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  1. Stromal cell-based immunotherapy in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Charles, Ronald; Lu, Lina; Qian, Shiguang; Fung, John J

    2012-01-01

    Organs are composed of parenchymal cells that characterize organ function and nonparenchymal cells that are composed of cells in transit, as well as tissue connective tissue, also referred to as tissue stromal cells. It was originally thought that these tissue stromal cells provided only structural and functional support for parenchymal cells and were relatively inert. However, we have come to realize that tissue stromal cells, not restricted to in the thymus and lymphoid organs, also play an active role in modulating the immune system and its response to antigens. The recognition of these elements and the elucidation of their mechanisms of action have provided valuable insight into peripheral immune regulation. Extrapolation of these principles may allow us to utilize their potential for clinical application. In this article, we will summarize a number of tissue stromal elements/cell types that have been shown to induce hyporesponsiveness to transplants. We will also discuss the mechanisms by which these stromal cells create a tolerogenic environment, which in turn results in long-term allograft survival. PMID:22091683

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-based therapy in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Cheng; Hou, Jianquan

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the best treatment for end-stage renal disease, but its implementation is limited by organ shortage and immune rejection. Side effects of current immunosuppressive drugs, such as nephrotoxicity, opportunistic infection, and tumorigenic potential, influence long-term graft outcomes. In recent years, continued research and subsequent discoveries concerning the properties and potential utilization of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have aroused considerable interest and expectations. Biological characteristics of MSCs, including multi-lineage differentiation, homing potential, paracrine effect and immunomodulation, have opened new horizons for applications in kidney transplantation. However, many studies have shown that the biological activity of MSCs depends on internal inflammatory conditions, and the safety and efficacy of the clinical application of MSCs remain controversial. This review summarizes the findings of a large number of studies and aims to provide an objective viewpoint based on a comprehensive analysis of the presently established benefits and obstacles of implementing MSC-based therapy in kidney transplantation, and to promote its clinical translation. PMID:26852923

  3. Apoptotic cell-based therapies against transplant rejection: role of recipient’s dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Larregina, Adriana T.

    2010-01-01

    One of the ultimate goals in transplantation is to develop novel therapeutic methods for induction of donor-specific tolerance to reduce the side effects caused by the generalized immunosuppression associated to the currently used pharmacologic regimens. Interaction or phagocytosis of cells in early apoptosis exerts potent anti-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects on antigen (Ag)-presenting cells (APC) like dendritic cells (DC) and macrophages. This observation led to the idea that apoptotic cell-based therapies could be employed to deliver donor-Ag in combination with regulatory signals to recipient’s APC as therapeutic approach to restrain the anti-donor response. This review describes the multiple mechanisms by which apoptotic cells down-modulate the immuno-stimulatory and pro-inflammatory functions of DC and macrophages, and the role of the interaction between apoptotic cells and APC in self-tolerance and in apoptotic cell-based therapies to prevent/treat allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease in murine experimental systems and in humans. It also explores the role that in vivo-generated apoptotic cells could have in the beneficial effects of extracorporeal photopheresis, donor-specific transfusion, and tolerogenic DC-based therapies in transplantation. PMID:20140521

  4. Limbal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective The objective of this analysis is to systematically review limbal stem cell transplantation (LSCT) for the treatment of patients with limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). This evidence-based analysis reviews LSCT as a primary treatment for nonpterygium LSCD conditions, and LSCT as an adjuvant therapy to excision for the treatment of pterygium. Background Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population The outer surface of the eye is covered by 2 distinct cell layers: the corneal epithelial layer that overlies the cornea, and the conjunctival epithelial layer that overlies the sclera. These cell types are separated by a transitional zone known as the limbus. The corneal epithelial cells are renewed every 3 to 10 days by a population of stem cells located in the limbus. Nonpterygium Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency When the limbal stem cells are depleted or destroyed, LSCD develops. In LSCD, the conjunctival epithelium migrates onto the cornea (a process called conjunctivalization), resulting in a thickened, irregular, unstable corneal surface that is prone to defects, ulceration, corneal scarring, vascularization, and opacity. Patients experience symptoms including severe irritation, discomfort, photophobia, tearing, blepharospasm, chronic inflammation and redness, and severely decreased vision. Depending on the degree of limbal stem cell loss, LSCD may be total (diffuse) or partial (local). In total LSCD, the limbal stem cell population is completed destroyed and conjunctival epithelium covers the entire cornea. In partial LSCD, some areas of the limbus are unharmed, and the corresponding areas on the cornea maintain phenotypically normal corneal epithelium. Confirmation of the presence of conjunctivalization is necessary for LSCD diagnosis as the other characteristics and symptoms are nonspecific and indicate a variety of diseases. The definitive test for LSCD is impression cytology, which detects the presence of conjunctival epithelium and

  5. Haploidentical stem cell transplantation: anti-thymocyte globulin-based experience.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Jun; Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-04-01

    Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haplo-SCT) with an anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) preparative regimen is associated with induced immune tolerance, rapid hematopoietic recovery, effective prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and lower non-relapse mortality (NRM). This has become a common and successfully applied protocol in patients with hematological diseases undergoing haplo-SCT. Survival rates among patients who undergo unmanipulated haploidentical blood and marrow transplantation (HBMT) with anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG)-based regimens are comparable to those following human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling transplantation or unrelated donor transplantation. Unmanipulated HBMT can also be successfully used as a post-remission treatment algorithm for acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and adult acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in cases with unfavorable cytogenetics. Future investigations should focus on further improving donor selection, optimizing allografts, dealing with primary graft failure, and relapse prophylaxis and treatment. PMID:27000731

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hatzimichael, Eleftheria; Tuthill, Mark

    2010-01-01

    More than 25,000 hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs) are performed each year for the treatment of lymphoma, leukemia, immune-deficiency illnesses, congenital metabolic defects, hemoglobinopathies, and myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative syndromes. Before transplantation, patients receive intensive myeloablative chemoradiotherapy followed by stem cell “rescue.” Autologous HSCT is performed using the patient’s own hematopoietic stem cells, which are harvested before transplantation and reinfused after myeloablation. Allogeneic HSCT uses human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched stem cells derived from a donor. Survival after allogeneic transplantation depends on donor–recipient matching, the graft-versus-host response, and the development of a graft versus leukemia effect. This article reviews the biology of stem cells, clinical efficacy of HSCT, transplantation procedures, and potential complications. PMID:24198516

  7. Islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, P; Huang, G C; Amiel, S A; Heaton, N D

    2007-04-01

    People with type 1 diabetes have normal exocrine pancreatic function, making islet cell rather than whole organ transplantation an attractive option. Achieving insulin independence in type 1 diabetes was the perceived goal of islet cell transplantation. The success of the Edmonton group in achieving this in a selected group of type 1 patients has led to renewed optimism that this treatment could eventually replace whole organ pancreas transplantation. However the long-term results of this treatment indicate that insulin independence is lost with time in a significant proportion of patients, although they may retain glycaemic stability. In this context, the indications for islet cell transplantation, which have evolved over the last 5 years, indicate that the patients who benefit most are those who experience severe hypoglycaemic reactions despite optimal insulin therapy. This review will summarise the history of islet cell transplantation, islet isolation techniques, the transplant procedure, immunosuppressive therapy, indications for islet cell transplantation, current clinical trials, the early UK islet cell transplant experience using the Edmonton protocol, and some of the challenges that lie ahead. PMID:17403947

  8. Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... It is an experimental treatment for type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin. A person who has type 1 diabetes must take insulin daily to live. Transplanted islet ...

  9. Transplantation of Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Acute Spinal Cord Injury in Rats: Comparative Study between Intralesional Injection and Scaffold Based Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon Chung; Kim, Young Hoon; Kim, Jang Woon; Ha, Kee Yong

    2016-09-01

    Experimental stem cell therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) has been extensively investigated. The selection of effective cell transplantation route is also an important issue. Although various types of scaffold have been widely tried as a carrier of stem cells to the injured spinal cord, there was little comparative study to investigate the efficacy of transplantation comparing with conventional transplantation route. A total of 48 Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to standardized SCI, followed by transplantation of allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), either via intralesional injection (IL group), or via the poly (lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold (IP group) or chitosan scaffold (IC group). Engraftment and differentiation of the transplanted cells, expression of neurotrophic factors in the injured spinal cord, and functional recovery were compared with those of the control group. The mean numbers of engrafted MSCs in the IL, IP, and IC groups were 20.6 ± 0.7, 25.6 ± 1.7 and 26.7 ± 1.8 cells/high power filed (HPF), respectively. Results showed higher success rate of MSCs engraftment in the scaffold groups compared to the IL group. Expression of neuroprotective growth factors in the SCI lesions showed no significant differences between the IL, IP, and IC groups. The mean Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan locomotor scales at 6 weeks post-transplantation in the IL, IP, IC, and control groups were 7.9 ± 1.1, 7.9 ± 2.1, 8.7 ± 2.1, and 2.9 ± 1.0, respectively. The functional improvement was most excellent in the IC group. The scaffold based MSC transplantation for acute SCI presented the better cell engraftment and neuroprotective effect compared to the intralesional injection transplantation. PMID:27510379

  10. Stem Cell Transplants (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Stem Cell Transplants KidsHealth > For Teens > Stem Cell Transplants Print ... Does it Take to Recover? Coping What Are Stem Cells? As you probably remember from biology class, every ...

  11. A Critical Care and Transplantation-Based Approach to Acute Respiratory Failure after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    Elbahlawan, Lama; Srinivasan, Ashok; Morrison, R Ray

    2016-04-01

    Acute respiratory failure contributes significantly to nonrelapse mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although there is a trend of improved survival over time, mortality remains unacceptably high. An understanding of the pathophysiology of early respiratory failure, opportunities for targeted therapy, assessment of the patient at risk, optimal use of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, strategies to improve alveolar recruitment, appropriate fluid management, care of the patient with chronic lung disease, and importantly, a team approach between critical care and transplantation services may improve outcomes. PMID:26409244

  12. Peripheral blood progenitor cell transplantation in multiple myeloma following high-dose melphalan-based therapy.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, H; Hegenbart, U; Wallmeier, M; Hohaus, S; Engenhart, R; Wannenmacher, M; Haas, R

    1998-01-01

    The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of a high-dose melphalan-based therapy with or without total body irradiation (TBI) followed by peripheral blood progenitor cell (PBPC) transplantation in patients with multiple myeloma. Between June 1992 and June 1996, 104 patients (71 male, 33 female) with a median age of 51 years (range 30-65 years) underwent transplantation at our center. PBPC were mobilized using high-dose chemotherapy followed by treatment with G-CSF. Fifty patients were treated with TBI+melphalan 140 mg/m2 while 54 patients received melphalan 200 mg/m2. Following PBPC autografting, the median time to attainment of platelets > or = 20 x 10(9)/l and neutrophils > or = 0.5 x 10(9)/l was 11 and 14 days, with no difference between the treatment groups. In the TBI group significantly longer periods of total parenteral nutrition were required due to the occurrence of severe mucositis. Two patients from the TBI group died of transplantation-related complications. Following high-dose treatment, remission state improved in 43 out of 102 patients. No statistically significant advantage in reaching complete or partial remission was observed with TBI+high-dose melphalan compared to the treatment with high-dose melphalan alone. The optimal high-dose treatment, with particular reference to the inclusion or omission of TBI, should be prospectively investigated. PMID:9304704

  13. Conditioning with α-emitter based radioimmunotherapy in canine allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Kornblit, Brian; Chen, Yun; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2012-01-01

    With the introduction of nonmyeloablative conditioning, hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has become a viable treatment option for patients who due to age or comorbidities are ineligible for high dose conditioning. However, relapse and toxicities are still major problems in HCT. Radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning is a promising approach that has the ability to specifically target radiation to hematopoietic cells. The most widely investigated isotopes are the β-emitters, but because of long path lengths and low linear energy transfer, α-emitters which have more favorable physical characteristics, might prove to be a better alternative. In the current study we have investigated the efficacy and safety of α-emitter based RIT as the only form of conditioning in a preclinical model of canine allogeneic HCT. PMID:22772070

  14. B cells in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Dijke, Esme I.; Platt, Jeffrey L.; Blair, Paul; Clatworthy, Menna R.; Patel, Jignesh K.; Kfoury, A.G.; Cascalho, Marilia

    2016-01-01

    B cell responses underlie the most vexing immunological barriers to organ transplantation. Much has been learned about the molecular mechanisms of B cell responses to antigen and new therapeutic agents that specifically target B cells or suppress their functions are available. Yet, despite recent advances, there remains an incomplete understanding about how B cell functions determine the fate of organ transplants and how, whether or when potent new therapeutics should optimally be used. This gap in understanding reflects in part the realization that besides producing antibodies, B cells can also regulate cellular immunity, contribute to the genesis of tolerance and induce accommodation. Whether non-specific depletion of B cells, their progeny or suppression of their functions would undermine these non-cognate functions and whether graft outcome would suffer as a result is unknown. These questions were discussed at a symposium on “B cells in transplantation” at the 2015 ISHLT annual meeting. Those discussions are summarized here and a new perspective is offered. PMID:26996930

  15. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation in Congenital Hemoglobinopathies Using a Tailored Busulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen: Single-Center Experience.

    PubMed

    Zaidman, Irina; Rowe, Jacob M; Khalil, Abdalla; Ben-Arush, Myriam; Elhasid, Ronit

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is the only proven curative option for patients with hemoglobinopathies, both thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA). A busulfan-based myeloablative conditioning regimen is the standard of care for HSCT in these patients, although increased treatment-related morbidity, including veno-occlusive disease (VOD), has been demonstrated. Thirty-eight pediatric patients, median age 8 years (range, 6 months to 22 years), suffering from hemoglobinopathy were treated at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, between 1998 and 2011. Thirty-four patients had thalassemia major and 4 had SCA. The 38 patients underwent 40 HSCTs, 34 of which were first transplants and 6 second transplants. Most transplants (32/40) were from matched sibling donors. Sources of stem cells were peripheral blood in 30 transplants, bone marrow in 7 transplants, and cord blood in 3 transplants. All received different customized busulfan-based conditioning regimens tailored by pharmacokinetic analysis of busulfan levels. Primary engraftment occurred in 37 of 40 transplants. Neutrophil engraftment (>.5 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 15.3 days post-transplantation (range, 10 to 45). Platelet transfusion independence (>20 × 10(9)/L) occurred at a median of 22.3 days (range, 11 to 60). The rate of 5-year overall survival for thalassemia patients after first transplantation was 90.5% ± 5.3%. The rate of 5-year thalassemia-free survival was 81.7% ± 6.8%. Cumulative incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) was 17.6%. Rate of grades III to IV GVHD was 8.8%. Cumulative incidence of chronic GVHD was 23.5%, with 11.8% incidence of extensive chronic GVHD. One patient developed VOD. Full donor chimerism occurred in 36.4% of patients with class 1 + 2 thalassemia, compared with 78.6% in class 3 thalassemia (P = .049). Overall survival above 90% in patients undergoing their first transplant was demonstrated using busulfan-based

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Thalassemia and Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Lucarelli, Guido; Isgrò, Antonella; Sodani, Pietro; Gaziev, Javid

    2012-01-01

    The globally widespread single-gene disorders β-thalassemia and sickle cell anemia (SCA) can only be cured by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). HSCT treatment of thalassemia has substantially improved over the last two decades, with advancements in preventive strategies, control of transplant-related complications, and preparative regimens. A risk class–based transplantation approach results in disease-free survival probabilities of 90%, 84%, and 78% for class 1, 2, and 3 thalassemia patients, respectively. Because of disease advancement, adult thalassemia patients have a higher risk for transplant-related toxicity and a 65% cure rate. Patients without matched donors could benefit from haploidentical mother-to-child transplantation. There is a high cure rate for children with SCA who receive HSCT following myeloablative conditioning protocols. Novel non-myeloablative transplantation protocols could make HSCT available to adult SCA patients who were previously excluded from allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:22553502

  17. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  18. Nanovector-based prolyl hydroxylase domain 2 silencing system enhances the efficiency of stem cell transplantation for infarcted myocardium repair

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Kai; Lai, Hao; Guo, Changfa; Li, Jun; Wang, Yulin; Wang, Lingyan; Wang, Chunsheng

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation has attracted much attention in myocardial infarction therapy. One of the limitations is the poor survival of grafted cells in the ischemic microenvironment. Small interfering RNA-mediated prolyl hydroxylase domain protein 2 (PHD2) silencing in MSCs holds tremendous potential to enhance their survival and paracrine effect after transplantation. However, an efficient and biocompatible PHD2 silencing system for clinical application is lacking. Herein, we developed a novel PHD2 silencing system based on arginine-terminated generation 4 poly(amidoamine) (Arg-G4) nanoparticles. The system exhibited effective and biocompatible small interfering RNA delivery and PHD2 silencing in MSCs in vitro. After genetically modified MSC transplantation in myocardial infarction models, MSC survival and paracrine function of IGF-1 were enhanced significantly in vivo. As a result, we observed decreased cardiomyocyte apoptosis, scar size, and interstitial fibrosis, and increased angiogenesis in the diseased myocardium, which ultimately attenuated ventricular remodeling and improved heart function. This work demonstrated that an Arg-G4 nanovector-based PHD2 silencing system could enhance the efficiency of MSC transplantation for infarcted myocardium repair. PMID:25429216

  19. Memory T Cells in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Su, Charles A.; Fairchild, Robert L.

    2014-01-01

    Following infections and environmental exposures, memory T cells are generated that provide long-term protective immunity. Compared to their naïve T cell counterparts, memory T cells possess unique characteristics that endow them with the ability to quickly and robustly respond to foreign antigens. While such memory T cells are beneficial in protecting their hosts from recurrent infection, memory cells reactive to donor antigens pose a major barrier to successful transplantation and tolerance induction. Significant progress has been made over the past several decades contributing to our understanding of memory T cell generation, their distinct biology, and their detrimental impact in clinical and animal models of transplantation. This review focuses on the unique features which make memory T cells relevant to the transplant community and discusses potential therapies targeting memory T cells which may ameliorate allograft rejection. PMID:25435071

  20. MedlinePlus: Islet Cell Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Human Islet Transplantation. Islet Cell Transplantation -- see more articles Topic Image MedlinePlus Email Updates Get Islet Cell Transplantation updates by email What's this? GO GO National Institutes of Health The primary NIH organization for research on Islet Cell Transplantation is the ...

  1. Concise Review: Mechanisms Behind Apoptotic Cell-Based Therapies Against Transplant Rejection and Graft versus Host Disease.

    PubMed

    Morelli, Adrian E; Larregina, Adriana T

    2016-05-01

    The main limitations to the success of transplantation are the antigraft response developed by the recipient immune system, and the adverse side effects of chronic immunosuppression. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) triggered by donor-derived T lymphocytes against the recipient tissues is another serious obstacle in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Several laboratories have tested the possibility of promoting antigen (Ag)-specific tolerance for therapy of graft rejection, GVHD, and autoimmune disorders, by developing methodologies that mimic the mechanisms by which the immune system maintains peripheral tolerance in the steady state. It has been long recognized that the silent clearance of cells undergoing apoptosis exerts potent immune-regulatory effects and provides apoptotic cell-derived Ags to those Ag-presenting cells (APCs) that internalize them, in particular macrophages and dendritic cells. Therefore, in situ-targeting of recipient APCs by systemic administration of leukocytes in early apoptosis and bearing donor Ags represents a relatively simple approach to control the antidonor response against allografts. Here, we review the mechanisms by which apoptotic cells are silently cleared by phagocytes, and how such phenomenon leads to down-regulation of the innate and adaptive immunity. We discuss the evolution of apoptotic cell-based therapies from murine models of organ/tissue transplantation and GVHD, to clinical trials. We make emphasis on potential limitations and areas of concern of apoptotic cell-based therapies, and on how other immune-suppressive therapies used in the clinics or tested experimentally likely also function through the silent clearance of apoptotic cells by the immune system. Stem Cells 2016;34:1142-1150. PMID:26865545

  2. Arrhythmia in Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Shone O.; Skelton, Rhys J.; Adigopula, Sasikanth; Ardehali, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Stem cell regenerative therapies hold promise for treating diseases across the spectrum of medicine. Recent clinical trials have confirmed the safety of stem cell delivery to the heart with promising but variable results. While significant progress has been made in the preclinical stages, the clinical application of cardiac cell therapy is limited by technical challenges, including inability to isolate a pure population of cardiac-specific progenitors capable of robust engraftment and regeneration, lack of appropriate pre-clinical animal models, uncertainty about the best mode of delivery, paucity of adequate imaging modalities, and lack of knowledge about the fate of transplanted cells. The inability of transplanted cells to structurally and functionally integrate into the host myocardium may pose arrhythmogenic risk to patients. This is in part dependent on the type of cell transplanted, where the expression of gap junctions such as connexin-43 is essential not only for electromechanical integration, but has also been found to be protective against electrical instability post-transplant. Additionally, certain methods of cell delivery, such as intramyocardial injection, carry a higher rate of arrhythmias. Other potential contributors to the arrhythmogenicity of cell transplantation include re-entrant pathways due to heterogeneity in conduction velocities between graft and host as well as graft automaticity. In this paper, we discuss the arrhythmogenic potential of cell delivery to the heart. PMID:26002399

  3. L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation improve outcomes in aggressive natural killer cell leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ki Sun; Cho, Su-Hee; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Kang, Eun-Suk; Kim, Won Seog

    2016-01-01

    Aggressive nature killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is a mature NK-T cell lymphoma with worse prognosis, but optimal treatment is unclear. Therefore, we analyzed the efficacy of L-asparaginase-based regimens for ANKL patients. Twenty-one patients who received dexamethasone, methotrexate, ifosfamide, L-asparaginase, and etoposide (SMILE) or etoposide, ifosfamide, dexamethasone, and L-asparaginase (VIDL) chemotherapy at Samsung Medical Center were selected. The overall response rate for all patients was 33% (7/21); 38% (5/13) in SMILE and 40% (2/5) in VIDL, respectively. The median progression-free survival was 3.9 months (95% CI 0.0-8.1 months) and median overall survival was 7.0 months (95% CI 2.3-11.7 months). Treatment response (P = 0.001), hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) (P = 0.007) and negative conversion of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) DNA titer after treatment (P = 0.004) were significantly associated with survival. Thus, L-asparaginase-based regimens followed by allogeneic HSCT seem to improve the outcome for ANKL patients. PMID:27091029

  4. Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells on Transplantation: Immunotherapy Based on Second Signal Blockage

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Priscila de Matos; Bier, Julia; Paiatto, Lisiery Negrini; Galdino Albuquerque, Cassia; Lopes Souza, Caique; Fernandes, Luis Gustavo Romani; Tamashiro, Wirla Maria da Silva Cunha; Simioni, Patricia Ucelli

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs), the most important professional antigen-presenting cells (APC), play crucial role in both immunity and tolerance. It is well known that DCs are able to mount immune responses against foreign antigens and simultaneously tolerate self-antigens. Since DCs can be modulated depending on the surrounding microenvironment, they can act as a bridge between innate and adaptive immunity. However, the mechanisms that support this dual role are not entirely clear. Recent studies have shown that DCs can be manipulated ex vivo in order to trigger their tolerogenic profile, what can be a tool to be used in clinical trials aiming the treatment of various diseases and the prevention of transplant rejection. In this sense, the blockage of costimulatory molecules on DC, in the attempt of inhibiting the second signal in the immunological synapse, can be considered as one of the main strategies under development. This review brings an update on current therapies using tolerogenic dendritic cells modulated with costimulatory blockers with the aim of reducing transplant rejection. However, although there are current clinical trials using tolerogenic DC to treat allograft rejection, the actual challenge is to modulate these cells in order to maintain a permanent tolerogenic profile. PMID:26543876

  5. Haplotype-based banking of human pluripotent stem cells for transplantation: potential and limitations.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Anna; Preynat-Seauve, Olivier; Tiercy, Jean-Marie; Krause, Karl-Heinz; Villard, Jean

    2012-09-01

    High expectations surround the area of stem cells therapeutics. However, the cells' source-adult or embryonic-and the cells' origin-patient-derived autologous or healthy donor genetically unrelated-remain subjects of debate. Autologous origins have the advantage of a theoretical absence of immune rejection by the recipient. However, this approach has several limitations with regard to the disease of the recipient and to potential problems with the generation, expansion, and manipulation of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells) preparation. An alternative to using autologous cells is the establishment of a bank of well-characterized adult cells that would be used to generate iPS cells and their derivatives. In the context of transplantation, such cells would come from genetically unrelated donors and the immune system of the recipient would reject the graft without immunosuppressive therapy. To minimize the risk of rejection, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) compatibility is certainly the best option, and the establishment of an HLA-organized bank would mean having a limited number of stem cells that would be sufficient for a large number of recipients. The concept of haplobanking with HLA homozygous cell lines would also limit the number of HLA mismatches, but such an approach will not necessarily be less immunogenic in terms of selection criteria, because of the limited number of HLA-compatible loci and the level of HLA typing resolution. PMID:22559254

  6. Intravenous Busulfan-Based Myeloablative Conditioning Regimens Prior to Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Zhu, Xiaochun; Artz, Andrew; DiPersio, John; Fernandez, Hugo F; Mineishi, Shin; Kamishohara, Masaru; Mehta, Jayesh; Nakamura, Yuki; Ratanatharathorn, Voravit; Sobecks, Ronald; Burkart, Jeanne; Bredeson, Christopher

    2016-08-01

    Busulfan (Bu)-containing regimens are commonly used in myeloablative conditioning regimens before allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Yet, there is considerable variability on how Bu is administered related to frequency (4 times a day [Q6] or daily [Q24]) and combinations with other chemotherapeutic agents (cyclophosphamide [Cy] or fludarabine [Flu]). We performed a prospective cohort study of recipients of Bu-based conditioning according to contemporary practices to compare different approaches (BuCy Q6, n = 495; BuFlu Q24, n = 331; BuCy Q24, n = 96; BuFlu Q6, n = 91) in patients with myeloid malignancies between 2009 and 2011. BuFlu Q24 recipients were more likely to be older and tended to have worse performance status and a higher comorbid burden. The cumulative incidences of hepatic veno-occlusive disease (P = .40), idiopathic pneumonia (P = .50), and seizures (P = .50) did not differ across groups. One-year HCT-related mortality ranged from 12% to 16% (P = .80), 3-year relapse incidence ranged from 32% to 36% (P = .80), and 3-year overall survival ranged from 51% to 58% (P = .20) across groups. This study demonstrates that HCT conditioning regimens using i.v. Bu Q6 or Q24 alone or in combination with Cy or Flu have similar outcomes in the myeloablative setting for treatment of myeloid malignancies. PMID:27154848

  7. Treosulfan-based conditioning regimen for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Strocchio, Luisa; Zecca, Marco; Comoli, Patrizia; Mina, Tommaso; Giorgiani, Giovanna; Giraldi, Eugenia; Vinti, Luciana; Merli, Pietro; Regazzi, Mario; Locatelli, Franco

    2015-06-01

    Although allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) still represents the only consolidated possibility of cure for sickle cell disease (SCD) patients, its use has been limited by the risk of morbidity and mortality associated with conventional myeloablative therapy. The introduction of treosulfan to replace busulfan in conditioning regimens has recently been explored by virtue of its lower toxicity profile. We report our experience with a treosulfan/thiotepa/fludarabine conditioning for human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling or unrelated donor-HSCT in 15 children with SCD, and compare patient outcomes with those of a historical cohort (15 patients) given a busulfan-based regimen. Engraftment was achieved in 28 out of 30 patients (93%), with one case of graft failure in either group. The conditioning regimen was well tolerated in both groups, with no cases of grade III-IV regimen-related toxicity. The 7-year overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS) for the whole cohort were 100% and 93%, respectively, with a 93% DFS in both busulfan and treosulfan groups. No SCD-related adverse events occurred after engraftment in patients with complete or mixed donor chimerism. This retrospective analysis suggests that a treosulfan-based conditioning regimen is able to ensure engraftment with excellent OS/DFS and low regimen-related toxicity in patients with SCD. PMID:25818248

  8. Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... Foodborne, Waterborne, and Environmental Diseases Mycotic Diseases Branch Stem Cell Transplant Patients and Fungal Infections Recommend on Facebook ... Mold . Top of Page Preventing fungal infections in stem cell transplant patients Fungi are difficult to avoid because ...

  9. Impaired interferon-alpha production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells after cord blood transplantation in children: implication for post-transplantation toll-like receptor ligand-based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Charrier, Emily; Cordeiro, Paulo; Brito, Rose-Marie; Harnois, Michaël; Mezziani, Samira; Herblot, Sabine; Le Deist, Françoise; Duval, Michel

    2014-10-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) initiate both innate and adaptive immune responses, making them attractive targets for post-transplantation immunotherapy, particularly after cord blood transplantation (CBT). Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists are currently studied for pDC stimulation in various clinical settings. Their efficacy depends on pDC number and functionality, which are unknown after CBT. We performed a longitudinal study of pDC reconstitution in children who underwent bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and single-unit CBT. Both CBT and unrelated BMT patients received antithymocyte globulin as part of their graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis regimen. pDC blood counts were higher in CBT patients than in healthy volunteers from 2 to 9 months after transplantation, whereas they remained lower in BMT patients. We showed that cord blood progenitors gave rise in vitro to a 500-fold increase in functional pDCs over bone marrow counterparts. Upon stimulation with a TLR agonist, pDCs from both CBT and BMT recipients upregulated T cell costimulatory molecules, whereas interferon-alpha (IFN-α) production was impaired for 9 months after CBT. TLR agonist treatment is thus not expected to induce IFN-α production by pDCs after CBT, limiting its immunotherapeutic potential. Fortunately, in vitro production of large amounts of functional pDCs from cord blood progenitors paves the way for the post-transplantation adoptive transfer of pDCs. PMID:25128615

  10. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    ... Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth Main Content Key Points​ ... Your Dentist Before Transplant Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth should ...

  11. Pre- and postmortem imaging of transplanted cells

    PubMed Central

    Andrzejewska, Anna; Nowakowski, Adam; Janowski, Miroslaw; Bulte, Jeff WM; Gilad, Assaf A; Walczak, Piotr; Lukomska, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic interventions based on the transplantation of stem and progenitor cells have garnered increasing interest. This interest is fueled by successful preclinical studies for indications in many diseases, including the cardiovascular, central nervous, and musculoskeletal system. Further progress in this field is contingent upon access to techniques that facilitate an unambiguous identification and characterization of grafted cells. Such methods are invaluable for optimization of cell delivery, improvement of cell survival, and assessment of the functional integration of grafted cells. Following is a focused overview of the currently available cell detection and tracking methodologies that covers the entire spectrum from pre- to postmortem cell identification. PMID:26366076

  12. Preconditioning Strategy in Stem Cell Transplantation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shan Ping; Wei, Zheng; Wei, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation therapy has emerged as a promising regenerative medicine for ischemic stroke and other neurodegenerative disorders. However, many issues and problems remain to be resolved before successful clinical applications of the cell-based therapy. To this end, some recent investigations have sought to benefit from well-known mechanisms of ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning. Ischemic/hypoxic preconditioning activates endogenous defense mechanisms that show marked protective effects against multiple insults found in ischemic stroke and other acute attacks. As in many other cell types, a sub-lethal hypoxic exposure significantly increases the tolerance and regenerative properties of stem cells and progenitor cells. So far, a variety of preconditioning triggers have been tested on different stem cells and progenitor cells. Preconditioned stem cells and progenitors generally show much better cell survival, increased neuronal differentiation, enhanced paracrine effects leading to increased trophic support, and improved homing to the lesion site. Transplantation of preconditioned cells helps to suppress inflammatory factors and immune responses, and promote functional recovery. Although the preconditioning strategy in stem cell therapy is still an emerging research area, accumulating information from reports over the last few years already indicates it as an attractive, if not essential, prerequisite for transplanted cells. It is expected that stem cell preconditioning and its clinical applications will attract more attention in both the basic research field of preconditioning as well as in the field of stem cell translational research. This review summarizes the most important findings in this active research area, covering the preconditioning triggers, potential mechanisms, mediators, and functional benefits for stem cell transplant therapy. PMID:23914259

  13. Personalized home-based interval exercise training may improve cardiorespiratory fitness in cancer patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Wood, W A; Phillips, B; Smith-Ryan, A E; Wilson, D; Deal, A M; Bailey, C; Meeneghan, M; Reeve, B B; Basch, E M; Bennett, A V; Shea, T C; Battaglini, C L

    2016-07-01

    Impaired cardiorespiratory fitness is associated with inferior survival in patients preparing to undergo hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Exercise training based on short, higher intensity intervals has the potential to efficiently improve cardiorespiratory fitness. We studied home-based interval exercise training (IET) in 40 patients before autologous (N=20) or allogeneic (N=20) HCT. Each session consisted of five, 3 min intervals of walking, jogging or cycling at 65-95% maximal heart rate (MHR) with 3 min of low-intensity exercise (<65% MHR) between intervals. Participants were asked to perform sessions at least three times weekly. The duration of the intervention was at least 6 weeks, depending on each patient's scheduled transplantation date. Cardiorespiratory fitness was assessed from a peak oxygen consumption test (VO2peak) and a 6 min walk (6MWD) before and after the intervention period. For the autologous HCT cohort, improvements in VO2peak (P=0.12) and 6MWD (P=0.19) were not statistically significant. For the allogeneic cohort, the median VO2peak improvement was 3.7 ml/kg min (P=0.005) and the median 6MWD improvement was 34 m (P=0.006). Home-based IET can be performed before HCT and has the potential to improve cardiorespiratory fitness. PMID:26999467

  14. [Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells].

    PubMed

    Amano, Shiro

    2002-12-01

    Though conventional corneal transplantation has achieved great success, it still has several drawbacks including limited availability of donor corneas, recurrent allograft rejection, and subsequent graft failure in certain cases. Reconstructing clinically usable corneas by applying the technology of regenerative medicine can offer a solution to these problems, as well as making corneal transplantation a non-emergency surgery and enabling the usage of banked corneal cells. In the present study, we focused on corneal endothelium that is critical for corneal transparency and investigated the reconstruction of cornea utilizing cultured human corneal endothelial cells (HCECs). We succeeded in steadily culturing HCECs by using culture dishes pre-coated with extracellular matrix produced by calf corneal endothelial cells and culture media that contained basic fibroblast growth factor and fetal bovine serum. We performed the following analysis utilizing these cultured HCECs. The older the donor was, the more frequently large senescent cells appeared in the passaged HCECs. The telomeres of HCECs were measured as terminal restriction fragments (TRF) by Southern blotting. HCECs, in vivo from donors in their seventies had a long TRFs of over 12 kilobases. Passaging shortened the TRFs but there was no difference in TRFs among donors of various ages. These results indicated that shortening of telomere length is not related to senescence of HCECs. We investigated the role of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) in the senescence of in vivo HCECs. The results indicated that AGE-protein in the aqueous humor is endocytosed into HCECs via AGE receptors expressed on the surface of HCECs and damages HCECs by producing reactive oxygen species and inducing apoptosis, suggesting that AGEs, at least partly, cause the senescence of HECEs. HCECs were cultured using adult human serum instead of bovine serum to get rid of bovine material that can be infected with prions. Primary and passage

  15. Gene modified cell transplantation for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Murasawa, Satoshi; Asahara, Takayuki

    2007-02-01

    Cell Transplantation is one of the powerful tools to ameliorate the capillary flow in ischemic condition. EPC (Endothelial Progenitor Cell) was identified in adult peripheral blood and thought to be a suitable candidate for cell transplantation. Also, gene therapy is already promising choice for enhancing angiogenic property. The combination of cell transplantation and gene therapy should be more effective way to regenerate vasculature in ischemic region. Recently, several research reports have come out regarding gene modified cell transplantation. We will mainly focus on the background of EPC, and then gene modified EPC findings in this review. PMID:17305524

  16. Process-Based Expansion and Neural Differentiation of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells for Transplantation and Disease Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Stover, Alexander E.; Brick, David J.; Nethercott, Hubert E.; Banuelos, Maria G.; Sun, Lei; O’Dowd, Diane K.; Schwartz, Philip H.

    2014-01-01

    Robust strategies for developing patient-specific, human, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-based therapies of the brain require an ability to derive large numbers of highly defined neural cells. Recent progress in iPSC culture techniques includes partial-to-complete elimination of feeder layers, use of defined media, and single-cell passaging. However, these techniques still require embryoid body formation or coculture for differentiation into neural stem cells (NSCs). In addition, none of the published methodologies has employed all of the advances in a single culture system. Here we describe a reliable method for long-term, single-cell passaging of PSCs using a feeder-free, defined culture system that produces confluent, adherent PSCs that can be differentiated into NSCs. To provide a basis for robust quality control, we have devised a system of cellular nomenclature that describes an accurate genotype and phenotype of the cells at specific stages in the process. We demonstrate that this protocol allows for the efficient, large-scale, cGMP-compliant production of transplantable NSCs from all lines tested. We also show that NSCs generated from iPSCs produced with the process described are capable of forming both glia defined by their expression of S100β and neurons that fire repetitive action potentials. PMID:23893392

  17. Treosulfan-based conditioning regimens for allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children with non-malignant diseases.

    PubMed

    Slatter, M A; Boztug, H; Pötschger, U; Sykora, K-W; Lankester, A; Yaniv, I; Sedlacek, P; Glogova, E; Veys, P; Gennery, A R; Peters, C

    2015-12-01

    An increasing number of children with non-malignant diseases can be cured by allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Treosulfan (L-treitol-1,4-bis-methanesulfonate) is being used more frequently for conditioning, owing to its' lower toxicity profile compared with conventional myeloablative regimens. A retrospective analysis was performed of children registered in the EBMT database, who received treosulfan before HSCT between January 2005 and 2010, to identify possible dose-related toxicity and determine the incidence of engraftment, treatment-related mortality and overall survival (OS). Results from 316 transplants from 11 different countries are presented. Ninety-five (30%) were under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. OS was 83% and event-free survival was 76%; 3-year OS and event-free survival of infants below 1 year were 79% and 73%, respectively. No association was found with age at transplant, dose of treosulfan given, other agents used in combination with treosulfan, donor type, stem cell source, or second or subsequent transplant. In this report of the largest number of children to date receiving treosulfan for non-malignant diseases, treosulfan is shown to be a safe and effective agent even for those under 1 year of age at the time of transplant. Further prospective studies are needed using precisely defined protocols with pharmacokinetic monitoring and detailed chimerism analysis. In addition, long-term studies will be vital to determine long-term effects, for example, on fertility in comparison with other regimens. PMID:26259076

  18. Mantle cell lymphoma: observation to transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Babak; Sweetenham, John W

    2015-02-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma as a rare non-Hodgkin B-cell lymphoma can present in different clinical presentations such as an aggressive form or a more indolent picture. Treatment modality is based on multiple factors including age, presence or absence of symptoms, and comorbidities. Watchful waiting is a reasonable approach for asymptomatic patients especially in elderly. In symptomatic patients, treatment is chemo-immunotherapy followed by maintenance immunotherapy or autologous bone marrow transplant. Allogeneic bone marrow transplant has a potential benefit of cure for relapsed/refractory cases, but it has a high mortality rate. Novel treatment with agents such as ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has shown promising results in relapse/refractory cases. We extensively review the most recent data on diagnostic and therapeutic management of mantle cell lymphoma through presenting two extreme clinical scenarios. PMID:25642314

  19. Regulatory T Cells in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nagler, Arnon

    2013-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests that cellular adoptive immunotherapy is becoming an attractive though challenging approach in regulating tumor immunity and alloresponses in clinical transplantation. Naturally arising CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg) have emerged as a key component in this regard. Over the last decade, a large body of evidence from preclinical models has demonstrated their crucial role in auto- and tumor immunity and has opened the door to their “first-in-man” clinical application. Initial studies in clinical allogeneic stem cell transplantation are very encouraging and may pave the way for other applications. Further improvements in Treg ex vivo or in vivo expansion technologies will simplify their global clinical application. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of Treg biology and their potential for cell-based immunotherapy in allogeneic stem cell transplantation. PMID:23737813

  20. A population-based cohort study of late mortality in adult autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients in Australia.

    PubMed

    Ashton, Lesley J; Le Marsney, Renate E; Dodds, Anthony J; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Wilcox, Leonie; O'Brien, Tracey A; Vajdic, Claire M

    2014-07-01

    We assessed overall and cause-specific mortality and risk factors for late mortality in a nation-wide population-based cohort of 4547 adult cancer patients who survived 2 or more years after receiving an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in Australia between 1992 and 2005. Deaths after HSCT were identified from the Australasian Bone Marrow Transplant Recipient Registry and through data linkage with the National Death Index. Overall, the survival probability was 56% at 10 years from HSCT, ranging from 34% for patients with multiple myeloma to 90% for patients with testicular cancer. Mortality rates moved closer to rates observed in the age- and sex-matched Australian general population over time but remained significantly increased 11 or more years from HSCT (standardized mortality ratio, 5.9). Although the proportion of deaths from nonrelapse causes increased over time, relapse remained the most frequent cause of death for all diagnoses, 10 or more years after autologous HSCT. Our findings show that prevention of disease recurrence remains 1 of the greatest challenges for autologous HSCT recipients, while the increasing rates of nonrelapse deaths due to the emergence of second cancers, circulatory diseases, and respiratory diseases highlight the long-term health issues faced by adult survivors of autologous HSCT. PMID:24631736

  1. Cost of Stem Cell-Based Tissue-Engineered Airway Transplants in the United Kingdom: Case Series.

    PubMed

    Culme-Seymour, Emily J; Mason, Katrina; Vallejo-Torres, Laura; Carvalho, Carla; Partington, Leanne; Crowley, Claire; Hamilton, Nick J; Toll, Ed C; Butler, Colin R; Elliott, Martin J; Birchall, Martin A; Lowdell, Mark W; Mason, Chris

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based tissue-engineered tracheas are at an early stage in their product development cycle. Tens of patients have been treated worldwide in predominantly compassionate use settings, demonstrating significant promise. This potentially life-saving treatment is complex, and the cost and its implications for such treatments are yet to be fully understood. The costs are compounded by varying strategies for graft preparation and transplant, resulting in differing clinical and laboratory costs from different research groups. In this study, we present a detailed breakdown of the clinical and manufacturing costs for three of the United Kingdom (UK) patients treated with such transplants. All three patients were treated under Compassionate Use legislation, within the UK National Health Service (NHS) hospital setting. The total costs for the three UK patients treated ranged from $174,420 to $740,500. All three patients were in a state of poor health at time of treatment and had a number of complexities in addition to the restricted airway. This is the first time a cost analysis has been made for a tissue-engineered organ and provides a benchmark for future studies, as well as comparative data for use in reimbursement considerations. PMID:26559535

  2. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as "off-the-shelf" therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  3. Prophylactic and therapeutic adenoviral vector-based multivirus-specific T-cell immunotherapy for transplant patients

    PubMed Central

    Dasari, Vijayendra; Schuessler, Andrea; Smith, Corey; Wong, Yide; Miles, John J; Smyth, Mark J; Ambalathingal, George; Francis, Ross; Campbell, Scott; Chambers, Daniel; Khanna, Rajiv

    2016-01-01

    Viral infections including cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus are a common and predictable problem in transplant recipients. While cellular immune therapies have been successfully used to tackle infectious complications in transplant recipients, manufacturing immunotherapies to address the multitude of possible pathogens can be technically challenging and labor-intensive. Here we describe a novel adenoviral antigen presentation platform (Ad-MvP) as a tool for rapid generation of multivirus-specific T-cells in a single step. Ad-MvP encodes 32 CD8+ T-cell epitopes from cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus, adenovirus, and BK virus as a contiguous polyepitope. We demonstrate that Ad-MvP vector can be successfully used for rapid in vitro expansion of multivirus-specific T-cells from transplant recipients and in vivo priming of antiviral T-cell immunity. Most importantly, using an in vivo murine model of Epstein-Barr virus-induced lymphoma, we also show that adoptive immunotherapy with Ad-MvP expanded autologous and allogeneic multivirus-specific T-cells is highly effective in controlling Epstein-Barr virus tumor outgrowth and improving overall survival. We propose that Ad-MvP has wide ranging therapeutic applications in greatly facilitating in vivo priming of antiviral T-cells, the generation of third-party T-cell banks as “off-the-shelf” therapeutics as well as autologous T-cell therapies for transplant patients. PMID:27606351

  4. The effect of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel on bone marrow stromal cell transplant survival and spinal cord repair

    PubMed Central

    Ritfeld, Gaby J; Rauck, Britta; Novosat, Tabitha L; Park, Daewon; Patel, Pavan; Roos, Raymund AC; Wang, Yadong; Oudega, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy for nervous tissue repair is limited by low transplant survival. We investigated the effects of a polyurethane-based reverse thermal gel, poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(serinol hexamethylene urethane) (ESHU) on bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplant survival and repair using a rat model of spinal cord contusion. Transplantation of BMSCs in ESHU at three days post-contusion resulted in a 3.5-fold increase in BMSC survival at one week post-injury and a 66% increase in spared nervous tissue volume at four weeks post-injury. These improvements were accompanied by enhanced hindlimb motor and sensorimotor recovery. In vitro, we found that ESHU protected BMSCs from hydrogen peroxide-mediated death, resulting in a four-fold increase in BMSC survival with two-fold fewer BMSCs expressing the apoptosis marker, caspase 3 and the DNA oxidation marker, 8-Oxo-deoxyguanosine. We argue that ESHU protected BMSCs transplanted is a spinal cord contusion from death thereby augmenting their effects on neuroprotection leading to improved behavioral restoration. The data show that the repair effects of intraneural BMSC transplants depend on the degree of their survival and may have a widespread impact on cell-based regenerative medicine. PMID:24331711

  5. Development of a novel carrier optimized for cell sheet transplantation.

    PubMed

    Amagai, Yosuke; Karasawa, Kaoru; Kyungsook, Jung; Matsuda, Akira; Kojima, Masanori; Watanabe, Jun; Hibi, Toyoji; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Akane

    2015-01-01

    Tissue engineering is a rapidly advancing technology in the field of regenerative medicine. For the transplantation of cell sheets, a carrier must maintain the shape of a cell sheet from a culture dish to affected sites as well as release the sheet easily onto the lesion. In this study, we examined the utility of a novel, poly(lactic acid)-based carrier for cell sheets transplantation to the cornea of dogs and the skin of rats. The poly(lactic acid)-based carrier easily picked a cell sheet up from the dish, fit to the shape of the transplantation sites, and saved time for cell sheets detachment comparing to a conventional carrier. Thus, the poly(lactic acid)-based carrier would be useful for easy cell sheet transplantations. PMID:25869322

  6. Management of Liver Failure: From Transplantation to Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Francipane, Maria Giovanna; Cervello, Melchiorre; Vizzini, Giovanni Battista; Pietrosi, Giada; Montalto, Giuseppe

    2011-01-01

    The severe shortage of deceased donor organs has driven a search for alternative methods of treating liver failure. In this context, cell-based regenerative medicine is emerging as a promising interdisciplinary field of tissue repair and restoration, able to contribute to improving health in a minimally invasive fashion. Several cell types have allowed long-term survival in experimental models of liver injury, but their therapeutic potential in humans should be regarded with deep caution, because few clinical trials are currently available and the number of patients enrolled so far is too small to assess benefits versus risks. This review summarizes the current literature on the physiological role of endogenous stem cells in liver regeneration and on the therapeutic benefits of exogenous stem cell administration with specific emphasis on the potential clinical uses of mesenchymal stem cells. Moreover, critical points that still need clarification, such as the exact identity of the stem-like cell population exerting the beneficial effects, as well as the limitations of stem cell-based therapies, are discussed. PMID:26998399

  7. High-dose CD20-targeted radioimmunotherapy-based autologous transplantation improves outcomes for persistent mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cassaday, Ryan D; Stevenson, Philip A; Gooley, Theodore A; Chauncey, Thomas R; Pagel, John M; Rajendran, Joseph; Till, Brian G; Philip, Mary; Orozco, Johnnie J; Bensinger, William I; Holmberg, Leona A; Shustov, Andrei R; Green, Damian J; Smith, Stephen D; Libby, Edward N; Maloney, David G; Press, Oliver W; Gopal, Ajay K

    2015-12-01

    Autologous stem cell transplant (ASCT) can improve outcomes for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) patients, yet relapses are frequent. We hypothesized that high-dose anti-CD20 radioimmunotherapy (RIT)-based conditioning could improve results in this setting. We thus assessed 162 consecutive patients with MCL at our centre undergoing ASCT following high-dose RIT-based (n = 61) or standard (n = 101) conditioning. RIT patients were less likely to be in first remission (48% vs. 72%; P = 0·002), be in complete remission (CR) (26% vs. 61%; P < 0·001) and have chemosensitive disease (84% vs. 96%; P = 0·006). RIT-based conditioning was associated with a reduced risk of treatment failure [hazard ratio (HR) 0·40; P = 0·001] and mortality (HR 0·49; P = 0·01) after adjusting for these imbalances. This difference increased as disease status worsened (from CR to partial remission to stable/progressive disease), with respective HRs of 1·14, 0·53 and 0·04 for mortality, and 0·66, 0·36 and 0·14 for treatment failure. RIT-based conditioning appears to improve outcome following ASCT for MCL patients unable to achieve CR after controlling for imbalances in important risk factors. These data support the further study of RIT and radiation-based strategies in a risk-adapted approach to ASCT for persistent MCL. PMID:26455717

  8. Biodistribution of locally or systemically transplanted osteoblast-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Okabe, Y. T.; Kondo, T.; Mishima, K.; Hayase, Y.; Kato, K.; Mizuno, M.; Ishiguro, N.; Kitoh, H.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives In order to ensure safety of the cell-based therapy for bone regeneration, we examined in vivo biodistribution of locally or systemically transplanted osteoblast-like cells generated from bone marrow (BM) derived mononuclear cells. Methods BM cells obtained from a total of 13 Sprague-Dawley (SD) green fluorescent protein transgenic (GFP-Tg) rats were culture-expanded in an osteogenic differentiation medium for three weeks. Osteoblast-like cells were then locally transplanted with collagen scaffolds to the rat model of segmental bone defect. Donor cells were also intravenously infused to the normal Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats for systemic biodistribution. The flow cytometric and histological analyses were performed for cellular tracking after transplantation. Results Locally transplanted donor cells remained within the vicinity of the transplantation site without migrating to other organs. Systemically administered large amounts of osteoblast-like cells were cleared from various organ tissues within three days of transplantation and did not show any adverse effects in the transplanted rats. Conclusions We demonstrated a precise assessment of donor cell biodistribution that further augments prospective utility of regenerative cell therapy. PMID:24652780

  9. Second Cancer Risk and Late Mortality in Adult Australians Receiving Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Vajdic, Claire M; Mayson, Eleni; Dodds, Anthony J; O'Brien, Tracey; Wilcox, Leonie; Nivison-Smith, Ian; Le Marsney, Renate; Daniels, Benjamin; Ashton, Lesley J

    2016-05-01

    We quantified the risk of second cancer and late mortality in a population-based Australian cohort of 3273 adult (≥15 years) allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients (1992 to 2007). Most recipients received nonradiation-based conditioning and a peripheral blood graft from a matched related donor. Using record linkage with death and cancer registries, 79 second cancers were identified a median of 3.5 years after transplantation. The competing-risk adjusted cumulative incidence of second cancers was 3.35% (95% CI, 2.59 to 4.24) at 10 years, and the cancer risk relative to the matched general population was 2.10 (95% CI, 1.65 to 2.56). We observed an excess risk of melanoma and lip, tongue, esophagus, and soft tissue cancers. Cancer risk relative to the general population was elevated for those transplanted for lymphoma, some leukemia subtypes, and severe aplastic anemia, recipients who developed chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) and irrespective of radiation-based conditioning or stem cell source. In those alive 2 years after transplantation (n = 1463), the cumulative incidence of late mortality was 22.2% (95% CI, 19.7 to 24.9) at 10 years, and the risk of death relative to the matched general population was 13.8 (95% CI, 12.2 to 15.6). In multivariable modeling, risk of late death was reduced for females compared with males and those transplanted for chronic myeloid leukemia compared with acute myeloid leukemia; risk was increased for recipients with discordant sex donors, cGVHD, those undergoing second transplants, and disease relapse. Adults undergoing allogeneic transplantation have unique cancer and mortality risk profiles that continue to warrant prevention and surveillance activities targeted at high-risk subgroups. PMID:26860637

  10. Re-engineering Islet Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fotino, Nicoletta; Fotino, Carmen; Pileggi, Antonello

    2015-01-01

    We are living exciting times in the field of beta cell replacement therapies for the treatment of diabetes. While steady progress has been recorded thus far in clinical islet transplantation, novel approaches are needed to make cell-based therapies more reproducible and leading to long-lasting success. The multiple facets of diabetes impose the need for a transdisciplinary approach to attain this goal, by targeting immunity, promoting engraftment and sustained functional potency. We discuss herein the emerging technologies applied to beta cell replacement therapies. PMID:25814189

  11. Radioimmunotherapy for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jurcic, Joseph G

    2013-04-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) represents an attractive strategy to deliver radiation selectively to tumor and other target organs while minimizing toxicity to normal tissues. RIT with β-particle-emitting isotopes targeting CD33, CD45 and CD66 can potentially allow intensification of conditioning before hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in leukemia. Similarly, RIT directed against CD20 has shown promise in the setting of autologous and allogeneic HCT for B-cell lymphomas. α-particle immunotherapy with isotopes such as bismuth-213, actinium-225 and astatinine-211 offers the possibility of more selective and efficient killing of target cells while sparing the surrounding normal cells. Pretargeting strategies may further improve target:normal organ dose ratios. While RIT has demonstrated significant antitumor activity, ultimately, randomized studies will be required to determine if conditioning regimens that include this therapeutic modality can improve patient outcomes after HCT. PMID:23557421

  12. Thiotepa-based high-dose therapy for autologous stem cell transplantation in lymphoma: a retrospective study from the EBMT.

    PubMed

    Sellner, L; Boumendil, A; Finel, H; Choquet, S; de Rosa, G; Falzetti, F; Scime, R; Kobbe, G; Ferrara, F; Delmer, A; Sayer, H; Amorim, S; Bouabdallah, R; Finke, J; Salles, G; Yakoub-Agha, I; Faber, E; Nicolas-Virelizier, E; Facchini, L; Vallisa, D; Zuffa, E; Sureda, A; Dreger, P

    2016-02-01

    Clinical information about thiotepa-based autologous stem cell transplantation (auto-SCT) outside the primary central nervous system lymphoma (PCNSL) field is sparse. In this registry-based retrospective study, we evaluated potential risks and benefits of thiotepa-based preparative regimens compared with BEAM (carmustine, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan) in auto-SCT for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, excluding PCNSL), follicular lymphoma (FL) or Hodgkin lymphoma (HL). A total of 14 544 patients (589 thiotepa and 13 955 BEAM) met the eligibility criteria, and 535 thiotepa- and 1031 BEAM-treated patients were matched in a 1:2 ratio for final comparison. No significant differences between thiotepa and BEAM groups for any survival end point were identified in the whole sample or disease entity subsets. For a more detailed analysis, 47 TEAM (thiotepa, etoposide, cytarabine, melphalan)-treated patients were compared with 75 matched BEAM patients with additional collection of toxicity data. Again, there were no significant differences between the two groups for any survival end point. In addition, the frequency of common infectious and non-infectious complications including secondary malignancies was comparable between TEAM and BEAM. These results indicate that thiotepa-based high-dose therapy might be a valuable alternative to BEAM in DLBCL, HL and FL. Further evaluation by prospective clinical trials is warranted. PMID:26569093

  13. Solid cancers after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Rochelle E.; Socié, Gérard; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Gilbert, Ethel; Landgren, Ola; Travis, Lois B.; Travis, William D.; Flowers, Mary E. D.; Friedman, Debra L.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Wingard, John R.; Deeg, H. Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Transplant recipients have been reported to have an increased risk of solid cancers but most studies are small and have limited ability to evaluate the interaction of host, disease, and treatment-related factors. In the largest study to date to evaluate risk factors for solid cancers, we studied a multi-institutional cohort of 28 874 allogeneic transplant recipients with 189 solid malignancies. Overall, patients developed new solid cancers at twice the rate expected based on general population rates (observed-to-expected ratio 2.1; 95% confidence interval 1.8-2.5), with the risk increasing over time (P trend < .001); the risk reached 3-fold among patients followed for 15 years or more after transplantation. New findings showed that the risk of developing a non–squamous cell carcinoma (non-SCC) following conditioning radiation was highly dependent on age at exposure. Among patients irradiated at ages under 30 years, the relative risk of non-SCC was 9 times that of nonirradiated patients, while the comparable risk for older patients was 1.1 (P interaction < .01). Chronic graft-versus-host disease and male sex were the main determinants for risk of SCC. These data indicate that allogeneic transplant survivors, particularly those irradiated at young ages, face increased risks of solid cancers, supporting strategies to promote lifelong surveillance among these patients. PMID:18971419

  14. Challenges in the harmonization of immune monitoring studies and trial design for cell-based therapies in the context of hematopoietic cell transplantation for pediatric cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nierkens, Stefan; Lankester, Arjan C; Egeler, R Maarten; Bader, Peter; Locatelli, Franco; Pulsipher, Michael A; Bollard, Catherine M; Boelens, Jaap-Jan

    2015-12-01

    Clinical trials aimed at improving results of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) by adjuvant cell-based interventions in children have been limited by small numbers and pediatric-specific features. The need for a larger number of pediatric HCT centers to participate in trials has resulted in a demand for harmonization of disease-specific clinical trials and immune-monitoring. Thus far, most phase I/II trials select different end points evaluated at disparate time points, making inter-study comparisons difficult and, sometimes, impossible. In this review, we discuss the various aspects that are important to consider for harmonizing clinical trial design as well as the critical elements for standardized (immune)-monitoring protocols in cell-based intervention trials in the context of HCT. Comparison data from trials applying harmonized trial design will lead to optimized immunotherapeutic treatment protocols to maximize clinical efficacy while minimizing toxicity. PMID:26589751

  15. Haematopoietic cell transplants in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Gale, R P; Seber, A; Bonfim, C; Pasquini, M

    2016-07-01

    Haematopoietic cell transplants are done by more than 1500 transplant centres in 75 countries, mostly for life-threatening haematological disorders. However, transplant technology and access are not uniformly distributed worldwide. Most transplants are done predominately in Europe, North America and some Asian countries. We review transplant activity in Latin America, a geographic region with a population of >600 million persons living in countries with diverse economic and social development levels. These data indicate a 20-40-fold lower frequency of transplants in Latin America compared with Europe and North America. We show that although economics, infrastructure and expertise are important limitations, other variables also operate. Changes in several of these variables may substantially increase transplant activity in Latin America. PMID:26999468

  16. Immunomodulatory drugs improve the immune environment for dendritic cell-based immunotherapy in multiple myeloma patients after autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    De Keersmaecker, Brenda; Fostier, Karel; Corthals, Jurgen; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Heirman, Carlo; Aerts, Joeri L; Thielemans, Kris; Schots, Rik

    2014-10-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a malignant proliferation of plasma cells in the bone marrow with associated organ damage. Although the prognosis of MM has improved recently, the disease remains incurable for the large majority of patients. The eradication of residual disease in the bone marrow is a main target on the road toward cure. Immune cells play a role in the control of cancer and can be tools to attack residual MM cells. However, the myeloma-associated immune deficiency is a major hurdle to immunotherapy. We evaluated ex vivo the effects of low doses of the immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) lenalidomide and pomalidomide on several immune cell types from MM patients after autologous stem cell transplantation and with low tumor burden. We observed that these drugs increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation and cytokine production, enhanced the lytic capacity of cytotoxic T lymphocytes and reduced the suppressive effects of regulatory T cells on CD8(+) T-cell responses. In addition, we found that functional dendritic cells (DCs) can be generated from mononuclear cells from MM patients. The presence of IMiDs improved the quality of antigen-specific T cells induced or expanded by these DCs as evidenced by a higher degree of T-cell polyfunctionality. Our results provide a rationale for the design of early phase clinical studies to assess the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy in combination with posttransplant maintenance treatment with IMiDs in MM. PMID:24947180

  17. Antifungal Treatment in Stem Cell Transplantation Centers in Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Akan, Hamdi; Atilla, Erden

    2016-01-01

    Despite the development of various guidelines, the approach to antifungal treatment in stem cell transplantation centers differs according to country or even between centers. This led to the development of another survey that aims to understand the antifungal treatment policies of Turkish stem cell transplantation centers. Although there has been an increasing trend towards the use of diagnostic-based treatments in Turkey in the last few years, empirical treatment is still the main approach. The practices of the stem cell transplantation centers reflect the general trends and controversies in this area, while there is a considerable use of antifungal combination therapy. PMID:25913124

  18. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  19. Parasitic Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jarque, Isidro; Salavert, Miguel; Pemán, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Parasitic infections are rarely documented in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. However they may be responsible for fatal complications that are only diagnosed at autopsy. Increased awareness of the possibility of parasitic diseases both in autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant patients is relevant not only for implementing preventive measures but also for performing an early diagnosis and starting appropriate therapy for these unrecognized but fatal infectious complications in hematopoietic transplant recipients. In this review, we will focus on parasitic diseases occurring in this population especially those with major clinical relevance including toxoplasmosis, American trypanosomiasis, leishmaniasis, malaria, and strongyloidiasis, among others, highlighting the diagnosis and management in hematopoietic transplant recipients. PMID:27413527

  20. Oral carcinoma after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation – a new classification based on a literature review over 30 years

    PubMed Central

    Kruse, Astrid LD; Grätz, Klaus W

    2009-01-01

    Background Patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have a higher risk of developing secondary solid tumors, in particular squamous cell carcinoma, because of several risk factors, including full-body irradiation (TBI), chemotherapy, and chronic graft versus host disease (GVHD). Based on the review presented here, a classification of oral changes is suggested in order to provide a tool to detect high-risk patients. Methods and Results The literature over the last 30 years was reviewed for development of malignoma of the oral cavity after HSCT. Overall, 64 cases were found. In 16 out of 30 cases, the tongue was the primary location, followed by the salivary gland (10 out of 30); 56.4% appeared in a latency time of 5 to 9 years after HSCT. In 76.6%, GVHD was noticed before the occurrence of oral malignancy. Premalignant changes of the oral mucosa were mucositis, xerostomia, and lichenoid changes, developing into erosive form. Conclusion All physicians involved in the treatment of post-HSCT patients should be aware of the increased risk, even after 5 years from the development of oral malignancy, in particular when oral graft versus host changes are visible. In order to develop evidence based management, screening and offer adequate therapy as early as possible in this patient group, multicenter studies, involving oncologists and head and neck surgeons, should be established. PMID:19624855

  1. [Post-hematopietic stem cell transplant complications].

    PubMed

    de Berranger, Eva; Jubert, Charlotte; Michel, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    Under the long-term monitoring of patients treated in childhood or adolescence for cancer, we present in this article the long-term monitoring and therefore possible effects of patients who underwent allergenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This article is based on a collaborative effort organized by the French Society of Bone Marrow Transplantation and Cell Therapy (SFGM-TC), which took place during the 4th day of allograft harmonization practices. Patients affected are children and young adults (0-25 years). We defined the monitoring effects beyond 1 year post-transplant. Our recommendations are based on a literature review, in line with the Leucémie Enfant Adulte (LEA) study cohort of long-term monitoring of patients treated for hematological malignancies in childhood, grafted or not. It became important to determine the nature of problems, their risk factors, frequency and monitoring necessary to implement for their detection. We will not address the therapeutic management of sequelae. PMID:25962541

  2. Re-engineering islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Fotino, Nicoletta; Fotino, Carmen; Pileggi, Antonello

    2015-08-01

    We are living exciting times in the field of beta cell replacement therapies for the treatment of diabetes. While steady progress has been recorded thus far in clinical islet transplantation, novel approaches are needed to make cell-based therapies more reproducible and leading to long-lasting success. The multiple facets of diabetes impose the need for a transdisciplinary approach to attain this goal, by targeting immunity, promoting engraftment and sustained functional potency. We discuss herein the emerging technologies applied to this rapidly evolving field. PMID:25814189

  3. Chimerism-based pre-emptive immunotherapy with fast withdrawal of immunosuppression and donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for pediatric hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Horn, Biljana; Petrovic, Aleksandra; Wahlstrom, Justin; Dvorak, Christopher C; Kong, Denice; Hwang, Jimmy; Expose-Spencer, Jueleah; Gates, Michael; Cowan, Morton J

    2015-04-01

    The presence of increasing host chimerism or persistent mixed chimerism (MC) after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for leukemia in children is a predictor of relapse. To reduce the risk of relapse, we prospectively studied post-transplantation chimerism-based immunotherapy (IT) using fast withdrawal of immunosuppression (FWI) and donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI) in children with early post-transplantation MC. Forty-three children with hematologic malignancies at 2 institutions were enrolled prospectively in this study from 2009 until 2012 and were followed for a mean of 42 (SD, 10) months. Twelve patients (28%) were assigned to the observation arm based on the presence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) or full donor chimerism (FDC), and 5 (12%) sustained early events and could not undergo intervention. Twenty-six (60%) patients with MC were assigned to IT with FWI, which started at a median of 49 days (range, 35 to 85 days) after transplantation. Fourteen patients proceeded to DLI after FWI. Toxicities of treatment included GVHD, which developed in 19% of patients undergoing intervention, with 1 of 26 (4%) dying from GVHD and 1 (4%) still requiring therapy for chronic GVHD 21 months after DLI. Patients with MC undergoing IT had similar 2-year event-free survival (EFS) (73%; 95% confidence interval (CI), 55% to 91%) compared with patients who achieved FDC spontaneously (83%; 95% CI, 62% to 100%); however, because 50% of all relapses in the IT occurred later than 2 years after transplantation, the EFS declined to 55% (95% CI, 34% to 76%) at 42 (SD, 11) months. There were no late relapses in the observation group. EFS in the entire cohort was 58% (95% CI, 42% to 73%) at 42 (SD, 11) months after transplantation. Evidence of disease before transplantation remained a significant predictor of relapse, whereas development of chronic GVHD was protective against relapse. PMID:25644958

  4. Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth

    MedlinePlus

    Organ or Stem Cell Transplant and Your Mouth KEY POINTS n Have a dental checkup before your transplant procedure. n See your ... problems . SEE YOUR DENTIST Before an organ or stem cell transplant, have a dental checkup. Your mouth BEFORE ...

  5. B Cells and Antibodies in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Alice; Mariat, Christophe; Mousson, Christiane; Wood, Kathryn J; Rifle, Gérard; Thaunat, Olivier

    2016-07-01

    Overlooked for decades, the humoral alloimmune response is increasingly recognized as a leading cause of graft loss after transplantation. However, improvement in the diagnosis of antibody-mediated rejection has not yet translated into better outcomes for transplanted patients. After an update on B cell physiology and antibody generation, the 2015 Beaune Seminar in Transplant Research challenged the conventional view of antibody-mediated rejection pathophysiology and discussed the latest promising therapeutic approaches. PMID:26845305

  6. Eleven secondary cancers after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a total body irradiation-based regimen in 370 consecutive pediatric and adult patients.

    PubMed

    Omori, Mami; Yamashita, Hideomi; Shinohara, Akihito; Kurokawa, Mineo; Takita, Jyunko; Hiwatari, Mitsuteru; Nakagawa, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    About the bone marrow transplantation that high dose chemotherapy and total-body irradiation (TBI) are used for as conditioning regimen, a late toxicity may become the problem in the long-term survival patient. One of the toxicities which has been implied to be associated with TBI is secondary cacinogenesis. Between June 1995 and December 2010, 370 patients who were undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using a TBI-based regimen at our department, were the subjects of this study. Eleven secondary cancers occurred in 10 patients. The median time from transplantation to diagnosis of a secondary cancer was 6.8 years. In this analysis, the cumulative incidence rate of secondary cancer at 5 and 10 years was 2.15% and 6.46%, respectively after TBI in our institution. PMID:24040584

  7. Thrombosis in stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kansu, Emin

    2012-04-01

    Hemostatic changes and thrombotic events are frequent in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. Arterial and venous thromboses are major causes of morbidity and mortality. Thrombotic complications can be classified into four groups including: catheter-related thrombosis, venous thromboembolic (VTE) events, sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS)/veno-occlusive disease, and transplant-associated thrombotic microangiopathy (TAM). The incidence of catheter-related thrombosis is 8-20% in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and the incidence is low in syngeneic and allogeneic transplant patients. Venous duplex Doppler ultrasound, venogram, and computed tomography scan are required to visualize the venous thrombus. The treatment should be aimed at the prevention of pulmonary embolism, the avoidance of thrombus extension, and the preservation of catheter patency. Patients undergoing HSCT may have risk factors for VTE including underlying malignancy, traumatic brain injury, prolonged hospitalization, administration of conditioning regimens, and central venous catheters. Important risk factors are presence of history of VTE and graft-versus-host disease. One-year incidence of symptomatic VTE is 3.7%. SOS, also known as veno-occlusive disease, is a serious liver disease, seen in approximately 50-60% of HSCT patients. The mortality rate from the severe form of SOS is 84.3% and majority of the patients have multi-organ failure. The frequency is quite low after autologous transplantation. Risk factors for SOS include pre-existing hepatic damage, previous high-dose chemotherapy and abdominal irradiation, female gender and donor-recipient human leukocyte antigen disparity. Cyclophosphamide and busulphan are the most common agents with the highest incidence and fatal SOS. Histopathologic features of SOS include dilatation of sinusoids, necrosis of perivenular hepatocytes, and obstruction of small intrahepatic central venules by

  8. Hospital infection control in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed Central

    Dykewicz, C. A.

    2001-01-01

    Guidelines for Preventing Opportunistic Infections Among Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients contains a section on hospital infection control including evidence-based recommendations regarding ventilation, construction, equipment, plants, play areas and toys, health-care workers, visitors, patient skin and oral care, catheter-related infections, drug-resistant organisms, and specific nosocomial infections. These guidelines are intended to reduce the number and severity of hospital infections in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:11294720

  9. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; ...

  10. Bone marrow transplant

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow; Stem cell transplant; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant; Reduced intensity, nonmyeloablative transplant; Mini transplant; Allogenic bone marrow transplant; Autologous bone marrow transplant; Umbilical ...

  11. Pharmacogenetic aspects of drug metabolizing enzymes in busulfan based conditioning prior to allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in children.

    PubMed

    Huezo-Diaz, Patricia; Uppugunduri, Chakradhara Rao S; Tyagi, Anuj Kumar; Krajinovic, Maja; Ansari, Marc

    2014-03-01

    Allogenic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a well established but complex treatment option for malignant and non-malignant disorders in pediatric patients. Most commonly used myeloablative and non-myeloablative conditioning regimens in children comprise alkylating agents, such as busulfan (BU) and cyclophosphamide. Inter-individual variability in the pharmacokinetics of BU can result in altered conditioning of the patient and therefore lead to relapse or rejection due to under exposures, or occurrence of toxicities due to over exposures. With the introduction of the intravenous formulation of BU, this variability has been reduced but still cannot be fully predicted. Inter and intra-individual variability of BU kinetics is more common in children compared to adults and toxicity of BU based regimens is still a concern. It has been hypothesized that some of this variability in BU pharmacokinetics and treatment outcomes, especially the toxicity, might be predicted by genetic variants of enzymes involved in the metabolism of BU. This review intends to summarize the studies performed to date on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacogenetics of BU based conditioning, specifically in relation to children. PMID:24524663

  12. Transplantation Tolerance Induction: Cell Therapies and Their Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Scalea, Joseph R.; Tomita, Yusuke; Lindholm, Christopher R.; Burlingham, William

    2016-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have been studied extensively in the context of transplantation tolerance induction. The most successful protocols have relied on transfusion of bone marrow prior to the transplantation of a renal allograft. However, it is not clear that stem cells found in bone marrow are required in order to render a transplant candidate immunologically tolerant. Accordingly, mesenchymal stem cells, regulatory myeloid cells, T regulatory cells, and other cell types are being tested as possible routes to tolerance induction, in the absence of donor-derived stem cells. Early data with each of these cell types have been encouraging. However, the induction regimen capable of achieving consistent tolerance, while avoiding unwanted sided effects, and which is scalable to the human patient, has yet to be identified. Here, we present the status of investigations of various tolerogenic cell types and the mechanistic rationale for their use in tolerance induction protocols. PMID:27014267

  13. The effect of dendritic cells on the retinal cell transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Akio; Nagai, Takayuki; Mandai, Michiko Takahashi, Masayo; Yoshimura, Nagahisa

    2007-11-16

    The potential of bone marrow cell-derived immature dendritic cells (myeloid iDCs) in modulating the efficacy of retinal cell transplantation therapy was investigated. (1) In vitro, myeloid iDCs but not BMCs enhanced the survival and proliferation of embryonic retinal cells, and the expression of various neurotrophic factors by myeloid iDCs was confirmed with RT-PCR. (2) In subretinal transplantation, neonatal retinal cells co-transplanted with myeloid iDCs showed higher survival rate compared to those transplanted without myeloid iDCs. (3) CD8 T-cells reactive against donor retinal cells were significantly increased in the mice with transplantation of retinal cells alone. These results suggested the beneficial effects of the use of myeloid iDCs in retinal cell transplantation therapy.

  14. Daylight vision repair by cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Postel, Kai; Stutzki, Henrike; Kurth, Thomas; Zeck, Günther; Ader, Marius

    2015-01-01

    Human daylight vision depends on cone photoreceptors and their degeneration results in visual impairment and blindness as observed in several eye diseases including age-related macular degeneration, cone-rod dystrophies, or late stage retinitis pigmentosa, with no cure available. Preclinical cell replacement approaches in mouse retina have been focusing on rod dystrophies, due to the availability of sufficient donor material from the rod-dominated mouse retina, leaving the development of treatment options for cone degenerations not well studied. Thus, an abundant and traceable source for donor cone-like photoreceptors was generated by crossing neural retina leucine zipper-deficient (Nrl(-/-) ) mice with an ubiquitous green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter line resulting in double transgenic tg(Nrl(-/-); aGFP) mice. In Nrl(-/-) retinas, all rods are converted into cone-like photoreceptors that express CD73 allowing their enrichment by CD73-based magnetic activated cell sorting prior transplantation into the subretinal space of adult wild-type, cone-only (Nrl(-/-)), or cone photoreceptor function loss 1 (Cpfl1) mice. Donor cells correctly integrated into host retinas, acquired mature photoreceptor morphology, expressed cone-specific markers, and survived for up to 6 months, with significantly increased integration rates in the cone-only Nrl(-/-) retina. Individual retinal ganglion cell recordings demonstrated the restoration of photopic responses in cone degeneration mice following transplantation suggesting, for the first time, the feasibility of daylight vision repair by cell replacement in the adult mammalian retina. PMID:25183393

  15. Prolonged Survival of Transplanted Osteoblastic Cells Does Not Directly Accelerate the Healing of Calvarial Bone Defects.

    PubMed

    Kitami, Megumi; Kaku, Masaru; Rocabado, Juan Marcelo Rosales; Ida, Takako; Akiba, Nami; Uoshima, Katsumi

    2016-09-01

    Considering the increased interest in cell-based bone regeneration, it is necessary to reveal the fate of transplanted cells and their substantive roles in bone regeneration. The aim of this study was to analyze the fate of transplanted cells and the effect of osteogenic cell transplantation on calvarial bone defect healing. An anti-apoptotic protein, heat shock protein (HSP) 27, was overexpressed in osteoblasts. Then, the treated osteoblasts were transplanted to calvarial bone defect and their fate was analyzed to evaluate the significance of transplanted cell survival. Transient overexpression of Hsp27 rescued MC3T3-E1 osteoblastic cells from H2 O2 -induced apoptosis without affecting osteoblastic differentiation in culture. Transplantation of Hsp27-overexpressing cells, encapsulated in collagen gel, showed higher proliferative activity, and fewer apoptotic cells in comparison with control cells. After 4-week of transplantation, both control cell- and Hsp27 overexpressed cell-transplanted groups showed significantly higher new bone formation in comparison with cell-free gel-transplantation group. Interestingly, the prolonged survival of transplanted osteoblastic cells by Hsp27 did not provide additional effect on bone healing. The transplanted cells in collagen gel survived for up to 4-week but did not differentiate into bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, cell-containing collagen gel accelerated calvarial bone defect healing in comparison with cell-free collagen gel. However, prolonged survival of transplanted cells by Hsp27 overexpression did not provide additional effect. These results strongly indicate that cell transplantation-based bone regeneration cannot be explained only by the increment of osteogenic cells. Further studies are needed to elucidate the practical roles of transplanted cells that will potentiate successful bone regeneration. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 1974-1982, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26754153

  16. Micron-sized iron oxide-containing particles for microRNA-targeted manipulation and MRI-based tracking of transplanted cells.

    PubMed

    Leder, Annekatrin; Raschzok, Nathanael; Schmidt, Christian; Arabacioglu, Duygu; Butter, Antje; Kolano, Susanne; de Sousa Lisboa, Luisa S; Werner, Wiebke; Polenz, Dietrich; Reutzel-Selke, Anja; Pratschke, Johann; Sauer, Igor M

    2015-05-01

    Particle-based delivery systems for therapeutic manipulation and tracking of transplanted cells by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly based on nanometer-sized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs). Here, we present a proof of concept for multifunctional, silica based micron-sized iron oxide-containing particles (sMPIO) that combine fluorescence imaging, MRI tracking, and on-the-spot targeting of specific microRNAs on a particle surface for therapeutic manipulation by RNA interference. Antisense locked nucleic acids (α-LNA) were covalently bound to the surface of silica-based, DAPI-integrated, micron-sized iron oxide particles (sMPIO-α-LNA). In vitro studies using primary human hepatocytes showed rapid particle uptake (4 h) that was accompanied by significant depletion of the targeted microRNA Let7g (80%), up-regulation of the target proteins Cyclin D1 and c-Myc, and specific proteome changes. sMPIO-α-LNA-labeled cells were successfully detected by fluorescence imaging and could be visualized by MRI after intrasplenic transplantation in rats. This new theranostic particle provides a promising tool for cell transplantation where cellular imaging and microRNA-based manipulation is needed. [165]. PMID:25771004

  17. Cell replacement and visual restoration by retinal sheet transplants.

    PubMed

    Seiler, Magdalene J; Aramant, Robert B

    2012-11-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affect millions of people. Replacing lost cells with new cells that connect with the still functional part of the host retina might repair a degenerating retina and restore eyesight to an unknown extent. A unique model, subretinal transplantation of freshly dissected sheets of fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells, combined with its retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), has demonstrated successful results in both animals and humans. Most other approaches are restricted to rescue endogenous retinal cells of the recipient in earlier disease stages by a 'nursing' role of the implanted cells and are not aimed at neural retinal cell replacement. Sheet transplants restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration models in the superior colliculus (SC) corresponding to the location of the transplant in the retina. They do not simply preserve visual performance - they increase visual responsiveness to light. Restoration of visual responses in the SC can be directly traced to neural cells in the transplant, demonstrating that synaptic connections between transplant and host contribute to the visual improvement. Transplant processes invade the inner plexiform layer of the host retina and form synapses with presumable host cells. In a Phase II trial of RP and ARMD patients, transplants of retina together with its RPE improved visual acuity. In summary, retinal progenitor sheet transplantation provides an excellent model to answer questions about how to repair and restore function of a degenerating retina. Supply of fetal donor tissue will always be limited but the model can set a standard and provide an informative base for optimal cell replacement therapies such as embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived therapy. PMID:22771454

  18. Cell replacement and visual restoration by retinal sheet transplants

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Magdalene J.; Aramant, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Retinal diseases such as age-related macular degeneration (ARMD) and retinitis pigmentosa (RP) affect millions of people. Replacing lost cells with new cells that connect with the still functional part of the host retina might repair a degenerating retina and restore eyesight to an unknown extent. A unique model, subretinal transplantation of freshly dissected sheets of fetal-derived retinal progenitor cells, combined with its retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), has demonstrated successful results in both animals and humans. Most other approaches are restricted to rescue endogenous retinal cells of the recipient in earlier disease stages by a ‘nursing’ role of the implanted cells and are not aimed at neural retinal cell replacement. Sheet transplants restore lost visual responses in several retinal degeneration models in the superior colliculus (SC) corresponding to the location of the transplant in the retina. They do not simply preserve visual performance – they increase visual responsiveness to light. Restoration of visual responses in the SC can be directly traced to neural cells in the transplant, demonstrating that synaptic connections between transplant and host contribute to the visual improvement. Transplant processes invade the inner plexiform layer of the host retina and form synapses with presumable host cells. In a Phase II trial of RP and ARMD patients, transplants of retina together with its RPE improved visual acuity. In summary, retinal progenitor sheet transplantation provides an excellent model to answer questions about how to repair and restore function of a degenerating retina. Supply of fetal donor tissue will always be limited but the model can set a standard and provide an informative base for optimal cell replacement therapies such as embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived therapy. PMID:22771454

  19. Clinical experience in cell-based therapeutics: disc chondrocyte transplantation A treatment for degenerated or damaged intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans Jörg; Siodla, Vilma; Ganey, Timothy; Minkus, Yvonne; Hutton, William C; Alasevic, Olivera J

    2007-02-01

    minimally invasive procedure after 12 weeks; () disc chondrocytes remained viable after transplantation as shown by bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and maintained a capacity for proliferation after transplantation as depicted by histology; () transplanted disc chondrocytes produced an extracellular matrix that displayed composition similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue. Positive evidence of Proteoglycan content was supported by accepted histochemical staining techniques such as Safranin O-Fast Green; () both Type II and Type I collagens were demonstrated in the regenerated intervertebral disc matrix by immunohistochemistry after chondrocyte transplantation; and () when the disc heights were analyzed for variance according to treatment a statistically significant-correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height was achieved. A clinically significant reduction of low back pain in the ADCT-treated group was shown by all three pain score systems. The median total Oswestry score was 2 in the ADCT-treated group compared with 6 in the control group. Decreases in the disability index and VAS score in ADCT-treated patients correlated strongly with the reduction of low back pain. Decreases in disc height over time were only found in the control group, and of potential significance, intervertebral discs in adjacent segments appeared to retain hydration when compared to those adjacent to levels that had undergone discectomy without cell intervention. Autologous chondrocyte transplantation is technically feasible and biologically relevant to repairing disc damage and retarding disc degeneration. PMID:16963315

  20. Related Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation (HSCT) for Genetic Diseases of Blood Cells

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-11

    Stem Cell Transplantation; Bone Marrow Transplantation; Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Allogeneic Transplantation,; Genetic Diseases; Thalassemia; Pediatrics; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Combined Immune Deficiency; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic Granulomatous Disease; X-linked Lymphoproliferative Disease; Metabolic Diseases

  1. Clinical-scale laser-based scanning and processing of live cells: selective photothermal killing of fluorescent tumor targets for autologous stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koller, Manfred R.; Hanania, Elie G.; Eisfeld, Timothy; O'Neal, Robert A.; Khovananth, Kevin M.; Palsson, Bernhard O.

    2001-04-01

    High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, is widely used for the treatment of cancer. However, contaminating tumor cells within HSC harvests continue to be of major concern since re-infused tumor cells have proven to contribute to disease relapse. Many tumor purging methods have been evaluated, but all leave detectable tumor cells in the transplant and result in significant loss of HSCs. These shortcomings cause engraftment delays and compromise the therapeutic value of purging. A novel approach integrating automated scanning cytometry, image analysis, and selective laser-induced killing of labeled cells within a cell mixture is described here. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) cells were spiked into cell mixtures, and fluorochrome-conjugated antibodies were used to label tumor cells within the mixture. Cells were then allowed to settle on a surface, and as the surface was scanned with a fluorescence excitation source, a laser pulse was fired at every detected tumor cell using high-speed beam steering mirrors. Tumor cells were selectively killed with little effect on adjacent non-target cells, demonstrating the feasibility of this automated cell processing approach. This technology has many potential research and clinical applications, one example of which is tumor cell purging for autologous HSC transplantation.

  2. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S; Vondran, Florian W R

    2016-01-01

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/long-term acceptance of cellular allografts mainly due to rejection of transplanted cells. This is in contrast to the results achieved for OLT where long-term graft survival is observed on a regular basis and, hence, the liver has been deemed an immune-privileged organ. Immune responses induced by isolated hepatocytes apparently differ considerably from those observed following transplantation of solid organs and, thus, LCTx requires refined immunological strategies to improve its clinical outcome. In addition, clinical usage of LCTx but also related basic research efforts are hindered by the limited availability of high quality liver cells, strongly emphasizing the need for alternative cell sources. This review focuses on the various immunological aspects of LCTx summarizing data available not only for hepatocyte transplantation but also for transplantation of non-parenchymal liver cells and liver stem cells. PMID:27011904

  3. Immunological aspects of liver cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oldhafer, Felix; Bock, Michael; Falk, Christine S; Vondran, Florian W R

    2016-03-24

    Within the field of regenerative medicine, the liver is of major interest for adoption of regenerative strategies due to its well-known and unique regenerative capacity. Whereas therapeutic strategies such as liver resection and orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) can be considered standards of care for the treatment of a variety of liver diseases, the concept of liver cell transplantation (LCTx) still awaits clinical breakthrough. Success of LCTx is hampered by insufficient engraftment/long-term acceptance of cellular allografts mainly due to rejection of transplanted cells. This is in contrast to the results achieved for OLT where long-term graft survival is observed on a regular basis and, hence, the liver has been deemed an immune-privileged organ. Immune responses induced by isolated hepatocytes apparently differ considerably from those observed following transplantation of solid organs and, thus, LCTx requires refined immunological strategies to improve its clinical outcome. In addition, clinical usage of LCTx but also related basic research efforts are hindered by the limited availability of high quality liver cells, strongly emphasizing the need for alternative cell sources. This review focuses on the various immunological aspects of LCTx summarizing data available not only for hepatocyte transplantation but also for transplantation of non-parenchymal liver cells and liver stem cells. PMID:27011904

  4. Germline Stem Cell Transplantation and Transgenesis

    PubMed Central

    Brinster, Ralph L.

    2016-01-01

    The recently developed testis cell transplantation method provides a powerful approach to studying the biology of the male germline stem cell and its microenvironment, the stem cell niche. The technique also is being used to examine spermatogenic defects, correct male infertility, and generate transgenic animals. PMID:12077400

  5. Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Blood-Forming Stem Cell Transplants On This Page What are bone marrow ... are evaluating BMT and PBSCT in clinical trials (research studies) for the treatment ... are the donor’s stem cells matched to the patient’s stem cells in allogeneic ...

  6. National Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplant Registry in Poland: Nationwide Internet Reporting System and Results.

    PubMed

    Łęczycka, A; Dudkiewicz, M; Czerwiński, J; Malanowski, P; Żalikowska-Hołoweńko, J; Danielewicz, R

    2016-06-01

    History of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations in Poland begins in early 1980s; the 1st bone marrow allotransplantation was performed in 1983 in the Central Clinical Hospital of the Military Medical Academy in Warsaw. Following years brought the 1st autologous stem cell transplantations. Ten years later, unrelated bone marrow transplantation was performed for the 1st time by the team of the Hematology and Blood and Marrow Transplantation Unit in Katowice. Since then, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation developed to be standard procedure and one of the most important therapies applied in leukemia treatment. The number of allotransplantations in Poland has grown significantly in the past 2 decades, which generated new needs and problems. In 2005, based on a new Transplant Law, a National Transplants Registry was created. Its main role is to collect data (registration of procedures and follow-up data) related to every transplantation case for stem cells and tissues as well as for organs. We present statistics concerning stem cell transplantations performed in Poland, as collected in the National Transplants Registry in the years 2006-2014. There are 18 centers transplanting hematopoietic stem cells in Poland. The total number of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations performed in 2006-2014 was 3,537, with allotransplantations from relatives accounted for 1,491 and from unrelated donors for 2,046. The main indication for allotransplantation in past years was acute leukemia. PMID:27496493

  7. Consideration of strategies for hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yaniv, Isaac; Ash, Shifra; Farkas, Daniel L; Askenasy, Nadir; Stein, Jerry

    2009-01-01

    Bone marrow transplantation has been adoptively transferred from oncology to the treatment of autoimmune disorders. Along with extension of prevalent transplant-related concepts, the assumed mechanism that arrests autoimmunity involves elimination of pathogenic cells and resetting of immune homeostasis. Similar to graft versus tumor (GVT) reactivity, allogeneic transplants are considered to provide a better platform of immunomodulation to induce a graft versus autoimmunity reaction (GVA). It is yet unclear whether recurrence of autoimmunity in both autologous and allogeneic settings reflects relapse of the disease, transplant-associated immune dysfunction or insufficient immune modulation. Possible causes of disease recurrence include reactivation of residual host pathogenic cells and persistence of memory cells, genetic predisposition to autoimmunity and pro-inflammatory characteristics of the target tissues. Most important, there is little evidence that autoimmune disorders are indeed abrogated by current transplant procedures, despite reinstitution of both peripheral and thymic immune homeostasis. It is postulated that non-specific immunosuppressive therapy that precedes and accompanies current bone marrow transplant strategies is detrimental to the active immune process that restores self-tolerance. This proposition refocuses the need to develop strategies of immunomodulation without immunosuppression. PMID:19800763

  8. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation for hemoglobinopathies

    PubMed Central

    Derderian, S. Christopher; Jeanty, Cerine; Walters, Mark C.; Vichinsky, Elliott; MacKenzie, Tippi C.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCTx) is a promising strategy to circumvent the challenges of postnatal hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation. The goal of IUHCTx is to introduce donor cells into a naïve host prior to immune maturation, thereby inducing donor–specific tolerance. Thus, this technique has the potential of avoiding host myeloablative conditioning with cytotoxic agents. Over the past two decades, several attempts at IUHCTx have been made to cure numerous underlying congenital anomalies with limited success. In this review, we will briefly review the history of IUHCTx and give a perspective on alpha thalassemia major, one target disease for its clinical application. PMID:25628564

  9. Bone marrow transplant - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    Transplant - bone marrow - discharge; Stem cell transplant - discharge; Hematopoietic stem cell transplant - discharge; Reduced intensity; Non-myeloablative transplant - discharge; Mini transplant - discharge; Allogenic bone marrow transplant - ...

  10. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    PubMed

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies. PMID:27121227

  11. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation A Global Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Gratwohl, Alois; Baldomero, Helen; Aljurf, Mahmoud; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Bouzas, Luis Fernando; Yoshimi, Ayami; Szer, Jeff; Lipton, Jeff; Schwendener, Alvin; Gratwohl, Michael; Frauendorfer, Karl; Niederwieser, Dietger; Horowitz, Mary; Kodera, Yoshihisa

    2011-01-01

    Context Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) requires significant infrastructure. Little is known on its use and the factors associated with it on a global level. Objective To determine current use of HSCT, to assess differences in its application and to explore associations of macroeconomic factors with transplant rates on a global level. Design Structured worldwide collection of numbers of allogeneic and autologous HSCT by main indication, donor type and stem cell source for the year 2006. Setting Worldwide Network for Blood and Marrow Transplantation (WBMT), a global non-profit umbrella organization for clinical HSCT. Patients All patients with an allogeneic or autologous HSCT for any indication transplanted in 2006 within any of the participating countries. Interventions none Main Outcome measures Transplant rates (number of HSCT per 10 million inhabitants) by indication, donor type and country; description of main differences in HSCT use; macroeconomic factors of reporting countries associated with transplant rates. Results There were 50’417 first HSCT, 21’516 allogeneic (43%), 28’901 autologous (57%) reported from 1’327 centers in 71 countries for leukemia (17’049 (34%; 89% allogeneic)), lymphoma (27’492 (54%; 87% autologous)), solid tumors (2’925 (6%, 95% autologous)), non-malignant disorder (2’593 (5%; 92% allogeneic)) or, “others” 358 (1%). Use of allogeneic or autologous HSCT, use of unrelated or family donors for allogeneic HSCT and proportions of disease indications varied significantly between countries and continental regions. In linear regression analyses, Government Health Care Expenditures (r2 = 77.33), team density (r2 =76.28), Human Development Index (r2 = 74.36) and Gross National Income /Capita (r2 = 74.04) showed the highest association with transplant rates. Conclusions HSCT is an accepted therapy today with different use and needs worldwide. Availability of resources, Governmental support and, access for

  12. Genetic Modification of Stem Cells for Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M. Ian; Tang, Yao Liang

    2009-01-01

    Gene modification of cells for prior to their transplantation, especially stem cells, enhances their survival and increases their function in cell therapy. Like the Trojan horse, the gene modified cell has to gain entrance inside the host’s walls and survive and deliver its transgene products Using cellular, molecular and gene manipulation techniques the transplanted cell can be protected in a hostile environment from immune rejection, inflammation, hypoxia and apoptosis. Genetic engineering to modify cells involves constructing modules of functional gene sequences. They can be simple reporter genes or complex cassettes with gene switches, cell specific promoters and multiple transgenes. We discuss methods to deliver and construct gene cassettes with viral and non viral delivery, siRNA, and conditional Cre/Lox P. We review the current uses of gene modified stem cells in cardiovascular disease, diabetes, neurological diseases,( including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and spinal cord injury repair), bone defects, hemophilia, and cancer. PMID:18031863

  13. Brain microvascular endothelial cell transplantation ameliorates ischemic white matter damage.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Sandra; Kurachi, Masashi; Shibasaki, Koji; Naruse, Masae; Yoshimoto, Yuhei; Mikuni, Masahiko; Imai, Hideaki; Ishizaki, Yasuki

    2012-08-21

    Ischemic insults affecting the internal capsule result in sensory-motor disabilities which adversely affect the patient's life. Cerebral endothelial cells have been reported to exert a protective effect against brain damage, so the transplantation of healthy endothelial cells might have a beneficial effect on the outcome of ischemic brain damage. In this study, endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the rat internal capsule to induce lacunar infarction. Seven days after ET-1 injection, microvascular endothelial cells (MVECs) were transplanted into the internal capsule. Meningeal cells or 0.2% bovine serum albumin-Hank's balanced salt solution were injected as controls. Two weeks later, the footprint test and histochemical analysis were performed. We found that MVEC transplantation improved the behavioral outcome based on recovery of hind-limb rotation angle (P<0.01) and induced remyelination (P<0.01) compared with the control groups. Also the inflammatory response was repressed by MVEC transplantation, judging from fewer ED-1-positive activated microglial cells in the MVEC-transplanted group than in the other groups. Elucidation of the mechanisms by which MVECs ameliorate ischemic damage of the white matter may provide important information for the development of effective therapies for white matter ischemia. PMID:22771710

  14. Mesenchymal stromal cells in renal transplantation: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, Federica; Perico, Norberto; Cortinovis, Monica; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-01

    Lifelong immunosuppressive therapy is essential to prevent allograft rejection in transplant recipients. Long-term, nonspecific immunosuppression can, however, result in life-threatening complications and fail to prevent chronic graft rejection. Bone marrow (BM)-derived multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) have emerged as a potential candidate for cell-based therapy to modulate the immune response in organ transplantation. These cells can repair tissue after injury and downregulate many of the effector functions of immune cells that participate in the alloimmune response, converting them into regulatory cells. The findings of preclinical and initial clinical studies support the potential tolerance-inducing effects of MSCs and highlight the unanticipated complexity of MSC therapy in kidney transplantation. In animal models of transplantation MSCs promote donor-specific tolerance through the generation of regulatory T cells and antigen-presenting cells. In some settings, however, MSCs can acquire proinflammatory properties and contribute to allograft dysfunction. The available data from small clinical studies suggest that cell infusion is safe and well tolerated by kidney transplant recipients. Ongoing and future trials will provide evidence regarding the long-term safety of MSC therapy and determine the optimum cell source (either autologous or allogeneic) and infusion protocol to achieve operational tolerance in kidney transplant recipients. These studies will also provide additional evidence regarding the risks and benefits of MSC infusion and will hopefully offer definitive answers to the important questions of when, where, how many and which types of MSCs should be infused to fully exploit their immunomodulatory, pro-tolerogenic and tissue-repairing properties. PMID:26853275

  15. Pre-transplant weight loss predicts inferior outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Radujkovic, Aleksandar; Becker, Natalia; Benner, Axel; Penack, Olaf; Platzbecker, Uwe; Stölzel, Friedrich; Bornhäuser, Martin; Hegenbart, Ute; Ho, Anthony D.; Dreger, Peter; Luft, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT) represents a curative therapeutic option for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but relapse and non-relapse mortality (NRM) limit treatment efficacy. Based on our previous observation in acute myeloid leukemia we investigated the impact of pre-transplant weight loss on post-transplant outcome in MDS patients. A total of 111 patients diagnosed with MDS according to WHO criteria transplanted between 2000 and 2012 in three different transplant centers were included into the analysis. Data on weight loss were collected from medical records prior to conditioning therapy and 3–6 months earlier. Patient, disease and transplant characteristics did not differ between patients with weight loss (2–5%, n = 17; > 5%, n = 17) and those without (n = 77). In a mixed effect model, weight loss was associated with higher risk MDS (p = 0.046). In multivariable analyses, pre-transplant weight loss exceeding 5% was associated with a higher incidence of relapse (p < 0.001) and NRM (p = 0.007). Pre-transplant weight loss of 2–5% and > 5% were independent predictors of worse disease-free (p = 0.023 and p < 0.001, respectively) and overall survival (p = 0.043 and p < 0.001, respectively). Our retrospective study suggests that MDS patients losing weight prior to alloSCT have an inferior outcome after transplantation. Prospective studies addressing pre-transplant nutritional interventions are highly warranted. PMID:26360778

  16. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: Study ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these cases. ...

  17. Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159395.html Stem Cell Transplant Can Help HIV Patients Battling Lymphoma: ... for lymphoma, and a new study concludes that stem cell transplant should be standard treatment in these ...

  18. Double Stem Cell Transplant May Help Fight a Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_159243.html Double Stem Cell Transplant May Help Fight a Childhood Cancer ... better chance of survival if they receive two stem cell transplants, a new study reports. The double ...

  19. Nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Storb, Rainer; Sandmaier, Brenda M.

    2016-01-01

    Most hematological malignancies occur in older patients. Until recently these patients and those with comorbidities were not candidates for treatment with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation because they were unable to tolerate the heretofore used high-dose conditioning regimens. The finding that many of the cures achieved with allogeneic hematopoietic transplantation were due to graft-versus-tumor effects led to the development of less toxic and well-tolerated reduced intensity and nonmyeloablative regimens. These regimens enabled allogeneic engraftment, thereby setting the stage for graft-versus-tumor effects. This review summarizes the encouraging early results seen with the new regimens and discusses the two hurdles that need to be overcome for achieving even greater success, disease relapse and graft-versus-host disease. PMID:27132278

  20. BACTERIAL FOODBORNE INFECTIONS AFTER HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, Nicole; Podczervinski, Sara; Jordan, Kim; Stednick, Zach; Butler-Wu, Susan; McMillen, Kerry; Pergam, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Diarrhea, abdominal pain and fever are common among patients undergoing hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT), but such symptoms are also typical with foodborne infections. The burden of disease caused by foodborne infections in patients undergoing HCT is unknown. We sought to describe bacterial foodborne infection incidence post-transplant within a single-center population of HCT recipients. Methods All HCT recipients transplanted from 2001 through 2011 at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, WA were followed for one year post-transplant. Data were collected retrospectively using center databases, which include information from transplant, on-site examinations, outside records, and collected laboratory data. Patients were considered to have a bacterial foodborne infection if Campylobacter jejuni/coli, Listeria monocytogenes, E. coli 0157:H7, Salmonella species, Shigella species, Vibrio species or Yersinia species were isolated in culture within one-year post-transplant. Non-foodborne infections with these agents and patients with preexisting bacterial foodborne infection (within 30 days of transplant) were excluded from analyses. Results A total of 12/4069 (0.3%) patients developed a bacterial foodborne infection within one year post-transplant. Patients with infections had a median age at transplant of 50.5 years (interquartile range [IQR]: 35–57), and the majority were adults ≥18 years of age (9/12 [75%]), male gender (8/12 [67%]) and post-allogeneic transplant (8/12 [67%]). Infectious episodes occurred at an incidence rate of 1.0 per 100,000 patient-days (95% CI: 0.5–1.7) and at a median of 50.5 days after transplant (IQR: 26–58.5). The most frequent pathogen detected was Campylobacter jejuni/coli (5/12 [42%]) followed by Yersinia (3/12 [25%]), while Salmonella (2/12 [17%]) and Listeria (2/12 [17%]) showed equal frequencies; no cases of Shigella, Vibrio, or E. coli 0157:H7 were detected. Most patients were diagnosed via stool

  1. Outer Segment Formation of Transplanted Photoreceptor Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eberle, Dominic; Kurth, Thomas; Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Wilson, John; Corbeil, Denis; Ader, Marius

    2012-01-01

    Transplantation of photoreceptor precursor cells (PPCs) into the retina represents a promising treatment for cell replacement in blinding diseases characterized by photoreceptor loss. In preclinical studies, we and others demonstrated that grafted PPCs integrate into the host outer nuclear layer (ONL) and develop into mature photoreceptors. However, a key feature of light detecting photoreceptors, the outer segment (OS) with natively aligned disc membrane staples, has not been studied in detail following transplantation. Therefore, we used as donor cells PPCs isolated from neonatal double transgenic reporter mice in which OSs are selectively labeled by green fluorescent protein while cell bodies are highlighted by red fluorescent protein. PPCs were enriched using CD73-based magnetic associated cell sorting and subsequently transplanted into either adult wild-type or a model of autosomal-dominant retinal degeneration mice. Three weeks post-transplantation, donor photoreceptors were identified based on fluorescent-reporter expression and OS formation was monitored at light and electron microscopy levels. Donor cells that properly integrated into the host wild-type retina developed OSs with the formation of a connecting cilium and well-aligned disc membrane staples similar to the surrounding native cells of the host. Surprisingly, the majority of not-integrated PPCs that remained in the sub-retinal space also generated native-like OSs in wild-type mice and those affected by retinal degeneration. Moreover, they showed an improved photoreceptor maturation and OS formation by comparison to donor cells located on the vitreous side suggesting that environmental cues influence the PPC differentiation and maturation. We conclude that transplanted PPCs, whether integrated or not into the host ONL, are able to generate the cellular structure for effective light detection, a phenomenon observed in wild-type as well as in degenerated retinas. Given that patients suffering from

  2. Genetic investigation of biological materials from patients after stem cell transplantation based on autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers.

    PubMed

    Jacewicz, Renata; Lewandowski, Krzysztof; Rupa-Matysek, Joanna; Jedrzejczyk, Maciej; Komarnicki, Mieczysław; Berent, Jarosław

    2013-03-01

    The authors presented the results of DNA polymorphism investigation of blood, buccal swabs and hair follicles originating from patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The real-time and multiplex assays based on polymerase chain reaction within the range of autosomal as well as Y-chromosomal markers were applied to assess the possible dangers arising from investigation of these materials in forensic genetics. The results revealed that not only post-transplant blood and buccal swab, but also recipient hair, up to now regarded as devoid of any donor's cells, do not constitute entirely safe material for forensic purposes. Their analysis can lead to the false identification of gender or male haplotype. The investigation of sex-determining region Y and Y-chromosome short tandem repeats performed in female recipients with male donors resulted in the designation of donor's DNA in hair cells as well as in blood and buccal swabs. Therefore, biological stains gathered from crime scenes should not be analysed exclusively based on the investigation of male-specific markers. PMID:23052441

  3. Sweet Syndrome After Autologous Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Ali; İdemen, Celal; Okçu Heper, Aylin; Utkan, Güngör

    2016-02-01

    Sweet syndrome (acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis) is a rare clinical entity characterized by skin lesions, neutrophilia, fever, and neutrophilic infiltration of the dermis. It may be a consequence of malignant disease, comorbidities, or drugs. We present a case of acute febrile neutrophilic dermatosis in a patient after autologous stem cell transplant. PMID:25748978

  4. Supportive Care of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jim, Heather S. L.; Syrjala, Karen L.; Rizzo, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplant survivors face a number of challenges including low energy and stamina, “chemo-brain” and emotional distress, and late effects that can compromise functioning or lead to early mortality. This session will review the most recent interventions and recommendations to avoid or mitigate these complications. PMID:22226095

  5. Limbal stem cell transplantation: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Atallah, Marwan Raymond; Palioura, Sotiria; Perez, Victor L; Amescua, Guillermo

    2016-01-01

    Regeneration of the corneal surface after an epithelial insult involves division, migration, and maturation of a specialized group of stem cells located in the limbus. Several insults, both intrinsic and extrinsic, can precipitate destruction of the delicate microenvironment of these cells, resulting in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). In such cases, reepithelialization fails and conjunctival epithelium extends across the limbus, leading to vascularization, persistent epithelial defects, and chronic inflammation. In partial LSCD, conjunctival epitheliectomy, coupled with amniotic membrane transplantation, could be sufficient to restore a healthy surface. In more severe cases and in total LSCD, stem cell transplantation is currently the best curative option. Before any attempts are considered to perform a limbal stem cell transplantation procedure, the ocular surface must be optimized by controlling causative factors and comorbid conditions. These factors include adequate eyelid function or exposure, control of the ocular surface inflammatory status, and a well-lubricated ocular surface. In cases of unilateral LSCD, stem cells can be obtained from the contralateral eye. Newer techniques aim at expanding cells in vitro or in vivo in order to decrease the need for large limbal resection that may jeopardize the “healthy” eye. Patients with bilateral disease can be treated using allogeneic tissue in combination with systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Another emerging option for this subset of patients is the use of noncorneal cells such as mucosal grafts. Finally, the use of keratoprosthesis is reserved for patients who are not candidates for any of the aforementioned options, wherein the choice of the type of keratoprosthesis depends on the severity of the disease. In summary, limbal stem cell transplantation improves both vision and quality-of-life in patients with ocular surface disorders associated with LSCD, and overall, the use of autologous tissue offers

  6. Iron overload in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Majhail, N S; Lazarus, H M; Burns, L J

    2008-06-01

    Iron overload, primarily related to RBC transfusions, is a relatively common complication in hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients. Iron overload increases the risk of infections, veno-occlusive disease and hepatic dysfunction post transplant. Elevated pretransplant ferritin levels have been reported to increase the risk of nonrelapse mortality following HCT and might influence the risk of acute and chronic GVHD. Serum ferritin is sensitive but not specific for iron overload and is a poor predictor of body iron burden. Estimation of hepatic iron content with a liver biopsy or magnetic resonance imaging should be considered prior to initiating therapy for post transplant iron overload. A subgroup of transplant survivors with mild iron overload and no end-organ damage may not need therapy. Phlebotomy is the treatment of choice with iron-chelation therapy reserved for patients not eligible for phlebotomy. Natural history, evolution and treatment of iron overload in transplant survivors have not been adequately investigated and more studies are needed to determine its impact on short-term and long-term morbidity and mortality. PMID:18438425

  7. Addition of High-Dose Cytarabine to Fludarabine-Based Conditioning for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Treating Fanconi Anemia Patients with Advanced Myeloid Malignancy: A Single-Center Experience and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Takahiro; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ikeda, Yuhachi; Sekinaka, Yujin; Akiyama, Kosuke; Mori, Makiko; Arakawa, Yuki; Hanada, Ryoji

    2016-09-01

    The complication of Fanconi anemia (FA) with acute leukemia is rare and challenging to treat because of high relapse rates, despite the improved outcome of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with fludarabine-based conditioning for treating FA patients with hematological abnormalities. We added high-dose cytarabine to fludarabine-based conditioning to promote an enhanced antitumor effect and successfully subjected 4 patients with FA, including 3 with acute leukemia, to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. All patients remain alive without treatment-related mortality or evidence of disease. Adding high-dose cytarabine to fludarabine-based conditioning may be tolerable and effective for treating FA patients with acute leukemia. PMID:27246371

  8. Hematopoietic cell transplantation: a curative option for sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-12-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. Reduced intensity conditioning regimen have the potential to further reduce regimen related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments, such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimen may enable the safe use of alternate source of stem cells such as unrelated matched donors and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment. PMID:18092247

  9. Umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells: adjuvants for human cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Robb; Betancur, Monica; Boissel, Laurent; Tuncer, Hande; Cetrulo, Curtis; Klingemann, Hans

    2007-12-01

    The Wharton's jelly of the umbilical cord is rich in mesenchymal stem cells (UC-MSCs) that fulfill the criteria for MSCs. Here we describe a novel, simple method of obtaining and cryopreserving UC-MSCs by extracting the Wharton's jelly from a small piece of cord, followed by mincing the tissue and cryopreserving it in autologous cord plasma to prevent exposure to allogeneic or animal serum. This direct freezing of cord microparticles without previous culture expansion allows the processing and freezing of umbilical cord blood (UCB) and UC-MSCs from the same individual on the same day on arrival in the laboratory. UC-MSCs produce significant concentrations of hematopoietic growth factors in culture and augment hematopoietic colony formation when co-cultured with UCB mononuclear cells. Mice undergoing transplantation with limited numbers of human UCB cells or CD34(+) selected cells demonstrated augmented engraftment when UC-MSCs were co-transplanted. We also explored whether UC-MSCs could be further manipulated by transfection with plasmid-based vectors. Electroporation was used to introduce cDNA and mRNA constructs for GFP into the UC-MSCs. Transfection efficiency was 31% for cDNA and 90% for mRNA. These data show that UC-MSCs represent a reliable, easily accessible, noncontroversial source of MSCs. They can be prepared and cryopreserved under good manufacturing practices (GMP) conditions and are able to enhance human hematopoietic engraftment in SCID mice. Considering their cytokine production and their ability to be easily transfected with plasmid-based vectors, these cells should have broad applicability in human cell-based therapies. PMID:18022578

  10. Who Needs a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant?

    MedlinePlus

    ... to find out whether you have any medical problems that could cause complications after the transplant. (See "What To Expect Before a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant" for more information.) Rate This Content: NEXT >> ...

  11. Mesenchymal stem cells as feeder cells for pancreatic islet transplants.

    PubMed

    Sordi, Valeria; Piemonti, Lorenzo

    2010-01-01

    Allogeneic islet transplantation serves as a source of insulin-secreting beta-cells for the maintenance of normal glucose levels and treatment of diabetes. However, limited availability of islets, high rates of islet graft failure, and the need for life-long non-specific immunosuppressive therapy are major obstacles to the widespread application of this therapeutic approach. To overcome these problems, pancreatic islet transplantation was recently suggested as a potential target of the "therapeutic plasticity" of adult stem cells. In fact, new results suggest that stem/precursor cells, and mesenchymal stem cells in particular, co-transplanted with islets can promote tissue engraftment and beta-cell survival via bystander mechanisms, mainly exerted by creating a milieu of cytoprotective and immunomodulatory molecules. This evidence consistently challenges the limited view that stem/precursor cells work exclusively through beta-cell replacement in diabetes therapy. It proposes that stem cells also act as "feeder" cells for islets, and supporter of graft protection, tissue revascularization, and immune acceptance. This article reviews the experience of using stem cell co-transplantation as strategy to improve islet transplantation. It highlights that comprehension of the mechanisms involved will help to identify new molecular targets and promote development of new pharmacological strategies to treat type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. PMID:21060972

  12. iPS cell transplantation for traumatic spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Goulão, Miguel; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2016-01-01

    A large body of work has been published on transplantation of a wide range of neural stem and progenitor cell types derived from the developing and adult CNS, as well as from pluripotent embryonic stem cells, in models of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, many of these cell-based approaches present practical issues for clinical translation such as ethical cell derivation, generation of potentially large numbers of homogenously prepared cells, and immune rejection. With the advent of induced Pluripotent Stem (iPS) cell technology, many of these issues may potentially be overcome. To date, a number of studies have demonstrated integration, differentiation into mature CNS lineages, migration and long-term safety of iPS cell transplants in a variety of SCI models, as well as therapeutic benefits in some cases. Given the clinical potential of this advance in stem cell biology, we present a concise review of studies published to date involving iPS cell transplantation in animal models of SCI. PMID:26201863

  13. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  14. Neuroprotective effects of systemic cerebral endothelial cell transplantation in a rat model of cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Moon, Jong-Hyun; Na, Joo-Young; Lee, Min-Cheol; Choi, Kang-Ho; Lee, Jeong-Kil; Min, Jung-Joon; Kim, Kyung-Tae; Park, Jong-Tae; Park, Man-Seok; Kim, Hyung-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Human cerebral microvascular endothelial cell line (hCMEC)/D3 cells, which are from a stable clonal cell line of human immortalized cerebral endothelial cells, were intra-arterially transplanted through the common carotid artery in a rat model of photochemical-induced cerebral ischemia. Their therapeutic effects on infarct size, blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, and outcome were examined. The hCMEC/D3 cells were genetically modified with the firefly luciferase gene for in vivo imaging post-transplantation. Transplanted hCMEC/D3 cells were identified in the infarcted brain by bioluminescence imaging at 1 day after transplantation. Compared with the control group, the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group showed reduced infarct size on day 3, reduced Evans blue dye leakage on day 1 indicating decreased BBB breakdown, and early recovery from Rotarod test neurological deficits. The hCMEC/D3-transplanted group also showed decreased levels of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9, which were inversely correlated with TIMP-1 levels on post-transplantation days 1 and 3. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β were markedly diminished in the hCMEC/D3-transplanted group compared with controls. The systemically transplanted cells selectively migrated and integrated into the ischemically lesioned area, which accelerated neurological recovery. This new cerebral endothelial cell-based therapy may hold promise for clinical trials in patients with ischemic stroke. PMID:27347342

  15. Regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Banas, Agnieszka; Teratani, Takumi; Iwaguro, Hideki; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2012-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (ES) cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have an enormous potential; however, their potential clinical application is being arrested due to various limitations such as teratoma formation followed by tumorigenesis, emergent usage, and the quality control of cells, as well as safety issues regarding long-term culture are also delaying their clinical application. In addition, human ES cells have two crucial issues: immunogenicity and ethical issues associated with their clinical application. The efficient generation of human iPS cells requires gene transfer, yet the mechanism underlying pluripotent stem cell induction has not yet been fully elucidated. Otherwise, although human adult regenerative cells including mesenchymal stem cells have a limited capacity for differentiation, they are nevertheless promising candidates for tissue regeneration in a clinical setting. This review highlights the use of regenerative cells for transplantation in hepatic failure. PMID:22793046

  16. Immunoselection techniques in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Biagini, Simone; Cicchetti, Elisabetta; Merli, Pietro; Brescia, Letizia Pomponia; Milano, Giuseppe Maria; Montanari, Mauro

    2016-06-01

    Hematopoietic Stem Cells Transplantation (HSCT) is an effective treatment for hematological and non-hematological diseases. The main challenge in autologous HSCT is purging of malignant cells to prevent relapse. In allogeneic HSCT graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) and opportunistic infections are frequent complications. Two types of graft manipulation have been introduced: the first one in the autologous context aimed at separating malignant cells from hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), and the second one in allogeneic HSCT aimed at reducing the incidence of GvHD and at accelerating immune reconstitution. Here we describe the manipulations used for cell purging in autologous HSCT or for T Cell Depletion (TCD) and T cell selection in allogeneic HSCT. More complex manipulations, requiring a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) facility, are briefly mentioned. PMID:27209628

  17. Patterns and kinetics of T-cell chimerism after allo transplant with alemtuzumab-based conditioning: mixed chimerism protects from GVHD, but does not portend disease recurrence.

    PubMed

    van Besien, Koen; Dew, Alexander; Lin, Shang; Joseph, Loren; Godley, Lucy A; Larson, Richard A; Odenike, Toyosi; Rich, Elizabeth; Stock, Wendy; Wickrema, Amittha; Artz, Andrew S

    2009-11-01

    We analyzed the kinetics of CD3 chimerism in 120 consecutive allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) recipients receiving alemtuzumab-based conditioning. Fifty-two received fludarabine/melphalan, 44 received fludarabine/busulfan, and 24 received clofarabine/melphalan in addition to alemtuzumab. Post-transplant GVHD prophylaxis consisted of tacrolimus. No prophylactic donor lymphocyte infusion or other interventions were used for mixed donor chimerism (MDC). Bone marrow (BM) and/or peripheral blood (PB) samples were obtained at 30 days, 100 days, 180 days, and 1 year following HCT. On Day 30, 15% of assessable patients had MDC in the CD3 compartment. This had increased to 50% by Day 100, and to 63% by Day 180. MDC predicted for a lower risk of acute (p = 0.08) and particularly of chronic GVHD (p = 0.01). MDC was not associated with subsequent relapse or TRM (p = 0.67 and 0.72, respectively). A decline of more than 15% in CD3 chimerism between Day 30 and Day 180 predicted for a 40% risk of subsequent disease recurrence. The observation of MDC after alemtuzumab conditioning does not by itself constitute a risk factor for relapse and should not be used to guide therapeutic intervention. By contrast, declining donor chimerism between Day 30 and Day 180 is associated with a somewhat increased risk of disease recurrence. The high incidence of MDC after alemtuzumab containing conditioning contributes to the low risk of acute and chronic GVHD. PMID:19821799

  18. Cryptococcal meningitis post autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chaaban, S; Wheat, L J; Assi, M

    2014-06-01

    Disseminated Cryptococcus disease occurs in patients with defective T-cell immunity. Cryptococcal meningitis following autologous stem cell transplant (SCT) has been described previously in only 1 patient, 4 months post SCT and while off antifungal prophylaxis. We present a unique case of Cryptococcus meningitis pre-engraftment after autologous SCT, while the patient was receiving fluconazole prophylaxis. A 41-year-old man with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma underwent autologous SCT. Post-transplant prophylaxis consisted of fluconazole 400 mg daily, levofloxacin 500 mg daily, and acyclovir 800 mg twice daily. On day 9 post transplant, he developed fever and headache. Peripheral white blood cell count (WBC) was 700/μL. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain showed lesions consistent with meningoencephalitis. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed a WBC of 39 with 77% lymphocytes, protein 63, glucose 38, CSF pressure 20.5 cmH2 O, and a positive cryptococcal antigen. CSF culture confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans. The patient was treated with liposomal amphotericin B 5 mg/kg intravenously daily, and flucytosine 37.5 mg/kg orally every 6 h. He was switched to fluconazole 400 mg daily after 3 weeks of amphotericin therapy, with sterilization of the CSF with negative CSFCryptococcus antigen and negative CSF culture. Review of the literature revealed 9 cases of cryptococcal disease in recipients of SCT. Median time of onset was 64 days post transplant. Only 3 meningitis cases were described; 2 of them after allogeneic SCT. Fungal prophylaxis with fluconazole post autologous SCT is recommended at least through engraftment, and for up to 100 days in high-risk patients. A high index of suspicion is needed to diagnose and treat opportunistic infections, especially in the face of immunosuppression and despite adequate prophylaxis. Infection is usually fatal without treatment, thus prompt diagnosis and therapy might be life saving. PMID:24750320

  19. The case for intrauterine stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mattar, Citra N; Biswas, Arijit; Choolani, Mahesh; Chan, Jerry K Y

    2012-10-01

    The clinical burden imposed by the collective group of monogenic disorders demands novel therapies that are effective at achieving phenotypic cure early in the disease process before the development of permanent organ damage. This is important for lethal diseases and also for non-perinatally lethal conditions that are characterised by severe disability with little prospect of postnatal cure. Where postnatal treatments are limited to palliative options, intrauterine stem-cell therapies may offer the potential to arrest pathogenesis in the early undamaged fetus. Intrauterine stem-cell transplantation has been attempted for a variety of diseases, but has only been successful in immune deficiency states in the presence of a competitive advantage for donor cells. This disappointing clinical record requires preclinical investigations into strategies that improve donor cell engraftment, including optimising the donor cell source and manipulating the microenvironment to facilitate homing. This chapter aims to outline the current challenges of intrauterine stem-cell therapy. PMID:22809469

  20. Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a pluripotent non-hematopoietic precursor cells that can be isolated from bone marrow and numerous other tissues, culture-expanded to purity, and induced to differentiate in vitro and in vivo into mesodermal derivatives. MSCs exhibit many phenotypic and functional similarities to pericytes. The immunomodulatory, tissue protective, and repair-promoting properties of MSCs demonstrated both in vitro and in animal models make them an attractive potential therapy for MS and other conditions characterized by inflammation and/or tissue injury. Other potential advantages of MSCs as a therapeutic include the relative ease of culture expansion, relative immunoprivilege allowing allogeneic transplantation, and their ability to traffic from blood to areas of tissue allowing intravascular administration. The overall published experience with MSC transplantation in MS is modest, but several small case series and preliminary studies yielded promising results. Several groups, including us, recently initiated formal studies of autologous, culture-expanded, bone-marrow-derived MSC transplantation in MS. Although there are several potential safety concerns, to date, the procedure has been well tolerated. Future studies that more definitively assess efficacy also will need to address several technical issues. PMID:23294498

  1. Transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells into contusion-injured spinal cord of rats

    PubMed Central

    Kanekiyo, Kenji; Nakano, Norihiko; Noda, Toru; Yamada, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Yoshihisa; Ohta, Masayoshi; Yokota, Atsushi; Fukushima, Masanori; Ide, Chizuka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The effect of the transplantation of choroid plexus epithelial cells (CPECs) on locomotor improvement and tissue repair including axonal extension in spinal cord lesions was examined in rats with spinal cord injury (SCI). Methods: CPECs were cultured from the choroid plexus of green fluorescent protein (GFP)-transgenic rats, and transplanted directly into the contusion-injured spinal cord lesions of rats of the same strain. Locomotor behaviors were evaluated based on BBB scores every week after transplantation until 4 weeks after transplantation. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations were performed at 2 days, and every week until 5 weeks after transplantation. Results: Locomotor behaviors evaluated by the BBB score were significantly improved in cell-transplanted rats. Numerous axons grew, with occasional interactions with CPECs, through the astrocyte-devoid areas. These axons exhibited structural characteristics of peripheral nerves. GAP-43-positive axons were found at the border of the lesion 2 days after transplantation. Cavity formation was more reduced in cell-transplanted than control spinal cords. CPECs were found within the spinal cord lesion, and sometimes in association with astrocytes at the border of the lesion until 2 weeks after transplantation. Conclusion: The transplantation of CPECs enhanced locomotor improvement and tissue recovery, including axonal regeneration, in rats with SCI. PMID:26923614

  2. CMV in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    de la Cámara, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Due to its negative impact on the outcome of stem cell transplant (SCT) and solid organ transplant patients (SOT) CMV has been called “the troll of transplantation”. One of the greatest advances in the management of SCT has been the introduction of the preemptive strategy. Since its introduction, the incidence of the viremia, as expected, remains unchanged but there has been a marked decline in the incidence of early CMV disease. However, in spite of the advances in prevention of CMV disease, CMV is still today an important cause of morbidity and mortality. Late CMV disease is still occurring in a significant proportion of patients and the so-called indirect effects of CMV are causing significant morbidity and mortality. Fortunately there have been several advances in the development of new antivirals, adoptive immunotherapy and DNA-CMV vaccines that might transform the management of CMV in the near future. PMID:27413524

  3. T Cell Cosignaling Molecules in Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ford, Mandy L

    2016-05-17

    The ultimate outcome of alloreactivity versus tolerance following transplantation is potently influenced by the constellation of cosignaling molecules expressed by immune cells during priming with alloantigen, and the net sum of costimulatory and coinhibitory signals transmitted via ligation of these molecules. Intense investigation over the last two decades has yielded a detailed understanding of the kinetics, cellular distribution, and intracellular signaling networks of cosignaling molecules such as the CD28, TNF, and TIM families of receptors in alloimmunity. More recent work has better defined the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which engagement of cosignaling networks serve to either dampen or augment alloimmunity. These findings will likely aid in the rational development of novel immunomodulatory strategies to prolong graft survival and improve outcomes following transplantation. PMID:27192567

  4. Hematopoietic Cell and Renal Transplantation in Plasma Cell Dyscrasia Patients.

    PubMed

    Baraldi, Olga; Grandinetti, Valeria; Donati, Gabriele; Comai, Giorgia; Battaglino, Giuseppe; Cuna, Vania; Capelli, Irene; Sala, Elisa; La Manna, Gaetano

    2016-01-01

    Gammopathies, multiple myeloma, and amyloidosis are plasma dyscrasias characterized by clonal proliferation and immunoglobulin overproduction. Renal impairment is the most common and serious complication with an incidence of 20-30% patients at the diagnosis. Kidney transplant has not been considered feasible in the presence of plasma dyscrasias because the immunosuppressive therapy may increase the risk of neoplasia progression, and paraproteins may affect the graft. However, recent advances in clinical management of multiple myeloma and other gammopathies allow considering kidney transplant as a possible alternative to dialysis. Numerous evidence indicates the direct relationship between hematological remission and renal function restoring. The combination of kidney and hematopoietic cell transplant has been reported as a promising approach to reestablish end-organ function and effectively treat the underlying disease. This review describes current protocols used to perform kidney transplantation in patients with plasma dyscrasias. PMID:26160700

  5. Ectonucleotidases in Solid Organ and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Chernogorova, Petya; Zeiser, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides are ubiquitous signalling molecules which modulate distinct physiological and pathological processes. Nucleotide concentrations in the extracellular space are strictly regulated by cell surface enzymes, called ectonucleotidases, which hydrolyze nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. Recent studies suggest that ectonucleotidases play a significant role in inflammation by adjusting the balance between ATP, a widely distributed proinflammatory danger signal, and the anti-inflammatory mediator adenosine. There is increasing evidence for a central role of adenosine in alloantigen-mediated diseases such as solid organ graft rejection and acute graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Solid organ and hematopoietic cell transplantation are established treatment modalities for a broad spectrum of benign and malignant diseases. Immunological complications based on the recognition of nonself-antigens between donor and recipient like transplant rejection and GvHD are still major challenges which limit the long-term success of transplantation. Studies in the past two decades indicate that purinergic signalling influences the severity of alloimmune responses. This paper focuses on the impact of ectonucleotidases, in particular, NTPDase1/CD39 and ecto-5′-nucleotidase/CD73, on allograft rejection, acute GvHD, and graft-versus-leukemia effect, and on possible clinical implications for the modulation of purinergic signalling after transplantation. PMID:23125523

  6. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in thalassemia major and sickle cell disease: indications and management recommendations from an international expert panel

    PubMed Central

    Angelucci, Emanuele; Matthes-Martin, Susanne; Baronciani, Donatella; Bernaudin, Françoise; Bonanomi, Sonia; Cappellini, Maria Domenica; Dalle, Jean-Hugues; Di Bartolomeo, Paolo; de Heredia, Cristina Díaz; Dickerhoff, Roswitha; Giardini, Claudio; Gluckman, Eliane; Hussein, Ayad Achmed; Kamani, Naynesh; Minkov, Milen; Locatelli, Franco; Rocha, Vanderson; Sedlacek, Petr; Smiers, Frans; Thuret, Isabelle; Yaniv, Isaac; Cavazzana, Marina; Peters, Christina

    2014-01-01

    Thalassemia major and sickle cell disease are the two most widely disseminated hereditary hemoglobinopathies in the world. The outlook for affected individuals has improved in recent years due to advances in medical management in the prevention and treatment of complications. However, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is still the only available curative option. The use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been increasing, and outcomes today have substantially improved compared with the past three decades. Current experience world-wide is that more than 90% of patients now survive hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and disease-free survival is around 80%. However, only a few controlled trials have been reported, and decisions on patient selection for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and transplant management remain principally dependent on data from retrospective analyses and on the clinical experience of the transplant centers. This consensus document from the European Blood and Marrow Transplantation Inborn Error Working Party and the Paediatric Diseases Working Party aims to report new data and provide consensus-based recommendations on indications for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and transplant management. PMID:24790059

  7. Haploidentical haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute leukaemia in adults: experience in Europe and the United States.

    PubMed

    Aversa, F

    2008-03-01

    Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft. Haploidentical transplant modalities are based mainly on high-intensity conditioning regimen, but reduced intensity regimens have recently been introduced. The graft may be a megadose of extensively T cell-depleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of GVHD- and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling. Improvements will come with successful implementation of strategies to accelerate and strengthen post transplant immune reconstitution as well as transplantation of patients in early stage disease. PMID:18176612

  8. Current Opinion of Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Ischemic Stroke

    PubMed Central

    KURODA, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    This article reviews recent advancement and perspective of bone marrow stromal cell (BMSC) transplantation for ischemic stroke, based on current information of basic and translational research. The author would like to emphasize that scientific approach would enable us to apply BMSC transplantation into clinical situation in near future. PMID:26984453

  9. Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplant for Prolymphocytic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Kalaycio, Matt E.; Kukreja, Manisha; Woolfrey, Ann E.; Szer, Jeffrey; Cortes, Jorge; Maziarz, Richard T.; Bolwell, Brian J.; Buser, Andreas; Copelan, Edward; Gale, Robert Peter; Gupta, Vikas; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Marks, David I; Pavletic, Steven Z.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Arora, Mukta

    2009-01-01

    The poor prognosis of patients with prolymphocytic leukemia (PLL) has led some clinicians to recommend allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). However, the data to support this approach is limited to case-reports and small case-series. We reviewed the database of the Center for International Blood & Marrow Transplant Research to determine outcomes after allotransplant for patients with PLL. We identified 47 patients with a median age of 54 years (range, 30–75). With a median follow-up of 13 months, progression-free survival was 33% (95% Confidence Interval 20–47%) at 2 years. The most common cause of death was relapse or progression in 49%. The cumulative incidence of treatment-related mortality at 1-year post transplant was 28%. The small patient population prohibited prognostic factor analysis but these data support consideration of allotransplant for PLL. Further study of a larger population of patients is needed to determine which patients are more likely to benefit. PMID:19961946

  10. Fertility issues following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tichelli, André; Rovó, Alicia

    2013-08-01

    With the improvement of the outcome, the number of long-term survivors of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is continuously increasing. However, there is still a high burden of late morbidity and mortality. Two-thirds of the transplant survivors develop at least one late effect interfering with their physical or psychological health. Infertility is common after myeloablative HSCT conditioned with total body irradiation and high doses of gonadotoxic drugs. Other factors, such as the age of the patient at transplantation, the treatment modality received before HSCT or the onset of chronic graft versus host disease, may play an additional role. Accordingly, the number of pregnancies observed after HSCT is very low when compared to a general population in childbearing age. Furthermore, complications during pregnancy and at delivery occur significantly more frequently, probably because of the uterine damages caused by irradiation therapy. However, there is no excess of congenital abnormalities observed among newborn children. Today there are good possibilities for fertility preservation. In male patients cryopreservation of sperm, and in female patients cryopreservation of fertilized embryos or of mature oocytes, are well-established treatment options. Patients' and physicians' attitude toward discussion on fertility issues play a key role in the success of fertility preservation after HSCT. PMID:23991924

  11. Modeling the Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galvão, Viviane; Miranda, José Garcia Vivas

    2009-04-01

    A recent model for Chagas’ disease after stem cell transplantation is extended for a three-dimensional multi-agent-based model. The computational model includes six different types of autonomous agents: inflammatory cell, fibrosis, cardiomyocyte, proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor- α, Trypanosoma cruzi, and bone marrow stem cell. Only fibrosis is fixed and the other types of agents can move randomly through the empty spaces using the three-dimensional Moore neighborhood. Bone marrow stem cells can promote apoptosis in inflammatory cells, fibrosis regression and can differentiate in cardiomyocyte. T. cruzi can increase the number of inflammatory cells. Inflammatory cells and tumor necrosis factor- α can increase the quantity of fibrosis. Our results were compared with experimental data giving a fairly fit and they suggest that the inflammatory cells are important for the development of fibrosis.

  12. [Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Vela-Ojeda, Jorge; Ruiz-Esparza, Miriam A García

    2005-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy, affecting approximately 14,000 new patients per year in the United States. For over four decades, the standard treatment for MM has been a regimen of melphalan combined with prednisone. Using this treatment modality, complete responses are rare, and 50% of patients have had disease that was resistant to chemotherapy. Attempts have been made to improve the outcome of MM by administering combinations of i.v. poli-chemotherapy, but these treatments are equivalent in terms of overall survival. High-dose therapy with peripheral blood stem cell support can be applied safely in these patients and achieves significantly higher complete remission rates as well as better event-free survival and overall survival. However, neither tumor-cell purging, positive selection, intensification of conditioning with additional chemotherapeutic agents, nor total body irradiation have been shown to improve outcome. The role of tandem transplantation with high-dose melphalan seems to be a good selection of treatment in hospitals having all resources. Future research will include the combination of the best remission-induction regimen with tandem transplants and maintenance treatments (thalidomide, idiotype or dendritic cell vaccination) that will sustain complete remission. Development of non-myeloablative allogeneic transplantation in order to exploit the graft-versus myeloma effect provides an alternative for patients who have a compatible donor. Combining all of these modalities with the new drugs developed few years ago (thalidomide, bortezomib, revlimid), we hope that MM will become a manageable chronic disease and perhaps a curable disease at least for 30% to 40% of the patients. PMID:16524072

  13. Neuromuscular complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ruzhansky, Katherine M; Brannagan, Thomas H

    2015-10-01

    Neuromuscular diseases such as polymyositis, dermatomyositis, peripheral neuropathy, and disorders of neuromuscular transmission are reported to be complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Although cases have been reported with allogeneic HSCT in the setting of chronic graft versus host disease, they are also known to occur without evidence thereof and even occur in the setting of autologous HSCT. The 2005 National Institutes of Health Consensus Criteria classify polymyositis and dermatomyositis as "distinctive" features, and neuropathy and MG as "other" features. These neuromuscular complications present very similarly to the idiopathic autoimmune disorders and respond to similar treatment modalities. PMID:26044357

  14. Inflammatory Pseudotumors After Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tufan, Asli; Bahat, Gulistan

    2015-01-01

    Inflammatory pseudotumors (IPT) are rare tumors that occur in various organs and tissues. The clinical picture varies from the more frequent benign lesions to rare malignant tumors with distant metastases. IPTs associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is rarely reported. In this article, we review the reports of IPT after HSCT. We also review the possible factors involved in the pathogenesis. IPT may be rare but they are a potentially serious complication of HSCT. A knowledge of these entities and insistence on a definitive biopsy of mass lesions in the post-HSCT period can avoid unnecessary treatment such as radical surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. PMID:26487930

  15. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  16. Haploidentical Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Parmesar, Kevon; Raj, Kavita

    2016-01-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a well-established treatment option for both hematological malignancies and nonmalignant conditions such as aplastic anemia and haemoglobinopathies. For those patients lacking a suitable matched sibling or matched unrelated donor, haploidentical donors are an alternative expedient donor pool. Historically, haploidentical transplantation led to high rates of graft rejection and GVHD. Strategies to circumvent these issues include T cell depletion and management of complications thereof or T replete transplants with GVHD prophylaxis. This review is an overview of these strategies and contemporaneous outcomes for hematological malignancies in adult haploidentical stem cell transplant recipients. PMID:27313619

  17. Protein-Based Urine Test Predicts Kidney Transplant Outcomes

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Releases News Release Thursday, August 22, 2013 Protein-based urine test predicts kidney transplant outcomes NIH- ... supporting development of noninvasive tests. Levels of a protein in the urine of kidney transplant recipients can ...

  18. Bortezomib-based induction for transplant ineligible AL amyloidosis and feasibility of later transplantation.

    PubMed

    Cornell, R F; Zhong, X; Arce-Lara, C; Atallah, E; Blust, L; Drobyski, W R; Fenske, T S; Pasquini, M C; Rizzo, J D; Saber, W; Hari, P N

    2015-07-01

    Recent studies support the use of bortezomib-based therapies in light chain amyloidosis (AL). We performed a retrospective analysis of the safety, efficacy and long-term survival (median follow-up 3 years) after bortezomib-based treatment in 28 consecutive patients with de novo AL deemed ineligible at initial presentation. The first 14 patients received bortezomib and dexamethasone (VD), and the second 14 patients received cyclophosphamide, bortezomib and dexamethasone (CVD; CyBorD). Both regimens were well tolerated with no treatment-related mortality. The overall hematological response (HR) rate was 93% in both the groups. Median time to response was shorter in the CVD group (39 days vs 96 days in the VD group; P=0.002). Hematological and organ responses induced with bortezomib-based therapy enabled 8 (33%) of initially transplant ineligible patients to undergo autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHCT), including 4 patients with cardiac stage III or IV. Seven of the eight patients (88%) who underwent subsequent AHCT achieved sustained HR at a median of 33 months posttransplant. These data suggest that bortezomib-based induction followed by AHCT is a viable therapeutic strategy for transplant-ineligible AL. Larger, multicenter prospective trials are necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:25915809

  19. Transplantation Dose Alters the Differentiation Program of Hematopoietic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Brewer, Casey; Chu, Elizabeth; Chin, Mike; Lu, Rong

    2016-05-24

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation is the most prevalent stem cell therapy, but it remains a risky procedure. To improve this treatment, it is important to understand how transplanted stem cells rebuild the blood and immune systems and how this process is impacted by transplantation variables such as the HSC dose. Here, we find that, in the long term following transplantation, 70%-80% of donor-HSC-derived clones do not produce all measured blood cell types. High HSC doses lead to more clones that exhibit balanced lymphocyte production, whereas low doses produce more T-cell-specialized clones. High HSC doses also produce significantly higher proportions of early-differentiating clones compared to low doses. These complex differentiation behaviors uncover the clonal-level regeneration dynamics of hematopoietic regeneration and suggest that transplantation dose can be exploited to improve stem cell therapy. PMID:27184851

  20. Replacement of Diseased Mouse Liver by Hepatic Cell Transplantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhim, Jonathan A.; Sandgren, Eric P.; Degen, Jay L.; Palmiter, Richard D.; Brinster, Ralph L.

    1994-02-01

    Adult liver has the unusual ability to fully regenerate after injury. Although regeneration is accomplished by the division of mature hepatocytes, the replicative potential of these cells is unknown. Here, the replicative capacity of adult liver cells and their medical usefulness as donor cells for transplantation were investigated by transfer of adult mouse liver cells into transgenic mice that display an endogenous defect in hepatic growth potential and function. The transplanted liver cell populations replaced up to 80 percent of the diseased recipient liver. These findings demonstrate the enormous growth potential of adult hepatocytes, indicating the feasibility of liver cell transplantation as a method to replace lost or diseased hepatic parenchyma.

  1. Gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tuncer, Hande H; Rana, Naveed; Milani, Cannon; Darko, Angela; Al-Homsi, Samer A

    2012-01-01

    Recognition and management of gastrointestinal and hepatic complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has gained increasing importance as indications and techniques of transplantation have expanded in the last few years. The transplant recipient is at risk for several complications including conditioning chemotherapy related toxicities, infections, bleeding, sinusoidal obstruction syndrome, acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) as well as other long-term problems. The severity and the incidence of many complications have improved in the past several years as the intensity of conditioning regimens has diminished and better supportive care and GVHD prevention strategies have been implemented. Transplant clinicians, however, continue to be challenged with problems arising from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched and unrelated donor transplants, expanding transplant indications and age-limit. This review describes the most commonly seen transplant related complications, focusing on their pathogenesis, differential diagnosis and management. PMID:22563164

  2. Tissue typing for hematopoietic cell transplantation: newer techniques and newer antigens for which cross-matching is helpful.

    PubMed

    Iannone, Robert; Davies, Stella M

    2005-12-01

    Refinements in human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing techniques for hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) have permitted a more precise assessment of donor-recipient histocompatibility, which has impacted transplantation outcomes. More recently, differences in transplant outcomes associated with killer immunoglobulin-like receptor compatibility have emphasized the potential importance of natural killer (NK) cell typing in HCT. This article reviews the current state of the art for HCT donor selection based on both HLA and NK cell typing. PMID:16305621

  3. Immune Reconstitution after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Children.

    PubMed

    de Koning, Coco; Plantinga, Maud; Besseling, Paul; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Nierkens, Stefan

    2016-02-01

    Allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has evolved into a potent curative treatment option for a variety of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. The occurrence of complications and mortality after allo-HCT is, however, still high and is strongly associated with immune reconstitution (IR). Therefore, detailed information on IR through immunomonitoring is crucial to improve survival chances after HCT. To date, information about the reconstituting immune system after allo-HCT in pediatric patients is mostly derived from routine standard-of-care measurements. More profound knowledge on IR may provide tools to better predict and modulate adverse reactions and, subsequently, improve survival chances. Here, we provide an overview of IR (eg, immune cell subsets and circulating chemokines/cytokines) after allo-HCT in children, taking into account different cell sources and serotherapy, and discuss strategies to enhance immunomonitoring. We conclude that available IR data after allo-HCT contain limited information on immune cell families (mostly only generic T, B, and NK cells), which would improve with more detailed information on reconstituting cell subsets or effector cell functionality at earlier time points (<1 month). In addition, secretome data (eg, multiplex cytokine/chemokine profiles) could add to the understanding of IR mechanisms and cell functionality and may even provide (early) biomarkers for individual disease outcome, such as viral reactivity, graft-versus-host disease, or graft-versus-leukemia. The present data and suggestions for more detailed, standardized, and harmonized immunomonitoring in future (pediatric) allo-HCT studies will pave the path to "precision transplantation:" an individualized HCT approach (including conditioning), based on detailed information on IR and biomarkers, aiming to reduce transplantation related mortality and relapse, and subsequently improve survival chances. PMID:26341398

  4. Fetal stem cell transplantation: Past, present, and future

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Tetsuya; Eto, Koji

    2014-01-01

    Since 1928, human fetal tissues and stem cells have been used worldwide to treat various conditions. Although the transplantation of the fetal midbrain substantia nigra and dopaminergic neurons in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease is particularly noteworthy, the history of other types of grafts, such as those of the fetal liver, thymus, and pancreas, should be addressed as there are many lessons to be learnt for future stem cell transplantation. This report describes previous practices and complications that led to current clinical trials of isolated fetal stem cells and embryonic stem (ES) cells. Moreover, strategies for transplantation are considered, with a particular focus on donor cells, cell processing, and the therapeutic cell niche, in addition to ethical issues associated with fetal origin. With the advent of autologous induced pluripotent stem cells and ES cells, clinical dependence on fetal transplantation is expected to gradually decline due to lasting ethical controversies, despite landmark achievements. PMID:25258662

  5. Stem Cell Harvesting after Bortezomib-Based Reinduction for Myeloma Relapsing after Autologous Transplantation: Results from the British Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation/United Kingdom Myeloma Forum Myeloma X (Intensive) Trial.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Christopher; Morris, Curly T C M; Williams, Cathy D; Cairns, David A; Cavenagh, Jamie; Snowden, John A; Ashcroft, John; Cavet, Jim; Hunter, Hannah; Bird, Jenny M; Chalmers, Anna; Brown, Julia M; Yong, Kwee; Schey, Steve; Chown, Sally; Cook, Gordon

    2016-06-01

    The phase III British Society of Blood and Marrow Transplantation/United Kingdom Myeloma Forum Myeloma X trial (MMX) demonstrated prospectively, for the first time, superiority of salvage autologous stem cell transplantation over chemotherapy maintenance for multiple myeloma (MM) in first relapse after previous ASCT. However, many patients have stored insufficient stem cells (PBSC) for second ASCT and robust evidence for remobilization after first ASCT is lacking. We report the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of remobilization after bortezomib-doxorubicin-dexamethasone reinduction in MMX and outcomes of second ASCT with these cells. One hundred ten patients underwent ≥1 remobilization with 32 and 4, undergoing second and third attempts, respectively. Toxicities of remobilization were similar to those seen in first-line mobilization. After all attempts, 52% of those with insufficient previously stored PBSC had harvested a sufficient quantity to proceed to second ASCT. Median PBSC doses infused, neutrophil engraftment, and time to discharge after second ASCT were similar regardless of stem cell source, as were the toxicities of second ASCT. No significant differences between PBSC sources were noted in depth of response to ASCT or time to progression. Harvesting after bortezomib-doxorubicin-dexamethasone reinduction for MM at first relapse is safe and feasible and yields a reliable cell product for second ASCT. The study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov (NCT00747877) and EudraCT (2006-005890-24). PMID:26827659

  6. Comparison of Subcutaneous versus Intravenous Alemtuzumab for Graft-versus-Host Disease Prophylaxis with Fludarabine/Melphalan-Based Conditioning in Matched Unrelated Donor Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Patel, Khilna; Parmar, Sapna; Shah, Shreya; Shore, Tsiporah; Gergis, Usama; Mayer, Sebastian; van Besien, Koen

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study was to compare infusion-related reactions and outcomes of using subcutaneous (subQ) alemtuzumab versus intravenous (i.v.) alemtuzumab as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis for matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations. Outcomes include incidence of cytomegalovirus (CMV)/Epstein-Barr (EBV) viremia, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, time to engraftment, relapse rate, and survival. We conducted a retrospective study of all adult matched unrelated donor stem cell transplantations patients who received fludarabine/melphalan with subQ or i.v. alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus as part of their conditioning for unrelated donor transplantation at New York-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center from January 1, 2012 to March 21, 2014. Alemtuzumab was administered at a total cumulative dose of 100 mg (divided over days -7 to -3). Forty-six patients received an unrelated donor stem cell transplantation with fludarabine/melphalan and either subQ (n = 26) or i.v. (n = 20) alemtuzumab in combination with tacrolimus. Within the evaluable population, 130 subQ and 100 i.v. alemtuzumab doses were administered. For the primary outcome, ≥grade 2 infusion-related reactions occurred in 11 (8%) versus 25 (25%) infusions in the subQ and i.v. cohorts, respectively (P = .001). Overall, 12 injections (9%) in the subQ arm versus 26 infusions (26%) in the i.v. arm experienced an infusion-related reaction of any grade (P = .001). There were no significant differences between the subQ and i.v. arms in rates of reactivation of CMV/EBV, development of CMV disease or post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder, fatal infections, acute and chronic GVHD, relapse, or survival. Subcutaneous administration of alemtuzumab for GVHD prophylaxis was associated with fewer infusion-related reactions compared with i.v. administration in the SCT

  7. Venous thromboembolism in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, S; Neff, A; Nagler, A; Savani, U; Mohty, M; Savani, B N

    2016-04-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is an increasingly recognized problem in the post-hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) setting, with a lack of high-quality evidence-based data to recommend best practices. Few patients with hematologic malignancies and even fewer post-HSCT patients were included in randomized trials of VTE prophylaxis and treatment. Prior VTE, GVHD, infections and indwelling venous catheters are risk factors for thrombosis. The increasing use of post-transplant maintenance therapy with lenalidomide in patients with multiple myeloma adds to this risk after autologous HSCT. These patients are also at high risk of bleeding complications because of prolonged thrombocytopenia and managing the competing risks of bleeding and thrombosis can be challenging. This review aims to provide a practical, clinician-focused approach to the prevention and treatment of VTE in the post-HSCT setting. PMID:26691425

  8. Update on islet cell transplantation for type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Avinash; Brayman, Kenneth L

    2012-06-01

    Despite modern medical breakthroughs, diabetes mellitus is a worldwide leading cause of morbidity and mortality. Definitive surgical treatment of diabetes mellitus was established with the advent and refinement of clinical pancreas transplantation in the 1960s. During the following decades, critical discoveries involving islet isolation and engraftment took place. Clinical islet cell transplantation represents the potential for reduced insulin requirements and debilitating hypoglycemic episodes without the morbidity of surgery. Unfortunately, islet cell transplantation was unable to achieve comparable results with solid organ transplantation. This was until the Edmonton protocol (steroid-free immunosuppression) was described, which demonstrated that islet cell transplantation could be a viable alternative to pancreas transplantation. Significant advances in islet purification techniques and novel immunomodulatory agents have since renewed interest in islet cell transplantation. Yet the field is still challenged by a limited supply of islet cells, inadequate engraftment, and the deleterious effects of chronic immunosuppression. This article discusses the history and the current status of clinical islet cell transplantation. PMID:23729978

  9. Cytomegalovirus (CMV) Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families After Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... Infection: A Guide for Patients and Families after Stem Cell Transplant What is cytomegalovirus (CMV)? Cytomegalovirus (CMV), a ... weakened by medicines that you must take after stem cell transplant and by the transplant itself. Your body ...

  10. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation as initial salvage for patients with acute myeloid leukemia refractory to high-dose cytarabine-based induction chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jabbour, Elias; Daver, Naval; Champlin, Richard; Mathisen, Michael; Oran, Betul; Ciurea, Stefan; Khouri, Issa; Cornelison, A Megan; Ghanem, Hady; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Popat, Uday; Ravandi, Farhad; Giralt, Sergio; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-04-01

    Outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to high-dose Cytarabine (HiDAC)-based induction are dismal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) as initial salvage may be effective and potentially superior to conventional salvage chemotherapy. Eighteen percent (285 of 1597) of AML patients were primary refractory to HiDAC-based regimens at the MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2009. AHSCT was the initial salvage in 28 cases. These patients were compared against 149 patients who received salvage chemotherapy, but never received AHSCT. Patients receiving salvage chemotherapy were older, had higher bone marrow blasts percentage, and higher incidence of unfavorable cytogenetics (P < 0.001). Median time from induction to AHSCT was 76 days. Objective response was achieved in 23 of 28 patients (82%) undergoing AHSCT. The incidence of grade III/IV acute and chronic graft versus-host-disease was 11% and 29%, respectively. Median follow up for living patients is 80 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 15.7 months and 2.9 months for AHSCT and chemotherapy, respectively (P < 0.001); the 3-year OS rates were 39% and 2%, respectively. ASHCT as initial salvage therapy was identified as an independent prognostic factor for survival in multivariate analysis (HR = 3.03; P < 0.001). Initial salvage therapy with AHSCT in patients with primary HiDAC refractory AML is feasible and may yield superior outcomes to salvage chemotherapy. PMID:24375514

  11. Allogeneic Stem Cell transplantation as Initial Salvage for Patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia Refractory to High-Dose Cytarabine-Based Induction Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jabbour, Elias; Daver, Naval; Champlin, Richard; Mathisen, Michael; Oran, Betul; Ciurea, Stefan; Khouri, Issa; Cornelison, A Megan; Ghanem, Hady; Cardenas-Turanzas, Marylou; Popat, Uday; Ravandi, Farhad; Giralt, Sergio; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Kantarjian, Hagop; de Lima, Marcos

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Outcomes of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are refractory to high-dose Cytarabine (HiDAC)-based induction are dismal. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT) as initial salvage may be effective and potentially superior to conventional salvage chemotherapy. Methods Eighteen percent (285 of 1597) of AML patients were primary refractory to HiDAC-based regimens at the MD Anderson Cancer Center between 1995 and 2009. AHSCT was the initial salvage in 28 cases. These patients were compared against 149 patients who received salvage chemotherapy, but never received AHSCT. Results Patients receiving salvage chemotherapy were older, had higher bone marrow blasts percentage, and higher incidence of unfavorable cytogenetics (P<0.001). Median time from induction to AHSCT was 76 days. Objective response was achieved in 23 of 28 patients (82%) undergoing AHSCT. The incidence of grade III/IV acute and chronic graft versus-host-disease was 11% and 29%, respectively. Median follow up for living patients is 80 months. Median overall survival (OS) was 15.7 months and 2.9 months for AHSCT and chemotherapy, respectively (P<0.001); the 3-year OS rates were 39% and 2%, respectively. ASHCT as initial salvage therapy was identified as an independent prognostic factor for survival in multivariate analysis (HR = 3.03; P < 0.001). Conclusion Initial salvage therapy with AHSCT in patients with primary HiDAC refractory AML is feasible and may yield superior outcomes to salvage chemotherapy. PMID:24375514

  12. [Nutritional pathway for autologous stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Takashi; Imataki, Osamu; Inoue, Naomi; Katsumata, Mina; Katsuta, Tomoko; Kataoka, Tomomi; Yoshida, Takashi; Mochizuki, Takahiro; Motokawa, Satoshi; Tamai, Yotaro; Hagiwara, Shotaro; Kawakami, Kimihiro

    2007-08-01

    We developed a nutritional pathway for autologous stem cell transplantation (SCT) to be applied in our transplantation unit. We performed autologous SCT for 37 patients with malignant lymphoma and multiple myeloma during from April 2003 to July 2005. For 10 of them who underwent SCT since 2005,we intervened with nutritional support using our original nutritional pathway,to monitor the clinical course of SCT from the aspect of dietetics with a dietician making assessments of the individual nutrition status. From comparing the 2 groups with (n=27) or without (n=10) the nutritional pathway, oral intake at day 14 was significantly increased from 1,038 kcal to 1,440 kcal,and at discharge developed from 1,167 kcal to 1,446 kcal without statistical significance. Patients whose body weight decreased more than 5% were reduced from 52%(14/27) to 10%(1/10),and 3 days reduction of the CVC insertion period was observed after the intervention. Although the long-term clinical outcome was not fully evaluated, the efficacy of nutritional pathway for autologous SCT was suggested. PMID:17687206

  13. Curative treatment for severe sickle cell disease: allogeneic transplantation.

    PubMed

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Talano, Julie-An

    2015-04-01

    Sickle cell disease is an inherited hematologic disorder that in its severe form can result in substantial morbidity and early mortality. Patients with this disorder can suffer from severe pain, lung disease, and strokes, resulting in chronic debilitating conditions, end organ dysfunction, and organ failure. The health care costs of caring for these chronically ill patients are substantial. Allogeneic transplantation is a modality that has the potential to cure these patients. To date, matched sibling donor transplantation is widely accepted as a standard of care for pediatric patients. Utilizing alternative donors for transplant is still under investigation, as is transplant for adult patients with sickle cell disease. This review focuses on the most recent data for hematopoietic cell transplantation for patients with sickle cell disease. PMID:26352583

  14. Cells transplanted onto the surface of the glial scar reveal hidden potential for functional neural regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Holley, Matthew C.; Hashido, Kento; Ono, Kazuya; Shimomura, Koichiro; Horie, Rie T.; Hamaguchi, Kiyomi; Yoshida, Atsuhiro; Sakamoto, Tatsunori; Ito, Juichi

    2015-01-01

    Cell transplantation therapy has long been investigated as a therapeutic intervention for neurodegenerative disorders, including spinal cord injury, Parkinson’s disease, and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Indeed, patients have high hopes for a cell-based therapy. However, there are numerous practical challenges for clinical translation. One major problem is that only very low numbers of donor cells survive and achieve functional integration into the host. Glial scar tissue in chronic neurodegenerative disorders strongly inhibits regeneration, and this inhibition must be overcome to accomplish successful cell transplantation. Intraneural cell transplantation is considered to be the best way to deliver cells to the host. We questioned this view with experiments in vivo on a rat glial scar model of the auditory system. Our results show that intraneural transplantation to the auditory nerve, preceded by chondroitinase ABC (ChABC)-treatment, is ineffective. There is no functional recovery, and almost all transplanted cells die within a few weeks. However, when donor cells are placed on the surface of a ChABC-treated gliotic auditory nerve, they autonomously migrate into it and recapitulate glia- and neuron-guided cell migration modes to repair the auditory pathway and recover auditory function. Surface transplantation may thus pave the way for improved functional integration of donor cells into host tissue, providing a less invasive approach to rescue clinically important neural tracts. PMID:26080415

  15. Allogeneic and autologous mode of stem cell transplantation in regenerative medicine: which way to go?

    PubMed

    Mamidi, Murali Krishna; Dutta, Susmita; Bhonde, Ramesh; Das, Anjan Kumar; Pal, Rajarshi

    2014-12-01

    Stem cell transplantation is a generic term covering different techniques. However there is argument over the pros and cons of autologous and allogeneic transplants of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for regenerative therapy. Given that the MSCs have already been proven to be safe in patients, we hypothesize that allogeneic transplantation could be more effective and cost-effective as compared to autologous transplantation specifically in older subjects who are the likely victims of degenerative diseases. This analysis is based on the scientific logic that allogeneic stem cells extracted in large numbers from young and healthy donors could be physiologically, metabolically and genetically more stable. Therefore stem cells from young donors may be expected to exhibit higher vigor in secreting trophic factors leading to activation of host tissue-specific stem cells and also be more efficient in remodeling the micro-environmental niche of damaged tissue. PMID:25456787

  16. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in China: current status and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiao-Jun

    2011-01-01

    During the past four decades, a substantial progress has been made in the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). From July, 2007 to December, 2010, a transplant survey from 42 HSCT units indicates that the types of transplantation performed are related identical (43%), related mismatched/haploidentical (28%), unrelated donor matched (11%), unrelated donor mismatched (7%), umbilical cord blood (UCB, 2%) and autologous (9%). The distribution of disease entities being transplanted in allogeneic settings is acute myeloid leukemia (AML) (34%), acute lymphoblastic leukemia(ALL) (24%), chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) (20%), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (8%), aplastic anemia (AA) (7%), Mediterranean anemia (MIA) (2%), non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) (3%), and other diseases (3%). Clinical data from Peking University Institute of Hematology and other transplant centers suggest that haploidentical transplantation has been a choice of the best alternative source of stem cells for individual patients without matched sibling donors. A modified donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) approach can be safely used for prophylaxis and treatment of leukemia relapse in patients with advanced leukemia following mismatched transplant. The number of transplants from unrelated donor or related mismatched/haploidentical donor has increased significantly during recent years. Double UCBT is a promising strategy for the therapy of hematological disease. In addition, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation may be a potential therapeutic approach for treating systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PMID:22432069

  17. Second autologous stem cell transplant for multiply relapsed Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Lin, T S; Avalos, B R; Penza, S L; Marcucci, G; Elder, P J; Copelan, E A

    2002-05-01

    Therapeutic options for patients with Hodgkin's disease who relapse after high-dose chemotherapy with autologous stem cell support are limited. Salvage chemotherapy is not curative, and allogeneic stem cell transplantation in this setting is associated with mortality rates of 40-65%. We report our institution's experience with second autologous transplants in this patient population. Five patients (median age 36) with relapsed Hodgkin's disease underwent a second autologous stem cell transplant at a median of 66 months after first transplant. Four patients received CBV, and one patient received BuCy as conditioning. Neutrophil and platelet engraftment occurred by days +10 and +16, respectively. All patients achieved a complete response, and no relapses have occurred after a median follow-up of 42 months. All four patients who received CBV developed interstitial pneumonitis, and two patients died of pulmonary complications 37 and 48 months following second transplant. Three patients remain alive and disease-free 41, 42 and 155 months after second transplant. These data indicate that second autologous transplantation should be considered for selected patients who relapse after a prolonged response to first autologous transplant. However, BCNU pneumonitis is the major toxicity in patients who have undergone previous mantle radiation and received busulfan with first transplant. PMID:12040474

  18. Melatonin improves spermatogonial stem cells transplantation efficiency in azoospermic mice

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mohammadreza; Saki, Ghasem; Hemadi, Masoud; Khodadadi, Ali; Mohammadi-asl, Javad

    2014-01-01

    Objective(s): Transplantation quality improvement and reduction of cellular damage are important goals that are now considered by researchers. Melatonin is secreted from the pineal gland and some organs such as testes. According to beneficial effects of melatonin (such as its antioxidant and antiapoptotic properties), researchers have proposed that the use of melatonin may improve transplantation quality. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of melatonin on the spermatogonial stem cells transplantation in the azoospermic mice. Materials and Methods: The testes of the BALB/c mice pups (6-day-old) after vitrified-thawed, were digested with enzymes (collagenase, DNaseΙ, trypsin-EDTA) to disperse the cells. The SSCs, type A, were isolated from the rest of testicular cells by MACS. Spermatogonial stem cells were labeled with PKH26 fluorescent kit. Labeled spermatogonial stem cells were transplanted into the testes of infertile mice (busulfan 40 mg/kg). The mice died two months after transplantation and the efficiency of spermatogenesis was investigated. TNP2 and hematoxyline-eosin staining were used to detect the efficiency of cell transplantation. Results: TNP2 were detected in the samples that received melatonin and spermatogonial stem cells transplantation, simultaneously. TNP2 was not detectable in the transplant recipient mice that received placebo for 10 weeks (control group). According to hematoxyline-eosin staining, melatonin improved structure of testes. Conclusion: Administration of melatonin (20 mg/kg) simultaneously with transplantation of spermatogonial stem cells in azoospermia mouse testis increases the efficiency of transplantation and improves structural properties of the testes tissue. PMID:24711891

  19. Treatment of CMV infection after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Maffini, Enrico; Giaccone, Luisa; Festuccia, Moreno; Brunello, Lucia; Busca, Alessandro; Bruno, Benedetto

    2016-06-01

    Despite a remarkable reduction in the past decades, cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) recipients remains a feared complication, still associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Today, first line treatment of CMV infection/reactivation is still based on dated antiviral compounds Ganciclovir (GCV), Foscarnet (FOS) and Cidofovir (CDF) with their burdensome weight of side effects. Maribavir (MBV), Letermovir (LMV) and Brincidofovir (BDF) are three new promising anti-CMV drugs without myelosuppressive properties or renal toxic effects that are under investigation in randomized phase II and III trials. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ATCT) in CMV infection possesses a strong rationale, demonstrated by several proof of concept studies; its feasibility is currently under investigation by clinical trials. ATCT from third-party and naïve donors could meet the needs of HSCT recipients of seronegative donors and cord blood grafts. In selected patients such as recipients of T-cell depleted grafts, ATCT, based on CMV-specific host T-cells reconstitution kinetics, would be of value in the prophylactic and/or preemptive CMV treatment. Vaccine-immunotherapy has the difficult task to reduce the incidence of CMV reactivation/infection in highly immunocompromised HSCT patients. Newer notions on CMV biology may represent the base to flush out the Troll of transplantation. PMID:27043241

  20. Bioengineered stem cells as an alternative for islet cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Sarah J; Gala-Lopez, Boris L; Pepper, Andrew R; Pawlick, Rena L; Shapiro, AM James

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune and increasingly prevalent condition caused by immunological destruction of beta cells. Insulin remains the mainstay of therapy. Endeavours in islet transplantation have clearly demonstrated that type 1 diabetes is treatable by cellular replacement. Many challenges remain with this approach. The opportunity to use bioengineered embryonic or adult pluripotential stem cells, or islets derived from porcine xenograft sources could address future demands, but are still associated with considerable challenges. This detailed review outlines current progress in clinical islet transplantation, and places this in perspective for the remarkable scientific advances now occurring in stem cell and regenerative medicine approaches in the treatment of future curative treatment of diabetes. PMID:25815266

  1. Transplantation and differentiation of donor cells in the cloned pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Shimada, Arata; Tomii, Ryo; Kano, Koichiro; Nagashima, Hiroshi . E-mail: hnagas@isc.meiji.ac.jp

    2006-06-02

    The application of nuclear transfer technology is an interesting approach to investigate stem and progenitor cell transplantation therapy. If stem cells are used as a nuclear donor, donor cells can engraft into cloned animals without histocompatible problems. However, it is still uncertain whether donor cells can engraft to cloned animal and differentiate in vivo. To address this problem, we transplanted donor cells to dermal tissues of cloned pigs developed by using preadipocytes as donor cells. Preadipocytes are adipocytic progenitor which can differentiate to mature adipocytes in vitro. We showed that the donor preadipocytes were successfully transplanted into the cloned pigs without immune rejection and they differentiated into mature adipocytes in vivo 3 weeks after transplantation. In contrast, allogenic control preadipocytes, which can differentiate in vitro, did not differentiate in vivo. These results indicate that donor progenitor cells can differentiate in cloned animal.

  2. Cell transplantation to the auditory nerve and cochlear duct.

    PubMed

    Sekiya, Tetsuji; Kojima, Ken; Matsumoto, Masahiro; Kim, Tae-Soo; Tamura, Tetsuya; Ito, Juichi

    2006-03-01

    We have developed a technique to deliver cells to the inner ear without injuring the membranes that seal the endolymphatic and perilymphatic chambers. The integrity of these membranes is essential for normal hearing, and the technique should significantly reduce surgical trauma during cell transplantation. Embryonic stem cells transplanted at the internal auditory meatal portion of an atrophic auditory nerve migrated extensively along it. Four-five weeks after transplantation, the cells were found not only throughout the auditory nerve, but also in Rosenthal's canal and the scala media, the most distal portion of the auditory nervous system where the hair cells reside. Migration of the transplanted cells was more extensive following damage to the auditory nerve. In the undamaged nerve, migration was more limited, but the cells showed more signs of neuronal differentiation. This highlights an important balance between tissue damage and the potential for repair. PMID:16376874

  3. Persistent Disparities in Adult Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Crockett, David G; Loberiza, Fausto R

    2015-09-01

    The use of large databases has provided advancements in the understanding of racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic disparities in the field of adult hematopoietic cell transplants (HCT). Disparities exist on individual, institutional, and systemic levels for both allogeneic and autologous HCT. We reviewed the most recent publications that utilized large databases to elucidate disparities in HCT and placed them into historical context of the other major studies in the field. Two emerging themes were identified. These themes are persistent inequalities in both allogeneic HCT and autologous HCT for myeloma and the importance of improving homogeneity of care in HCT. Minimization of inequalities can be achieved only with an understanding of the persistent barriers that exist in the field. PMID:26104908

  4. Intensive care outcomes in adult hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas D; Nates, Joseph L

    2016-01-01

    Although outcomes of intensive care for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) have improved in the last two decades, the short-term mortality still remains above 50% among allogeneic HSCT patients. Better selection of HSCT patients for intensive care, and consequently reduction of non-beneficial care, may reduce financial costs and alleviate patient suffering. We reviewed the studies on intensive care outcomes of patients undergoing HSCT published since 2000. The risk factors for intensive care unit (ICU) admission identified in this report were primarily patient and transplant related: HSCT type (autologous vs allogeneic), conditioning intensity, HLA mismatch, and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). At the same time, most of the factors associated with ICU outcomes reported were related to the patients’ functional status upon development of critical illness and interventions in ICU. Among the many possible interventions, the initiation of mechanical ventilation was the most consistently reported factor affecting ICU survival. As a consequence, our current ability to assess the benefit or futility of intensive care is limited. Until better ICU or hospital mortality prediction models are available, based on the available evidence, we recommend practitioners to base their ICU admission decisions on: Patient pre-transplant comorbidities, underlying disease status, GVHD diagnosis/grade, and patients’ functional status at the time of critical illness. PMID:26862493

  5. Renal cell carcinoma in a transplanted kidney: MR imaging findings.

    PubMed

    Leonardou, Polytimi; Semelka, Richard C; Mastropasqua, Maria; Kanematsu, Masayuki; Woosley, John T

    2003-07-01

    We report the MR findings of a 42-year-old man who developed renal cell carcinoma in an allograft kidney, 10 years after transplantation. The lower pole of the transplant kidney showed a solid lesion which was well shown on the post gadolinium fat suppressed images as a heterogeneously enhancing 2 cm mass lesion. PMID:12915202

  6. Paracrine Mechanism of Angiogenesis in Adipose-derived Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Suga, Hirotaka; Glotzbach, Jason P.; Sorkin, Michael; Longaker, Michael T.; Gurtner, Geoffrey C.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) have shown potential for cell-based therapy in the field of plastic surgery. However, the fate of ASCs after transplantation and the mechanism(s) of their biologic capabilities remain unclear. Methods We isolated and cultured ASCs from transgenic mice that express both luciferase and green fluorescent protein (GFP) and injected the cells into the inguinal fat pads of wild-type mice. We tested four experimental groups: ischemic fat pads with/without ASCs and control fat pads with/without ASCs. Results Transplanted ASCs were tracked with bioluminescence imaging. The luminescence gradually decreased over 28 days, indicating cell death after transplantation. More ASCs were retained in ischemic fat pads on day 7 compared to control fat pads. On day 14, adipose tissue vascular density was higher in the ASC transplantation groups compared to those without ASCs. On day 28, there was decreased atrophy of adipose tissue in ASC-treated ischemic fat pads. Transplanted ASCs were detected as non-proliferating GFP+ cells, whereas native endothelial cells adjacent to the transplanted ASCs were proliferative. Protein analysis demonstrated higher expression of hepatocyte growth factor and vascular endothelial growth factor in the ASC transplantation groups, suggesting a paracrine mechanism, which was confirmed by in vitro experiments with conditioned media from ASCs. Conclusions Transplanted ASCs are preferentially retained in ischemic adipose tissue, although most of the cells eventually undergo cell death. They exert an angiogenic effect on adipose tissue mainly through a paracrine mechanism. Increased understanding of these effects will help develop ASCs as a tool for cell-based therapy. PMID:23636112

  7. Cell Delivery: From Cell Transplantation to Organ Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Gutierrez, Alejandro; Yagi, Hiroshi; Uygun, Basak E.; Navarro-Alvarez, Nalu; Uygun, Korkut; Kobayashi, Naoya; Yang, Yong-Guang; Yarmush, Martin L.

    2010-01-01

    Cell populations derived from adult tissue and stem cells possess a great expectation for the treatment of several diseases. Great efforts have been made to generate cells with therapeutic impact from stem cells. However, it is clear that the development of systems to deliver such cells to induce efficient engraftment, growth and function is a real necessity. Biologic and artificial scaffolds have received significant attention for their potential therapeutic application when use to form tissues in vitro and facilitate engraftment in vivo. Ultimately more sophisticated methods for decellularization of organs have been successfully used in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. These decellularized tissues and organs appear to provide bioactive molecules, and bioinductive properties to induce homing, differentiation and proliferation of cells. The combination of decellularized organs and stem cells may dramatically improve the survival, engraftment, and fate control of transplanted stem cells and their ultimate clinical utility opening the doors to a new era of organ engineering. PMID:20525441

  8. Post-transplant T-cell type lymphoproliferative disorder.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Zubair; Ahsan, Aamir; Sheikh, Usman; Minhas, Khurram

    2007-12-01

    Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder (PTLD) is a lymphoma, which develops as a result of immunosuppression in a recipient of a solid organ or bone marrow allograft. Majority are associated with Ebstein-Barr Virus (EBV) infection, are mostly B-cell type and less often T-cell type. We report a case of T-cell PTLD, occurring in a renal transplant recipient. PMID:18182148

  9. Autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mediastinal extramedullary plasmocytoma.

    PubMed

    Abdelkefi, Abderrahmene; Ben Othman, Tarek; Torjman, Lamia; Ladeb, Saloua; Ben Ghorbel, Imed; Lakhal, Amed; Ben Amor, Ramzi; Miled, Mohamed; Kchir, Mohamed-Nidhameddine; Ben Abdeladhim, Abdeladhim

    2003-07-01

    Extramedullary plasmocytoma (EMP) is a rare cell neoplasm most frequently localised in the upper respiratory tract. We report the case of a 43 year-old-man, with an unusual presentation of EMP developing in the mediastinum, two years after a diagnosis of solitary plasmocytoma of the bone which was successfully treated by local irradiation. In this aggressive presentation, we decided to perform an autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Two months after transplantation, CT scan showed disappearance of the mediastinal mass and immunofixation of the serum was normal. Selected cases of diffuse EMP, could benefit from intensive treatment followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:14534964

  10. Physical and mental recovery after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Syrjala, Karen L; Langer, Shelby; Abrams, Janet; Storer, Barry; Martin, Paul

    2004-10-01

    Extract: Hematologic malignancies such as leukemia and lymphoma can be treated with high-dose chemotherapy and irradiation, but in many cases, the amount of treatment needed to eliminate malignant cells also destroys normal blood-forming cells in the bone marrow. During the past 35 years, this problem has been solved by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). With this strategy, normal marrow function can be restored by the transplanted blood-forming stem cells that are infused like a blood transfusion after high-dose chemotherapy. In allogeneic transplantation, the stem cells come from a healthy donor. In autologous transplantation, the cells are taken from the patient and frozen until they are infused after high-dose treatment has been completed. Along with killing malignant and non-malignant immune cells, the treatment given before HCT also kills other rapidly dividing healthy cells, often causing hair loss, mouth sores and sometimes other organ problems. The immune suppression caused by treatment leaves a patient vulnerable to viruses and bacterial infections. After transplantation, immune reconstitution and resolution of acute complications usually begin within two weeks, but other complications, such as graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) can continue for years. GVHD occurs when the transplanted allogeneic cells attack (attempt to reject) the host body. PMID:20704957

  11. [Monomorphic post-transplant T-lymphoproliferative disorder after autologous stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma].

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Tetsuya; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Takei, Toshifumi; Koya, Hiroko; Iriuchishima, Hirono; Hosiho, Takumi; Hirato, Junko; Kojima, Masaru; Handa, Hiroshi; Nojima, Yoshihisa; Murakami, Hirokazu

    2016-01-01

    We report a rare case of T cell type monomorphic post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLD) after autologous stem cell transplantation. A 53-year-old man with multiple myeloma received autologous stem cell transplantation and achieved a very good partial response. Nine months later, he developed a high fever and consciousness disturbance, and had multiple swollen lymph nodes and a high titer of Epstein-Barr (EB) virus DNA in his peripheral blood. Neither CT nor MRI of the brain revealed any abnormalities. Cerebrospinal fluid contained no malignant cells, but the EB virus DNA titer was high. Lymph node biopsy revealed T cell type monomorphic PTLD. Soon after high-dose treatment with methotrexate and cytosine arabinoside, the high fever and consciousness disturbance subsided, and the lymph node swelling and EB virus DNA disappeared. Given the efficacy of chemotherapy in this case, we concluded that the consciousness disturbance had been induced by central nervous system involvement of monomorphic PTLD. PMID:26861102

  12. [Introduction and prospect of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Y

    1995-12-01

    The number of hematopoietic stem cells circulating in peripheral blood increases remarkably during the recovery of marrow function after myelosuppressive chemotherapy. In peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, these stem cells are collected and cryopreserved, and then used to restore marrow function after myelodisruptive (high-dose) anticancer therapy, Marrow recovery is faster with this procedure than with autologous bone marrow transplantation. Recently, this procedure has been used after high-dose chemotherapy for chemosensitive solid tumors such as breast cancer. We used high-dose chemotherapy with etoposide and carboplatin, followed by peripheral blood stem cell transplantation, to treat 5 patients with intrathoracic malignant tumors, including small cell lung cancer Neutrophils recovered (> 500 microliters) with 9 to 11 days and platelets recovered (> 5,000 microliters) within 8 to 13 days after the transplantation. No other serious complication was seen. Current topics regarding this procedure, problems to be solved, and prospects for further development are discussed. PMID:8752478

  13. Promoting transplantation tolerance; adoptive regulatory T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Safinia, N; Leech, J; Hernandez-Fuentes, M; Lechler, R; Lombardi, G

    2013-01-01

    Transplantation is a successful treatment for end-stage organ failure. Despite improvements in short-term outcome, long-term survival remains suboptimal because of the morbidity and mortality associated with long-term use of immunosuppression. There is, therefore, a pressing need to devise protocols that induce tolerance in order to minimize or completely withdraw immunosuppression in transplant recipients. In this review we will discuss how regulatory T cells (Tregs) came to be recognized as an attractive way to promote transplantation tolerance. We will summarize the preclinical data, supporting the importance of these cells in the induction and maintenance of immune tolerance and that provide the rationale for the isolation and expansion of these cells for cellular therapy. We will also describe the data from the first clinical trials, using Tregs to inhibit graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation and will address both the challenges and opportunities in human Treg cell therapy. PMID:23574313

  14. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Myelodysplastic Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj; Steensma, David P

    2016-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) offers the only potential cure for patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, with current approaches to HCT, many older patients with comorbidities are poor HCT candidates, and treatment-related morbidity and mortality may offset benefit for patients with lower-risk disease. Consequently, selection of patients with MDS for HCT should take into consideration disease risk category including mutational status, HCT comorbidity index, functional status, donor options, and available institutional resources. Formal geriatric assessment may further guide use of HCT and, if HCT is chosen, selection of conditioning intensity. Patients with higher-risk MDS should be considered for HCT at the time of diagnosis, whereas expectant nontransplant management is more appropriate for those with lower-risk disease. A high blast burden at the time of HCT increases the risk of subsequent relapse; however, the role of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy and the regimen of choice remain controversial. Patients with MDS younger than 65 years and with an HCT comorbidity index ≤ 4 may benefit from more intense conditioning regimens. The presence of complex or monosomal karyotype or mutations in TP53, DNMT3A, or other genes identify patients with poorer outcomes following HCT. Patients with TP53 mutations have particularly poor survival, and should be enrolled in clinical trials whenever possible. Several important HCT studies are ongoing and will better define the role of HCT in MDS as well as the value of pretransplant cytoreductive therapy or post-transplant relapse-prevention strategies. Given the apparent underuse of HCT in eligible patients and low enrollment in MDS HCT clinical trials to date, timely referral of patients with MDS to such trials and HCT programs is critical. PMID:27621329

  15. Secondary solid cancer screening following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Inamoto, Y; Shah, NN; Savani, BN; Shaw, BE; Abraham, AA; Ahmed, IA; Akpek, G; Atsuta, Y; Baker, KS; Basak, GW; Bitan, M; DeFilipp, Z; Gregory, TK; Greinix, HT; Hamadani, M; Hamilton, BK; Hayashi, RJ; Jacobsohn, DA; Kamble, RT; Kasow, KA; Khera, N; Lazarus, HM; Malone, AK; Lupo-Stanghellini, MT; Margossian, SP; Muffly, LS; Norkin, M; Ramanathan, M; Salooja, N; Schoemans, H; Wingard, JR; Wirk, B; Wood, WA; Yong, A; Duncan, CN; Flowers, MED; Majhail, NS

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HCT) recipients have a substantial risk of developing secondary solid cancers, particularly beyond 5 years after HCT and without reaching a plateau overtime. A working group was established through the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research and the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation with the goal to facilitate implementation of cancer screening appropriate to HCT recipients. The working group reviewed guidelines and methods for cancer screening applicable to the general population and reviewed the incidence and risk factors for secondary cancers after HCT. A consensus approach was used to establish recommendations for individual secondary cancers. The most common sites include oral cavity, skin, breast and thyroid. Risks of cancers are increased after HCT compared with the general population in skin, thyroid, oral cavity, esophagus, liver, nervous system, bone and connective tissues. Myeloablative TBI, young age at HCT, chronic GVHD and prolonged immunosuppressive treatment beyond 24 months were well-documented risk factors for many types of secondary cancers. All HCT recipients should be advised of the risks of secondary cancers annually and encouraged to undergo recommended screening based on their predisposition. Here we propose guidelines to help clinicians in providing screening and preventive care for secondary cancers among HCT recipients. PMID:25822223

  16. Prenatal transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells to treat osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jerry K. Y.; Götherström, Cecilia

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) can be a severe disorder that can be diagnosed before birth. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) has the potential to improve the bone structure, growth, and fracture healing. In this review, we give an introduction to OI and MSC, and the basis for pre- and postnatal transplantation in OI. We also summarize the two patients with OI who have received pre- and postnatal transplantation of MSC. The findings suggest that prenatal transplantation of allogeneic MSC in OI is safe. The cell therapy is of likely clinical benefit with improved linear growth, mobility, and reduced fracture incidence. Unfortunately, the effect is transient. For this reason, postnatal booster infusions using same-donor MSC have been performed with clinical benefit, and without any adverse events. So far there is limited experience in this specific field and proper studies are required to accurately conclude on clinical benefits of MSC transplantation to treat OI. PMID:25346689

  17. A Calpain Inhibitor Enhances the Survival of Schwann Cells In Vitro and after Transplantation into the Injured Spinal Cord

    PubMed Central

    Guller, Yelena; Raffa, Scott J.; Hurtado, Andres; Bunge, Mary Bartlett

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Despite the diversity of cells available for transplantation into sites of spinal cord injury (SCI), and the known ability of transplanted cells to integrate into host tissue, functional improvement associated with cellular transplantation has been limited. One factor potentially limiting the efficacy of transplanted cells is poor cell survival. Recently we demonstrated rapid and early death of Schwann cells (SCs) within the first 24 h after transplantation, by both necrosis and apoptosis, which results in fewer than 20% of the cells surviving beyond 1 week. To enhance SC transplant survival, in vitro and in vivo models to rapidly screen compounds for their ability to promote SC survival are needed. The current study utilized in vitro models of apoptosis and necrosis, and based on withdrawal of serum and mitogens and the application of hydrogen peroxide, we screened several inhibitors of apoptosis and necrosis. Of the compounds tested, the calpain inhibitor MDL28170 enhanced SC survival both in vitro in response to oxidative stress induced by application of H2O2, and in vivo following delayed transplantation into the moderately contused spinal cord. The results support the use of calpain inhibitors as a promising new treatment for promoting the survival of transplanted cells. They also suggest that in vitro assays for cell survival may be useful for establishing new compounds that can then be tested in vivo for their ability to promote transplanted SC survival. PMID:20568964

  18. Hemophagocytic syndrome following haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell transplantation with post-transplant cyclophosphamide.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Sarita Rani; Chakrabarti, Aditi; Chatterjee, Sumita; Bhargava, Sneh; Ray, Kunal; Chakrabarti, Suparno

    2016-02-01

    Hemophagocytic syndrome (HPS) is a rare but serious complication after allogeneic transplantation which has been reported to be particularly high after unrelated cord blood transplantation. We report on the incidence, risk factors and outcome of HPS in 51 patients (age 2-64 years) after haploidentical peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCY). The incidence of HPS was 12.2 %, occurring at a median of 18 days. The non-relapse mortality in patients with HPS was 83.3 % compared to 11.6 % in patients without HPS. Complete donor chimerism was documented in all patients with HPS. Definite infective etiology was identified in two patients only. The others were refractory to multiple lines of treatment and 3 patients underwent a second transplant. Even though the symptoms and biochemical markers of HPS showed prompt response in 2/3 patients undergoing a second allograft, they succumbed to infections before haematological recovery. The others succumbed to multi-organ failure or infections. Age < 10 years, transplantation for non-malignant disease and high CD34 content of the graft were identified as risk factors for HPS. Considering the fact that post-transplant HPS is usually a refractory and fatal condition, we discuss further attempts at deciphering the pathogenesis, developing modalities to prevent this complication and improve the outcome. PMID:26619832

  19. Transplantation of neural progenitor cells in chronic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Jin, Y; Bouyer, J; Shumsky, J S; Haas, C; Fischer, I

    2016-04-21

    Previous studies demonstrated that neural progenitor cells (NPCs) transplanted into a subacute contusion injury improve motor, sensory, and bladder function. In this study we tested whether transplanted NPCs can also improve functional recovery after chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) alone or in combination with the reduction of glial scar and neurotrophic support. Adult rats received a T10 moderate contusion. Thirteen weeks after the injury they were divided into four groups and received either: 1. Medium (control), 2. NPC transplants, 3. NPC+lentivirus vector expressing chondroitinase, or 4. NPC+lentivirus vectors expressing chondroitinase and neurotrophic factors. During the 8weeks post-transplantation the animals were tested for functional recovery and eventually analyzed by anatomical and immunohistochemical assays. The behavioral tests for motor and sensory function were performed before and after injury, and weekly after transplantation, with some animals also tested for bladder function at the end of the experiment. Transplant survival in the chronic injury model was variable and showed NPCs at the injury site in 60% of the animals in all transplantation groups. The NPC transplants comprised less than 40% of the injury site, without significant anatomical or histological differences among the groups. All groups also showed similar patterns of functional deficits and recovery in the 12weeks after injury and in the 8weeks after transplantation using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan rating score, the grid test, and the Von Frey test for mechanical allodynia. A notable exception was group 4 (NPC together with chondroitinase and neurotrophins), which showed a significant improvement in bladder function. This study underscores the therapeutic challenges facing transplantation strategies in a chronic SCI in which even the inclusion of treatments designed to reduce scarring and increase neurotrophic support produce only modest functional improvements. Further

  20. National Survey of Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Center Personnel, Infrastructure and Models of Care Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Majhail, Navneet S.; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Payton, Tammy; Eckrich, Michael; Joffe, Steven; Lee, Stephanie J.; LeMaistre, Charles F.; LeRademacher, Jennifer; Loberiza, Fausto; Logan, Brent; Parsons, Susan K.; Repaczki-Jones, Ramona; Robinett, Pam; Rizzo, J Douglas; Murphy, Elizabeth; Denzen, Ellen M.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a complex procedure that requires availability of adequate infrastructure, personnel and resources at transplant centers. We conducted a national survey of transplant centers in the United States to obtain data on their personnel, infrastructure and care delivery models. A 42-item web-based survey was administered to medical directors of transplant centers in the US that reported any allogeneic HCT to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) in 2011. The response rate for the survey was 79% for adult programs (85/108 centers) and 82% for pediatric programs (54/66 centers). For describing results, we categorized centers into groups with similar volumes based on 2010 total HCT activity (adult centers 9 categories, pediatric centers 6 categories). We observed considerable variation in available resources, infrastructure, personnel and care delivery models among adult and pediatric transplant centers. Characteristics varied substantially among centers with comparable transplant volumes. Transplant centers may find these data helpful in assessing their present capacity and use them to evaluate potential resource needs for personnel, infrastructure and care delivery and in planning for growth. PMID:25840337

  1. National Survey of Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Center Personnel, Infrastructure, and Models of Care Delivery.

    PubMed

    Majhail, Navneet S; Mau, Lih-Wen; Chitphakdithai, Pintip; Payton, Tammy; Eckrich, Michael; Joffe, Steven; Lee, Stephanie J; LeMaistre, Charles F; LeRademacher, Jennifer; Loberiza, Fausto; Logan, Brent; Parsons, Susan K; Repaczki-Jones, Ramona; Robinett, Pam; Rizzo, J Douglas; Murphy, Elizabeth; Denzen, Ellen M

    2015-07-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a complex procedure that requires availability of adequate infrastructure, personnel, and resources at transplantation centers. We conducted a national survey of transplantation centers in the United States to obtain data on their personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery models. A 42-item web-based survey was administered to medical directors of transplantation centers in the United States that reported any allogeneic HCT to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research in 2011. The response rate for the survey was 79% for adult programs (85 of 108 centers) and 82% for pediatric programs (54 of 66 centers). For describing results, we categorized centers into groups with similar volumes based on 2010 total HCT activity (adult centers, 9 categories; pediatric centers, 6 categories). We observed considerable variation in available resources, infrastructure, personnel, and care delivery models among adult and pediatric transplantation centers. Characteristics varied substantially among centers with comparable transplantation volumes. Transplantation centers may find these data helpful in assessing their present capacity and use them to evaluate potential resource needs for personnel, infrastructure, and care delivery and in planning for growth. PMID:25840337

  2. Stem Cell Transplantation for Pulpal Regeneration: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Fawzy El-Sayed, Karim M; Jakusz, Kimberley; Jochens, Arne; Dörfer, Christof; Schwendicke, Falk

    2015-10-01

    For treating pulpal pathological conditions, pulpal regeneration through transplanted stem/progenitor cells might be an alternative to conventional root canal treatment. A number of animal studies demonstrated beneficial effects of stem/progenitor cell transplantation for pulp-dentin complex regeneration, that is, pulpal tissue, neural, vascular, and dentinal regeneration. We systematically reviewed animal studies investigating stem/progenitor cell-mediated pulp-dentin complex regeneration. Studies quantitatively comparing pulp-dentin complex regeneration after transplantation of stem/progenitor cells versus no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls in intraoral in vivo teeth animal models were analyzed. The following outcomes were investigated: regenerated pulp area per root canal total area, capillaries per total surface, regenerated dentinal area per total defect area, and nerves per total surface. PubMed and EMBASE were screened for studies published until July 2014. Cross-referencing and hand searching were used to identify further articles. Standardized mean differences (SMD) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using random-effects meta-analysis. To assess possible bias, SYRCLE's risk of bias tool for animal studies was used. From 1364 screened articles, five studies (representing 64 animals) were included in the quantitative analysis. Risk of bias of all studies was high. Stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps showed significantly larger regenerated pulp area per root canal total area (SMD [95% CI]: 2.28 [0.35-4.21]) and regenerated dentin area per root canal total area (SMD: 6.91 [5.39-8.43]) compared with no stem/progenitor cell transplantation controls. Only one study reported on capillaries per or nerves per total surface and found both significantly increased in stem/progenitor cell-transplanted pulps compared with controls. Stem/progenitor cell transplantation seems to enhance pulp-dentin complex regeneration in animal models

  3. Double Stem Cell Transplant May Help Fight a Childhood Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... treatments might give survival edge to kids with neuroblastoma, researcher says To use the sharing features on ... The double stem cell transplant allows children with neuroblastoma to withstand two rounds of chemotherapy rather than ...

  4. Tolerogenic dendritic cells and their applications in transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Haibin; Shi, Bingyi

    2015-01-01

    In transplantation immunology, the ultimate goal is always to successfully and specifically induce immune tolerance of allografts. Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tol-DCs) with immunoregulatory functions have attracted much attention as they play important roles in inducing and maintaining immune tolerance. Here, we focused on tol-DCs that have the potential to promote immune tolerance after solid-organ transplantation. We focus on their development and interactions with other regulatory cells, and we also explore various tol-DC engineering protocols. Harnessing tol-DCs represents a promising cellular therapy for promoting long-term graft functional survival in transplant recipients that will most likely be achieved in the future. PMID:25109681

  5. Notch signaling in hematopoietic cell transplantation and T cell alloimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ebens, Christen; Maillard, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling can regulate both hematopoietic progenitors and alloimmune T cells in the setting of allogeneic bone marrow or hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT). Ex vivo culture of multipotent blood progenitors with immobilized Delta-like ligands induces supraphysiological Notch signals and can markedly enhance progenitor expansion. Infusion of Notch-expanded progenitors shortened myelosuppression in preclinical and early clinical studies, while accelerating T cell reconstitution in preclinical models. Notch also plays an essential role in vivo to regulate pathogenic alloimmune T cells that mediate graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), the most severe complication of allo-HCT. In mouse allo-HCT models, Notch inhibition in donor-derived T cells or transient blockade of Delta-like ligands after transplantation profoundly decreased GVHD incidence and severity, without causing global immunosuppression. These findings identify Notch in T cells as an attractive therapeutic target to control GVHD. In this review, we discuss these contrasting functions of Notch signaling with high translational significance in allo-HCT patients. PMID:24050990

  6. Immunological considerations in in utero hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT)

    PubMed Central

    Loewendorf, Andrea I.; Csete, Marie; Flake, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT) is an attractive approach and a potentially curative surgery for several congenital hematopoietic diseases. In practice, this application has succeeded only in the context of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders. Here, we review potential immunological hurdles for the long-term establishment of chimerism and discuss relevant models and findings from both postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and IUHCT. PMID:25610396

  7. Immunological considerations in in utero hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT).

    PubMed

    Loewendorf, Andrea I; Csete, Marie; Flake, Alan

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (IUHCT) is an attractive approach and a potentially curative surgery for several congenital hematopoietic diseases. In practice, this application has succeeded only in the context of Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Disorders. Here, we review potential immunological hurdles for the long-term establishment of chimerism and discuss relevant models and findings from both postnatal hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and IUHCT. PMID:25610396

  8. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Halter, Joerg P; Michael, W; Schüpbach, M; Mandel, Hanna; Casali, Carlo; Orchard, Kim; Collin, Matthew; Valcarcel, David; Rovelli, Attilio; Filosto, Massimiliano; Dotti, Maria T; Marotta, Giuseppe; Pintos, Guillem; Barba, Pere; Accarino, Anna; Ferra, Christelle; Illa, Isabel; Beguin, Yves; Bakker, Jaap A; Boelens, Jaap J; de Coo, Irenaeus F M; Fay, Keith; Sue, Carolyn M; Nachbaur, David; Zoller, Heinz; Sobreira, Claudia; Pinto Simoes, Belinda; Hammans, Simon R; Savage, David; Martí, Ramon; Chinnery, Patrick F; Elhasid, Ronit; Gratwohl, Alois; Hirano, Michio

    2015-10-01

    Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been proposed as treatment for mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy, a rare fatal autosomal recessive disease due to TYMP mutations that result in thymidine phosphorylase deficiency. We conducted a retrospective analysis of all known patients suffering from mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy who underwent allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation between 2005 and 2011. Twenty-four patients, 11 males and 13 females, median age 25 years (range 10-41 years) treated with haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from related (n = 9) or unrelated donors (n = 15) in 15 institutions worldwide were analysed for outcome and its associated factors. Overall, 9 of 24 patients (37.5%) were alive at last follow-up with a median follow-up of these surviving patients of 1430 days. Deaths were attributed to transplant in nine (including two after a second transplant due to graft failure), and to mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in six patients. Thymidine phosphorylase activity rose from undetectable to normal levels (median 697 nmol/h/mg protein, range 262-1285) in all survivors. Seven patients (29%) who were engrafted and living more than 2 years after transplantation, showed improvement of body mass index, gastrointestinal manifestations, and peripheral neuropathy. Univariate statistical analysis demonstrated that survival was associated with two defined pre-transplant characteristics: human leukocyte antigen match (10/10 versus <10/10) and disease characteristics (liver disease, history of gastrointestinal pseudo-obstruction or both). Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation can restore thymidine phosphorylase enzyme function in patients with mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy and improve clinical manifestations of mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy in the long term. Allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation

  9. Stem Cell Transplantation for Neuroprotection in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Shinozuka, Kazutaka; Dailey, Travis; Tajiri, Naoki; Ishikawa, Hiroto; Kaneko, Yuji; Borlongan, Cesar V.

    2013-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapies for stroke have expanded substantially over the last decade. The diversity of embryonic and adult tissue sources provides researchers with the ability to harvest an ample supply of stem cells. However, the optimal conditions of stem cell use are still being determined. Along this line of the need for optimization studies, we discuss studies that demonstrate effective dose, timing, and route of stem cells. We recognize that stem cell derivations also provide uniquely individual difficulties and limitations in their therapeutic applications. This review will outline the current knowledge, including benefits and challenges, of the many current sources of stem cells for stroke therapy. PMID:24147217

  10. [Regeneration of the retina using pigment epithelial cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshiaki

    2002-12-01

    At has been reported that transplantation of appropriate cells, growth factors, and/or extracellular matrix may help the regeneration of damaged tissues or organs. Some growth factors, such as basic fibroblast growth factor(bFGF), have been successfully transferred to patients with ischemic heart disease. Embryonic dopamine neurons were also transplanted into the brains of patients with Parkinson's disease successfully. We have also performed cultured auto iris pigment epithelial cell (IPE) transplantation into the subretinal space after removal of choroidal neovascularization in patients with age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Here, we report the results of auto IPE transplantation in 35 patients, who could be followed for more than 6 months. We also tried to apply cell transplantation to other retinal diseases by managing the transplanted cells as introduced growth factor genes. Auto IPE transplantation was performed after removal of choroidal neovascular membranes (CNV). Visual acuity wes improved by more than 0.2 log MAR in 18 of 35 patients (51.5%), it was unchanged in 11 patients (31.5%), and it was worsened in 6 patients (17%). No significant difference was observed in comparison to patients who underwent CNV removal only. However, unlike the previous reports, we found no patients showing rejection. We also found that the cultured transplanted cells never showed proliferation under the retina or in the vitreous cavity and concluded that cultured auto IPE transplantation can be performed safely without complications. Next, we examined whether cell transplantation can be expanded to other degenerative retinal diseases. One of our results showed that host RPE may play an important role against the transplanted cells in the subretinal regions. When we introduced bFGF gene into the cells, we found synexpression cluster of the genes in the cells. One of the most prominent movements among the genes was lysyl oxidase like-1 gene, which plays an important role

  11. Stem cell transplantation and mesenchymal cells to treat autoimmune diseases.

    PubMed

    Tyndall, Alan; van Laar, Jacob M

    2016-06-01

    Since the start of the international stem cell transplantation project in 1997, over 2000 patients have received a haematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT), mostly autologous, as treatment for a severe autoimmune disease, the majority being multiple sclerosis (MS), systemic sclerosis (SSc) and Crohn's disease. There was an overall 85% 5-year survival and 43% progression-free survival. Around 30% of patients in all disease subgroups had a complete response, often durable despite full immune reconstitution. In many cases, e.g. systemic sclerosis, morphological improvement such as reduction of skin collagen and normalization of microvasculature was documented, beyond any predicted known effects of intense immunosuppression alone. It is hoped that the results of the three running large prospective randomized controlled trials will allow modification of the protocols to reduce the high transplant-related mortality which relates to regimen intensity, age of patient, and comorbidity. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC), often incorrectly called stem cells, have been the intense focus of in vitro studies and animal models of rheumatic and other diseases over more than a decade. Despite multiple plausible mechanisms of action and a plethora of positive in vivo animal studies, few randomised controlled clinical trials have demonstrated meaningful clinical benefit in any condition so far. This could be due to confusion in cell product terminology, complexity of clinical study design and execution or agreement on meaningful outcome measures. Within the rheumatic diseases, SLE and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) have received most attention. Uncontrolled multiple trial data from over 300 SLE patients have been published from one centre suggesting a positive outcome; one single centre comparative study in 172 RA was positive. In addition, small numbers of patients with Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, primary Sjögren's disease, polymyositis/dermatomyositis and type II diabetes

  12. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation promotes adult neurogenesis in the brains of Alzheimer's disease mice

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yufang; Ma, Tuo; Gong, Kai; Ao, Qiang; Zhang, Xiufang; Gong, Yandao

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we transplanted adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells into the hippocampi of APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease model mice. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that the number of newly generated (BrdU+) cells in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus was significantly higher in Alzheimer's disease mice after adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation, and there was also a significant increase in the number of BrdU+/DCX+ neuroblasts in these animals. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhanced neurogenic activity in the subventricular zone as well. Furthermore, adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation reduced oxidative stress and alleviated cognitive impairment in the mice. Based on these findings, we propose that adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation enhances endogenous neurogenesis in both the subgranular and subventricular zones in APP/PS1 transgenic Alzheimer's disease mice, thereby facilitating functional recovery. PMID:25206892

  13. The role of stem cell transplantation for chronic myelogenous leukemia in the 21st century

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Sawa

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), a treatment of chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), has largely replaced curative strategies based on allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Nevertheless, SCT still remains an option for accelerated/blastic-phase and selected chronic-phase CML. Transplant outcomes can be optimized by peritransplant TKIs, conditioning regimen, BCR-ABL monitoring, and relapse management. Controversies exist in transplant timing, pediatric CML, alternative donors, and economics. SCT continues to serve as a platform of “operational cure” for CML with TKIs and immunotherapies. PMID:25852053

  14. Co-transplantation of syngeneic mesenchymal stem cells improves survival of allogeneic glial-restricted precursors in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Amit K; Bulte, Camille A; Shats, Irina; Walczak, Piotr; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of functional cells from immunorejection during the early post-transplantation period is an important factor that reduces the efficacy of stem cell-based therapies. Recent studies have shown that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can exert therapeutic effects by secreting anti-inflammatory and pro-survival trophic factors. We investigated whether co-transplantation of MSCs could improve the survival of other transplanted therapeutic cells. Allogeneic glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) were isolated from the brain of a firefly luciferase transgenic FVB mouse (at E13.5 stage) and intracerebrally transplanted, either alone, or together with syngeneic MSCs in immunocompetent BALB/c mice (n=20) or immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice as survival control (n=8). No immunosuppressive drug was given to any animal. Using bioluminescence imaging (BLI) as a non-invasive readout of cell survival, we found that co-transplantation of MSCs significantly improved (p<0.05) engrafted GRP survival. No significant change in signal intensities was observed in immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice, with transplanted cells surviving in both the GRP only and the GRP+MSC group. In contrast, on day 21 post-transplantation, we observed a 94.2% decrease in BLI signal intensity in immunocompetent mice transplanted with GRPs alone versus 68.1% in immunocompetent mice co-transplanted with MSCs and GRPs (p<0.05). Immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated a lower number of infiltrating CD45, CD11b(+) and CD8(+) cells, reduced astrogliosis, and a higher number of FoxP3(+) cells at the site of transplantation for the immunocompetent mice receiving MSCs. The present study demonstrates that co-transplantation of MSCs can be used to create a microenvironment that is more conducive to the survival of allogeneic GRPs. PMID:26515691

  15. Intraspinal transplantation of mouse and human neural precursor cells

    PubMed Central

    Weinger, Jason G.; Chen, Lu; Coleman, Ronald; Leang, Ronika; Plaisted, Warren C.; Loring, Jeanne F.; Lane, Thomas E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the preparation and transplantation of human neural precursor cells (hNPCs) and mouse neural precursor cells (mNPCs) into the thoracic region of the mouse spinal cord. The techniques in this unit also describe how to prepare the mouse for surgery by performing a laminectomy to expose the spinal cord for transplantation. Here we show NPCs genetically labeled with eGFP transplanted into the spinal cord of a mouse following viralmediated demyelination can efficiently be detected via eGFP expression. Transplantation of these cells into the spinal cord is an efficacious way to determine their effects in neurological disorders such as multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, and spinal cord injury. PMID:24510791

  16. Transplantation of Reprogrammed Embryonic Stem Cells Improves Visual Function in a Mouse Model for Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Nan-Kai; Tosi, Joaquin; Kasanuki, Jennifer Mie; Chou, Chai Lin; Kong, Jian; Parmalee, Nancy; Wert, Katherine J.; Allikmets, Rando; Lai, Chi-Chun; Chien, Chung-Liang; Nagasaki, Takayuki; Lin, Chyuan-Sheng; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2010-01-01

    Background To study whether C57BL/6J-Tyrc−2j/J (C2J) mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can differentiate into retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells in vitro and then restore retinal function in a model for retinitis pigmentosa: Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 C57BL6 mice. Methods Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-labeled C2J ES cells were induced to differentiate into RPE-like structures on PA6 feeders. RPE-specific markers are expressed from differentiated cells in vitro. After differentiation, ES cell-derived RPE-like cells were transplanted into the subretinal space of postnatal day 5 Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 mice. Live imaging of YFP-labeled C2J ES cells demonstrated survival of the graft. Electroretinograms (ERGs) were performed on transplanted mice to evaluate the functional outcome of transplantation. Results RPE-like cells derived from ES cells sequentially express multiple RPE-specific markers. After transplantation, YFP-labeled cells can be tracked with live imaging for as long as 7 months. Although more than half of the mice were complicated with retinal detachments or tumor development, one fourth of the mice showed increased electroretinogram responses in the transplanted eyes. Rpe65rd12/Rpe65rd12 mice transplanted with RPE-like cells showed significant visual recovery during a 7-month period, whereas those injected with saline, PA6 feeders, or undifferentiated ES cells showed no rescue. Conclusions ES cells can differentiate, morphologically, and functionally, into RPE-like cells. Based on these findings, differentiated ES cells have the potential for the development of new therapeutic approaches for RPE-specific diseases such as certain forms of retinitis pigmentosa and macular degeneration. Nevertheless, stringent control of retinal detachment and teratoma development will be necessary before initiation of treatment trials. PMID:20164818

  17. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis

    PubMed Central

    Fasth, Anders L.; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M.; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M.; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K.; Kapoor, Neena; O’Brien, Tracey A.; Perez, Miguel A. Diaz; Veys, Paul A.; Eapen, Mary

    2015-01-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  18. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis.

    PubMed

    Orchard, Paul J; Fasth, Anders L; Le Rademacher, Jennifer; He, Wensheng; Boelens, Jaap Jan; Horwitz, Edwin M; Al-Seraihy, Amal; Ayas, Mouhab; Bonfim, Carmem M; Boulad, Farid; Lund, Troy; Buchbinder, David K; Kapoor, Neena; O'Brien, Tracey A; Perez, Miguel A Diaz; Veys, Paul A; Eapen, Mary

    2015-07-01

    We report the international experience in outcomes after related and unrelated hematopoietic transplantation for infantile osteopetrosis in 193 patients. Thirty-four percent of transplants used grafts from HLA-matched siblings, 13% from HLA-mismatched relatives, 12% from HLA-matched, and 41% from HLA-mismatched unrelated donors. The median age at transplantation was 12 months. Busulfan and cyclophosphamide was the most common conditioning regimen. Long-term survival was higher after HLA-matched sibling compared to alternative donor transplantation. There were no differences in survival after HLA-mismatched related, HLA-matched unrelated, or mismatched unrelated donor transplantation. The 5- and 10-year probabilities of survival were 62% and 62% after HLA-matched sibling and 42% and 39% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .01 and P = .002, respectively). Graft failure was the most common cause of death, accounting for 50% of deaths after HLA-matched sibling and 43% of deaths after alternative donor transplantation. The day-28 incidence of neutrophil recovery was 66% after HLA-matched sibling and 61% after alternative donor transplantation (P = .49). The median age of surviving patients is 7 years. Of evaluable surviving patients, 70% are visually impaired; 10% have impaired hearing and gross motor delay. Nevertheless, 65% reported performance scores of 90 or 100, and in 17%, a score of 80 at last contact. Most survivors >5 years are attending mainstream or specialized schools. Rates of veno-occlusive disease and interstitial pneumonitis were high at 20%. Though allogeneic transplantation results in long-term survival with acceptable social function, strategies to lower graft failure and hepatic and pulmonary toxicity are urgently needed. PMID:26012570

  19. Stem cell transplant: An experience from eastern India

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Gupta, P.; Basak, J.; Chakraborty, A.; Bhattacharyya, D.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Roy, U. K.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Hematopoietic stem cell transplant using human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched sibling or unrelated bone marrow, or related or unrelated cord blood has been performed successfully to treat patients with different types of hematological malignancies, genetic disorders and hereditary immune deficiencies. Since 1983, stem cell transplantation has been carried out in different institutes of India. But, till then, no transplantation was performed in eastern India. Materials and Methods: Our present study is reporting for the first time stem cell transplantation in eastern India. From August 2000 to June 2011 (with a 3-year gap for up-gradation), we have performed a total of 22 transplants. Thirteen patients (M:F:9:4) with indications of aplastic anemia, thalassaemia, acute myeloid leukemia and chronic myeloid leukemia underwent allogenic transplant, whereas autologous transplant was performed for nine patients (M:F:2:1) of multiple myeloma, Hodgkin's and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and neuroblastoma. The median age of the patients was 19.6 years, with a range of 5 years 8 months to 52 years. Fourteen patients received myeloablative conditioning regime whereas eight patients received immunosuppressive and less myeloablative protocol. Sources of stem cells in case of allogenic transplant are bone marrow and related or unrelated umbilical cord blood and in case of autologous transplant, these are peripheral blood stem cells or self-bone marrow. Standard prophylactic medication was followed prior to transplants. Results: A disease-free survival of 68.18% and overall survival of 86.3% were seen at the median follow-up period of 4.6 years. Common post-transplant complications were mucositis, infection, venoocclusive disease, graft versus host disease, hemorrhagic cystitis, etc. Conclusion: The use of cord blood as a source of stem cells has been proved inferior as compared with the bone marrow stem cell source in cases of thalassaemia in our institute and thus is not

  20. The risk of transmitting cutaneous malignancy through skin transplantation: a literature-based risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Sarah; Van Wijk, Marja J; Richters, Cornelia D; Beele, Hilde

    2015-12-01

    According to the European Union Tissues and Cells Directives donation of tissue is contraindicated in the presence of or a previous history of malignant disease, with the exception of cutaneous basal cell carcinoma. Skin cancer is the most common cancer. Due to ultraviolet light exposure and increasing life expectancy an increasing prevalence of malignant or premalignant skin lesions is observed, which may result in a decline of the availability of skin for transplantation. A risk assessment based on published studies and expert opinion was performed in order to investigate the risk of transmitting malignant or premalignant skin lesions through tissue transplantation, and more particular through skin transplantation. The scarcity of data concerning cancer transmission in tissue transplantation was challenging. Circumstantial evidence, available for organ transplantation, was used to develop the following policy proposal for skin transplantation and cutaneous tumours. Malignant melanoma is an absolute contraindication for the donation of skin and also of other tissues, whereas, non-lesional skin and other tissues of a donor with non-melanoma skin cancer (basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma) or with a premalignant skin lesion can be considered for transplantation. The above mentioned protocol proposal might serve as a prototype for analogous protocols for non-cutaneous malignancies. PMID:25631853

  1. Recruitment of Host Progenitor Cells in Rat Liver Transplants

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhaoli; Zhang, Xiuying; Locke, Jayme E.; Zheng, Qizhi; Tachibana, Shingo; Diehl, Anna Mae; Williams, George Melville

    2015-01-01

    Despite MHC incompatibility, Lewis to DA rat liver transplants survive indefinitely without immunosuppression, and the studies we report sought the mechanism(s) responsible for this. At one year most of the liver reacted positively to host anti-DA antibody. When small (50%) grafts were transplanted, recruitment was more rapid as most of the organ assumed the host phenotype at 3 months. After transplantation the Y-chromosome was detected in the hepatocytes of XX to XY grafts by both in-situ hybridization and PCR. Further, livers from transgenic Lewis rats carrying strong GFP markers lost the marker with time after transplantation to DA, GFP− hosts. Few liver cells contained the Y chromosome in syngeneic XX to XY liver grafts or when the hosts of Lewis XX to DA XY allografts were treated with cyclosporine A (CsA) 10mgs/kg/day. This dosage also impeded enlargement of the liver at ten days. Using GFP+ XX Lewis donors transplanted to GFP− XY DA hosts, we found little Y DNA in GFP+ cells at 10 days. Host derived OV-6 and c-kit positive, albumen positive cells were present at 3-10 days, but cells with the CD34 marker were less common and some clearly still had the donor phenotype at ten days. CXCR-4 positive cells increased with time and were abundant at 1 month after transplantation. We conclude: 1. extra-hepatic cells can differentiate into liver tissues; 2. regenerative stimuli accelerate stem cell recruitment; 3. both regeneration and recruitment are impeded by CsA immunosuppression, and 4. donor GFP positive cells contained little host Y-chromosome after transplantation suggesting that cell fusion was uncommon and, therefore, unlikely to be the mechanism leading to the changes in genotype and phenotype we observed. PMID:18972402

  2. HLA mismatches and hematopoietic cell transplantation: structural simulations assess the impact of changes in peptide binding specificity on transplant outcome

    PubMed Central

    Yanover, Chen; Petersdorf, Effie W.; Malkki, Mari; Gooley, Ted; Spellman, Stephen; Velardi, Andrea; Bardy, Peter; Madrigal, Alejandro; Bignon, Jean-Denis; Bradley, Philip

    2013-01-01

    The success of hematopoietic cell transplantation from an unrelated donor depends in part on the degree of Human Histocompatibility Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) matching between donor and patient. We present a structure-based analysis of HLA mismatching, focusing on individual amino acid mismatches and their effect on peptide binding specificity. Using molecular modeling simulations of HLA-peptide interactions, we find evidence that amino acid mismatches predicted to perturb peptide binding specificity are associated with higher risk of mortality in a large and diverse dataset of patient-donor pairs assembled by the International Histocompatibility Working Group in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation consortium. This analysis may represent a first step toward sequence-based prediction of relative risk for HLA allele mismatches. PMID:24482668

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Europe 2014: more than 40 000 transplants annually

    PubMed Central

    Passweg, J R; Baldomero, H; Bader, P; Bonini, C; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Kuball, J; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Nagler, A; Sureda, A; Mohty, M

    2016-01-01

    A record number of 40 829 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 36 469 patients (15 765 allogeneic (43%), 20 704 autologous (57%)) were reported by 656 centers in 47 countries to the 2014 survey. Trends include: continued growth in transplant activity, more so in Eastern European countries than in the west; a continued increase in the use of haploidentical family donors (by 25%) and slower growth for unrelated donor HSCT. The use of cord blood as a stem cell source has decreased again in 2014. Main indications for HSCT were leukemias: 11 853 (33% 96% allogeneic); lymphoid neoplasias; 20 802 (57% 11% allogeneic); solid tumors; 1458 (4% 3% allogeneic) and non-malignant disorders; 2203 (6% 88% allogeneic). Changes in transplant activity include more allogeneic HSCT for AML in CR1, myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) and aplastic anemia and decreasing use in CLL; and more autologous HSCT for plasma cell disorders and in particular for amyloidosis. In addition, data on numbers of teams doing alternative donor transplants, allogeneic after autologous HSCT, autologous cord blood transplants are presented. PMID:26901709

  4. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Europe 2014: more than 40 000 transplants annually.

    PubMed

    Passweg, J R; Baldomero, H; Bader, P; Bonini, C; Cesaro, S; Dreger, P; Duarte, R F; Dufour, C; Kuball, J; Farge-Bancel, D; Gennery, A; Kröger, N; Lanza, F; Nagler, A; Sureda, A; Mohty, M

    2016-06-01

    A record number of 40 829 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) in 36 469 patients (15 765 allogeneic (43%), 20 704 autologous (57%)) were reported by 656 centers in 47 countries to the 2014 survey. Trends include: continued growth in transplant activity, more so in Eastern European countries than in the west; a continued increase in the use of haploidentical family donors (by 25%) and slower growth for unrelated donor HSCT. The use of cord blood as a stem cell source has decreased again in 2014. Main indications for HSCT were leukemias: 11 853 (33%; 96% allogeneic); lymphoid neoplasias; 20 802 (57%; 11% allogeneic); solid tumors; 1458 (4%; 3% allogeneic) and non-malignant disorders; 2203 (6%; 88% allogeneic). Changes in transplant activity include more allogeneic HSCT for AML in CR1, myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) and aplastic anemia and decreasing use in CLL; and more autologous HSCT for plasma cell disorders and in particular for amyloidosis. In addition, data on numbers of teams doing alternative donor transplants, allogeneic after autologous HSCT, autologous cord blood transplants are presented. PMID:26901709

  5. Changing Epidemiology of Respiratory Viral Infections in Hematopoietic Cell Transplant Recipients and Solid Organ Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Renaud, Christian; Campbell, Angela P.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of review New respiratory viruses have been discovered in recent years and new molecular diagnostic assays have been developed that improve our understanding of respiratory virus infections. This article will review the changing epidemiology of these viruses after hematopoietic stem cell and solid organ transplantation. Recent findings Respiratory viruses are frequently detected in transplant recipients. A number of viruses have been newly discovered or emerged in the last decade, including human metapneumovirus, human bocavirus, new human coronaviruses and rhinoviruses, human polyomaviruses, and a new 2009 pandemic strain of influenza A/H1N1. The potential for these viruses to cause lower respiratory tract infections after transplantation varies, and is greatest for human metapneumovirus and H1N1 influenza, but appears to be limited for the other new viruses. Acute and long term complications in hematopoietic and solid organ transplant recipients are active areas of research. Summary Respiratory viral infections are frequently associated with significant morbidity following transplantation and are therefore of great clinical and epidemiologic interest. As new viruses are discovered, and more sensitive diagnostic methods are developed, defining the full impact of emerging respiratory viruses in transplant recipients must be elucidated by well-designed clinical studies. PMID:21666460

  6. Magnetic resonance imaging of transplanted stem cell fate in stroke

    PubMed Central

    Aghayan, Hamid Reza; Soleimani, Masoud; Goodarzi, Parisa; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hasan; Larijani, Bagher; Arjmand, Babak

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, scientific findings in the field of regeneration of nervous system have revealed the possibility of stem cell based therapies for damaged brain tissue related disorders like stroke. Furthermore, to achieve desirable outcomes from cellular therapies, one needs to monitor the migration, engraftment, viability, and also functional fate of transplanted stem cells. Magnetic resonance imaging is an extremely versatile technique for this purpose, which has been broadly used to study stroke and assessment of therapeutic role of stem cells. In this review we searched in PubMed search engine by using following keywords; “Stem Cells”, “Cell Tracking”, “Stroke”, “Stem Cell Transplantation”, “Nanoparticles”, and “Magnetic Resonance Imaging” as entry terms and based on the mentioned key words, the search period was set from 1976 to 2012. The main purpose of this article is describing various advantages of molecular and magnetic resonance imaging of stem cells, with focus on translation of stem cell research to clinical research. PMID:25097631

  7. [Nosocomial infection in patients receiving a solid organ transplant or haematopoietic stem cell transplant].

    PubMed

    Moreno Camacho, Asunción; Ruiz Camps, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial infections are the most common infections in solid organ transplant recipients. These infections occur mainly in the first month after transplantation and are hospital-acquired. Nosocomial infections cause significant morbidity and are the most common cause of mortality in this early period of transplantation. These infections are caused by multi-drug resistant (MDR) microorganisms, mainly Gram-negative enterobacteria, non-fermentative Gram-negative bacilli, enterococci, and staphylococci. The patients at risk of developing nosocomial bacterial infections are those previously colonized with MDR bacteria while on the transplant waiting list. Intravascular catheters, the urinary tract, the lungs, and surgical wounds are the most frequent sources of infection. Preventive measures are the same as those applied in non-immunocompromised, hospitalized patients except in patients at high risk for developing fungal infection. These patients need antifungal therapy during their hospitalization, and for preventing some bacterial infections in the early transplant period, patients need vaccinations on the waiting list according to the current recommendations. Although morbidity and mortality related to infectious diseases have decreased during the last few years in haematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients, they are still one of the most important complications in this population. Furthermore, as occurs in the general population, the incidence of nosocomial infections has increased during the different phases of transplantation. It is difficult to establish general preventive measures in these patients, as there are many risk factors conditioning these infections. Firstly, they undergo multiple antibiotic treatments and interventions; secondly, there is a wide variability in the degree of neutropenia and immunosuppression among patients, and finally they combine hospital and home stay during the transplant process. However, some simple measures could be

  8. Advances in haplo-identical stem cell transplantation in adults with high-risk hematological malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Michael J; Medin, Jeffrey A; Foley, Ronan S

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplant is a life-saving procedure for adults and children that have high-risk or relapsed hematological malignancies. Incremental advances in the procedure, as well as expanded sources of donor hematopoietic cell grafts have significantly improved overall rates of success. Yet, the outcomes for patients for whom suitable donors cannot be found remain a significant limitation. These patients may benefit from a hematopoietic cell transplant wherein a relative donor is fully haplotype mismatched. Previously this procedure was limited by graft rejection, lethal graft-versus-host disease, and increased treatment-related toxicity. Recent approaches in haplo-identical transplantation have demonstrated significantly improved outcomes. Based on years of incremental pre-clinical research into this unique form of bone marrow transplant, a range of approaches have now been studied in patients in relatively large phase II trials that will be summarized in this review. PMID:25258660

  9. Advances in haplo-identical stem cell transplantation in adults with high-risk hematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Michael J; Medin, Jeffrey A; Foley, Ronan S

    2014-09-26

    Allogeneic bone marrow transplant is a life-saving procedure for adults and children that have high-risk or relapsed hematological malignancies. Incremental advances in the procedure, as well as expanded sources of donor hematopoietic cell grafts have significantly improved overall rates of success. Yet, the outcomes for patients for whom suitable donors cannot be found remain a significant limitation. These patients may benefit from a hematopoietic cell transplant wherein a relative donor is fully haplotype mismatched. Previously this procedure was limited by graft rejection, lethal graft-versus-host disease, and increased treatment-related toxicity. Recent approaches in haplo-identical transplantation have demonstrated significantly improved outcomes. Based on years of incremental pre-clinical research into this unique form of bone marrow transplant, a range of approaches have now been studied in patients in relatively large phase II trials that will be summarized in this review. PMID:25258660

  10. A Novel Health Information Technology Communication System to Increase Caregiver Activation in the Context of Hospital-Based Pediatric Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Maher, Molly; Hanauer, David A; Kaziunas, Elizabeth; Ackerman, Mark S; Derry, Holly; Forringer, Rachel; Miller, Kristen; O'Reilly, Dennis; An, Lawrence; Tewari, Muneesh

    2015-01-01

    Background Pediatric hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), commonly referred to as blood and marrow transplantation (BMT), is an intense treatment modality that requires the involvement of engaged caregivers during the patient’s (child’s) prolonged hospitalization. The ubiquity of electronic health records (EHRs) and a trend toward patient-centered care could allow a novel health information technology (IT) system to increase parental engagement. The paucity of research on acute care, hospital-based (inpatient) health IT applications for patients or caregivers provides an opportunity for testing the feasibility of such applications. The pediatric BMT population represents an ideal patient group to conduct an evaluation due to the lengthy inpatient stays and a heightened need for patient activation. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess the feasibility of implementing the BMT Roadmap in caregivers as an intervention during their child’s inpatient hospitalization. The BMT Roadmap is an inpatient portal prototype optimized for tablet with a user-centered design. It integrates patient-specific laboratory and medication data from the EHR in real-time and provides support in terms of discharge goals, home care education, and other components. Feasibility will be proven if (1) the BMT Roadmap functions and can be managed by the study team without unexpected effort, (2) the system is accessed by users at a defined minimum threshold, and (3) the qualitative and quantitative research conducted provides quality data that address the perceived usefulness of the BMT Roadmap and could inform a study in a larger sample size. Methods This will be a single-arm, nonrandomized feasibility study. We aim to enroll 10 adult caregivers (age ≥ 18 years) of pediatric patients (aged 0-25 years) undergoing autologous (self-donor) or allogeneic (alternative donor) BMT. Assenting minors (aged 10-18) will also be invited to participate. Recruitment of study

  11. Delayed attainment of full donor chimaerism following alemtuzumab-based reduced-intensity conditioning haematopoeitic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia and myelodysplastic syndromes is associated with improved outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lim, Zi Yi; Pearce, Laurence; Ho, Aloysius Y; Barber, Linda; Ingram, Wendy; Usai, Monica; Tobal, Khalid; Devereux, Stephen; Pagliuca, Antonio; Mufti, Ghulam J

    2007-08-01

    This prospective study evaluated the kinetics of lymphoid (CD3) engraftment in 110 patients with acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) after allogeneic transplantation and conditioning with fludarabine, busulphan and alemtuzumab, using ciclosporin for post-transplant immunosuppression. Declining donor CD3 chimaerism beyond day+100 was treated with pre-emptive donor lymphocyte infusion (pDLI). The median age of patients was 53.0 years (range: 19-72 years), and the median follow-up was 690 d (range:168-1470 d). Patients achieving full CD3 donor chimaerism (FDC, n = 46) by day+100 had a significantly inferior disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) compared to patients with mixed donor chimaerism (MDC, n = 59). Twenty patients had stable MDC and did not require pDLI. Patients attaining early FDC had a higher transplant-related mortality compared to those who maintained stable levels of MDC (P = 0.02), with no difference between the FDC and pDLI groups (P = 0.07). There was no difference in relapse between all three groups (P = 0.21). On multivariate analysis, only CD3 chimaerism status at day+100 and disease status at transplantation had a significant effect on DFS and OS. In patients with AML/MDS undergoing alemetuzumab based-RIC HSCT, prolonged MDC beyond day+100 is associated with an improved OS. Future studies need to be directed towards establishing the underlying factors that dictate T-cell engraftment, expansion and homing post-transplantation. PMID:17608767

  12. Optimal benefits for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a consensus opinion.

    PubMed

    Maziarz, Richard T; Farnia, Stephanie; Martin, Patricia; Komanduri, Krishna V

    2014-11-01

    Variability in transplantation benefits may directly affect outcomes of individuals undergoing autologous or allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation procedures. The Financial Working Group of the National Marrow Donor Program-sponsored System Capacity Initiative addressed the issue of variable benefits and reviewed multiple transplantation benefit packages from both public and private payer organizations. On completion of the review, a consensus was obtained on defining a recipient benefit package that avoids major coverage gaps that could negatively influence patient outcomes. The recommendation was to encourage adoption of these benefits at a national level by payers, benefit brokers/consultants, and sales teams. PMID:25020102

  13. The Emerging Role of Nanotechnology in Cell and Organ Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tasciotti, Ennio; Cabrera, Fernando J; Evangelopoulos, Michael; Martinez, Jonathan O; Thekkedath, Usha R; Kloc, Malgorzata; Ghobrial, Rafik M; Li, Xian C; Grattoni, Alessandro; Ferrari, Mauro

    2016-08-01

    Transplantation is often the only choice many patients have when suffering from end-stage organ failure. Although the quality of life improves after transplantation, challenges, such as organ shortages, necessary immunosuppression with associated complications, and chronic graft rejection, limit its wide clinical application. Nanotechnology has emerged in the past 2 decades as a field with the potential to satisfy clinical needs in the area of targeted and sustained drug delivery, noninvasive imaging, and tissue engineering. In this article, we provide an overview of popular nanotechnologies and a summary of the current and potential uses of nanotechnology in cell and organ transplantation. PMID:27257995

  14. Engraftment and regenerative effects of bone marrow stromal cell transplantation on damaged rat olfactory mucosa.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Jang-Woo; Jo, Hyo Gyeong; Park, Sang Man; Ku, Cheol Hyo; Park, Dong-Joon

    2016-09-01

    To develop a new therapeutic method to treat olfactory deficits, we investigated the engraftment and regenerative effects of transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) on damaged rat olfactory mucosa. To induce olfactory nerve degeneration, one side of the olfactory mucosa of Sprague-Dawley rats was damaged via Triton X-100 irrigation. Phosphate-buffered saline containing syngeneic BMSCs was injected into the olfactory mucosa for transplantation. PKH fluorescent cell dye labeling of BMSCs was used to monitor the transplanted cells. After transplantation of BMSCs, the thickness and regeneration of olfactory mucosa were analyzed using hematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining. S100 immunohistochemical staining was used to measure nerve sheath regeneration. The increase in NGF (nerve growth factor) level in the olfactory mucosa was measured by Western blot analysis. Transplanted bone marrow stromal cells were engrafted to the lamia propria of damaged mucosa. The mean time for normalization of thickness and morphological recovery of the olfactory mucosa was 4 weeks in the therapeutic group and 9 weeks in the control group. S100 immunoreactivity was higher on the BMSC-treated side than on the control side. During regeneration, the expression of NGF increased in the olfactory mucosa of the experimental group. Based on these results, BMSC transplantation accelerated regeneration of olfactory mucosa damaged by Triton X-100, and NGF may be essential to this regenerative process. PMID:26940801

  15. Peri-transplant clostridium difficile infections in patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Agha, Aya; Sehgal, Alison; Lim, Matthew J; Weber, David; Hou, Jing-Zhou; Farah, Rafic; Raptis, Anastasios; Im, Annie; Dorritie, Kathleen; Marks, Stanley; Agha, Mounzer; Lim, Seah H

    2016-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) remain the leading cause of infectious diarrhea among hospitalized patients in this country. Patients with hematologic malignancies, especially those who undergo hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants are particularly at risk for developing CDI. One hundred and forty seven consecutive allogeneic hematopoietic progenitor cell transplants were analyzed for peri-transplant Clostridium difficile infections (PT-CDI). Sixteen patients (11%) developed PT-CDI (Median time = 7 days after transplant). The probability for developing PT-CDI during the peri-transplant period was 12.3%. History of CDI was strongly associated with the development of PT-CDI (P = 0.008) (OR = 5.48) (P = 0.017). These patients also developed PT-CDI much earlier than in those without a history (median 1 day vs. 8 days, P = 0.03). The probability for developing PT-CDI for those with a history was 39%. There was a trend toward significance (P = 0.065) between matched related donor grafts and the development of PT-CDI (OR = 0.245) (P = 0.08). Age, sex, diagnosis, transplant preparative regimens, Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, grade 3/4 acute GVHD, or use of antimicrobials within 8 weeks of transplant were not associated with PT-CDI. Non-CDI-related deaths occurred in one patient in the PT-CDI group and nine in the group without PT-CDI. In the remaining 139 patients, the length of hospital stay for those with PT-CDI was significantly longer than those without (mean 27 days vs. 22 days; P = 0.02). PMID:26661725

  16. In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation: induction of donor specific immune tolerance and postnatal transplants

    PubMed Central

    Peranteau, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In utero hematopoietic cell transplantation (IUHCT) is a non-myeloablative non-immunosuppressive transplant approach that allows for donor cell engraftment across immunologic barriers. Successful engraftment is associated with donor-specific tolerance. IUHCT has the potential to treat a large number of congenital hematologic, immunologic, and genetic diseases either by achieving high enough engraftment levels following a single IUHCT or by inducing donor specific tolerance to allow for non-toxic same-donor postnatal transplants. This review evaluates donor specific tolerance induction achieved by IUHCT. Specifically it addresses the need to achieve threshold levels of donor cell engraftment following IUHCT to consistently obtain immunologic tolerance. The mechanisms of tolerance induction including partial deletion of donor reactive host T cells by direct and indirect antigen presentation and the role of regulatory T cells in maintaining tolerance are reviewed. Finally, this review highlights the promising clinical potential of in utero tolerance induction to provide a platform on which postnatal cellular and organ transplants can be performed without myeloablative or immunosuppressive conditioning. PMID:25429269

  17. Autologous Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Multiple Myeloma without Cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Al-Anazi, Khalid Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    High-dose chemotherapy followed by autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is considered the standard of care for multiple myeloma patients who are eligible for transplantation. The process of autografting comprises the following steps: control of the primary disease by using a certain induction therapeutic protocol, mobilization of stem cells, collection of mobilized stem cells by apheresis, cryopreservation of the apheresis product, administration of high-dose pretransplant conditioning therapy, and finally infusion of the cryopreserved stem cells after thawing. However, in cancer centers that treat patients with multiple myeloma and have transplantation capabilities but lack or are in the process of acquiring cryopreservation facilities, alternatively noncryopreserved autologous stem cell therapy has been performed with remarkable success as the pretransplant conditioning therapy is usually brief. PMID:22693672

  18. The putative role of mast cells in lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Jungraithmayr, W

    2015-03-01

    Mast cells (MCs) were primarily recognized as effector cells of allergy. These cells are acting predominantly at the interface between the host and the external environment, such as skin, gastrointestinal and the respiratory tract. Only recently, MCs have gained increased recognition as cells of functional plasticity with immune-regulatory properties that influence both the innate and the adaptive immune response in inflammatory disorders, cancer and transplantation. Through the secretion of both proinflammatory and antiinflammatory mediators, MCs can either ameliorate or deteriorate the course and outcome in lung transplantation. Recent research from other models recognized the immune-protective activity of MCs including its role as an important source of IL-10 and TGF-β for the modulation of alloreactive T cell responses or assistance in Treg activity. This paper summarizes the current understanding of MCs in lung transplantation and discusses MC-mediated immune-mechanisms by which the outcome of the engrafted organ is modulated. PMID:25693471

  19. Role of NK, NKT cells and macrophages in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fahrner, René; Dondorf, Felix; Ardelt, Michael; Settmacher, Utz; Rauchfuss, Falk

    2016-01-01

    Liver transplantation has become the treatment of choice for acute or chronic liver disease. Because the liver acts as an innate immunity-dominant organ, there are immunological differences between the liver and other organs. The specific features of hepatic natural killer (NK), NKT and Kupffer cells and their role in the mechanism of liver transplant rejection, tolerance and hepatic ischemia-reperfusion injury are discussed in this review. PMID:27468206

  20. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder following kidney transplantation: a population-based cohort study.

    PubMed

    Maksten, Eva Futtrup; Vase, Maja Ølholm; Kampmann, Jan; d'Amore, Francesco; Møller, Michael Boe; Strandhave, Charlotte; Bendix, Knud; Bistrup, Claus; Thiesson, Helle Charlotte; Søndergaard, Esben; Hamilton-Dutoit, Stephen; Jespersen, Bente

    2016-04-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) incidence is difficult to determine, mainly because both early and other lesions may go unrecognized and unregistered. Few studies have included systematic pathology review to maximize case identification and decide more accurately PTLD frequency after long-term post-transplantation follow-up. A retrospective population-based cohort study including all kidney transplant recipients at two Danish centres (1990-2011; population covered 3.1 million; 2175 transplantations in 1906 patients). Pathology reports were reviewed for all patient biopsies to identify possible PTLDs. Candidate PTLDs underwent histopathological review and classification. Seventy PTLD cases were identified in 2175 transplantations (3.2%). The incidence rate (IR) after first transplantation was 5.4 cases per 1000 patient-years (95% CI: 4.0-7.3). Most PTLDs were monomorphic (58.5%), or early lesions (21.5%). Excluding early lesions and patients <18 years, IR was 3.7 (95% CI: 2.9-5.5). Ten patients with PTLD were retransplanted, 2 developing further PTLDs. Post-transplant patient survival was inferior in patients with PTLD, while death-censored graft survival was not. Using registry data together with extensive pathological review and long follow-up, a rather high incidence of PTLD was found. PMID:26749337

  1. Strength Training Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hacker, Eileen Danaher; Larson, Janet; Kujath, Amber; Peace, David; Rondelli, Damiano; Gaston, Lisa

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients receiving high-dose chemotherapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) experience considerable reductions in physical activity and deterioration of their health status. Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to test the effects of strength training compared to usual activity on physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions, and quality of life following HSCT. Interventions/Methods Nineteen subjects were randomized to the exercise or control group. Moderate intensity strength training began following discharge from the hospital. Dependent variables included physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, health status perceptions and quality of life. Variables were measured prior to admission to the hospital for HSCT, day 8 following HSCT, and six weeks following discharge from the hospital. Results Significant time effects were noted for many variables with anticipated declines in physical activity, muscle strength, fatigue, and health status perceptions immediately after HSCT with subsequent improvements six weeks following hospital discharge. One group effect was noted with subjects in the exercise group reporting less fatigue than subjects in the control group. Although no significant interactions were detected, the trends suggest that the exercise group may be more physically active following the intervention compared to the usual activity group. Conclusions This study demonstrates the potential positive effects of strength training on physical activity, fatigue, and quality of life in people receiving high-dose chemotherapy and HSCT. Implications for Practice Preliminary evidence is provided for using strength training to enhance early recovery following HSCT. Elastic resistance bands are easy to use and relatively inexpensive. PMID:21116175

  2. Human corneal endothelial cell sheets for transplantation: thermo-responsive cell culture carriers to meet cell-specific requirements.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, J; Valtink, M; Gramm, S; Nitschke, M; Werner, C; Funk, R H W; Engelmann, K

    2013-02-01

    Corneal endothelial diseases lead to severe vision impairment, motivating the transplantation of donor corneae or corneal endothelial lamellae, which is, however, impeded by endothelial cell loss during processing. Therefore, one prioritized aim in corneal tissue engineering is the generation of transplantable human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) layers. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers are widely used for non-enzymatic harvest of cell sheets. The current study presents a novel thermo-responsive carrier based on simultaneous electron beam immobilization and cross-linking of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) on polymeric surfaces, which allows one to adjust layer thickness, stiffness, switching amplitude and functionalization with bioactive molecules to meet cell type specific requirements. The efficacy of this approach for HCEC, which require elaborate cell culture conditions and are strongly adherent to the substratum, is demonstrated. The developed method may pave the way to tissue engineering of corneal endothelium and significantly improve therapeutic options. PMID:23099299

  3. Plasma cell neoplasms in US solid organ transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Engels, Eric A; Clarke, Christina A; Pfeiffer, Ruth M; Lynch, Charles F; Weisenburger, Dennis D; Gibson, Todd M; Landgren, Ola; Morton, Lindsay M

    2013-06-01

    Transplant recipients have elevated risk for plasma cell neoplasms (PCNs, comprising multiple myeloma and plasmacytoma), but little is known about risk factors in the transplant setting. Through linkage of the US solid organ transplant registry with 15 state/regional cancer registries, we identified 140 PCNs in 202 600 recipients (1987-2009). PCN risk was 1.8-fold increased relative to the general population (standardized incidence ratio [SIR] 1.80, 95%CI 1.51-2.12). Among cases, 102 were multiple myeloma (SIR 1.41) and 38 were plasmacytoma (SIR 7.06). PCN incidence increased with age, but due to the rarity of PCNs in younger people in the general population, SIRs were highest in younger transplant recipients (p = 0.03). PCN risk was especially high in recipients who were Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) seronegative at transplantation (SIR 3.93). EBV status was known for 18 tumors, of which 7 (39%) were EBV positive. Following liver transplantation, PCN risk was higher in recipients with cholestatic liver disease (SIR 2.78); five of these cases had primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC). A role for primary EBV infection after transplantation is supported by the increased PCN risk in young EBV seronegative recipients and the presence of EBV in tumors. PBC may be another risk factor, perhaps by causing chronic immune activation. PMID:23635036

  4. Stem Cell Transplantation for Indolent Lymphoma. A Reappraisal

    PubMed Central

    van Besien, Koen

    2011-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic transplantation is established as a curative treatment for follicular lymphoma, but with considerable short and long-term morbidity and mortality. Data and controversies regarding conditioning regimen, donor source, GVHD prophylaxis, post transplant interventions and approaches to predict and reduce morbidity and mortality are reviewed. Total body irradiation is very effective but toxic and reduced intensity conditioning is often preferred though associated with somewhat higher rates of recurrence. The risk of chronic GVHD and its late sequelae can be markedly reduced by in-vivo T-cell depletion using alemtuzumab but also leads to somewhat higher incidence of disease recurrence. When using such treatment strategies, one can consider prophylactic or preemptive donor lymphocyte infusions or low toxicity medical treatment such as rituximab. Overall the long term outcomes, particularly survival and current progression free survival of patients undergoing allogeneic transplantation for indolent lymphoma have steadily improved and transplant can now often safely be considered up to the sixth decade of life. Outcomes of unrelated donor transplantation approach those of HLA-identical sibling transplant and even mismatched umbilical cord transplant can be considered in selected patients. The assessment of risks and benefits is aided by the use of various novel tools. PMID:21641099

  5. Stem Cell Microencapsulation for Phenotypic Control, Bioprocessing, and Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Jenna L.

    2014-01-01

    Cell microencapsulation has been utilized for decades as a means to shield cells from the external environment while simultaneously permitting transport of oxygen, nutrients, and secretory molecules. In designing cell therapies, donor primary cells are often difficult to obtain and expand to appropriate numbers, rendering stem cells an attractive alternative due to their capacities for self-renewal, differentiation, and trophic factor secretion. Microencapsulation of stem cells offers several benefits, namely the creation of a defined microenvironment which can be designed to modulate stem cell phenotype, protection from hydrodynamic forces and prevention of agglomeration during expansion in suspension bioreactors, and a means to transplant cells behind a semi-permeable barrier, allowing for molecular secretion while avoiding immune reaction. This review will provide an overview of relevant microencapsulation processes and characterization in the context of maintaining stem cell potency, directing differentiation, investigating scalable production methods, and transplanting stem cells for clinically relevant disorders. PMID:23239279

  6. Daily Weight-Based Busulfan with Cyclophosphamide and Etoposide Produces Comparable Outcomes to Four-Times-Daily Busulfan Dosing for Lymphoma Patients Undergoing Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hill, Brian T; Rybicki, Lisa; Carlstrom, Kelley D; Jagadeesh, Deepa; Gerds, Aaron; Hamilton, Betty; Liu, Hien; Dean, Robert; Sobecks, Ronald; Pohlman, Brad; Andresen, Steven; Kalaycio, Matt; Bolwell, Brian J; Majhail, Navneet S

    2016-09-01

    High-dose busulfan (Bu) is an integral component of commonly used preparative regimens for both allogeneic and autologous transplantation. There is significant interest in comparing the efficacy and toxicity of administering Bu every 6 (Bu6) or every 24 hours (daily Bu). To facilitate a therapeutic dose-monitoring protocol, we transitioned from Bu6 to daily Bu dosing for patients with Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma undergoing autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT). Here, we retrospectively review outcomes of 400 consecutive eligible lymphoma patients who underwent ASCT from 2007 to 2013 with high-dose busulfan (Bu), cyclophosphamide (Cy), and etoposide (E). Bu was given at a fixed dose of either .8 mg/kg every 6 hours for 14 doses for 307 patients or a fixed dose of 2.8 mg/kg every 24 hours for 4 doses (days -9 through -6) for 93 patients who underwent transplantation after the transition from Bu6 to daily Bu was made. Toxicity was assessed using pulmonary and liver function tests (LFT) at specified time points before and after ASCT. Baseline patient and disease characteristics of patients dosed with Bu6 and daily Bu were similar. There was no significant difference in forced expiratory volume in 1 second or diffusing capacity of the lungs for carbon monoxide before and after transplantation in the Bu6 versus daily Bu cohorts. Changes in LFTs with daily Bu were not significantly different than those with Bu6. There were no differences in relapse, nonrelapse mortality, progression-free survival, or overall survival between Bu6 and Bu 24 administration schedules in univariable or multivariable analysis (P ≥ .34). For a subset of 23 patients who had first-dose Bu levels measured, we observed significant variation in an median estimated cumulative area under the curve (AUC) of 17,568 µM-minute (range, 12,104 µM-23,084 µM-minute). In conclusion, daily Bu with Cy/E is more convenient than Bu6, has equivalent outcomes, and results in no increase

  7. Long-term evaluation of corneal endothelial cell transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Mohay, J; Wood, T O; McLaughlin, B J

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: This report describes the clinical course, refractive changes, confocal microscopic and histological evaluation of corneal endothelial cell transplantation in rabbits with long-term follow-up. METHODS: Transplantation of corneal endothelial cells using a cell/carrier device was performed in 19 rabbits. Clinical evaluation between 1-25 months included slit-lamp examination, keratometry, retinoscopy and surface topography. Two grafts in rabbits with 12 and 24 month survivals were evaluated in vivo by 3D tandem scanning confocal microscopy. The same grafts were then processed for transmission electron microscopy. BrdU labeling of the grafted cells in one transplant was performed in order to distinguish between host and grafted endothelial cells. RESULTS: All grafts cleared and remained clear for an average of one year without signs of rejection or inflammation. Postoperative refraction data and topography of the transplants showed progressive development of myopia and steep corneas compared to the unoperated eyes in each case. Confocal microscopy in vivo demonstrated a regular hexagonal pattern of the transplanted endothelial cells and a thickened Descemet's membrane, which correlated with the light and electron microscopic findings. BrdU labeling of the grafted endothelial cells showed a homogenous labeling of cell nuclei 6 months after the transplantation. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that corneal endothelial cells grown on a biomaterial can be replaced and remain functional for a long period of time. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2A FIGURE 2B FIGURE 2C FIGURE 3A FIGURE 3B FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6A FIGURE 6B FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8A FIGURE 8B FIGURE 8C FIGURE 8D FIGURE 8E FIGURE 8F FIGURE 9 PMID:9440167

  8. Therapeutically targeting astrocytes with stem and progenitor cell transplantation following traumatic spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Falnikar, Aditi; Li, Ke; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-09-01

    Replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes via multipotent neural stem cell (NSC) and lineage-restricted neural progenitor cell (NPC) transplantation is a promising therapeutic approach for traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI). Cell transplantation in general offers the potential to replace central nervous system (CNS) cell types, achieve remyelination, deliver missing gene products, promote and guide axonal growth, modulate the host immune response, deliver neuroprotective factors, and provide a cellular substrate for bridging the lesion site, amongst other possible benefits. A host of cell types that differ in their developmental stage, CNS region and species of derivation, as well as in their phenotypic potential, have been tested in a variety of SCI animal models. Historically in the SCI field, most pre-clinical NSC and NPC transplantation studies have focused on neuronal and oligodendrocyte replacement. However, much less attention has been geared towards targeting astroglial dysfunction in the inured spinal cord, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in both normal CNS function and in the diseased nervous system. Despite the relative lack of studies, cell transplantation-based targeting of astrocytes dates back to some of the earliest transplant studies in SCI animal models. In this review, we will describe the history of work involving cell transplantation for targeting astrocytes in models of SCI. We will also touch on the current state of affairs in the field, as well as on important future directions as we move forward in trying to develop this approach into a viable strategy for SCI patients. Practical issues such as timing of delivery, route of transplantation and immunesuppression needs are beyond the scope of this review. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Spinal cord injury. PMID:25251595

  9. Stem cells: a promising source of pancreatic islets for transplantation in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Street, Cale N; Rajotte, Ray V; Korbutt, Gregory S

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes is a disease that affects millions and causes a major burden on the health care system. Type 1 diabetes has traditionally been managed with exogenous insulin therapy, however factors such as cost, lifestyle restriction, and life threatening complications necessitate the development of a more efficient treatment alternative. Pancreas transplantation, and more recently transplant of purified pancreatic islets, has offered the potential for independence from insulin injections. Islet transplantation is gaining acceptance as it has been shown to be effective for certain patients with type 1 diabetes. One obstacle, however, is the fact that there is an inadequate supply of cadaveric human islets to implement this procedure on a widespread clinical basis. A promising source of transplantable islets in the future will come through the use of adult or embryonic stem cells. This chapter presents an overview of the advancements made in the development of a stem cell based application to islet transplantation. Advantages and limitations are discussed regarding the use of embryonic stem cells, adult pancreatic stem/progenitor cells, and the use of nonpancreatic tissues based on current experimental models in the literature. It is concluded that stem cells offer the greatest potential for the development of an abundant source of pancreatic islets, although specific obstacles must be overcome before this can become a reality. PMID:14711014

  10. Transplantation of Autologous Mesenchymal Stem Cells for End-Stage Liver Cirrhosis: A Meta-Analysis Based on Seven Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xiang-Rui; Tang, Ya-Ling; Xuan, Ming; Chang, Zheng; Wang, Xiao-Yi; Liang, Xin-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Background. The bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) have demonstrated great potential as regenerative medicine in different therapeutic applications. This study aims to pool previous controlled clinical trials to make an update assessment of the effectiveness of BM-MSC transplantation on end-stage liver cirrhosis. Methods. Relevant studies published between January 1990 and June 2014 were searched among Pubmed, Embase, and ClinicalTrial.gov. A meta-analysis was performed to assess the effect of BM-MSCs on liver function indicators, including Models of End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) score, serum albumin (g/L), total bilirubin (mg/dl), Prothrombin concentration (%), and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) (U/L). Results. BM-MSCs therapy could significantly improve liver function in patients with end-stage liver cirrhosis, in terms of MELD score, serum albumin, total bilirubin, and prothrombin concentration, at least during the half year after transplantation. Conclusions. Due to BM-MSCs' immunomodulatory functions and the potential to differentiate into hepatocytes, they are a promising therapeutic agent to liver cirrhosis. Considering currently available evidence, this therapy is relatively safe and effective in improving liver function. However, how different variables should be controlled to optimize the therapeutic effect is still not clear. Thus, future mechanism studies and clinical trials are required for this optimization. PMID:25861263

  11. Mesenchymal stromal cells and kidney transplantation: pretransplant infusion protects from graft dysfunction while fostering immunoregulation.

    PubMed

    Perico, Norberto; Casiraghi, Federica; Gotti, Eliana; Introna, Martino; Todeschini, Marta; Cavinato, Regiane Aparecida; Capelli, Chiara; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Cassis, Paola; Rizzo, Paola; Cortinovis, Monica; Noris, Marina; Remuzzi, Giuseppe

    2013-09-01

    Bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have emerged as useful cell population for immunomodulation therapy in transplantation. Moving this concept towards clinical application, however, should be critically assessed by a tailor-made step-wise approach. Here, we report results of the second step of the multistep MSC-based clinical protocol in kidney transplantation. We examined in two living-related kidney transplant recipients whether: (i) pre-transplant (DAY-1) infusion of autologous MSC protected from the development of acute graft dysfunction previously reported in patients given MSC post-transplant, (ii) avoiding basiliximab in the induction regimen improved the MSC-induced Treg expansion previously reported with therapy including this anti-CD25-antibody. In patient 3, MSC treatment was uneventful and graft function remained normal during 1 year follow-up. In patient 4, acute cellular rejection occurred 2 weeks post-transplant. Both patients had excellent graft function at the last observation. Circulating memory CD8(+) T cells and donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell cytolytic response were reduced in MSC-treated patients, not in transplant controls not given MSC. CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg expansion was comparable in MSC-treated patients with or without basiliximab induction. Thus, pre-transplant MSC no longer negatively affect kidney graft at least to the point of impairing graft function, and maintained MSC-immunomodulatory properties. Induction therapy without basiliximab does not offer any advantage on CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg expansion (ClinicalTrials.gov number: NCT 00752479). PMID:23738760

  12. Islet and Stem Cell Encapsulation for Clinical Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster 3rd, Clarence E.; Lakey, Jonathan R.T.

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  13. Islet and stem cell encapsulation for clinical transplantation.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster, Clarence E; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  14. European research on cell and organ transplantation: towards novel opportunities?

    PubMed

    Goldman, Michel; Wood, Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Recent developments in basic and translational immunology open new exciting perspectives for clinical cell and organ transplantation, including the development of novel immunosuppressive agents, new diagnostic tools and validation of biomarkers for the prediction of rejection as well as the induction of tolerance. With respect to tolerance, a number of hurdles still need to be overcome before immunosuppressive drugs can be safely minimized or withdrawn in solid organ transplant recipients. Indeed, the human immune system appears more resistant to tolerance induction than expected from experimental studies in animals. Furthermore, the basic ethical principle 'primum non-nocere' prevents the implementation of clinical protocols endowed with a significant risk for graft and/or patient survival. With this background, the European Commission recently launched several initiatives to tackle unmet needs in transplantation medicine. Herein, we focus attention on the ongoing collaborative effort across the European Union aiming at identifying the current priorities requiring better integration of resources dedicated to transplantation research. PMID:17803662

  15. Analyzing center specific outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Logan, Brent R; Nelson, Gene O; Klein, John P

    2008-12-01

    Reporting transplant center-specific survival rates after hematopoietic cell transplantation is required in the United States. We describe a method to report 1-year survival outcomes by center, as well as to quantify center performance relative to the transplant center network average, which can be reliably used with censored data and for small center sizes. Each center's observed 1-year survival outcome is compared to a predicted survival outcome adjusted for patient characteristics using a pseudovalue regression technique. A 95% prediction interval for 1-year survival assuming no center effect is computed for each center by bootstrapping the scaled residuals from the regression model, and the observed 1-year survival is compared to this prediction interval to determine center performance. We illustrate the technique using a recent center specific analysis performed by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and study the performance of this method using simulation. PMID:18836830

  16. Late cytomegalovirus infection after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: case reports

    PubMed Central

    Pinheiro, Sâmara Grapiuna; de Matos, Sócrates Bezerra; Botura, Mônica Borges; Meyer, Roberto; Lima, Fernanda Washington de Mendonça

    2013-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus is related to high rates of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This report highlights the importance of adequate monitoring and management of this infection. We report on two cases of patients with late subclinical cytomegalovirus infection. These patients were monitored for antigenemia by indirect immunofluorescence assay. Active cytomegalovirus infection is most common in the first three months after transplantation however the cases reported herein show the importance of monitoring for active infection after Day +100 post-transplantation. Early detection of active infection enables quick preemptive therapy. In conclusion, we emphasize that patients with risk factors for developing severe or late cytomegalovirus disease should be monitored for more than 100 post-transplant days as late active infection is a reality. PMID:24478611

  17. ALLOGENEIC STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN FIRST COMPLETE REMISSION

    PubMed Central

    Oran, Betul; Weisdorf, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of review The optimal post-remission therapy of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR1) is uncertain. This review summarizes the recent developments in the clinical research and therapeutic applications defining the role of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) in CR1. Recent findings Molecular markers in combinations with cytogenetics have improved the risk stratification and informed decision-making in patients with AML in CR1. In parallel, several important advances in the transplant field, such as better supportive care, improved transplant technology, increased availability of alternative donors, and reduced-intensity conditioning have improved the safety as well as access of allo-HCT for a larger number of patients. Summary The progress in risk stratification and transplant technology dictate that early donor identification search should be initiated for all eligible AML patients in CR1. PMID:21912256

  18. Systems Approaches to Preventing Transplanted Cell Death in Cardiac Repair

    PubMed Central

    Robey, Thomas E.; Saiget, Mark K; Reinecke, Hans; Murry, Charles E.

    2008-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation may repair the injured heart, but tissue regeneration is limited by death of transplanted cells. Most cell death occurs in the first few days post-transplantation, likely from a combination of ischemia, anoikis and inflammation. Interventions known to enhance transplanted cell survival include heat shock, over-expressing anti-apoptotic proteins, free radical scavengers, anti-inflammatory therapy and co-delivery of extracellular matrix molecules. Combinatorial use of such interventions markedly enhances graft cell survival, but death still remains a significant problem. We review these challenges to cardiac cell transplantation and present an approach to systematically address them. Most anti-death studies use histology to assess engraftment, which is time- and labor-intensive. To increase throughput, we developed two biochemical approaches to follow graft viability in the mouse heart. The first relies on LacZ enyzmatic activity to track genetically modified cells, and the second quantifies human genomic DNA content using repetitive Alu sequences. Both show linear relationships between input cell number and biochemical signal, but require correction for the time lag between cell death and loss of signal. Once optimized, they permit detection of as few as 1 graft cell in 40,000 host cells. Pro-survival effects measured biochemically at three days predict long-term histological engraftment benefits. These methods permitted identification of carbamylated erythropoietin (CEPO) as a pro-survival factor for human embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte grafts. CEPO’s effects were additive to heat shock, implying independent survival pathways. This system should permit combinatorial approaches to enhance graft viability in a fraction of the time required for conventional histology. PMID:18466917

  19. BK nephropathy in pediatric hematopoeitic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Verghese, Priya S; Finn, Laura S; Englund, Janet A; Sanders, Jean E; Hingorani, Sangeeta

    2009-01-01

    BK nephropathy is a known cause of renal insufficiency in kidney transplant recipients. Activation of the polyoma virus may also occur in the native kidneys of non-renal allograft recipients. BK nephropathy has only been reported in a few patients after hematopoetic stem cell transplantation (HCT), most being adult patients, and the single reported pediatric case had evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis. The response to anti-viral therapy also seems to differ widely. Here, we describe two cases of BK nephropathy in the native kidneys of HCT recipients exposed to high levels of immunosuppression due to graft-versus-host-disease. Neither of our patients had any evidence of hemorrhagic cystitis. We present definitive renal pathology and detailed chronological evidence of the rising serum creatinine with simultaneous serum and urine BK PCR titers. In one of our cases, anti-viral therapy did not seem beneficial as documented by continued renal dysfunction and serum/urine BK PCR titers. Based on our report, intense immunosuppression in pediatric HCT recipients seems to be involved in the activation of BK virus and BK nephropathy should be suspected even in the absence of hematuria in HCT recipients with unexplained renal dysfunction. PMID:19067914

  20. Advances in haploidentical stem cell transplantation for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Montoro, Juan; Sanz, Jaime; Sanz, Guillermo F; Sanz, Miguel A

    2016-08-01

    One of the most important advances in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) is the use of alternative donors and cell sources, such as haploidentical transplants (haplo-HSCT) from family donors. Several approaches have been developed to overcome the challenging bidirectional alloreactivity. We discuss these approaches, including ex vivo T-cell-depleted grafts with megadose of CD34(+) cells, not requiring immunosuppression after allogeneic transplantation for graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis, and other strategies using unmanipulated T-cell-replete grafts with intensive immunosuppression or post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to minimize the GVHD. We also address the role of other strategies developed in the context of the haplo-HSCT platforms, such as ex vivo selective depletion of alloreactive donor T-cell subpopulations, infusion of antigen-specific T-cells against several pathogens, and infusion of regulatory T-cells, among other experimental approaches. Finally, some considerations about the selection of the most suitable donor, when more than one family member is available, are also addressed. PMID:27424663

  1. Stem cell transplantation for treating stroke: status, trends and development.

    PubMed

    Huo, Wenxin; Liu, Xiaoyang; Tan, Cheng; Han, Yingying; Kang, Chunyang; Quan, Wei; Chen, Jiajun

    2014-09-01

    The developing approaches of thrombolytic therapy, endovascular treatment, neuroprotective therapy, and stem cell therapy have enabled breakthroughs in stroke treatment. In this study, we summarize and analyze trends and progress in stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment by retrieval of literature from Thomson Reuters Web of Science database, the NIH Clinical Trial Planning Grant Program, and Clinical Trials Registration Center in North America. In the last 10 years, there has been an increasing number of published articles on stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment. In particular, research from the USA and China has focused on stem cell transplantation. A total of 2,167 articles addressing stem cell transplantation for stroke treatment from 2004 to 2013 were retrieved from the Thomson Reuters Web of Science database. The majority of these articles were from the USA (854, 39.4%), with the journal Stroke publishing the most articles (145, 6.7%). Of the published articles, 143 were funded by the National Institutes of Health (accounting for 6.6% of total publications), and 91 by the National Natural Science Foundation of China. Between 2013 and 2014, the National Institutes of Health provided financial support ($130 million subsidy) for 329 research projects on stroke therapy using stem cell transplantation. In 2014, 215 new projects were approved, receiving grants of up to $70,440,000. Ninety clinical trials focusing on stem cell transplantation for stroke were registered in the Clinical Trial Registration Center in North America, with 40 trials registered in the USA (ranked first place). China had the maximum number of registered research or clinical trials (10 projects). PMID:25368653

  2. Stem cell transplantation in strategies for curing HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Hütter, Gero

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 can persist in a latent form in resting memory CD4+ cells and macrophages carrying an integrated copy of the HIV genome. Because of the presence of these stable reservoir cells, eradication by antiretroviral therapy is unlikely and in order to achieve eradication, alternative treatment options are required. Stem cell transplantation has been considered previously to effect the clinical course of HIV-infection but in practice eradication or virus control was not achievable. However, modifications of stem cell transplantation using natural or artificial resistant cell sources, combination with new techniques of gene editing or generating cytotoxic anti HIV effector cells have stimulated this field of HIV cell therapy substantially. Here, we look back on 30 years of stem cell therapy in HIV patients and discuss most recent developments in this direction. PMID:27625700

  3. Major Pulmonary Complications After Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant.

    PubMed

    Diab, Maria; ZazaDitYafawi, Jihane; Soubani, Ayman O

    2016-06-01

    Both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplants are important therapeutic options for several benign and malignant disorders. Pulmonary complications, although they have become less frequent, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. These complications range from bacterial, fungal, and viral pulmonary infections to noninfectious conditions such as diffuse alveolar hemorrhage and idiopathic pneumonia syndrome. Bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome is the primary chronic pulmonary complication, and treatment of this condition remains challenging. This report highlights the advances in the diagnosis and management of the major pulmonary complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplant. It also underscores the need for prospective and multicenter research to have a better understanding of the mechanisms behind these complications and to obtain more effective diagnostic tool and therapeutic options. PMID:27040986

  4. Transfusion strategies in patients undergoing stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Radia, Rohini; Pamphilon, Derwood

    2011-04-01

    Hemopoietic stem-cell transplant patients may require intensive blood component support. Complications of transfusions include transmission of viral and bacterial infections, transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and transfusion-related acute lung injury. Alloimmunization to red cell antigens may cause difficulties in selecting compatible blood, while alloimmunization to HLA expressed on platelets may cause subsequent platelet transfusion refractoriness. It is essential to define robust transfusion policies and procedures and these should be regularly audited. This article reviews blood component transfusion in the setting of hemopoietic stem-cell transplant and specifically discusses the management of ABO-mismatched transplants, the prevention of cytomegalovirus transmission, the prevention of transfusion-associated graft-versus-host disease and the use of granulocyte transfusions. PMID:21495930

  5. Successful expansion of functional and stable regulatory T cells for immunotherapy in liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Safinia, Niloufar; Vaikunthanathan, Trishan; Fraser, Henrieta; Thirkell, Sarah; Lowe, Katie; Blackmore, Laura; Whitehouse, Gavin; Martinez-Llordella, Marc; Jassem, Wayel; Sanchez-Fueyo, Alberto; Lechler, Robert I.; Lombardi, Giovanna

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to prevent organ transplant rejection whilst minimizing long-term immunosuppression are currently under intense investigation with regulatory T cells (Tregs) nearing clinical application. The clinical trial, ThRIL, recently commenced at King's College London, proposes to use Treg cell therapy to induce tolerance in liver transplant recipients, the success of which has the potential to revolutionize the management of these patients and enable a future of drug-free transplants. This is the first report of the manufacture of clinical grade Tregs from prospective liver transplant recipients via a CliniMACS-based GMP isolation technique and expanded using anti-CD3/CD28 beads, IL-2 and rapamycin. We report the enrichment of a pure, stable population of Tregs (>95% CD4+CD25+FOXP3+), reaching adequate numbers for their clinical application. Our protocol proved successful in, influencing the expansion of superior functional Tregs, as compared to freshly isolated cells, whilst also preventing their conversion to Th17 cells under pro-inflammatory conditions. We conclude with the manufacture of the final Treg product in the clinical research facility (CRF), a prerequisite for the clinical application of these cells. The data presented in this manuscript together with the much-anticipated clinical results from ThRIL, will undoubtedly inform the improved management of the liver transplant recipient. PMID:26788992

  6. Analysis of graft survival in a trial of stem cell transplant in ALS

    PubMed Central

    Tadesse, Tezeta; Gearing, Marla; Senitzer, David; Saxe, Debra; Brat, Daniel J; Bray, Robert; Gebel, Howard; Hill, Charles; Boulis, Nicholas; Riley, Jonathan; Feldman, Eva; Johe, Karl; Hazel, Thomas; Polak, Meraida; Bordeau, Jane; Federici, Thais; Glass, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Objective The first US Food and Drug Administration–approved clinical trial to treat amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with neural stem cell–based therapy is in progress. The goal of the current study was to identify and assess the survival of human spinal cord–derived neural stem cells (HSSCs) transplanted into the spinal cord in patients with ALS. Methods Spinal cords transplanted with HSSCs were examined from six autopsy cases. Homogenized tissues were interrogated for the presence of donor versus recipient DNA using real-time PCR methods (qPCR). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) was performed using DNA probes for XY chromosomes to identify male donor HSSCs in one female case, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was used to characterize the identified donor cells. Results Genomic DNA from donor HSSCs was identified in all cases, comprising 0.67–5.4% of total tissue DNA in patients surviving 196 to 921 days after transplantation. In the one female patient a “nest” of cells identified on H&E staining were XY-positive by FISH, confirming donor origin. A subset of XY-positive cells labeled for the neuronal marker NeuN and stem cell marker SOX2. Interpretation This is the first study to identify human neural stem cells transplanted into a human spinal cord. Transplanted HSSCs survived up to 2.5 years posttransplant. Some cells differentiated into neurons, while others maintained their stem cell phenotype. This work is a proof of concept of the survival and differentiation of human stems cell transplanted into the spinal cord of ALS patients. PMID:25540804

  7. What to Expect After a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... What To Expect After a Blood and Marrow Stem Cell Transplant You’ll stay in the hospital for ... or even months after your blood and marrow stem cell transplant. Your doctors will want to be sure ...

  8. Monocytic suppressive cells mediate cardiovascular transplantation tolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mercedes Rodriguez; Ledgerwood, Levi; Yang, Yu; Xu, Jiangnan; Lal, Girdhari; Burrell, Bryna; Ma, Ge; Hashimoto, Daigo; Li, Yansui; Boros, Peter; Grisotto, Marcos; van Rooijen, Nico; Matesanz, Rafael; Tacke, Frank; Ginhoux, Florent; Ding, Yaozhong; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Merad, Miriam; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main unresolved questions in solid organ transplantation is how to establish indefinite graft survival that is free from long-term treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and chronic rejection (i.e., the establishment of tolerance). The failure to achieve this goal may be related to the difficulty in identifying the phenotype and function of the cell subsets that participate in the induction of tolerance. To address this issue, we investigated the suppressive roles of recipient myeloid cells that may be manipulated to induce tolerance to transplanted hearts in mice. Using depleting mAbs, clodronate-loaded liposomes, and transgenic mice specific for depletion of CD11c+, CD11b+, or CD115+ cells, we identified a tolerogenic role for CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes during the induction of tolerance by costimulatory blockade with CD40L-specific mAb. Early after transplantation, Gr1+ monocytes migrated from the bone marrow into the transplanted organ, where they prevented the initiation of adaptive immune responses that lead to allograft rejection and participated in the development of Tregs. Our results suggest that mobilization of bone marrow CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes under sterile inflammatory conditions mediates the induction of indefinite allograft survival. We propose that manipulating the common bone marrow monocyte progenitor could be a useful clinical therapeutic approach for inducing transplantation tolerance. PMID:20551515

  9. Prospective Clinical Testing of Regulatory Dendritic Cells in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, Angus W.; Zahorchak, Alan F.; Ezzelarab, Mohamed B.; Butterfield, Lisa H.; Lakkis, Fadi G.; Metes, Diana M.

    2016-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are rare, professional antigen-presenting cells with ability to induce or regulate alloimmune responses. Regulatory DC (DCreg) with potential to down-modulate acute and chronic inflammatory conditions that occur in organ transplantation can be generated in vitro under a variety of conditions. Here, we provide a rationale for evaluation of DCreg therapy in clinical organ transplantation with the goal of promoting sustained, donor-specific hyporesponsiveness, while lowering the incidence and severity of rejection and reducing patients’ dependence on anti-rejection drugs. Generation of donor- or recipient-derived DCreg that suppress T cell responses and prolong transplant survival in rodents or non-human primates has been well-described. Recently, good manufacturing practice (GMP)-grade DCreg have been produced at our Institution for prospective use in human organ transplantation. We briefly review experience of regulatory immune therapy in organ transplantation and describe our experience generating and characterizing human monocyte-derived DCreg. We propose a phase I/II safety study in which the influence of donor-derived DCreg combined with conventional immunosuppression on subclinical and clinical rejection and host alloimmune responses will be examined in detail. PMID:26858719

  10. Mapping MHC haplotype effects in unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Malkki, Mari; Horowitz, Mary M.; Spellman, Stephen R.; Haagenson, Michael D.; Wang, Tao

    2013-01-01

    Life-threatening risks associated with HLA-mismatched unrelated donor hematopoietic cell transplantation limit its general application for the treatment of blood diseases. The increased risks might be explained by undetected genetic variation within the highly polymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region. We retrospectively assessed each of 1108 MHC region single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 2628 patients and their HLA-mismatched unrelated donors to determine whether SNPs are associated with the risk of mortality, disease-free survival, transplant-related mortality, relapse, and acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Multivariate analysis adjusted for HLA mismatching and nongenetic variables associated with each clinical end point. Twelve SNPs were identified as transplantation determinants. SNP-associated risks were conferred by either patient or donor SNP genotype or by patient-donor SNP mismatching. Risks after transplantation increased with increasing numbers of unfavorable SNPs. SNPs that influenced acute GVHD were independent of those that affected risk of chronic GVHD and relapse. HLA haplotypes differed with respect to haplotype content of (un)favorable SNPs. Outcome after HLA-mismatched unrelated donor transplantation is influenced by MHC region variation that is undetected with conventional HLA typing. Knowledge of the SNP content of HLA haplotypes provides a means to estimate risks prior to transplantation and to lower complications through judicious selection of donors with favorable MHC genetics. PMID:23305741

  11. Alternative approaches to myeloid suppressor cell therapy in transplantation: comparing regulatory macrophages to tolerogenic DCs and MDSCs.

    PubMed

    Riquelme, Paloma; Geissler, Edward K; Hutchinson, James A

    2012-01-01

    Several types of myeloid suppressor cell are currently being developed as cell-based immunosuppressive agents. Despite detailed knowledge about the molecular and cellular functions of these cell types, expert opinions differ on how to best implement such therapies in solid organ transplantation. Efforts in our laboratory to develop a cell-based medicinal product for promoting tolerance in renal transplant patients have focused on a type of suppressor macrophage, which we call the regulatory macrophage (M reg). Our favoured clinical strategy is to administer donor-derived M regs to recipients one week prior to transplantation. In contrast, many groups working with tolerogenic dendritic cells (DCs) advocate post-transplant administration of recipient-derived cells. A third alternative, using myeloid-derived suppressor cells, presumably demands that cells are given around the time of transplantation, so that they can infiltrate the graft to create a suppressive environment. On present evidence, it is not possible to say which cell type and treatment strategy might be clinically superior. This review seeks to position our basic scientific and early-stage clinical studies of human regulatory macrophages within the broader context of myeloid suppressor cell therapy in transplantation. PMID:23369628

  12. Insights and Hopes in Umbilical Cord Blood Stem Cell Transplantations

    PubMed Central

    Shahrokhi, Somayeh; Menaa, Farid; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; McGuckin, Colin; Ebtekar, Massoumeh

    2012-01-01

    Over 20.000 umblical cord blood transplantations (UCBT) have been carried out around the world. Indeed, UCBT represents an attractive source of donor hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and, offer interesting features (e.g., lower graft-versus-host disease) compared to bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Thereby, UCBT often represents the unique curative option against several blood diseases. Recent advances in the field of UCBT, consisted to develop strategies to expand umbilical stem cells and shorter the timing of their engraftment, subsequently enhancing their availability for enhanced efficacy of transplantation into indicated patients with malignant diseases (e.g., leukemia) or non-malignant diseases (e.g., thalassemia major). Several studies showed that the expansion and homing of UCBSCs depends on specific biological factors and cell types (e.g., cytokines, neuropeptides, co-culture with stromal cells). In this review, we extensively present the advantages and disadvantages of current hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs), compared to UBCT. We further describe the importance of cord blood content and obstetric factors on cord blood selection, and report the recent approaches that can be undertook to improve cord blood stem cell expansion as well as engraftment. Eventually, we provide two majors examples underlining the importance of UCBT as a potential cure for blood diseases. PMID:23258957

  13. B cells with regulatory properties in transplantation tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Justine; Chiffoleau, Elise

    2015-01-01

    Induction of tolerance remains a major goal in transplantation. Indeed, despite potent immunosuppression, chronic rejection is still a real problem in transplantation. The humoral response is an important mediator of chronic rejection, and numerous strategies have been developed to target either B cells or plasma cells. However, the use of anti-CD20 therapy has highlighted the beneficial role of subpopulation of B cells, termed regulatory B cells. These cells have been characterized mainly in mice models of auto-immune diseases but emerging literature suggests their role in graft tolerance in transplantation. Regulatory B cells seem to be induced following inflammation to restrain excessive response. Different phenotypes of regulatory B cells have been described and are functional at various differentiation steps from immature to plasma cells. These cells act by multiple mechanisms such as secretion of immuno-suppressive cytokines interleukin-10 (IL-10) or IL-35, cytotoxicity, expression of inhibitory receptors or by secretion of non-inflammatory antibodies. Better characterization of the development, phenotype and mode of action of these cells seems urgent to develop novel approaches to manipulate the different B cell subsets and the response to the graft in a clinical setting. PMID:26722647

  14. Transmission of Clostridium difficile During Hospitalization for Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant

    PubMed Central

    Kamboj, Mini; Sheahan, Anna; Sun, Janet; Taur, Ying; Robilotti, Elizabeth; Babady, Esther; Papanicolaou, Genovefa; Jakubowski, Ann; Pamer, Eric; Sepkowitz, Kent

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine the role of unit-based transmission that accounts for cases of early Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) during hospitalization for allogeneic stem cell transplant. SETTING Stem cell transplant unit at a tertiary care cancer center. METHODS Serially collected stool from patients admitted for transplant was screened for toxigenic C. difficile through the hospital stay and genotyping was performed by multilocus sequence typing. In addition, isolates retrieved from cases of CDI that occurred in other patients hospitalized on the same unit were similarly characterized. Transmission links were established by time-space clustering of cases and carriers of shared toxigenic C. difficile strains. RESULTS During the 27-month period, 1,099 samples from 264 patients were screened, 69 of which had evidence of toxigenic C. difficile; 52 patients developed CDI and 17 were nonsymptomatic carriers. For the 52 cases, 41 had evidence of toxigenic C. difficile on the first study sample obtained within a week of admission, among which 22 were positive within the first 48 hours. A total of 24 sequence types were isolated from this group; 1 patient had infection with the NAP1 strain. A total of 11 patients had microbiologic evidence of acquisition; donor source could be established in half of these cases. CONCLUSIONS Most cases of CDI after stem cell transplant represent delayed onset disease in nonsymptomatic carriers. Transmission on stem cell transplant unit was confirmed in 19% of early CDI cases in our cohort with a probable donor source established in half of the cases. PMID:26486102

  15. Synthetic molecules that protect cells from anoikis and their use in cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Frisco-Cabanos, Heidie L; Watanabe, Mizuki; Okumura, Naoki; Kusamori, Kosuke; Takemoto, Naohiro; Takaya, Junichiro; Sato, Shin-ichi; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeru; Nishikawa, Makiya; Koizumi, Noriko; Uesugi, Motonari

    2014-10-13

    One of the major problems encountered in cell transplantation is the low level of survival of transplanted cells due to detachment-induced apoptosis, called anoikis. The present study reports on the chemical synthesis and biological evaluation of water-soluble molecules that protect suspended cells from anoikis. The synthetic molecules bind to and induce clusters of integrins and heparan-sulfate-bound syndecans, two classes of receptors that are important for extracellular matrix-mediated cell survival. Molecular biological analysis indicates that such molecules prolong the survival of suspended NIH3T3 cells, at least in part, by promoting clustering of syndecan-4 and integrin β1 on the cell surface, leading to the activation of small GTPase Rac-1 and Akt. In vivo experiments using animal disease models demonstrated the ability of the molecules to improve cell engraftment. The cluster-inducing molecules may provide a starting point for the design of new synthetic tools for cell-based therapy. PMID:25196666

  16. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mycosis fungoides*

    PubMed Central

    Atalla, Angelo; Hallack Neto, Abrahão Elias; Siqueira, Denise Bittencourt; Toledo, Gabriela Cumani

    2013-01-01

    Mycosis Fungoides is typically an indolent disease in early stages. However, approximately 30% of patients have advanced staged disease at presentation and 20% will develop it at some time. These patients have a poorer prognosis with a median survival of 2-4 years. The only curative option for mycosis fungoides may be hematopoietic allogeneic stem cell transplantation. We report the case of a patient with mycosis fungoides in an advanced stage (IIB), refractory to treatment options. She underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). The patient remains in complete remission nineteen months after allo-HSCT. Allogeneic transplantation can alter the natural history of mycosis fungoides and should be considered in patients who have refractory disease or short-lived responses with standard therapies. PMID:24346924

  17. Outcomes of Hematological Malignancies after Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic-Cell Transplantation According to Place of Residence

    PubMed Central

    Loberiza, Fausto R; Lee, Stephanie J; Klein, John P; Hassebroek, Anna; Dehn, Jason G; Frangoul, Haydar A; Hahn, Theresa; Hale, Gregory; Lazarus, Hillard M; LeMaistre, Charles F; Maziarz, Richard T; Rizzo, J Douglas; Majhail, Navneet S

    2009-01-01

    Studies suggest that patients who live in rural areas may have worse clinical outcomes compared with patients living in urban areas. We studied whether place of residence (rural vs. urban) is associated with clinical outcomes of patients with leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome who received an unrelated donor hematopoietic-cell transplantation (HCT). Patients’ residential ZIP code at the time of transplant was used to determine rural or urban designation based on the Rural Urban Commuting Codes. The study included 6140 patients reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 121 US HCT centers: 1179 (19%) came from rural areas while 4961 (81%) came from urban areas. Rural and urban patients were similar in patient-, disease- and transplant-related characteristics aside from household income and distance travelled to HCT center. After adjusting for income and other significant patient, disease and transplant-related variables, the risk of overall mortality between patients residing in rural and urban areas were not statistically significant (relative risk 1.01, 95% confidence intervals 0.93–1.10, p=0.74). Similar outcomes were noted for transplant-related mortality, disease-free survival and relapse. Patient’s income, derived from US Census and based on their residential ZIP code, was independently associated with outcomes. In summary, our study showed no differences in the clinical outcomes of patients from rural or urban areas after unrelated donor HCT. PMID:19879951

  18. Endometrial stem cell transplantation in MPTP- exposed primates: an alternative cell source for treatment of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Erin F; Mutlu, Levent; Massasa, Efi E; Elsworth, John D; Eugene Redmond, D; Taylor, Hugh S

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Cell-replacement therapies have emerged as a promising strategy to slow down or replace neuronal loss. Compared to other stem cell types, endometrium-derived stem cells (EDSCs) are an attractive source of stem cells for cellular therapies because of their ease of collection and vast differentiation potential. Here we demonstrate that endometrium-derived stem cells may be transplanted into an MPTP exposed monkey model of PD. After injection into the striatum, endometrium-derived stem cells engrafted, exhibited neuron-like morphology, expressed tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and increased the numbers of TH positive cells on the transplanted side and dopamine metabolite concentrations in vivo. Our results suggest that endometrium-derived stem cells may provide a therapeutic benefit in the primate model of PD and may be used in stem cell based therapies. PMID:25283241

  19. Role of Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant in the Management of Follicular Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Matthew; Gabriel, Don A.; Shea, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Despite decades of published data regarding the application of autologous and allogeneic stem cell transplant in patients with follicular lymphoma, there remain no uniform indications for its use in this disease. Autologous transplant has been shown to lead to longer progression-free survival times in randomized trials when compared with postremission interferon-based chemo-immunotherapy. However, the development of rituximab and its use in frontline, salvage, and maintenance therapy complicates the decision to pursue autologous transplant, a modality developed prior to the advent of anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies. Allogeneic transplant offers the advantages of lymphoma-free grafts and the immunologic graft-versus-lymphoma effect. These factors may confer the possibility of long-term remission, though historically they have been accompanied by high rates of upfront morbidity and mortality, especially in heavily pretreated patients with a poor performance status or chemotherapy-refractory disease. Advances in patient selection, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) matching, conditioning regimens, and supportive care have reduced transplant-related mortality and the incidence of graft-versus-host disease. Recently published data focus on the incorporation of rituximab and radioimmunoconjugates prior to, during, and following autologous transplant. Furthermore, reduced-intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantation has increasingly been used for relapsed follicular lymphoma patients with comorbidities or advanced age. Several recent reports suggest that reduced-intensity regimens may provide a high likelihood of long-term disease-free survival for patients up to 70 years of age with a good performance status, chemotherapy-sensitive disease, and HLA-matched sibling donors. Such patients with relapsed disease should be referred to a transplant center that can enroll them in one of the forthcoming clinical trials that aim to confirm these outcomes. PMID:19561292

  20. Fully functional NK cells after unrelated cord blood transplantation.

    PubMed

    Beziat, V; Nguyen, S; Lapusan, S; Hervier, B; Dhedin, N; Bories, D; Uzunov, M; Boudifa, A; Trebeden-Negre, H; Norol, F; Marjanovic, Z; Marie, J-P; Vernant, J-P; Debre, P; Rio, B; Vieillard, V

    2009-04-01

    Promising results of umbilical cord blood transplantation (UCBT) from unrelated donors have been reported in patients with hematologic disorders. These transplants, having potential to trigger beneficial donor-versus-recipient natural killer (NK) cell-mediated alloreaction, we have conducted the first extensive analysis of the phenotypic and functional properties of NK cells after UCBT. NK cells from 25 patients with high-risk hematologic malignancies were compared with cells derived from both healthy adult and CB cells. We found that following UCBT, NK cells display not only some phenotypic features associated with maturity but also unique characteristics that make them fully functional against leukemic blasts. We propose that this full functionality of alloreactive donor-derived NK may drive graft-versus-leukemia reactions after UCBT. PMID:19151772

  1. Prolongation of skin allograft survival in rats by the transplantation of microencapsulated xenogeneic neonatal porcine Sertoli cells.

    PubMed

    Bistoni, Giovanni; Calvitti, Mario; Mancuso, Francesca; Arato, Iva; Falabella, Giulia; Cucchia, Rosa; Fallarino, Francesca; Becchetti, Alessio; Baroni, Tiziano; Mazzitelli, Stefania; Nastruzzi, Claudio; Bodo, Maria; Becchetti, Ennio; Cameron, Don F; Luca, Giovanni; Calafiore, Riccardo

    2012-07-01

    Skin rejection remains a major hurdle in skin reconstructive transplantation surgery. In fact, 85% of the grafted patients experience at least one episode of acute skin rejection in the first year. It has been observed that Sertoli cells (SC), when co-transplanted with allo- or xenogeneic cell/tissues, can induce graft acceptance in the absence of systemic immunosuppression. A method aimed at significantly prolonging skin allografts in rats transplanted with barium alginate-based microencapsulated xenogeneic porcine SC (SC-MCs) is described. Results demonstrated that intraperitoneal (IP) transplantation of SC-MCs with high cellular viability and function can significantly prolong allogeneic skin grafts when compared to transplantation controls receiving only empty alginate capsules (E-MCs). Lymphocytic infiltration at the skin graft site was not observed in 80% of the SC-MCs transplanted rats and these recipient animals showed a significant increased expression of T regulatory (Tregs) cells when compared to E-MCs transplantation controls. The findings of this report further substantiate the positive therapeutic effects of SC on transplantation technology mediated by Sertoli cell-induced alterations of the host's immune system and indicate new perspectives and new strategies for successful skin tissue allografts. PMID:22560198

  2. Transplantation and Stem Cell Therapy for Cerebellar Degenerations.

    PubMed

    Cendelin, Jan

    2016-02-01

    Stem cell-based and regenerative therapy may become a hopeful treatment for neurodegenerative diseases including hereditary cerebellar degenerations. Neurotransplantation therapy mainly aims to substitute lost cells, but potential effects might include various mechanisms including nonspecific trophic effects and stimulation of endogenous regenerative processes and neural plasticity. Nevertheless, currently, there remain serious limitations. There is a wide spectrum of human hereditary cerebellar degenerations as well as numerous cerebellar mutant mouse strains that serve as models for the development of effective therapy. By now, transplantation has been shown to ameliorate cerebellar function, e.g. in Purkinje cell degeneration mice, Lurcher mutant mice and mouse models of spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 and type 2 and Niemann-Pick disease type C. Despite the lack of direct comparative studies, it appears that there might be differences in graft development and functioning between various types of cerebellar degeneration. Investigation of the relation of graft development to specific morphological, microvascular or biochemical features of the diseased host tissue in various cerebellar degenerations may help to identify factors determining the fate of grafted cells and potential of their functional integration. PMID:26155762

  3. Clinical perspectives for regulatory T cells in transplantation tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hippen, Keli L; Riley, James L; June, Carl H; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-12-01

    Three main types of CD4+ regulatory T cells can be distinguished based upon whether they express Foxp3 and differentiate naturally in the thymus (natural Tregs) or are induced in the periphery (inducible Tregs); or whether they are FoxP3 negative but secrete IL-10 in response to antigen (Tregulatory type 1, Tr1 cells). Adoptive transfer of each cell type has proven highly effective in mouse models at preventing graft vs. host disease (GVHD) and autoimmunity. Although clinical application was initially hampered by low Treg frequency and unfavorable ex vivo expansion properties, several phase I trials are now being conducted to assess their effect on GVHD following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and in type I diabetes. Human Treg trials for HSCT recipients have preceded other indications because GVHD onset is precisely known, the time period needed for prevention relatively short, initial efficacy is likely to provide life-long protection, and complications of GVHD can be lethal. This review will summarize the clinical trials conducted to date that have employed Tregs to prevent GVHD following HSCT and discuss recent advances in Treg cellular therapy. PMID:21820917

  4. Adoptive precursor cell therapy to enhance immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Ghosh, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. T cell deficiency following transplantation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss adoptive transfer of committed precursor cells to enhance T cell reconstitution and improve overall prognosis after transplantation. PMID:19015856

  5. Proceedings: Immune Tolerance and Stem Cell Transplantation: A CIRM Mini-Symposium and Workshop Report

    PubMed Central

    Millan, Maria T.; Jorgenson, Rebecca L.; Shepard, Kelly A.

    2015-01-01

    The mission of the California Institute for Regenerative Medicine (CIRM) is to accelerate stem cell treatments to patients with unmet medical needs. Immune rejection is one hurdle that stem cell therapies must overcome to achieve a durable and effective therapeutic benefit. In July 2014, CIRM convened a group of clinical investigators developing stem cell therapeutics, immunologists, and transplantation biologists to consider strategies to address this challenge. Workshop participants discussed current approaches for countering immune rejection in the context of organ transplant and cellular therapy and defined the risks, challenges, and opportunities for adapting them to the development of stem cell-based therapeutics. This effort led to the development of a Roadmap to Tolerance for allogeneic stem cell therapy, with four fundamental steps: (a) the need to identify “tolerance-permissive” immune-suppressive regimens to enable the eventual transition from current, drug-based approaches to a newer generation of technologies for inducing tolerance; (b) testing new biologics and small molecules for inducing tolerance in stem cell-based preclinical and clinical studies; (c) stimulation of efforts to develop novel therapeutic approaches to induce central and peripheral tolerance, including manipulation of the thymus, transplantation of purified stem cells, and cell therapy with T-regulatory cells; and (d) development of robust and sensitive immune monitoring technologies for identifying biomarkers of tolerance and rejection after allogeneic stem cell treatments in the clinical setting. PMID:25473085

  6. Sleep disturbance in hospitalized recipients of stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Laura; Harden, Karen; Jarvis, Sarah; Palmer, Stephanie; Kavanaugh-Carveth, Pam; Barnett, Joe; Friese, Christopher

    2011-06-01

    Disrupted sleep is considered a patient outcome sensitive to oncology nursing care and can lead to a variety of physical and psychologic dysfunctions, such as insomnia, chronic pain, respiratory distress, obesity, stress, and anxiety. Although sleep disturbances have been studied in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantations (HSCTs), these studies have not examined the acute phase of transplantation. The current study aimed to identify the level of sleep disturbance in this patient population, identify factors contributing to decreased ability to sleep for hospitalized recipients of HSCT, and compare the differences in sleep disturbance between age, gender, type of transplantation, and initial stem cell transplantation versus readmission for transplantation-associated complications. Among the 69 patients studied, 26% reported clinical insomnia, as measured by the Insomnia Severity Index, and 74% had some degree of insomnia. Patient characteristics were not significantly associated with insomnia scores. Patients reported bathroom use as the most frequent reason for sleep disruption (85%). These findings suggest that sleep disturbances are common in hospitalized patients undergoing HSCT, and strategies to reduce disruptions are needed to improve patient outcomes. PMID:21624862

  7. Second Unrelated Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Primary Graft Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schriber, Jeffrey; Agovi, Manza-A.; Ho, Vincent; Ballen, Karen K.; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Gupta, Vikas; Maziarz, Richard T.; Hale, Gregory A.; Litzow, Mark R.; Logan, Brent; Bornhauser, Martin; Giller, Roger H.; Isola, Luis; Marks, David I.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Pasquini, Marcelo C.

    2010-01-01

    Failure to engraft donor cells is a devastating complication after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We describe the results of 122 patients reported to the National Marrow Donor Program between 1990 and 2005, who received a second unrelated donor HCT after failing to achieve an absolute neutrophil count of ≥ 500/ μL without recurrent disease. Patients were transplanted for leukemia (n=83), myelodysplastic disorders (n=16), severe aplastic anemia (n=20) and other diseases (n=3). The median age was 29 years. Twenty-four patients received second grafts from a different unrelated donor. Among 98 patients who received a second graft from the same donor, 28 received products that were previously collected and cryopreserved for the first transplantation. One-year overall survival after second transplant was 11% with 10 patients alive at last follow up. We observed no differences between patients who received grafts from the same or different donors, or in those who received fresh or cryopreserved product. The outcomes after a second allogeneic HCT for primary graft failure are dismal. Identifying risk factors for primary graft failure can decrease the incidence of this complication. Further studies are needed to test whether early recognition and hastened procurement of alternative grafts can improve transplant outcomes for primary graft failure. PMID:20172038

  8. Key factors in experimental mouse hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nevozhay, Dmitry; Opolski, Adam

    2006-01-01

    The first mouse model of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) was developed more than 50 years ago. HSCT is currently being widely used in a broad range of research areas, which include studies of the engraftment process, the pathogenesis of graft-versus-host disease and possible ways of its treatment and prophylaxis, attempts to use the graft-versus-leukemia/tumor effect in treating hematological and oncological malignancies, cancer vaccine development, induction of transplanted organ tolerance, and gene therapy. However, although this model is widely distributed, many laboratories use different protocols for the procedure. There are a number of papers discussing different HSCT protocols in clinical work, but no articles summarizing mouse laboratory models are available. This review attempts to bring together different details about HSCT in the mouse model, such as the types of transplantation, possible pretreatment regimens and their combinations, methods and sources of graft harvesting and preparation for the transplantation procedure, the influence of graft cell dose and content on the engraftment process, the transplantation method itself, possible complications, symptoms and techniques of their prophylaxis or treatment, as well as follow-up and engraftment assessment. We have also tried to reflect current knowledge of the biology of the engraftment. PMID:16868724

  9. Optimized cell transplantation using adult rag2 mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qin; Abdelfattah, Nouran S.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Moore, John C.; Martinez, Sarah A.; Moore, Finola E.; Lobbardi, Riadh; Tenente, Inês M.; Ignatius, Myron S.; Berman, Jason N.; Liwski, Robert S.; Houvras, Yariv; Langenau, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Cell transplantation into adult zebrafish has lagged behind mouse due to the lack of immune compromised models. Here, we have created homozygous rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish that have reduced numbers of functional T and B cells but are viable and fecund. Mutant fish engraft zebrafish muscle, blood stem cells, and cancers. rag2E450fs mutant zebrafish are the first immune compromised zebrafish model that permits robust, long-term engraftment of multiple tissues and cancer. PMID:25042784

  10. Identification of Barriers to Retinal Engraftment of Transplanted Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Thomas V.; Bull, Natalie D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. Intraocular stem cell transplantation may be therapeutic for retinal neurodegenerative diseases such as glaucoma via neuronal replacement and/or neuroprotection. However, efficacy is hindered by extremely poor retinal graft integration. The purpose was to identify the major barrier to retinal integration of intravitreally transplanted stem cells, which was hypothesized to include the cellular and/or extracellular matrix (ECM) components of the inner limiting membrane (ILM). Methods. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cocultured on the vitreal surface of retinal explants. Retinal MSC migration was compared between control explants and explants in which portions of the ILM were removed by mechanical peeling; the inner basal lamina was digested with collagenase; and glial cell reactivity was selectively modulated with α-aminoadipic acid (AAA). In vivo, the MSCs were transplanted after intravitreal AAA or saline injection into glaucomatous rat eyes. Results. Retinal MSC migration correlated positively with the amount of peeled ILM, whereas enzymatic digestion of the basal lamina was robust but did not enhance MSC entry. In contrast, AAA treatment suppressed glial cell reactivity and facilitated a >50-fold increase in MSC migration into retinal explants. In vivo analysis showed that AAA treatment led to a more than fourfold increase in retinal engraftment. Conclusions. The results demonstrated that the ECM of the inner basal lamina is neither necessary nor sufficient to prevent migration of transplanted cells into the neural retina. In contrast, glial reactivity was associated with poor graft migration. Targeted disruption of glial reactivity dramatically improved the structural integration of intravitreally transplanted cells. PMID:19850833

  11. Alternative donor hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide for nonmalignant disorders

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Orly R.; Chen, Allen R.; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E.; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R.; Symons, Heather J.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic (allo-) hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft versus host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable to that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted eleven pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced intensity conditioning (RIC), alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allo-HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  12. Alternative-Donor Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Post-Transplantation Cyclophosphamide for Nonmalignant Disorders.

    PubMed

    Klein, Orly R; Chen, Allen R; Gamper, Christopher; Loeb, David; Zambidis, Elias; Llosa, Nicolas; Huo, Jeffrey; Dezern, Amy E; Steppan, Diana; Robey, Nancy; Holuba, Mary Jo; Cooke, Kenneth R; Symons, Heather J

    2016-05-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for many nonmalignant pediatric disorders, including hemoglobinopathies, bone marrow failure syndromes, and immunodeficiencies. There is great success using HLA-matched related donors for these patients; however, the use of alternative donors has been associated with increased graft failure, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and transplant-related mortality (TRM). HSCT using alternative donors with post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PT/Cy) for GVHD prophylaxis has been performed for hematologic malignancies with engraftment, GVHD, and TRM comparable with that seen with HLA-matched related donors. There are limited reports of HSCT in nonmalignant pediatric disorders other than hemoglobinopathies using alternative donors and PT/Cy. We transplanted 11 pediatric patients with life-threatening nonmalignant conditions using reduced-intensity conditioning, alternative donors, and PT/Cy alone or in combination with tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil. We observed limited GVHD, no TRM, and successful engraftment sufficient to eliminate manifestations of disease in all patients. Allogeneic HSCT using alternative donors and PT/Cy shows promise for curing nonmalignant disorders; development of prospective clinical trials to confirm these observations is warranted. PMID:26860634

  13. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant for AML: no impact of pre-transplant extramedullary disease on outcome.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S D; Zhang, M-J; Wang, H-L; Akpek, G; Copelan, E A; Freytes, C; Gale, R P; Hamadani, M; Inamoto, Y; Kamble, R T; Lazarus, H M; Marks, D I; Nishihori, T; Olsson, R F; Reshef, R; Ritchie, D S; Saber, W; Savani, B N; Seber, A; Shea, T C; Tallman, M S; Wirk, B; Bunjes, D W; Devine, S M; de Lima, M; Weisdorf, D J; Uy, G L

    2015-08-01

    The impact of extramedullary disease (EMD) in AML on the outcomes of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT) is unknown. Using data from the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, we compared the outcomes of patients who had EMD of AML at any time before transplant, with a cohort of AML patients without EMD. We reviewed data from 9797 AML patients including 814 with EMD from 310 reporting centers and 44 different countries, who underwent alloHCT between and 1995 and 2010. The primary outcome was overall survival (OS) after alloHCT. Secondary outcomes included leukemia-free survival (LFS), relapse rate and treatment-related mortality (TRM). In a multivariate analysis, the presence of EMD did not affect either OS (hazard ratio 1.00, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.91-1.09), LFS (0.98, 0.89-1.09), TRM (relative risk 0.92, 95% CI 0.80-1.16, P=0.23) or relapse (relative risk=1.03, 95% CI, 0.92-1.16; P=0.62). Furthermore, the outcome of patients with EMD was not influenced by the location, timing of EMD, or intensity of conditioning regimen. The presence of EMD in AML does not affect transplant outcomes and should not be viewed as an independent adverse prognostic feature. PMID:25915806

  14. Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Faro, Albert; Weymann, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Despite improvement in median life expectancy and overall health, some children with cystic fibrosis (CF) progress to end-stage lung or liver disease and become candidates for transplant. Transplants for children with CF hold the promise to extend and improve the quality of life, but barriers to successful long-term outcomes include shortage of suitable donor organs; potential complications from the surgical procedure and immunosuppressants; risk of rejection and infection; and the need for lifelong, strict adherence to a complex medical regimen. This article reviews the indications and complications of lung and liver transplantation in children with CF. PMID:27469184

  15. Hepatocyte Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mitry, Ragai R; Hughes, Robin D; Dhawan, Anil

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation (HTx) has been developed for use in liver-based metabolic disorders and in acute liver failure. Worldwide, there are around 80 patients that have been transplanted with hepatocytes. Almost all reported studies prove feasibility and safety of the procedure with short- to medium-term success. Availability of good quality hepatocytes (HCs) is the main limiting factor, and therefore alternative sources of cells such as stem cells are being investigated. Other limiting factors include cell engraftment, survival, and function of transplanted cells. It remains to be seen if progress in HTx research can overcome these hurdles leading to the wider use of the technique as an alternative to liver transplantation in the future. PMID:25755322

  16. Efficacy and Safety of a Preemptive Antiviral Therapy Strategy Based on Combined Virological and Immunological Monitoring for Active Cytomegalovirus Infection in Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, David; Amat, Paula; de la Cámara, Rafael; López, Javier; Vázquez, Lourdes; Serrano, David; Nieto, José; Rovira, Monserrat; Piñana, José Luis; Giménez, Estela; Solano, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Background. Preemptive antiviral therapy for active cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection in allogeneic stem cell transplant recipients (Allo-SCT) results in overtreatment and a high rate of recurrences. Monitoring of CMV-specific T-cell immunity may help to individualize treatments and minimize these problems. Methods. We conducted a prospective, multicenter, matched comparison-group study to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel strategy that consisted of interrupting anti-CMV therapy upon CMV DNAemia clearance and concurrent detection of phosphoprotein 65/immediate-early-1-specific interferon-γ-producing CD8+ T cells at levels of >1 cell/µL (within 30 days after the initiation of therapy). Immunological monitoring was performed on days +7, +14, +21, and +28 after treatment initiation. The primary endpoint was the cumulative incidence of recurrent DNAemia within 2 months after treatment cessation. Secondary endpoints were the length of antiviral treatment courses and the incidence of hematological toxicity. Results. Sixty-one patients were enrolled in the study group. Fifty-six patients were included in the matched-control group. Eleven patients (18%) fulfilled the criteria for antiviral treatment interruption. The cumulative incidence of recurrent CMV DNAemia was significantly lower (P = .02) in these patients than in patients in the comparative groups. Likewise, the length of antiviral treatment courses was significantly shorter in these patients than that in patients in the matched-control group (P = .003). No significant differences in the incidence of hematological toxicity was observed between the comparative groups. Conclusions. Our data support the clinical utility of combining immunological and virological monitoring for the management of CMV infection in a subset of Allo-SCT recipients. PMID:27419179

  17. Actinomycosis after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation despite penicillin prophylaxis.

    PubMed

    Barraco, F; Labussière-Wallet, H; Valour, F; Ducastelle-Leprêtre, S; Nicolini, F-E; Thomas, X; Ferry, T; Dumitrescu, O; Michallet, M; Ader, F

    2016-08-01

    Actinomycosis is a rare chronic and multifaceted disease caused by Actinomyces species frequently mimicking malignancy or other chronic granulomatous lung diseases. We report 4 original presentations of actinomycosis arising under supposed penicillin prophylaxis in allogeneic stem cell transplantation recipients. PMID:27203624

  18. High-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide to promote graft-host tolerance after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Luznik, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease, or GVHD, is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (alloHSCT) for the treatment of hematologic malignancies. Here, we describe a novel method for preventing GVHD after alloHSCT using high-dose, post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (Cy). Post-transplantation Cy promotes tolerance in alloreactive host and donor T cells, leading to suppression of both graft rejection and GVHD after alloHSCT. High-dose, post-transplantation Cy facilitates partially HLA-mismatched HSCT without severe GVHD and is effective as sole prophylaxis of GVHD after HLA-matched alloHSCT. By reducing the morbidity and mortality of alloHSCT, post-transplantation Cy may expand the applications of this therapy to the treatment of autoimmune diseases and non-malignant hematologic disorders such as sickle cell disease. PMID:20066512

  19. Localization of mesenchymal stromal cells dictates their immune or proinflammatory effects in kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Casiraghi, F; Azzollini, N; Todeschini, M; Cavinato, R A; Cassis, P; Solini, S; Rota, C; Morigi, M; Introna, M; Maranta, R; Perico, N; Remuzzi, G; Noris, M

    2012-09-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) have recently emerged as promising candidates for cell-based immunotherapy in solid-organ transplantation. However, optimal conditions and settings for fully harnessing MSC tolerogenic properties need to be defined. We recently reported that autologous MSC given posttransplant in kidney transplant patients was associated with transient renal insufficiency associated with intragraft recruitment of neutrophils and complement C3 deposition. Here, we moved back to a murine kidney transplant model with the aim to define the best timing of MSC infusion capable of promoting immune tolerance without negative effects on early graft function. We also investigated the mechanisms of the immunomodulatory and/or proinflammatory activities of MSC according to whether cells were given before or after transplant. Posttransplant MSC infusion in mice caused premature graft dysfunction and failed to prolong graft survival. In this setting, infused MSC localized mainly into the graft and associated with neutrophils and complement C3 deposition. By contrast, pretransplant MSC infusion induced a significant prolongation of kidney graft survival by a Treg-dependent mechanism. MSC-infused pretransplant localized into lymphoid organs where they promoted early expansion of Tregs. Thus, pretransplant MSC infusion may be a useful approach to fully exploit their immunomodulatory properties in kidney transplantation. PMID:22642544

  20. Conversion of monkey fibroblasts to transplantable telencephalic neuroepithelial stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ai, Zongyong; Xiang, Zheng; Li, Yuemin; Liu, Guoku; Wang, Hong; Zheng, Yun; Qiu, Xiaoyan; Zhao, Shumei; Zhu, Xiaoqing; Li, Yanhua; Ji, Weizhi; Li, Tianqing

    2016-01-01

    Non-human primates provide optimal models for the development of stem cell therapies. Although somatic cells have been converted into neural stem/progenitor cells, it is unclear whether telencephalic neuroepithelial stem cells (NESCs) with stable properties can be generated from fibroblasts in primate. Here we report that a combination of transcription factors (Oct4, Sox2, Klf4) with a new culture medium induces rhesus monkey fibroblasts into NESCs, which can develop into miniature neural tube (NT)-like structures at a cell level. Furthermore, single induced NESCs (iNESCs) can generate later-stage 3D-NTs after grown on matrigel in suspension culture. iNESCs express NT cell markers, have a unique gene expression pattern biasing towards telencephalic patterning, and give rise to cortical neurons. Via transplantation, single iNESCs can extensively survive, regenerate myelinated neuron axons and synapse structures in adult monkey striatum and cortex, and differentiate into cortical neurons. Successful transplantation is closely associated with graft regions and grafted cell identities. The ability to generate defined and transplantable iNESCs from primate fibroblasts under a defined condition with predictable fate choices will facilitate disease modeling and cell therapy. PMID:26584346

  1. Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jun; Lepski, Guilherme

    2013-01-01

    Cell transplantation, as a therapeutic intervention for spinal cord injury (SCI), has been extensively studied by researchers in recent years. A number of different kinds of stem cells, neural progenitors, and glial cells have been tested in basic research, and most have been excluded from clinical studies because of a variety of reasons, including safety and efficacy. The signaling pathways, protein interactions, cellular behavior, and the differentiated fates of experimental cells have been studied in vitro in detail. Furthermore, the survival, proliferation, differentiation, and effects on promoting functional recovery of transplanted cells have also been examined in different animal SCI models. However, despite significant progress, a “bench to bedside” gap still exists. In this paper, we comprehensively cover publications in the field from the last years. The most commonly utilized cell lineages were covered in this paper and specific areas covered include survival of grafted cells, axonal regeneration and remyelination, sensory and motor functional recovery, and electrophysiological improvements. Finally we also review the literature on the in vivo tracking techniques for transplanted cells. PMID:23484157

  2. Effect of Irradiation on Incidence of Post-Transplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder after Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation in Miniature Swine.

    PubMed

    Matar, Abraham J; Patil, Aarti R; Al-Musa, Ahmad; Hanekamp, Isabel; Sachs, David H; Huang, Christene A; Duran-Struuck, Raimon

    2015-10-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a major complication of clinical organ and cell transplantation. Conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens that significantly impair T cell immunity, including depleting antibodies and calcineurin inhibitors, increase the risk of PTLD after transplantation. Swine PTLD has been shown to closely resemble human PTLD in morphology, histology, and viral-driven reactivation of B cells. Previously, we reported high incidences of PTLD after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) in miniature swine recipients conditioned with thymic irradiation (TI) in addition to T cell depletion and cyclosporine A monotherapy after transplantation. Replacement of TI with 100 cGy of total body irradiation resulted in similar numbers of B cells early post-transplantation, greater numbers of T cells at day 0, and markedly decreased incidence of PTLD, suggesting that a threshold number of T cells may be necessary to prevent subsequent B cell proliferation and development of overt PTLD. Results from this large cohort of animals provide insight into the important effect of irradiation and T cell immunity on the incidence of PTLD after HCT and reinforce the pig model as a valuable tool for the study of PTLD and HCT. PMID:26210443

  3. Sexual health in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S M; Shaw, Bronwen E; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S; Savani, Bipin N; Rovó, Alicia

    2015-12-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  4. Sexual Health in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhuoyan; Mewawalla, Prerna; Stratton, Pamela; Yong, Agnes S.M.; Shaw, Bronwen E.; Hashmi, Shahrukh; Jagasia, Madan; Mohty, Mohamad; Majhail, Navneet S.; Savani, Bipin N.; Rovó, Alicia

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) plays a central role in patients with malignant and, increasingly, nonmalignant conditions. As the number of transplants increases and the survival rate improves, long-term complications are important to recognize and treat to maintain quality of life. Sexual dysfunction is a commonly described but relatively often underestimated complication after HSCT. Conditioning regimens, generalized or genital graft-versus-host disease, medications, and cardiovascular complications as well as psychosocial problems are known to contribute significantly to physical and psychological sexual dysfunction. Moreover, it is often a difficult topic for patients, their significant others, and health care providers to discuss. Early recognition and management of sexual dysfunction after HSCT can lead to improved quality of life and outcomes for patients and their partners. This review focuses on the risk factors for and treatment of sexual dysfunction after transplantation and provides guidance concerning how to approach and manage a patient with sexual dysfunction after HSCT. PMID:26372459

  5. The hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Indonesia: an unsolved dilemma.

    PubMed

    Hariman, H

    2008-08-01

    Allogeneic BMT was performed in Indonesia, but had to be stopped prematurely because of the small number of patients. In the beginning, only patients with sufficient financial resources to travel to western countries could undergo transplant procedures. When neighbouring countries (Singapore and Malaysia) began performing transplant, patients were referred to those centres. In both countries, the procedure is more economical and therefore patients come from a broader range of economic classes. The Indonesian hematologist must deal with the post-transplantation side effects, such as GVHD, which are mostly of the chronic type of GVHD. The types of the post-transplant complications do not differ too much from other centres and need the same treatment used in the transplant centres. Hematologists in Indonesia also treat complications of HSCT performed in other countries. When there is no recovery of HSCT development in Indonesia so far, many commercially oriented companies or centres from other countries see Indonesia as a good commercial market and offer services, some of which are not scientifically sound. One of the main problems is umbilical cord blood stem cell banking from foreign countries, which is eagerly offered to parents expecting a baby. Moreover, parents are not fully protected by law. In conclusion, Indonesia needs to revive its own HSCT program to serve and protect its own patients of being used as commercial targets by other countries. PMID:18724313

  6. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia in Adults.

    PubMed

    Speziali, Craig; Paulson, Kristjan; Seftel, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    The majority of adults with acute lymphoblastic leukemia will achieve a first complete remission (CR). However relapse is the most common cause of treatment failure. Outcomes after relapse remain poor, with long-term survival in the order of 10 %. Treatment decisions made at the time of first complete remission are thus critical to ensuring long-term survival. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) is effective at preventing relapse in many transplant recipients but is also associated with significant treatment related morbidity and mortality. Alternatively, ongoing systemic chemotherapy offers lower toxicity at the expense of increased relapse rates. Over the past decades, both the safety of transplant and the efficacy of non-transplant chemotherapy have improved. Emerging data show substantially improved outcomes for young adults treated with pediatric-inspired chemotherapy regimens that question the role of HCT in the upfront setting. In this review, we review the data supporting the role of allogeneic transplantation in adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and we propose a therapeutic algorithm for upfront therapy of adults with ALL. PMID:26984203

  7. Transplantation of adipocyte-derived stem cells in a hydrogel scaffold for the repair of cortical contusion injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Xue, Sha; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Hong-tian; Guo, Yan-wu; Zou, Yu-xi; Zhou, Zhen-jun; Jiang, Xiao-dan; Ke, Yi-quan; Xu, Ru-xiang

    2015-04-01

    Adipocyte-derived stem cells have emerged as a novel source of stem cell therapy for their autologous and readily accessible and pluripotent potential to differentiate into different lineages such as neural stem cells (NSCs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs). Transplantation of NSCs and EPCs has been promising for the repair of brain injury. We explored using co-transplanted hydrogel scaffold to improve the survival of the transplanted cells and recovery of neurological function. Adult Wistar rats were transplanted with EPC-hydrogel, NSC-hydrogel, NSC-EPC-hydrogel, EPC only, or NSC only 7 days after cortical contusion injury. Behavioral tests were performed to evaluate neurological function before, and 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after transplantation. Size of injury, extent of vascularization, as well as the survival and differentiation of the transplanted EPCs and NSCs, were evaluated at week 5. All transplantation groups displayed significantly better neurological function compared with the control groups. Improved neurological function correlated with significantly smaller injury volumes than that of the saline group. Using immunostaining, we have shown that while transplanted NSCs differentiated into both neurons and astrocytes, the EPCs were incorporated into vessel epithelia. The extent of reactive gliosis (based on glial fibrillary acidic protein immunostaining) was significantly reduced in all treatment groups (NSC-EPC-hydrogel, NSC-hydrogel, and EPC-hydrogel) when compared with the saline group, with the highest reduction in the NSC-EPC-hydrogel transplantation group. Thus, co-transplantation of hydrogel scaffold provides a more conducive environment for the survival and differentiation of NSCs and EPCs at the site of brain injury, leading to improved vascularization and better recovery of neurological function. PMID:25225747

  8. The role of physical rehabilitation in stem cell transplantation patients

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Amir; Asher, Arash; Bailey, Charlotte; Fu, Jack B.

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence for the role of physical rehabilitation in stem cell transplantation patients. We will also review the literature and discuss professional experiences on how rehabilitation can play a role in stem cell transplant care and survivorship. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is a procedure that has evolved substantially over the years to help treat multiple conditions, particularly hematologic malignancies. HCT can be very stressful on the body and can leave patients weakened and sometimes quite debilitated. Supportive care measures have advanced to improve the quality of life and overall survival of HCT survivors. One key component of improved supportive care is gaining increased attention, and that is physical medicine and rehabilitation. Its role in HCT survivorship care is expanding, and new insight and research within the discipline have focused on fatigue, inflammation, exercise, and the development of structured rehabilitation programs to improve the musculoskeletal sequelae of transplantation. This literature review has demonstrated the utility of physical rehabilitation in HCT, its impact on cancer-related fatigue, and to outline the current state of the literature on these topics. The paper delves into a background of HCT. Cancer-related fatigue in HCT is then discussed and summarized, and the role that exercise plays in modifying such fatigue is outlined. We then outline the models and the impact that physical rehabilitation may play in HCT recipients. PMID:25971213

  9. The role of physical rehabilitation in stem cell transplantation patients.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Amir; Asher, Arash; Bailey, Charlotte; Fu, Jack B

    2015-08-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the evidence for the role of physical rehabilitation in stem cell transplantation patients. We will also review the literature and discuss professional experiences on how rehabilitation can play a role in stem cell transplant care and survivorship. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT) is a procedure that has evolved substantially over the years to help treat multiple conditions, particularly hematologic malignancies. HCT can be very stressful on the body and can leave patients weakened and sometimes quite debilitated. Supportive care measures have advanced to improve the quality of life and overall survival of HCT survivors. One key component of improved supportive care is gaining increased attention, and that is physical medicine and rehabilitation. Its role in HCT survivorship care is expanding, and new insight and research within the discipline have focused on fatigue, inflammation, exercise, and the development of structured rehabilitation programs to improve the musculoskeletal sequelae of transplantation. This literature review has demonstrated the utility of physical rehabilitation in HCT, its impact on cancer-related fatigue, and to outline the current state of the literature on these topics. The paper delves into a background of HCT. Cancer-related fatigue in HCT is then discussed and summarized, and the role that exercise plays in modifying such fatigue is outlined. We then outline the models and the impact that physical rehabilitation may play in HCT recipients. PMID:25971213

  10. Role of allogeneic stem cell transplantation in mantle cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Jonathon B; Burns, Linda J; Bachanova, Veronika

    2015-04-01

    Despite a wide spectrum of treatment options, mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) remains a challenging hematologic malignancy to manage. Advances in front-line therapy, including the monoclonal antibody rituximab and increasing use of cytarabine, have improved remission rates. Autologous hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) can effectively consolidate remission of MCL, leading to encouraging survival beyond 5 yr. However, nearly all patients with MCL will relapse and require salvage therapy. Novel agents such as ibrutinib, bortezomib, and lenalidomide have dramatically expanded the options for treating relapsed MCL. In this review, we summarize the clinical evidence supporting the use of allogeneic donor HCT in MCL and make recommendations on indications for its use. Data suggest that allogeneic donor HCT is the only curative therapy for patients with poor prognosis or aggressive MCL. Patient selection, timing, and optimal use remain a matter of scientific debate and given the rapidly changing therapeutic landscape of MCL, the outcomes of allogeneic HCT should be interpreted in the context of novel therapeutics. PMID:25154430

  11. An In Vivo Characterization of Trophic Factor Production Following Neural Precursor Cell or Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Hawryluk, Gregory W.J.; Mothe, Andrea; Wang, Jian; Wang, Shelly; Tator, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Cellular transplantation strategies for repairing the injured spinal cord have shown consistent benefit in preclinical models, and human clinical trials have begun. Interactions between transplanted cells and host tissue remain poorly understood. Trophic factor secretion is postulated a primary or supplementary mechanism of action for many transplanted cells, however, there is little direct evidence to support trophin production by transplanted cells in situ. In the present study, trophic factor expression was characterized in uninjured, injured-untreated, injured-treated with transplanted cells, and corresponding control tissue from the adult rat spinal cord. Candidate trophic factors were identified in a literature search, and primers were designed for these genes. We examined in vivo trophin expression in 3 paradigms involving transplantation of either brain or spinal cord-derived neural precursor cells (NPCs) or bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Injury without further treatment led to a significant elevation of nerve growth factor (NGF), leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF), insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), and lower expression of vascular endothelial growth factor isoform A (VEGF-A) and platelet-derived growth factor-A (PDGF-A). Transplantation of NPCs led to modest changes in trophin expression, and the co-administration of intrathecal trophins resulted in significant elevation of the neurotrophins, glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), LIF, and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). BMSCs transplantation upregulated NGF, LIF, and IGF-1. NPCs isolated after transplantation into the injured spinal cord expressed the neurotrophins, ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), epidermal growth factor (EGF), and bFGF at higher levels than host cord. These data show that trophin expression in the spinal cord is influenced by injury and cell transplantation, particularly when combined with intrathecal trophin infusion

  12. Subretinal transplantation of putative retinal pigment epithelial cells derived from human embryonic stem cells in rat retinal degeneration model

    PubMed Central

    Park, Un Chul; Cho, Myung Soo; Park, Jung Hyun; Kim, Sang Jin; Ku, Seung-Yup; Choi, Young Min; Moon, Shin Yong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To differentiate the human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) in the defined culture condition and determine its therapeutic potential for the treatment of retinal degenerative diseases. Methods The embryoid bodies were formed from hESCs and attached on the matrigel coated culture dishes. The neural structures consisting neural precursors were selected and expanded to form rosette structures. The mechanically isolated neural rosettes were differentiated into pigmented cells in the media comprised of N2 and B27. Expression profiles of markers related to RPE development were analyzed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunostaining. Dissociated putative RPE cells (105 cells/5 µL) were transplanted into the subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model induced by intravenous sodium iodate injection. Animals were sacrificed at 1, 2, and 4 weeks after transplantation, and immnohistochemistry study was performed to verify the survival of the transplanted cells. Results The putative RPE cells derived from hESC showed characteristics of the human RPE cells morphologically and expressed molecular markers and associated with RPE fate. Grafted RPE cells were found to survive in the subretinal space up to 4 weeks after transplantation, and the expression of RPE markers was confirmed with immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Transplanted RPE cells derived from hESC in the defined culture condition successfully survived and migrated within subretinal space of rat retinal degeneration model. These results support the feasibility of the hESC derived RPE cells for cell-based therapies for retinal degenerative disease. PMID:22384445

  13. Accelerating immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2014-01-01

    Viral infections remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Pharmacologic agents are effective against some pathogens, but they are costly and can be associated with significant toxicities. Thus, many groups have investigated adoptive T-cell transfer as a means of hastening immune reconstitution and preventing and treating viral infections. This review discusses the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been explored. PMID:25505959

  14. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for auto immune rheumatic diseases.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Jain, Sandeep; Ravindran, Vinod

    2016-03-24

    Stem cells have their origins in the embryo and during the process of organogenesis, these differentiate into specialized cells which mature to form tissues. In addition, stem cell are characterized by an ability to indefinitely self renew. Stem cells are broadly classified into embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Adult stem cells can be genetically reprogrammed to form pluripotent stem cells and exist in an embroyonic like state. In the early phase of embryogenesis, human embryonic stem cells only exist transiently. Adult stem cells are omnipresent in the body and function to regenerate during the process of apoptosis or tissue repair. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells. Autoimmune responses are sustained due to the perennial persistence of tissue self autoantigens and/or auto reactive lymphocytes. Immune reset is a process leading to generation of fresh self-tolerant lymphocytes after chemotherapy induced elimination of self or autoreactive lymphocytes. This forms the basis for autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT). In the beginning HSCT had been limited to refractory autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) due to concern about transplant related mortality and morbidity. However HSCT for AIRD has come a long way with better understanding of patient selection, conditioning regime and supportive care. In this narrative review we have examined the available literature regarding the HSCT use in AIRD. PMID:27011918

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for auto immune rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Subramanian; Jain, Sandeep; Ravindran, Vinod

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells have their origins in the embryo and during the process of organogenesis, these differentiate into specialized cells which mature to form tissues. In addition, stem cell are characterized by an ability to indefinitely self renew. Stem cells are broadly classified into embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Adult stem cells can be genetically reprogrammed to form pluripotent stem cells and exist in an embroyonic like state. In the early phase of embryogenesis, human embryonic stem cells only exist transiently. Adult stem cells are omnipresent in the body and function to regenerate during the process of apoptosis or tissue repair. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are adult stem cells that form blood and immune cells. Autoimmune responses are sustained due to the perennial persistence of tissue self autoantigens and/or auto reactive lymphocytes. Immune reset is a process leading to generation of fresh self-tolerant lymphocytes after chemotherapy induced elimination of self or autoreactive lymphocytes. This forms the basis for autologous HSC transplantation (HSCT). In the beginning HSCT had been limited to refractory autoimmune rheumatic diseases (AIRD) due to concern about transplant related mortality and morbidity. However HSCT for AIRD has come a long way with better understanding of patient selection, conditioning regime and supportive care. In this narrative review we have examined the available literature regarding the HSCT use in AIRD. PMID:27011918

  16. Stem cell transplantation for lymphoma patients with HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Michieli, Mariagrazia; Mazzucato, Mario; Tirelli, Umberto; De Paoli, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    The advent of Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy (HAART) has radically changed incidence characteristics and prognosis of HIV-positive patients affected by lymphomas. At this time there is consensus in the literature that, in first line, HIV-positive patients should always be treated with curative intent preferentially following the same approach used in the HIV-negative counterpart. On the contrary, an approach of salvage therapy in HIV-positive lymphomas is still a matter of debate given that for a wide range of relapsed or resistant HIV-negative Hodgkin's disease (HD) and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) patients, autologous peripheral or allogeneic stem cell transplantation are among the established options. In the pre-HAART era, therapeutic options derived from pioneering experiences gave only anecdotal success, either when transplantation was used to cure lymphomas or to improve HIV infection itself. Concerns relating to the entity, quality, and kinetics of early and late immune reconstitutions and the possible worsening of underlying viroimmunological conditions were additional obstacles. Currently, around 100 relapsed or resistant HIV-positive lymphomas have been treated with an autologous peripheral stem cell transplantation (APSCT) in the HAART era. Published data compared favorably with any previous salvage attempt showing a percentage of complete remission ranging from 48% to 90%, and overall survival ranging from 36% to 85% at median follow-up approaching 3 years. However, experiences are still limited and have given somewhat confounding indications, especially concerning timing and patients' selection for APSCT and feasibility and outcome for allogeneic stem cell transplant. Moreover, little data exist on the kinetics of immunological reconstitution after APSCT or relevant to the outcome of HIV infection. The aim of this review is to discuss current knowledge of the role of allogeneic and autologous stem cell transplantation as a modality in the cure of

  17. Development of interspecies testicular germ-cell transplantation in flatfish.

    PubMed

    Pacchiarini, Tiziana; Sarasquete, Carmen; Cabrita, Elsa

    2014-06-01

    Interspecific testicular germ cell (TGC) transplantation was investigated in two commercial flatfish species. Testes from donor species (Senegalese sole) were evaluated using classical histological techniques (haematoxylin-eosin staining and haematoxylin-light green-orange G-acid fuchsine staining), in situ hybridisation and immunohistochemical analysis. Both Ssvasa1-2 mRNAs and SsVasa protein allowed the characterisation of TGCs, confirming the usefulness of the vasa gene in the detection of Senegalese sole TGCs. Xenogenic transplants were carried out using TGCs from one-year-old Senegalese sole into turbot larvae. Propidium iodide-SYBR-14 and 4',6'-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining showed that 87.98% of the extracted testicular cells were viable for microinjection and that 15.63% of the total recovered cells were spermatogonia. The vasa gene was characterised in turbot recipients using cDNA cloning. Smvasa mRNA was confirmed as a germ cell-specific molecular marker in this species. Smvasa expression analysis during turbot ontogeny was carried out before Senegalese sole TGC transplants into turbot larvae. Turbot larvae at 18 days after hatching (DAH) proved to be susceptible to manipulation procedures. High survival rates (83.75±15.90-100%) were obtained for turbot larvae at 27, 34 and 42 DAH. These data highlight the huge potential of this species for transplantation studies. Quantitative PCR was employed to detect Senegalese sole vasa mRNAs (Ssvasa1-2) in the recipient turbot larvae. The Ssvasa mRNAs showed a significant increase in relative expression in 42-DAH microinjected larvae three weeks after treatment, showing the proliferation of Senegalese sole spermatogonia in transplanted turbot larvae. PMID:23735683

  18. Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans in children: lessons from bronchiolitis obliterans after lung transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is an irreversible obstructive lung disease characterized by subepithelial inflammation and fibrotic narrowing of the bronchioles after lower respiratory tract infection during childhood, especially early childhood. Although diagnosis of PIBO should be confirmed by histopathology, it is generally based on history and clinical findings. Irreversible airway obstruction is demonstrated by decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second with an absent bronchodilator response, and by mosaic perfusion, air trapping, and/or bronchiectasis on computed tomography images. However, lung function tests using spirometry are not feasible in young children, and most cases of PIBO develop during early childhood. Further studies focused on obtaining serial measurements of lung function in infants and toddlers with a risk of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) after lower respiratory tract infection are therefore needed. Although an optimal treatment for PIBO has not been established, corticosteroids have been used to target the inflammatory component. Other treatment modalities for BO after lung transplantation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been studied in clinical trials, and the results can be extrapolated for the treatment of PIBO. Lung transplantation remains the final option for children with PIBO who have progressed to end-stage lung disease. PMID:26770220

  19. Exercise and stress management training prior to hematopoietic cell transplantation: Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network (BMT CTN) 0902.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, Paul B; Le-Rademacher, Jennifer; Jim, Heather; Syrjala, Karen; Wingard, John R; Logan, Brent; Wu, Juan; Majhail, Navneet S; Wood, William; Rizzo, J Douglas; Geller, Nancy L; Kitko, Carrie; Faber, Edward; Abidi, Muneer H; Slater, Susan; Horowitz, Mary M; Lee, Stephanie J

    2014-10-01

    Studies show that engaging patients in exercise and/or stress management techniques during hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) improves quality of life. The Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network tested the efficacy of training patients to engage in self-directed exercise and stress management during HCT. The study randomized 711 patients at 21 centers to receive 1 of 4 training interventions before HCT: a self-directed exercise program, a self-administered stress management program, both, or neither. Participants completed self-reported assessments at enrollment and up to 180 days after HCT. Randomization was stratified by center and transplant type. There were no differences in the primary endpoints of the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scales of the Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 at day +100 among the groups, based on an intention-to-treat analysis. There also were no differences in overall survival, days of hospitalization through day +100 post-HCT, or in other patient-reported outcomes, including treatment-related distress, sleep quality, pain, and nausea. Patients randomized to training in stress management reported more use of those techniques, but patients randomized to training in exercise did not report more physical activity. Although other studies have reported efficacy of more intensive interventions, brief training in an easy-to-disseminate format for either self-directed exercise or stress management was not effective in our trial. PMID:24910380

  20. Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans in children: lessons from bronchiolitis obliterans after lung transplantation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jinho

    2015-12-01

    Postinfectious bronchiolitis obliterans (PIBO) is an irreversible obstructive lung disease characterized by subepithelial inflammation and fibrotic narrowing of the bronchioles after lower respiratory tract infection during childhood, especially early childhood. Although diagnosis of PIBO should be confirmed by histopathology, it is generally based on history and clinical findings. Irreversible airway obstruction is demonstrated by decreased forced expiratory volume in 1 second with an absent bronchodilator response, and by mosaic perfusion, air trapping, and/or bronchiectasis on computed tomography images. However, lung function tests using spirometry are not feasible in young children, and most cases of PIBO develop during early childhood. Further studies focused on obtaining serial measurements of lung function in infants and toddlers with a risk of bronchiolitis obliterans (BO) after lower respiratory tract infection are therefore needed. Although an optimal treatment for PIBO has not been established, corticosteroids have been used to target the inflammatory component. Other treatment modalities for BO after lung transplantation or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation have been studied in clinical trials, and the results can be extrapolated for the treatment of PIBO. Lung transplantation remains the final option for children with PIBO who have progressed to end-stage lung disease. PMID:26770220

  1. Transplantation models to characterize the mechanisms of stem cell-induced islet regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Seneviratne, Ayesh K; Nasri, Grace N; Hess, David A

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes our current knowledge regarding the isolation human bone marrow-derived progenitor cells for the paracrine stimulation of islet regeneration after transplantation into immunodeficient mouse models of diabetes. By using high aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH(hi) ) activity, a conserved function in multiple stem cell lineages, a mixed population of hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor cells can be efficiently purified using flow cytometry. We describe in vitro approaches to characterize and expand these distinct cell types. Importantly, these cell types can be transplanted into immunodeficient mice rendered beta-cell deficient by streptozotocin (STZ) treatment, in order monitor functional recovery from hyperglycemia and to characterize endogenous islet regeneration via paracrine mechanisms. Herein, we provide detailed protocols for: (1) isolation and characterization of ALDH(hi) cells for the establishment of hematopoietic and multipotent-stromal progenitor lineages; (2) intravenous and intrapancreatic transplantation of human stem cell subtypes for the quantification of glycemic recovery in STZ-treated immunodeficient mice; and (3) immunohistochemical characterization of islet recovery via the stimulation of islet neogenic, beta-cell proliferative, and islet revascularization programs. Collectively, these systems can be used to support the pre-clinical development of human progenitor cell-based therapies to treat diabetes via islet regeneration. PMID:24510790

  2. SUCCESSFUL TRANSPLANTATION OF MOTONEURONS INTO THE PERIPHERAL NERVE DEPENDS ON THE NUMBER OF TRANSPLANTED CELLS

    PubMed Central

    KATO, SHUICHI; KURIMOTO, SHIGERU; NAKANO, TOMONORI; YONEDA, HIDEMASA; ISHII, HISAO; MITA-SUGIURA, SATOKA; HIRATA, HITOSHI

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transplantation of motoneurons (MN) into the peripheral nerve to provide a source of neurons for muscle reinnervation, termed motoneuron integrated striated muscle (MISM), may provide the potential to restore functional muscle activity, when combined with computer-programmed functional electrical stimulation (FES). The number of MNs required to restore innervation to denervated muscles in adult Fischer 344 rats was investigated by comparing two groups, one transplanted with 2 × 105 cells (group A) and the other with 1 × 106 cells (group B). Twelve weeks after transplantation, electrophysiological analysis, muscle function analysis, and tissue analysis were performed. The mean motor nerve conduction velocity was faster (12.4 ± 1.0 m/s vs. 8.5 ± 0.7 m/s, P = 0.011) and the mean amplitude of compound muscle action potential was larger (1.6 ± 0.4 mV vs. 0.7 ± 0.2 mV, P = 0.034) in group B. The dorsiflexed ankle angle was larger in group B (27 ± 5° vs. 75 ± 8°, P = 0.02). The mean myelinated axon number in the peroneal nerve and the proportion of reinnervated motor end plates were also greater in group B (317 ± 33 vs. 104 ± 17, 87.5 ± 3.4% vs. 40.6 ± 7.7%; P < 0.01, respectively). When sufficient MNs are transplanted into the peripheral nerve, MISM forms functional motor units. MISM, in conjunction with FES, provides a new treatment strategy for paralyzed muscles. PMID:25797991

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Cryopreserved Grafts: Adverse Reactions after Transplantation and Cryoprotectant Removal Prior to Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Heimfeld, Shelly; Gao, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been successfully developed as a part of treatment protocols for a large number of clinical indications, and cryopreservation of both autologous and allogeneic sources of HSC grafts is increasingly being employed to facilitate logistical challenges in coordinating the collection, processing, preparation, quality control testing and release of the final HSC product with delivery to the patient. Direct infusion of cryopreserved cell products into patients has been associated with the development of adverse reactions, ranging from relatively mild symptoms to much more serious, life-threatening complications, including allergic/gastrointestinal/cardiovascular/neurological complications, renal/hepatic dysfunctions, etc. In many cases the cryoprotective agent (CPA) used — which is typically dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), is believed to be the main causal agent of these adverse reactions and thus many studies recommend depletion of DMSO before cell infusion. In this paper, we will briefly review the history of HSC cryopreservation, the side effects reported after transplantation, along with advances in strategies for reducing the adverse reactions, including methods and devices for removal of DMSO. Strategies to minimize adverse effects include medication before and after transplantation, optimizing the infusion procedure, reducing the DMSO concentration or using alternative CPAs for cryopreservation, and removing DMSO prior to infusion. For DMSO removal, besides the traditional and widely applied method of centrifugation, new approaches have been explored in the last decade, such as filtration by spinning membrane, stepwise dilution-centrifugation using rotating syringe, diffusion-based DMSO extraction in microfluidic channels, dialysis and dilution-filtration through hollow-fiber dialyzers, and some instruments (CytoMate™, Sepax S-100, Cobe 2991, microfluidic channels, dilution-filtration system, etc.) as well

  4. Meta-analysis on autologous stem cell transplantation in the treatment of limb ischemic

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiuqin; Ying, Jilin; Wang, Yunan; Li, Wei; Wu, Yaojiang; Yao, Baoting; Liu, Ying; Gao, Hongkai; Zhang, Xiaomei

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Meta-analysis on the effectiveness of the autologous stem cell transplantation in curing limb ischemic. Method: Consulting papers relate to the autologous stem cell transplantation in curing limb ischemic in PubMed, CNKI, Wan-fang Data and VIP. Based on include and exclude standards, we arrange at least 2 evaluators sifting these papers separately, doing Quality evaluation and information extraction and then cross checking. Negotiate through a third party if any disagreement comes out. Review Manager 4.2 is used in Meta-analysis. Result: Involved 7 papers, all in English version. Patients involved all diagnosed as critical limb ischemia (CLI). Results show that no adverse reaction occurred during this study. Amputation rate in patients with stem cell group treatment is lower than control group (P < 0.05). And no notable difference in improving ABI (P > 0.05). Conclusions: Applying autologous stem cell transplantation in curing limb ischemic does not have obviously effectiveness in the improvement of ABI of the limb ischemic patients. But it can dramatically reduce the rate of amputation. So autologous stem cell transplantation is a good and safe choice for patients have no choice but amputation. PMID:26309525

  5. Outcomes of Autologous or Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Nishitha M.; Oluwole, Olalekan; Greer, John P.; Engelhardt, Brian G.; Jagasia, Madan H.; Savani, Bipin N.

    2016-01-01

    Transplant outcomes of autologous or allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) have not been elucidated as a single cohort in non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). We analyzed the outcomes of 270 adult recipients receiving auto (n=198) or allo-SCT (n=72) for NHL between year 2000 and 2010. Five-year overall survival for B-cell and T-cell NHL were 58% and 50%, respectively (allo-SCT 51% vs. 54% for B and T-cell NHL, and auto-SCT 60% vs. 47% for B and T-cell lymphoma, respectively) (p=NS). In multivariate analysis, number of chemotherapy regimens and disease status pre-SCT were independently associated with long-term outcome after SCT (for both auto and allo-SCT). We conclude that based on patient selection and disease related factors, the type of transplantation offered to patients can achieve long term survival highlighting the importance of further improvement in disease control and reducing procedure related mortality. The role of transplantation needs to be reevaluated in the era of targeted therapy. PMID:24096123

  6. Influence of the extracellular matrix on endogenous and transplanted stem cells after brain damage

    PubMed Central

    Roll, Lars; Faissner, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    The limited regeneration capacity of the adult central nervous system (CNS) requires strategies to improve recovery of patients. In this context, the interaction of endogenous as well as transplanted stem cells with their environment is crucial. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms could help to improve regeneration by targeted manipulation. In the course of reactive gliosis, astrocytes upregulate Glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and start, in many cases, to proliferate. Beside GFAP, subpopulations of these astroglial cells coexpress neural progenitor markers like Nestin. Although cells express these markers, the proportion of cells that eventually give rise to neurons is limited in many cases in vivo compared to the situation in vitro. In the first section, we present the characteristics of endogenous progenitor-like cells and discuss the differences in their neurogenic potential in vitro and in vivo. As the environment plays an important role for survival, proliferation, migration, and other processes, the second section of the review describes changes in the extracellular matrix (ECM), a complex network that contains numerous signaling molecules. It appears that signals in the damaged CNS lead to an activation and de-differentiation of astrocytes, but do not effectively promote neuronal differentiation of these cells. Factors that influence stem cells during development are upregulated in the damaged brain as part of an environment resembling a stem cell niche. We give a general description of the ECM composition, with focus on stem cell-associated factors like the glycoprotein Tenascin-C (TN-C). Stem cell transplantation is considered as potential treatment strategy. Interaction of transplanted stem cells with the host environment is critical for the outcome of stem cell-based therapies. Possible mechanisms involving the ECM by which transplanted stem cells might improve recovery are discussed in the last section. PMID:25191223

  7. Haploidentical Natural Killer Cells Infused before Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Myeloid Malignancies: A Phase I Trial.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dean A; Denman, Cecele J; Rondon, Gabriela; Woodworth, Glenda; Chen, Julianne; Fisher, Tobi; Kaur, Indreshpal; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Cao, Kai; Ciurea, Stefan; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation is an effective treatment for high-risk myeloid malignancies, but relapse remains the major post-transplantation cause of treatment failure. Alloreactive natural killer (NK) cells mediate a potent antileukemic effect and may also enhance engraftment and reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Haploidentical transplantations provide a setting in which NK cell alloreactivity can be manipulated, but they are associated with high rates of GVHD. We performed a phase I study infusing escalating doses of NK cells from an HLA haploidentical-related donor-selected for alloreactivity when possible-as a component of the preparative regimen for allotransplantation from a separate HLA-identical donor. The goal of infusing third-party alloreactive NK cells was to augment the antileukemic effect of the transplantation without worsening GVHD and, thus, improve the overall outcome of hematopoietic transplantation. Twenty-one patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), or chronic myelogenous leukemia refractory or beyond first remission received a preparative regimen with busulfan and fludarabine followed by infusion of apheresis-derived, antibody-selected, and IL-2-activated NK cells. Doses were initially based on total nucleated cell (TNC) content and later based on CD56(+) cells to reduce variability. CD56(+) content ranged from .02 to 8.32 × 10(6)/kg. IL-2, .5 × 10(6) units/m(2) subcutaneously was administered daily for 5 days in the final cohort (n = 10). CD3(+) cells in the NK cell product were required to be < 10(5)/kg. Median relapse-free, overall, and GVHD-free/relapse-free survival for all patients enrolled was 102, 233, and 89 days, respectively. Five patients are alive, 5 patients died of transplantation-related causes, and 11 patients died of relapse. Despite the small sample size, survival was highly associated with CD56(+) cells delivered (P = .022) and development of

  8. Relevance of regulatory T cell promotion of donor-specific tolerance in solid organ transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Sagoo, Pervinder; Lombardi, Giovanna; Lechler, Robert I.

    2012-01-01

    Current clinical strategies to control the alloimmune response after transplantation do not fully prevent induction of the immunological processes which lead to acute and chronic immune-mediated graft rejection, and as such the survival of a solid organ allograft is limited. Experimental research on naturally occurring CD4+CD25highFoxP3+ Regulatory T cells (Tregs) has indicated their potential to establish stable long-term graft acceptance, with the promise of providing a more effective therapy for transplant recipients. Current approaches for clinical use are based on the infusion of freshly isolated or ex vivo polyclonally expanded Tregs into graft recipients with an aim to redress the in vivo balance of T effector cells to Tregs. However mounting evidence suggests that regulation of donor-specific immunity may be central to achieving immunological tolerance. Therefore, the next stages in optimizing translation of Tregs to organ transplantation will be through the refinement and development of donor alloantigen-specific Treg therapy. The altering kinetics and intensity of alloantigen presentation pathways and alloimmune priming following transplantation may indeed influence the specificity of the Treg required and the timing or frequency at which it needs to be administered. Here we review and discuss the relevance of antigen-specific regulation of alloreactivity by Tregs in experimental and clinical studies of tolerance and explore the concept of delivering an optimal Treg for the induction and maintenance phases of achieving transplantation tolerance. PMID:22811678

  9. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation.

    PubMed

    Strong, D Michael; Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-11-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with mis-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  10. Coding and traceability for cells, tissues and organs for transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shinozaki, Naoshi

    2010-01-01

    Modern transplantation of cells, tissues and organs has been practiced within the last century achieving both life saving and enhancing results. Associated risks have been recognized including infectious disease transmission, malignancy, immune mediated disease and graft failure. This has resulted in establishment of government regulation, professional standard setting and establishment of vigilance and surveillance systems for early detection and prevention and to improve patient safety. The increased transportation of grafts across national boundaries has made traceability difficult and sometimes impossible. Experience during the first Gulf War with miss-identification of blood units coming from multiple countries without standardized coding and labeling has led international organizations to develop standardized nomenclature and coding for blood. Following this example, cell therapy and tissue transplant practitioners have also moved to standardization of coding systems. Establishment of an international coding system has progressed rapidly and implementation for blood has demonstrated multiple advantages. WHO has held two global consultations on human cells and tissues for transplantation, which recognized the global circulation of cells and tissues and growing commercialization and the need for means of coding to identify tissues and cells used in transplantation, are essential for full traceability. There is currently a wide diversity in the identification and coding of tissue and cell products. For tissues, with a few exceptions, product terminology has not been standardized even at the national level. Progress has been made in blood and cell therapies with a slow and steady trend towards implementation of the international code ISBT 128. Across all fields, there are now 3,700 licensed facilities in 66 countries. Efforts are necessary to encourage the introduction of a standardized international coding system for donation identification numbers, such as ISBT

  11. Pediatric donor cell leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in AML patient from related donor.

    PubMed

    Bobadilla-Morales, Lucina; Pimentel-Gutiérrez, Helia J; Gallegos-Castorena, Sergio; Paniagua-Padilla, Jenny A; Ortega-de-la-Torre, Citlalli; Sánchez-Zubieta, Fernando; Silva-Cruz, Rocio; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; González-Ramella, Oscar; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Here we present a male patient with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially diagnosed as M5 and with karyotype 46,XY. After induction therapy, he underwent a HLA-matched allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and six years later he relapsed as AML M1 with an abnormal karyotype //47,XX,+10[2]/47,XX,+11[3]/48,XX,+10,+11[2]/46,XX[13]. Based on this, we tested the possibility of donor cell origin by FISH and molecular STR analysis. We found no evidence of Y chromosome presence by FISH and STR analysis consistent with the success of the allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from the female donor. FISH studies confirmed trisomies and no evidence of MLL translocation either p53 or ATM deletion. Additionally 28 fusion common leukemia transcripts were evaluated by multiplex reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assay and were not rearranged. STR analysis showed a complete donor chimerism. Thus, donor cell leukemia (DCL) was concluded, being essential the use of cytological and molecular approaches. Pediatric DCL is uncommon, our patient seems to be the sixth case and additionally it presented a late donor cell leukemia appearance. Different extrinsic and intrinsic mechanisms have been considered to explain this uncommon finding as well as the implications to the patient. PMID:25674158

  12. Comparison of Regulatory T Cells in Hemodialysis Patients and Healthy Controls: Implications for Cell Therapy in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Afzali, Behdad; Edozie, Francis C.; Fazekasova, Henrieta; Scottà, Cristiano; Mitchell, Peter J.; Canavan, James B.; Kordasti, Shahram Y.; Chana, Prabhjoat S.; Ellis, Richard; Lord, Graham M.; John, Susan; Hilton, Rachel; Lechler, Robert I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Cell-based therapy with natural (CD4+CD25hiCD127lo) regulatory T cells to induce transplant tolerance is now technically feasible. However, regulatory T cells from hemodialysis patients awaiting transplantation may be functionally/numerically defective. Human regulatory T cells are also heterogeneous, and some are able to convert to proinflammatory Th17 cells. This study addresses the suitability of regulatory T cells from hemodialysis patients for cell-based therapy in preparation for the first clinical trials in renal transplant recipients (the ONE Study). Design, setting, participants, & measurements Healthy controls and age- and sex-matched hemodialysis patients without recent illness/autoimmune disease on established, complication-free hemodialysis for a minimum of 6 months were recruited. Circulating regulatory T cells were studied by flow cytometry to compare the regulatory T cell subpopulations. Regulatory T cells from members of each group were compared for suppressive function and plasticity (IL-17–producing capacity) before and after in vitro expansion with and without Rapamycin, using standard assays. Results Both groups had similar total regulatory T cells and subpopulations I and III. In each subpopulation, regulatory T cells expressed similar levels of the function-associated markers CD27, CD39, HLA-DR, and FOXP3. Hemodialysis regulatory T cells were less suppressive, expanded poorly compared with healthy control regulatory T cells, and produced IL-17 in the absence of Rapamycin. However, Rapamycin efficiently expanded hemodialysis regulatory T cells to a functional and stable cell product. Conclusions Rapamycin-based expansion protocols should enable clinical trials of cell-based immunotherapy for the induction of tolerance to renal allografts using hemodialysis regulatory T cells. PMID:23580782

  13. Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation for Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Vijaya Raj

    2016-06-01

    Observational studies indicate a similar or higher probability of disease control, higher risk of non-relapse mortality (NRM), and similar overall survival (OS) with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (alloSCT), compared to autologous SCT, in relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Careful patient selection and utilization of reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) alloSCT may allow reduction in NRM. The optimal conditioning regimen and the roles of radioimmunotherapy, T cell depletion, and tandem SCT continue to be explored. Recent studies highlight comparable results with haploidentical SCT and cord blood SCT, thus providing alternate donor sources. Disease relapse and late effects continue to be major problems. Optimization of SCT techniques (e.g., improved graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis), post-transplant monitoring of minimal residual disease, and post-transplant maintenance, or pre-emptive therapy (e.g., with novel therapies) are emerging strategies to reduce the risk of relapse. Survivorship management using a multidisciplinary care approach, adoption of healthy lifestyle, and socioeconomic counseling are integral parts of a high-quality transplant program. PMID:26983957

  14. Therapeutic Efficacy of Stem Cells Transplantation in Diabetes: Role of Heme Oxygenase

    PubMed Central

    Raffaele, Marco; Li Volti, Giovanni; Barbagallo, Ignazio A.; Vanella, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The growing data obtained from in vivo studies and clinical trials demonstrated the benefit of adult stem cells transplantation in diabetes; although an important limit is represented by their survival after the transplant. To this regard, recent reports suggest that genetic manipulation of stem cells prior to transplantation can lead to enhanced survival and better engraftment. The following review proposes to stimulate interest in the role of heme oxygenase-1 over-expression on transplantation of stem cells in diabetes, focusing on the clinical potential of heme oxygenase protein and activity to restore tissue damage and/or to improve the immunomodulatory properties of transplanted stem cells. PMID:27547752

  15. An update on stem cell transplantation in autoimmune rheumatologic disorders.

    PubMed

    Mascarenhas, Sheryl; Avalos, Belinda; Ardoin, Stacy P

    2012-12-01

    Stem cell transplant (SCT) has long been the standard of care for several hematologic, immunodeficient, and oncologic disorders. Recently, SCT has become an increasingly utilized therapy for refractory autoimmune rheumatologic disorders (ARDs). The efficacy of SCT in ARDs has been attributed to resetting an aberrant immune system either through direct immune replacement with hematopoietic stem cells or through immunomodulation with mesenchymal stem cells. Among ARDs, refractory systemic sclerosis (SSc) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) are the most common indications for SCT. SCT has also been used in refractory rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory myopathies, antiphospholipid syndrome, granulomatosis with polyangiitis, and pediatric ARDs. Complete responses have been reported in approximately 30 % of patients in all disease categories. Transplant-related mortality, however, remains a concern. Future large multi-center prospective randomized clinical trials will help to better define the specific role of SCT in the treatment of patients with ARDs. PMID:22956390

  16. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Primary Immunodeficiencies By Elizabeth Kang and Andrew Gennery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Elizabeth; Gennery, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation has been shown to be curative for well described as well as newly discovered immunodeficiencies. However it is difficulty to define a universal transplant regimen given the rarity of these disorders and the varied pathophysiology these disorders encompass. This review will discuss those primary immunodeficiencies most commonly treated by hematopoietic stem cell transplant and describe the transplant issues specific to these disorders. PMID:25459185

  17. Cell therapy for liver disease: From liver transplantation to cell factory.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Stuart J; Gupta, Sanjeev; Dhawan, Anil

    2015-04-01

    Work over several decades has laid solid foundations for the advancement of liver cell therapy. To date liver cell therapy in people has taken the form of hepatocyte transplantation for metabolic disorders with a hepatic basis, and for acute or chronic liver failure. Although clinical trials using various types of autologous cells have been implemented to promote liver regeneration or reduce liver fibrosis, clear evidence of therapeutic benefits have so far been lacking. Cell types that have shown efficacy in preclinical models include hepatocytes, liver sinusoidal endothelial cells, mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and macrophages. However, positive results in animal models have not always translated through to successful clinical therapies and more realistic preclinical models need to be developed. Studies defining the optimal repopulation by transplanted cells, including routes of cell transplantation, superior engraftment and proliferation of transplanted cells, as well as optimal immunosuppression regimens are required. Tissue engineering approaches to transplant cells in extrahepatic locations have also been proposed. The derivation of hepatocytes from pluripotent or reprogrammed cells raises hope that donor organ and cell shortages could be overcome in the future. Critical hurdles to be overcome include the production of hepatocytes from pluripotent cells with equal functional capacity to primary hepatocytes and long-term phenotypic stability in vivo. PMID:25920085

  18. Pros and cons of stem cell transplantation for autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Thomas, E D

    1997-05-01

    The data and discussion at this symposium have provided a most useful analysis of the autoimmune diseases and their potential for therapy by stem cell transplantation. These diseases are characterized by threat to life and particularly by chronic, painful and debilitating courses that warrant aggressive therapy. Selection of patients will be difficult because of the variable disease course and the necessity to choose patients who still have reversible disease. The safety of both autologous and allogeneic stem cell grafting has progressed to the point where, in many cases, the risks of the disease far outweigh those of transplantation. In my opinion the data presented at this symposium show that we should proceed cautiously with both autologous and allogeneic stem cell grafts. Purified stem cells, which have the advantage of being free of lymphocytes, should be used for the first series of autologous studies. These studies are attractive because of the low risk of transplant related complications but are less likely to be curative. Allogeneic grafts from perfectly matched donors have the advantage of providing a completely new immunological environment. For this reason, I believe that curative results are most probable after allogeneic stem cell engraftment. Emphasis should be on the identification of patients with HLA matched siblings. Initially, these studies will be carried out in patients with advanced disease, as was the case in the early days of transplantation for leukemia. In considering more aggressive treatment for autoimmune diseases it appears there are 3 possible approaches. First, and most conservative, is to store peripheral blood stem cells for possible future marrow rescue and then to give higher doses of immunosuppressive agents, especially in combination, to see whether there is an improvement over conventional doses. Second, for those who prefer a conservative approach to stem cell transplantation, is to give myeloablative and lymphoablative

  19. Stem cell transplantation in genetically linked regulatory T-cell disorders.

    PubMed

    Shenoy, Shalini

    2008-01-01

    T-regulatory disorders are a heterogenous group characterized by autoimmune and allergic manifestations of varying onset, severity, and progression. The advent of sophisticated molecular and immunologic diagnostic techniques has resulted in accurate elucidation of etiopathogenesis of many immunoregulatory disorders previously clubbed under the autoimmune umbrella. The severity of presentation and progression, early morbidity and mortality, poor quality of life, and frequent refractoriness to immunosuppressive therapy has prompted studies of stem cell transplantation in many immunoregulatory disorders. The benefits of autologous or allogeneic transplantation are related to either suppression and reprogramming of the immune system (autologous transplant) or replacement of missing elements of immune regulation (allogeneic transplants). Transplant methods have steadily improved through a series of studies and trials to have the benefits of this approach outweigh the risks of procedure-related toxicities. This article summarizes the current status and the future goals of stem cell transplantation for T-cell immunoregulatory disorders and reviews advances in disease detection, targeted transplant strategies and novel approaches, and the pros and cons of transplant in this field. PMID:18802350

  20. Current progress in stem cell research and its potential for islet cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leung, P S; Ng, K Y

    2013-01-01

    Diabetes is characterized by insulin deficiency concomitant with hyperglycemia due to reduced islet cell mass and/or dysfunction. Currently, insulin replacement is the first-line treatment option for patients with type 1 and a severe form of type 2 diabetes. Treatment by insulin injection is generally effective but nonphysiological, and has the potential of producing chronic complications. On the other hand, islet transplantation can maintain normoglycemia without hypoglycemic side effects, potentially freeing diabetic patients of insulin dependence. In practice, islet transplantation remains hindered by the lack of organ donors and transplant rejection concerns. Recent advances in stem cell research and regenerative medicine, however, offer promise for the clinical application of islet cell transplantation. This review article offers a critical appraisal of current molecular induction approaches, such as directed differentiation, microenvironment induction, and genetic modification, which mimic islet cell development by inducing a variety of stem cells; they include embryonic stem cells, induced pluripotent stem cells, and various tissue-derived stem cells to become functional and transplantable insulin-producing islet cells. Despite good progress, several obstacles remain to be overcome before islet transplantation can be translated into a therapy for human patients, including, but are not limited to, immunogenicity and risk of tumorogenesis. PMID:22834839

  1. Optimal timing of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Alessandrino, Emilio Paolo; Porta, Matteo G Della; Malcovati, Luca; Jackson, Christopher H; Pascutto, Cristiana; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Teresa van Lint, Maria; Falda, Michele; Bernardi, Massimo; Onida, Francesco; Guidi, Stefano; Iori, Anna Paola; Cerretti, Raffaella; Marenco, Paola; Pioltelli, Pietro; Angelucci, Emanuele; Oneto, Rosi; Ripamonti, Francesco; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Bosi, Alberto; Cazzola, Mario

    2013-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) represents the only curative treatment for patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), but involves non-negligible morbidity and mortality. Registry studies have shown that advanced disease stage at transplantation is associated with inferior overall survival. To define the optimal timing of allogeneic HSCT, we carried out a decision analysis by studying 660 patients who received best supportive care and 449 subjects who underwent transplantation. Risk assessment was based on both the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) and the World Health Organization classification-based Prognostic Scoring System (WPSS). We used a continuous-time multistate Markov model to describe the natural history of disease and evaluate the effect of allogeneic HSCT on survival. This model estimated life expectancy from diagnosis according to treatment policy at different risk stages. Relative to supportive care, estimated life expectancy increased when transplantation was delayed from the initial stages until progression to intermediate-1 IPSS-risk or to intermediate WPSS-risk stage, and then decreased for higher risks. Modeling decision analysis on WPSS versus IPSS allowed better estimation of the optimal timing of transplantation. These observations indicate that allogeneic HSCT offers optimal survival benefits when the procedure is performed before MDS patients progress to advanced disease stages. Am. J. Hematol. 88:581–588, 2013. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:23606215

  2. Nonparametric methods for analyzing recurrent gap time data with application to infections after hematopoietic cell transplant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Hyun; Luo, Xianghua; Huang, Chiung-Yu; DeFor, Todd E; Brunstein, Claudio G; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-06-01

    Infection is one of the most common complications after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Many patients experience infectious complications repeatedly after transplant. Existing statistical methods for recurrent gap time data typically assume that patients are enrolled due to the occurrence of an event of interest, and subsequently experience recurrent events of the same type; moreover, for one-sample estimation, the gap times between consecutive events are usually assumed to be identically distributed. Applying these methods to analyze the post-transplant infection data will inevitably lead to incorrect inferential results because the time from transplant to the first infection has a different biological meaning than the gap times between consecutive recurrent infections. Some unbiased yet inefficient methods include univariate survival analysis methods based on data from the first infection or bivariate serial event data methods based on the first and second infections. In this article, we propose a nonparametric estimator of the joint distribution of time from transplant to the first infection and the gap times between consecutive infections. The proposed estimator takes into account the potentially different distributions of the two types of gap times and better uses the recurrent infection data. Asymptotic properties of the proposed estimators are established. PMID:26575402

  3. Factors affecting long-term outcome after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation for acute myelogenous leukaemia: a retrospective study of 172 adult patients reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry.

    PubMed

    Greinix, Hildegard T; Nachbaur, David; Krieger, Otto; Eibl, Margit; Knöbl, Paul; Kalhs, Peter; Lutz, Dieter; Linkesch, Werner; Niederwieser, Dietger; Hinterberger, Wolfgang; Lechner, Klaus; Rosenmayr, Agathe; Gritsch, Beate

    2002-06-01

    Between 1982 and 2000, 172 patients with acute myelogenous leukaemia (AML) received haematopoietic stem cell transplants (SCT) from related (n = 132) or unrelated (n = 40) donors at four Austrian transplant centres and their results were reported to the Austrian Stem Cell Transplantation Registry. Conditioning for SCT consisted of cyclophosphamide and total body irradiation in 156 (91%) patients. Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) prophylaxis was with standard cyclosporine and methotrexate in 95 (55%) patients. Median post-transplant follow-up was 5.6 years (range, 0.2--16.7). Multivariate analysis of transplant-related mortality (TRM) identified four variables associated with a lower risk: disease status of first complete remission (CR) at SCT, patient age of 45 years and younger, transplant performed during or after 1995, and lack of acute GVHD. Variables associated with significantly improved leukaemia-free survival were: bone marrow as the stem cell source, disease status of first CR at SCT, and occurrence of chronic GVHD. In multivariate analysis, transplantation performed during or after 1995, first CR at SCT, occurrence of limited chronic GVHD and lack of acute GVHD grades III to IV were associated with increased overall survival. Based on these analyses, options for the improvement of results obtained with allogeneic SCT in patients with AML could be defined. PMID:12060131

  4. Risk Factors and Utility of a Risk-Based Algorithm for Monitoring Cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr Virus, and Adenovirus Infections in Pediatric Recipients after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Rustia, Evelyn; Violago, Leah; Jin, Zhezhen; Foca, Marc D; Kahn, Justine M; Arnold, Staci; Sosna, Jean; Bhatia, Monica; Kung, Andrew L; George, Diane; Garvin, James H; Satwani, Prakash

    2016-09-01

    Infectious complications, particularly viral infections, remain a significant cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (alloHCT). Only a handful of studies in children have analyzed the risks for and impact of viremia on alloHCT-related outcomes. We conducted a retrospective study of 140 pediatric patients undergoing alloHCT to investigate the incidence of and risk factors for cytomegalovirus (CMV), adenovirus (ADV), and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) viremia and viral disease after alloHCT. Furthermore, we assessed the impact of viremia on days of hospitalization and develop an algorithm for routine monitoring of viremia. Patients were monitored before alloHCT and then weekly for 180 days after alloHCT. Patients were considered to have viremia if CMV were > 600 copies/mL, EBV were > 1000 copies/mL, or ADV were > 1000 copies/mL on 2 consecutive PCRs. The overall incidences of viremia and viral disease in all patients from day 0 to +180 after alloHCT were 41.4% (n = 58) and 17% (n = 24), respectively. The overall survival for patients with viremia and viral disease was significantly lower compared with those without viremia (58% versus 74.2%, P = .03) and viral disease (48.2% versus 71.2%, P = .024). We identified that pretransplantation CMV risk status, pre-alloHCT viremia, and use of alemtuzumab were associated with the risk of post-alloHCT viremia. The average hospitalization days in patients with CMV risk (P = .011), viremia (P = .024), and viral disease (P = .002) were significantly higher. The algorithm developed from our data can potentially reduce viral PCR testing by 50% and is being studied prospectively at our center. Improved preventative treatment strategies for children at risk of viremia after alloHCT are needed. PMID:27252110

  5. Myocardial regeneration by transplantation of modified endothelial progenitor cells expressing SDF-1 in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Schuh, Alexander; Kroh, Andreas; Konschalla, Simone; Liehn, Elisa A; Sobota, Radoslav M; Biessen, Erik AL; Bot, Ilze; Sönmez, Tolga Taha; Schober, Andreas; Marx, Nikolaus; Weber, Christian; Sasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Cell based therapy has been shown to attenuate myocardial dysfunction after myocardial infarction (MI) in different acute and chronic animal models. It has been further shown that stromal-cell derived factor-1α (SDF-1α) facilitates proliferation and migration of endogenous progenitor cells into injured tissue. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of exogenously applied and endogenously mobilized cells in a regenerative strategy for MI therapy. Lentivirally SDF-1α-infected endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) were injected after 90 min. of ligation and reperfusion of the left anterior descending artery (LAD) intramyocardial and intracoronary using a new rodent catheter system. Eight weeks after transplantation, echocardiography and isolated heart studies revealed a significant improvement of LV function after intramyocardial application of lentiviral with SDF-1 infected EPCs compared to medium control. Intracoronary application of cells did not lead to significant differences compared to medium injected control hearts. Histology showed a significantly elevated rate of apoptotic cells and augmented proliferation after transplantation of EPCs and EPCs + SDF-1α in infarcted myocardium. In addition, a significant increased density of CD31+ vessel structures, a lower collagen content and higher numbers of inflammatory cells after transplantation of SDF-1 transgenic cells were detectable. Intramyocardial application of lentiviral-infected EPCs is associated with a significant improvement of myocardial function after infarction, in contrast to an intracoronary application. Histological results revealed a significant augmentation of neovascularization, lower collagen content, higher numbers of inflammatory cells and remarkable alterations of apoptotic/proliferative processes in infarcted areas after cell transplantation. PMID:22288686

  6. Risk factors for lymphoproliferative disorders after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Ethel S.; Rizzo, J. Douglas; Socié, Gérard; Banks, Peter M.; Sobocinski, Kathleen A.; Horowitz, Mary M.; Jaffe, Elaine S.; Kingma, Douglas W.; Travis, Lois B.; Flowers, Mary E.; Martin, Paul J.; Deeg, H. Joachim; Curtis, Rochelle E.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated 26 901 patients who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) at 271 centers worldwide to define patterns of posttransplantation lymphoproliferative disorders (PTLDs). PTLDs developed in 127 recipients, with 105 (83%) cases occurring within 1 year after transplantation. In multivariate analyses, we confirmed that PTLD risks were strongly associated (P < .001) with T-cell depletion of the donor marrow, antithymocyte globulin (ATG) use, and unrelated or HLA-mismatched grafts (URD/HLA mismatch). Significant associations were also confirmed for acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease. The increased risk associated with URD/HLA-mismatched donors (RR = 3.8) was limited to patients with T-cell depletion or ATG use (P = .004). New findings were elevated risks for age 50 years or older at transplantation (RR = 5.1; P < .001) and second transplantation (RR = 3.5; P < .001). Lower risks were found for T-cell depletion methods that remove both T and B cells (alemtuzumab and elutriation, RR = 3.1; P = .025) compared with other methods (RR = 9.4; P = .005 for difference). The cumulative incidence of PTLDs was low (0.2%) among 21 686 patients with no major risk factors, but increased to 1.1%, 3.6%, and 8.1% with 1, 2, and more than 3 major risk factors, respectively. Our findings identify subgroups of patients who underwent allogeneic HCT at elevated risk of PTLDs for whom prospective monitoring of Epstein-Barr virus activation and early treatment intervention may be particularly beneficial. PMID:19264919

  7. Reduced-intensity conditioning for hematopoietic cell transplantation of chronic granulomatous disease.

    PubMed

    Oshrine, Benjamin; Morsheimer, Megan; Heimall, Jennifer; Bunin, Nancy

    2014-08-30

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is the only available curative therapy for chronic granulomatous disease (CGD), but its use is limited by transplant-related mortality (TRM) in patients who often come to transplant with existing infections or organ dysfunction. Reduction in the intensity of the preparative regimen mitigates these risks, but increases the potential for mixed donor-recipient chimerism (MC) that may progress to graft loss. Recently a busulfan-based reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) regimen has been described with excellent survival and little MC. We report our experience with a similar RIC regimen at our institution, demonstrating problems with donor chimerism and graft loss. Pediatr Blood Cancer © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:25175046

  8. ABO-Mismatched Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Worel, Nina

    2016-01-01

    Summary Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a curative option for a variety of malignant and non-malignant hematological and congenital diseases. Due to the fact that the human leukocyte antigen system is inherited independently of the blood group system, approximately 40-50% of all HSCTs are performed across the ABO blood group barrier. The expected immune-hematological consequences after transplantation of an ABO-mismatched stem cell graft are immediate and delayed hemolytic complications due to presence of isohemagglutinins or passenger lymphocyte syndrome. The risks of these complications can partially be prevented by graft manipulation and appropriate transfusion support. Dependent on the kind of ABO mismatch, different effects on engraftment have been observed, e.g. delayed red blood cell recovery and pure red cell aplasia. Data on incidence of acute graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), non-relapse mortality, relapse, and overall survival are inconsistent as most studies include limited patient numbers, various graft sources, and different conditioning and GVHD prophylaxis regimens. This makes it difficult to detect a consistent effect of ABO-mismatched transplantation in the literature. However, knowledge of expectable complications and close monitoring of patients helps to detect problems early and to treat patients efficiently, thus reducing the number of fatal or life-threatening events caused by ABO-mismatched HSCT. PMID:27022317

  9. SHIPi Enhances Autologous and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Sandra; Brooks, Robert; Gumbleton, Matthew; Park, Mi-Young; Russo, Christopher M.; Howard, Kyle T.; Chisholm, John D.; Kerr, William G.

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a highly effective procedure enabling long-term survival for patients with hematologic malignancy or heritable defects. Although there has been a dramatic increase in the success rate of HSCT over the last two decades, HSCT can result in serious, sometimes untreatable disease due to toxic conditioning regimens and Graft-versus-Host-Disease. Studies utilizing germline knockout mice have discovered several candidate genes that could be targeted pharmacologically to create a more favorable environment for transplant success. SHIP1 deficiency permits improved engraftment of hematopoietic stem-progenitor cells (HS-PCs) and produces an immunosuppressive microenvironment ideal for incoming allogeneic grafts. The recent development of small molecule SHIP1 inhibitors has opened a different therapeutic approach by creating transient SHIP1-deficiency. Here we show that SHIP1 inhibition (SHIPi) mobilizes functional HS-PC, accelerates hematologic recovery, and enhances donor HS-PC engraftment in both allogeneic and autologous transplant settings. We also observed the expansion of key cell populations known to suppress host-reactive cells formed during engraftment. Therefore, SHIPi represents a non-toxic, new therapeutic that has significant potential to improve the success and safety of therapies that utilize autologous and allogeneic HSCT. PMID:26052545

  10. Time-dependent effects of clinical predictors in unrelated hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Fuerst, Daniel; Mueller, Carlheinz; Beelen, Dietrich W; Neuchel, Christine; Tsamadou, Chrysanthi; Schrezenmeier, Hubert; Mytilineos, Joannis

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a multifactorial process. Some of the predictors exhibit time-dependent effects. We present a systematic analysis and description of selected clinical predictors influencing outcome in a time-dependent manner based on an analysis of registry data from the German Registry for Stem Cell Transplantation. A total of 14,951 patients with acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, myelodysplastic syndrome and non-Hodgkin lymphoma transplanted with peripheral blood stem cells or bone marrow grafts were included. Multivariate Cox regression models were tested for time-dependent effects within each diagnosis group. Predictors not satisfying the proportional hazards assumption were modeled in a time-dependent manner, extending the Cox regression models. Similar patterns occurred in all diagnosis groups. Patients with a poor Karnofsky performance score (<80) had a high risk for early mortality until day 139 following transplantation (HR 2.42, CI: 2.19–2.68; P<0.001) compared to patients with a good Karnofsky performance score (80–100). Afterwards the risk reduced to HR 1.43, CI: 1.25–1.63; P<0.001. A lower mortality risk was found for patients after conditioning treatment with reduced intensity until day 120 post transplant (HR: 0.81 CI: 0.75–0.88; P<0.001). After this, a slightly higher risk could be shown for these patients. Similarly, patients who had received a PBSC graft exhibited a significantly lower mortality risk until day 388 post transplantation (HR 0.79, CI: 0.73–0.85; P<0.001), reversing to a significantly higher risk afterwards (HR 1.23, CI: 1.08–1.40; P=0.002). Integrating time dependency in regression models allows a more accurate description and quantification of clinical predictors to be made, which may help in risk assessment and patient counseling. PMID:26611475

  11. Extrathymic development of murine T cells after bone marrow transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Hanash, Alan M.; Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Smith, Odette M.; West, Mallory L.; Singer, Natalie V.; Brill, Jessie; Sun, Joseph C.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2012-01-01

    Restoring T cell competence is a significant clinical challenge in patients whose thymic function is severely compromised due to age or cytoreductive conditioning. Here, we demonstrate in mice that mesenteric LNs (MLNs) support extrathymic T cell development in euthymic and athymic recipients of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Furthermore, in aged murine BMT recipients, the contribution of the MLNs to the generation of T cells was maintained, while the contribution of the thymus was significantly impaired. Thymic impairment resulted in a proportional increase in extrathymic-derived T cell progenitors. Extrathymic development in athymic recipients generated conventional naive TCRαβ T cells with a broad Vβ repertoire and intact functional and proliferative potential. Moreover, in the absence of a functional thymus, immunity against known pathogens could be augmented using engineered precursor T cells with viral specificity. These findings demonstrate the potential of extrathymic T cell development for T cell reconstitution in patients with limited thymic function. PMID:23160195

  12. Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lechowicz, M J; Lazarus, H M; Carreras, J; Laport, G G; Cutler, C S; Wiernik, P H; Hale, G A; Maharaj, D; Gale, R P; Rowlings, P A; Freytes, C O; Miller, A M; Vose, J M; Maziarz, R T; Montoto, S; Maloney, D G; Hari, P N

    2014-11-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and Sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant from 2000-2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4-206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/ refractory disease. The majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared with myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs 44 years, P=0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95% confidence interval (CI) 12-27%) and 22% (95% CI 15-31%), respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41-60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50-71%) at 5 years. PFS at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22-40%) and 17% (95% CI 9-26%), respectively. OS at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45-63%) and 32% (95% CI 22-44%), respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5-year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  13. ALLOGENEIC HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR MYCOSIS FUNGOIDES AND SEZARY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Carreras, Jeanette; Laport, Ginna G.; Cutler, Corey S.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hale, Gregory A.; Maharaj, Dipnarine; Gale, Robert Peter; Rowlings, Phillip A.; Freytes, César O; Miller, Alan M.; Vose, Julie M.; Maziarz, Richard T.; Montoto, Silvia; Maloney, David G.; Hari, Parameswaran N.

    2014-01-01

    We describe outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for mycosis fungoides and sezary syndrome (MF/SS). Outcomes of 129 subjects with MF/SS reported to the Center for the International Blood and Marrow Transplant (CIBMTR) from 2000–2009. Median time from diagnosis to transplant was 30 (4–206) months and most subjects were with multiply relapsed/refractory disease. Majority (64%) received non-myeloablative conditioning (NST) or reduced intensity conditioning (RIC). NST/RIC recipients were older in age compared to myeloablative recipients (median age 51 vs. 44 y p= 0.005) and transplanted in recent years. Non-relapse mortality (NRM) at 1 and 5 years was 19% (95 % CI 12–27%) and 22% (95 % CI 15–31%) respectively. Risk of disease progression was 50% (95% CI 41–60%) at 1 year and 61% (95% CI 50–71%) at 5 years. Progression free survival (PFS) at 1 and 5 years was 31% (95% CI 22–40%) and 17% (95% CI 9–26%) respectively. Overall survival at 1 and 5 years was 54% (95% CI 45–63%) and 32% (95% CI 22–44%) respectively. Allogeneic HCT in MF/SS results in 5 year survival in approximately one-third of patients and of those, half of them remain disease-free. PMID:25068422

  14. Analyzing In Vivo Cell Migration using Cell Transplantations and Time-lapse Imaging in Zebrafish Embryos.

    PubMed

    Giger, Florence A; Dumortier, Julien G; David, Nicolas B

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is key to many physiological and pathological conditions, including cancer metastasis. The cellular and molecular bases of cell migration have been thoroughly analyzed in vitro. However, in vivo cell migration somehow differs from in vitro migration, and has proven more difficult to analyze, being less accessible to direct observation and manipulation. This protocol uses the migration of the prospective prechordal plate in the early zebrafish embryo as a model system to study the function of candidate genes in cell migration. Prechordal plate progenitors form a group of cells which, during gastrulation, undergoes a directed migration from the embryonic organizer to the animal pole of the embryo. The proposed protocol uses cell transplantation to create mosaic embryos. This offers the combined advantages of labeling isolated cells, which is key to good imaging, and of limiting gain/loss of function effects to the observed cells, hence ensuring cell-autonomous effects. We describe here how we assessed the function of the TORC2 component Sin1 in cell migration, but the protocol can be used to analyze the function of any candidate gene in controlling cell migration in vivo. PMID:27168357

  15. Airborne elements, cell membranes, and chlorophyll in transplanted lichens

    SciTech Connect

    Garty, J.; Cohen, Y.; Kloog, N.

    1998-07-01

    The objective of the present study was to test the concentration of airborne mineral elements in the lichen Ramalina lacera (with.) J.R. Laund. in comparison with its physiological status. Thalli of Ramalina lacera were collected in a remote unpolluted site and transplanted in a polluted region for 10 mo. An analysis of 20 elements in addition to an analysis of the status of cell membranes and the integrity of chlorophyll was performed after this period of transplantation. The lichen manifested a great potential for the accumulation of Pb, V, Ni, Zn, and Cu. Potassium and P were found to leach out. High concentrations of Ni, Mg, and B coincided with damage caused to cell membranes. The integrity of chlorophyll correlated with the concentration of K and correlated inversely with the concentration of Cr, Fe, Mn, Ni, Pb, and B.

  16. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells improves type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Li, Lisha; Li, Furong; Gao, Feng; Yang, Yali; Liu, Yuanyuan; Guo, Pingping; Li, Yulin

    2016-05-01

    Bone-marrow-derived stem cells can regenerate pancreatic tissue in a model of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) form the main part of bone marrow. We show that the intrapancreatic transplantation of MSCs elevates serum insulin and C-peptide, while decreasing blood glucose. MSCs engrafted into the damaged rat pancreas become distributed into the blood vessels, acini, ducts, and islets. Renascent islets, islet-like clusters, and a small number of MSCs expressing insulin protein have been observed in the pancreas of diabetic rats. Intrapancreatic transplantation of MSCs triggers a series of molecular and cellular events, including differentiation towards the pancreas directly and the provision of a niche to start endogenous pancreatic regeneration, which ameliorates hypoinsulinemia and hyperglycemia caused by streptozotocin. These data establish the many roles of MSCs in the restoration of the function of an injured organ. PMID:26650464

  17. Sleep disruption impairs haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice.

    PubMed

    Rolls, Asya; Pang, Wendy W; Ibarra, Ingrid; Colas, Damien; Bonnavion, Patricia; Korin, Ben; Heller, H Craig; Weissman, Irving L; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting the success of haematopoietic cell transplantation are still unknown. Here we show in mice that donor sleep deprivation reduces the ability of its haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to engraft and reconstitute the blood and bone marrow of an irradiated recipient by more than 50%. We demonstrate that sleep deprivation downregulates the expression of microRNA (miR)-19b, a negative regulator of the suppressor of cytokine signalling (SOCS) genes, which inhibit HSC migration and homing. Accordingly, HSCs from sleep-deprived mice have higher levels of SOCS genes expression, lower migration capacity in vitro and reduced homing to the bone marrow in vivo. Recovery of sleep after sleep deprivation restored the reconstitution potential of the HSCs. Taken together, this study provides insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep deprivation on HSCs, emphasizing the potentially critical role of donor sleep in the success of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26465715

  18. Sleep disruption impairs hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Rolls, Asya; Pang, Wendy W.; Ibarra, Ingrid; Colas, Damien; Bonnavion, Patricia; Korin, Ben; Heller, H. Craig; Weissman, Irving L.; de Lecea, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Many of the factors affecting the success of hematopoietic cell transplantation are still unknown. Here we show in mice that donor’s sleep deprivation reduces the ability of its hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to engraft and reconstitute the blood and bone marrow of an irradiated recipient by more than 50%. We demonstrate that sleep deprivation downregulates the expression of microRNA (miR)-19b, a negative regulator of the suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) genes, which inhibit HSC migration and homing. Accordingly, HSCs from sleep-deprived mice have higher levels of SOCS genes expression, lower migration capacity in vitro and reduced homing to the bone marrow in vivo. Recovery of sleep after sleep deprivation restored the reconstitution potential of the HSCs. Taken together, this study provides insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of sleep deprivation on HSCs, emphasizing the potentially critical role of donor sleep in the success of bone marrow transplantation. PMID:26465715

  19. Protection of photoreceptor cells from phototoxicity by transplanted retinal pigment epithelial cells expressing different neurotrophic factors.

    PubMed

    Abe, Toshiaki; Saigo, Yoko; Hojo, Masayoshi; Kano, Tetsuya; Wakusawa, Ryosuke; Tokita, Yumi; Tamai, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Transplantation of cells or tissues and the intravitreal injection of neurotrophic factors are two methods that have been used to treat retinal diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of combining both methods: the transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells expressing different neurotrophic factors. The neutrophic factors were Axokine, brain derived-neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF). The enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) gene was used as a reporter gene. These genes were transduced into RPE cells by lipofection, selected by antibiotics, and transplanted into the subretinal space of 108 rats. The rats were examined at 1 week and 3 months after the transplantation to determine whether the transduced cells were present, were expressing the protein, and were able to protect photoreceptors against phototoxicity. The survival of the transplanted cells was monitored by the presence of eGFP. The degree of protection was determined by the thickness of the outer nuclear layer. Our results showed that the degree of photoreceptor protection was different for the different types of neurotrophic factors at 1 week. After 3 months, the number of surviving transplanted cell was markedly reduced, and protection was observed only with the BDNF-transduced RPE cells. A significant degree of rescue was also observed by BDNF-transduced RPE cells in the nontransplanted area of the retina at both the early and late times. Lymphocytic infiltration was not detected in the vitreous, retina, and choroid at any time. We conclude that the transplantation of BDNF-transduced RPE cells can reduce the photoreceptor damage induced by phototoxicity in the transplanted area and weakly in the nontransplanted area. PMID:16454354

  20. Hematopoietic cell transplantation for sickle cell disease: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurti, Lakshmanan

    2007-02-01

    Sickle cell disease is associated with considerable morbidity and premature mortality. Hematopoietic cell transplantation offers the possibility of cure and is associated with excellent results in pediatric patients receiving stem cell transplantation from a matched sibling donor. A reduced-intensity conditioning regimen has the potential to further reduce regimen-related morbidity and mortality. Improved understanding of the natural history of complications, such as stroke and pulmonary hypertension, effects of treatments such as hydroxyurea and blood transfusions, as well as the impact of transplantation on organ damage, are likely to influence the timing and indication of transplantation. Improvements in preparative regimens may enable the safe use of an alternative source of stem cells, such as unrelated matched donors, and further improve the applicability and acceptability of this treatment. PMID:17250455

  1. Post-relapse survival after haploidentical transplantation vs matched-related or matched-unrelated hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Solh, M; Zhang, X; Connor, K; Brown, S; Solomon, S R; Morris, L E; Holland, H K; Bashey, A

    2016-07-01

    Relapse remains a major cause of mortality among patients receiving allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The impact of donor type on post-relapse survival (PRS) has not been widely examined. We compared the survival outcomes for patients relapsing after haploidentical donor transplantation (HIDT) using post-transplant cyclophosphamide with those relapsing after matched-related donor transplantation (MRDT) or matched-unrelated donor transplantation (MUDT) at our institution. Two hundred and thirty-seven consecutive HCT recipients with relapse occurring after HIDT (N=48), MUDT (N=87) and MRDT (N=102) were included in this analysis. Median age was 49 years (19-77 years) and the median time to relapse was 156 days (12-2465) after HCT. HIDT recipients had similar median time to relapse (5.8 vs 4.8 vs 5.5 months, P=0.638) compared with MUDT and MRDT, respectively. One-year PRS was worse among HIDT recipients compared with MRDT and MUDT (17% vs 46% vs 40%, P<0.05). In a multivariate analysis, time to relapse (<3 vs >3 months post transplant), no use of donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) following relapse, higher Dana Farber disease risk index and HCT comorbidity index scores at the time of transplant and delayed platelet engraftment post transplant were all predictive of worse PRS. This analysis shows that 1-year PRS is inferior among HIDT when compared with MRDT or MUDT. Lower use of DLI after HIDT may have contributed to this inferior survival. PMID:26999464

  2. [Research and application of cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes mellitus: a review].

    PubMed

    Wei, Lingling; Lu, Yanrong; Cheng, Jingqiu

    2009-10-01

    In the conventional treatments of type I diabetes, there are various problems. As a new adequate treatment of diabetes, cell replacement therapy of diabetes has been applied and given research priority. We have investigated the applications of cell transplantation in the treatment of diabetes and have retrieved the relevant articles on cells transplantation for the treatment of diabetes. In this paper, we review the history, development, merits and demerits of cell transplantation and the recent advances in pancreatic islet transplantation research. The latest progress in the induction of stem cell to differentiate into the insulin-producing cells was also introduced. PMID:19947503

  3. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boadi, J.; Sangwal, V.; MacNeil, S.; Matcher, S. J.

    2015-03-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells is continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency (LSCD), in which the stem cell population is depleted, can lead to blindness. LSCD can be caused by chemical and thermal burns to the eye. A popular treatment, especially in emerging economies such as India, is the transplantation of limbal stem cells onto damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region. Hence regenerating the corneal epithelium. In order to gain insights into the success rates of this treatment, new imaging technologies are needed in order to track the transplanted cells. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images of the retina. A custom OCT system has been built to image the corneal surface, to investigate the fate of transplanted limbal stem cells. We evaluate two methods to label and track transplanted cells: melanin labelling and magneto-labelling. To evaluate melanin labelling, stem cells are loaded with melanin and then transplanted onto a rabbit cornea denuded of its epithelium. The melanin displays strongly enhanced backscatter relative to normal cells. To evaluate magneto-labelling the stem cells are loaded with magnetic nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) and then imaged with a custom-built, magneto-motive OCT system.

  4. COMPARABLE OUTCOMES IN NON-SECRETORY AND SECRETORY MULTIPLE MYELOMA AFTER AUTOLOGOUS STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Pérez, Waleska S.; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Ballen, Karen; Bashey, Asad; To, L. Bik; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Elfenbein, Gerald J.; Freytes, César O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Gibson, John; Kyle, Robert A.; Lacy, Martha Q.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Milone, Gustavo A.; Moreb, Jan S.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Reece, Donna E.; Vesole, David H.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Hari, Parameswaran

    2008-01-01

    Non-secretory myeloma (NSM) accounts for <5% of cases of multiple myeloma (MM). The outcome of these patients following autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) has not been evaluated in clinical trials. We compared the outcomes after ASCT for patients with NSM reported to the CIBMTR between 1989 and 2003, to a matched group of 438 patients (4 controls for each patient) with secretory myeloma (SM). The patients were matched using propensity scores calculated using age, Durie-Salmon stage, sensitivity to pre-transplant therapy, time from diagnosis to transplant and year of transplant. Disease characteristics were similar in both groups at diagnosis and at transplant except higher risk of anemia, hypoalbuminemia and marrow plasmacytosis (in SM) and plasmacytoma (more in NSM). Cumulative incidence of TRM, relapse, PFS and OS were similar between the groups. In multivariate analysis, based on a Cox model stratified on matched pairs and adjusted for covariates not considered in the propensity score, we found no difference in outcome between the NSM and SM groups. In this large cohort of patients undergoing ASCT, we found no difference in outcomes of patients with NSM compared to those with SM. PMID:18804043

  5. Transplanting Retinal Cells using Bucky Paper for Support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J.; Cinke, Martin; Meyyappan, Meyya; Fishman, Harvey; Leng, Ted; Huie, Philip; Bilbao, Kalayaan

    2004-01-01

    A novel treatment for retinal degenerative disorders involving transplantation of cells into the eye is currently under development at NASA Ames Research Center and Stanford University School of Medicine. The technique uses bucky paper as a support material for retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells, iris pigment epithelial (IPE) cells, and/or stem cells. This technology is envisioned as a treatment for age-related macular degeneration, which is the leading cause of blindness in persons over age 65 in Western nations. Additionally, patients with other retinal degenerative disorders, such as retinitis pigmentosa, may be treated by this strategy. Bucky paper is a mesh of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as shown in Figure 1, that can be made from any of the commercial sources of CNTs. Bucky paper is biocompatible and capable of supporting the growth of biological cells. Because bucky paper is highly porous, nutrients, oxygen, carbon dioxide, and waste can readily diffuse through it. The thickness, density, and porosity of bucky paper can be tailored in manufacturing. For transplantation of cells into the retina, bucky paper serves simultaneously as a substrate for cell growth and as a barrier for new blood vessel formation, which can be a problem in the exudative type of macular degeneration. Bucky paper is easily handled during surgical implantation into the eye. Through appropriate choice of manufacturing processes, bucky paper can be made relatively rigid yet able to conform to the retina when the bucky paper is implanted. Bucky paper offers a distinct advantage over other materials that have been investigated for retinal cell transplantation - lens capsule and Descemet's membrane - which are difficult to handle during surgery because they are flimsy and do not stay flat.

  6. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Wright, Megan C; Lepore, Angelo C

    2015-09-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  7. Human iPS cell-derived astrocyte transplants preserve respiratory function after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ke; Javed, Elham; Scura, Daniel; Hala, Tamara J.; Seetharam, Suneil; Falnikar, Aditi; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Chorath, Ashley; Maragakis, Nicholas J.; Wright, Megan C.; Lepore, Angelo C.

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation-based replacement of lost and/or dysfunctional astrocytes is a promising therapy for spinal cord injury (SCI) that has not been extensively explored, despite the integral roles played by astrocytes in the central nervous system (CNS). Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells are a clinically-relevant source of pluripotent cells that both avoid ethical issues of embryonic stem cells and allow for homogeneous derivation of mature cell types in large quantities, potentially in an autologous fashion. Despite their promise, the iPS cell field is in its infancy with respect to evaluating in vivo graft integration and therapeutic efficacy in SCI models. Astrocytes express the major glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of glutamate uptake in spinal cord. Following SCI, compromised GLT1 expression/function can increase susceptibility to excitotoxicity. We therefore evaluated intraspinal transplantation of human iPS cell-derived astrocytes (hIPSAs) following cervical contusion SCI as a novel strategy for reconstituting GLT1 expression and for protecting diaphragmatic respiratory neural circuitry. Transplant-derived cells showed robust long-term survival post-injection and efficiently differentiated into astrocytes in injured spinal cord of both immunesuppressed mice and rats. However, the majority of transplant-derived astrocytes did not express high levels of GLT1, particularly at early times post-injection. To enhance their ability to modulate extracellular glutamate levels, we engineered hIPSAs with lentivirus to constitutively express GLT1. Overexpression significantly increased GLT1 protein and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake levels in hIPSAs both in vitro and in vivo post-transplantation. Compared to human fibroblast control and unmodified hIPSA transplantation, GLT1-overexpressing hIPSAs reduced (1) lesion size within the injured cervical spinal cord, (2) morphological denervation by respiratory phrenic motor

  8. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8(+) memory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kitchens, W H; Haridas, D; Wagener, M E; Song, M; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T-cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study the mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8(+) T-cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T-cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T-cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  9. Integrin antagonists prevent costimulatory blockade-resistant transplant rejection by CD8+ memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Kitchens, W. H.; Haridas, D.; Wagener, M. E.; Song, M.; Kirk, A. D.; Larsen, C. P.; Ford, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    The success of belatacept in late-stage clinical trials inaugurates the arrival of a new class of immunosuppressants based on costimulatory blockade, an immunosuppression strategy that disrupts essential signals required for alloreactive T cell activation. Despite having improved renal function, kidney transplant recipients treated with belatacept experienced increased rates of acute rejection. This finding has renewed focus on costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and specifically the role of alloreactive memory T cells in mediating this resistance. To study mechanisms of costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection and enhance the clinical efficacy of costimulatory blockade, we developed an experimental transplant system that models a donor-specific memory CD8+ T cell response. After confirming that graft-specific memory T cells mediate costimulatory blockade-resistant rejection, we characterized the role of integrins in this rejection. The resistance of memory T cells to costimulatory blockade was abrogated when costimulatory blockade was coupled with either anti-VLA-4 or anti-LFA-1. Mechanistic studies revealed that in the presence of costimulatory blockade, anti-VLA-4 impaired T cell trafficking to the graft but not memory T cell recall effector function, whereas anti-LFA-1 attenuated both trafficking and memory recall effector function. As antagonists against these integrins are clinically approved, these findings may have significant translational potential for future clinical transplant trials. PMID:21942986

  10. 111Indium labeling of hepatocytes for analysis of short-term biodistribution of transplanted cells.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S; Lee, C D; Vemuru, R P; Bhargava, K K

    1994-03-01

    Hepatocyte transplantation is useful for ex vivo gene therapy and liver repopulation. Methods for hepatic reconstitution have recently been developed but optimization of hepatocyte transplantation systems is necessary. To develop systems for noninvasive assessment of the biodistribution of transplanted cells, we labeled hepatocytes with 111indium-oxine. Our initial studies showed that hepatocytes incorporated 111indium-oxine with an efficiency of approximately 20%. After labeling, cell viability was unchanged and 111indium was present in hepatocytes after overnight culture, as well as after intrasplenic transplantation. Transplanted cells were successfully localized by means of scintigraphic imaging. The scintigraphic patterns of cell distribution were different when hepatocytes were transplanted by means of either spleen or internal jugular vein, which deposit cells into separate vascular beds. Quantitative analysis of the biodistribution of 111indium-labeled hepatocytes indicated that within 2 hr of intrasplenic transplantation, cells were predominantly localized in liver and spleen, and occasionally in lungs. To determine whether the rate of intrasplenic cell injection influenced translocation of hepatocytes, we transplanted cells in normal rats. Despite intrasplenic cell injection at a variety of rates, organ-specific distribution of 111indium-labeled hepatocytes remained unchanged. Labeling with 111indium did not affect long-term survival of transplanted hepatocytes. These results indicate that 111indium-labeling of hepatocytes should greatly assist noninvasive analysis in the short-term of the biodistribution of transplanted hepatocytes. PMID:8119703

  11. Trends in allogeneic stem cell transplantation for multiple myeloma: a CIBMTR analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Shaji; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Li, Peigang; Dispenzieri, Angela; Milone, Gustavo A.; Lonial, Sagar; Krishnan, Amrita; Maiolino, Angelo; Wirk, Baldeep; Weiss, Brendan; Freytes, César O.; Vogl, Dan T.; Vesole, David H.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Meehan, Kenneth R.; Hamadani, Mehdi; Lill, Michael; Callander, Natalie S.; Majhail, Navneet S.; Wiernik, Peter H.; Nath, Rajneesh; Kamble, Rammurti T.; Vij, Ravi; Kyle, Robert A.; Gale, Robert Peter

    2011-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation in multiple myeloma is limited by prior reports of high treatment-related mortality. We analyzed outcomes after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation for multiple myeloma in 1207 recipients in 3 cohorts based on the year of transplantation: 1989-1994 (n = 343), 1995-2000 (n = 376), and 2001-2005 (n = 488). The most recent cohort was significantly older (53% > 50 years) and had more recipients after prior autotransplantation. Use of unrelated donors, reduced-intensity conditioning and the blood cell grafts increased over time. Rates of acute graft-versus-host (GVHD) were similar, but chronic GVHD rates were highest in the most recent cohort. Overall survival (OS) at 1-year increased over time, reflecting a decrease in treatment-related mortality, but 5-year relapse rates increased from 39% (95% confidence interval [CI], 33%-44%) in 1989-1994 to 58% (95% CI, 51%-64%; P < .001) in the 2001-2005 cohort. Projected 5-year progression-free survival and OS are 14% (95% CI, 9%-20%) and 29% (95% CI, 23%-35%), respectively, in the latest cohort. Increasing age, longer interval from diagnosis to transplantation, and unrelated donor grafts adversely affected OS in multivariate analysis. Survival at 5 years for subjects with none, 1, 2, or 3 of these risk factors were 41% (range, 36%-47%), 32% (range, 27%-37%), 25% (range, 19%-31%), and 3% (range, 0%-11%), respectively (P < .0001). PMID:21690560

  12. Transplantation stimulates interstitial cell migration in hydra

    SciTech Connect

    Fujisawa, T.; David, C.N.; Bosch, T.C. )

    1990-04-01

    Migration of interstitial cells and nerve cell precursors was analyzed in Hydra magnipapillata and Hydra vulgaris (formerly Hydra attenuata). Axial grafts were made between ({sup 3}H)thymidine-labeled donor and unlabeled host tissue. Migration of labeled cells into the unlabeled half was followed for 4 days. The results indicate that the rate of migration was initially high and then slowed on Days 2-4. Regrafting fresh donor tissue on Days 2-4 maintained high levels of migration. Thus, migration appears to be stimulated by the grafting procedure itself.

  13. Alefacept and Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-26

    Thalassemia; Sickle Cell Disease; Glanzmann Thrombasthenia; Wiskott-Aldrich Syndrome; Chronic-granulomatous Disease; Severe Congenital Neutropenia; Leukocyte Adhesion Deficiency; Schwachman-Diamond Syndrome; Diamond-Blackfan Anemia; Fanconi Anemia; Dyskeratosis-congenita; Chediak-Higashi Syndrome; Severe Aplastic Anemia

  14. Tracking Fusion of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation to the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Brian T.; Kouris, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Significance Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the

  15. Transplantation of Adrenal Cortical Progenitor Cells Enriched by Nile Red

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, James C.Y.; Chu, Yinting; Qin, Harry H.; Zupekan, Tatiana

    2009-01-01

    Background The adrenal cortex may contain progenitor cells useful for tissue regeneration. Currently there are no established methods to isolate these cells. Material and Methods Murine adrenal cells were sorted into a Nile-Red-bright (NRbright) and a Nile-Red-dim (NRdim) population of cells according to their degree of cholesterol content revealed by Nile Red fluorescence. The cells were transplanted under the renal capsule to determine their ability for regeneration. Results The NRbright cells contained an abundance of lipid droplets, whereas the NRdim cells contained little. The NRbright cells expressed Sf1 and the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes including Cyp11a1, Cyp11b1, and Cyp11b2, whereas the NRdim cells expressed Sf1 but not the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes. After 56 days of implantation in unilateral adrenalectomized mice, the NRdim cells expressed Sf1 and the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes, whereas the NRbright cells ceased to express Sf1 as well as the more differentiated adrenal cortical genes. NRdim cells also proliferated in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor. Conclusions The population of NRdim cells contained adrenal cortical progenitor cells that can proliferate and give rise to differentiated daughter cells. These cells may be useful for adrenal cortical regeneration. PMID:19592014

  16. Therapeutic potential of transplanted placental mesenchymal stem cells in treating Chinese miniature pigs with acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Stem cell-based therapy to treat liver diseases is a focus of current research worldwide. So far, most such studies depend on rodent hepatic failure models. The purpose of this study was to isolate mesenchymal stem cells from human placenta (hPMSCs) and determine their therapeutic potential for treating Chinese experimental miniature pigs with acute liver failure (ALF). Methods hPMSCs were isolated and analyzed for their purity and differentiation potential before being employed as the donor cells for transplantation. ALF models of Chinese experimental miniature pigs were established and divided into four groups: no cell transplantation; hPMSCs transplantation via the jugular vein; X-ray-treated hPMSCs transplantation via the portal vein; and hPMSCs transplantation via the portal vein. The restoration of biological functions of the livers receiving transplantation was assessed via a variety of approaches such as mortality rate determination, serum biochemical analysis, and histological, immunohistochemical, and genetic analysis. Results hPMSCs expressed high levels of CD29, CD73, CD13, and CD90, had adipogenic, osteogenic, and hepatic differentiation potential. They improved liver functions in vivo after transplantation into the D-galactosamine-injured pig livers as evidenced by the fact that ALT, AST, ALP, CHE, TBIL, and TBA concentrations returned to normal levels in recipient ALF pigs. Meanwhile, histological data revealed that transplantation of hPMSCs via the portal vein reduced liver inflammation, decreased hepatic denaturation and necrosis, and promoted liver regeneration. These ameliorations were not found in the other three groups. The result of 7-day survival rates suggested that hPMSCs transplantation via the portal vein was able to significantly prolong the survival of ALF pigs compared with the other three groups. Histochemistry and RT-PCR results confirmed the presence of transplanted human cells in recipient pig livers (Groups III, IV

  17. Humanized mice as a model to study human hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Tanner, Anne; Taylor, Stephen E; Decottignies, Wittnee; Berges, Bradford K

    2014-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation has the potential to treat a variety of human diseases, including genetic deficiencies, immune disorders, and to restore immunity following cancer treatment. However, there are several obstacles that prevent effective HSC transplantation in humans. These include finding a matched donor, having a sufficient number of cells for the transplant, and the potency of the cells in the transplant. Ethical issues prevent effective research in humans that could provide insight into ways to overcome these obstacles. Highly immunodeficient mice can be transplanted with human HSCs and this process is accompanied by HSC homing to the murine bone marrow. This is followed by stem cell expansion, multilineage hematopoiesis, long-term engraftment, and functional human antibody and cellular immune responses. As such, humanized mice serve as a model for human HSC transplantation. A variety of conditions have been analyzed for their impact on HSC transplantation to produce humanized mice, including the type and source of cells used in the transplant, the number of cells transplanted, the expansion of cells with various protocols, and the route of introduction of cells into the mouse. In this review, we summarize what has been learned about HSC transplantation using humanized mice as a recipient model and we comment on how these models may be useful to future preclinical research to determine more effective ways to expand HSCs and to determine their repopulating potential in vivo. PMID:23962058

  18. Dopamine release from transplanted neural stem cells in Parkinsonian rat striatum in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kang, Xinjiang; Xu, Huadong; Teng, Sasa; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Deng, Zijun; Zhou, Li; Zuo, Panli; Liu, Bing; Liu, Bin; Wu, Qihui; Wang, Li; Hu, Meiqin; Dou, Haiqiang; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Feipeng; Li, Qing; Guo, Shu; Gu, Jingli; Lei, Qian; Lü, Jing; Mu, Yu; Jin, Mu; Wang, Shirong; Jiang, Wei; Liu, Kun; Wang, Changhe; Li, Wenlin; Zhang, Kang; Zhou, Zhuan

    2014-11-01

    Embryonic stem cell-based therapies exhibit great potential for the treatment of Parkinson's disease (PD) because they can significantly rescue PD-like behaviors. However, whether the transplanted cells themselves release dopamine in vivo remains elusive. We and others have recently induced human embryonic stem cells into primitive neural stem cells (pNSCs) that are self-renewable for massive/transplantable production and can efficiently differentiate into dopamine-like neurons (pNSC-DAn) in culture. Here, we showed that after the striatal transplantation of pNSC-DAn, (i) pNSC-DAn retained tyrosine hydroxylase expression and reduced PD-like asymmetric rotation; (ii) depolarization-evoked dopamine release and reuptake were significantly rescued in the striatum both in vitro (brain slices) and in vivo, as determined jointly by microdialysis-based HPLC and electrochemical carbon fiber electrodes; and (iii) the rescued dopamine was released directly from the grafted pNSC-DAn (and not from injured original cells). Thus, pNSC-DAn grafts release and reuptake dopamine in the striatum in vivo and alleviate PD symptoms in rats, providing proof-of-concept for human clinical translation. PMID:25331880

  19. Enhancing T cell reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: a brief update of the latest trends

    PubMed Central

    Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Smith, Odette M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is associated with a period of immune incompetence that particularly affects the T cell lineage. Strategies to enhance T cell reconstitution could significantly improve the survival of HSCT recipients by decreasing the incidence of fatal infectious complications and by enhancing graft-versus-tumor activity. In recent years, a variety of promising strategies have been established in preclinical models to improve T cell recovery in particular after allogeneic T cell-depleted HSCT, without aggravating graft-versus-host disease while preserving or even improving graft-versus-tumor activity. These therapies include treatment with keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), growth hormone (GH), LHRH agonists, interleukin 7 (IL-7) and interleukin 15 (IL-15). Thanks to the establishment of Notch-based culture systems, adoptive cellular therapies with T lineage-committed precursor cells have become feasible, since early T cell progenitors can now easily be generated in vitro in large quantities and have been proven to be very effective in enhancing T cell reconstitution and anti-tumor activity after allogeneic T cell-depleted HSCT. The translation of most of these strategies into clinical trials is likely and in some cases Phase I/II studies are already underway. PMID:17905611

  20. [Human Herpesvirus-6 Encephalitis in Allogeneic Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ogata, Masao

    2015-07-01

    The reactivation of human herpesvirus-6B (HHV-6B) is common after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (allo-HCT), and it is sporadically associated with the development of HHV-6 encephalitis. HHV-6 encephalitis typically develops around 2-6 weeks after allo-HCT, and it is characterized by short-term memory loss. Magnetic resonance imaging typically shows bilateral signal abnormalities in the limbic system. The incidence of HHV-6 encephalitis is reportedly 0-11.6% after bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation and 4.9-21.4% after cord blood transplantation. The mortality of HHV-6 encephalitis is high, and survivors are often left with serious sequelae. Antiviral therapy using foscarnet or ganciclovir is recommended for the treatment of HHV-6 encephalitis, but the efficacy of the currently available treatment is insufficient once HHV-6 encephalitis has developed. The elucidation of the pathogenesis of HHV-6 encephalitis and the establishment of preventative therapy are needed to overcome this disease. PMID:26160819

  1. Secondary Malignant Neoplasms Following Haematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Childhood

    PubMed Central

    Bomken, Simon; Skinner, Roderick

    2015-01-01

    Improving survival rates in children with malignancy have been achieved at the cost of a high frequency of late adverse effects of treatment, especially in intensively treated patients such as those undergoing haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), many of whom suffer the high burden of chronic toxicity. Secondary malignant neoplasms (SMNs) are one of the most devastating late effects, cause much morbidity and are the most frequent cause of late (yet still premature) treatment-related mortality. They occur in up to 7% of HSCT recipients by 20 years post-HSCT, and with no evidence yet of a plateau in incidence with longer follow-up. This review describes the epidemiology, pathogenesis, clinical features and risk factors of the three main categories of post-HSCT SMNs. A wide range of solid SMNs has been described, usually occurring 10 years or more post-HSCT, related most often to previous or conditioning radiotherapy. Therapy-related acute myeloid leukaemia/myelodysplasia occurs earlier, typically three to seven years post-HSCT, mainly in recipients of autologous transplant and is related to previous alkylating agent or topoisomerase II inhibitor chemotherapy. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders occur early (usually within two years) post-HSCT, usually presenting as Epstein-Barr virus-related B cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27417356

  2. Transplantation of human embryonic stem cells onto a partially wounded human cornea in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Hanson, Charles; Hardarson, Thorir; Ellerström, Catharina; Nordberg, Markus; Caisander, Gunilla; Rao, Mahendra; Hyllner, Johan; Stenevi, Ulf

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate whether cells originating from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) could be successfully transplanted onto a partially wounded human cornea. A second aim was to study the ability of the transplanted cells to differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells. Methods Spontaneously, differentiated hESCs were transplanted onto a human corneal button (without limbus) with the epithelial layer partially removed. The cells were cultured on Bowman’s membrane for up to 9 days, and the culture dynamics documented in a time-lapse system. As the transplanted cells originated from a genetically engineered hESC line, they all expressed green fluorescent protein, which facilitated their identification during the culture experiments, tissue preparation and analysis. To detect any differentiation into human corneal epithelial-like cells, we analysed the transplanted cells by immunohistochemistry using antibodies specific for CK3, CK15 and PAX6. Results The transplanted cells established and expanded on Bowman’s membrane, forming a 1–4 cell layer surrounded by host corneal epithelial cells. Expression of the corneal marker PAX6 appeared 3 days after transplantation, and after 6 days, the cells were expressing both PAX6 and CK3. Conclusion This shows that it is possible to transplant cells originating from hESCs onto Bowman’s membrane with the epithelial layer partially removed and to get these cells to establish, grow and differentiate into corneal epithelial-like cells in vitro. PMID:22280565

  3. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation in Adult Sickle Cell Disease: Problems and Solutions

    PubMed Central

    Özdoğu, Hakan; Boğa, Can

    2015-01-01

    Sickle cell disease-related organ injuries cannot be prevented despite hydroxyurea use, infection prophylaxis, and supportive therapies. As a consequence, disease-related mortality reaches 14% in adolescents and young adults. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a unique curative therapeutic approach for sickle cell disease. Myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is curative for children with sickle cell disease. Current data indicate that long-term disease-free survival is about 90% and overall survival about 95% after transplantation. However, it is toxic in adults due to organ injuries. In addition, this curative treatment approach has several limitations, such as difficulties to find donors, transplant-related mortality, graft loss, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), and infertility. Engraftment effectivity and toxicity for transplantations performed with nonmyeloablative reduced-intensity regimens in adults are being investigated in phase 1/2 trials at many centers. Preliminary data indicate that GVHD could be prevented with transplantations performed using reduced-intensity regimens. It is necessary to develop novel regimens to prevent graft loss and reduce the risk of GVHD. PMID:25912490

  4. Informational Theory of Aging: The Life Extension Method Based on the Bone Marrow Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Karnaukhov, Alexey V.; Karnaukhova, Elena V.; Sergievich, Larisa A.; Karnaukhova, Natalia A.; Bogdanenko, Elena V.; Manokhina, Irina A.; Karnaukhov, Valery N.

    2015-01-01

    The method of lifespan extension that is a practical application of the informational theory of aging is proposed. In this theory, the degradation (error accumulation) of the genetic information in cells is considered a main cause of aging. According to it, our method is based on the transplantation of genetically identical (or similar) stem cells with the lower number of genomic errors to the old recipients. For humans and large mammals, this method can be realized by cryopreservation of their own stem cells, taken in a young age, for the later autologous transplantation in old age. To test this method experimentally, we chose laboratory animals of relatively short lifespan (mouse). Because it is difficult to isolate the required amount of the stem cells (e.g., bone marrow) without significant damage for animals, we used the bone marrow transplantation from sacrificed inbred young donors. It is shown that the lifespan extension of recipients depends on level of their genetic similarity (syngeneity) with donors. We have achieved the lifespan increase of the experimental mice by 34% when the transplantation of the bone marrow with high level of genetic similarity was used. PMID:26491435

  5. The Cell Biology of Cytomegalovirus: Implications for Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kaminski, H; Fishman, J A

    2016-08-01

    Interpretation of clinical data regarding the impact of cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection on allograft function is complicated by the diversity of viral strains and substantial variability of cellular receptors and viral gene expression in different tissues. Variation also exists in nonspecific (monocytes and dendritic cells) and specific (NK cells, antibodies) responses that augment T cell antiviral activities. Innate immune signaling pathways and expanded pools of memory NK cells and γδ T cells also serve to amplify host responses to infection. The clinical impact of specific memory T cell anti-CMV responses that cross-react with graft antigens and alloantigens is uncertain but appears to contribute to graft injury and to the abrogation of allograft tolerance. These responses are modified by diverse immunosuppressive regimens and by underlying host immune deficits. The impact of CMV infection on the transplant recipient reflects cellular changes and corresponding host responses, the convergence of which has been termed the "indirect effects" of CMV infection. Future studies will clarify interactions between CMV infection and allograft injury and will guide interventions that may enhance clinical outcomes in transplantation. PMID:26991039

  6. Treating Parkinson’s disease in the 21st century: Can stem cell transplantation compete?

    PubMed Central

    Buttery, Philip C; Barker, Roger A

    2014-01-01

    The characteristic and selective degeneration of a unique population of cells—the nigrostriatal dopamine (DA) neurons—that occurs in Parkinson’s disease (PD) has made the condition an iconic target for cell replacement therapies. Indeed, transplantation of fetal ventral mesencephalic cells into the DA-deficient striatum was first trialled nearly 30 years ago, at a time when other treatments for the disease were less well developed. Over recent decades standard treatments for PD have advanced, and newer biological therapies are now emerging. In the 21st century, stem cell technology will have to compete alongside other sophisticated treatments, including deep brain stimulation and gene therapies. In this review we examine how stem cell–based transplantation therapies compare with these novel and emerging treatments in the management of this common condition. J. Comp. Neurol. 522:2802–2816, 2014. PMID:24610597

  7. Immune-Mediated Complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhuoyan; Rubinstein, Samuel M; Thota, Ramya; Savani, Malvi; Brissot, Eolia; Shaw, Bronwen E; Majhail, Navneet S; Mohty, Mohamad; Savani, Bipin N

    2016-08-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) has an integral role in the treatment of malignant and nonmalignant diseases. Long-term complications after HSCT have been well established and include graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), conditioning regimen-related toxicities, disease relapse, and infections. Immune-mediated phenomena are increasingly described after HSCT with clinically significant sequelae. Diagnosis is challenging because of features that overlap with other commonly reported post-transplantation complications. Patients who experience immune-mediated disease after HSCT tend to have poor outcomes. Early recognition of immune-mediated complications is imperative to reduce preventable morbidity and mortality. This review looks at the currently available literature on pathogenesis, incidence, risk factors, treatment, and outcomes of immune-mediated disease (other than GVHD) after HSCT. PMID:27095688

  8. Immunotherapy following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: potential for synergistic effects

    PubMed Central

    Bouchlaka, Myriam N; Redelman, Doug; Murphy, William J

    2011-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is a particularly important treatment for hematologic malignancies. Unfortunately, following allogeneic HSCT, graft-versus-host disease, immunosuppression and susceptibility to opportunistic infections remain among the most substantial problems restricting the efficacy and use of this procedure, particularly for cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy and/or manipulation of the graft offer ways to attack residual cancer as well as other transplant-related complications. Recent exciting discoveries have demonstrated that HSCT could be expanded to solid tissue cancers with profound effects on the effectiveness of adoptive immunotherapy. This review will provide a background regarding HSCT, discuss the complications that make it such a complex treatment procedure following up with current immunotherapeutic strategies and discuss emerging approaches in applying immunotherapy in HSCT for cancer. PMID:20635904

  9. SECOND AUTOLOGOUS STEM CELL TRANSPLANTATION FOR RELAPSED LYMPHOMA AFTER A PRIOR AUTOLOGOUS TRANSPLANT

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sonali M.; van Besien, Koen; Carreras, Jeanette; Bashey, Asad; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Freytes, Cesar O.; Gale, Robert Peter; Hale, Gregory A.; Hayes-Lattin, Brandon; Holmberg, Leona A.; Keating, Armand; Maziarz, Richard T.; McCarthy, Philip L.; Navarro, Willis H.; Pavlovsky, Santiago; Schouten, Harry C.; Seftel, Matthew; Wiernik, Peter H.; Vose, Julie M.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Hari, Parameswaran

    2012-01-01

    We determined treatment-related mortality (TRM), progression free survival (PFS), and overall survival (OS) after a second autologous HCT (HCT2) for patients with lymphoma relapse after a prior HCT (HCT1). Outcomes for patients with either Hodgkin lymphoma (HL, n=21) or non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL, n=19) receiving HCT2 reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR) were analyzed. The median age at HCT2 was 38 years (range, 16–61) and 22 (58%) patients had a Karnofsky performance score less than 90. HCT2 was performed >1 year after HCT1 in 82%. The probability of TRM at day 100 was 15% (95% CI, 3–22%). The 1, 3 and 5 yr probabilities of PFS were 50% (95% CI, 34–66%), 36% (95% CI, 21–52%) and 30% (95% CI, 16–46%), respectively. Corresponding probabilities of survival were 65% (95% CI, 50–79%), 36% (95% CI, 22–52%) and 30% (95% CI, 17–46%), respectively. At a median follow up of 72 months (range, 12–124 months) after HCT2, 29 patients (73%) have died, 18 (62%) secondary to relapsed lymphoma. The outcomes of patients with HL and NHL were similar. In summary, this series represents the largest reported group of patients with relapsed lymphomas undergoing SCT2 following failed SCT1, and with long-term follow-up. Our series suggests that SCT2 is feasible in patients relapsing after prior HCT1, with a lower TRM than that reported for allogeneic transplant in this setting. HCT2 should be considered for patients with relapsed HL or NHL after HCT1 without alternative allogeneic stem cell transplant options. PMID:18640574

  10. Scripts for TRUMP data analyses. Part II (HLA-related data): statistical analyses specific for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kanda, Junya

    2016-01-01

    The Transplant Registry Unified Management Program (TRUMP) made it possible for members of the Japan Society for Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation (JSHCT) to analyze large sets of national registry data on autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. However, as the processes used to collect transplantation information are complex and differed over time, the background of these processes should be understood when using TRUMP data. Previously, information on the HLA locus of patients and donors had been collected using a questionnaire-based free-description method, resulting in some input errors. To correct minor but significant errors and provide accurate HLA matching data, the use of a Stata or EZR/R script offered by the JSHCT is strongly recommended when analyzing HLA data in the TRUMP dataset. The HLA mismatch direction, mismatch counting method, and different impacts of HLA mismatches by stem cell source are other important factors in the analysis of HLA data. Additionally, researchers should understand the statistical analyses specific for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, such as competing risk, landmark analysis, and time-dependent analysis, to correctly analyze transplant data. The data center of the JSHCT can be contacted if statistical assistance is required. PMID:26588927

  11. Late effects in patients with Fanconi anemia following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from alternative donors.

    PubMed

    Anur, P; Friedman, D N; Sklar, C; Oeffinger, K; Castiel, M; Kearney, J; Singh, B; Prockop, S E; Kernan, N A; Scaradavou, A; Kobos, R; Curran, K; Ruggiero, J; Zakak, N; O'Reilly, R J; Boulad, F

    2016-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is curative for hematological manifestations of Fanconi anemia (FA). We performed a retrospective analysis of 22 patients with FA and aplastic anemia, myelodysplastic syndrome or acute myelogenous leukemia who underwent a HSCT at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and survived at least 1 year post HSCT. Patients underwent either a TBI- (N=18) or busulfan- (N=4) based cytoreduction followed by T-cell-depleted transplants from alternative donors. Twenty patients were alive at time of the study with a 5- and 10-year overall survival of 100 and 84% and no evidence of chronic GvHD. Among the 18 patients receiving a TBI-based regimen, 11 (61%) had persistent hemochromatosis, 4 (22%) developed hypothyroidism, 7 (39%) had insulin resistance and 5 (27%) developed hypertriglyceridemia after transplant. Eleven of 16 evaluable patients (68%), receiving TBI, developed gonadal dysfunction. Two patients who received a TBI-based regimen died of squamous cell carcinoma. One patient developed hemochromatosis, hypothyroidism and gonadal dysfunction after busulfan-based cytoreduction. TBI appears to be a risk factor for malignant and endocrine late effects in the FA host. Multidisciplinary follow-up of patients with FA (including cancer screening) is essential for early detection and management of late complications, and improving long-term outcomes. PMID:26999465

  12. Pancreatic islet and stem cell transplantation: new strategies in cell therapy of diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bretzel, R G; Eckhard, M; Brendel, M D

    2004-03-01

    Long-term studies strongly suggest that tight control of blood glucose can prevent the development and retard the progression of chronic complications of type 1 diabetes mellitus. In contrast to conventional insulin treatment, replacement of a patient's islets of Langerhans either by pancreas organ transplantation of by isolated islet transplantation is the only treatment to achieve a constant normoglycemic state and avoiding hypoglycemic episodes, a typical adverse event of multiple daily insulin injections. However, the expense of this benefit is still the need for immunosuppressive treatment of the recipient with all its potential risks. Islet cell transplantation offers the advantage of being performed as a minimally invasive procedure, in which islets can be perfused percutaneously into the liver via the portal vein. As of June 2003, 705 pancreatic islet transplants worldwide have been reported to the International Islet Transplant Registry (ITR) at our Third Medical Department, University of Giessen/Germany. Data analysis shows at 1 year after adult islet transplantation a patient survival rate of 97%, a functioning islet graft in 54% of the cases, whereas insulin independence was meanwhile achieved in 20% of the cases. However, using a novel protocol established by the Edmonton Center/Canada, the insulin independence rates have improved significantly reaching meanwhile a 50-80% level. Finally, the concept of islet cell or stem cell transplantation is most attractive since it offers many perspectives: islet cell availability could become unlimited and islet or stem cells my be transplanted without life-long immunosuppressive treatment of the recipient, just to mention 2 of them. PMID:15238879

  13. Transplantation and Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Canine Neural Progenitor Cell Grafts in the Postnatal Dog Brain

    PubMed Central

    Walton, Raquel M.; Magnitsky, Sergey G.; Seiler, Gabriela S.; Poptani, Harish; Wolfe, John H.

    2009-01-01

    Cellular transplantation in the form of bone marrow has been one of the primary treatments of many lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs). Although bone marrow transplantation can help central nervous system manifestations in some cases, it has little impact in many LSD patients. Canine models of neurogenetic LSDs provide the opportunity for modeling central nervous system transplantation strategies in brains that more closely approximate the size and architectural complexity of the brains of children. Canine olfactory bulb-derived neural progenitor cells (NPCs) isolated from dog brains were expanded ex vivo and implanted into the caudate nucleus/thalamus or cortex of allogeneic dogs. Canine olfactory bulb-derived NPCs labeled with micron-sized superparamagnetic iron oxide particles were detected by magnetic resonance imaging both in vivo and postmortem. Grafts expressed markers of NPCs (i.e. nestin and glial fibrillary acidic protein), but not the neuronal markers Map2ab or β-tubulin III. The NPCs were from dogs with the LSD mucopolysaccharidosis VII, which is caused by a deficiency of β-glucuronidase. When mucopolysaccharidosis VII canine olfactory bulb-NPCs that were genetically corrected with a lentivirus vector ex vivo were transplanted into mucopolysaccharidosis VII recipient brains, they were detected histologically by β-glucuronidase expression in areas identified by antemortem magnetic resonance imaging tracking. These results demonstrate the potential for ex vivo stem cell-based gene therapy and noninvasive tracking of therapeutic grafts in vivo. PMID:18800012

  14. Clonal CD8+ T Cell Persistence and Variable Gene Usage Bias in a Human Transplanted Hand

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joseph Y.; Balamurugan, Arumugam; Azari, Kodi; Hofmann, Christian; Ng, Hwee L.; Reed, Elaine F.; McDiarmid, Suzanne; Yang, Otto O.

    2015-01-01

    Immune prophylaxis and treatment of transplanted tissue rejection act indiscriminately, risking serious infections and malignancies. Although animal data suggest that cellular immune responses causing rejection may be rather narrow and predictable based on genetic background, there are only limited data regarding the clonal breadth of anti-donor responses in humans after allogeneic organ transplantation. We evaluated the graft-infiltrating CD8+ T lymphocytes in skin punch biopsies of a transplanted hand over 178 days. Profiling of T cell receptor (TCR) variable gene usage and size distribution of the infiltrating cells revealed marked skewing of the TCR repertoire indicating oligoclonality, but relatively normal distributions in the blood. Although sampling limitation prevented complete assessment of the TCR repertoire, sequencing further identified 11 TCR clonal expansions that persisted through varying degrees of clinical rejection and immunosuppressive therapy. These 11 clones were limited to three TCR beta chain variable (BV) gene families. Overall, these data indicate significant oligoclonality and likely restricted BV gene usage of alloreactive CD8+ T lymphocytes, and suggest that changes in rejection status are more due to varying regulation of their activity or number rather than shifts in the clonal populations in the transplanted organ. Given that controlled animal models produce predictable BV usage in T lymphocytes mediating rejection, understanding the determinants of TCR gene usage associated with rejection in humans may have application in specifically targeted immunotherapy. PMID:26287728

  15. Donor cell leukemia after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Murata, Makoto; Ishikawa, Yuichi; Ohashi, Haruhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Ozeki, Kazutaka; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki

    2008-07-01

    A 49-year-old male developed recurrent acute myeloid leukemia 27 months after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) from an HLA-identical brother. The immunophenotype of the blastic cell population was incompatible with that of the pre-transplant blast cells; a mutation in C/EBPA gene was found in the pre-transplant blast cells that was not present in the post-transplant blast cells, and short tandem repeat analysis of marrow cells, which included 71% blasts, showed complete donor chimera. Thus, this recipient developed donor cell leukemia (DCL). The donor was healthy when DCL developed in the recipient as well as before donation of the peripheral blood stem cells. Only five cases of DCL after PBSCT have been reported in the literature. As a mechanism for the development of DCL, a vigorous proliferative demand on the donor cells, which often correlates with a higher likelihood of replication error or mutation, has been proposed. Peripheral blood stem cells might have an advantage in that they are associated with a low incidence of DCL development because PBSCT recipients receive a higher total cell dose than recipients of bone marrow or cord blood cells. PMID:18470599

  16. Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide versus conventional graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis in mismatched unrelated donor haematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rohtesh S; Saliba, Rima M; Chen, Julianne; Rondon, Gabriela; Hammerstrom, Aimee E; Alousi, Amin; Qazilbash, Muzaffar; Bashir, Qaiser; Ahmed, Sairah; Popat, Uday; Hosing, Chitra; Khouri, Issa; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard E; Ciurea, Stefan O

    2016-05-01

    Post-transplantation cyclophosphamide (PTCy) is an effective strategy to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after haploidentical haematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We determined the efficacy of PTCy-based GVHD prophylaxis in human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-mismatched unrelated donor (MMUD) HCT. We analysed 113 adult patients with high-risk haematological malignancies who underwent one-antigen MMUD transplantation between 2009 and 2013. Of these, 41 patients received PTCy, tacrolimus and mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) for GVHD prophylaxis; 72 patients received conventional prophylaxis with anti-thymocyte globulin, tacrolimus and methotrexate. Graft source was primarily bone marrow (83% PTCy vs. 63% conventional group). Incidence of grade II-IV (37% vs. 36%, P = 0·8) and grade III-IV (17% vs. 12%, P = 0·5) acute GVHD was similar at day 100. However, the incidence of grade II-IV acute GVHD by day 30 was significantly lower in the PTCy group (0% vs. 15%, P = 0·01). Median time to neutrophil (18 days vs. 12 days, P < 0·001) and platelet (25·5 days vs. 18 days, P = 0·05) engraftment was prolonged in PTCy group. Rates of graft failure, chronic GVHD, 2-year non-relapse mortality, relapse, progression-free survival or overall survival were similar. Our results demonstrate that PTCy, tacrolimus and MMF for GVHD prophylaxis is safe and produced similar results as conventional prophylaxis in patients with one antigen HLA-MMUD HCT. PMID:26947769

  17. NK Cells and Other Innate Lymphoid Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vacca, Paola; Montaldo, Elisa; Croxatto, Daniele; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Vitale, Chiara; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3) are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILCs provide host defenses against viruses, bacteria, and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodeling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defenses that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILCs may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodeling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILCs. Of note, CD34(+) cells isolated from different sources of HSC may differentiate in vitro toward various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g., IL-1β) may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT. PMID:27242795

  18. NK Cells and Other Innate Lymphoid Cells in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vacca, Paola; Montaldo, Elisa; Croxatto, Daniele; Moretta, Francesca; Bertaina, Alice; Vitale, Chiara; Locatelli, Franco; Mingari, Maria Cristina; Moretta, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in the T-cell depleted haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (haplo-HSCT) to cure high-risk leukemias. NK cells belong to the expanding family of innate lymphoid cells (ILCs). At variance with NK cells, the other ILC populations (ILC1/2/3) are non-cytolytic, while they secrete different patterns of cytokines. ILCs provide host defenses against viruses, bacteria, and parasites, drive lymphoid organogenesis, and contribute to tissue remodeling. In haplo-HSCT patients, the extensive T-cell depletion is required to prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) but increases risks of developing a wide range of life-threatening infections. However, these patients may rely on innate defenses that are reconstituted more rapidly than the adaptive ones. In this context, ILCs may represent important players in the early phases following transplantation. They may contribute to tissue homeostasis/remodeling and lymphoid tissue reconstitution. While the reconstitution of NK cell repertoire and its role in haplo-HSCT have been largely investigated, little information is available on ILCs. Of note, CD34+ cells isolated from different sources of HSC may differentiate in vitro toward various ILC subsets. Moreover, cytokines released from leukemia blasts (e.g., IL-1β) may alter the proportions of NK cells and ILC3, suggesting the possibility that leukemia may skew the ILC repertoire. Further studies are required to define the timing of ILC development and their potential protective role after HSCT. PMID:27242795

  19. Plasmacytoid dendritic cells in allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation: benefit or burden?

    PubMed Central

    Auletta, JJ; Devine, SM; Waller, EK

    2016-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs) bridge innate and adaptive immune responses and have important roles in hematopoietic engraftment, GvHD and graft-versus-leukemia responses following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In addition, pDCs mediate antiviral immunity, particularly as they are the body’s primary cellular source of type I interferon. Given their pleiotropic roles, pDCs have emerged as cells that critically impact transplant outcomes, including overall survival. In this article, we will review the pre-clinical and clinical literature, supporting the crucial roles that pDCs assume as key immune effector cells during HCT. PMID:26642333

  20. Successful second transplantation with non-myeloablative conditioning using haploidentical donors for young patients after graft failure following double umbilical cord cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Huilan; Wang, Xingbing; Geng, Liangquan; Tang, Baolin; Tong, Juan; Yao, Wen; Wang, Zuyi; Sun, Zimin

    2010-06-01

    GF is a common and life-threatening complication of UCBT. Here, we report that successful second transplantation of five patients using G-CSF-mobilized maternal stem cells with non-myeloablative conditioning after GF following double UCBT. The median interval between the two transplants were 38 days. The first transplantation was administered after myeloablative conditioning for hematologic malignancies (n=3), and rabbit ATG in combination with cyclophosphamide for SAA (n=2). The second conditioning consisted of Flu and ATG-based non-myeloablative regimen. All five patients acquired quick and sustained engraftment after the second transplant. Treatment-related toxicity was minimal. Three patients developed acute GVHD (>grade II=1). Three patients developed chronic GVHD (limited=1, extensive=2). Severe infectious episodes were significant but manageable. With a median follow-up of 713 days (592-1127), all patients have currently had an event-free survival. These results indicate that a second transplant with non-myeloablative conditioning using mother as the donor for young patient after GF is feasible. PMID:19732379

  1. Molecular Mechanisms Mediating Retinal Reactive Gliosis Following Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Tassoni, Alessia; Gutteridge, Alex; Barber, Amanda C.; Osborne, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    abstract A variety of diseases lead to degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons within the optic nerve resulting in loss of visual function. Although current therapies may delay RGC loss, they do not restore visual function or completely halt disease progression. Regenerative medicine has recently focused on stem cell therapy for both neuroprotective and regenerative purposes. However, significant problems remain to be addressed, such as the long‐term impact of reactive gliosis occurring in the host retina in response to transplanted stem cells. The aim of this work was to investigate retinal glial responses to intravitreally transplanted bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BM‐MSCs) to help identify factors able to modulate graft‐induced reactive gliosis. We found in vivo that intravitreal BM‐MSC transplantation is associated with gliosis‐mediated retinal folding, upregulation of intermediate filaments, and recruitment of macrophages. These responses were accompanied by significant JAK/STAT3 and MAPK (ERK1/2 and JNK) cascade activation in retinal Muller glia. Lipocalin‐2 (Lcn‐2) was identified as a potential new indicator of graft‐induced reactive gliosis. Pharmacological inhibition of STAT3 in BM‐MSC cocultured retinal explants successfully reduced glial fibrillary acidic protein expression in retinal Muller glia and increased BM‐MSC retinal engraftment. Inhibition of stem cell‐induced reactive gliosis is critical for successful transplantation‐based strategies for neuroprotection, replacement, and regeneration of the optic nerve. Stem Cells 2015;33:3006–3016 PMID:26175331

  2. Pretransplant immediately early-1-specific T cell responses provide protection for CMV infection after kidney transplantation.

    PubMed

    Bestard, O; Lucia, M; Crespo, E; Van Liempt, B; Palacio, D; Melilli, E; Torras, J; Llaudó, I; Cerezo, G; Taco, O; Gil-Vernet, S; Grinyó, J M; Cruzado, J M

    2013-07-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is still a major complication after kidney transplantation. Although cytotoxic CMV-specific T cells play a crucial role controlling CMV survival and replication, current pretransplant risk assessment for CMV infection is only based on donor/recipient (IgG)-serostatus. Here, we evaluated the usefulness of monitoring pre- and 6-month CMV-specific T cell responses against two dominant CMV antigens (IE-1 and pp65) and a CMV lysate, using an IFN-γ Elispot, for predicting the advent of CMV infection in two cohorts of 137 kidney transplant recipients either receiving routine prophylaxis (n = 39) or preemptive treatment (n = 98). Incidence of CMV antigenemia/disease within the prophylaxis and preemptive group was 28%/20% and 22%/12%, respectively. Patients developing CMV infection showed significantly lower anti-IE-1-specific T cell responses than those that did not in both groups (p < 0.05). In a ROC curve analysis, low pretransplant anti-IE-1-specific T cell responses predicted the risk of both primary and late-onset CMV infection with high sensitivity and specificity (AUC > 0.70). Furthermore, when using most sensitive and specific Elispot cut-off values, a higher than 80% and 90% sensitivity and negative predictive value was obtained, respectively. Monitoring IE-1-specific T cell responses before transplantation may be useful for predicting posttransplant risk of CMV infection, thus potentially guiding decision-making regarding CMV preventive treatment. PMID:23711167

  3. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines.

    PubMed

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  4. Management of Epstein-Barr Virus infections and post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in patients after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia (ECIL-6) guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Styczynski, Jan; van der Velden, Walter; Fox, Christopher P.; Engelhard, Dan; de la Camara, Rafael; Cordonnier, Catherine; Ljungman, Per

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders are recognized as a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. To better define current understanding of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders in stem cell transplant patients, and to improve its diagnosis and management, a working group of the Sixth European Conference on Infections in Leukemia 2015 reviewed the literature, graded the available quality of evidence, and developed evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis, prevention, prophylaxis and therapy of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders exclusively in the stem cell transplant setting. The key elements in diagnosis include non-invasive and invasive methods. The former are based on quantitative viral load measurement and imaging with positron emission tomography; the latter with tissue biopsy for histopathology and detection of Epstein-Barr virus. The diagnosis of post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder can be established on a proven or probable level. Therapeutic strategies include prophylaxis, preemptive therapy and targeted therapy. Rituximab, reduction of immunosuppression and Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell therapy are recommended as first-line therapy, whilst unselected donor lymphocyte infusions or chemotherapy are options as second-line therapy; other methods including antiviral drugs are discouraged. PMID:27365460

  5. Transplantation of Neural Stem Cells Clonally Derived from Embryonic Stem Cells Promotes Recovery After Murine Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Salewski, Ryan P.; Mitchell, Robert A.; Shen, Carl

    2015-01-01

    The pathology of spinal cord injury (SCI) makes it appropriate for cell-based therapies. Treatments using neural stem cells (NSCs) in animal models of SCI have shown positive outcomes, although uncertainty remains regarding the optimal cell source. Pluripotent cell sources such as embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide a limitless supply of therapeutic cells. NSCs derived using embryoid bodies (EB) from ESCs have shown tumorigenic potential. Clonal neurosphere generation is an alternative method to generate safer and more clinically relevant NSCs without the use of an EB stage for use in cell-based therapies. We generated clonally derived definitive NSCs (dNSCs) from ESC. These cells were transplanted into a mouse thoracic SCI model. Embryonic stem cell-derived definitive neural stem cell (ES-dNSC)-transplanted mice were compared with controls using behavioral measures and histopathological analysis of tissue. In addition, the role of remyelination in injury recovery was investigated using transmission electron microscopy. The SCI group that received ES-dNSC transplantation showed significant improvements in locomotor function compared with controls in open field and gait analysis. The cell treatment group had a significant enhancement of spared neural tissue. Immunohistological assessments showed that dNSCs differentiated primarily to oligodendrocytes. These cells were shown to express myelin basic protein, associate with axons, and support nodal architecture as well as display proper compact, multilayer myelination in electron microscopic analysis. This study provides strong evidence that dNSCs clonally derived from pluripotent cells using the default pathway of neuralization improve motor function after SCI and enhance sparing of neural tissue, while remaining safe and clinically relevant. PMID:25119334

  6. Granulomatous amebic encephalitis following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Doan, Ninh; Rozansky, Gregory; Nguyen, Ha Son; Gelsomino, Michael; Shabani, Saman; Mueller, Wade; Johnson, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Background: Granulomatous amebic encephalitis (GAE) is rare, but often fatal. The infection has been documented predominantly among the immunocompromised population or among those with chronic disease. To date, however, there have only been eight cases regarding the infection following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Case Description: A 62-year-old female with a history of relapsed diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, recently underwent peripheral blood autologous stem cell transplant after BEAM conditioning (day 0). On day +15, she began to exhibit worsening fatigue, generalized weakness, and fever. Symptoms progressed to nausea, emesis, somnolence, confusion, and frontal headaches over the next few days. Imaging demonstrated multifocal ill-defined vasogenic edema with patchy enhancement. The patient was started on broad antibiotics, antifungals, and seizure prophylaxis. Evaluation for bacterial, fungal, mycobacterial, and viral etiologies was fruitless. Her mental status progressively deteriorated. On day +22, she exhibited severe lethargy and went into pulseless electrical activity arrest, requiring chest compressions. The episode lasted <2 min and her pulse was restored. She was taken to the operating room for a brain biopsy. Postoperatively, her right pupil began to dilate compared to the left; she demonstrated extensor posturing in her upper extremities and withdrawal in her lower extremities. Repeat computed tomography demonstrated progressive edema. Given poor prognosis and poor neurological examination, the family opted for withdrawal of care. Final pathology was consistent with Acanthamoeba GAE. Conclusion: The authors report the third case of GAE after autologous stem cell transplant, and the ninth case overall after HSCT. This case is unusual due to its rapid clinical presentation after HSCT compared to prior literature. The case highlights the need for high suspicion of Acanthamoeba infection in this patient population. PMID:26539322

  7. Exanthem subitum (human herpesvirus-6 reactivation) after autologous stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Schlaweck, S; Brägelmann, J; Brossart, P; Mayer, K

    2016-04-01

    We present the case of a 62-year-old man treated with high-dose chemotherapy and consecutive autologous stem cell transplantation for mantle cell lymphoma, who developed high fever and a rash of the trunk and both axillae 10 days after stem cell transplantation. PMID:26918962

  8. 76 FR 11491 - Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation; Request for Nominations for Voting Members

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-02

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Health Resources and Services Administration Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell... requesting nominations to fill expected vacancies on the Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation. The Advisory Council on Blood Stem Cell Transplantation was established pursuant to Public Law...

  9. Involvement of mature donor T cells in the NK cell reconstitution after haploidentical hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, S; Kuentz, M; Vernant, J-P; Dhedin, N; Bories, D; Debré, P; Vieillard, V

    2008-02-01

    We previously demonstrated that natural killer (NK) cells generated after haploidentical stem-cell transplantation (SCT) are blocked at an immature state characterized by phenotypic features and impaired functioning and that this may affect transplantation outcome. We hypothesize that the absence of mature donor T cells in the graft may affect NK cell differentiation. NK cells from 21 transplant recipients who underwent either partial (pTCD; n=11) or extensive (eTCD; n=10) T-cell depletion were compared with NK cells from their healthy donors. We report that despite the strong graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) reaction, pTCD patients, with T cells present during SCT, had a better clinical outcome than patients with eTCD transplants. In addition, the frequency of CD3- CD56(bright) and NKG2A+ NK cells was much lower in pTCD than in eTCD patients after transplantation, and the level of cytotoxicity against primary haplo-mismatched blasts was significantly more pronounced after pTCD than eTCD transplants. These finding strongly suggest that mature donor T cells in the graft may play a key role in NK cell differentiation in vivo, after haploidentical SCT. PMID:18033316

  10. Human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell transplantation restores damaged ovaries

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Shao-Fang; Hu, Hong-Bo; Xu, Hong-Yan; Fu, Xia-Fei; Peng, Dong-Xian; Su, Wei-Yan; He, Yuan-Li

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian injury because of chemotherapy can decrease the levels of sexual hormones and potentia generandi of patients, thereby greatly reducing quality of life. The goal of this study was to investigate which transplantation method for human umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cells (HUMSCs) can recover ovarian function that has been damaged by chemotherapy. A rat model of ovarian injury was established using an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide. Membrane-labelled HUMSCs were subsequently injected directly into ovary tissue or tail vein. The distribution of fluorescently labelled HUMSCs, estrous cycle, sexual hormone levels, and potentia generandi of treated and control rats were then examined. HUMSCs injected into the ovary only distributed to the ovary and uterus, while HUMSCs injected via tail vein were detected in the ovary, uterus, kidney, liver and lung. The estrous cycle, levels of sex hormones and potentia generandi of the treated rats were also recovered to a certain degree. Moreover, in some transplanted rats, fertility was restored and their offspring developed normally. While ovary injection could recover ovarian function faster, both methods produced similar results in the later stages of observation. Therefore, our results suggest that transplantation of HUMSCs by tail vein injection represents a minimally invasive and effective treatment method for ovarian injury. PMID:25922900

  11. [Current and future status of haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation].

    PubMed

    Ikegame, Kazuhiro; Ogawa, Hiroyasu

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell transplantation from HLA-haploidentical related donors (haploSCT) has been highlighted as an alternative donor source. The regimen consisting of post-transplant cyclophosphamide (PTCY) has been highly prevalent in the US, Europe, and Japan. Considering the status overseas and the current status in Japan, we aim to show our efforts in haploSCT. We initially established the "haplo-full (original)" regimen, which was found to be excessively toxic for general use. Thus, we added ATG to diminish the GVH reaction (haplo-full with ATG). Unfortunately, "haplo-mini (original)" was found to be relatively weak against refractory diseases. Thus, we intensified the preconditioning regimen, which has enabled us to deal with refractory and post-transplant relapse (FAMC-T). One of the characteristics in haploSCT in Hyogo is the use of steroids from the beginning of SCT. The aim of this strategy is to diminish the inflammation affecting GVHD-target organs, and to suppress chemokine release. Since chemokines produced by the preconditioning regimen are well known to induce GVHD, chemokine suppression should effectively suppress GVHD development. The dependency of the GVL effect on chemokines is unclear, possibly serving as a therapeutic window to separate GVHD from the GVL effect. PMID:25876782

  12. Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Outcomes in Monosomal Karyotype Myeloid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Pasquini, Marcelo C; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Medeiros, Bruno C; Armand, Philippe; Hu, Zhen-Huan; Nishihori, Taiga; Aljurf, Mahmoud D; Akpek, Görgün; Cahn, Jean-Yves; Cairo, Mitchell S; Cerny, Jan; Copelan, Edward A; Deol, Abhinav; Freytes, César O; Gale, Robert Peter; Ganguly, Siddhartha; George, Biju; Gupta, Vikas; Hale, Gregory A; Kamble, Rammurti T; Klumpp, Thomas R; Lazarus, Hillard M; Luger, Selina M; Liesveld, Jane L; Litzow, Mark R; Marks, David I; Martino, Rodrigo; Norkin, Maxim; Olsson, Richard F; Oran, Betul; Pawarode, Attaphol; Pulsipher, Michael A; Ramanathan, Muthalagu; Reshef, Ran; Saad, Ayman A; Saber, Wael; Savani, Bipin N; Schouten, Harry C; Ringdén, Olle; Tallman, Martin S; Uy, Geoffrey L; Wood, William A; Wirk, Baldeep; Pérez, Waleska S; Batiwalla, Minoo; Weisdorf, Daniel J

    2016-02-01

    The presence of monosomal karyotype (MK+) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is associated with dismal outcomes. We evaluated the impact of MK+ in AML (MK+AML, n = 240) and in myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) (MK+MDS, n = 221) on hematopoietic cell transplantation outcomes compared with other cytogenetically defined groups (AML, n = 3360; MDS, n = 1373) as reported to the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research from 1998 to 2011. MK+ AML was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 1.98; P < .01), similar transplantation-related mortality (TRM) (hazard ratio, 1.01; P = .90), and worse survival (hazard ratio, 1.67; P < .01) compared with those outcomes for other cytogenetically defined AML. Among patients with MDS, MK+ MDS was associated with higher disease relapse (hazard ratio, 2.39; P < .01), higher TRM (hazard ratio, 1.80; P < .01), and worse survival (HR, 2.02; P < .01). Subset analyses comparing chromosome 7 abnormalities (del7/7q) with or without MK+ demonstrated higher mortality for MK+ disease in for both AML (hazard ratio, 1.72; P < .01) and MDS (hazard ratio, 1.79; P < .01). The strong negative impact of MK+ in myeloid malignancies was observed in all age groups and using either myeloablative or reduced-intensity conditioning regimens. Alternative approaches to mitigate disease relapse in this population are needed. PMID:26327629

  13. Differential Gene Expression Profiling of Dystrophic Dog Muscle after MuStem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Babarit, Candice; Larcher, Thibaut; Dubreil, Laurence; Leroux, Isabelle; Zuber, Céline; Ledevin, Mireille; Deschamps, Jack-Yves; Fromes, Yves; Cherel, Yan; Guevel, Laetitia; Rouger, Karl

    2015-01-01

    Background Several adult stem cell populations exhibit myogenic regenerative potential, thus representing attractive candidates for therapeutic approaches of neuromuscular diseases such as Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). We have recently shown that systemic delivery of MuStem cells, skeletal muscle-resident stem cells isolated in healthy dog, generates the remodelling of muscle tissue and gives rise to striking clinical benefits in Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog. This global effect, which is observed in the clinically relevant DMD animal model, leads us to question here the molecular pathways that are impacted by MuStem cell transplantation. To address this issue, we compare the global gene expression profile between healthy, GRMD and MuStem cell treated GRMD dog muscle, four months after allogenic MuStem cell transplantation. Results In the dystrophic context of the GRMD dog, disease-related deregulation is observed in the case of 282 genes related to various processes such as inflammatory response, regeneration, calcium ion binding, extracellular matrix organization, metabolism and apoptosis regulation. Importantly, we reveal the impact of MuStem cell transplantation on several molecular and cellular pathways based on a selection of 31 genes displaying signals specifically modulated by the treatment. Concomitant with a diffuse dystrophin expression, a histological remodelling and a stabilization of GRMD dog clinical status, we show that cell delivery is associated with an up-regulation of genes reflecting a sustained enhancement of muscle regeneration. We also identify a decreased mRNA expression of a set of genes having metabolic functions associated with lipid homeostasis and energy. Interestingly, ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation is highly enhanced in GRMD dog muscle after systemic delivery of MuStem cells. Conclusions Overall, our results provide the first high-throughput characterization of GRMD dog muscle and throw new light on the

  14. Successful treatment of Epstein-Barr virus-related post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease with central nervous system involvement following allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation - a case study.

    PubMed

    Wróblewska, Małgorzata; Gil, Lidia A; Komarnicki, Mieczysław A

    2015-01-01

    Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD) is a rare but severe form of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven complication that develops in patients after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In rare cases it manifests as primary central nervous system (CNS) involvement, which is thought to be the most unfavourable localisation with respect to outcome. Disease confined to the CNS is much more challenging than systemic PTLD, and one of the contributing factors is the limited drug penetration across the blood-brain barrier. We describe the case of a 29-year-old woman who was successfully treated for PTLD with CNS involvement. The patient was diagnosed with T-cell lymphoblastic lymphoma and underwent the procedure of haematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an unrelated donor. Two months after transplantation she manifested severe headache and progressive mental deterioration accompanied by enlargement of the lymph nodes. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan revealed segmental, asymmetrical thickening of the meninges. Based on the clinical picture and the laboratory findings diagnosis of PTLD was made. The patient was effectively treated with reduction of immunosuppressive therapy and intravenous rituximab. Initially started intrathecal chemotherapy was stopped due to iatrogenic complications. We conclude that in this case the involvement of meninges in the course of the lymphoproliferative process might have compromised the blood-brain barrier. This factor probably improved rituximab's penetration to CNS, contributing to our patient's recovery. PMID:26155195

  15. Nonspecific suppressor T cells cause decreased mixed lymphocyte culture reactivity in bone marrow transplant patients

    SciTech Connect

    Harada, M.; Ueda, M.; Nakao, S.; Kondo, K.; Odaka, K.; Shiobara, S.; Matsue, K.; Mori, T.; Matsuda, T.

    1986-07-15

    Decreased reactivity in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC) was observed in patients within 1 yr after allogeneic and autologous bone marrow transplantation. Suppressor activity of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from transplant patients was studied by adding these cells as modulator cells to a bidirectional MLC with cells from normal individuals. PBMC from transplant patients markedly suppressed MLC reactivity in a dose-dependent manner. Suppressor activity was present in cells forming rosettes with sheep erythrocytes. Treatment of modulator cells with monoclonal antibodies against T cell differentiation antigens (OKT8, OKIa1) and complement completely abolished suppression of MLC. Suppressor activity was unaffected by 30 Gy irradiation. Suppressor activity declined gradually after transplantation and was inversely correlated with MLC reactivity of each patient at a significant level (p less than 0.01). These observations suggest that OKT8+ Ia+ radioresistant suppressor T cells play a role in the development of decreased MLC reactivity observed during the early post-transplant period.

  16. Engraftment syndrome after nonmyeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: incidence and effects on survival.

    PubMed

    Gorak, Edward; Geller, Nancy; Srinivasan, Ramaprasad; Espinoza-Delgado, Igor; Donohue, Teresa; Barrett, A John; Suffredini, Anthony; Childs, Richard

    2005-07-01

    Engraftment syndrome (ES) encompasses a constellation of symptoms that occur during neutrophil recovery after both autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HCT). Although it is well characterized after conventional myeloablative procedures, limited data exist on this complication after nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT. The clinical manifestations, incidence, and risk factors associated with ES were investigated in a consecutive series of patients undergoing cyclophosphamide/fludarabine-based nonmyeloablative allogeneic HCT from a related HLA-compatible donor. Fifteen (10%) of 149 patients (median age, 53 years; range, 27-66 years) developed ES; the onset of symptoms occurred at a median of 10 days (range, 3-14 days), and they consisted of fever (100%), cough (53%), diffuse pulmonary infiltrates (100%), rash (13%), and room air hypoxia (87%). ES was more likely to develop in patients who received empiric amphotericin formulations after transplant conditioning (Fisher exact test; P=.007). In a multivariate analysis, older patient age, female sex, and treatment with amphotericin were predictors for the development of ES. Intravenous methylprednisolone led to the rapid resolution of ES; however, transplant-related mortality was significantly higher (cumulative incidence, 49% versus 16%; P=.0005), and median survival was significantly shorter (168 versus 418 days; P=.005) in patients with ES compared with non-ES patients. In conclusion, ES occurs commonly after cyclophosphamide/fludarabine-based nonmyeloablative transplantation and responds rapidly to corticosteroid treatment, but it is associated with a higher risk of nonrelapse mortality and with shorter overall survival. PMID:15983554

  17. Thiotepa-based versus total body irradiation-based myeloablative conditioning prior to allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission: a retrospective analysis from the Acute Leukemia Working Party of the European Group for Blood and Marrow Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Eder, Sandra; Labopin, Myriam; Arcese, William; Or, Reuven; Majolino, Ignazio; Bacigalupo, Andrea; de Rosa, Gennaro; Volin, Liisa; Beelen, Dietrich; Veelken, Hendrik; Schaap, Nicolaas P M; Kuball, Jurgen; Cornelissen, Jan; Nagler, Arnon; Mohty, Mohamad

    2016-01-01

    Thiotepa is an alkylating compound with an antineoplastic and myeloablative activity and can mimic the effect of radiation. However, it is unknown whether this new regimen could safely replace the long-established ones. This retrospective matched-pair analysis evaluated the outcome of adults with acute myeloid leukaemia in first complete remission who received myeloablative conditioning either with a thiotepa-based (n = 121) or a cyclophosphamide/total body irradiation-based (TBI; n = 358) regimen for allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation from an HLA-matched sibling or an unrelated donor. With a median follow-up of 44 months, the outcome was similar in both groups. Acute graft-versus-host disease grade II-IV was observed in 25% after thiotepa-containing regimen versus 35% after TBI (P = 0.06). The 2-yr cumulative incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease was 40.5% for thiotepa and 41% for TBI (P = 0.98). At 2 yrs, the cumulative incidences of non-relapse mortality and relapse incidence were 23.9% (thiotepa) vs. 22.4% (TBI; P = 0.66) and 17.2% (thiotepa) vs. 23.3% (TBI; P = 0.77), respectively. The probabilities of leukaemia-free and overall survival at 2 yrs were not significantly different between the thiotepa and TBI groups, at 58.9% vs. 54.2% (P = 0.95) and 61.4% vs. 58% (P = 0.72), respectively. Myeloablative regimens using combinations including thiotepa can provide satisfactory outcomes, but the optimal conditioning remains unclear for the individual patient in this setting. PMID:25807864

  18. An association between antibodies specific for endothelial cells and renal transplant failure.

    PubMed

    Perrey, C; Brenchley, P E; Johnson, R W; Martin, S

    1998-06-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies, present at the time of transplant, cause renal transplant rejection but cases of rejection of HLA-identical renal transplants indicate that antibodies to non-HLA antigens may also be detrimental. There is increasing evidence that antibodies to antigens present on endothelial cells and monocytes, and on endothelial cells alone, are associated with transplant rejection. We investigated 105 patients with failed renal transplants for the presence of endothelial cell reactive antibodies and compared them with 94 successful transplant patients to determine the role of non-HLA antibodies in transplant failure. Patient sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) using as a target fixed cells either from the endothelial/epithelial cell line EAHy.926 or primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Antibody binding was detected using an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Fourteen of the 105 failed transplant patients had endothelial cell-reactive antibodies as compared with only three of the 94 patients with successful transplants (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.02). Antibody-positive sera were absorbed with the epithelial cell line A549 to remove antibodies directed against the epithelial component of EAHy.926 and with a pool of lymphoblastoid cell line cells to remove HLA-specific antibodies. Absorption did not reduce antibody activity showing the antibodies to be directed against endothelial cell determinants. Antibody-positive sera were also tested by flow cytometry against the monocyte cell line THP-1 and 13 of the 14 patients were negative. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of IgG antibodies directed against endothelial cell determinants in renal transplant recipients in association with renal transplant failure. PMID:9777698

  19. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Tunisia.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, T; Torjemane, L; Abdelkefi, A; Lakhal, A; Ladeb, S; Ben Hamed, L; Slama, H; Ben Abdeladhim, A

    2008-08-01

    In 1998, the Tunisian team of the 'Centre National de Greffe de Moelle Osseuse' initiated allogeneic hematopoietic SCT (AHSCT) in Tunisia. As of June 2007, information was collected about 299 patients with a first AHSCT and 12 additional retransplants. The median age was 19 years (range 2-49 years). The main indications were aplastic anemia (n=106, 36%), leukemia and nonmalignant disorders (n=153, 51%), Fanconi anemia (n=26, 9%) and other nonmalignant disorders (n=14, 4%). Preparative regimens depended on indication. All donors were HLA geno-identical. The stem cell sources were BM (87%) and PBSCs (13%). At the time of analysis, 200 patients (67%) were alive after a median follow-up of 42 months (range 3-112 months). The overall TRM rate was 17%. Outcome depended on indication. According to our results, allogeneic HSCT is potentially curative for hematological diseases, but it is a toxic approach for malignant disorders. PMID:18724288

  20. Targeting CD8 T-Cell Metabolism in Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Yap, Michelle; Brouard, Sophie; Pecqueur, Claire; Degauque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Infiltration of effector CD8 T cells plays a major role in allograft rejection, and increases in memory and terminally differentiated effector memory CD8 T cells are associated with long-term allograft dysfunction. Alternatively, CD8 regulatory T cells suppress the inflammatory responses of effector lymphocytes and induce allograft tolerance in animal models. Recently, there has been a renewed interest in the field of immunometabolics and its important role in CD8 function and differentiation. The purpose of this review is to highlight the key metabolic pathways involved in CD8 T cells and to discuss how manipulating these metabolic pathways could lead to new immunosuppressive strategies for the transplantation field. PMID:26557123

  1. Transplantation of Human Neural Stem Cells in a Parkinsonian Model Exerts Neuroprotection via Regulation of the Host Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Zuo, Fu-Xing; Bao, Xin-Jie; Sun, Xi-Cai; Wu, Jun; Bai, Qing-Ran; Chen, Guo; Li, Xue-Yuan; Zhou, Qiang-Yi; Yang, Yuan-Fan; Shen, Qin; Wang, Ren-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is characterized by a progressive loss of dopaminergic neurons and consequent dopamine (DA) deficit, and current treatment still remains a challenge. Although neural stem cells (NSCs) have been evaluated as appealing graft sources, mechanisms underlying the beneficial phenomena are not well understood. Here, we investigate whether human NSCs (hNSCs) transplantation could provide neuroprotection against DA depletion by recruiting endogenous cells to establish a favorable niche. Adult mice subjected to 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) were transplanted with hNSCs or vehicle into the striatum. Behavioral and histological analyses demonstrated significant neurorescue response observed in hNSCs-treated animals compared with the control mice. In transplanted animals, grafted cells survived, proliferated, and migrated within the astrocytic scaffold. Notably, more local astrocytes underwent de-differentiation, acquiring the properties of NSCs or neural precursor cells (NPCs) in mice given hNSCs. Additionally, we also detected significantly higher expression of host-derived growth factors in hNSCs-transplanted mice compared with the control animals, together with inhibition of local microglia and proinflammatory cytokines. Overall, our results indicate that hNSCs transplantation exerts neuroprotection in MPTP-insulted mice via regulating the host niche. Harnessing synergistic interaction between the grafts and host cells may help optimize cell-based therapies for PD. PMID:26556344

  2. Remodeling of the thoracic aorta after bone marrow cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Alyne; Monteiro, Nemesis; Rocha, Vinícius Novaes; Oliveira, Genilza; Moraes, Alan Cesar; Andrade, Cherley; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; de Carvalho, Laís; Thole, Alessandra; Carvalho, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and display the paracrine effect. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of therapy with bone marrow cells (BMCs) on blood glucose, lipid metabolism and aortic wall remodeling in mice through the administration of a high fat diet and subsequent BMCs transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet (CO group) or an atherogenic diet (AT group). After 16 weeks, the AT group was divided into four groups: an AT 14 days group and AT 21 days group, that were given an injection of vehicle and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after, respectively; AT-BMC 14 days group and AT-BMC 21 days group that was given an injection of BMCs and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after. The CO group was sacrificed along with other groups. The BMCs transplant had reduced blood glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol. The Qa (1/mm2) was quantitatively reduced in AT 14 days group, AT 21 days group and was high in AT-BMC 21 days group. The AT 21 days group exhibited increased tunica media and elastic system fibers. The immunolabeling for α-SMA and VEGF showed less immunolabeling in transplanted groups with BMCs. The immunostaining for PCNA seems to be more expressive in the group AT-BMC 21 days group. To conclude, our results support the concept that in mice, the injection of BMCs improve glucose levels, lipid metabolism and remodeling of the aortic wall in animals using atherogenic diet. PMID:25337194

  3. Infectious diseases in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation: prevention and prophylaxis strategy guidelines 2016.

    PubMed

    Ullmann, Andrew J; Schmidt-Hieber, Martin; Bertz, Hartmut; Heinz, Werner J; Kiehl, Michael; Krüger, William; Mousset, Sabine; Neuburger, Stefan; Neumann, Silke; Penack, Olaf; Silling, Gerda; Vehreschild, Jörg Janne; Einsele, Hermann; Maschmeyer, Georg

    2016-09-01

    Infectious complications after allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HCT) remain a clinical challenge. This is a guideline provided by the AGIHO (Infectious Diseases Working Group) of the DGHO (German Society for Hematology and Medical Oncology). A core group of experts prepared a preliminary guideline, which was discussed, reviewed, and approved by the entire working group. The guideline provides clinical recommendations for the preventive management including prophylactic treatment of viral, bacterial, parasitic, and fungal diseases. The guideline focuses on antimicrobial agents but includes recommendations on the use of vaccinations. This is the updated version of the AGHIO guideline in the field of allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation utilizing methods according to evidence-based medicine criteria. PMID:27339055

  4. In Vivo Transplantation of Autogenous Marrow-Derived Cells Following Rapid Intraoperative Magnetic Separation Based on Hyaluronan to Augment Bone Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Powrnima; Fleury, Sean; Luangphakdy, Viviane; Shinohara, Kentaro; Pan, Hui; Boehm, Cynthia; Vasanji, Amit; Hefferan, Theresa E.; Walker, Esteban; Yaszemski, Michael; Hascall, Vincent; Zborowski, Maciej

    2013-01-01

    Introduction This project was designed to test the hypothesis that rapid intraoperative processing of bone marrow based on hyaluronan (HA) could be used to improve the outcome of local bone regeneration if the concentration and prevalence of marrow-derived connective tissue progenitors (CTPs) could be increased and nonprogenitors depleted before implantation. Methods HA was used as a marker for positive selection of marrow-derived CTPs using magnetic separation (MS) to obtain a population of HA-positive cells with an increased CTP prevalence. Mineralized cancellous allograft (MCA) was used as an osteoconductive carrier scaffold for loading of HA-positive cells. The canine femoral multidefect model was used and four cylindrical defects measuring 10 mm in diameter and 15 mm in length were grafted with MCA combined with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow that was enriched in HA+ CTPs and depleted in red blood cells and nonprogenitors. Outcome was assessed at 4 weeks using quantitative 3D microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) analysis of bone formation and histomorphological assessment. Results Histomorphological assessment showed a significant increase in new bone formation and in the vascular sinus area in the MS-processed defects. Robust bone formation was found throughout the defect area in both groups (defects grafted with unprocessed marrow or with MS processed marrow.) Percent bone volume in the defects, as assessed by micro-CT, was greater in defects engrafted with MS processed cells, but the difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Rapid intraoperative MS processing to enrich CTPs based on HA as a surface marker can be used to increase the concentration and prevalence of CTPs. MCA grafts supplemented with heparinized bone marrow or MS processed cells resulted in a robust and advanced stage of bone regeneration at 4 weeks. A greater new bone formation and vascular sinus area was found in defects grafted with MS processed cells

  5. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation corrects biochemical derangements in MNGIE.

    PubMed

    Hirano, M; Martí, R; Casali, C; Tadesse, S; Uldrick, T; Fine, B; Escolar, D M; Valentino, M L; Nishino, I; Hesdorffer, C; Schwartz, J; Hawks, R G; Martone, D L; Cairo, M S; DiMauro, S; Stanzani, M; Garvin, J H; Savage, D G

    2006-10-24

    Mitochondrial neurogastrointestinal encephalomyopathy (MNGIE) is a multisystemic autosomal recessive disease due to primary thymidine phosphorylase (TP) deficiency. To restore TP activity, we performed reduced intensity allogeneic stem cell transplantations (alloSCTs) in two patients. In the first, alloSCT failed to engraft, but the second achieved mixed donor chimerism, which partially restored buffy coat TP activity and lowered plasma nucleosides. Thus, alloSCT can correct biochemical abnormalities in the blood of patients with MNGIE, but clinical efficacy remains unproven. PMID:16971696

  6. A Study of Noncultured Extracted Hair Follicle Outer Root Sheath Cell Suspension for Transplantation in Vitiligo

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Aarti N; Marfatia, Ritu K; Saikia, Siddhartha S

    2016-01-01

    Context: Vitiligo surgeries have come a long way from tissue grafts to cultured and non cultured cell transplantation. Extracted hair follicle outer root sheath cell transplantation (EHF ORS) suspension is more enriched with melanocyte. In a hair bulb, there is one melanocyte for every five keratinocytes which is much higher than the epidermal melanin unit. Aims: To analyse the effectiveness of cultured EHF ORS and to perform objective evaluation based on clinical improvement & photographic evidence. To observe any untoward events or side effects. Settings and Design: The study was open and uncontrolled. All the patients were screened at preliminary visit. Reviews were done every two weeks. The endpoint selected was six months post procedure. Materials and Methods: Twenty five patients of stable Vitiligo were included in the study and follicular unit were harvested by Follicular Unit Extraction method. Outer root sheath cells were extracted by trypsinization. The solution was transplanted over dermabraded recipient site. Pressure dressing was given. Patients were followed up regularly. Statistical Analysis Used: Descriptive Statistics, Chi-Square. Results: Mean ± SD repigmentation was 80.15% ± 22.9% with excellent repigmentation (90-100%) in 60% of patients. Conclusions: This method is safe, effective, and simpler than the other methods involving cell culturing and requiring a laboratory set-up but selection of patients is crucial for the success of the outcome. PMID:27601859

  7. Primary Graft Failure after Myeloablative Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation for Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Richard F.; Logan, Brent R.; Chaudhury, Sonali; Zhu, Xiaochun; Akpek, Görgün; Bolwell, Brian J.; Bredeson, Christopher N.; Dvorak, Christopher C.; Gupta, Vikas; Ho, Vincent T.; Lazarus, Hillard M.; Marks, David I.; Ringdén, Olle T.H.; Pasquini, Marcelo C.; Schriber, Jeffrey R.; Cooke, Kenneth R.

    2015-01-01

    Clinical outcomes after primary graft failure (PGF) remain poor. Here we present a large retrospective analysis (n=23,272) which investigates means to prevent PGF and early detection of patients at high risk. In patients with hematologic malignancies, who underwent their first myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation, PGF was reported in 1,278 (5.5%), and there was a marked difference in PGFs using peripheral blood stem cell compared to bone marrow grafts (2.5 vs. 7.3%; P<0.001). A 4-fold increase of PGF was observed in myeloproliferative disorders compared to acute leukemia (P<0.001). Other risk factors for PGF included recipient age below 30, HLA-mismatch, male recipients of female donor grafts, ABO-incompatibility, busulfan/cyclophosphamide conditioning, and cryopreservation. In bone marrow transplants, total nucleated cell doses ≤2.4 × 108/kg were associated with PGF (OR 1.39; P<0.001). The use of tacrolimus-based immunosuppression and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor were associated with decreased PGF risk. These data, allow clinicians to do more informed choices with respect to graft source, donor selection, conditioning and immunosuppressive regimens to reduce the risk of PGF. Moreover, a novel risk score determined on day 21 post-transplant may provide the rationale for an early request for additional hematopoietic stem cells. PMID:25772027

  8. Application and Progress of Combined Mesenchymal Stem Cell Transplantation in the Treatment of Ischemic Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Ping; Liu, Jian-Yang; Tao, Jun; Yang, Song-Ran

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of ischemic cardiomyopathy caused by myocardial infarction (MI) using mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation is a widely researched field, with promising clinical application. However, the low survival rate of transplanted cells has a severe impact on treatment outcome. Currently, research is focused on investigating the strategy of combining genetic engineering, tissue engineering materials, and drug/hypoxia preconditioning to improve ischemic cardiomyopathy treatment outcome using MSC transplantation treatment (MSCTT). This review discusses the application and progress of these techniques. PMID:26295041

  9. A review of transfusion practice before, during, and after hematopoietic progenitor cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Viviana V.; Sandler, S. Gerald; Sayegh, Antoine; Klumpp, Thomas R.

    2008-01-01

    The increased use of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) transplantation has implications and consequences for transfusion services: not only in hospitals where HPC transplantations are performed, but also in hospitals that do not perform HPC transplantations but manage patients before or after transplantation. Candidates for HPC transplantation have specific and specialized transfusion requirements before, during, and after transplantation that are necessary to avert the adverse consequences of alloimmunization to human leukocyte antigens, immunohematologic consequences of ABO-mismatched transplantations, or immunosuppression. Decisions concerning blood transfusions during any of these times may compromise the outcome of an otherwise successful transplantation. Years after an HPC transplantation, and even during clinical remission, recipients may continue to be immunosuppressed and may have critically important, special transfusion requirements. Without a thorough understanding of these special requirements, provision of compatible blood components may be delayed and often urgent transfusion needs prohibit appropriate consultation with the patient's transplantation specialist. To optimize the relevance of issues and communication between clinical hematologists, transplantation physicians, and transfusion medicine physicians, the data and opinions presented in this review are organized by sequence of patient presentation, namely, before, during, and after transplantation. PMID:18583566

  10. The development of squamous cell carcinoma in a patient after kidney transplantation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lewandowska, Małgorzata; Szychta, Paweł; Sporny, Stanisław; Rykała, Jan

    2013-01-01

    In patients with organ transplantation as compared to the general population the risk of cancer is significantly increased. The most common changes are malignant tumors of the skin, constituting 30-65% of malignant tumors found in recipients. Potential risk factors for skin cancer after a transplant operation are: solar radiation, immunosuppressive therapy, genetic factors, infection with HPV and skin cancer transmission before transplantation. In contrast to the immunocompetent population, skin cancers in transplant recipients are dominated by squamous cell carcinoma, followed by basal cell carcinoma. Squamous cell carcinoma in patients after transplantation is characterized by a strong tendency to give local recurrences and distant metastases. Due to the high risk of developing skin cancer in transplant recipients, preventive oncology plays an important role in the long-term care of patients after transplantation. This includes: sun protection, education, and early treatment of patients with precancerous lesions. It is also stressed that systematic dermatologic studies need to be carried out in patients after transplantation surgery. The paper contains basic information about skin cancers in organ transplant recipients: epidemiology, potential risk factors, treatment and prognosis. The paper presents also a case of patient who developed squamous cell carcinoma of the skin 3 years after renal transplantation. PMID:24278050

  11. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  12. Germline replacement by blastula cell transplantation in the fish medaka

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mingyou; Hong, Ni; Xu, Hongyan; Song, Jianxing; Hong, Yunhan

    2016-01-01

    Primordial germ cell (PGC) specification early in development establishes the germline for reproduction and reproductive technologies. Germline replacement (GR) is a powerful tool for conservation of valuable or endangered animals. GR is achievable by germ cell transplantation into the PGC migration pathway or gonads. Blastula cell transplantation (BCT) can also lead to the chimeric germline containing PGCs of both donor and host origins. It has remained largely unknown whether BCT is able to achieve GR at a high efficiency. Here we report efficient GR by BCT into blastula embryos in the fish medaka (Oryzias latipes). Specifically, dnd depletion completely ablated host PGCs and fertility, and dnd overexpression remarkably boosted PGCs in donor blastulae. BCT between normal donor and host produced a germline transmission rate of ~4%. This rate was enhanced up to ~30% upon PGC boosting in donors. Most importantly, BCT between PGC-boosted donors and PGC-ablated hosts led to more than 90% fertility restoration and 100% GR. Therefore, BCT features an extremely high efficiency of fertility recovery and GR in medaka. This finding makes medaka an ideal model to analyze genetic and physiological donor-host compatibilities for BCT-mediated surrogate production and propagation of endangered lower vertebrates and biodiversity. PMID:27406328

  13. Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder of recipient origin in a boy with acute T-cell leukemia with detection of B-cell clonality 3 months before stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kontny, Udo; Boppana, Sridhar; Jung, Andreas; Goebel, Heike; Strahm, Brigitte; Peters, Anke; Dormann, Sabine; Werner, Martin; Bader, Peter; Fisch, Paul; Niemeyer, Charlotte

    2005-11-01

    Post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder is an infrequent complication after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. It is hypothesized that lack of T-cell surveillance following transplantation permits reactivation of latent EBV leading to polyclonal B-cell expansion and finally outgrowth of a predominant clone. Most cases are of donor origin. Here, we describe an 8-year old boy with early onset post-transplantation lymphoproliferative disorder following matched-unrelated stem cell transplantation for high-risk T-cell leukemia whose disease was unusual for two reasons. First, his B-cell clone was of host origin and, in contrast to the few PTLD of host origin described so far, not associated with autologous reconstitution. Secondly, using clonal analysis, we could retrospectively show that the B-cell clone emerged during consolidation chemotherapy for T-cell leukemia, 3 months before stem cell transplantation. PMID:16266918

  14. Ex vivo expansion and transplantation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells supported by mesenchymal stem cells from human umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guo-Ping; Pan, Zhi-Jun; Jia, Bing-Bing; Zheng, Qiang; Xie, Chun-Gang; Gu, Jiang-Hong; McNiece, Ian K; Wang, Jin-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotential and are detected in bone marrow (BM), adipose tissue, placenta, and umbilical cord blood (UCB). In this study, we examined the ability of UCB-derived MSCs (UCB-MSCs) to support ex vivo expansion of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from UCB and the engraftment of expanded HSPCs in NOD/SCID mice. The result showed that UCB-MSCs supported the proliferation and differentiation of CD34+ cells in vitro. The number of expanded total nucleated cells (TNCs) in MSC-based culture was twofold higher than cultures without MSC (control cultures). UCB-MSCs increased the expansion capabilities of CD34+ cells, long-term culture-initiating cells (LTC-ICs), granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming cells (GM-CFCs), and high proliferative potential colony-forming cells (HPP-CFCs) compared to control cultures. The expanded HSPCs were transplanted into lethally irradiated NOD/SCID mice to assess the effects of expanded cells on hematopoietic recovery. The number of white blood cells (WBCs) in the peripheral blood of mice transplanted with expanded cells from both the MSC-based and control cultures returned to pretreatment levels at day 25 posttransplant and then decreased. The WBC levels returned to pretreatment levels again at days 45-55 posttransplant. The level of human CD45+ cell engraftment in primary recipients transplanted with expanded cells from the MSC-based cultures was significantly higher than recipients transplanted with cells from the control cultures. Serial transplantation demonstrated that the expanded cells could establish long-term engraftment of hematopoietic cells. UCB-MSCs similar to those derived from adult bone marrow may provide novel targets for cellular and gene therapy. PMID:17912949

  15. Determination of the prime electrostatic endothelial cell transplantation procedure for e-PTFE vascular prostheses.

    PubMed

    Bowlin, G L; Rittgers, S E; Schmidt, S P; Alexander, T; Sheffer, D B; Milsted, A

    2000-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent of cellular adhesion (density and morphological maturation), cellular membrane damage, and cellular viability after an electrostatic transplantation of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) onto 6-cm segments of 4-mm I.D. e-PTFE (GORE-TEX) vascular prostheses using a prototype electrostatic endothelial cell transplantation device (EECTD). The electrostatic transplantation parameters evaluated were the apparatus-applied voltage and transplantation time. By our definition, the combination of applied voltage and transplantation time that met the a priori criteria of: 1) maximum transplanted cellular viability, 2) maximum transplantation density, 3) maximum morphological maturation (degree of cellular flattening), and 4) minimal cellular membrane damage would be the prime transplantation procedure. The results of the experimentation indicated that the prime conditions for HUVEC transplantation were obtained when +1.0 V was applied for a transplantation time of 16 min. These conditions achieved an average viable graft surface coverage of 97.4+/-1.6% with an average transplantation density of 73,540+/-8.514 HUVECs/cm2. Furthermore, the transplanted HUVECs were morphologically mature (flattened) with minimal apparent cellular membrane damage (lysis or pitting). The overall clinical significance of this study is that viable endothelial cell transplantation to synthetic vascular grafts can be accomplished at high cellular densities and morphological maturation in 16 min using the EECTD. With the promising in vitro transplantation results, the next logical investigations will include additional in vitro evaluations (cellular retention upon shear stress exposure and biochemical assays) followed by in vivo evaluations to examine thromboresistance and influence on intimal/anastomotic hyperplasia. PMID:10972333

  16. Multi-state analysis illustrates treatment success after stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia followed by donor lymphocyte infusion.

    PubMed

    Eefting, Matthias; de Wreede, Liesbeth C; Halkes, Constantijn J M; von dem Borne, Peter A; Kersting, Sabina; Marijt, Erik W A; Veelken, Hendrik; Putter, Hein; Schetelig, Johannes; Falkenburg, J H Frederik

    2016-04-01

    In the field of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, the common approach is to focus outcome analyses on time to relapse and death, without assessing the impact of post-transplant interventions. We investigated whether a multi-state model would give insight into the events after transplantation in a cohort of patients who were transplanted using a strategy including scheduled donor lymphocyte infusions. Seventy-eight consecutive patients who underwent myeloablative T-cell depleted allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome were studied. We constructed a multi-state model to analyze the impact of donor lymphocyte infusion and graft-versus-host disease on the probabilities of relapse and non-relapse mortality over time. Based on this model we introduced a new measure for outcome after transplantation which we called 'treatment success': being alive without relapse and immunosuppression for graft-versus-host disease. All relevant clinical events were implemented into the multi-state model and were denoted treatment success or failure (either transient or permanent). Both relapse and non-relapse mortality were causes of failure of comparable magnitude. Whereas relapse was the dominant cause of failure from the transplantation state, its rate was reduced after graft-versus-host disease, and especially after donor lymphocyte infusion. The long-term probability of treatment success was approximately 40%. This probability was increased after donor lymphocyte infusion. Our multi-state model helps to interpret the impact of post-transplantation interventions and clinical events on failure and treatment success, thus extracting more information from observational data. PMID:26802054

  17. Therapeutic Potential of Autologous Stem Cell Transplantation for Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Purandare, Chaitanya; Shitole, D. G.; Belle, Vaijayantee; Kedari, Aarti; Bora, Neeta; Joshi, Meghnad

    2012-01-01

    Background. Cerebral palsy (CP) is a severe disabling disease with worldwide incidence being 2 to 3 per 1000 live births. CP was considered as a noncurable, nonreparative disorder, but stem cell therapy offers a potential treatment for CP. Objective. The present study evaluates the safety and efficacy of autologous bone-marrow-derived mononuclear cell (BMMNCs) transplantation in CP patient. Material and Methods. In the present study, five infusions of autologous stem cells were injected intrathecally. Changes in neurological deficits and improvements in function were assessed using Gross Motor Function Classification System (GMFCS-E&R) scale. Results. Significant motor, sensory, cognitive, and speech improvements were observed. Bowel and bladder control has been achieved. On the GMFCS-E&R level, the patient was promoted from grade III to I. Conclusion. In this study, we report that intrathecal infusion of autologous BMMNCs seems to be feasible, effective, and safe with encouraging functional outcome improvements in CP patient. PMID:23259143

  18. Management of respiratory viral infections in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dimpy P; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Mulanovich, Victor E; Ariza-Heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell transplantation procedures and the overall improvement in the clinical management of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients over the past 2 decades have led to an increase in survival duration, in part owing to better strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant complications, including opportunistic infections. However, post-HCT infections remain a concern for HCT recipients, particularly infections caused by community respiratory viruses (CRVs), which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These viruses can potentially cause lower respiratory tract illness, which is associated with a higher mortality rate among HCT recipients. Clinical management of CRV infections in HCT recipients includes supportive care and antiviral therapy, especially in high-risk individuals, when available. Directed antiviral therapy is only available for influenza infections, where successful use of neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir) and/or M2 inhibitors (amantadine or rimantadine) has been reported. Data on the successful use of ribavirin, with or without immunomodulators, for respiratory syncytial virus infections in HCT recipients has emerged over the past 2 decades but is still controversial at best because of a lack of randomized controlled trials. Because of the lack of directed antiviral therapy for most of these viruses, prevention should be emphasized for healthcare workers, patients, family, and friends and should include the promotion of the licensed inactivated influenza vaccine for HCT recipients, when indicated. In this review, we discuss the clinical management of respiratory viruses in this special patient population, focusing on commercially available antivirals, adjuvant therapy, and novel drugs under investigation, as well as on available means for prevention. PMID:23226621

  19. Management of respiratory viral infections in hematopoietic cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Dimpy P; Ghantoji, Shashank S; Mulanovich, Victor E; Ariza-heredia, Ella J; Chemaly, Roy F

    2012-01-01

    Advances in stem cell transplantation procedures and the overall improvement in the clinical management of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) recipients over the past 2 decades have led to an increase in survival duration, in part owing to better strategies for prevention and treatment of post-transplant complications, including opportunistic infections. However, post-HCT infections remain a concern for HCT recipients, particularly infections caused by community respiratory viruses (CRVs), which can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. These viruses can potentially cause lower respiratory tract illness, which is associated with a higher mortality rate among HCT recipients. Clinical management of CRV infections in HCT recipients includes supportive care and antiviral therapy, especially in high-risk individuals, when available. Directed antiviral therapy is only available for influenza infections, where successful use of neuraminidase inhibitors (oseltamivir or zanamivir) and/or M2 inhibitors (amantadine or rimantadine) has been reported. Data on the successful use of ribavirin, with or without immunomodulators, for respiratory syncytial virus infections in HCT recipients has emerged over the past 2 decades but is still controversial at best because of a lack of randomized controlled trials. Because of the lack of directed antiviral therapy for most of these viruses, prevention should be emphasized for healthcare workers, patients, family, and friends and should include the promotion of the licensed inactivated influenza vaccine for HCT recipients, when indicated. In this review, we discuss the clinical management of respiratory viruses in this special patient population, focusing on commercially available antivirals, adjuvant therapy, and novel drugs under investigation, as well as on available means for prevention. PMID:23226621

  20. Quality control and assurance in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation data registries in Japan and other countries.

    PubMed

    Kuwatsuka, Yachiyo

    2016-01-01

    Observational studies from national and international registries with large volumes of patients are commonly performed to identify superior strategies for hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Major international and national stem cell transplant registries collect outcome data using electronic data capture systems, and a systematic study support process has been developed. Statistical support for studies is available from some major international registries, and international and national registries also mutually collaborate to promote stem cell transplant outcome studies and transplant-related activities. Transplant registries additionally take measures to improve data quality to further improve the quality of outcome studies by utilizing data capture systems and manual data management. Data auditing can potentially even further improve data quality; however, human and budgetary resources can be limiting factors in system construction and audits of the Japanese transplant registry are not currently performed. PMID:26563189

  1. Neurons Differentiated from Transplanted Stem Cells Respond Functionally to Acoustic Stimuli in the Awake Monkey Brain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jing-Kuan; Wang, Wen-Chao; Zhai, Rong-Wei; Zhang, Yu-Hua; Yang, Shang-Chuan; Rizak, Joshua; Li, Ling; Xu, Li-Qi; Liu, Li; Pan, Ming-Ke; Hu, Ying-Zhou; Ghanemi, Abdelaziz; Wu, Jing; Yang, Li-Chuan; Li, Hao; Lv, Long-Bao; Li, Jia-Li; Yao, Yong-Gang; Xu, Lin; Feng, Xiao-Li; Yin, Yong; Qin, Dong-Dong; Hu, Xin-Tian; Wang, Zheng-Bo

    2016-07-26

    Here, we examine whether neurons differentiated from transplanted stem cells can integrate into the host neural network and function in awake animals, a goal of transplanted stem cell therapy in the brain. We have developed a technique in which a small "hole" is created in the inferior colliculus (IC) of rhesus monkeys, then stem cells are transplanted in situ to allow for investigation of their integration into the auditory neural network. We found that some transplanted cells differentiated into mature neurons and formed synaptic input/output connections with the host neurons. In addition, c-Fos expression increased significantly in the cells after acoustic stimulation, and multichannel recordings indicated IC specific tuning activities in response to auditory stimulation. These results suggest that the transplanted cells have the potential to functionally integrate into the host neural network. PMID:27425612

  2. Therapeutic potential for mesenchymal stem cell transplantation in critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The therapeutic potential of mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) transplantation for the treatment of ischemic conditions such as coronary artery disease, peripheral arterial disease, and stroke has been explored in animal models and early-phase clinical trials. A substantial database documents the safety profile of MSC administration to humans in a large number of disease states. The mechanism of the therapeutic effect of MSC transplantation in ischemic disease has been postulated to be due to paracrine, immunomodulatory, and differentiation effects. This review provides an overview of the potential role of MSC-based therapy for critical limb ischemia (CLI), the comparison of MSC cellular therapy with angiogenesis gene therapy in CLI, and the proposed mechanism of action of MSC therapy. Preclinical efficacy data in animal models of hindlimb ischemia, current early-phase human trial data, and considerations for future MSC-based therapy in CLI will also be discussed. PMID:22846185

  3. Rituximab for immune hemolytic anemia following T- and B-Cell-depleted hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Corti, P; Bonanomi, S; Vallinoto, C; Balduzzi, A; Uderzo, C; Cazzaniga, G; Gaipa, G; Dassi, M; Perseghin, P; Rovelli, A

    2003-01-01

    The treatment of immune-mediated hemolytic anemia (IHA) complicating hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is often unsatisfactory. We report a case of IHA which occurred after T- and B-cell depleted unrelated donor HSCT carried out for mucopolysaccharidosis type I-H (Hurler syndrome) which was successfully treated with anti-CD20+ monoclonal antibody PMID:12486323

  4. Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Related Plasmodium falciparum Infection in a Patient with Sickle Cell Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Rojelio; Booth, Garrett S.; Fedorko, Daniel P.; Hsieh, Matthew M.; Khuu, Hanh M.; Klein, Harvey G.; Mu, Jianbing; Fahle, Gary; Nutman, Thomas B.; Su, Xin-Zhuan; Williams, Esther C.; Flegel, Willy A.; Klion, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background Although transmission of Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) infection during red blood cell transfusion from an infected donor has been well documented, malaria parasites are not known to infect hematopoietic stem cells. We report a case of Pf infection in a patient 11 days after peripheral blood stem cell transplant for sickle cell disease. Study Design and Methods Malaria parasites were detected in thick blood smears by Giemsa staining. Pf HRP2 antigen was measured by ELISA on whole blood and plasma. Pf DNA was detected in whole blood and stem cell retention samples by real-time PCR using Pf species–specific primers and probes. Genotyping of 8 Pf microsatellites was performed on genomic DNA extracted from whole blood. Results Pf was not detected by molecular, serologic or parasitologic means in samples from the recipient until day 11 post-transplant, coincident with the onset of symptoms. In contrast, Pf antigen was retrospectively detected in stored plasma collected 3 months prior to transplant from the asymptomatic donor. Pf DNA was detected in whole blood from both the donor and recipient post-transplant, and genotyping confirmed shared markers between donor and recipient Pf strains. Look back analysis of red blood cell donors was negative for Pf infection. Conclusions These findings are consistent with transmission by the stem cell product and have profound implications with respect to the screening of potential stem cell donors and recipients from malaria-endemic regions. PMID:22536941

  5. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue. PMID:26137552

  6. 3-D Imaging Reveals Participation of Donor Islet Schwann Cells and Pericytes in Islet Transplantation and Graft Neurovascular Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Juang, Jyuhn-Huarng; Kuo, Chien-Hung; Peng, Shih-Jung; Tang, Shiue-Cheng

    2015-02-01

    The primary cells that participate in islet transplantation are the endocrine cells. However, in the islet microenvironment, the endocrine cells are closely associated with the neurovascular tissues consisting of the Schwann cells and pericytes, which form sheaths/barriers at the islet exterior and interior borders. The two cell types have shown their plasticity in islet injury, but their roles in transplantation remain unclear. In this research, we applied 3-dimensional neurovascular histology with cell tracing to reveal the participation of Schwann cells and pericytes in mouse islet transplantation. Longitudinal studies of the grafts under the kidney capsule identify that the donor Schwann cells and pericytes re-associate with the engrafted islets at the peri-graft and perivascular domains, respectively, indicating their adaptability in transplantation. Based on the morphological proximity and cellular reactivity, we propose that the new islet microenvironment should include the peri-graft Schwann cell sheath and perivascular pericytes as an integral part of the new tissue. PMID:26137552

  7. Unrelated haematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Taiwan and beyond.

    PubMed

    Yang, K L; Chang, C Y; Lin, S; Shyr, M H; Lin, P Y

    2009-06-01

    Since its inception in October 1993, the world-renowned Buddhist Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry has facilitated more than 1800 cases of stem cell donations for patients in 27 countries to date. Under the auspices of the Buddhist Tzu Chi Stem Cells Center (BTCSCC), the Registry (> 310,000 donors) offers, on average, one case of stem cell donation every day to national or international transplantation community. The accomplishment of the Registry stems from the philosophy and spirit of giving without reward that was inspired by its founder Dharma Master Cheng Yen, the Samaritan devotions of selfless voluntary stem cell donors and the efforts from a dedicated network of volunteer workers. Demographically speaking, slightly less than one third of the donations are provided to domestic patients and the rest to mainland China and countries in Asia, North America, Europe, Middle East, Oceania, and South Africa. While most of the patients belong to the Oriental ethnic group, a few of the patients are non-Oriental. In addition to the Registry, a non-profit umbilical cord blood (UCB) bank is operating since 2002 to provide a complimentary role for patients unable to identify appropriate bone marrow stem cell donors in the Registry in time. To date, with an inventory of over 12,000 units of UCB cryopreserved in the Tzu Chi Cord Blood Bank, 47 units have been employed in 37 cases of transplantation for both paediatric and adult patients domestically and internationally. The fact that Buddhist Tzu Chi Marrow Donor Registry and Cord Blood Bank are established and operating without governmental financial support is unique and special. To facilitate haematopoietic stem cells to its domestic patients experiencing financial burdens, the BTCSCC offers financial aids to the underprivileged for their medical relief. This humanitarian approach and compassion is definitely a role model for many countries in the world. PMID:19494399

  8. Cellular transplantation-based evolving treatment options in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wu, Mao-cheng; Yuan, Hu; Li, Kang-jie; Qiu, De-Lai

    2015-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often represents a condition of permanent neurologic deficit. It has been possible to understand and delineate the mechanisms contributing to loss of function following primary injury. The clinicians might hope to improve the outcome in SCI injury by designing treatment strategies that could target these secondary mechanisms of response to injury. However, the approaches like molecular targeting of the neurons or surgical interventions have yielded very limited success till date. In recent times, a great thrust is put on to the cellular transplantation mode of treatment strategies to combat SCI problems so as to gain maximum functional recovery. In this review, we discuss about the various cellular transplantation strategies that could be employed in the treatment of SCI. The success of such cellular approaches involving Schwann cells, olfactory ensheathing cells, peripheral nerve, embryonic CNS tissue and activated macrophage has been supported by a number of reports and has been detailed here. Many of these cell transplantation strategies have reached the clinical trial stages. Also, the evolving field of stem cell therapy has made it possible to contemplate the role of both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells to stimulate the differentiation of neurons when transplanted in SCI models. Moreover, the roles of tissue engineering techniques and synthetic biomaterials have also been explained with their beneficial and deleterious effects. Many of these cell-based therapeutic approaches have been able to cause only a little change in recovery and a combinatorial approach involving more than one strategy are now being tried out to successfully treat SCI and improve functional recovery. PMID:25120021

  9. In vivo imaging of transplanted stem cells in the central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Duffy, Ben A; Weitz, Andrew J; Lee, Jin Hyung

    2015-01-01

    In vivo imaging is increasingly being utilized in studies investigating stem cell-based treatments for neurological disorders. Direct labeling is used in preclinical and clinical studies to track the fate of transplanted cells. To further determine cell viability, experimental studies are able to take advantage of reporter gene technologies. Structural and functional brain imaging can also be used alongside cell imaging as biomarkers of treatment efficacy. Furthermore, it is possible that new imaging techniques could be used to monitor functional integration of stem cell-derived cells with the host nervous system. In this review, we examine recent developments in these areas and identify promising directions for future research at the interface of stem cell therapies and neuroimaging. PMID:25461455

  10. Impact of Pre-Transplant Anti-T Cell Globulin (ATG) on Immune Recovery after Myeloablative Allogeneic Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Servais, Sophie; Menten-Dedoyart, Catherine; Beguin, Yves; Seidel, Laurence; Gothot, André; Daulne, Coline; Willems, Evelyne; Delens, Loïc; Humblet-Baron, Stéphanie; Hannon, Muriel; Baron, Frédéric

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-transplant infusion of rabbit anti-T cell globulin (ATG) is increasingly used as prevention of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). However, the precise impact of pre-transplant ATG on immune recovery after PBSCT is still poorly documented. Methods In the current study, we compared immune recovery after myeloablative PBSCT in 65 patients who either received (n = 37) or did not (n = 28) pre-transplant ATG-Fresenius (ATG-F). Detailed phenotypes of circulating T, B, natural killer (NK) and invariant NKT (iNKT) cells were analyzed by multicolor flow cytometry at serial time-points from day 40 to day 365 after transplantation. Thymic function was also assessed by sjTREC quantification. Serious infectious events were collected up to 2 years post-transplantation. Results Pre-transplant ATG-F had a prolonged (for at least up to 1-year) and selective negative impact on the T-cell pool, while it did not impair the recovery of B, NK nor iNKT cells. Among T cells, ATG-F selectively compromised the recovery of naïve CD4+, central memory CD4+ and naïve CD8+ cells, while it spared effector memory T and regulatory T cells. Levels of sjTRECs were similar in both cohorts at 1-year after PBSCT, suggesting that ATG-F unlikely impaired thymopoiesis at long-term after PBSCT. Finally, the incidence and rate of serious infections were similar in both groups, while ATG-F patients had a lower incidence of grade II-IV acute graft-versus-host disease. Conclusions Pre-transplant ATG-F induces long-lasting modulation of the circulating T-cell pool after myeloablative PBSCT, that may participate in preventing graft-versus-host disease without deeply compromising anti-pathogen defenses. PMID:26098781

  11. Hematopoietic microenvironment. Origin, lineage, and transplantability of the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow cultures from chimeric mice

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, S.; Fleischman, R.A.

    1988-04-01

    Studies of bone marrow transplant patients have suggested that the stromal cells of the in vitro hematopoietic microenvironment are transplantable into conditioned recipients. Moreover, in patients with myeloproliferative disorders, all of the stromal cells, which include presumptive endothelial cells, appear to be derived from hematopoietic precursors. To confirm these findings, we have constructed two chimeric mouse models: (a) traditional radiation chimeras, and (b) fetal chimeras, produced by placental injection of bone marrow into genetically anemic Wx/Wv fetuses, a technique that essentially precludes engraftment of nonhematopoietic cells. Using two-color indirect immunofluorescence, the stromal cells in long-term bone marrow culture derived from these chimeras were analyzed for donor or host origin by strain-specific H-2 antigens, and for cell lineage by a variety of other specific markers. 75-95% of the stromal cells were shown to be hematopoietic cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage, based upon donor origin, phagocytosis, and expression of specific hematopoietic surface antigens. The remaining 5-25% of the stromal cells were exclusively host in origin. Apart from occasional fat cells, these cells uniformly expressed collagen type IV, laminin, and a surface antigen associated with endothelial cells. Since these endothelial-like cells are not transplantable into radiation or fetal chimeras, they are not derived from hematopoietic stem cells. The contrast between our findings and human studies suggests either unexpected species differences in the origin of stromal lineages or limitations in the previous methodology used to detect nonhematopoietic stromal cells.

  12. Favorable Outcomes in Patients with High Donor-Derived T Cell Count Following in vivo T Cell Depleted Reduced Intensity Allogeneic Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Toor, Amir A.; Sabo, Roy T.; Chung, Harold M.; Roberts, Catherine; Manjili, Rose H.; Song, Shiyu; Williams, David C.; Edmiston, Wendy; Gatesman, Mandy L.; Edwards, Richard W.; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea; Clark, William B.; Neale, Michael C.; McCarty, John M.; Manjili, Masoud H.

    2016-01-01

    Patients with hematological malignancies were conditioned using a rabbit anti-thymocyte globulin based reduced intensity conditioning regimen for allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Donor-derived CD3+ cell count (ddCD3), a product of CD3+ cell chimerism and absolute CD3+ cell count, when less than 110/μL, eight weeks post-transplant, predicted a high risk of sustained mixed chimerism and relapse. Alternatively, patients with a higher ddCD3 developed GVHD more frequently, and when partially chimeric, had higher rates of conversion to full donor chimerism upon withdrawal of immunosuppression. In conclusion, early data from a small cohort of patients indicates that ddCD3+ cell count at 8 weeks may be used to guide the decision-making process regarding withdrawal of immunosuppression and administration of donor lymphocyte infusion in partially T cell depleted reduced intensity regimens. PMID:22005648

  13. GVHD after haploidentical transplantation: a novel, MHC-defined rhesus macaque model identifies CD28− CD8+ T cells as a reservoir of breakthrough T-cell proliferation during costimulation blockade and sirolimus-based immunosuppression

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Weston P.; Srinivasan, Swetha; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Singh, Karnail; Sen, Sharon; Hamby, Kelly; Deane, Taylor; Stempora, Linda; Beus, Jonathan; Turner, Alexa; Wheeler, Caleb; Anderson, Daniel C.; Sharma, Prachi; Garcia, Anapatricia; Strobert, Elizabeth; Elder, Eric; Crocker, Ian; Crenshaw, Timothy; Penedo, M. Cecilia T.; Ward, Thea; Song, Mingqing; Horan, John; Larsen, Christian P.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a major histocompatibility complex–defined primate model of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and have determined the effect that CD28/CD40-directed costimulation blockade and sirolimus have on this disease. Severe GVHD developed after haploidentical transplantation without prophylaxis, characterized by rapid clinical decline and widespread T-cell infiltration and organ damage. Mechanistic analysis showed activation and possible counter-regulation, with rapid T-cell expansion and accumulation of CD8+ and CD4+ granzyme B+ effector cells and FoxP3pos/CD27high/CD25pos/CD127low CD4+ T cells. CD8+ cells down-regulated CD127 and BCl-2 and up-regulated Ki-67, consistent with a highly activated, proliferative profile. A cytokine storm also occurred, with GVHD-specific secretion of interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), IL-18, and CCL4. Costimulation Blockade and Sirolimus (CoBS) resulted in striking protection against GVHD. At the 30-day primary endpoint, CoBS-treated recipients showed 100% survival compared with no survival in untreated recipients. CoBS treatment resulted in survival, increasing from 11.6 to 62 days (P < .01) with blunting of T-cell expansion and activation. Some CoBS-treated animals did eventually develop GVHD, with both clinical and histopathologic evidence of smoldering disease. The reservoir of CoBS-resistant breakthrough immune activation included secretion of interferon-γ, IL-2, monocyte chemotactic protein-1, and IL-12/IL-23 and proliferation of cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated antigen 4 immunoglobulin-resistant CD28− CD8+ T cells, suggesting adjuvant treatments targeting this subpopulation will be needed for full disease control. PMID:20833977

  14. Dietary recommendations for immunosuppressed patients of 17 hematopoietic stem cell transplantation centers in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Vicenski, Paola Pasini; Alberti, Paloma; do Amaral, Denise Johnsson Campos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Low-microbial diets are recommended to reduce the risk of foodborne infections when hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients have neutropenia. However there is no pattern concerning the composition of such a diet. Objective To collect information concerning the structure of nutrition departments and the diets recommended for immunosuppressed patients in transplant centers in Brazil. Methods Questionnaires were sent to the 45 Bone Marrow Transplantation Centers listed by the Sociedade Brasileira de Transplante de Medula Óssea (SBTMO). Completed questionnaires were returned by 17 centers. The questions were related to the profile and the structure of the nutrition department, at what point a general diet is allowed after transplantation, and which food is allowed during the critical period of immunosuppression and soon after transplantation. Results Of the 17 centers that participated, 82% have a professional nutritionist exclusively for the Transplant Department but only 41% have an area specifically for the preparation of diets for immunosuppressed patients. The patients are released from the low-microbial diet to general diets 90-100 days after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation by 29% of the centers and only after suspension of immunosuppressive drugs in 24%. Most centers (88%) restrict the consumption of raw fruits, all restrict the consumption of raw vegetables and 88% forbid the consumption of yogurt in the critical period of immunosuppression. There was no consensus on forbidden foods soon after transplantation. Conclusion Major differences in diets recommended to hematopoietic stem cell transplantation patients were observed between the different centers. PMID:23049398

  15. Bioethical considerations of monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis: donor transfer after haematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Nancy M; Grady, Christine; Pentz, Rebecca; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice; Raffeld, Mark; Fontaine, Laura S; Babb, Rebecca; Bishop, Michael R; Caporaso, Neil; Marti, Gerald E

    2007-12-01

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a recently described laboratory finding in otherwise healthy individuals. In MBL, a light chain-restricted, clonal B-cell population, often with a chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) phenotype, is identified by flow cytometry. Although the prognostic significance remains unclear, there is an increased incidence in ageing populations and those with a family history of CLL. During the past decade of MBL study, three families have come to our attention in which prospective sibling haematopoietic stem cell donors were found to have an MBL. These families raise complex bioethical issues with regard to disclosure of research data, eligibility for clinical trials and potential donor transfer of MBL. These issues are explored in this report. Identification of MBL among prospective sibling transplant donors will become a common occurrence in transplant practice as transplantation is increasingly offered to older individuals and those with CLL. PMID:18021093

  16. Late Effects Surveillance Recommendations among Survivors of Childhood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Children's Oncology Group Report.

    PubMed

    Chow, Eric J; Anderson, Lynnette; Baker, K Scott; Bhatia, Smita; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Huang, Jennifer T; Pelletier, Wendy; Perkins, Joanna L; Rivard, Linda S; Schechter, Tal; Shah, Ami J; Wilson, Karla D; Wong, Kenneth; Grewal, Satkiran S; Armenian, Saro H; Meacham, Lillian R; Mulrooney, Daniel A; Castellino, Sharon M

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important curative treatment for children with high-risk hematologic malignancies, solid tumors, and, increasingly, nonmalignant diseases. Given improvements in care, there are a growing number of long-term survivors of pediatric HCT. Compared with childhood cancer survivors who did not undergo transplantation, HCT survivors have a substantially increased burden of serious chronic conditions and impairments involving virtually every organ system and overall quality of life. This likely reflects the joint contributions of pretransplantation treatment exposures and organ dysfunction, the transplantation conditioning regimen, and any post-transplantation graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In response, the Children's Oncology Group (COG) has created long-term follow-up guidelines (www.survivorshipguidelines.org) for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer, including those who were treated with HCT. Guideline task forces, consisting of HCT specialists, other pediatric oncologists, radiation oncologists, organ-specific subspecialists, nurses, social workers, other health care professionals, and patient advocates systematically reviewed the literature with regards to late effects after childhood cancer and HCT since 2002, with the most recent review completed in 2013. For the most recent review cycle, over 800 articles from the medical literature relevant to childhood cancer and HCT survivorship were reviewed, including 586 original research articles. Provided herein is an organ system-based overview that emphasizes the most relevant COG recommendations (with accompanying evidence grade) for the long-term follow-up care of childhood HCT survivors (regardless of current age) based on a rigorous review of the available evidence. These recommendations cover both autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors, those who underwent transplantation for nonmalignant diseases, and those with a history of chronic GVHD. PMID

  17. Persistent seropositivity for yellow fever in a previously vaccinated autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation recipient.

    PubMed

    Hayakawa, Kayoko; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Tsunemine, Hiroko; Kanagawa, Shuzo; Kutsuna, Satoshi; Takeshita, Nozomi; Mawatari, Momoko; Fujiya, Yoshihiro; Yamamoto, Kei; Ohmagari, Norio; Kato, Yasuyuki

    2015-08-01

    The duration of a protective level of yellow fever antibodies after autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in a previously vaccinated person is unclear. The case of a patient who had previously been vaccinated for yellow fever and who remained seropositive for 22 months after autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for malignant lymphoma is described herein. PMID:26068870

  18. Restoration of spermatogenesis after transplantation of c-Kit positive testicular cells in the fowl

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transplantation of male germ line cells into sterilized recipients has been used in mammals for conventional breeding as well as for transgenesis. This study presents an improvement in the approach for germ cell transplantation between fowl males by using an enriched subpopulation of c-Kit positive ...

  19. Effect of Astragaloside IV on Neural Stem Cell Transplantation in Alzheimer's Disease Rat Models

    PubMed Central

    Haiyan, Hu; Rensong, Yang; Guoqin, Jin; Xueli, Zhang; Huaying, Xia; Yanwu, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell-based therapy is a promising treatment strategy for neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the mechanism underlying the maintenance of renewal and replacement capabilities of endogenous progenitor cells or engrafted stem cells in a pathological environment remains elusive. To investigate the effect of astragaloside IV (ASI) on the proliferation and differentiation of the engrafted neural stem cells (NSCs), we cultured NSCs from the hippocampus of E14 rat embryos, treated the cells with ASI, and then transplanted the cells into the hippocampus of rat AD models. In vitro experimentation showed that 10−5 M ASI induced NSCs to differentiate into β-tubulin III+ and GFAP+ cells. NSCs transplantation into rat AD models resulted in improvements in learning and memory, especially in the ASI-treated groups. ASI treatment resulted in an increase in the number of β-tubulin III+ cells in the hippocampus. Further investigation showed that ASI inhibited PS1 expression in vitro and in vivo. The high-dose ASI downregulated the Notch intracellular domain, whereas the low-dose ASI increased Notch-1 and NICD. In conclusion, ASI treatment resulted in improvements in learning and memory of AD models by promoting NSC proliferation and differentiation partly through the Notch signal pathway. PMID:27034688

  20. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical use and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barriga, Francisco; Ramírez, Pablo; Wietstruck, Angélica; Rojas, Nicolás

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the accepted therapy of choice for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases in children and adults. Initially developed as rescue therapy for a patient with cancer after high doses of chemotherapy and radiation as well as the correction of severe deficiencies in the hematopoietic system, it has evolved into an adoptive immune therapy for malignancies and autoimmune disorders. The procedure has helped to obtain key information about the bone marrow environment, the biology of hematopoietic stem cells and histocompatibility. The development of this new discipline has allowed numerous groups working around the world to cure patients of diseases previously considered lethal. Together with the ever growing list of volunteer donors and umbilical cord blood banks, this has resulted in life saving therapy for thousands of patients yearly. We present an overview of the procedure from its cradle to the most novel applications, as well as the results of the HSC transplant program developed at our institution since 1989. PMID:23283440

  1. Preclinical modeling of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation - advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Stolfi, Jessica L; Pai, Chien-Chun S; Murphy, William J

    2016-05-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, which was first successfully performed in the 1950s, remains a critical therapeutic modality for treatment of a diverse array of diseases, including a multitude of hematological malignancies, autoimmune disorders, amyloidosis and inherited genetic hematological disorders. Although great advances have been made in understanding and application of this therapy, significant complications still exist, warranting further investigation. Of critical importance, graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in both acute and chronic forms, remains a major complication of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, responsible for both the development of chronic illness and morbidity, as well as mortality. Use of an appropriate preclinical model may provide significant insight into the mechanistic pathways leading to the development and progression of graft-versus-host disease, as well as cancer in general. However, existing preclinical modeling systems exhibit significant limitations, and development of models that recapitulate the complex and comprehensive clinical scenario and provide a tool by which therapeutic intervention may be developed and assessed is of utmost importance. Here, we review the present status of the field of graft-versus-host disease research. We discuss and summarize the preclinical models currently in use, as well as their advantages and limitations. PMID:26640088

  2. Fecal microbiota transplantation for recurrent Clostridium difficile infection in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Webb, B J; Brunner, A; Ford, C D; Gazdik, M A; Petersen, F B; Hoda, D

    2016-08-01

    Recurrent Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) is a consequence of intestinal dysbiosis and is particularly common following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) is an effective method of treating CDI by correcting intestinal dysbiosis by passive transfer of healthy donor microflora. FMT has not been widely used in immunocompromised patients, including HSCT recipients, owing to concern for donor-derived infection. Here, we describe initial results of an FMT program for CDI at a US HSCT center. Seven HSCT recipients underwent FMT between February 2015 and February 2016. Mean time post HSCT was 635 days (25-75 interquartile range [IQR] 38-791). Five of the patients (71.4%) were on immunosuppressive therapy at FMT; 4 had required long-term suppressive oral vancomycin therapy because of immediate recurrence after antibiotic cessation. Stool donors underwent comprehensive health and behavioral screening and laboratory testing of serum and stool for 32 potential pathogens. FMT was administered via the naso-jejunal route in 6 of the 7 patients. Mean follow-up was 265 days (IQR 51-288). Minor post-FMT adverse effects included self-limited bloating and urgency. One patient was suspected of having post-FMT small intestinal bacterial overgrowth. No serious adverse events were noted and all-cause mortality was 0%. Six of 7 (85.7%) patients had no recurrence; 1 patient recurred at day 156 post FMT after taking an oral antibiotic and required repeat FMT, after which no recurrence has occurred. Diarrhea was improved in all patients and 1 patient with gastrointestinal graft-versus-host disease was able to taper off systemic immunosuppression after FMT. With careful donor selection and laboratory screening, FMT appears to be a safe and effective therapy for CDI in HSCT patients and may confer additional benefits. Larger studies are necessary to confirm safety and efficacy and explore other possible effects. PMID:27214585

  3. Increased Numbers of Circulating CD8 Effector Memory T Cells before Transplantation Enhance the Risk of Acute Rejection in Lung Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    San Segundo, David; Ballesteros, María Ángeles; Naranjo, Sara; Zurbano, Felipe; Miñambres, Eduardo; López-Hoyos, Marcos

    2013-01-01

    The effector and regulatory T cell subpopulations involved in the development of acute rejection episodes in lung transplantation remain to be elucidated. Twenty-seven lung transplant candidates were prospectively monitored before transplantation and within the first year post-transplantation. Regulatory, Th17, memory and naïve T cells were measured in peripheral blood of lung transplant recipients by flow cytometry. No association of acute rejection with number of peripheral regulatory T cells and Th17 cells was found. However, effector memory subsets in acute rejection patients were increased during the first two months post-transplant. Interestingly, patients waiting for lung transplant with levels of CD8+ effector memory T cells over 185 cells/mm3 had a significant increased risk of rejection [OR: 5.62 (95% CI: 1.08-29.37), p=0.04]. In multivariate analysis adjusted for age and gender the odds ratio for rejection was: OR: 5.89 (95% CI: 1.08-32.24), p=0.04. These data suggest a correlation between acute rejection and effector memory T cells in lung transplant recipients. The measurement of peripheral blood CD8+ effector memory T cells prior to lung transplant may define patients at high risk of acute lung rejection. PMID:24236187

  4. Pain Management for Children during Bone Marrow and Stem Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Vasquenza, Kelly; Ruble, Kathy; Chen, Allen; Billett, Carol; Kozlowski, Lori; Atwater, Sara; Kost-Byerly, Sabine

    2014-01-01

    Pain management for children during bone marrow and stem cell transplantation is a significant clinical challenge for the health care team. Pain management strategies vary by institution. This paper reports on the use of a pediatric pain management service and patient-and caregiver-controlled analgesia for children undergoing transplant. This 2-year retrospective chart review examined the pain management practices and outcomes of children undergoing bone marrow and stem cell transplants in a large urban teaching hospital during 2008 and 2009. We concluded that patient- and caregiver-controlled analgesia is a well-tolerated modality for pain control during hospitalization for transplantation at this institution. PMID:25267531

  5. Zhichan decoction induces differentiation of dopaminergic neurons in Parkinson's disease rats after neural stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Huifen; Song, Jie; Yang, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to increase the dopamine content and reduce dopaminergic metabolites in the brain of Parkinson's disease rats. Using high-performance liquid chromatography, we found that dopamine and dopaminergic metabolite (dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid) content in the midbrain of Parkinson's disease rats was increased after neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction, compared with neural stem cell transplantation alone. Our genetic algorithm results show that dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and homovanillic acid levels achieve global optimization. Neural stem cell transplantation + Zhichan decoction increased dihydroxyphenylacetic acid levels up to 10-fold, while transplantation alone resulted in a 3-fold increment. Homovanillic acid levels showed no apparent change. Our experimental findings show that after neural stem cell transplantation in Parkinson's disease rats, Zhichan decoction can promote differentiation of neural stem cells into dopaminergic neurons. PMID:25206914

  6. Cell transplantation as a non-invasive strategy for treating liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Toshihiko; Takami, Taro; Sakaida, Isao

    2016-05-01

    Advancements in antiviral drugs have enabled control of viral hepatitis; yet, many patients with liver cirrhosis (LC) are awaiting liver transplants. Liver transplantation yields dramatic therapeutic effects, but problems such as shortage of donors, surgical invasiveness, immunological rejection and costs, limit the number of transplantations. Advances in liver regeneration therapy through cell transplantation as a non-invasive treatment for cirrhosis will supplement these restrictions to the number of liver transplants. Clinical trials for LC have included hematopoietic stem cell mobilization by administration of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, infusion of autologous bone marrow cells, and administration of autologous mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow or umbilical cord. Several recently reported randomized controlled studies have shown the effectiveness of these approaches. However, to promote implementation of new liver regeneration therapies, it is important to develop a system whereby cell therapies with ensured safety can be approved quickly. PMID:26691057

  7. Circulating Cell-Free DNA Enables Noninvasive Diagnosis of Heart Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Valantine, Hannah A.; Snyder, Thomas M.; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F.; Okamoto, Jennifer; Bernstein, Daniel; Weisshaar, Dana; Quake, Stephen R.; Khush, Kiran K.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring allograft health is an important component of posttransplant therapy. Endomyocardial biopsy is the current gold standard for cardiac allograft monitoring but is an expensive and invasive procedure. Proof of principle of a universal, noninvasive diagnostic method based on high-throughput screening of circulating cell-free donor-derived DNA (cfdDNA) was recently demonstrated in a small retrospective cohort. We present the results of a prospective cohort study (65 patients, 565 samples) that tested the utility of cfdDNA in measuring acute rejection after heart transplantation. Circulating cell-free DNA was purified from plasma and sequenced (mean depth, 1.2 giga–base pairs) to quantify the fraction of cfdDNA. Through a comparison with endomyocardial biopsy results, we demonstrate that cfdDNA enables diagnosis of acute rejection after heart transplantation, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.83 and sensitivity and specificity that are comparable to the intrinsic performance of the biopsy itself. This noninvasive genome transplant dynamics approach is a powerful and informative method for routine monitoring of allograft health without incurring the risk, discomfort, and expense of an invasive biopsy. PMID:24944192

  8. The significance of non-T cell pathways in graft rejection--implications for transplant tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xian Chang

    2010-01-01

    Both innate and adaptive immune cells are actively involved in the initiation and destruction of allotransplants, there is a true need now to look beyond T cells in the allograft response, examining various non-T cell types in transplant models and how such cell types interact with T cells in determining the fate of an allograft. Studies in this area may lead to further improvement in transplant outcomes. SUMMARY The “T cell-centric paradigm” has dominated transplant research for decades. While T cells are undeniably quintessential in allograft rejection, recent studies have demonstrated unexpected roles for non-T cells such as NK cells, B cells, macrophage and mast cells in regulating transplant outcomes. It has been shown that depending on models, context, and tolerizing protocols, the innate immune cells contribute significantly to both graft rejection and graft acceptance. Some innate immune cells are potent inflammatory cells directly mediating graft injury while others regulate effector programs of alloreactive T cells and ultimately determine whether the graft is rejected or accepted. Furthermore, when properly activated, some innate immune cells promote the induction of Foxp3+ Tregs whereas others readily kill them, thereby differentially affecting the induction of tolerance. In addition, B cells can induce graft damage by producing alloantibodies or by promoting T cell activation. However, B cells also contribute to transplant tolerance by acting as regulatory cells or by stimulating Foxp3+ Tregs. These new findings unravel unexpected complexities for non-T cells in transplant models and may have important clinical implications. In this overview, we highlight recent advances on the role of B cells, NK cells, dendritic cells, and macrophages in the allograft response, and discuss whether such cells can be therapeutically targeted for the induction of transplant tolerance. PMID:20686444

  9. The role of targeted treatment in mantle cell lymphoma: is transplant dead or alive?

    PubMed Central

    Dreyling, Martin; Ferrero, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Based on the profound biological insights of the last years into the molecular pathogenesis of mantle cell lymphoma and the clinical introduction of new targeted drugs, with high efficacy and a good safety profile, the therapeutic scenario for this tumor has been shown to be thoroughly favourable. No longer characterized by a uniformly dismal prognosis, mantle cell lymphoma has been revealed as a spectrum of different diseases, ranging from very indolent cases to highly aggressive and refractory ones. Thus, there is an urgent need to adapt therapy to accommodate the diverse presentations of the disease. High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is the current standard of care for younger patients, generally providing high responses and long survival rates, but hampered by acute and long-term toxicity. In addition, some patients may be overtreated, while others could benefit from targeted approaches, based on the new, molecular-directed compounds. Such a personalized treatment based on the specific characteristics of individual patients may be guided by validated prognostic tools, such as the Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index and the Ki-67 Proliferative Index, as well as by early predictors of treatment response, like minimal residual disease analysis. Moreover, mutation screening of distinctive genomic alterations may provide new, predictive biomarkers, with an additional impact on clinical practice. Only after tailoring treatment according to the clinical and biological heterogeneity of the disease the role of transplantation and modern therapeutic options will be redefined in mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:26830211

  10. The role of targeted treatment in mantle cell lymphoma: is transplant dead or alive?

    PubMed

    Dreyling, Martin; Ferrero, Simone

    2016-02-01

    Based on the profound biological insights of the last years into the molecular pathogenesis of mantle cell lymphoma and the clinical introduction of new targeted drugs, with high efficacy and a good safety profile, the therapeutic scenario for this tumor has been shown to be thoroughly favourable. No longer characterized by a uniformly dismal prognosis, mantle cell lymphoma has been revealed as a spectrum of different diseases, ranging from very indolent cases to highly aggressive and refractory ones. Thus, there is an urgent need to adapt therapy to accommodate the diverse presentations of the disease. High-dose chemotherapy, followed by autologous stem cell transplantation is the current standard of care for younger patients, generally providing high responses and long survival rates, but hampered by acute and long-term toxicity. In addition, some patients may be overtreated, while others could benefit from targeted approaches, based on the new, molecular-directed compounds. Such a personalized treatment based on the specific characteristics of individual patients may be guided by validated prognostic tools, such as the Mantle Cell Lymphoma International Prognostic Index and the Ki-67 Proliferative Index, as well as by early predictors of treatment response, like minimal residual disease analysis. Moreover, mutation screening of distinctive genomic alterations may provide new, predictive biomarkers, with an additional impact on clinical practice. Only after tailoring treatment according to the clinical and biological heterogeneity of the disease the role of transplantation and modern therapeutic options will be redefined in mantle cell lymphoma. PMID:26830211

  11. Bacterial Infections in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Recipients

    PubMed Central

    Balletto, Elisa; Mikulska, Małgorzata

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial infections are major complications after Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant (HSCT). They consist mainly of bloodstream infections (BSI), followed by pneumonia and gastrointestinal infections, including typhlitis and Clostridium difficile infection. Microbiological data come mostly from BSI. Coagulase negative staphylococci and Enterobacteriaceae are the most frequent pathogens causing approximately 25% of BSI each, followed by enterococci, P. aeruginosa and viridans streptococci. Bacterial pneumonia is frequent after HSCT, and Gram-negatives are predominant. Clostridium difficile infection affects approximately 15% of HSCT recipients, being more frequent in case of allogeneic than autologous HSCT. The epidemiology and the prevalence of resistant strains vary significantly between transplant centres. In some regions, multi-drug resistant (MDR) Gram-negative rods are increasingly frequent. In others, vancomycin-resistant enterococci are predominant. In the era of increasing resistance to antibiotics, the efficacy of fluoroquinolone prophylaxis and standard treatment of febrile neutropenia have been questioned. Therefore, a thorough evaluation of local epidemiology is mandatory to decide the need for prophylaxis and the choice of the best regimen for empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia. For the latter, individualised approach has been proposed, consisting of either escalation or de-escalation strategy. De-escalation strategy is recommended since resistant bacteria should be covered upfront, mainly in patients with severe clinical presentation and previous infection or colonisation with a resistant pathogen. Non-pharmacological interventions, such as screening for resistant bacteria, applying isolation and contact precautions should be put in place to limit the spread of MDR bacteria. Antimicrobial stewardship program should be implemented in transplant centres. PMID:26185610

  12. Progress toward curing HIV infections with hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Smiley, Stephen T; Singh, Anjali; Read, Sarah W; Sharma, Opendra K; Finzi, Diana; Lane, Clifford; Rice, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-15

    Combination antiretroviral therapy can suppress human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection but cannot completely eradicate the virus. A major obstacle in the quest for a cure is the difficulty in targeting and measuring latently infected cells. To date, a single person seems to have been cured of HIV. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) preceded this cancer patient's long-term sustained HIV remission, but researchers have been unable to replicate this cure, and the mechanisms that led to HIV remission remain to be established. In February 2014, the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases sponsored a workshop that provided a venue for in-depth discussion of whether HSCT could be exploited to cure HIV in cancer patients requiring such procedures. Participants also discussed how HSCT might be applied to a broader community of HIV-infected persons in whom the risks of HSCT currently outweigh the likelihood and benefits of HIV cure. PMID:25273081

  13.  Liver transplantation followed by autologous stem cell transplantation for acute liver failure caused by AL amyloidosis. Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Elnegouly, Mayada; Specht, Katja; Zoller, Heinz; Matevossian, Edouard; Bassermann, Florian; Umgelter, Andreas

    2016-01-01

     Hepatic involvement in AL amyloidosis may present as acute liver failure. Historically, liver transplantation in these cases has achieved poor outcomes due to progress of amyloidosis and non-hepatic organ damage. In the era of bortezomib treatment, the prognosis of AL amyloidosis has been markedly improved and may also result in better post-transplant outcomes. We present a case of isolated acute liver failure caused by AL amyloidosis, bridged to transplantation with bortezomib and treated with sequential orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) and autologous stem cell transplantation. The patient is in stable remission 3 years after OLT. PMID:27236160

  14. Quantitative characterization of T-cell repertoire in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Yew, P Y; Alachkar, H; Yamaguchi, R; Kiyotani, K; Fang, H; Yap, K L; Liu, H T; Wickrema, A; Artz, A; van Besien, K; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Bishop, M R; Stock, W; Nakamura, Y

    2015-09-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of curative treatment options for patients with hematologic malignancies. Although GVHD mediated by the donor's T lymphocytes remains the most challenging toxicity of allo-HSCT, graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect targeting leukemic cells, has an important role in affecting the overall outcome of patients with AML. Here we comprehensively characterized the TCR repertoire in patients who underwent matched donor or haplo-cord HSCT using next-generation sequencing approach. Our study defines the functional kinetics of each TCRA and TCRB clone, and changes in T-cell diversity (with identification of CDR3 sequences) and the extent of clonal expansion of certain T-cells. Using this approach, our study demonstrates that higher percentage of cord-blood cells at 30 days after transplant was correlated with higher diversity of TCR repertoire, implicating the role of cord-chimerism in enhancing immune recovery. Importantly, we found that GVHD and relapse, exclusive of each other, were correlated with lower TCR repertoire diversity and expansion of certain T-cell clones. Our results highlight novel insights into the balance between GVHD and GVL effect, suggesting that higher diversity early after transplant possibly implies lower risks of both GVHD and relapse following the HSCT transplantation. PMID:26052909

  15. Quantitative characterization of T-cell repertoire in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yew, P Y; Alachkar, H; Yamaguchi, R; Kiyotani, K; Fang, H; Yap, K L; Liu, H T; Wickrema, A; Artz, A; van Besien, K; Imoto, S; Miyano, S; Bishop, M R; Stock, W; Nakamura, Y

    2015-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is one of curative treatment options for patients with hematologic malignancies. Although GVHD mediated by the donor's T lymphocytes remains the most challenging toxicity of allo-HSCT, graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect targeting leukemic cells, has an important role in affecting the overall outcome of patients with AML. Here we comprehensively characterized the TCR repertoire in patients who underwent matched donor or haplo-cord HSCT using next-generation sequencing approach. Our study defines the functional kinetics of each TCRA and TCRB clone, and changes in T-cell diversity (with identification of CDR3 sequences) and the extent of clonal expansion of certain T-cells. Using this approach, our study demonstrates that higher percentage of cord-blood cells at 30 days after transplant was correlated with higher diversity of TCR repertoire, implicating the role of cord-chimerism in enhancing immune recovery. Importantly, we found that GVHD and relapse, exclusive of each other, were correlated with lower TCR repertoire diversity and expansion of certain T-cell clones. Our results highlight novel insights into the balance between GVHD and GVL effect, suggesting that higher diversity early after transplant possibly implies lower risks of both GVHD and relapse following the HSCT transplantation. PMID:26052909

  16. The Power and the Promise of Cell Reprogramming: Personalized Autologous Body Organ and Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Alvarez Palomo, Ana Belen; Lucas, Michaela; Dilley, Rodney J.; McLenachan, Samuel; Chen, Fred Kuanfu; Requena, Jordi; Sal, Marti Farrera; Lucas, Andrew; Alvarez, Inaki; Jaraquemada, Dolores; Edel, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Reprogramming somatic cells to induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) or direct reprogramming to desired cell types are powerful and new in vitro methods for the study of human disease, cell replacement therapy, and drug development. Both methods to reprogram cells are unconstrained by the ethical and social questions raised by embryonic stem cells. iPSC technology promises to enable personalized autologous cell therapy and has the potential to revolutionize cell replacement therapy and regenerative medicine. Potential applications of iPSC technology are rapidly increasing in ambition from discrete cell replacement applications to the iPSC assisted bioengineering of body organs for personalized autologous body organ transplant. Recent work has demonstrated that the generation of organs from iPSCs is a future possibility. The development of embryonic-like organ structures bioengineered from iPSCs has been achieved, such as an early brain structure (cerebral organoids), bone, optic vesicle-like structures (eye), cardiac muscle tissue (heart), primitive pancreas islet cells, a tooth-like structure (teeth), and functional liver buds (liver). Thus, iPSC technology offers, in the future, the powerful and unique possibility to make body organs for transplantation removing the need for organ donation and immune suppressing drugs. Whilst it is clear that iPSCs are rapidly becoming the lead cell type for research into cell replacement therapy and body organ transplantation strategies in humans, it is not known whether (1) such transplants will stimulate host immune responses; and (2) whether this technology will be capable of the bioengineering of a complete and fully functional human organ. This review will not focus on reprogramming to iPSCs, of which a plethora of reviews can be found, but instead focus on the latest developments in direct reprogramming of cells, the bioengineering of body organs from iPSCs, and an analysis of the immune response induced by i

  17. Tracking Transplanted Stem Cells Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging and the Nanoparticle Labeling Method in Urology

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Heon; Lee, Hong J.; Song, Yun Seob

    2015-01-01

    A reliable in vivo imaging method to localize transplanted cells and monitor their viability would enable a systematic investigation of cell therapy. Most stem cell transplantation studies have used immunohistological staining, which does not provide information about the migration of transplanted cells in vivo in the same host. Molecular imaging visualizes targeted cells in a living host, which enables determining the biological processes occurring in transplanted stem cells. Molecular imaging with labeled nanoparticles provides the opportunity to monitor transplanted cells noninvasively without sacrifice and to repeatedly evaluate them. Among several molecular imaging techniques, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provides high resolution and sensitivity of transplanted cells. MRI is a powerful noninvasive imaging modality with excellent image resolution for studying cellular dynamics. Several types of nanoparticles including superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles have been used to magnetically label stem cells and monitor viability by MRI in the urologic field. This review focuses on the current role and limitations of MRI with labeled nanoparticles for tracking transplanted stem cells in urology. PMID:26413510

  18. Tolerance Induction in HLA Disparate Living Donor Kidney Transplantation by Donor Stem Cell Infusion: durable chimerism predicts outcome1

    PubMed Central

    Leventhal, Joseph; Abecassis, Michael; Miller, Joshua; Gallon, Lorenzo; Tollerud, David; Elliott, Mary Jane; Bozulic, Larry D.; Houston, Chris; Sustento-Reodica, Nedjema; Ildstad, Suzanne T.

    2012-01-01

    Background We recently reported that durable chimerism can be safely established in mismatched kidney recipients through nonmyeloablative conditioning followed by infusion of a facilitating cell (FC)-based hematopoietic stem cell transplant termed FCRx. Here we provide intermediate-term follow-up on this phase 2 trial. Methods Fifteen HLA mismatched living donor renal transplant recipients underwent low intensity conditioning (fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, 200cGyTBI), received a living donor kidney transplant on day 0, then infusion of cryopreserved FCRx on day +1. Maintenance immunosuppression(IS),consisting of tacrolimus and mycophenolate, was weaned over one year. Results All but one patient demonstrated peripheral blood macrochimerism post-transplantation. Engraftment failure occurred in a highly sensitized (PRA of52%) recipient. Chimerism was lost in 3patients at 2, 3, and 6 months post transplantation. Two of these subjects had received either a reduced cell dose or incomplete conditioning; the other 2 had PRA >20%. All demonstrated donor-specific hyporesponsiveness and were weaned from full dose immunosuppression. Comple