulation, the concentration of many ISG phosphatidylserines and phosphatidylinositols increased; unsaturated fatty acids in phosphatidylserine increased; and most phosphatidylethanolamines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins, and lysophosphatidylcholines were unchanged. Unsaturation and shorter fatty acid length in phospholipids facilitate curvature and fluidity of membranes, which favors fusion of membranes. Recent evidence suggests that negatively charged phospholipids, such as phosphatidylserine, act as coupling factors enhancing the interaction of positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in synaptic or secretory vesicle membrane lipid bilayers with positively charged regions in SNARE proteins in the plasma membrane lipid bilayer to facilitate docking of vesicles to the plasma membrane during exocytosis. The results indicate that ISG phospholipids are in a dynamic state and are consistent with the idea that changes in ISG phospholipids facilitate fusion of ISG with the plasma membrane-enhancing glucose-stimulated insulin exocytosis. PMID:25762724

  2. Endocytosis of secretory granules in mouse pancreatic beta-cells evoked by transient elevation of cytosolic calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Eliasson, L; Proks, P; Ammälä, C; Ashcroft, F M; Bokvist, K; Renström, E; Rorsman, P; Smith, P A

    1996-01-01

    1. To investigate the mechanisms regulating the reuptake of secretory granule membranes following regulated exocytosis, we have monitored changes in cell capacitance in single pancreatic beta-cells. 2. Membrane retrieval (endocytosis) occurred both in a continuous manner and in abrupt steps, corresponding to the simultaneous retrieval of 50-100 granules. The large endocytotic steps were associated with a conductance change of about 1 nS which we attribute to the formation of a fission pore with a pore radius of approximately 1 nm. 3. In some cells, we observed large amplitude capacitance fluctuations, suggesting that aggregates of granules are connected to the plasma membrane by a single pore and are subsequently retrieved as a single unit. 4. Endocytosis was evoked by elevation of cytosolic [Ca2+]i, but once initiated, a sustained increase in [Ca2+]i was not required for endocytosis to continue. 5. The [Ca2+]i dependence of exo- and endocytosis was studied by photorelease of Ca2+ from the 'caged' precursor Ca(2+)-nitrophenyl-EGTA (Ca(2+)-NP-EGTA). Both exo- and endocytosis were initiated at between 0.5 and 2 microM Cai(2+). The rate of endocytosis saturated above 2 microM Cai(2+), whereas exocytosis continued to increase up to 4 microM Cai(2+). The maximum rate of endocytosis was < 25% of that of exocytosis. 6. Unlike exocytosis, endocytosis proceeded equally well in the presence or absence of Mg-ATP. 7. Our data indicate that in the pancreatic beta-cell, exocytosis and endocytosis are regulated by different mechanisms. Images Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8799897

  3. The Rab-binding protein Noc2 is associated with insulin-containing secretory granules and is essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Cheviet, Séverine; Coppola, Thierry; Haynes, Lee P; Burgoyne, Robert D; Regazzi, Romano

    2004-01-01

    The small GTPases Rab3 and Rab27 are associated with secretory granules of pancreatic beta-cells and regulate insulin exocytosis. In this study, we investigated the role of Noc2, a potential partner of these two GTPases, in insulin secretion. In the beta-cell line INS-1E wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, and Noc258A, a mutant capable of interacting with Rab27 but not Rab3, colocalized with insulin-containing vesicles. In contrast, two mutants (Noc2138S,141S and Noc2154A,155A,156A) that bind neither Rab3 nor Rab27 did not associate with secretory granules and were uniformly distributed throughout the cell cytoplasm. Overexpression of wild-type Noc2, Noc265E, or Noc258A inhibited hormone secretion elicited by insulin secretagogues. In contrast, overexpression of the mutants not targeted to secretory granules was without effect. Silencing of the Noc2 gene by RNA interference led to a strong impairment in the capacity of INS-1E cells to respond to insulin secretagogues, indicating that appropriate levels of Noc2 are essential for pancreatic beta-cell exocytosis. The defect was already detectable in the early secretory phase (0-10 min) but was particularly evident during the sustained release phase (10-45 min). Protein-protein binding studies revealed that Noc2 is a potential partner of Munc13, a component of the machinery that controls vesicle priming and insulin exocytosis. These data suggest that Noc2 is involved in the recruitment of secretory granules at the plasma membrane possibly via the interaction with Munc13. PMID:14593078

  4. Vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin-2 is associated with dense core secretory granules in PC12 neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Papini, E; Rossetto, O; Cutler, D F

    1995-01-20

    The presence and intracellular distribution of vesicle-associated membrane protein-1 (VAMP-1) and VAMP-2 were investigated in the PC12 neuroendocrine cell line using isotype-specific polyclonal antibodies. VAMP-2 was detected in the total membrane fraction, while VAMP-1 was undetectable. Subcellular fractionation demonstrates that a substantial amount of the VAMP-2 (24-36%) is associated with dense core, catecholamine-containing granules (DCGs). This was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. The L chain of tetanus neurotoxin, known to inhibit granule mediated secretion in permeabilized PC12 cells, as well as botulinum neurotoxins F and G, effectively cleaved DCG-associated VAMP-2. These data demonstrate that VAMP-2 is present on the secretory granules of PC12 cells. PMID:7836399

  5. Atomic force microscopy study of the secretory granule lumen.

    PubMed Central

    Parpura, V; Fernandez, J M

    1996-01-01

    We have used an atomic force microscope to study the mechanical properties of the matrix found in the lumen of secretory granules isolated from mast cells. The matrices were insoluble and had an average height of 474 +/- 197 nm. The volume of these matrices increased reversibly about tenfold by decreasing the valency of the bathing external cation (La3+ < Ca2+ < Na+). The elastic (Young's) modulus was found to decrease by about 100-fold (4.3 MPa in La3+ to 37 kPa in Na+) upon a tenfold increase in the matrix volume. A swollen granule matrix had an elastic modulus similar to that of gelatin in water. The elastic modulus was inversely related to the change in the volume of the matrix, following a relationship similar to that predicted for the elasticity of weakly cross-linked polymers. Our results show that the matrix of these secretory granules have the mechanical properties of weak ion exchange resins, lending strong support to an ion exchange mechanism for the storage and release of cationic secretory products. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 9 PMID:8913576

  6. Cleavage of a rat serosal mast cell membrane component during degranulation mediated by chymase, a secretory granule protease.

    PubMed Central

    Schick, B

    1990-01-01

    Exogenous addition of purified chymase, a rat serosal mast cell (RSMC) chymotryptic enzyme, results in RSMC degranulation at 37 degrees, but not at 1 degree. Chymase can cause an active site-dependent inducing event at 1 degree such that RSMC degranulation occurs if the cells are later incubated at 37 degrees. RSMC exposed to chymase or other stimuli were surface radiolabelled using 125I and Iodo-Gen, solubilized with 1% Nonidet-40, and the resulting 25,000 g supernatants analysed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. A 125I-labelled RSMC membrane protein of approximate 90,000 MW decreased upon exposure to either chymase or alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT) for 5 min at 37 degrees or to chymase for 60 min at 1 degree. Exposure of RSMC to the secretagogues ionophore A23187, compound 48/80, and anti-IgE for 5 min at 37 degrees resulted in beta-hexosaminidase (a secretory granule enzyme) release, but did not cause a detectable change in the 90,000 MW surface-labelled protein. Lima bean trypsin inhibitor, which inhibits both the esterase and RSMC degranulation activities of chymase and alpha-CT, prevented the disappearance of the 125I-labelled 90,000 MW band when added with chymase or alpha-CT. Exposure of RSMC to chymase at 1 degree for 0-10 min, prior to addition of LBTI, led to a progressive disappearance of the 90,000 MW band, which corresponded to the kinetics of priming for subsequent RSMC degranulation at 37 degrees. When RSMC were exposed to trypsin (2.5 micrograms/ml) for 0-120 min at 1 degree, a progressive disappearance of the 90,000 MW band occurred, in association with a loss of sensitivity to subsequent activation by chymase at 37 degrees. The disappearance of the 90,000 MW determinant in association with chymase-mediated priming for degranulation and the inability of chymase to mediate degranulation of trypsin-treated RSMC, which lack this membrane protein, suggests that it is involved in chymase-mediated RSMC degranulation. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3

  7. Not All Secretory Granules Are Created Equal: Partitioning of Soluble Content Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Sobota, Jacqueline A.; Ferraro, Francesco; Bäck, Nils; Eipper, Betty A.

    2006-01-01

    Secretory granules carrying fluorescent cargo proteins are widely used to study granule biogenesis, maturation, and regulated exocytosis. We fused the soluble secretory protein peptidylglycine α-hydroxylating monooxygenase (PHM) to green fluorescent protein (GFP) to study granule formation. When expressed in AtT-20 or GH3 cells, the PHM-GFP fusion protein partitioned from endogenous hormone (adrenocorticotropic hormone, growth hormone) into separate secretory granule pools. Both exogenous and endogenous granule proteins were stored and released in response to secretagogue. Importantly, we found that segregation of content proteins is not an artifact of overexpression nor peculiar to GFP-tagged proteins. Neither luminal acidification nor cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains play essential roles in soluble content protein segregation. Our data suggest that intrinsic biophysical properties of cargo proteins govern their differential sorting, with segregation occurring during the process of granule maturation. Proteins that can self-aggregate are likely to partition into separate granules, which can accommodate only a few thousand copies of any content protein; proteins that lack tertiary structure are more likely to distribute homogeneously into secretory granules. Therefore, a simple “self-aggregation default” theory may explain the little acknowledged, but commonly observed, tendency for both naturally occurring and exogenous content proteins to segregate from each other into distinct secretory granules. PMID:17005911

  8. AP-1 and clathrin are essential for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Burgess, Jason; Jauregui, Miluska; Tan, Julie; Rollins, Janet; Lallet, Sylvie; Leventis, Peter A.; Boulianne, Gabrielle L.; Chang, Henry C.; Le Borgne, Roland; Krämer, Helmut; Brill, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

     Regulated secretion of hormones, digestive enzymes, and other biologically active molecules requires the formation of secretory granules. Clathrin and the clathrin adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1) are necessary for maturation of exocrine, endocrine, and neuroendocrine secretory granules. However, the initial steps of secretory granule biogenesis are only minimally understood. Powerful genetic approaches available in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster were used to investigate the molecular pathway for biogenesis of the mucin-containing “glue granules” that form within epithelial cells of the third-instar larval salivary gland. Clathrin and AP-1 colocalize at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and clathrin recruitment requires AP-1. Furthermore, clathrin and AP-1 colocalize with secretory cargo at the TGN and on immature granules. Finally, loss of clathrin or AP-1 leads to a profound block in secretory granule formation. These findings establish a novel role for AP-1– and clathrin-dependent trafficking in the biogenesis of mucin-containing secretory granules. PMID:21490149

  9. A novel regulatory mechanism for trimeric GTP-binding proteins in the membrane and secretory granule fractions of human and rodent beta cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kowluru, A; Seavey, S E; Rhodes, C J; Metz, S A

    1996-01-01

    Recently we described roles for heterotrimeric and low-molecular-mass GTP-binding proteins in insulin release from normal rat islets. During these studies, we observed that a protein with an apparent molecular mass (37 kDa) similar to that of the beta subunit of trimeric GTP-binding proteins underwent phosphorylation in each of five classes of insulin-secreting cells. Incubation of the beta cell total membrane fraction or the isolated secretory granule fraction (but not the cytosolic fraction) with [gamma-32P]ATP or [gamma-32P]GTP resulted in the phosphorylation of this protein, which was selectively immunoprecipitated by an anti-serum directed against the common beta subunit of trimeric G-proteins. Disruption of the alpha beta gamma trimer (by pretreatment with either fluoroaluminate or guanosine 5'(-)[gamma-thio]triphosphate) prevented beta subunit phosphorylation. Based on differential sensitivities to pH, heat and the histidine-selective reagent diethyl pyrocarbonate (and reversal of the latter by hydroxylamine), the phosphorylated amino acid was presumptively identified as histidine. Incubation of pure beta subunit alone or in combination with the exogenous purified alpha subunit of transducin did not result in the phosphorylation of the beta subunit, but addition of the islet cell membrane fraction did support this event, suggesting that membrane localization (or a membrane-associated factor) is required for beta subunit phosphorylation. Incubation of phosphorylated beta subunit with G alpha.GDP accelerated the dephosphorylation of the beta subunit, accompanied by the formation of G alpha-GTP. Immunoblotting detected multiple alpha subunits (of Gi, G(o) and Gq) and at least one beta subunit in the secretory granule fraction of normal rat islets and insulinoma cells. These data describe a potential alternative mechanism for the activation of GTP-binding proteins in beta cells which contrasts with the classical receptor-agonist mechanism: G beta undergoes

  10. Lipids implicated in the journey of a secretory granule: from biogenesis to fusion.

    PubMed

    Tanguy, Emeline; Carmon, Ophélie; Wang, Qili; Jeandel, Lydie; Chasserot-Golaz, Sylvette; Montero-Hadjadje, Maité; Vitale, Nicolas

    2016-06-01

    The regulated secretory pathway begins with the formation of secretory granules by budding from the Golgi apparatus and ends by their fusion with the plasma membrane leading to the release of their content into the extracellular space, generally following a rise in cytosolic calcium. Generation of these membrane-bound transport carriers can be classified into three steps: (i) cargo sorting that segregates the cargo from resident proteins of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) membrane budding that encloses the cargo and depends on the creation of appropriate membrane curvature, and (iii) membrane fission events allowing the nascent carrier to separate from the donor membrane. These secretory vesicles then mature as they are actively transported along microtubules toward the cortical actin network at the cell periphery. The final stage known as regulated exocytosis involves the docking and the priming of the mature granules, necessary for merging of vesicular and plasma membranes, and the subsequent partial or total release of the secretory vesicle content. Here, we review the latest evidence detailing the functional roles played by lipids during secretory granule biogenesis, recruitment, and exocytosis steps. In this review, we highlight evidence supporting the notion that lipids play important functions in secretory vesicle biogenesis, maturation, recruitment, and membrane fusion steps. These effects include regulating various protein distribution and activity, but also directly modulating membrane topology. The challenges ahead to understand the pleiotropic functions of lipids in a secretory granule's journey are also discussed. This article is part of a mini review series on Chromaffin cells (ISCCB Meeting, 2015). PMID:26877188

  11. Type II PKAs are anchored to mature insulin secretory granules in INS-1 β-cells and required for cAMP-dependent potentiation of exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Villalpando, Sabrina; Cazevieille, Chantal; Fernandez, Anne; Lamb, Ned J; Hani, El-Habib

    2016-06-01

    Specificity of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) pathway relies on an extremely sophisticated compartmentalization mechanism of the kinase within a given cell, based on high-affinity binding of PKA tetramer pools to different A-Kinase Anchoring Proteins (AKAPs). We and others have previously shown that AKAPs-dependent PKA subcellular targeting is a requisite for optimal cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin exocytosis. We thus hypothesized that a PKA pool may directly anchor to the secretory compartment to potentiate insulin exocytosis. Here, using immunofluorescence analyses combined to subcellular fractionations and purification of insulin secretory granules (ISGs), we identified discrete subpools of type II PKAs, RIIα and RIIβ PKAs, along with the catalytic subunit, physically associated with ISGs within pancreatic insulin-secreting β-cells. Ultrastructural analysis of native rodent β-cells confirmed in vivo the occurrence of PKA on dense-core ISGs. Isoform-selective disruption of binding of PKAs to AKAPs reinforced the requirement of type II PKA isoforms for cAMP potentiation of insulin exocytosis. This granular localization of PKA was of critical importance since siRNA-mediated depletion of either RIIα or RIIβ PKAs resulted in a significant reduction of cAMP-dependent potentiation of insulin release. The present work provides evidence for a previously unrecognized pool of type II PKAs physically anchored to the β-cell ISGs compartment and supports a non-redundant function for type II PKAs during cAMP potentiation of exocytosis. PMID:26898328

  12. Somatostatin inhibits exocytosis in rat pancreatic α-cells by Gi2-dependent activation of calcineurin and depriming of secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Gromada, Jesper; Høy, Marianne; Buschard, Karsten; Salehi, Albert; Rorsman, Patrik

    2001-01-01

    Measurements of cell capacitance were used to investigate the molecular mechanisms by which somatostatin inhibits Ca2+-induced exocytosis in single rat glucagon-secreting pancreatic α-cells. Somatostatin decreased the exocytotic responses elicited by voltage-clamp depolarisations by 80 % in the presence of cyclic AMP-elevating agents such as isoprenaline and forskolin. Inhibition was time dependent and half-maximal within 22 s. The inhibitory action of somatostatin was concentration dependent with an IC50 of 68 nm and prevented by pretreatment of the cells with pertussis toxin. The latter effect was mimicked by intracellular dialysis with specific antibodies to Gi1/2 and by antisense oligonucleotides against G proteins of the subtype Gi2. Somatostatin lacked inhibitory action when applied in the absence of forskolin or in the presence of the L-type Ca2+ channel blocker nifedipine. The size of the ω-conotoxin-sensitive and forskolin-independent component of exocytosis was limited to 60 fF. By contrast, somatostatin abolished L-type Ca2+ channel-dependent exocytosis in α-cells exposed to forskolin. The magnitude of the latter pool amounted to 230 fF. The inhibitory effect of somatostatin on exocytosis was mediated by activation of the serine/threonine protein phosphatase calcineurin and was prevented by pretreatment with cyclosporin A and deltamethrin or intracellularly applied calcineurin autoinhibitory peptide. Experiments using the stable ATP analogue AMP-PCP indicate that somatostatin acts by depriming of granules. We propose that somatostatin receptors associate with L-type Ca2+ channels and couple to Gi2 proteins leading to a localised activation of calcineurin and depriming of secretory granules situated close to the L-type Ca2+ channels. PMID:11533141

  13. Proteome profiling of human neutrophil granule subsets, secretory vesicles, and cell membrane: correlation with transcriptome profiling of neutrophil precursors.

    PubMed

    Rørvig, Sara; Østergaard, Ole; Heegaard, Niels H H; Borregaard, Niels

    2013-10-01

    Neutrophils are indispensable in the innate immune defense against invading microorganisms. Neutrophils contain SVs and several subsets of granules that are essential for their function. Proteins present in neutrophil SVs and granules are synthesized during terminal granulopoiesis in the bone marrow. The heterogeneity of granules, as determined by marker proteins characteristic of each granule subset, is thought to result from differences in the biosynthetic windows of major classes of granule proteins, a process referred to as targeting by timing. Qualitative proteomic analysis of neutrophil granules, SVs, and plasma membrane has been performed before. Here, we performed subcellular fractionation on freshly isolated human neutrophils by nitrogen cavitation and density centrifugation on a four-layer Percoll gradient. Granule subsets were pooled and subjected to SDS-PAGE, and gel pieces were in-gel-digested with trypsin. The resulting peptides were analyzed using LTQ Orbitrap XL tandem MS. A total of 1292 unique proteins were identified and grouped, according to the neutrophil fraction, in which they displayed maximal expression. In addition to various known neutrophil proteins, several uncharacterized proteins were found, as well as proteins not described previously in neutrophils. To study the correlation between mRNA expression in neutrophil precursors and the localization of their cognate proteins, the distribution of 126 identified proteins was compared with their mRNA expression profiles. The neutrophil subcellular proteome profiles presented here may be used as a database in combination with the mRNA array database to predict and test the presence and localization of proteins in neutrophil granules and membranes. PMID:23650620

  14. Regulated phosphorylation of secretory granule membrane proteins of the rat parotid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Marino, C.R.; Castle, J.D.; Gorelick, F.S. )

    1990-07-01

    An antiserum raised against purified rat parotid secretory granule membrane proteins has been used to identify organelle-specific protein phosphorylation events following stimulation of intact cells from the rat parotid gland. After lobules were prelabeled with ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and exposed to secretagogues, phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated with the granule membrane protein antiserum, separated by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and visualized by autoradiography. Parallel studies of stimulated amylase release were performed. Isoproterenol treatment of parotid lobules resulted in an increase in the phosphate content of immunoprecipitable 60- and 72-kDa proteins that correlated with amylase release in a time-dependent manner. Forskolin addition mimicked these effects, but only the isoproterenol effects were reversed by propranolol treatment. To confirm the specificity of the antiserum to the secretory granule membrane fraction, subcellular isolation techniques were employed following in situ phosphorylation. The 60- and 72-kDa phosphoproteins were immunoprecipitated from both a particulate fraction and a purified secretory granule fraction. Furthermore, the extraction properties of both species suggest that they are integral membrane proteins. These findings support the possibility that stimulus-regulated secretion may involve phosphorylation of integral membrane proteins of the exocrine secretory granule.

  15. A signal sequence is sufficient for green fluorescent protein to be routed to regulated secretory granules.

    PubMed

    El Meskini, R; Jin, L; Marx, R; Bruzzaniti, A; Lee, J; Emeson, R; Mains, R

    2001-02-01

    To investigate trafficking in neuroendocrine cells, green fluorescent protein (GFP) tags were fused to various portions of the preproneuropeptide Y (NPY) precursor. Two neuroendocrine cell lines, AtT-20 corticotrope tumor cells and PC-12 pheochromocytoma cells, along with primary anterior pituitary cells, were examined. Expression of chimeric constructs did not disrupt trafficking or regulated secretion of endogenous ACTH and prohormone convertase 1 in AtT-20 cells. Western blot and immunocytochemical analyses demonstrated that the chimeric constructs remained intact, as long as the Lys-Arg cleavage site within preproNPY was deleted. GFP was stored in, and released from, regulated granules in cells expressing half of the NPY precursor fused to GFP, and also in cells in which only the signal sequence of preproNPY was fused to GFP. Thus, in neuroendocrine cells, entering the lumen of the secretory pathway is sufficient to target GFP to regulated secretory granules. PMID:11159860

  16. Electron microprobe analysis of human labial gland secretory granules in cystic fibrosis

    SciTech Connect

    Izutsu, K.; Johnson, D.; Schubert, M.; Wang, E.; Ramsey, B.; Tamarin, A.; Truelove, E.; Ensign, W.; Young, M.

    1985-06-01

    X-ray microanalysis of freeze-dried labial gland cryosections revealed that Na concentration was doubled and the Ca/S concentration ratio was decreased in secretory granules of labial glands from patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) when compared with glands from normal subjects. Other results suggested that the decrease in the Ca/S concentration ratio resulted from an increase in S concentration. These findings imply that mucous granules in labial saliva showed a CF-related increase in Na and S content, and such changes would be expected to affect the rheology of the mucus after exocytosis. In contrast with a previous study in human parotid glands, no evidence was found for CF-related changes in cytoplasmic or nuclear Na, K, and Ca concentrations. Significant elemental differences were found between secretory granules and nuclei and cytoplasm of control cells.

  17. Ultrastructural features of goat oviductal secretory cells at follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle

    PubMed Central

    ABE, HIROYUKI; ONODERA, MASAKAZU; SUGAWARA, SHICHIRO; SATOH, TAKESHI; HOSHI, HIROYOSHI

    1999-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the ultrastructure of secretory cells in the various regions of the goat oviduct during the follicular and luteal phases of the oestrous cycle. During the follicular phase in the fimbriae, the secretory cells contained small secretory granules with electron-dense matrices. In the luteal phase, the secretory granules disappeared and cytoplasmic protrusions, extending beyond the luminal border of the ciliated cells and often containing the nucleus, were predominant. During the follicular phase in ampullary secretory cells, numerous secretory granules with moderately electron-dense matrices were present in the supranuclear cytoplasm and exocytosis of secretory granules was observed. The number of secretory granules was dramatically reduced in the ampullary secretory cells at the luteal phase. Conspicuous cytoplasmic protrusions of secretory cells were observed similar to those of the fimbrial epithelium. Isthmic cells were almost free of secretory granules and lysosome-like bodies were found both at the follicular and luteal phases. In conclusion, our ultrastructural observations of goat oviduct revealed marked cyclic changes in the ultrastructural features of secretory cells and the ultrastructural features and the numbers of secretory granules were distinctive for each particular segment. PMID:10634690

  18. Porosome: The Universal Secretory Portal in Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jena, Bhanu

    2012-10-01

    , and only 20-45% increase in porosome diameter is demonstrated following the docking and fusion of 0.2-1.2 μm in diameter secretory vesicles, it is concluded that secretory vesicles ``transiently'' dock and fuse, rather than completely merge at the base of the porosome complex to release their contents to the outside. In agreement, it has been demonstrated that ``secretory granules are recaptured largely intact after stimulated exocytosis in cultured endocrine cells''; that ``single synaptic vesicles fuse transiently and successively without loss of identity''; and that``zymogen granule (the secretory vesicle in exocrine pancreas) exocytosis is characterized by long fusion pore openings and preservation of vesicle lipid identity.'' In this presentation, the discovery of the porosome, resulting in a paradigm shift in our understanding of cell secretion will be briefly discussed.

  19. Myosin Vc Is a Molecular Motor That Functions in Secretory Granule Trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Damon T.; Weigert, Roberto; Grode, Kyle D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2009-01-01

    Class V myosins are actin-based motor proteins that have critical functions in organelle trafficking. Of the three class V myosins expressed in mammals, relatively little is known about Myo5c except that it is abundant in exocrine tissues. Here we use MCF-7 cells to identify the organelles that Myo5c associates with, image the dynamics of Myo5c in living cells, and test the functions of Myo5c. Endogenous Myo5c localizes to two distinct compartments: small puncta and slender tubules. Myo5c often exhibits a highly polarized distribution toward the leading edge in migrating cells and is clearly distinct from the Myo5a or Myo5b compartments. Imaging with GFP-Myo5c reveals that Myo5c puncta move slowly (∼30 nm/s) and microtubule independently, whereas tubules move rapidly (∼440 nm/s) and microtubule dependently. Myo5c puncta colocalize with secretory granule markers such as chromogranin A and Rab27b, whereas Myo5c tubules are labeled by Rab8a. TIRF imaging indicates that the granules can be triggered to undergo secretion. To test if Myo5c functions in granule trafficking, we used the Myo5c tail as a dominant negative and found that it dramatically perturbs the distribution of granule markers. These results provide the first live-cell imaging of Myo5c and indicate that Myo5c functions in secretory granule trafficking. PMID:19741097

  20. The secretory granule matrix: a fast-acting smart polymer.

    PubMed

    Nanavati, C; Fernandez, J M

    1993-02-12

    The secretory granule matrix is a miniature biopolymer that consists of a charged polymer network that traps peptides and transmitters when it condenses and releases them on exocytotic decondensation. Models of exocytotic fusion have treated this matrix as a short circuit and have neglected its electrical contributions. This matrix responded to negative voltages by swelling, which was accompanied by a large increase in conductance, and to positive voltages by condensing. Thus, the matrix resembled a diode. The swollen matrix exerted large pressures on the order of 12 bar. The responses took place within milliseconds of the application of the electric field. These findings suggest that matrix decondensation, and therefore product release, is controlled by potential gradients. PMID:8438154

  1. Sorting and storage during secretory granule biogenesis: looking backward and looking forward.

    PubMed Central

    Arvan, P; Castle, D

    1998-01-01

    Secretory granules are specialized intracellular organelles that serve as a storage pool for selected secretory products. The exocytosis of secretory granules is markedly amplified under physiologically stimulated conditions. While granules have been recognized as post-Golgi carriers for almost 40 years, the molecular mechanisms involved in their formation from the trans-Golgi network are only beginning to be defined. This review summarizes and evaluates current information about how secretory proteins are thought to be sorted for the regulated secretory pathway and how these activities are positioned with respect to other post-Golgi sorting events that must occur in parallel. In the first half of the review, the emerging role of immature secretory granules in protein sorting is highlighted. The second half of the review summarizes what is known about the composition of granule membranes. The numerous similarities and relatively limited differences identified between granule membranes and other vesicular carriers that convey products to and from the plasmalemma, serve as a basis for examining how granule membrane composition might be established and how its unique functions interface with general post-Golgi membrane traffic. Studies of granule formation in vitro offer additional new insights, but also important challenges for future efforts to understand how regulated secretory pathways are constructed and maintained. PMID:9620860

  2. Sending proteins to dense core secretory granules: still a lot to sort out

    PubMed Central

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Reudelhuber, Timothy L.

    2007-01-01

    The intracellular sorting of peptide hormone precursors to the dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) is essential for their bioactivation. Despite the fundamental importance of this cellular process, the nature of the sorting signals for entry of proteins into DCSGs remains a source of vigorous debate. This review highlights recent discoveries that are consistent with a model in which several protein domains, acting in a cell-specific fashion and at different steps in the sorting process, act in concert to regulate the entry of proteins into DCSGs. PMID:17438078

  3. The Arf family G protein Arl1 is required for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Isabel L.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Munro, Sean

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small G protein Arf like 1 (Arl1) is found at the Golgi complex, and its GTP-bound form recruits several effectors to the Golgi including GRIP-domain-containing coiled-coil proteins, and the Arf1 exchange factors Big1 and Big2. To investigate the role of Arl1, we have characterised a loss-of-function mutant of the Drosophila Arl1 orthologue. The gene is essential, and examination of clones of cells lacking Arl1 shows that it is required for recruitment of three of the four GRIP domain golgins to the Golgi, with Drosophila GCC185 being less dependent on Arl1. At a functional level, Arl1 is essential for formation of secretory granules in the larval salivary gland. When Arl1 is missing, Golgi are still present but there is a dispersal of adaptor protein 1 (AP-1), a clathrin adaptor that requires Arf1 for its membrane recruitment and which is known to be required for secretory granule biogenesis. Arl1 does not appear to be required for AP-1 recruitment in all tissues, suggesting that it is crucially required to enhance Arf1 activation at the trans-Golgi in particular tissues. PMID:24610947

  4. Amyloid formation of growth hormone in presence of zinc: Relevance to its storage in secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Reeba S; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Saikat; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Khan, Tuhin; Singru, Praful; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are cross-β-sheet fibrillar aggregates, associated with various human diseases and native functions such as protein/peptide hormone storage inside secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In the current study, using amyloid detecting agents, we show that growth hormone (GH) could be stored as amyloid in the pituitary of rat. Moreover, to demonstrate the formation of GH amyloid in vitro, we studied various conditions (solvents, glycosaminoglycans, salts and metal ions) and found that in presence of zinc metal ions (Zn(II)), GH formed short curvy fibrils. The amyloidogenic nature of these fibrils was examined by Thioflavin T binding, Congo Red binding, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our biophysical studies also suggest that Zn(II) initiates the early oligomerization of GH that eventually facilitates the fibrillation process. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence study of pituitary tissue, we show that GH in pituitary significantly co-localizes with Zn(II), suggesting the probable role of zinc in GH aggregation within secretory granules. We also found that GH amyloid formed in vitro is capable of releasing monomers. The study will help to understand the possible mechanism of GH storage, its regulation and monomer release from the somatotrophs of anterior pituitary. PMID:27004850

  5. Amyloid formation of growth hormone in presence of zinc: Relevance to its storage in secretory granules

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Reeba S.; Das, Subhadeep; Ghosh, Saikat; Anoop, Arunagiri; Jha, Narendra Nath; Khan, Tuhin; Singru, Praful; Kumar, Ashutosh; Maji, Samir K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloids are cross-β-sheet fibrillar aggregates, associated with various human diseases and native functions such as protein/peptide hormone storage inside secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. In the current study, using amyloid detecting agents, we show that growth hormone (GH) could be stored as amyloid in the pituitary of rat. Moreover, to demonstrate the formation of GH amyloid in vitro, we studied various conditions (solvents, glycosaminoglycans, salts and metal ions) and found that in presence of zinc metal ions (Zn(II)), GH formed short curvy fibrils. The amyloidogenic nature of these fibrils was examined by Thioflavin T binding, Congo Red binding, transmission electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. Our biophysical studies also suggest that Zn(II) initiates the early oligomerization of GH that eventually facilitates the fibrillation process. Furthermore, using immunofluorescence study of pituitary tissue, we show that GH in pituitary significantly co-localizes with Zn(II), suggesting the probable role of zinc in GH aggregation within secretory granules. We also found that GH amyloid formed in vitro is capable of releasing monomers. The study will help to understand the possible mechanism of GH storage, its regulation and monomer release from the somatotrophs of anterior pituitary. PMID:27004850

  6. Morphological and morphometric study of atrial specific granules and other secretory components in dogs experimentally infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Caliari, M. V.; Lana, M.; Leite, V. H.; Tafuri, W. L.

    1995-01-01

    Changes in blood volume can induce morphometric and morphological alterations in the secretory complex of the myoendocrine cells due to the stretching of atrial walls. These alterations were studied by electron microscopy, using dogs infected intraperitonially with Trypanosoma cruzi and necropsied during the acute phase of the infection when congestive heart failure was present. Several changes were observed in the myoendocrine cells of the heart: hypertrophy and hyperplasia of rough endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, increase in telenuclear secretory complex, increase in fusion of type B atrial specific granules (ASG), decrease of the total number of ASG, enlargement of the maximum diameter of type A ASG and a relative increase in the number of type B ASG. These alterations suggest a larger secretory activity of the atrial myoendocrine cells with a larger secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7547444

  7. Automated kymograph analysis for profiling axonal transport of secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Amit; Jenkins, Brian; Fang, Cheng; Radke, Richard J; Banker, Gary; Roysam, Badrinath

    2011-06-01

    This paper describes an automated method to profile the velocity patterns of small organelles (BDNF granules) being transported along a selected section of axon of a cultured neuron imaged by time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Instead of directly detecting the granules as in conventional tracking, the proposed method starts by generating a two-dimensional spatio-temporal map (kymograph) of the granule traffic along an axon segment. Temporal sharpening during the kymograph creation helps to highlight granule movements while suppressing clutter due to stationary granules. A voting algorithm defined over orientation distribution functions is used to refine the locations and velocities of the granules. The refined kymograph is analyzed using an algorithm inspired from the minimum set cover framework to generate multiple motion trajectories of granule transport paths. The proposed method is computationally efficient, robust to significant levels of noise and clutter, and can be used to capture and quantify trends in transport patterns quickly and accurately. When evaluated on a collection of image sequences, the proposed method was found to detect granule movement events with 94% recall rate and 82% precision compared to a time-consuming manual analysis. Further, we present a study to evaluate the efficacy of velocity profiling by analyzing the impact of oxidative stress on granule transport in which the fully automated analysis correctly reproduced the biological conclusion generated by manual analysis. PMID:21330183

  8. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Factor Required for Secretory Granule Maturation in Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed

    Kontur, Cassandra; Kumar, Santosh; Lan, Xun; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Turkewitz, Aaron P

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased genetic approaches have a unique ability to identify novel genes associated with specific biological pathways. Thanks to next generation sequencing, forward genetic strategies can be expanded to a wider range of model organisms. The formation of secretory granules, called mucocysts, in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila relies, in part, on ancestral lysosomal sorting machinery, but is also likely to involve novel factors. In prior work, multiple strains with defects in mucocyst biogenesis were generated by nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, and characterized using genetic and cell biological approaches, but the genetic lesions themselves were unknown. Here, we show that analyzing one such mutant by whole genome sequencing reveals a novel factor in mucocyst formation. Strain UC620 has both morphological and biochemical defects in mucocyst maturation-a process analogous to dense core granule maturation in animals. Illumina sequencing of a pool of UC620 F2 clones identified a missense mutation in a novel gene called MMA1 (Mucocyst maturation). The defects in UC620 were rescued by expression of a wild-type copy of MMA1, and disrupting MMA1 in an otherwise wild-type strain phenocopies UC620. The product of MMA1, characterized as a CFP-tagged copy, encodes a large soluble cytosolic protein. A small fraction of Mma1p-CFP is pelletable, which may reflect association with endosomes. The gene has no identifiable homologs except in other Tetrahymena species, and therefore represents an evolutionarily recent innovation that is required for granule maturation. PMID:27317773

  9. Whole Genome Sequencing Identifies a Novel Factor Required for Secretory Granule Maturation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Kontur, Cassandra; Kumar, Santosh; Lan, Xun; Pritchard, Jonathan K.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.

    2016-01-01

    Unbiased genetic approaches have a unique ability to identify novel genes associated with specific biological pathways. Thanks to next generation sequencing, forward genetic strategies can be expanded to a wider range of model organisms. The formation of secretory granules, called mucocysts, in the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila relies, in part, on ancestral lysosomal sorting machinery, but is also likely to involve novel factors. In prior work, multiple strains with defects in mucocyst biogenesis were generated by nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis, and characterized using genetic and cell biological approaches, but the genetic lesions themselves were unknown. Here, we show that analyzing one such mutant by whole genome sequencing reveals a novel factor in mucocyst formation. Strain UC620 has both morphological and biochemical defects in mucocyst maturation—a process analogous to dense core granule maturation in animals. Illumina sequencing of a pool of UC620 F2 clones identified a missense mutation in a novel gene called MMA1 (Mucocyst maturation). The defects in UC620 were rescued by expression of a wild-type copy of MMA1, and disrupting MMA1 in an otherwise wild-type strain phenocopies UC620. The product of MMA1, characterized as a CFP-tagged copy, encodes a large soluble cytosolic protein. A small fraction of Mma1p-CFP is pelletable, which may reflect association with endosomes. The gene has no identifiable homologs except in other Tetrahymena species, and therefore represents an evolutionarily recent innovation that is required for granule maturation. PMID:27317773

  10. Sorting of a HaloTag protein that has only a signal peptide sequence into exocrine secretory granules without protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fujita-Yoshigaki, Junko; Matsuki-Fukushima, Miwako; Yokoyama, Megumi; Katsumata-Kato, Osamu

    2013-11-15

    The mechanism involved in the sorting and accumulation of secretory cargo proteins, such as amylase, into secretory granules of exocrine cells remains to be solved. To clarify that sorting mechanism, we expressed a reporter protein HaloTag fused with partial sequences of salivary amylase protein in primary cultured parotid acinar cells. We found that a HaloTag protein fused with only the signal peptide sequence (Met(1)-Ala(25)) of amylase, termed SS25H, colocalized well with endogenous amylase, which was confirmed by immunofluorescence microscopy. Percoll-density gradient centrifugation of secretory granule fractions shows that the distributions of amylase and SS25H were similar. These results suggest that SS25H is transported to secretory granules and is not discriminated from endogenous amylase by the machinery that functions to remove proteins other than granule cargo from immature granules. Another reporter protein, DsRed2, that has the same signal peptide sequence also colocalized with amylase, suggesting that the sorting to secretory granules is not dependent on a characteristic of the HaloTag protein. Whereas Blue Native PAGE demonstrates that endogenous amylase forms a high-molecular-weight complex, SS25H does not participate in the complex and does not form self-aggregates. Nevertheless, SS25H was released from cells by the addition of a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, which also induces amylase secretion. These results indicate that addition of the signal peptide sequence, which is necessary for the translocation in the endoplasmic reticulum, is sufficient for the transportation and storage of cargo proteins in secretory granules of exocrine cells. PMID:24029466

  11. Myosin VI small insert isoform maintains exocytosis by tethering secretory granules to the cortical actin

    PubMed Central

    Tomatis, Vanesa M.; Papadopulos, Andreas; Malintan, Nancy T.; Martin, Sally; Wallis, Tristan; Gormal, Rachel S.; Kendrick-Jones, John; Buss, Folma

    2013-01-01

    Before undergoing neuroexocytosis, secretory granules (SGs) are mobilized and tethered to the cortical actin network by an unknown mechanism. Using an SG pull-down assay and mass spectrometry, we found that myosin VI was recruited to SGs in a Ca2+-dependent manner. Interfering with myosin VI function in PC12 cells reduced the density of SGs near the plasma membrane without affecting their biogenesis. Myosin VI knockdown selectively impaired a late phase of exocytosis, consistent with a replenishment defect. This exocytic defect was selectively rescued by expression of the myosin VI small insert (SI) isoform, which efficiently tethered SGs to the cortical actin network. These myosin VI SI–specific effects were prevented by deletion of a c-Src kinase phosphorylation DYD motif, identified in silico. Myosin VI SI thus recruits SGs to the cortical actin network, potentially via c-Src phosphorylation, thereby maintaining an active pool of SGs near the plasma membrane. PMID:23382463

  12. Prolonged retention after aggregation into secretory granules of human R183H-growth hormone (GH), a mutant that causes autosomal dominant GH deficiency type II.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yong Lian; Conway-Campbell, Becky; Waters, Michael J; Dannies, Priscilla S

    2002-11-01

    Human R183H-GH causes autosomal dominant GH deficiency type II. Because we show here that the mutant hormone is fully bioactive, we have sought to locate an impairment in its progress through the secretory pathway as assessed by pulse chase experiments. Newly synthesized wild-type and R183H-GH were stable when expressed transiently in AtT20 cells, and both formed equivalent amounts of Lubrol-insoluble aggregates within 40 min after synthesis. There was no evidence for intermolecular disulfide bond formation in aggregates of wild-type hormone or the R183H mutant. Both wild-type and R183H-GH were packaged into secretory granules, assessed by the ability of 1 mM BaCl2 to stimulate release and by immunocytochemistry. The mutant differed from wild-type hormone in its retention in the cells after packaging into secretory granules; 50% more R183H-GH than wild-type aggregates were retained in AtT20 cells 120 min after synthesis, and stimulated release of R183H-GH or a mixture of R183H-GH and wild-type that had been retained in the cell was reduced. The longer retention of R183H-GH aggregates indicates that a single point mutation in a protein contained in secretory granules affects the rate of secretory granule release. PMID:12399418

  13. Serous cutaneous glands in anurans: Fourier transform analysis of the repeating secretory granule substructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosi, D.; Delfino, G.; Quercioli, F.

    2013-03-01

    A combined transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform analysis has been performed on the secretory granules storing active peptides/proteins in serous cutaneous glands of n = 12 anuran species. Previous TEM investigation showed that the granules are provided with remarkable repeating substructures based on discrete subunits, arranged into a consistent framework. Furthermore, TEM findings revealed that this recurrent arrangement is acquired during a prolonged post-Golgian (or maturational) processing that affects the secretory product. Maturation leads to a variety of patterns depending on the degree of subunit clustering. This variety of recurrent patterns has been plotted into a range of frequency spectra. Through this quantitative approach, we found that the varying granule substructure can be reduced to a single mechanism of peptide/protein aggregation.

  14. Characterization of proinsulin- and proglucagon-converting activities in isolated islet secretory granules.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, D J; Quigley, J P; Bauer, G E; Noe, B D

    1981-08-01

    The conversion of proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules isolated from both prelabeled and unlabeled anglerfish islets was investigated. Either granules isolated from tissue labeled with [3H]tryptophan and [14C]isoleucine or [35S]cysteine, or lysed granules from unlabeled tissue to which exogenously labeled prohormones had been added were incubated under various conditions. Acetic acid extracts of these granule preparations were analyzed for prohormone and hormone content by gel filtration. Both prelabeled and lysed, unlabeled secretory granules converted radiolabeled precursor peptides (Mr 8,000-15,000) to labeled insulin and glucagon. The accuracy of the cleavage process was established by demonstrating comigration of products obtained from in vitro cleavage with insulin and glucagon extracted from intact islets using electrophoresis and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). The pH optimum for granule-mediated conversion was found to be in the range of pH 4.5-5.5. Conversion of both proglucagon and proinsulin by secretory granules was significantly inhibited in the presence of antipain, leupeptin, p-chloromercuribenzoate (PCMB) or dithiodipyridine (DDP) but not chloroquine, diisopropyl fluorophosphate, EDTA, p-nitrophenyl guanidinobenzoate, soybean trypsin inhibitor, or N-p-tosyl-L-lysine chloromethyl ketone HCl. The inhibitory action of PCMB and DDP was reversed in the presence of dithiothreitol. Both membranous and soluble components of the secretory granules possessed significant converting activity. HPLC and electrophoretic analysis of cleavage products demonstrated that the converting activities of the membranous and soluble components were indistinguishable. The amount of inhibition of proinsulin and proglucagon conversion caused by 600 micrograms/ml porcine proinsulin was significantly lower than that caused by the same concentration of unlabeled anglerfish precursor peptides. These results indicate that the proinsulin and proglucagon

  15. The role of secretory granules in radiation-induced dysfunction of rat salivary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Peter, B.; Van Waarde, M.A.W.H.; Konings, A.W.T.; Vissink, A. |; `s-Gravenmade, E.J.

    1995-02-01

    To investigate the possible role of secretory granules in radiation-induced salivary gland dysfunction, rats were pretreated with isoproterenol (5 mg/kg intraperitoneally) to degranulate salivary gland acini. At maximal depletion, salivary glands were locally irradiated with a single dose of 15 Gy of X rays. Parotid and submandibular/sublingual saliva samples were collected before and 1-10 days after irradiation. The lag phase, flow rate, concentrations of potassium and sodium, and amylase secretion were determined. Sham-treated, isoproterenol-treated and irradiated animals provided reference data. In the parotid gland, but not in the submandibular gland, protection against radiation-induced changes in flow rate and composition of saliva occurred after pretreatment with isoproterenol. Combining morphological data from a previous study with data from the current study, it is suggested that improvement of parotid gland function is attributed predominantly to a proliferative stimulus on acinar cells by isoproterenol and not to its degranulation effect. After pretreatment with isoproterenol, an earlier expression of radiation-induced acinar cell damage leading to death was observed, followed by a faster tissue recovery. Thus the proliferative stimulus on acinar cells may accelerate the unmasking of latent lethal damage, resulting in the earlier replacement of dead cells by new, functionally intact cells. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  16. RNA Granules in Germ Cells

    PubMed Central

    Voronina, Ekaterina; Seydoux, Geraldine; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo; Nagamori, Ippei

    2011-01-01

    “Germ granules” are cytoplasmic, nonmembrane-bound organelles unique to germline. Germ granules share components with the P bodies and stress granules of somatic cells, but also contain proteins and RNAs uniquely required for germ cell development. In this review, we focus on recent advances in our understanding of germ granule assembly, dynamics, and function. One hypothesis is that germ granules operate as hubs for the posttranscriptional control of gene expression, a function at the core of the germ cell differentiation program. PMID:21768607

  17. Annexins V and VI: major calcium-dependent atrial secretory granule-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Doubell, A F; Bester, A J; Thibault, G

    1991-11-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is stored by atrial myocytes in secretory granules, known as atrial specific granules, and is released from these granules by exocytosis. We have isolated a group of atrial proteins by affinity chromatography that bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner. The two major proteins isolated (32.5 kd and 67 kd) are calcium-binding proteins and have been identified as annexins V and VI by immunoblotting with specific antisera. The calcium dependence of their binding to atrial specific granules has been characterized in vitro and indicates that this interaction takes place at micromolar levels of calcium. In addition, the group of proteins isolated includes another calcium-binding protein of 20 kd, as well as GTP-binding proteins of 22 to 26 kd. Membrane interactions during exocytosis are presumably mediated by the interaction of specific proteins with the granule membrane. The properties of the proteins described here, and their ability to bind to atrial specific granules in a calcium-dependent manner, make them likely candidates in the search for regulatory proteins mediating atrial natriuretic peptide secretion. PMID:1834552

  18. Porosome: the secretory NanoMachine in cells.

    PubMed

    Jena, Bhanu P

    2013-01-01

    Cells synthesize and store within membranous sacs products such as hormones, growth factors, neurotransmitters, or digestive enzymes, for release on demand. As recently as just 15 years ago, it was believed that during cell secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles completely merge at the cell plasma membrane resulting in the diffusion of intravesicular contents to the cell exterior and the compensatory retrieval of the excess membrane by endocytosis. This explanation, however, failed to explain the generation of partially empty vesicles observed in electron micrographs following secretion. Logically therefore, in a 1993 News and Views article in the journal Nature, Prof. Erwin Neher wrote "It seems terribly wasteful that, during the release of hormones and neurotransmitters from a cell, the membrane of a vesicle should merge with the plasma membrane to be retrieved for recycling only seconds or minutes later." The discovery of permanent secretory portals or nanomachines at the cell plasma membrane called POROSOMES, where membrane-bound secretory vesicles transiently dock and fuse to release intravesicular contents to the cell exterior, has finally resolved this conundrum. Following this discovery, the composition of the porosome, its structure and dynamics visualized with high-resolution imaging techniques atomic force and electron microscopy, and its functional reconstitution into artificial lipid membrane have provided a molecular understanding of cell secretion. In agreement, it has been demonstrated that "secretory granules are recaptured largely intact after stimulated exocytosis in cultured endocrine cells" (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 100:2070-2075, 2003); that "single synaptic vesicles fuse transiently and successively without loss of identity" (Nature 423:643-647, 2003); and that "zymogen granule exocytosis is characterized by long fusion pore openings and preservation of vesicle lipid identity" (Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 101:6774-6779, 2004). It made no

  19. A Dynamic Analysis of Secretory Granules Containing Proteins Involved In Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prahl, Louis; Simon, Alex; Jacobs, Conor; Fulwiler, Audrey; Hilken, Lindsay; Scalettar, Bethe; Lochner, Janis

    2010-10-01

    Formation and encoding of long-term memories requires a series of structural changes at synapses, or sites of neuronal communication, in the hippocampus; these changes are mediated by neuromodulatory proteins and serve to strengthen synapses to improve communication. Two prominent neuromodulators, tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are copackaged into secretory granules (SGs) in the body of nerve cells and are transported to distal synapses by motor proteins. At synapses, particularly presynaptic sites, the fate of tPA and BDNF is largely unknown. Motivated by this, and by recent data implicating presynaptic BDNF in early phases of learning, we used fluorescence microscopy to elucidate dynamic properties of presynaptic tPA and BDNF. We find that presynaptic SGs containing tPA and/or BDNF undergo Brownian and anomalous diffusive motion that, in 75% of cases, is so slow that it typically would be classified as immobility. These results suggest that tPA and BDNF are retained at presynaptic sites to facilitate their corelease and role in learning.

  20. The econobiology of pancreatic acinar cells granule inventory and the stealthy nano-machine behind it.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2016-03-01

    The pancreatic gland secretes most of the enzymes and many other macromolecules needed for food digestion in the gastrointestinal tract. These molecules play an important role in digestion, host defense and lubrication. The secretion of pancreatic proteins ensures the availability of the correct mix of proteins when needed. This review describes model systems available for the study of the econobiology of secretory granule content. The secretory pancreatic molecules are stored in large dense-core secretory granules that may undergo either constitutive or evoked secretion, and constitute the granule inventory of the cell. It is proposed that the Golgi complex functions as a distribution center for secretory proteins in pancreatic acinar cells, packing the newly formed secretory molecules into maturing secretory granules, also known functionally as condensing vacuoles. Mathematical modelling brings forward a process underlying granule inventory maintenance at various physiological states of condensation and aggregation by homotypic fusion. These models suggest unique but simple mechanisms accountable for inventory buildup and size, as well as for the distribution of secretory molecules into different secretory pathways in pancreatic acinar cells. PMID:26702787

  1. Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, D.T. )

    1991-08-01

    The effect of Ca2+ and calmodulin on phosphorylation of islet secretory granule proteins was studied. Secretory granules were incubated in a phosphorylation reaction mixture containing (32P)ATP and test reagents. The 32P-labeled proteins were resolved by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 32P content was visualized by autoradiography, and the relative intensities of specific bands were quantitated. When the reaction mixture contained EGTA and no added Ca2+, 32P was incorporated into two proteins with molecular weights of 45,000 and 13,000. When 10(-4) M Ca2+ was added without EGTA, two additional proteins (58,000 and 48,000 Mr) were phosphorylated, and the 13,000-Mr protein was absent. The addition of 2.4 microM calmodulin markedly enhanced the phosphorylation of the 58,000- and 48,000-Mr proteins and resulted in the phosphorylation of a major protein whose molecular weight (64,000 Mr) is identical to that of one of the calmodulin binding proteins located on the granule surface. Calmodulin had no effect on phosphorylation in the absence of Ca2+ but was effective in the presence of calcium between 10 nM and 50 microM. Trifluoperazine and calmidazolium, calmodulin antagonists, produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the calmodulin effect. 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol 13-acetate, a phorbol ester that activates protein kinase C, produced no increase in phosphorylation, and 1-(5-isoquinoline sulfonyl)-2-methyl piperazine dihydrochloride, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, had no effect. These results indicate that Ca(2+)-calmodulin-dependent protein kinases and endogenous substrates are present in islet secretory granules.

  2. Morphological and cytochemical studies on the secretory granules of the pyloric caeca of the starfish, Asterias amurensis.

    PubMed

    Hori, S H; Tanahashi, K; Matsuoka, N

    1977-02-01

    A fraction rich in secretory granules was prepared from the pyloric caeca of Asterias amurensis by sucrose density gradient centrifugation. The freshly prepared fraction exhibited no casein-hydrolyzing activity, but showed nine times as much specific activity as that of tissue homogenates after incubation at 37 degrees C for thirty minutes. Electron microscopy showed that the secretory granules were membrane-bound granules measuring 0.5-2.0 mu in diameter and contained dense and/or light amorphous substances. PMID:836911

  3. Proteoglycans support proper granule formation in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Aroso, Miguel; Agricola, Brigitte; Hacker, Christian; Schrader, Michael

    2015-10-01

    Zymogen granules (ZG) are specialized organelles in the exocrine pancreas which allow digestive enzyme storage and regulated secretion. The molecular mechanisms of their biogenesis and the sorting of zymogens are still incompletely understood. Here, we investigated the role of proteoglycans in granule formation and secretion of zymogens in pancreatic AR42J cells, an acinar model system. Cupromeronic Blue cytochemistry and biochemical studies revealed an association of proteoglycans primarily with the granule membrane. Removal of proteoglycans by carbonate treatment led to a loss of membrane curvature indicating a supportive role in the maintenance of membrane shape and stability. Chemical inhibition of proteoglycan synthesis impaired the formation of normal electron-dense granules in AR42J cells and resulted in the formation of unusually small granule structures. These structures still contained the zymogen carboxypeptidase, a cargo molecule of secretory granules, but migrated to lighter fractions after density gradient centrifugation. Furthermore, the basal secretion of amylase was increased in AR42J cells after inhibitor treatment. In addition, irregular-shaped granules appeared in pancreatic lobules. We conclude that the assembly of a proteoglycan scaffold at the ZG membrane is supporting efficient packaging of zymogens and the proper formation of stimulus-competent storage granules in acinar cells of the pancreas. PMID:26105026

  4. Epithelial Cell Culture from Human Adenoids: A Functional Study Model for Ciliated and Secretory Cells

    PubMed Central

    González, Claudia; Espinosa, Marisol; Sánchez, María Trinidad; Droguett, Karla; Ríos, Mariana; Fonseca, Ximena; Villalón, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background. Mucociliary transport (MCT) is a defense mechanism of the airway. To study the underlying mechanisms of MCT, we have both developed an experimental model of cultures, from human adenoid tissue of ciliated and secretory cells, and characterized the response to local chemical signals that control ciliary activity and the secretion of respiratory mucins in vitro. Materials and Methods. In ciliated cell cultures, ciliary beat frequency (CBF) and intracellular Ca2+ levels were measured in response to ATP, UTP, and adenosine. In secretory cultures, mucin synthesis and secretion were identified by using immunodetection. Mucin content was taken from conditioned medium and analyzed in the presence or absence of UTP. Results. Enriched ciliated cell monolayers and secretory cells were obtained. Ciliated cells showed a basal CBF of 10.7 Hz that increased significantly after exposure to ATP, UTP, or adenosine. Mature secretory cells showed active secretion of granules containing different glycoproteins, including MUC5AC. Conclusion. Culture of ciliated and secretory cells grown from adenoid epithelium is a reproducible and feasible experimental model, in which it is possible to observe ciliary and secretory activities, with a potential use as a model to understand mucociliary transport control mechanisms. PMID:23484122

  5. Secretory organelles in ECL cells of the rat stomach: an immunohistochemical and electron-microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C M; Chen, D; Lintunen, M; Panula, P; Håkanson, R

    1999-12-01

    ECL cells are numerous in the rat stomach. They produce and store histamine and chromogranin-A (CGA)-derived peptides such as pancreastatin and respond to gastrin with secretion of these products. Numerous electron-lucent vesicles of varying size and a few small, dense-cored granules are found in the cytoplasm. Using confocal and electron microscopy, we examined these organelles and their metamorphosis as they underwent intracellular transport from the Golgi area to the cell periphery. ECL-cell histamine was found to occur in both cytosol and secretory vesicles. Histidine decarboxylase, the histamine-forming enzyme, was in the cytosol, while pancreastatin (and possibly other peptide products) was confined to the dense cores of granules and secretory vesicles. Dense-cored granules and small, clear microvesicles were more numerous in the Golgi area than in the docking zone, i.e. close to the plasma membrane. Secretory vesicles were numerous in both Golgi area and docking zone, where they were sometimes seen to be attached to the plasma membrane. Upon acute gastrin stimulation, histamine was mobilized and the compartment size (volume density) of secretory vesicles in the docking zone was decreased, while the compartment size of microvesicles was increased. Based on these findings, we propose the following life cycle of secretory organelles in ECL cells: small, electron-lucent microvesicles (pro-granules) bud off the trans Golgi network, carrying proteins and secretory peptide precursors (such as CGA and an anticipated prohormone). They are transformed into dense-cored granules (approximate profile diameter 100 nm) while still in the trans Golgi area. Pro-granules and granules accumulate histamine, which leads to their metamorphosis into dense-cored secretory vesicles. In the Golgi area the secretory vesicles have an approximate profile diameter of 150 nm. By the time they reach their destination in the docking zone, their profile diameter is between 200 and 500 nm

  6. The secretory granule matrix-electrolyte interface: a homologue of the p-n rectifying junction.

    PubMed Central

    Marszalek, P E; Markin, V S; Tanaka, T; Kawaguchi, H; Fernandez, J M

    1995-01-01

    When placed at the tip of a glass micropipette electrode the polymeric matrix of the secretory granule behaves like a diode. The measured current was 100-fold greater at negative potentials compared to positive potentials, and up to sixfold greater than that measured with the pipette alone. By manipulating the geometry of the electric field we show that these electrical properties result from focusing an electric field at the gel-electrolyte interface. We also show, by using pulsed-laser imaging with fluorescein as the ionic probe, that there is a rapid accumulation and depletion of ions at the gel-electrolyte interface. A voltage pulse of -9 V applied to the gel caused a severalfold increase in the fluorescence intensity within 5 ms. This correlated with an increase in the measured current (approximately 1 microA). In contrast, within 5 ms of applying +9 V we recorded a decrease in the fluorescence intensity, which paralleled the twofold decrease in the measured current. This is similar to a p-n junction where an applied voltage causes the accumulation and depletion of charge carriers. Using synthetic gels (diameter 3-6 microns) with different charge characteristics we observed no rectification of the current with neutral gels and confirmed that rectification and amplification of the current were dependent on the fixed charge within a gel. In addition, we modeled the conduction at the gel-electrolyte interface using the Nernst-Planck electrodiffusion equation and accurately fitted the experimental current-voltage relationships. This study provides some insight into how biological interfaces may function. For example, we suggest that neurotransmitter release during exocytosis could be regulated by voltage-induced accumulation and depletion of ions at the interface between the secretory granule and the fusion pore. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:8534793

  7. Stimulation by ATP of proinsulin to insulin conversion in isolated rat pancreatic islet secretory granules. Association with the ATP-dependent proton pump

    SciTech Connect

    Rhodes, C.J.; Lucas, C.A.; Mutkoski, R.L.; Orci, L.; Halban, P.A.

    1987-08-05

    Isolated rat pancreatic islets were pulse-labeled for 5 min with (/sup 3/H)leucine then chased for 25 min, during which time endogenously labeled (/sup 3/H)proinsulin becomes predominantly compartmented in immature secretory granules. The islets were then homogenized in isotonic sucrose (pH 7.4) and a beta-granule preparation obtained by differential centrifugation and discontinuous sucrose gradient ultracentrifugation. This preparation was enriched 8-fold in beta-granules. Aside from contamination with mitochondria and a limited number of lysosomes, the beta-granule preparation was essentially free of any other organelles involved in proinsulin synthesis and packaging (i.e. microsomal elements and, more particularly, Golgi complex). Conversion of endogenously labeled (/sup 3/H)proinsulin was followed in this beta-granule fraction for up to 2 h at 37 degrees C in a buffer (pH 7.3) that mimicked the cationic constituents of B-cell cytosol, during which time 92% of the beta-granules remained intact. Proinsulin conversion was analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography. The rate of proinsulin conversion to insulin was stimulated by 2.2 +/- 0.1-fold (n = 6) (at a 60-min incubation) in the presence of ATP (2 mM) and an ATP regenerating system compared to beta-granule preparations incubated without ATP. This ATP stimulation was abolished in the presence of beta-granule proton pump ATPase inhibitors (tributyltin, 2.5 microM, or 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide, 50 microM). Inhibitors of mitochondrial proton pump ATPases had no effect on the ATP stimulation of proinsulin conversion. When granules were incubated in a more acidic buffer, proinsulin conversion was increased relative to that at pH 7.3. At pH 5.5, ATP no longer stimulated conversion, and tributyltin and 1,3-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide had no effect.

  8. Iron granules in plasma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Cook, M K; Madden, M

    1982-01-01

    The curious and unusual finding of coarse iron granules in marrow plasma cells is reported in 13 patients, in whom the finding was incidental. In 10 of these patients there was known alcohol abuse and serious medical complications of that abuse. Previous reports of the finding are reviewed. Haematological data of the 13 patients are presented. A hypothesis is outlined which may account for the finding. Images PMID:7068907

  9. The organization of the secretory machinery in chromaffin cells as a major factor in modeling exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva, José; Torregrosa-Hetland, Cristina J.; Gil, Amparo; González-Vélez, Virginia; Segura, Javier; Viniegra, Salvador; Gutiérrez, Luis M.

    2010-01-01

    The organization of cytoplasm in excitable cells was a largely ignored factor when mathematical models were developed to understand intracellular calcium and secretory behavior. Here we employed a combination of fluorescent evanescent and transmitted light microscopy to explore the F-actin cytoskeletal organization in the vicinity of secretory sites in cultured bovine chromaffin cells. This technique and confocal fluorescent microscopy show chromaffin granules associated with the borders of cortical cytoskeletal cages forming an intricate tridimensional network. Furthermore, the overexpression of SNAP-25 in these cells also reveals the association of secretory machinery clusters with the borders of these cytoskeletal cages. The importance of these F-actin cage borders is stressed when granules appear to interact and remain associated during exocytosis visualized in acridin orange loaded vesicles. These results will prompt us to propose a model of cytoskeletal cages, where the secretory machinery is associated with its borders. Both the calcium level and the secretory response are enhanced in this geometrical arrangement when compared with a random distribution of the secretory machinery that is not restricted to the borders of the cage. PMID:20885775

  10. Low-molecular-weight constituents of isolated insulin-secretory granules. Bivalent cations, adenine nucleotides and inorganic phosphate.

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, J C; Penn, E J; Peshavaria, M

    1983-01-01

    The concentrations of Zn2+, Ca2+, Mg2+, Pi and adenine nucleotides were determined in insulin-secretory granules prepared from a transplantable rat insulinoma. Differential and density-gradient centrifugation analyses revealed that Zn2+ in this tissue was principally localized in the secretory granule, a second major fraction being found in association with cytosolic proteins. Pi was principally recovered in the latter fraction, whereas Ca2+ and Mg2+ were more widely distributed. Intragranular ion-distribution experiments suggested that Zn2+ was complexed mainly to insulin and its precursor forms and remained in the granule in an insoluble state. The Zn2+/insulin ratio (0.54) was greater than that expected for insulin molecules having two centrally co-ordinated Zn2+ atoms/hexamer, but less than the maximal Zn2+-binding capacity of the molecule. Most of the granular Ca2+, Mg2+ and Pi was released in a soluble form when granules were disrupted by sonication. Simulation in vitro of the ionic composition of the granule suggested that up to 90% of its Ca2+ was complexed to Pi and adenine nucleotides. Granular macromolecules also bound Ca2+, as shown by equilibrium-dialysis studies of granule lysates. However, such binding was displaced by Mg2+. Examination of the efflux of Ca2+ from granules incubated in iso-osmotic suspensions at 37 degrees C suggested that the passive permeability of the granule membrane to Ca2+ was very low. Nevertheless, more than 50% of the granular Ca2+ was rapidly released in an ionized form on hypo-osmotic or detergent-induced disruption of the granule membrane. This may represent a potentially mobilizable pool of Ca2+ in vivo. PMID:6344863

  11. Biogenesis of the Secretory Granule: Chromogranin a Coiled-Coil Structure Results in Unusual Physical Properties And Suggests a Mechanism for Granule Core Condensation

    SciTech Connect

    Mosley, C.A.; Taupenot, L.; Biswas, N.; Taulane, J.P.; Olson, N.H.; Vaingankar, S.M.; Wen, G.; Schork, N.J.; Ziegler, M.G.; Mahata, S.K.; O'Connor, D.T.

    2009-06-03

    The secretory pro-hormone chromogranin A (CHGA) is densely packed into storage granules along with catecholamines, playing a catalytic role in granule biogenesis. 3-Dimensional structural data on CHGA are lacking. We found a superfamily structural homology for CHGA in the tropomyosin family of alpha-helical coiled-coils, even in mid-molecule regions where primary sequence identity is only modest. The assignment was confirmed by an independent algorithm, suggesting approximately 6-7 such domains spanning CHGA. We provide additional physiochemical evidence (chromatographic, spectral, microscopic) consistent with this unusual structure. Alpha-helical secondary structure (at up to approximately 45%) was confirmed by circular dichroism. CHGA molecular mass was estimated by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry at approximately 50 kDa and by denaturing gel filtration at approximately 50-61 kDa, while its native Stokes radius was approximately 84.8 A, as compared to an expected approximately 30 A; the increase gave rise to an apparent native molecular weight of approximately 578 kDa, also consistent with the extended conformation of a coiled-coil. Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) on CHGA in solution best fit an elongated cylindrical conformation in the monodisperse region with a radius of gyration of the rod cross-section (Rt) of approximately 52 A, compatible with a coiled-coil in the hydrated, aqueous state, or a multimeric coiled-coil. Electron microscopy with negative staining revealed an extended, filamentous CHGA structure with a diameter of approximately 94 +/- 4.5 A. Extended, coiled-coil conformation is likely to permit protein 'packing' in the secretory granule at approximately 50% higher density than a globular/spherical conformation. Natural allelic variation in the catestatin region was predicted to disrupt the coiled-coil. Chromaffin granule ultrastructure revealed a approximately 108 +/- 6.3 A periodicity of electron density, suggesting nucleation of a binding

  12. The stealthy nano-machine behind mast cell granule size distribution.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Meilijson, Isaac

    2015-01-01

    The classical model of mast cell secretory granule formation suggests that newly synthesized secretory mediators, transported from the rough endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex, undergo post-transitional modification and are packaged for secretion by condensation within membrane-bound granules of unit size. These unit granules may fuse with other granules to form larger granules that reside in the cytoplasm until secreted. A novel stochastic model for mast cell granule growth and elimination (G&E) as well as inventory management is presented. Resorting to a statistical mechanics approach in which SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) REceptor (SNARE) components are viewed as interacting particles, the G&E model provides a simple 'nano-machine' of SNARE self-aggregation that can perform granule growth and secretion. Granule stock is maintained as a buffer to meet uncertainty in demand by the extracellular environment and to serve as source of supply during the lead time to produce granules of adaptive content. Experimental work, mathematical calculations, statistical modeling and a rationale for the emergence of nearly last-in, first out inventory management, are discussed. PMID:24629227

  13. Localization of anionic constituents in mast cell granules of brachymorphic (bm/bm) mice by using avidin-conjugated colloidal gold

    PubMed Central

    Hammel, Ilan; Shoichetman, Tanya; Amihai, Dina; Galli, Stephen J.; Skutelsky, Ehud

    2013-01-01

    We used the egg avidin gold complex as a polycationic probe for the localization of negatively charged sites in the secretory granules of mouse mast cells. We compared the binding of this reagent to mast cell granules in wild-type mice and in congenic brachymorphic mice in which mast cell secretory granules contained undersulfated proteoglycans. We localized anionic sites by post-embedding labeling of thin sections of mouse skin and tongue tissues fixed in Karnovsky's fixative and OsO4 and embedded in Araldite. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the mast cell granules of bm/bm mice had a lower optical density than those of wild-type mice (P<0.001) and a lower adivin gold binding density (by approximately 50%, P<0.001). The latter result provides additional evidence that the contents of mast cell granules in bm/bm mice were less highly sulfated than in those of wild type mice. In both wild type and bm/bm mast cells, the distribution of granule equivalent volumes was multimodal, but the unit granule volume was approximately 19% lower in bm/bm cells than in wild type cells (P < 0.05). Thus, bm/bm mast cells develop secretory granules that differ from those of wild type mice in exhibiting a lower optical density and slightly smaller unit granules, however the processes that contribute to granule maturation and granule-granule fusion in mast cells are operative in the bm/bm cells. PMID:20127366

  14. Annexin A2–dependent actin bundling promotes secretory granule docking to the plasma membrane and exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Gabel, Marion; Delavoie, Franck; Demais, Valérie; Royer, Cathy; Bailly, Yannick; Vitale, Nicolas; Bader, Marie-France

    2015-01-01

    Annexin A2, a calcium-, actin-, and lipid-binding protein involved in exocytosis, mediates the formation of lipid microdomains required for the structural and spatial organization of fusion sites at the plasma membrane. To understand how annexin A2 promotes this membrane remodeling, the involvement of cortical actin filaments in lipid domain organization was investigated. 3D electron tomography showed that cortical actin bundled by annexin A2 connected docked secretory granules to the plasma membrane and contributed to the formation of GM1-enriched lipid microdomains at the exocytotic sites in chromaffin cells. When an annexin A2 mutant with impaired actin filament–bundling activity was expressed, the formation of plasma membrane lipid microdomains and the number of exocytotic events were decreased and the fusion kinetics were slower, whereas the pharmacological activation of the intrinsic actin-bundling activity of endogenous annexin A2 had the opposite effects. Thus, annexin A2–induced actin bundling is apparently essential for generating active exocytotic sites. PMID:26323692

  15. Subcellular distribution of docking/fusion proteins in neutrophils, secretory cells with multiple exocytic compartments.

    PubMed

    Brumell, J H; Volchuk, A; Sengelov, H; Borregaard, N; Cieutat, A M; Bainton, D F; Grinstein, S; Klip, A

    1995-12-15

    Neutrophils contain at least four distinct types of secretory organelles, which undergo exocytosis during infection and inflammation. The signaling pathways leading to secretion of individual granules and their kinetics of exocytosis vary greatly, causing temporal and regional differences in docking and fusion with the plasma membrane. As a step toward understanding the processes underlying differential granular secretion in neutrophils, we assessed the presence and distribution of a number of proteins reported to be involved in vesicular docking and/or fusion in other systems. Specific Abs were used for immunoblotting of cells fractionated by density gradients and free-flow electrophoresis, and for localization by confocal immunofluorescence and electron microscopy. Syntaxin 1, VAMP (vesicle-associated membrane protein)-1, synaptosome-associated protein-25 (SNAP-25), synaptophysin, and cellubrevin were not detectable in human neutrophils. In contrast, syntaxin 4, VAMP-2, and the 39-kDa isoform of secretory carrier membrane protein (SCAMP) were present. SCAMP was found mainly in secondary and tertiary granules and in a fraction containing secretory vesicles, but was virtually absent from the primary (lysosomal) granules. This profile is consistent with the proposed "post-Golgi" distribution of SCAMP. VAMP-2 was largely absent from primary and secondary granules, but concentrated in tertiary granules and secretory vesicles. This pattern of distribution parallels the increasing sensitivity of these exocytic compartments to intracellular free calcium. Accordingly, ionomycin induced translocation of VAMP-2 toward the plasma membrane. Syntaxin 4 was found almost exclusively in the plasma membrane, and it accumulated in lamellipodia of migrating cells. This regional accumulation may contribute to localized secretion into the phagosomal lumen. PMID:7499863

  16. Stimulation of mast cells leads to cholesterol accumulation in macrophages in vitro by a mast cell granule-mediated uptake of low density lipoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    Kokkonen, J.O.; Kovanen, P.T.

    1987-04-01

    The uptake of low density lipoprotein (LDL) by cultured mouse macrophages was markedly promoted by isolated rat mast cell granules present in the culture medium. The granule-mediated uptake of /sup 125/I-LDL enhanced the rate of cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages, the result being accumulation of cholesteryl esters in these cells. Binding of LDL to the granules was essential for the granule-mediated uptake of LDL by macrophages, for the uptake process was prevented by treating the granules with avidin or protamine chloride or by treating LDL with 1,2-cyclohexanedione, all of which inhibit the binding of LDL to the granules. Inhibition of granule phagocytosis by the macrophages with cytochalasin B also abolished the granule-mediated uptake of LDL. Finally, mouse macrophage monolayers and LDL were incubated in the presence of isolated rat serosal mast cells. Stimulation of the mast cells with compound 48/80, a degranulating agent, resulted in dose-dependent release of secretory granules from the mast cells and a parallel increase in /sup 14/C cholesteryl ester synthesis in the macrophages. The results show that, in this in vitro model, the sequence of events leading to accumulation of cholesteryl esters in macrophages involves initial stimulation of mast cells, subsequent release of their secretory granules, binding of LDL to the exocytosed granules, and, finally, phagocytosis of the LDL-containing granules by macrophages.

  17. Oligomerization of green fluorescent protein in the secretory pathway of endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, R K; Joyce, P B; Molinete, M; Halban, P A; Gorr, S U

    2001-01-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) is used extensively as a reporter protein to monitor cellular processes, including intracellular protein trafficking and secretion. In general, this approach depends on GFP acting as a passive reporter protein. However, it was recently noted that GFP oligomerizes in the secretory pathway of endocrine cells. To characterize this oligomerization and its potential role in GFP transport, cytosolic and secretory forms of enhanced GFP (EGFP) were expressed in GH4C1 and AtT-20 endocrine cells. Biochemical analysis showed that cytosolic EGFP existed as a 27 kDa monomer, whereas secretory forms of EGFP formed disulphide-linked oligomers. EGFP contains two cysteine residues (Cys(49) and Cys(71)), which could play a role in this oligomerization. Site-directed mutagenesis of Cys(49) and Cys(71) showed that both cysteine residues were involved in disulphide interactions. Substitution of either cysteine residue resulted in a reduction or loss of oligomers, although dimers of the secretory form of EGFP remained. Mutation of these residues did not adversely affect the fluorescence of EGFP. EGFP oligomers were stored in secretory granules and secreted by the regulated secretory pathway in endocrine AtT-20 cells. Similarly, the dimeric mutant forms of EGFP were still secreted via the regulated secretory pathway, indicating that the higher-order oligomers were not necessary for sorting in AtT-20 cells. These results suggest that the oligomerization of EGFP must be considered when the protein is used as a reporter molecule in the secretory pathway. PMID:11736655

  18. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    PubMed

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity. PMID:27262873

  19. Localization of human intestinal defensin 5 in Paneth cell granules.

    PubMed Central

    Porter, E M; Liu, L; Oren, A; Anton, P A; Ganz, T

    1997-01-01

    Antibiotic peptides of higher animals include the defensins, first discovered in phagocytic cells but recently also found to be produced by epithelial cells. We biosynthesized recombinant human intestinal defensin 5 (rHD-5) using the baculovirus-insect cell expression system. Since insect cells process defensin incompletely and secrete the precursor proHD-5, we substituted a methionine for an alanine at a likely processing site to allow selective chemical cleavage with cyanogen bromide, and rHD-5 was used to elicit polyclonal antibodies. By the immunoperoxidase-staining technique, the antibodies selectively stained Paneth cells of the normal adult small intestine. Immunogold electron microscopy further localized HD-5 to the Paneth cell secretory granules. Since some defensins exert activity cytotoxic to mammalian cells, we assayed the effect of rHD-5 on the human intestinal cell lines Caco2 and Int407. proHD-5 did not exert cytotoxic activity, and rHD-5 showed only minimal activity against Int407 and was inert against Caco2. Since Paneth cells release their granules adjacent to the mitotic cells of the intestinal crypts, HD could protect this cell population against invasion and parasitization by microbes. PMID:9169779

  20. Studies on the pH gradient and histamine uptake of isolated mast cell granules

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1986-05-01

    A purified preparation of mast cell granules with intact perigranular membranes was obtained using a method involving probe sonication of rat serosal mast cells followed by differential centrifugation and Percoll gradient separation of the granules. Purification was assessed with histamine and mast cell granule protease assays. Granule integrity was demonstrated by light and electron microscopy and quantitated with a ruthenium red binding assay. The low yield of granules (20 ..mu..g protein/4 rats) necessitated the development of two microanalytical techniques to demonstrate the existence of a pH gradient across the membrane: 9-aminoacridine fluorescence studies in a cuvet with 50 ..mu..l capacity and /sup 14/C-methylamine distribution studies on microgram quantities of granule protein. Quantitation of results from isotope studies were confounded by the presence of oil used for separating granules from the aqueous phase. Nonetheless, an extrapolation procedure calibrated by external pH yielded an internal pH value of 5.46 +/- .03 (n = 4), consistent with values observed in granules obtained from other secretory cells. Collapse of the pH gradient by NH/sub 4//sup +/ or nigericin/KCl was demonstrated using either technique. Addition of histamine depressed intragranular pH, suggesting that histamine transport may utilize the ..delta..pH as a driving force.

  1. Tracheobronchial epithelium of the sheep: IV. Lectin histochemical characterization of secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mariassy, A T; Plopper, C G; St George, J A; Wilson, D W

    1988-09-01

    Conventional histochemical characterization of the mucus secretory apparatus is often difficult to reconcile with the biochemical analysis of respiratory secretions. This study was designed to examine the secretory glycoconjugates in airways using lectins with biochemically defined affinities for main sugar residues of mucus. We used five biotinylated lectins--DBA (Dolichos biflorus) and SBA (Glycine max) for N-acetyl galactosamine (galNAc), BSA I (Bandeiraea simplicifolia) and PNA (Arachis hypogea) for galactose (gal), and UEA I (Ulex europeus)--for detection of fucose (fuc) in HgCl2-fixed, paraffin-embedded, serially sectioned trachea, lobar and segmental bronchi and bronchioles of nine sheep. Lectins selectively localized the carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, on epithelial cell surfaces, and in secretory cells. In proximal airways, the major carbohydrate residues in luminal secretions, cell surfaces, goblet cells, and glands were fuc and gal-NAc. PNA reacted mainly with apical granules of less than 10% of goblet cells, and gal residues were only detected in some of the mucous cells and on basolateral cell surfaces. Distal airways contained sparse secretion in the lumen, mucous cells contained weakly reactive fuc and gal-NAc, and the epithelial surfaces of Clara cells contained gal. Sugars abundant in the airway secretions were also the major component of cells in glands. We conclude that there is a correlation between specific sugar residues in secretory cells, glycocalyx, and luminal secretions in proximal and distal airways. This suggests that lectins may be used to obtain information about airway secretory cell composition from respiratory secretions. PMID:3189886

  2. Vesicle Associated Membrane Protein 8 (VAMP8)-mediated Zymogen Granule Exocytosis Is Dependent on Endosomal Trafficking via the Constitutive-Like Secretory Pathway*

    PubMed Central

    Messenger, Scott W; Falkowski, Michelle A.; Thomas, Diana D. H.; Jones, Elaina K.; Hong, Wanjin; Giasano, Herbert Y.; Boulis, Nicholas M.; Groblewski, Guy E.

    2014-01-01

    Acinar cell zymogen granules (ZG) express 2 isoforms of the vesicle-associated membrane protein family (VAMP2 and -8) thought to regulate exocytosis. Expression of tetanus toxin to cleave VAMP2 in VAMP8 knock-out (−/−) acini confirmed that VAMP2 and -8 are the primary VAMPs for regulated exocytosis, each contributing ∼50% of the response. Analysis of VAMP8−/− acini indicated that although stimulated secretion was significantly reduced, a compensatory increase in constitutive secretion maintained total secretion equivalent to wild type (WT). Using a perifusion system to follow secretion over time revealed VAMP2 mediates an early rapid phase peaking and falling within 2–3 min, whereas VAMP8 controls a second prolonged phase that peaks at 4 min and slowly declines over 20 min to support the protracted secretory response. VAMP8−/− acini show increased expression of the endosomal proteins Ti-VAMP7 (2-fold) and Rab11a (4-fold) and their redistribution from endosomes to ZGs. Expression of GDP-trapped Rab11a-S25N inhibited secretion exclusively from the VAMP8 but not the VAMP2 pathway. VAMP8−/− acini also showed a >90% decrease in the early endosomal proteins Rab5/D52/EEA1, which control anterograde trafficking in the constitutive-like secretory pathway. In WT acini, short term (14–16 h) culture also results in a >90% decrease in Rab5/D52/EEA1 and a complete loss of the VAMP8 pathway, whereas VAMP2-secretion remains intact. Remarkably, rescue of Rab5/D52/EEA1 expression restored the VAMP8 pathway. Expressed D52 shows extensive colocalization with Rab11a and VAMP8 and partially copurifies with ZG fractions. These results indicate that robust trafficking within the constitutive-like secretory pathway is required for VAMP8- but not VAMP2-mediated ZG exocytosis. PMID:25138214

  3. An aspartyl cathepsin, CTH3, is essential for proprotein processing during secretory granule maturation in Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Santosh; Briguglio, Joseph S.; Turkewitz, Aaron P.

    2014-01-01

    In Tetrahymena thermophila, peptides secreted via dense-core granules, called mucocysts, are generated by proprotein processing. We used expression profiling to identify candidate processing enzymes, which localized as cyan fluorescent protein fusions to mucocysts. Of note, the aspartyl cathepsin Cth3p plays a key role in mucocyst-based secretion, since knockdown of this gene blocked proteolytic maturation of the entire set of mucocyst proproteins and dramatically reduced mucocyst accumulation. The activity of Cth3p was eliminated by mutation of two predicted active-site mutations, and overexpression of the wild-type gene, but not the catalytic-site mutant, partially rescued a Mendelian mutant defective in mucocyst proprotein processing. Our results provide the first direct evidence for the role of proprotein processing in this system. Of interest, both localization and the CTH3 disruption phenotype suggest that the enzyme provides non–mucocyst-related functions. Phylogenetic analysis of the T. thermophila cathepsins, combined with prior work on the role of sortilin receptors in mucocyst biogenesis, suggests that repurposing of lysosomal enzymes was an important step in the evolution of secretory granules in ciliates. PMID:24943840

  4. Vaccine adjuvants: Tailor-made mast-cell granules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunzer, Matthias

    2012-03-01

    Mast cells induce protective immune responses through secretion of stimulatory granules. Microparticles modelled after mast-cell granules are now shown to replicate and enhance the functions of their natural counterparts and to direct the character of the resulting immunity.

  5. Monoclonal Antibodies as Probes for Unique Antigens in Secretory Cells of Mixed Exocrine Organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basbaum, C. B.; Mann, J. K.; Chow, A. W.; Finkbeiner, W. E.

    1984-07-01

    In the past, it has been difficult to identify the secretory product and control mechanisms associated with individual cell types making up mixed exocrine organs. This report establishes the feasibility of using immunological methods to characterize both the biochemical constituents and regulatory mechanisms associated with secretory cells in the trachea. Monoclonal antibodies directed against components of tracheal mucus were produced by immunizing mice with dialyzed, desiccated secretions harvested from tracheal organ culture. An immunofluorescence assay revealed that of the total 337 hybridomas screened, 100 produced antibodies recognizing goblet cell granules; 64, gland cell granules; and 3, antigen confined to the ciliated apical surface of the epithelium. The tracheal goblet cell antibody described in this report was strongly cross-reactive with intestinal goblet cells, as well as with a subpopulation of submandibular gland cells, but not with cells of Brunner's glands or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The serous cell antibody was not cross-reactive with goblet, Brunner's gland, or submandibular cells, or the ciliated cell apical membrane. The antibody directed against the apical membrane of ciliated cells did not cross-react with gland or goblet cells or the apical membrane of epithelial cells in the duodenum. Monoclonal antibodies, therefore, represent probes by which products unique to specific cells or parts of cells in the trachea can be distinguished. The antibodies, when used in enzyme immunoassays, can be used to quantitatively monitor secretion by individual cell types under a variety of physiological and pathological conditions. They also provide the means for purification and characterization of cell-specific products by immunoaffinity chromatography.

  6. PTEN deletion from adult-generated dentate granule cells disrupts granule cell mossy fiber axon structure

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; Santos, Victor R; Danzer, Steve C.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of the mTOR-signaling pathway is implicated in the development of temporal lobe epilepsy. In mice, deletion of PTEN from hippocampal dentate granule cells leads to mTOR hyperactivation and promotes the rapid onset of spontaneous seizures. The mechanism by which these abnormal cells initiate epileptogenesis, however, is unclear. PTEN-knockout granule cells develop abnormally, exhibiting morphological features indicative of increased excitatory input. If these cells are directly responsible for seizure genesis, it follows that they should also possess increased output. To test this prediction, dentate granule cell axon morphology was quantified in control and PTEN-knockout mice. Unexpectedly, PTEN deletion increased giant mossy fiber bouton spacing along the axon length, suggesting reduced innervation of CA3. Increased width of the mossy fiber axon pathway in stratum lucidum, however, which likely reflects an unusual increase in mossy fiber axon collateralization in this region, offset the reduction in boutons per axon length. These morphological changes predicts a net increase in granule cell >> CA3 innervation. Increased diameter of axons from PTEN-knockout cells would further enhance granule cell >> CA3 communication. Altogether, these findings suggest that amplified information flow through the hippocampal circuit contributes to seizure occurrence in the PTEN-knockout mouse model of temporal lobe epilepsy. PMID:25600212

  7. Cell-specific analysis of tracheobronchial secretory cells and secretions

    SciTech Connect

    Finkbeiner, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    In these studies, two methods (cell culture and monoclonal antibody production) that allowed cell-specific analysis of tracheobronchial secretion were used. Bovine tracheal submucosal gland cells were isolated, placed into culture and serially propagated. In culture, the cells maintained features of serous cells. The cells incorporated {sup 35}S into high molecular weight molecules. {beta}-adrenergic agonists stimulated release of radiolabeled molecules and elevations in intracellular cAMP levels, responses that could be blocked by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. Cyclic AMP appeared to be involved in the stimulus-secretion coupling events in serous cells since the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine potentiated the effects of isoproterenol on the secretory response and the elevation of intracellular cAMP levels. Furthermore, cAMP analogues elicited a secretory response in the absence of cAMP. The phosphorylation state of several cytosolic and particulate phosphoproteins was altered by cAMP-activated kinase activity. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against human airway secretions.

  8. Functional and structural characterization of a dense core secretory granule sorting domain from the PC1/3 protease

    PubMed Central

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D.; Di Lello, Paola; Lacombe, Marie-Josée; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Legault, Pascale; Reudelhuber, Timothy L.; Omichinski, James G.

    2009-01-01

    Several peptide hormones are initially synthesized as inactive precursors. It is only on entry of these prohormones and their processing proteases into dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) that the precursors are cleaved to generate their active forms. Prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 is a processing protease that is targeted to DCSGs. The signal for targeting PC1/3 to DCSGs resides in its carboxy-terminal tail (PC1/3617–753), where 3 regions (PC1/3617–625, PC1/3665–682, and PC1/3711–753) are known to aid in sorting and membrane association. In this article, we have determined a high-resolution structure of the extreme carboxy-terminal sorting domain, PC1/3711–753 in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. PC1/3711–753 contains 2 alpha helices located between residues 722–728 and 738–750. Functional assays demonstrate that the second helix (PC1/3738–750) is necessary and sufficient to target a constitutively secreted protein to granules, and that L745 anchors a hydrophobic patch that is critical for sorting. Also, we demonstrate that calcium binding by the second helix of PC1/3711–753 promotes aggregation of the domain via the hydrophobic patch centered on L745. These results provide a structure-function analysis of a DCSG-sorting domain, and reveal the importance of a hydrophobic patch and calcium binding in controlling the sorting of proteins containing alpha helices to DCSGs. PMID:19376969

  9. Functional and structural characterization of a dense core secretory granule sorting domain from the PC1/3 protease.

    PubMed

    Dikeakos, Jimmy D; Di Lello, Paola; Lacombe, Marie-Josée; Ghirlando, Rodolfo; Legault, Pascale; Reudelhuber, Timothy L; Omichinski, James G

    2009-05-01

    Several peptide hormones are initially synthesized as inactive precursors. It is only on entry of these prohormones and their processing proteases into dense core secretory granules (DCSGs) that the precursors are cleaved to generate their active forms. Prohormone convertase (PC)1/3 is a processing protease that is targeted to DCSGs. The signal for targeting PC1/3 to DCSGs resides in its carboxy-terminal tail (PC1/3(617-753)), where 3 regions (PC1/3(617-625), PC1/3(665-682), and PC1/3(711-753)) are known to aid in sorting and membrane association. In this article, we have determined a high-resolution structure of the extreme carboxy-terminal sorting domain, PC1/3(711-753) in micelles by NMR spectroscopy. PC1/3(711-753) contains 2 alpha helices located between residues 722-728 and 738-750. Functional assays demonstrate that the second helix (PC1/3(738-750)) is necessary and sufficient to target a constitutively secreted protein to granules, and that L(745) anchors a hydrophobic patch that is critical for sorting. Also, we demonstrate that calcium binding by the second helix of PC1/3(711-753) promotes aggregation of the domain via the hydrophobic patch centered on L(745). These results provide a structure-function analysis of a DCSG-sorting domain, and reveal the importance of a hydrophobic patch and calcium binding in controlling the sorting of proteins containing alpha helices to DCSGs. PMID:19376969

  10. [Physiology of secretory cells in the mouse mammary gland].

    PubMed

    Tolkunov, Iu A; Markov, A G

    2000-08-01

    Secretory cells' membrane potential and transepithelial potential difference in the mouse mammary gland diminish within 2.5 hours following breast-feeding of the litter. The transepithelial resistance for up to 20 hours after the feeding did not drop below 40-70 k omega. The secret pressure in the mammary gland does not grow during this period. Therefore an increase of interval between litter feeding up to 20 hours does not entail any mechanical lesion of the secretory epithelium. The latter's cells seem to secrete organic and inorganic substances in concentrations which do not change significantly during their transfer along the outgoing ducts. PMID:11059022

  11. Single granule cells excite Golgi cells and evoke feedback inhibition in the cochlear nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yaeger, Daniel B; Trussell, Laurence O

    2015-03-18

    In cerebellum-like circuits, synapses from thousands of granule cells converge onto principal cells. This fact, combined with theoretical considerations, has led to the concept that granule cells encode afferent input as a population and that spiking in individual granule cells is relatively unimportant. However, granule cells also provide excitatory input to Golgi cells, each of which provide inhibition to hundreds of granule cells. We investigated whether spiking in individual granule cells could recruit Golgi cells and thereby trigger widespread inhibition in slices of mouse cochlear nucleus. Using paired whole-cell patch-clamp recordings, trains of action potentials at 100 Hz in single granule cells was sufficient to evoke spikes in Golgi cells in ∼40% of paired granule-to-Golgi cell recordings. High-frequency spiking in single granule cells evoked IPSCs in ∼5% of neighboring granule cells, indicating that bursts of activity in single granule cells can recruit feedback inhibition from Golgi cells. Moreover, IPSPs mediated by single Golgi cell action potentials paused granule cell firing, suggesting that inhibitory events recruited by activity in single granule cells were able to control granule cell firing. These results suggest a previously unappreciated relationship between population coding and bursting in single granule cells by which spiking in a small number of granule cells may have an impact on the activity of a much larger number of granule cells. PMID:25788690

  12. Genetic deletion of Rab27B in pancreatic acinar cells affects granules size and has inhibitory effects on amylase secretion.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yanan; Ernst, Stephen A; Lentz, Stephen I; Williams, John A

    2016-03-18

    Small G protein Rab27B is expressed in various secretory cell types and plays a role in mediating secretion. In pancreatic acinar cells, Rab27B was found to be expressed on the zymogen granule membrane and by overexpression to regulate the secretion of zymogen granules. However, the effect of Rab27B deletion on the physiology of pancreatic acinar cells is unknown. In the current study, we utilized the Rab27B KO mouse model to better understand the role of Rab27B in the secretion of pancreatic acinar cells. Our data show that Rab27B deficiency had no obvious effects on the expression of major digestive enzymes and other closely related proteins, e.g. similar small G proteins, such as Rab3D and Rab27A, and putative downstream effectors. The overall morphology of acinar cells was not changed in the knockout pancreas. However, the size of zymogen granules was decreased in KO acinar cells, suggesting a role of Rab27B in regulating the maturation of secretory granules. The secretion of digestive enzymes was moderately decreased in KO acini, compared with the WT control. These data indicate that Rab27B is involved at a different steps of zymogen granule maturation and secretion, which is distinct from that of Rab3D. PMID:26845357

  13. Formation of secretory vesicles in permeabilized cells: a salt extract from yeast membranes promotes budding of nascent secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network of endocrine cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ling, W L; Shields, D

    1996-01-01

    The mechanism of secretory-vesicle formation from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) of endocrine cells is poorly understood. To identify cytosolic activities that facilitate the formation and fission of nascent secretory vesicles, we treated permeabilized pituitary GH3 cells with high salt to remove endogenous budding factors. Using this cell preparation, secretory-vesicle budding from the TGN required addition of exogenous cytosol and energy. Mammalian cytosols (GH3 cells and bovine brain) promoted post-TGN vesicle formation. Most significantly, a salt extract of membranes from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a cell lacking a regulated secretory pathway, stimulated secretory vesicle budding in the absence of mammalian cytosolic factors. These results demonstrate that the factors which promote secretory-vesicle release from the TGN are conserved between yeast and mammalian cells. PMID:8615761

  14. Cytochemical calcium distribution in secretory ameloblasts of the rat in relation to enamel mineralization.

    PubMed

    Chen, S; Eisenmann, D R; Zaki, A E; Ashrafi, S H

    1986-01-01

    Calcium distribution in secretory ameloblasts was studied in rat incisor enamel in which mineralization was temporarily disturbed by injection of either fluoride or cobalt. Pyroantimonate precipitates of calcium were analysed morphometrically in regions of the cell membranes, mitochondria and secretory granules. The disturbances in mineralization were characterized by accumulations of unmineralized enamel matrix at the secretory regions of Tomes' process within 1 h after injection. Fluoride-induced disturbances in mineralization were not accompanied by marked changes in calcium concentration and distribution. It may be that fluoride causes alterations in the synthesis and secretion of the organic matrix which affects its ability to mineralize. Secretory ameloblasts treated with cobalt showed a broad basis for interference with calcium, in particular that which is associated with cell membranes and secretory granules. Secretory ameloblasts may be actively controlling the availability of calcium to enamel by mechanisms involving the cell membrane as well as the secretory granules. PMID:3739601

  15. Pancreatic β-Cell Adaptive Plasticity in Obesity Increases Insulin Production but Adversely Affects Secretory Function.

    PubMed

    Alarcon, Cristina; Boland, Brandon B; Uchizono, Yuji; Moore, Patrick C; Peterson, Bryan; Rajan, Suryalekha; Rhodes, Olivia S; Noske, Andrew B; Haataja, Leena; Arvan, Peter; Marsh, Bradly J; Austin, Jotham; Rhodes, Christopher J

    2016-02-01

    Pancreatic β-cells normally produce adequate insulin to control glucose homeostasis, but in obesity-related diabetes, there is a presumed deficit in insulin production and secretory capacity. In this study, insulin production was assessed directly in obese diabetic mouse models, and proinsulin biosynthesis was found to be contrastingly increased, coupled with a significant expansion of the rough endoplasmic reticulum (without endoplasmic reticulum stress) and Golgi apparatus, increased vesicular trafficking, and a depletion of mature β-granules. As such, β-cells have a remarkable capacity to produce substantial quantities of insulin in obesity, which are then made available for immediate secretion to meet increased metabolic demand, but this comes at the price of insulin secretory dysfunction. Notwithstanding, it can be restored. Upon exposing isolated pancreatic islets of obese mice to normal glucose concentrations, β-cells revert back to their typical morphology with restoration of regulated insulin secretion. These data demonstrate an unrealized dynamic adaptive plasticity of pancreatic β-cells and underscore the rationale for transient β-cell rest as a treatment strategy for obesity-linked diabetes. PMID:26307586

  16. COMPARABLE OUTCOMES IN NON-SECRETORY AND SECRETORY MULTIPLE MYELOMA AFTER AUTOLOGOUS STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Pérez, Waleska S.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Ballen, Karen; Bashey, Asad; To, L. Bik; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Elfenbein, Gerald J.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Kyle, Robert A.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Milone, Gustavo A.; Moreb, Jan S.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Reece, Donna E.; Vesole, David H.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hari, Parameswaran

    2008-01-01

    Non-secretory myeloma (NSM) accounts for <5% of cases of multiple myeloma (MM). The outcome of these patients following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has not been evaluated in clinical trials. We compared the outcomes after ASCT for patients with NSM reported to the CIBMTR between 1989 and 2003, to a matched group of 438 patients (4 controls for each patient) with secretory myeloma (SM). The patients were matched using propensity scores calculated using age, Durie-Salmon stage, sensitivity to pre-transplant therapy, time from diagnosis to transplant and year of transplant. Disease characteristics were similar in both groups at diagnosis and at transplant except higher risk of anemia, hypoalbuminemia and marrow plasmacytosis (in SM) and plasmacytoma (more in NSM). Cumulative incidence of TRM, relapse, PFS and OS were similar between the groups. In multivariate analysis, based on a Cox model stratified on matched pairs and adjusted for covariates not considered in the propensity score, we found no difference in outcome between the NSM and SM groups. In this large cohort of patients undergoing ASCT, we found no difference in outcomes of patients with NSM compared to those with SM. PMID:18804043

  17. Secretory and basal cells of the epithelium of the tubular glands in the male Mullerian gland of the caecilian Uraeotyphlus narayani (Amphibia: Gymnophiona).

    PubMed

    George, Jancy M; Smita, Matthew; Kadalmani, Balamuthu; Girija, Ramankutty; Oommen, Oommen V; Akbarsha, Mohammad A

    2004-12-01

    Caecilians are exceptional among the vertebrates in that males retain the Mullerian duct as a functional glandular structure. The Mullerian gland on each side is formed from a large number of tubular glands connecting to a central duct, which either connects to the urogenital duct or opens directly into the cloaca. The Mullerian gland is believed to secrete a substance to be added to the sperm during ejaculation. Thus, the Mullerian gland could function as a male accessory reproductive gland. Recently, we described the male Mullerian gland of Uraeotyphlus narayani using light and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and histochemistry. The present TEM study reports that the secretory cells of both the tubular and basal portions of the tubular glands of the male Mullerian gland of this caecilian produce secretion granules in the same manner as do other glandular epithelial cells. The secretion granules are released in the form of structured granules into the lumen of the tubular glands, and such granules are traceable to the lumen of the central duct of the Mullerian gland. This is comparable to the situation prevailing in the epididymal epithelium of several reptiles. In the secretory cells of the basal portion of the tubular glands, mitochondria are intimately associated with fabrication of the secretion granules. The structural and functional organization of the epithelium of the basal portion of the tubular glands is complicated by the presence of basal cells. This study suggests the origin of the basal cells from peritubular tissue leukocytes. The study also indicates a role for the basal cells in acquiring secretion granules from the neighboring secretory cells and processing them into lipofuscin material in the context of regression of the Mullerian gland during the period of reproductive quiescence. In these respects the basal cells match those in the epithelial lining of the epididymis of amniotes. PMID:15487004

  18. Quantification of endocrine cells and ultrastructural study of insulin granules in the large intestine of opossum Didelphis aurita (Wied-Neuwied, 1826).

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Daiane Cristina Marques; Cupertino, Marli do Carmo; Fialho, Maria do Carmo Queiroz; Barbosa, Alfredo Jose Afonso; Fonseca, Cláudio Cesar; Sartori, Sirlene Souza Rodrigues; da Matta, Sérgio Luis Pinto

    2014-02-01

    This study aimed to investigate the distribution of argyrophil, argentaffin, and insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the large intestine of opossums (Didelphis aurita) and to describe the ultrastructure of the secretory granules of insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells. Fragments of the large intestine of 10 male specimens of D. aurita were collected, processed, and subjected to staining, immunohistochemistry, and transmission electron microscopy. The argyrophil, the argentaffin, and the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were sparsely distributed in the intestinal glands of the mucous layer, among other cell types of the epithelium in all regions studied. Proportionally, the argyrophil, the argentaffin, and the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells represented 62.75%, 36.26%, and 0.99% of the total determined endocrine cells of the large intestine, respectively. Quantitatively, there was no difference between the argyrophil and the argentaffin endocrine cells, whereas insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were less numerous. The insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were elongated or pyramidal, with rounded nuclei of irregularly contoured, and large amounts of secretory granules distributed throughout the cytoplasm. The granules have different sizes and electron densities and are classified as immature and mature, with the mature granules in predominant form in the overall granular population. In general, the granule is shown with an external electron-lucent halo and electron-dense core. The ultrastructure pattern in the granules of the insulin-immunoreactive endocrine cells was similar to that of the B cells of pancreatic islets in rats. PMID:24359801

  19. Evidence for recognition of novel islet T cell antigens by granule-specific T cell lines from new onset type 1 diabetic patients

    PubMed Central

    Tree, T I M; O'Byrne, D; Tremble, J M; Macfarlane, W M; Haskins, K; James, R F L; Docherty, K; Hutton, J C; Banga, J P

    2000-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease where a number of islet β-cell target autoantigens have been characterized on the basis of reactivity with autoantibodies. Nevertheless, there remains uncertainty of the nature of another group of autoantigens associated with the secretory granule fraction of islet β-cells that appear to be targeted predominantly by autoreactive T cells. We have previously characterized CD4+, HLA-DR-restricted T cell lines from new onset type 1 diabetic patients that are specific for the secretory granule fraction of rat tumour insulinoma, RIN. The T cell line from the first patient, HS, proliferates in response to crude microsomal membranes prepared from a recently established, pure human islet β-cell line NES2Y. In addition, the HS line also responds to secretory granule fractions prepared from a murine tumour insulinoma grown in RIP-Tag mice, showing the recognition of species-conserved antigen(s) in β-cells. Using partially matched antigen-presenting cells, the HS T cells and another line derived from a second patient, MR, were shown to be restricted by disease-associated DRB1*0101 and DRB1*0404 alleles, respectively. Neither the HS or MR T cell lines proliferate in response to a large panel of candidate islet cell antigens, including insulin, proinsulin, glutamic acid decarboxylase, the protein tyrosine phosphatase IA-2/phogrin, imogen-38, ICA69 or hsp60. Our data provide compelling evidence of the presence of a group of antigens associated with the secretory granule fraction of islet β-cells recognized by the T cell lines, whose definition may contribute to our knowledge of disease induction as well as to diagnosis. PMID:10886245

  20. Secretory glycoconjugates of a mucin-synthesizing human colonic adenocarcinoma cell line. Analysis using double labeling with lectins.

    PubMed

    Phillips, T E; Frisch, E B

    1990-01-01

    Lectins were used to characterize mucin glycoproteins and other secretory glycoconjugates synthesized by a human colon adenocarcinoma-derived cell line which expresses a goblet cell phenotype. Despite being clonally derived, HT29-18N2 (N2) cells, like normal goblet cells in situ were heterogeneous in their glycosylation of mucin. Only wheat-germ agglutinin, which recognizes N-acetylglucosamine and sialic acid residues, and succinylated wheatgerm agglutinin, which binds N-acetylglucosamine, stained the contents of all secretory granules in all N2 goblet cells. The N-acetylgalactosamine binding lectins Dolichos biflorus and Glycine max stained 20% and 21% of N2 goblet cells respectively. Ricinus communis I, a galactose-binding lectin, stained 67% of N2 goblet cells although staining by another galactose-binding lectin, Bandeiraea simplicifolia I, was limited to 19%. Peanut agglutinin, a lectin whose Gal(beta 1-3)GalNAc binding site is not present on mucins produced in the normal colon but which is found on most mucins of cancerous colonic epithelia, stained 68% of the cells. Ulex europeus I, a fucose-binding lectin, did not stain any N2 goblet cells. Four lectins (Lens culinaris, Pisum sativum, Phaseolus vulgaris E, Phaseolus vulgaris L) which recognize sugars normally present only in N-linked oligosaccharides stained up to 38% of N2 goblet cells. The binding of these lectins indicates either both O-linked and N-linked oligosaccharide chains are present on the mucin protein backbone or the co-existence of non-mucin N-linked glycoproteins and O-linked mucins within the goblet cell secretory granule. PMID:2312359

  1. Differential localization of prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 in two distinct types of secretory granules in rat pituitary gonadotrophs.

    PubMed

    Uehara, M; Yaoi, Y; Suzuki, M; Takata, K; Tanaka, S

    2001-04-01

    Prohormone convertases PC1 and PC2 are endoproteases involved in prohormone cleavage at pairs of basic amino acids. There is a report that prohormone convertase exists in the rat anterior pituitary gonadotrophs, where it had previously been considered that proprotein processing does not take place. In addition to luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, rat pituitary gonadotrophs contain chromogranin A (CgA) and secretogranin II (SgII), two members of the family of granin proteins, which have proteolytic sites in their molecules. In the present study we examined whether there is a close correlation between subcellular localization of prohormone convertases and granin proteins. Ultrathin sections of rat anterior pituitary were immunolabeled with anti-PC1 or -PC2 antisera and then stained with immunogold. Immunogold particles for PC1 were exclusively found in large, lucent secretory granules, whereas those for PC2 were seen in both large, lucent and small, dense granules. The double-immunolabeling also demonstrated colocalization of PC2 and SgII in small, dense granules and of PC1, PC2, and CgA in large, lucent granules. These immunocytochemical results suggest that PC2 may be involved in the proteolytic processing of SgII and that both PC1 and PC2 may be necessary to process CgA. PMID:11383885

  2. Ecdysteroids regulate secretory competence in Inka cells.

    PubMed

    Kingan, T G; Adams, M E

    2000-10-01

    Ecdysis, or molting behavior, in insects requires the sequential action of high levels of ecdysteroids, which induce accumulation of ecdysis-triggering hormone (ETH) in Inka cells, followed by low levels of ecdysteroids, permissive for the onset of the behavior. Here, we show that high ecdysteroid levels suppress the onset of the behavioral sequence by inhibiting the development of competence to secrete ETH. In pharate pupae of Manduca sexta, Inka cells in the epitracheal glands normally develop competence to secrete ETH in response to eclosion hormone (EH) 8 h before pupation. Injection of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) into precompetent insects prevents this acquisition of competence, but does not affect EH-evoked accumulation of the second messenger cyclic GMP. Precompetent glands acquire competence in vitro after overnight culture, and this can be prevented by the inclusion of 20E at concentrations greater than 0.1 microg ml(-1)in the culture medium. Actinomycin D completely inhibits the acquisition of competence, demonstrating that it is dependent on transcriptional events. Cultured epitracheal glands become refractory to the inhibitory effects of 20E in the acquisition of competence at least 3 h earlier than for Actinomycin D, indicating that 20E acts on an early step in a sequence of nuclear events leading to transcription of a structural gene. Our findings suggest that declining ecdysteroid levels permit a late event in transcription, the product of which is downstream of EH receptor activation and cyclic GMP accumulation in the cascade leading to ETH secretion. PMID:10976037

  3. Synaptic representation of locomotion in single cerebellar granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Kate; Mathy, Alexandre; Duguid, Ian; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The cerebellum plays a crucial role in the regulation of locomotion, but how movement is represented at the synaptic level is not known. Here, we use in vivo patch-clamp recordings to show that locomotion can be directly read out from mossy fiber synaptic input and spike output in single granule cells. The increase in granule cell spiking during locomotion is enhanced by glutamate spillover currents recruited during movement. Surprisingly, the entire step sequence can be predicted from input EPSCs and output spikes of a single granule cell, suggesting that a robust gait code is present already at the cerebellar input layer and transmitted via the granule cell pathway to downstream Purkinje cells. Thus, synaptic input delivers remarkably rich information to single neurons during locomotion. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07290.001 PMID:26083712

  4. Multimodal sensory integration in single cerebellar granule cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ishikawa, Taro; Shimuta, Misa; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian cerebellum is a highly multimodal structure, receiving inputs from multiple sensory modalities and integrating them during complex sensorimotor coordination tasks. Previously, using cell-type-specific anatomical projection mapping, it was shown that multimodal pathways converge onto individual cerebellar granule cells (Huang et al., 2013). Here we directly measure synaptic currents using in vivo patch-clamp recordings and confirm that a subset of single granule cells receive convergent functional multimodal (somatosensory, auditory, and visual) inputs via separate mossy fibers. Furthermore, we show that the integration of multimodal signals by granule cells can enhance action potential output. These recordings directly demonstrate functional convergence of multimodal signals onto single granule cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12916.001 PMID:26714108

  5. UNUSUAL EOSINOPHILIC GRANULE CELL PROLIFERATION IN COHO SALMON (ONCHORHYNCHUS KISUTCH)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Proliferative lesions comprised of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) extended throughout the gastrointestinal tract of several mature, spawning coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch (Walbaum). istological examination of the tumour showed extensive proliferation and infiltration of EGC...

  6. Human NK cell lytic granules and regulation of their exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Krzewski, Konrad; Coligan, John E.

    2012-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells form a subset of lymphocytes that play a key role in immuno-surveillance and host defense against cancer and viral infections. They recognize stressed cells through a variety of germline-encoded activating cell surface receptors and utilize their cytotoxic ability to eliminate abnormal cells. Killing of target cells is a complex, multi-stage process that concludes in the directed secretion of lytic granules, containing perforin and granzymes, at the immunological synapse. Upon delivery to a target cell, perforin mediates generation of pores in membranes of target cells, allowing granzymes to access target cell cytoplasm and induce apoptosis. Therefore, lytic granules of NK cells are indispensable for normal NK cell cytolytic function. Indeed, defects in lytic granule secretion lead or are related to serious and often fatal diseases, such as familial hemophagocytic lymphohistiocytosis (FHL) type 2–5 or Griscelli syndrome type 2. A number of reports highlight the role of several proteins involved in lytic granule release and NK cell-mediated killing of tumor cells. This review focuses on lytic granules of human NK cells and the advancements in understanding the mechanisms controlling their exocytosis. PMID:23162553

  7. Acid-induced secretory cell metaplasia in hamster bronchi

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, T.G.; Lucey, E.C.; Breuer, R.; Snider, G.L.

    1988-02-01

    Hamsters were exposed to an intratracheal instillation of 0.5 ml of 0.08 N nitric, hydrochloric, or sulfuric acid to determine their airway epithelial response. Three weeks after exposure, the left intrapulmonary bronchi in Alcian blue/PAS-strained paraffin sections were evaluated for the amount of secretory product in the airway epithelium as a measure of secretory cell metaplasia (SCM). Compared to saline-treated control animals, all three acids caused statistically significant SCM. In addition to the bronchial lesion, all three acids caused similar interstitial fibrosis, bronchiolectasis, and bronchiolization of alveoli that varied in individual animals from mild to severe. In a separate experiment to study the persistence of the SCM, hamsters treated with a single instillation of 0.1 N nitric acid showed significant SCM 3, 7, and 17 weeks after exposure. There was a high correlation (r = 0.96) between a subjective assessment of SCM and objective assessment using a digital image-analysis system. We conclude that protons induce SCM independently of the associated anion; the SCM persists at least 17 weeks. Sulfuric acid is an atmospheric pollutant and nitric acid may form locally on the mucosa of lungs exposed to nitrogen dioxide. These acids may contribute to the development of maintenance of the SCM seen in the conducting airways of humans with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  8. Young Dentate Granule Cells Mediate Pattern Separation whereas Old Granule Cells Contribute to Pattern Completion

    PubMed Central

    Nakashiba, Toshiaki; Cushman, Jesse D.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Renaudineau, Sophie; Buhl, Derek L.; McHugh, Thomas J.; Barrera, Vanessa Rodriguez; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; McBain, Chris J.; Fanselow, Michael S.; Tonegawa, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adult-born granule cells (GCs), a minor population of cells in the hippocampal dentate gyrus, are highly active during the first few weeks following functional integration into the neuronal network (young GCs), distinguishing them from less active older adult-born GCs and the major population of dentate GCs generated developmentally (together, old GCs). We created a transgenic mouse in which output of old GCs was specifically inhibited while leaving a substantial portion of young GCs intact. These mice exhibited enhanced or normal pattern separation between similar contexts that was reduced following removal of young GCs by X-ray irradiation. Furthermore, mutant mice exhibited deficits in rapid pattern completion. Therefore, pattern separation of similar contexts requires adult-born young GCs while old GCs are unnecessary, whereas older GCs contribute to the rapid recall by pattern completion. Our data suggest that as adult-born GCs age, their function switches from pattern separation to rapid pattern completion. PMID:22365813

  9. Inhibition of Cerebellar Granule Cell Turning by Alcohol

    PubMed Central

    Kumada, Tatsuro; Komuro, Yutaro; Li, Ying; Hu, Taofang; Wang, Zhe; Littner, Yoav; Komuro, Hitoshi

    2010-01-01

    Ectopic neurons are often found in the brains of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD) and fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) patients, suggesting that alcohol exposure impairs neuronal cell migration. Although it has been reported that alcohol decreases the speed of neuronal cell migration, little is known about whether alcohol also affects the turning of neurons. Here we show that ethanol exposure inhibits the turning of cerebellar granule cells in vivo and in vitro. First, in vivo studies using P10 mice demonstrated that a single i.p. injection of ethanol not only reduces the number of turning granule cells but also alters the mode of turning at the EGL-ML border of the cerebellum. Second, in vitro analysis using microexplant cultures of P0-P3 mouse cerebella revealed that ethanol directly reduces the frequency of spontaneous granule cell turning in a dose-dependent manner. Third, the action of ethanol on the frequency of granule cell turning was significantly ameliorated by stimulating Ca2+ and cGMP signaling or by inhibiting cAMP signaling. Taken together, these results indicate that ethanol affects the frequency and mode of cerebellar granule cell turning through alteration of the Ca2+ and cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways, suggesting that the abnormal allocation of neurons found in the brains of FASD and FSA patients results, at least in part, from impaired turning of immature neurons by alcohol. PMID:20691765

  10. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells vary with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (p < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:27069556

  11. Fallopian tube secretory cell expansion: a sensitive biomarker for ovarian serous carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yiying; Li, Li; Wang, Yue; Tang, Sarah Ngocvi; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances suggest that precancerous lesions of pelvic serous carcinoma originate from tubal secretory cells. The purpose of our study was to determine if an increased number of secretory cells varies with age or location in the fallopian tube and to examine its association with serous neoplasia. Three groups (benign control, high-risk, and pelvic serous carcinoma) of age-matched patients were studied. The age data were stratified into 10-year intervals ranging from 20-29 to older than 80. The number of secretory and ciliated cells from both tubal fimbria and ampulla segments was counted by microscopy and immunohistochemical staining methods. The data were analyzed by standard contingency table and Poisson distribution methods after age justification. We found that the absolute number of tubal secretory cells increased significantly with age in all three groups. But a more dramatic increase of secretory cells was observed in high-risk and pelvic serous carcinoma patients. Secretory cell expansion is more prevalent than secretory cell outgrowth in both fimbria and ampulla tubal segments and is significantly associated with serous neoplasia (P < 0.001). Furthermore, age remained a significant risk factor for serous neoplasia after age adjustment. These findings suggest that secretory cell expansion could serve as a potential sensitive biomarker for early serous carcinogenesis within the fallopian tube. The study also supports a relationship between serous neoplasia and increased secretory to ciliated cell ratios, and the relationship between frequency of secretory cell expansion within the fallopian tube and increasing age and-more significantly-presence of high-risk factors or co-existing serous cancers. PMID:26692952

  12. Mast Cell Mediators: Their Differential Release and the Secretory Pathways Involved

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Tae Chul; Befus, A. Dean; Kulka, Marianna

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells (MC) are widely distributed throughout the body and are common at mucosal surfaces, a major host–environment interface. MC are functionally and phenotypically heterogeneous depending on the microenvironment in which they mature. Although MC have been classically viewed as effector cells of IgE-mediated allergic diseases, they are also recognized as important in host defense, innate and acquired immunity, homeostatic responses, and immunoregulation. MC activation can induce release of pre-formed mediators such as histamine from their granules, as well as release of de novo synthesized lipid mediators, cytokines, and chemokines that play diverse roles, not only in allergic reactions but also in numerous physiological and pathophysiological responses. Indeed, MC release their mediators in a discriminating and chronological manner, depending upon the stimuli involved and their signaling cascades (e.g., IgE-mediated or Toll-like receptor-mediated). However, the precise mechanisms underlying differential mediator release in response to these stimuli are poorly known. This review summarizes our knowledge of MC mediators and will focus on what is known about the discriminatory release of these mediators dependent upon diverse stimuli, MC phenotypes, and species of origin, as well as on the intracellular synthesis, storage, and secretory processes involved. PMID:25452755

  13. Secretory autophagy.

    PubMed

    Ponpuak, Marisa; Mandell, Michael A; Kimura, Tomonori; Chauhan, Santosh; Cleyrat, Cédric; Deretic, Vojo

    2015-08-01

    Autophagy, once viewed exclusively as a cytoplasmic auto-digestive process, has its less intuitive but biologically distinct non-degradative roles. One manifestation of these functions of the autophagic machinery is the process termed secretory autophagy. Secretory autophagy facilitates unconventional secretion of the cytosolic cargo such as leaderless cytosolic proteins, which unlike proteins endowed with the leader (N-terminal signal) peptides cannot enter the conventional secretory pathway normally operating via the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi apparatus. Secretory autophagy may also export more complex cytoplasmic cargo and help excrete particulate substrates. Autophagic machinery and autophagy as a process also affect conventional secretory pathways, including the constitutive and regulated secretion, as well as promote alternative routes for trafficking of integral membrane proteins to the plasma membrane. Thus, autophagy and autophagic factors are intimately intertwined at many levels with secretion and polarized sorting in eukaryotic cells. PMID:25988755

  14. Identification of Stem Cells in the Secretory Complex of Salivary Glands.

    PubMed

    Kwak, M; Alston, N; Ghazizadeh, S

    2016-07-01

    Salivary glands have an essential secretory function for maintaining oral and overall health. The epithelial compartment of the gland is composed of several highly specialized cell types that cooperate to secrete and deliver saliva to the oral cavity. The mouse submandibular gland has been used as a model for major salivary glands in human. The secretory complex in this model is composed of 2 secretory compartments, including acini and granular ducts connected by intercalated ducts. Contractile myoepithelial cells surround the secretory complex to facilitate salivary flow. Whether differentiated cells in the secretory complex are maintained by self-duplication or contribution from stem cells has remained an open question. Here, in analyzing the expression of basal cytokeratin (K) 14 in the secretory complex, we discovered a subset of K14(+) ductal cells in the intercalated ducts of the adult gland. These cells are distinct from the K14-expressing basal/myoepithelial cells, proliferate at a significantly higher rate than any other epithelial cell type in the gland, and reside in a spatially defined domain within the intercalated duct. Using inducible genetic lineage tracing, we show that K14(+) ductal cells represent a long-lived yet cycling population of stem cells that are established during development and contribute to the formation and maintenance of the granular ducts throughout life. Our data provide direct evidence for the existence of stem cells contributing to homeostasis of salivary glands, as well as new insights into glandular pathobiology. PMID:26936214

  15. Mapping organelle motion reveals a vesicular conveyor belt spatially replenishing secretory vesicles in stimulated chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Maucort, Guillaume; Kasula, Ravikiran; Papadopulos, Andreas; Nieminen, Timo A; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina; Meunier, Frederic A

    2014-01-01

    How neurosecretory cells spatially adjust their secretory vesicle pools to replenish those that have fused and released their hormonal content is currently unknown. Here we designed a novel set of image analyses to map the probability of tracked organelles undergoing a specific type of movement (free, caged or directed). We then applied our analysis to time-lapse z-stack confocal imaging of secretory vesicles from bovine Chromaffin cells to map the global changes in vesicle motion and directionality occurring upon secretagogue stimulation. We report a defined region abutting the cortical actin network that actively transports secretory vesicles and is dissipated by actin and microtubule depolymerizing drugs. The directionality of this "conveyor belt" towards the cell surface is activated by stimulation. Actin and microtubule networks therefore cooperatively probe the microenvironment to transport secretory vesicles to the periphery, providing a mechanism whereby cells globally adjust their vesicle pools in response to secretagogue stimulation. PMID:24489879

  16. The use of lectins as markers for differentiated secretory cells in planarians.

    PubMed

    Zayas, Ricardo M; Cebrià, Francesc; Guo, Tingxia; Feng, Junjie; Newmark, Phillip A

    2010-11-01

    Freshwater planarians have reemerged as excellent models to investigate mechanisms underlying regeneration. The introduction of molecular tools has facilitated the study of planarians, but cell- and tissue-specific markers are still needed to examine differentiation of most cell types. Here we report the utility of fluorescent lectin-conjugates to label tissues in the planarian Schmidtea mediterranea. We show that 16 lectin-conjugates stain planarian cells or tissues; 13 primarily label the secretory cells, their cytoplasmic projections, and terminal pores. Thus, we examined regeneration of the secretory system using lectin markers and functionally characterized two genes expressed in the secretory cells: marginal adhesive gland-1 (mag-1) and Smed-reticulocalbin1 (Smed-rcn1). RNAi knockdown of these genes caused a dramatic reduction of secretory cell lectin staining, suggesting a role for mag-1 and Smed-rcn1 in secretory cell differentiation. Our results provide new insights into planarian secretory system regeneration and add new markers for labeling several planarian tissues. PMID:20865784

  17. Asymmetric cell division of granule neuron progenitors in the external granule layer of the mouse cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    Haldipur, Parthiv; Sivaprakasam, Iswariya; Periasamy, Vinod; Govindan, Subashika; Mani, Shyamala

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The plane of division of granule neuron progenitors (GNPs) was analysed with respect to the pial surface in P0 to P14 cerebellum and the results showed that there was a significant bias towards the plane of cell division being parallel to pial surface across this developmental window. In addition, the distribution of β-Catenin in anaphase cells was analysed, which showed that there was a significant asymmetry in the distribution of β-Catenin in dividing GNPs. Further, inhibition of Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) signalling had an effect on plane of cell division. Asymmetric distribution of β-Catenin was shown to occur towards the source of a localized extracellular cue. PMID:25979710

  18. Signal transduction pathways in mast cell granule-mediated endothelial cell activation.

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Luqi; Stehno-Bittel, Lisa; Smirnova, Irina; Stechschulte, Daniel J; Dileepan, Kottarappat N

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We have previously shown that incubation of human endothelial cells with mast cell granules results in potentiation of lipopolysaccharide-induced production of interleukin-6 and interleukin-8. AIMS: The objective of the present study was to identify candidate molecules and signal transduction pathways involved in the synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide on endothelial cell activation. METHODS: Human umbilical vein endothelial cells were incubated with rat mast cell granules in the presence and absence of lipopolysaccharide, and IL-6 production was quantified. The status of c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation, nuclear factor-kappaB translocation and intracellular calcium levels were determined to identify the mechanism of synergy between mast cell granules and lipopolysaccaride. RESULTS: Mast cell granules induced low levels of interleukin-6 production by endothelial cells, and this effect was markedly enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. The results revealed that both serine proteases and histamine present in mast cell granules were involved in this activation process. Mast cell granules increased intracellular calcium, and activated c-Jun amino-terminal kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. The combination of lipopolysaccharide and mast cell granules prolonged c-Jun amino-terminal kinase activity beyond the duration of induction by either stimulant alone and was entirely due to active proteases. However, both proteases and histamine contributed to calcium mobilization and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 activation. The nuclear translocation of nuclear factor-kappaB proteins was of greater magnitude in endothelial cells treated with the combination of mast cell granules and lipopolysaccharide. CONCLUSIONS:Mast cell granule serine proteases and histamine can amplify lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial cell activation, which involves calcium mobilization, mitogen

  19. Rapid Feedforward Inhibition and Asynchronous Excitation Regulate Granule Cell Activity in the Mammalian Main Olfactory Bulb

    PubMed Central

    Burton, Shawn D.

    2015-01-01

    Granule cell-mediated inhibition is critical to patterning principal neuron activity in the olfactory bulb, and perturbation of synaptic input to granule cells significantly alters olfactory-guided behavior. Despite the critical role of granule cells in olfaction, little is known about how sensory input recruits granule cells. Here, we combined whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology in acute mouse olfactory bulb slices with biophysical multicompartmental modeling to investigate the synaptic basis of granule cell recruitment. Physiological activation of sensory afferents within single glomeruli evoked diverse modes of granule cell activity, including subthreshold depolarization, spikelets, and suprathreshold responses with widely distributed spike latencies. The generation of these diverse activity modes depended, in part, on the asynchronous time course of synaptic excitation onto granule cells, which lasted several hundred milliseconds. In addition to asynchronous excitation, each granule cell also received synchronous feedforward inhibition. This inhibition targeted both proximal somatodendritic and distal apical dendritic domains of granule cells, was reliably recruited across sniff rhythms, and scaled in strength with excitation as more glomeruli were activated. Feedforward inhibition onto granule cells originated from deep short-axon cells, which responded to glomerular activation with highly reliable, short-latency firing consistent with tufted cell-mediated excitation. Simulations showed that feedforward inhibition interacts with asynchronous excitation to broaden granule cell spike latency distributions and significantly attenuates granule cell depolarization within local subcellular compartments. Collectively, our results thus identify feedforward inhibition onto granule cells as a core feature of olfactory bulb circuitry and establish asynchronous excitation and feedforward inhibition as critical regulators of granule cell activity. SIGNIFICANCE

  20. Behavioral experience induces zif268 expression in mature granule cells but suppresses its expression in immature granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Huckleberry, Kylie A.; Kane, Gary A.; Mathis, Rita J.; Cook, Sarah G.; Clutton, Jonathan E.; Drew, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Thousands of neurons are born each day in the dentate gyrus (DG), but many of these cells die before reaching maturity. Both death and survival of adult-born neurons are regulated by neuronal activity in the DG. The immediate-early gene (IEG) zif268 appears to be an important mediator of these effects, as its expression can be induced by neural activity and knockout of zif268 impairs survival of adult-born neurons (Richardson et al., 1992; Veyrac et al., 2013). Despite the apparent importance of zif268 for adult neurogenesis, its behavior-induced expression has not been fully characterized in adult-born neurons. Here we characterize behavior-evoked expression of zif268 in mature and newborn dentate granule cells (DGCs). We first quantified zif268 expression in doublecortin-positive (DCX+) immature neurons and in the general granule cell population after brief exposure to a novel environment (NE). In the general granule cell population, zif268 expression peaked 1 h after NE exposure and returned to baseline by 8 h post-exposure. However, in the DCX+ cells, zif268 expression was suppressed relative to home cage for at least 8 h post-exposure. We next asked whether suppression of zif268 in DCX+ immature cells occurs in other behavioral paradigms that recruit the hippocampus. Exposure to Morris water maze (MWM) training, an enriched environment, or a NE caused approximately equal suppression of zif268 expression in DCX+ cells and approximately equal activation of zif268 expression among the general granule cell population. The same behavioral procedures activated zif268 expression in 6-week-old BrdU-labeled adult-born neurons, indicating that zif268 suppression is specific to immature neurons. Finally, we asked whether zif268 suppression varied as a function of age within the DCX+ population, which ranges in age from 0 to approximately 4 weeks. NE exposure had no significant effect on zif268 expression in 2- or 4-week-old BrdU-labeled neurons, but it significantly

  1. Astrocytes as secretory cells of the central nervous system: idiosyncrasies of vesicular secretion.

    PubMed

    Verkhratsky, Alexei; Matteoli, Michela; Parpura, Vladimir; Mothet, Jean-Pierre; Zorec, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Astrocytes are housekeepers of the central nervous system (CNS) and are important for CNS development, homeostasis and defence. They communicate with neurones and other glial cells through the release of signalling molecules. Astrocytes secrete a wide array of classic neurotransmitters, neuromodulators and hormones, as well as metabolic, trophic and plastic factors, all of which contribute to the gliocrine system. The release of neuroactive substances from astrocytes occurs through several distinct pathways that include diffusion through plasmalemmal channels, translocation by multiple transporters and regulated exocytosis. As in other eukaryotic cells, exocytotic secretion from astrocytes involves divergent secretory organelles (synaptic-like microvesicles, dense-core vesicles, lysosomes, exosomes and ectosomes), which differ in size, origin, cargo, membrane composition, dynamics and functions. In this review, we summarize the features and functions of secretory organelles in astrocytes. We focus on the biogenesis and trafficking of secretory organelles and on the regulation of the exocytotic secretory system in the context of healthy and diseased astrocytes. PMID:26758544

  2. Rab27b regulates exocytosis of secretory vesicles in acinar epithelial cells from the lacrimal gland

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Lilian; Ngo, Julie; Schechter, Joel E.; Karvar, Serhan; Tolmachova, Tanya; Seabra, Miguel C.; Hume, Alistair N.

    2011-01-01

    Tear proteins are supplied by the regulated fusion of secretory vesicles at the apical surface of lacrimal gland acinar cells, utilizing trafficking mechanisms largely yet uncharacterized. We investigated the role of Rab27b in the terminal release of these secretory vesicles. Confocal fluorescence microscopy analysis of primary cultured rabbit lacrimal gland acinar cells revealed that Rab27b was enriched on the membrane of large subapical vesicles that were significantly colocalized with Rab3D and Myosin 5C. Stimulation of cultured acinar cells with the secretagogue carbachol resulted in apical fusion of these secretory vesicles with the plasma membrane. Evaluation of morphological changes by transmission electron microscopy of lacrimal glands from Rab27b−/− and Rab27ash/ash/Rab27b−/− mice, but not ashen mice deficient in Rab27a, showed changes in abundance and organization of secretory vesicles, further confirming a role for this protein in secretory vesicle exocytosis. Glands lacking Rab27b also showed increased lysosomes, damaged mitochondria, and autophagosome-like organelles. In vitro, expression of constitutively active Rab27b increased the average size but retained the subapical distribution of Rab27b-enriched secretory vesicles, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b redistributed this protein from membrane to the cytoplasm. Functional studies measuring release of a cotransduced secretory protein, syncollin-GFP, showed that constitutively active Rab27b enhanced, whereas dominant-negative Rab27b suppressed, stimulated release. Disruption of actin filaments inhibited vesicle fusion to the apical membrane but did not disrupt homotypic fusion. These data show that Rab27b participates in aspects of lacrimal gland acinar cell secretory vesicle formation and release. PMID:21525430

  3. Discovery and progress in our understanding of the regulated secretory pathway in neuroendocrine cells

    PubMed Central

    Morvan, Joëlle

    2008-01-01

    In this review we start with a historical perspective beginning with the early morphological work done almost 50 years ago. The importance of these pioneering studies is underscored by our brief summary of the key questions addressed by subsequent research into the mechanism of secretion. We then highlight important advances in our understanding of the formation and maturation of neuroendocrine secretory granules, first using in vitro reconstitution systems, then most recently biochemical approaches, and finally genetic manipulations in vitro and in vivo. PMID:18197413

  4. FIB/SEM cell sectioning for intracellular metal granules characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milani, Marziale; Brundu, Claudia; Santisi, Grazia; Savoia, Claudio; Tatti, Francesco

    2009-05-01

    Focused Ion Beams (FIBs) provide a cross-sectioning tool for submicron dissection of cells and subcellular structures. In combination with Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), FIB provides complementary morphological information, that can be further completed by EDX (Energy Dispersive X-ray Spectroscopy). This study focus onto intracellular microstructures, particularly onto metal granules (typically Zn, Cu and Fe) and on the possibility of sectioning digestive gland cells of the terrestrial isopod P. scaber making the granules available for a compositional analysis with EDX. Qualitative and quantitative analysis of metal granules size, amount and distribution are performed. Information is made available of the cellular storing pattern and, indirectly, metal metabolism. The extension to human level is of utmost interest since some pathologies of relevance are metal related. Apart from the common metal-overload-diseases (hereditary hemochromatosis, Wilson's and Menkes disease) it has been demonstrated that metal in excess can influence carcinogenesis in liver, kidney and breast. Therefore protocols will be established for the observation of mammal cells to improve our knowledge about the intracellular metal amount and distribution both in healthy cells and in those affected by primary or secondary metal overload or depletion.

  5. Secretory end-feet, extracerebral cells, and cerebral sense organs in certain limicole oligochaete annelids.

    PubMed

    Golding, D W; Whittle, A C

    1975-01-01

    Secretory end-feet (or SEF) systems are present in Limnodrilus and Stylodrilus but are less highly organized than those of polychaetes. SEF contain secretory vesicles and abundant mitochondria. Typical neurosecretory terminals are not found within the brain although "neurosecretory" perikarya are present in all four species studied. In Limnodrilus, Stylodrilus and Enchytraeus extracerebral cells, of probable neurosecretory function, are invested by the pericapsular epithelium. Characteristically such cells bear several cilia. In these species and in Stylaria a pair of sensory cell groups is located anteriorly within the brain. These cells are ciliated but lack associated supporting cells. PMID:170709

  6. Control of cerebellar granule cell output by sensory-evoked Golgi cell inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Duguid, Ian; Branco, Tiago; Chadderton, Paul; Arlt, Charlotte; Powell, Kate; Häusser, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Classical feed-forward inhibition involves an excitation–inhibition sequence that enhances the temporal precision of neuronal responses by narrowing the window for synaptic integration. In the input layer of the cerebellum, feed-forward inhibition is thought to preserve the temporal fidelity of granule cell spikes during mossy fiber stimulation. Although this classical feed-forward inhibitory circuit has been demonstrated in vitro, the extent to which inhibition shapes granule cell sensory responses in vivo remains unresolved. Here we combined whole-cell patch-clamp recordings in vivo and dynamic clamp recordings in vitro to directly assess the impact of Golgi cell inhibition on sensory information transmission in the granule cell layer of the cerebellum. We show that the majority of granule cells in Crus II of the cerebrocerebellum receive sensory-evoked phasic and spillover inhibition prior to mossy fiber excitation. This preceding inhibition reduces granule cell excitability and sensory-evoked spike precision, but enhances sensory response reproducibility across the granule cell population. Our findings suggest that neighboring granule cells and Golgi cells can receive segregated and functionally distinct mossy fiber inputs, enabling Golgi cells to regulate the size and reproducibility of sensory responses. PMID:26432880

  7. Disinhibition of olfactory bulb granule cells accelerates odour discrimination in mice

    PubMed Central

    Nunes, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells are the dominant cell type of the olfactory bulb inhibiting mitral and tufted cells via dendrodendritic synapses; yet the factors regulating the strength of their inhibitory output, and, therefore, their impact on odour discrimination, remain unknown. Here we show that GABAAR β3-subunits are distributed in a somatodendritic pattern, mostly sparing the large granule cell spines also known as gemmules. Granule cell-selective deletion of β3-subunits nearly abolishes spontaneous and muscimol-induced currents mediated by GABAA receptors in granule cells, yet recurrent inhibition of mitral cells is strongly enhanced. Mice with disinhibited granule cells require less time to discriminate both dissimilar as well as highly similar odourants, while discrimination learning remains unaffected. Hence, granule cells are controlled by an inhibitory drive that in turn tunes mitral cell inhibition. As a consequence, the olfactory bulb inhibitory network adjusts the speed of early sensory processing. PMID:26592770

  8. Disinhibition of olfactory bulb granule cells accelerates odour discrimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Daniel; Kuner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Granule cells are the dominant cell type of the olfactory bulb inhibiting mitral and tufted cells via dendrodendritic synapses; yet the factors regulating the strength of their inhibitory output, and, therefore, their impact on odour discrimination, remain unknown. Here we show that GABAAR β3-subunits are distributed in a somatodendritic pattern, mostly sparing the large granule cell spines also known as gemmules. Granule cell-selective deletion of β3-subunits nearly abolishes spontaneous and muscimol-induced currents mediated by GABAA receptors in granule cells, yet recurrent inhibition of mitral cells is strongly enhanced. Mice with disinhibited granule cells require less time to discriminate both dissimilar as well as highly similar odourants, while discrimination learning remains unaffected. Hence, granule cells are controlled by an inhibitory drive that in turn tunes mitral cell inhibition. As a consequence, the olfactory bulb inhibitory network adjusts the speed of early sensory processing. PMID:26592770

  9. Synaptotagmin-7 Functions to Replenish Insulin Granules for Exocytosis in Human Islet β-Cells.

    PubMed

    Dolai, Subhankar; Xie, Li; Zhu, Dan; Liang, Tao; Qin, Tairan; Xie, Huanli; Kang, Youhou; Chapman, Edwin R; Gaisano, Herbert Y

    2016-07-01

    Synaptotagmin (Syt)-7, a major component of the exocytotic machinery in neurons, is also the major Syt in rodent pancreatic β-cells shown to mediate glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS). However, Syt-7's precise exocytotic actions in β-cells remain unknown. We show that Syt-7 is abundant in human β-cells. Adenovirus-short hairpin RNA knockdown (KD) of Syt-7 in human islets reduced first- and second-phase GSIS attributed to the reduction of exocytosis of predocked and newcomer insulin secretory granules (SGs). Glucose stimulation expectedly induced Syt-7 association in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner with syntaxin-3 and syntaxin-1A soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) complexes known to mediate exocytosis of newcomer and predocked SGs, respectively. However, Syt-7-KD did not disrupt SNARE complex assembly. Instead, electron microscopy analysis showed that Syt-7-KD reduced the recruitment of SGs to the plasma membrane after glucose-stimulated depletion, which could not be rescued by glucagon-like peptide 1 pretreatment. To assess the possibility that this new action of Syt-7 on SG recruitment may involve calmodulin (CaM), pretreatment of islets with CaM blocker calmidazolium showed effects very similar to those of Syt-7-KD. Syt-7 therefore plays a novel more dominant function in the replenishment of releasable SG pools in human β-cells than its previously purported role in exocytotic fusion per se. PMID:27207520

  10. Temperature-sensitive steps in the transport of secretory proteins through the Golgi complex in exocrine pancreatic cells.

    PubMed

    Saraste, J; Palade, G E; Farquhar, M G

    1986-09-01

    The effect of temperature on secretory protein transport was studied by cell fractionation of rat pancreatic lobules, pulse-labeled in vitro with [35S]methionine and chased for 60 min at 16, 20, or 37 degrees C. Chase at 37 degrees C allowed secretory proteins to reach a zymogen granule fraction, whereas chase at 16 or 20 degrees C led to their extensive retention in a total microsomal fraction. To pinpoint the sites of transport inhibition, total microsomes were subfractionated by flotation in a sucrose density gradient. Five bands were resolved, of which the heaviest or B1 (density = 1.20 g/ml) consisted primarily of rough microsomes. The lighter fractions, B2 (1.17 g/ml), B3 (1.15 g/ml), and B4 (1.14-1.13 g/ml), consisted primarily of smooth vesicles derived from Golgi elements. B4 had the highest specific activity for galactosyltransferase, a trans Golgi cisternal marker; B2, B3, and B4 are assumed to represent cis, middle, and trans Golgi subcompartments, respectively. At the end of a 2-min pulse, a single peak of labeled proteins colocalized with B1. During subsequent 60-min chases, labeled proteins advanced to B2 at 16 degrees C and to B3 at 20 degrees C. At 37 degrees C the radioactivity remaining in the total microsomal fraction was distributed among four peaks (B1-B4). The results indicate that transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi complex is strongly inhibited below 20 degrees C. At 16 degrees C, the bulk of the cohort of labeled secretory proteins is still in the rough endoplasmic reticulum, but its advancing front reaches cis Golgi elements. At 20 degrees C, the front advances to a middle Golgi compartment, and at 37 degrees C most of the cohort (approximately 70%) reaches condensing vacuoles and zymogen granules. It is concluded that transport steps along the endoplasmic reticulum-plasmalemma pathway have distinct temperature requirements. PMID:3462704

  11. Afferent-target cell interactions in the cerebellum: negative effect of granule cells on Purkinje cell development in lurcher mice.

    PubMed

    Doughty, M L; Lohof, A; Selimi, F; Delhaye-Bouchaud, N; Mariani, J

    1999-05-01

    Lurcher (Lc) is a gain-of-function mutation in the delta2 glutamate receptor gene that results in a large, constitutive inward current in the cerebellar Purkinje cells of +/Lc mice. +/Lc Purkinje cells fail to differentiate fully and die during postnatal development. In normal mice, interactions with granule cells promote Purkinje cell dendritic differentiation. Partial destruction of the granule cell population in young +/Lc mice by x irradiation resulted in a significant increase in Purkinje cell dendritic growth and improved cytoplasmic structure but did not prevent Purkinje cell death. These results indicate two components to Purkinje cell abnormalities in +/Lc mice: a retardation/blockade of dendritic development that is mediated by interactions with granule cells and the death of the cell. Thus, the normal trophic effects of granule cell interaction on Purkinje cell development are absent in the +/Lc cerebellum, suggesting that granule cells are powerful regulators of Purkinje cell differentiation. PMID:10212305

  12. Structure and regulation of the murine Clara cell secretory protein gene.

    PubMed

    Stripp, B R; Huffman, J A; Bohinski, R J

    1994-03-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC10 or CCSP) is an abundant component of airway secretions and has the ability to bind small hydrophobic molecules. Genomic clones were isolated for the murine gene coding for Clara cell secretory protein. Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that the gene was composed of three exons that span 4316 bp. Organization of the murine CCSP gene was very similar to that of the rabbit gene that codes for the biochemically related uteroglobin protein. Messenger RNAs for both genes were coded for by three exons, counterparts of which encode similar structural and functional protein domains. Transcriptional regulatory elements in the 5' flanking DNA were conserved between species, as were the functional properties of these elements when characterized in assays of promoter function. These data support the notion that Clara cell secretory protein genes from the rat and mouse, and the uteroglobin gene in rabbit, represent interspecies homologues. PMID:8020953

  13. Control over the morphology and segregation of Zebrafish germ cell granules during embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Strasser, Markus J; Mackenzie, Natalia C; Dumstrei, Karin; Nakkrasae, La-Iad; Stebler, Jürg; Raz, Erez

    2008-01-01

    Background Zebrafish germ cells contain granular-like structures, organized around the cell nucleus. These structures share common features with polar granules in Drosophila, germinal granules in Xenopus and chromatoid bodies in mice germ cells, such as the localization of the zebrafish Vasa, Piwi and Nanos proteins, among others. Little is known about the structure of these granules as well as their segregation in mitosis during early germ-cell development. Results Using transgenic fish expressing a fluorescently labeled novel component of Zebrafish germ cell granules termed Granulito, we followed the morphology and distribution of the granules. We show that whereas these granules initially exhibit a wide size variation, by the end of the first day of development they become a homogeneous population of medium size granules. We investigated this resizing event and demonstrated the role of microtubules and the minus-end microtubule dependent motor protein Dynein in the process. Last, we show that the function of the germ cell granule resident protein the Tudor domain containing protein-7 (Tdrd7) is required for determination of granule morphology and number. Conclusion Our results suggest that Zebrafish germ cell granules undergo a transformation process, which involves germ cell specific proteins as well as the microtubular network. PMID:18507824

  14. AMPA receptors in cerebellar granule cells during development in culture.

    PubMed

    Hack, N J; Sluiter, A A; Balázs, R

    1995-06-27

    The survival and maturation of differentiating cerebellar granule cells in culture are known to be promoted by excitatory amino acids (EAAs) which, however, compromise the survival of mature cells. In contrast to the trophic effect, the toxic effect of alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxasolepropiate (AMPA) could only be elicited when the desensitisation of AMPA receptors was blocked, cyclothiazide being used in this study. Nevertheless, even under these conditions, toxicity induced by AMPA in contrast to kainate was, at 9 DIV, only half of the maximal toxicity attained by 13-16 DIV. Since cellular responses to AMPA depend so dramatically on the maturational stage of granule cells, we examined here whether this characteristic is related to developmental changes in AMPA receptor properties, which may result from changes in the subunit composition of the receptor. In contrast to toxicity, AMPA-induced 45Ca2+ influx (determined in the presence of cyclothiazide and the NMDA receptor blocker MK-801) reached a maximum already at 9 DIV. This also applied to a fraction of the 45Ca2+ uptake which persisted either after Cd2+ application or under Na(+)-free conditions and therefore presumably was mediated directly through AMPA receptor channels. Quantitative analysis of Western blots showed that the amounts of GluR4 and to a lesser extent GluR2/3/4c are substantial already at 2 DIV, remaining fairly constant until 9 DIV, followed by an increase by 16 DIV. However GluR1, which is hardly detectable in granule cells in vivo and is also low early in vitro, increased almost linearly with cultivation time.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7554232

  15. Imaging of zymogen granules in fully wet cells: evidence for restricted mechanism of granule growth.

    PubMed

    Hammel, Ilan; Anaby, Debbie

    2007-09-01

    The introduction of wet SEM imaging technology permits electron microscopy of wet samples. Samples are placed in sealed specimen capsules and are insulated from the vacuum in the SEM chamber by an impermeable, electron-transparent membrane. The complete insulation of the sample from the vacuum allows direct imaging of fully hydrated, whole-mount tissue. In the current work, we demonstrate direct inspection of thick pancreatic tissue slices (above 400 mum). In the case of scanning of the pancreatic surface, the boundaries of intracellular features are seen directly. Thus no unfolding is required to ascertain the actual particle size distribution based on the sizes of the sections. This method enabled us to investigate the true granule size distribution and confirm early studies of improved conformity to a Poisson-like distribution, suggesting that the homotypic granule growth results from a mechanism, which favors the addition of a single unit granule to mature granules. PMID:17557275

  16. In vivo imaging of dendritic pruning in dentate granule cells.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, J Tiago; Bloyd, Cooper W; Shtrahman, Matthew; Johnston, Stephen T; Schafer, Simon T; Parylak, Sarah L; Tran, Thanh; Chang, Tina; Gage, Fred H

    2016-06-01

    We longitudinally imaged the developing dendrites of adult-born mouse dentate granule cells (DGCs) in vivo and found that they underwent over-branching and pruning. Exposure to an enriched environment and constraint of dendritic growth by disrupting Wnt signaling led to increased branch addition and accelerated growth, which were, however, counteracted by earlier and more extensive pruning. Our results indicate that pruning is regulated in a homeostatic fashion to oppose excessive branching and promote a similar dendrite structure in DGCs. PMID:27135217

  17. Sustained Arc expression in adult-generated granule cells.

    PubMed

    Meconi, Alicia; Lui, Erika; Marrone, Diano F

    2015-08-31

    The dentate gyrus (DG) plays a critical role in memory formation and maintenance. Fitting this specialized role, the DG has many unique characteristics. In addition to being one of the few places in which new neurons are continually added in adulthood, the region also shows a unique long-term sustained transcriptional response of the immediate-early gene Arc to sensory input. Although we know that adult-generated granule cells are reliably recruited into behaviorally-driven neuronal network, it remains unknown whether they display robust late-phase sustained transcription in response to activity like their developmentally-generated counterparts. Since this late-phase of transcription is required for enduring plasticity, knowing if sustained transcription appears as soon as these cells are incorporated provides information on their potential for plasticity. To address this question, adult F344 rats were injected with BrdU (50mg/kg/day for 5 days) and 4 weeks later explored a novel environment. Arc expression in both BrdU- and BrdU+ neurons was determined 0.5h, 1h, 2h, 6h, 8h, 12h, or 24h following this behavior. Recently-generated granule cells showed a robust sustained Arc expression following a discrete behavioral experience. These data provide information on a potential mechanism to sculpt the representations of events occurring within hours of each other to create uncorrelated representations of episodes despite a highly excitable population of neurons. PMID:26219984

  18. Granuphilin exclusively mediates functional granule docking to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Kouichi; Fujita, Takuji; Gomi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Tetsuro

    2016-01-01

    In regulated exocytosis, it is generally assumed that vesicles must stably “dock” at the plasma membrane before they are primed to become fusion-competent. However, recent biophysical analyses in living cells that visualize fluorescent secretory granules have revealed that exocytic behaviors are not necessarily uniform: some granules beneath the plasma membrane are resistant to Ca2+ -triggered release, while others are accelerated to fuse without a pause for stable docking. These findings suggest that stable docking is unnecessary, and can even be inhibitory or nonfunctional, for fusion. Consistently, pancreatic β cells deficient in the Rab27 effector, granuphilin, lack insulin granules directly attached to the plasma membrane in electron micrographs but nevertheless exhibit augmented exocytosis. Here we directly compare the exocytic behaviors between granuphilin-positive and -negative insulin granules. Although granuphilin makes granules immobile and fusion-reluctant beneath the plasma membrane, those granuphilin-positive, docked granules release a portion of granuphilin upon fusion, and fuse at a frequency and time course similar to those of granuphilin-negative undocked granules. Furthermore, granuphilin forms a 180-nm cluster at the site of each docked granule, along with granuphilin-interacting Rab27a and Munc18-1 clusters. These findings indicate that granuphilin is an exclusive component of the functional and fusion-inhibitory docking machinery of secretory granules. PMID:27032672

  19. A Mathematical Model of Granule Cell Generation During Mouse Cerebellum Development.

    PubMed

    Leffler, Shoshana R; Legué, Emilie; Aristizábal, Orlando; Joyner, Alexandra L; Peskin, Charles S; Turnbull, Daniel H

    2016-05-01

    Determining the cellular basis of brain growth is an important problem in developmental neurobiology. In the mammalian brain, the cerebellum is particularly amenable to studies of growth because it contains only a few cell types, including the granule cells, which are the most numerous neuronal subtype. Furthermore, in the mouse cerebellum granule cells are generated from granule cell precursors (gcps) in the external granule layer (EGL), from 1 day before birth until about 2 weeks of age. The complexity of the underlying cellular processes (multiple cell behaviors, three spatial dimensions, time-dependent changes) requires a quantitative framework to be fully understood. In this paper, a differential equation-based model is presented, which can be used to estimate temporal changes in granule cell numbers in the EGL. The model includes the proliferation of gcps and their differentiation into granule cells, as well as the process by which granule cells leave the EGL. Parameters describing these biological processes were derived from fitting the model to histological data. This mathematical model should be useful for understanding altered gcp and granule cell behaviors in mouse mutants with abnormal cerebellar development and cerebellar cancers. PMID:27125657

  20. Biochemical and microscopic evidence for the internalization and degradation of heparin-containing mast cell granules by bovine endothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Atkins, F.M.; Friedman, M.M.; Metcalfe, D.D.

    1985-03-01

    Incubation of (/sup 35/S)heparin-containing mast cell granules with cultured bovine endothelial cells was followed by the appearance of /sup 35/S-granule-associated radioactivity within the endothelial cells and a decrease in radioactivity in the extracellular fluid. These changes occurred during the first 24 hours of incubation and suggested ingestion of the mast cell granules by the endothelial cells. Periodic electron microscopic examination of the monolayers confirmed this hypothesis by demonstrating apposition of the granules to the plasmalemma of endothelial cells, which was followed by the engulfment of the granules by cytoplasmic projections. Under light microscopic examination, mast cell granules within endothelial cells then appeared to undergo degradation. The degradation of (/sup 35/S)heparin in mast cell granules was demonstrated by a decrease in the amount of intracellular (/sup 35/S)heparin proteoglycan after 24 hours and the appearance of free (/sup 35/S)sulfate in the extracellular compartment. Intact endothelial cells were more efficient at degrading (/sup 35/S)heparin than were cell lysates or cell supernatants. These data provide evidence of the ability of endothelial cells to ingest mast cell granules and degrade native heparin that is presented as a part of the mast cell granule.

  1. Enhanced CREB phosphorylation in immature dentate gyrus granule cells precedes neurotrophin expression and indicates a specific role of CREB in granule cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Bender, R. A.; Lauterborn, J. C.; Gall, C. M.; Cariaga, W.; Baram, T. Z.

    2011-01-01

    Differentiation and maturation of dentate gyrus granule cells requires coordinated interactions of numerous processes. These must be regulated by protein factors capable of integrating signals mediated through diverse signalling pathways. Such integrators of inter and intracellular physiological stimuli include the cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB), a leucine-zipper class transcription factor that is activated through phosphorylation. Neuronal activity and neurotrophic factors, known to be involved in granule cell differentiation, are major physiologic regulators of CREB function. To examine whether CREB may play a role in governing coordinated gene transcription during granule cell differentiation, we determined the spatial and temporal profiles of phosphorylated (activated) CREB throughout postnatal development in immature rat hippocampus. We demonstrate that CREB activation is confined to discrete, early stages of granule cell differentiation. In addition, CREB phosphorylation occurs prior to expression of the neurotrophins BDNF and NT-3. These data indicate that in a signal transduction cascade connecting CREB and neurotrophins in the process of granule cell maturation, CREB is located upstream of neurotrophins. Importantly, CREB may be a critical component of the machinery regulating the coordinated transcription of genes contributing to the differentiation of granule cells and their integration into the dentate gyrus network. PMID:11207803

  2. Sequestration of Highly Expressed mRNAs in Cytoplasmic Granules, P-Bodies, and Stress Granules Enhances Cell Viability

    PubMed Central

    Lavut, Anna; Raveh, Dina

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptome analyses indicate that a core 10%–15% of the yeast genome is modulated by a variety of different stresses. However, not all the induced genes undergo translation, and null mutants of many induced genes do not show elevated sensitivity to the particular stress. Elucidation of the RNA lifecycle reveals accumulation of non-translating mRNAs in cytoplasmic granules, P-bodies, and stress granules for future regulation. P-bodies contain enzymes for mRNA degradation; under stress conditions mRNAs may be transferred to stress granules for storage and return to translation. Protein degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system is elevated by stress; and here we analyzed the steady state levels, decay, and subcellular localization of the mRNA of the gene encoding the F-box protein, UFO1, that is induced by stress. Using the MS2L mRNA reporter system UFO1 mRNA was observed in granules that colocalized with P-bodies and stress granules. These P-bodies stored diverse mRNAs. Granules of two mRNAs transported prior to translation, ASH1-MS2L and OXA1-MS2L, docked with P-bodies. HSP12 mRNA that gave rise to highly elevated protein levels was not observed in granules under these stress conditions. ecd3, pat1 double mutants that are defective in P-body formation were sensitive to mRNAs expressed ectopically from strong promoters. These highly expressed mRNAs showed elevated translation compared with wild-type cells, and the viability of the mutants was strongly reduced. ecd3, pat1 mutants also exhibited increased sensitivity to different stresses. Our interpretation is that sequestration of highly expressed mRNAs in P-bodies is essential for viability. Storage of mRNAs for future regulation may contribute to the discrepancy between the steady state levels of many stress-induced mRNAs and their proteins. Sorting of mRNAs for future translation or decay by individual cells could generate potentially different phenotypes in a genetically identical population and enhance

  3. Planar cell polarity protein localization in the secretory ameloblasts of rat incisors.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Sumio; Kawamoto, Tadafumi

    2012-05-01

    The localization of the planar cell polarity proteins Vang12, frizzled-3, Vang11, and Celsr1 in the rat incisors was examined using immunocytochemistry. The results showed that Vang12 was localized at two regions of the Tomes' processes of inner enamel-secretory ameloblasts in rat incisors: a proximal and a distal region. In contrast, frizzled-3 was localized at adherens junctions of the proximal and distal areas of inner enamel- and outer enamel-secretory ameloblasts, where N-cadherin and β-catenin were localized. frizzled-3 was also localized in differentiating inner enamel epithelial cells. Vang11 was localized sparsely in differentiating preameloblasts and extensively at the cell boundary of stratum intermedium. Celsr1 was not localized in ameloblasts but localized in odontoblasts extensively. These results suggest the involvement of planar cell polarity proteins in odontogenesis. PMID:22378702

  4. Preservation of the secretory response of peritoneal mast cells in the absence of extracellular calcium.

    PubMed

    Bronner, C; Gies, J P; Vallé, A; Landry, Y

    1987-12-01

    The transfer of rat peritoneal mast cells from balanced salt solution to calcium-free buffer led to a time-dependent decrease in their response to compound 48/80 and to ionophore A23187. The concomittant absence of potassium from the calcium-free buffer enabled the mast cells to retain their secretory response. The increase in potassium level, with a parallel decrease in sodium to maintain osmolarity, led to a slight potentiation of the response to 48/80 and to a large but transient potentiation of the response to A23187. Mast cells can be considered nonexcitable. The apparent dependency upon extracellular calcium of mast cell secretory responses might be related to the presumed tight equilibrium between endoplasmic reticulum calcium stores and extracellular calcium. The control of this equilibrium by transmembrane gradients of monovalent ions is proposed. PMID:2446099

  5. Effect of oral acetylcysteine on tobacco smoke-induced secretory cell hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Jeffery, P K; Rogers, D F; Ayers, M M

    1985-01-01

    The present investigation explores whether N-acetylcysteine (NAC) inhibits the secretory cell hyperplasia known to occur experimentally in specific pathogen-free (SPF) bronchitic rats. The animals were divided into 4 groups: no tobacco smoke (TS), no drug, no TS but NAC (1040 mg/kg body weight), TS but no drug, and TS plus NAC. NAC-treated animals showed no ill effects, TS exposed animals showed an initial fall in weight gain which never fully recovered (P less than 0.01): NAC did not protect. TS caused a significant increase (62-421%) in secretory cell number at all airway levels distal to the upper trachea (P less than 0.01) and NAC significantly inhibited it (P less than 0.01-0.05) in all, mostly in secretory cells containing acidic glycoprotein. TS exposure also induced a significant rise in epithelial cell concentration and of ciliated, mucous and especially basal cell number (P less than 0.001). NAC inhibited the mucous cell increase (P less than 0.001) and had 3 effects on the peak of dividing cells: it was (a) delayed until 3 days (b) greatly reduced in size and (c) prolonged at a lower level until its return to control values at 10 days of TS exposure. PMID:3862604

  6. Calcium transients in cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals.

    PubMed Central

    Regehr, W G; Atluri, P P

    1995-01-01

    Calcium ions act presynaptically to modulate synaptic strength and to trigger neurotransmitter release. Here we detect stimulus-evoked changes in residual free calcium ([Ca2+]i) in rat cerebellar granule cell presynaptic terminals. Granule cell axons, known as parallel fibers, and their associated boutons, were labeled with several calcium indicators. When parallel fibers were extracellularly activated with stimulus trains, calcium accumulated in the terminals, producing changes in the fluorescence of the indicators. During the stimulus train, the fluorescence change per pulse became progressively smaller with the high affinity indicators Fura-2 and calcium green-2 but remained constant with the low affinity dyes BTC and furaptra. In addition, fluorescence transients of high affinity dyes were slower than those of low affinity indicators, which appear to accurately report the time course of calcium transients. Simulations show that differences in the observed transients can be explained by the different affinities and off rates of the fluorophores. The return of [Ca2+]i to resting levels can be approximated by an exponential decay with a time constant of 150 ms. On the basis of the degree of saturation in the response of high affinity dyes observed during trains, we estimate that each action potential increases [Ca2+]i in the terminal by several hundred nanomolar. These findings indicate that in these terminals [Ca2+]i transients are much larger and faster than those observed in larger boutons, such as those at the neuromuscular junction. Such rapid [Ca2+]i dynamics may be found in many of the terminals in the mammalian brain that are similar in size to parallel fiber boutons. Images FIGURE 1 PMID:7612860

  7. Innovative macroporous granules of nanostructured-hydroxyapatite agglomerates: bioactivity and osteoblast-like cell behaviour.

    PubMed

    Laranjeira, M S; Fernandes, M H; Monteiro, F J

    2010-12-01

    To modulate the biological response of implantable granules, two types of bioactive porous granules composed of nanostructured-hydroxyapatite (HA) agglomerates and microstructured-HA, respectively, were prepared using a polyurethane sponge impregnation and burnout method. The resulting granules presented a highly porous structure with interconnected porosity. Both types of granules were characterized using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and mercury intrusion porosimetry. Results showed that nanostructed-HA granules presented higher surface area and porosity than microstructured-HA granules. In vitro testing using MG63 human osteoblast-like cells showed that on both types of surfaces cells were able to adhere, proliferate, and migrate through the macropores, and a higher growth rate was achieved on nanostructured-HA granules than on microstructured-HA granules (76 and 40%, respectively). In addition, these cells maintained similar expression levels of osteoblastic-associated markers namely collagen type I, alkaline phosphatase, bone morphogenetic protein-2, macrophage colony-stimulating factor, and osteoprotegerin. These innovative nanostructured-HA granules may be considered as promising bioceramic alternative matrixes for bone regeneration and drug release application. PMID:20845490

  8. Extracellular potassium concentration regulates proliferation of immature cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Borodinsky, L N; Fiszman, M L

    1998-04-17

    The present study examines the effect of depolarizing potassium concentrations on the proliferation of immature rat cerebellar neurons. Cells inoculated in serum free medium and 5 mM KCl (5 K) showed a high degree of 3H-thymidine incorporation that decreased 24-48 h after plating as differentiation began. During the first 24 h after inoculation, cells grown in high potassium (25 K), showed a 34 +/- 3% increase (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 12) in 3H-thymidine incorporation as compared with the values observed in 5 K. After 24 h in vitro, cells grown in 25 K showed 23 +/- 3% (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3) less DNA synthesis than those inoculated in 5 K. The increase in DNA synthesis due to 25 K was blocked by MgCl2 and nifedipine, but not by omega-conotoxin GVIA, suggesting that it is mediated by a Ca2+ influx via voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCC) of the L-subtype. High potassium-induced cell proliferation was blocked by the mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK1) inhibitor (PD98059, 75 microM). The number of neurons counted after 48 h in vitro in 25 K was 35-100% above of the number obtained with 5 K and this increase also was blocked by MgCl2 and nifedipine. These data support the hypothesis that depolarizing activity during neurogenesis plays a role in the modulation of cerebellar granule cells proliferation. PMID:9602050

  9. Characterization of the T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues of chronic suppurative otitis media

    PubMed Central

    WANG, BING; CHENG, YING; XU, MIN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the potential involvement of specific T-cell subpopulations in granulation tissue formation in chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM). Fifteen patients with CSOM were enrolled in this study. Granulation tissues were obtained from the middle ear cavity. Hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for histopathological observation, and different T-cell subpopulations were characterized by immunohistochemistry. No evident association was identified between granulation tissue formation and disease course. The number of cluster of differentiation 8+ (CD8+) T cells, forkhead box P3+ (FOXP3+) regulatory T (Treg) cells and OX40+ T cells were significantly higher in granulation tissues from patients with ear discharge within the last 6 months compared to those without (P<0.05). Fresh granulation tissues had more CD8+ T cells and FOXP3+ Treg cells compared to the mature granulation tissues (P<0.05). There was a differential abundance of specific T-cell subpopulations in the granulation tissues in CSOM with different disease courses or with ear discharge, suggesting that T cell-mediated cellular immunity is involved in lesion formation of CSOM. PMID:27313854

  10. Clonal Analysis of Newborn Hippocampal Dentate Granule Cell Proliferation and Development in Temporal Lobe Epilepsy123

    PubMed Central

    LaSarge, Candi L.; McAuliffe, John J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Hippocampal dentate granule cells are among the few neuronal cell types generated throughout adult life in mammals. In the normal brain, new granule cells are generated from progenitors in the subgranular zone and integrate in a typical fashion. During the development of epilepsy, granule cell integration is profoundly altered. The new cells migrate to ectopic locations and develop misoriented “basal” dendrites. Although it has been established that these abnormal cells are newly generated, it is not known whether they arise ubiquitously throughout the progenitor cell pool or are derived from a smaller number of “bad actor” progenitors. To explore this question, we conducted a clonal analysis study in mice expressing the Brainbow fluorescent protein reporter construct in dentate granule cell progenitors. Mice were examined 2 months after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus, a treatment that leads to the development of epilepsy. Brain sections were rendered translucent so that entire hippocampi could be reconstructed and all fluorescently labeled cells identified. Our findings reveal that a small number of progenitors produce the majority of ectopic cells following status epilepticus, indicating that either the affected progenitors or their local microenvironments have become pathological. By contrast, granule cells with “basal” dendrites were equally distributed among clonal groups. This indicates that these progenitors can produce normal cells and suggests that global factors sporadically disrupt the dendritic development of some new cells. Together, these findings strongly predict that distinct mechanisms regulate different aspects of granule cell pathology in epilepsy. PMID:26756038

  11. Phospholipase D2 Modulates the Secretory Pathway in RBL-2H3 Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Marchini-Alves, Claudia Maria Meirelles; Barbosa Lorenzi, Valeria Cintra; da Silva, Elaine Zayas Marcelino; Mazucato, Vivian Marino; Jamur, Maria Celia; Oliver, Constance

    2015-01-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) hydrolyses phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid (PA) and choline. It has two isoforms, PLD1 and PLD2, which are differentially expressed depending on the cell type. In mast cells it plays an important role in signal transduction. The aim of the present study was to clarify the role of PLD2 in the secretory pathway. RBL-2H3 cells, a mast cell line, transfected to overexpress catalytically active (PLD2CA) and inactive (PLD2CI) forms of PLD2 were used. Previous observations showed that the Golgi complex was well organized in CA cells, but was disorganized and dispersed in CI cells. Furthermore, in CI cells, the microtubule organizing center was difficult to identify and the microtubules were disorganized. These previous observations demonstrated that PLD2 is important for maintaining the morphology and organization of the Golgi complex. To further understand the role of PLD2 in secretory and vesicular trafficking, the role of PLD2 in the secretory process was investigated. Incorporation of sialic acid was used to follow the synthesis and transport of glycoconjugates in the cell lines. The modified sialic acid was subsequently detected by labeling with a fluorophore or biotin to visualize the localization of the molecule after a pulse-chase for various times. Glycoconjugate trafficking was slower in the CI cells and labeled glycans took longer to reach the plasma membrane. Furthermore, in CI cells sialic acid glycans remained at the plasma membrane for longer periods of time compared to RBL-2H3 cells. These results suggest that PLD2 activity plays an important role in regulating glycoconjugate trafficking in mast cells. PMID:26492088

  12. Internalized Tau sensitizes cells to stress by promoting formation and stability of stress granules

    PubMed Central

    Brunello, Cecilia A.; Yan, Xu; Huttunen, Henri J.

    2016-01-01

    Stress granules are membrane-less RNA- and RNA-binding protein-containing complexes that are transiently assembled in stressful conditions to promote cell survival. Several stress granule-associated RNA-binding proteins have been associated with neurodegenerative diseases. In addition, a close link was recently identified between the stress granule core-nucleating protein TIA-1 and Tau. Tau is a central pathological protein in Alzheimer’s disease and other tauopathies, and misfolded, aggregated Tau is capable of propagating pathology via cell-to-cell transmission. Here we show that following internalization hyperphosphorylated extracellular Tau associates with stress granules in a TIA-1 dependent manner. Cytosolic Tau normally only weakly interacts with TIA-1 but mutations mimicking abnormal phosphorylation promote this interaction. We show that internalized Tau significantly delays normal clearance of stress granules in the recipient cells sensitizing them to secondary stress. These results suggest that secreted Tau species may have properties, likely related to its hyperphosphorylation and oligomerization, which promote pathological association of internalized Tau with stress granules altering their dynamics and reducing cell viability. We suggest that stress granules and TIA-1 play a central role in the cell-to-cell transmission of Tau pathology. PMID:27460788

  13. Intracellular ion concentrations and cell volume during cholinergic stimulation of eccrine secretory coil cells

    SciTech Connect

    Takemura, T.; Sato, F.; Saga, K.; Suzuki, Y.; Sato, K. )

    1991-02-01

    Methacholine (MCh)-induced changes in intracellular concentrations of Na, K, and Cl (( Na)i, (K)i, and (Cl)i, respectively) and in cellular dry mass (a measure of cell shrinkage) were examined in isolated monkey eccrine sweat secretory coils by electron probe X-ray microanalysis using the peripheral standard method. To further confirm the occurrence of cell shrinkage during MCh stimulation, the change in cell volume of dissociated clear and dark cells were directly determined under a light microscope equipped with differential interference contrast (DIC) optics. X-ray microanalysis revealed a biphasic increase in cellular dry mass in clear cells during continuous MCh stimulation; an initial increase of dry mass to 158% (of control) followed by a plateau at 140%, which correspond to the decrease in cell volume of 37 and 29%, respectively. The latter agrees with the MCh-induced cell shrinkage of 29% in dissociated clear cells. The MCh-induced increase in dry mass in myoepithelial cells was less than half that of clear cells. During the steady state of MCh stimulation, both (K+)i and (Cl)i of clear cells decreased by about 45%, whereas (Na)i increased in such a way to maintain the sum of (Na) i + (K)i constant. There was a small (12-15 mM) increase in (Na)i and a decrease in (K)i in myoepithelial cells during stimulation with MCh. Dissociated dark cells failed to significantly shrink during MCh stimulation. The decrease in (Cl)i in the face of constant (Na)i + (K)i suggests the accumulation of unknown anion(s) inside the clear cell during MCh stimulation.

  14. Odontogenic Differentiation of Human Dental Pulp Stem Cells Stimulated by the Calcium Phosphate Porous Granules

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sunyoung; Won, Jong-Eun; Kim, Cheol-Hwan; Kim, Hae-Won

    2011-01-01

    Effects of three-dimensional (3D) calcium phosphate (CaP) porous granules on the growth and odontogenic differentiation of human dental pulp stem cells (hDPSCs) were examined for dental tissue engineering. hDPSCs isolated from adult human dental pulps were cultured for 3-4 passages, and populated on porous granules. Cell growth on the culture dish showed an ongoing increase for up to 21 days, whereas the growth on the 3D granules decreased after 14 days. This reduction in proliferative potential on the 3D granules was more conspicuous under the osteogenic medium conditions, indicating that the 3D granules may induce the odontogenic differentiation of hDPSCs. Differentiation behavior on the 3D granules was confirmed by the increased alkaline phosphatase activity, up-regulation of odontoblast-specific genes, including dentin sialophosphoprotein (DSPP) and dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, and greater level of dentin sialoprotein synthesis by western blot. Moreover, the cellular mineralization, as assessed by Alizarin red S and calcium quantification, was significantly higher in the 3D CaP granules than in the culture dish. Taken all, the 3D CaP porous granules should be useful for dental tissue engineering in combination with hDPSCs by providing favorable 3D substrate conditions for cell growth and odontogenic development. PMID:21772958

  15. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of beta-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense core in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zin...

  16. Down-regulation of zinc transporter 8 (SLC30A8) in pancreatic beta-cells promotes cell survival.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The pancreatic islet contains high levels of zinc in granular vesicles of ß-cells where insulin is matured, crystallized, and stored before secretion. Zinc is an essential co-factor for insulin crystallization forming dense cores in secretory granules. In insulin-containing secretory granules, zinc ...

  17. Zinc sulfide in intestinal cell granules of Ancylostoma caninum adults

    SciTech Connect

    Gianotti, A.J.; Clark, D.T.; Dash, J. )

    1991-04-01

    A source of confusion has existed since the turn of the century about the reddish brown, weakly birefringent 'sphaerocrystals' located in the intestines of strongyle nematodes, Strongylus and Ancylostoma. X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive spectrometric analyses were used for accurate determination of the crystalline order and elemental composition of the granules in the canine hookworm Ancylostoma caninum. The composition of the intestinal pigmented granules was identified unequivocally as zinc sulfide. It seems most probable that the granules serve to detoxify high levels of metallic ions (specifically zinc) present due to the large intake of host blood.

  18. Granulated peripolar epithelial cells in the renal corpuscle of marine elasmobranch fish.

    PubMed

    Lacy, E R; Reale, E

    1989-07-01

    Granulated epithelial cells at the vascular pole of the renal corpuscle, peripolar cells, have been found in the kidneys of five species of elasmobranchs, the little skate (Raja erinacea), the smooth dogfish shark (Mustelus canis), the Atlantic sharpnose shark (Rhizoprionodon terraenovae), the scalloped hammerhead shark (Sphyrna lewini), and the cow-nosed ray (Rhinoptera bonasus). In a sixth elasmobranch, the spiny dogfish shark (Squalus acanthias), the peripolar cells could not be identified among numerous other granulated epithelial cells. The peripolar cells are located at the transition between the parietal epithelium of Bowman's capsule and the visceral epithelium (podocytes) of the glomerulus, thus forming a cuff-like arrangement surrounding the hilar vessels of the renal corpuscle. These cells may have granules and/or vacuoles. Electron microscopy shows that the granules are membrane-bounded, and contain either a homogeneous material or a paracrystalline structure with a repeating period of about 18 nm. The vacuoles are electron lucent or may contain remnants of a granule. These epithelial cells lie close to the granulated cells of the glomerular afferent arteriole. They correspond to the granular peripolar cells of the mammalian, avian and amphibian kidney. The present study is the first reported occurrence of peripolar cells in a marine organism or in either bony or cartilagenous fish. PMID:2519933

  19. Tissue-specific expression of mast cell granule serine proteinases and their role in inflammation in the lung and gut

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Hugh R P; Pemberton, Alan D

    2002-01-01

    Serine proteinases with trypsin-like (tryptase) and chymotrypsin-like (chymase) properties are major constituents of mast cell granules. Several tetrameric tryptases with differing specificities have been characterized in humans, but only a single chymase. In other species there are larger families of chymases with distinct and narrow proteolytic specificities. Expression of chymases and tryptases varies between tissues. Human pulmonary and gastrointestinal mast cells express chymase at lower levels than tryptase, whereas rodent and ruminant gastrointestinal mast cells express uniquely mucosa-specific chymases. Local and systemic release of chymases and tryptases can be quantified by immunoassay, providing highly specific markers of mast cell activation. The expression and constitutive extracellular secretion of the mucosa-specific chymase, mouse mast cell proteinase-1 (mMCP-1), is regulated by transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in vitro, but it is not clear how the differential expression of chymases and tryptases is regulated in other species. Few native inhibitors have been identified for tryptases but the tetramers dissociate into inactive subunits in the absence of heparin. Chymases are variably inhibited by plasma proteinase inhibitors and by secretory leucocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI) that is expressed in the airways. Tryptases and chymases promote vascular permeability via indirect and possibly direct mechanisms. They contribute to tissue remodelling through selective proteolysis of matrix proteins and through activation of proteinase-activated receptors and of matrix metalloproteinases. Chymase may modulate vascular tissues through its ability to process angiotensin-I to angiotensin-II. Mucosa-specific chymases promote epithelial permeability and are involved in the immune expulsion of intestinal nematodes. Importantly, granule proteinases released extracellularly contribute to the recruitment of inflammatory cells and may thus be involved in

  20. Plasticity of intrinsic excitability in mature granule cells of the dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey; Heine, Martin; Kreutz, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    The dentate gyrus is the main entry gate for cortical input to the hippocampus and one of the few brain areas where adult neurogenesis occurs. Several studies have shown that it is relatively difficult to induce synaptic plasticity in mature but not in newborn dentate granule cells. In the present work we have systematically addressed how classical protocols to induce synaptic plasticity affect action potential firing and intrinsic excitability in mature granule cells. We found that stimulation paradigms considered to be relevant for learning processes consistently modified the probability to generate action potentials in response to a given synaptic input in mature cells, in some paradigms even without any modification of synaptic strength. Collectively the results suggest that plasticity of intrinsic dendritic excitability has a lower induction-threshold than synaptic plasticity in mature granule cells and that this form of plasticity might be an important mechanism by which mature granule cells contribute to hippocampal function. PMID:26857841

  1. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  2. Kinetics of the secretory response in bovine chromaffin cells following flash photolysis of caged Ca2+.

    PubMed Central

    Heinemann, C; Chow, R H; Neher, E; Zucker, R S

    1994-01-01

    The kinetics of the secretory response in bovine chromaffin cells following flash photolysis of caged Ca2+ were studied by capacitance (Cm) measurements with millisecond time resolution. After elevation of the internal Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), Cm rises rapidly with one or more exponentials. The time constant of the fastest component decreases for higher [Ca2+]i (range 3-600 microM) over three orders of magnitude before it saturates at approximately 1 ms. The corresponding maximal rates of secretion can be as fast as 100,000 fF/s or 40,000 vesicles/s. There is a Ca(2+)-dependent delay before Cm rises, which may reflect the kinetics of multiple Ca2+ ions binding to the secretory apparatus. The initial rise in Cm is described by models containing a sequence of two to four single Ca(2+)-binding steps followed by a rate-limiting exocytosis step. The predicted Ca2+ dissociation constant (Kd) of a single Ca(2+)-binding site is between 7 and 21 microM. At [Ca2+]i > 30 microM clear indications of a fast endocytotic process complicate the analysis of the secretory response. PMID:7696493

  3. Neuroligin-2 accelerates GABAergic synapse maturation in cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Fu, Zhanyan; Vicini, Stefano

    2009-09-01

    Neuroligins (NLGs) are postsynaptic cell adhesion molecules that are thought to function in synaptogenesis. To investigate the role of NLGs on synaptic transmission once the synapse is formed, we transfected neuroligin-2 (NLG-2) in cultured mouse cerebellar granule cells (CGCs), and recorded GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid) receptor mediated miniature postsynaptic currents (mIPSCs). NLG-2 transfected cells had mIPSCs with faster decay than matching GFP expressing controls at young culture ages (days in vitro, DIV7-8). Down-regulation of NLG-2 by the isoform specific shRNA-NLG-2 resulted in an opposite effect. We and others have shown that the switch of alpha subunits of GABA(A)Rs from alpha2/3 to alpha1 underlies developmental speeding of the IPSC decay in various CNS regions, including the cerebellum. To assess whether the reduced decay time of mIPSCs by NLG-2 is due to the recruitment of more alpha1 containing GABA(A)Rs at the synapses, we examined the prolongation of current decay by the Zolpidem, which has been shown to preferentially enhance the activity of alpha1 subunit-containing GABA channel. The application of Zolpidem resulted in a significantly greater prolongation kinetics of synaptic currents in NLG-2 over-expressing cells than control cells, suggesting that NLG-2 over-expression accelerates synapse maturation by promoting incorporation of the alpha1 subunit-containing GABA(A)Rs at postsynaptic sites in immature cells. In addition, the effect of NLG-2 on the speeding of decay time course of synaptic currents was abolished when we used CGC cultures from alpha1-/- mice. Lastly, to exclude the possibility that the fast decay of mIPSCs induced by NLG-2 could be also due to the impacts of NLG-2 on the GABA transient in synaptic cleft, we measured the sensitivity of mIPSCs to the fast-off competitive antagonists TPMPA. We found that TPMPA similarly inhibits mIPSCs in control and NLG-2 over-expressing CGCs both at young age (DIV8) and old age (DIV14) of

  4. [Effect of plant hormones on the components of secretory pathway in human normal and tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Vil'danova, M S; Savitskaia, M A; Onishchenko, G E; Smirnova, E A

    2014-01-01

    Plant hormones play a key role in plant growth and differentiation. Many hormones are known as potential antitumor agents, yet others appear to affect the secretory activity and are produced by mammalian cells as pro-inflammatory cytokines. The goal of this research was to study the effect of abscisic and gibberellic acids on the secretory system of human cultured epidermoid carcinoma cells A431 and keratinocytes HaCat. Immunocytochemical and morphometric analysis demonstrated that subtoxic concentration of plant hormones induced the broadening of the ER network and increased the size of Golgi complex. Electron microscopy studies confirmed the hypertrophic changes of the Golgi apparatus, specifically, the swelling of cisternae in the trans-compartment of dictyosomes after exposure to abscisic acid, and swelling of cis- and trans-compartment of dictyosomes after exposure to abscisic acid, and swelling of cis- and trans-compartments of dictyosomes after exposure to gibberellic acid. Using of Click-iT technique allowed to detect the elevation of the total protein synthesis only in A431 cells exposed to abscisic acid. Cumulative data suggests that, under these conditions, the hypertrophy of Golgi apparatus may reflect the enhanced secretory activity of cells. In other experiments, the hypertrophy of Golgi is not related to increased protein synthesis and therefore may suggest the stress-related changes of ER and Golgi apparatus. Our results demonstrate that morphologically similar reaction of cellular organelles, such as hypertrophy of Golgi apparatus, is the result of different functional activities, and that molecular mechanisms underlying the changes induced in cells need further investigations. PMID:25696996

  5. Light microscopic characterization of glycoconjugates in secretory cells of the carp (Cyprinus carpio) gill epithelium.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, J; Velasco, A; Sánchez Aguayo, I; Amores, P

    1987-01-01

    Secretory products of granular and mucous cells in the gill epithelium of the carp, Cyprinus carpio, were distinguished by their cytochemical reactions with peroxidase-labelled lectins and with the galactose oxidase (GO)-Schiff reagents. Secretory products of granular cells reacted with lectins from Triticum vulgaris (WGA), Arachis hypogaea (PNA), Dolichos biflorus (DBA), Glycine max (SAB), and Lotus tetragonolobus (LTA). They also reacted with GO-Schiff reagents. After sialic acid cleavage with HCl, new binding sites for DBA and SBA appeared, suggesting the terminal sequence sialic acid-N-acetylgalactosamine (SA-GalNAc) for the secretion of this cell type. In mucous cells, binding sites for WGA, DBA, and SBA and, after acid hydrolysis, binding sites for PNA and a positive GO-Schiff reaction were detected. The terminal trisaccharide sialic acid-galactose (beta 1-3)-N-acetylgalactosamine (SA-Gal-GalNAc) is proposed for the secretion of mucous cells. These cytochemical differences are discussed in light of the involvement of both cell types in fish mucus elaboration. PMID:2449406

  6. The biology and dynamics of mammalian cortical granules

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cortical granules are membrane bound organelles located in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes. Following fertilization, cortical granules undergo exocytosis to release their contents into the perivitelline space. This secretory process, which is calcium dependent and SNARE protein-mediated pathway, is known as the cortical reaction. After exocytosis, the released cortical granule proteins are responsible for blocking polyspermy by modifying the oocytes' extracellular matrices, such as the zona pellucida in mammals. Mammalian cortical granules range in size from 0.2 um to 0.6 um in diameter and different from most other regulatory secretory organelles in that they are not renewed once released. These granules are only synthesized in female germ cells and transform an egg upon sperm entry; therefore, this unique cellular structure has inherent interest for our understanding of the biology of fertilization. Cortical granules are long thought to be static and awaiting in the cortex of unfertilized oocytes to be stimulated undergoing exocytosis upon gamete fusion. Not till recently, the dynamic nature of cortical granules is appreciated and understood. The latest studies of mammalian cortical granules document that this organelle is not only biochemically heterogeneous, but also displays complex distribution during oocyte development. Interestingly, some cortical granules undergo exocytosis prior to fertilization; and a number of granule components function beyond the time of fertilization in regulating embryonic cleavage and preimplantation development, demonstrating their functional significance in fertilization as well as early embryonic development. The following review will present studies that investigate the biology of cortical granules and will also discuss new findings that uncover the dynamic aspect of this organelle in mammals. PMID:22088197

  7. Alcohol enhances GABAergic transmission to cerebellar granule cells via an increase in Golgi cell excitability.

    PubMed

    Carta, Mario; Mameli, Manuel; Valenzuela, C Fernando

    2004-04-14

    Alcohol intoxication alters coordination and motor skills, and this is responsible for a significant number of traffic accident-related deaths around the world. Although the precise mechanism of action of ethanol (EtOH) is presently unknown, studies suggest that it acts, in part, by interfering with normal cerebellar functioning. An important component of cerebellar circuits is the granule cell. The excitability of these abundantly expressed neurons is controlled by the Golgi cell, a subtype of GABAergic interneuron. Granule cells receive GABAergic input in the form of phasic and tonic currents that are mediated by synaptic and extrasynaptic receptors, respectively. Using the acute cerebellar slice preparation and patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques, we found that ethanol induces a parallel increase in both the frequency of spontaneous IPSCs and the magnitude of the tonic current. EtOH (50 mm) did not produce this effect when spontaneous action potentials were blocked with tetrodotoxin. Recordings in the loose-patch cell-attached configuration demonstrated that ethanol increases the frequency of spontaneous action potentials in Golgi cells. Taken together, these findings indicate that ethanol enhances GABAergic inhibition of granule cells via a presynaptic mechanism that involves an increase in action potential-dependent GABA release from Golgi cells. This effect is likely to have an impact on the flow of information through the cerebellar cortex and may contribute to the mechanism by which acute ingestion of alcoholic beverages induces motor impairment. PMID:15084654

  8. Competition from newborn granule cells does not drive axonal retraction of silenced old granule cells in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Lopez, Carla M.; Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Nakashiba, Toshiaki; Tóth, Katalin; Tonegawa, Susumu; McBain, Chris J.

    2012-01-01

    In the developing nervous system synaptic refinement, typified by the neuromuscular junction where supernumerary connections are eliminated by axon retraction leaving the postsynaptic target innervated by a single dominant input, critically regulates neuronal circuit formation. Whether such competition-based pruning continues in established circuits of mature animals remains unknown. This question is particularly relevant in the context of adult neurogenesis where newborn cells must integrate into preexisting circuits, and thus, potentially compete with functionally mature synapses to gain access to their postsynaptic targets. The hippocampus plays an important role in memory formation/retrieval and the dentate gyrus (DG) subfield exhibits continued neurogenesis into adulthood. Therefore, this region contains both mature granule cells (old GCs) and immature recently born GCs that are generated throughout adult life (young GCs), providing a neurogenic niche model to examine the role of competition in synaptic refinement. Recent work from an independent group in developing animals indicated that embryonically/early postnatal generated GCs placed at a competitive disadvantage by selective expression of tetanus toxin (TeTX) to prevent synaptic release rapidly retracted their axons, and that this retraction was driven by competition from newborn GCs lacking TeTX. In contrast, following 3–6 months of selective TeTX expression in old GCs of adult mice we did not observe any evidence of axon retraction. Indeed ultrastructural analyses indicated that the terminals of silenced GCs even maintained synaptic contact with their postsynaptic targets. Furthermore, we did not detect any significant differences in the electrophysiological properties between old GCs in control and TeTX conditions. Thus, our data demonstrate a remarkable stability in the face of a relatively prolonged period of altered synaptic competition between two populations of neurons within the adult brain

  9. Secretory clusterin inhibits osteoclastogenesis by attenuating M-CSF-dependent osteoclast precursor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Bongkun; Kang, Soon-Suk; Kang, Sang-Wook; Min, Bon-Hong; Lee, Eun-Jin; Song, Da-Hyun; Kim, Sang-Min; Song, Youngsup; Yoon, Seung-Yong; Chang, Eun-Ju

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We describe the expression and secretion of clusterin in osteoclasts. • Endogenous clusterin deficiency does not affect osteoclast formation. • Exogenous treatment with secretory clusterin decreases osteoclast differentiation. • Secretory clusterin attenuates osteoclast precursor cell proliferation by inhibiting M-CSF-mediated ERK activation. - Abstract: Secretory clusterin (sCLU)/apolipoprotein J is a multifunctional glycoprotein that is ubiquitously expressed in various tissues. Reduced sCLU in the joints of patients with bone erosive disease is associated with disease activity; however, its exact role has yet to be elucidated. Here, we report that CLU is expressed and secreted during osteoclastogenesis in mouse bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs) that are treated with receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) and macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF). CLU-deficient BMMs obtained from CLU{sup −/−} mice exhibited no significant alterations in OC differentiation in comparison with BMMs obtained from wild-type mice. In contrast, exogenous sCLU treatment significantly inhibited OC formation in both BMMs and OC precursor cultures. The inhibitory effect of sCLU was more prominent in BMMs than OC precursor cultures. Interestingly, treating BMMs with sCLU decreased the proliferative effects elicited by M-CSF and suppressed M-CSF-induced ERK activation of OC precursor cells without causing apoptotic cell death. This study provides the first evidence that sCLU reduces OC formation by inhibiting the actions of M-CSF, thereby suggesting its protective role in bone erosion.

  10. Myosin Va Transports Dense Core Secretory Vesicles in Pancreatic MIN6 β-CellsV⃞

    PubMed Central

    Varadi, Aniko; Tsuboi, Takashi; Rutter, Guy A.

    2005-01-01

    The role of unconventional myosins in neuroendocrine cells is not fully understood, with involvement suggested in the movement of both secretory vesicles and mitochondria. Here, we demonstrate colocalization of myosin Va (MyoVa) with insulin in pancreatic β-cells and show that MyoVa copurifies with insulin in density gradients and with the vesicle marker phogrin-enhanced green fluorescent protein upon fluorescence-activated sorting of vesicles. By contrast, MyoVa immunoreactivity was poorly colocalized with mitochondrial or other markers. Demonstrating an important role for MyoVa in the recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface, a reduction of MyoVa protein levels achieved by RNA interference caused a significant decrease in glucose- or depolarization-stimulated insulin secretion. Similarly, expression of the dominant-negative–acting globular tail domain of MyoVa decreased by ∼50% the number of vesicles docked at the plasma membrane and by 87% the number of depolarization-stimulated exocytotic events detected by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy. We conclude that MyoVa-driven movements of vesicles along the cortical actin network are essential for the terminal stages of regulated exocytosis in β-cells. PMID:15788565

  11. Secretory prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4 sensitizes multicellular spheroids (MCS) of glioblastoma multiforme cells to tamoxifen-induced cell death

    PubMed Central

    Jagtap, Jayashree C.; Parveen, D.; Shah, Reecha D.; Desai, Aarti; Bhosale, Dipali; Chugh, Ashish; Ranade, Deepak; Karnik, Swapnil; Khedkar, Bhushan; Mathur, Aaishwarya; Natesh, Kumar; Chandrika, Goparaju; Shastry, Padma

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of brain tumor and is associated with resistance to conventional therapy and poor patient survival. Prostate apoptosis response (Par)-4, a tumor suppressor, is expressed as both an intracellular and secretory/extracellular protein. Though secretory Par-4 induces apoptosis in cancer cells, its potential in drug-resistant tumors remains to be fully explored. Multicellular spheroids (MCS) of cancer cells often acquire multi-drug resistance and serve as ideal experimental models. We investigated the role of Par-4 in Tamoxifen (TAM)-induced cell death in MCS of human cell lines and primary cultures of GBM tumors. TCGA and REMBRANT data analysis revealed that low levels of Par-4 correlated with low survival period (21.85 ± 19.30 days) in GBM but not in astrocytomas (59.13 ± 47.26 days) and oligodendrogliomas (58.04 ± 59.80 days) suggesting low PAWR expression as a predictive risk factor in GBM. Consistently, MCS of human cell lines and primary cultures displayed low Par-4 expression, high level of chemo-resistance genes and were resistant to TAM-induced cytotoxicity. In monolayer cells, TAM-induced cytotoxicity was associated with enhanced expression of Par-4 and was alleviated by silencing of Par-4 using specific siRNA. TAM effectively induced secretory Par-4 in conditioned medium (CM) of cells cultured as monolayer but not in MCS. Moreover, MCS were rendered sensitive to TAM-induced cell death by exposure to conditioned medium (CM)-containing Par-4 (derived from TAM-treated monolayer cells). Also TAM reduced the expression of Akt and PKCζ in GBM cells cultured as monolayer but not in MCS. Importantly, combination of TAM with inhibitors to PI3K inhibitor (LY294002) or PKCζ resulted in secretion of Par-4 and cell death in MCS. Since membrane GRP78 is overexpressed in most cancer cells but not normal cells, and secretory Par-4 induces apoptosis by binding to membrane GRP78, secretory Par-4 is an

  12. Mesenchymal cell activation is the rate-limiting step of granulation tissue induction.

    PubMed Central

    McClain, S. A.; Simon, M.; Jones, E.; Nandi, A.; Gailit, J. O.; Tonnesen, M. G.; Newman, D.; Clark, R. A.

    1996-01-01

    During wound repair a 3-day lag occurs between injury and granulation tissue development. When full-thickness, 8-mm-round, excisional wounds were made in the paravertebral skin of outbred Yorkshire pigs and harvested at various times, no granulation tissue was observed before day 4. Day 4 wounds were 3% filled with granulation tissue, day 5 wounds 48% filled, and day 7 wounds 88% filled. The prerequisites for granulation tissue induction are not known but hypothetically include fibrin matrix maturation or cell activation. To examine whether matrix maturation was necessary, wounds were allowed to heal for 5 or 7 days and then aggressively curetted, resulting in the formation of fresh fibrin clots in the newly formed wound spaces. In contrast to original wounds, no lag phase was observed; wounds curetted on day 5 were 23% filled with granulation tissue 1 day later and 99% filled 3 days later, whereas wounds curetted on day 7 were 47% filled 1 day later and completely filled within 2 days. Thus, granulation tissue formation resumed promptly and independently of fibrin clot matrix maturation. This observation suggested that mesenchymal cell activation might be the rate-limiting step in granulation tissue formation. To address this hypothesis more directly, cultured porcine or human fibroblasts, grown to 80% confluence in Dulbecco's minimal essential medium plus 10% fetal calf serum, were added to new wounds. These wounds were sealed with a freshly made exogenous fibrin clot. In some wounds, platelet releasate was added to the fibrin clot. Granulation tissue did not form in day 3 wounds, which had received either fibrin alone, fibrin and platelet releasate, or fibrin and fibroblasts. In contrast, granulation tissue was observed in wounds receiving fibrin, human fibroblasts, and platelet releasate. By day 4, wounds receiving cultured human fibroblasts, fibrin, and platelet releasate were 14% filled with granulation tissue compared with less than 4% granulation tissue in

  13. LYST controls the biogenesis of the endosomal compartment required for secretory lysosome function.

    PubMed

    Sepulveda, Fernando E; Burgess, Agathe; Heiligenstein, Xavier; Goudin, Nicolas; Ménager, Mickaël M; Romao, Maryse; Côte, Marjorie; Mahlaoui, Nizar; Fischer, Alain; Raposo, Graça; Ménasché, Gaël; de Saint Basile, Geneviève

    2015-02-01

    Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS) is caused by mutations in the gene encoding LYST protein, the function of which remains poorly understood. Prominent features of CHS include defective secretory lysosome exocytosis and the presence of enlarged, lysosome-like organelles in several cell types. In order to get further insight into the role of LYST in the biogenesis and exocytosis of cytotoxic granules, we analyzed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) from patients with CHS. Using confocal microscopy and correlative light electron microscopy, we showed that the enlarged organelle in CTLs is a hybrid compartment that contains proteins components from recycling-late endosomes and lysosomes. Enlargement of cytotoxic granules results from the progressive clustering and then fusion of normal-sized endolysosomal organelles. At the immunological synapse (IS) in CHS CTLs, cytotoxic granules have limited motility and appear docked while nevertheless unable to degranulate. By increasing the expression of effectors of lytic granule exocytosis, such as Munc13-4, Rab27a and Slp3, in CHS CTLs, we were able to restore the dynamics and the secretory ability of cytotoxic granules at the IS. Our results indicate that LYST is involved in the trafficking of the effectors involved in exocytosis required for the terminal maturation of perforin-containing vesicles into secretory cytotoxic granules. PMID:25425525

  14. Measurement of the internal pH of mast cell granules using microvolumetric fluorescence and isotopic techniques

    SciTech Connect

    De Young, M.B.; Nemeth, E.F.; Scarpa, A.

    1987-04-01

    The intragranular pH of isolated mast cell granules was measured. Because of the minute amounts of isolated granules available, two techniques were developed by modifying aminoacridine fluorescence and (/sup 14/C)methylamine accumulation techniques to permit measurements with microliter sample volumes. Granule purity was demonstrated by electron microscopy, ruthenium red exclusion, and biochemical (histamine, mast cell granule protease) analysis. The internal pH was determined to be 5.55 +/- 0.06, indicating that the pH environment within mast cell granules is not significantly different from that of previously studied granule types (i.e., chromaffin, platelet, pancreatic islet, and pituitary granules). Collapse of the pH gradient by NH+4 was demonstrated with both techniques. No evidence of Cl-/OH- or specific cation/H+ transport was found, and major chloride permeability could not be unequivocably demonstrated. Ca/sup 2 +/ and Cl- at concentrations normally present extracellularly destabilized granules in the presence of NH+4, but this phenomenon does not necessarily indicate a role for these ions in the exocytotic release of granule contents from intact cells. The pH measurement techniques developed for investigating the properties of granules in mast cells may be useful for studying other granules that can be obtained only in limited quantities.

  15. Activation of protein kinase Ceta triggers cortical granule exocytosis in Xenopus oocytes.

    PubMed

    Gundersen, Cameron B; Kohan, Sirus A; Chen, Qian; Iagnemma, Joseph; Umbach, Joy A

    2002-03-15

    Previous work has shown that phorbol esters or diacylglycerol trigger cortical granule exocytosis in Xenopus oocytes. We sought to identify the isoform(s) of protein kinase C (PKC) that mediate(s) this regulated secretory event. Because this process is initiated by lipid activators of PKC but is independent of calcium ions, we focused on the family of novel (calcium-independent) PKCs. Pharmacological investigations using Gö6976 and Gö6983 tended to exclude PKCdelta, epsilon and mu as secretory triggers. Subcellular fractionation and immunoblot data revealed that these oocytes expressed all five members of the novel PKC family, but it was only PKCeta that colocalized with cortical granules. Finally, expression of wild type or constitutively active forms of PKCdelta and eta strongly supported the conclusion that it is PKCeta that initiates cortical granule exocytosis in these cells. These observations represent an important step in identifying the mechanism of secretory triggering in this system. PMID:11884530

  16. Murine granulated metrial gland cells are susceptible to Chlamydia psittaci infection in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, J; Buendía, A J; Salinas, J; Bernabé, A; Rodolakis, A; Stewart, I J

    1996-01-01

    Granulated metrial gland (GMG) cells are the most numerous lymphoid cells in the uteroplacental unit in rodent pregnancy. In an experimental murine model of abortion-causing infection, we have studied the responses of GMG cells to Chlamydia psittaci. Chlamydial inclusions have been found within GMG cells, both in apparently healthy cells and in cells with degenerative changes. Establishing the existence of GMG cells infected by C. psittaci opens a new and interesting chapter in the study of these cells. PMID:8751945

  17. Quantitative and morphological analysis of dentate granule cells with recurrent basal dendrites from normal and epileptic rats.

    PubMed

    Dashtipour, Khashayar; Yan, Xiao-Xin; Dinh, Trinh T; Okazaki, Maxine M; Nadler, J Victor; Ribak, Charles E

    2002-01-01

    Granule cells with recurrent basal dendrites (RBDs) were previously reported in both control and epileptic rats. RBDs are dendrites that arise from the basal half of granule cell bodies and curve toward and extend into the molecular layer. They are increased in frequency in the pilocarpine model of epilepsy. The present study was undertaken to analyze the distribution and morphology of granule cells with RBDs and the synaptic connections of RBDs. Granule cells were labeled by retrograde transport of biocytin. Those with an RBD were found throughout the granule cell layer, but were most numerous at the hilar border. The morphology of these cells varied in the different depths of the granule cell layer; the angle of their cell body's long axis was mainly vertical at the hilar margin, and changed to virtually horizontal close to the molecular layer border. Quantitative data on the distribution of granule cells with RBDs and the angle of the cell body's long axis confirmed these descriptions. At the electron microscopic level, RBDs showed the typical features of dendrites and formed numerous axodendritic and axospinous synapses with labeled and unlabeled axon terminals. These results showed that RBDs of granule cells from epileptic rats are postsynaptic to axon terminals, including mossy fibers, and thus are involved in a similar synaptic circuitry as apical dendrites of granule cells from these animals. PMID:12000120

  18. Multiple extra-synaptic spillover mechanisms regulate prolonged activity in cerebellar Golgi cell–granule cell loops

    PubMed Central

    Holtzman, Tahl; Sivam, Vanessa; Zhao, Tian; Frey, Oivier; van der Wal, Peter Dow; de Rooij, Nico F; Dalley, Jeffrey W; Edgley, Steve A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Despite a wealth of in vitro and modelling studies it remains unclear how neuronal populations in the cerebellum interact in vivo. We address the issue of how the cerebellar input layer processes sensory information, with particular focus on the granule cells (input relays) and their counterpart inhibitory interneurones, Golgi cells. Based on the textbook view, granule cells excite Golgi cells via glutamate forming a negative feedback loop. However, Golgi cells express inhibitory mGluR2 receptors suggesting an inhibitory role for glutamate. We set out to test this glutamatergic paradox in Golgi cells. Here we show that granule cells and Golgi cells interact through extra-synaptic signalling mechanisms during sensory information processing, as well as synaptic mechanisms. We demonstrate that such interactions depend on granule cell-derived glutamate acting via inhibitory mGluR2 receptors leading causally to the suppression of Golgi cell activity for several hundreds of milliseconds. We further show that granule cell-derived inhibition of Golgi cell activity is regulated by GABA-dependent extra-synaptic Golgi cell inhibition of granule cells, identifying a regulatory loop in which glutamate and GABA may be critical regulators of Golgi cell–granule cell functional activity. Thus, granule cells may promote their own prolonged activity via paradoxical feed-forward inhibition of Golgi cells, thereby enabling information processing over long timescales. PMID:21669981

  19. Bone Marrow Cells Expressing Clara Cell Secretory Protein Increase Epithelial Repair After Ablation of Pulmonary Clara Cells

    PubMed Central

    Bustos, Martha L; Mura, Marco; Marcus, Paula; Hwang, David; Ludkovski, Olga; Wong, Amy P; Waddell, Thomas K

    2013-01-01

    We have previously reported a subpopulation of bone marrow cells (BMC) that express Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP), generally felt to be specific to lung Clara cells. Ablation of lung Clara cells has been reported using a transgenic mouse that expresses thymidine kinase under control of the CCSP promoter. Treatment with ganciclovir results in permanent elimination of CCSP+ cells, failure of airway regeneration, and death. To determine if transtracheal delivery of wild-type bone marrow CCSP+ cells is beneficial after ablation of lung CCSP+ cells, transgenic mice were treated with ganciclovir followed by transtracheal administration of CCSP+ or CCSP− BMC. Compared with mice administered CCSP− cells, mice treated with CCSP+ cells had more donor cells lining the airway epithelium, where they expressed epithelial markers including CCSP. Although donor CCSP+ cells did not substantially repopulate the airway, their administration resulted in increased host ciliated cells, better preservation of airway epithelium, reduction of inflammatory cells, and an increase in animal survival time. Administration of CCSP+ BMC is beneficial after permanent ablation of lung Clara cells by increasing bronchial epithelial repair. Therefore, CCSP+ BMC could be important for treatment of lung diseases where airways re-epithelialization is compromised. PMID:23609017

  20. Spatial relationships between markers for secretory and endosomal machinery in human cytomegalovirus-infected cells versus those in uninfected cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhendu; Pellett, Philip E

    2011-06-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) induces extensive remodeling of the secretory apparatus to form the cytoplasmic virion assembly compartment (cVAC), where virion tegumentation and envelopment take place. We studied the structure of the cVAC by confocal microscopy to assess the three-dimensional distribution of proteins specifically associated with individual secretory organelles. In infected cells, early endosome antigen 1 (EEA1)-positive vesicles are concentrated at the center of the cVAC and, as previously seen, are distinct from structures visualized by markers for the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and trans-Golgi network (TGN). EEA1-positive vesicles can be strongly associated with markers for recycling endosomes, to a lesser extent with markers associated with components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport III (ESCRT III) machinery, and then with markers of late endosomes. In comparisons of uninfected and infected cells, we found significant changes in the structural associations and colocalization of organelle markers, as well as in net organelle volumes. These results provide new evidence that the HCMV-induced remodeling of the membrane transport apparatus involves much more than simple relocation and expansion of preexisting structures and are consistent with the hypothesis that the shift in identity of secretory organelles in HCMV-infected cells results in new functional profiles. PMID:21471245

  1. Common spectrum of polypeptides occurs in secretion granule membranes of different exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Cameron, R.S.; Cameron, P.L.; Castle, J.D.

    1986-10-01

    A highly purified membrane preparation from rat parotid secretion granules has been used as a comparative probe to examine the extent of compositional overlap in granule membranes of three other exocrine secretory tissues - pancreatic, lacrimal, and submandibular - from several standpoints. First, indirect immunofluorescent studies using a polyclonal polyspecific anti-parotid granule membrane antiserum has indicated a selective staining of granule membrane profiles in all acinar cells of all tissues. Second, highly purified granule membrane subfractions have been isolated from each exocrine tissue; comparative two-dimensional (isoelectric focusing; SDS) PAGE of radioiodinated granule membranes has identified 10-15 polypeptides of identical pI and apparent molecular mass. These species are likely to be integral membrane components since they are not extracted by either saponin-sodium sulfate or sodium carbonate (pH 11.5) treatments, and they do not have counterparts in the granule content. Finally, the identity among selected parotid and pancreatic radioiodinated granule membrane polypeptides has been documented using two-dimensional peptide mapping of chymotryptic and tryptic digests. These findings clearly indicate that exocrine secretory granules, irrespective of the nature of stored secretion, comprise a type of vesicular carrier with a common (and probably refined) membrane composition. Conceivably, the polypeptides identified carry out general functions related to exocrine secretion.

  2. Role of granule-cell transmission in memory trace of cerebellum-dependent optokinetic motor learning.

    PubMed

    Wada, Norio; Funabiki, Kazuo; Nakanishi, Shigetada

    2014-04-01

    Adaptation of the optokinetic response (OKR) is an eye movement enhanced by repeated motion of a surrounding visual field and represents a prototype of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. Purkinje cells and vestibular nuclei (VN) receive optokinetic and retinal slip signals via the mossy fiber-granule cell pathway and climbing-fiber projections, respectively. To explore the neural circuits and mechanisms responsible for OKR adaptation, we adopted the reversible neurotransmission-blocking (RNB) technique, in which granule-cell transmission to Purkinje cells was selectively and reversibly blocked by doxycycline-dependent expression of transmission-blocking tetanus toxin in granule cells. Blockade of granule-cell inputs abolished both short-term and long-term OKR adaptation induced by repeated OKR training, but normal levels of both responses were immediately evoked in the pretrained RNB mice by OKR retraining once granule-cell transmission had recovered. Importantly, eye movement elicited by electrical stimulation of the cerebellar focculus was elevated by long-term but not by short-term OKR training in adaptive OKR-negative RNB mice. Furthermore, when the flocculus of adaptive OKR-negative RNB mice was electrically excited in-phase with OKR stimulation, these mice exhibited long-term adaptive OKR. These results indicate that convergent information to the VN was critical for acquisition and storage of long-term OKR adaptation with conjunctive action of Purkinje cells for OKR expression. Interestingly, in contrast to conditioned eyeblink memory, the expression of once acquired adaptive long-term OKR was not abrogated by blockade of granule-cell transmission, suggesting that distinct forms of neural plasticity would operate in different forms of cerebellum-dependent motor learning. PMID:24706878

  3. Combining quantitative 2D and 3D image analysis in the serial block face SEM: application to secretory organelles of pancreatic islet cells

    PubMed Central

    SHOMORONY, A.; PFEIFER, C.R.; ARONOVA, M.A.; ZHANG, G.; CAI, T.; XU, H.; NOTKINS, A.L.

    2015-01-01

    Summary A combination of two‐dimensional (2D) and three‐dimensional (3D) analyses of tissue volume ultrastructure acquired by serial block face scanning electron microscopy can greatly shorten the time required to obtain quantitative information from big data sets that contain many billions of voxels. Thus, to analyse the number of organelles of a specific type, or the total volume enclosed by a population of organelles within a cell, it is possible to estimate the number density or volume fraction of that organelle using a stereological approach to analyse randomly selected 2D block face views through the cells, and to combine such estimates with precise measurement of 3D cell volumes by delineating the plasma membrane in successive block face images. The validity of such an approach can be easily tested since the entire 3D tissue volume is available in the serial block face scanning electron microscopy data set. We have applied this hybrid 3D/2D technique to determine the number of secretory granules in the endocrine α and β cells of mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and have been able to estimate the total insulin content of a β cell. PMID:26139222

  4. Combining quantitative 2D and 3D image analysis in the serial block face SEM: application to secretory organelles of pancreatic islet cells.

    PubMed

    Shomorony, A; Pfeifer, C R; Aronova, M A; Zhang, G; Cai, T; Xu, H; Notkins, A L; Leapman, R D

    2015-08-01

    A combination of two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) analyses of tissue volume ultrastructure acquired by serial block face scanning electron microscopy can greatly shorten the time required to obtain quantitative information from big data sets that contain many billions of voxels. Thus, to analyse the number of organelles of a specific type, or the total volume enclosed by a population of organelles within a cell, it is possible to estimate the number density or volume fraction of that organelle using a stereological approach to analyse randomly selected 2D block face views through the cells, and to combine such estimates with precise measurement of 3D cell volumes by delineating the plasma membrane in successive block face images. The validity of such an approach can be easily tested since the entire 3D tissue volume is available in the serial block face scanning electron microscopy data set. We have applied this hybrid 3D/2D technique to determine the number of secretory granules in the endocrine α and β cells of mouse pancreatic islets of Langerhans, and have been able to estimate the total insulin content of a β cell. PMID:26139222

  5. Protein Kinases Are Associated with Multiple, Distinct Cytoplasmic Granules in Quiescent Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Khyati H.; Nostramo, Regina; Zhang, Bo; Varia, Sapna N.; Klett, Bethany M.; Herman, Paul K.

    2014-01-01

    The cytoplasm of the eukaryotic cell is subdivided into distinct functional domains by the presence of a variety of membrane-bound organelles. The remaining aqueous space may be further partitioned by the regulated assembly of discrete ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complexes that contain particular proteins and messenger RNAs. These RNP granules are conserved structures whose importance is highlighted by studies linking them to human disorders like amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. However, relatively little is known about the diversity, composition, and physiological roles of these cytoplasmic structures. To begin to address these issues, we examined the cytoplasmic granules formed by a key set of signaling molecules, the protein kinases of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Interestingly, a significant fraction of these proteins, almost 20%, was recruited to cytoplasmic foci specifically as cells entered into the G0-like quiescent state, stationary phase. Colocalization studies demonstrated that these foci corresponded to eight different granules, including four that had not been reported previously. All of these granules were found to rapidly disassemble upon the resumption of growth, and the presence of each was correlated with cell viability in the quiescent cultures. Finally, this work also identified new constituents of known RNP granules, including the well-characterized processing body and stress granule. The composition of these latter structures is therefore more varied than previously thought and could be an indicator of additional biological activities being associated with these complexes. Altogether, these observations indicate that quiescent yeast cells contain multiple distinct cytoplasmic granules that may make important contributions to their long-term survival. PMID:25342717

  6. Ovulation in Drosophila is controlled by secretory cells of the female reproductive tract.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianjun; Spradling, Allan C

    2013-01-01

    How oocytes are transferred into an oviduct with a receptive environment remains poorly known. We found that glands of the Drosophila female reproductive tract, spermathecae and/or parovaria, are required for ovulation and to promote sperm storage. Reducing total secretory cell number by interferring with Notch signaling during development blocked ovulation. Knocking down expression after adult eclosion of the nuclear hormone receptor Hr39, a master regulator of gland development, slowed ovulation and blocked sperm storage. However, ovulation (but not sperm storage) continued when only canonical protein secretion was compromised in adult glands. Our results imply that proteins secreted during adulthood by the canonical secretory pathway from female reproductive glands are needed to store sperm, while a non-canonical glandular secretion stimulates ovulation. Our results suggest that the reproductive tract signals to the ovary using glandular secretions, and that this pathway has been conserved during evolution. DOI:http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00415.001. PMID:23599892

  7. Ionic and secretory response of pancreatic islet cells to minoxidil sulfate

    SciTech Connect

    Antoine, M.H.; Hermann, M.; Herchuelz, A.; Lebrun, P. )

    1991-07-01

    Minoxidil sulfate is an antihypertensive agent belonging to the new class of vasodilators, the K+ channel openers. The present study was undertaken to characterize the effects of minoxidil sulfate on ionic and secretory events in rat pancreatic islets. The drug unexpectedly provoked a concentration-dependent decrease in 86Rb outflow. This inhibitory effect was reduced in a concentration-dependent manner by glucose and tolbutamide. Minoxidil sulfate did not affect 45Ca outflow from islets perfused in the presence of extracellular Ca++ and absence or presence of glucose. However, in islets exposed to a medium deprived of extracellular Ca++, the drug provoked a rise in 45Ca outflow. Whether in the absence or presence of extracellular Ca++, minoxidil sulfate increased the cytosolic free Ca++ concentration of islet cells. Lastly, minoxidil sulfate increased the release of insulin from glucose-stimulated pancreatic islets. These results suggest that minoxidil sulfate reduces the activity of the ATP-sensitive K+ channels and promotes an intracellular translocation of Ca++. The latter change might account for the effect of the drug on the insulin-releasing process. However, the secretory response to minoxidil sulfate could also be mediated, at least in part, by a modest Ca++ entry.

  8. Ex Vivo Imaging of Postnatal Cerebellar Granule Cell Migration Using Confocal Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  9. Ex vivo imaging of postnatal cerebellar granule cell migration using confocal macroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  10. Seizure-Induced Motility of Differentiated Dentate Granule Cells Is Prevented by the Central Reelin Fragment.

    PubMed

    Orcinha, Catarina; Münzner, Gert; Gerlach, Johannes; Kilias, Antje; Follo, Marie; Egert, Ulrich; Haas, Carola A

    2016-01-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) represents a pathological widening of the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus and it is frequently observed in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Recent studies in human MTLE specimens and in animal epilepsy models have shown that a decreased expression and functional inactivation of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin correlates with GCD formation, but causal evidence is still lacking. Here, we used unilateral kainate (KA) injection into the mouse hippocampus, an established MTLE animal model, to precisely map the loss of reelin mRNA-synthesizing neurons in relation to GCD along the septotemporal axis of the epileptic hippocampus. We show that reelin mRNA-producing neurons are mainly lost in the hilus and that this loss precisely correlates with the occurrence of GCD. To monitor GCD formation in real time, we used organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) prepared from mice which express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) primarily in differentiated dentate granule cells. Using life cell microscopy we observed that increasing doses of KA resulted in an enhanced motility of eGFP-positive granule cells. Moreover, KA treatment of OHSC resulted in a rapid loss of Reelin-producing interneurons mainly in the hilus, as observed in vivo. A detailed analysis of the migration behavior of individual eGFP-positive granule cells revealed that the majority of these neurons actively migrate toward the hilar region, where Reelin-producing neurons are lost. Treatment with KA and subsequent addition of the recombinant R3-6 Reelin fragment significantly prevented the movement of eGFP-positive granule cells. Together, these findings suggest that GCD formation is indeed triggered by a loss of Reelin in hilar interneurons. PMID:27516734

  11. Seizure-Induced Motility of Differentiated Dentate Granule Cells Is Prevented by the Central Reelin Fragment

    PubMed Central

    Orcinha, Catarina; Münzner, Gert; Gerlach, Johannes; Kilias, Antje; Follo, Marie; Egert, Ulrich; Haas, Carola A.

    2016-01-01

    Granule cell dispersion (GCD) represents a pathological widening of the granule cell layer in the dentate gyrus and it is frequently observed in patients with mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE). Recent studies in human MTLE specimens and in animal epilepsy models have shown that a decreased expression and functional inactivation of the extracellular matrix protein Reelin correlates with GCD formation, but causal evidence is still lacking. Here, we used unilateral kainate (KA) injection into the mouse hippocampus, an established MTLE animal model, to precisely map the loss of reelin mRNA-synthesizing neurons in relation to GCD along the septotemporal axis of the epileptic hippocampus. We show that reelin mRNA-producing neurons are mainly lost in the hilus and that this loss precisely correlates with the occurrence of GCD. To monitor GCD formation in real time, we used organotypic hippocampal slice cultures (OHSCs) prepared from mice which express enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) primarily in differentiated dentate granule cells. Using life cell microscopy we observed that increasing doses of KA resulted in an enhanced motility of eGFP-positive granule cells. Moreover, KA treatment of OHSC resulted in a rapid loss of Reelin-producing interneurons mainly in the hilus, as observed in vivo. A detailed analysis of the migration behavior of individual eGFP-positive granule cells revealed that the majority of these neurons actively migrate toward the hilar region, where Reelin-producing neurons are lost. Treatment with KA and subsequent addition of the recombinant R3–6 Reelin fragment significantly prevented the movement of eGFP-positive granule cells. Together, these findings suggest that GCD formation is indeed triggered by a loss of Reelin in hilar interneurons. PMID:27516734

  12. Dependence of structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules on ATP and cell communication.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Bo; Liu, Yu

    2013-06-01

    Aerobic granules are dense and compact microbial aggregates with various bacterial species. Recently, aerobic granulation technology has been extensively explored for treatment of municipal and industrial wastewaters. However, little information is currently available with regard to their structure stability and integrity at levels of energy metabolism and cell communication. In the present study, a typical chemical uncoupler, 3,3',4',5-tetrachlorosalicylanilide with the power to dissipate proton motive force and subsequently inhibit adenosine triphosphate (ATP) generation, was used to investigate possible roles of ATP and cell communication in maintaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. It was found that inhibited ATP synthesis resulted in the reduced production of autoinducer-2 and N-acylhomoserine lactones essential for cell communication, while lowered extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) production was also observed. As a consequence, aerobic granules appeared to break up. This study showed that ATP-dependent quorum sensing and EPS were essential for sustaining the structure stability and integrity of aerobic granules. PMID:23011346

  13. von Willebrand factor multimerization and the polarity of secretory pathways in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lopes da Silva, Mafalda; Cutler, Daniel F

    2016-07-14

    The von Willebrand factor (VWF) synthesized and secreted by endothelial cells is central to hemostasis and thrombosis, providing a multifunctional adhesive platform that brings together components needed for these processes. VWF secretion can occur from both apical and basolateral sides of endothelial cells, and from constitutive, basal, and regulated secretory pathways, the latter two via Weibel-Palade bodies (WPB). Although the amount and structure of VWF is crucial to its function, the extent of VWF release, multimerization, and polarity of the 3 secretory pathways have only been addressed separately, and with conflicting results. We set out to clarify these relationships using polarized human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) grown on Transwell membranes. We found that regulated secretion of ultra-large (UL)-molecular-weight VWF predominantly occurred apically, consistent with a role in localized platelet capture in the vessel lumen. We found that constitutive secretion of low-molecular-weight (LMW) VWF is targeted basolaterally, toward the subendothelial matrix, using the adaptor protein complex 1 (AP-1), where it may provide the bulk of collagen-bound subendothelial VWF. We also found that basally-secreted VWF is composed of UL-VWF, released continuously from WPBs in the absence of stimuli, and occurs predominantly apically, suggesting this could be the main source of circulating plasma VWF. Together, we provide a unified dataset reporting the amount and multimeric state of VWF secreted from the constitutive, basal, and regulated pathways in polarized HUVECs, and have established a new role for AP-1 in the basolateral constitutive secretion of VWF. PMID:27106123

  14. Cytocompatibility of porous biphasic calcium phosphate granules with human mesenchymal cells by a multiparametric assay.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Fabio; Alves, Gutemberg; Fernandes, Gustavo; König, Bruno; Rossi, Alexandre J R; Granjeiro, Jose

    2012-06-01

    This work aims to evaluate the cytocompatibility of injectable and moldable restorative biomaterials based on granules of dense or porous biphasic calcium phosphates (BCPs) with human primary mesenchymal cells, in order to validate them as tools for stem cell-induced bone regeneration. Porous hydroxyapatite (HA) and HA/beta-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) (60:40) granules were obtained by the addition of wax spheres and pressing at 20 MPa, while dense materials were compacted by pressing at 100 MPa, followed by thermal treatment (1100°C), grinding, and sieving. Extracts were prepared by 24-h incubation of granules on culture media, with subsequent exposition of human primary mesenchymal cells. Three different cell viability parameters were evaluated on the same samples. Scanning electron microscopy analysis of the granules revealed distinct dense and porous surfaces. After cell exposition to extracts, no significant differences on mitochondrial activity (2,3-bis(2-methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenly)-5-[(phenylamino) carbonyl]-2H-tetrazolium hydroxide) or cell density (Crystal Violet Dye Elution) were observed among groups. However, Neutral Red assay revealed that dense materials extracts induced lower levels of total viable cells to porous HA/β-TCP (P < 0.01). Calcium ion content was also significantly lower on the extracts of dense samples. Porogenic treatments on BCP composites do not affect cytocompatibility, as measured by three different parameters, indicating that these ceramics are well suited for further studies on future bioengineering applications. PMID:22372877

  15. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2) in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Rasila, Tiina; Lehtonen, Alexandra; Kanerva, Kristiina; Mäkitie, Laura T; Haglund, Caj; Andersson, Leif C

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2), originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s) of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3) to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated. PMID:26963840

  16. Expression of ODC Antizyme Inhibitor 2 (AZIN2) in Human Secretory Cells and Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Rasila, Tiina; Lehtonen, Alexandra; Kanerva, Kristiina; Mäkitie, Laura T.; Haglund, Caj; Andersson, Leif C.

    2016-01-01

    Ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) antizyme inhibitor 2 (AZIN2), originally called ODCp, is a regulator of polyamine synthesis that we originally identified and cloned. High expression of ODCp mRNA was found in brain and testis. We reported that AZIN2 is involved in regulation of cellular vesicle transport and / or secretion, but the ultimate physiological role(s) of AZIN2 is still poorly understood. In this study we used a peptide antibody (K3) to human AZIN2 and by immunohistochemistry mapped its expression in various normal tissues. We found high expression in the nervous system, in type 2 pneumocytes in the lung, in megakaryocytes, in gastric parietal cells co-localized with H,K-ATPase beta subunit, in selected enteroendocrine cells, in acinar cells of sweat glands, in podocytes, in macula densa cells and epithelium of collecting ducts in the kidney. The high expression of AZIN2 in various cells with secretory or vesicle transport activity indicates that the polyamine metabolism regulated by AZIN2 is more significantly involved in these events than previously appreciated. PMID:26963840

  17. Evidence for evoked release of adenosine and glutamate from cultured cerebellar granule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schousboe, A.; Frandsen, A.; Drejer, J. )

    1989-09-01

    Evoked release of ({sup 3}H)-D-aspartate which labels the neurotransmitter glutamate pool in cultured cerebellar granule cells was compared with evoked release of adenosine from similar cultures. It was found that both adenosine and (3H)-D-aspartate could be released from the neurons in a calcium dependent manner after depolarization of the cells with either 10-100 microM glutamate or 50 mM KCl. Cultures of cerebellar granule cells treated with 50 microM kainate to eliminate GABAergic neurons behaved in the same way. This together with the observation that cultured astrocytes did not exhibit a calcium dependent, potassium stimulated adenosine release strongly suggest that cerebellar granule cells release adenosine in a neurotransmitter-like fashion together with glutamate which is the classical neurotransmitter of these neurons. Studies of the metabolism of adenosine showed that in the granule cells adenosine is rapidly metabolized to ATP, ADP, and AMP, but in spite of this, adenosine was found to be released preferential to ATP.

  18. Quantitative description of the spatial arrangement of organelles in a polarised secretory epithelial cell: the salivary gland acinar cell

    PubMed Central

    MAYHEW, TERRY M.

    1999-01-01

    Previous quantitative descriptions of cellular ultrastructure have focused on spatial content (volume, surface area and number of organelles and membrane domains). It is possible to complement such descriptions by also quantifying spatial arrangements. Hitherto, applications of stereological methods for achieving this (notably, estimation of covariance and pair correlation functions) have been confined to organ and tissue levels. This study explores 3-dimensional subcellular arrangements of key organelles within acinar cells of rabbit parotid salivary glands, highly polarised epithelial cells specialised for exocrine secretion of α-amylase. It focuses on spatial arrangements of secretion product stores (zymogen granules), rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER) and mitochondria. Systematic random samples of electron microscopical fields of view from 3 rabbits were analysed using test grids bearing linear dipole probes of different sizes. Unbiased estimates of organelle volume densities were obtained by point counting and estimates of covariance and pair correlation functions by dipole counting. Plots of pair correlation functions against dipole length identified spatial arrangement differences between organelle types. Volumes within RER and mitochondrial compartments were positively correlated with themselves at distances below 4 μm and 2 μm respectively but were essentially randomly arranged at longer distances. In sharp contrast, zymogen granules were not randomly arranged. They were clustered at distances below 6–7 μm and more widely scattered at greater distances. These findings provide quantitative confirmation of the polarised arrangement of zymogen granules within acinar cells and further support for the relative invariance of biological organisation between subjects. PMID:10337960

  19. Radioresistance of granulation tissue-derived cells from skin wounds combined with total body irradiation.

    PubMed

    Dai, Tingyu; Chen, Zelin; Tan, Li; Shi, Chunmeng

    2016-04-01

    Combined radiation and wound injury (CRWI) occurs following nuclear explosions and accidents, radiological or nuclear terrorism, and radiation therapy combined with surgery. CRWI is complicated and more difficult to heal than single injuries. Stem cell‑based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for CRWI, however, sourcing stem cells remains a challenge. In the present study, the granulation tissue-derived cells (GTCs) from the skin wounds (SWs) of CRWI mice (C‑GTCs) demonstrated a higher radioresistance to the damage caused by combined injury, and were easier to isolate and harvest when compared with bone marrow‑derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs). Furthermore, the C-GTCs exhibited similar stem cell-associated properties, such as self-renewal and multilineage differentiation capacity, when compared with neonatal dermal stromal cells (DSCs) and GTCs from unirradiated SWs. Granulation tissue, which is easy to access, may present as an optimal autologous source of stem/progenitor cells for therapeutic applications in CRWI. PMID:26936439

  20. Secretory IgA induces tolerogenic dendritic cells through SIGNR1 dampening autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Diana, Julien; Moura, Ivan C; Vaugier, Céline; Gestin, Aurélie; Tissandie, Emilie; Beaudoin, Lucie; Corthésy, Blaise; Hocini, Hakim; Lehuen, Agnès; Monteiro, Renato C

    2013-09-01

    IgA plays ambivalent roles in the immune system. The balance between inhibitory and activating responses relies on the multimerization status of IgA and interaction with their cognate receptors. In mucosal sites, secretory IgA (SIgA) protects the host through immune-exclusion mechanisms, but its function in the bloodstream remains unknown. Using bone marrow-derived dendritic cells, we found that both human and mouse SIgA induce tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) following binding to specific ICAM-3 grabbing nonintegrin receptor 1. This interaction was dependent on Ca(2+) and mannose residues. SIgA-primed DCs (SIgA-DCs) are resistant to TLR-dependent maturation. Although SIgA-DCs fail to induce efficient proliferation and Th1 differentiation of naive responder T cells, they generate the expansion of regulatory T cells through IL-10 production. SIgA-DCs are highly potent in inhibiting autoimmune responses in mouse models of type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis. This discovery may offer new insights about mucosal-derived DC immunoregulation through SIgA opening new therapeutic approaches to autoimmune diseases. PMID:23926325

  1. Structural, mass and elemental analyses of storage granules in methanogenic archaeal cells

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Daniel B.; Henstra, Anne M.; Gunsalus, Robert P.; Zhou, Z. Hong

    2013-01-01

    Summary Storage granules are an important component of metabolism in many organisms spanning the bacterial, eukaryal and archaeal domains, but systematic analysis of their organization inside cells is lacking. In this study, we identify and characterize granulelike inclusion bodies in a methanogenic archaeon, Methanospirillum hungatei, an anaerobic microorganism that plays an important role in nutrient recycling in the ecosystem. Using cryo electron microscopy, we show that granules in mature M. hungatei are amorphous in structure with a uniform size. Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy analysis establishes that each granule is a polyphosphate body (PPB) that consists of high concentrations of phosphorous and oxygen, and increased levels of iron and magnesium. By scanning transmission electron tomography, we further estimate that the mass density within a PPB is a little less than metal titanium at room temperature and is about four times higher than that of the surrounding cytoplasm. Finally, three-dimensional cryo electron tomography reveals that PPBs are positioned off-centre in their radial locations relative to the cylindrical axis of the cell, and almost uniformly placed near cell ends. This positioning ability points to a genetic program that spatially and temporally directs the accumulation of polyphosphate into a storage granule, perhaps for energy-consuming activities, such as cell maintenance, division or motility. PMID:21854518

  2. Synaptic action of ethanol on cerebellar auditory granule cells reveals acute tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.M.; Liu, G.; Huang, R.H. )

    1991-03-11

    The cerebellum is very sensitive to acute intoxication by ethanol. The authors have recorded electrophysiological responses of granule cells to auditory stimulation from the posterior cerebellar vermis of cats before and after a relatively low dose of ethanol. Auditory responses of granule cells were severely inhibited by ethanol at a transient, peak ethanol concentration of 15-18 mM in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Thereafter, the clearance of ethanol from CSF followed an exponential time course, with 50% of the CSF ethanol being cleared with every passing hour. Auditory responses of granule cells returned to control levels within 60-90 minutes, despite the presence of a DSF ethanol concentration at 8-10mM, indicating acute tolerance. Moreover, a second, identical dose of ethanol, delivered two hours after the first dose produced an attenuated inhibition in the auditory response of cerebellar granule cells. The inhibition took a longer time to be evident but a shorter time to recover than that followed by the first dose of ethanol.

  3. A Novel Function of Noc2 in Agonist-Induced Intracellular Ca2+ Increase during Zymogen-Granule Exocytosis in Pancreatic Acinar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogata, Sho; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Tamai, Seiichi; Kasai, Haruo; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2012-01-01

    Noc2, a putative Rab effector, contributes to secretory-granule exocytosis in neuroendocrine and exocrine cells. Here, using two-photon excitation live-cell imaging, we investigated its role in Ca2+-dependent zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells from wild-type (WT) and Noc2-knockout (KO) mice. Imaging of a KO acinar cell revealed an expanded granular area, indicating ZG accumulation. In our spatiotemporal analysis of the ZG exocytosis induced by agonist (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine) stimulation, the location and rate of progress of ZG exocytosis did not differ significantly between the two strains. ZG exocytosis from KO acinar cells was seldom observed at physiological concentrations of agonists, but was normal (vs. WT) at high concentrations. Flash photolysis of a caged calcium compound confirmed the integrity of the fusion step of ZG exocytosis in KO acinar cells. The decreased ZG exocytosis present at physiological concentrations of agonists raised the possibility of impaired elicitation of calcium spikes. When calcium spikes were evoked in KO acinar cells by a high agonist concentration: (a) they always started at the apical portion and traveled to the basal portion, and (b) calcium oscillations over the 10 µM level were observed, as in WT acinar cells. At physiological concentrations of agonists, however, sufficient calcium spikes were not observed, suggesting an impaired [Ca2+]i-increase mechanism in KO acinar cells. We propose that in pancreatic acinar cells, Noc2 is not indispensable for the membrane fusion of ZG per se, but instead performs a novel function favoring agonist-induced physiological [Ca2+]i increases. PMID:22615885

  4. A novel function of Noc2 in agonist-induced intracellular Ca2+ increase during zymogen-granule exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Sho; Miki, Takashi; Seino, Susumu; Tamai, Seiichi; Kasai, Haruo; Nemoto, Tomomi

    2012-01-01

    Noc2, a putative Rab effector, contributes to secretory-granule exocytosis in neuroendocrine and exocrine cells. Here, using two-photon excitation live-cell imaging, we investigated its role in Ca(2+)-dependent zymogen granule (ZG) exocytosis in pancreatic acinar cells from wild-type (WT) and Noc2-knockout (KO) mice. Imaging of a KO acinar cell revealed an expanded granular area, indicating ZG accumulation. In our spatiotemporal analysis of the ZG exocytosis induced by agonist (cholecystokinin or acetylcholine) stimulation, the location and rate of progress of ZG exocytosis did not differ significantly between the two strains. ZG exocytosis from KO acinar cells was seldom observed at physiological concentrations of agonists, but was normal (vs. WT) at high concentrations. Flash photolysis of a caged calcium compound confirmed the integrity of the fusion step of ZG exocytosis in KO acinar cells. The decreased ZG exocytosis present at physiological concentrations of agonists raised the possibility of impaired elicitation of calcium spikes. When calcium spikes were evoked in KO acinar cells by a high agonist concentration: (a) they always started at the apical portion and traveled to the basal portion, and (b) calcium oscillations over the 10 µM level were observed, as in WT acinar cells. At physiological concentrations of agonists, however, sufficient calcium spikes were not observed, suggesting an impaired [Ca(2+)](i)-increase mechanism in KO acinar cells. We propose that in pancreatic acinar cells, Noc2 is not indispensable for the membrane fusion of ZG per se, but instead performs a novel function favoring agonist-induced physiological [Ca(2+)](i) increases. PMID:22615885

  5. Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylation of kinesin heavy chain on beta-granules in pancreatic beta-cells. Implications for regulated beta-granule transport and insulin exocytosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donelan, Matthew J.; Morfini, Gerardo; Julyan, Richard; Sommers, Scott; Hays, Lori; Kajio, Hiroshi; Briaud, Isabelle; Easom, Richard A.; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Brady, Scott T.; Rhodes, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    The specific biochemical steps required for glucose-regulated insulin exocytosis from beta-cells are not well defined. Elevation of glucose leads to increases in cytosolic [Ca2+]i and biphasic release of insulin from both a readily releasable and a storage pool of beta-granules. The effect of elevated [Ca2+]i on phosphorylation of isolated beta-granule membrane proteins was evaluated, and the phosphorylation of four proteins was found to be altered by [Ca2+]i. One (a 18/20-kDa doublet) was a Ca2+-dependent increase in phosphorylation, and, surprisingly, three others (138, 42, and 36 kDa) were Ca2+-dependent dephosphorylations. The 138-kDa beta-granule phosphoprotein was found to be kinesin heavy chain (KHC). At low levels of [Ca2+]i KHC was phosphorylated by casein kinase 2, but KHC was rapidly dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 2B beta (PP2Bbeta) as [Ca2+]i increased. Inhibitors of PP2B specifically reduced the second, microtubule-dependent, phase of insulin secretion, suggesting that dephosphorylation of KHC was required for transport of beta-granules from the storage pool to replenish the readily releasable pool of beta-granules. This is distinct from synaptic vesicle exocytosis, because neurotransmitter release from synaptosomes did not require a Ca2+-dependent KHC dephosphorylation. These results suggest a novel mechanism for regulating KHC function and beta-granule transport in beta-cells that is mediated by casein kinase 2 and PP2B. They also implicate a novel regulatory role for PP2B/calcineurin in the control of insulin secretion downstream of a rise in [Ca2+]i.

  6. Model cerebellar granule cells can faithfully transmit modulated firing rate signals

    PubMed Central

    Rössert, Christian; Solinas, Sergio; D'Angelo, Egidio; Dean, Paul; Porrill, John

    2014-01-01

    A crucial assumption of many high-level system models of the cerebellum is that information in the granular layer is encoded in a linear manner. However, granule cells are known for their non-linear and resonant synaptic and intrinsic properties that could potentially impede linear signal transmission. In this modeling study we analyse how electrophysiological granule cell properties and spike sampling influence information coded by firing rate modulation, assuming no signal-related, i.e., uncorrelated inhibitory feedback (open-loop mode). A detailed one-compartment granule cell model was excited in simulation by either direct current or mossy-fiber synaptic inputs. Vestibular signals were represented as tonic inputs to the flocculus modulated at frequencies up to 20 Hz (approximate upper frequency limit of vestibular-ocular reflex, VOR). Model outputs were assessed using estimates of both the transfer function, and the fidelity of input-signal reconstruction measured as variance-accounted-for. The detailed granule cell model with realistic mossy-fiber synaptic inputs could transmit information faithfully and linearly in the frequency range of the vestibular-ocular reflex. This was achieved most simply if the model neurons had a firing rate at least twice the highest required frequency of modulation, but lower rates were also adequate provided a population of neurons was utilized, especially in combination with push-pull coding. The exact number of neurons required for faithful transmission depended on the precise values of firing rate and noise. The model neurons were also able to combine excitatory and inhibitory signals linearly, and could be replaced by a simpler (modified) integrate-and-fire neuron in the case of high tonic firing rates. These findings suggest that granule cells can in principle code modulated firing-rate inputs in a linear manner, and are thus consistent with the high-level adaptive-filter model of the cerebellar microcircuit. PMID:25352777

  7. The tetraspanin CD63/lamp3 cycles between endocytic and secretory compartments in human endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, T; Vischer, U M; Rosnoblet, C; Lebrand, C; Lindsay, M; Parton, R G; Kruithof, E K; Gruenberg, J

    2000-05-01

    In the present study, we show that in human endothelial cells the tetraspanin CD63/lamp3 distributes predominantly to the internal membranes of multivesicular-multilamellar late endosomes, which contain the unique lipid lysobisphosphatidic acid. Some CD63/lamp3 is also present in Weibel-Palade bodies, the characteristic secretory organelle of these cells. We find that CD63/lamp3 molecules can be transported from late endosomes to Weibel-Palade bodies and thus that CD63/lamp3 cycles between endocytic and biosynthetic compartments; however, movement of CD63/lamp3 is much slower than that of P-selectin, which is known to cycle between plasma membrane and Weibel-Palade bodies. When cells are treated with U18666A, a drug that mimics the Niemann-Pick type C syndrome, both proteins accumulate in late endosomes and fail to reach Weibel-Palade bodies efficiently, suggesting that P-selectin, like CD63/lamp3, cycles via late endosomes. Our data suggest that CD63/lamp3 partitions preferentially within late endosome internal membranes, thus causing its accumulation, and that this mechanism contributes to CD63/lamp3 retention in late endosomes; however, our data also indicate that the protein can eventually escape from these internal membranes and recycle toward Weibel-Palade bodies to be reused. Our observations thus uncover the existence of a selective trafficking route from late endosomes to Weibel-Palade bodies. PMID:10793155

  8. Free and complexed-secretory immunoglobulin A triggers distinct intestinal epithelial cell responses.

    PubMed

    Salerno-Goncalves, R; Safavie, F; Fasano, A; Sztein, M B

    2016-09-01

    Secretory immunoglobulin A (SIgA) antibodies play an important role in protecting the mucosal surfaces against pathogens and maintaining homeostasis with the commensal microbiota. Because a substantial portion of the gut microbiota is coated with SIgA, we hypothesized that microbiota-SIgA complexes are important for the maintenance of gut homeostasis. Here we investigated the relationship between microbiota-SIgA complexes and inflammatory epithelial cell responses. We used a multi-cellular three-dimensional (3D) organotypical model of the human intestinal mucosa composed of an intestinal epithelial cell line and primary human lymphocytes/monocytes, endothelial cells and fibroblasts. We also used human SIgA from human colostrum, and a prominent bacterial member of the first colonizers, Escherichia coli, as a surrogate commensal. We found that free and microbiota-complexed SIgA triggered different epithelial responses. While free SIgA up-regulated mucus production, expression of polymeric immunoglobulin receptor (pIgR) and secretion of interleukin-8 and tumoir necrosis factor-α, microbiota-complexed SIgA mitigated these responses. These results suggest that free and complexed SIgA have different functions as immunoregulatory agents in the gut and that an imbalance between the two may affect gut homeostasis. PMID:27084834

  9. [Identification of Ca2+ release channels in salivary glands secretory cells of Chironomus plumosus L].

    PubMed

    Man'ko, V V; Bychkova, S V; Klevets', M Iu

    2004-01-01

    The presence of two types of well-characterised Ca2+ release channels, namely IP3-receptors (Ins(1,4,5)P3Rs) and ryanodine-receptors (RyRs), was detected in the salivary glands secretory cells of Chironomus plumosus L. For this aim different blockators and activators of these Ca2+ -transport systems were used. The conditions for permeabilization of these cells by saponine were experimentally chosen for their more intensive action. It was shown that IP3 decreased calcium content in saponine-treated gland tissue by (41.14 +/- 11.75)%. The effect of IP3 was not observed under condition of heparin and eosin Y presence in the incubation medium, but heparin alone did not cause any action on calcium content in saponine-treated gland tissue. The observed effects of IP3 are supposed to be the evidences of Ins (1,4,5)P3Rs presence in the intracellular membrane of this object. It was also shown that calcium content in intact gland tissue increased by (67.12 +/- 22.60)% in presence of heparin (500 mkg/ml) in the incubation medium. This effect of heparin was also observed with presence of verapamil (100 mkM) and eosin Y (5, 20 mkM) in incubation medium. So, this effect is not connected with function of voltage-gated Ca2+ -channels and Ca2+ -pumps. Ryanodine in concentration of 5nM decreased calcium content in saponine-treated gland tissue by (35.18 +/- 3.87)% but it caused the increase of calcium content at high concentration (500 nM) by (40.72 +/- 12.52)%. It improved the presence of RyRs in intracellular membrane of secretory cells of this object. Besides, these channels, perhaps, belong to "non-sensitive" to caffeine, because caffeine did not affect calcium content in the gland tissue neither in presence nor with absence of eosin Y. PMID:15909419

  10. Granulopoiesis and granules of human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Cowland, Jack B; Borregaard, Niels

    2016-09-01

    Granules are essential for the ability of neutrophils to fulfill their role in innate immunity. Granule membranes contain proteins that react to environmental cues directing neutrophils to sites of infection and initiate generation of bactericidal oxygen species. Granules are densely packed with proteins that contribute to microbial killing when liberated to the phagosome or extracellularly. Granules are, however, highly heterogeneous and are traditionally subdivided into azurophil granules, specific granules, and gelatinase granules in addition to secretory vesicles. This review will address issues pertinent to formation of granules, which is a process intimately connected to maturation of neutrophils from their precursors in the bone marrow. We further discuss possible mechanisms by which decisions are made regarding sorting of proteins to constitutive secretion or storage in granules and how degranulation of granule subsets is regulated. PMID:27558325

  11. Immunohistological comparison of granulated cell proteins in induced immediate urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria lesions.

    PubMed

    McEvoy, M T; Peterson, E A; Kobza-Black, A; English, J S; Dover, J S; Murphy, G M; Bhogal, B; Greaves, M W; Winkelmann, R K; Leiferman, K M

    1995-12-01

    Urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria are two forms of physical urticaria which are well defined clinically and histologically. Previous studies have shown eosinophil granule protein deposition in urticarial reactions, including chronic urticaria, solar urticaria and delayed pressure urticaria. To evaluate and compare the involvement of granulated inflammatory cells in urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria, we studied sequential biopsies of induced lesions of urticarial dermographism and delayed pressure urticaria by indirect immunofluorescence, to detect eosinophil granule major basic protein (MBP) and neutrophil granule elastase. Biopsies from dermographic lesions at time 0, 5 min, 15 min, 2 h and 24 h, showed few infiltrating eosinophils, with minimal extracellular MBP deposition, and a few infiltrating neutrophils, with minimal neutrophil elastase deposition, throughout the evolution of the lesions. Sequential biopsies of delayed pressure urticaria at time 0, 20 min, 6, 12 and 24 h, showed eosinophil infiltration with extensive MBP deposition beginning at 20 min, and neutrophil infiltration with variable elastase deposition beginning at 20 min. Control tissue specimens from normal volunteers showed neutrophil infiltration and slight degranulation, but no eosinophil infiltration or degranulation. Comparison of urticarial dermographism with delayed pressure urticaria showed marked differences in the patterns of infiltration. Delayed pressure urticaria, with eosinophil and neutrophil degranulation, was strikingly similar to the IgE-mediated late phase reaction. In contrast, eosinophil and neutrophil involvement in urticarial dermographism was minimal. Considering the extent of eosinophil granule protein deposition and the biological activities of the eosinophil granule proteins, the findings in delayed pressure urticaria point to an important pathophysiological role of eosinophils in the disease. PMID:8547035

  12. CD63 is tightly associated with intracellular, secretory events chaperoning piecemeal degranulation and compound exocytosis in human eosinophils.

    PubMed

    Carmo, Lívia A S; Bonjour, Kennedy; Ueki, Shigeharu; Neves, Josiane S; Liu, Linying; Spencer, Lisa A; Dvorak, Ann M; Weller, Peter F; Melo, Rossana C N

    2016-08-01

    Eosinophil activation leads to secretion of presynthesized, granule-stored mediators that determine the course of allergic, inflammatory, and immunoregulatory responses. CD63, a member of the transmembrane-4 glycoprotein superfamily (tetraspanins) and present on the limiting membranes of eosinophil-specific (secretory) granules, is considered a potential surface marker for eosinophil degranulation. However, the intracellular secretory trafficking of CD63 in eosinophils and other leukocytes is not understood. Here, we provide a comprehensive investigation of CD63 trafficking at high resolution within human eosinophils stimulated with inflammatory stimuli, CCL11 and tumor necrosis factor α, which induce distinctly differing secretory processes in eosinophils: piecemeal degranulation and compound exocytosis, respectively. By using different transmission electron microscopy approaches, including an immunonanogold technique, for enhanced detection of CD63 at subcellular compartments, we identified a major intracellular pool of CD63 that is directly linked to eosinophil degranulation events. Transmission electron microscopy quantitative analyses demonstrated that, in response to stimulation, CD63 is concentrated within granules undergoing secretion by piecemeal degranulation or compound exocytosis and that CD63 tracks with the movements of vesicles and granules in the cytoplasm. Although CD63 was observed at the cell surface after stimulation, immunonanogold electron microscopy revealed that a strong CD63 pool remains in the cytoplasm. It is remarkable that CCL11 and tumor necrosis factor α triggered increased formation of CD63(+) large vesiculotubular carriers (eosinophil sombrero vesicles), which fused with granules in the process of secretion, likely acting in the intracellular translocation of CD63. Altogether, we identified active, intracellular CD63 trafficking connected to eosinophil granule-derived secretory pathways. This is important for understanding the

  13. Expression of S100 beta in sensory and secretory cells of the vertebrate inner ear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fermin, C. D.; Martin, D. S.

    1995-01-01

    We evaluated anti-S100 beta expression in the chick (Gallus domesticus) inner ear and determined that: 1) the monomer anti-S100 beta is expressed differentially in the vestibular and auditory perikarya; 2) expression of S100 beta in the afferent nerve terminals is time-related to synapse and myelin formation; 3) the expression of the dimer anti-S100 alpha alpha beta beta and monomer anti-S100 beta overlaps in most inner ear cell types. Most S100 alpha alpha beta beta positive cells express S100 beta, but S100 beta positive cells do not always express S100 alpha alpha beta beta. 4) the expression of S100 beta is diffused over the perikaryal cytoplasm and nuclei of the acoustic ganglia but is concentrated over the nuclei of the vestibular perikarya. 6) S100 beta is expressed in secretory cells, and it is co-localized with GABA in sensory cells. 7) Color thresholding objective quantitation indicates that the amount of S100 beta was higher (mean 22, SD +/- 4) at E19 than at E9 (mean 34, SD +/- 3) in afferent axons. 8) Moreover, S100 beta was unchanged between E11-E19 in the perikaryal cytoplasm, but did change over the nuclei. At E9, 74%, and at E21, 5% of vestibular perikarya were positive. The data suggest that S100 beta may be physically associated with neuronal and ionic controlling cells of the vertebrate inner ear, where it could provide a dual ionic and neurotrophic modulatory function.

  14. Local postsynaptic voltage-gated sodium channel activation in dendritic spines of olfactory bulb granule cells.

    PubMed

    Bywalez, Wolfgang G; Patirniche, Dinu; Rupprecht, Vanessa; Stemmler, Martin; Herz, Andreas V M; Pálfi, Dénes; Rózsa, Balázs; Egger, Veronica

    2015-02-01

    Neuronal dendritic spines have been speculated to function as independent computational units, yet evidence for active electrical computation in spines is scarce. Here we show that strictly local voltage-gated sodium channel (Nav) activation can occur during excitatory postsynaptic potentials in the spines of olfactory bulb granule cells, which we mimic and detect via combined two-photon uncaging of glutamate and calcium imaging in conjunction with whole-cell recordings. We find that local Nav activation boosts calcium entry into spines through high-voltage-activated calcium channels and accelerates postsynaptic somatic depolarization, without affecting NMDA receptor-mediated signaling. Hence, Nav-mediated boosting promotes rapid output from the reciprocal granule cell spine onto the lateral mitral cell dendrite and thus can speed up recurrent inhibition. This striking example of electrical compartmentalization both adds to the understanding of olfactory network processing and broadens the general view of spine function. PMID:25619656

  15. YAP Induces High-Grade Serous Carcinoma in Fallopian Tube Secretory Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Guohua; Lv, Xiangmin; He, Chunbo; Remmenga, Steven W.; Rodabough, Kerry J.; Dong, Jixin; Yang, Liguo; Lele, Subodh M.; Yang, Peixin; Zhou, Jin; Karst, Alison; Drapkin, Ronny I.; Davis, John S.; Wang, Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates from Fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of HGSC derived from FTSECs remains unclear. In the present study, we found that the Hippo/YAP signaling pathway plays a critical role in the initiation and progression of Fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. Importantly, YAP was overexpressed in inflammatory and cancerous Fallopian tube tissues. Further, overexpression of wild-type YAP, or constitutively active YAP in immortalized FTSECs, induced cell proliferation, migration, colony formation, and tumorigenesis. Moreover, the Hippo/YAP and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways formed an autocrine/paracrine positive feedback loop to drive the progression of the FTSECs-derived HGSC. Evidence in this study strongly suggests that combined therapy with inhibitors of YAP (such as verteporfin) and FGFRs (such as BGJ398) can provide a novel therapeutic strategy to treat Fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. PMID:26364602

  16. YAP induces high-grade serous carcinoma in fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hua, G; Lv, X; He, C; Remmenga, S W; Rodabough, K J; Dong, J; Yang, L; Lele, S M; Yang, P; Zhou, J; Karst, A; Drapkin, R I; Davis, J S; Wang, C

    2016-04-28

    Accumulating evidence indicates that ovarian high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) originates from fallopian tube secretory epithelial cells (FTSECs). However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the initiation and progression of HGSC derived from FTSECs remains unclear. In this study, we found that the Hippo/Yes-associated protein (YAP) signaling pathway has a critical role in the initiation and progression of fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. Importantly, YAP was overexpressed in inflammatory and cancerous fallopian tube tissues. Further, overexpression of wild-type YAP, or constitutively active YAP in immortalized FTSECs, induced cell proliferation, migration, colony formation and tumorigenesis. Moreover, the Hippo/YAP and the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling pathways formed an autocrine/paracrine-positive feedback loop to drive the progression of the FTSEC-derived HGSC. Evidence in this study strongly suggests that combined therapy with inhibitors of YAP (such as verteporfin) and FGF receptors (such as BGJ398) can provide a novel therapeutic strategy to treat fallopian tube and ovarian HGSC. PMID:26364602

  17. Multiple Signaling Pathways Contribute to the Thrombin-induced Secretory Phenotype in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Young; Son, Younghae; Kim, Bo-Young; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong

    2015-01-01

    We attempted to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by determining signaling molecules involved in chemokine production. Treatment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs) with thrombin resulted not only in elevated transcription of the (C-C motif) ligand 11 (CCL11) gene but also in enhanced secretion of CCL11 protein. Co-treatment of HAoSMCs with GF109230X, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, or GW5074, an inhibitor of Raf-1 kinase, caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and significantly attenuated expression of CCL11 at transcriptional and protein levels induced by thrombin. Both Akt phosphorylation and CCL11 expression induced by thrombin were attenuated in the presence of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi protein-coupled receptor, or LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. In addition, thrombin-induced production of CCL11 was significantly attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of Akt or MEK which phosphorylates ERK1/2. These results indicate that thrombin is likely to promote expression of CCL11 via PKC/Raf-1/ERK1/2 and PTX-sensitive protease-activated receptors/PI3K/Akt pathways in HAoSMCs. We propose that multiple signaling pathways are involved in change of VSMCs to a secretory phenotype. PMID:26557022

  18. Multiple Signaling Pathways Contribute to the Thrombin-induced Secretory Phenotype in Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Young; Son, Younghae; Kim, Bo-Young; Eo, Seong-Kug; Rhim, Byung-Yong; Kim, Koanhoi

    2015-11-01

    We attempted to investigate molecular mechanisms underlying phenotypic change of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) by determining signaling molecules involved in chemokine production. Treatment of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs) with thrombin resulted not only in elevated transcription of the (C-C motif) ligand 11 (CCL11) gene but also in enhanced secretion of CCL11 protein. Co-treatment of HAoSMCs with GF109230X, an inhibitor of protein kinase C, or GW5074, an inhibitor of Raf-1 kinase, caused inhibition of ERK1/2 phosphorylation and significantly attenuated expression of CCL11 at transcriptional and protein levels induced by thrombin. Both Akt phosphorylation and CCL11 expression induced by thrombin were attenuated in the presence of pertussis toxin (PTX), an inhibitor of Gi protein-coupled receptor, or LY294002, a PI3K inhibitor. In addition, thrombin-induced production of CCL11 was significantly attenuated by pharmacological inhibition of Akt or MEK which phosphorylates ERK1/2. These results indicate that thrombin is likely to promote expression of CCL11 via PKC/Raf-1/ERK1/2 and PTX-sensitive protease-activated receptors/PI3K/Akt pathways in HAoSMCs. We propose that multiple signaling pathways are involved in change of VSMCs to a secretory phenotype. PMID:26557022

  19. SNAP23 is selectively expressed in airway secretory cells and mediates baseline and stimulated mucin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Binhui; Azzegagh, Zoulikha; Jaramillo, Ana M.; Zhu, Yunxiang; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Bagirzadeh, Rustam; Flores, Jose R.; Han, Wei; Tang, Yong-jun; Tu, Jing; Alanis, Denise M.; Evans, Christopher M.; Guindani, Michele; Roche, Paul A.; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Chen, Jichao; Davis, C. William; Tuvim, Michael J.; Dickey, Burton F.

    2015-01-01

    Airway mucin secretion is important pathophysiologically and as a model of polarized epithelial regulated exocytosis. We find the trafficking protein, SNAP23 (23-kDa paralogue of synaptosome-associated protein of 25 kDa), selectively expressed in secretory cells compared with ciliated and basal cells of airway epithelium by immunohistochemistry and FACS, suggesting that SNAP23 functions in regulated but not constitutive epithelial secretion. Heterozygous SNAP23 deletant mutant mice show spontaneous accumulation of intracellular mucin, indicating a defect in baseline secretion. However mucins are released from perfused tracheas of mutant and wild-type (WT) mice at the same rate, suggesting that increased intracellular stores balance reduced release efficiency to yield a fully compensated baseline steady state. In contrast, acute stimulated release of intracellular mucin from mutant mice is impaired whether measured by a static imaging assay 5 min after exposure to the secretagogue ATP or by kinetic analysis of mucins released from perfused tracheas during the first 10 min of ATP exposure. Together, these data indicate that increased intracellular stores cannot fully compensate for the defect in release efficiency during intense stimulation. The lungs of mutant mice develop normally and clear bacteria and instilled polystyrene beads comparable to WT mice, consistent with these functions depending on baseline secretion that is fully compensated. PMID:26182382

  20. The secretory epithelial cells of the choroid plexus employ a novel kinesin-related protein.

    PubMed

    Rogers, K R; Griffin, M; Brophy, P J

    1997-11-01

    The proteins of the kinesin superfamily (KIFs) are microtubule-based molecular motors whose functions include the transport of membrane-bound organelles. We have isolated the cDNA encoding a novel kinesin by reverse transcription and polymerase chain reaction using degenerate primers that flank the highly conserved motor domain. The deduced amino acid sequence of this protein shows considerable similarity to both KIF1A and KIF1B thus defining it as a new member of the monomeric KIF1/unc104 family. The C-terminal domain of KIF1D is the most divergent by comparison with the other members of the family, which supports the view that the tail region is responsible for conferring specificity on the interactions of these kinesins with their cargoes. In the adult rat brain KIF1D mRNA is expressed in neurons in the hippocampus and in the Purkinje cells of the cerebellum. However, the levels of KIF1D are particularly high in the choroid plexus which is a polarised epithelium that lines the lateral, third and fourth ventricles. The major function of the epithelial cells in the choroid plexus is to produce cerebrospinal fluid, which suggests that KIF1D plays an important role in their secretory function. PMID:9427518

  1. Dendritic morphology, synaptic transmission, and activity of mature granule cells born following pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus in the rat

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei; Song, Xueying; Zhu, Dexiao; Wang, Xiaochen; Hao, Aijun; Nadler, J. Victor; Zhan, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    To understand the potential role of enhanced hippocampal neurogenesis after pilocarpine-induced status epilepticus (SE) in the development of epilepsy, we quantitatively analyzed the geometry of apical dendrites, synaptic transmission, and activation levels of normotopically distributed mature newborn granule cells in the rat. SE in male Sprague-Dawley rats (between 6 and 7 weeks old) lasting for more than 2 h was induced by an intraperitoneal injection of pilocarpine. The complexity, spine density, miniature post-synaptic currents, and activity-regulated cytoskeleton-associated protein (Arc) expression of granule cells born 5 days after SE were studied between 10 and 17 weeks after CAG-GFP retroviral vector-mediated labeling. Mature granule cells born after SE had dendritic complexity similar to that of granule cells born naturally, but with denser mushroom-like spines in dendritic segments located in the outer molecular layer. Miniature inhibitory post-synaptic currents (mIPSCs) were similar between the controls and rats subjected to SE; however, smaller miniature excitatory post-synaptic current (mEPSC) amplitude with a trend toward less frequent was found in mature granule cells born after SE. After maturation, granule cells born after SE did not show denser Arc expression in the resting condition or 2 h after being activated by pentylenetetrazol-induced transient seizure activity than vicinal GFP-unlabeled granule cells. Thus our results suggest that normotopic granule cells born after pilocarpine-induced SE are no more active when mature than age-matched, naturally born granule cells. PMID:26500490

  2. Secretory Phospholipases A2 Are Secreted From Ciliated Cells and Increase Mucin and Eicosanoid Secretion From Goblet Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shimokawaji, Tadasuke; Kanoh, Soichiro; Rubin, Bruce K.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Secretory phospholipases A2 (sPLA2) initiate the biosynthesis of eicosanoids, are increased in the airways of people with severe asthma, and induce mucin hypersecretion. We used IL-13-transformed, highly enriched goblet cells and differentiated (ciliary cell-enriched) human bronchial epithelial cell culture to evaluate the relative contribution of ciliated and goblet cells to airway sPLA2 generation and response. We wished to determine the primary source(s) of sPLA2 and leukotrienes in human airway epithelial cells. METHODS: Human bronchial epithelial cells from subjects without lung disease were differentiated to a ciliated-enriched or goblet-enriched cell phenotype. Synthesis of sPLA2, cysteinyl leukotrienes (cysLTs), and airway mucin messenger RNA and protein was measured by real-time-polymerase chain reaction and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and the localization of mucin and sPLA2 to specific cells types was confirmed by confocal microscopy. RESULTS: sPLA2 group IIa, V, and X messenger RNA expression was increased in ciliated-enriched cells (P < .001) but not in goblet-enriched cells. sPLA2 were secreted from the apical (air) side of ciliated-enriched cells but not goblet-enriched cells (P < .001). Immunostaining of sPLA2 V was strongly positive in ciliated-enriched cells but not in goblet-enriched cells. sPLA2 released cysLTs from goblet-enriched cells but not from ciliated-enriched cells, and this result was greatest with sPLA2 V (P < .05). sPLA2 V increased goblet-enriched cell mucin secretion, which was inhibited by inhibitors of lipoxygenase or cyclooxygenase (P < .02). CONCLUSIONS: sPLA2 are secreted from ciliated cells and appear to induce mucin and cysLT secretion from goblet cells, strongly suggesting that airway goblet cells are proinflammatory effector cells. PMID:25429648

  3. Mature granule cells of the dentate gyrus-Passive bystanders or principal performers in hippocampal function?

    PubMed

    Lopez-Rojas, Jeffrey; Kreutz, Michael R

    2016-05-01

    The dentate gyrus is the main entrance of highly processed information to the hippocampus which derives from associative cortices and it is one of the few privileged areas in the brain where adult neurogenesis occurs. This creates the unique situation that neurons of diverse maturation stages are part of one neuronal network at any given point in life. While recently adult-born cells have a low induction threshold for long-term potentiation several studies suggest that following maturation granule cells are poorly excitable and they exhibit reduced Hebbian synaptic plasticity to an extent that it was even suggested that they functionally retire. Here, we review the functional properties of mature granule cells and discuss how plasticity of intrinsic excitability and alterations in excitation-inhibition balance might impact on their role in hippocampal information processing. PMID:26949226

  4. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M.; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T.; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  5. Rapid erasure of hippocampal memory following inhibition of dentate gyrus granule cells.

    PubMed

    Madroñal, Noelia; Delgado-García, José M; Fernández-Guizán, Azahara; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Köhn, Maja; Mattucci, Camilla; Jain, Apar; Tsetsenis, Theodoros; Illarionova, Anna; Grinevich, Valery; Gross, Cornelius T; Gruart, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    The hippocampus is critical for the acquisition and retrieval of episodic and contextual memories. Lesions of the dentate gyrus, a principal input of the hippocampus, block memory acquisition, but it remains unclear whether this region also plays a role in memory retrieval. Here we combine cell-type specific neural inhibition with electrophysiological measurements of learning-associated plasticity in behaving mice to demonstrate that dentate gyrus granule cells are not required for memory retrieval, but instead have an unexpected role in memory maintenance. Furthermore, we demonstrate the translational potential of our findings by showing that pharmacological activation of an endogenous inhibitory receptor expressed selectively in dentate gyrus granule cells can induce a rapid loss of hippocampal memory. These findings open a new avenue for the targeted erasure of episodic and contextual memories. PMID:26988806

  6. Cytokine signals through STAT3 promote expression of granulocyte secondary granule proteins in 32D cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Arcasoy, Murat O.; Watowich, Stephanie S.; Forget, Bernard G.

    2008-01-01

    Objective In a previous study, we showed that activation of a transfected human erythropoietin receptor (EPOR) in the murine myeloid cell line 32D resulted in the development of morphologic features of granulocytic differentiation and expression of the neutrophil primary granule protein myeloperoxidase. We now studied if EPOR signaling could also mediate secondary granule protein gene expression and investigated the signal transduction requirements for induction of secondary granule gene expression in 32D cells. Materials and Methods Wild-type and variant 32D cells expressing normal or chimeric EPORs or receptors for granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSFRs) were stimulated with EPO or G-CSF and the expression of granulocyte-specific genes was analyzed by Northern blot analysis. To determine the signaling mechanisms required for secondary granule protein gene induction, the activation of STAT pathways following growth factor stimulation was studied by Western blot analysis. Results We found that EPO treatment of 32D cells engineered to express EPOR did not result in induction of the secondary granule protein genes encoding lactoferrin and 24p3 lipocalin, the mouse homolog of human N-Gal, or the myeloid transcription factor C/EBPε. Replacement of the intracellular domain of EPOR with the intracellular domain of G-CSFR in a chimeric receptor was associated with EPO-mediated induction of lactoferrin, 24p3 lipocalin, and C/EBPε genes. We found that STAT3 phosphorylation was mediated by the intracellular domain of G-CSFR, but not EPOR. Replacement of one or two of the STAT5 binding sites in the intracytoplasmic domain of the EPOR with STAT3 binding sites resulted in EPO-mediated STAT3 activation and a marked increase in the expression of the 24p3 lipocalin gene. Knockdown of STAT3 protein levels with siRNA caused significant decrease in 24p3 lipocalin gene induction. Conclusion These results indicate that EPOR signaling cannot substitute for G-CSFR signaling to

  7. Dynamic light-scattering study on changes in mobility of chromaffin granules in actin network with its assembly and Ca2+-dependent disassembly by gelsolin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujime, Satoru; Miyamoto, Shigeaki; Funatsu, Takashi; Ishiwata, S.

    1993-06-01

    As a final stage of cell signal transduction, secretory cells release hormones by exocytosis. Before secretory granules contact with the cell membrane for fusion, an actin network barrier must dissociate as a prelude. In order to elucidate dynamical behaviors of secretory granules in actin network, in vitro assembly and disassembly processes of actin networks were examined by means of dynamic light-scattering spectroscopy. We studied actin polymerization in the presence of chromaffin granules isolated from bovine adrenal medullae, and found that the entanglement of actin filaments rapidly formed cages which confined granules in them. We also studied the effect of gelsolin, one of the actin-severing proteins, on the network of actin filaments performed in the presence of chromaffin granules. It turned out that the cages which confined granules rapidly disappeared when gelsolin was added in the presence of free Ca2+ ions. Semiquantitative analyses of dynamic light-scattering spectra permitted us to estimate the changes in the mobility (or translational diffusion coefficient) of chromaffin granules in the actin network with its assembly and Ca2+-dependent disassembly by gelsolin. Based on the present results and some pieces of evidence in literature, a model is proposed for biophysical situations before, during, and after an exocytotic event.

  8. Insulin Granule Biogenesis, Trafficking and Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Hou, June Chunqiu; Min, Le; Pessin, Jeffrey E.

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly apparent that beta cell dysfunction resulting in abnormal insulin secretion is the essential element in the progression of patients from a state of impaired glucose tolerance to frank type 2 diabetes (Del Prato, 2003; Del Prato and Tiengo, 2001). Although extensive studies have examined the molecular, cellular and physiologic mechanisms of insulin granule biogenesis, sorting, and exocytosis the precise mechanisms controlling these processes and their dysregulation in the developed of diabetes remains an area of important investigation. We now know that insulin biogenesis initiates with the synthesis of preproinsulin in rough endoplastic reticulum and conversion of preproinsulin to proinsulin. Proinsulin begins to be packaged in the Trans-Golgi Network and is sorting into immature secretory granules. These immature granules become acidic via ATP-dependent proton pump and proinsulin undergoes proteolytic cleavage resulting the formation of insulin and C-peptide. During the granule maturation process, insulin is crystallized with zinc and calcium in the form of dense-core granules and unwanted cargo and membrane proteins undergo selective retrograde trafficking to either the constitutive trafficking pathway for secretion or to degradative pathways. The newly formed mature dense-core insulin granules populate two different intracellular pools, the readily releasable pools (RRP) and the reserved pool. These two distinct populations are thought to be responsible for the biphasic nature of insulin release in which the RRP granules are associated with the plasma membrane and undergo an acute calcium-dependent release accounting for first phase insulin secretion. In contrast, second phase insulin secretion requires the trafficking of the reserved granule pool to the plasma membrane. The initial trigger for insulin granule fusion with the plasma membrane is a rise in intracellular calcium and in the case of glucose stimulation results from

  9. Sputum and BAL Clara cell secretory protein and surfactant protein D levels in asthma.

    PubMed

    Emmanouil, P; Loukides, S; Kostikas, K; Papatheodorou, G; Papaporfyriou, A; Hillas, G; Vamvakaris, I; Triggidou, R; Katafigiotis, P; Kokkini, A; Papiris, S; Koulouris, N; Bakakos, P

    2015-06-01

    Clara cell secretory protein (CC16) is associated with Th2 modulation. Surfactant protein D (SPD) plays an important role in surfactant homeostasis and eosinophil chemotaxis. We measured CC16 and SPD in sputum supernatants of 84 asthmatic patients and 12 healthy controls. In 22 asthmatics, we additionally measured CC16 and SPD levels in BAL and assessed smooth muscle area (SMA), reticular basement membrane (RBM) thickness, and epithelial detachment (ED) in bronchial biopsies. Induced sputum CC16 and SPD were significantly higher in patients with severe asthma (SRA) compared to mild-moderate and healthy controls. BAL CC16 and SPD levels were also higher in SRA compared to mild-moderate asthma. CC16 BAL levels correlated with ED, while SPD BAL levels correlated with SMA and RBM. Severity represented a significant covariate for these associations. CC16 and SPD levels are upregulated in SRA and correlate with remodeling indices, suggesting a possible role of these biomarkers in the remodeling process. PMID:25728058

  10. Enterovirus 71 induces anti-viral stress granule-like structures in RD cells.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuanmei; Wang, Bei; Huang, He; Zhao, Zhendong

    2016-08-01

    Stress granules (SGs) are dynamic cytoplasmic granules formed in response to a variety of stresses, including viral infection. Several viruses can modulate the formation of SG with different effects, but the relationship between SG formation and EV71 infection is poorly understood. In this study, we report that EV71 inhibits canonical SGs formation in infected cells and induces the formation of novel RNA granules that were distinguished from canonical SGs in composition and morphology, which we termed 'SG like structures'. Our results also demonstrated that EV71 triggered formation of SG-like structures is dependent on PKR and eIF2α phosphorylation and requires ongoing cellular mRNA synthesis. Finally, we found that SG-like structures are antiviral RNA granules that promote cellular apoptosis and suppress EV71 propagation. Taken together, our findings explain the formation mechanism of SG-like structures induced by EV71 and shed light on virus-host interaction and molecular mechanism underlying EV71 pathogenesis. PMID:27216457

  11. Eosinophil extracellular DNA trap cell death mediates lytic release of free secretion-competent eosinophil granules in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ueki, Shigeharu; Melo, Rossana C. N.; Ghiran, Ionita; Spencer, Lisa A.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Weller, Peter F.

    2013-01-01

    Eosinophils release their granule proteins extracellularly through exocytosis, piecemeal degranulation, or cytolytic degranulation. Findings in diverse human eosinophilic diseases of intact extracellular eosinophil granules, either free or clustered, indicate that eosinophil cytolysis occurs in vivo, but the mechanisms and consequences of lytic eosinophil degranulation are poorly understood. We demonstrate that activated human eosinophils can undergo extracellular DNA trap cell death (ETosis) that cytolytically releases free eosinophil granules. Eosinophil ETosis (EETosis), in response to immobilized immunoglobulins (IgG, IgA), cytokines with platelet activating factor, calcium ionophore, or phorbol myristate acetate, develops within 120 minutes in a reduced NADP (NADPH) oxidase-dependent manner. Initially, nuclear lobular formation is lost and some granules are released by budding off from the cell as plasma membrane–enveloped clusters. Following nuclear chromatolysis, plasma membrane lysis liberates DNA that forms weblike extracellular DNA nets and releases free intact granules. EETosis-released eosinophil granules, still retaining eosinophil cationic granule proteins, can be activated to secrete when stimulated with CC chemokine ligand 11 (eotaxin-1). Our results indicate that an active NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanism of cytolytic, nonapoptotic eosinophil death initiates nuclear chromatolysis that eventuates in the release of intact secretion-competent granules and the formation of extracellular DNA nets. PMID:23303825

  12. Calcium-mediated agonists activate an inwardly rectified K+ channel in colonic secretory cells.

    PubMed

    Devor, D C; Frizzell, R A

    1993-11-01

    Single-channel recording techniques were used to identify and characterize the K+ channel activated by Ca(2+)-mediated secretory agonists in T84 cells. Carbachol (CCh; 100 microM) and taurodeoxycholate (TDC; 0.75 mM) stimulated oscillatory outward K+ currents. With K gluconate in bath and pipette, cell-attached single-channel K+ currents stimulated by CCh and ionomycin (2 microM) were inwardly rectified and reversed at 0 mV. The single-channel chord conductance was 32 pS at -90 mV and 14 pS at +90 mV. Similar properties were observed in excised inside-out patches in symmetric K+, permitting further characterization of channel properties. Partial substitution of bath or pipette K+ with Na+ gave a K(+)-to-Na+ selectivity ratio of 5.5:1. Channel activity increased with increasing bath Ca2+ concentration in the physiological range of 50-800 nM. Maximal channel activity occurred at intracellular pH 7.2 and decreased at more acidic or alkaline pH values. Extracellular charybdotoxin (CTX; 50 nM) blocked inward but not outward currents. Extracellular tetraethylammonium (TEA; 10 mM) reduced single-channel amplitude at all voltages. No apparent block of the channel was observed with extracellular Ba2+ (1 mM), apamin (1 microM), 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; 4 mM), quinine (500 microM), or glyburide (10 microM). Cytosolic quinine and 4-AP blocked both inward and outward currents, whereas Ba2+ blocked only outward currents. Apamin, CTX, TEA, and glyburide did not affect channel activity. The agonist activation and pharmacological profile of this inwardly rectified K+ channel indicate that it is responsible for the increase in basolateral K+ conductance stimulated by Ca(2+)-mediated agonists in T84 cells. PMID:7694492

  13. Targeting vaccinia virus-expressed secretory beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin to the cell surface induces antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, J; Singh, O; Chakrabarti, S; Talwar, G P

    1995-01-01

    We carried out experiments designed to study the effect of a protein's localization on its immunogenicity. A novel cell-surface protein was generated from a small, glycosylated secretory protein. The DNA sequence encoding the entire precursor of the human chorionic gonadotropin beta (beta hCG) subunit was fused in the correct reading frame to the DNA sequence encoding the transmembrane and cytoplasmic domains of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. This chimeric gene was introduced into the vaccinia virus genome to generate a recombinant virus. The recombinant virus, when used to infect animal cells, expressed a 135-amino-acid beta hCG subunit anchored in cellular membranes by the 48 carboxy-terminal amino acids of vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein. The immunogenicity of this recombinant virus with respect to its ability to generate anti-hCG antibodies was compared with that of a second recombinant vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG. All animals immunized with the vaccinia virus expressing beta hCG on the cell surface elicited high titers of anti-hCG antibodies. Even after a single immunization with the recombinant vaccinia virus, the anti-hCG antibody titers persisted for a long period of time (more than 6 months). None of the animals immunized with vaccinia virus expressing the native secretory form of beta hCG showed any hCG-specific antibody response. PMID:7591154

  14. Elemental levels in mast cell granules differ in sections from normal and diabetic rats: an X-ray microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Kendall, M.D.

    1988-03-01

    Mast cells around the thymus of rats stain red with alcian blue and safranin indicating that the mast cells are probably of the peritoneal (connective tissue) type. After the onset of streptozotocin induced diabetes some cells contain both red and blue granules and blue staining cells may appear. X-ray microanalysis of frozen freeze-dried sections from diabetic male CSE Wistar rats showed electron dense granules to have similar amounts of S to normal rat mast cell granules but reduced levels of Na, Mg, P, Cl and K. Two cells also had electron lucent granules with very high levels of Na, Cl, K and Ca and reduced concentrations of S. The differences in elemental composition suggest that the mast cells from diabetic rats are not immature, but are related to the condition of induced diabetes, and that granules of very different composition can occur within a single cell. X-ray microanalysis has given an insight into mast cell granule elemental content which was not possible by conventional biochemical methods.

  15. Adult-born hippocampal dentate granule cells undergoing maturation modulate learning and memory in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Wei; Saxe, Michael D.; Gallina, Iryna S.; Gage, Fred H.

    2009-01-01

    Adult-born dentate granule cells (DGCs) contribute to learning and memory, yet it remains unknown when adult-born DGCs become involved in the cognitive processes. During neurogenesis, immature dentate granule cells (DGCs) display distinctive physiological characteristics while undergoing morphological maturation before final integration into the neural circuits. The survival and activity of the adult-born DGCs can be influenced by the experience of the animal during a critical period when newborn DGCs are still immature. To assess the temporal importance of adult neurogenesis, we developed a transgenic mouse model that allowed us to transiently reduce the numbers of adult-born DGCs in a temporally regulatable manner. We found that mice with a reduced population of adult-born DGCs at the immature stage were deficient in forming robust, long-term spatial memory and displayed impaired performance in extinction tasks. These results suggest that immature DGCs that undergo maturation make important contributions to learning and memory. PMID:19864566

  16. Effects of zinc chloride on the RNP structures in HEp-2 cells: accumulation of perichromatin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Cervera, J.; Baguena-Cervellera, R.; Martinez, A.

    1985-12-01

    The effects of zinc on the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) constituents of HEp-2 cells have been analyzed. Pulse-chase autoradiographic experiments show a preferential inhibition of nucleolar RNA synthesis and a block in the transport of nucleolar and extranucleolar RNA in zinc-treated cells. Concomitantly with the disturbance in RNA metabolism and in protein synthesis, nucleolar condensation, accumulation of perichromatin granules and fibrils, condensation of interchromatin fibrils, and appearance of dense granular bodies occur. Accumulation of perichromatin fibrils and condensation of interchromatin fibrils appear to be related to the block in the transport of heterogeneous nuclear RNA. Depletion of certain proteins required for the assembly of RNP particles could share in the abnormal behavior of RNA and lead to the accumulation of perichromatin granules and the appearance of dense granular bodies.

  17. Parallel Computational Subunits in Dentate Granule Cells Generate Multiple Place Fields

    PubMed Central

    Ujfalussy, Balázs; Kiss, Tamás; Érdi, Péter

    2009-01-01

    A fundamental question in understanding neuronal computations is how dendritic events influence the output of the neuron. Different forms of integration of neighbouring and distributed synaptic inputs, isolated dendritic spikes and local regulation of synaptic efficacy suggest that individual dendritic branches may function as independent computational subunits. In the present paper, we study how these local computations influence the output of the neuron. Using a simple cascade model, we demonstrate that triggering somatic firing by a relatively small dendritic branch requires the amplification of local events by dendritic spiking and synaptic plasticity. The moderately branching dendritic tree of granule cells seems optimal for this computation since larger dendritic trees favor local plasticity by isolating dendritic compartments, while reliable detection of individual dendritic spikes in the soma requires a low branch number. Finally, we demonstrate that these parallel dendritic computations could contribute to the generation of multiple independent place fields of hippocampal granule cells. PMID:19750211

  18. Effect of mycobacterial secretory proteins on the cellular integrity and cytokine profile of type II alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Adlakha, Nidhi; Vir, Pooja; Verma, Indu

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb). In lungs, alveolar macrophages and type II alveolar epithelial cells serve as a replicative niche for this pathogen. Secretory proteins released by actively replicating tubercle bacilli are known to interact with host cells at the initial stages of infection. To understand the role of these cells in TB pathogenesis, it is important to identify the mycobacterial components involved in interaction with alveolar epithelial cells. Materials and Methods: We fractionated the whole secretory proteome of M. tb H37Rv into 10 narrow molecular mass fractions (A1-A10; <20 kDa to >90 kDa) that were studied for their binding potential with A549; type II alveolar epithelial cell line. We also studied the consequences of this interaction in terms of change in epithelial cell viability by MTT assay and cytokine release by ELISA. Results: Our results show that several mycobacterial proteins bind and confer cytolysis in epithelial cells. Amongst all the fractions, proteins ranging from 35-45 kDa (A5) exhibited highest binding to A549 cells with a consequence of cytolysis of these cells. This fraction (A5) also led to release of various cytokines important in anti-mycobacterial immunity. Conclusion: Fraction A5 (35-45 kDa) of mycobacterial secretory proteome play an important role in mediating M. tb interaction with type II alveolar epithelial cells with the consequences detrimental for the TB pathogenesis. Further studies are being carried out to identify the candidate proteins from this region. PMID:23243342

  19. Tethering of ICAM on target cells is required for LFA-1-dependent NK cell adhesion and granule polarization

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Catharina C.; Brzostowski, Joseph A.; Liu, Dongfang; Long, Eric O.

    2013-01-01

    αLβ2 integrin (LFA-1) has an important role in the formation of T cell and NK cell cytotoxic immunological synapses and in target cell killing. Binding of LFA-1 to ICAM on target cells promotes not only adhesion, but also polarization of cytolytic granules in NK cells. Here we tested whether LFA-1-dependent NK cell responses are regulated by the distribution and mobility of ICAM at the surface of target cells. We show that depolymerization of F-actin in NK-sensitive target cells abrogated LFA-1-dependent conjugate formation and granule polarization in primary NK cells. Degranulation, which is not controlled by LFA-1, was not impaired. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching experiments and particle tracking by total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy revealed that ICAM-1 and ICAM-2 were distributed in largely immobile clusters. ICAM clusters were maintained and became highly mobile after actin depolymerization. Moreover, reducing ICAM-2 mobility on an NK-resistant target cell through expression of ezrin, an adapter molecule that tethers proteins to the actin cytoskeleton, enhanced LFA-1-dependent adhesion and granule polarization. Finally, while NK cells kept moving over freely diffusible ICAM-1 on a lipid bilayer, they bound and spread over solid-phase ICAM-1. We conclude that tethering, rather than clustering of ICAM promotes proper signaling by LFA-1 in NK cells. Our findings suggest that the lateral diffusion of integrin ligands on cells may be an important determinant of susceptibility to lysis by cytotoxic lymphocytes. PMID:20675589

  20. Secretory phospholipases A2 induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nakashima, Satoru; Ikeno, Yutaka; Yokoyama, Tatsuya; Kuwana, Masakazu; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Kitamoto, Katsuhiko; Arioka, Manabu

    2003-01-01

    sPLA(2)s (secretory phospholipases A(2)) belong to a broad and structurally diverse family of enzymes that hydrolyse the sn -2 ester bond of glycerophospholipids. We previously showed that a secreted fungal 15 kDa protein, named p15, as well as its orthologue from Streptomyces coelicolor (named Scp15) induce neurite outgrowth in PC12 cells at nanomolar concentrations. We report here that both p15 and Scp15 are members of a newly identified group of fungal/bacterial sPLA(2)s. The phospholipid-hydrolysing activity of p15 is absolutely required for neurite outgrowth induction. Mutants with a reduced PLA(2) activity exhibited a comparable reduction in neurite-inducing activity, and the ability to induce neurites closely matched the capacity of various p15 forms to promote fatty acid release from live PC12 cells. A structurally divergent member of the sPLA(2) family, bee venom sPLA(2), also induced neurites in a phospholipase activity-dependent manner, and the same effect was elicited by mouse group V and X sPLA(2)s, but not by group IB and IIA sPLA(2)s. Lysophosphatidylcholine, but not other lysophospholipids, nor arachidonic acid, elicited neurite outgrowth in an L-type Ca(2+) channel activity-dependent manner. In addition, p15-induced neuritogenesis was unaffected by various inhibitors that block arachidonic acid conversion into bioactive eicosanoids. Altogether, these results delineate a novel, Ca(2+)- and lysophosphatidylcholine-dependent neurotrophin-like role of sPLA(2)s in the nervous system. PMID:12967323

  1. Fine Tuning of Synaptic Plasticity and Filtering by GABA Released from Hippocampal Autaptic Granule Cells.

    PubMed

    Valente, Pierluigi; Orlando, Marta; Raimondi, Andrea; Benfenati, Fabio; Baldelli, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    The functional consequence of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release at mossy fiber terminals is still a debated topic. Here, we provide multiple evidence of GABA release in cultured autaptic hippocampal granule cells. In ∼50% of the excitatory autaptic neurons, GABA, VGAT, or GAD67 colocalized with vesicular glutamate transporter 1-positive puncta, where both GABAB and GABAA receptors (Rs) were present. Patch-clamp recordings showed a clear enhancement of autaptic excitatory postsynaptic currents in response to the application of the GABABR antagonist CGP58845 only in neurons positive to the selective granule cell marker Prox1, and expressing low levels of GAD67. Indeed, GCP non-responsive excitatory autaptic neurons were both Prox1- and GAD67-negative. Although the amount of released GABA was not sufficient to activate functional postsynaptic GABAARs, it effectively activated presynaptic GABABRs that maintain a tonic "brake" on the probability of release and on the size of the readily releasable pool and contributed to resting potential hyperpolarization possibly through extrasynaptic GABAAR activation. The autocrine inhibition exerted by GABABRs on glutamate release enhanced both paired-pulse facilitation and post-tetanic potentiation. Such GABABR-mediated changes in short-term plasticity confer to immature granule cells the capability to modulate their filtering properties in an activity-dependent fashion, with remarkable consequences on the dynamic behavior of neural circuits. PMID:25576534

  2. Neuroendocrine secretory protein 7B2: structure, expression and functions.

    PubMed Central

    Mbikay, M; Seidah, N G; Chrétien, M

    2001-01-01

    7B2 is an acidic protein residing in the secretory granules of neuroendocrine cells. Its sequence has been elucidated in many phyla and species. It shows high similarity among mammals. A Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro polyproline motif is its most conserved feature, being carried by both vertebrate and invertebrate sequences. It is biosynthesized as a precursor protein that is cleaved into an N-terminal fragment and a C-terminal peptide. In neuroendocrine cells, 7B2 functions as a specific chaperone for the proprotein convertase (PC) 2. Through the sequence around its Pro-Pro-Asn-Pro-Cys-Pro motif, it binds to an inactive proPC2 and facilitates its transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to later compartments of the secretory pathway where the zymogen is proteolytically matured and activated. Its C-terminal peptide can inhibit PC2 in vitro and may contribute to keep the enzyme transiently inactive in vivo. The PC2-7B2 model defines a new neuroendocrine paradigm whereby proteolytic activation of prohormones and proneuropeptides in the secretory pathway is spatially and temporally regulated by the dynamics of interactions between converting enzymes and their binding proteins. Interestingly, unlike PC2-null mice, which are viable, 7B2-null mutants die early in life from Cushing's disease due to corticotropin ('ACTH') hypersecretion by the neurointermediate lobe, suggesting a possible involvement of 7B2 in secretory granule formation and in secretion regulation. The mechanism of this regulation is yet to be elucidated. 7B2 has been shown to be a good marker of several neuroendocrine cell dysfunctions in humans. The possibility that anomalies in its structure and expression could be aetiological causes of some of these dysfunctions warrants investigation. PMID:11439082

  3. N-hypermannose glycosylation disruption enhances recombinant protein production by regulating secretory pathway and cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongting; Wang, Shenghuan; Wang, Jiajing; Song, Meihui; Xu, Mengyang; Zhang, Mengying; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust host for heterologous protein expression. The efficient expression of cellulases in S. cerevisiae is important for the consolidated bioprocess that directly converts lignocellulose into valuable products. However, heterologous proteins are often N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae, which may affect protein activity. In this study, the expression of three heterologous proteins, β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and cellobiohydrolase, was found to be N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae. To block the formation of hypermannose glycan, these proteins were expressed in strains with deletions in key Golgi mannosyltransferases (Och1p, Mnn9p and Mnn1p), respectively. Their extracellular activities improved markedly in the OCH1 and MNN9 deletion strains. Interestingly, truncation of the N-hypermannose glycan did not increase the specific activity of these proteins, but improved the secretion yield. Further analysis showed OCH1 and MNN9 deletion up-regulated genes in the secretory pathway, such as protein folding and vesicular trafficking, but did not induce the unfolded protein response. The cell wall integrity was also affected by OCH1 and MNN9 deletion, which contributed to the release of secretory protein extracellularly. This study demonstrated that mannosyltransferases disruption improved protein secretion through up-regulating secretory pathway and affecting cell wall integrity and provided new insights into glycosylation engineering for protein secretion. PMID:27156860

  4. N-hypermannose glycosylation disruption enhances recombinant protein production by regulating secretory pathway and cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongting; Wang, Shenghuan; Wang, Jiajing; Song, Meihui; Xu, Mengyang; Zhang, Mengying; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust host for heterologous protein expression. The efficient expression of cellulases in S. cerevisiae is important for the consolidated bioprocess that directly converts lignocellulose into valuable products. However, heterologous proteins are often N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae, which may affect protein activity. In this study, the expression of three heterologous proteins, β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and cellobiohydrolase, was found to be N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae. To block the formation of hypermannose glycan, these proteins were expressed in strains with deletions in key Golgi mannosyltransferases (Och1p, Mnn9p and Mnn1p), respectively. Their extracellular activities improved markedly in the OCH1 and MNN9 deletion strains. Interestingly, truncation of the N-hypermannose glycan did not increase the specific activity of these proteins, but improved the secretion yield. Further analysis showed OCH1 and MNN9 deletion up-regulated genes in the secretory pathway, such as protein folding and vesicular trafficking, but did not induce the unfolded protein response. The cell wall integrity was also affected by OCH1 and MNN9 deletion, which contributed to the release of secretory protein extracellularly. This study demonstrated that mannosyltransferases disruption improved protein secretion through up-regulating secretory pathway and affecting cell wall integrity and provided new insights into glycosylation engineering for protein secretion. PMID:27156860

  5. Epithelial Cell Transforming 2 and Aurora Kinase B Modulate Formation of Stress Granule-Containing Transcripts from Diverse Cellular Pathways in Astrocytoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Adrienne; Agnihotri, Sameer; Lymer, Jennifer; Chalil, Alan; Diaz, Roberto; Isik, Semra; Smith, Christian; Rutka, James T

    2016-06-01

    Stress granules are small RNA-protein granules that modify the translational landscape during cellular stress to promote survival. The RhoGTPase RhoA is implicated in the formation of RNA stress granules. Our data demonstrate that the cytokinetic proteins epithelial cell transforming 2 and Aurora kinase B (AurkB) are localized to stress granules in human astrocytoma cells. AurkB and its downstream target histone-3 are phosphorylated during arsenite-induced stress. Chemical (AZD1152-HQPA) and siRNA inhibition of AurkB results in fewer and smaller stress granules when analyzed using high-throughput fluorescent-based cellomics assays. RNA immunoprecipitation with the known stress granule aggregates TIAR and G3BP1 was performed on astrocytoma cells, and subsequent analysis revealed that astrocytoma stress granules harbor unique mRNAs for various cellular pathways, including cellular migration, metabolism, translation, and transcriptional regulation. Human astrocytoma cell stress granules contain mRNAs that are known to be involved in glioma signaling and the mammalian target of rapamycin pathway. These data provide evidence that RNA stress granules are a novel form of epigenetic regulation in astrocytoma cells, which may be targetable by chemical inhibitors and enhance astrocytoma susceptibility to conventional therapy, such as radiation and chemotherapy. PMID:27106762

  6. The secretory pathway calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 has essential roles in cell migration during Caenorhabditis elegans embryonic development.

    PubMed

    Praitis, Vida; Simske, Jeffrey; Kniss, Sarah; Mandt, Rebecca; Imlay, Leah; Feddersen, Charlotte; Miller, Michael B; Mushi, Juliet; Liszewski, Walter; Weinstein, Rachel; Chakravorty, Adityarup; Ha, Dae-Gon; Schacht Farrell, Angela; Sullivan-Wilson, Alexander; Stock, Tyson

    2013-05-01

    Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR), which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA) is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600), a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family. PMID:23696750

  7. The Secretory Pathway Calcium ATPase PMR-1/SPCA1 Has Essential Roles in Cell Migration during Caenorhabditis elegans Embryonic Development

    PubMed Central

    Praitis, Vida; Simske, Jeffrey; Kniss, Sarah; Mandt, Rebecca; Imlay, Leah; Feddersen, Charlotte; Miller, Michael B.; Mushi, Juliet; Liszewski, Walter; Weinstein, Rachel; Chakravorty, Adityarup; Ha, Dae-Gon; Schacht Farrell, Angela; Sullivan-Wilson, Alexander; Stock, Tyson

    2013-01-01

    Maintaining levels of calcium in the cytosol is important for many cellular events, including cell migration, where localized regions of high calcium are required to regulate cytoskeletal dynamics, contractility, and adhesion. Studies show inositol-trisphosphate receptors (IP3R) and ryanodine receptors (RyR), which release calcium into the cytosol, are important regulators of cell migration. Similarly, proteins that return calcium to secretory stores are likely to be important for cell migration. The secretory protein calcium ATPase (SPCA) is a Golgi-localized protein that transports calcium from the cytosol into secretory stores. SPCA has established roles in protein processing, metal homeostasis, and inositol-trisphosphate signaling. Defects in the human SPCA1/ATP2C1 gene cause Hailey-Hailey disease (MIM# 169600), a genodermatosis characterized by cutaneous blisters and fissures as well as keratinocyte cell adhesion defects. We have determined that PMR-1, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of SPCA1, plays an essential role in embryogenesis. Pmr-1 strains isolated from genetic screens show terminal phenotypes, such as ventral and anterior enclosure failures, body morphogenesis defects, and an unattached pharynx, which are caused by earlier defects during gastrulation. In Pmr-1 embryos, migration rates are significantly reduced for cells moving along the embryo surface, such as ventral neuroblasts, C-derived, and anterior-most blastomeres. Gene interaction experiments show changing the activity of itr-1/IP3R and unc-68/RyR modulates levels of embryonic lethality in Pmr-1 strains, indicating pmr-1 acts with these calcium channels to regulate cell migration. This analysis reveals novel genes involved in C. elegans cell migration, as well as a new role in cell migration for the highly conserved SPCA gene family. PMID:23696750

  8. Excretory/secretory products of the carcinogenic liver fluke are endocytosed by human cholangiocytes and drive cell proliferation and IL6 production.

    PubMed

    Chaiyadet, Sujittra; Smout, Michael; Johnson, Michael; Whitchurch, Cynthia; Turnbull, Lynne; Kaewkes, Sasithorn; Sotillo, Javier; Loukas, Alex; Sripa, Banchob

    2015-10-01

    Liver fluke infection caused by Opisthorchis viverrini remains a major public health problem in many parts of Asia including Thailand, Lao PDR, Vietnam and Cambodia, where there is a strikingly high incidence of cholangiocarcinoma (CCA - hepatic cancer of the bile duct epithelium). Among other factors, uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products (OvES) by biliary epithelial cells has been postulated to be responsible for chronic inflammation and proliferation of cholangiocytes, but the mechanisms by which cells internalise O. viverrini excretory/secretory products are still unknown. Herein we incubated normal human cholangiocytes (H69), human cholangiocarcinoma cells (KKU-100, KKU-M156) and human colon cancer (Caco-2) cells with O. viverrini excretory/secretory products and analysed the effects of different endocytic inhibitors to address the mechanism of cellular uptake of ES proteins. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products was internalised preferentially by liver cell lines, and most efficiently/rapidly by H69 cells. There was no evidence for trafficking of ES proteins to cholangiocyte organelles, and most of the fluorescence was detected in the cytoplasm. Pretreatment with clathrin inhibitors significantly reduced the uptake of O. viverrini excretory/secretory products, particularly by H69 cells. Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products induced proliferation of liver cells (H69 and CCA lines) but not intestinal (Caco-2) cells, and proliferation was blocked using inhibitors of the classical endocytic pathways (clathrin and caveolae). Opisthorchis viverrini excretory/secretory products drove IL6 secretion by H69 cells but not Caco-2 cells, and cytokine secretion was significantly reduced by endocytosis inhibitors. This the first known study to address the endocytosis of helminth ES proteins by host epithelial cells and sheds light on the pathways by which this parasite causes one of the most devastating forms of cancer in south

  9. Somatostatin-14, somatostatin-28, and prosomatostatin[1-10] are independently and efficiently processed from prosomatostatin in the constitutive secretory pathway in islet somatostatin tumor cells (1027B2).

    PubMed

    Patel, Y C; Galanopoulou, A S; Rabbani, S N; Liu, J L; Ravazzola, M; Amherdt, M

    1997-08-01

    We have characterized the biosynthetic origin of somatostatin-14 (SS-14), SS-28, and pro-SS[1-10] from pro-SS (PSS) in 1027B2 rat islet tumor cells. Because these cells lack regulated secretion and show unresponsiveness of the SS gene to cAMP, we have additionally carried out morphological and functional studies to elucidate the molecular defect in cAMP signalling and to localize the sites of PSS maturation along the secretory pathway. Cell extracts and secretion media were analysed by high performance liquid chromatography and specific C- and N-terminal radioimmunoassays. Electron microscopic sampling of 1027B2 cell cultures showed that most cells had very few dense core secretory granules for heterogeneous sizes. The cells expressed the endoproteases furin, PC1, and PC2 and contained large quantities of fully processed SS-14 and SS-28 with very little unprocessed PSS (ratio SS-14:SS-28:PSS = 39:51:10%). They secreted high concentrations of SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] constitutively along with PC1 and PC2. Pulse-chase studies demonstrated that PSS is rapidly (within 15 min), and efficiently processed to SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] via separate biosynthetic pathways: PSS --> SS-14 + 8 kDa; PSS --> SS-28 + 7 kDa; PSS --> PSS[1-10]. Monensin reduced intracellular SS-like immunoreactivity without altering processing efficiency. Transfection with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A (PKA-C) activated SS promoter-CAT activating indicating that the defect in cAMP-dependent signaling in 1027B2 cells lies at the level of PKA-C. PKA-C overexpression failed to alter the ratio of processed SS-14 and SS-28. These results demonstrate that SS-14, SS-28, and PSS[1-10] are independently synthesized from PSS and that efficient precursor processing can occur within the constitutive secretory pathway in the relative absence of dense core secretory vesicles. PMID:9296377

  10. Rapid uncoupling of oxidative phosphorylation accompanies glutamate toxicity in rat cerebellar granule cells.

    PubMed

    Atlante, A; Gagliardi, S; Minervini, G M; Marra, E; Passarella, S; Calissano, P

    1996-11-01

    A 100 microM glutamate pulse administered to rat cerebellar granule cells causes a very rapid and progressive decrease in both cell and mitochondrial oxygen consumption caused by glucose and succinate addition, respectively. The respiratory control ratio, which reflects the ability of mitochondria to produce ATP, is reduced by 50% within the first 30 min after glutamate addition. Subsequent to glutamate exposure, a progressive decrease of respiratory control ratio to almost 1 was found within the following 3-5 h. The addition of extra calcium had no effect per se on oxygen consumption by cell homogenate. PMID:8981415