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  1. Experimental Adaptation of Rotaviruses to Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Carlos A.; Guerrero, Rafael A.; Silva, Elver; Acosta, Orlando; Barreto, Emiliano

    2016-01-01

    A number of viruses show a naturally extended tropism for tumor cells whereas other viruses have been genetically modified or adapted to infect tumor cells. Oncolytic viruses have become a promising tool for treating some cancers by inducing cell lysis or immune response to tumor cells. In the present work, rotavirus strains TRF-41 (G5) (porcine), RRV (G3) (simian), UK (G6-P5) (bovine), Ym (G11-P9) (porcine), ECwt (murine), Wa (G1-P8), Wi61 (G9) and M69 (G8) (human), and five wild-type human rotavirus isolates were passaged multiple times in different human tumor cell lines and then combined in five different ways before additional multiple passages in tumor cell lines. Cell death caused by the tumor cell-adapted isolates was characterized using Hoechst, propidium iodide, 7-AAD, Annexin V, TUNEL, and anti-poly-(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) and -phospho-histone H2A.X antibodies. Multiple passages of the combined rotaviruses in tumor cell lines led to a successful infection of these cells, suggesting a gain-of-function by the acquisition of greater infectious capacity as compared with that of the parental rotaviruses. The electropherotype profiles suggest that unique tumor cell-adapted isolates were derived from reassortment of parental rotaviruses. Infection produced by such rotavirus isolates induced chromatin modifications compatible with apoptotic cell death. PMID:26828934

  2. MOLECULAR AND CYTOGENETIC ANALYSIS OF LUNG TUMOR CELL LINES

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have measured the levels of amplification of oncogenes and tumor marker genes or other genes of interest in nine human lung tumor cell lines in comparison to normal human bronchial epithelial cells or normal blood lymphocytes to test the hypothesis that aberrant amplification ...

  3. High incidence of TERT mutation in brain tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Johanns, Tanner M; Fu, Yujie; Kobayashi, Dale K; Mei, Yu; Dunn, Ian F; Mao, Diane D; Kim, Albert H; Dunn, Gavin P

    2016-07-01

    TERT promoter gene mutations are highly recurrent in malignant glioma. However, little information exists regarding their presence in experimental brain tumor models. To better characterize systems in which TERT mutation studies could be appropriately modeled experimentally, the TERT promoter was examined by conventional sequencing in primary brain tumor initiating cells (BTIC), two matched recurrent BTIC lines, a panel of established malignant glioma cell lines, and two meningioma cell lines. Telomerase gene expression was examined by quantitative PCR. We found that all glioblastoma BTIC lines harbored a TERT mutation, which was retained in two patient-matched recurrent BTIC. The TERT C228T or C250T mutation was found in 33/35 (94 %) of established malignant glioma cell lines and both meningioma cell lines examined. Brain tumor cell lines expressed variably high telomerase levels. Thus, a high percentage of glioma cell lines, as well as two meningioma cell lines, harbors TERT mutations. These data characterize tractable, accessible models with which to further explore telomerase biology in these tumor types. PMID:26960334

  4. Hypoxic cell turnover in different solid tumor lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ljungkvist, Anna S.E. . E-mail: a.ljungkvist@rther.umcn.nl; Bussink, Johan; Kaanders, Johannes H.A.M.; Rijken, Paulus F.J.W.; Begg, Adrian C.; Raleigh, James A.; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-07-15

    Purpose: Most solid tumors contain hypoxic cells, and the amount of tumor hypoxia has been shown to have a negative impact on the outcome of radiotherapy. The efficacy of combined modality treatments depends both on the sequence and timing of the treatments. Hypoxic cell turnover in tumors may be important for optimal scheduling of combined modality treatments, especially when hypoxic cell targeting is involved. Methods and Materials: Previously we have shown that a double bioreductive hypoxic marker assay could be used to detect changes of tumor hypoxia in relation to the tumor vasculature after carbogen and hydralazine treatments. This assay was used in the current study to establish the turnover rate of hypoxic cells in three different tumor models. The first hypoxic marker, pimonidazole, was administered at variable times before tumor harvest, and the second hypoxic marker, CCI-103F, was injected at a fixed time before harvest. Hypoxic cell turnover was defined as loss of pimonidazole (first marker) relative to CCI-103F (second marker). Results: The half-life of hypoxic cell turnover was 17 h in the murine C38 colon carcinoma line, 23 h and 49 h in the human xenograft lines MEC82 and SCCNij3, respectively. Within 24 h, loss of pimonidazole-stained areas in C38 and MEC82 occurred concurrent with the appearance of pimonidazole positive cell debris in necrotic regions. In C38 and MEC82, most of the hypoxic cells had disappeared after 48 h, whereas in SCCNij3, viable cells that had been labeled with pimonidazole were still observed after 5 days. Conclusions: The present study demonstrates that the double hypoxia marker assay can be used to study changes in both the proportion of hypoxic tumor cells and their lifespan at the same time. The present study shows that large differences in hypoxic cell turnover rates may exist among tumor lines, with half-lives ranging from 17-49 h.

  5. Establishment of human colon cancer cell lines from fresh tumors versus xenografts: comparison of success rate and cell line features.

    PubMed

    Dangles-Marie, Virginie; Pocard, Marc; Richon, Sophie; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Assayag, Franck; Saulnier, Patrick; Judde, Jean-Gabriel; Janneau, Jean-Louis; Auger, Nathalie; Validire, Pierre; Dutrillaux, Bernard; Praz, Françoise; Bellet, Dominique; Poupon, Marie-France

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining representative human colon cancer cell lines from fresh tumors is technically difficult. Using 32 tumor fragments from patients with colon cancer, the present study shows that prior xenograft leads to more efficient cell line establishment compared with direct establishment from fresh tumors (P < 0.05). From 26 tumor specimens, we successfully established 20 tumor xenografts in nude mice (77%); among 19 of these xenografts, 9 (47%) led to cell lines, including four from liver metastases. Only 3 of 31 tumor specimens (9.7%) grew immediately in vitro, and all were derived from primary tumors. To compare major phenotypic and genotypic characteristics of human colon cancer cell lines derived from the same tumor fragment using two protocols, the two pairs of cell lines obtained from 2 of 32 tumor fragments were extensively studied. They displayed similar morphology and were able to form compact spheroids. Chemosensitivity to 5-fluorouracil, CPT11, and L-OHP differed between cell lines obtained from patient tumors and those derived from xenografts. Matched cell lines shared a common core of karyotype alterations and distinctive additional chromosomal aberrations. Expression levels of genes selected for their role in oncogenesis evaluated by real-time quantitative PCR were found to be statistically correlated whatever the in vitro culture model used. In conclusion, xenotransplantation in mice of tumor fragments before establishment of cell lines enables generation of more novel human cancer cell lines for investigation of colon cancer cell biology, opening up the opportunity of reproducing the diversity of this disease. PMID:17210723

  6. Phase transitions in tumor growth: II prostate cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Llanos-Pérez, J. A.; Betancourt-Mar, A.; De Miguel, M. P.; Izquierdo-Kulich, E.; Royuela-García, M.; Tejera, E.; Nieto-Villar, J. M.

    2015-05-01

    We propose a mechanism for prostate cancer cell lines growth, LNCaP and PC3 based on a Gompertz dynamics. This growth exhibits a multifractal behavior and a "second order" phase transition. Finally, it was found that the cellular line PC3 exhibits a higher value of entropy production rate compared to LNCaP, which is indicative of the robustness of PC3, over to LNCaP and may be a quantitative index of metastatic potential tumors.

  7. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression in solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Collart, F.R.; Chubb, C.B.; Mirkin, B.L.; Huberman, E.

    1992-07-10

    IMP dehydrogenase, a regulatory enzyme of guanine nucleotide biosynthesis, may play a role in cell proliferation and malignancy. To assess this possibility, we examined IMP dehydrogenase expression in a series of human solid tumor tissues and tumor cell lines in comparison with their normal counterparts. Increased IMP dehydrogenase gene expression was observed in brain tumors relative to normal brain tissue and in sarcoma cells relative to normal fibroblasts. Similarly, in several B- and T-lymphoid leukemia cell lines, elevated levels of IMP dehydrogenase mRNA and cellular enzyme were observed in comparison with the levels in peripheral blood lymphocytes. These results are consistent with an association between increased IMP dehydrogenase expression and either enhanced cell proliferation or malignant transformation.

  8. Standardized orthotopic xenografts in zebrafish reveal glioma cell-line-specific characteristics and tumor cell heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Welker, Alessandra M.; Jaros, Brian D.; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Imitola, Jaime; Kaur, Balveen; Beattie, Christine E.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Glioblastoma (GBM) is a deadly brain cancer, for which few effective drug treatments are available. Several studies have used zebrafish models to study GBM, but a standardized approach to modeling GBM in zebrafish was lacking to date, preventing comparison of data across studies. Here, we describe a new, standardized orthotopic xenotransplant model of GBM in zebrafish. Dose-response survival assays were used to define the optimal number of cells for tumor formation. Techniques to measure tumor burden and cell spread within the brain over real time were optimized using mouse neural stem cells as control transplants. Applying this standardized approach, we transplanted two patient-derived GBM cell lines, serum-grown adherent cells and neurospheres, into the midbrain region of embryonic zebrafish and analyzed transplanted larvae over time. Progressive brain tumor growth and premature larval death were observed using both cell lines; however, fewer transplanted neurosphere cells were needed for tumor growth and lethality. Tumors were heterogeneous, containing both cells expressing stem cell markers and cells expressing markers of differentiation. A small proportion of transplanted neurosphere cells expressed glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) or vimentin, markers of more differentiated cells, but this number increased significantly during tumor growth, indicating that these cells undergo differentiation in vivo. By contrast, most serum-grown adherent cells expressed GFAP and vimentin at the earliest times examined post-transplant. Both cell types produced brain tumors that contained Sox2+ cells, indicative of tumor stem cells. Transplanted larvae were treated with currently used GBM therapeutics, temozolomide or bortezomib, and this resulted in a reduction in tumor volume in vivo and an increase in survival. The standardized model reported here facilitates robust and reproducible analysis of glioblastoma tumor cells in real time and provides a platform for

  9. Assessment of tumor characteristic gene expression in cell lines using a tissue similarity index (TSI)

    PubMed Central

    Sandberg, Rickard; Ernberg, Ingemar

    2005-01-01

    The gene expression profiles of 60 cell lines, derived from nine different tissues, were compared with their corresponding in vivo tumors and tissues. Cell lines expressed few tissue-specific (2%) or tumor-specific (5%) genes when analyzed group-wise. A tissue similarity index (TSI) was designed based upon singular value decomposition that measured in vivo tumor characteristic gene expression in each cell line independently. Only 34 of the 60 cell lines received the highest TSI toward its tumor of origin. In addition, we identified the most appropriate cell lines to be used as model systems for different in vivo tumors. Seven cell lines were identified as being of another origin than the originally presumed one. The proposed TSI will likely become an important tool for the selection of the most appropriate cell lines in pharmaceutical screening programs and experimental and biomedical research. PMID:15671165

  10. Cytolytic activity against tumor cells by macrophage cell lines and augmentation by macrophage stimulants.

    PubMed

    Taniyama, T; Holden, H T

    1980-07-15

    Previous studies have shown that macrophage cell lines retained the ability to phagocytize, to secrete lysosomal enzymes, and to function as effector cells in antibody-dependent cellular cytoxicity. In this paper, the cytolytic activity of murine macrophage cell lines against tumor target cells was assessed using an 18-h 51Cr release assay. Of the macrophage cell lines tested, RAW 264, PU5-1.8 and IC-21 had intermediate to high levels of spontaneous cytolytic activity, P388D, and J774 had low to intermediate levels, while /WEHI-3 showed little or no cytolytic activity against RBL-5, MBL-2 and TU-5 target cells. Tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines could be augmented by the addition of macrophage stimulants, such as bacterial lipopolysaccharide and poly I:C, indicating that the activation of macrophages by these stimulants does not require the participation of other cell types. Treatment with interferon also augmented the tumor-cell killing by macrophage cell lines. Although the mechanism by which these cell lines exert their spontaneous or boosted cytotoxic activity is not clear, it does not appear to be due to depletion of nutrients since cell lines with high metabolic and proliferative activities, such as WEHI-3 and RBL-5, showed little or no cytotoxicity and supernatants from the macrophage cell lines did not exert any cytotoxic effects in their essay. Thus, it appears that the different macrophage cell lines represent different levels of activation and/or differentiation and may be useful for studying the development of these processes as well as providing a useful tool for analyzing the mechanisms of macrophage-mediated cytolysis. PMID:6165690

  11. Single Cell Profiling of Circulating Tumor Cells: Transcriptional Heterogeneity and Diversity from Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Coram, Marc A.; Reddy, Anupama; Deng, Glenn; Telli, Melinda L.; Advani, Ranjana H.; Carlson, Robert W.; Mollick, Joseph A.; Sheth, Shruti; Kurian, Allison W.; Ford, James M.; Stockdale, Frank E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Pease, R. Fabian; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Bhanot, Gyan; Dairkee, Shanaz H.; Davis, Ronald W.; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.

    2012-01-01

    Background To improve cancer therapy, it is critical to target metastasizing cells. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are rare cells found in the blood of patients with solid tumors and may play a key role in cancer dissemination. Uncovering CTC phenotypes offers a potential avenue to inform treatment. However, CTC transcriptional profiling is limited by leukocyte contamination; an approach to surmount this problem is single cell analysis. Here we demonstrate feasibility of performing high dimensional single CTC profiling, providing early insight into CTC heterogeneity and allowing comparisons to breast cancer cell lines widely used for drug discovery. Methodology/Principal Findings We purified CTCs using the MagSweeper, an immunomagnetic enrichment device that isolates live tumor cells from unfractionated blood. CTCs that met stringent criteria for further analysis were obtained from 70% (14/20) of primary and 70% (21/30) of metastatic breast cancer patients; none were captured from patients with non-epithelial cancer (n = 20) or healthy subjects (n = 25). Microfluidic-based single cell transcriptional profiling of 87 cancer-associated and reference genes showed heterogeneity among individual CTCs, separating them into two major subgroups, based on 31 highly expressed genes. In contrast, single cells from seven breast cancer cell lines were tightly clustered together by sample ID and ER status. CTC profiles were distinct from those of cancer cell lines, questioning the suitability of such lines for drug discovery efforts for late stage cancer therapy. Conclusions/Significance For the first time, we directly measured high dimensional gene expression in individual CTCs without the common practice of pooling such cells. Elevated transcript levels of genes associated with metastasis NPTN, S100A4, S100A9, and with epithelial mesenchymal transition: VIM, TGFß1, ZEB2, FOXC1, CXCR4, were striking compared to cell lines. Our findings demonstrate that profiling CTCs

  12. Different toxic effects of YTX in tumor K-562 and lymphoblastoid cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Araujo, Andrea; Sánchez, Jon A.; Alfonso, Amparo; Vieytes, Mercedes R.; Botana, Luis M.

    2015-01-01

    Yessotoxin (YTX) modulates cellular phosphodiesterases (PDEs). In this regard, opposite effects had been described in the tumor model K-562 cell line and fresh human lymphocytes in terms of cell viability, cyclic adenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) production and protein expression after YTX treatment. Studies in depth of the pathways activated by YTX in K-562 cell line, have demonstrated the activation of two different cell death types, apoptosis, and autophagy after 24 and 48 h of treatment, respectively. Furthermore, the key role of type 4A PDE (PDE4A) in both pathways activated by YTX was demonstrated. Therefore, taking into account the differences between cellular lines and fresh cells, a study of cell death pathways activated by YTX in a non-tumor cell line with mitotic activity, was performed. The cellular model used was the lymphoblastoid cell line that represents a non-tumor model with normal apoptotic and mitotic machinery. In this context, cell viability and cell proliferation, expression of proteins involved in cell death activated by YTX and mitochondrial mass, were studied after the incubation with the toxin. Opposite to the tumor model, no cell death activation was observed in lymphoblastoid cell line in the presence of YTX. In this sense, variations in apoptosis hallmarks were not detected in the lymphoblastoid cell line after YTX incubation, whereas this type I of programmed cell death was observed in K-562 cells. On the other hand, autophagy cell death was triggered in this cellular line, while other autophagic process is suggested in lymphoblastoid cells. These YTX effects are related to PDE4A in both cellular lines. In addition, while cell death is triggered in K-562 cells after YTX treatment, in lymphoblastoid cells the toxin stops cellular proliferation. These results point to YTX as a specific toxic compound of tumor cells, since in the non-tumor lymphoblastoid cell line, no cell death hallmarks are observed. PMID:26136685

  13. Characterization of tumor binding by the IC-21 macrophage cell line.

    PubMed

    Crawford, E K; Latham, P S; Shah, E M; Hasday, J D

    1990-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the SV40-transformed murine macrophage cell line IC-21 is a suitable model to study the selective high avidity binding of tumor cells by subpopulations of activated macrophages. IC-21 macrophages bound P815, RBL5, and EL-4 murine tumor cells with high avidity, as measured by the inverted centrifugation method. Tumor binding by IC-21 macrophages was competitively inhibited by crude membrane vesicles prepared from tumor cells but not by cell membranes prepared from nontransformed splenic leukocytes, suggesting that this process was mediated by tumor-specific binding sites. IC-21 macrophages and primary cultures of pyran copolymer-elicited peritoneal macrophages demonstrated similar tumor binding avidity, kinetics, saturability, and metabolic requirements for optimal high avidity tumor binding. However, compared with primary cultures of pyran copolymer-elicited peritoneal macrophages, IC-21 macrophages bound 4-fold more tumor cells and were more homogeneous for tumor binding capability. Finally, one third of maximal tumor cell binding by IC-21 macrophages was completed within 5 min of contact with tumor, suggesting that IC-21 macrophages constitutively expressed some high avidity tumor binding sites. Their stable and homogeneous capability for binding tumor cells and their ease of growth make the IC-21 macrophage cell line a potentially valuable model for elucidating the molecular mechanisms responsible for selective high avidity tumor binding by subpopulations of activated macrophages. PMID:2164442

  14. Epigenetic regulation of human hedgehog interacting protein in glioma cell lines and primary tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Shahi, Mehdi H.; Zazpe, Idoya; Afzal, Mohammad; Sinha, Subrata; Rebhun, Robert B.; Meléndez, Bárbara; Rey, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    Glioma constitutes one of the most common groups of brain tumors, and its prognosis is influenced by different genetic and epigenetic modulations. In this study, we demonstrated low or no expression of hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) in most of the cell lines and primary glioma tumor samples. We further proceeded to promoter methylation study of this gene in the same cell lines and primary tumor samples and found 87 % (7/8) HHIP methylation in glioblastoma cell lines and 75 % (33/44) in primary tumor samples. These methylation pattern correlates with low or unexpressed HHIP in both cell lines and primary tumor samples. Our results suggest the possibility of epigenetic regulation of this gene in glioma, similarly to medulloblastoma, gastric, hepatic, and pancreatic cancers. Also, HHIP might be a diagnostic or prognostic marker in glioma and help to the detection of these tumors in early stages of disease. PMID:25416442

  15. Role of cell surface oligosaccharides of mouse mammary tumor cell lines in cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yunxue; Li, Jing; Wang, Jingjian; Xing, Yanli; Geng, Meiyu

    2007-06-01

    Malignant transformation is associated with changes in the glycosylation of cell surface proteins and lipids. In tumor cells, alterations in cellular glycosylation may play a key role in their metastatic behaviour. In the present study, we have assessed the relationship between cell surface oligosaccharides and the metastasis ability of mouse mammary tumor cell lines 67NR and 4TO7. The cell surface oligosaccharides have been analyzed using specific binding assays with some plant lectins and the metastasis ability has been studied using transwell migration and invasion assays. In addition, we investigated the role of terminal sialic acids in the metastatic potential (cell adhesion on fibronectin, cell migration and invasion) in the 4TO7 cells on treatment with neuraminidase. The cell lines used in study have different metastasis abilities in vivo - the 67NR form primary tumors, but no tumor cells are detectable in any distant tissues, while cells of the 4TO7 line are able to spread to lung. In vitro metastasis experiments have revealed higher ability of adhesion, cell migration and invasion in the 4TO7 cells than the 67NR cells. Specific lectins binding assays show that the 4TO7 cells expressed more high-mannose type, multi-antennary complex-type N-glycans, beta-1,6-GlcNAc-branching, alpha-2,6-linked sialic acids, N-acetylgalactosamine and galactosyl(beta-1,3)-N-acetylgalactosamine. Removal of sialic acids on treatment with neuraminidase decreases adhesion, but increases the migration and has shown no significant change in the invasion ability of the 4TO7 cells. The study suggests that the sialic acids are not crucial for the cell migration and invasion in the 4TO7 cells. The findings provide the new insights in understanding the role of cell surface oligosaccharides in cancer metastasis. PMID:17650582

  16. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  17. Immortalized Human Schwann Cell Lines Derived From Tumors of Schwannomatosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ostrow, Kimberly Laskie; Donaldson, Katelyn; Blakeley, Jaishri; Belzberg, Allan; Hoke, Ahmet

    2015-01-01

    Schwannomatosis, a rare form of neurofibromatosis, is characterized predominantly by multiple, often painful, schwannomas throughout the peripheral nervous system. The current standard of care for schwannomatosis is surgical resection. A major obstacle to schwannomatosis research is the lack of robust tumor cell lines. There is a great need for mechanistic and drug discovery studies of schwannomatosis, yet appropriate tools are not currently available. Schwannomatosis tumors are difficult to grow in culture as they survive only a few passages before senescence. Our lab has extensive experience in establishing primary and immortalized human Schwann cell cultures from normal tissue that retain their phenotypes after immortalization. Therefore we took on the challenge of creating immortalized human Schwann cell lines derived from tumors from schwannomatosis patients. We have established and fully characterized 2 schwannomatosis cell lines from 2 separate patients using SV40 virus large T antigen. One patient reported pain and the other did not. The schwannomatosis cell lines were stained with S100B antibodies to confirm Schwann cell identity. The schwannomatosis cells also expressed the Schwann cell markers, p75NTR, S100B, and NGF after multiple passages. Cell morphology was retained following multiple passaging and freeze/ thaw cycles. Gene expression microarray analysis was used to compare the cell lines with their respective parent tumors. No differences in key genes were detected, with the exception that several cell cycle regulators were upregulated in the schwannomatosis cell lines when compared to their parent tumors. This upregulation was apparently a product of cell culturing, as the schwannomatosis cells exhibited the same expression pattern of cell cycle regulatory genes as normal primary human Schwann cells. Cell growth was also similar between normal primary and immortalized tumor cells in culture. Accurate cell lines derived directly from human tumors

  18. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe extracts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maier, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2002-04-01

    Extracts of Viscum album (mistletoe) are widely used as complementary cancer therapies in Europe. The mistletoe lectins have been identified as the main active principle of mistletoe extracts. They have been shown to exhibit cytotoxic effects as well as immunomodulatory activities. The latter is exemplified by induction of cytokine secretion and increased activity of natural killer cells. Recent reports, however, indicated possible tumor growth stimulation by mistletoe extracts. Therefore, the three aqueous mistletoe extracts (Iscador M special, Iscador Qu special and Iscador P) were evaluated for antiproliferative and/or stimulatory effects in a panel of 16 human tumor cell lines in vitro using a cellular proliferation assay. The results show no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three Iscador preparations, comprising central nervous system, gastric, non-small cell lung, mammary, prostate, renal and uterine cancer cell lines, as well as cell lines from hematological malignancies and melanomas. On the contrary, Iscador preparations containing a high lectin concentration (Iscador M special and Iscador Qu special) showed antitumor activity in the mammary cancer cell line MAXF 401NL at the 15 microg/ml dose level with a more than 70% growth inhibition compared to untreated control cells. In addition, a slight antitumor activity (growth inhibition 30-70%) was found in three tumor cell lines for Iscador M special and in seven tumor cell lines for Iscador Qu special, respectively. Iscador P, which contains no mistletoe lectin I, showed no antiproliferative activity. PMID:11984083

  19. Cytometric comparisons between circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients and the prostate tumor derived LNCaP cell line

    PubMed Central

    Lazar, Daniel C.; Cho, Edward H.; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Metzner, Thomas J.; Uson, Maria Loressa; Torrey, Melissa; Gross, Mitchell E.; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Many important experiments in cancer research are initiated with cell line data analysis due to the ease of accessibility and utilization. Recently, the ability to capture and characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become more prevalent in the research setting. This ability to detect, isolate, and analyze CTCs allows us to directly compare specific protein expression levels found in patient CTCs to cell lines. In this study, we use immunocytochemistry to compare the protein expression levels of total cytokeratin (CK) and androgen receptor (AR) in CTCs and cell lines from patients with prostate cancer to determine what translational insights might be gained through the use of cell line data. A non-enrichment CTC detection assay enables us to compare cytometric features and relative expression levels of CK and AR by indirect immunofluorescence from prostate cancer patients against the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. We measured physical characteristics of these two groups and observed significant differences in cell size, fluorescence intensity, and nuclear to cytoplasmic (N/C) ratio. We hope that these experiments will initiate a foundation to allow cell line data to be compared against characteristics of primary cells from patients. PMID:22306736

  20. Close Interactions between Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Neuroblastoma Cell Lines Lead to Tumor Growth Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Giovanna; Morandi, Fabio; Cilli, Michele; Daga, Antonio; Bocelli-Tyndall, Chiara; Gambini, Claudio

    2012-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have attracted much interest in oncology since they exhibit marked tropism for the tumor microenvironment and support or suppress malignant cell growth depending on the tumor model tested. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of MSCs in the control of the growth of neuroblastoma (NB), which is the second most common solid tumor in children. In vivo experiments showed that systemically administered MSCs, under our experimental conditions, did not home to tumor sites and did not affect tumor growth or survival. However, MSCs injected intratumorally in an established subcutaneous NB model reduced tumor growth through inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis of NB cells and prolonged the survival of hMSC-treated mice. The need for contact between MSCs and NB cells was further supported by in vitro experiments. In particular, MSCs were found to be attracted by NB cells, and to affect NB cell proliferation with different results depending on the cell line tested. Moreover, NB cells, after pre-incubation with hMSCs, acquired a more invasive behavior towards CXCL12 and the bone marrow, i.e., the primary site of NB metastases. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that functional cross-talk between MSCs and NB cell lines used in our experiments can occur only within short range interaction. Thus, this report does not support the clinical use of MSCs as vehicles for selective delivery of antitumor drugs at the NB site unless chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy create suitable local conditions for MSCs recruitment. PMID:23119082

  1. Biological characteristics of a novel giant cell tumor cell line derived from spine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhenhua; Li, Yan; Xu, Leqin; Wang, Xudong; Chen, Su; Yang, Cheng; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-07-01

    Giant cell tumor of bone(GCTB) is a special bone tumor for it consists of various cell types, and its biological characteristics is different from common benign or malignant neoplasm. In the present study, we report the biological features of a primary Asian GCTB cell line named GCTB28. We analyzed extensive properties of the GCTB28 cells including morphological observations, growth, cell cycle, karyotype, proliferation, proteins expression, surface biomarker verification, and tumorigenicity in nude mice. We found that the stromal cells of GCTB were endowed with self-renewal capacity and played dominant roles in GCTB development. Moreover, we confirmed that GCTB cells can be CD33(-)CD14(-) phenotype which was not in accord with previous study. This study provides an in vitro model system to investigate pathogenic mechanisms and molecular characteristics of GCTB and also provides a useful tool for researching the therapeutic targeting of GCTB. PMID:26801673

  2. Tumor-Derived Cell Lines as Molecular Models of Cancer Pharmacogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Goodspeed, Andrew; Heiser, Laura M.; Gray, Joe W.; Costello, James C.

    2016-01-01

    Compared with normal cells, tumor cells have undergone an array of genetic and epigenetic alterations. Often, these changes underlie cancer development, progression, and drug resistance, so the utility of model systems rests on their ability to recapitulate the genomic aberrations observed in primary tumors. Tumor-derived cell lines have long been used to study the underlying biologic processes in cancer, as well as screening platforms for discovering and evaluating the efficacy of anticancer therapeutics. Multiple -omic measurements across more than a thousand cancer cell lines have been produced following advances in high-throughput technologies and multigroup collaborative projects. These data complement the large, international cancer genomic sequencing efforts to characterize patient tumors, such as The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) and International Cancer Genome Consortium (ICGC). Given the scope and scale of data that have been generated, researchers are now in a position to evaluate the similarities and differences that exist in genomic features between cell lines and patient samples. As pharmacogenomics models, cell lines offer the advantages of being easily grown, relatively inexpensive, and amenable to high-throughput testing of therapeutic agents. Data generated from cell lines can then be used to link cellular drug response to genomic features, where the ultimate goal is to build predictive signatures of patient outcome. This review highlights the recent work that has compared -omic profiles of cell lines with primary tumors, and discusses the advantages and disadvantages of cancer cell lines as pharmacogenomic models of anticancer therapies. PMID:26248648

  3. Synergistic action of tiazofurin with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in human neuroectodermal tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Szekeres, T; Schuchter, K; Chiba, P; Ressmann, G; Lhotka, C; Gharehbaghi, K; Szalay, S M; Pillwein, K

    1993-12-01

    The activity of IMP dehydrogenase (EC 1.2.1.14), the key enzyme of de novo guanylate biosynthesis, was shown to be increased in tumor cells. Tiazofurin (TR), a potent and specific inhibitor of this enzyme, proved to be effective in the treatment of refractory granulocytic leukemia in blast crisis. We examined the effects of tiazofurin as a single agent and in combination with hypoxanthine and allopurinol in six different neuroectodermal tumor cell lines, the STA-BT-3 and 146-18 human glioblastoma cell lines, the SK-N-SH, LA-N-1 and LA-N-5 human neuroblastoma cell lines, and the STA-ET-1 Ewing tumor cell line. Tiazofurin inhibited tumor cell growth with IC50 values between 2.2 microM (LA-N-1 cell line) and 550 microM (LA-N-5 cells) and caused a significant decrease of intracellular GTP pools (GTP concentrations decreased to 39-79% of control). Incorporation of [8-14C]guanine into GTP pools was determined as a measure of guanylate salvage activity; incubation with 100 microM hypoxanthine caused a 62-96% inhibition of the salvage pathway. Incubation with tiazofurin (100 microM) and hypoxanthine (100 microM) synergistically inhibited tumor cell growth, and the addition of allopurinol (100 microM) strengthened these effects. Therefore, this drug combination, inhibiting guanylate de novo and salvage pathways, may prove useful in the treatment of human neuroectodermal tumors. PMID:7903533

  4. Oncogenic relevant defensins: expression pattern and proliferation characteristics of human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jochen; Kraus, Dominik; Reckenbeil, Jan; Probstmeier, Rainer

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate gene expression levels of oncogenic relevant human defensins and their impact on proliferation rates of 29 cell lines derived from main types of different tumor origins. Differential gene expression analysis of human defensins was performed by real-time PCR experiments. The proliferation rate of tumor cells that had been cultivated in the absence or presence of biologically active peptides was analyzed with a lactate dehydrogenase assay kit. At least one member of the defensin family was expressed in each tumor cell line, whereby α-defensin (DEFA1), DEFA2, or DEFA3 transcripts could be ubiquitously detected. Cell lines of neural origin (glioma, neuroblastoma, and small-cell lung carcinoma) expressed far less human β-defensins (hBDs) in comparison to other tumor types. The expression level of a specific defensin in various cell lines could vary by more than five orders of magnitude. Compensatory mechanisms on the expression levels of the different defensins could not be strictly observed. Only in 3 out of 29 tumor cell lines the proliferation rate was affected after defensin stimulation. The variable appearance of defensins, as well as the cell line-restricted functional activity, argues for the integration of defensins in complex cellular and molecular networks that tolerate rather flexible expression patterns. PMID:26711780

  5. Detection of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus RNA in BALB/c Tumor Cell Lines of Nonviral Etiologies

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Jaquelin P.; Butel, Janet S.; Socher, Susan H.; Rosen, Jeffrey M.

    1978-01-01

    A complementary DNA (cDNA) probe to mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) RNA was synthesized using calf thymus DNA oligonucleotides as a random primer. This probe was then used to study the expression of MMTV RNA in cell lines from BALB/c tumors induced in vivo either spontaneously or in response to viral, chemical, or hormonal stimuli. The cDNA had a length of approximately 400 to 500 nucleotides and specifically hybridized to MMTV RNA and BALB/c lactating mammary gland RNA, but not to Moloney leukemia virus RNA. Calf thymus DNA-primed cDNA could protect 50% of iodinated MMTV RNA from S1 nuclease digestion at cDNA-RNA ratios of 1:1 and 90% of labeled viral RNA at ratios of 10:1. Thermal denaturation of MMTV RNA-cDNA hybrids yielded a Tm of 88.5°C, indicative of a well-base-paired duplex. Screening of mouse mammary tumor cells for MMTV sequences revealed that three out of five lines of BALB/c origin had undetectable levels of viral RNA (cell) by RNA excess hybridization. Two of the three “virus-negative” cell lines were derived from tumors induced by the chemical carcinogen 7,12-dimethylbenz(α)anthracene, whereas the third tumor occurred spontaneously. Two lines from tumors induced by either viral (mammary tumor virus) or hormonal (17-β-estradiol) stimulus contained between three and nine molecules of MMTV RNA per cell by both RNA excess and cDNA excess hybridization. Clonal derivatives of these tumor lines had levels of viral RNA comparable to those of their parental lines. Therefore, it appears that the presence of detectable MMTV RNA sequences is not a necessary requirement for the maintenance of all murine mammary gland neoplasias. PMID:215778

  6. Relationship between DNA ploidy level and tumor sociology behavior in 12 nervous cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kiss, R.; Camby, I.; Salmon, I.

    1995-06-01

    Cell population sociology was studied in two medulloblastomas and 10 astrocytic human tumor cell lines by means of the characterization of the structure of neoplastic cell colonies growing on histological slides. This was carried out via digital cell image analysis of Feulgen-stained nuclei, to which the Delaunay triangulation and Voronoi paving mathematical techniques were applied. Such assessments were compared to the DNA ploidy level (assessed by means of DNA histogram typing). The results show that the cell colony architecture characteristics differed markedly according to whether the cell lines were euploid (diploid or tetraploid) or aneuploid (hyperdiploid, triploid, hypertriploid, or polymorphic). In fact, the cell colonies from the euploid cell nuclei populations were larger and more dense than those from the aneuploid ones. Furthermore, for an identical period of culture, the cell lines from high-grade malignant astrocytic tumors (glioblastomas) exhibited cell colonies that were larger and more dense than those in cell lines from low-grade astrocytic tumors (astrocytomas). In each of these two groups, the diploid cell nuclei populations exhibited cell colonies larger and more dense than the nondiploid colonies. The present methodology is now being applied in vivo to histological sections of surgically removed human brain tumors in order to distinguish between high-risk clinical subgroups and medium-risk subgroups in clearly circumscribed histopathological groups. 38 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. The oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine solid tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    IGASE, Masaya; HWANG, Chung Chew; COFFEY, Matt; OKUDA, Masaru; NOGUCHI, Shunsuke; MIZUNO, Takuya

    2015-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy for cancer treatment for humans and dogs. Reovirus has been proven to be a potent oncolytic virus in human medicine. Our laboratory has previously reported that canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma were susceptible to reovirus. In this study, canine solid tumor cell lines (mammary gland tumor, osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma) were tested to determine their susceptibility towards reovirus. We demonstrated that reovirus induces more than 50% cell death in three canine mammary gland tumors and one canine malignant melanoma cell line. The reovirus-induced cell death occurred via the activation of caspase 3. Ras activation has been shown to be one of the important mechanisms of reovirus-susceptibility in human cancers. However, Ras activation was not related to the reovirus-susceptibility in canine solid tumor cell lines, which was similar to reports in canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma. The results of this study highly suggest that canine mammary gland tumor and canine malignant melanoma are also potential candidates for reovirus therapy in veterinary oncology. PMID:25648933

  8. The oncolytic effects of reovirus in canine solid tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Igase, Masaya; Hwang, Chung Chew; Coffey, Matt; Okuda, Masaru; Noguchi, Shunsuke; Mizuno, Takuya

    2015-05-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy is a new strategy for cancer treatment for humans and dogs. Reovirus has been proven to be a potent oncolytic virus in human medicine. Our laboratory has previously reported that canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma were susceptible to reovirus. In this study, canine solid tumor cell lines (mammary gland tumor, osteosarcoma and malignant melanoma) were tested to determine their susceptibility towards reovirus. We demonstrated that reovirus induces more than 50% cell death in three canine mammary gland tumors and one canine malignant melanoma cell line. The reovirus-induced cell death occurred via the activation of caspase 3. Ras activation has been shown to be one of the important mechanisms of reovirus-susceptibility in human cancers. However, Ras activation was not related to the reovirus-susceptibility in canine solid tumor cell lines, which was similar to reports in canine mast cell tumor and canine lymphoma. The results of this study highly suggest that canine mammary gland tumor and canine malignant melanoma are also potential candidates for reovirus therapy in veterinary oncology. PMID:25648933

  9. Establishment and Characterization of 7 Novel Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines from Patient-Derived Tumor Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Gang; Xie, Fubo; Ouyang, Kedong; Tang, Xuzhen; Wang, Minjun; Wen, Danyi; Zhu, Yizhun; Qin, Xiaoran

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common cancer with poor prognosis worldwide and the molecular mechanism is not well understood. This study aimed to establish a collection of human HCC cell lines from patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models. From the 20 surgical HCC sample collections, 7 tumors were successfully developed in immunodeficient mice and further established 7 novel HCC cell lines (LIXC002, LIXC003, LIXC004, LIXC006, LIXC011, LIXC012 and CPL0903) by primary culture. The characterization of cell lines was defined by morphology, growth kinetics, cell cycle, chromosome analysis, short tandem repeat (STR) analysis, molecular profile, and tumorigenicity. Additionally, response to clinical chemotherapeutics was validated both in vitro and in vivo. STR analysis indicated that all cell lines were unique cells different from known cell lines and free of contamination by bacteria or mycoplasma. The other findings were quite heterogeneous between individual lines. Chromosome aberration could be found in all cell lines. Alpha-fetoprotein was overexpressed only in 3 out of 7 cell lines. 4 cell lines expressed high level of vimentin. Ki67 was strongly stained in all cell lines. mRNA level of retinoic acid induced protein 3 (RAI3) was decreased in all cell lines. The 7 novel cell lines showed variable sensitivity to 8 tested compounds. LIXC011 and CPL0903 possessed multiple drug resistance property. Sorafenib inhibited xenograft tumor growth of LIXC006, but not of LIXC012. Our results indicated that the 7 novel cell lines with low passage maintaining their clinical and pathological characters could be good tools for further exploring the molecular mechanism of HCC and anti-cancer drug screening. PMID:24416385

  10. Chondrocytic differentiation of peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell line in nude mouse xenograft.

    PubMed

    Goji, J; Sano, K; Nakamura, H; Ito, H

    1992-08-01

    We have established a cell line (KU-SN) from a peripheral neuroectodermal tumor originating in the left scapula of a 4-year-old girl. The original tumor was immunoreactive with antibodies for neurofilament proteins, neuron-specific enolase, vimentin, S100 protein, and beta 2-microglobulin. Dense core granules, 50-150 nm in diameter, were identified by electron microscopy. The cell line was established from tumor cells in metastatic lung fluid. KU-SN cells were immunoreactive with the antibodies for neurofilament proteins, vimentin, neuron-specific enolase, S100 protein, glial fibrillary acidic protein, cytokeratin, and carcinoembryonic antigen. Besides these neuronal features, KU-SN cells express type 2 collagen and insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor. The addition of insulin-like growth factor 1 (100 ng/ml) increased the growth rate of KU-SN cells 2.1-fold over control. Some cells were positive for Alcian blue and alkaline phosphatase staining. Cytogenetic analysis of KU-SN cells disclosed a reciprocal chromosomal translocation [t(11,22)]. Northern blot analysis of KU-SN cells demonstrated amplified expression of the c-myc gene but not the N-myc gene. When tumor cells were transplanted into nude mice, cartilage was formed. The cartilage was immunoreactive with the antibody for HLA-ABC, indicating that it was derived from the tumor cells, not from mouse tissue. Chondrocytic differentiation was not observed in xenografts of Ewing's sarcoma cell lines SK-ES or RD-ES or the peripheral neuroectodermal tumor cell line SK-N-MC. These results indicate that KU-SN cells represent primitive neural crest cells having the potential for chondrocytic differentiation. PMID:1379122

  11. Isolation of the Ubiquitin-Proteome from Tumor Cell Lines and Primary Cells Using TUBEs.

    PubMed

    Xolalpa, Wendy; Mata-Cantero, Lydia; Aillet, Fabienne; Rodriguez, Manuel S

    2016-01-01

    Tandem ubiquitin-binding entities (TUBEs) act as molecular traps to isolate polyubiquitylated proteins facilitating the study of this highly reversible posttranslational modification. We provide here sample preparation and adaptations required for TUBE-based enrichment of the ubiquitin proteome from tumor cell lines or primary cells. Our protocol is suitable to identify ubiquitin substrates, enzymes involved in the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, as well as proteasome subunits by mass spectrometry. This protocol was adapted to prepare affinity columns, reduce background, and improve the protein recovery depending on the sample source and necessities. PMID:27613034

  12. Second-line therapy for small cell lung cancer: exploring the potential role of circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Barbara; Holzer, Sophia; Hochmair, Maximilian

    2016-01-01

    Background Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive and invasive variant of lung tumors. SCLC, especially in advanced stages, is distinguished by extremely high numbers of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in comparison to other malignancies. CTCs are operative in tumor spread and are currently enumerated to assess prognosis and response to cytotoxic therapy. Chemosensitivity of SCLC CTCs compared to primary tumors and metastases is not known. Methods Establishment of two SCLC CTC cell lines, namely BHGc7 and BHGc10, allowed the in vitro characterization of their chemosensitivity to the second-line chemotherapeutics topotecan and epirubicin in comparison to a range of SCLC cell lines. Results The SCLC CTC cell lines exhibited an approximately 7- and 12-fold increased chemosensitivity to epirubicin compared to topotecan, respectively, in in vitro cytotoxicity assays. In comparison to a panel of six SCLC cell lines, the two CTC lines showed a significantly higher chemosensitivity to epirubicin (range, 3- to 16-fold) and topotecan (range, 2.2- to 14.4-fold), respectively. Conclusions CTC cell lines derived from SCLC patients with recurrent disease exhibit high chemosensitivity to epirubicin vs. topotecan and show considerable more cytotoxicity in response to both compounds in comparison to a panel of SCLC cell lines. Thus, a decrease in the number of CTCs in response to second-line chemotherapy in SCLC patients may overestimate the effect on resident SCLC lesions and metastases. PMID:26958494

  13. Progenitor Cell Line (hPheo1) Derived from a Human Pheochromocytoma Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Stastny, Victor; Click, Arielle; Ding, Liang-Hao; Mizrachi, Dario; Zou, Ying S.; Chari, Raj; Lam, Wan L.; Bachoo, Robert M.; Smith, Alice L.; Story, Michael D.; Sidhu, Stan; Robinson, Bruce G.; Nwariaku, Fiemu E.; Gazdar, Adi F.; Auchus, Richard J.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2013-01-01

    Background Pheochromocytomas are rare tumors generally arising in the medullary region of the adrenal gland. These tumors release excessive epinephrine and norepinephrine resulting in hypertension and cardiovascular crises for which surgery is the only definitive treatment. Molecular mechanisms that control tumor development and hormone production are poorly understood, and progress has been hampered by the lack of human cellular model systems. To study pheochromocytomas, we developed a stable progenitor pheochromocytoma cell line derived from a primary human tumor. Methods After IRB approval and written informed consent, human pheochromocytoma tissue was excised, minced, dispersed enzymatically, and cultured in vitro. Primary pheochromocytoma cells were infected with a lentivirus vector carrying the catalytic subunit of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT). The hTERT immortalized cells (hPheo1) have been passaged >300 population doublings. The resulting cell line was characterized morphologically, biochemically and for expression of neuroendocrine properties. The expression of marker enzymes and proteins was assessed by immunofluorescence staining and immunoblotting. Telomerase activity was determined by using the telomeric repeat amplification protocol (TRAP) assay. Results We have established a human pheochromocytoma precursor cell line that expresses the neuroendocrine marker, chromogranin A, when differentiated in the presence of bone morphogenic protein 4 (BMP4), nerve growth factor (NGF), and dexamethasone. Phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) expression is also detected with this differentiation regimen. CD-56 (also known as NCAM, neural cell adhesion molecule) is expressed in these cells, but CD31 (also known as PECAM-1, a marker of endothelial cells) is negative. Conclusions We have maintained hTERT-immortalized progenitor cells derived from a pheochromocytoma (hPheo1) in culture for over 300 population doublings. This progenitor human

  14. Response of human tumor cell lines in vitro to fractionated irradiation.

    PubMed

    Matthews, J H; Meeker, B E; Chapman, J D

    1989-01-01

    The surviving fraction of human tumor cell lines after 2 Gy (SF2) varies between 0.1 and 0.8. It has been postulated that differences in inherent radiosensitivity of tumor cells are a major determinant of radiation response in vivo. Assays of inherent radiosensitivity based on acute survival are being developed as predictors of tumor response which often assume that the same inherent radiosensitivity persists throughout a fractionated treatment. We have investigated the response of 2 human tumor cell lines (A549 and MCF7) with different inherent radiosensitivities to in vitro fractionated irradiation. A549 cells had an SF2 of 0.62 and a mean inactivation dose (D) of 3.07 Gy whereas MCF7 cells had an SF2 of 0.30 and a D of 1.52 Gy. Split dose repair capacity (at equal survival levels) was less for A549 than for MCF7 cells and recovery kinetics for both cell lines were substantially longer than those of rodent cell lines. Survival after 5 fractions of 2 Gy given 12 hr apart at 37 degrees C was near to that predicted from the acute survival curve, assuming complete repair and no proliferation. Acute survival of A549 cells which survived 5 fractions of 2 Gy given 12 hr apart was similar to the acute survival of unirradiated cells. When A549 cells were incubated at 22 degrees C between 5 fractions of 2 Gy given 12 hr apart, proliferation and split dose repair were substantially inhibited. These studies support the proposals to use in vitro inherent radiosensitivity assays for the prediction of in vivo response of tumors to fractionated treatment. PMID:2912934

  15. Label-free multimodal microspectroscopic differentiation of glioblastoma tumor model cell lines combined with multivariate data analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostertag, Edwin; Boldrini, Barbara; Luckow, Sabrina; Kessler, Rudolf W.

    2012-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme represents a highly lethal brain tumor. A tumor model has been developed based on the U-251 MG cell line from a human explant. The tumor model simulates different malignancies by controlled expression of the tumor suppressor proteins PTEN and TP53 within the cell lines derived from the wild type. The cells from each different malignant cell line are grown on slides, followed by a paraformaldehyde fixation. UV / VIS and IR spectra are recorded in the cell nuclei. For the differentiation of the cell lines a principal component analysis (PCA) is performed. The PCA demonstrates a good separation of the tumor model cell lines both with UV / VIS spectroscopy and with IR spectroscopy.

  16. Methylomes of renal cell lines and tumors or metastases differ significantly with impact on pharmacogenes

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Stefan; Fisel, Pascale; Büttner, Florian; Rausch, Steffen; D’Amico, Debora; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Kruck, Stephan; Nies, Anne T.; Stenzl, Arnulf; Junker, Kerstin; Scharpf, Marcus; Hofmann, Ute; van der Kuip, Heiko; Fend, Falko; Ott, German; Agaimy, Abbas; Hartmann, Arndt; Bedke, Jens; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) show limited efficacy. Drug efficacy, typically investigated in preclinical cell line models during drug development, is influenced by pharmacogenes involved in targeting and disposition of drugs. Here we show through genome-wide DNA methylation profiling, that methylation patterns are concordant between primary ccRCC and macro-metastases irrespective of metastatic sites (rs ≥ 0.92). However, 195,038 (41%) of all investigated CpG sites, including sites within pharmacogenes, were differentially methylated (adjusted P < 0.05) in five established RCC cell lines compared to primary tumors, resulting in altered transcriptional expression. Exemplarily, gene-specific analyses of DNA methylation, mRNA and protein expression demonstrate lack of expression of the clinically important drug transporter OCT2 (encoded by SLC22A2) in cell lines due to hypermethylation compared to tumors or metastases. Our findings provide evidence that RCC cell lines are of limited benefit for prediction of drug effects due to epigenetic alterations. Similar epigenetic landscape of ccRCC-metastases and tumors opens new avenue for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:27435027

  17. Methylomes of renal cell lines and tumors or metastases differ significantly with impact on pharmacogenes.

    PubMed

    Winter, Stefan; Fisel, Pascale; Büttner, Florian; Rausch, Steffen; D'Amico, Debora; Hennenlotter, Jörg; Kruck, Stephan; Nies, Anne T; Stenzl, Arnulf; Junker, Kerstin; Scharpf, Marcus; Hofmann, Ute; van der Kuip, Heiko; Fend, Falko; Ott, German; Agaimy, Abbas; Hartmann, Arndt; Bedke, Jens; Schwab, Matthias; Schaeffeler, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Current therapies for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) show limited efficacy. Drug efficacy, typically investigated in preclinical cell line models during drug development, is influenced by pharmacogenes involved in targeting and disposition of drugs. Here we show through genome-wide DNA methylation profiling, that methylation patterns are concordant between primary ccRCC and macro-metastases irrespective of metastatic sites (rs ≥ 0.92). However, 195,038 (41%) of all investigated CpG sites, including sites within pharmacogenes, were differentially methylated (adjusted P < 0.05) in five established RCC cell lines compared to primary tumors, resulting in altered transcriptional expression. Exemplarily, gene-specific analyses of DNA methylation, mRNA and protein expression demonstrate lack of expression of the clinically important drug transporter OCT2 (encoded by SLC22A2) in cell lines due to hypermethylation compared to tumors or metastases. Our findings provide evidence that RCC cell lines are of limited benefit for prediction of drug effects due to epigenetic alterations. Similar epigenetic landscape of ccRCC-metastases and tumors opens new avenue for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:27435027

  18. Antiproliferative activity of chloroformic extract of Persian Shallot, Allium hirtifolium, on tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghodrati Azadi, Hamideh; Ghaffari, Seyed Mahmood; Riazi, Gholam Hossein; Ahmadian, Shahin; Vahedi, Fatemeh

    2008-03-01

    Allium hirtifolim (Persian Shallot) belongs to Allium genus (Alliaceae family). We investigated the in vitro effects of chloroformic extract of A. hirtifolium and its Allicin on the proliferation of HeLa (cervical cancer), MCF7 (human, caucasion, breast, adenocarcinoma) and L929 (mouse, C3H/An, connective) cell lines. Our results showed that components of A. hirtifolium might inhibit proliferation of tumor cell lines. This inhibition in HeLa and MCF-7 cells was dose-dependent. The presence of Allicin was evaluated by TLC method in bulbs and the extract of A. hirtifolium was analyzed by HPLC. MTT test was performed 24, 48 and 72 h after cell culture. A significant decrease in cell lines was observed in HeLa and MCF-7 as compared to L929 cell lines. DNA fragmentation analysis revealed a large number of apoptotic cells in treated HeLa and MCF-7 cell groups, but no effects in L929 cells. Therefore A. hirtifolium might be a candidate for tumor suppression. PMID:19002856

  19. Sapodilla plum (Achras sapota) induces apoptosis in cancer cell lines and inhibits tumor progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2014-01-01

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice. PMID:25142835

  20. Sapodilla Plum (Achras sapota) Induces Apoptosis in Cancer Cell Lines and Inhibits Tumor Progression in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Mrinal; Hegde, Mahesh; Chiruvella, Kishore K.; Koroth, Jinsha; Bhattacharya, Souvari; Choudhary, Bibha; Raghavan, Sathees C.

    2014-01-01

    Intake of fruits rich in antioxidants in daily diet is suggested to be cancer preventive. Sapota is a tropical fruit grown and consumed extensively in several countries including India and Mexico. Here we show that methanolic extracts of Sapota fruit (MESF) induces cytotoxicity in a dose-dependent manner in cancer cell lines. Cell cycle analysis suggested activation of apoptosis, without arresting cell cycle progression. Annexin V-propidium iodide double-staining demonstrated that Sapota fruit extracts potentiate apoptosis rather than necrosis in cancer cells. Loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, upregulation of proapoptotic proteins, activation of MCL-1, PARP-1, and Caspase 9 suggest that MESF treatment leads to activation of mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. More importantly, we show that MESF treatment leads to significant inhibition of tumor growth and a 3-fold increase in the life span of tumor bearing animals compared to untreated tumor mice. PMID:25142835

  1. A cell line with multinucleated giant cell formation established from a human giant cell tumor of tendon sheath--preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Hosaka, M; Hatori, M; Smith, R A; Kokubun, S

    2001-01-01

    We first established a cell line with unique giant cell formation properties from a human giant cell tumor of tendon sheath (GCTTS) arising in the right ankle of a 7-year-old girl. The specimen for cell culture taken from the tumor was heterotransplanted into the back of a BALB/c (nu/nu) nude mouse. An in-vitro cell line was established from a tumor that grew after this heterotransplantation. Only mononuclear cells were observed in the primary culture, and these remained constant in growth. Multinucleated giant cells appeared at passage 3 and were constantly observed thereafter. The fusion of mononuclear cells into giant cells was verified by light and phase-contrast microscopy. This cell line was confirmed to be derived from a human by karyotype analysis and DNA fingerprinting. The cell-doubling time was 150 h. This cell line should be useful for studies of the mechanism of multinucleation in giant cell tumors. PMID:11845350

  2. B7h triggering inhibits the migration of tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dianzani, Chiara; Minelli, Rosalba; Gigliotti, Casimiro Luca; Occhipinti, Sergio; Giovarelli, Mirella; Conti, Laura; Boggio, Elena; Shivakumar, Yogesh; Baldanzi, Gianluca; Malacarne, Valeria; Orilieri, Elisabetta; Cappellano, Giuseppe; Fantozzi, Roberto; Sblattero, Daniele; Yagi, Junji; Rojo, Josè Maria; Chiocchetti, Annalisa; Dianzani, Umberto

    2014-05-15

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) and several cancer cells express B7h, which is the ligand of the ICOS T cell costimulatory molecule. We have previously shown that B7h triggering via a soluble form of ICOS (ICOS-Fc) inhibits the adhesion of polymorphonuclear and tumor cell lines to HUVECs; thus, we suggested that ICOS-Fc may act as an anti-inflammatory and antitumor agent. Because cancer cell migration and angiogenesis are crucial for metastasis dissemination, the aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of ICOS-Fc on the migration of cancer cells and ECs. ICOS-Fc specifically inhibited the migration of HUVECs, human dermal lymphatic ECs, and the HT29, HCT116, PC-3, HepG2, JR8, and M14 tumor cell lines expressing high levels of B7h, whereas it was ineffective in the RPMI7932, PCF-2, LM, and BHT-101 cell lines expressing low levels of B7h. Furthermore, ICOS-Fc downmodulated hepatocyte growth factor facilitated the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in HepG2 cells. Moreover, ICOS-Fc downmodulated the phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase and the expression of β-Pix in both HUVECs and tumor cell lines. Finally, treatment with ICOS-Fc inhibited the development of lung metastases upon injection of NOD-SCID-IL2Rγnull mice with CF-PAC1 cells, as well as C57BL/6 mice with B16-F10 cells. Therefore, the B7h-ICOS interaction may modulate the spread of cancer metastases, which suggests the novel use of ICOS-Fc as an immunomodulatory drug. However, in the B16-F10-metastasized lungs, ICOS-Fc also increased IL-17A/RORc and decreased IL-10/Foxp3 expression, which indicates that it also exerts positive effects on the antitumor immune response. PMID:24729612

  3. Characterization and drug resistance patterns of Ewing's sarcoma family tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    May, William A; Grigoryan, Rita S; Keshelava, Nino; Cabral, Daniel J; Christensen, Laura L; Jenabi, Jasmine; Ji, Lingyun; Triche, Timothy J; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Reynolds, C Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Despite intensive treatment with chemotherapy, radiotherapy and surgery, over 70% of patients with metastatic Ewing's Sarcoma Family of Tumors (EFT) will die of their disease. We hypothesize that properly characterized laboratory models reflecting the drug resistance of clinical tumors will facilitate the application of new therapeutic agents to EFT. To determine resistance patterns, we studied newly established EFT cell lines derived from different points in therapy: two established at diagnosis (CHLA-9, CHLA-32), two after chemotherapy and progressive disease (CHLA-10, CHLA-25), and two at relapse after myeloablative therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation (post-ABMT) (CHLA-258, COG-E-352). The new lines were compared to widely studied EFT lines TC-71, TC-32, SK-N-MC, and A-673. These lines were extensively characterized with regard to identity (short tandem repeat (STR) analysis), p53, p16/14 status, and EWS/ETS breakpoint and target gene expression profile. The DIMSCAN cytotoxicity assay was used to assess in vitro drug sensitivity to standard chemotherapy agents. No association was found between drug resistance and the expression of EWS/ETS regulated genes in the EFT cell lines. No consistent association was observed between drug sensitivity and p53 functionality or between drug sensitivity and p16/14 functionality across the cell lines. Exposure to chemotherapy prior to cell line initiation correlated with drug resistance of EFT cell lines in 5/8 tested agents at clinically achievable concentrations (CAC) or the lower tested concentration (LTC): (cyclophosphamide (as 4-HC) and doxorubicin at CAC, etoposide, irinotecan (as SN-38) and melphalan at LTC; P<0.1 for one agent, and P<0.05 for four agents. This panel of well-characterized drug-sensitive and drug-resistant cell lines will facilitate in vitro preclinical testing of new agents for EFT. PMID:24312454

  4. Phosphoproteomics data classify hematological cancer cell lines according to tumor type and sensitivity to kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Tumor classification based on their predicted responses to kinase inhibitors is a major goal for advancing targeted personalized therapies. Here, we used a phosphoproteomic approach to investigate biological heterogeneity across hematological cancer cell lines including acute myeloid leukemia, lymphoma, and multiple myeloma. Results Mass spectrometry was used to quantify 2,000 phosphorylation sites across three acute myeloid leukemia, three lymphoma, and three multiple myeloma cell lines in six biological replicates. The intensities of the phosphorylation sites grouped these cancer cell lines according to their tumor type. In addition, a phosphoproteomic analysis of seven acute myeloid leukemia cell lines revealed a battery of phosphorylation sites whose combined intensities correlated with the growth-inhibitory responses to three kinase inhibitors with remarkable correlation coefficients and fold changes (> 100 between the most resistant and sensitive cells). Modeling based on regression analysis indicated that a subset of phosphorylation sites could be used to predict response to the tested drugs. Quantitative analysis of phosphorylation motifs indicated that resistant and sensitive cells differed in their patterns of kinase activities, but, interestingly, phosphorylations correlating with responses were not on members of the pathway being targeted; instead, these mainly were on parallel kinase pathways. Conclusion This study reveals that the information on kinase activation encoded in phosphoproteomics data correlates remarkably well with the phenotypic responses of cancer cells to compounds that target kinase signaling and could be useful for the identification of novel markers of resistance or sensitivity to drugs that target the signaling network. PMID:23628362

  5. Englerin A Agonizes the TRPC4/C5 Cation Channels to Inhibit Tumor Cell Line Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Carson, Cheryl; Raman, Pichai; Tullai, Jennifer; Xu, Lei; Henault, Martin; Thomas, Emily; Yeola, Sarita; Lao, Jianmin; McPate, Mark; Verkuyl, J. Martin; Marsh, George; Sarber, Jason; Amaral, Adam; Bailey, Scott; Lubicka, Danuta; Pham, Helen; Miranda, Nicolette; Ding, Jian; Tang, Hai-Ming; Ju, Haisong; Tranter, Pamela; Ji, Nan; Krastel, Philipp; Jain, Rishi K.; Schumacher, Andrew M.; Loureiro, Joseph J.; George, Elizabeth; Berellini, Giuliano; Ross, Nathan T.; Bushell, Simon M.; Erdemli, Gül; Solomon, Jonathan M.

    2015-01-01

    Englerin A is a structurally unique natural product reported to selectively inhibit growth of renal cell carcinoma cell lines. A large scale phenotypic cell profiling experiment (CLiP) of englerin A on ¬over 500 well characterized cancer cell lines showed that englerin A inhibits growth of a subset of tumor cell lines from many lineages, not just renal cell carcinomas. Expression of the TRPC4 cation channel was the cell line feature that best correlated with sensitivity to englerin A, suggesting the hypothesis that TRPC4 is the efficacy target for englerin A. Genetic experiments demonstrate that TRPC4 expression is both necessary and sufficient for englerin A induced growth inhibition. Englerin A induces calcium influx and membrane depolarization in cells expressing high levels of TRPC4 or its close ortholog TRPC5. Electrophysiology experiments confirmed that englerin A is a TRPC4 agonist. Both the englerin A induced current and the englerin A induced growth inhibition can be blocked by the TRPC4/C5 inhibitor ML204. These experiments confirm that activation of TRPC4/C5 channels inhibits tumor cell line proliferation and confirms the TRPC4 target hypothesis generated by the cell line profiling. In selectivity assays englerin A weakly inhibits TRPA1, TRPV3/V4, and TRPM8 which suggests that englerin A may bind a common feature of TRP ion channels. In vivo experiments show that englerin A is lethal in rodents near doses needed to activate the TRPC4 channel. This toxicity suggests that englerin A itself is probably unsuitable for further drug development. However, since englerin A can be synthesized in the laboratory, it may be a useful chemical starting point to identify novel modulators of other TRP family channels. PMID:26098886

  6. In vitro 3-dimensional tumor model for radiosensitivity of HPV positive OSCC cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Mei; Rose, Barbara; Lee, C Soon; Hong, Angela M

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is increasing due to the rising prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) positive OSCC. HPV positive OSCC is associated with better outcomes than HPV negative OSCC. Our aim was to explore the possibility that this favorable prognosis is due to the enhanced radiosensitivity of HPV positive OSCC. HPV positive OSCC cell lines were generated from the primary OSCCs of 2 patients, and corresponding HPV positive cell lines generated from nodal metastases following xenografting in nude mice. Monolayer and 3 dimensional (3D) culture techniques were used to compare the radiosensitivity of HPV positive lines with that of 2 HPV negative OSCC lines. Clonogenic and protein assays were used to measure survival post radiation. Radiation induced cell cycle changes were studied using flow cytometry. In both monolayer and 3D culture, HPV positive cells exhibited a heterogeneous appearance whereas HPV negative cells tended to be homogeneous. After irradiation, HPV positive cells had a lower survival in clonogenic assays and lower total protein levels in 3D cultures than HPV negative cells. Irradiated HPV positive cells showed a high proportion of cells in G1/S phase, increased apoptosis, an increased proliferation rate, and an inability to form 3D tumor clumps. In conclusion, HPV positive OSCC cells are more radiosensitive than HPV negative OSCC cells in vitro, supporting a more radiosensitive nature of HPV positive OSCC. PMID:26046692

  7. Cytogenetic characterization of three cell lines derived from primary cervical tumors of different histologic grade

    SciTech Connect

    Hann, E.; Beauregard, L.; Mikumo, R.

    1994-09-01

    Braum et al.(1993) established three cell lines from keratinizing and nonkeratinizing cervical carcinomas. These cell lines were subsequently analyzed for growth properties and the physical state of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome. TC140, derived from a keratinizing cervical tumor, contains human papillomavirus type 16 in the episomal state. TC-146A and TC-146B, derived from a nonkeratinizing large-cell cervical carcinoma, contain human papillomavirus type 16 in the integrated state. The goal of the present study was to cytogenetically characterize these cell lines, developed from cervical carcinoma with a defined histopathology, in order to shed additional light on the biological basis of the histological and clinical heterogeneity of cervical cancers. Information on solid tumors has been limited because they are often difficult to culture and the karyotypes on the available metaphases are often complex with unidentifiable markers. The chromosomes of these three cell lines were characterized in the present study using GTG-banding. For cell line 140, the most striking chromosomal abnormalities noted were the presence of an i(5p) or i(12p) marker, an isochromosome 8q marker and multiple copies of chromosome 9. For cell line 146A, the most notable chromosomal abnormalities noted were the presence of a marker chromosome 7 with additional materials present on the long arms, an isochomosome of the long arms of chromosome 8 and a question of chromosome 19 markers. For cell line 146B, the most notable chromosomal abnormalities were found to be a deleted X chromosome, a marker chromosome 7 with additional material on the long arm, an isochromosome 8q marker, and isochromosome 16q marker and one or more copies of an isochromosome 17q marker. Fluorescent in situ hybridization experiments performed using select probes further corroborate the results of the above-mentioned conventional cytogenetic studies.

  8. Heterogeneous response of different tumor cell lines to methotrexate-coupled nanoparticles in presence of hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Stapf, Marcus; Pömpner, Nadine; Teichgräber, Ulf; Hilger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Today, the therapeutic efficacy of cancer is restricted by the heterogeneity of the response of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Since those therapies are also associated with severe side effects in nontarget organs, the application of drugs in combination with nanocarriers for targeted therapy has been suggested. Here, we sought to assess whether the coupling of methotrexate (MTX) to magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) could serve as a valuable tool to circumvent the heterogeneity of tumor cell response to MTX by the combined treatment with hyperthermia. To this end, we investigated five breast cancer cell lines of different origin and with different mutational statuses, as well as a bladder cancer cell line in terms of their response to exposure to MTX as a free drug or after its coupling to MNP as well as in presence/absence of hyperthermia. We also assessed whether the effects could be connected to the cell line-specific expression of proteins related to the uptake and efflux of MTX and MNP. Our results revealed a very heterogeneous and cell line-dependent response to an exposure with MTX-coupled MNP (MTX–MNP), which was almost comparable to the efficacy of free MTX in the same cell line. Moreover, a cell line-specific and preferential uptake of MTX–MNP compared with MNP alone was found (probably by receptor-mediated endocytosis), agreeing with the observed cytotoxic effects. Opposed to this, the expression pattern of several cell membrane transport proteins noted for MTX uptake and efflux was only by tendency in agreement with the cellular toxicity of MTX–MNP in different cell lines. Higher cytotoxic effects were achieved by exposing cells to a combination of MTX–MNP and hyperthermal treatment, compared with MTX or thermo-therapy alone. However, the heterogeneity in the response of the tumor cell lines to MTX could not be completely abolished – even after its combination with MNP and/or hyperthermia – and the application of higher thermal dosages

  9. Heterogeneous response of different tumor cell lines to methotrexate-coupled nanoparticles in presence of hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Stapf, Marcus; Pömpner, Nadine; Teichgräber, Ulf; Hilger, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    Today, the therapeutic efficacy of cancer is restricted by the heterogeneity of the response of tumor cells to chemotherapeutic drugs. Since those therapies are also associated with severe side effects in nontarget organs, the application of drugs in combination with nanocarriers for targeted therapy has been suggested. Here, we sought to assess whether the coupling of methotrexate (MTX) to magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) could serve as a valuable tool to circumvent the heterogeneity of tumor cell response to MTX by the combined treatment with hyperthermia. To this end, we investigated five breast cancer cell lines of different origin and with different mutational statuses, as well as a bladder cancer cell line in terms of their response to exposure to MTX as a free drug or after its coupling to MNP as well as in presence/absence of hyperthermia. We also assessed whether the effects could be connected to the cell line-specific expression of proteins related to the uptake and efflux of MTX and MNP. Our results revealed a very heterogeneous and cell line-dependent response to an exposure with MTX-coupled MNP (MTX-MNP), which was almost comparable to the efficacy of free MTX in the same cell line. Moreover, a cell line-specific and preferential uptake of MTX-MNP compared with MNP alone was found (probably by receptor-mediated endocytosis), agreeing with the observed cytotoxic effects. Opposed to this, the expression pattern of several cell membrane transport proteins noted for MTX uptake and efflux was only by tendency in agreement with the cellular toxicity of MTX-MNP in different cell lines. Higher cytotoxic effects were achieved by exposing cells to a combination of MTX-MNP and hyperthermal treatment, compared with MTX or thermo-therapy alone. However, the heterogeneity in the response of the tumor cell lines to MTX could not be completely abolished - even after its combination with MNP and/or hyperthermia - and the application of higher thermal dosages might be

  10. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The histamine receptor-1 (H1)-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29). Methods Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF) were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1ser345, and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Results Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours) increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1ser345, however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1) directly damages DNA, 2) activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3) downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of damaged DNA. Conclusions

  11. Characterization of small spheres derived from various solid tumor cell lines: are they suitable targets for T cells?

    PubMed

    Busse, Antonia; Letsch, Anne; Fusi, Alberto; Nonnenmacher, Anika; Stather, David; Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Regenbrecht, Christian R A; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2013-08-01

    T cell based immunotherapy has been investigated in a variety of malignancies and analyses have been mostly founded on in vitro data with tumor cell monolayers. However, three-dimensional (3D) culture models might mimic more closely the 'in vivo' conditions than 2D monolayers. Therefore, we analyzed the expression of tumor-associated antigens (TAA) and of molecules involved in antigen processing and presentation (APM) in tumor spheres, which served as an in vitro model for micrometastasis which might be enriched in tumor propagating cancer stem cells. For enrichment of sphere cells 12 human solid tumor cell lines were cultured in serum-free medium. Expression of a variety of TAA and APM were analyzed by RT-PCR and/or flow cytometry and compared to expression in corresponding adherent bulk cells grown in regular growth medium. Compared to adherent cells, spheres showed equal or higher mRNA expression levels of LMP2, LMP7 and MECL-1, of TAP1 and TAP2 transporters and, surprisingly, also of TAA including differentiation antigens. However, downregulation or loss of HLA-I and HLA-II molecules in spheres was observed in 8 of 10 and 1 of 2 cell lines, respectively, and was unresponsive to stimulation with IFN-γ. Although tumor spheres express TAA and molecules of intracellular antigen processing, they are defective in antigen presentation due to downregulation of HLA surface expression which may lead to immune evasion. PMID:23519726

  12. Modulation of Efector Caspase Cleavage Determines Response of Breast and Lung Tumor Cell Lines to Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Odonkor, Charles Amoatey; Achilefu, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    In spite of compelling evidence implicating caspases in drug-induced apoptosis, how tumors modulate caspase expression and activity to overcome the cytotoxicity of anticancer agents is not fully understood. To address this issue, we investigated the role of caspases-3 and 7 in determining the response of breast and lung tumor cell lines to chemotherapy. We found that an early and late apoptotic response correlated with weak and strong cellular caspase-activation, respectively. The results highlight an underappreciated relationship of temporal apoptotic response with caspase-activation and drug-resistance. Moreover, the extent of tumor growth restoration after drug withdrawal was dependent on the degree of endogenous blockage of caspase-3 and caspase-7 cleavages. This points to an unrecognized role of caspase modulation in tumor recurrence and suggests that targeting caspase cleavage is a rational approach to increasing potency of cancer drugs. PMID:19241192

  13. Comparison of the photodynamic effect in human and animal tumor cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykova, Elena; Alexandrova, Radostina; Nedkova, Kristina; Ivanova, Elena; Sabotinov, Ognian; Zdravkov, Kaloian; Minchev, Georgi

    2005-04-01

    The aim of the present work is to compare the photodynamic effect in vitro for permanent cell lines established from some of the most common and invasive human cancers (breast cancer and brain glioblastoma) as well as for animal cell lines obtained from virus-induced transplantable tumors. The cytotoxicity assessment was performed for human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7, human glioblastoma 8-MG-BA, and two virus-induced animal tumor cell lines: a cell line LSCC-SF-Mc29, obtained from a transplantable chicken hepatoma induced by the myelocytomatosis virus Mc20, and a line LSR-SF- SR, obtained from a transplantable sarcoma in rat induced by Rous sarcoma virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin. We used in the experiments a PS produced by NIOPIK, Russia) [www.tech-db.ru/istc/db/inst.nsf/wu] with peak absorption around 670 nm. The photodynamic effect was assessed by a neutral red uptake cytotoxicity test. To activate the photosensitizer we used a semiconductor laser that emitted at 672 nm at irradiance of 120 mW/cm2; the latter value had been chosen after comparison of the photodynamic effect at 12, 60 and 120 mW/cm2.

  14. Characterization of a canine glioma cell line as related to established experimental brain tumor models.

    PubMed

    Rainov, N G; Koch, S; Sena-Esteves, M; Berens, M E

    2000-07-01

    A large animal tumor model for anaplastic glioma has been recently developed using immunotolerant allogeneic Beagle dogs and an established canine glioma cell line, J3T. This model offers advantages in terms of tumor morphology and similarity to human anaplastic glioma. The present study was aimed at evaluating the biological characteristics of the J3T canine glioma cell line as related to experimental gene therapy studies. Furthermore, development and morphology of canine brain tumors in a xenogeneic immunodeficient SCID mouse model was investigated. It was demonstrated that cultured J3T cells can be efficiently infected by adenovirus (AV), herpes-simplex type I (HSV), or retrovirus (RV) vectors, as well as by non-virus vectors such as cationic liposome/DNA complexes. Thus, in terms of infectability and transfectability, J3T cells seem to be closer to human glioma than the 9L rodent gliosarcoma. Cytotoxicity of selection antibiotics such as G418, puromycin, and hygromycin on J3T cells essentially resemble cytotoxicity seen with other established glioma lines, for example, 9L, U87, or U343. RV-mediated HSV-TK/GCV gene therapy demonstrated comparable LD50 for TK-expressing and control (non-expressing) J3T and 9L cells treated with Ganciclovir. Further, it was proven that J3T cells are tumorigenic and may grow heterotopically and orthotopically in a xenogeneic immunodeficient host, the SCID mouse, although morphology and growth pattern of these xenogeneic tumors differ from the demonstrated invasive phenotype in the Beagle dog. PMID:10901232

  15. Proscillaridin A is cytotoxic for glioblastoma cell lines and controls tumor xenograft growth in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tchoghandjian, Aurélie; Carré, Manon; Colin, Carole; Jiglaire, Carine Jiguet; Mercurio, Sandy; Beclin, Christophe; Figarella-Branger, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most frequent primary brain tumor in adults. Because of molecular and cellular heterogeneity, high proliferation rate and significant invasive ability, prognosis of patients is poor. Recent therapeutic advances increased median overall survival but tumor recurrence remains inevitable. In this context, we used a high throughput screening approach to bring out novel compounds with anti-proliferative and anti-migratory properties for glioblastoma treatment. Screening of the Prestwick chemical library® of 1120 molecules identified proscillaridin A, a cardiac glycoside inhibitor of the Na+/K+ ATPase pump, with most significant effects on glioblastoma cell lines. In vitro effects of proscillaridin A were evaluated on GBM6 and GBM9 stem-like cell lines and on U87-MG and U251-MG cell lines. We showed that proscillaridin A displayed cytotoxic properties, triggered cell death, induced G2/M phase blockade in all the glioblastoma cell lines and impaired GBM stem self-renewal capacity even at low concentrations. Heterotopic and orthotopic xenotransplantations were used to confirm in vivo anticancer effects of proscillaridin A that both controls xenograft growth and improves mice survival. Altogether, results suggest that proscillaridin A is a promising candidate as cancer therapies in glioblastoma. This sustains previous reports showing that cardiac glycosides act as anticancer drugs in other cancers. PMID:25400117

  16. Establishment, characterization, and successful adaptive therapy against human tumors of NKG cell, a new human NK cell line.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Min; Ma, Juan; Chen, Yongyan; Zhang, Jianhua; Zhao, Weidong; Zhang, Jian; Wei, Haiming; Ling, Bin; Sun, Rui; Tian, Zhigang

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play important roles in adoptive cellular immunotherapy against certain human cancers. This study aims to establish a new human NK cell line and to study its role for adoptive cancer immunotherapy. Peripheral blood samples were collected from 54 patients to establish the NK cell line. A new human NK cell line, termed as NKG, was established from a Chinese male patient with rapidly progressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. NKG cells showed LGL morphology and were phenotypically identified as CD56(bright) NK cell with CD16(-), CD27(-), CD3(-), αβTCR(-), γδTCR(-), CD4(-), CD8(-), CD19(-), CD161(-), CD45(+), CXCR4(+), CCR7(+), CXCR1(-), and CX3CR1(-). NKG cells showed high expression of adhesive molecules (CD2, CD58, CD11a, CD54, CD11b, CD11c), an array of activating receptors (NKp30, NKp44, NKp46, NKG2D, NKG2C), and cytolysis-related receptors and molecules (TRAIL, FasL, granzyme B, perforin, IFN-γ). The cytotoxicity of NKG cells against tumor cells was higher than that of the established NK cell lines NK-92, NKL, and YT. NKG cell cytotoxicity depended on the presence of NKG2D and NKp30. When irradiated with 8 Gy, NKG cells were still with high cytotoxicity and activity in vitro and with safety in vivo, but without proliferation. Further, the irradiated NKG cells exhibited strong cytotoxicity against human primary ovarian cancer cells in vitro, and against human ovarian cancer in a mouse xenograft model. The adoptive transfer of NKG cells significantly inhibited the ovarian tumor growth, decreased the mortality rate and prolonged the survival, even in cases of advanced diseases. A number of NKG cells were detected in the ovarian tumor tissues during cell therapy. In use of the new human NK cell line, NKG would a promising cellular candidate for adoptive immunotherapy of human cancer. PMID:21669033

  17. Establishment and genetic characterization of six unique tumor cell lines as preclinical models for sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    García-Inclán, Cristina; López-Hernández, Alejandro; Alonso-Guervós, Marta; Allonca, Eva; Potes, Sira; Melón, Santiago; López, Fernando; Llorente, José Luis; Hermsen, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Sinonasal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are rare tumors, etiologically related to occupational exposure to wood and leather dust. In spite of surgical and radiotherapeutic advances, the 5 year survival is still 30–50%. Therefore, alternative treatment options are needed. We report the establishment and characterization of six unique human sinonasal SCC cell lines, named SCCNC1, 2, 4, 5, 6 and 7. In vitro growth and invasion characteristics were evaluated and genetic profiles were compared to those of the original primary tumors. The population doubling times ranged from 21 to 34 hours. Cell lines SCCNC2 and 7 were highly invasive in matrigel. Five cell lines carried a high number of copy number alterations, including amplifications and homozygous deletions, while one showed only three abnormalities. Sequence analysis revealed three cell lines with TP53 mutation and none with KRAS or BRAF. Overexpression of p53 was observed in five, and of EGFR in four cell lines. None of the cell lines showed strong immunopositivity of p16 or presence of human papilloma virus. In conclusion, we have created six new cell lines that are clinically and genetically representative of sinonasal SCC and that will be a useful tool for the preclinical testing of new therapeutic agents. PMID:24816148

  18. GSK-3β signaling determines autophagy activation in the breast tumor cell line MCF7 and inclusion formation in the non-tumor cell line MCF10A in response to proteasome inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Gavilán, E; Sánchez-Aguayo, I; Daza, P; Ruano, D

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin–proteasome system and the autophagy–lysosome pathway are the two main mechanisms for eukaryotic intracellular protein degradation. Proteasome inhibitors are used for the treatment of some types of cancer, whereas autophagy seems to have a dual role in tumor cell survival and death. However, the relationship between both pathways has not been extensively studied in tumor cells. We have investigated both proteolytic systems in the human epithelial breast non-tumor cell line MCF10A and in the human epithelial breast tumor cell line MCF7. In basal condition, tumor cells showed a lower proteasome function but a higher autophagy activity when compared with MCF10A cells. Importantly, proteasome inhibition (PI) leads to different responses in both cell types. Tumor cells showed a dose-dependent glycogen synthase kinase-3 (GSK-3)β inhibition, a huge increase in the expression of the transcription factor CHOP and an active processing of caspase-8. By contrast, MCF10A cells fully activated GSK-3β and showed a lower expression of both CHOP and processed caspase-8. These molecular differences were reflected in a dose-dependent autophagy activation and cell death in tumor cells, while non-tumor cells exhibited the formation of inclusion bodies and a decrease in the cell death rate. Importantly, the behavior of the MCF7 cells can be reproduced in MCF10A cells when GSK-3β and the proteasome were simultaneously inhibited. Under this situation, MCF10A cells strongly activated autophagy, showing minimal inclusion bodies, increased CHOP expression and cell death rate. These findings support GSK-3β signaling as a key mechanism in regulating autophagy activation or inclusion formation in human tumor or non-tumor breast cells, respectively, which may shed new light on breast cancer control. PMID:23559006

  19. 3D Cell-SELEX: Development of RNA aptamers as molecular probes for PC-3 tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Souza, Aline G; Marangoni, Karina; Fujimura, Patrícia T; Alves, Patrícia T; Silva, Márcio J; Bastos, Victor Alexandre F; Goulart, Luiz R; Goulart, Vivian A

    2016-02-15

    Human prostate cancer (PCa) is a highly heterogeneous and multifactorial disease. Current clinical biomarkers are not sufficiently accurate, thus being unable to predict the clinical outcome. Therefore, searching for new biomarkers aiming to improve diagnosis, prognosis and therapy is still required. In this study, we performed 3D Cell-SELEX against PC-3 prostate cancer cell line, a novel strategy to select specific nucleic acid ligands against spheroid cells in 3D cell culture. This original system combines Cell-SELEX, a process that exploits the cellular structure to generate specific ligands, and 3D cell culture, an approach that mimics the tissue microenvironment in vitro. In the first round of 3D Cell-SELEX, a negative selection against RWPE-1, non-tumor cell line, was performed to subtract non-tumor specific aptamers. The supernatant was used in eight additional rounds of selection, which were performed against PC-3 cell line. After nine selection cycles, eight PC-3 specific RNA aptamers were selected and sequenced. The aptamers presented sizes between 20 and 50 nucleotides-long, with low free energy (∆G<-13.6), which contributed for their spontaneous folding and high stability. Furthermore, our results showed the aptamer A4 as a specific ligand to prostate tumor cells, with dissociation constant in the nanomolar scale. Therefore, the novel 3D Cell-SELEX procedure improved the selection of PCa cell-surface ligands and the aptamer A4 has shown potential for the identification of prostate tumor cells, suggesting the application of this molecule in further screening assays for PCa. PMID:26821206

  20. Thyrotropin dependent and independent thyroid cell lines selected from FRTL-5 derived tumors grown in nude mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ossendorp, F.A.; Bruning, P.F.; Schuuring, E.M.; Van Den Brink, J.A.; van der Heide, D.; De Vijlder, J.J.; De Bruin, T.W. )

    1990-07-01

    FRTL-5 cells were used to set up a thyroid tumor model system in C3H nu/nu mice. FRTL-5 tumors could be grown in nude mice provided serum TSH levels were elevated. Persistent TSH elevation was obtained by administration of Na131I, rendering the mice hypothyroid. After 4 weeks FRTL-5 cells were injected sc resulting in tumor growth within 2 weeks in eight out of eight mice. Although the tumors showed an apparently undifferentiated histology, lacking normal follicular structures, they were functional since the tumors were capable of concentrating (131)iodine, as demonstrated by nuclear imaging. From one of the tumors a new cell line was isolated (FRTL-5/T) that, like the parental FRTL-5 cell line, was TSH dependent for growth. In a control group of six euthyroid nude mice FRTL-5 tumor growth could not be obtained with one exception. After 3 months one animal developed a small tumor that grew rapidly thereafter. This tumor was easily transplantable in other euthyroid nude mice, showed an undifferentiated histology, and was nonfunctional, as it could not concentrate (131)iodine. From this tumor two cell lines were derived: one cultured in the presence of TSH (FRTL-5/TP) and one in the absence of TSH (FRTL-5/TA). The cell lines were analyzed for TSH responsive functions and TSH receptor expression. Responsiveness to TSH in FRTL-5/T and the parental FRTL-5 cell line were similar for most thyroid specific functions tested. However, FRTL-5/T was less sensitive than FRTL-5 for TSH induced (3H)thymidine incorporation. Both cell lines had two classes of TSH binding sites with high and low affinity respectively. FRTL-5/TP and FRTL-5/TA were both able to grow in TSH free medium and were nonresponsive to TSH in vitro, as tested for (3H)thymidine and (3H)uridine incorporation, iodine uptake, thyroglobulin iodination, and thyroglobulin secretion.

  1. Cytotoxicity of Portuguese Propolis: The Proximity of the In Vitro Doses for Tumor and Normal Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Falcão, Soraia; Queiroz, Maria João R. P.; Ferreira, Isabel C. F. R.

    2014-01-01

    With a complex chemical composition rich in phenolic compounds, propolis (resinous substance collected by Apis mellifera from various tree buds) exhibits a broad spectrum of biological activities. Recently, in vitro and in vivo data suggest that propolis has anticancer properties, but is the cytoxicity of propolis specific for tumor cells? To answer this question, the cytotoxicity of phenolic extracts from Portuguese propolis of different origins was evaluated using human tumor cell lines (MCF7—breast adenocarcinoma, NCI-H460—non-small cell lung carcinoma, HCT15—colon carcinoma, HeLa—cervical carcinoma, and HepG2—hepatocellular carcinoma), and non-tumor primary cells (PLP2). The studied propolis presented high cytotoxic potential for human tumor cell lines, mostly for HCT15. Nevertheless, excluding HCT15 cell line, the extracts at the GI50 obtained for tumor cell lines showed, in general, cytotoxicity for normal cells (PLP2). Propolis phenolic extracts comprise phytochemicals that should be further studied for their bioactive properties against human colon carcinoma. In the other cases, the proximity of the in vitro cytotoxic doses for tumor and normal cell lines should be confirmed by in vivo tests and may highlight the need for selection of specific compounds within the propolis extract. PMID:24982911

  2. Lysis of small cell carcinoma of the lung tumor cell lines by gamma interferon-activated allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells: abrogation of killing by pretreatment of tumor cells with gamma interferon.

    PubMed

    Ball, E D; Nichols, K E; Pettengill, O S; Sorenson, G D; Fanger, M W

    1986-01-01

    Interferon has been shown to enhance the ability of nonspecific cytotoxic mononuclear cells to lyse some, but not all, tumor cells. We have examined the effect of recombinant human gamma interferon (rIFN gamma) on the cell-mediated cytolysis of tumor target cells derived from continuously cultured lines of small cell carcinoma of the lung (SCCL). Cells from the SCCL lines DMS 44, 53, 79, 92, and 406 were labeled with 51Cr and incubated with normal and rIFN gamma-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 18 h at 37 degrees C and tumor cell lysis estimated by measuring 51Cr release. Although cells from certain SCCL lines were good targets for cell mediated cytotoxicity, susceptibility to lysis was heterogeneous among the different SCCL lines. DMS 406 and 79 were, on average, maximally lysed, while DMS 44, 53, and 92 showed less susceptibility to lysis by either control or rIFN gamma-stimulated effector cells. In addition, although pretreatment with rIFN gamma increased the cytolytic capacity of normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells from several different donors, preincubation of the tumor cell lines with rIFN gamma resulted in inhibition of cytolysis mediated by both control and IFN-activated effector cells. These findings suggest that although rIFN gamma may enhance cell-mediated lysis of SCCL tumor cells, it may also decrease susceptibility to lysis. PMID:3015408

  3. Soy Promotes Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumor Development in Mice and in the Human Granulosa Cell Tumor-Derived COV434 Cell Line1

    PubMed Central

    Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; James, Rebecca; Ligon, Alysse; Li, Xiaohui; Pangas, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Soy attracts attention for its health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol or preventing breast and colon cancer. Soybeans contain isoflavones, which act as phytoestrogens. Even though isoflavones have beneficial health effects, a role for isoflavones in the initiation and progression of diseases including cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. While data from rodent studies suggest that neonatal exposure to genistein (the predominant isoflavone in soy) disrupts normal reproductive function, its role in ovarian cancers, particularly granulosa cell tumors (GCT), is largely unknown. Our study aimed to define the contribution of a soy diet in GCT development using a genetically modified mouse model for juvenile GCTs (JGCT; Smad1 Smad5 conditional double knockout mice) as well as a human JGCT cell line (COV434). While dietary soy cannot initiate JGCT development in mice, we show that it has dramatic effects on GCT growth and tumor progression compared to a soy-free diet. Loss of Smad1 and Smad5 alters estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) expression in granulosa cells, perhaps sensitizing the cells to the effects of genistein. In addition, we found that genistein modulates estrogen receptor expression in the human JGCT cell line and positively promotes cell growth in part by suppressing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Combined, our work suggests that dietary soy consumption has deleterious effects on GCT development. PMID:25165122

  4. Soy promotes juvenile granulosa cell tumor development in mice and in the human granulosa cell tumor-derived COV434 cell line.

    PubMed

    Mansouri-Attia, Nadéra; James, Rebecca; Ligon, Alysse; Li, Xiaohui; Pangas, Stephanie A

    2014-10-01

    Soy attracts attention for its health benefits, such as lowering cholesterol or preventing breast and colon cancer. Soybeans contain isoflavones, which act as phytoestrogens. Even though isoflavones have beneficial health effects, a role for isoflavones in the initiation and progression of diseases including cancer is becoming increasingly recognized. While data from rodent studies suggest that neonatal exposure to genistein (the predominant isoflavone in soy) disrupts normal reproductive function, its role in ovarian cancers, particularly granulosa cell tumors (GCT), is largely unknown. Our study aimed to define the contribution of a soy diet in GCT development using a genetically modified mouse model for juvenile GCTs (JGCT; Smad1 Smad5 conditional double knockout mice) as well as a human JGCT cell line (COV434). While dietary soy cannot initiate JGCT development in mice, we show that it has dramatic effects on GCT growth and tumor progression compared to a soy-free diet. Loss of Smad1 and Smad5 alters estrogen receptor alpha (Esr1) expression in granulosa cells, perhaps sensitizing the cells to the effects of genistein. In addition, we found that genistein modulates estrogen receptor expression in the human JGCT cell line and positively promotes cell growth in part by suppressing caspase-dependent apoptosis. Combined, our work suggests that dietary soy consumption has deleterious effects on GCT development. PMID:25165122

  5. Extraction of tumor-specific antigen from cells and plasma membranes of line-10 hepatoma.

    PubMed

    Leonard, E J; Richardson, A K; Hardy, A S; Rapp, H J

    1975-07-01

    Tumor-specific antigen was extracted with 3 M KCl from line-10 guinea pig hepatoma cells. The yield of antigenic activity, estimated by production of delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity reactions in line-10 immune guinea pigs, was 10-30% of the antigen present in intact cells. By ultracentrifugation criteria, the extracted antigen was soluble. Gel filtration, ion exchange chromatography, and salting-out studies showed that the antigen was heterogeneous in size and net charge. The possibility that 3 M KCl extracted a homogeneous population of molecules associating into polymers of various sizes at low ionic strength was ruled out by heterogeneity on Sephadex G-200 chromatography at high ionic strength. After osmotic lysis of sucrose-loaded line-10 cells, whole plasma membranes or large membrane fragments were obtained in a yield of about 20%. The isolation procedure did not cause detectable loss of membrane antigenic activity. The membranes had 33 skin test U/mg membrane protein, compared to the intact cell value of 1.7 skin test U/mg cell protein. Extracts of plasma membranes had 10-20% of the antigenic activity of the starting membrane material. In contrast to the wide variety of proteins liberated from intact cells, much of the protein extracted from the membranes was in the molecular weight range above 250,000. PMID:169367

  6. Effect of restoration of retinoblastoma gene function on the radiosensitivity of cells of human tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsang, N.M.; Little, J.B.

    1994-11-01

    To assess the role of expression of the retinoblastoma (RB) gene on the sensitivity of cells to the cytotoxic effects of ionizing radiation, we transfected a normal RB gene into cells of RB{sup +} and RB{sup {minus}} osteosarcoma cell lines and an RB{sup {minus}} prostate carcinoma line and studied the radiosensitivity of the cells before and after transfection. Four transfected clones were isolated from the two RB{sup {minus}} tumor cell lines that expressed the product of the transfected normal RB gene and contained no mutations in the pocket and C-terminal regions by sequencing. A small increase in radiosensitivity was observed in cell lines transfected with the pDOL plasmid vector alone, containing the neo gene and a long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter. However, no significant change in radiosensitivity occurred in transfected cells expressing the normal RB gene compared to controls transfected with an RB{sup {minus}} plasmid. Based on this and other information, we conclude that RB gene function is not involved in the response of these human tumor cells to the cytotoxic effects of radiation. 38 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  7. Cytokine profile of conditioned medium from human tumor cell lines after acute and fractionated doses of gamma radiation and its effect on survival of bystander tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Desai, Sejal; Kumar, Amit; Laskar, S; Pandey, B N

    2013-01-01

    Cytokines are known to play pivotal roles in cancer initiation, progression and pathogenesis. Accumulating evidences suggest differences in basal and stress-induced cytokine profiles of cancers with diverse origin. However, a comprehensive investigation characterising the cytokine profile of various tumor types after acute and fractionated doses of gamma-irradiation, and its effect on survival of bystander cells is not well known in literature. In the present study, we have evaluated the cytokine secretion profile of human tumor cell lines (HT1080, U373MG, HT29, A549 and MCF-7) either before (basal) or after acute (2, 6 Gy) and fractionated doses (3×2 Gy) of gamma-irradiation in culture medium obtained from these cells by multiplex bead array/ELISA. Moreover, clonogenic assays were performed to evaluate the effect of conditioned medium (CM) on the survival and growth of respective cells. Based on the screening of 28 analytes, our results showed that the basal profiles of these cell lines varied considerably in terms of the number and magnitude of secreted factors, which was minimum in MCF-7. Interestingly, TNF-α, IL-1β, PDGF-AA, TGF-β1, fractalkine, IL-8, VEGF and GCSF were found in CM of all the cell lines. However, secretion of certain cytokines was cell line-specific. Moreover, CM caused increase in clonogenic survival of respective tumor cells (in the order HT1080>U373MG>HT29>A549>MCF-7), which was correlated with the levels of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, GMCSF and VEGF in their CM. After irradiation, the levels of most of the cytokines increased markedly in a dose dependent manner. The fold change in cytokine levels was lower in irradiated conditioned medium (ICM) of tumor cells collected after fractionated than respective acute dose, except in MCF-7. Interestingly, amongst these cell lines, the radiation-induced fold increase in cytokine levels was maximum in ICM of A549 cells. Moreover, bystander A549 cells treated with respective ICM showed dose dependent

  8. Down-regulation of HSP40 gene family following OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Asadi, MalekHosein; Mowla, Seyed Javad; Hassanshahi, Gholamhossin; Ahmadi, Zahra

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): The OCT4B1, as one of OCT4 variants, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tissues more than other variants and plays an important role in apoptosis and stress (heat shock protein) pathways. The present study was designed to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on expressional profile of HSP40 gene family expression in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods: The OCT4B1 expression was suppressed by specific siRNA transfection in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor) and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines employing Lipofectamine reagent. Real-time PCR array technique was employed for RNA qualification. The fold changes were calculated using RT2 Profiler PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results: Our results indicated that fifteen genes (from 36 studied genes) were down-regulated and two genes (DNAJC11 and DNAJC5B) were up-regulated in all three studied tumor cell lines by approximately more than two folds. The result of other studied genes (19 genes) showed different expressional pattern (up or down-expression) based on tumor cell lines. Conclusion: According to the findings of the present study, we may suggest that there is a direct correlation between OCT4B1 expression in tumor cell lines (and tissues) and HSP40 family gene expressions to escape from apoptosis and cancer expansion. PMID:27081464

  9. Demethylation and expression of murine mammary tumor proviruses in mouse thymoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mermod, J J; Bourgeois, S; Defer, N; Crépin, M

    1983-01-01

    Murine mammary tumor virus (MMTV) expression is analyzed in a T-lymphoid cell line (T1M1) sensitive to the killing effect of glucocorticoids and in two of its variants, one resistant (T1M1r) and one supersensitive (T1M1ss) to glucocorticoid-induced lymphocytolysis. In the T1M1 line, MMTV is expressed and induced approximately 10-fold by short treatment with dexamethasone. Southern blot analyses of restriction enzyme digests of DNA from T1M1 cells reveal three proviruses similar to those of normal C57BL mouse tissue. In the T1M1ss line, which has retained functional glucocorticoid receptors, MMTV mRNA is inducible by glucocorticoids, while induction is reduced in the T1M1r line defective in glucocorticoid receptors. Moreover, the T1M1r line expresses a strikingly elevated basal level of MMTV mRNA in the absence of hormone. No rearrangements or superinfection have occurred in the variants, but all the regions containing 5'-long terminal repeats are demethylated in the T1M1r variant although other sites of the provirus remain methylated. Because this variant was selected by prolonged treatment with dexamethasone, these observations raise the possibility that the continuous transcription of MMTV that occurred during this selection can result in glucocorticoid-induced demethylation of long-terminal-repeat sequences. Images PMID:6296860

  10. Expression analysis of secreted and cell surface genes of five transformed human cell lines and derivative xenograft tumors

    PubMed Central

    Stull, Robert A; Tavassoli, Roya; Kennedy, Scot; Osborn, Steve; Harte, Rachel; Lu, Yan; Napier, Cheryl; Abo, Arie; Chin, Daniel J

    2005-01-01

    Background Since the early stages of tumorigenesis involve adhesion, escape from immune surveillance, vascularization and angiogenesis, we devised a strategy to study the expression profiles of all publicly known and putative secreted and cell surface genes. We designed a custom oligonucleotide microarray containing probes for 3531 secreted and cell surface genes to study 5 diverse human transformed cell lines and their derivative xenograft tumors. The origins of these human cell lines were lung (A549), breast (MDA MB-231), colon (HCT-116), ovarian (SK-OV-3) and prostate (PC3) carcinomas. Results Three different analyses were performed: (1) A PCA-based linear discriminant analysis identified a 54 gene profile characteristic of all tumors, (2) Application of MANOVA (Pcorr < .05) to tumor data revealed a larger set of 149 differentially expressed genes. (3) After MANOVA was performed on data from individual tumors, a comparison of differential genes amongst all tumor types revealed 12 common differential genes. Seven of the 12 genes were identified by all three analytical methods. These included late angiogenic, morphogenic and extracellular matrix genes such as ANGPTL4, COL1A1, GP2, GPR57, LAMB3, PCDHB9 and PTGER3. The differential expression of ANGPTL4 and COL1A1 and other genes was confirmed by quantitative PCR. Conclusion Overall, a comparison of the three analyses revealed an expression pattern indicative of late angiogenic processes. These results show that a xenograft model using multiple cell lines of diverse tissue origin can identify common tumorigenic cell surface or secreted molecules that may be important biomarker and therapeutic discoveries. PMID:15836779

  11. Cytometric comparisons between circulating tumor cells from prostate cancer patients and the prostate-tumor-derived LNCaP cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazar, Daniel C.; Cho, Edward H.; Luttgen, Madelyn S.; Metzner, Thomas J.; Loressa Uson, Maria; Torrey, Melissa; Gross, Mitchell E.; Kuhn, Peter

    2012-02-01

    Many important experiments in cancer research are initiated with cell line data analysis due to the ease of accessibility and utilization. Recently, the ability to capture and characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has become more prevalent in the research setting. This ability to detect, isolate and analyze CTCs allows us to directly compare specific protein expression levels found in patient CTCs to cell lines. In this study, we use immunocytochemistry to compare the protein expression levels of total cytokeratin (CK) and androgen receptor (AR) in CTCs and cell lines from patients with prostate cancer to determine what translational insights might be gained through the use of cell line data. A non-enrichment CTC detection assay enables us to compare cytometric features and relative expression levels of CK and AR by indirect immunofluorescence from prostate cancer patients against the prostate cancer cell line LNCaP. We measured physical characteristics of these two groups and observed significant differences in cell size, fluorescence intensity and nuclear to cytoplasmic ratio. We hope that these experiments will initiate a foundation to allow cell line data to be compared against characteristics of primary cells from patients.

  12. Transmittance of MCF-7 breast tumor cell line through visible and near infrared spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabakoǧlu, H. Ã.-zgür

    2016-03-01

    In this study, light transmittance of MCF-7 tumor cells from 450 nm to 1100 nm has been measured in their growing medium and evaluated. Transmittance differences have been tried to be put forward in cancer cell line on visible (VIS) and near infrared (NIR) spectrum as well as in between different numbers of cells in medium. An absorption-reflection spectrophotometer was used in the experiments. System has a tungsten light source, optical chopper, a monochromator, sample chamber, silicon detectors, lock-in amplifier and computer. System was controlled by software in order to adjust scan range, scan steps and grating configuration. Cells were grown in medium, and measurements were taken from cells while they were in 5 ml medium. According to our findings, there are significant differences between VIS and NIR regions for the same number of cells. There were found no statistical difference among different numbers of cells. Increasing number of cells has not affected the transmittance. Transmittance of medium is not significantly different from different concentration of cells.

  13. Genomic analysis of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cell lines and human tumors: a rational approach to preclinical model selection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hua; Wawrose, John S.; Gooding, William E.; Garraway, Levi A.; Lui, Vivian Wai Yan; Peyser, Noah D.; Grandis, Jennifer R.

    2014-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common type of cancer worldwide. The increasing amount of genomic information on human tumors and cell lines provides more biological data to design preclinical studies. We and others previously reported whole exome sequencing data of 106 HNSCC primary tumors. In 2012, high throughput genomic data and pharmacological profiling of anticancer drugs of hundreds of cancer cell lines were reported. Here we compared the genomic data of 39 HNSCC cell lines with the genomic findings in 106 HNSCC tumors. Amplification of eight genes (PIK3CA, EGFR, CCND2, KDM5A, ERBB2, PMS1, FGFR1 and WHSCIL1) and deletion of five genes (CDKN2A, SMAD4, NOTCH2, NRAS and TRIM33) were found in both HNSCC cell lines and tumors. Seventeen genes were only mutated in HNSCC cell lines (>10%) suggesting that these mutations may arise through immortalization in tissue culture. Conversely, 11 genes were only mutated in >10% of human HNSCC tumors. Several mutant genes in the EGFR pathway are shared both in cell lines and in tumors. Pharmacological profiling of eight anticancer agents in six HNSCC cell lines suggested that PIK3CA mutation may serve as a predictive biomarker for the drugs targeting the EGFR/PI3K pathway. These findings suggest that a correlation of gene mutations between HNSCC cell lines and human tumors may be used to guide the selection of preclinical models for translational research. PMID:24425785

  14. Characterization of the inhibitor of kappaB kinase (IKK) complex in granulosa cell tumors of the ovary and granulosa cell tumor-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jamieson, Stacey; Fuller, Peter J

    2013-10-01

    Granulosa cell tumors of the ovary (GCT) are a distinct, hormonally active subset of ovarian cancers. Although it has recently been shown that ∼97 % of all adult GCT harbor a novel somatic missense mutation in the FOXL2 gene, given its almost universal presence, it does not explain differences in tumor stage and/or recurrence. The nuclear factor kappaB (NFκB) transcription factor is constitutively active in two human GCT-derived cell lines, COV434 and KGN, which are useful in vitro models to investigate juvenile and adult GCT, respectively. This study aimed to determine the molecular basis and pathogenetic significance of this aberrant NFκB activity. Selective chemical inhibitors were used to target candidate components of the pathway. The constitutive activity was blocked by two independent inhibitors of IκBα phosphorylation, suggesting that aberrant activation occurs upstream of this point. NFκB inhibition resulted in a dose-dependent decrease in cell proliferation and viability and a dose-dependent increase in apoptosis. Inhibitors of earlier components of the pathway were without effect. Two independent inhibitors of inhibitor of kappaB kinase (IKK)β, a catalytic subunit of the NFκB activation complex, were unable to inhibit the constitutive activity, but surprisingly also ligand-induced activity. These findings suggest a central role for IKKβ; however, no mutations or altered expression of the IKKβ, IKKα, or IKKγ genes was observed in the cell lines or in a panel of human GCT samples. This study highlights unresolved issues in understanding the pathogenesis of GCT and in the use of the COV434 and KGN cells lines as model systems. PMID:23674259

  15. High-throughput identification of genotype-specific cancer vulnerabilities in mixtures of barcoded tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yu, Channing; Mannan, Aristotle M; Yvone, Griselda Metta; Ross, Kenneth N; Zhang, Yan-Ling; Marton, Melissa A; Taylor, Bradley R; Crenshaw, Andrew; Gould, Joshua Z; Tamayo, Pablo; Weir, Barbara A; Tsherniak, Aviad; Wong, Bang; Garraway, Levi A; Shamji, Alykhan F; Palmer, Michelle A; Foley, Michael A; Winckler, Wendy; Schreiber, Stuart L; Kung, Andrew L; Golub, Todd R

    2016-04-01

    Hundreds of genetically characterized cell lines are available for the discovery of genotype-specific cancer vulnerabilities. However, screening large numbers of compounds against large numbers of cell lines is currently impractical, and such experiments are often difficult to control. Here we report a method called PRISM that allows pooled screening of mixtures of cancer cell lines by labeling each cell line with 24-nucleotide barcodes. PRISM revealed the expected patterns of cell killing seen in conventional (unpooled) assays. In a screen of 102 cell lines across 8,400 compounds, PRISM led to the identification of BRD-7880 as a potent and highly specific inhibitor of aurora kinases B and C. Cell line pools also efficiently formed tumors as xenografts, and PRISM recapitulated the expected pattern of erlotinib sensitivity in vivo. PMID:26928769

  16. Differential Expression of OCT4 Pseudogenes in Pluripotent and Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Poursani, Ensieh M.; Mohammad Soltani, Bahram; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective The human OCT4 gene, the most important pluripotency marker, can generate at least three different transcripts (OCT4A, OCT4B, and OCT4B1) by alternative splicing. OCT4A is the main isoform responsible for the stemness property of embryonic stem (ES) cells. There also exist eight processed OCT4 pseudogenes in the human genome with high homology to the OCT4A, some of which are transcribed in various cancers. Recent conflicting reports on OCT4 expression in tumor cells and tissues emphasize the need to discriminate the expression of OCT4A from other variants as well as OCT4 pseudogenes. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, DNA sequencing confirmed the authenticity of transcripts of OCT4 pseudogenes and their expression patterns were investigated in a panel of different human cell lines by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Results Differential expression of OCT4 pseudogenes in various human cancer and pluripotent cell lines was observed. Moreover, the expression pattern of OCT4-pseudogene 3 (OCT4-pg3) followed that of OCT4A during neural differentiation of the pluripotent cell line of NTERA-2 (NT2). Although OCT4-pg3 was highly expressed in undifferentiated NT2 cells, its expression was rapidly down-regulated upon induction of neural differentiation. Analysis of protein expression of OCT4A, OCT4-pg1, OCT4-pg3, and OCT4-pg4 by Western blotting indicated that OCT4 pseudogenes cannot produce stable proteins. Consistent with a newly proposed competitive role of pseudogene microRNA docking sites, we detected miR-145 binding sites on all transcripts of OCT4 and OCT4 pseudogenes. Conclusion Our study suggests a potential coding-independent function for OCT4 pseudogenes during differentiation or tumorigenesis. PMID:27054116

  17. The Ultrasound effects on non tumoral cell line at 1 MHz therapeutic frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Giambattista, L.; Grimaldi, P.; Udroiu, I.; Pozzi, D.; Cinque, G.; Frogley, M. D.; Cassarà, A. M.; Bedini, A.; Giliberti, C.; Palomba, R.; Buogo, S.; Giansanti, A.; Congiu Castellano, A.

    2011-02-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate some bioeffects due to Therapeutic Ultrasound (1 MHz and 50tumoral cells. Ultrasound (US) has been demonstrated to alter the cell membrane permeability due to a biophysical mechanism, Sonoporation, and exploited as a promising non-invasive gene transfer method. We have used the NIH-3T3 cell line as a model system and exposed it to US medical equipment for 15, 30, 45, 60 minutes at distances of 10 and 15 cm from the source transducer, corresponding to the far field region where cm. We have worked with the maximum power in pulsed system with 75% duty cycle. Characterization of the unfocused, planar and with a circular geometry 1 MHz source transducer, was performed and the acoustics pressure was measured by a calibrated 0.5 mm needle hydrophone; moreover, the pressure field generated by the source transducer was simulated. The US effects on cells were assessed by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) Imaging with focal plane array (FPA) detector. By the IR analysis, the US exposure on non tumoral cells has induced a change of the intensity for CH2 asymmetric stretching (2924 cm-1) band in the lipid region (3000-2800 cm-1) that it could detect an energy-dependent process. It has already shown that cells invest energy to catalyze lipid movement in order to maintain a specific transmembrane phospholipid distribution. Although asymmetry is the rule for control cells, the loss of asymmetry could be associated with the permeability change of plasma membrane inducing temporary pores.

  18. Changes of heterogeneous cell populations in the Ishikawa cell line during long-term culture: Proposal for an in vitro clonal evolution model of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Kasai, Fumio; Hirayama, Noriko; Ozawa, Midori; Iemura, Masashi; Kohara, Arihiro

    2016-06-01

    Genomic changes in tumor cell lines can occur during culture, leading to differences between cell lines carrying the same name. In this study, genome profiles between low and high passages were investigated in the Ishikawa 3-H-12 cell line (JCRB1505). Cells contained between 43 and 46 chromosomes and the modal number changed from 46 to 45 during culture. Cytogenetic analysis revealed that a translocation t(9;14), observed in all metaphases, is a robust marker for this cell line. Single-nucleotide polymorphism microarrays showed a heterogeneous copy number in the early passages and distinct profiles at late passages. These results demonstrate that cell culture can lead to elimination of ancestral clones by sequential selection, resulting in extensive replacement with a novel clone. Our observations on Ishikawa cells in vitro are different from the in vivo heterogeneity in which ancestral clones are often retained during tumor evolution and suggest a model for in vitro clonal evolution. PMID:27107655

  19. In vitro cytotoxicity assessment of [5,10,15,20-tetra (4-sulfophenyl) porphyrin] on tumor and nontumor cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrova, R.; Sabotinov, O.; Stoykova, Elena V.; Ion, Rodica-Mariana; Shurulinkov, Stanislav; Minchev, Georgi

    2004-06-01

    In this study we evaluate the cytotoxicity of 5,10,15,20- tetra (4-sulfophenyl) porphyrins on a tumor cell line LSCC-SF-Mc29, obtained from a transplantable chicken hepatoma induced by the myelocytomatosis virus Mc29, a timor line LSR-SF-SR, obtained from a transplantable sarcoma in rat induced by Rous sarcoma virus strain Schmidt-Ruppin and for normal mouse cell line (BALB/c-3T3-A31) and bovine kidney cell line (MDBK). The cells were exposed to irradiation from a pulsed CuBr vapor laser system at 510.6 nm and 578.2 nm at fluence rate 50 mW/cm2 and pulse frequency rate 20 kHz. The viability of cells was determined by the neutral red uptake cytotoxicity assay. The light dose-response curves and light exposures that ensure viability drop to 50 % were obtained for each cell line. The cytotoxic effect of TS4PP is most distinguished for LSCC-SF-Mc29. The bovine cell line is more vulnerable than the mouse line, especially at 510.6 nm. The 2-4 times higher viability of the normal cell lines in comparison with the tumor lines has been obtained.

  20. DETECTION OF HUMAN LUNG EPITHELIA CELL GROWTH FACTORS PRODUCED BY A LUNG CARCINOMA CELL LINE: USE IN CULTURE OF PRIMARY SOLID LUNG TUMORS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Serum-free medium conditioned for 72 h by a human undifferentiated adenocarcinoma of lung, Cal u 6, stimulated the colony formation of normal human bronchial epithelial cells, newly cultured cells from human solid lung tumors, and established human lung tumor cell lines, includin...

  1. Absence of tumor growth stimulation in a panel of 26 human tumor cell lines by mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts Iscador in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kelter, Gerhard; Fiebig, Heinz-Herbert

    2006-06-01

    Mistletoe (Viscum album L.) extracts exhibit antitumor activity based on direct inhibition of tumor growth as well as modulation of immune response. Recent reports suggested potential stimulation of tumor growth at low doses of mistletoe extracts, particularly in hematological tumors and tumors responding to immunotherapy. Therefore, the direct effect of the three mistletoe extracts Iscador M Spezial, Iscador Qu Spezial and Iscador P on tumor growth was investigated in a panel of 26 human tumor cell lines in vitro using cellular proliferation assays. Antitumor activity of the three preparations at high concentrations was investigated in a panel of 12 cell lines. The results showed no evidence of stimulation of tumor growth by any of the three extracts, in particular the five tumor cell lines previously reported to be sensitive to direct mistletoe lectin stimulation. On the contrary, the lectin containing preparations Iscador M Spezial and Iscador Qu Spezial expressed a pronounced antitumor activity exhibiting a nearly identical antitumor profile compared to isolated mistletoe lectin 1. PMID:16927523

  2. Low dose perfluorooctanoate exposure promotes cell proliferation in a human non-tumor liver cell line.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongxia; Cui, Ruina; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Jiayue; Dai, Jiayin

    2016-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is a well-known persistent organic pollutant widely found in the environment, wildlife and humans. Medical surveillance and experimental studies have investigated the potential effects of PFOA on human livers, but the hepatotoxicity of PFOA on humans and its underlying mechanism remain to be clarified. We exposed a human liver cell line (HL-7702) to 50μM PFOA for 48h and 96h, and identified 111 significantly differentially expressed proteins by iTRAQ analysis. A total of 46 proteins were related to cell proliferation and apoptosis. Through further analysis of the cell cycle, apoptosis and their related proteins, we found that low doses of PFOA (50-100μM) promoted cell proliferation and numbers by promoting cells from the G1 to S phases, whereas high doses of PFOA (200-400μM) led to reduced HL-7702 cell numbers compared with that of the control mainly due to cell cycle arrest in the G0/G1 phase. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the promotion of cell cycle progression in human cells following PFOA exposure. PMID:27045622

  3. Assembly And Initial Characterization Of A Panel Of 85 Genomically Validated Cell Lines From Diverse Head And Neck Tumor Sites

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Mei; Sano, Daisuke; Pickering, Curtis R.; Jasser, Samar A.; Henderson, Ying C.; Clayman, Gary L.; Sturgis, Erich M.; Ow, Thomas J.; Lotan, Reuben; Carey, Thomas E.; Sacks, Peter G.; Grandis, Jennifer R.; Sidransky, David; Heldin, Nils Erik; Myers, Jeffrey N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Human cell lines are useful for studying cancer biology and pre-clinically modeling cancer therapy, but can be misidentified and cross contamination is unfortunately common. The purpose of this study was to develop a panel of validated head and neck cell lines representing the spectrum of tissue sites and histologies that could be used for studying the molecular, genetic, and phenotypic diversity of head and neck cancer. Methods A panel of 122 clinically and phenotypically diverse head and neck cell lines from head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), thyroid cancer, cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma, oral leukoplakia, immortalized primary keratinocytes, and normal epithelium, was assembled from the collections of several individuals and institutions. Authenticity was verified by performing short tandem repeat (STR) analysis. Human papillomavirus (HPV) status and cell morphology were also determined. Results Eighty-five of the 122 cell lines had unique genetic profiles. HPV-16 DNA was detected in 2 cell lines. These 85 cell lines included cell lines from the major head and neck primary tumor sites, and close examination demonstrates a wide range of in vitro phenotypes. Conclusion This panel of 85 genomically validated head and neck cell lines represents a valuable resource for the head and neck cancer research community that can help advance understanding of the disease by providing a standard reference for cell lines that can be utilized for biological as well as preclinical studies. PMID:21868764

  4. Phenotypic characterization of telomerase-immortalized primary non-malignant and malignant tumor-derived human prostate epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gu Yongpeng; Li Hongzhen; Miki, Jun; Kim, Kee-Hong; Furusato, Bungo; Sesterhenn, Isabell A.; Chu, Wei-Sing; McLeod, David G.; Srivastava, Shiv; Ewing, Charles M.; Isaacs, William B.; Rhim, Johng S. . E-mail: jrhim@cpdr.org

    2006-04-01

    In vitro human prostate cell culture models are critical for clarifying the mechanism of prostate cancer progression and for testing preventive and therapeutic agents. Cell lines ideal for the study of human primary prostate tumors would be those derived from spontaneously immortalized tumor cells; unfortunately, explanted primary prostate cells survive only short-term in culture, and rarely immortalize spontaneously. Therefore, we recently have generated five immortal human prostate epithelial cell cultures derived from both the benign and malignant tissues of prostate cancer patients with telomerase, a gene that prevents cellular senescence. Examination of these cell lines for their morphologies and proliferative capacities, their abilities to grow in low serum, to respond to androgen stimulation, to grow above the agar layer, to form tumors in SCID mice, suggests that they may serve as valid, useful tools for the elucidation of early events in prostate tumorigenesis. Furthermore, the chromosome alterations observed in these immortalized cell lines expressing aspects of the malignant phenotypes imply that these cell lines accurately recapitulate the genetic composition of primary tumors. These novel in vitro models may offer unique models for the study of prostate carcinogenesis and also provide the means for testing both chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic agents.

  5. Ligand-Independent Canonical Wnt Activity in Canine Mammary Tumor Cell Lines Associated with Aberrant LEF1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    van Wolferen, Monique E.; Rao, Nagesha A. S.; Grizelj, Juraj; Vince, Silvijo; Hellmen, Eva; Mol, Jan A.

    2014-01-01

    Pet dogs very frequently develop spontaneous mammary tumors and have been suggested as a good model organism for breast cancer research. In order to obtain an insight into underlying signaling mechanisms during canine mammary tumorigenesis, in this study we assessed the incidence and the mechanism of canonical Wnt activation in a panel of 12 canine mammary tumor cell lines. We show that a subset of canine mammary cell lines exhibit a moderate canonical Wnt activity that is dependent on Wnt ligands, similar to what has been described in human breast cancer cell lines. In addition, three of the tested canine mammary cell lines have a high canonical Wnt activity that is not responsive to inhibitors of Wnt ligand secretion. Tumor cell lines with highly active canonical Wnt signaling often carry mutations in key members of the Wnt signaling cascade. These cell lines, however, carry no mutations in the coding regions of intracellular Wnt pathway components (APC, β-catenin, GSK3β, CK1α and Axin1) and have a functional β-catenin destruction complex. Interestingly, however, the cell lines with high canonical Wnt activity specifically overexpress LEF1 mRNA and the knock-down of LEF1 significantly inhibits TCF-reporter activity. In addition, LEF1 is overexpressed in a subset of canine mammary carcinomas, implicating LEF1 in ligand-independent activation of canonical Wnt signaling in canine mammary tumors. We conclude that canonical Wnt activation may be a frequent event in canine mammary tumors both through Wnt ligand-dependent and novel ligand–independent mechanisms. PMID:24887235

  6. Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Cherbas, Lucy; Gong, Lei

    2014-01-01

    We review the properties and uses of cell lines in Drosophila research, emphasizing the variety of lines, the large body of genomic and transcriptional data available for many of the lines, and the variety of ways the lines have been used to provide tools for and insights into the developmental, molecular, and cell biology of Drosophila and mammals. PMID:24434506

  7. Expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in human adrenal tumors and cell lines: antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, C G; Brown, J W; Schally, A V; Erler, A; Gebauer, L; Treszl, A; Young, L; Fishman, L M; Engel, J B; Willenberg, H S; Petersenn, S; Eisenhofer, G; Ehrhart-Bornstein, M; Bornstein, S R

    2009-09-15

    Peptide analogues targeting various neuropeptide receptors have been used effectively in cancer therapy. A hallmark of adrenocortical tumor formation is the aberrant expression of peptide receptors relating to uncontrolled cell proliferation and hormone overproduction. Our microarray results have also demonstrated a differential expression of neuropeptide hormone receptors in tumor subtypes of human pheochromocytoma. In light of these findings, we performed a comprehensive analysis of relevant receptors in both human adrenomedullary and adrenocortical tumors and tested the antiproliferative effects of peptide analogues targeting these receptors. Specifically, we examined the receptor expression of somatostatin-type-2 receptor, growth hormone-releasing hormone (GHRH) receptor or GHRH receptor splice variant-1 (SV-1) and luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) receptor at the mRNA and protein levels in normal human adrenal tissues, adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tumors, and cell lines. Cytotoxic derivatives of somatostatin AN-238 and, to a lesser extent, AN-162, reduced cell numbers of uninduced and NGF-induced adrenomedullary pheochromocytoma cells and adrenocortical cancer cells. Both the splice variant of GHRH receptor SV-1 and the LHRH receptor were also expressed in adrenocortical cancer cell lines but not in the pheochromocytoma cell line. The GHRH receptor antagonist MZ-4-71 and LHRH antagonist Cetrorelix both significantly reduced cell growth in the adrenocortical cancer cell line. In conclusion, the expression of receptors for somatostatin, GHRH, and LHRH in the normal human adrenal and in adrenal tumors, combined with the growth-inhibitory effects of the antitumor peptide analogues, may make possible improved treatment approaches to adrenal tumors. PMID:19717419

  8. An Investigation of the Growth Inhibitory Capacity of Several Medicinal Plants From Iran on Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Esmaeilbeig, Maryam; Kouhpayeh, Seyed Amin; Amirghofran, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditional herbal medicine is a valuable resource that provides new drugs for cancer treatment. Objectives: In this study we aim to screen and investigate the in vitro anti-tumor activities of ten species of plants commonly grown in Southern Iran. Materials and Methods: We used the MTT colorimetric assay to evaluate the cytotoxic activities of the methanol extracts of these plants on various tumor cell lines. The IC50 was calculated as a scale for this evaluation. Results: Satureja bachtiarica, Satureja hortensis, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis and Mentha lonigfolia showed the inhibitoriest effects on Jurkat cells with > 80% inhibition at 200 µg/mL. Satureja hortensis (IC50: 66.7 µg/mL) was the most effective. These plants also strongly inhibited K562 cell growth; Satureja bachtiarica (IC50: 28.3 µg/mL), Satureja hortensis (IC50: 52 µg/mL) and Thymus vulgaris (IC50: 87 µg/mL) were the most effective extracts. Cichorium intybus, Rheum ribes, Alhagi pseudalhagi and Glycyrrihza glabra also showed notable effects on the leukemia cell lines. The Raji cell line was mostly inhibited by Satureja bachtiarica and Thymus vulgaris with approximately 40% inhibition at 200µg/ml. The influence of these extracts on solid tumor cell lines was not strong. Fen cells were mostly affected by Glycyrrihza glabra (IC50: 182 µg/mL) and HeLa cells by Satureja hortensis (31.6% growth inhibitory effect at 200 µg/mL). Conclusions: Leukemic cell lines were more sensitive to the extracts than the solid tumor cell lines; Satureja hortensis, Satureja bachtiarica, Thymus vulgaris, Thymus daenensis and Mentha lonigfolia showed remarkable inhibitory potential. PMID:26634114

  9. Biological effect of tyrosine kinase inhibitors on three canine mast cell tumor cell lines with various KIT statuses.

    PubMed

    Takeuchi, Y; Fujino, Y; Fukushima, K; Watanabe, M; Nakagawa, T; Ohno, K; Sasaki, N; Sugano, S; Tsujimoto, H

    2012-02-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) can be important in the treatment of canine mast cell tumor (cMCT). Meanwhile, some TKIs have been identified as substrates for ABCB1. The inhibitory effect of four TKIs (axitinib, imatinib, masitinib, and vatalanib) for proliferation and phosphorylation of c-Kit receptor as well as the expression and function of ABCB1 were investigated in three cMCT cell lines (HRMC, VIMC1, and CMMC1). The IC(50) values of the TKIs in HRMC, the only cell line with wild-type KIT, were clearly higher than those in CMMC1 and VIMC1. In HRMC and CMMC1, both the growth and phosphorylation of c-Kit receptor were suppressed proportionally by the TKIs. VIMC1 required higher concentrations for the inhibition of c-Kit receptor phosphorylation than those in cell growth. The treatment with cyclosporine increased the effects of the TKIs on VIMC1 since ABCB1 was expressed in VIMC1. The results indicated that cMCT cell lines harboring wild-type KIT had lower sensitivity to TKIs. The growth of VIMC1 was seemingly reduced by TKIs through the inhibition of other tyrosine kinases than c-Kit receptor. There was little influence of ABCB1 on TKI effects to the proliferation of VIMC1. These results will be helpful to understand the different sensitivity to TKIs in cMCT patients. PMID:21480930

  10. Nicotine, acetylcholine and bombesin are trophic growth factors in neuroendocrine cell lines derived from experimental hamster lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Schueller, H.M.; Nylen, E.; Park, P.; Becker, K.L. George Washington Univ., Washington, DC )

    1990-01-01

    Neuroendocrine hamster lung tumors, induced by exposure to 60% hyperoxia and subcutaneous administration of the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone (NNK) for 12 weeks, were placed in cell culture. By subsequent selective transfer of epithelial cells and maintenance in an atmosphere of 8% CO{sub 2}, cell lines with characteristics of neuroendocrine cells were established. The neuroendocrine markers expressed by these cell lines included electron dense neuroendocrine secretion granules as well as secretion of calcitonin and mammalian bombesin. In keeping with data previously reported for a human neuroendocrine lung tumor cell line, nicotine, acetylcholien, and mammalian bombesin (MB) acted as strongrowth factors in these neuroendocrine hamster tumor lines. The mitogenic effect of nicotine an acetylcholine was abolished by nicotinic receptor inhibition while the effects of mammalian bombesin were inhibited by an antagonist of MB receptors. Our data suggest that a receptor-mediated mitogenic effect of nicotine on neuroendocrine lung cells may be instrumental in the induction of smoking-associated small cell lung cancer.

  11. Sensitivity of malignant rhabdoid tumor cell lines to PD 0332991 is inversely correlated with p16 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Katsumi, Yoshiki; Iehara, Tomoko; Miyachi, Mitsuru; Yagyu, Shigeki; Tsubai-Shimizu, Satoko; Kikuchi, Ken; Tamura, Shinichi; Kuwahara, Yasumichi; Tsuchiya, Kunihiko; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Houghton, Peter J.; Hosoi, Hajime

    2011-09-16

    Highlights: {yields} PD 0332991 (PD) could suppress four of five malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) cell lines. {yields} The sensitivity of the MRT cell lines to PD was inversely correlated with p16 expression (r = 0.951). {yields} p16 expression in MRT could be used to predict its sensitivity to PD. {yields} PD may be an attractive agent for patients with MRT whose tumors express low levels of p16. -- Abstract: Malignant rhabdoid tumor (MRT) is a rare and highly aggressive neoplasm of young children. MRT is characterized by inactivation of integrase interactor 1 (INI1). Cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), which acts downstream of INI1, is required for the proliferation of MRT cells. Here we investigated the effects of PD 0332991 (PD), a potent inhibitor of CDK4, against five human MRT cell lines (MP-MRT-AN, KP-MRT-RY, G401, KP-MRT-NS, KP-MRT-YM). In all of the cell lines except KP-MRT-YM, PD inhibited cell proliferation >50%, (IC{sub 50} values 0.01 to 0.6 {mu}M) by WST-8 assay, and induced G1-phase cell cycle arrest, as shown by flow cytometry and BrdU incorporation assay. The sensitivity of the MRT cell lines to PD was inversely correlated with p16 expression (r = 0.951). KP-MRT-YM cells overexpress p16 and were resistant to the growth inhibitory effect of PD. Small interfering RNA against p16 significantly increased the sensitivity of KP-MRT-YM cells to PD (p < 0.05). These results suggest that p16 expression in MRT could be used to predict its sensitivity to PD. PD may be an attractive agent for patients with MRT whose tumors express low levels of p16.

  12. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the ‘normal’ small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  13. In vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines using flow cytometry and multicellular tumor spheroids.

    PubMed

    Inoue, S; Takaoka, K; Endo, T; Mizuno, S; Ogawa, Y; Yoshida, M; Ohnuma, T

    1997-05-01

    We report on a simplified method of cytomorphological in vitro confirmation of newly established lung cancer cell lines by using multicellular tumor spheroids (MTS) and flow cytometry (FCM). Eleven cell lines were established from 11 patients with lung cancer. The MTS were produced by culturing cells in agar-coated dish. Cytomorphological studies were made using smears of crushed MTS and frozen sections of MTS. The MTS were fixed doubly with paraformaldehyde and osmic acid for scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Bivariate fluorescence of fluorescein isothyocyanate (FITC, tumor associated antigen, TAA) and propidium iodide (DNA) were measured by FCM. The MTS grew anchorage-independently. Cytopathological and electron microscopic findings of MTS were similar to those of the original clinical specimens. The DNA index and TAA were useful in evaluating the presence or absence of contamination by cells of non-tumor origin. The new cell lines satisfied a minimum of four conditions to confirm their establishment: (a) they originated from humans, (b) they were cytomorphologically identified with specimens from primary lesions, (c) they showed tumorigenicity, and (d) they were free from contamination by cells of different origin. From these findings, the establishment of new cell lines can be confirmed in vitro by using MTS and FCM. PMID:9194029

  14. Annona squamosa Linn: cytotoxic activity found in leaf extract against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, De-Shen; Rizwani, Ghazala H; Guo, Huiqin; Ahmed, Mansoor; Ahmed, Maryam; Hassan, Syed Zeeshan; Hassan, Amir; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Xu, Rui-Hua

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death in human populations. Surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy still remain the corner stone of treatment. However, herbal medicines are gaining popularity on account of their lesser harmful side effects on non-targeted human cells and biological environment. Annona squamosa Linn is a common delicious edible fruit and its leaf have been used for the treatment in various types of diseases. The objective of present study is to determine the anticancer potential of the organic and aqueous extracts of leaf of Annona squamosa L. MTT (3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2yl)-2, 5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide) assay against hepatocellular carcinoma cell line BEL-7404, lung cancer line H460, human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1, prostatic cancer cell line DU145, breast carcinoma cell line MDA-MB-435, and colon cancer cell line HCT-116 Human primary embryonic kidney cell line HEK293 as control were used for the study. The crude extract (Zcd) and Ethyl acetate extract (ZE) were found significant anticancer activity only on human epidermoid carcinoma cell line KB-3-1 and colon cancer cell line HCT-116. PMID:25176251

  15. Tumor suppressor p16INK4A is necessary for survival of cervical carcinoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Park, Donglim; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p16INK4A inhibits formation of enzymatically active complexes of cyclin-dependent kinases 4 and 6 (CDK4/6) with D-type cyclins. Oncogenic stress induces p16INK4A expression, which in turn triggers cellular senescence through activation of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor. Subversion of oncogene-induced senescence is a key step during cancer development, and many tumors have lost p16INK4A activity by mutation or epigenetic silencing. Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated tumors express high levels of p16INK4A in response to E7 oncoprotein expression. Induction of p16INK4A expression is not a consequence of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor inactivation but is triggered by a cellular senescence response and is mediated by epigenetic derepression through the H3K27-specific demethylase (KDM)6B. HPV E7 expression causes an acute dependence on KDM6B expression for cell survival. The p16INK4A tumor suppressor is a critical KDM6B downstream transcriptional target and its expression is critical for cell survival. This oncogenic p16INK4A activity depends on inhibition of CDK4/CDK6, suggesting that in cervical cancer cells where retinoblastoma tumor suppressor is inactivated, CDK4/CDK6 activity needs to be inhibited in order for cells to survive. Finally, we note that HPV E7 expression creates a unique cellular vulnerability to small-molecule KDM6A/B inhibitors. PMID:24046371

  16. MicroRNA-340 Inhibits Tumor Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Endometrial Carcinoma Cell Line RL 95-2.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wei; Qin, Wen; Kang, Yalin; Zhou, Ziyan; Qin, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The purpose of our study was to investigate the functional role of microRNA-340 (miR-340) in endometrial carcinoma (EC). MATERIAL AND METHODS Human EC cell line RL 95-2 was transfected with miR-340 mimics, inhibitors, or controls. After 48 h of transfection, the cell viability was determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2- thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl -2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The BrdU assay and apoptosis assay were performed to determine the effects of miR-340 mimics or inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The underlying mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis were explored by measuring the protein levels of cell cycle regulators (p27 kinase inhibition protein (KIP) 1 and p21) and apoptosis-related factors (B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3). RESULTS Overexpression of miR-340 significantly inhibited the cell viability (P<0.05) and cell proliferation (P<0.01) of RL 95-2 cells compared with the control group, but increased the apoptosis (P<0.01). However, suppression of miR-340 had opposite results. Moreover, the protein levels of p27 KIP1, Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3 were significantly increased by overexpression of miR-340 but were statistically decreased by suppression of miR-340. Contrary results were found in the protein levels of Bcl-2. However, no significant differences were found in p21 expression. CONCLUSIONS MiRNA-340 acts as an anti-oncogene in EC cell line RL 95-2 by inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27153225

  17. MicroRNA-340 Inhibits Tumor Cell Proliferation and Induces Apoptosis in Endometrial Carcinoma Cell Line RL 95-2

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wei; Qin, Wen; Kang, Yalin; Zhou, Ziyan; Qin, Aiping

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of our study was to investigate the functional role of microRNA-340 (miR-340) in endometrial carcinoma (EC). Material/Methods Human EC cell line RL 95-2 was transfected with miR-340 mimics, inhibitors, or controls. After 48 h of transfection, the cell viability was determined by 3-(4, 5-dimethyl-2- thiazolyl)-2, 5-diphenyl -2-H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The BrdU assay and apoptosis assay were performed to determine the effects of miR-340 mimics or inhibitors on cell proliferation and apoptosis, respectively. The underlying mechanisms involved in cell proliferation and apoptosis were explored by measuring the protein levels of cell cycle regulators (p27 kinase inhibition protein (KIP) 1 and p21) and apoptosis-related factors (B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2), Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3). Results Overexpression of miR-340 significantly inhibited the cell viability (P<0.05) and cell proliferation (P<0.01) of RL 95-2 cells compared with the control group, but increased the apoptosis (P<0.01). However, suppression of miR-340 had opposite results. Moreover, the protein levels of p27 KIP1, Bax, pro-Caspase 3, and active-Caspase-3 were significantly increased by overexpression of miR-340 but were statistically decreased by suppression of miR-340. Contrary results were found in the protein levels of Bcl-2. However, no significant differences were found in p21 expression. Conclusions MiRNA-340 acts as an anti-oncogene in EC cell line RL 95-2 by inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and induction of apoptosis. PMID:27153225

  18. Biological characterization of AT7519, a small-molecule inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinases, in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Squires, Matthew S; Feltell, Ruth E; Wallis, Nicola G; Lewis, E Jonathan; Smith, Donna-Michelle; Cross, David M; Lyons, John F; Thompson, Neil T

    2009-02-01

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDK), and their regulatory cyclin partners, play a central role in eukaryotic cell growth, division, and death. This key role in cell cycle progression, as well as their deregulation in several human cancers, makes them attractive therapeutic targets in oncology. A series of CDK inhibitors was developed using Astex's fragment-based medicinal chemistry approach, linked to high-throughput X-ray crystallography. A compound from this series, designated AT7519, is currently in early-phase clinical development. We describe here the biological characterization of AT7519, a potent inhibitor of several CDK family members. AT7519 showed potent antiproliferative activity (40-940 nmol/L) in a panel of human tumor cell lines, and the mechanism of action was shown here to be consistent with the inhibition of CDK1 and CDK2 in solid tumor cell lines. AT7519 caused cell cycle arrest followed by apoptosis in human tumor cells and inhibited tumor growth in human tumor xenograft models. Tumor regression was observed following twice daily dosing of AT7519 in the HCT116 and HT29 colon cancer xenograft models. We show that these biological effects are linked to inhibition of CDKs in vivo and that AT7519 induces tumor cell apoptosis in these xenograft models. AT7519 has an attractive biological profile for development as a clinical candidate, and the tolerability and efficacy in animal models compare favorably with other CDK inhibitors in clinical development. Studies described here formed the biological rationale for investigating the potential therapeutic benefit of AT7519 in cancer patients. PMID:19174555

  19. Wilms’ Tumor Gene 1 (WT1) Silencing Inhibits Proliferation of Malignant Peripheral Nerve Sheath Tumor sNF96.2 Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Parenti, Rosalba; Cardile, Venera; Graziano, Adriana Carol Eleonora; Parenti, Carmela; Venuti, Assunta; Bertuccio, Maria Paola; Furno, Debora Lo; Magro, Gaetano

    2014-01-01

    Wilms’ tumor gene 1 (WT1) plays complex roles in tumorigenesis, acting as tumor suppressor gene or an oncogene depending on the cellular context. WT1 expression has been variably reported in both benign and malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNSTs) by means of immunohistochemistry. The aim of the present study was to characterize its potential pathogenetic role in these relatively uncommon malignant tumors. Firstly, immunohistochemical analyses in MPNST sNF96.2 cell line showed strong WT1 staining in nuclear and perinuclear areas of neoplastic cells. Thus, we investigated the effects of silencing WT1 by RNA interference. Through Western Blot analysis and proliferation assay we found that WT1 knockdown leads to the reduction of cell growth in a time- and dose-dependent manner. siWT1 inhibited proliferation of sNF96.2 cell lines likely by influencing cell cycle progression through a decrease in the protein levels of cyclin D1 and inhibition of Akt phosphorylation compared to the control cells. These results indicate that WT1 knockdown attenuates the biological behavior of MPNST cells by decreasing Akt activity, demonstrating that WT1 is involved in the development and progression of MPNSTs. Thus, WT1 is suggested to serve as a potential therapeutic target for MPNSTs. PMID:25474318

  20. A novel angiomatoid epithelioid sarcoma cell line, Asra-EPS, forming tumors with large cysts containing hemorrhagic fluid in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Whereas we can use several human epithelioid sarcoma (ES) cell lines for basic and preclinical research, an angiomatoid ES cell line has not been reported to date. We have treated a case of an angiomatoid ES developing in the right upper extremity of a 67-year-old man. Methods An angiomatoid ES cell line, Asra-EPS was newly established and characterized for its morphology, growth rate and chromosomal analysis. Tumorigenicity of Asra-EPS cells was also analyzed in athymic nude mice. Results Asra-EPS cells were round, polygonal or spindle-shaped with an abundant cytoplasm and have been maintained continuously in vitro for over 150 passages during more than 15 months. These cells secreted cancer antigen 125 (CA 125), interleukin-6 (IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) into the culture medium. Asra-EPS cells were tumorigenic when implanted in nude mice with tumors reaching a volume of 1000 mm3 at around 50 days. Histological features of tumors formed in mice were essentially the same as those of the original tumor, exhibiting a multinodular proliferation of eosinophilic epithelioid and spindle-shaped cells with prominent areas of hemorrhage and blood-filled cystic spaces strikingly corresponding to the potential of hemorrhagic cyst formation in the original tumor. They showed immunopositive staining for cytokeratins (AE1/AE3 and CAM5.2), epithelial membrane antigen (EMA), vimentin, CD31, CD34 and CA 125, but negative for integrase interactor 1 (INI-1) and factor VIII-related antigen. Conclusions The established cell line represents a biologically relevant new tool to investigate the molecular pathology of human angiomatoid ES and to evaluate the efficacy of novel therapeutics both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:23915498

  1. Characterization of NADPH oxidase 5 expression in human tumors and tumor cell lines with a novel mouse monoclonal antibody

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Smitha; Wu, Yongzhong; Hewitt, Stephen M.; Anver, Miriam R.; Butcher, Donna; Jiang, Guojian; Meitzler, Jennifer L.; Liu, Han; Juhasz, Agnes; Lu, Jiamo; Roy, Krishnendu K.; Doroshow, James H.

    2013-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species generated by NADPH oxidase 5 (Nox5) have been implicated in physiological and pathophysiological signaling pathways, including cancer development and progression. However, because immunological tools are lacking, knowledge of the role of Nox5 in tumor biology has been limited; the expression of Nox5 protein across tumors and normal tissues is essentially unknown. Here, we report the characterization and use of a mouse monoclonal antibody against a recombinant Nox5 protein (600–746) for expression profiling of Nox5 in human tumors by tissue microarray analysis. Using our novel antibody, we also report the detection of endogenous Nox5 protein in human UACC-257 melanoma cells. Immunofluorescence, confocal microscopy, and immunohistochemical techniques were employed to demonstrate Nox5 localization throughout UACC-257 cells, with perinuclear enhancement. Tissue microarray analysis revealed, for the first time, substantial Nox5 overexpression in several human cancers including those of prostate, breast, colon, lung, brain, and ovary as well as in malignant melanoma and non-Hodgkin lymphoma; expression in most non-malignant tissues was negative to weak. This validated mouse monoclonal antibody will promote further exploration of the functional significance of Nox5 in human pathophysiology, including tumor cell growth and proliferation. PMID:23851018

  2. Low or undetectable TPO receptor expression in malignant tissue and cell lines derived from breast, lung, and ovarian tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Numerous efficacious chemotherapy regimens may cause thrombocytopenia. Thrombopoietin receptor (TPO-R) agonists, such as eltrombopag, represent a novel approach for the treatment of chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. The TPO-R MPL is expressed on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors, although little is known about its expression on other tissues. Methods Breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples were analyzed for MPL expression by microarray and/or quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and for TPO-R protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Cell line proliferation assays were used to analyze the in vitro effect of eltrombopag on breast, lung, and ovarian tumor cell proliferation. The lung carcinoma cell lines were also analyzed for TPO-R protein expression by Western blot. Results MPL mRNA was not detectable in 118 breast tumors and was detectable at only very low levels in 48% of 29 lung tumors studied by microarray analysis. By qRT-PCR, low but detectable levels of MPL mRNA were detectable in some normal (14-43%) and malignant (3-17%) breast, lung, and ovarian tissues. A comparison of MPL to EPOR, ERBB2, and IGF1R mRNA demonstrates that MPL mRNA levels were far lower than those of EPOR and ERBB2 mRNA in the same tissues. IHC analysis showed negligible TPO-R protein expression in tumor tissues, confirming mRNA analysis. Culture of breast, lung, and ovarian carcinoma cell lines showed no increase, and in fact, showed a decrease in proliferation following incubation with eltrombopag. Western blot analyses revealed no detectable TPO-R protein expression in the lung carcinoma cell lines. Conclusions Multiple analyses of breast, lung, and ovarian tumor samples and/or cell lines show no evidence of MPL mRNA or TPO-R protein expression. Eltrombopag does not stimulate growth of breast, lung, or ovarian tumor cell lines at doses likely to exert their actions on megakaryocytes and megakaryocyte precursors. PMID

  3. Altered expression of apoptotic genes in response to OCT4B1 suppression in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Ali; Arababadi, Mohammad Kazemi; Asadi, Malek Hosein; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2014-10-01

    OCT4B1 is a newly discovered spliced variant of OCT4 which is primarily expressed in pluripotent and tumor cells. Based on our previous studies, OCT4B1 is significantly overexpressed in tumors, where it endows an anti-apoptotic property to tumor cells. However, the mechanism by which OCT4B1 regulates the apoptotic pathway is not yet elucidated. Here, we investigated the effects of OCT4B1 suppression on the expression alteration of 84 genes involved in apoptotic pathway. The AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor), and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines were transfected with OCT4B1 or irrelevant siRNAs. The expression level of apoptotic genes was then quantified using a human apoptosis panel-PCR kit. Our data revealed an almost similar pattern of alteration in the expression profile of apoptotic genes in all three studied cell lines, following OCT4B1 suppression. In general, the expression of more than 54 apoptotic genes (64 % of arrayed genes) showed significant changes. Among these, some up-regulated (CIDEA, CIDEB, TNFRSF1A, TNFRSF21, TNFRSF11B, TNFRSF10B, and CASP7) and down-regulated (BCL2, BCL2L11, TP73, TP53, BAD, TRAF3, TRAF2, BRAF, BNIP3L, BFAR, and BAX) genes had on average more than tenfold gene expression alteration in all three examined cell lines. With some minor exceptions, suppression of OCT4B1 caused upregulation of pro-apoptotic and down-regulation of anti-apoptotic genes in transfected tumor cells. Uncovering OCT4B1 down-stream targets could further elucidate its part in tumorigenesis, and could lead to finding a new approach to combat cancer, based on targeting OCT4B1. PMID:25008565

  4. Involvement of aberrant DNA methylation on reduced expression of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-1 gene in rat tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi . E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp; Shimizu, Kyoko; Onishi, Mariko; Sugata, Eriko; Fujii, Hiromasa; Mori, Toshio; Honoki, Kanya; Fukushima, Nobuyuki

    2006-10-27

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a bioactive phospholipid that stimulates cell proliferation, migration, and protects cells from apoptosis. It interacts with specific G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors. Recently, it has been reported that alterations of LPA receptor expression might be important in the malignant transformation of tumor cells. Therefore, to assess an involvement of DNA methylation in reduced expression of the LPA receptor-1 (lpa1) gene, we investigated the expression of the lpa1 gene and its DNA methylation patterns in rat tumor cell lines. Both rat brain-derived neuroblastoma B103 and liver-derived hepatoma RH7777 cells used in this study indicated no expression of lpa1. For the analysis of methylation status, bisulfite sequencing was performed with B103 and RH7777 cells, comparing with other lpa1 expressed cells and normal tissues of brain and liver. The lpa1 expressed cells and tissues were all unmethylated in this region of lpa1. In contrast, both B103 and RH7777 cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expression of the lpa1. Treatment with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine induced expression of lpa1 gene in B103 and RH7777 cells after 24 h. In RH7777 cells treated with 5-aza 2'-deoxycytidine, stress fiber formation was also observed in response to LPA in RH7777 cells, but not in untreated RH7777 cells. These results suggest that aberrant DNA methylation of the lpa1 gene may be involved in its reduced expression in rat tumor cells.

  5. Screening of Venezuelan medicinal plant extracts for cytostatic and cytotoxic activity against tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Peter; Arsenak, Miriam; Abad, María Jesús; Fernández, Angel; Milano, Balentina; Gonto, Reina; Ruiz, Marie-Christine; Fraile, Silvia; Taylor, Sofía; Estrada, Omar; Michelangeli, Fabian

    2013-04-01

    There are estimated to be more than 20,000 species of plants in Venezuela, of which more than 1500 are used for medicinal purposes by indigenous and local communities. Only a relatively small proportion of these have been evaluated in terms of their potential as antitumor agents. In this study, we screened 308 extracts from 102 species for cytostatic and cytotoxic activity against a panel of six tumor cell lines using a 24-h sulphorhodamine B assay. Extracts from Clavija lancifolia, Hamelia patens, Piper san-vicentense, Physalis cordata, Jacaranda copaia, Heliotropium indicum, and Annona squamosa were the most cytotoxic, whereas other extracts from Calotropis gigantea, Hyptis dilatata, Chromolaena odorata, Siparuna guianensis, Jacaranda obtusifolia, Tapirira guianensis, Xylopia aromatica, Protium heptaphyllum, and Piper arboreum showed the greatest cytostatic activity. These results confirm previous reports on the cytotoxic activities of the above-mentioned plants as well as prompting further studies on others such as C. lancifolia and H. dilatata that have not been so extensively studied. PMID:22648665

  6. Apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-alpha in rat hepatocyte cell lines expressing hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Guilhot, S.; Miller, T.; Cornman, G.; Isom, H. C.

    1996-01-01

    Three well differentiated SV40-immortalized rat hepatocyte cell lines, CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14, and Hepatitis B Virus (HBV)-producing cell lines derived from them were examined for sensitivity to tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha. CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV14 cells were co-transfected with a DNA construct containing a dimer of the HBV genome and the neo gene and selected in G418 to generate stable cell lines. Characterization of these cell lines indicated that they contain integrated HBV DNA, contain low molecular weight HBV DNA compatible with the presence of HBV replication intermediates, express HBV transcripts, and produce HBV proteins. The viability of CWSV1, CWSV2, and CWSV2 cells was not significantly altered when they were treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations as high as 20,000 U/ml. The HBV-expressing CWSV1 cell line, SV1di36, and the HBV-expressing CWSV14 cell line, SV14di208, were also not killed when treated with TNF-alpha. However, the HBV-expressing CWSV2 cell line, SV2di366, was extensively killed when treated with TNF-alpha at concentrations ranging from 200 to 20,000 U/ml. Analysis of several different HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines indicated that TNF-alpha killing depended upon the level of HBV expression. The TNF-alpha-induced cell killing in high HBV-producing CWSV2 cell lines was accompanied by the presence of an oligonucleosomal DNA ladder characteristic of apoptosis. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:8774135

  7. Establishment and Characterization of Human Germline Stem Cell Line with Unlimited Proliferation Potentials and no Tumor Formation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jingmei; Niu, Minghui; Liu, Linhong; Zhu, Zijue; Wang, Xiaobo; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Yang, Shi; Zeng, Wenxian; Liu, Yang; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have significant applications in both reproductive and regenerative medicine. However, primary human SSCs are very rare, and a human SSC line has not yet been available. In this study, we have for the first time reported a stable human SSC line by stably expressing human SV40 large T antigen. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blots revealed that this cell line was positive for a number of human spermatogonial and SSC hallmarks, including VASA, DAZL, MAGEA4, GFRA1, RET, UCHL1, GPR125, PLZF and THY1, suggesting that these cells are human SSCs phenotypically. Proliferation analysis showed that the cell line could be expanded with significant increases of cells for 1.5 years, and high levels of PCNA, UCHL1 and SV40 were maintained for long-term culture. Transplantation assay indicated that human SSC line was able to colonize and proliferate in vivo in the recipient mice. Neither Y chromosome microdeletions of numerous genes nor tumor formation was observed in human SSC line although there was abnormal karyotype in this cell line. Collectively, we have established a human SSC line with unlimited proliferation potentials and no tumorgenesis, which could provide an abundant source of human SSCs for their mechanistic studies and translational medicine. PMID:26585066

  8. Establishment and Characterization of Human Germline Stem Cell Line with Unlimited Proliferation Potentials and no Tumor Formation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jingmei; Niu, Minghui; Liu, Linhong; Zhu, Zijue; Wang, Xiaobo; Sun, Min; Yuan, Qingqing; Yang, Shi; Zeng, Wenxian; Liu, Yang; Li, Zheng; He, Zuping

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) have significant applications in both reproductive and regenerative medicine. However, primary human SSCs are very rare, and a human SSC line has not yet been available. In this study, we have for the first time reported a stable human SSC line by stably expressing human SV40 large T antigen. RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, and Western blots revealed that this cell line was positive for a number of human spermatogonial and SSC hallmarks, including VASA, DAZL, MAGEA4, GFRA1, RET, UCHL1, GPR125, PLZF and THY1, suggesting that these cells are human SSCs phenotypically. Proliferation analysis showed that the cell line could be expanded with significant increases of cells for 1.5 years, and high levels of PCNA, UCHL1 and SV40 were maintained for long-term culture. Transplantation assay indicated that human SSC line was able to colonize and proliferate in vivo in the recipient mice. Neither Y chromosome microdeletions of numerous genes nor tumor formation was observed in human SSC line although there was abnormal karyotype in this cell line. Collectively, we have established a human SSC line with unlimited proliferation potentials and no tumorgenesis, which could provide an abundant source of human SSCs for their mechanistic studies and translational medicine. PMID:26585066

  9. Presence of dopamine D-2 receptors in human tumoral cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Sokoloff, P.; Riou, J.F.; Martres, M.P.; Schwartz, J.C. )

    1989-07-31

    ({sup 125}I) Iodosulpride binding was examined on eight human cell lines derived from lung, breast and digestive tract carcinomas, neuroblastomas and leukemia. Specific binding was detected in five of these cell lines. In the richest cell line N417, derived from small cell lung carcinoma, ({sup 125}I) iodosulpride bound with a high affinity (Kd = 1.3 nM) to an apparently homogeneous population of binding site (Bmax = 1,606 sites per cell). These sites displayed a typical D-2 specificity, established with several dopaminergic agonists and antagonists selective of either D-1 or D-2 receptor subtypes. In addition, dopamine, apomorphine and RU 24926 distinguished high- and low-affinity sites, suggesting that the binding sites are associated with a G-protein. The biological significance and the possible diagnostic implication of the presence of D-2 receptors on these cell lines are discussed.

  10. Multiple myeloma cell lines and primary tumors proteoma: protein biosynthesis and immune system as potential therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Mazzotti, Diego Robles; Evangelista, Adriane Feijó; Braga, Walter Moisés Tobias; de Lourdes Chauffaille, Maria; Leme, Adriana Franco Paes; Colleoni, Gisele Wally Braga

    2015-01-01

    Despite great advance in multiple myeloma (MM) treatment since 2000s, it is still an incurable disease and novel therapies are welcome. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to explore MM plasma cells' (MM-PC) proteome, in comparison with their normal counterparts (derived from palatine tonsils of normal donors, ND-PC), in order to find potential therapeutic targets expressed on the surface of these cells. We also aimed to evaluate the proteome of MM cell lines with different genetic alterations, to confirm findings obtained with primary tumor cells. Bone marrow (BM) samples from eight new cases of MM and palatine tonsils from seven unmatched controls were submitted to PC separation and, in addition to two MM cell lines (U266, RPMI-8226), were submitted to protein extraction for mass spectrometry analyses. A total of 81 proteins were differentially expressed between MM-PC and ND-PC - 72 upregulated and nine downregulated; U266 vs. RPMI 8226 cell lines presented 61 differentially expressed proteins - 51 upregulated and 10 downregulated. On primary tumors, bioinformatics analyses highlighted upregulation of protein biosynthesis machinery, as well as downregulation of immune response components, such as MHC class I and II, and complement receptors. We also provided comprehensive information about U266 and RPMI-8226 cell lines' proteome and could confirm some patients' findings. PMID:26807199

  11. Altered Expression of High Molecular Weight Heat Shock Proteins after OCT4B1 Suppression in Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Mirzaei, Mohammad Reza; Kazemi Arababadi, Mohammad; Asadi, Malek Hossein; Mowla, Seyed Javad

    2016-01-01

    Objective OCT4B1, a novel variant of OCT4, is expressed in cancer cell lines and tis- sues. Based on our previous reports, OCT4B1 appears to have a crucial role in regulating apoptosis as well as stress response [heat shock proteins (HSPs)] pathways. The aim of the present study was to determine the effects of OCT4B1 silencing on the expression of high molecular weight HSPs in three different human tumor cell lines. Materials and Methods In this experimental study, OCT4B1 expression was suppressed in AGS (gastric adenocarcinoma), 5637 (bladder tumor) and U-87MG (brain tumor) cell lines using RNAi strategy. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array was em- ployed for expression level analysis and the fold changes were calculated using RT2 Pro- filer PCR array data analysis software version 3.5. Results Our data revealed up-regulation of HSPD1 (from HSP60 family) as well as HSPA14, HSPA1L, HSPA4, HSPA5 and HSPA8 (from HSP70 family) following OCT4B1 knock-down in all three cell lines. In contrast, the expression of HSP90AA1 and HSP90AB1 (from HSP90 family) as well as HSPA1B and HSPA6 (from HSP70 family) was down-regulated under similar conditions. Other stress-related genes showed varying ex- pression pattern in the examined tumor cell lines. Conclusion Our data suggest a direct or indirect correlation between the expression of OCT4B1 and HSP90 gene family. However, OCT4B1 expression was not strongly corre- lated with the expression of HSP70 and HSP60 gene families. PMID:26862520

  12. Rapid obtention of stable, bioluminescent tumor cell lines using a tCD2-luciferase chimeric construct

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Bioluminescent tumor cell lines are experimental tools of major importance for cancer investigation, especially imaging of tumors in xenografted animals. Stable expression of exogenous luciferase in tumor cells combined to systemic injection of luciferin provides an excellent signal/background ratio for external optical imaging. Therefore, there is a need to rationalize and speed up the production of luciferase-positive tumor cell lines representative of multiple tumor phenotypes. For this aim we have designed a fusion gene linking the luciferase 2 protein to the c-terminus of a truncated form of the rat CD2 protein (tCD2-luc2). To allow simultaneous assessment of the wild-type luciferase 2 in a context of tCD2 co-expression, we have made a bicistronic construct for concomitant but separate expression of these two proteins (luc2-IRES-tCD2). Both the mono- and bi-cistronic constructs were transduced in lymphoid and epithelial cells using lentiviral vectors. Results The tCD2-luc2 chimera behaves as a type I membrane protein with surface presentation of CD2 epitopes. One of these epitopes reacts with the OX34, a widely spread, high affinity monoclonal antibody. Stably transfected cells are sorted by flow cytometry on the basis of OX34 staining. In vitro and, moreover, in xenografted tumors, the tCD2-luc2 chimera retains a substantial and stable luciferase activity, although not as high as the wild-type luciferase expressed from the luc2-IRES-tCD2 construct. Expression of the tCD2-luc2 chimera does not harm cell and tumor growth. Conclusion Lentiviral transduction of the chimeric tCD2-luc2 fusion gene allows selection of cell clones with stable luciferase expression in less than seven days without antibiotic selection. We believe that it will be helpful to increase the number of tumor cell lines available for in vivo imaging and assessment of novel therapeutic modalities. On a longer term, the tCD2-luc2 chimera has the potential to be expressed from multi

  13. Fusion of CCL21 Non-Migratory Active Breast Epithelial and Breast Cancer Cells Give Rise to CCL21 Migratory Active Tumor Hybrid Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Reith, Georg; Keil, Silvia; Niggemann, Bernd; Zänker, Kurt S.; Dittmar, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    The biological phenomenon of cell fusion has been linked to tumor progression because several data provided evidence that fusion of tumor cells and normal cells gave rise to hybrid cell lines exhibiting novel properties, such as increased metastatogenic capacity and an enhanced drug resistance. Here we investigated M13HS hybrid cell lines, derived from spontaneous fusion events between M13SV1-EGFP-Neo breast epithelial cells exhibiting stem cell characteristics and HS578T-Hyg breast cancer cells, concerning CCL21/CCR7 signaling. Western Blot analysis showed that all cell lines varied in their CCR7 expression levels as well as differed in the induction and kinetics of CCR7 specific signal transduction cascades. Flow cytometry-based calcium measurements revealed that a CCL21 induced calcium influx was solely detected in M13HS hybrid cell lines. Cell migration demonstrated that only M13HS hybrid cell lines, but not parental derivatives, responded to CCL21 stimulation with an increased migratory activity. Knockdown of CCR7 expression by siRNA completely abrogated the CCL21 induced migration of hybrid cell lines indicating the necessity of CCL21/CCR7 signaling. Because the CCL21/CCR7 axis has been linked to metastatic spreading of breast cancer to lymph nodes we conclude from our data that cell fusion could be a mechanism explaining the origin of metastatic cancer (hybrid) cells. PMID:23667660

  14. Evaluation of effect of triterpenes and limonoids on cell growth, cell cycle and apoptosis in human tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Cazal, Cristiane M; Choosang, Kantima; Severino, Vanessa Gisele P; Soares, Marcio S; Sarria, Andre Lucio F; Fernandes, Joao B; Silva, Maria Fatima G F; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Pakkong, Pannee; Almeida, Gabriela M; Vasconcelos, M Helena; Nascimento, Maria S J; Pinto, Madalena M M

    2010-12-01

    Six triterpenes and eight limonoids were evaluated for their capacity to inhibit the growth of three human tumour cell lines, breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), non-small cell lung cancer (NCI-H460) and melanoma (A375-C5). The mechanisms involved in the observed cell growth arrest of the four most potent compounds were carried out by studying their effect in cell cycle profile and programmed cell death. The results showed that one triterpene (odoratol) and two limonoids (gedunin and cedrelone) caused cell cycle arrest while only the limonoids gedunin and cedrelone were found to be very potent inducers of apoptosis. PMID:21269253

  15. Plasma membrane reorganization induced by tumor promoters in an epithelial cell line

    SciTech Connect

    PACKARD, BEVERLY S.; SAXTON, MICHAEL J.; BISSELL, MINA J.; KLEIN, MELVIN P.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of phorbol ester tumor promoters on the lateral diffusion in plasma membrane lipid environments were examined by the technique of fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. To this end, the probe collarein, a fluorescent lipid analog that has the property of exclusive localization in the plasma membrane, was synthesized. Measured decreases in three parameters [percentage of fluorescence bleached (30%), percentage of recovery (52%), and half-time for recovery (52%)] connoted the appearance of an immobile fraction upon exposure to tumor promoters. These data are consistent with lipid reorganization in response to a reorganization of the intra- and perimembranous macromolecular scaffolding upon the interaction of cells with tumor promoters. The idea of induced reorganization is supported by experiments in which cell shape change, brought about by either exposure to cytochalasin B or growth on matrices of collagen, fibronectin, or laminin, resulted in values in the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique similar to those with active phorbol esters.

  16. Intermediate-sized filaments and specific markers in a human salivary gland adenocarcinoma cell line and its nude mouse tumors.

    PubMed

    Sato, M; Hayashi, Y; Yanagawa, T; Yoshida, H; Yura, Y; Azuma, M; Ueno, A

    1985-08-01

    The adenocarcinoma cell line HSG from human salivary gland, which proliferates in vitro or in nude mice, was examined by the immunoperoxidase method for the expression of three different types of intermediate-sized filaments (IFs) and of specific antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen, S-100 protein, secretory component, lactoferrin, myosin, tropomyosin, and actin. The cultured HSG cells were found to express three different types of IFs defined by antibodies to keratin, vimentin, and desmin. In HSG cells proliferating in vitro at 34 degrees C and 37 degrees C but not at 39 degrees C, the expression of tropomyosin and carcinoembryonic antigen was observed, although myosin and S-100 protein were not detected. The expressions of actin, lactoferrin, and secretory component were restricted to cultured HSG cells at 39 degrees C and 37 degrees C, respectively. Transplantation of HSG cells into nude mice resulted in the establishment of a nude mouse system with malignant characteristics such as invasion and metastasis. The expression of IFs in the primary tumors was restricted to keratin and desmin IFs, whereas coexpression of keratin, vimentin, and desmin IFs was observed in some neoplastic cells present in the metastatic tumors in regional lymph nodes and lung. In addition, expression of actin, myosin, tropomyosin, and S-100 protein was found in the metastatic tumors, whereas myosin and S-100 protein were not detected in the primary tumors. Moreover, the metastatic tumors were almost occupied by the neoplastic cells with oncocytic changes, although oncocytic change was not found in the cultured HSG cells and their primary tumors. PMID:2410104

  17. Antioxidant activity and antiproliferative action of methanolic extract of Geum quellyon Sweet roots in human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Russo, Alessandra; Cardile, Venera; Lombardo, Laura; Vanella, Luca; Vanella, Angelo; Garbarino, Juan Antonio

    2005-09-14

    Geum quellyon Sweet, a perennial herb of the Rosaceae family, has been used in the traditional medicine of the Mapuche Amerindians of Chile to treat tooth neuralgia, gastric inflammation, prostatitis and to regulate menstruation, and for its diuretic and aphrodisiac properties. Although many benefits have been claimed for this plant, few scientific studies are available in the literature. In this study, we investigated the antioxidant activity of a methanolic extract of Geum quellyon roots. We also examined the anticancer action of this plant on Caco-2 (colon adenocarcinoma cells), DU-145 (androgen-insensitive prostate cancer cells) and KB (oral squamous carcinoma cells) human tumor cell lines. Our data showed that Geum quellyon extract, containing tannins, exhibits interesting antioxidant properties, expressed by its capacity to scavenge 1,1-diphenyl-2-picryl-hydrazyl radical (DPPH) and superoxide anion (O(2)*-), to inhibit xanthine oxidase activity, to chelate metals, and to protect plasmid DNA from cleavage induced by hydroxyl radicals (*OH) and nitric oxide (NO). These results may explain, at least in part, its use in Mapuche traditional medicine for gastric inflammation and prostatitis. The assays on human tumor cell lines demonstrated that this natural product exhibits a inhibitory effect on all human cancer cells examined, and seem to indicate that necrosis cell death is triggered in KB cells and Caco-2, while apoptotic cell demise appears to be induced in DU-145. The effect evidenced in Caco-2 cells can be in part correlated to a modulation of redox-sensitive mechanisms. PMID:15941635

  18. Efficient duck hepatitis B virus production by an avian liver tumor cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Condreay, L D; Aldrich, C E; Coates, L; Mason, W S; Wu, T T

    1990-01-01

    Duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV) is produced in small amounts following transfection of human hepatoma or hepatoblastoma cell lines with cloned viral DNA. In a search for better hosts for DHBV replication, two avian liver cell lines were investigated. One of these cell lines, LMH, produced 5 to 10 times more DNA replicative intermediates and 10 to 20 times more infectious DHBV than did either of the two human cell lines, HuH-7 and Hep G2. Utilization of cell lines in genetic analyses of virus replication is often dependent upon obtaining efficient complementation between cotransfected viral genomes. We assayed transcomplementation of a viral polymerase (pol) gene mutant, which is rather inefficient in transfected human cells, and found that viral DNA synthesis was at least 20 times more efficient following cotransfection of LMH cells than in similarly transfected HuH-7 cells. Recombination, a potential interpretation problem in complementation assays, occurred at low levels in the cotransfected cultures but was substantially reduced or eliminated by creation of an LMH subline stably expressing the viral polymerase. This cell line, pol-7, supported the replication of DHBV pol mutants at ca. 10 to 15% of the level of virus replication obtained following transfection with wild-type viral DNA. By transcomplementation of a pol gene mutant in LMH cells, we were able to produce sufficient virus with the mutant genome to investigate the role of polymerase in covalently closed circular DNA amplification. Our results substantiate the hypothesis that covalently closed circular DNA is synthesized by the viral reverse transcriptase. Images PMID:2352324

  19. Microenvironment Promotes Tumor Cell Reprogramming in Human Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    D’Anselmi, Fabrizio; Masiello, Maria Grazia; Cucina, Alessandra; Proietti, Sara; Dinicola, Simona; Pasqualato, Alessia; Ricci, Giulia; Dobrowolny, Gabriella; Catizone, Angela; Palombo, Alessandro; Bizzarri, Mariano

    2013-01-01

    The microenvironment drives mammary gland development and function, and may influence significantly both malignant behavior and cell growth of mammary cancer cells. By restoring context, and forcing cells to properly interpret native signals from the microenvironment, the cancer cell aberrant behavior can be quelled, and organization re-established. In order to restore functional and morphological differentiation, human mammary MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cancer cells were allowed to grow in a culture medium filled with a 10% of the albumen (EW, Egg White) from unfertilized chicken egg. That unique microenvironment behaves akin a 3D culture and induces MCF-7 cells to produce acini and branching duct-like structures, distinctive of mammary gland differentiation. EW-treated MDA-MB-231 cells developed buds of acini and duct-like structures. Both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells produced β-casein, a key milk component. Furthermore, E-cadherin expression was reactivated in MDA-MB-231 cells, as a consequence of the increased cdh1 expression; meanwhile β-catenin – a key cytoskeleton component – was displaced behind the inner cell membrane. Such modification hinders the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in MDA-MB-231 cells. This differentiating pathway is supported by the contemporary down-regulation of canonical pluripotency markers (Klf4, Nanog). Given that egg-conditioned medium behaves as a 3D-medium, it is likely that cancer phenotype reversion could be ascribed to the changed interactions between cells and their microenvironment. PMID:24386275

  20. Identification and characterization of a tumor infiltrating CD56(+)/CD16 (-) NK cell subset with specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Frankel, Timothy L; Burns, William; Riley, John; Morgan, Richard A; Davis, Jeremy L; Hanada, Kenichi; Quezado, Martha; Rosenberg, Steven A; Royal, Richard E

    2010-12-01

    In a recent clinical trial, a patient exhibited regression of several pancreatic cancer metastases following the administration of the immune modulator Ipilimumab (anti-CTLA-4 antibody). We sought to characterize the immune cells responsible for this regression. Tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL-2742) and an autologous tumor line (TC-2742) were expanded from a regressing metastatic lesion excised from this patient. Natural killer (NK) cells predominated in the TIL (92% CD56(+)) with few T cells (12% CD3(+)). A majority (88%) of the NK cells were CD56(bright)CD16(-). TIL-2742 secreted IFN-γ and GM-CSF following co-culture with TC-2742 and major histocompatibility complex mismatched pancreatic tumor lines. After sorting TIL-2742, the purified CD56(+)CD16(-)CD3(-) subset showed reactivity similar to TIL-2742 while the CD56(-)CD16(-)CD3(+) cells exhibited no tumor recognition. In co-culture assays, TIL-2742 and the NK subset expressed high reactivity to several pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and could lyse the autologous tumor as well as pancreas and prostate cancer lines. Reactivity was partially abrogated by blockade of TRAIL. We thus identified a unique subset of NK cells (CD56(bright)CD16(dim)) isolated from a regressing metastatic pancreatic cancer in a patient responding to Ipilimumab. This represents the first report of CD56(+)CD16(-) NK cells with apparent specificity for pancreatic and prostate cancer cell lines and associated with tumor regression following the treatment with an immune modulating agent. PMID:20734041

  1. Antiproliferative activities of Garcinia bracteata extract and its active ingredient, isobractatin, against human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Shen, Tao; Li, Wei; Wang, Yan-Yan; Zhong, Qing-Qing; Wang, Shu-Qi; Wang, Xiao-Ning; Ren, Dong-Mei; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2014-03-01

    In our cell based screening of antitumor ingredients from plants, the EtOH extract of Garcinia bracteata displayed antiproliferative effect against human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells, human breast cancer MCF-7 cells, and human prostate cancer PC3 cells. Phytochemical investigation of this active extract produced nine ingredients, and their structures were established by analysis of MS and NMR spectra. Antiproliferative evaluation of isolated ingredients on A549, MCF-7 and PC3 cells indicated that a xanthone named isobractatin (1) exhibited potent antiproliferative activity against the above three human cancer cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 2.90 to 4.15 μM. Treatment of PC3 cells with 1 led to an enhancement of the cell apoptosis, and arrested cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. The G0/G1 phase cycle-related proteins analysis showed that the expressions of cyclins D1 and E were reduced by 1, whereas the protein level of cyclin dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor P21 was induced. Additionally, 1 enhanced PC3 cell apoptosis by activations of Bax, caspases 3 and 9, and by inhibition of Bcl-2. Our combined data illustrated that isobractatin (1) was the antiproliferative ingredient of G. bracteata against three human cancer cell lines, which exerted its antiproliferatrive effect via cell cycle arrest and induction of apoptosis. PMID:23812779

  2. The LKB1 tumor suppressor differentially affects anchorage independent growth of HPV positive cervical cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mack, Hildegard I.D.; Munger, Karl

    2013-11-15

    Infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses is causally linked to cervical carcinogenesis. However, most lesions caused by high-risk HPV infections do not progress to cancer. Host cell mutations contribute to malignant progression but the molecular nature of such mutations is unknown. Based on a previous study that reported an association between liver kinase B1 (LKB1) tumor suppressor loss and poor outcome in cervical cancer, we sought to determine the molecular basis for this observation. LKB1-negative cervical and lung cancer cells were reconstituted with wild type or kinase defective LKB1 mutants and we examined the importance of LKB1 catalytic activity in known LKB1-regulated processes including inhibition of cell proliferation and elevated resistance to energy stress. Our studies revealed marked differences in the biological activities of two kinase defective LKB1 mutants in the various cell lines. Thus, our results suggest that LKB1 may be a cell-type specific tumor suppressor. - Highlights: • LKB1 is a tumor suppressor that is linked to Peutz-Jeghers syndrome. • Peutz-Jeghers syndrome patients have a high incidence of cervical cancer. • Cervical cancer is caused by HPV infections. • This study investigates LKB1 tumor suppressor activity in cervical cancer.

  3. Establishment and characterization of a transplantable tumor line (RMM) and cell line (RMM-C) from a malignant amelanotic melanoma in the F344 rat, with particular reference to galectin-3 expression in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bondoc, Alexandra; Katou-Ichikawa, Chisa; Golbar, Hossain M; Tanaka, Miyuu; Izawa, Takeshi; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2016-11-01

    To investigate characteristics of malignant melanomas with various pathobiological features, a homotransplantable tumor line (RMM) was established from a spontaneous amelanotic melanoma found in the pinna of an aged F344 rat. RMM tumors were transplanted in syngeneic rats by serial subcutaneous implantation with 100% intake. The original and RMM tumors consisted of spindle-shaped cells arranged mainly in interlacing bundles. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells were positive to PNL-2 (melanocytes), nestin (neuroectodermal stem cells), S-100 (neurogenic cells) and vimentin (mesenchymal cells). Electron microscopically, tumor cells possessed single membrane-bound pre-melanosomes. Further, a cell line (RMM-C) was induced from an RMM tumor. RMM-C cells and the induced tumors in syngeneic rats showed immunohistochemical reactions similar to the original and RMM tumors. Interestingly, serum level of galectin-3 expression was increased with growing RMM tumors, and the expression was influenced by TNF-α (increase) or TGF-β1 (decrease), indicating a possible biomarker of amelanotic melanomas. The RMM tumors and RMM-C cell line could become useful tools for studies on the pathobiology, including tumor immunity, and development of therapeutic strategies against this malignancy. These tools are the first tumor lines of amelanotic melanomas in the rat. PMID:26949998

  4. In Vitro Cytotoxic Potential of Essential Oils of Eucalyptus benthamii and Its Related Terpenes on Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Döll-Boscardin, Patrícia Mathias; Sartoratto, Adilson; Sales Maia, Beatriz Helena Lameiro de Noronha; Padilha de Paula, Josiane; Nakashima, Tomoe; Farago, Paulo Vitor; Kanunfre, Carla Cristine

    2012-01-01

    Eucalyptus L. is traditionally used for many medicinal purposes. In particular, some Eucalyptus species have currently shown cytotoxic properties. Local Brazilian communities have used leaves of E. benthamii as a herbal remedy for various diseases, including cancer. Considering the lack of available data for supporting this cytotoxic effect, the goal of this paper was to study the in vitro cytotoxic potential of the essential oils from young and adult leaves of E. benthamii and some related terpenes (α-pinene, terpinen-4-ol, and γ-terpinene) on Jurkat, J774A.1 and HeLa cells lines. Regarding the cytotoxic activity based on MTT assay, the essential oils showed improved results than α-pinene and γ-terpinene, particularly for Jurkat and HeLa cell lines. Terpinen-4-ol revealed a cytotoxic effect against Jurkat cells similar to that observed for volatile oils. The results of LDH activity indicated that cytotoxic activity of samples against Jurkat cells probably involved cell death by apoptosis. The decrease of cell DNA content was demonstrated due to inhibition of Jurkat cells proliferation by samples as a result of cytotoxicity. In general, the essential oils from young and adult leaves of E. benthamii presented cytotoxicity against the investigated tumor cell lines which confirms their antitumor potential. PMID:22645627

  5. Negative growth regulation in a glioblastoma tumor cell line that conditionally expresses human wild-type p53

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, W.E.; Shields, M.T.; Amin, M.; Sauve, G.J. ); Appella, E.; Romano, J.W.; Ullrich, S.J. )

    1990-08-01

    To investigate the effect that human wild-type p53 (wt-p53) expression has on cell proliferation the authors constructed a recombinant plasmid, pM47, in which wt-p53 cDNA is under transcriptional control of the hormone-inducible mouse mammary tumor virus promoter linked to the dominant biochemical selection marker gene Eco gpt. The pM47 plasmid was introduced into T98G cells derived from a human glioblastomas multiforme tumor, and a stable clonal cell line, GM47.23, was derived that conditionally expressed wt-p53 following exposure to dexamethasone. The authors show that induction of wt-p53 expression in exponentially growing cells inhibits cell cycle progression and that the inhibitory effect is reversible upon removal of the inducer or infection with simian virus 40. Moreover, when growth-arrested cells are stimulated to proliferate, induction of wt-p53 expression inhibits G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} progression into S phase and the cells accumulate with a DNA content equivalent to cells arrested in the G{sub 0}/G{sub 1} phase of the cell cycle. Taken together, these studies suggest that wt-p53 may play a negative role in growth regulation.

  6. Loss of N-Cadherin Expression in Tumor Transplants Produced From As+3- and Cd+2-Transformed Human Urothelial (UROtsa) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sandquist, Elizabeth J.; Somji, Seema; Dunlevy, Jane R.; Garrett, Scott H.; Zhou, Xu Dong; Slusser-Nore, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Background Epithelial to mesenchymal transition is a process in which a cell experiences a loss of epithelial cell characteristics and acquires a more mesenchymal cell phenotype. In cancer, epithelial to mesenchymal transition has been proposed to play an important role during specific stages of tumor progression. The role epithelial to mesenchymal transition and mesenchymal to epithelial transition might play in toxicant-induced urothelial cancer is unknown. Methods Real-time PCR, Western blotting, immuno-histochemistry and immuno-fluorescence were used to determine the expression of E- and N-cadherin in the UROtsa parent, the As+3- and Cd+2-transformed cell lines, the spheroids isolated from these cell lines as well as the tumor heterotransplants that were produced by the injection of the transformed cells into immune compromised mice. Results This study showed that N-cadherin expression was increased in 6 As+3- and 7 Cd+2- transformed cell lines generated from human urothelial cells (UROtsa). The expression varied within each cell line, with 10% to 95% of the cells expressing N-cadherin. Tumors produced from these cell lines showed no expression of the N-cadherin protein. Spheroids which are made up of putative cancer initiating cells produced from these cell lines showed only background expression of N-cadherin mRNA, increased expression of aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 mRNA and produced tumors which did not express N-cadherin. There was no change in the expression of E-cadherin in the tumors, and the tumors formed by all the As+3 and Cd+2-transformed cell lines and cancer initiating cells stained intensely and uniformly for E-cadherin. Conclusions The finding that the cells expressing N-cadherin gave rise to tumors with no expression of N-cadherin is in agreement with the classical view of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition and N-cadherin are associated with dissemination and not with the ability to establish new tumor growth

  7. PAX8 is transcribed aberrantly in cervical tumors and derived cell lines due to complex gene rearrangements.

    PubMed

    López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Pedroza-Torres, Abraham; Fernández-Retana, Jorge; De Leon, David Cantu; Morales-González, Fermín; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia; Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; García-Mendez, Jorge; García-Castillo, Verónica; Bautista-Isidro, Osvaldo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos

    2016-07-01

    The transcription factor PAX8, a member of the paired box-containing gene family with an important role in embryogenesis of the kidney, thyroid gland and nervous system, has been described as a biomarker in tumors of the thyroid, parathyroid, kidney and thymus. The PAX8 gene gives rise to four isoforms, through alternative mRNA splicing, but the splicing pattern in tumors is not yet established. Cervical cancer has a positive expression of PAX8; however, there is no available data determining which PAX8 isoform or isoforms are present in cervical cancer tissues as well as in cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines. Instead of a differential pattern of splicing isoforms, we found numerous previously unreported PAX8 aberrant transcripts ranging from 378 to 542 bases and present in both cervical carcinoma-derived cell lines and tumor samples. This is the first report of PAX8 aberrant transcript production in cervical cancer. Reported PAX8 isoforms possess differential transactivation properties; therefore, besides being a helpful marker for detection of cancer, PAX8 isoforms can plausibly exert differential regulation properties during carcinogenesis. PMID:27175788

  8. Evaluation of novel trans-sulfonamide platinum complexes against tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Carlos; Díaz-García, C Vanesa; Agudo-López, Alba; del Solar, Virginia; Cabrera, Silvia; Agulló-Ortuño, M Teresa; Navarro-Ranninger, Carmen; Alemán, José; López-Martín, José A

    2014-04-01

    Platinum-based drugs, mainly cisplatin, are employed for the treatment of solid malignancies. However, cisplatin treatment often results in the development of chemoresistance, leading to therapeutic failure. Here, the antitumor activity of different trans-sulfonamide platinum complexes in a panel of human cell lines is presented. The cytotoxicity profiles and cell cycle analyses of these platinum sulfonamide complexes were different from those of cisplatin. These studies showed that complex 2b with cyclohexyldiamine and dansyl moieties had the best antitumoral activities. PMID:24589491

  9. Transcriptional profiling of genes at the human common fragile site FRA1H in tumor-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Pelliccia, Franca; Curatolo, Angela; Limongi, Zaira M; Bosco, Nazario; Rocchi, Angela

    2007-10-15

    Common fragile sites (CFSs) are chromosome regions that exhibit gaps and breaks when the cells are exposed to replication stress and to some DNA-binding compounds. In cancer cells, the CFSs are frequently involved in recurrent chromosome rearrangements. Furthermore, altered expression of associated genes, known or potential oncogenes, and tumor-suppressor genes has often been observed. Seventeen of the 88 listed CFSs have been analyzed at the molecular level, but the basis of their fragility has not been clarified. In the present work, the nine genes TGFB2, IARS2, MARK1, TAF1A, TP53BP2, ADPRT, including a very large gene ESRRG and two microRNA genes, MIRN194-1 and MIRN215, localized in the fragile site FRA1H, were investigated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for homozygous deletions and by real-time PCR for modification or loss of gene expression in a panel of 19 cancer cell lines. The expression level of five (ESRRG, TGFB2, MIRN194-1, MIRN215, and MARK1) of the nine genes studied presented significant modifications in some of the 19 examined tumor-derived cell lines compared to their normal control tissues. Because of their function, these genes could have a role in neoplastic transformation. PMID:17954271

  10. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Islet cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors ... In the healthy pancreas, cells called islet cells produce hormones that regulate a several bodily functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of ...

  11. Cytotoxicity effects of metal oxide nanoparticles in human tumor cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozano, T.; Rey, M.; Rojas, E.; Moya, S.; Fleddermann, J.; Estrela-Lopis, I.; Donath, E.; Wang, B.; Mao, Z.; Gao, C.; González-Fernández, África

    2011-07-01

    Metallic and metal oxide nanoparticles (Nps) have a wide range of applications in various settings including household, cosmetics and chemical industries, as well as for coatings. Nevertheless, an in-depth study of the potential toxic effects of these Nps is still needed, in order to fulfill the mandatory requirement of ensuring the safety of workers, patients and the general public. In this study, Quick Cell colorimetric assays were used to evaluate the in vitro toxicity of different metal oxide Nps [Fe(II,III)Ox, TiOx, ZnO and CeO2] in several cell lines. The ZnO Nps were found to be highly toxic, with a lethal dose <=100 μg/ml for all the cell lines studied. Western blot was also used to test the ability of the different Nps to activate the complement pathway. However, no activation of this cascade was observed when the Nps were added. In addition, the aggregation state and charge of the Nps in culture media was studied by dynamic light scattering (DLS) and measurement of zeta potential. Transmission Electron Microscopy was used to analyze Np uptake and localization at the cellular level.

  12. Synergistic growth inhibitory effect of deracoxib with doxorubicin against a canine mammary tumor cell line, CMT-U27

    PubMed Central

    BAKIREL, Tülay; ALKAN, Fulya Üstün; ÜSTÜNER, Oya; ÇINAR, Suzan; YILDIRIM, Funda; ERTEN, Gaye; BAKIREL, Utku

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been shown to exert anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities on many types of malignant tumors. These anticancer properties make it worthwhile to examine the possible benefit of combining COX inhibitors with other anti-cancer agents. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of deracoxib (DER) in potentiating antitumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX) in canine mammary carcinoma cells (CMT-U27). DER (50–250 µM) enhanced the antiproliferative activity of DOX by reducing the IC50 (approximately 3- to 3.5 fold). Interaction analysis of the data showed that combinations of DOX at 0.9 µM with DER (100–250 µM) produced synergism in the CMT-U27 cell line, with a ratio index ranging from 1.98 to 2.33. In additional studies identifying the mechanism of observed synergistic effect, we found that DER strongly potentiated DOX-caused G0/G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. Also, DER (100–250 µM) augmented apoptosis induction with approximately 1.35- and 1.37- fold increases in apoptotic response caused by DOX in the cells. DER enhanced the antiproliferative effect of DOX in conjunction with induction of apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 expression and changes in the cell cycle of the CMT-U27 cell line. Although the exact molecular mechanism of the alterations in the cell cycle and apoptosis observed with DER and DOX combinations require further investigations, the results suggest that the synergistic effect of DOX and DER combinations in CMT therapy may be achieved at relatively lower doses of DOX with lesser side effects. Therefore, combining DER with DOX may prove beneficial in the clinical treatment of canine mammary cancer. PMID:26822118

  13. Synergistic growth inhibitory effect of deracoxib with doxorubicin against a canine mammary tumor cell line, CMT-U27.

    PubMed

    Bakirel, Tülay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Üstüner, Oya; Çinar, Suzan; Yildirim, Funda; Erten, Gaye; Bakirel, Utku

    2016-05-01

    Cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors have been shown to exert anti-angiogenic and anti-tumor activities on many types of malignant tumors. These anticancer properties make it worthwhile to examine the possible benefit of combining COX inhibitors with other anti-cancer agents. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of deracoxib (DER) in potentiating antitumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX) in canine mammary carcinoma cells (CMT-U27). DER (50-250 µM) enhanced the antiproliferative activity of DOX by reducing the IC50 (approximately 3- to 3.5 fold). Interaction analysis of the data showed that combinations of DOX at 0.9 µM with DER (100-250 µM) produced synergism in the CMT-U27 cell line, with a ratio index ranging from 1.98 to 2.33. In additional studies identifying the mechanism of observed synergistic effect, we found that DER strongly potentiated DOX-caused G0/G1 arrest in cell cycle progression. Also, DER (100-250 µM) augmented apoptosis induction with approximately 1.35- and 1.37- fold increases in apoptotic response caused by DOX in the cells. DER enhanced the antiproliferative effect of DOX in conjunction with induction of apoptosis by modulation of Bcl-2 expression and changes in the cell cycle of the CMT-U27 cell line. Although the exact molecular mechanism of the alterations in the cell cycle and apoptosis observed with DER and DOX combinations require further investigations, the results suggest that the synergistic effect of DOX and DER combinations in CMT therapy may be achieved at relatively lower doses of DOX with lesser side effects. Therefore, combining DER with DOX may prove beneficial in the clinical treatment of canine mammary cancer. PMID:26822118

  14. Cytotoxicity of Triterpenoid Alkaloids from Buxus microphylla against Human Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bai, Shi-Tou; Zhu, Guo-Lei; Peng, Xing-Rong; Dong, Jin-Run; Yu, Mu-Yuan; Chen, Jian-Chao; Wan, Luo-Sheng; Qiu, Ming-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Three new triterpenoid alkaloids, namely buxmicrophyllines P-R (1-3), were isolated from the twigs and leaves of Buxus microphylla. Their structures were elucidated on the basis of NMR and MS spectroscopic analyses. Structurally, compounds 1-3 belong to the 9,10-cycloartane type alkaloids. In addition, compound 3 exhibited moderate cytotoxic activities in vitro against HL-60, SMMC-7221, A-549, MCF-7, and SW480 cell lines (with IC50 values ranging from 4.51 to 15.58 μM). PMID:27571056

  15. The role of endogenous proteins in the protein-free maintenance of 3 distinct tumor-cell lines invitro.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, H; Chigira, M

    1992-09-01

    We established new two protein-free culture subclones from murine well-characterized Ehrlich ascites carcinoma and P815 mastocytoma using intermittent protein-free culture performed previously for a protein-free subclone of fibrosarcoma (Gc-4 PF). The Ehrlich protein-free subclone (Ehrlich PF) grew much more slowly than the original cell line and showed a proliferative response to FCS. On the other hand, like Gc-4 PF, the P815 protein-free subclone (P815 PF) showed a similar growth rate to that of the original counterpart. Interestingly the original P815 mastocytoma cells also grew exponentially in protein-free medium. Although the protein-free culture exhibited cells that were more spheroid and spread less in each of these three cell lines, the major structure protein bands demonstrated on SDS-PAGE were virtually identical between the original and protein-free culture cells. In contrast to the structural peptides, the distribution of the secretory peptide differed among the three protein-free culture cell lines, which may reflect their state of differentiation. Growth-inhibiting activities were detected from the supernatant of all three protein-free culture cells, while no protein-free culture cells secreted predominantly growth-stimulating activity into their cultured media. These results suggest that autonomy in tumor cell proliferation may result from the acquisition of the ability to escape from negative control in multicellular organisms, as shown in monads, rather than an acquisition of further response to growth-stimulating control. PMID:21584570

  16. Composition and antiproliferative effect of essential oil of Origanum vulgare against tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Begnini, Karine Rech; Nedel, Fernanda; Lund, Rafael Guerra; Carvalho, Pedro Henrique de Azambuja; Rodrigues, Maria Regina Alves; Beira, Fátima Tereza Alves; Del-Pino, Francisco Augusto Burkert

    2014-10-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death and is responsible for one in eight deaths worldwide. The use of herbs as complementary medicine for cancer, especially advanced cancer, has recently increased. The aim of this study was to evaluate in vitro, the antiproliferative effect of Origanum vulgare against human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7), and human colon adenocarcinoma (HT-29). The essential oil (EO) was extracted from a bought amount of O. vulgare dried leaves and analyzed in a gas chromatograph interfaced with a mass selective detector. The cytotoxicity test was performed by sulforhodamine B assay. The results show that the EO is composed mostly of 4-terpineol and induces a high cytotoxicity effect in HT-29. In the MCF-7 cell line the EO was less effective. In conclusion, this study showed that O. vulgare main component is 4-terpineol and was effective in inducing cancer cell growth inhibition. PMID:25230257

  17. Cell Free DNA of Tumor Origin Induces a ‘Metastatic’ Expression Profile in HT-29 Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Fűri, István; Kalmár, Alexandra; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Schöller, Andrea; Barták, Barbara; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial cells in malignant conditions release DNA into the extracellular compartment. Cell free DNA of tumor origin may act as a ligand of DNA sensing mechanisms and mediate changes in epithelial-stromal interactions. Aims To evaluate and compare the potential autocrine and paracrine regulatory effect of normal and malignant epithelial cell-related DNA on TLR9 and STING mediated pathways in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and normal fibroblasts. Materials and Methods DNA isolated from normal and tumorous colonic epithelia of fresh frozen surgically removed tissue samples was used for 24 and 6 hour treatment of HT-29 colon carcinoma and HDF-α fibroblast cells. Whole genome mRNA expression analysis and qRT-PCR was performed for the elements/members of TLR9 signaling pathway. Immunocytochemistry was performed for epithelial markers (i.e. CK20 and E-cadherin), DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3a) and NFκB (for treated HDFα cells). Results Administration of tumor derived DNA on HT29 cells resulted in significant (p<0.05) mRNA level alteration in 118 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including overexpression of metallothionein genes (i.e. MT1H, MT1X, MT1P2, MT2A), metastasis-associated genes (i.e. TACSTD2, MACC1, MALAT1), tumor biomarker (CEACAM5), metabolic genes (i.e. INSIG1, LIPG), messenger molecule genes (i.e. DAPP, CREB3L2). Increased protein levels of CK20, E-cadherin, and DNMT3a was observed after tumor DNA treatment in HT-29 cells. Healthy DNA treatment affected mRNA expression of 613 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including increased expression of key adaptor molecules of TLR9 pathway (e.g. MYD88, IRAK2, NFκB, IL8, IL-1β), STING pathway (ADAR, IRF7, CXCL10, CASP1) and the FGF2 gene. Conclusions DNA from tumorous colon epithelium, but not from the normal epithelial cells acts as a pro-metastatic factor to HT-29 cells through the overexpression of pro-metastatic genes through TLR9/MYD88 independent pathway. In contrast, DNA derived from

  18. Effects of doxorubicin mediated by gold nanoparticles and resveratrol in two human cervical tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tomoaia, Gheorghe; Horovitz, Ossi; Mocanu, Aurora; Nita, Andreea; Avram, Alexandra; Racz, Csaba Pal; Soritau, Olga; Cenariu, Mihai; Tomoaia-Cotisel, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Green synthesis of gold nanoparticles capped with resveratrol (GNPs) and their physical and chemical characterization by UV-vis spectra, FTIR, DLS, XRD, TEM and AFM are reported. The GNPs are highly stable, with average diameter of about 20 nm. Then, supramolecular nanoassemblies of GNPs and doxorubicin (Dox), Dox-GNPs complexes, were prepared and morphologically characterized. The stability of these Dox nanocomplexes is high in phosphate buffer saline as estimated by UV-vis spectra, TEM and AFM analysis. Effects of resveratrol (Resv), Resv-Dox mixtures, GNPs and Dox-GNPs complexes on HeLa and CaSki cells, after 24h drug incubation, were assessed using MTT cell viability assay. Results showed strong anticancer activity for Resv-Dox mixtures and Dox-GNPs complexes in the two human cervical carcinoma cell lines. Clearly, both Resv and GNPs can mediate the anticancer activity of Dox at its very low concentration of 0.1 μg/mL, reaching the cytotoxicity of Dox alone, at its concentration up to 20 times higher. Cytotoxic effects of Resv-Dox mixtures and Dox-GNPs complexes have been found for the first time in HeLa and CaSki cells. Furthermore, the apoptosis induction in HeLa and CaSki cells was evidenced for Resv-Dox mixtures and Dox-GNPs complexes by flow cytometry using Annexin V-FITC/propidium iodide cellular staining. For CaSki cells, the apoptosis was also demonstrated, mainly for the treatment with Dox-GNPs complexes, by MTT formazan cellular staining visualized in phase contrast microscopy. Our results provide strong evidence that novel drug delivery vehicles developed on Dox-GNPs nanocomplexes and Resv could have wide applications in cancer diagnosis and treatment. PMID:26340362

  19. Complex CGH alterations on chromosome arm 8p at candidate tumor suppressor gene loci in breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Venter, Deon J; Ramus, Susan J; Hammet, Fleur M A; de Silva, Melanie; Hutchins, Anne-Marie; Petrovic, Vida; Price, Gareth; Armes, Jane E

    2005-07-15

    Loss of genetic material from chromosome arm 8p occurs frequently in human breast carcinomas, consistent with this region of the genome harboring one or more tumor suppressor genes (TSGs). We used the complementary techniques of microsatellite-based LOH, high-density FISH, and conventional CGH on 6 breast cancer cell lines (MCF7, SKBR3, T47D, MDA MB453, BT549, and BT474) to investigate the molecular cytogenetic changes occurring on chromosome 8 during tumorigenesis, with particular emphasis on 6 potential TSGs on 8p. We identified multiple alterations of chromosome 8, including partial or complete deletion of 8p or 8q, duplication of 8q, and isochromosome 8q. The detailed FISH analysis showed several complex rearrangements of 8p with differing breakpoints of varying proximity to the genes of interest. High rates of LOH were observed at markers adjacent to or within PCM1, DUSP4/MKP2, NKX3A, and DLC1, supporting their status as candidate TSGs. Due to the complex ploidy status of these cell lines, relative loss of 8p material detected by CGH did not always correlate with microsatellite-based LOH results. These results extend our understanding of the mechanisms accompanying the dysregulation of candidate tumor suppressor loci on chromosome arm 8p, and identify appropriate cellular systems for further investigation of their biological properties. PMID:15993269

  20. Hsa-let-7a functions as a tumor suppressor in renal cell carcinoma cell lines by targeting c-myc

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yongchao; Yin, Bingde; Zhang, Changcun; Zhou, Libin; Fan, Jie

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is the first to test the let-7a/c-myc loop in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Let-7a down-regulated c-myc in three renal cell carcinoma cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer c-myc target genes were down-regulated because of the let-7a-mediated down-regulation of c-myc. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The let-7a/c-myc loop has a significant function in renal cell carcinoma cell lines. -- Abstract: Widespread functions of the c-myc pathway play a crucial role in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) carcinogenesis. Thus, we evaluated the connection between proto-oncogenic c-myc and anti-neoplastic hsa-let-7a (let-7a) in RCC cell lines. The levels of c-myc and let-7a in 3 RCC cell lines (769P, Caki-1 and 786O) were measured after transfecting the cells with let-7a mimics or a negative control. The change in c-myc protein level was confirmed by Western blot. The anti-neoplastic function of let-7a was evaluated using cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) for proliferation analysis and cell flow cytometry for cell cycle analysis. The changes of downstream targets of c-myc were measured using reverse transcription quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Our results suggest for the first time that let-7a acts as a tumor suppressor in RCC cell lines by down-regulating c-myc and c-myc target genes such as proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), cyclin D1 (CCND1) and the miR17-92 cluster, which is accompanied by proliferation inhibition and cell cycle arrest.

  1. Increased sensitivity to glucose starvation correlates with downregulation of glycogen phosphorylase isoform PYGB in tumor cell lines resistant to 2-deoxy-d-glucose

    PubMed Central

    Philips, Katherine B.; Kurtoglu, Metin; Leung, Howard J.; Liu, Huaping; Gao, Ningguo; Lehrman, Mark A.; Murray, Timothy G.

    2015-01-01

    Background As tumors evolve, they upregulate glucose metabolism while also encountering intermittent periods of glucose deprivation. Here, we investigate mechanisms by which pancreatic cancer cells respond to therapeutic (2-deoxy-d-glucose, 2-DG) and physiologic (glucose starvation, GS) forms of glucose restriction. Methods From a tumor cell line (1420) that is unusually sensitive to 2-DG under normoxia, low (14DG2)- and high (14DG5)-dose resistant cell lines were selected and used to probe the metabolic pathways involved with their response to different forms of glucose deprivation. Results Muted induction of the unfolded protein response was found to correlate with resistance to 2-DG. Additionally, 14DG2 displayed reduced 2-DG uptake, while 14DG5 was cross-resistant to tunicamycin, suggesting it has enhanced ability to manage glycosylation defects. Conversely, 2-DG-resistant cell lines were more sensitive than their parental cell line to GS, which coincided with lowered levels of glycogen phosphorylase (PYGB) and reduced breakdown of glycogen to glucose in the 2-DG-resistant cell lines. Moreover, by inhibiting PYGB in the parental cell line, sensitivity to GS was increased. Conclusions Overall, the data demonstrate that the manner in which glucose is restricted in tumor cells, i.e., therapeutic or physiologic, leads to differential biological responses involving distinct glucose metabolic pathways. Moreover, in evolving tumors where glucose restriction occurs, the identification of PYGB as a metabolic target may have clinical application. PMID:24292700

  2. Ruthenium(II) complexes of 2-benzoylpyridine-derived thiosemicarbazones with cytotoxic activity against human tumor cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graminha, Angelica E.; Rodrigues, Cláudia; Batista, Alzir A.; Teixeira, Letícia R.; Fagundes, Elaine S.; Beraldo, Heloisa

    2008-04-01

    Reaction of [RuCl 3(dppb)H 2O] (dppb = 1,4 bis(diphenylphospine)butane) with 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone (H2Bz4DH) and its N(4)-methyl (H2Bz4M) and N(4)-phehyl (H2Bz4Ph) derivatives gave [RuCl(dppb)(H2Bz4DH)]Cl ( 1), [RuCl(dppb)(H2Bz4M)]Cl ( 2) and [RuCl(dppb)(H2Bz4Ph)]Cl ( 3). The cytotoxic activity of the studied compounds was tested against the MCF-7, TK-10 and UACC-62 human tumor cell lines. The precursor [RuCl 3(dppb)H 2O] exhibits cytocidal activity against the tree cell lines. H2BzDH, H2Bz4M, and [RuCl(dppb)(H2Bz4M)]Cl ( 2) show a selective cytocidal effect against the UACC-62 cell line which makes them the most promising compounds.

  3. Expression of human LINE-1 elements in enhanced by isochromosome 12p; evidence from testicular germ cell tumors and the Pallister-Killian syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Swergold, D.

    1994-09-01

    Expression of the human LINE-1 (L1Hs) transposable element is restricted to a narrow range of cell types. Specific expression of either endogenous elements or transfected recombinant elements has been reported primarily in tumors and cell lines of germ cell origin, including the NTera2D1, 2102EP, and JEG3 cell lines. These tumors and cell lines often contain one or more copies of isochromosome 12p, or translocations of 12p. Another human condition, the Pallister-Killian syndrome, is also characterized by the mosaic presence of an isochromosome 12p in patient`s cells. M28, a previously described somatic hybrid cell line, contains a human isochromosone 12p derived from fibroblasts of a patient with Pallister-Killian syndrome in a mouse LMTK-background. I asked whether the M28 cell line would exhibit enhanced expression of endogenous or transfected L1Hs elements. Expression of transfected recombinant L1Hs elements was 10-20 fold higher in M28 than in LMTK-cells. Expression of L1Hs elements was not increased in the GM10868A somatic cell hybrid line which contains a complete human chromosome 12 in a Chinese Hamster Ovary background. Somatic cell hybrid lines containing various human chromosomes in a LMTK-background also exhibited no enhanced L1Hs expression. P40, the protein encoded by the L1Hs first open reading frame, was detected in NTera2D1 but not in non-transfected M28 cells. Preliminary promoter deletion experiments indicate that similar, but non-identical regions of the L1Hs 5{prime} UTR, contribute to high level expression in the NTera2D1 and the M28 cell lines. These data suggest that the enhanced expression of human LINE-1 elements in tumors of germ cell origin is due in part to the presence of the isochromosome 12p.

  4. Citral is a new inducer of caspase-3 in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dudai, Nativ; Weinstein, Yacob; Krup, Margalit; Rabinski, Titiana; Ofir, Rivka

    2005-05-01

    Citral, 3,7-dimethyl-2,6-octadien-1-al, a key component of the lemon-scented essential oils extracted from several herbal plants such as lemon grass (Cymbopogon citratus), melissa (Melissa officinalis), verbena (Verbena officinalis) is used as a food additive and as a fragrance in cosmetics. In this study, we investigated the anti-cancer potential of citral and its mode of action. Concentrations of 44.5 muM, comparable to the concentration of citral in a cup of tea prepared from 1 g of lemon grass, induced apoptosis in several hematopoietic cancer cell lines. Apoptosis was accompanied by DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 catalytic activity induction. Citral activity (22.25 microM) was compared to a reference compound like staurosporine (0.7 microM), in respect to DNA fragmentation and caspase-3 enzymatic activity. The apoptotic effect of citral depended on the alpha,beta-unsaturated aldehyde group. PMID:15931590

  5. Analysis of the growth properties and physical state of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome in cell lines derived from primary cervical tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, L.; Mikumo, R.; Mark, H. F.; Lauchlan, S.

    1993-01-01

    We have established three cell lines from keratinizing and nonkeratinizing cervical carcinomas with distinct growth properties in vitro and in vivo. Each cell line contained human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences, but the lines differed in the physical state of the viral genome present in the cells. A high copy number of episomal human papillomavirus type 16 DNA sequences was detected in the TC-140 line derived from a keratinizing cervical cancer. This cell line had an aneuploid karyotype, did not grow in soft agarose, and formed benign cystlike nodules in nude mice, similar in morphology to well-differentiated areas of the primary tumor. Only integrated human papillomavirus type 16 sequences were detected in the TC-146A and TC-146B lines established from a nonkeratinizing large-cell cervical carcinoma. These cell lines exhibited reduced sensitivity to transforming growth factor-beta 1 and produced invasive, but not progressively growing, tumors in nude mice. These cell lines should complement existing in vitro models of cervical carcinogenesis and provide useful tools for understanding the importance of virus integration in the transformation process as well as the cellular and molecular basis for tumor progression. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:8395773

  6. Molecular Pathology of Patient Tumors, Patient-Derived Xenografts, and Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Qian, Wubin; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Likun; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-15

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has generated abundant genomic data for human cancers of various histopathology types and enabled exploring cancer molecular pathology per big data approach. We developed a new algorithm based on most differentially expressed genes (DEG) per pairwise comparisons to calculate correlation coefficients to be used to quantify similarity within and between cancer types. We systematically compared TCGA cancers, demonstrating high correlation within types and low correlation between types, thus establishing molecular specificity of cancer types and an alternative diagnostic method largely equivalent to histopathology. Different coefficients for different cancers in study may reveal that the degree of the within-type homogeneity varies by cancer types. We also performed the same calculation using the TCGA-derived DEGs on patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of different histopathology types corresponding to the TCGA types, as well as on cancer cell lines. We, for the first time, demonstrated highly similar patterns for within- and between-type correlation between PDXs and patient samples in a systematic study, confirming the high relevance of PDXs as surrogate experimental models for human diseases. In contrast, cancer cell lines have drastically reduced expression similarity to both PDXs and patient samples. The studies also revealed high similarity between some types, for example, LUSC and HNSCC, but low similarity between certain subtypes, for example, LUAD and LUSC. Our newly developed algorithm seems to be a practical diagnostic method to classify and reclassify a disease, either human or xenograft, with better accuracy than traditional histopathology. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4619-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325646

  7. Human L-type amino acid transporter 1 (LAT1): characterization of function and expression in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Yanagida, O; Kanai, Y; Chairoungdua, A; Kim, D K; Segawa, H; Nii, T; Cha, S H; Matsuo, H; Fukushima, J; Fukasawa, Y; Tani, Y; Taketani, Y; Uchino, H; Kim, J Y; Inatomi, J; Okayasu, I; Miyamoto, K; Takeda, E; Goya, T; Endou, H

    2001-10-01

    System L is a major nutrient transport system responsible for the transport of large neutral amino acids including several essential amino acids. We previously identified a transporter (L-type amino acid transporter 1: LAT1) subserving system L in C6 rat glioma cells and demonstrated that LAT1 requires 4F2 heavy chain (4F2hc) for its functional expression. Since its oncofetal expression was suggested in the rat liver, it has been proposed that LAT1 plays a critical role in cell growth and proliferation. In the present study, we have examined the function of human LAT1 (hLAT1) and its expression in human tissues and tumor cell lines. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes with human 4F2hc (h4F2hc), hLAT1 transports large neutral amino acids with high affinity (K(m)= approximately 15- approximately 50 microM) and L-glutamine and L-asparagine with low affinity (K(m)= approximately 1.5- approximately 2 mM). hLAT1 also transports D-amino acids such as D-leucine and D-phenylalanine. In addition, we show that hLAT1 accepts an amino acid-related anti-cancer agent melphalan. When loaded intracellularly, L-leucine and L-glutamine but not L-alanine are effluxed by extracellular substrates, confirming that hLAT1 mediates an amino acid exchange. hLAT1 mRNA is highly expressed in the human fetal liver, bone marrow, placenta, testis and brain. We have found that, while all the tumor cell lines examined express hLAT1 messages, the expression of h4F2hc is varied particularly in leukemia cell lines. In Western blot analysis, hLAT1 and h4F2hc have been confirmed to be linked to each other via a disulfide bond in T24 human bladder carcinoma cells. Finally, in in vitro translation, we show that hLAT1 is not a glycosylated protein even though an N-glycosylation site has been predicted in its extracellular loop, consistent with the property of the classical 4F2 light chain. The properties of the hLAT1/h4F2hc complex would support the roles of this transporter in providing cells with essential

  8. Cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53 by a heat shock protein 70 family member, mortalin, in human colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Gestl, Erin E.; Anne Boettger, S.

    2012-06-29

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Eight human colorectal cell lines were evaluated for p53 and mortalin localization. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Six cell lines displayed cytoplasmic sequestration of the tumor suppressor p53. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Direct interaction between mortalin and p53 was shown in five cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell lines positive for p53 sequestration yielded elevated p53 expression levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study yields the first evidence of cytoplasmic sequestration p53 by mortalin. -- Abstract: While it is known that cytoplasmic retention of p53 occurs in many solid tumors, the mechanisms responsible for this retention have not been positively identified. Since heatshock proteins like mortalin have been associated with p53 inactivation in other tumors, the current study sought to characterize this potential interaction in never before examined colorectal adenocarcinoma cell lines. Six cell lines, one with 3 different fractions, were examined to determine expression of p53 and mortalin and characterize their cellular localization. Most of these cell lines displayed punctate p53 and mortalin localization in the cell cytoplasm with the exception of HCT-8 and HCT116 379.2 cells, where p53 was not detected. Nuclear p53 was only observed in HCT-116 40-16, LS123, and HT-29 cell lines. Mortalin was only localized in the cytoplasm in all cell lines. Co-immunoprecipitation and immunohistochemistry revealed that p53 and mortalin were bound and co-localized in the cytoplasmic fraction of four cell lines, HCT-116 (40-16 and 386; parental and heterozygous fractions respectively of the same cell line), HT-29, LS123 and LoVo, implying that p53 nuclear function is limited in those cell lines by being restricted to the cytoplasm. Mortalin gene expression levels were higher than gene expression levels of p53 in all cell lines. Cell lines with cytoplasmic sequestration of p53, however, also displayed elevated p53

  9. Identification of a small, naked virus in tumor-like aggregates in cell lines derived from a green turtle, Chelonia mydas, with fibropapillomas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lu, Y.; Aguirre, A.A.; Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Nerurkar, V.R.; Yanagihara, R.

    2000-01-01

    Serial cultivation of cell lines derived from lung, testis, periorbital and tumor tissues of a green turtle (Chelonia mydas) with fibropapillomas resulted in the in vitro formation of tumor-like cell aggregates, ranging in size from 0.5 to 2.0 mm in diameter. Successful induction of tumor-like aggregates was achieved in a cell line derived from lung tissue of healthy green turtles, following inoculation with cell-free media from these tumor-bearing cell lines, suggesting the presence of a transmissible agent. Thin-section electron microscopy of the cell aggregates revealed massive collagen deposits and intranuclear naked viral particles, measuring 50??5 nm in diameter. These findings, together with the morphological similarity between these tumor-like cell aggregates and the naturally occurring tumor, suggest a possible association between this novel virus and the disease. Further characterization of this small naked virus will clarify its role in etiology of green turtle fibropapilloma, a life-threatening disease of this endangered marine species. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  10. Based on Nucleotides Analysis of Tumor Cell Lines to Construct and Validate a Prediction Model of Mechanisms of Chemotherapeutics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cuichai; Wang, Fang; Liu, Xi; Liu, Min; Liu, Zheng; Sun, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is one of the diseases that seriously threaten to human life worldwide. Up to now, chemotherapy remains to be a critical means of cancer treatment, thus the development of chemotherapeutical drugs has become a top priority. An ion pair high performance liquid chromatography (ion pair RP-HPLC) was established for analyzing intracellular nucleotides of tumor cell lines. In this article, a partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) prediction model of mechanisms of chemotherapeutics was established based on four types of drugs with different mechanisms, including antimetabolic agents, antineoplastic agents that affect protein synthesis, agents directly acting on DNA, and RNA interference agents. Then four anti-tumor agents commonly used in clinical were used to validate the availability of the prediction model. Three natural compounds, including 16- dehydropregnenolone (16-DHP), apigenin (API) and diosgenin (DIO), were reported to display anti-tumor effect with unclear mechanisms. The three components were applied to this prediction model firstly. In conclusion, the recognition model was proved to be accurate and feasible to some degree and might become a promising auxiliary method in the process of chemotherapeutic drugs development. PMID:26234361

  11. Enhanced tumor targeting of cRGD peptide-conjugated albumin nanoparticles in the BxPC-3 cell line.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xinzhe; Song, Yunlong; Di, Yang; He, Hang; Fu, Deliang; Jin, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The emerging albumin nanoparticle brings new hope for the delivery of antitumor drugs. However, a lack of robust tumor targeting greatly limits its application. In this paper, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic-conjugated, gemcitabine-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs) were successfully prepared, characterized, and tested in vitro in the BxPC-3 cell line. Initially, 4-N-myristoyl-gemcitabine (Gem-C14) was formed by conjugating myristoyl to the 4-amino group of gemcitabine. Then, cRGD-HSA was synthesized using sulfosuccinimidyl-(4-N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC) cross-linkers. Finally, cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs were formulated based on the nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab) technology. The resulting NPs were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading efficiency. In vitro cellular uptake and inhibition studies were conducted to compare Gem-HSA-NPs and cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs exhibited an average particle size of 160 ± 23 nm. The encapsulation rate and drug loading rate were approximately 83 ± 5.6% and 11 ± 4.2%, respectively. In vitro, the cRGD-anchored NPs exhibited a significantly greater affinity for the BxPC-3 cells compared to non-targeted NPs and free drug. The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs also showed the strongest inhibitory effect in the BxPC-3 cells among all the analyzed groups. The improved efficacy of cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in the BxPC-3 cell line warrants further in vivo investigations. PMID:27515795

  12. Modulation of transglutaminase activity in mononuclear phagocytes and macrophage-like tumor cell lines by differentiation agents

    SciTech Connect

    Goldman, R.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of glucocorticosteroids, retinoids, 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D/sub 3/ (1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/) and the tumor promoter phorbol myristate acetate (TPA) on the expression of transglutaminase activity in in vitro differentiating bone marrow-derived mouse and rat mononuclear phagocytes (BMDMP) and mouse and human myeloid leukemia cell lines was assessed. Dexamethasone was found to induce an increase of about 100% in transglutaminase activity in mouse and rat BMDMP. The effect was time- and dose-dependent, and specific for steroids with glucocorticoid activity. Retinoic acid (RA) suppressed transglutaminase activity in mouse BMDMP and enhanced it in rat BMDMP. In murine and human myeloid leukemia cell lines, dexamethasone enhanced transglutaminase activity to a varying degree, RA suppressed it in P388D1 cells and enhanced it in the other cell lines. 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ induced a rather small augmentation of enzyme expression, whereas TPA suppressed enzyme expression (70-100%). The species-specific differences previously observed by the authors for the effect of RA, dexamethasone and 1,25(OH)/sub 2/D/sub 3/ on the formation of BMDMP from mouse and rat bone marrow progenitor cells are now shown to extend also to effects on expression of transglutaminase activity. From a mechanistic point of view it is of interest that dexamethasone uniformly enhanced transglutaminase activity, whereas TPA suppressed it. The data suggest that modulation of transglutaminase activity by the four agents occurs via disparate mechanisms.

  13. Enhanced tumor targeting of cRGD peptide-conjugated albumin nanoparticles in the BxPC-3 cell line

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xinzhe; Song, Yunlong; Di, Yang; He, Hang; Fu, Deliang; Jin, Chen

    2016-01-01

    The emerging albumin nanoparticle brings new hope for the delivery of antitumor drugs. However, a lack of robust tumor targeting greatly limits its application. In this paper, cyclic arginine-glycine-aspartic-conjugated, gemcitabine-loaded human serum albumin nanoparticles (cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs) were successfully prepared, characterized, and tested in vitro in the BxPC-3 cell line. Initially, 4-N-myristoyl-gemcitabine (Gem-C14) was formed by conjugating myristoyl to the 4-amino group of gemcitabine. Then, cRGD-HSA was synthesized using sulfosuccinimidyl-(4-N-maleimidomethyl)cyclohexane-1-carboxylate (Sulfo-SMCC) cross-linkers. Finally, cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs were formulated based on the nanoparticle albumin-bound (nab) technology. The resulting NPs were characterized for particle size, zeta potential, morphology, encapsulation efficiency, and drug loading efficiency. In vitro cellular uptake and inhibition studies were conducted to compare Gem-HSA-NPs and cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in a human pancreatic cancer cell line (BxPC-3). The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs exhibited an average particle size of 160 ± 23 nm. The encapsulation rate and drug loading rate were approximately 83 ± 5.6% and 11 ± 4.2%, respectively. In vitro, the cRGD-anchored NPs exhibited a significantly greater affinity for the BxPC-3 cells compared to non-targeted NPs and free drug. The cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs also showed the strongest inhibitory effect in the BxPC-3 cells among all the analyzed groups. The improved efficacy of cRGD-Gem-HSA-NPs in the BxPC-3 cell line warrants further in vivo investigations. PMID:27515795

  14. Synthesis of a novel cytokine and its gene (LD78) expressions in hematopoietic fresh tumor cells and cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Y; Hattori, T; Obaru, K; Sakai, K; Asou, N; Takatsuki, K; Ohmoto, Y; Nomiyama, H; Shimada, K

    1989-01-01

    The gene coding for the protein LD78 was isolated from stimulated human tonsillar lymphocytes by differential hybridization. The gene product consisted of 92 amino acids with characteristics of cytokines. LD78 gene transcripts were detected in eight of eight fresh samples of cells from patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) by Northern blot analysis. ANLL cells with monocytic features gave the strongest bands. RNA transcripts were found in two of three samples of cells from patients with adult T cell leukemia (ATL), eight of nine samples from patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) of B cell lineage, and one of the three samples from patients with T cell ALL. KG-1, HL-60, HUT 102, MT-2, and MJ cell lines expressed the LD78 gene constitutively. The LD78 protein was detected in culture supernatants and cell lysates of HUT 102, MT-2, MJ, and fresh ATL cells by Western blot analysis. This protein was not found in culture supernatants or cell lysates of monocytic leukemia cells and HL-60 cells, although LD78 transcripts were found in those cells. The discrepancy between gene and protein expression might be explained by the stability of the mRNA. Thus, the protein may be involved in the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:2687328

  15. TPR-MET oncogenic rearrangement: Detection by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the transcript and expression in human tumor cells lines

    SciTech Connect

    Soman, N.R.; Wogan, G.N. ); Rhim, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Activation of the MET protooncogene by a rearrangement involving the fusion of TPR and MET specific gene sequences has been observed in a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS) treated in vitro with N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). No information has been available about the possible occurrence of this rearrangement in human tumors. To facilitate rapid screening of human cell lines and tumor samples for this specific gene rearrangement; the authors developed a sensitive detection method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of TPR-MET mRNA. cDNA was generated from cellular transcripts by using one of the PCR primers, which was then used as a template for PCR amplification of a 205-base-pair region carrying the breakpoint. An end-labeled internal probe was hybridized in solution to an aliquot of the PCR product for detecting amplification. Cells could be directly screened by the assay without prior isolation of RNA. A 205-base-pair DNA fragment characteristic of the TRP-MET rearrangement was detected in cell lines previously known to contain this altered sequence. The rearrangement was also detected at very low levels in the parental (nontransformed) cell line, HOS TE-85. A preliminary survey of cell lines derived from a variety of human tumors indicates that TPR-MET rearrangement occurred and was expressed at very low frequencies by cells from 7 of 14 tumors of nonhematopoietic origin.

  16. Peripheral blood-derived, γ9δ2 t cell-enriched cell lines from glioblastoma multiforme patients exert anti-tumoral effects in vitro.

    PubMed

    Marcu-Malina, V; Garelick, D; Peshes-Yeloz, N; Wohl, A; Zach, L; Nagar, M; Amariglio, N; Besser, M J; Cohen, Z R; Bank, I

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this work was to assess the potential of T cells expressing Vγ9Vδ2+ T cell receptors (TCR, γ9δ2T cells) present in peripheral blood (PB) m ononuclear cells (MC, PBMC) of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) patients to act as anti-tumoral agents. We found that γ9δ2T cell levels were decreased in patients' PB relative to a cohort of healthy donors (HD) (respectively 0.52±0.55%, n=16, vs 1.12±0.6%, n=14, p=0.008) but did not significantly correlate with postoperative survival (R=0.6, p=0.063). Importantly, however, the γ9δ2T cells could be expanded in vitro to consist 51±23% of the cultured lymphocytes (98% CD3+). This was achieved after 14 days of culture in medium containing the amino-bisphosphonate (ABP) Zoledronate (Zol) and interleukin (IL)-2, resulting in γ9δ2T cell-enriched lines (gdTCEL) similar to those of HD derived gdTCEL (54±19%). Moreover, gdTCEL from patients and HD mediated cytotoxicity to GBM-derived cell lines (GBMDCL), which was abrogated by immune-magnetic removal of the γ9δ2T cells. Furthermore, low level interferon (IFN) γ secretion was induced by gdTCEL briefly co-cultured with GBMDCL or autologous - tumor-derived cells, which was greatly amplified in the presence of Zol. Importantly, IFNγ secretion was inhibited by mevastatin but enhanced by cross-linking of butyrophilin 3A1 (CD277) on a CD277+ GBMDCL (U251MG) or by pretreatment of GBMDCL with temozolomide (TMZ). Taken together, these data suggest that γ9δ2T cells in PB of GBM patients can give rise to gdTCEL that mediate anti-tumoral activities. PMID:27049073

  17. Anti-Tumor Activity of Eurycoma longifolia Root Extracts against K-562 Cell Line: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Majid, Amin Malik Shah Abdul; Kit-Lam, Chan; Abdullah, Wan Zaidah; Zaki, Abdelhamid; Jamal Din, Shah Kamal Khan; Yusoff, Narazah Mohd

    2014-01-01

    Eurycoma longifolia Jack has been widely used in traditional medicine for its antimalarial, aphrodisiac, anti-diabetic, antimicrobial and anti-pyretic activities. Its anticancer activity has also been recently reported on different solid tumors, however no anti-leukemic activity of this plant has been reported. Thus the present study assesses the in vitro and in vivo anti-proliferative and apoptotic potentials of E. longifolia on K-562 leukemic cell line. The K-562 cells (purchased from ATCC) were isolated from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) were treated with the various fractions (TAF273, F3 and F4) of E. longifolia root methanolic extract at various concentrations and time intervals and the anti-proliferative activity assessed by MTS assay. Flow cytometry was used to assess the apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Nude mice injected subcutaneously with 107 K-562 cells were used to study the anti-leukemic activity of TAF273 in vivo. TAF273, F3 and F4 showed various degrees of growth inhibition with IC50 values of 19, 55 and 62 µg/ml, respectively. TAF273 induced apoptosis in a dose and time dependent manner. TAF273 arrested cell cycle at G1and S phases. Intraperitoneal administration of TAF273 (50 mg/kg) resulted in a significant growth inhibition of subcutaneous tumor in TAF273-treated mice compared with the control mice (P = 0.024). TAF273 shows potent anti-proliferative activity in vitro and in vivo models of CML and therefore, justifies further efforts to define more clearly the potential benefits of using TAF273 as a novel therapeutic strategy for CML management. PMID:24409284

  18. Different cell death responses induced by eupomatenoid-5 in MCF-7 and 786-0 tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Longato, Giovanna Barbarini; Fiorito, Giovanna Francisco; Vendramini-Costa, Débora Barbosa; de Oliveira Sousa, Ilza Maria; Tinti, Sirlene Valério; Ruiz, Ana Lúcia Tasca Gois; de Almeida, Sinara Mônica Vitalino; Padilha, Rafael José Ribeiro; Foglio, Mary Ann; de Carvalho, João Ernesto

    2015-08-01

    Natural products remain an important source of new drugs, including anticancer drugs. Recently, our group reported the anticancer activity of eupomatenoid-5 (eup-5), a neolignan isolated from Piper regnellii (Miq.) C. DC. var. regnellii leaves. In vitro studies demonstrated that MCF-7 (breast) and 786-0 (kidney) were among the cancer cell lines most sensitive to eup-5 treatment. The current results demonstrate that mitochondrial membrane depolarization and generation of reactive oxygen species are implicated in eup-5-mediated cytotoxic effects on these cancer cells lines. In MCF-7 cells, eup-5 led to phosphatidylserine externalization and caspase activation, whereas the same did not occur in 786-0 cells. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a reduction of microvilli density, as well as cell morphology alterations. Moreover, treated MCF-7 cells exhibited well-characterized apoptosis alterations, while treated 786-0 cells exhibited characteristics of programmed necroptosis process. These findings support the possibility that different mechanisms may be targeted by eup-5 in cell death response. PMID:25882683

  19. Patient-Derived Antibody Targets Tumor Cells

    Cancer.gov

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog on an antibody derived from patients that killed tumor cells in cell lines of several cancer types and slowed tumor growth in mouse models of brain and lung cancer without evidence of side effects.

  20. A new method for detection of tumor driver-dependent changes of protein sialylation in a colon cancer cell line reveals nectin-3 as TGFBR2 target.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jennifer; Warnken, Uwe; Schnölzer, Martina; Gebert, Johannes; Kopitz, Jürgen

    2015-10-01

    Protein-linked glycans play key roles in cell differentiation, cell-cell interactions, cell growth, adhesion and immune response. Aberrant glycosylation is a characteristic feature of tumor cells and is involved in tumor growth, escape from apoptosis, metastasis formation, and resistance to therapy. It can serve as cancer biomarker and treatment target. To enable comprehensive screening for the impact of tumor driving mutations in colorectal cancer cells we present a method for specific analysis of tumor driver-induced glycome changes. The strategy is based on a combination of three technologies, that is recombinase-mediated cassette exchange (RMCE), Click-It chemistry and mass spectrometry. The new method is exemplified by the analysis of the impact of inactivating mutations of the TGF-ß-receptor type II (TGFBR2) on sialic acid incorporation into protein-linked glycans of the colon cancer cell line HCT116. Overall, 70 proteins were found to show de novo sialic acid incorporation exclusively upon TGFBR2 expression whereas 7 proteins lost sialylation upon TGFBR2 reconstitution. Validation of detected candidate glycoproteins is demonstrated with the cell surface glycoprotein nectin-3 known to be involved in metastasis, invasion and prognosis of various cancers. Altogether, our new approach can help to systematically puzzle out the influence of tumor-specific mutations in a major signaling pathway, as exemplified by the TGFBR2 tumor suppressor, on the tumor glycome. It facilitates the identification of glycan-based tumor markers that could be used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In principle the outlined strategy can be adapted to any cancer cell line, tumor driver mutation and several glycan-building blocks. PMID:26177744

  1. The methanolic extract of Cordyceps militaris (L.) Link fruiting body shows antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal and antihuman tumor cell lines properties.

    PubMed

    Reis, Filipa S; Barros, Lillian; Calhelha, Ricardo C; Cirić, Ana; van Griensven, Leo J L D; Soković, Marina; Ferreira, Isabel C F R

    2013-12-01

    Being Cordyceps militaris (L.) Link recognized as a medicinal and edible mushroom, this work intends to reveal new interesting bioactive molecules that could be isolated from this species. Hydrophilic and lipophilic compounds were analyzed by chromatographic techniques coupled to different detectors. The methanolic extract of C. militaris was tested for its antioxidant, antibacterial, antifungal and anti-proliferative properties in different human tumor cell lines. Mannitol (2.01 g/100 g dw) and trehalose (24.71 g/100 g) were the free sugars found in C. militaris. Polyunsaturated fatty acids (68.87%) predominated over saturated fatty acids (23.40%) and δ-tocopherol was the only isoform of vitamin E detected (55.86 μg/100 g). The organic acids found in this mushroom were oxalic, citric and fumaric acids (0.33, 7.97 and 0.13 g/100 g, respectively). p-Hydroxybenzoic acid was the only phenolic acid quantified in this species (0.02 mg/100 g); although cinnamic acid was also found (0.11 mg/100 g). The methanolic extract of C. militaris proved to inhibit lipid peroxidation, have reducing power and scavenge free radicals. This extract also revealed strong antibacterial and antifungal properties. Finally, the C. militaris extract was able to inhibit the proliferation of MCF-7 (breast), NCI-H460 (non-small lung), HCT-15 (colon) and HeLa (cervical) human carcinoma cell lines. PMID:23994083

  2. Analysis of FDA-Approved Anti-Cancer Agents in the NCI60 Panel of Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Holbeck, Susan L.; Collins, Jerry M.; Doroshow, James H.

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 1990's the Developmental Therapeutics Program (DTP) of the National Cancer Institute (NCI) has utilized a panel of 60 human tumor cell lines representing 9 tissue types to screen for potential new anti-cancer agents. To date, about 100,000 compounds and 50,000 natural product extracts have been screened. Early in this program it was discovered that the pattern of growth inhibition in these cell lines was similar for compounds of similar mechanism. The development of the COMPARE algorithm provided a means by which investigators, starting with a compound of interest, could identify other compounds whose pattern of growth inhibition was similar. With extensive molecular characterization of these cell lines, COMPARE and other user-defined algorithms have been used to link patterns of molecular expression and drug sensitivity. We describe here results of screening current FDA-approved anti-cancer agents in the NCI60 screen, with an emphasis on those agents that target signal transduction. We have analyzed results from agents with mechanisms of action presumed to be similar; we have also performed hierarchical clustering of all of these agents. The addition of data from recently approved anti-cancer agents will increase the utility of the NCI60 databases to the cancer research community. These data are freely accessible to the public on the DTP web site (http://dtp.cancer.gov/). The FDA-approved anti-cancer agents are themselves available from the NCI as a plated set of compounds for research use. PMID:20442306

  3. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T; Hecht, Vivian C; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O; Manalis, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  4. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  5. β-Caryophyllene, a Compound Isolated from the Biblical Balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis), Is a Selective Apoptosis Inducer for Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Amiel, Eitan; Ofir, Rivka; Dudai, Nativ; Soloway, Elaine; Rabinsky, Tatiana; Rachmilevitch, Shimon

    2012-01-01

    The biblical balm of Gilead (Commiphora gileadensis) was investigated in this study for anticancerous activity against tumor cell lines. The results obtained from ethanol-based extracts and from essential oils indicated that β-caryophyllene (trans-(1R,9S)-8-methylene-4,11,11-trimethylbicyclo[7.2.0]undec-4-ene) is a key component in essential oils extracted from the balm of Gilead. β-Caryophyllene can be found in spice blends, citrus flavors, soaps, detergents, creams, and lotions, as well as in a variety of food and beverage products, and it is known for its anti-inflammatory, local anaesthetic, and antifungal properties. It is also a potent cytotoxic compound over a wide range of cell lines. In the current paper, we found that Commiphora gileadensis stem extracts and essential oil have an antiproliferative proapoptotic effect against tumor cells and not against normal cells. β-caryophyllene caused a potent induction of apoptosis accompanied by DNA ladder and caspase-3 catalytic activity in tumor cell lines. In summary, we showed that C. gileadensis stems contain an apoptosis inducer that acts, in a selective manner, against tumor cell lines and not against normal cells. PMID:22567036

  6. Urea derivates of ursolic, oleanolic and maslinic acid induce apoptosis and are selective cytotoxic for several human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sommerwerk, Sven; Heller, Lucie; Kuhfs, Julia; Csuk, René

    2016-08-25

    2,3-Di-O-acetyl-maslinic acid benzylamide (5) has previously been shown to possess high cytotoxicity for a variety of human tumor cell lines while being of low cytotoxicity to non-malignant cells. Structural modifications performed on 5 revealed that the presence of these acetyl groups in 5 and the presence of (2β,3β)-configurated centers seems necessary for obtaining high cytotoxicity combined with best selectivity between malignant cells and non-malignant mouse fibroblasts. Compounds carrying an ursane skeleton showed weaker cytotoxicity than their oleanane derived analogs. In addition, the benzylamide function in compound 5 should be replaced by a phenylurea moiety to gain better cytotoxicity while retaining and improving the selectivity. Thus, maslinic acid derived N-[2β,3β-di-O-acetyl-17β-amino-28-norolean-12-en-17-yl]phenylurea (45) gave best results showing EC50 = 0.9 μM (for A2780 ovarian cancer cells) with EC50 > 120 μM for fibroblasts (NIH 3T3) and triggered apoptosis while caspase-3 was not activated by this compound. PMID:27149037

  7. Phosphorylation of intracellular proteins related to the multihormonal regulation of prolactin: comparison of normal anterior pituitary cells in culture with the tumor-derived GH cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Beretta, L.; Boutterin, M.C.; Sobel, A.

    1988-01-01

    We have previously identified a group of cytoplasmic phosphoproteins (proteins 1-11) whose phosphorylation could be related, on a pharmacological basis, to the multihormonal regulation of PRL synthesis and release in the anterior pituitary tumor-derived GH cell lines. Phosphoproteins with identical migration properties on two-dimensional electrophoresis gels were also detectable in normal rat anterior pituitary cells in culture. We designed appropriate culture and (/sup 32/P) phosphate-labeling conditions allowing to analyze the regulation of the phosphorylation of these proteins in normal pituitary cells. TRH, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate, and vasoactive intestinal peptide induced the same qualitative changes in phosphorylation of proteins 1-11 in normal as in GH cells. Quantitative differences observed are most likely due to the heterogeneity of primary pituitary cultures. Phosphorylation changes affecting proteins 14-16, not previously detected in GH cells, were also observed with normal anterior pituitary cells. GH cell lines have lost the sensitivity of pituitary lactotrophs for dopamine, an important physiological inhibitor of PRL synthesis and release. In normal anterior pituitary cells in culture, dopamine inhibited also the TRH-stimulated phosphorylation of proteins 1-10, thus strengthening the correlation between phosphorylation of these proteins and multihormonal regulation of pituitary cell functions. Our results indicate: 1) that the same phosphoproteins as in GH cells are related to the multihormonal regulation of nontumoral, normal anterior pituitary cells in culture; 2) that dopamine acts by interfering with the phosphorylation of these proteins.

  8. Molecular cytogenetic anomalies and phenotype alterations in a newly established cell line from Wilms tumor with diffuse anaplasia.

    PubMed

    Faussillon, Marine; Murakami, Ichiro; Bichat, Magalie; Telvi, Louise; Jeanpierre, Cécile; Nezelof, Christian; Jaubert, Francis; Gogusev, Jean

    2008-07-01

    The novel continuous cell line WT-Pe.1 was established in vitro from Wilms tumor with histological features of diffuse anaplasia. The cultures grew as poorly differentiated epithelial-like cells with pleomorphic polygonal shapes and formation of typical monolayers. WT-Pe.1 cells were immunoreactive for cytokeratin, vimentin, laminin, villin, CD10, and CD24 proteins. Conventional cytogenetic analysis by RHG-banding revealed a hypotriploid karyotype with numerous abnormalities including ring chromosomes, double-minutes, homogeneous staining regions, radial structures, dicentrics, and several marker chromosomes. Comparative genomic hybridization analysis revealed DNA copy numbers losses on chromosome segments 1p, 3p, 6q, 9q34.1 approximately q34.3, 11q24 approximately q25, 14q12 approximately qter, 16q, 18q, and 22q11 approximately q13; gain of genomic material was localized on chromosome arms 1q, 4p, 6q, and 7p and the entire chromosome 12. With DNA from the original tumor, copy number losses were detected on chromosomes 1p, 14q, 16q, 17q, and 22q and gains were observed on 1q, 4p, 8q, 12p, 12q, and chromosome 14p. Copy number amplifications of distinct loci were found on 1q21.1 and 4p15.3, as well as an elevated copy number of cyclin D2 (CCND2) and cyclin D associated kinase (CDK4) genes on chromosome 12 (confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization). PMID:18558285

  9. Transcription of a novel mouse semaphorin gene, M-semaH, correlates with the metastatic ability of mouse tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Christensen, C R; Klingelhöfer, J; Tarabykina, S; Hulgaard, E F; Kramerov, D; Lukanidin, E

    1998-03-15

    In the attempt to identify genes associated with metastasis, we have compared gene expressions of two metastatic cell lines, 4T1 and 66cl4, and one noninvasive, nonmetastatic cell line, 67NR, which originate from the same mouse mammary adenocarcinoma. Using the technique of differential display, we identified a novel member of the semaphorin/collapsin family in the two metastatic cell lines. We have named it M-semaH. Northern hybridization to a panel of tumor cell lines revealed transcripts in 12 of 12 metastatic cell lines but in only 2 of 6 nonmetastatic cells and none in immortalized mouse fibroblasts. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the expression of a semaphorin gene has been shown to correlate positively with tumor progression. We have characterized two transcripts present in the tumor cells. One transcript, M-semaH-v, is a putative splice variant, which is less abundant in normal tissue and lacks 478 bp in the 3' untranslated region. Both transcripts encode the same 775 amino acids with the features of a secreted glycoprotein. Northern analysis suggests that the M-semaH gene is involved in embryonic development and in situ hybridization locates the M-semaH expression to the developing lungs, to developing skeletal elements, and to the ventral horns of the developing neural tube. PMID:9515811

  10. Decreased expression of the type I isozyme of cAMP-dependent protein kinase in tumor cell lines of lung epithelial origin.

    PubMed

    Lange-Carter, C A; Fossli, T; Jahnsen, T; Malkinson, A M

    1990-05-15

    A spontaneous transformant derived from a mouse lung epithelial cell line exhibited decreased cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) activity. DEAE column chromatography demonstrated that this was caused by specific loss of the type I PKA isozyme (PKA I). Western immunoblot analysis indicated that indeed several mouse lung tumor-derived cell lines and spontaneous transformants of immortalized, nontumorigenic lung cell lines contained less PKA I regulatory subunit (RI) protein than normal cell lines. PKA II regulatory subunit protein differed only slightly among cell lines and showed no conspicuous trend between normal and neoplastic cells. The decrease in RI was apparently concomitant with decreased catalytic (C) subunit levels in neoplastic cells since no free catalytic subunit activity was detected by DEAE chromatography. Northern blot analysis using RI alpha and C alpha cDNA probes showed that the levels of RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs paralleled their intracellular protein concentrations; neoplastic cell lines contained significantly less RI alpha and C alpha mRNAs than the normal cell line. The decreased expression of both RI and C subunits therefore results in a net decrease of PKA I in neoplastic lung cells, an isozymic difference which may account for the differential effects of cAMP analogs on cell growth and differentiation in normal and neoplastic cells. PMID:2159459

  11. Immunochemistry of ethylnitrosourea-induced rat neurinomas, the RN6 neurinoma cell line and their transplantation tumors.

    PubMed

    Vogeley, K T; Bilzer, T; Reifenberger, G; Wechsler, W

    1991-01-01

    The expression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), vimentin, S-100 protein (S-100), HNK-1, myelin basic protein (MBP) and fibronectin was investigated immunohistochemically in 51 ethylnitrosourea (ENU)-induced neurinomas of the rat. Additionally, 90 transplantation tumors derived from ENU-induced neurinomas and the RN6 rat neurinoma cell clone were studied. Vimentin immunoreactivity was shown in 50/51 primary neurinomas and 60/90 transplantation tumors. In contrast, GFAP was expressed in only 23/51 primary tumors and in 5/90 transplantation tumors. In the RN6 neurinoma clone, vimentin and GFAP could be demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro. GFAP expression varied depending on the tumor localization, i.e., tumors of distal portions of peripheral nerves were more frequently GFAP positive than tumors of the spinal roots or of cranial nerves. The same tendency was observed for S-100. In the series of transplantation tumors S-100 and GFAP immunoreactivity decreased with increasing numbers of transplantation passages. Only individual cells in 5 primary tumors were HNK-1 positive and no MBP-immunoreactive cells were observed. Our results demonstrate that the expression of differentiation antigens in ENU-induced experimental neurinomas parallels the results reported for human neurinomas. PMID:1719740

  12. N-ω-chloroacetyl-L-ornithine has in-vitro activity against cancer cell lines and in-vivo activity against ascitic and solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Ramírez, Alba L; Medina-Enríquez, Miriam M; Cordero-Rodríguez, Neira I; Ruiz-Cuello, Tatiana; Aguilar-Faisal, Leopoldo; Trujillo-Ferrara, José G; Alcántara-Farfán, Verónica; Rodríguez-Páez, Lorena

    2016-07-01

    N-ω-chloroacetyl-L-ornithine (NCAO) is an ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) inhibitor that is known to exert cytotoxic and antiproliferative effects on three neoplastic human cancer cell lines (HeLa, MCF-7, and HepG2). Here, we show that NCAO has antiproliferative activity in 13 cancer cell lines, of diverse tissue origin from human and mice, and in a mouse cancer model in vivo. All cell lines were sensitive to NCAO after 72 h of treatment (the EC50 ranged from 1 to 50.6 µmol/l). The Ca Ski cell line was the most sensitive (EC50=1.18±0.07 µmol/l) and MDA-MB-231 was the least sensitive (EC50=50.6±0.3 µmol/l). This ODC inhibitor showed selectivity for cancer cells, exerting almost no cytotoxic effect on the normal Vero cell line (EC50>1000 µmol/l). NCAO induced apoptosis and inhibited tumor cell migration in vitro. Furthermore, in vivo, this compound (at 50 and 100 mg/kg, daily intraperitoneal injection for 7 days) exerted potent antitumor activity against both solid and ascitic tumors in a mouse model using the myeloma (Ag8) cell line. At these same two doses, the toxicological evaluation showed that NCAO has no obvious systemic toxicity. The current results suggest that the antitumor activity is exerted by apoptosis related not only to a local but also a systemic cytotoxic effect exerted by NCAO on tumor cells. The applications for NCAO as an antitumor agent may be extensive; however, further studies are needed to ascertain the antitumor activity on other types of tumor in vivo and to determine the precise molecular mechanism of its activity. PMID:26918391

  13. MURC/cavin-4 Is Co-Expressed with Caveolin-3 in Rhabdomyosarcoma Tumors and Its Silencing Prevents Myogenic Differentiation in the Human Embryonal RD Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Faggi, Fiorella; Codenotti, Silvia; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cominelli, Manuela; Chiarelli, Nicola; Colombi, Marina; Vezzoli, Marika; Monti, Eugenio; Bono, Federica; Tulipano, Giovanni; Fiorentini, Chiara; Zanola, Alessandra; Lo, Harriet P.; Parton, Robert G.; Keller, Charles; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether MURC/cavin-4, a plasma membrane and Z-line associated protein exhibiting an overlapping distribution with Caveolin-3 (Cav-3) in heart and muscle tissues, may be expressed and play a role in rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS), an aggressive myogenic tumor affecting childhood. We found MURC/cavin-4 to be expressed, often concurrently with Cav-3, in mouse and human RMS, as demonstrated through in silico analysis of gene datasets and immunohistochemical analysis of tumor samples. In vitro expression studies carried out using human cell lines and primary mouse tumor cultures showed that expression levels of both MURC/cavin-4 and Cav-3, while being low or undetectable during cell proliferation, became robustly increased during myogenic differentiation, as detected via semi-quantitative RT-PCR and immunoblotting analysis. Furthermore, confocal microscopy analysis performed on human RD and RH30 cell lines confirmed that MURC/cavin-4 mostly marks differentiated cell elements, colocalizing at the cell surface with Cav-3 and labeling myosin heavy chain (MHC) expressing cells. Finally, MURC/cavin-4 silencing prevented the differentiation in the RD cell line, leading to morphological cell impairment characterized by depletion of myogenin, Cav-3 and MHC protein levels. Overall, our data suggest that MURC/cavin-4, especially in combination with Cav-3, may play a consistent role in the differentiation process of RMS. PMID:26086601

  14. Synthesis, structural characterization, modal membrane interaction and anti-tumor cell line studies of nitrophenyl ferrocenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altaf, Ataf Ali; Lal, Bhajan; Badshah, Amin; Usman, Muhammad; Chatterjee, Pabitra B.; Huq, Fazlul; Ullah, Shafiq; Crans, Debbie C.

    2016-06-01

    A series of nitrophenyl ferrocens (A1 - A5) were synthesized and fully characterized in solid state (using CHN analysis, FTIR and single crystal XRD) as well as in solution phase (1H &13C NMR and UV-visible spectroscopy). Micelle interface interactions of these compounds were explored and found to have ability across a micelle membrane interface. Interestingly, these compounds exhibited π-electronic push pull systems and oxidation of ferrocene to ferrocenium on crossing the negative interface of the micelle membrane. Selective compounds were screened for antitumor activity against parental and drug resistant human ovarian tumor models i.e. A2780 and A2780cisR, A2780ZD0473R. Screened compounds were found to overcome resistance factor compared to cisplatin.

  15. Tumor angiogenesis--characteristics of tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Hida, Kyoko; Maishi, Nako; Torii, Chisaho; Hida, Yasuhiro

    2016-04-01

    Tumor blood vessels provide nutrition and oxygen to the tumor, resulting in tumor progression. They also act as gatekeepers, inducing tumor metastasis. Thus, targeting tumor blood vessels is an important strategy in cancer therapy. Tumor endothelial cells (TECs), which line the inner layer of blood vessels of the tumor stromal tissue, are the main targets of anti-angiogenic therapy. Because new tumor blood vessels generally sprout from pre-existing vasculature, they have been considered to be the same as normal blood vessels. However, tumor blood vessels demonstrate a markedly abnormal phenotype that includes several important morphological changes. The degree of angiogenesis is determined by the balance between the angiogenic stimulators and inhibitors released by the tumor and host cells. Recent studies have revealed that TECs also exhibit altered characteristics which depend on the tumor microenvironment. Here, we review recent studies on TEC abnormalities and heterogeneity with respect to tumor progression and consider their therapeutic implications. PMID:26879652

  16. Clonal evolution and tumor progression in 2 human colorectal adenoma-derived cell-lines invitro - the involvement of chromosome-1 abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Hague, A; Hanlon, K; Paraskeva, C

    1992-07-01

    Two human colorectal adenoma cell lines, S/RG and S/AN, have been continuously passaged in vitro to determine whether they would immortalize and if specific cytogenetic changes were involved in immortalization and tumor progression. At passage 7, S/RG was highly aneuploid, but had no abnormalities of chromosome 1 (Paraskeva et al, Cancer Res 49: 1282-1286, 1989). With continued passage under two independent sets of growth conditions an isochromosome Iq and derivatives of this isochromosome occurred as specific abnormalities. S/AN was near-diploid at passage 10, with a deletion in lp and monosomy 18. The karyotype at passage 44 showed no change. The cell lines are stable in that they have remained anchorage-dependent and non-tumorigenic after several years in culture and S/AN has retained a near diploid karyotype. These cell lines are therefore highly valuable for further studies of tumor progression in human colorectal carcinogenesis. PMID:21584532

  17. Near infrared optical visualization of epidermal growth factor receptors levels in COLO205 colorectal cell line, orthotopic tumor in mice and human biopsies.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Gadi; Lecht, Shimon; Oron-Herman, Mor; Momic, Tatjana; Nissan, Aviram; Lazarovici, Philip

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we present the applicability of imaging epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor levels in preclinical models of COLO205 carcinoma cells in vitro, mice with orthotopic tumors and ex vivo colorectal tumor biopsies, using EGF-labeled with IRDye800CW (EGF-NIR). The near infrared (NIR) bio-imaging of COLO205 cultures indicated specific and selective binding, reflecting EGF receptors levels. In vivo imaging of tumors in mice showed that the highest signal/background ratio between tumor and adjacent tissue was achieved 48 hours post-injection. Dissected colorectal cancer tissues from different patients demonstrated ex vivo specific imaging using the NIR bio-imaging platform of the heterogeneous distributed EGF receptors. Moreover, in the adjacent gastrointestinal tissue of the same patients, which by Western blotting was demonstrated as EGF receptor negative, no labeling with EGF-NIR probe was detected. Present results support the concept of tumor imaging by measuring EGF receptor levels using EGF-NIR probe. This platform is advantageous for EGF receptor bio-imaging of the NCI-60 recommended panel of tumor cell lines including 6-9 colorectal cell lines, since it avoids radioactive probes and is appropriate for use in the clinical setting using NIR technologies in a real-time manner. PMID:23857061

  18. Enhanced induction of apoptosis in a radio-resistant bladder tumor cell line by combined treatments with X-rays and wortmannin.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Trinidad; Burguillos, Miguel Angel; López-Lluch, Guillermo; Navas, Plácido; Herrador, Miguel; González, Isabel; Piñero, Joaquín

    2008-11-01

    The radiosensitizing effect of wortmannin (WM) treatment during and after irradiation was studied in radioresistant bladder tumor cell lines with normal (MGH-U1 cells) or defective p53 activity (RT112 cells). WM modulated G(2)/M cell cycle arrest induced by higher X-ray doses (10 Gy) in both cell lines, although the alteration was significant only in RT112 cells. The observation suggests that WM activity is independent of p53. Constitutive expression of DNA-PKcs was found to be higher in RT112 cells than in MGH-U1. Treatment with WM enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis significantly in RT112 cells while it had no effect on MGH-U1 cells. Although a variety of PI3-kinases and PI3-K like kinases (including ATM) could be inhibited by WM, our observation of increased early lethality by WM treatment in RT112 is in agreement with previous results. They suggest that the WM-dependent radiosensitization of RT112 is a direct consequence of the inhibition of DNA-PK, resulting in the inhibition of DSB repair in the fast component. This early effect in the p53 deficient cell line could also indicate that processes other than apoptosis may contribute to the increased radiosensitization. In our opinion, the expression level of DNA-PKcs in human tumor cells may be a good predictor for the success of DNA-PKcs inhibitors when used as radiosensitizers. PMID:18787832

  19. Modulation of cell cycle and gene expression in pancreatic tumor cell lines by methionine deprivation (methionine stress): implications to the therapy of pancreatic adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kokkinakis, Demetrius M; Liu, Xiaoyan; Neuner, Russell D

    2005-09-01

    The effect of methionine deprivation (methionine stress) on the proliferation, survival, resistance to chemotherapy, and regulation of gene and protein expression in pancreatic tumor lines is examined. Methionine stress prevents successful mitosis and promotes cell cycle arrest and accumulation of cells with multiple micronuclei with decondensed chromatin. Inhibition of mitosis correlates with CDK1 down-regulation and/or inhibition of its function by Tyr(15) phosphorylation or Thr(161) dephosphorylation. Inhibition of cell cycle progression correlates with loss of hyperphosphorylated Rb and up-regulation of p21 via p53 and/or transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) activation depending on p53 status. Although methionine stress-induced toxicity is not solely dependent on p53, the gain in p21 and loss in CDK1 transcription are more enhanced in wild-type p53 tumors. Up-regulation of SMAD7, a TGF-beta signaling inhibitor, suggests that SMAD7 does not restrict the TGF-beta-mediated induction of p21, although it may prevent up-regulation of p27. cDNA oligoarray analysis indicated a pleiotropic response to methionine stress. Cell cycle and mitotic arrest is in agreement with up-regulation of NF2, ETS2, CLU, GADD45alpha, GADD45beta, and GADD45gamma and down-regulation of AURKB, TOP2A, CCNA, CCNB, PRC1, BUB1, NuSAP, IFI16, and BRCA1. Down-regulation of AREG, AGTR1, M-CSF, and EGF, IGF, and VEGF receptors and up-regulation of GNA11 and IGFBP4 signify loss of growth factor support. PIN1, FEN1, and cABL up-regulation and LMNB1, AREG, RhoB, CCNG, TYMS, F3, and MGMT down-regulation suggest that methionine stress sensitizes the tumor cells to DNA-alkylating drugs, 5-fluorouracil, and radiation. Increased sensitivity of pancreatic tumor cell lines to temozolomide is shown under methionine stress conditions and is attributed in part to diminished O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase and possibly to inhibition of the cell cycle progression. PMID:16170025

  20. Establishment and evaluation of a new highly metastatic tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Imamura, Takeshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Although advances in diagnostic imaging for early detection, surgical techniques and chemotherapy have improved overall survival, the prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor. Understanding cancer cell dynamics in the metastatic process is important to develop new therapeutic strategies. Experimental animal models and imaging would be powerful tools for understanding of the molecular events of multistep process of metastasis. In the present study, to develop a new cancer cell line that is applicable to bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we transfected the expression vector of a green fluorescent protein ZsGreen1 into a metastatic cell line 5a-D-Luc, which is a subclone of the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing luciferase, and established a new tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and ZsGreen1. The 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells proliferate more rapidly and have a more invasive phenotype compared with 5a-D-Luc cells following intracardiac injection. Metastasis sites were easily detected in the whole body by bioluminescence imaging and in excised tissues by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells was not lost after formalin fixation and decalcification. It enabled us to easily evaluate tumor spread and localization at the cellular level in microscopic analysis. The strong fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells allowed for real-time imaging of circulating tumor cells in cerebral blood vessels of live animals immediately after intracardiac injection of cells using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. These findings suggest that the 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells would be a useful tool for research on mechanisms of metastatic process in animal models. PMID:26691676

  1. Hydrodynamic properties of the gonadotropin receptor from a murine Leydig tumor cell line are altered by desensitization

    SciTech Connect

    Rebois, R.V.; Bradley, R.M.; Titlow, C.C.

    1987-10-06

    The murine Leydig tumor cell line 1 (MLTC-1) contains gonadotropin receptors (GR) that are coupled to adenylate cyclase through the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein (G/sub s/). The binding of human choriogonadotropin (hGC) causes MLTC-1 cells to accumulate cAMP. With time, the ability of MLTC-1 cells to respond to hCG is attenuated by a process called desensitization. The hydrodynamic properties of GR from control and desensitized MLTC-1 cells were studied. Sucrose density gradient sedimentation in H/sub 2/O and D/sub 2/O and gel filtration chromatography were used to estimate the Stokes radius (a), partial specific volume (v/sub c/), sedimentation coefficient (s/sub 20,w/), and molecular weight (M/sub r/) of the detergent-solubilized hormone-receptor complex (hCG-GR). (/sup 125/I)hCG was bound to MLTC-1 cells under conditions that allow (37/sup 0/C) or prevent (0/sup 0/C) desensitization, and hCG-GR was solubilized in Triton X-100. In the absence of desensitization, control hCG-GR had a M/sub r/ of 213,000, whereas desensitized hCG-GR had a M/sub r/ of 158,000. Deglycosylated hCG (DG-HCG) is an antagonist that binds to GR with high affinity but fails to stimulate adenylate cyclase or cause desensitization. (/sup 125/I)DG-hCG was bound to MLTC-1 cells and DG-hCG-GR solubilized in Triton X-100. The hydrodynamic properties of DG-hCG-GR were the same as that for control hCG-GR. There was no evidence for the association of adenylate cyclase or G/sub s/ with GR in Triton X-100 solubilized preparations. When hCG was cross-linked to GR and solubilized with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the M/sub r/ was found to be 116,000, which was similar to that determined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and less than that of the Triton X-100 solubilized control hCG-GR.

  2. Ribosomal S6 kinase 4 (RSK4) expression in ovarian tumors and its regulation by antineoplastic drugs in ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Arechavaleta-Velasco, Fabian; Zeferino-Toquero, Moises; Estrada-Moscoso, Isaias; Imani-Razavi, Fazlollah Shahram; Olivares, Aleida; Perez-Juarez, Carlos Eduardo; Diaz-Cueto, Laura

    2016-02-01

    Survival rate in ovarian cancer depends on the stage of the disease. RSK4, which has been considered as a tumor suppressor factor, controls cells invasion due to its antiinvasive and antimetastatic properties. Modulation of RSK4 expression could be an important event to increase the survival rate in ovarian cancer patients. Thus, the goal of the present study was to establish the differences in RSK4 expression among normal, benign and malignant ovarian tissues and to determine whether antineoplastic drugs regulate its expression in SKOV3 and TOV-112D cells. RSK4 levels in 30 malignant ovarian tumors, 64 benign tumors and 36 normal ovary tissues were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction and Western blot. Modulation of RSK4 expression by two antineoplastic drugs (cisplatin and vorinostat) was also studied in the SKOV3 and TOV-112D ovarian cancer cell lines using the same techniques. RSK4 mRNA and protein levels were decreased in malignant ovarian tumors as compared to benign tumors and normal tissue. These low-RSK4 levels were significantly associated with advanced stages of ovarian cancer. RSK4 expression was increased after incubation of SKOV3 and TOV-112D cell lines with cisplatin and vorinostat for 24 h. The combination of these antineoplastic drugs did not produce a synergistic or additive effect. These results suggest that RSK4 is expressed at low levels in malignant ovarian tumors, which correlates with advanced stages of the disease. Additionally, RSK4 expression is regulated by cisplatin and vorinostat in two ovarian cancer cell lines. PMID:26732474

  3. A novel quinoline, MT477: suppresses cell signaling through Ras molecular pathway, inhibits PKC activity, and demonstrates in vivo anti-tumor activity against human carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jasinski, Piotr; Welsh, Brandon; Galvez, Jorge; Land, David; Zwolak, Pawel; Ghandi, Lori; Terai, Kaoru; Dudek, Arkadiusz Z

    2008-06-01

    MT477 is a novel thiopyrano[2,3-c]quinoline that has been identified using molecular topology screening as a potential anticancer drug with a high activity against protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms. The objective of the present study was to determine the mechanism of action of MT477 and its activity against human cancer cell lines. MT477 interfered with PKC activity as well as phosphorylation of Ras and ERK1/2 in H226 human lung carcinoma cells. It also induced poly-caspase-dependent apoptosis. MT477 had a dose-dependent (0.006 to 0.2 mM) inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation of H226, MCF-7, U87, LNCaP, A431 and A549 cancer cell lines as determined by in vitro proliferation assays. Two murine xenograft models of human A431 and H226 lung carcinoma were used to evaluate tumor response to intraperitoneal administration of MT477 (33 microg/kg, 100 microg/kg, and 1 mg/kg). Tumor growth was inhibited by 24.5% in A431 and 43.67% in H226 xenografts following MT477 treatment, compared to vehicle controls (p < 0.05). In conclusion, our empirical findings are consistent with molecular modeling of MT477's activity against PKC. We also found, however, that its mechanism of action occurs through suppressing Ras signaling, indicating that its effects on apoptosis and tumor growth in vivo may be mediated by Ras as well as PKC. We propose, therefore, that MT477 warrants further development as an anticancer drug. PMID:17957339

  4. Ligand stimulation of ErbB4 and a constitutively-active ErbB4 mutant result in different biological responses in human pancreatic tumor cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Mill, Christopher P.; Gettinger, Kathleen L.; Riese, David J.

    2011-02-15

    Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Indeed, it has been estimated that 37,000 Americans will die from this disease in 2010. Late diagnosis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance of these tumors are major reasons for poor patient outcome, spurring the search for pancreatic cancer early diagnostic and therapeutic targets. ErbB4 (HER4) is a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), a family that also includes the Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR/ErbB1/HER1), Neu/ErbB2/HER2, and ErbB3/HER3. These RTKs play central roles in many human malignancies by regulating cell proliferation, survival, differentiation, invasiveness, motility, and apoptosis. In this report we demonstrate that human pancreatic tumor cell lines exhibit minimal ErbB4 expression; in contrast, these cell lines exhibit varied and in some cases abundant expression and basal tyrosine phosphorylation of EGFR, ErbB2, and ErbB3. Expression of a constitutively-dimerized and -active ErbB4 mutant inhibits clonogenic proliferation of CaPan-1, HPAC, MIA PaCa-2, and PANC-1 pancreatic tumor cell lines. In contrast, expression of wild-type ErbB4 in pancreatic tumor cell lines potentiates stimulation of anchorage-independent colony formation by the ErbB4 ligand Neuregulin 1{beta}. These results illustrate the multiple roles that ErbB4 may be playing in pancreatic tumorigenesis and tumor progression.

  5. Inferring primary tumor sites from mutation spectra: a meta-analysis of histology-specific aberrations in cancer-derived cell lines.

    PubMed

    Dietlein, Felix; Eschner, Wolfgang

    2014-03-15

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have led to profound characterization of mutation spectra for several cancer types. Hence, we sought to systematically compare genomic aberrations between primary tumors and cancer lines. For this, we compiled publically available sequencing data of 1651 genes across 905 cell lines. We used them to characterize 23 distinct primary tumor sites by a novel approach that is based on Bayesian spam-filtering techniques. Thereby, we confirmed the strong overall similarity of alterations between patient samples and cell culture. However, we also identified several suspicious mutations, which had not been associated with their cancer types before. Based on these characterizations, we developed the inferring cancer origins from mutation spectra (ICOMS) tool. On our cell line collection, the algorithm reached a prediction specificity rate of 79%, which strongly variegated between primary cancer sites. On an independent validation cohort of 431 primary tumor samples, we observed a similar accuracy of 71%. Additionally, we found that ICOMS could be employed to deduce further attributes from mutation spectra, including sub-histology and compound sensitivity. Thus, thorough classification of site-specific mutation spectra for cell lines may decipher further genome-phenotype associations in cancer. PMID:24163242

  6. Synthesis and Characterization of New Palladium(II) Thiosemicarbazone Complexes and Their Cytotoxic Activity against Various Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, Wilfredo; Paz, Juan; Carrasco, Fernando; Spodine, Evgenia; Manzur, Jorge; Sieler, Joachim; Blaurock, Steffen; Beyer, Lothar

    2013-01-01

    The palladium(II) bis-chelate complexes of the type [Pd(TSC1-5)2] (6–10), with their corresponding ligands 4-phenyl-1-(acetone)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC1 (1), 4-phenyl-1-(2′-chloro-benzaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC2 (2), 4-phenyl-1-(3′-hydroxy-benzaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC3 (3), 4-phenyl-1-(2′-naphthaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC4 (4), and 4-phenyl-1-(1′-nitro-2′-naphthaldehyde)-thiosemicarbazone, HTSC5 (5), were synthesized and characterized by elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques (IR and 1H- and 13C-NMR). The molecular structure of HTSC3, HTSC4, and [Pd(TSC1)2] (6) have been determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. Complex 6 shows a square planar geometry with two deprotonated ligands coordinated to PdII through the azomethine nitrogen and thione sulfur atoms in a cis arrangement. The in vitro cytotoxic activity measurements indicate that the palladium(II) complexes (IC50 = 0.01–9.87 μM) exhibited higher antiproliferative activity than their free ligands (IC50 = 23.48–70.86 and >250 μM) against different types of human tumor cell lines. Among all the studied palladium(II) complexes, the [Pd(TSC3)2] (8) complex exhibited high antitumor activity on the DU145 prostate carcinoma and K562 chronic myelogenous leukemia cells, with low values of the inhibitory concentration (0.01 and 0.02 μM, resp.). PMID:24391528

  7. Radiation induced DNA damage and damage repair in human tumor and fibroblast cell lines assessed by histone H2AX phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Mahrhofer, Hartmut; Buerger, Susann; Oppitz, Ulrich; Flentje, Michael; Djuzenova, Cholpon S. . E-mail: djuzenova_t@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: To analyze the radiation-induced levels of {gamma}H2AX and its decay kinetics in 10 human cell lines covering a wide range of cellular radiosensitivity (SF2, 0.06-0.63). Methods and Materials: Five tumor cell lines included Colo-800 melanoma, two glioblastoma (MO59J and MO59K), fibrosarcoma HT 1080, and breast carcinoma MCF7. Five primary skin fibroblasts lines included two normal strains, an ataxia telangiectasia strain, and two fibroblast strains from breast cancer patients with an adverse early skin reaction to radiotherapy. Cellular radiosensitivity was assessed by colony-forming test. Deoxyribonucleic acid damage and repair were analyzed according to nuclear {gamma}H2AX foci intensity, with digital image analysis. Results: The cell lines tested showed a wide degree of variation in the background intensity of immunostained nuclear histone {gamma}H2AX, which was higher for the tumor cell lines compared with the fibroblast strains. It was not possible to predict clonogenic cell survival (SF2) for the 10 cell lines studied from the radiation-induced {gamma}H2AX intensity. In addition, the slopes of the dose-response (0-4 Gy) curves, the rates of {gamma}H2AX disappearance, and its residual expression ({<=}18 h after irradiation) did not correlate with SF2 values. Conclusions: The results from 10 cell lines showed that measurements of immunofluorescence intensity by digital image analysis of phosphorylated histone H2AX as a surrogate marker of DNA double-strand breaks did not allow reliable ranking of cell strains according to their clonogenic survival after irradiation.

  8. Computational method for estimating DNA copy numbers in normal samples, cancer cell lines, and solid tumors using array comparative genomic hybridization.

    PubMed

    Abkevich, Victor; Iliev, Diana; Timms, Kirsten M; Tran, Thanh; Skolnick, Mark; Lanchbury, Jerry S; Gutin, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Genomic copy number variations are a typical feature of cancer. These variations may influence cancer outcomes as well as effectiveness of treatment. There are many computational methods developed to detect regions with deletions and amplifications without estimating actual copy numbers (CN) in these regions. We have developed a computational method capable of detecting regions with deletions and amplifications as well as estimating actual copy numbers in these regions. The method is based on determining how signal intensity from different probes is related to CN, taking into account changes in the total genome size, and incorporating into analysis contamination of the solid tumors with benign tissue. Hidden Markov Model is used to obtain the most likely CN solution. The method has been implemented for Affymetrix 500K GeneChip arrays and Agilent 244K oligonucleotide arrays. The results of CN analysis for normal cell lines, cancer cell lines, and tumor samples are presented. The method is capable of detecting copy number alterations in tumor samples with up to 80% contamination with benign tissue. Analysis of 178 cancer cell lines reveals multiple regions of common homozygous deletions and strong amplifications encompassing known tumor suppressor genes and oncogenes as well as novel cancer related genes. PMID:20706610

  9. CD146 expression is associated with a poor prognosis in human breast tumors and with enhanced motility in breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Zabouo, Gwladys; Imbert, Anne-Marie; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Finetti, Pascal; Moreau, Thomas; Esterni, Benjamin; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François; Chabannon, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Metastasis is a complex process involving loss of adhesion, migration, invasion and proliferation of cancer cells. Cell adhesion molecules play a pivotal role in this phenomenon by regulating cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. CD146 (MCAM) is associated with an advanced tumor stage in melanoma, prostate cancer and ovarian cancer. Studies of CD146 expression and function in breast cancer remain scarce except for a report concluding that CD146 could act as a tumor suppressor in breast carcinogenesis. Methods To resolve these apparent discrepancies in the role of CD146 in tumor cells, we looked at the association of CD146 expression with histoclinical features in human primary breast cancers using DNA and tissue microarrays. By flow cytometry, we characterized CD146 expression on different breast cancer cell lines. Using siRNA or shRNA technology, we studied functional consequences of CD146 downmodulation of MDA-MB-231 cells in migration assays. Wild-type, mock-transfected and downmodulated transfected cells were profiled using whole-genome DNA microarrays to identify genes whose expression was modified by CD146 downregulation. Results Microarray studies revealed the association of higher levels of CD146 with histoclinical features that belong to the basal cluster of human tumors. Expression of CD146 protein on epithelial cells was detected in a small subset of cancers with histoclinical features of basal tumors. CD146+ cell lines displayed a mesenchymal phenotype. Downmodulation of CD146 expression in the MDA-MB-231 cell line resulted in downmodulation of vimentin, as well as of a set of genes that include both genes associated with a poor prognosis in a variety of cancers and genes known to promote cell motility. In vitro functional assays revealed decreased migration abilities associated with decreased CD146 expression. Conclusions In addition to its expression in the vascular compartment, CD146 is expressed on a subset of epithelial cells in

  10. Characterization of p21Ras-mediated apoptosis induced by protein kinase C inhibition and application to human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Liou, James S; Chen, James S; Faller, Douglas V

    2004-02-01

    Suppression of PKC activity can selectively induce apoptosis in cells expressing a constitutively activated p21Ras protein. We demonstrate that continued expression of p21Ras activity is required in PKC-mediated apoptosis because farnesyltransferase inhibitors abrogated the loss of viability in p21Ras-transformed cells occurring following PKC inhibition. Studies utilizing gene transfer or viral vectors demonstrate that transient expression of oncogenic p21Ras activity is sufficient for induction of apoptosis by PKC inhibition, whereas physiologic activation of p21Ras by growth factor is not sufficient to induce apoptosis. Mechanistically, the p21Ras-mediated apoptosis induced by PKC inhibition is dependent upon mitochondrial dysregulation, with a concurrent loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (psim). Cyclosporine A, which prevented the loss of psim, also inhibited HMG-induced DNA fragmentation in cells expressing an activated p21Ras. Induction of apoptosis by PKC inhibition in human tumors with oncogenic p21Ras mutations was demonstrated. Inhibition of PKC caused increased apoptosis in MIA-PaCa-2, a human pancreatic tumor line containing a mutated Ki-ras allele, when compared to HS766T, a human pancreatic tumor line with normal Ki-ras alleles. Furthermore, PKC inhibition induced apoptosis in HCT116, a human colorectal tumor line containing an oncogenic Ki-ras allele but not in a subline (Hke3) in which the mutated Ki-ras allele had been disrupted. The PKC inhibitor 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (HMG), significantly reduced p21Ras-mediated tumor growth in vivo in a nude mouse MIA-PaCa-2 xenograft model. Collectively these studies suggest the therapeutic feasibility of targeting PKC activity in tumors expressing an activated p21Ras oncoprotein. PMID:14603530

  11. Modulation of tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand-induced apoptosis by chemotherapy in thyroid cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Woo; Wong, Mariwil G; Lobo, Margaret; Hyun, William C; Duh, Quan-Yang; Clark, Orlo H

    2003-12-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) induces apoptosis in many human cancer cells but not in normal cells. Thyroid cancer cells, however, appear to be relatively resistant to TRAIL-induced apoptosis. We therefore investigated the effect of chemotherapy on TRAIL-induced apoptosis in thyroid cancer cells. We used six thyroid cancer cell lines: TPC-1, FTC-133, FTC-236, FTC-238, XTC-1, and ARO82-1. We used flow cytometry to measure apoptosis, dimethyl-thiazol-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay to measure antiproliferation effects and Western blot to determine the expression of Bcl family proteins. Troglitazone, paclitaxel, geldanamycin, and cycloheximide were used for pretreatment. We used the Student's t test and analysis of variance (ANOVA) for statistical analysis. All thyroid cancer cell lines, except the TPC-1 cell line, were resistant to TRAIL, and growth inhibition was less than 20% at concentration of 800 ng/mL of TRAIL. In both TPC-1 (TRAIL-sensitive) and FTC-133 (TRAIL-resistant) thyroid cancer cell lines, pretreatment with troglitazone, cycloheximide, and paclitaxel enhanced TRAIL-induced cell death significantly but pretreatment with geldanamycin did not. There were no significant changes in Bcl-2, Bcl-xl, and Bax protein expression after troglitazone treatment. In conclusion, TRAIL in combination with troglitazone, paclitaxel, and cycloheximide induces apoptosis in thyroid cancer cells at suboptimal concentrations that cannot be achieved using TRAIL alone. PMID:14751030

  12. Chromosome site for Epstein-Barr virus DNA in a Burkitt tumor cell line and in lymphocytes growth-transformed in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, A; Ripley, S; Heller, M; Kieff, E

    1983-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) genome stably persists in latently infected Burkitt tumor cells and growth-transformed B lymphocytes. These cells usually contain multiple copies of episomal viral DNA. Cytological hybridization of recombinant viral DNA fragments to metaphase chromosomes of two latently infected cell lines demonstrates that viral DNA localizes to both chromatids of one homologue of chromosome 1 in Namalwa, a Burkitt tumor cell line, and to both chromatids of one homologue of chromosome 4 in IB4, a cell line with transformed growth properties in vitro. The site of chromosome association remains stable in a clone of IB4 cells. Probes from five separate regions of the EBV genome hybridize to the same chromosome regions. A previously undescribed achromatic site is identified within the region of EBV chromosome cytological hybridization. These observations suggest that most or all of the EBV genome is integrated into the chromosomal DNA of Namalwa and IB4 cells. Although the chromosomal sites of EBV DNA association are among those regions with homology to the EBV IR3 repeated DNA sequence, EBV IR3 did not mediate recombination between EBV and chromosomal DNA. Images PMID:6300885

  13. Toxicities of trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin, abortifacient proteins from Chinese medicinal plants, on cultured tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Tsao, S W; Ng, T B; Yeung, H W

    1990-01-01

    Trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin are abortifacient proteins extracted from Chinese medicinal herbs. Study of their in vitro cytotoxicities showed that the two proteins selectively injured choriocarcinoma and melanoma cells. Hepatoma cells represented the most resistant cell line among the various cell lines investigated. Cytotoxicity profiles of trichosanthin and alpha-momorcharin differed from those of anti-cancer drugs which interfere with DNA metabolism such as cisplatin, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. Radioactive precursor incorporation studies suggested that the two abortifacient proteins inhibited cellular protein synthesis. The marked decrease in secretion of human chorionic gonadotrophin and progesterone by choriocarcinoma cells after treatment with the proteins could be attributed mainly to loss of cells. PMID:2175958

  14. Cytocidal activities of topoisomerase 1 inhibitors and 5-azacytidine against pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cells in primary human tumor cultures and mouse cell lines.

    PubMed

    Powers, James F; Korgaonkar, Parimal G; Fliedner, Stephanie; Giubellino, Alessio; Pacak, Karel; Sahagian, G Gary; Tischler, Arthur S

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for metastatic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. A deficiency in current chemotherapy regimens is that the metastases usually grow very slowly. Drugs that target dividing tumor cells have therefore had limited success. To improve treatment, new strategies and valid experimental models are required for pre-clinical testing. However, development of models has itself been hampered by the absence of human pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cell lines for cultures or xenografts. Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors are drugs that interfere with mechanisms that maintain DNA integrity during transcription in both quiescent and dividing cells. We used primary cultures of representative human tumors to establish the cytotoxicity of camptothecin, a prototypical TOP1 inhibitor, against non-dividing pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cells, and then employed a mouse pheochromocytoma model (MPC) to show that efficacy of low concentrations of camptothecin and other TOP1 inhibitors is increased by intermittent coadministration of sub-toxic concentrations of 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor that modulates transcription. We then tested the same drugs against a clonal MPC derivative that expresses CMV reporter-driven luciferase and GFP, intended for in vivo drug testing. Unexpectedly, luciferase expression, bioluminescence and GFP expression were paradoxically increased by both camptothecin and SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, thereby masking cell death. Expression of chromogranin A, a marker for neuroendocrine secretory granules, was not increased, indicating that the drug effects on levels of luciferase and GFP are specific to the GFP-luciferase construct rather than generalized cellular responses. Our findings provide proof of principle for use of TOP1 inhibitors against pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and suggest novel strategies for enhancing efficacy and reducing toxicity by optimizing the combination and timing of their

  15. Cytocidal Activities of Topoisomerase 1 Inhibitors and 5-Azacytidine against Pheochromocytoma/Paraganglioma Cells in Primary Human Tumor Cultures and Mouse Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Powers, James F.; Korgaonkar, Parimal G.; Fliedner, Stephanie; Giubellino, Alessio; Sahagian, Karel Pacak, G. Gary.; Tischler, Arthur S.

    2014-01-01

    There is currently no effective treatment for metastatic pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas. A deficiency in current chemotherapy regimens is that the metastases usually grow very slowly. Drugs that target dividing tumor cells have therefore had limited success. To improve treatment, new strategies and valid experimental models are required for pre-clinical testing. However, development of models has itself been hampered by the absence of human pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cell lines for cultures or xenografts. Topoisomerase 1 (TOP1) inhibitors are drugs that interfere with mechanisms that maintain DNA integrity during transcription in both quiescent and dividing cells. We used primary cultures of representative human tumors to establish the cytotoxicity of camptothecin, a prototypical TOP1 inhibitor, against non-dividing pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma cells, and then employed a mouse pheochromocytoma model (MPC) to show that efficacy of low concentrations of camptothecin and other TOP1 inhibitors is increased by intermittent coadministration of sub-toxic concentrations of 5-azacytidine, a DNA methylation inhibitor that modulates transcription. We then tested the same drugs against a clonal MPC derivative that expresses CMV reporter-driven luciferase and GFP, intended for in vivo drug testing. Unexpectedly, luciferase expression, bioluminescence and GFP expression were paradoxically increased by both camptothecin and SN38, the active metabolite of irinotecan, thereby masking cell death. Expression of chromogranin A, a marker for neuroendocrine secretory granules, was not increased, indicating that the drug effects on levels of luciferase and GFP are specific to the GFP-luciferase construct rather than generalized cellular responses. Our findings provide proof of principle for use of TOP1 inhibitors against pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma and suggest novel strategies for enhancing efficacy and reducing toxicity by optimizing the combination and timing of their

  16. Germ-Line Mutations in the von Hippel–Lindau Tumor-Suppressor Gene Are Similar to Somatic von Hippel–Lindau Aberrations in Sporadic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Whaley, Jean M.; Naglich, Joseph; Gelbert, Lawrence; Hsia, Y. Edward; Lamiell, James M.; Green, Jane S.; Collins, Debra; Neumann, Hartmut P. H.; Laidlaw, Jana; Li, Fred P.; Klein-Szanto, Andres J. P.; Seizinger, Bernd R.; Kley, Nikolai

    1994-01-01

    von Hippel–Lindau (VHL) disease is a hereditary tumor syndrome predisposing to multifocal bilateral renal cell carcinomas (RCCs), pheochromocytomas, and pancreatic tumors, as well as angiomas and hemangioblastomas of the CNS. A candidate gene for VHL was recently identified, which led to the isolation of a partial cDNA clone with extended open reading frame, without significant homology to known genes or obvious functional motifs, except for an acidic pentamer repeat domain. To further characterize the functional domains of the VHL gene and assess its involvement in hereditary and nonhereditary tumors, we performed mutation analyses and studied its expression in normal and tumor tissue. We identified germ-line mutations in 39% of VHL disease families. Moreover, 33% of sporadic RCCs and all (6/6) sporadic RCC cell lines analyzed showed mutations within the VHL gene. Both germ-line and somatic mutations included deletions, insertions, splice-site mutations, and missense and nonsense mutations, all of which clustered at the 3' end of the corresponding partial VHL cDNA open reading frame, including an alternatively spliced exon 123 nt in length, suggesting functionally important domains encoded by the VHL gene in this region. Over 180 sporadic tumors of other types have shown no detectable base changes within the presumed coding sequence of the VHL gene to date. We conclude that the gene causing VHL has an important and specific role in the etiology of sporadic RCCs, acts as a recessive tumor-suppressor gene, and appears to encode important functional domains within the 3' end of the known open reading frame. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5 PMID:7977367

  17. Studies of variation in inherent sensitivities to radiation, 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate in a series of human and murine tumor cell lines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Bellamy, A.S.; Whelan, R.D.H.; Hill, B.T.

    1984-01-01

    Clinical studies have reported reduced response rates to subsequent chemotherapy in certain tumors recurring after radiotherapy. These authors have investigated whether there are any correlations between radiation and drug responses in vitro using a range of murine and human tumor cell lines. They have compared sensitivities to X-irradiation and to 24 hr exposures to two widely used antitumor drugs, methotrexate and 5-fluorouracil. The 4 murine lines selected showed a range of radiation responses with Do values of 0.48-0.76 Gy. Methotrexate sensitivities also exhibited an 800-fold difference which appeared to correlate inversely with radiation response. Sensitivity to 5-FU was less variable in these cells and was unrelated to radiation response. In contrast, in the human lines tested, no correlations were observed between drug sensitivities and radiation response. The six lines tested showed a range of radiation responses with Do values of 0.66-1.59 Gy. Methotrexate sensitivities ranged only over a 150-fold concentration but, contrasting with data from the murine cells, no correlation with radiation response was apparent. Similarly, no correlations between response to 5-fluorouracil and radiation or 5-fluorouracil and methotrexate were noted, which is inconsistent with results using murine cells.

  18. Quantitative assays for the measurement of HER1-HER2 heterodimerization and phosphorylation in cell lines and breast tumors: applications for diagnostics and targeted drug mechanism of action

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Ligand-bound and phosphorylated ErbB/HER heterodimers are potent signaling forms of this receptor family, and quantitative measurements of these active receptors may be predictive of patient response to targeted therapies. Using VeraTag™ technology, we developed and characterized quantitative assays measuring epidermal growth factor (EGF)-dependent increases in activated HER receptors in tumor cell line lysates and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumor sections. We demonstrated the ability of the assays to quantitatively measure changes in activated HER1 and HER2 receptor levels in cell lines following treatment with 2C4, erlotinib, and lapatinib. We utilized these assays to determine the prevalence and distribution of activated HER1, HER2, and HER1-HER2 heterodimers in 43 HER2-positive breast tumors. Methods Assays for activated HER1 and HER2 receptors in FFPE and cell lysate formats were developed using VeraTag™ technology, which requires the proximity of an antibody pair for light-dependent release of a fluorescently labeled tag, followed by capillary electrophoresis-based quantitation. Results Ligand-dependent and independent HER1-HER2 heterodimer levels measured by lysate and FFPE VeraTag™ assays trended with HER1 and HER2 expression levels in tumor cell lines, which was confirmed by co-immunoprecipitation. The formation of EGF-dependent HER1-HER2 heterodimers were inhibited by the HER2-targeted monoclonal antibody 2C4 and stabilized by the HER1 tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) erlotinib. EGF-dependent HER1 and HER2 phosphorylation was inhibited by lapatinib and erlotinib. Further, we observed that dominant receptor signaling patterns may switch between HER1-HER1 and HER1-HER2, depending on drug mechanism of action and relative levels of HER receptors. In FFPE breast tumors that expressed both HER1 and HER2, HER1-HER2 heterodimers were detected in 25 to 50% of tumors, depending on detection method. The levels of activated phospho

  19. Effects of an inhibitor of the γ-secretase complex on proliferation and apoptotic parameters in a FOXL2-mutated granulosa tumor cell line (KGN).

    PubMed

    Irusta, Griselda; Pazos, Maria Camila; Maidana, Camila Pazos; Abramovich, Dalhia; De Zúñiga, Ignacio; Parborell, Fernanda; Tesone, Marta

    2013-07-01

    Ovarian granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) represent 3%-5% of all ovarian malignancies. Treatments have limited proven efficacy and biologically targeted treatment is lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Notch signaling in the proliferation, steroidogenesis, apoptosis, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway in a FOXL2-mutated granulosa tumor cell line (KGN) representative of the adult form of GCTs. When Notch signaling is initiated, the receptors expose a cleavage site in the extracellular domain to the metalloproteinase TACE and, following this cleavage, Notch undergoes another cleavage mediated by the presenilin-gamma-secretase complex. To achieve our goal, DAPT, an inhibitor of the gamma-secretase complex, was used to investigate the role of the Notch system in parameters associated with cell growth and death, using a human granulosa cell tumor line (KGN) as an experimental model. We observed that JAGGED1, DLL4, NOTCH1, and NOTCH4 were highly expressed in KGN cells as compared to granulosa-lutein cells obtained from assisted reproductive techniques patients. The proliferation and viability of KGN cells, as well as progesterone and estradiol production, decreased in the presence of 20 μM DAPT. Apoptotic parameters like PARP and caspase 8 cleavages, BAX, and BCLXs increased in KGN cells cultured with DAPT, whereas others such as BCL2, BCLXl, FAS, and FAS ligand did not change. AKT phosphorylation decreased and PTEN protein increased when Notch signaling was inhibited in KGN cells. We conclude that the Notch system acts as a survival pathway in KGN cells, and might be interacting with the PI3K/AKT pathway. PMID:23699387

  20. Polyoxometalates functionalized by bisphosphonate ligands: synthesis, structural, magnetic, and spectroscopic characterizations and activity on tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    El Moll, Hani; Zhu, Wei; Oldfield, Eric; Rodriguez-Albelo, L Marleny; Mialane, Pierre; Marrot, Jérôme; Vila, Neus; Mbomekallé, Israel Martyr; Rivière, Eric; Duboc, Carole; Dolbecq, Anne

    2012-07-16

    We report the synthesis and characterization of eight new Mo, W, or V-containing polyoxometalate (POM) bisphosphonate complexes with metal nuclearities ranging from 1 to 6. The compounds were synthesized in water by treating Mo(VI), W(VI), V(IV), or V(V) precursors with biologically active bisphosphonates H(2)O(3)PC(R)(OH)PO(3)H(2) (R = C(3)H(6)NH(2), Ale; R = CH(2)S(CH(3))(2), Sul and R = C(4)H(5)N(2), Zol, where Ale = alendronate, Sul = (2-Hydroxy-2,2-bis-phosphono-ethyl)-dimethyl-sulfonium and Zol = zoledronate). Mo(6)(Sul)(2) and Mo(6)(Zol)(2) contain two trinuclear Mo(VI) cores which can rotate around a central oxo group while Mo(Ale)(2) and W(Ale)(2) are mononuclear species. In V(5)(Ale)(2) and V(5)(Zol)(2) a central V(IV) ion is surrounded by two V(V) dimers bound to bisphosphonate ligands. V(6)(Ale)(4) can be viewed as the condensation of one V(5)(Ale)(2) with one additional V(IV) ion and two Ale ligands, while V(3)(Zol)(3) is a triangular V(IV) POM. These new POM bisphosphonates complexes were all characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The stability of the Mo and W POMs was studied by (31)P NMR spectroscopy and showed that all compounds except the mononuclear Mo(Ale)(2) and W(Ale)(2) were stable in solution. EPR measurements performed on the vanadium derivatives confirmed the oxidation state of the V ions and evidenced their stability in aqueous solution. Electrochemical studies on V(5)(Ale)(2) and V(5)(Zol)(2) showed reduction of V(V) to V(IV), and magnetic susceptibility investigations on V(3)(Zol)(3) enabled a detailed analysis of the magnetic interactions. The presence of zoledronate or vanadium correlated with the most potent activity (IC(50)~1-5 μM) against three human tumor cell lines. PMID:22725619

  1. Human dipeptidyl peptidase III mRNA variant I and II are expressed concurrently in multiple tumor derived cell lines and translated at comparable efficiency in vitro.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Subhash C; Chauhan, Shyam S

    2016-06-01

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) is an emerging biomarker of human cancers. Expression, specificity, and function of human DPP III (hDPP III) mRNA variant I (V-I), II (V-II), and III (V-III) are poorly understood. Here, we investigated expression of these variants in multiple human tumor derived cell lines. DNA sequencing revealed concurrent expression of hDPP III V-I and V-II in U87MG (glioblastoma), SCC4 (squamous cell carcinoma), SiHa (carcinoma of uterus) cells. In SKOV1 cells, a cell line derived from ovarian carcinoma where a positive correlation between histological aggressiveness of the malignancy and hDPP III expression has previously been established, only V-II could be detected. Human DPP III V-III, which lacks an in-frame coding sequence, could not be detected in any of these cell lines. 5' untranslated region (UTR) of hDPP III V-II contains nucleotides GCA (-12 to -10 bp) upstream to the translation initiator codon (AUG). These nucleotides are absent from V-I and V-III, however, both V-I and V-II encode for the same hDPP III protein isoform-I. In vitro transcription coupled translation assay using hDPP III V-I and V-II expression vectors which contained full length V-I and V-II cDNA including the variable 5' UTR cloned under T7 promoter, respectively revealed a comparable translational efficiency for both the variants, abrogating involvement of nucleotides GCA (-12 to -10 bp) in translation of the variants. Our results, for the first time, demonstrate concurrent expression in multiple tumor derived cell lines and a comparable in vitro translational efficiency for hDPP III V-I and II. PMID:27153830

  2. Human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 contains a natriuretic peptide receptor system that responds preferentially to ANP among various natriuretic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Katafuchi, T.; Hagiwara, H.; Ito, T.; Kangawa, K.; Matsuo, H.; Hirose, S. )

    1990-12-31

    A new type of ANP receptor system which clearly distinguishes natriuretic peptides A and B (ANP and BNP) has been identified in the human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 and characterized. SW-13 cells responded to nanomolar concentrations of ANP with large increases in cGMP levels but in the case of BNP, much higher concentrations were required to produce the same extent of response. This property is unique since the 140-kDa ANP receptors so far characterized do not discriminate between ANP and BNP. For comparison, various natriuretic peptide receptors were also re-characterized using the recently identified CNP.

  3. Radiation-induced interphase death observed in human T-cell lymphoma cells established as a nude mouse tumor line

    SciTech Connect

    Igarashi, T.; Yoshida, S.; Miyamoto, T. )

    1990-08-01

    Interphase death of cells occurs physiologically in healthy animal tissues as well as in tissues pathologically injured by radiation or drugs. An active self-destruction process has been found to play a major role in the interphase death of highly radiosensitive cells. However, the mechanism of this radiation-induced interphase death in human lymphoma has not yet been studied in detail. In the present study, we examined a lymphoma derived from a child lymphoblastic lymphoma bearing CD1, CD4, and CD8 antigens and established in nude mice. Low-dose x-irradiation of this lymphoma induced interphase cell death with characteristic morphological and biological changes of an active self-destruction process, i.e., changes in cell surface appearance seen using scanning electron microscopy and nuclear fragmentation accompanied with an increase in free DNA. The process was proved to require protein synthesis. It was concluded that the radiosensitivity of this T-cell lymphoma of common thymic type is mainly due to the occurrence of the active self-destruction process.

  4. Recurrent patterns of DNA methylation in the ZNF154, CASP8, and VHL promoters across a wide spectrum of human solid epithelial tumors and cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Vega, Francisco; Gotea, Valer; Petrykowska, Hanna M; Margolin, Gennady; Krivak, Thomas C; DeLoia, Julie A; Bell, Daphne W; Elnitski, Laura

    2013-01-01

    The study of aberrant DNA methylation in cancer holds the key to the discovery of novel biological markers for diagnostics and can help to delineate important mechanisms of disease. We have identified 12 loci that are differentially methylated in serous ovarian cancers and endometrioid ovarian and endometrial cancers with respect to normal control samples. The strongest signal showed hypermethylation in tumors at a CpG island within the ZNF154 promoter. We show that hypermethylation of this locus is recurrent across solid human epithelial tumor samples for 15 of 16 distinct cancer types from TCGA. Furthermore, ZNF154 hypermethylation is strikingly present across a diverse panel of ENCODE cell lines, but only in those derived from tumor cells. By extending our analysis from the Illumina 27K Infinium platform to the 450K platform, to sequencing of PCR amplicons from bisulfite treated DNA, we demonstrate that hypermethylation extends across the breadth of the ZNF154 CpG island. We have also identified recurrent hypomethylation in two genomic regions associated with CASP8 and VHL. These three genes exhibit significant negative correlation between methylation and gene expression across many cancer types, as well as patterns of DNaseI hypersensitivity and histone marks that reflect different chromatin accessibility in cancer vs. normal cell lines. Our findings emphasize hypermethylation of ZNF154 as a biological marker of relevance for tumor identification. Epigenetic modifications affecting the promoters of ZNF154, CASP8, and VHL are shared across a vast array of tumor types and may therefore be important for understanding the genomic landscape of cancer. PMID:24149212

  5. MicroRNA-148b and microRNA-152 reactivate tumor suppressor genes through suppression of DNA methyltransferase-1 gene in pancreatic cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Azizi, Masoumeh; Teimoori-Toolabi, Ladan; Arzanani, Mohsen Karimi; Azadmanesh, Kayhan; Fard-Esfahani, Pezhman; Zeinali, Sirous

    2014-01-01

    Overexpression of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT-1) is observed mostly in pancreatic cancer and it can cause tumor suppressor genes silencing in this disease. Recent studies suggest that abnormal expressions of microRNAs (miRs) are involved in pathogenesis of different types of human cancers including pancreatic cancer. In this study we aimed to investigate the effect of miR-148b and -152 on reverting the tumorigenic phenotype of pancreatic cancer cell lines. In order to investigate whether miR-148b and -152 are involved in the regulation of DNMT-1, luciferase reporter assay was used and confirmed that the DNMT-1 mRNA could be a target for miR-148b and miR-152. Furthermore, overexpression of miR-148b and -152 in pancreatic cancer cell lines (MIA PaCa-2 and AsPC-1) decreased DNMT-1 expression (53% and 59% respectively), returned DNA methylation to normal patterns and induced re-expression of tumor suppressor genes, like BNIP3 (4.7- and 3.8-fold) and SPARC (5.3- and 2.9-fold) for miR-148b and -152 respectively. Moreover, the introduced miR-148b and -152 could inhibit the proliferation of MIA PaCa-2 (35% and 37% respectively) and AsPC-1 (39% and 40% respectively) cell lines. The apoptosis rates of MIA PaCa-1 after treatment with miR-148b and -152 were 10% and 8% respectively; while these rates in AsPC-1 were 16% and 11% respectively. Conclusively these findings mean that miRs that are targeting DNMT-1 and modifying methylation status of tumor suppressor genes such as BNIP3 and SPARC can be applied in killing the pancreatic cancer cells and decreasing the tumorigenicity of these cells. PMID:24448385

  6. Anti-tumor Activity of Ferulago angulata Boiss. Extract in Gastric Cancer Cell Line via Induction of Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Heidari, Shafagh; Akrami, Hassan; Gharaei, Roghaye; Jalili, Ali; Mahdiuni, Hamid; Golezar, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Ferulago angulata Boiss. known in Iran as Chavir, has some bioactive compounds having antioxidant activity. Because of its antioxidant activities, it sounded Chavir extract can be a good candidate for finding chemopreventive agents having inductive apoptosis properties on cancer cells. In this study, the cytotoxic effects and proapoptotic activities of Chavir’s leaf and flower extracts were investigated on human adenocarcinoma gastric cell line (AGS). The ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay was used to determine antioxidant activity of the extract. Cytotoxic effects of the extract were performed by trypan blue and neutral red assays. For apoptosis detection, we used Annexin V staining, flow cytometry and DNA fragmentation assays. The FRAP assay results showed that antioxidant activity of leaf extract was higher than flower extract. Cytotoxicity and apoptosis–inducing activity of flower and leaf extracts changed coordinately, indicating the cytotoxicity of chavir extracts is due probably to induce apoptosis. Our results revealed that the cytotoxic effects of F. angulate Boiss. extracts on AGS cell line is close to some other plant extracts such as Rhus verniciflua Stokes (RVS) and Scutellaria litwinowii. This is the first study on cytotoxic and apoptosis–inducing effects of chavir leaf and flower extracts against AGS cell line. The Further investigation can be identification of the agent(s) by which these effects is observed. PMID:25587323

  7. Canine mast cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Macy, D W

    1985-07-01

    Despite the fact that the mast cell tumor is a common neoplasm of the dog, we still have only a meager understanding of its etiology and biologic behavior. Many of the published recommendations for treatment are based on opinion rather than facts derived from careful studies and should be viewed with some skepticism. Because of the infrequent occurrence of this tumor in man, only a limited amount of help can be expected from human oncologists; therefore, burden of responsibility for progress in predicting behavior and developing treatment effective for canine mast cell tumors must fall on the shoulders of the veterinary profession. PMID:3929444

  8. Constitutive activity of the tumor necrosis factor promoter is canceled by the 3' untranslated region in nonmacrophage cell lines; a trans-dominant factor overcomes this suppressive effect.

    PubMed Central

    Kruys, V; Kemmer, K; Shakhov, A; Jongeneel, V; Beutler, B

    1992-01-01

    The role of the mouse tumor necrosis factor (TNF) promoter, 5' untranslated region (UTR), and 3' UTR in TNF gene expression has been examined in three nonmacrophage cell lines (HeLa, NIH 3T3, and L-929). The TNF promoter is not macrophage-specific. On the contrary, it constitutively drives reporter gene expression in all three cell lines. Not only the full-length promoter but also truncated versions of the promoter, lacking NF-kappa B binding motifs, are active in each type of cell. The TNF 3' UTR effectively cancels reporter gene expression in HeLa cells and in NIH 3T3 cells but fails to block expression in L-929 cells. L-929 cells contain a factor that overcomes the inhibitory influence of the TNF 3' UTR. Its action depends upon the presence of sequences found in the TNF 5' UTR. Cell-fusion experiments reveal that this activator is trans-dominant. These studies highlight the essential role played by the TNF 3' UTR, which silences the TNF gene in cells that might otherwise express TNF. They also reveal the existence of an escape mechanism whereby inappropriate synthesis of TNF might occur. Images PMID:1731340

  9. Efficient expression of bioactive murine IL12 as a self-processing P2A polypeptide driven by inflammation-regulated promoters in tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lorenzo, C; Pérez-Chacón, G; Garaulet, G; Mallorquín, Z; Zapata, J M; Rodríguez, A

    2015-11-01

    Interleukin 12 (IL12) is a heterodimeric proinflammatory cytokine that has shown promise as an anticancer agent. However, despite encouraging results in animal models, clinical trials involving IL12 have been unsuccessful due to toxic side effects associated with its systemic administration, prompting investigation into new delivery methods to confine IL12 expression to the tumor environment. In this study we used the self-cleaving property of the 2A peptide to express both codon-optimized murine IL12 subunits (muIL12opt) as a self-processing polypeptide (muIL12opt-P2A). We cloned muIL12opt-P2A driven by different inflammation-induced lentiviral expression systems to transduce murine tumor cell lines commonly employed in syngeneic tumor models. We confirmed the inducibility of these systems in vitro and in vivo and demonstrated the successful expression of both IL12 subunits and the release of bioactive IL12 upon proinflammatory stimulation in vitro. Therefore, IL12 release driven by these inflammation-regulated expression systems might be useful not only to address the impact of IL12 expression in the tumor environment but also to achieve a local IL12 release controlled by the inflammation state of the tumor, thus avoiding toxic side effects associated with systemic administration. PMID:26450626

  10. Expression of human selenoprotein genes selh, selk, selm, sels, selv, and gpx-6 in various tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Varlamova, E G; Goltyaev, M V; Fesenko, E E

    2016-05-01

    The expression level of the genes encoding six selenocysteine-containing human proteins was determined in the brain, cervical, liver, breast, prostate, and human fibrosarcoma cancer cells. It was found that a high level of expression in all studied types genes of tumor cells is characteristic for selh, selk, and selm genes, encoding SelH, SelK, and SelM proteins, respectively, whereas a complete lack of such expression was shown for gpx-6, selv, and sels genes. The results of this work can be regarded as a major prerequisite for further studies on the role of the three selenoproteins SelH, SelK, and SelM in the regulation of carcinogenesis processes associated with these types of cancer. PMID:27417721

  11. GSH, GSH-related enzymes and GS-X pump in relation to sensitivity of human tumor cell lines to chlorambucil and adriamycin.

    PubMed

    Zhang, K; Yang, E B; Wong, K P; Mack, P

    1999-05-01

    Glutathione (GSH) contents and activities of glutathione S-transferase (GST), glutathione reductase (GSH-RD), glutathione peroxidase (GSHpx) and glutathione conjugate export pump (GS-X pump) were determined in eight human tumor cell lines with different sensitivities to adriamycin and chlorambucil. Correlations between sensitivities of the human tumor cells to adriamycin and chlorambucil and the glutathione related factors were analyzed statistically. Sensitivities of the human tumor cells to chlorambucil were found to be correlated to all the glutathione related factors tested (r=0.68-0.88). IC50 values of adriamycin were also positively correlated to GSH contents and activities of GSH-RD, GSHpx and GS-X pump with r values ranging from 0.66 to 0.77 but not to GST activity (r=0.25). Chang liver cells with highest GSH content and highest activities of GST, GSH-RD, GSHpx and GS-X pump were most resistant to both adriamycin and chlorambucil. These data suggested that glutathione related factors may work as an overall detoxification system participating in the detoxification of anticancer drugs such as adriamycin and chlorambucil, and to be involved in cellular resistance to these drugs. PMID:10200335

  12. Brain tumor stem cells.

    PubMed

    Palm, Thomas; Schwamborn, Jens C

    2010-06-01

    Since the end of the 'no-new-neuron' theory, emerging evidence from multiple studies has supported the existence of stem cells in neurogenic areas of the adult brain. Along with this discovery, neural stem cells became candidate cells being at the origin of brain tumors. In fact, it has been demonstrated that molecular mechanisms controlling self-renewal and differentiation are shared between brain tumor stem cells and neural stem cells and that corruption of genes implicated in these pathways can direct tumor growth. In this regard, future anticancer approaches could be inspired by uncovering such redundancies and setting up treatments leading to exhaustion of the cancer stem cell pool. However, deleterious effects on (normal) neural stem cells should be minimized. Such therapeutic models underline the importance to study the cellular mechanisms implicated in fate decisions of neural stem cells and the oncogenic derivation of adult brain cells. In this review, we discuss the putative origins of brain tumor stem cells and their possible implications on future therapies. PMID:20370314

  13. Testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Looijenga, Leendert H J

    2014-02-01

    Human germ cell tumors are of interest because of their epidemiology, clinical behavior and pathobiology. Histologically, they are subdivided into various elements, with similarities to embryogenesis. Recent insights resulted in a division of five types of human germ cell tumors. In the context of male germ cells, three are relevant; Type I: teratomas and yolk sac tumors of neonates and infants; Type II: seminomas and nonseminomas of (predominantly) adolescents and adults; and Type III: spermatocytic seminomas of the elderly. Recent studies led to significant increases in understanding of the parameters involved in the earliest pathogenetic steps of human germ cells tumors, in particularly the seminomas and nonseminomas (Type II). In case of a disturbed gonadal physiology, either due to the germ cell itself, or the micro-environment, embryonic germ cells during a specific window of sensitization can be blocked in their maturation, resulting in carcinoma in situ or gonadoblastoma, the precursors of seminomas and nonseminomas. The level of testicularization of the gonad determines the histological composition of the precursor. These insights will allow better definition of individuals at risk to develop a germ cell malignancy, with putative preventive measurements, and allow better selection of scientific approaches to elucidate the pathogenesis. PMID:24683949

  14. Induction of apoptosis in Neurofibromatosis Type 1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor cell lines by a combination of novel farnesyl transferase inhibitors and lovastatin

    PubMed Central

    Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Fouad, Farid; LaLonde, Daniel T.; Kleinman, Miriam D.; Gibbs, Richard A.; Reiners, John J.; Borch, Richard F.; Mattingly, Raymond R.

    2013-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis Type 1 (NF1) is a genetic disorder that is driven by the loss of neurofibromin (Nf) protein function. Nf contains a Ras GTPase activating domain (Ras-GAP), which directly regulates Ras signaling. Numerous clinical manifestations are associated with the loss of Nf and increased Ras activity. Ras proteins must be prenylated in order to traffic and functionally localize with target membranes. Hence, Ras is a potential therapeutic target for treating NF1. We have tested the efficacy of two novel farnesyl transferase inhibitors (FTI), 1 and 2, alone or in combination with lovastatin, on two NF1 malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor (MPSNT) cell lines, NF90-8 and ST88-14. Single treatments of 1, 2, or lovastatin had no effect on MPNST cell proliferation. However, low micromolar combinations of 1 or 2 with lovastatin (FTI/lovastatin) reduced Ras prenylation in both MPNST cell lines. Further, this FTI/lovastatin combination treatment reduced cell proliferation and induced an apoptotic response as shown by morphological analysis, pro-caspase-3/-7 activation, loss of mitochondrial membrane potential, and accumulation of cells with sub G1 DNA content. Little to no detectable toxicity was observed in normal rat Schwann cells following FTI/lovastatin combination treatment. These data support the hypothesis that combination FTI plus lovastatin therapy may be a potential treatment for NF1 MPNSTs. PMID:18367665

  15. Altered glycosylation in tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reading, C.L. ); Hakomori, S. ); Marcus, D.M. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceeding on the following: Glycoconjugates of normal and tumor cells; Glycosyltransferases in normal and neoplastic cells; Mammalian lectins of normal tissues and tumor cells; and Immune recognition of carbohydrates and clinical applications.

  16. Expression of the class II tumor suppressor gene RIG1 is directly regulated by p53 tumor suppressor in cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Tzu-Hui; Chu, Chin-Chen; Jiang, Shun-Yuan; Hung, May-Whey; Ni, Wen-Chieh; Lin, Huai-En; Chang, Tsu-Chung

    2012-05-01

    Recent studies indicated that the RIG1 (RARRES3/TIG3) plays an important role in cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. However, the regulatory mechanism of RIG1 gene expression has not been clearly elucidated. In this study, we identified a functional p53 response element (p53RE) in the RIG1 gene promoter. Transfection studies revealed that the RIG1 promoter activity was greatly enhanced by wild type but not mutated p53 protein. Sequence specific mutation of the p53RE abolished p53-mediated transactivation. Specific binding of p53 protein to the rig-p53RE was demonstrated using electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. Further studies confirmed that the expression of RIG1 mRNA and protein is enhanced through increased p53 protein in HepG2 or in H24-H1299 cells. In conclusion, our results indicated that RIG1 gene is a downstream target of p53 in cancer cell lines. PMID:22616991

  17. Inverse relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 early gene expression and cell differentiation in nude mouse epithelial cysts and tumors induced by HPV-positive human cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Dürst, M; Bosch, F X; Glitz, D; Schneider, A; zur Hausen, H

    1991-01-01

    Two human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16)-immortalized human keratinocyte cell lines (HPK) were shown to have retained the ability for differentiation after subcutaneous injection into nude mice. These properties were maintained even at late passage. HPK cells gave rise to transiently growing cysts which exhibited an epitheliumlike architecture. Moreover, differentiation-specific markers such as cytokeratin 10, involucrin, and filaggrin were shown to be expressed in an ordered succession. RNA-RNA in situ hybridization revealed heterogeneous and low levels of HPV 16 E6-E7 RNA in the basal layer of the cysts. In contrast, in progressively growing tumors induced by HPK cells containing an activated ras oncogene (EJ-ras) or in tumors induced by the cervical carcinoma cell line CaSki, high levels of E6-E7-specific RNA could be detected. Irrespective of the growth potential of these cell lines in nude mice, viral transcription was always more evident in the basal layer and in proliferatively active cells rather than in differentiated cells. This contrasts with viral gene expression in HPV 16 positive low-grade cervical dysplasia, in which abundant viral transcriptional activity was mapped to the upper third of the epithelium. It is suggested that the physical state of the viral DNA, i.e., integrated viral DNA in the cell lines as opposed to extrachromosomal DNA in low-grade cervical dysplasia, may influence viral gene regulation. Images PMID:1846200

  18. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs. PMID:26902424

  19. Establishment of a Conditionally Immortalized Wilms Tumor Cell Line with a Homozygous WT1 Deletion within a Heterozygous 11p13 Deletion and UPD Limited to 11p15

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Artur; Löhers, Katharina; Beier, Manfred; Leube, Barbara; de Torres, Carmen; Mora, Jaume; Arora, Parineeta; Jat, Parmjit S.; Royer-Pokora, Brigitte

    2016-01-01

    We describe a stromal predominant Wilms tumor with focal anaplasia and a complex, tumor specific chromosome 11 aberration: a homozygous deletion of the entire WT1 gene within a heterozygous 11p13 deletion and an additional region of uniparental disomy (UPD) limited to 11p15.5-p15.2 including the IGF2 gene. The tumor carried a heterozygous p.T41A mutation in CTNNB1. Cells established from the tumor carried the same chromosome 11 aberration, but a different, homozygous p.S45Δ CTNNB1 mutation. Uniparental disomy (UPD) 3p21.3pter lead to the homozygous CTNNB1 mutation. The tumor cell line was immortalized using the catalytic subunit of human telomerase (hTERT) in conjunction with a novel thermolabile mutant (U19dl89-97tsA58) of SV40 large T antigen (LT). This cell line is cytogenetically stable and can be grown indefinitely representing a valuable tool to study the effect of a complete lack of WT1 in tumor cells. The origin/fate of Wilms tumors with WT1 mutations is currently poorly defined. Here we studied the expression of several genes expressed in early kidney development, e.g. FOXD1, PAX3, SIX1, OSR1, OSR2 and MEIS1 and show that these are expressed at similar levels in the parental and the immortalized Wilms10 cells. In addition the limited potential for muscle/ osteogenic/ adipogenic differentiation similar to all other WT1 mutant cell lines is also observed in the Wilms10 tumor cell line and this is retained in the immortalized cells. In summary these Wilms10 cells are a valuable model system for functional studies of WT1 mutant cells. PMID:27213811

  20. Caveolin-1, Caveolin-2 and Cavin-1 are strong predictors of adipogenic differentiation in human tumors and cell lines of liposarcoma.

    PubMed

    Codenotti, Silvia; Vezzoli, Marika; Poliani, Pietro Luigi; Cominelli, Manuela; Bono, Federica; Kabbout, Hadi; Faggi, Fiorella; Chiarelli, Nicola; Colombi, Marina; Zanella, Isabella; Biasiotto, Giorgio; Montanelli, Alessandro; Caimi, Luigi; Monti, Eugenio; Fanzani, Alessandro

    2016-08-01

    Caveolins (Cav-1, -2 and -3) and Cavins (Cavin-1, -2, -3 and -4) are two protein families controlling the biogenesis and function of caveolae, plasma membrane omega-like invaginations representing the primary site of important cellular processes like endocytosis, cholesterol homeostasis and signal transduction. Caveolae are especially abundant in fat tissue, playing a consistent role in a number of processes, such as the insulin-dependent glucose uptake and transmembrane transport of lipids underlying differentiation, maintenance and adaptive hypertrophy of adipocytes. Based on this premise, in this work we have investigated the expression of caveolar protein components in liposarcoma (LPS), an adipocytic soft tissue sarcoma affecting adults categorized in well-differentiated, dedifferentiated, myxoid and pleomorphic histotypes. By performing an extensive microarray data analysis followed by immunohistochemistry on human LPS tumors, we demonstrated that Cav-1, Cav-2 and Cavin-1 always cluster in all the histotypes, reaching the highest expression in well-differentiated LPS, the least aggressive of the malignant forms composed by tumor cells with a morphology resembling mature adipocytes. In vitro experiments carried out using two human LPS cell lines showed that the expression levels of Cav-1, Cav-2 and Cavin-1 proteins were faintly detectable during cell growth, becoming consistently increased during the accumulation of intracellular lipid droplets characterizing the adipogenic differentiation. Moreover, in differentiated LPS cells the three proteins were also found to co-localize and form molecular aggregates at the plasma membrane, as shown via immunofluorescence and immunoprecipitation analysis. Overall, these data indicate that Cav-1, Cav-2 and Cavin-1 may be considered as reliable markers for identification of LPS tumors characterized by consistent adipogenic differentiation. PMID:27168348

  1. Tumor cell intravasation.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Serena P H; Cabrera, Ramon M; Segall, Jeffrey E

    2016-07-01

    The process of entering the bloodstream, intravasation, is a necessary step in the development of distant metastases. The focus of this review is on the pathways and molecules that have been identified as being important based on current in vitro and in vivo assays for intravasation. Properties of the vasculature which are important for intravasation include microvessel density and also diameter of the vasculature, with increased intravasation correlating with increased vessel diameter in some tumors. TGFB signaling can enhance intravasation at least in part through induction of EMT, and we discuss other TGFB target genes that are important for intravasation. In addition to TGFB signaling, a number of studies have demonstrated that activation of EGF receptor family members stimulates intravasation, with downstream signaling through PI3K, N-WASP, RhoA, and WASP to induce invadopodia. With respect to proteases, there is strong evidence for contributions by uPA/uPAR, while the roles of MMPs in intravasation may be more tumor specific. Other cells including macrophages, fibroblasts, neutrophils, and platelets can also play a role in enhancing tumor cell intravasation. The technology is now available to interrogate the expression patterns of circulating tumor cells, which will provide an important reality check for the model systems being used. With a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying intravasation, the goal is to provide new opportunities for improving prognosis as well as potentially developing new treatments. PMID:27076614

  2. Knockdown of aberrantly upregulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor reduces tumor growth and metastasis of MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    Goode, Gennifer; Ballard, Billy R.; Manning, H Charles; Freeman, Michael L; Kang, Yibin; Eltom, Sakina E

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a ligand-activated transcription factor that belongs to the basic-helix-loop-helix (bHLH)–Per-ARNT-Sim (PAS) superfamily of transcription factors, mediates toxic response induced by environmental chemicals such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH). AhR is expressed at high levels in several human breast carcinoma cell lines in direct correlation with the degree of their malignancy. Recent studies suggest a possible role for AhR in cancer independent of PAH. Therefore, we established stable AhR knockdown cells of the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 and analyzed their tumorigenic properties in in vitro and in vivo model systems. In addition we analyzed their response to radiation and chemotherapeutic treatment. AhR knockdown attenuated these cells tumorigenic properties in vitro including proliferation, anchorage independent growth, migration and apoptosis and reduced orthotopic xenograft tumor growth and lung metastasis in vivo. Notably, we observed that AhR knockdown enhanced radiation-induced apoptosis as well as significantly decreased cell clonogenic survival. Furthermore, AhR knockdown in MDA-MB-231 cells sensitized them to paclitaxel treatment, evident by a decrease in the required cytotoxic dose. Subsequent analysis revealed AhR knockdown significantly reduced phosphorylation of AKT, which impacts cell proliferation and survival. Apoptosis-focused gene expression analyses revealed an altered expression of genes regulating apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 cells. Collectively, our data identify AhR as a potential novel therapeutic target in the treatment of metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23733406

  3. Induction of a high phagocytic capability in P388D1, a macrophage-like tumor cell line, by 1 alpha, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3.

    PubMed

    Goldman, R

    1984-01-01

    1 alpha, 25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25-(OH)2D3] was shown to induce a high phagocytic capability in the macrophage-like murine tumor cell line P388D1. Induction of phagocytic capability by 1,25-(OH)2D3 was dose-dependent in the range of 0.2 to 5.0 ng/ml, required the continuous presence of the secosteroid in culture, and was reversible. 25-Hydroxyvitamin D3 was an effective inducer only at about 500 ng/ml, while 24R,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 was ineffective. The induction of the high phagocytic capability was neither accompanied by increased synthesis of lysozyme nor closely associated with an inhibitory effect on cellular proliferation. P388D1 cells bound (without ingestion) nonopsonized sheep erythrocytes (sheep RBC), and the binding increased in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells. Fc-receptor-mediated binding of immunoglobulin G-coated sheep RBC was not modulated in 1,25-(OH)2D3-treated cells, but the cells acquired an Fc-receptor-mediated phagocytic capability that was expressed only when preformed P388D1-sheep RBC rosettes were further exposed to immunoglobulin G. Several differentiation agents of myeloid leukemia cells (including dexamethasone) were not effective in inducing the high-phagocytic phenotype, while retinoic acid was very effective. Different myeloid or macrophage-like tumors (WEHI-265, J774.2, PU-5, and WEHI-3) were variable in their response to 1,25-(OH)2D3. PMID:6546302

  4. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E.

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging them. Additional protocols for labeling macrophages, blood vessel imaging, and image analysis are also included. PMID:23456602

  5. [Mediastinal germ cell tumors].

    PubMed

    Bremmer, F; Ströbel, P

    2016-09-01

    The mediastinum is among the most frequent anatomic region in which germ cell tumors (GCT) arise, second only to the gonads. Mediastinal GCT (mGCT) account for 16 % of all mediastinal neoplasms. Although the morphology and (according to all available data) the molecular genetics of mediastinal and gonadal GCT are identical, a number of unique aspects exist. There is a highly relevant bi-modal age distribution. In pre-pubertal children of both sexes, mGCT consist exclusively of teratomas and yolk sac tumors. The prognosis is generally favorable with modern treatment. In post-pubertal adults, virtually all patients with malignant mGCT are males; the prognosis is more guarded and depends (among other factors) on the histological GCT components and is similar to GCT in other organs. So-called somatic type malignancies (i. e. clonally related, non-germ cell neoplasias arising in a GCT) are much more frequent in mGCT than in other organs, and the association between mediastinal yolk sac tumors and hematological malignancies, such as myelodysplasias and leukemias, is unique to mediastinal tumors. The prognosis of GCT with somatic type malignancies is generally dismal. PMID:27491549

  6. Role of self carriers in the immune response and tolerance. XI. Correlation of Ia expression and interleukin-1 production with delivery of immunogenic signals in vivo by hapten-modified accessory cell-like tumor lines.

    PubMed

    Cogswell, J P; Phipps, R P; Scott, D W

    1988-06-01

    It was recently demonstrated that a lymphoid dendritic-like tumor, P388AD.2, presented hapten-modified self (HMS) in an immunogenic fashion even after injection via the normally "tolerogenic" intravenous (iv) route. To determine whether this property was unique to the P388AD.2 line, other hapten-modified tumors were administered iv and the result of their presentation was measured by changes in the number of splenic plaque-forming cells (PFC) following in vitro challenge with thymic-independent antigens. Of the six tumors tested, two (P388 and J774.5R) primed for augmented PFC responses, while four others (P388NA.10, P388D1, WEHI-231, and 70Z/3) did not. When these tumors were compared for Ia expression and production of interleukin-1 (IL-1), it was discovered that (1) all of the immunogenic tumors were Ia+ and IL-1 producing (IL-1+), although not all Ia+,IL-1+ tumors could elicit augmented PFC responses; (2) none of the tumors that were deficient in either Ia expression or IL-1 production could prime B-cell responses in vivo; and (3) the ability to augment PFC responses was proportional to the density of Ia on the immunogenic tumors. These results demonstrated that P388AD.2 was not the only tumor line capable of presenting HMS iv as an immunogen, and that the accessory cell phenotype is critical for the induction of an immunogenic response in vivo. PMID:3259475

  7. Dipyrithione induces cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in four cancer cell lines in vitro and inhibits tumor growth in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dipyrithione (PTS2) is widely used as a bactericide and fungicide. Here, we investigated whether PTS2 has broad-spectrum antitumor activity by studying its cytotoxicity and proapoptotic effects in four cancer cell lines. Methods We used MTT assays and trypan blue staining to test the viability of cancer cell lines. Hoechst 33258 and DAPI staining were used to observe cell apoptosis. Cell-cycle percentages were analyzed by flow cytometry. Apoptosis was assayed using caspase-3 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) combined with Western blotting. Student’s t-test was used for statistical analysis. Results PTS2 inhibited proliferation in four cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Treated cells showed shrinkage, irregular fragments, condensed and dispersed blue fluorescent particles compared with control cells. PTS2 induced cycle-arrest and death. Cleavage of caspase-9, caspase-3, and PARP were detected in PTS2-treated cells. Antitumor activity of PTS2 was more effective against widely used cancer drugs and its precursor. Conclusions PTS2 appears to have novel cytotoxicity and potent broad-spectrum antitumor activity, which suggests its potential as the basis of an anticancer drug. PMID:24139500

  8. Characterization and affinity cross-linking of receptors for human recombinant lymphotoxin (tumor necrosis factor-beta) on a human histiocytic lymphoma cell line, U-937

    SciTech Connect

    Stauber, G.B.; Aggarwal, B.B.

    1989-02-25

    Recombinant human lymphotoxin (rhLT) expressed in a mammalian cell line was purified and used to examine its receptors on the human histiocytic lymphoma cell line U-937. rhLT was radioiodinated by the IODO-GEN method to a specific activity of 60 microCi/micrograms; the labeled protein was biologically active in the cytolytic assay, and displaceable binding to U-937 cells was observed. The specific binding reached a plateau within 10, 60, and 180 min at 37, 23, and 4 degrees C, respectively. Scatchard analysis of the binding data revealed the presence of a single class of high affinity receptors with an apparent Kd of 0.6 nM and a capacity of 33,000 +/- 7,000 binding sites/cell. The binding of 125I-rhLT to U-937 cells could be inhibited by excess unlabeled rhLT or recombinant human tumor necrosis factor (rhTNF), suggesting a common receptor for both molecules. As competitive inhibitor of the binding, rhTNF was equal in its potency to rhLT. Bacterial derived rhLT lacking carbohydrate was also found equipotent to cell line-derived rhLT for cell binding, indicating that carbohydrate plays no significant role in receptor interaction. Additionally, 125I-rhLT was covalently attached to the cell surface via a bifunctional cross-linking reagent, ethylene glycol bis(succinimidyl succinate), solubilized, and analyzed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The cross-linking of the receptor to rhLT revealed two distinct bands at approximate molecular masses of 100,000 and 120,000 daltons. Both bands were absent when unlabeled rhLT or rhTNF was used for competition, indicating the specificity. Affinity cross-linking of U-937 cells with 125I-rhTNF, however, provided only a single band with a molecular mass of about 100,000 daltons. These results suggest that the manner in which rhLT interacts with its receptor is perhaps somewhat different from that of rhTNF.

  9. Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Bafna, Sweety Sagarmal; Joy, Tabita; Tupkari, Jagdish Vishnu; Landge, Jayant Shivaji

    2016-01-01

    Dentinogenic ghost cell tumor (DGCT) is a rare, odontogenic neoplasm which is considered to be a solid variant of calcifying odontogenic cyst (COC) with locally aggressive behavior. It accounts for only 2–14% of all COCs. To the best of our knowledge, only 88 cases of DGCT have been reported in the literature from 1968 to 2014. Herewith, we report a case of DGCT in a 68-year-old male patient with clinical presentation as a soft tissue growth over alveolar ridge and histopathologically characterized by ameloblastomatous epithelium, abundance of eosinophilic material and ghost cells. PMID:27194885

  10. Large scale integration of drug-target information reveals poly-pharmacological drug action mechanisms in tumor cell line growth inhibition assays

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Richard A.; Gostev, Mikhail; Ilisavskii, Sergei; Willis, Anne E.; Melino, Gerry; Antonov, Alexey V.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding therapeutic mechanisms of drug anticancer cytotoxicity represents a key challenge in preclinical testing. Here we have performed a meta-analysis of publicly available tumor cell line growth inhibition assays (~ 70 assays from 6 independent experimental groups covering ~ 500 000 molecules) with the primary goal of understanding molecular therapeutic mechanisms of cancer cytotoxicity. To implement this we have collected currently available information on protein targets for molecules that were tested in the assays. We used a statistical methodology to identify protein targets overrepresented among molecules exhibiting cancer cytotoxicity with the particular focus of identifying overrepresented patterns consisting of several proteins (i.e. proteins “A” and “B” and “C”). Our analysis demonstrates that targeting individual proteins can result in a significant increase (up to 50-fold) of the observed odds for a molecule to be an efficient inhibitor of tumour cell line growth. However, further insight into potential molecular mechanisms reveals a multi-target mode of action: targeting a pattern of several proteins drastically increases the observed odds (up to 500-fold) for a molecule to be tumour cytotoxic. In contrast, molecules targeting only one protein but not targeting an additional set of proteins tend to be nontoxic. Our findings support a poly-pharmacology drug discovery paradigm, demonstrating that anticancer cytotoxicity is a product, in most cases, of multi-target mode of drug action PMID:24553133

  11. Dibutyltin(IV) complexes containing arylazobenzoate ligands: chemistry, in vitro cytotoxic effects on human tumor cell lines and mode of interaction with some enzymes.

    PubMed

    Basu Baul, Tushar S; Paul, Anup; Pellerito, Lorenzo; Scopelliti, Michelangelo; Singh, Palwinder; Verma, Pooja; Duthie, Andrew; de Vos, Dick; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2011-04-01

    Dibutyltin(IV) complexes of composition Bu₂Sn(LH)₂, where LH is a carboxylate residue derived from 2-[(E)-(5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoate (L¹H) with water molecule (1), 4-[(E)-(5-tert-butyl-2-hydroxyphenyl)diazenyl]benzoate (L²H) (2) and 4-[(E)-(4-hydroxy-5-methylphenyl)diazenyl]benzoate (L³H) (3), were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (¹H, ¹³C and ¹¹⁹Sn NMR, IR, ¹¹⁹Sn Mössbauer) techniques. A full characterization was accomplished from the crystal structure of complex 1. The molecular structures and geometries of the complexes (1a i.e. 1 without water molecule and 3) were fully optimized using the quantum mechanical method (PM6). Complexes 1 and 3 were found to exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity in vitro across a panel of human tumor cell lines viz., A498, EVSA-T, H226, IGROV, M19 MEL, MCF-7 and WIDR. Compound 3 is found to be four times superior for the A498, EVSA-T and MCF-7 cell lines than CCDP (cisplatin), and four, eight and sixteen times superior for the A498, H226 and MCF-7 cell lines, respectively, compared to ETO (etoposide). The mechanistic role of cytotoxic activity of test compounds is discussed in relation to the theoretical results of docking studies with some key enzymes such as ribonucleotide reductase, thymidylate synthase, thymidylate phosphorylase and topoisomerase II associated with the propagation of cancer. PMID:20012338

  12. The synergistic effect between vanillin and doxorubicin in ehrlich ascites carcinoma solid tumor and MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Elsherbiny, Nehal M; Younis, Nahla N; Shaheen, Mohamed A; Elseweidy, Mohamed M

    2016-09-01

    Despite the remarkable anti-tumor activity of doxorubicin (DOX), its clinical application is limited due to multiple organ toxicities. Products with less side effects are therefore highly requested. The current study investigated the anti-cancer activities of vanillin against breast cancer and possible synergistic potentiation of DOX chemotherapeutic effects by vanillin. Vanillin (100mg/kg), DOX (2mg/kg) and their combination were administered i.p. to solid Ehrlich tumor-bearing mice for 21days. MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line was treated with vanillin (1 and 2mM), DOX (100μM) or their combination. Protection against DOX-induced nephrotoxicity was studied in rats that received vanillin (100mg/kg, ip) for 10days with a single dose of DOX (15mg/kg) on day 6. Vanillin exerted anticancer effects comparable to DOX and synergesticlly potentiated DOX anticancer effects both in-vivo and in-vitro. The anticancer potency of vanillin in-vivo was mediated via apoptosis and antioxidant capacity. It also offered an in-vitro growth inhibitory effect and cytotoxicity mediated by apoptosis (increased caspase-9 and Bax:Bcl-2 ratio) along with anti-metasasis effect. Vanillin protected against DOX-induced nephrotoxicity in rats. In conclusion, vanillin can be a potential lead molecule for the development of non-toxic agents for the treatment of breast cancer either alone or combined with DOX. PMID:27493101

  13. Cathepsin S from both tumor and tumor-associated cells promote cancer growth and neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Small, Donna M; Burden, Roberta E; Jaworski, Jakub; Hegarty, Shauna M; Spence, Shaun; Burrows, James F; McFarlane, Cheryl; Kissenpfennig, Adrien; McCarthy, Helen O; Johnston, James A; Walker, Brian; Scott, Christopher J

    2013-11-01

    Recent murine studies have demonstrated that tumor-associated macrophages in the tumor microenvironment are a key source of the pro-tumorigenic cysteine protease, cathepsin S. We now show in a syngeneic colorectal carcinoma murine model that both tumor and tumor-associated cells contribute cathepsin S to promote neovascularization and tumor growth. Cathepsin S depleted and control colorectal MC38 tumor cell lines were propagated in both wild type C57Bl/6 and cathepsin S null mice to provide stratified depletion of the protease from either the tumor, tumor-associated host cells, or both. Parallel analysis of these conditions showed that deletion of cathepsin S inhibited tumor growth and development, and revealed a clear contribution of both tumor and tumor-associated cell derived cathepsin S. The most significant impact on tumor development was obtained when the protease was depleted from both sources. Further characterization revealed that the loss of cathepsin S led to impaired tumor vascularization, which was complemented by a reduction in proliferation and increased apoptosis, consistent with reduced tumor growth. Analysis of cell types showed that in addition to the tumor cells, tumor-associated macrophages and endothelial cells can produce cathepsin S within the microenvironment. Taken together, these findings clearly highlight a manner by which tumor-associated cells can positively contribute to developing tumors and highlight cathepsin S as a therapeutic target in cancer. PMID:23629809

  14. Physalin A exerts anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines by suppressing JAK/STAT3 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Loo, Jacky F.C.; Xia, Dajin; Gao, Sizhi P.; Ma, Zhongjun; Chen, Zhe

    2016-01-01

    The signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of various human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of physalin A, a bioactive withanolide derived from Physalis alkekengi var. francheti used in traditional Chinese medicine, was evaluated in human NSCLC cells. Its and determined whether it effect oninhibited both constitutive and induced STAT3 activity, through repressing the phosphorylation levels of JAK2 and JAK3, resulting in anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects on NSCLC cells was also determined, and. theThe antitumor effects of physalin A were also validated usingin an in vivo mouse xenograft models of NSCLC cells. Physalin A had anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in NSCLC cells with constitutively activated STAT3; it also suppressed both constitutive and induced STAT3 activity by modulating the phosphorylation of JAK2 and JAK3. Furthermore, physalin A abrogated the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of STAT3, thereby decreasing the expression levels of STAT3, its target genes, such as Bcl-2 and XIAP. Knockdown of STAT3 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of physalin A in NSCLC cells. Moreover, physalin A significantly suppressed tumor xenograft growth. Thus, as an inhibitor of JAK2/3-STAT3 signaling, physalin A, has potent anti-tumor activities, which may facilitate the development of a therapeutic strategy for treating NSCLC. PMID:26843613

  15. Physalin A exerts anti-tumor activity in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines by suppressing JAK/STAT3 signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Fanfan; Dai, Chunyan; Fu, Yufei; Loo, Jacky F C; Xia, Dajin; Gao, Sizhi P; Ma, Zhongjun; Chen, Zhe

    2016-02-23

    The signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling pathway plays critical roles in the pathogenesis and progression of various human cancers, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we aimed to evaluate the therapeutic potential of physalin A, a bioactive withanolide derived from Physalis alkekengi var. francheti used in traditional Chinese medicine, was evaluated in human NSCLC cells. Its and determined whether it effect oninhibited both constitutive and induced STAT3 activity, through repressing the phosphorylation levels of JAK2 and JAK3, resulting in anti-proliferation and pro-apoptotic effects on NSCLC cells was also determined, and. theThe antitumor effects of physalin A were also validated usingin an in vivo mouse xenograft models of NSCLC cells. Physalin A had anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic effects in NSCLC cells with constitutively activated STAT3; it also suppressed both constitutive and induced STAT3 activity by modulating the phosphorylation of JAK2 and JAK3. Furthermore, physalin A abrogated the nuclear translocation and transcriptional activity of STAT3, thereby decreasing the expression levels of STAT3, its target genes, such as Bcl-2 and XIAP. Knockdown of STAT3 expression by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly enhanced the pro-apoptotic effects of physalin A in NSCLC cells. Moreover, physalin A significantly suppressed tumor xenograft growth. Thus, as an inhibitor of JAK2/3-STAT3 signaling, physalin A, has potent anti-tumor activities, which may facilitate the development of a therapeutic strategy for treating NSCLC. PMID:26843613

  16. Functional alterations induced by the food contaminant furazolidone on the human tumoral intestinal cell line Caco-2.

    PubMed

    Vincentini, O; De Angelis, I; Stammati, A; Zucco, F

    1993-07-01

    Caco-2 cells, which are derived from a human colon carcinoma and are able to differentiate in culture, have been used to study the effect of furazolidone (FZ), a chemical belonging to the nitrofuran family which is frequently used for the prevention of animal infections. Its potentially toxic residues could remain in some food products of animal origin and affect human health. Toxicity has been measured by different parameters, either in undifferentiated cells (day 7 of culture), or on differentiated cells (day 21 of culture). Our results indicate that FZ may seriously affect the proliferating portion of the intestinal mucosa, while the differentiated cells appear to be more resistant. However, the slight effect recorded on the aspecific and specific functions of the differentiated cells may suggest that the specialized portion of the intestine can also be compromised by the drug. Caco 2 cells seem a good model for a deeper investigation of the mechanism involved in the toxic action of FZ. PMID:20732223

  17. Spontaneous γH2AX Foci in Human Solid Tumor-Derived Cell Lines in Relation to p21WAF1 and WIP1 Expression

    PubMed Central

    Mirzayans, Razmik; Andrais, Bonnie; Scott, April; Wang, Ying W.; Weiss, Robert H.; Murray, David

    2015-01-01

    Phosphorylation of H2AX on Ser139 (γH2AX) after exposure to ionizing radiation produces nuclear foci that are detectable by immunofluorescence microscopy. These so-called γH2AX foci have been adopted as quantitative markers for DNA double-strand breaks. High numbers of spontaneous γH2AX foci have also been reported for some human solid tumor-derived cell lines, but the molecular mechanism(s) for this response remains elusive. Here we show that cancer cells (e.g., HCT116; MCF7) that constitutively express detectable levels of p21WAF1 (p21) exhibit low numbers of γH2AX foci (<3/nucleus), whereas p21 knockout cells (HCT116p21−/−) and constitutively low p21-expressing cells (e.g., MDA-MB-231) exhibit high numbers of foci (e.g., >50/nucleus), and that these foci are not associated with apoptosis. The majority (>95%) of cells within HCT116p21−/− and MDA-MB-231 cultures contain high levels of phosphorylated p53, which is localized in the nucleus. We further show an inverse relationship between γH2AX foci and nuclear accumulation of WIP1, an oncogenic phosphatase. Our studies suggest that: (i) p21 deficiency might provide a selective pressure for the emergence of apoptosis-resistant progeny exhibiting genomic instability, manifested as spontaneous γH2AX foci coupled with phosphorylation and nuclear accumulation of p53; and (ii) p21 might contribute to positive regulation of WIP1, resulting in dephosphorylation of γH2AX. PMID:26006237

  18. Blasted Cell Line Names

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Byers, Lauren A.; Yordy, John S.; Liu, Wenbin; Shen, Li; Baggerly, Keith A.; Giri, Uma; Myers, Jeffrey N.; Ang, K. Kian; Story, Michael D.; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Heymach, John V.; Coombes, Kevin R.

    2010-01-01

    Background: While trying to integrate multiple data sets collected by different researchers, we noticed that the sample names were frequently entered inconsistently. Most of the variations appeared to involve punctuation, white space, or their absence, at the juncture between alphabetic and numeric portions of the cell line name. Results: Reasoning that the variant names could be described in terms of mutations or deletions of character strings, we implemented a simple version of the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm and applied it to the cell line names. All correct matches were found by this procedure. Incorrect matches only occured when a cell line was present in one data set but not in the other. The raw match scores tended to be substantially worse for the incorrect matches. Conclusions: A simple application of the Needleman-Wunsch global sequence alignment algorithm provides a useful first pass at matching sample names from different data sets. PMID:21082038

  19. Properties of retrovirus-like particles produced by a human breast carcinoma cell line: immunological relationship with mouse mammary tumor virus proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Keydar, I; Ohno, T; Nayak, R; Sweet, R; Simoni, F; Weiss, F; Karby, S; Mesa-Tejada, R; Spiegelman, S

    1984-01-01

    Clonal derivatives 8 and 11 of the T47D human breast carcinoma cell line release particles that have the biochemical characteristics of a retrovirus. Particles recovered from cultures of [3H]uridine-labeled clone 11 had a density of 1.18 g/ml and contained 60-70S and 35S RNAs associated with reverse transcriptase activity. The production of these particles was steroid-dependent. Clone 8 particles had a higher density, 1.195 g/ml, and their production was independent of steroid hormone. By RIA, antigens crossreactive with the 52,000-dalton envelope glycoprotein gp52, the major external protein of mouse mammary tumor virus, were found associated with these particles and in the media. Most of the gp52-related antigen was in soluble form, but it was enriched in the particle preparation. A lesser amount of antigen was distributed within the cultured cells. Absorption of rabbit antibody to gp52 with clone 11 particle preparations eliminated the ability of this antibody to detect immunocytochemically a crossreactive antigen previously localized in tissue sections of human breast carcinoma. These results indicate that the particle isolates from T47D contain the same gp52-related antigen found in human breast carcinomas and constitute an excellent source for the purification and characterization of this antigen. Images PMID:6330748

  20. General Information about Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Islet Cell Tumors) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors (Islet Cell Tumors) Go ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. Tumor cell response to bevacizumab single agent therapy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Angiogenesis represents a highly multi-factorial and multi-cellular complex (patho-) physiologic event involving endothelial cells, tumor cells in malignant conditions, as well as bone marrow derived cells and stromal cells. One main driver is vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), which is known to interact with endothelial cells as a survival and mitogenic signal. The role of VEGFA on tumor cells and /or tumor stromal cell interaction is less clear. Condition specific (e.g. hypoxia) or tumor specific expression of VEGFA, VEGF receptors and co-receptors on tumor cells has been reported, in addition to the expression on the endothelium. This suggests a potential paracrine/autocrine loop that could affect changes specific to tumor cells. Methods We used the monoclonal antibody against VEGFA, bevacizumab, in various in vitro experiments using cell lines derived from different tumor entities (non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), colorectal cancer (CRC), breast cancer (BC) and renal cell carcinoma (RCC)) in order to determine if potential VEGFA signaling could be blocked in tumor cells. The experiments were done under hypoxia, a major inducer of VEGFA and angiogenesis, in an attempt to mimic the physiological tumor condition. Known VEGFA induced endothelial biological responses such as proliferation, migration, survival and gene expression changes were evaluated. Results Our study was able to demonstrate expression of VEGF receptors on tumor cells as well as hypoxia regulated angiogenic gene expression. In addition, there was a cell line specific effect in tumor cells by VEGFA blockade with bevacizumab in terms of proliferation; however overall, there was a limited measurable consequence of bevacizumab therapy detected by migration and survival. Conclusion The present study showed in a variety of in vitro experiments with several tumor cell lines from different tumor origins, that by blocking VEGFA with bevacizumab, there was a limited autocrine or cell

  2. Enhancing Anti-Tumor Efficacy of Doxorubicin by Non-Covalent Conjugation to Gold Nanoparticles – In Vitro Studies on Feline Fibrosarcoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Michał; Lewandowski, Wiktor; Król, Magdalena; Pawłowski, Karol; Mieczkowski, Józef; Lechowski, Roman; Zabielska, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Background Feline injection-site sarcomas are malignant skin tumors of mesenchymal origin, the treatment of which is a challenge for veterinary practitioners. Methods of treatment include radical surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy. The most commonly used cytostatic drugs are cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin and vincristine. However, the use of cytostatics as adjunctive treatment is limited due to their adverse side-effects, low biodistribution after intravenous administration and multidrug resistance. Colloid gold nanoparticles are promising drug delivery systems to overcome multidrug resistance, which is a main cause of ineffective chemotherapy treatment. The use of colloid gold nanoparticles as building blocks for drug delivery systems is preferred due to ease of surface functionalization with various molecules, chemical stability and their low toxicity. Methods Stability and structure of the glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles non-covalently modified with doxorubicin (Au-GSH-Dox) was confirmed using XPS, TEM, FT-IR, SAXRD and SAXS analyses. MTT assay, Annexin V and Propidium Iodide Apoptosis assay and Rhodamine 123 and Verapamil assay were performed on 4 feline fibrosarcoma cell lines (FFS1WAW, FFS1, FFS3, FFS5). Statistical analyses were performed using Graph Pad Prism 5.0 (USA). Results A novel approach, glutathione-stabilized gold nanoparticles (4.3 +/- 1.1 nm in diameter) non-covalently modified with doxorubicin (Au-GSH-Dox) was designed and synthesized. A higher cytotoxic effect (p<0.01) of Au-GSH-Dox than that of free doxorubicin has been observed in 3 (FFS1, FFS3, FFS1WAW) out of 4 feline fibrosarcoma cell lines. The effect has been correlated to the activity of glycoprotein P (main efflux pump responsible for multidrug resistance). Conclusions The results indicate that Au-GSH-Dox may be a potent new therapeutic agent to increase the efficacy of the drug by overcoming the resistance to doxorubicin in feline fibrosarcoma cell lines. Moreover, as

  3. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  4. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor of the pancreas☆

    PubMed Central

    Temesgen, Wudneh M.; Wachtel, Mitchell; Dissanaike, Sharmila

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare, with an incidence of less than 1% of all pancreatic tumors. Osteoclastic giant cell tumor (OGCT) of the pancreas is one of the three types of PGCT, which are now classified as undifferentiated carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells. PRESENTATION OF CASE The patient is a 57 year old woman who presented with a 3 week history of epigastric pain and a palpable abdominal mass. Imaging studies revealed an 18 cm × 15 cm soft tissue mass with cystic components which involved the pancreas, stomach and spleen. Exploratory laparotomy with distal pancreatectomy, partial gastrectomy and splenectomy was performed. Histology revealed undifferentiated pancreatic carcinoma with osteoclast-like giant cells with production of osteoid and glandular elements. DISCUSSION OGCT of the pancreas resembles benign-appearing giant cell tumors of bone, and contain osteoclastic-like multinucleated cells and mononuclear cells. OGCTs display a less aggressive course with slow metastasis and lymph node spread compared to pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Due to the rarity of the cancer, there is a lack of prospective studies on treatment options. Surgical en-bloc resection is currently considered first line treatment. The role of adjuvant therapy with radiotherapy or chemotherapy has not been established. CONCLUSION Pancreatic giant cell tumors are rare pancreatic neoplasms with unique clinical and pathological characteristics. Osteoclastic giant cell tumors are the most favorable sub-type. Surgical en bloc resection is the first line treatment. Long-term follow-up of patients with these tumors is essential to compile a body of literature to help guide treatment. PMID:24631915

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and In Vitro Cytotoxic Activities of Benzaldehyde Thiosemicarbazone Derivatives and Their Palladium (II) and Platinum (II) Complexes against Various Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hernándeza, Wilfredo; Paz, Juan; Vaisberg, Abraham; Spodine, Evgenia; Richter, Rainer; Beyer, Lothar

    2008-01-01

    The palladium (II) bis-chelate Pd (L1−3)2 and platinum (II) tetranuclear Pt4(L4)4 complexes of benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone derivatives have been synthesized, and characterized by elemental analysis and IR, FAB(+)-mass and NMR (1H, 13C) spectroscopy. The complex Pd(L2)2 [HL2 = m-CN-benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone] shows a square-planar geometry with two deprotonated ligands (L) coordinated to PdII through the nitrogen and sulphur atoms in a transarrangement, while the complex Pt4(L4)4 [HL4 = 4-phenyl-1-benzaldehyde thiosemicarbazone] has a tetranuclear geometry with four tridentate ligands coordinated to four PtII ions through the carbon (aromatic ring), nitrogen, and sulphur atoms where the ligands are deprotonated at the NH group. The in vitro antitumor activity of the ligands and their complexes was determined against different human tumor cell lines, which revealed that the palladium (II) and platinum (II) complexes are more cytotoxic than their ligands with IC50 values at the range of 0.07–3.67 μM. The tetranuclear complex Pt4(L4)4, with the phenyl group in the terminal amine of the ligand, showed higher antiproliferative activity (CI50 = 0.07–0.12 μM) than the other tested palladium (II) complexes. PMID:19148285

  6. Antitumor and antiproliferative effects of an aqueous extract from the marine diatom Haslea ostrearia (Simonsen) against solid tumors: lung carcinoma (NSCLC-N6), kidney carcinoma (E39) and melanoma (M96) cell lines.

    PubMed

    Carbonnelle, D; Pondaven, P; Morancais, M; Masse, G; Bosch, S; Jacquot, C; Briand, G; Robert, J; Roussakis, C

    1999-01-01

    An aqueous extract of the marine diatom Haslea ostrearia (Simonsen) was studied for its antiproliferative properties against human solid tumors: lung carcinoma (NSCLC-N6), kidney carcinoma (E39) and melanoma (M96). These types of carcinoma are particularly chemoresistant. The extract has a potent cytostatic effect in vitro on the three cell lines and blocks the NSCLC-N6 line in the G1/S phase of the cell cycle. Moreover, the extract strongly inhibits tumor growth of NSCLC-N6 bearing nude mice. These preliminary results indicate that the aqueous extract of Haslea ostrearia exhibits inhibitory effects both in vitro and in vivo against solid carcinoma lines, suggesting the presence of a new potent antitumor agent in the aqueous algal homogenate. PMID:10226609

  7. Cross-talk among myeloid-derived suppressor cells, macrophages, and tumor cells impacts the inflammatory milieu of solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Beury, Daniel W.; Parker, Katherine H.; Nyandjo, Maeva; Sinha, Pratima; Carter, Kayla A.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, Suzanne

    2014-01-01

    MDSC and macrophages are present in most solid tumors and are important drivers of immune suppression and inflammation. It is established that cross-talk between MDSC and macrophages impacts anti-tumor immunity; however, interactions between tumor cells and MDSC or macrophages are less well studied. To examine potential interactions between these cells, we studied the impact of MDSC, macrophages, and four murine tumor cell lines on each other, both in vitro and in vivo. We focused on IL-6, IL-10, IL-12, TNF-α, and NO, as these molecules are produced by macrophages, MDSC, and many tumor cells; are present in most solid tumors; and regulate inflammation. In vitro studies demonstrated that MDSC-produced IL-10 decreased macrophage IL-6 and TNF-α and increased NO. IL-6 indirectly regulated MDSC IL-10. Tumor cells increased MDSC IL-6 and vice versa. Tumor cells also increased macrophage IL-6 and NO and decreased macrophage TNF-α. Tumor cell-driven macrophage IL-6 was reduced by MDSC, and tumor cells and MDSC enhanced macrophage NO. In vivo analysis of solid tumors identified IL-6 and IL-10 as the dominant cytokines and demonstrated that these molecules were produced predominantly by stromal cells. These results suggest that inflammation within solid tumors is regulated by the ratio of tumor cells to MDSC and macrophages and that interactions of these cells have the potential to alter significantly the inflammatory milieu within the tumor microenvironment. PMID:25170116

  8. CLO: The cell line ontology

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cell lines have been widely used in biomedical research. The community-based Cell Line Ontology (CLO) is a member of the OBO Foundry library that covers the domain of cell lines. Since its publication two years ago, significant updates have been made, including new groups joining the CLO consortium, new cell line cells, upper level alignment with the Cell Ontology (CL) and the Ontology for Biomedical Investigation, and logical extensions. Construction and content Collaboration among the CLO, CL, and OBI has established consensus definitions of cell line-specific terms such as ‘cell line’, ‘cell line cell’, ‘cell line culturing’, and ‘mortal’ vs. ‘immortal cell line cell’. A cell line is a genetically stable cultured cell population that contains individual cell line cells. The hierarchical structure of the CLO is built based on the hierarchy of the in vivo cell types defined in CL and tissue types (from which cell line cells are derived) defined in the UBERON cross-species anatomy ontology. The new hierarchical structure makes it easier to browse, query, and perform automated classification. We have recently added classes representing more than 2,000 cell line cells from the RIKEN BRC Cell Bank to CLO. Overall, the CLO now contains ~38,000 classes of specific cell line cells derived from over 200 in vivo cell types from various organisms. Utility and discussion The CLO has been applied to different biomedical research studies. Example case studies include annotation and analysis of EBI ArrayExpress data, bioassays, and host-vaccine/pathogen interaction. CLO’s utility goes beyond a catalogue of cell line types. The alignment of the CLO with related ontologies combined with the use of ontological reasoners will support sophisticated inferencing to advance translational informatics development. PMID:25852852

  9. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) for markers on chromosome 8q in a human chondrosarcoma cell line and in a tumor that developed in a man with Hereditary Multiple Exostoses (HME)

    SciTech Connect

    Raskind, W.H.; Conrad, E.U.; Robbins, J.R.

    1994-09-01

    HME is an autosomal dominant disorder in which multiple benign cartilage-capped lesions develop on otherwise histologically normal bones. The majority of chondrosarcomas are sporadic, but the presence of HME greatly increases the risk to develop this tumor. Sarcoma may also arise in sporadically-occurring exostoses. The study of inherited disorders that predispose to malignant diseases has led to discoveries regarding molecular changes involved in carcinogenesis in general. In an analogous manner, somatic mutations in HME genes may be responsible for sporadic exostoses and/or chondrosarcomas. HME is genetically heterogeneous; EXT genes have been assigned to 8q24, the pericentromeric region of 11 and 19p11-p13. We compared chondrosarcoma cell DNA to DNA from white blood cells for LOH at polymorphic loci in these 3 regions. LOH for 4 of 5 markers in 8q24 was detected in a chondrosarcoma that arose in a man with HME. Heterozygosity was retained for markers and chromosomes 11 and 19. We then evaluated cultured cells from 10 sporadic chondrosarcomas. LOH for multiple markers in 8q24 was detected in a cell line, Ch-1, established from an aggressive tumor, but not in 9 other tumors. Of the 9 tumors studied, only the Ch-1 line exhibited LOH for chromosome 11 markers. LOH for a 19p marker was not detected in any of 6 tumors examined, including Ch-1. The karyotype of Ch-1 contains many structurally rearranged chromosomes. The two chromosome 11s appear normal but both chromosome 8 homologues have been replaced by der(8)t(5;8)(q22;q21.2). LOH at 8q24 was also detected in the uncultured tumor. These results suggest that genes responsible for HME may have tumor suppressor functions whose loss may be related to the development of a subset of chondrosarcomas.

  10. Systemic transduction of p16INK4A antitumor peptide inhibits the growth of MBT-2 mouse bladder tumor cell line grafts.

    PubMed

    Shimazui, Toru; Yoshikawa, Kazuhiro; Miyazaki, Jun; Kojima, Takahiro; Inai, Hiromu; Ando, Satoshi; Uemura, Hirotsugu; Uchida, Kazuhiko; Nishiyama, Hiroyuki

    2013-02-01

    p16(INK4a) (p16), a key molecule in bladder tumor development, inhibits the activities of cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) and maintains the retinoblastoma protein (pRb) in its active hypophosphorylated state. Following the finding that the p16 antitumor peptide dramatically inhibits the growth of aggressive leukemia/lymphoma through the restoration of p16 function using the Wr-T peptide transporter system, in this study, we developed a systemic therapy using mouse‑p16 peptide (m‑p16) in subcutaneous p16‑null mouse bladder tumors. In vitro analysis showed that the growth of p16‑null bladder tumor cells and the hyperphosphorylation of their pRbs were inhibited by p16 transduction in a concentration‑dependent manner. In an animal model, p16‑null MBT‑2 cells were injected subcutaneously into KSN/SKC nude mice. The systemic delivery of the m‑p16 peptide using Wr‑T by cardiac injection significantly inhibited the growth of solid MBT‑2 tumors compared with the control phosphate‑buffered saline (PBS) injection. Histological examination by TUNEL staining revealed that apoptosis was increased and pRb phosphorylation was inhibited. Thus, the systemic peptide delivery of p16 restores the hypophosphorylation of pRb and may be a useful tool for the treatment of bladder tumors. PMID:23292502

  11. Cell-host, LINE and environment

    PubMed Central

    Del Re, Brunella; Giorgi, Gianfranco

    2013-01-01

    Long interspersed nuclear elements -1 (LINEs, L1s) are retroelements occupying almost 17% of the human genome. L1 retrotransposition can cause deleterious effects on the host-cell and it is generally inhibited by suppressive mechanisms, but it can occur in some specific cells during early development as well as in some tumor cells and in the presence of several environmental factors. In a recent publication we reported that extremely low frequency pulsed magnetic field can affect L1 retrotransposition in neuroblastoma cells. In this commentary we discuss the interaction between environment and L1 activity in the light of the new emerging paradigm of host-LINE relationship. PMID:23734298

  12. A crucial role for tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 in synovial lining cells and the reticuloendothelial system in mediating experimental arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease that mainly affects synovial joints. Biologics directed against tumor-necrosis-factor (TNF)-α are efficacious in the treatment of RA. However, the role of TNF receptor-1 (TNFR1) in mediating the TNFα effects in RA has not been elucidated and conflicting data exist in experimental arthritis models. The objective is to investigate the role of TNFR1 in the synovial lining cells (SLC) and the reticuloendothelial system (RES) during experimental arthritis. Methods Third generation of adenovirus serotype 5 were either injected locally in the knee joint cavity or systemically by intravenous injection into the retro-orbital venous sinus to specifically target SLC and RES, respectively. Transduction of organs was detected by immunohistochemistry of the eGFP transgene. An adenoviral vector containing a short hairpin (sh) RNA directed against TNFR1 (HpTNFR1) was constructed and functionally evaluated in vitro using a nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) reporter assay and in vivo in streptococcal cell wall-induced arthritis (SCW) and collagen-induced arthritis (CIA). Adenoviruses were administered before onset of CIA, and the effect of TNFR1 targeting on the clinical development of arthritis, histology, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), cytokine analyses and T-cell assays was evaluated. Results Systemic delivery of Ad5.CMV-eGFP predominantly transduced the RES in liver and spleen. Local delivery transduced the synovium and not the RES in liver, spleen and draining lymph nodes. In vitro, HpTNFR1 reduced the TNFR1 mRNA expression by three-fold resulting in a 70% reduction of TNFα-induced NF-κB activation. Local treatment with HpTNFR1 markedly reduced mRNA and protein levels of interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6 in SLC during SCW arthritis and ameliorated CIA. Systemic targeting of TNFR1 in RES of liver and spleen by systemic delivery of Ad5 virus encoding for a small hairpin RNA against TNFR1

  13. Effect of Micromorphology and Surface Reactivity of Several Unusual forms of Crystalline Silica on the toxicity to a Monocyte-Macrophage Tumor Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, I; Fubini, B; Tiozzo, R; Di Renzo, F

    2000-01-01

    The fibrogenic or carcinogenic response to the inhalation of crystalline silica dusts is strictly related to the physicochemical properties of the particles, which, in turn, are mostly determined by the "origin" and the history of the dust. Several physicochemical properties have been reported to modulate silica pathogenicity. None of them simply correlate with the reported toxicity in all the systems used to study silica pathogenicity. This confirms, on the one hand, that several properties are implicated at the same time, and on the other that pathogenicity is the result of a multistage process. There is a general consensus on the key role played by alveolar macrophages in silica-related diseases. For this article the cytotoxicity of a large variety of silicas, including rather unusual forms, with controlled micromorphology and surface properties, has been studied on a mouse monocyte-machrophage tumor cell line successfully employed in previous studies on cristobalite (Fubini et al., 1999). When compared on a per unit surface basis, crystalline silicas were more cytotoxic than amorphous ones, with the notable exception of stishovite, the nonpathogenic crystalline polymorph, with octahedrally coordinated silicon atoms. Among the amorphous ones, a diatomaceous earth and a powdered silica glass exhibited an intermediate toxicity, higher than what was elicited by a pyrogenic silica. In this study a new class of crystalline silicas have been considered, pure-silica zeolites, which constitute a new morphological entity with which cells may be confronted. The cytotoxicity of these samples varies from inert to highly cytotoxic, covering all the range of toxicity covered by the traditional silica dusts. We discuss the influence of morphological properties and surface reactivity on the cytotoxicity of several pure-silica zeolites. The extent of exposed surface and the shape of the particles correlate with cell toxicity. The lower cytotoxicity of one "non-pathogenic quartz

  14. Lymphatic endothelial cells support tumor growth in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor lymphatic vessels (LV) serve as a conduit of tumor cell dissemination, due to their leaky nature and secretion of tumor-recruiting factors. Though lymphatic endothelial cells (LEC) lining the LV express distinct factors (also called lymphangiocrine factors), these factors and their roles in the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here we employ LEC, microvascular endothelial cells (MEC), and human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured in triple-negative MDA-MB-231 tumor-conditioned media (TCM) to determine the factors that may be secreted by various EC in the MDA-MB-231 breast tumor. These factors will serve as endothelium derived signaling molecules in the tumor microenvironment. We co-injected these EC with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells into animals and showed that LEC support tumor growth, HUVEC have no significant effect on tumor growth, whereas MEC suppress it. Focusing on LEC-mediated tumor growth, we discovered that TCM-treated LEC (‘tumor-educated LEC') secrete high amounts of EGF and PDGF-BB, compared to normal LEC. LEC-secreted EGF promotes tumor cell proliferation. LEC-secreted PDGF-BB induces pericyte infiltration and angiogenesis. These lymphangiocrine factors may support tumor growth in the tumor microenvironment. This study shows that LV serve a novel role in the tumor microenvironment apart from their classical role as conduits of metastasis. PMID:25068296

  15. High prevalence of side population in human cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Boesch, Maximilian; Zeimet, Alain G.; Fiegl, Heidi; Wolf, Barbara; Huber, Julia; Klocker, Helmut; Gastl, Guenther

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell lines are essential platforms for performing cancer research on human cells. We here demonstrate that, across tumor entities, human cancer cell lines harbor minority populations of putative stem-like cells, molecularly defined by dye extrusion resulting in the side population phenotype. These findings establish a heterogeneous nature of human cancer cell lines and argue for their stem cell origin. This should be considered when interpreting research involving these model systems. PMID:27226981

  16. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  17. [Ovarian germ cell tumors in girls].

    PubMed

    Nechushkina, I V; Karseladze, A I

    2015-01-01

    Morphological structure of tumor influences on the clinical course of the disease in children with germ cell tumors. Patients with ovarian dysgerminoma at the time of diagnosis are significantly older than patients with immature teratoma and yolk sac tumor. Immature teratoma and mixed germ cell tumors are significantly larger compared to other germ cell tumors. Yolk sac tumor and embryonal carcinoma are the most common cause of emergency surgical interventions and are accompanied by rupture of tumor capsule. PMID:26087605

  18. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  19. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at g2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.2 In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin’s function to kill tumor cells.3 In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin’s ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported “black and white” tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  20. Potentiation of cytotoxicity by 3-aminobenzamide in DNA repair-deficient human tumor cell lines following exposure to methylating agents or anti-neoplastic drugs.

    PubMed

    Babich, M A; Day, R S

    1988-04-01

    We studied the potentiation by 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) of killing of nine human cell lines exposed to alkylating agents. Cell lines included normal, transformed and DNA repair-proficient and -deficient phenotypes. 3AB potentiated cell killing by the methylating agents methylmethanesulfonate (MMS) and N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) in all lines tested. The degree of potentiation ranged from 1.7- to 3.8-fold, based on the LD99. The average potentiation observed with MMS (2.7-fold) was greater than with MNNG (2.2-fold). On average the potentiation of MMS and MNNG killing of repair-deficient Mer- lines (2.4-fold) was similar to that of repair-proficient Mer+ lines. The degree of 3AB potentiation of MNNG killing (2.0-fold) was similar in Mer+ Rem- lines and in Mer+ Rem+ lines. Mer+ Rem+, Mer+ Rem-, Mer- Rem+, and Mer- Rem- strains all appeared proficient in a 3AB-sensitive DNA repair pathway. Within experimental error, 20 mM 3AB did not inhibit the removal of the MNNG-induced methylpurines 7-methylguanine, O6-methylguanine and 3-methyladenine from the DNA of repair-proficient Mer+ Rem+ HT29 cells, consistent with evidence that 3AB inhibits the ligation step of excision repair. 3AB potentiated cell killing by the bifunctional alkylating agents 1-(2-chlorethyl)-1-nitrosourea or busulfan, two anti-neoplastic drugs, by only 0.9- to 1.5-fold. These drugs therefore produce DNA damage which is not efficiently repaired by the pathways that repair methylated bases. PMID:3356063

  1. T cells from the tumor microenvironment of patients with progressive myeloma can generate strong, tumor-specific cytolytic responses to autologous, tumor-loaded dendritic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhodapkar, Madhav V.; Krasovsky, Joseph; Olson, Kara

    2002-10-01

    Most untreated cancer patients develop progressive tumors. We tested the capacity of T lymphocytes from patients with clinically progressive, multiple myeloma to develop killer function against fresh autologous tumor. In this malignancy, it is feasible to reproducibly evaluate freshly isolated tumor cells and T cells from the marrow tumor environment. When we did this with seven consecutive patients, with all clinical stages of disease, we did not detect reactivity to autologous cancer cells. However, both cytolytic and IFN--producing responses to autologous myeloma were generated in six of seven patients after stimulation ex vivo with dendritic cells that had processed autologous tumor cells. The antitumor effectors recognized fresh autologous tumor but not nontumor cells in the bone marrow, myeloma cell lines, dendritic cells loaded with tumor-derived Ig, or allogeneic tumor. Importantly, these CD8+ effectors developed with similar efficiency by using T cells from both the blood and the bone marrow tumor environment. Therefore, even in the setting of clinical tumor progression, the tumor bed of myeloma patients contains T cells that can be activated readily by dendritic cells to kill primary autologous tumor.

  2. Expression of Hyaluronidase by Tumor Cells Induces Angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dacai; Pearlman, Eric; Diaconu, Eugenia; Guo, Kun; Mori, Hiroshi; Haqqi, Tariq; Markowitz, Sanford; Willson, James; Sy, Man-Sun

    1996-07-01

    Hyaluronic acid is a proteoglycan present in the extracellular matrix and is important for the maintenance of tissue architecture. Depolymerization of hyaluronic acid may facilitate tumor invasion. In addition, oligosaccharides of hyaluronic acid have been reported to induce angiogenesis. We report here that a hyaluronidase similar to the one on human sperm is expressed by metastatic human melanoma, colon carcinoma, and glioblastoma cell lines and by tumor biopsies from patients with colorectal carcinomas, but not by tissues from normal colon. Moreover, angiogenesis is induced by hyaluronidase+ tumor cells but not hyaluronidase- tumor cells and can be blocked by an inhibitor of hyaluronidase. Tumor cells thus use hyaluronidase as one of the ``molecular saboteurs'' to depolymerize hyaluronic acid to facilitate invasion. As a consequence, breakdown products of hyaluronic acid can further promote tumor establishment by inducing angiogenesis. Hyaluronidase on tumor cells may provide a target for anti-neoplastic drugs.

  3. Tetrahydro Iso-Alpha Acids and Hexahydro Iso-Alpha Acids from Hops Inhibit Proliferation of Human Hepatocarcinoma Cell Lines and Reduce Diethylnitrosamine Induced Liver Tumor Formation in Rats.

    PubMed

    Stärkel, Peter; De Saeger, Christine; Delire, Bénédicte; Magat, Julie; Jordan, Bénédicte; Konda, Veera R; Tripp, Mathew L; Borbath, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Chronic inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). To date, no antiinflammatory approach has shown its efficacy in preventing HCC occurrence in humans. Because tetra- and hexahydro isoalpha acids (THIAA and HHIAA) from hops elicit antiinflammatory properties, we evaluated these compounds for antitumor effects in vitro in human HCC cell lines (HepG2, Hep3B, Huh7) and in vivo in diethylnitrosamine (DEN)-induced animal model of HCC. In human HCC cell lines, THIAA and HHIAA reduced cell proliferation and viability which was associated with the inhibition of the NF-κB-DNA binding and tumor necrosis factor α mRNA expression. Both compounds also inhibited phosphorylation of the mTOR effector p70S6 kinase without affecting ERK, AKT, JNK, and GSK3β phosphorylation or activator protein-1 activation. In DEN-treated rats, administration of THIAA and HHIAA in food reduced the tumor numbers and the expression of the cellular transformation marker glutathione-S-transferase in the liver. In conclusion, THIAA and HHIAA show antitumor properties in vitro in human HCC cell lines as well as in vivo in a chemically induced animal model of HCC. PMID:25941903

  4. Development of a Self-Assembled Nanoparticle Formulation of Orlistat, Nano-ORL, with Increased Cytotoxicity against Human Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Hill, Tanner K; Davis, Amanda L; Wheeler, Frances B; Kelkar, Sneha S; Freund, Erica C; Lowther, W Todd; Kridel, Steven J; Mohs, Aaron M

    2016-03-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FASN), the enzyme that catalyzes de novo synthesis of fatty acids, is expressed in many cancer types. Its potential as a therapeutic target is well recognized, but inhibitors of FASN have not yet been approved for cancer therapy. Orlistat (ORL), an FDA-approved lipase inhibitor, is also an effective inhibitor of FASN. However, ORL is extremely hydrophobic and has low systemic uptake after oral administration. Thus, new strategies are required to formulate ORL for cancer treatment as a FASN inhibitor. Here, we report the development of a nanoparticle (NP) formulation of ORL using amphiphilic bioconjugates that are derived from hyaluronic acid (HA), termed Nano-ORL. The NPs were loaded with up to 20 wt % weight of ORL at greater than 95% efficiency. The direct inhibition of the human recombinant thioesterase domain of FASN by ORL extracted from Nano-ORL was similar to that of stock ORL. Nano-ORL demonstrated a similar ability to inhibit cellular FASN activity when compared to free ORL, as demonstrated by analysis of (14)C-acetate incorporation into lipids. Nano-ORL treatment also disrupted mitochondrial function similarly to ORL by reducing adenosine triphosphate turnover in MDA-MB-231 and LNCaP cells. Nano-ORL demonstrated increased potency compared to ORL toward prostate and breast cancer cells. Nano-ORL decreased viability of human prostate and breast cancer cell lines to 55 and 57%, respectively, while free ORL decreased viability to 71 and 79% in the same cell lines. Moreover, Nano-ORL retained cytotoxic activity after a 24 h preincubation in aqueous conditions. Preincubation of ORL dramatically reduced the efficacy of ORL as indicated by high cell viability (>85%) in both breast and prostate cell lines. These data demonstrate that NP formulation of ORL using HA-derived polymers retains similar levels of FASN, lipid synthesis, and ATP turnover inhibition while significantly improving the cytotoxic activity against cancer cell lines. PMID

  5. Differential Adhesion of Tumor Cells to Capillary Endothelial Cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alby, Laverna; Auerbach, Robert

    1984-09-01

    Adhesion studies were carried out to determine the relative ability of glioma cells and ovary-derived teratoma cells to adhere to endothelial cells obtained from mouse brain capillaries (designated MBE cell line) or mouse ovaries (designated MOE cell line). The teratoma cells showed preferential adhesion to MOE cells, whereas the glioma cells showed preferential adhesion to the MBE cell line. In contrast, the glioma and teratoma cells adhered equally to L929 and 3T3 fibroblasts. A testicular teratoma with ovary-seeking properties in vivo also adhered preferentially to MOE cells, while the preference for MBE cells was shared by glioma cells with an endothelioma and a bladder tumor line. The endothelioma, interestingly, showed a marked preferential adhesion to 3T3 cells, thus distinguishing it from the glioma. The experiments demonstrate that capillary endothelial cells derived from different sources are not alike and that differences expressed at the cell surface of these cells can be distinguished by tumor cells.

  6. Cell line banks and their role in cancer research.

    PubMed

    Hay, R J; Reid, Y A; McClintock, P R; Chen, T R; Macy, M L

    1996-01-01

    The utility of centralized cell banks in providing reference cultures for cancer research is reviewed. Procedures applied at The American Type Culture Collection in development, maintenance and expansion of such a resource are discussed for example, with emphasis on human tumor cell lines. The various categories of cell-line holdings are explained, and status with regard both to the numbers of lines available and distribution experienced are documented. The locations of other national cell repositories plus contact data are provided. PMID:8806094

  7. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  8. Efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R in combination with anti-angiogenesis therapy on a pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) and cell line mouse models

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Murakami, Takashi; Maawy, Ali; Miwa, Shinji; Yamamoto, Mako; Yano, Shuya; Sato, Sho; Momiyama, Masashi; Mori, Ryutaro; Matsuyama, Ryusei; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the efficacy of tumor-targeting Salmonella typhimurium A1-R treatment following anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) therapy on VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer. A pancreatic cancer patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) that was VEGF-positive and an orthotopic VEGF-positive human pancreatic cancer cell line (MiaPaCa-2-GFP) as well as a VEGF-negative cell line (Panc-1) were tested. Nude mice with these tumors were treated with gemcitabine (GEM), bevacizumab (BEV), and S. typhimurium A1-R. BEV/GEM followed by S. typhimurium A1-R significantly reduced tumor weight compared to BEV/GEM treatment alone in the PDOX and MiaPaCa-2 models. Neither treatment was as effective in the VEGF-negative model as in the VEGF-positive models. These results demonstrate that S. typhimurium A1-R following anti-angiogenic therapy is effective on pancreatic cancer including the PDOX model, suggesting its clinical potential. PMID:25402324

  9. Interaction of MSC with tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Melzer, Catharina; Yang, Yuanyuan; Hass, Ralf

    2016-01-01

    Tumor development and tumor progression is not only determined by the corresponding tumor cells but also by the tumor microenvironment. This includes an orchestrated network of interacting cell types (e.g. immune cells, endothelial cells, fibroblasts, and mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC)) via the extracellular matrix and soluble factors such as cytokines, chemokines, growth factors and various metabolites. Cell populations of the tumor microenvironment can interact directly and indirectly with cancer cells by mutually altering properties and functions of the involved partners. Particularly, mesenchymal stroma/stem cells (MSC) play an important role during carcinogenesis exhibiting different types of intercellular communication. Accordingly, this work focusses on diverse mechanisms of interaction between MSC and cancer cells. Moreover, some functional changes and consequences for both cell types are summarized which can eventually result in the establishment of a carcinoma stem cell niche (CSCN) or the generation of new tumor cell populations by MSC-tumor cell fusion. PMID:27608835

  10. Etoposide, cisplatin, bleomycin, and cyclophosphamide (ECBC) as first-line chemotherapy for poor-risk non-seminomatous germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gerl, A; Clemm, C; Hentrich, M; Hartenstein, R; Wilmanns, W

    1993-01-01

    Sixty-one patients with advanced metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumors were treated with etoposide 120 mg/m2, cisplatin 30 mg/m2, bleomycin 12 mg/m2, and cyclophosphamide 300 mg/m2 daily for four days; and additional bleomycin bolus injection of 15 mg was given on day 1. Fifty patients (82%) were treated with four to six courses at 3-week intervals. Forty patients (66%) attained complete remission, and further 7 patients (11%) achieved a marker-negative partial remission accounting for a favorable response rate of 77%. Hematologic toxicity was considerable and there were two treatment-related deaths. After a median observation time of 47 months (range 12 to 108 months), 43 patients were alive, of which 38 had continuous complete remission, one a second complete remission, two marker-negative stable disease and two progressive disease. Our results are similar to those reported by other investigators for poor-risk metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumors treated with dose-intensified regimens. PMID:7692901

  11. Characterization of genetic rearrangements in esophageal squamous carcinoma cell lines by a combination of M-FISH and array-CGH: further confirmation of some split genomic regions in primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Chromosomal and genomic aberrations are common features of human cancers. However, chromosomal numerical and structural aberrations, breakpoints and disrupted genes have yet to be identified in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). Methods Using multiplex-fluorescence in situ hybridization (M-FISH) and oligo array-based comparative hybridization (array-CGH), we identified aberrations and breakpoints in six ESCC cell lines. Furthermore, we detected recurrent breakpoints in primary tumors by dual-color FISH. Results M-FISH and array-CGH results revealed complex numerical and structural aberrations. Frequent gains occurred at 3q26.33-qter, 5p14.1-p11, 7pter-p12.3, 8q24.13-q24.21, 9q31.1-qter, 11p13-p11, 11q11-q13.4, 17q23.3-qter, 18pter-p11, 19 and 20q13.32-qter. Losses were frequent at 18q21.1-qter. Breakpoints that clustered within 1 or 2 Mb were identified, including 9p21.3, 11q13.3-q13.4, 15q25.3 and 3q28. By dual-color FISH, we observed that several recurrent breakpoint regions in cell lines were also present in ESCC tumors. In particular, breakpoints clustered at 11q13.3-q13.4 were identified in 43.3% (58/134) of ESCC tumors. Both 11q13.3-q13.4 splitting and amplification were significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis (LNM) (P = 0.004 and 0.022) and advanced stages (P = 0.004 and 0.039). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that only 11q13.3-q13.4 splitting was an independent predictor for LNM (P = 0.026). Conclusions The combination of M-FISH and array-CGH helps produce more accurate karyotypes. Our data provide significant, detailed information for appropriate uses of these ESCC cell lines for cytogenetic and molecular biological studies. The aberrations and breakpoints detected in both the cell lines and primary tumors will contribute to identify affected genes involved in the development and progression of ESCC. PMID:22920630

  12. Improvement of the antiproliferative effect of rapamycin on tumor cell lines by poly (monomethylitaconate)-based pH-sensitive, plasma stable liposomes.

    PubMed

    Ghanbarzadeh, Saeed; Arami, Sanam; Pourmoazzen, Zhaleh; Khorrami, Arash

    2014-03-01

    pH-responsive polymers produce liposomes with pH-sensitive property which can release their encapsulated drug under mild acidic conditions found inside the cellular endosomes, inflammatory tissues and cancerous cells. The aim of this study was preparing pH-sensitive and plasma stable liposomes in order to enhance the selectivity and antiproliferative effect of Rapamycin. In the present study we used PEG-poly (monomethylitaconate)-CholC6 (PEG-PMMI-CholC6) copolymer and Oleic acid (OA) to induce pH-sensitive property in Rapamycin liposomes. pH-sensitive liposomal formulations bearing copolymer PEG-PMMI-CholC6 and OA were characterized in regard to physicochemical stability, pH-responsiveness and stability in human plasma. The ability of pH-sensitive liposomes in enhancing the cytotoxicity of Rapamycin was evaluated in vitro by using colon cancer cell line (HT-29) and compared with its cytotoxicity on human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) line. Both formulations were found to release their contents under mild acidic conditions rapidly. However, unlike OA-based liposomes, the PEG-PMMI-CholC6 bearing liposomes preserved their pH-sensitivity in plasma. Both types of pH-sensitive Rapamycin-loaded liposomes exhibited high physicochemical stability and could deliver antiproliferative agent into HT-29 cells much more efficiently in comparison with conventional liposomes. Conversely, the antiproliferative effect of pH-sensitive liposomes on HUVEC cell line was less than conventional liposomes. This study showed that both OA and PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based vesicles could submit pH-sensitive property, however, only PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based liposomes could preserve pH-sensitive property after incubation in plasma. As a result pH-sensitive PEG-PMMI-CholC6-based liposomal formulation can improve the selectivity, stability and antiproliferative effect of Rapamycin. PMID:24394948

  13. Palifosfamide in Treating Patients With Recurrent Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-11

    Adult Central Nervous System Germ Cell Tumor; Adult Teratoma; Malignant Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Malignant Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Seminoma; Recurrent Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Non-Seminomatous Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Extragonadal Seminoma; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor

  14. Differential Ratios of Omega Fatty Acids (AA/EPA+DHA) Modulate Growth, Lipid Peroxidation and Expression of Tumor Regulatory MARBPs in Breast Cancer Cell Lines MCF7 and MDA-MB-231

    PubMed Central

    Mansara, Prakash P.; Deshpande, Rashmi A.; Vaidya, Milind M.; Kaul-Ghanekar, Ruchika

    2015-01-01

    Omega 3 (n3) and Omega 6 (n6) polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been reported to exhibit opposing roles in cancer progression. Our objective was to determine whether different ratios of n6/n3 (AA/EPA+DHA) FAs could modulate the cell viability, lipid peroxidation, total cellular fatty acid composition and expression of tumor regulatory Matrix Attachment Region binding proteins (MARBPs) in breast cancer cell lines and in non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low ratios of n6/n3 (1:2.5, 1:4, 1:5, 1:10) FA decreased the viability and growth of MDA-MB-231 and MCF7 significantly compared to the non-cancerous cells (MCF10A). Contrarily, higher n6/n3 FA (2.5:1, 4:1, 5:1, 10:1) decreased the survival of both the cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Lower ratios of n6/n3 selectively induced LPO in the breast cancer cells whereas the higher ratios induced in both cancerous and non-cancerous cell types. Interestingly, compared to higher n6/n3 FA ratios, lower ratios increased the expression of tumor suppressor MARBP, SMAR1 and decreased the expression of tumor activator Cux/CDP in both breast cancer and non-cancerous, MCF10A cells. Low n6/n3 FAs significantly increased SMAR1 expression which resulted into activation of p21WAF1/CIP1 in MDA-MB-231 and MCF7, the increase being ratio dependent in MDA-MB-231. These results suggest that increased intake of n3 fatty acids in our diet could help both in the prevention as well as management of breast cancer. PMID:26325577

  15. An Active Form of Sphingosine Kinase-1 Is Released in the Extracellular Medium as Component of Membrane Vesicles Shed by Two Human Tumor Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Rigogliuso, Salvatrice; Donati, Chiara; Cassarà, Donata; Taverna, Simona; Salamone, Monica; Bruni, Paola; Vittorelli, Maria Letizia

    2010-01-01

    Expression of sphingosine kinase-1 (SphK-1) correlates with a poor survival rate of tumor patients. This effect is probably due to the ability of SphK-1 to be released into the extracellular medium where it catalyzes the biosynthesis of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a signaling molecule endowed with profound proangiogenic effects. SphK-1 is a leaderless protein which is secreted by an unconventional mechanism. In this paper, we will show that in human hepatocarcinoma Sk-Hep1 cells, extracellular signaling is followed by targeting the enzyme to the cell surface and parallels targeting of FGF-2 to the budding vesicles. We will also show that SphK-1 is present in a catalitycally active form in vesicles shed by SK-Hep1 and human breast carcinoma 8701-BC cells. The enzyme substrate sphingosine is present in shed vesicles where it is produced by neutral ceramidase. Shed vesicles are therefore a site for S1P production in the extracellular medium and conceivably also within host cell following vesicle endocytosis. PMID:20508814

  16. Differential expression of the human ST5 gene in HeLa-fibroblast hybrid cell lines mediated by YY1: evidence that YY1 plays a part in tumor suppression.

    PubMed Central

    Lichy, J H; Majidi, M; Elbaum, J; Tsai, M M

    1996-01-01

    Through a mutational analysis of a differentially regulated enhancer, we present evidence that supports a role for the transcription factor YY1 in tumor suppression in HeLa/fibroblast somatic cell hybrids. The human ST5 gene was previously shown to be expressed as three RNA species, 4.6, 3.1 and 2.8 kb in length. Whereas the two larger species are expressed at similar levels in all cell lines examined, the 2.8 kb mRNA is expressed specifically in non-tumorigenic hybrids. In this study, the basis for the differential expression of this mRNA species was investigated. The message was shown to originate from a promoter located within an intron of the ST5 gene. An enhancer located approximaely 1500 nt upstream of the start site was required for cell type specific expression. Mutational analysis of this enhancer revealed an AP1 site and five YY1 sites which were necessary for full enhancer activity. Levels of YY1 DNA binding activity were found to be as much as 6-fold higher in the non-tumorigenic cells relative to the tumorigenic cells, while AP1 activity was similar in both cell types. These results suggest that a signaling pathway targeting YY1 may play an important role in tumor suppression in HeLa-fibroblast hybrids. PMID:8972856

  17. Dielectrophoretic Capture and Genetic Analysis of Single Neuroblastoma Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Erica L.; Rader, JulieAnn; Ruden, Jacob; Rappaport, Eric F.; Hunter, Kristen N.; Hallberg, Paul L.; Krytska, Kate; O’Dwyer, Peter J.; Mosse, Yael P.

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of cells that escape the primary tumor and seed micrometastases remains rudimentary, and approaches for studying circulating and disseminated tumor cells have been limited by low throughput and sensitivity, reliance on single parameter sorting, and a focus on enumeration rather than phenotypic and genetic characterization. Here, we utilize a highly sensitive microfluidic and dielectrophoretic approach for the isolation and genetic analysis of individual tumor cells. We employed fluorescence labeling to isolate 208 single cells from spiking experiments conducted with 11 cell lines, including 8 neuroblastoma cell lines, and achieved a capture sensitivity of 1 tumor cell per 106 white blood cells (WBCs). Sample fixation or freezing had no detectable effect on cell capture. Point mutations were accurately detected in the whole genome amplification product of captured single tumor cells but not in negative control WBCs. We applied this approach to capture 144 single tumor cells from 10 bone marrow samples of patients suffering from neuroblastoma. In this pediatric malignancy, high-risk patients often exhibit wide-spread hematogenous metastasis, but access to primary tumor can be difficult or impossible. Here, we used flow-based sorting to pre-enrich samples with tumor involvement below 0.02%. For all patients for whom a mutation in the Anaplastic Lymphoma Kinase gene had already been detected in their primary tumor, the same mutation was detected in single cells from their marrow. These findings demonstrate a novel, non-invasive, and adaptable method for the capture and genetic analysis of single tumor cells from cancer patients. PMID:25133137

  18. Tumor infiltrating immune cells in gliomas and meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Miranda, David; Ruiz, Laura; Sousa, Pablo; Ciudad, Juana; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2016-03-01

    Tumor-infiltrating immune cells are part of a complex microenvironment that promotes and/or regulates tumor development and growth. Depending on the type of cells and their functional interactions, immune cells may play a key role in suppressing the tumor or in providing support for tumor growth, with relevant effects on patient behavior. In recent years, important advances have been achieved in the characterization of immune cell infiltrates in central nervous system (CNS) tumors, but their role in tumorigenesis and patient behavior still remain poorly understood. Overall, these studies have shown significant but variable levels of infiltration of CNS tumors by macrophage/microglial cells (TAM) and to a less extent also lymphocytes (particularly T-cells and NK cells, and less frequently also B-cells). Of note, TAM infiltrate gliomas at moderate numbers where they frequently show an immune suppressive phenotype and functional behavior; in contrast, infiltration by TAM may be very pronounced in meningiomas, particularly in cases that carry isolated monosomy 22, where the immune infiltrates also contain greater numbers of cytotoxic T and NK-cells associated with an enhanced anti-tumoral immune response. In line with this, the presence of regulatory T cells, is usually limited to a small fraction of all meningiomas, while frequently found in gliomas. Despite these differences between gliomas and meningiomas, both tumors show heterogeneous levels of infiltration by immune cells with variable functionality. In this review we summarize current knowledge about tumor-infiltrating immune cells in the two most common types of CNS tumors-gliomas and meningiomas-, as well as the role that such immune cells may play in the tumor microenvironment in controlling and/or promoting tumor development, growth and control. PMID:26216710

  19. General Information about Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  20. General Information about Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... Germ Cell Tumors Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Ovarian Germ Cell Tumors Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  1. X-ray sensitivity of human tumor cells in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Nove, J.; Little, J.B.

    1980-04-01

    Clonally-derived cells from ten human malignant tumors considered radiocurable (breast, neuroblastoma, medulloblastoma) or non-radiocurable (osteosarcoma, hypernephroma, glioblastoma, melanoma) were studied in cell culture and their in vitro x-ray survival curve parameters determined (anti n, D/sub 0/). There were no significant differences among the tumor cell lines suggesting that survival parameters in vitro do not explain differences in clinical radiocurability. Preliminary investigation with density inhibited human tumor cells indicate that such an approach may yield information regarding inherent cellular differences in radiocurability.

  2. Propanil inhibits tumor necrosis factor-alpha production by reducing nuclear levels of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappab in the macrophage cell line ic-21.

    PubMed

    Frost, L L; Neeley, Y X; Schafer, R; Gibson, L F; Barnett, J B

    2001-05-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is an essential proinflammatory cytokine whose production is normally stimulated by bacterial cell wall components, such as lipopolysaccharide (LPS), during an infection. Macrophages stimulated with LPS in vitro produce several cytokines, including TNF-alpha. LPS-stimulated primary mouse macrophages produced less TNF-alpha protein and message after treatment with the herbicide propanil (Xie et al., Toxicol. Appl. Pharmacol. 145, 184-191, 1997). Nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) tightly regulates TNF-alpha transcription. Therefore, as a step toward understanding the mechanism of the effect of propanil on TNF-alpha transcription, IC-21 cells were transfected with a TNF-alpha promoter-luciferase construct, and the effect of propanil on luciferase activity was measured. Cells transfected with promoter constructs containing a kappaB site showed decreased luciferase activity relative to controls after propanil treatment. These observations implicated NF-kappaB binding as an intracellular target of propanil. Further studies demonstrated a marked reduction in the nuclear levels of the stimulatory p65 subunit of NF-kappaB after propanil treatment, as measured by fluorescence confocal microscopy and Western blot analysis. The p50 subunit of NF-kappaB was not found to be reduced after propanil exposure by Western blot. Electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays showed decreased DNA binding of both p65/p50 heterodimers and p50/p50 homodimers to the kappaB3 site of the TNF-alpha promoter of propanil-treated cells. The marked reduction in nuclear p65/p50 NF-kappaB levels and diminished binding to the TNF-alpha promoter in propanil-treated cells are consistent with reduced TNF-alpha levels induced by LPS. PMID:11312646

  3. Growth of a human mammary tumor cell line is blocked by galangin, a naturally occurring bioflavonoid, and is accompanied by down-regulation of cyclins D3, E, and A

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Tessa J; Yang, Xinhai; Sherr, David H

    2006-01-01

    Introduction This study was designed to determine if and how a non-toxic, naturally occurring bioflavonoid, galangin, affects proliferation of human mammary tumor cells. Our previous studies demonstrated that, in other cell types, galangin is a potent inhibitor of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), an environmental carcinogen-responsive transcription factor implicated in mammary tumor initiation and growth control. Because some current breast cancer therapeutics are ineffective in estrogen receptor (ER) negative tumors and since the AhR may be involved in breast cancer proliferation, the effects of galangin on the proliferation of an ER-, AhRhigh line, Hs578T, were studied. Methods AhR expression and function in the presence or absence of galangin, a second AhR inhibitor, α-naphthoflavone (α-NF), an AhR agonist, indole-3-carbinol, and a transfected AhR repressor-encoding plasmid (FhAhRR) were studied in Hs578T cells by western blotting for nuclear (for instance, constitutively activated) AhR and by transfection of an AhR-driven reporter construct, pGudLuc. The effects of these agents on cell proliferation were studied by 3H-thymidine incorporation and by flow cytometry. The effects on cyclins implicated in mammary tumorigenesis were evaluated by western blotting. Results Hs578T cells were shown to express high levels of constitutively active AhR. Constitutive and environmental chemical-induced AhR activity was profoundly suppressed by galangin as was cell proliferation. However, the failure of α-NF or FhAhRR transfection to block proliferation indicated that galangin-mediated AhR inhibition was either insufficient or unrelated to its ability to significantly block cell proliferation at therapeutically relevant doses (IC50 = 11 μM). Galangin inhibited transition of cells from the G0/G1 to the S phases of cell growth, likely through the nearly total elimination of cyclin D3. Expression of cyclins A and E was also suppressed. Conclusion Galangin is a strong

  4. Permanently Blocked Stem Cells Derived from Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Sajithlal, Gangadharan B.; Rothermund, Kristi; Zhang, Fang; Dabbs, David J.; Latimer, Jean J.; Grant, Stephen G.; Prochownik, Edward V.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are thought to be resistant to standard chemotherapeutic drugs and the inimical conditions of the tumor microenvironment. Obtaining CSCs in sufficient quantities and maintaining their undifferentiated state have been major hurdles to their further characterization and to the identification of new pharmaceuticals that preferentially target these cells. We describe here the tagging of CSC-like populations from four human breast cancer cell lines with green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of the Oct3/4 stem cell-specific promoter. As expected, GFP was expressed by the CSC-enriched populations. An unanticipated result, however, was that these cells remained blocked in a CSC-like state and tended to be resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs as well as acidotic and hypoxic conditions. These CSC-like cells possessed several other in vitro attributes of CSCs and were able to reproducibly generate tumors in immuno-compromised mice from as few as 100 cells. Moreover, the tumors derived from these cells were comprised almost exclusively of pure CSCs. The ability of the Oct3/4 promoter to block CSC differentiation underscores its potential general utility for obtaining highly purified CSC populations, although the mechanism by which it does so remains undefined and subject to further study. Nonetheless, such stable cell lines should be extremely valuable tools for studying basic questions pertaining to CSC biology and for the initial identification of novel CSC-specific chemotherapeutic agents, which can then be verified in primary CSCs. PMID:20506227

  5. Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) inhibits human colon tumor growth by promoting apoptosis of tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xuguang; Li, Bingji; Liu, Jie; He, Rui

    2016-01-01

    Thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) has recently been suggested in several epithelial cancers, either pro-tumor or anti-tumor. However, the role of TSLP in colon cancer remains unknown. We here found significantly decreased TSLP levels in tumor tissues compared with tumor-surrounding tissues of patients with colon cancer and TSLP levels negatively correlated with the clinical staging score of colon cancer. TSLPR, the receptor of TSLP, was expressed in all three colon cancer cell lines investigated and colon tumor tissues. The addition of TSLP significantly enhanced apoptosis of colon cancer cells in a TSLPR-dependent manner. Interestingly, TSLP selectively induced the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, but not normal colonic epithelial cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that TSLP induced JNK and p38 activation and initiated apoptosis mainly through the extrinsic pathway, as caspase-8 inhibitor significantly reversed the apoptosis-promoting effect of TSLP. Finally, using a xenograft mouse model, we demonstrated that peritumoral administration of TSLP greatly reduced tumor growth accompanied with extensive tumor apoptotic response, which was abolished by tumor cell-specific knockdown of TSLPR. Collectively, our study reveals a novel anti-tumor effect of TSLP via direct promotion of the apoptosis of colon cancer cells, and suggests that TSLP could be of value in treating colon cancer. PMID:26919238

  6. Origin of the U87MG glioma cell line: Good news and bad news.

    PubMed

    Allen, Marie; Bjerke, Mia; Edlund, Hanna; Nelander, Sven; Westermark, Bengt

    2016-08-31

    Human tumor-derived cell lines are indispensable tools for basic and translational oncology. They have an infinite life span and are easy to handle and scalable, and results can be obtained with high reproducibility. However, a tumor-derived cell line may not be authentic to the tumor of origin. Two major questions emerge: Have the identity of the donor and the actual tumor origin of the cell line been accurately determined? To what extent does the cell line reflect the phenotype of the tumor type of origin? The importance of these questions is greatest in translational research. We have examined these questions using genetic profiling and transcriptome analysis in human glioma cell lines. We find that the DNA profile of the widely used glioma cell line U87MG is different from that of the original cells and that it is likely to be a bona fide human glioblastoma cell line of unknown origin. PMID:27582061

  7. Antiproliferative and anticarcinogenic effects of an aqueous preparation of Abies alba and Viscum album se abies, on a L-1210 malignant cell line and tumor-bearing Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Karkabounas, S; Assimakopoulos, D; Malamas, M; Skaltsounis, A L; Leonce, S; Zelovitis, J; Stefanou, D; Evangelou, A

    2000-01-01

    Extracts of plants have been widely tested for possible anticarcinogenic properties. In the present study a traditional remedy, consisting of an aqueous extract of mixed parts of the tree Abies alba and its mistletoe Viscum album se abies was tested on benzo(alpha)pyrene(BaP)-induced tumors in Wistar rats and on the L-1210 malignant cell line. Two main groups of male Wistar rats subcutaneously injected by 10 mg of BaP, a dose inducing 100% carcinogenesis, a control group (C-G, 15 rats) and a treatment group(TR-G, 18 rats), were used for the study. Five animals bearing BaP-induced tumors were also tested (TR-1-G). Animals of the TR-G were orally administered with the aqueous extract at doses of 50 ml/kg b.w, from the day of BaP injection and of the TR-1-G, from the 120th day of injection, till death. L-1210 malignant cells in cultivation, were administered with a powder obtained by condensation and lyophilization of the extract, at various concentrations and cytotoxicity was measured by the microculture tetrazolium assay. Autopsy of the rats, revealed metastasis in the lungs of the animals of all groups and the tumors developed were histologically identified as leiomyosarcomas. The results indicated that the extract of the above plants possess anticarcinogenic effects, documented by: a) its antiproliferative effects on L-1210 cells (IC50 = 49.6 +/- 1.4 micrograms/ml), b) the significant prolongation of life and reduction of tumor growth rate of the animals of the TR-G in comparison to the C-G, c) the inhibition by 16.6% of tumor induction in the TR-G and d) the prolongation of life and the necrotic effects of the extract on the tumors of the animals in the TR-1-G. The antiproliferative effects of the Abies alba and Viscum album se abies extract may be due to the lectins and thionins contained in Viscum album, as well as to the monoterpenes contained in Abies alba. Soft tissue tumors sensitive to the extract, are widespread among human organs, even in larynx, and are

  8. Molecular profiling reveals primary mesothelioma cell lines recapitulate human disease.

    PubMed

    Chernova, T; Sun, X M; Powley, I R; Galavotti, S; Grosso, S; Murphy, F A; Miles, G J; Cresswell, L; Antonov, A V; Bennett, J; Nakas, A; Dinsdale, D; Cain, K; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; MacFarlane, M

    2016-07-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive, fatal tumor strongly associated with asbestos exposure. There is an urgent need to improve MM patient outcomes and this requires functionally validated pre-clinical models. Mesothelioma-derived cell lines provide an essential and relatively robust tool and remain among the most widely used systems for candidate drug evaluation. Although a number of cell lines are commercially available, a detailed comparison of these commercial lines with freshly derived primary tumor cells to validate their suitability as pre-clinical models is lacking. To address this, patient-derived primary mesothelioma cell lines were established and characterized using complementary multidisciplinary approaches and bioinformatic analysis. Clinical markers of mesothelioma, transcriptional and metabolic profiles, as well as the status of p53 and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and NF2, were examined in primary cell lines and in two widely used commercial lines. Expression of MM-associated markers, as well as the status of CDKN2A, NF2, the 'gatekeeper' in MM development, and their products demonstrated that primary cell lines are more representative of the tumor close to its native state and show a degree of molecular diversity, thus capturing the disease heterogeneity in a patient cohort. Molecular profiling revealed a significantly different transcriptome and marked metabolic shift towards a greater glycolytic phenotype in commercial compared with primary cell lines. Our results highlight that multiple, appropriately characterised, patient-derived tumor cell lines are required to enable concurrent evaluation of molecular profiles versus drug response. Furthermore, application of this approach to other difficult-to-treat tumors would generate improved cellular models for pre-clinical evaluation of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26891694

  9. Molecular profiling reveals primary mesothelioma cell lines recapitulate human disease

    PubMed Central

    Chernova, T; Sun, X M; Powley, I R; Galavotti, S; Grosso, S; Murphy, F A; Miles, G J; Cresswell, L; Antonov, A V; Bennett, J; Nakas, A; Dinsdale, D; Cain, K; Bushell, M; Willis, A E; MacFarlane, M

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is an aggressive, fatal tumor strongly associated with asbestos exposure. There is an urgent need to improve MM patient outcomes and this requires functionally validated pre-clinical models. Mesothelioma-derived cell lines provide an essential and relatively robust tool and remain among the most widely used systems for candidate drug evaluation. Although a number of cell lines are commercially available, a detailed comparison of these commercial lines with freshly derived primary tumor cells to validate their suitability as pre-clinical models is lacking. To address this, patient-derived primary mesothelioma cell lines were established and characterized using complementary multidisciplinary approaches and bioinformatic analysis. Clinical markers of mesothelioma, transcriptional and metabolic profiles, as well as the status of p53 and the tumor suppressor genes CDKN2A and NF2, were examined in primary cell lines and in two widely used commercial lines. Expression of MM-associated markers, as well as the status of CDKN2A, NF2, the ‘gatekeeper' in MM development, and their products demonstrated that primary cell lines are more representative of the tumor close to its native state and show a degree of molecular diversity, thus capturing the disease heterogeneity in a patient cohort. Molecular profiling revealed a significantly different transcriptome and marked metabolic shift towards a greater glycolytic phenotype in commercial compared with primary cell lines. Our results highlight that multiple, appropriately characterised, patient-derived tumor cell lines are required to enable concurrent evaluation of molecular profiles versus drug response. Furthermore, application of this approach to other difficult-to-treat tumors would generate improved cellular models for pre-clinical evaluation of novel targeted therapies. PMID:26891694

  10. NK Cells and γδ T Cells Mediate Resistance to Polyomavirus–Induced Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rabinarayan; Chen, Alex T.; Welsh, Raymond M.; Szomolanyi-Tsuda, Eva

    2010-01-01

    NK and γδ T cells can eliminate tumor cells in many experimental models, but their effect on the development of tumors caused by virus infections in vivo is not known. Polyomavirus (PyV) induces tumors in neonatally infected mice of susceptible strains and in adult mice with certain immune deficiencies, and CD8+ αβ T cells are regarded as the main effectors in anti-tumor immunity. Here we report that adult TCRβ knockout (KO) mice that lack αβ but have γδ T cells remain tumor-free after PyV infection, whereas TCRβ×δ KO mice that lack all T cells develop tumors. In addition, E26 mice, which lack NK and T cells, develop the tumors earlier than TCRβ×δ KO mice. These observations implicate γδ T and NK cells in the resistance to PyV-induced tumors. Cell lines established from PyV-induced tumors activate NK and γδ T cells both in culture and in vivo and express Rae-1, an NKG2D ligand. Moreover, these PyV tumor cells are killed by NK cells in vitro, and this cytotoxicity is prevented by treatment with NKG2D-blocking antibodies. Our findings demonstrate a protective role for NK and γδ T cells against naturally occurring virus-induced tumors and suggest the involvement of NKG2D-mediated mechanisms. PMID:20523894

  11. DAPK loss in colon cancer tumor buds: implications for migration capacity of disseminating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Karamitopoulou, Eva; Dawson, Heather; Koelzer, Viktor Hendrik; Agaimy, Abbas; Garreis, Fabian; Söder, Stephan; Laqua, William; Lugli, Alessandro; Hartmann, Arndt; Rau, Tilman T.; Schneider-Stock, Regine

    2015-01-01

    Defining new therapeutic strategies to overcome therapy resistance due to tumor heterogeneity in colon cancer is challenging. One option is to explore the molecular profile of aggressive disseminating tumor cells. The cytoskeleton-associated Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is involved in the cross talk between tumor and immune cells at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. Here dedifferentiated tumor cells histologically defined as tumor budding are associated with a high risk of metastasis and poor prognosis. Analyzing samples from 144 colorectal cancer patients we investigated immunhistochemical DAPK expression in different tumor regions such as center, invasion front, and buds. Functional consequences for tumor aggressiveness were studied in a panel of colon tumor cell lines using different migration, wound healing, and invasion assays. DAPK levels were experimentally modified by siRNA transfection and overexpression as well as inhibitor treatments. We found that DAPK expression was reduced towards the invasion front and was nearly absent in tumor buds. Applying the ECIS system with HCT116 and HCT116 stable lentiviral DAPK knock down cells (HCTshDAPK) we identified an important role for DAPK in decreasing the migratory capacity whereas proliferation was not affected. Furthermore, the migration pattern differed with HCTshDAPK cells showing a cluster-like migration of tumor cell groups. DAPK inhibitor treatment revealed that the migration rate was independent of DAPK's catalytic activity. Modulation of DAPK expression level in SW480 and DLD1 colorectal cancer cells significantly influenced wound closure rate. DAPK seems to be a major player that influences the migratory capability of disseminating tumor cells and possibly affects the dynamic interface between pro- and anti-survival factors at the invasion front of colorectal cancer. This interesting and new finding requires further evaluation. PMID:26405175

  12. A human gallbladder adenocarcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Johzaki, H; Iwasaki, H; Nishida, T; Isayama, T; Kikuchi, M

    1989-12-01

    A cell strain (FU-GBC-1) was established from cancerous ascites of a 68-year-old male patient with well-differentiated adenocarcinoma of the gallbladder. By light and electron microscopy, the cultured cells showed the morphologic features of adenocarcinoma characterized by gland-like structures, intracellular microcystic spaces, and mucous production. Immunoperoxidase stains showed that FU-GBC-1 cells expressed several epithelial tumor antigens including CA 19-9, carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA). The cell strain has been in continuous culture up to passage 44 for 1 1/2 years, with the population doubling time of 120 hours. The cytogenetic analysis by a G-band technique showed a constant loss of chromosome Y in FU-GBC-1 cells. The modal chromosome number at passage 12 was 82 with a range of 77 to 85. Flow cytometry with an ethidium bromide technique additionally confirmed aneuploid DNA content (4C) in the cultured cells at passage 12 and 35. Inoculation of FU-GBC-1 cells into the dermis of BALB/c nude mice produced transplantable adenocarcinoma identical to the original tumor. Because no continuous cell lines of the well-differentiated type of gallbladder adenocarcinoma have been reported in the literature currently, the newly established cell strain we report may yield a useful system for studying the morphologic and biologic characteristics of gallbladder adenocarcinoma. PMID:2680052

  13. Human tumor-derived genomic DNA transduced into a recipient cell induces tumor-specific immune responses ex vivo

    PubMed Central

    Whiteside, Theresa L.; Gambotto, Andrea; Albers, Andreas; Stanson, Joanna; Cohen, Edward P.

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a DNA-based vaccination strategy evaluated ex vivo with human cells. The vaccine was prepared by transferring tumor-derived genomic DNA to PCI-13 cells, a highly immunogenic tumor cell line (“recipient cell”), which had been genetically modified to secrete IL-2 (PCI-13/IL-2). PCI-13 cells expressed class I MHC determinants (HLA-A2) shared with the tumor from which the DNA was obtained as well as allogeneic determinants. DNA from a gp100+ melanoma cell line was transduced into gp100− PCI-13/IL-2 cells (PCI-13/IL-2/DNA). A T cell line specific for the gp100 epitope responded to PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells by IFN-γ-secretion measured in enzyme-linked immunospot assays. The T cell line also recognized the gp100 epitope presented by dendritic cells that ingested PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells, which had been induced by UVB irradiation to undergo apoptosis. After up-take and processing of apoptotic PCI-13/IL-2/DNA cells, the dendritic cells primed normal peripheral blood lymphocytes to generate effector T cells specific for the tumor donating the DNA. The results indicate that tumor epitopes encoded in such DNA are expressed in recipient cells and can induce tumor-specific T cells. The findings support translation of this vaccination strategy to a phase I trial in patients with cancer. PMID:12080146

  14. Verification and unmasking of widely used human esophageal adenocarcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Boonstra, Jurjen J; van Marion, Ronald; Beer, David G; Lin, Lin; Chaves, Paula; Ribeiro, Catarina; Pereira, A Dias; Roque, Lúcia; Darnton, S Jane; Altorki, Nasser K; Schrump, David S; Klimstra, David S; Tang, Laura H; Eshleman, James R; Alvarez, Hector; Shimada, Yutaka; van Dekken, Herman; Tilanus, Hugo W; Dinjens, Winand N M

    2010-02-24

    For decades, hundreds of different human tumor type-specific cell lines have been used in experimental cancer research as models for their respective tumors. The veracity of experimental results for a specific tumor type relies on the correct derivation of the cell line. In a worldwide effort, we verified the authenticity of all available esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC) cell lines. We proved that the frequently used cell lines SEG-1 and BIC-1 and the SK-GT-5 cell line are in fact cell lines from other tumor types. Experimental results based on these contaminated cell lines have led to ongoing clinical trials recruiting EAC patients, to more than 100 scientific publications, and to at least three National Institutes of Health cancer research grants and 11 US patents, which emphasizes the importance of our findings. Widespread use of contaminated cell lines threatens the development of treatment strategies for EAC. PMID:20075370

  15. Identification of homologous pairing and strand-exchange activity from a human tumor cell line based on Z-DNA affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Fishel, R.A.; Detmer, K.; Rich, A.

    1988-01-01

    An enzymatic activity that catalyzes ATP-dependent homologous pairing and strand exchange of duplex linear DNA and single-stranded circular DNA has been purified several thousand-fold from a human leukemic T-lymphoblast cell line. The activity was identified after chromatography of nuclear proteins on a Z-DNA column matrix. The reaction was shown to transfer the complementary single strand from a donor duplex linear substrate to a viral circular single-stranded acceptor beginning at the 5' end and proceeding in the 3' direction. Products of the strand-transfer reaction were characterized by electron microscopy. A 74-kDa protein was identified as the major ATP-binding peptide in active strand transferase fractions. The protein preparation described in this report binds more strongly to Z-DNA than to B-DNA.

  16. Characterization of a Novel Radiation-Induced Sarcoma Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Lang, J.E.; Zhu, W.; Nokes, B.T.; Sheth, G.R.; Novak, P.; Fuchs, L.; Watts, G.S.; Futscher, B.W.; Mineyev, N.; Ring, A.; LeBeau, L.; Nagle, R.; Cranmer, L.D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS) is a potential complication of cancer treatment. No widely available cell line models exist to facilitate studies of RIS. Methods We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a RIS. Results Short tandem repeat (STR) profiling of UACC-SARC1 was virtually identical to its parental tumor. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis of the tumor and immunocytochemistry (ICC) analysis of UACC-SARC1 revealed shared expression of vimentin, osteonectin, CD68, Ki67 and PTEN but tumor-restricted expression of the histiocyte markers α1-antitrypsin and α1-antichymotrypsin. Karyotyping of the tumor demonstrated aneuploidy. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) provided direct genetic comparison between the tumor and UACC-SARC1. Sequencing of 740 mutation hotspots revealed no mutations in UACC-SARC1 nor in the tumor. NOD/SCID gamma mouse xenografts demonstrated tumor formation and metastasis. Clonogenicity assays demonstrated that 90% of single cells produced viable colonies. NOD/SCID gamma mice produced useful patient-derived xenografts for orthotopic or metastatic models. Conclusion Our novel RIS strain constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. UACC-SARC1 is an aneuploid cell line with complex genomics lacking common oncogenes or tumor suppressor genes as drivers of its biology. The UACC-SARC1 cell line will enable further studies of the drivers of RIS. Synopsis We derived a spontaneously immortalized primary human cell line, UACC-SARC1, from a radiation-induced sarcoma (RIS). Our novel RIS cell line constitutes a useful tool for pre-clinical studies of this rare, aggressive disease. PMID:25644184

  17. Establishment and characterization of unique human gallbladder cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Mila; Koike, Naoto; Yanagimoto, Go; Tsunoda, Shin-Ichi; Kaul, Sunil; Hirano, Takashi; Emura, Fabian; Kashiwagi, Hironobu; Kawamoto, Toru; Ohkohchi, Nobuhiro; Saijo, Kaoru; Ohno, Tadao; Miwa, Masanao; Todoroki, Takeshi

    2004-05-01

    Gallbladder cancer has a dismal prognosis. Understanding the disease at the biological, genetic, molecular, cellular, and clinical level is essential for effective diagnostics and therapeutics. However, the currently established gallbladder cell lines are insufficient for better understanding and further research. The aim of our present study was to establish and characterize human gallbladder cancer cell lines. We established 5 cell lines from resected specimens of gallbladder cancers. These cell lines revealed typical tumor histopathological characteristics. We examined growth characteristics and the colony-forming ability of established cell lines in terms of their cell cycle parameters, expression of tumor markers (carcinoembryonic antigen; CEA, carbohydrated antigen 19-9; CA19-9, MUC-1 and c-kit) and the oncogene c-erbB2 by flow cytometer. Comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis with specific gene probes was performed to detect changes in the gene copy numbers. Human origin of cell lines was confirmed by chromosomal analysis. Cells maintained differentiation characteristics of the original tumors. The doubling time of different cell lines varied from 30 to 96 h. All 5 cell lines formed colonies in the colony forming assays and expressed CEA, CA19-9, MUC-1 and the oncogene c-erbB2 and showed chromosomal aneuploidy. CGH analysis demonstrated gain of chromosomal region bearing SRC, RAB1, and PAP in all cell lines and hTERT in 4 cell lines. These newly established cell lines might serve as a useful model for studying the molecular pathogenesis of gallbladder cancer. Furthermore, they may serve as a model for testing new therapeutics against gallbladder cancer. These chromosomal aberrations and imbalances provide a starting point for molecular analyses of genomic regions and genes in gallbladder carcinogenesis. PMID:15067341

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumors)

    MedlinePlus

    ... hCG and LDH may be at any level. Poor prognosis A nonseminoma extragonadal germ cell tumor is in the poor prognosis group if: the tumor is in the ... extragonadal germ cell tumor does not have a poor prognosis group. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There ...

  19. Intracellular particle tracking as a tool for tumor cell characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yixuan; Schnekenburger, Juergen; Duits, Michael H. G.

    2009-11-01

    We studied the dynamics of two types of intracellular probe particles, ballistically injected latex spheres and endogenous granules, in tumor cell lines of differerent metastatic potential: breast tumor cells (MCF-7 malignant, MCF-10A benign) and pancreas adenocarcinoma (PaTu8988T malignant, PaTu8988S benign). For both tissue types and for both probes, the mean squared displacement (MSD) function measured in the malignant cells was substantially larger than in the benign cells. Only a few cells were needed to characterize the tissue as malignant or benign based on their MSD, since variations in MSD within the same cell line were relatively small. These findings suggest that intracellular particle tracking (IPT) can serve as a simple and reliable method for characterization of cell states obtained from a small amount of cell sample. Mechanical analysis of the same cell lines with atomic force microscopy (AFM) in force-distance mode revealed that AFM could distinguish between the benign and malignant breast cancer cells but not the pancreatic tumor cell lines. This underlines the potential value of IPT as a complementary nanomechanical tool for studying cell-state-dependent mechanical properties.

  20. Derivation of ductlike cell lines from a transplantable acinar cell carcinoma of the rat pancreas.

    PubMed Central

    Pettengill, O. S.; Faris, R. A.; Bell, R. H.; Kuhlmann, E. T.; Longnecker, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    Two cell lines were derived from a transplantable acinar cell carcinoma that had been established from a primary carcinoma of the pancreas in an azaserine-treated Lewis rat. The cultured tumor cells initially produced amylase, but production of exocrine enzymes ceased after 1-2 weeks in culture. The cultured cells were tumorigenic in Lewis rats, and one line produced solid tumors composed of ductlike structures surrounded by dense fibrous tissue. The second cell line produced partially solid and partially cystic tumors with a mixed phenotype of squamous, mucinous, and glandular areas when it grew in vivo following regrafting. Both cell lines lost structural and immunohistochemical acinar cell markers while acquiring duct cell markers during culture and regrafting. These studies provide strong support for the hypothesis that ductlike carcinomas can arise from neoplastic pancreatic acinar cells in rats. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 PMID:8391218

  1. Detection algorithm for the validation of human cell lines.

    PubMed

    Eltonsy, Névine; Gabisi, Vivian; Li, Xuesong; Russe, K Blair; Mills, Gordon B; Stemke-Hale, Katherine

    2012-09-15

    Cell lines are an important tool in understanding all aspects of cancer growth, development, metastasis and tumor cell death. There has been a dramatic increase in the number of cell lines and diversity of the cancers they represent; however, misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines can lead to erroneous conclusions. One method that has gained favor for authenticating cell lines is the use of short tandem repeats (STR) to generate a unique DNA profile. The challenge in validating cell lines is the requirement to compare the large number of existing STR profiles against cell lines of interest, particularly when considering that the profiles of many cell lines have drifted over time and original samples are not available. We report here methods that analyze the variations and the proportional changes extracted from tetra-nucleotide repeat regions in the STR analysis. This technique allows a paired match between a target cell line and a reference database of cell lines to find cell lines that match within a user designated percentage cut-off quality matrix. Our method accounts for DNA instability and can suggest whether the target cell lines are misidentified or unstable. PMID:22419365

  2. Inhibitory effects of a dendritic cell vaccine loaded with radiation-induced apoptotic tumor cells on tumor cell antigens in mouse bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, X F; Ding, Q; Hou, J G; Chen, G

    2015-01-01

    Herein, the preparation of a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine with radiation-induced apoptotic tumor cells and its immunological effects on bladder cancer in C57BL/6 mice was investigated. We used radiation to obtain a MB49 cell antigen that was sensitive to bone marrow-derived DCs to prepare a DC vaccine. An animal model of tumor-bearing mice was established with the MB49 mouse bladder cancer cell line. Animals were randomly allocated to an experimental group or control group. DC vaccine or phosphate-buffered saline was given 7 days before inoculation with tumor cells. Each group consisted of 2 subgroups in which tumor volume and the survival of tumor-bearing mice were recorded. Tumor volumes and average tumor masses of mice administered DC vaccine loaded with radiation-induced apoptotic cells were significantly lower than those in the control group (P < 0.01). Survival in the experimental group was also longer than that in the control group, and 2 mice survived without tumor formation. In the DC vaccine group, 2 mice were alive without tumor growth after 30 days, and no tumor was observed at 30 days after subcutaneous inoculation of MB49 cells. The DC vaccine loaded with radiation-induced apoptotic tumor cells had an anti-tumor effect and was associated with increased survival in a bladder cancer model in mice. PMID:26214433

  3. Interaction of tumor cells with the microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Recent advances in tumor biology have revealed that a detailed analysis of the complex interactions of tumor cells with their adjacent microenvironment (tumor stroma) is mandatory in order to understand the various mechanisms involved in tumor growth and the development of metastasis. The mutual interactions between tumor cells and cellular and non-cellular components (extracellular matrix = ECM) of the tumor microenvironment will eventually lead to a loss of tissue homeostasis and promote tumor development and progression. Thus, interactions of genetically altered tumor cells and the ECM on the one hand and reactive non-neoplastic cells on the other hand essentially control most aspects of tumorigenesis such as epithelial-mesenchymal-transition (EMT), migration, invasion (i.e. migration through connective tissue), metastasis formation, neovascularisation, apoptosis and chemotherapeutic drug resistance. In this mini-review we will focus on these issues that were recently raised by two review articles in CCS. PMID:21914164

  4. Thyroid cell lines in research on goitrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gerber, H; Peter, H J; Asmis, L; Studer, H

    1991-12-01

    Thyroid cell lines have contributed a lot to the understanding of goitrogenesis. The cell lines mostly used in thyroid research are briefly discussed, namely the rat thyroid cell lines FRTL and FRTL-5, the porcine thyroid cell lines PORTHOS and ARTHOS, The sheep thyroid cell lines OVNIS 5H and 6H, the cat thyroid cell lines PETCAT 1 to 4 and ROMCAT, and the human thyroid cell lines FTC-133 and HTh 74. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells and COS-7 cells, stably transfected with TSH receptor cDNA and expressing a functional TSH receptor, are discussed as examples for non-thyroidal cells, transfected with thyroid genes. PMID:1726925

  5. Granular Cell Tumor: An Uncommon Benign Neoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Gayen, Tirthankar; Das, Anupam; Shome, Kaushik; Bandyopadhyay, Debabrata; Das, Dipti; Saha, Abanti

    2015-01-01

    Granular cell tumor is a distinctly rare neoplasm of neural sheath origin. It mainly presents as a solitary asymptomatic swelling in the oral cavity, skin, and rarely internal organs in the middle age. Histopathology is characteristic, showing polyhedral cells containing numerous fine eosinophilic granules with indistinct cell margins. We present a case of granular cell tumor on the back of a 48-year-old woman which was painful, mimicking an adnexal tumor. PMID:26120181

  6. Mast cell tumor destruction by deionized water.

    PubMed

    Grier, R L; Di Guardo, G; Schaffer, C B; Pedrosa, B; Myers, R; Merkley, D F; Thouvenelle, M

    1990-07-01

    In a controlled study, malignant murine P815 mastocytoma cells exposed in vitro to distilled and deionized water died as a result of progressive swelling, degranulation, and membrane rupture. A 90% mean cell death occurred when cells obtained directly from culture were exposed to deionized water for 2 minutes. Of 6 cryopreserved malignant murine cell lines, which included Cloudman S91 melanoma, CMT-93 rectum carcinoma, MMT-06052 mammary carcinoma, and S-180 Sarcoma, only P815 mastocytoma and YAC-1 lymphoma were significantly (P less than 0.05) affected by hypotonic shock; Cloudman S91 melanoma cells were the most resistant. Mastocytoma cells were selectively killed by hypotonic solution, and lymphoma cells were also killed by isotonic saline solution. Local mast cell tumor (MCT) recurrence and percentage survival were evaluated in 12 cats (21 MCT) and 54 dogs (85 MCT) subjected to surgery alone or local infiltration of deionized water as an adjunct to surgery. Of all 16 incompletely excised MCT in cats, there was no local recurrence following injection. Four mast cell tumors (2 cats) regressed after being injected in situ. In dogs with clinical stage-I MCT, local recurrence was detected in 50% (5/10), but with injection after incomplete excision, local MCT recurrence was significantly (P less than 0.05) less (6.6%, 1/15). Percentage recurrence was significantly (P less than 0.05) less and survival significantly greater when incompletely excised grade-II MCT were injected. Mean follow-up period after surgery in cats and dogs was 35 and 23.4 months, respectively. PMID:2117868

  7. Salinomycin efficiency assessment in non-tumor (HB4a) and tumor (MCF-7) human breast cells.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Andressa Megumi; D Epiro, Gláucia Fernanda Rocha; Marques, Lilian Areal; Semprebon, Simone Cristine; Sartori, Daniele; Ribeiro, Lúcia Regina; Mantovani, Mário Sérgio

    2016-06-01

    The search for anticancer drugs has led researchers to study salinomycin, an ionophore antibiotic that selectively destroys cancer stem cells. In this study, salinomycin was assessed in two human cell lines, a breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7) and a non-tumor breast cell line (HB4a), to verify its selective action against tumor cells. Real-time assessment of cell proliferation showed that HB4a cells are more resistant to salinomycin than MCF-7 tumor cell line, and these data were confirmed in a cytotoxicity assay. The half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values show the increased sensitivity of MCF-7 cells to salinomycin. In the comet assay, only MCF-7 cells showed the induction of DNA damage. Flow cytometric analysis showed that cell death by apoptosis/necrosis was only induced in the MCF-7 cells. The increased expression of GADD45A and CDKN1A genes was observed in all cell lines. Decreased expression of CCNA2 and CCNB1 genes occurred only in tumor cells, suggesting G2/M cell cycle arrest. Consequently, cell death was activated in tumor cells through strong inhibition of the antiapoptotic genes BCL-2, BCL-XL, and BIRC5 genes in MCF-7 cells. These data demonstrate the selectivity of salinomycin in killing human mammary tumor cells. The cell death observed only in MCF-7 tumor cells was confirmed by gene expression analysis, where there was downregulation of antiapoptotic genes. These data contribute to clarifying the mechanism of action of salinomycin as a promising antitumor drug and, for the first time, we observed the higher resistance of HB4a non-tumor breast cells to salinomycin. PMID:26932586

  8. The expression of inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) is altered in prostate cancer cells and reverses the transformed phenotype of the LNCaP prostate tumor cell line.

    PubMed

    Yehia, G; Razavi, R; Memin, E; Schlotter, F; Molina, C A

    2001-08-15

    Inducible cAMP early repressor (ICER) has been shown to be an important mediator of cAMP antiproliferative activity. In this report, it was found that cAMP retards LNCaP cell growth; in contrast, cAMP inhibits the growth of PC-3 and DU-145 cells. ICER protein levels were markedly reduced in prostate cancer epithelial cells and undetectable and uninducible by cAMP in LNCaP and DU 145 cells. Forced expression of ICER in LNCaP cells caused inhibition of cell growth and thymidine incorporation and halted cells at the G(1) phase of the cell cycle. These ICER-bearing LNCaP cells were rendered unable to grow in soft agar and unable to form tumors in nude mice. These results suggest that deregulation of ICER expression may be related to carcinogenesis of the prostate gland. PMID:11507053

  9. Hand-Held High-Resolution Fluorescence Imaging System for Fluorescence-Guided Surgery of Patient and Cell-Line Pancreatic Tumors Growing Orthotopically in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Maawy, Ali; Sato, Sho; Murakami, Takashi; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Momiyama, Masashi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Bouvet, Michael; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study, we investigated the advantages for fluorescence-guided surgery (FGS) in mice of a portable hand-sized imaging system compared to a large chamber fluorescing imaging system or a long-working-distance fluorescence microscope. Methods Mouse models of human pancreatic cancer for FGS included (1) MiaPaCa-2-expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP), (2) BxPC3 labeled with anti-CEA antibody conjugated with Alexa 488, (3) patient-derived orhotopic xenograft (PDOX)™ labeled with anti-CA19-9 antibody conjugated with Alexa 488. Results Each device could clearly detect the primary MiaPaCa-2-GFP. tumor and any residual tumor after FGS. In the BxPC3 model labeled with Alexa 488-conjugated anti-CEA, each device could detect the primary tumor, but the MVX10 could not clearly detect the residual tumor remaining after FGS while the other devices could. In the PDOX™ model labeled with Alexa 488 conjugated with anti CA19-9, only the portable hand-held device could distinguish the residual tumor from the background, and complete resection of the residual tumor was achieved under fluorescence navigation. Conclusions The results described in the present report suggest the hand-held mobile imaging system can be able to be applied to the clinic for FGS due to its convenient size and high sensitivity and help make FGS widely-used. PMID:24373959

  10. [Establishment and characterization of cell lines derived from nude mice transplanted squamous cell carcinoma of uterine cervix].

    PubMed

    Imanishi, K; Kato, Y; Karasaki, S; Yoshida, R; Kawana, T; Mizuno, M

    1990-06-01

    Two human cell lines, KIMI-1 and -2 were established from nude mice transplanted tumor originated from a human squamous cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix. These two cell lines have different shapes, chromosome numbers and tumor markers, respectively. PMID:2085478

  11. Tumor initiating cells in malignant gliomas

    PubMed Central

    Hadjipanayis, Costas G.; Van Meir, Erwin G.

    2009-01-01

    A rare subpopulation of cells within malignant gliomas, which shares canonical properties with neural stem cells (NSCs), may be integral to glial tumor development and perpetuation. These cells, also known as tumor initiating cells (TICs), have the ability to self-renew, develop into any cell in the overall tumor population (multipotency), and proliferate. A defining property of TICs is their ability to initiate new tumors in immunocompromised mice with high efficiency. Mounting evidence suggests that TICs originate from the transformation of NSCs and their progenitors. New findings show that TICs may be more resistant to chemotherapy and radiation than the bulk of tumor cells, thereby permitting recurrent tumor formation and accounting for the failure of conventional therapies. The development of new therapeutic strategies selectively targeting TICs while sparing NSCs may provide for more effective treatment of malignant gliomas. PMID:19189072

  12. Comparison between 68Ga-bombesin (68Ga-BZH3) and the cRGD tetramer 68Ga-RGD4 studies in an experimental nude rat model with a neuroendocrine pancreatic tumor cell line

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Receptor scintigraphy gains more interest for diagnosis and treatment of tumors, in particular for neuroendocrine tumors (NET). We used a pan-Bombesin analog, the peptide DOTA-PEG2-[D-tyr6, β-Ala11, Thi13, Nle14] BN(6-14) amide (BZH3). BZH3 binds to at least three receptor subtypes: the BB1 (Neuromedin B), BB2 (Gastrin-releasing peptide, GRP), and BB3. Imaging of ανβ3 integrin expression playing an important role in angiogenesis and metastasis was accomplished with a 68Ga-RGD tetramer. The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinetics and to compare both tracers in an experimental NET cell line. Methods This study comprised nine nude rats inoculated with the pancreatic tumor cell line AR42J. Dynamic positron emission tomography (PET) scans using 68Ga-BZH3 and 68Ga-RGD tetramer were performed (68Ga-RGD tetramer: n = 4, 68Ga-BZH3: n = 5). Standardized uptake values (SUVs) were calculated, and a two-tissue compartmental learning-machine model (calculation of K1 - k4 vessel density (VB) and receptor binding potential (RBP)) as well as a non-compartmental model based on the fractal dimension was used for quantitative analysis of both tracers. Multivariate analysis was used to evaluate the kinetic data. Results The PET kinetic parameters showed significant differences when individual parameters were compared between groups. Significant differences were found in FD, VB, K1, and RBP (p = 0.0275, 0.05, 0.05, and 0.0275 respectively). The 56- to 60-min SUV for 68Ga-BZH3, with a range of 0.86 to 1.29 (median, 1.19) was higher than the corresponding value for the 68Ga-RGD tetramer, with a range of 0.78 to 1.31 (median, 0.99). Furthermore, FD, VB, K1, and RBP for 68Ga-BZH3 were generally higher than the corresponding values for the 68Ga-RGD tetramer, whereas k3 was slightly higher for 68Ga-RGD tetramer. Conclusions As a parameter that reflects receptor binding, the increase of K1 for 68Ga-BZH3 indicated higher expression of bombesin receptors than that of

  13. Cell Fusion Connects Oncogenesis with Tumor Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaofeng; Merchak, Kevin; Lee, Woojin; Grande, Joseph P.; Cascalho, Marilia; Platt, Jeffrey L.

    2016-01-01

    Cell fusion likely drives tumor evolution by undermining chromosomal and DNA stability and/or by generating phenotypic diversity; however, whether a cell fusion event can initiate malignancy and direct tumor evolution is unknown. We report that a fusion event involving normal, nontransformed, cytogenetically stable epithelial cells can initiate chromosomal instability, DNA damage, cell transformation, and malignancy. Clonal analysis of fused cells reveals that the karyotypic and phenotypic potential of tumors formed by cell fusion is established immediately or within a few cell divisions after the fusion event, without further ongoing genetic and phenotypic plasticity, and that subsequent evolution of such tumors reflects selection from the initial diverse population rather than ongoing plasticity of the progeny. Thus, one cell fusion event can both initiate malignancy and fuel evolution of the tumor that ensues. PMID:26066710

  14. Improved Methods to Generate Spheroid Cultures from Tumor Cells, Tumor Cells & Fibroblasts or Tumor-Fragments: Microenvironment, Microvesicles and MiRNA

    PubMed Central

    Lao, Zheng; Kelly, Catherine J.; Yang, Xiang-Yang; Jenkins, W. Timothy; Toorens, Erik; Ganguly, Tapan; Evans, Sydney M.; Koch, Cameron J.

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic and prognostic indicators are key components to achieve the goal of personalized cancer therapy. Two distinct approaches to this goal include predicting response by genetic analysis and direct testing of possible therapies using cultures derived from biopsy specimens. Optimally, the latter method requires a rapid assessment, but growing xenograft tumors or developing patient-derived cell lines can involve a great deal of time and expense. Furthermore, tumor cells have much different responses when grown in 2D versus 3D tissue environments. Using a modification of existing methods, we show that it is possible to make tumor-fragment (TF) spheroids in only 2–3 days. TF spheroids appear to closely model characteristics of the original tumor and may be used to assess critical therapy-modulating features of the microenvironment such as hypoxia. A similar method allows the reproducible development of spheroids from mixed tumor cells and fibroblasts (mixed-cell spheroids). Prior literature reports have shown highly variable development and properties of mixed-cell spheroids and this has hampered the detailed study of how individual tumor-cell components interact. In this study, we illustrate this approach and describe similarities and differences using two tumor models (U87 glioma and SQ20B squamous-cell carcinoma) with supporting data from additional cell lines. We show that U87 and SQ20B spheroids predict a key microenvironmental factor in tumors (hypoxia) and that SQ20B cells and spheroids generate similar numbers of microvesicles. We also present pilot data for miRNA expression under conditions of cells, tumors, and TF spheroids. PMID:26208323

  15. Pharmacogenomics of Scopoletin in Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Seo, Ean-Jeong; Saeed, Mohamed; Law, Betty Yuen Kwan; Wu, An Guo; Kadioglu, Onat; Greten, Henry Johannes; Efferth, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Drug resistance and the severe side effects of chemotherapy necessitate the development of novel anticancer drugs. Natural products are a valuable source for drug development. Scopoletin is a coumarin compound, which can be found in several Artemisia species and other plant genera. Microarray-based RNA expression profiling of the NCI cell line panel showed that cellular response of scopoletin did not correlate to the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters as classical drug resistance mechanisms (ABCB1, ABCB5, ABCC1, ABCG2). This was also true for the expression of the oncogene EGFR and the mutational status of the tumor suppressor gene, TP53. However, mutations in the RAS oncogenes and the slow proliferative activity in terms of cell doubling times significantly correlated with scopoletin resistance. COMPARE and hierarchical cluster analyses of transcriptome-wide mRNA expression resulted in a set of 40 genes, which all harbored binding motifs in their promoter sequences for the transcription factor, NF-κB, which is known to be associated with drug resistance. RAS mutations, slow proliferative activity, and NF-κB may hamper its effectiveness. By in silico molecular docking studies, we found that scopoletin bound to NF-κB and its regulator IκB. Scopoletin activated NF-κB in a SEAP-driven NF-κB reporter cell line, indicating that NF-κB might be a resistance factor for scopoletin. In conclusion, scopoletin might serve as lead compound for drug development because of its favorable activity against tumor cells with ABC-transporter expression, although NF-κB activation may be considered as resistance factor for this compound. Further investigations are warranted to explore the full therapeutic potential of this natural product. PMID:27092478

  16. Targeting Survivin Enhances Chemosensitivity in Retinoblastoma Cells and Orthotopic Tumors.

    PubMed

    Ferrario, Angela; Luna, Marian; Rucker, Natalie; Wong, Sam; Lederman, Ariel; Kim, Jonathan; Gomer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for retinoblastoma (Rb) vary depending on the size and location of the intraocular lesions and include chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We examined whether agents used to treat Rb induce a pro-survival phenotype associated with increased expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins. We document that exposure to carboplatin, topotecan or radiation resulted in elevated expression of survivin in two human Rb cell lines but not in normal retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Cellular levels of survivin were attenuated in Rb cells exposed to an imidazolium-based survivin suppressant, Sepantronium bromide (YM155). Protein expression patterns of survivin in RPE cells were not altered following treatment protocols involving exposure to YM155. Including YM155 with chemotherapy or radiation increased levels of apoptosis in Rb cells but not in RPE cells. Intraocular luciferase expressing Rb tumors were generated from the Rb cell lines and used to evaluate the effects of carboplatin and YM155 on in-vivo survivin expression and tumor growth. Carboplatin induced expression of survivin while carboplatin combined with YM155 reduced survivin expression in tumor bearing eyes. The combination protocol was also most effective in reducing the rate of tumor regrowth. These results indicate that targeted inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin provides a therapeutic advantage for Rb cells and tumors treated with chemotherapy. PMID:27050416

  17. Targeting Survivin Enhances Chemosensitivity in Retinoblastoma Cells and Orthotopic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rucker, Natalie; Wong, Sam; Lederman, Ariel; Kim, Jonathan; Gomer, Charles

    2016-01-01

    Treatments for retinoblastoma (Rb) vary depending on the size and location of the intraocular lesions and include chemotherapy and radiation therapy. We examined whether agents used to treat Rb induce a pro-survival phenotype associated with increased expression of survivin, a member of the inhibitor of apoptosis family of proteins. We document that exposure to carboplatin, topotecan or radiation resulted in elevated expression of survivin in two human Rb cell lines but not in normal retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) cells. Cellular levels of survivin were attenuated in Rb cells exposed to an imidazolium-based survivin suppressant, Sepantronium bromide (YM155). Protein expression patterns of survivin in RPE cells were not altered following treatment protocols involving exposure to YM155. Including YM155 with chemotherapy or radiation increased levels of apoptosis in Rb cells but not in RPE cells. Intraocular luciferase expressing Rb tumors were generated from the Rb cell lines and used to evaluate the effects of carboplatin and YM155 on in-vivo survivin expression and tumor growth. Carboplatin induced expression of survivin while carboplatin combined with YM155 reduced survivin expression in tumor bearing eyes. The combination protocol was also most effective in reducing the rate of tumor regrowth. These results indicate that targeted inhibition of the anti-apoptotic protein survivin provides a therapeutic advantage for Rb cells and tumors treated with chemotherapy. PMID:27050416

  18. Suppressive effects of tumor cell-derived 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine on human T cells.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Frederik C; Singer, Katrin; Poller, Kerstin; Bernhardt, Luise; Strobl, Carolin D; Limm, Katharina; Ritter, Axel P; Gottfried, Eva; Völkl, Simon; Jacobs, Benedikt; Peter, Katrin; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Dettmer, Katja; Oefner, Peter J; Bosserhoff, Anja-Katrin; Kreutz, Marina P; Aigner, Michael; Mackensen, Andreas

    2016-08-01

    The immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment represents one of the main obstacles for immunotherapy of cancer. The tumor milieu is among others shaped by tumor metabolites such as 5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadenosine (MTA). Increased intratumoral MTA levels result from a lack of the MTA-catabolizing enzyme methylthioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) in tumor cells and are found in various tumor entities. Here, we demonstrate that MTA suppresses proliferation, activation, differentiation, and effector function of antigen-specific T cells without eliciting cell death. Conversely, if MTA is added to highly activated T cells, MTA exerts cytotoxic effects on T cells. We identified the Akt pathway, a critical signal pathway for T cell activation, as a target of MTA, while, for example, p38 remained unaffected. Next, we provide evidence that MTA exerts its immunosuppressive effects by interfering with protein methylation in T cells. To confirm the relevance of the suppressive effects of exogenously added MTA on human T cells, we used an MTAP-deficient tumor cell-line that was stably transfected with the MTAP-coding sequence. We observed that T cells stimulated with MTAP-transfected tumor cells revealed a higher proliferative capacity compared to T cells stimulated with Mock-transfected cells. In conclusion, our findings reveal a novel immune evasion strategy of human tumor cells that could be of interest for therapeutic targeting. PMID:27622058

  19. Significance of Circulating Tumor Cells in Soft Tissue Sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Nicolazzo, Chiara; Gradilone, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells can be detected from the peripheral blood of cancer patients. Their prognostic value has been established in the last 10 years for metastatic colorectal, breast, and prostate cancer. On the contrary their presence in patients affected by sarcomas has been poorly investigated. The discovery of EpCAM mRNA expression in different sarcoma cell lines and in a small cohort of metastatic sarcoma patients supports further investigations on these rare tumors to deepen the importance of CTC isolation. Although it is not clear whether EpCAM expression might be originally present on tumor sarcoma cells or acquired during the mesenchymal-epithelial transition, the discovery of EpCAM on circulating sarcoma cells opens a new scenario in CTC detection in patients affected by a rare mesenchymal tumor. PMID:26167450

  20. AB241. Cancer stem cell-like side population cells in clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line 769P

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Bin; Wang, Dao-Hu; Chen, Jun-Xing; Qiu, Shao-Peng

    2016-01-01

    Background Although cancers are widely considered to be maintained by stem cells, the existence of stem cells in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has seldom been reported, in part due to the lack of unique surface markers. We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Methods We here identified cancer stem cell-like cells with side population (SP) phenotype in five human RCC cell lines. Results Flow cytometry analysis revealed that 769P, a human clear cell RCC cell line, contained the largest amount of SP cells among five cell lines. These 769P SP cells possessed characteristics of proliferation, self-renewal, and differentiation, as well as strong resistance to chemotherapy and radiotherapy that were possibly related to the ABCB1 transporter. In vivo experiments with serial tumor transplantation in mice also showed that 769P SP cells formed tumors in NOD/SCID mice. Conclusions Taken together, these results indicate that 769P SP cells have the properties of cancer stem cells, which may play important roles in tumorigenesis and therapy-resistance of RCC.

  1. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  2. Activity of nintedanib in germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Steinemann, Gustav; Jacobsen, Christine; Gerwing, Mirjam; Hauschild, Jessica; von Amsberg, Gunhild; Höpfner, Michael; Nitzsche, Bianca; Honecker, Friedemann

    2016-02-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are the most frequent malignancy in male patients between 15 and 45 years of age. Cisplatin-based chemotherapy shows excellent cure rates, but patients with cisplatin-resistant GCTs have a poor prognosis. Nintedanib (BIBF 1120, Vargatef) inhibits the receptor classes vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, platelet derived growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor, and has shown activity against many tumors, as well as in idiopathic lung fibrosis and bleomycin-induced lung injury. Here, we investigated the antineoplastic and antiangiogenic properties of nintedanib in cisplatin-resistant and cisplatin-sensitive GCT cells, both alone and in combination with classical cytotoxic agents such as cisplatin, etoposide, and bleomycin. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of nintedanib was 4.5 ± 0.43 μmol/l, 3.1 ± 0.45 μmol/l, and 3.6 ± 0.33 μmol/l in cisplatin-sensitive NTERA2, 2102Ep, and NCCIT cells, whereas the IC50 doses of the cisplatin-resistant counterparts were 6.6 ± 0.37 μmol/l (NTERA2-R), 4.5 ± 0.83 μmol/l (2102Ep-R), and 6.1 ± 0.41 μmol/l (NCCIT-R), respectively. Single treatment with nintedanib induced apoptosis and resulted in a sustained reduction in the capacity of colony formation in both cisplatin-sensitive and cisplatin-resistant GCT cells. Cell cycle analysis showed that nintedanib induced a strong G0/G1-phase arrest in all investigated cell lines. Combination treatment with cisplatin did not result in additive, synergistic, or antagonistic effects. The in-vivo activity was studied using the chorioallantoic membrane assay and indicated the antiangiogenic potency of nintedanib with markedly reduced microvessel density. Topical treatment of inoculated tumor plaques resulted in a significant reduction of the tumor size. This indicates that nintedanib might be a promising substance in the treatment of GCT. PMID:26479145

  3. Glomus tumor of the ovary masquerading as granulosa cell tumor: case report.

    PubMed

    Slone, Stephen P; Moore, Grace D; Parker, Lynn P; Rickard, Kyle A; Nixdorf-Miller, Allison S

    2010-01-01

    A solid right adnexal mass in a 73-year-old woman bled profusely with mobilization mimicking a granulosa cell tumor. There was almost complete replacement of the ovary by a circumscribed, 4.0 cm tumor with a hemorrhagic, solid cut surface. Morphologic and phenotypic correlation supported a diagnosis of glomus tumor. Large gaping vessels and small sinusoidal-type vessels formed an anastomotic vascular network with an inner endothelial lining (CD31+/CD34+) and an outer layer of glomocytes (actin+/desmin-/inhibin-). The hemangiopericytoma-like vasculature accounted for bleeding during surgery. PMID:19952942

  4. Effects of dimethyltriazenes on in vitro Lewis lung carcinoma tumor lines with different metastatic capacity.

    PubMed

    Zupi, G; Corsi, A; Sacchi, A; Lassiani, L; Giraldi, T

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a selective antimetastatic agent: the aryldimethyltriazene derivative 1-p-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)benzoic acid potassium salt (DM-COOK) have been examined on two in vitro tumor cell lines derived from lung metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma. These stabilized in vitro tumor cell lines named C108 and BC215 have been reported to differ in their metastatic potential evaluated as lung colony forming ability and as the number of spontaneous metastases produced after intramuscular implant of tumor cells. The cytotoxic effect of DM-COOK in vitro was also compared with the one demonstrated by the structure-related compound 4-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-5- carboxamide (DTIC) on the same variant lines. Survival curves show a different chemosensitivity of the two in vitro lines to the DM-COOK treatment, whereas no differences were detected between C108 and BC215 after exposure to DTIC. Moreover, DM-COOK and DTIC exhibit different trends of cell killing, implying different mechanisms of action for the two drugs. Results are discussed in view of the selective in vitro action of the aryldimethyltriazene derivative DM-COOK on cells which express a high metastatic potential. PMID:6480290

  5. Ganglioside GD2 in reception and transduction of cell death signal in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Ganglioside GD2 is expressed on plasma membranes of various types of malignant cells. One of the most promising approaches for cancer immunotherapy is the treatment with monoclonal antibodies recognizing tumor-associated markers such as ganglioside GD2. It is considered that major mechanisms of anticancer activity of anti-GD2 antibodies are complement-dependent cytotoxicity and/or antibody-mediated cellular cytotoxicity. At the same time, several studies suggested that anti-GD2 antibodies are capable of direct induction of cell death of number of tumor cell lines, but it has not been investigated in details. In this study we investigated the functional role of ganglioside GD2 in the induction of cell death of multiple tumor cell lines by using GD2-specific monoclonal antibodies. Methods Expression of GD2 on different tumor cell lines was analyzed by flow cytometry using anti-GD2 antibodies. By using HPTLC followed by densitometric analysis we measured the amount of ganglioside GD2 in total ganglioside fractions isolated from tumor cell lines. An MTT assay was performed to assess viability of GD2-positive and -negative tumor cell lines treated with anti-GD2 mAbs. Cross-reactivity of anti-GD2 mAbs with other gangliosides or other surface molecules was investigated by ELISA and flow cytometry. Inhibition of GD2 expression was achieved by using of inhibitor for ganglioside synthesis PDMP and/or siRNA for GM2/GD2 and GD3 synthases. Results Anti-GD2 mAbs effectively induced non-classical cell death that combined features of both apoptosis and necrosis in GD2-positive tumor cells and did not affect GD2-negative tumors. Anti-GD2 mAbs directly induced cell death, which included alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential, induction of apoptotic volume decrease and cell membrane permeability. This cytotoxic effect was mediated exclusively by specific binding of anti-GD2 antibodies with ganglioside GD2 but not with other molecules. Moreover, the level of GD2

  6. Regulatory T cells prevent CD8 T cell maturation by inhibiting CD4 Th cells at tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Chaput, Nathalie; Darrasse-Jèze, Guillaume; Bergot, Anne-Sophie; Cordier, Corinne; Ngo-Abdalla, Stacie; Klatzmann, David; Azogui, Orly

    2007-10-15

    Natural regulatory T cells (Tregs) are present in high frequencies among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and in draining lymph nodes, supposedly facilitating tumor development. To investigate their role in controlling local immune responses, we analyzed intratumoral T cell accumulation and function in the presence or absence of Tregs. Tumors that grew in normal BALB/c mice injected with the 4T1 tumor cell line were highly infiltrated by Tregs, CD4 and CD8 cells, all having unique characteristics. Most infiltrating Tregs expressed low levels of CD25Rs and Foxp3. They did not proliferate even in the presence of IL-2 but maintained a strong suppressor activity. CD4 T cells were profoundly anergic and CD8 T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity were severely impaired. Depletion of Tregs modified the characteristics of tumor infiltrates. Tumors were initially invaded by activated CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells, which produced IL-2 and IFN-gamma. This was followed by the recruitment of highly cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells at tumor sites leading to tumor rejection. The beneficial effect of Treg depletion in tumor regression was abrogated when CD4 helper cells were also depleted. These findings indicate that the massive infiltration of tumors by Tregs prevents the development of a successful helper response. The Tregs in our model prevent Th cell activation and subsequent development of efficient CD8 T cell activity required for the control of tumor growth. PMID:17911581

  7. Molecularly Characterized Solvent Extracts and Saponins from Polygonum hydropiper L. Show High Anti-Angiogenic, Anti-Tumor, Brine Shrimp, and Fibroblast NIH/3T3 Cell Line Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Ayaz, Muhammad; Junaid, Muhammad; Ullah, Farhat; Sadiq, Abdul; Subhan, Fazal; Khan, Mir Azam; Ahmad, Waqar; Ali, Gowhar; Imran, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Polygonum hydropiper is used as anti-cancer and anti-rheumatic agent in folk medicine. This study was designed to investigate the anti-angiogenic, anti-tumor, and cytotoxic potentials of different solvent extracts and isolated saponins. Samples were analyzed using GC, Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) to identify major and bioactive compounds. Quantitation of antiangiogenesis for the plant's samples including methanolic extract (Ph.Cr), its subsequent fractions; n-hexane (Ph.Hex), chloroform (Ph.Chf), ethyl acetate (Ph.EtAc), n-Butanol (Ph.Bt), aqueous (Ph.Aq), saponins (Ph.Sp) were performed using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Potato disc anti-tumor assay was performed on Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing tumor inducing plasmid. Cytotoxicity was performed against Artemia salina and mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cell line following contact toxicity and MTT cells viability assays, respectively. The GC-MS analysis of Ph.Cr, Ph.Hex, Ph.Chf, Ph.Bt, and Ph.EtAc identified 126, 124, 153, 131, and 164 compounds, respectively. In anti-angiogenic assay, Ph.Chf, Ph.Sp, Ph.EtAc, and Ph.Cr exhibited highest activity with IC50 of 28.65, 19.21, 88.75, and 461.53 μg/ml, respectively. In anti-tumor assay, Ph.Sp, Ph.Chf, Ph.EtAc, and Ph.Cr were most potent with IC50 of 18.39, 73.81, 217.19, and 342.53 μg/ml, respectively. In MTT cells viability assay, Ph.Chf, Ph.EtAc, Ph.Sp were most active causing 79.00, 72.50, and 71.50% cytotoxicity, respectively, at 1000 μg/ml with the LD50 of 140, 160, and 175 μg/ml, respectively. In overall study, Ph.Chf and Ph.Sp have shown overwhelming results which signifies their potentials as sources of therapeutic agents against cancer. PMID:27065865

  8. Molecularly Characterized Solvent Extracts and Saponins from Polygonum hydropiper L. Show High Anti-Angiogenic, Anti-Tumor, Brine Shrimp, and Fibroblast NIH/3T3 Cell Line Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Ayaz, Muhammad; Junaid, Muhammad; Ullah, Farhat; Sadiq, Abdul; Subhan, Fazal; Khan, Mir Azam; Ahmad, Waqar; Ali, Gowhar; Imran, Muhammad; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2016-01-01

    Polygonum hydropiper is used as anti-cancer and anti-rheumatic agent in folk medicine. This study was designed to investigate the anti-angiogenic, anti-tumor, and cytotoxic potentials of different solvent extracts and isolated saponins. Samples were analyzed using GC, Gas Chromatography–Mass Spectrometry (GC–MS) to identify major and bioactive compounds. Quantitation of antiangiogenesis for the plant's samples including methanolic extract (Ph.Cr), its subsequent fractions; n-hexane (Ph.Hex), chloroform (Ph.Chf), ethyl acetate (Ph.EtAc), n-Butanol (Ph.Bt), aqueous (Ph.Aq), saponins (Ph.Sp) were performed using the chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay. Potato disc anti-tumor assay was performed on Agrobacterium tumefaciens containing tumor inducing plasmid. Cytotoxicity was performed against Artemia salina and mouse embryonic fibroblast NIH/3T3 cell line following contact toxicity and MTT cells viability assays, respectively. The GC–MS analysis of Ph.Cr, Ph.Hex, Ph.Chf, Ph.Bt, and Ph.EtAc identified 126, 124, 153, 131, and 164 compounds, respectively. In anti-angiogenic assay, Ph.Chf, Ph.Sp, Ph.EtAc, and Ph.Cr exhibited highest activity with IC50 of 28.65, 19.21, 88.75, and 461.53 μg/ml, respectively. In anti-tumor assay, Ph.Sp, Ph.Chf, Ph.EtAc, and Ph.Cr were most potent with IC50 of 18.39, 73.81, 217.19, and 342.53 μg/ml, respectively. In MTT cells viability assay, Ph.Chf, Ph.EtAc, Ph.Sp were most active causing 79.00, 72.50, and 71.50% cytotoxicity, respectively, at 1000 μg/ml with the LD50 of 140, 160, and 175 μg/ml, respectively. In overall study, Ph.Chf and Ph.Sp have shown overwhelming results which signifies their potentials as sources of therapeutic agents against cancer. PMID:27065865

  9. An in vitro comparative assessment with a series of new triphenyltin(IV) 2-/4-[(E)-2-(aryl)-1-diazenyl]benzoates endowed with anticancer activities: structural modifications, analysis of efficacy and cytotoxicity involving human tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Basu Baul, Tushar S; Paul, Anup; Pellerito, Lorenzo; Scopelliti, Michelangelo; Duthie, Andrew; de Vos, Dick; Verma, Rajeshwar P; Englert, Ulli

    2012-02-01

    Four new triphenyltin(IV) complexes of composition Ph(3)SnLH (where LH=2-/4-[(E)-2-(aryl)-1-diazenyl]benzoate) (1-4) were synthesized and characterized by spectroscopic (((1))H, ((13))C and ((119))Sn NMR, IR, ((119))Sn Mössbauer) techniques in combination with elemental analysis. The ((119))Sn NMR spectroscopic data indicate a tetrahedral coordination geometry in non-coordinating solvents. The crystal structures of three complexes, Ph(3)SnL((1))H (1), Ph(3)SnL((3))H (3), Ph(3)SnL((4))H (4), were determined. All display an essentially tetrahedral geometry with angles ranging from 93.50(8) to 124.5(2)°; ((119))Sn Mössbauer spectral data support this assignment. The cytotoxicity studies were performed with complexes 1-4, along with a previously reported complex (5) in vitro across a panel of human tumor cell lines viz., A498, EVSA-T, H226, IGROV, M19 MEL, MCF-7 and WIDR. The screening results were compared with the results from other related triphenyltin(IV) complexes (6-7) and tributyltin(IV) complexes (8-11) having 2-/4-[(E)-2-(aryl)-1-diazenyl]benzoates framework. In general, the complexes exhibit stronger cytotoxic activity. The results obtained for 1-3 are also comparable to those of its o-analogs i.e. 4-7, except 5, but the advantage is the former set of complexes demonstrated two folds more cytotoxic activity for the cell line MCF-7 with ID(50) values in the range 41-53 ng/ml. Undoubtedly, the cytotoxic results of complexes 1-3 are far superior to CDDP, 5-FU and ETO, and related tributyltin(IV) complexes 8-11. The quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) studies for the cytotoxicity of triphenyltin(IV) complexes 1-7 and tributyltin(IV) complexes 8-11 is also discussed against a panel of human tumor cell lines. PMID:22182574

  10. Biological characteristics of side population cells in a self-established human ovarian cancer cell line

    PubMed Central

    WEI, ZHENTONG; LV, SHUANG; WANG, YISHU; SUN, MEIYU; CHI, GUANGFAN; GUO, JUN; SONG, PEIYE; FU, XIAOYU; ZHANG, SONGLING; LI, YULIN

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to establish an ovarian cancer (OC) cell line from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient and investigate the biological characteristics of its side population (SP) cells. The OC cell line was established by isolating, purifying and subculturing primary cells from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient (stage IIIc; grade 3). SP and non-SP (NSP) cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and cultured in serum-free medium and soft agar to compare the tumorsphere and colony formation capacities. Furthermore, SP and NSP cell tumorigenesis was examined by subcutaneous and intraperitoneal injection of the cells to non-obese diabetic/severe combined immune deficiency (NOD/SCID) mice. Drug resistance to cisplatin was examined by cell counting kit-8. The OC cell line was successfully established from ascites of an ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma patient, which exhibited properties similar to primary tumors subsequent to >50 passages and >2 years of culture. The SP cell ratio was 0.38% in the OC cell line, and a similar SP cell ratio (0.39%) was observed when sorted SP cells were cultured for 3 weeks. Compared with NSP cells, SP cells exhibited increased abilities in differentiation and tumorsphere and colony formation, in addition to the formation of xenografted tumors and ascites and metastasis of the tumors in NOD/SCID mice, even at low cell numbers (3.0×103 cells). The xenografted tumors demonstrated histological features similar to primary tumors and expressed the ovarian serous cystadenocarcinoma marker CA125. In addition, SP cells demonstrated a significantly stronger drug resistance to cisplatin compared with NSP and unsorted cells, while treatment with verapamil, an inhibitor of ATP-binding cassette transporters, potently abrogated SP cell drug resistance. In conclusion, the present study verified SP cells from an established OC cell line and characterized the cells with self

  11. Electric Field Analysis of Breast Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sree, V. Gowri; Udayakumar, K.; Sundararajan, R.

    2011-01-01

    An attractive alternative treatment for malignant tumors that are refractive to conventional therapies, such as surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy, is electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. Electric field distribution of tissue/tumor is important for effective treatment of tissues. This paper deals with the electric field distribution study of a tissue model using MAXWELL 3D Simulator. Our results indicate that tumor tissue had lower electric field strength compared to normal cells, which makes them susceptible to electrical-pulse-mediated drug delivery. This difference could be due to the altered properties of tumor cells compared to normal cells, and our results corroborate this. PMID:22295214

  12. SYNOVIAL GIANT CELL TUMOR OF THE KNEE

    PubMed Central

    Abdalla, Rene Jorge; Cohen, Moisés; Nóbrega, Jezimar; Forgas, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Synovial giant cell tumor is a benign neoplasm, rarely reported in the form of malignant metastasis. Synovial giant cell tumor most frequently occurs on the hand, and, most uncommon, on the ankle and knee. In the present study, the authors describe a rare case of synovial giant cell tumor on the knee as well as the treatment approach. Arthroscopy has been shown, in this case, to be the optimal method for treating this kind of lesion, once it allowed a less aggressive approach, while providing good visualization of all compartments of knee joint and full tumor resection. PMID:27004193

  13. Immune Cells in Blood Recognize Tumors

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have developed a novel strategy for identifying immune cells circulating in the blood that recognize specific proteins on tumor cells, a finding they believe may have potential implications for immune-based therapies.

  14. Targeting Tumor Vasculature Endothelial Cells and Tumor Cells for Immunotherapy of Human Melanoma in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhiwei; Sun, Ying; Garen, Alan

    1999-07-01

    An immunotherapy treatment for cancer that targets both the tumor vasculature and tumor cells has shown promising results in a severe combined immunodeficient mouse xenograft model of human melanoma. The treatment involves systemic delivery of an immunoconjugate molecule composed of a tumor-targeting domain conjugated to the Fc effector domain of human IgG1. The effector domain induces a cytolytic immune response against the targeted cells by natural killer cells and complement. Two types of targeting domains were used. One targeting domain is a human single-chain Fv molecule that binds to a chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed on the surface of most human melanoma cells. Another targeting domain is factor VII (fVII), a zymogen that binds with high specificity and affinity to the transmembrane receptor tissue factor (TF) to initiate the blood coagulation cascade. TF is expressed by endothelial cells lining the tumor vasculature but not the normal vasculature, and also by many types of tumor cells including melanoma. Because the binding of a fVII immunoconjugate to TF might cause disseminated intravascular coagulation, the active site of fVII was mutated to inhibit coagulation without affecting the affinity for TF. The immunoconjugates were encoded as secreted molecules in a replication-defective adenovirus vector, which was injected into the tail vein of severe combined immunodeficient mice. The results demonstrate that a mutated fVII immunoconjugate, administered separately or together with a single-chain Fv immunoconjugate that binds to the tumor cells, can inhibit the growth or cause regression of an established human tumor xenograft. This procedure could be effective in treating a broad spectrum of human solid tumors that express TF on vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells.

  15. CD44 enhances tumor aggressiveness by promoting tumor cell plasticity.

    PubMed

    Paulis, Yvette W J; Huijbers, Elisabeth J M; van der Schaft, Daisy W J; Soetekouw, Patricia M M B; Pauwels, Patrick; Tjan-Heijnen, Vivianne C G; Griffioen, Arjan W

    2015-08-14

    Aggressive tumor cells can obtain the ability to transdifferentiate into cells with endothelial features and thus form vasculogenic networks. This phenomenon, called vasculogenic mimicry (VM), is associated with increased tumor malignancy and poor clinical outcome. To identify novel key molecules implicated in the process of vasculogenic mimicry, microarray analysis was performed to compare gene expression profiles of aggressive (VM+) and non-aggressive (VM-) cells derived from Ewing sarcoma and breast carcinoma. We identified the CD44/c-Met signaling cascade as heavily relevant for vasculogenic mimicry. CD44 was at the center of this cascade, and highly overexpressed in aggressive tumors. Both CD44 standard isoform and its splice variant CD44v6 were linked to increased aggressiveness in VM. Since VM is most abundant in Ewing sarcoma tumors functional analyses were performed in EW7 cells. Overexpression of CD44 allowed enhanced adhesion to its extracellular matrix ligand hyaluronic acid. CD44 expression also facilitated the formation of vasculogenic structures in vitro, as CD44 knockdown experiments repressed migration and vascular network formation. From these results and the observation that CD44 expression is associated with vasculogenic structures and blood lakes in human Ewing sarcoma tissues, we conclude that CD44 increases aggressiveness in tumors through the process of vasculogenic mimicry. PMID:26189059

  16. Gemcitabine induces cell senescence in human pancreatic cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Song, Yao; Baba, Tomohisa; Mukaida, Naofumi

    2016-08-26

    Patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) commonly require chemotherapy because they frequently develop metastatic disease or locally advanced tumors. Gemcitabine, an analogue of cytosine arabinoside, is commonly used for PDAC treatment. We observed that gemcitabine induced senescence phenotypes characterized by enhanced senescence-associated β-galactosidase (SA β-Gal) staining and increased expression of senescence-associated molecules in two human pancreatic cancer cell lines, Miapaca-2 and Panc-1, which exhibit resistance to gemcitabine but not L3.pl cells with a high sensitivity to gemcitabine. Gemcitabine-induced cell senescence can be inhibited by reactive oxygen species inhibitor, N-acetyl cysteine. Although gemcitabine also enhanced CXCL8 expression, anti-CXCL8 antibody failed to reduce gemcitabine-induced increases in SA β-Gal-positive cell numbers. These observations would indicate that cell senescence can proceed independently of CXCL8 expression, a characteristic feature of senescence-associated secretion phenotype. PMID:27311854

  17. Genetic instability in human ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Orth, K; Hung, J; Gazdar, A; Bowcock, A; Mathis, J M; Sambrook, J

    1994-01-01

    We have analyzed the stability of microsatellites in cell lines derived from human ovarian cancers and found that 5 out of 10 of the ovarian tumor cell lines are genetically unstable at the majority of the loci analyzed. In clones and subclones derived serially from one of these cell lines (2774; serous cystadenocarcinoma), a very high proportion of microsatellites distributed in many different regions of the genome change their size in a mercurial fashion. We conclude that genomic instability in ovarian tumors is a dynamic and ongoing process whose high frequency may have been previously underestimated by PCR-based allelotyping of bulk tumor tissue. We have identified the source of the genetic instability in one ovarian tumor as a point mutation (R524P) in the human mismatch-repair gene MSH2 (Salmonella MutS homologue), which has recently been shown to be involved in hereditary nonpolyposis colorectal cancer. Patient 2774 was a 38-year-old heterozygote, and her normal tissue carried both mutant and wild-type alleles of the human MSH2 gene. However the wild-type allele was lost at some point early during tumorigenesis so that DNA isolated either from the patient's ovarian tumor or from the 2774 cell line carries only the mutant allele of the human MSH2 gene. The genetic instability observed in the tumor and cell line DNA, together with the germ-line mutation in a mismatch-repair gene, suggest that the MSH2 gene is involved in the onset and/or progression in a subset of ovarian cancer. Images PMID:7937795

  18. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  19. In vitro Enrichment of Ovarian Cancer Tumor-initiating Cells

    PubMed Central

    House, Carrie D.; Hernandez, Lidia; Annunziata, Christina M.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that small subpopulations of tumor cells maintain a unique self-renewing and differentiation capacity and may be responsible for tumor initiation and/or relapse. Clarifying the mechanisms by which these tumor-initiating cells (TICs) support tumor formation and progression could lead to the development of clinically favorable therapies. Ovarian cancer is a heterogeneous and highly recurrent disease. Recent studies suggest TICs may play an important role in disease biology. We have identified culture conditions that enrich for TICs from ovarian cancer cell lines. Growing either adherent cells or non-adherent ‘floater’ cells in a low attachment plate with serum free media in the presence of growth factors supports the propagation of ovarian cancer TICs with stem cell markers (CD133 and ALDH activity) and increased tumorigenicity without the need to physically separate the TICs from other cell types within the culture. Although the presence of floater cells is not common for all cell lines, this population of cells with innate low adherence may have high tumorigenic potential.Compared to adherent cells grown in the presence of serum, TICs readily form spheres, are significantly more tumorigenic in mice, and express putative stem cell markers. The conditions are easy to establish in a timely manner and can be used to study signaling pathways important for maintaining stem characteristics, and to identify drugs or combinations of drugs targeting TICs. The culture conditions described herein are applicable for a variety of ovarian cancer cells of epithelial origin and will be critical in providing new information about the role of TICs in tumor initiation, progression, and relapse. PMID:25742116

  20. Establishment of a novel human medulloblastoma cell line characterized by highly aggressive stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Patrícia Benites Gonçalves da; Rodini, Carolina Oliveira; Kaid, Carolini; Nakahata, Adriana Miti; Pereira, Márcia Cristina Leite; Matushita, Hamilton; Costa, Silvia Souza da; Okamoto, Oswaldo Keith

    2016-08-01

    Medulloblastoma is a highly aggressive brain tumor and one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality related to childhood cancer. These tumors display differential ability to metastasize and respond to treatment, which reflects their high degree of heterogeneity at the genetic and molecular levels. Such heterogeneity of medulloblastoma brings an additional challenge to the understanding of its physiopathology and impacts the development of new therapeutic strategies. This translational effort has been the focus of most pre-clinical studies which invariably employ experimental models using human tumor cell lines. Nonetheless, compared to other cancers, relatively few cell lines of human medulloblastoma are available in central repositories, partly due to the rarity of these tumors and to the intrinsic difficulties in establishing continuous cell lines from pediatric brain tumors. Here, we report the establishment of a new human medulloblastoma cell line which, in comparison with the commonly used and well-established cell line Daoy, is characterized by enhanced proliferation and invasion capabilities, stem cell properties, increased chemoresistance, tumorigenicity in an orthotopic metastatic model, replication of original medulloblastoma behavior in vivo, strong chromosome structural instability and deregulation of genes involved in neural development. These features are advantageous for designing biologically relevant experimental models in clinically oriented studies, making this novel cell line, named USP-13-Med, instrumental for the study of medulloblastoma biology and treatment. PMID:26358937

  1. [Establishment and biological characterization of human medulloblastoma cell lines].

    PubMed

    Yamada, M; Shimizu, K; Tamura, K; Okamoto, Y; Matsui, Y; Moriuchi, S; Park, K; Mabuchi, E; Yamamoto, K; Hayakawa, T

    1989-07-01

    Two cell lines of human medulloblastoma (ONS-76 and ONS-81) were established, and their biological characteristics were investigated. The cell line, ONS-76, was established from a tumor specimens obtained from a large cerebellar tumor of a 2-year-old girl. The pathological diagnosis was a typical medulloblastoma. The other cell line, ONS-81, was derived from a metastatic tumor in right frontal lobe of a 9-year-old girl. The tumor specimens were minced into fragments approximately 1 mm in diameter and cultured in plastic culture flasks in RPMI 1640 medium supplemented with 10% heat-inactivated fetal calf serum (FCS) and 50% patients serum. The cells growing as a monolayer were subcultured in RPMI 1640 supplemented with 10% FCS and initially with L-glutamine, sodium pyruvate, and nonessential amino acid. Microscopically, both cultured cells exhibited various morphological appearances, and this morphological heterogeneity seemed to be specific for medulloblastoma cells. The in vitro population doubling time of ONS-76 and ONS-81 were 18.6 and 19.2 hr, respectively. The ONS-76 and ONS-81 cells formed subcutaneous tumors in nude mice as serial transplantable xenograft, and these tumors had a microscopic appearance similar to that of the original medulloblastoma. Ultrastructurally++, the cultured cells showed primitive, undifferentiated appearance, and no neuronal or glial structures were not seen. Immunohistochemical studies showed that both cells expressed neuron-specific enolase (NSE) and neurofilament protein (NFP 200 K, 145 K), but glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) and S-100 protein were not detected. The NFP immunoreactivities of both cultured cells were demonstrated as abnormal perinuclear deposits.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2818910

  2. Targeting tumor cell motility to prevent metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Trenis D.; Ashby, William J.; Lewis, John D.; Zijlstra, Andries

    2011-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity in patients with solid tumors invariably results from the disruption of normal biological function caused by disseminating tumor cells. Tumor cell migration is under intense investigation as the underlying cause of cancer metastasis. The need for tumor cell motility in the progression of metastasis has been established experimentally and is supported empirically by basic and clinical research implicating a large collection of migration-related genes. However, there are few clinical interventions designed to specifically target the motility of tumor cells and adjuvant therapy to specifically prevent cancer cell dissemination is severely limited. In an attempt to define motility targets suitable for treating metastasis, we have parsed the molecular determinants of tumor cell motility into five underlying principles including cell autonomous ability, soluble communication, cell-cell adhesion, cell-matrix adhesion, and integrating these determinants of migration on molecular scaffolds. The current challenge is to implement meaningful and sustainable inhibition of metastasis by developing clinically viable disruption of molecular targets that control these fundamental capabilities. PMID:21664937

  3. Amplification of tumor inducing putative cancer stem cells (CSCs) by vitamin A/retinol from mammary tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Rohit B.; Wang, Qingde; Khillan, Jaspal S.

    2013-07-12

    Highlights: •Vitamin A supports self renewal of putative CSCs from mammary tumors. •These cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism into retinoic acid. •CSCs from mammary tumors differentiate into mammary specific cell lineages. •The cells express mammary stem cell specific CD29 and CD49f markers. •Putative CSCs form highly metastatic tumors in NOD SCID mouse. -- Abstract: Solid tumors contain a rare population of cancer stem cells (CSCs) that are responsible for relapse and metastasis. The existence of CSC however, remains highly controversial issue. Here we present the evidence for putative CSCs from mammary tumors amplified by vitamin A/retinol signaling. The cells exhibit mammary stem cell specific CD29{sup hi}/CD49f{sup hi}/CD24{sup hi} markers, resistance to radiation and chemo therapeutic agents and form highly metastatic tumors in NOD/SCID mice. The cells exhibit indefinite self renewal as cell lines. Furthermore, the cells exhibit impaired retinol metabolism and do not express enzymes that metabolize retinol into retinoic acid. Vitamin A/retinol also amplified putative CSCs from breast cancer cell lines that form highly aggressive tumors in NOD SCID mice. The studies suggest that high purity putative CSCs can be isolated from solid tumors to establish patient specific cell lines for personalized therapeutics for pre-clinical translational applications. Characterization of CSCs will allow understanding of basic cellular and molecular pathways that are deregulated, mechanisms of tumor metastasis and evasion of therapies that has direct clinical relevance.

  4. Human Adrenocortical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Rainey, William E.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The human adrenal cortex secretes mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens. These steroids are produced from unique cell types located within the three distinct zones of the adrenal cortex. Disruption of adrenal steroid production results in a variety of diseases that can lead to hypertension, metabolic syndrome, infertility and androgen excess. The adrenal cortex is also a common site for the development of adenomas, and rarely the site for the development of carcinomas. The adenomas can lead to diseases associated with adrenal steroid excess, while the carcinomas are particularly aggressive and have a poor prognosis. In vitro cell culture models provide an important tool to examine molecular and cellular mechanisms controlling both the normal and pathologic function of the adrenal cortex. Herein we discuss the human adrenocortical cell lines and their use as model systems for adrenal studies. PMID:21924324

  5. Safety of targeting tumor endothelial cell antigens.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Samuel C; Riordan, Neil H; Ichim, Thomas E; Szymanski, Julia; Ma, Hong; Perez, Jesus A; Lopez, Javier; Plata-Munoz, Juan J; Silva, Francisco; Patel, Amit N; Kesari, Santosh

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying discrimination between "self" and "non-self", a central immunological principle, require careful consideration in immune oncology therapeutics where eliciting anti-cancer immunity must be weighed against the risk of autoimmunity due to the self origin of tumors. Whole cell vaccines are one promising immunotherapeutic avenue whereby a myriad of tumor antigens are introduced in an immunogenic context with the aim of eliciting tumor rejection. Despite the possibility collateral damage to healthy tissues, cancer immunotherapy can be designed such that off target autoimmunity remains limited in scope and severity or completely non-existent. Here we provide an immunological basis for reconciling the safety of cancer vaccines, focusing on tumor endothelial cell vaccines, by discussing the following topics: (a) Antigenic differences between neoplastic and healthy tissues that can be leveraged in cancer vaccine design; (b) The layers of tolerance that control T cell responses directed against antigens expressed in healthy tissues and tumors; and, (c) The hierarchy of antigenic epitope selection and display in response to whole cell vaccines, and how antigen processing and presentation can afford a degree of selectivity against tumors. We conclude with an example of early clinical data utilizing ValloVax™, an immunogenic placental endothelial cell vaccine that is being advanced to target the tumor endothelium of diverse cancers, and we report on the safety and efficacy of ValloVax™ for inducing immunity against tumor endothelial antigens. PMID:27071457

  6. Human Rhabdomyosarcoma Cell Lines for Rhabdomyosarcoma Research: Utility and Pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Hinson, Ashley R. P.; Jones, Rosanne; Crose, Lisa E. S.; Belyea, Brian C.; Barr, Frederic G.; Linardic, Corinne M.

    2013-01-01

    Rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) is the most common soft tissue sarcoma of childhood and adolescence. Despite intergroup clinical trials conducted in Europe and North America, outcomes for high risk patients with this disease have not significantly improved in the last several decades, and survival of metastatic or relapsed disease remains extremely poor. Accrual into new clinical trials is slow and difficult, so in vitro cell-line research and in vivo xenograft models present an attractive alternative for preclinical research for this cancer type. Currently, 30 commonly used human RMS cell lines exist, with differing origins, karyotypes, histologies, and methods of validation. Selecting an appropriate cell line for RMS research has important implications for outcomes. There are also potential pitfalls in using certain cell lines including contamination with murine stromal cells, cross-contamination between cell lines, discordance between the cell line and its associated original tumor, imposter cell lines, and nomenclature errors that result in the circulation of two or more presumed unique cell lines that are actually from the same origin. These pitfalls can be avoided by testing for species-specific isoenzymes, microarray analysis, assays for subtype-specific fusion products, and short tandem repeat analysis. PMID:23882450

  7. Transcriptional profiling of macrophage and tumor cell interactions in vitro.

    PubMed

    Roudnicky, Filip; Hollmén, Maija

    2016-06-01

    Macrophages are important mediators of tumor progression and their function is broadly influenced by different microenvironmental stimuli. To understand the molecular basis of the tumor-supporting role of macrophages in aggressive breast cancer we co-cultured human peripheral monocytes with two breast cancer cell lines representing distinct aggressive cellular phenotype and transcriptionally profiled the changes occurring in both cells during in vitro activated crosstalk. Here we provide a detailed description of the experimental design, sample identity and analysis of the Illumina RNA-Seq data, which have been deposited into Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO): GSE75130. PMID:27081631

  8. Microfluidic Device for Studying Tumor Cell Extravasation in Cancer Metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Henry K; Thundat, Thomas George; Evans III, Boyd Mccutchen; Datar, Ram H; Reese, Benjamin E; Zheng, Siyang

    2010-01-01

    Metastasis is the process by which cancer spreads to form secondary tumors at downstream locations throughout the body. This uncontrolled spreading is the leading cause of death in patients with epithelial cancers and is the main reason that suppressing and targeting cancer has proven to be so challenging. Tumor cell extravasation is one of the key steps in cancer s progression towards a metastatic state. This occurs when circulating tumor cells found within the blood stream are able to transmigrate through the endothelium lining and basement membrane of the vasculature to form metastatic tumors at secondary sites within the body. Predicting the likelihood of this occurrence in patients, or being able to determine specific markers involved in this process could lead to preventative measures targeting these types of cancer; moreover, this may lead to the discovery of novel anti-metastatic drugs. We have developed a microfluidic device that has shown the extravasation of fluorescently labeled tumor cells across an endothelial cell lined membrane coated with matrigel followed by the formation of colonies. This device provides the advantages of combining a controlled environment, mimicking that found within the body, with real-time monitoring capabilities allowing for the study of these biomarkers and cellular interactions along with other potential mechanisms involved in the process of extravasation.

  9. DNA Tumor Viruses and Cell Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mushtaq, Muhammad; Darekar, Suhas

    2016-01-01

    Viruses play an important role in cancerogenesis. It is estimated that approximately 20% of all cancers are linked to infectious agents. The viral genes modulate the physiological machinery of infected cells that lead to cell transformation and development of cancer. One of the important adoptive responses by the cancer cells is their metabolic change to cope up with continuous requirement of cell survival and proliferation. In this review we will focus on how DNA viruses alter the glucose metabolism of transformed cells. Tumor DNA viruses enhance “aerobic” glycolysis upon virus-induced cell transformation, supporting rapid cell proliferation and showing the Warburg effect. Moreover, viral proteins enhance glucose uptake and controls tumor microenvironment, promoting metastasizing of the tumor cells. PMID:27034740

  10. Tumor-associated macrophages (not tumor cells) are the determinants of photosensitizer tumor localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd

    1995-03-01

    The distribution of Photofrin and several other photosensitizers among major cellular populations contained in solid mouse tumors was examined using flow cytometry. Seven tumor models were included in the analysis: sarcomas EMT6, KHT, RIF, FsaR and FsaN, Lewis lung carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma SCCVII. In all these tumors, the highest photosensitizer levels were found in a subpopulation of tumor associated macrophages consisting of activated cells (as suggested by their increased size, granularity, and the number of interleukin 2 receptors). There was no evidence of selective photosensitizer accumulation in malignant tumor cells. Results consistent with these observations were also obtained with the carcinogen induced squamous cell carcinoma growing in hamster cheek pouch.

  11. Zinc Finger Nuclease Knock-out of NADPH:Cytochrome P450 Oxidoreductase (POR) in Human Tumor Cell Lines Demonstrates That Hypoxia-activated Prodrugs Differ in POR Dependence*

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jiechuang; Gu, Yongchuan; Pruijn, Frederik B.; Smaill, Jeff B.; Patterson, Adam V.; Guise, Christopher P.; Wilson, William R.

    2013-01-01

    Hypoxia, a ubiquitous feature of tumors, can be exploited by hypoxia-activated prodrugs (HAP) that are substrates for one-electron reduction in the absence of oxygen. NADPH:cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (POR) is considered one of the major enzymes responsible, based on studies using purified enzyme or forced overexpression in cell lines. To examine the role of POR in HAP activation at endogenous levels of expression, POR knock-outs were generated in HCT116 and SiHa cells by targeted mutation of exon 8 using zinc finger nucleases. Absolute quantitation by proteotypic peptide mass spectrometry of DNA sequence-confirmed multiallelic mutants demonstrated expression of proteins with residual one-electron reductase activity in some clones and identified two (Hko2 from HCT116 and S2ko1 from SiHa) that were functionally null by multiple criteria. Sensitivities of the clones to 11 HAP (six nitroaromatics, three benzotriazine N-oxides, and two quinones) were compared with wild-type and POR-overexpressing cells. All except the quinones were potentiated by POR overexpression. Knocking out POR had a marked effect on antiproliferative activity of the 5-nitroquinoline SN24349 in both genetic backgrounds after anoxic exposure but little or no effect on activity of most other HAP, including the clinical stage 2-nitroimidazole mustard TH-302, dinitrobenzamide mustard PR-104A, and benzotriazine N-oxide SN30000. Clonogenic cell killing and reductive metabolism of PR-104A and SN30000 under anoxia also showed little change in the POR knock-outs. Thus, although POR expression is a potential biomarker of sensitivity to some HAP, identification of other one-electron reductases responsible for HAP activation is needed for their rational clinical development. PMID:24196959

  12. Pomegranate extract demonstrate a selective estrogen receptor modulator profile in human tumor cell lines and in vivo models of estrogen deprivation.

    PubMed

    Sreeja, Sreekumar; Santhosh Kumar, Thankayyan R; Lakshmi, Baddireddi S; Sreeja, Sreeharshan

    2012-07-01

    Selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) are estrogen receptor (ER) ligands exhibiting tissue-specific agonistic or antagonistic biocharacter and are used in the hormonal therapy for estrogen-dependent breast cancers. Pomegranate fruit has been shown to exert antiproliferative effects on human breast cancer cells in vitro. In this study, we investigated the tissue-specific estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of methanol extract of pericarp of pomegranate (PME). PME was evaluated for antiproliferative activity at 20-320 μg/ml on human breast (MCF-7, MDA MB-231) endometrial (HEC-1A), cervical (SiHa, HeLa), ovarian (SKOV3) carcinoma and normal breast fibroblast (MCF-10A) cells. Competitive radioactive binding studies were carried out to ascertain whether PME interacts with ER. The reporter gene assay measured the estrogenic/antiestrogenic activity of PME in MCF-7 and MDA MB-231 cells transiently transfected with plasmids coding estrogen response elements with a reporter gene (pG5-ERE-luc) and wild-type ERα (hEG0-ER). PME inhibited the binding of [³H] estradiol to ER and suppressed the growth and proliferation of ER-positive breast cancer cells. PME binds ER and down-regulated the transcription of estrogen-responsive reporter gene transfected into breast cancer cells. The expressions of selected estrogen-responsive genes were down-regulated by PME. Unlike 17β-estradiol [1 mg/kg body weight (BW)] and tamoxifen (10 mg/kg BW), PME (50 and 100 mg/kg BW) did not increase the uterine weight and proliferation in ovariectomized mice and its cardioprotective effects were comparable to that of 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, our findings suggest that PME displays a SERM profile and may have the potential for prevention of estrogen-dependent breast cancers with beneficial effects in other hormone-dependent tissues. PMID:21839626

  13. Primary pulmonary germ cell tumor with blastomatous differentiation.

    PubMed

    Miller, R R; Champagne, K; Murray, R C

    1994-11-01

    We describe the clinical and pathologic findings of a patient with mixed blastoma-germ cell malignancy primary in the lung. Serum alpha-fetoprotein levels were elevated at presentation, and normalized with anti-germ cell chemotherapy. The resection specimen contained massively necrotic germ cell tumor with viable mature neural tissue, plus viable biphasic blastoma with stromal bone and skeletal muscle differentiation. It is not clear whether the germ cell component represents unusual differentiation of a somatic cell line or whether the blastoma component represents an unusual pattern of teratomatous differentiation. PMID:7525163

  14. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  15. Cucurbitacin B Enhances the Anticancer Effect of Imatinib Mesylate Through Inhibition of MMP-2 Expression in MCF-7 and SW480 Tumor Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Bakar, Filiz

    2016-01-01

    The combination of medicinal plant extracts with known chemotherapeutics offers significant potential for the development of novel therapies in cancer disease. Cucurbitacin B (CuB) is one of the most potent and widely used members of cucurbitacin family and it is known to have important effects on several diseases including cancer. To determine whether CuB can enhance chemosensitivity to imatinib mesylate (IM), in the present study, the combined effects of CuB with IM on MCF-7 and SW480 cells were investigated. The cells were treated with CuB alone or in combination with IM and the results showed that the combination treatment synergistically inhibited cell proliferation and induced apoptosis. Furthermore, the combined effect of CuB and IM on matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) gene expression, a member of MMP family which is responsible for the degradation of extracellular matrix was also evaluated. CuB increased the inhibitory effect of IM on MMP-2 expression synergistically in a dose dependent manner. The results suggest that CuB in combination with IM may serve as a potentially useful therapeutic strategy for patients with breast and colorectal cancer. PMID:26863882

  16. Phosphatidylcholine passes through lateral tight junctions for paracellular transport to the apical side of the polarized intestinal tumor cell-line CaCo2.

    PubMed

    Stremmel, Wolfgang; Staffer, Simone; Gan-Schreier, Hongying; Wannhoff, Andreas; Bach, Margund; Gauss, Annika

    2016-09-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) is the most abundant phospholipid in intestinal mucus, indicative of a specific transport system across the mucosal epithelium to the intestinal lumen. To elucidate this transport mechanism, we employed a transwell tissue culture system with polarized CaCo2 cells. It was shown that PC could not substantially be internalized by the cells. However, after basal application of increasing PC concentrations, an apical transport of 47.1±6.3nmolh(-1)mMPC(-1) was observed. Equilibrium distribution studies with PC applied in equal concentrations to the basal and apical compartments showed a 1.5-fold accumulation on the expense of basal PC. Disruption of tight junctions (TJ) by acetaldehyde or PPARγ inhibitors or by treatment with siRNA to TJ proteins suppressed paracellular transport by at least 50%. Transport was specific for the choline containing the phospholipids PC, lysoPC and sphingomyelin. We showed that translocation is driven by an electrochemical gradient generated by apical accumulation of Cl(-) and HCO3(-) through CFTR. Pretreatment with siRNA to mucin 3 which anchors in the apical plasma membrane of mucosal cells inhibited the final step of luminal PC secretion. PC accumulates in intestinal mucus using a paracellular, apically directed transport route across TJs. PMID:27365309

  17. Molluscan cells in culture: primary cell cultures and cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Yoshino, T. P.; Bickham, U.; Bayne, C. J.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro cell culture systems from molluscs have significantly contributed to our basic understanding of complex physiological processes occurring within or between tissue-specific cells, yielding information unattainable using intact animal models. In vitro cultures of neuronal cells from gastropods show how simplified cell models can inform our understanding of complex networks in intact organisms. Primary cell cultures from marine and freshwater bivalve and gastropod species are used as biomonitors for environmental contaminants, as models for gene transfer technologies, and for studies of innate immunity and neoplastic disease. Despite efforts to isolate proliferative cell lines from molluscs, the snail Biomphalaria glabrata Say, 1818 embryonic (Bge) cell line is the only existing cell line originating from any molluscan species. Taking an organ systems approach, this review summarizes efforts to establish molluscan cell cultures and describes the varied applications of primary cell cultures in research. Because of the unique status of the Bge cell line, an account is presented of the establishment of this cell line, and of how these cells have contributed to our understanding of snail host-parasite interactions. Finally, we detail the difficulties commonly encountered in efforts to establish cell lines from molluscs and discuss how these difficulties might be overcome. PMID:24198436

  18. Establishment of an epithelioid malignant schwannoma cell line (YST-1).

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Y; Ohaki, Y; Tanaka, Y; Sumino, K; Funabiki, T; Okuyama, T; Watanabe, S; Umeda, M; Misugi, K

    1990-01-01

    A novel cell line, YST-1, was established from an epithelioid malignant schwannoma (EMS) that occurred in the upper arm of an 8-year-old girl. YST-1 cells were polygonal and stellate in shape, contained abundant free ribosomes, mitochondria, lysosomes and rough-surfaced endoplasmic reticulum, and grew stably with a population doubling time of 40 h. Immunohistochemically, vimentin, S100 protein and S100 protein beta subunit were positive in the cytoplasm. The xeno-transplanted tumor in nude mice was composed of cells with an epithelioid arrangement similar to the original tumor. The borders of the tumor cells were connected intimately without desmosomal junctions, and there were abundant organelles in the cytoplasm. YST-1 cells were considered to be of value for studying the nature and histogenesis of EMS. PMID:1980563

  19. Targeting regulatory T cells in tumors.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Workman, Creg J; Vignali, Dario A A

    2016-07-01

    Regulatory T (Treg ) cells play a crucial role in maintaining peripheral tolerance and preventing autoimmunity. However, they also represent a major barrier to effective antitumor immunity and immunotherapy. Consequently, there has been considerable interest in developing approaches that can selectively or preferentially target Treg cells in tumors, while not impacting their capacity to maintain peripheral immune homeostasis. In this review, we describe our current understanding of the mechanisms underlying the recruitment, expansion, and suppressive activity of tumor-associated Treg cells, and discuss the approaches used and the challenges encountered in the immunotherapeutic targeting of Treg cells. In addition, we summarize the primary clinical targets and some emerging data on exciting new potential Treg cell-restricted targets. We propose that discovering and understanding mechanisms that are preferentially used by Treg cells within the tumor microenvironment will lead to strategies that selectively target Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor immunity while maintaining peripheral immune tolerance. PMID:26787424

  20. Ceramide Kinase Promotes Tumor Cell Survival and Mammary Tumor Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Payne, Ania W.; Pant, Dhruv K.; Pan, Tien-chi; Chodosh, Lewis A.

    2014-01-01

    Recurrent breast cancer is typically an incurable disease and, as such, is disproportionately responsible for deaths from this disease. Recurrent breast cancers arise from the pool of disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) that survive adjuvant or neoadjuvant therapy, and patients with detectable DTCs following therapy are at substantially increased risk for recurrence. Consequently, the identification of pathways that contribute to the survival of breast cancer cells following therapy could aid in the development of more effective therapies that decrease the burden of residual disease and thereby reduce the risk of breast cancer recurrence. We now report that Ceramide Kinase (Cerk) is required for mammary tumor recurrence following HER2/neu pathway inhibition and is spontaneously up-regulated during tumor recurrence in multiple genetically engineered mouse models for breast cancer. We find that Cerk is rapidly up-regulated in tumor cells following HER2/neu down-regulation or treatment with Adriamycin and that Cerk is required for tumor cell survival following HER2/neu down-regulation. Consistent with our observations in mouse models, analysis of gene expression profiles from over 2,200 patients revealed that elevated CERK expression is associated with an increased risk of recurrence in women with breast cancer. Additionally, although CERK expression is associated with aggressive subtypes of breast cancer, including those that are ER–, HER2+, basal-like, or high grade, its association with poor clinical outcome is independent of these clinicopathological variables. Together, our findings identify a functional role for Cerk in breast cancer recurrence and suggest the clinical utility of agents targeted against this pro-survival pathway. PMID:25164007

  1. Characterization of cell suspensions from solid tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Pallavicini, M.

    1985-07-10

    The desirable features of cells in suspension will necessarily be dependent upon the use for which the cells were prepared. Adequate cell yield or recovery is defined by the measurement to be performed. Retention of cellular morphology is important for microscopic identification of cell types in a heterogenous cell suspension, and may be used to determine whether the cells in suspension are representative of those in the tumor in situ. Different dispersal protocols may yield cells with different degrees of clonogenicity, as well as altered biochemical features, such as loss of cellular proteins, surface antigens, nucleotide pools, etc. The quality of the cell suspension can be judged by the degree of cell clumping and level of cellular debris, both of which impact on flow cytometric measurements and studies in which the number of cells be known accurately. Finally, if the data measured on the cells in suspension are to be extrapolated to phenomena occurring in the tumor in situ, it is desirable that the cells in suspension are representative of those in the solid tumor in vivo. This report compares characteristics of tumor cell suspensions obtained by different types of selected disaggregation methods. 33 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A. M.; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I.; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created “sialic acid low” tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing “sialic acid low” tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  3. Tumor sialylation impedes T cell mediated anti-tumor responses while promoting tumor associated-regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Perdicchio, Maurizio; Cornelissen, Lenneke A M; Streng-Ouwehand, Ingeborg; Engels, Steef; Verstege, Marleen I; Boon, Louis; Geerts, Dirk; van Kooyk, Yvette; Unger, Wendy W J

    2016-02-23

    The increased presence of sialylated glycans on the tumor surface has been linked to poor prognosis, yet the effects on tumor-specific T cell immunity are hardly studied. We here show that hypersialylation of B16 melanoma substantially influences tumor growth by preventing the formation of effector T cells and facilitating the presence of high regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies. Knock-down of the sialic acid transporter created "sialic acid low" tumors, that grew slower in-vivo than hypersialylated tumors, altered the Treg/Teffector balance, favoring immunological tumor control. The enhanced effector T cell response in developing "sialic acid low" tumors was preceded by and dependent on an increased influx and activity of Natural Killer (NK) cells. Thus, tumor hypersialylation orchestrates immune escape at the level of NK and Teff/Treg balance within the tumor microenvironment, herewith dampening tumor-specific T cell control. Reducing sialylation provides a therapeutic option to render tumors permissive to immune attack. PMID:26741508

  4. [Benign and malignant granular cell tumors. An immunohistochemical classification of tumor cells].

    PubMed

    Kuhn, A; Mahrle, G; Steigleder, G K

    1987-06-15

    Eight benign and three malignant granular cell tumors were characterized by means of antibodies and antisera against keratin, desmin, epithelial membrane antigen, factor VIII-related protein, lysozyme, myelin basic protein, myoglobin, neurone-specific enolase, S 100 protein, myelin-associated protein (Leu 7), glial fibrillary acidic protein, vimentin, and neurofilament. All benign granular cell tumours showed positive staining of the tumor cells to antibodies against vimentin, S 100 protein, and neurone-specific enolase; myelin-associated protein (Leu 7), in contrast, was only detectable in a few tumor sections. Histogenetically the granular cells may be classified as Schwann's cells which lost their expression of laminin. The three malignant granular cell tumors showed a staining pattern significantly different from that of the benign tumours. Thus, only neurone-specific enolase was detectable in all the tumors, whereas S 100 protein and vimentin could not be demonstrated but in one and two, resp., out of three tumors. PMID:3303714

  5. Tumor-Associated Endothelial Cells Promote Tumor Metastasis by Chaperoning Circulating Tumor Cells and Protecting Them from Anoikis.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Arti; Kumar, Bhavna; Yu, Jun-Ge; Old, Matthew; Teknos, Theodoros N; Kumar, Pawan

    2015-01-01

    Tumor metastasis is a highly inefficient biological process as millions of tumor cells are released in circulation each day and only a few of them are able to successfully form distal metastatic nodules. This could be due to the fact that most of the epithelial origin cancer cells are anchorage-dependent and undergo rapid anoikis in harsh circulating conditions. A number of studies have shown that in addition to tumor cells, activated endothelial cells are also released into the blood circulation from the primary tumors. However, the precise role of these activated circulating endothelial cells (CECs) in tumor metastasis process is not known. Therefore, we performed a series of experiments to examine if CECs promoted tumor metastasis by chaperoning the tumor cells to distal sites. Our results demonstrate that blood samples from head and neck cancer patients contain significantly higher Bcl-2-positive CECs as compared to healthy volunteers. Technically, it is challenging to know the origin of CECs in patient blood samples, therefore we used an orthotopic SCID mouse model and co-implanted GFP-labeled endothelial cells along with tumor cells. Our results suggest that activated CECs (Bcl-2-positive) were released from primary tumors and they co-migrated with tumor cells to distal sites. Bcl-2 overexpression in endothelial cells (EC-Bcl-2) significantly enhanced adhesion molecule expression and tumor cell binding that was predominantly mediated by E-selectin. In addition, tumor cells bound to EC-Bcl-2 showed a significantly higher anoikis resistance via the activation of Src-FAK pathway. In our in vivo experiments, we observed significantly higher lung metastasis when tumor cells were co-injected with EC-Bcl-2 as compared to EC-VC. E-selectin knockdown in EC-Bcl-2 cells or FAK/FUT3 knockdown in tumor cells significantly reversed EC-Bcl-2-mediated tumor metastasis. Taken together, our results suggest a novel role for CECs in protecting the tumor cells in circulation and

  6. Tumor metastases and cell-mediated immunity in a model system in DBA/2 mice. VIII. Expression and shedding of Fc gamma receptors on metastatic tumor cell variants.

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, V; Jacobs, W

    1979-01-01

    The expression of receptors for the Fc portion of IgG immunoglobin molecules was studied on tumor cell lines with high and low metastatic capacity. Two tumor cell lines from DBA/2 mice that had high metastatic activity, ESb and MDAY-D2, contained a high percentage of Fc receptor positive cells, as detected in a rosette assay with IgG antibody-coated erythrocytes (EA). In contrast, the low metastatic parental line Eb, from which ESb was derived, contained only a low percentage of EA-rosette-forming cells. ESb ascites tumor cells adapted to tissue culture in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) had a high expression of Fc receptors, whereas a cell line adapted to tissue culture in the absence of 2ME had a low expression of Fc receptors. "Soluble" Fc receptors were detectable by their ability to bind to EA and to cause blocking of rosette formation. They were found to be present in fluids from tumor-bearing animals, such as serum and cell-free ascites. Even animals with an ascites tumor of the low-metastatic line Eb contained "soluble" Fc receptors. The results are discussed with regard to their possible significance for tumor metastasis. PMID:522481

  7. Recognition of tumor cells by Dectin-1 orchestrates innate immune cells for anti-tumor responses

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Shiho; Ikushima, Hiroaki; Ueki, Hiroshi; Yanai, Hideyuki; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Hangai, Sho; Nishio, Junko; Negishi, Hideo; Tamura, Tomohiko; Saijo, Shinobu; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Taniguchi, Tadatsugu

    2014-01-01

    The eradication of tumor cells requires communication to and signaling by cells of the immune system. Natural killer (NK) cells are essential tumor-killing effector cells of the innate immune system; however, little is known about whether or how other immune cells recognize tumor cells to assist NK cells. Here, we show that the innate immune receptor Dectin-1 expressed on dendritic cells and macrophages is critical to NK-mediated killing of tumor cells that express N-glycan structures at high levels. Receptor recognition of these tumor cells causes the activation of the IRF5 transcription factor and downstream gene induction for the full-blown tumoricidal activity of NK cells. Consistent with this, we show exacerbated in vivo tumor growth in mice genetically deficient in either Dectin-1 or IRF5. The critical contribution of Dectin-1 in the recognition of and signaling by tumor cells may offer new insight into the anti-tumor immune system with therapeutic implications. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.04177.001 PMID:25149452

  8. Cell culture of small round cell tumor originating in the thoracopulmonary region. Evidence for derivation from a primitive pluripotent cell.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Y; Hongo, T; Nakagawa, Y; Nasuda, K; Mizuno, Y; Igarashi, Y; Naito, Y; Maeda, M

    1989-07-01

    The authors describe a 14-year-old girl with small round cell tumor originating in the chest wall analyzed by the extensive studies including light and electron microscopic examination, histochemical study, immunochemical study, cytogenetics, and gene analysis. A cell line producing carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) has been established from pleural effusion of the pulmonary metastatic tumor. Cytogenetic analysis disclosed a reciprocal translocation (11;22)(q24;q12). Additionally, immunocytochemical studies demonstrated that CEA, NSE, vimentin, cytokeratin, and epithelial membrane antigens are positive, but desmin and S-100 protein are negative. Although neurofilament was negative in the pulmonary metastatic tumor cells, it became positive in cell line in vitro. These results suggest that this tumor may be derived from the primitive and pluripotential cells, differentiating into mesenchymal, epithelial, and neural features in variable proportions. PMID:2731119

  9. Energy and Redox Homeostasis in Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Marcus Fernandes; Amoêdo, Nívea Dias; Rumjanek, Franklin David

    2012-01-01

    Cancer cells display abnormal morphology, chromosomes, and metabolism. This review will focus on the metabolism of tumor cells integrating the available data by way of a functional approach. The first part contains a comprehensive introduction to bioenergetics, mitochondria, and the mechanisms of production and degradation of reactive oxygen species. This will be followed by a discussion on the oxidative metabolism of tumor cells including the morphology, biogenesis, and networking of mitochondria. Tumor cells overexpress proteins that favor fission, such as GTPase dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1). The interplay between proapoptotic members of the Bcl-2 family that promotes Drp 1-dependent mitochondrial fragmentation and fusogenic antiapoptotic proteins such as Opa-1 will be presented. It will be argued that contrary to the widespread belief that in cancer cells, aerobic glycolysis completely replaces oxidative metabolism, a misrepresentation of Warburg's original results, mitochondria of tumor cells are fully viable and functional. Cancer cells also carry out oxidative metabolism and generally conform to the orthodox model of ATP production maintaining as well an intact electron transport system. Finally, data will be presented indicating that the key to tumor cell survival in an ROS rich environment depends on the overexpression of antioxidant enzymes and high levels of the nonenzymatic antioxidant scavengers. PMID:22693511

  10. Tumor cell differentiation by label-free microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael

    2013-05-01

    Autofluorescence and Raman measurements of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and subsequent to activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence intensity patterns of the tumor (control) cells and the less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from fluorescence spectra and nanosecond decay times. In particular, upon excitation around 375nm, the fluorescence ratio of the protein bound and the free coenzyme NADH depends on the state of malignancy and reflects different cytoplasmic (including lysosomal) and mitochondrial contributions. Slight differences are also observed in the Raman spectra of these cell lines, mainly originating from small granules (lysosomes) surrounding the cell nucleus. While larger numbers of fluorescence and Raman spectra are evaluated by multivariate statistical methods, additional information is obtained from spectral images and fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM).

  11. Identification and Characterization of CD133pos Subpopulation Cells From a Human Laryngeal Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Hai-ou; Wang, Huifang; Che, Na; Li, Dong; Mao, Yong; Zeng, Qiao; Ge, Rongming

    2016-01-01

    Background Recent research indicates that CD133 are expressed in several kinds of stem cells, among which, its high expression in laryngeal carcinoma has caused wide concern. To further explore efficaciously targeting drugs to laryngeal carcinoma stem cells (CSCs), we transplanted a solid tumor from CSCs into abdominal subcutaneous tissue of nude mice, and then compared the biological characteristics of laryngeal solid tumors with or without cisplatin intervention. Material/Methods In this study, the expression of CD133 was detected in the Hep-2 cell line by flow cytometry. By applying magnetic cell sorting (MACS) technology, we reported the results of purifying CD133-positive cells from a Hep-2 cell line. Cell proliferation, colony formation, and tumor-forming ability were examined in vitro and in vivo to identify the marker of CSCs in Hep-2 cell line. Results Upon flow cytometry analysis, CD133 was expressed constantly on 40.12±1.32% in Hep-2 cell line. Cell proliferation and colony formation ability were higher in CD133-positive cells compared to CD133-negative cells, and the in vivo tumorigenesis experiment showed the same results as in vitro assay. The 2 subpopulations cells were both sensitive to DDP, among which, the effect of DPP on proliferation ability and tumor-forming ability of CD133-positive cells was obviously greater than that of CD133-negative cells. Conclusions Above all, our study revealed that CD133-positive cells have properties of higher proliferation, colony formation, and tumorigenesis in Hep-2 cell line, indicating that CD133 could be a marker to characterize laryngeal cancer stem cells. PMID:27049928

  12. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK+ and CK18+ CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7+ or TTF-1+, (CK20/ CDX2)+, or (PSA/ PSMA)+ corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  13. Identifying cancer origin using circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lu, Si-Hong; Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chang, Ying-Hsu; Chou, Teh-Ying; Pang, See-Tong; Lin, Po-Hung; Tsai, Chun-Ming; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have become an established clinical evaluation biomarker. CTC count provides a good correlation with the prognosis of cancer patients, but has only been used with known cancer patients, and has been unable to predict the origin of the CTCs. This study demonstrates the analysis of CTCs for the identification of their primary cancer source. Twelve mL blood samples were equally dispensed on 6 CMx chips, microfluidic chips coated with an anti-EpCAM-conjugated supported lipid bilayer, for CTC capture and isolation. Captured CTCs were eluted to an immunofluorescence (IF) staining panel consisting of 6 groups of antibodies: anti-panCK, anti-CK18, anti-CK7, anti-TTF-1, anti-CK20/anti-CDX2, and anti-PSA/anti-PSMA. Cancer cell lines of lung (H1975), colorectal (DLD-1, HCT-116), and prostate (PC3, DU145, LNCaP) were selected to establish the sensitivity and specificity for distinguishing CTCs from lung, colorectal, and prostate cancer. Spiking experiments performed in 2mL of culture medium or whole blood proved the CMx platform can enumerate cancer cells of lung, colorectal, and prostate. The IF panel was tested on blood samples from lung cancer patients (n = 3), colorectal cancer patients (n = 5), prostate cancer patients (n = 5), and healthy individuals (n = 12). Peripheral blood samples found panCK(+) and CK18(+) CTCs in lung, colorectal, and prostate cancers. CTCs expressing CK7(+) or TTF-1(+), (CK20/ CDX2)(+), or (PSA/ PSMA)(+) corresponded to lung, colorectal, or prostate cancer, respectively. In conclusion, we have designed an immunofluorescence staining panel to identify CTCs in peripheral blood to correctly identify cancer cell origin. PMID:26828696

  14. Reversing drug resistance of soft tumor-repopulating cells by tumor cell-derived chemotherapeutic microparticles.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jingwei; Zhang, Yi; Tang, Ke; Zhang, Huafeng; Yin, Xiaonan; Li, Yong; Xu, Pingwei; Sun, Yanling; Ma, Ruihua; Ji, Tiantian; Chen, Junwei; Zhang, Shuang; Zhang, Tianzhen; Luo, Shunqun; Jin, Yang; Luo, Xiuli; Li, Chengyin; Gong, Hongwei; Long, Zhixiong; Lu, Jinzhi; Hu, Zhuowei; Cao, Xuetao; Wang, Ning; Yang, Xiangliang; Huang, Bo

    2016-06-01

    Developing novel approaches to reverse the drug resistance of tumor-repopulating cells (TRCs) or stem cell-like cancer cells is an urgent clinical need to improve outcomes of cancer patients. Here we show an innovative approach that reverses drug resistance of TRCs using tumor cell-derived microparticles (T-MPs) containing anti-tumor drugs. TRCs, by virtue of being more deformable than differentiated cancer cells, preferentially take up T-MPs that release anti-tumor drugs after entering cells, which in turn lead to death of TRCs. The underlying mechanisms include interfering with drug efflux and promoting nuclear entry of the drugs. Our findings demonstrate the importance of tumor cell softness in uptake of T-MPs and effectiveness of a novel approach in reversing drug resistance of TRCs with promising clinical applications. PMID:27167569

  15. Characterization of PICM-19H porcine liver stem cell line for potential use in a bioartificial liver

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A hepatocyte cell line is needed as the biological component of a bioartificial liver (BAL). One candidate is the PICM-19 pig liver stem cell line. These cells have many normal hepatocyte functions often lacking in tumor-derived liver cell lines. The study characterized a PICM-19 derivative cell ...

  16. An overview of therapeutic approaches to brain tumor stem cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Primary and secondary malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumors are devastating invasive tumors able to give rise to many kinds of differentiated tumor cells. Glioblastoma multiform (GBM), is the most malignant brain tumor, in which its growth and persistence depend on cancer stem cells with enhanced DNA damage repair program that also induces recurrence and resists current chemo- and radiotherapies. Unlike non-tumor stem cells, tumor stem cells lack the normal mechanisms that regulate proliferation and differentiation, resulting in uncontrolled production and incomplete differentiation of tumor cells. In current paper recent developments and new researches in the field of brain tumor stem cells have been reviewed. PMID:23483074

  17. One cell, multiple roles: contribution of mesenchymal stem cells to tumor development in tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of tissue reparative and immunosuppressive abilities of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has drawn more attention to tumor microenvironment and its role in providing the soil for the tumor cell growth. MSCs are recruited to tumor which is referred as the never healing wound and altered by the inflammation environment, thereby helping to construct the tumor microenvironment. The environment orchestrated by MSCs and other factors can be associated with angiogenesis, immunosuppression, inhibition of apoptosis, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), survival of cancer stem cells, which all contribute to tumor growth and progression. In this review, we will discuss how MSCs are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and what effects they have on tumor progression. PMID:23336752

  18. Clustering of brain tumor cells: a first step for understanding tumor recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khain, Evgeniy; Nowicki, M. O.; Chiocca, E. A.; Lawler, S. E.; Schneider-Mizell, C. M.; Sander, L. M.

    2012-02-01

    Glioblastoma tumors are highly invasive; therefore the overall prognosis of patients remains poor, despite major improvements in treatment techniques. Cancer cells detach from the inner tumor core and actively migrate away [1]; eventually these invasive cells might form clusters, which can develop to recurrent tumors. In vitro experiments in collagen gel [1] followed the clustering dynamics of different glioma cell lines. Based on the experimental data, we formulated a stochastic model for cell dynamics, which identified two mechanisms of clustering. First, there is a critical value of the strength of adhesion; above the threshold, large clusters grow from a homogeneous suspension of cells; below it, the system remains homogeneous, similarly to the ordinary phase separation. Second, when cells form a cluster, there is evidence that their proliferation rate increases. We confirmed the theoretical predictions in a separate cell migration experiment on a substrate and found that both mechanisms are crucial for cluster formation and growth [2]. In addition to their medical importance, these phenomena present exciting examples of pattern formation and collective cell behavior in intrinsically non-equilibrium systems [3]. [4pt] [1] A. M. Stein et al, Biophys. J., 92, 356 (2007). [0pt] [2] E. Khain et al, EPL 88, 28006 (2009). [0pt] [3] E. Khain et al, Phys. Rev. E. 83, 031920 (2011).

  19. Targeting lactate-fueled respiration selectively kills hypoxic tumor cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Sonveaux, Pierre; Végran, Frédérique; Schroeder, Thies; Wergin, Melanie C.; Verrax, Julien; Rabbani, Zahid N.; De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Kennedy, Kelly M.; Diepart, Caroline; Jordan, Bénédicte F.; Kelley, Michael J.; Gallez, Bernard; Wahl, Miriam L.; Feron, Olivier; Dewhirst, Mark W.

    2008-01-01

    Tumors contain oxygenated and hypoxic regions, so the tumor cell population is heterogeneous. Hypoxic tumor cells primarily use glucose for glycolytic energy production and release lactic acid, creating a lactate gradient that mirrors the oxygen gradient in the tumor. By contrast, oxygenated tumor cells have been thought to primarily use glucose for oxidative energy production. Although lactate is generally considered a waste product, we now show that it is a prominent substrate that fuels the oxidative metabolism of oxygenated tumor cells. There is therefore a symbiosis in which glycolytic and oxidative tumor cells mutually regulate their access to energy metabolites. We identified monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) as the prominent path for lactate uptake by a human cervix squamous carcinoma cell line that preferentially utilized lactate for oxidative metabolism. Inhibiting MCT1 with α-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamate (CHC) or siRNA in these cells induced a switch from lactate-fueled respiration to glycolysis. A similar switch from lactate-fueled respiration to glycolysis by oxygenated tumor cells in both a mouse model of lung carcinoma and xenotransplanted human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells was observed after administration of CHC. This retarded tumor growth, as the hypoxic/glycolytic tumor cells died from glucose starvation, and rendered the remaining cells sensitive to irradiation. As MCT1 was found to be expressed by an array of primary human tumors, we suggest that MCT1 inhibition has clinical antitumor potential. PMID:19033663

  20. Generation and characterization of human insulin-releasing cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Labriola, Leticia; Peters, Maria G; Krogh, Karin; Stigliano, Iván; Terra, Letícia F; Buchanan, Cecilia; Machado, Marcel CC; Joffé, Elisa Bal de Kier; Puricelli, Lydia; Sogayar, Mari C

    2009-01-01

    Background The in vitro culture of insulinomas provides an attractive tool to study cell proliferation and insulin synthesis and secretion. However, only a few human beta cell lines have been described, with long-term passage resulting in loss of insulin secretion. Therefore, we set out to establish and characterize human insulin-releasing cell lines. Results We generated ex-vivo primary cultures from two independent human insulinomas and from a human nesidioblastosis, all of which were cultured up to passage number 20. All cell lines secreted human insulin and C-peptide. These cell lines expressed neuroendocrine and islets markers, confirming the expression profile found in the biopsies. Although all beta cell lineages survived an anchorage independent culture, none of them were able to invade an extracellular matrix substrate. Conclusion We have established three human insulin-releasing cell lines which maintain antigenic characteristics and insulin secretion profiles of the original tumors. These cell lines represent valuable tools for the study of molecular events underlying beta cell function and dysfunction. PMID:19545371

  1. TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis as a novel approach to eliminate tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The cytokine TRAIL represents one of the most promising candidates for the apoptotic elimination of tumor cells, either alone or in combination therapies. However, its efficacy is often limited by intrinsic or acquired resistance of tumor cells to apoptosis. Programmed necrosis is an alternative, molecularly distinct mode of programmed cell death that is elicited by TRAIL under conditions when the classical apoptosis machinery fails or is actively inhibited. The potential of TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis in tumor therapy is, however, almost completely uncharacterized. We therefore investigated its impact on a panel of tumor cell lines of wide-ranging origin. Methods Cell death/viability was measured by flow cytometry/determination of intracellular ATP levels/crystal violet staining. Cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors was detected by flow cytometry, expression of proteins by Western blot. Ceramide levels were quantified by high-performance thin layer chromatography and densitometric analysis, clonogenic survival of cells was determined by crystal violet staining or by soft agarose cloning. Results TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis killed eight out of 14 tumor cell lines. Clonogenic survival was reduced in all sensitive and even one resistant cell lines tested. TRAIL synergized with chemotherapeutics in killing tumor cell lines by programmed necrosis, enhancing their effect in eight out of 10 tested tumor cell lines and in 41 out of 80 chemotherapeutic/TRAIL combinations. Susceptibility/resistance of the investigated tumor cell lines to programmed necrosis seems to primarily depend on expression of the pro-necrotic kinase RIPK3 rather than the related kinase RIPK1 or cell surface expression of TRAIL receptors. Furthermore, interference with production of the lipid ceramide protected all tested tumor cell lines. Conclusions Our study provides evidence that TRAIL-induced programmed necrosis represents a feasible approach for the elimination of

  2. Treatment of an infected murine macrophage cell line (J774A.1) with interferon-gamma but not tumor necrosis factor-alpha or live Mycobacterium intracellulare alone modulates the expression of adhesion molecules.

    PubMed

    Pourshafie, M R; Sonnenfeld, G

    1997-02-01

    In the present study, we evaluated whether the activation of a murine macrophage cell line (J774.1A) by treatment with recombinant murine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (rTNF-alpha) or recombinant murine interferon-gamma (rIFN-gamma) before or simultaneous with infection with Mycobacterium intracellulare would affect their ability to express lymphocyte function-associated antigen-1 (LFA-1) and to restrict growth and kill the ingested M. intracellulare. The data showed that the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) in increasing the level of LFA-1 was the same in the presence or absence of M. intracellulare. The inability of M. intracellulare to affect the level of expression of LFA-1 was irrespective of the M. intracellulare to J774A.1 ratio. A significant increase in the expression of LFA-1 was observed when J774A.1 cells were prestimulated with IFN-gamma 1 day before the addition of the bacteria. The addition of IFN-gamma with M. intracellulare simultaneously, however, did not affect the expression of the adhesion molecules as compared with the IFN-gamma alone. Our results indicated no change in the level of LFA-1 on J774A.1 following exposure with TNF-alpha. We observed that preexposure with 10-10(4) IU/ml of TNF-alpha can significantly decrease the number of ingested M. intracellulare. Simultaneous addition of 10(3) and 10(4) IU/ml of TNF-alpha, however, did not have any mycobactericidal effect. This indicates that the TNF-alpha-induced killing by J774A.1 cells was relatively selective, depending on the concentration and the time of presence of TNF-alpha. The data may suggest that the uptake of M. intracellulare is carried out via other adhesion receptors when M. intracellulare and IFN-alpha are present simultaneously and that in the presence of TNF-alpha other surface receptors are involved in the uptake of M. intracellulare. Flow cytometry analysis of the spleen cells removed at various times from M. intracellulare-infected mice also indicated no change in the

  3. Disrupting Hypoxia-Induced Bicarbonate Transport Acidifies Tumor Cells and Suppresses Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Hulikova, Alzbeta; Ledaki, Ioanna; Snell, Cameron; Singleton, Dean; Steers, Graham; Seden, Peter; Jones, Dylan; Bridges, Esther; Wigfield, Simon; Li, Ji-Liang; Russell, Angela; Swietach, Pawel; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-07-01

    Tumor hypoxia is associated clinically with therapeutic resistance and poor patient outcomes. One feature of tumor hypoxia is activated expression of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA9), a regulator of pH and tumor growth. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that impeding the reuptake of bicarbonate produced extracellularly by CA9 could exacerbate the intracellular acidity produced by hypoxic conditions, perhaps compromising cell growth and viability as a result. In 8 of 10 cancer cell lines, we found that hypoxia induced the expression of at least one bicarbonate transporter. The most robust and frequent inductions were of the sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters SLC4A4 and SLC4A9, which rely upon both HIF1α and HIF2α activity for their expression. In cancer cell spheroids, SLC4A4 or SLC4A9 disruption by either genetic or pharmaceutical approaches acidified intracellular pH and reduced cell growth. Furthermore, treatment of spheroids with S0859, a small-molecule inhibitor of sodium-driven bicarbonate transporters, increased apoptosis in the cell lines tested. Finally, RNAi-mediated attenuation of SLC4A9 increased apoptosis in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer spheroids and dramatically reduced growth of MDA-MB-231 breast tumors or U87 gliomas in murine xenografts. Our findings suggest that disrupting pH homeostasis by blocking bicarbonate import might broadly relieve the common resistance of hypoxic tumors to anticancer therapy. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3744-55. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197160

  4. Whole tumor antigen vaccination using dendritic cells: comparison of RNA electroporation and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    Because of the lack of full characterization of tumor associated antigens for solid tumors, whole antigen use is a convenient approach to tumor vaccination. Tumor RNA and apoptotic tumor cells have been used as a source of whole tumor antigen to prepare dendritic cell (DC) based tumor vaccines, but their efficacy has not been directly compared. Here we compare directly RNA electroporation and pulsing of DCs with whole tumor cells killed by ultraviolet (UV) B radiation using a convenient tumor model expressing human papilloma virus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes. Although both approaches led to DCs presenting tumor antigen, electroporation with tumor cell total RNA induced a significantly higher frequency of tumor-reactive IFN-gamma secreting T cells, and E7-specific CD8+ lymphocytes compared to pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells. DCs electroporated with tumor cell RNA induced a larger tumor infiltration by T cells and produced a significantly stronger delay in tumor growth compared to DCs pulsed with UV-irradiated tumor cells. We conclude that electroporation with whole tumor cell RNA and pulsing with UV-irradiated tumor cells are both effective in eliciting antitumor immune response, but RNA electroporation results in more potent tumor vaccination under the examined experimental conditions. PMID:18445282

  5. c-Myc depletion inhibits proliferation of human tumor cells at various stages of the cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    Wang, H; Mannava, S; Grachtchouk, V; Zhuang, D; Soengas, MS; Gudkov, AV; Prochownik, EV; Nikiforov, MA

    2011-01-01

    A major role for c-Myc in the proliferation of normal cells is attributed to its ability to promote progression through G1 and into S phase of the cell cycle. The absolute requirement of c-Myc for cell cycle progression in human tumor cells has not been comprehensively addressed. In the present work, we used a lentiviral-based short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector to stably reduce c-Myc expression in a large number of human tumor cell lines and in three different types of normal human cells. In all cases, cell proliferation was severely inhibited, with normal cells ultimately undergoing G0/G1 growth arrest. In contrast, tumor cells demonstrated a much more variable cell cycle response with cells from several lines accumulating in S or G2/M phases. Moreover, in some tumor lines, the phase of cell cycle arrest caused by inhibition of c-Myc could be altered by depleting tumor suppressor protein p53 or its transcriptional target p21CIP/WAF. Our data suggest that, as in the case of normal cells, c-Myc is essential for sustaining proliferation of human tumor cells. However its rate-limiting role in cell cycle control is variable and is reliant upon the status of other cell cycle regulators. PMID:17906696

  6. Tumor-Infiltrating Immune Cells Promoting Tumor Invasion and Metastasis: Existing Theories

    PubMed Central

    Man, Yan-gao; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Mason, Jeffrey; Avital, Itzhak; Bilchik, Anton; Bruecher, Bjoern; Protic, Mladjan; Nissan, Aviram; Izadjoo, Mina; Zhang, Xichen; Jewett, Anahid

    2013-01-01

    It is a commonly held belief that infiltration of immune cells into tumor tissues and direct physical contact between tumor cells and infiltrated immune cells is associated with physical destructions of the tumor cells, reduction of the tumor burden, and improved clinical prognosis. An increasing number of studies, however, have suggested that aberrant infiltration of immune cells into tumor or normal tissues may promote tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis. Neither the primary reason for these contradictory observations, nor the mechanism for the reported diverse impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells has been elucidated, making it difficult to judge the clinical implications of infiltration of immune cells within tumor tissues. This mini-review presents several existing hypotheses and models that favor the promoting impact of tumor-infiltrating immune cells on tumor invasion and metastasis, and also analyzes their strength and weakness. PMID:23386907

  7. Molecular biology of testicular germ cell tumors.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Exposito, R; Merino, M; Aguayo, C

    2016-06-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) are the most common solid tumors in young adult men. They constitute a unique pathology because of their embryonic and germ origin and their special behavior. Genetic predisposition, environmental factors involved in their development and genetic aberrations have been under study in many works throughout the last years trying to explain the susceptibility and the transformation mechanism of TGCTs. Despite the high rate of cure in this type of tumors because its particular sensitivity to cisplatin, there are tumors resistant to chemotherapy for which it is needed to find new therapies. In the present work, it has been carried out a literature review on the most important molecular aspects involved in the onset and development of such tumors, as well as a review of the major developments regarding prognostic factors, new prognostic biomarkers and the possibility of new targeted therapies. PMID:26482724

  8. Elevation of XPA protein level in testis tumor cells without increasing resistance to cisplatin or UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Köberle, Beate; Roginskaya, Vera; Zima, Karen S; Masters, John R W; Wood, Richard D

    2008-08-01

    Most testicular germ cell tumors are curable using cisplatin-based chemotherapy, and cell lines from these tumors are unusually sensitive to cisplatin and other DNA-damaging agents. It has been suggested that this might be caused by a lower-than normal nucleotide excision repair (NER) activity. Previous studies found that cell lines from testicular germ cell tumors have on average about one-third the level of the NER protein XPA in comparison to cell lines from other tumors. We asked whether over-expression of XPA protein would alleviate the cellular sensitivity and increase the DNA repair capacity of a testis tumor cell line. Increasing XPA levels in 833K cells by 10-fold did not increase resistance to UV irradiation. XPA was localized to the cell nucleus in all cell lines, before and after exposure to UV-radiation. 833K cells were proficient in removing UV radiation-induced photoproducts from the genome and increased XPA did not enhance the rate of removal. Further, over-expressing functional XPA protein did not correlate with increased resistance of 833K testis tumor cells to cisplatin. Thus, although the amount of XPA in this testis tumor cell line is lower than normal, it is sufficient for NER in vivo. The relative sensitivity of testis tumor cells to cisplatin, UV radiation, and other DNA damaging agents is likely related not to NER capacity, but to other factors such as the integrity of the p53 pathway in these cells. PMID:18240296

  9. Cisplatin-induced Casepase-3 activation in different tumor cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Hua; Li, Xiao; Su, Ting; Zhang, Yu-Hai

    2008-12-01

    Apoptosis plays an essential role in normal organism development which is one of the main types of programmed cell death to help tissues maintain homeostasis. Defective apoptosis can result in cell accumulation and therefore effects on tumor pathogenesis, progression and therapy resistance. A family of proteins, known as caspases, is typically activated in the early stages of apoptosis. Therefore, studying the kinetics of activation of caspases induced by antitumor drugs can contribute to antitumor drug discovery and explanation of the molecular mechanisms. This paper detected the Caspase-3 activity induced by cisplatin in human adenoid cystic carcinoma cell line (ACC-M), human hepatocellular liver carcinoma cell line (HepG2) and human epithelial carcinoma cell line (Hela) with stably expressing ECFP-DEVDDsRed (CD3) probe, a fluorescent probe consisting of Enhanced Cyan Fluorescent Protein (ECFP), red fluorescent protein (DsRed) and a linker with a recognition site of Caspase-3, by using the capillary electrophoresis (CE) and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) imaging system. Under the same concentration of cisplatin, ACC-M cells responded the most rapidly, and then HepG2 cells and Hela cells, respectively, in the early 30 hours. Later, HepG2 cells represented acceleration in the Caspase-3 activation speed and reached full activation the earliest comparing to other two cell types. The results demonstrated that ACC-M cell is more sensitive than the other two cell types under the treatment of cisplatin.

  10. Irradiation combined with SU5416: Microvascular changes and growth delay in a human xenograft glioblastoma tumor line

    SciTech Connect

    Schuuring, Janneke; Bussink, Johan . E-mail: J.Bussink@rther.umcn.nl; Bernsen, Hans; Peeters, Wenny; Kogel, Albert J. van der

    2005-02-01

    Purpose: The combination of irradiation and the antiangiogenic compound SU5416 was tested and compared with irradiation alone in a human glioblastoma tumor line xenografted in nude mice. The aim of this study was to monitor microenvironmental changes and growth delay. Methods and materials: A human glioblastoma xenograft tumor line was implanted in nude mice. Irradiations consisted of 10 Gy or 20 Gy with and without SU5416. Several microenvironmental parameters (tumor cell hypoxia, tumor blood perfusion, vascular volume, and microvascular density) were analyzed after imunohistochemical staining. Tumor growth delay was monitored for up to 200 days after treatment. Results: SU5416, when combined with irradiation, has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation alone. Analysis of the tumor microenvironment showed a decreased vascular density during treatment with SU5416. In tumors regrowing after reaching only a partial remission, vascular characteristics normalized shortly after cessation of SU5416. However, in tumors regrowing after reaching a complete remission, permanent microenvironmental changes and an increase of tumor necrosis with a subsequent slower tumor regrowth was found. Conclusions: Permanent vascular changes were seen after combined treatment resulting in complete remission. Antiangiogenic treatment with SU5416 when combined with irradiation has an additive effect over treatment with irradiation or antiangiogenic treatment alone.

  11. Enhanced delivery of liposomes to lung tumor through targeting interleukin-4 receptor on both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Lianhua; Na, Moon-Hee; Jung, Hyun-Kyung; Vadevoo, Sri Murugan Poongkavithai; Kim, Cheong-Wun; Padmanaban, Guruprasath; Park, Tae-In; Park, Jae-Yong; Hwang, Ilseon; Park, Keon Uk; Liang, Frank; Lu, Maggie; Park, Jiho; Kim, In-San; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2015-07-10

    A growing body of evidence suggests that pathological lesions express tissue-specific molecular targets or biomarkers within the tissue. Interleukin-4 receptor (IL-4R) is overexpressed in many types of cancer cells, including lung cancer. Here we investigated the properties of IL-4R-binding peptide-1 (IL4RPep-1), a CRKRLDRNC peptide, and its ability to target the delivery of liposomes to lung tumor. IL4RPep-1 preferentially bound to H226 lung tumor cells which express higher levers of IL-4R compared to H460 lung tumor cells which express less IL-4R. Mutational analysis revealed that C1, R2, and R4 residues of IL4RPep-1 were the key binding determinants. IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes containing doxorubicin were more efficiently internalized in H226 cells and effectively delivered doxorubicin into the cells compared to unlabeled liposomes. In vivo fluorescence imaging of nude mice subcutaneously xenotransplanted with H226 tumor cells indicated that IL4RPep-1-labeled liposomes accumulate more efficiently in the tumor and inhibit tumor growth more effectively compared to unlabeled liposomes. Interestingly, expression of IL-4R was high in vascular endothelial cells of tumor, while little was detected in vascular endothelial cells of control organs including the liver. IL-4R expression in cultured human vascular endothelial cells was also up-regulated when activated by a pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α. Moreover, the up-regulation of IL-4R expression was observed in primary human lung cancer tissues. These results indicate that IL-4R-targeting nanocarriers may be a useful strategy to enhance drug delivery through the recognition of IL-4R in both tumor cells and tumor endothelial cells. PMID:25979323

  12. Development and Characterization of Six New Human Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Ying C.; Ahn, Soon-Hyun; Ryu, Junsun; Chen, Yunyun; Williams, Michelle D.; El-Naggar, Adel K.; Gagea, Mihai; Schweppe, Rebecca E.; Haugen, Bryan R.; Lai, Stephen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Cell lines are a widely used tool in cancer research. However, despite the relatively high incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), there are only four PTC cell lines available for international research audience. Objective: The objective of this study was to establish and characterize new PTC cell lines that represent primary tumor biology. Surgical specimens were obtained to generate PTC cell lines. Short tandem repeat profiling was used to confirm the uniqueness of the cell lines against databases of known cell lines and mutations were assessed using Sequenom. The expression of thyroid-specific genes was examined using real-time PCR. Tumorigenicity was determined using an orthotopic thyroid xenograft tumor mouse model. Results: Six PTC cell lines (five conventional PTCs and one follicular variant of PTC) were generated and found to be unique when compared by short tandem repeat profiling against databases of all existing cell lines. The five conventional PTC cell lines carry the BRAF V600E mutation and the follicular variant of PTC cell line had an NRAS mutation. Five of the six cell lines had a mutation in the promoter of the human telomerase reverse transcriptase gene. None of the cell lines have RET/PTC rearrangements. Three cell lines were tumorigenic in the orthotopic thyroid xenograft tumor mouse model. Conclusions: These five characterized conventional PTC cell lines and the unique follicular variant of PTC cell line should be valuable reagents for thyroid cancer research. The three tumorigenic cell lines can be used for in vivo testing of targeted therapeutic and novel agents. PMID:25427145

  13. Tumor cell differentiation by marker free fluorescence microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneckenburger, Herbert; Weber, Petra; Wagner, Michael; Brantsch, Marco; Biller, Philipp; Kioschis, Petra; Kessler, Waltraud

    2011-02-01

    Autofluorescence and Raman spectra, images and decay kinetics of U251-MG glioblastoma cells prior and after activation of tumor suppressor genes are compared. While phase contrast images and fluorescence patterns of the tumor (control) cells and the less malignant cells are similar, differences can be deduced from autofluorescence spectra and decay times. In particular, upon excitation around 375nm, the fluorescence ratio of the protein bound and the free coenzyme NADH depends on the state of malignancy. Slight differences are also observed in Raman spectra of these cell lines, in particular at wave numbers around 970 cm-1. While larger numbers of fluorescence and Raman spectra are evaluated by the method of multivariate data analysis, additional information is obtained from spectral images and fluorescence lifetime images (FLIM).

  14. Identification of Gene Expression Differences between Lymphangiogenic and Non-Lymphangiogenic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Regan, Erin; Sibley, Robert C.; Cenik, Bercin Kutluk; Silva, Asitha; Girard, Luc; Minna, John D.; Dellinger, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that lung tumors induce the formation of lymphatic vessels. However, the molecular mechanisms controlling tumor lymphangiogenesis in lung cancer have not been fully delineated. In the present study, we identify a panel of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines that induce lymphangiogenesis and use genome-wide mRNA expression to characterize the molecular mechanisms regulating tumor lymphangiogenesis. We show that Calu-1, H1993, HCC461, HCC827, and H2122 NSCLC cell lines form tumors that induce lymphangiogenesis whereas Calu-3, H1155, H1975, and H2073 NSCLC cell lines form tumors that do not induce lymphangiogenesis. By analyzing genome-wide mRNA expression data, we identify a 17-gene expression signature that distinguishes lymphangiogenic from non-lymphangiogenic NSCLC cell lines. Importantly, VEGF-C is the only lymphatic growth factor in this expression signature and is approximately 50-fold higher in the lymphangiogenic group than in the non-lymphangiogenic group. We show that forced expression of VEGF-C by H1975 cells induces lymphangiogenesis and that knockdown of VEGF-C in H1993 cells inhibits lymphangiogenesis. Additionally, we demonstrate that the triple angiokinase inhibitor, nintedanib (small molecule that blocks all FGFRs, PDGFRs, and VEGFRs), suppresses tumor lymphangiogenesis in H1993 tumors. Together, these data suggest that VEGF-C is the dominant driver of tumor lymphangiogenesis in NSCLC and reveal a specific therapy that could potentially block tumor lymphangiogenesis in NSCLC patients. PMID:26950548

  15. Surgery and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Children With Extracranial Germ Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-06

    Childhood Embryonal Tumor; Childhood Extracranial Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Childhood Teratoma; Ovarian Embryonal Carcinoma; Ovarian Yolk Sac Tumor; Stage II Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Malignant Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIA Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIB Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IIIC Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma and Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Embryonal Carcinoma

  16. Computing tumor trees from single cells.

    PubMed

    Davis, Alexander; Navin, Nicholas E

    2016-01-01

    Computational methods have been developed to reconstruct evolutionary lineages from tumors using single-cell genomic data. The resulting tumor trees have important applications in cancer research and clinical oncology.Please see related Research articles: http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0929-9 and http://genomebiology.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13059-016-0936-x . PMID:27230879

  17. Synthesis and biological evaluation of Fotemustine analogues on human melanoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Winum, Jean Yves; Bouissière, Jean Luc; Passagne, Isabelle; Evrard, Alexandre; Montero, Véronique; Cuq, Pierre; Montero, Jean Louis

    2003-03-01

    Two new analogues of Fotemustine have been synthesized and tested on two melanoma cell lines. Compounds 4 and 8 proved to be more potent than the reference compound on A375 cell line which express the MGMT enzyme involved in the chemoresistance of tumoral cells. PMID:12667699

  18. Analysis of differential protein expression in normal and neoplastic human breast epithelial cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, K.; Chubb, C.; Huberman, E.; Giometti, C.S.

    1997-07-01

    High resolution two dimensional get electrophoresis (2DE) and database analysis was used to establish protein expression patterns for cultured normal human mammary epithelial cells and thirteen breast cancer cell lines. The Human Breast Epithelial Cell database contains the 2DE protein patterns, including relative protein abundances, for each cell line, plus a composite pattern that contains all the common and specifically expressed proteins from all the cell lines. Significant differences in protein expression, both qualitative and quantitative, were observed not only between normal cells and tumor cells, but also among the tumor cell lines. Eight percent of the consistently detected proteins were found in significantly (P < 0.001) variable levels among the cell lines. Using a combination of immunostaining, comigration with purified protein, subcellular fractionation, and amino-terminal protein sequencing, we identified a subset of the differentially expressed proteins. These identified proteins include the cytoskeletal proteins actin, tubulin, vimentin, and cytokeratins. The cell lines can be classified into four distinct groups based on their intermediate filament protein profile. We also identified heat shock proteins; hsp27, hsp60, and hsp70 varied in abundance and in some cases in the relative phosphorylation levels among the cell lines. Finally, we identified IMP dehydrogenase in each of the cell lines, and found the levels of this enzyme in the tumor cell lines elevated 2- to 20-fold relative to the levels in normal cells.

  19. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Cassandra C; McMichael, Elizabeth L; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C; Abrams, Zachary B; Lee, Robert J; Carson, William E

    2016-08-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is overexpressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is overexpressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and a negative control, respectively. FR-positive and FR-negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G in the presence or absence of cytokines to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells increased following treatment with F-IgG compared with control immunoglobulin G at all effector : target (E : T) ratios (P<0.01). This trend further increased by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12. NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma, macrophage inflammatory protein 1α, and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) was also significantly increased in response to costimulation with interleukin-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells compared with controls (P<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells, which can be further increased by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  20. Folate-conjugated immunoglobulin targets melanoma tumor cells for NK cell effector functions

    PubMed Central

    Skinner, Cassandra C.; McMichael, Elizabeth L.; Jaime-Ramirez, Alena C.; Abrams, Zachary B.; Lee, Robert J.; Carson, William E.

    2016-01-01

    The folate receptor (FR) is over-expressed on the vascular side of cancerous cells including those of the breast, ovaries, testes, and cervix. We hypothesized that a folate-conjugated immunoglobulin (F-IgG) would bind to the FR that is over-expressed on melanoma tumor cells to target these cells for lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Folate receptor expression was confirmed in the Mel-39 (human melanoma) cell line by flow cytometry and immunoblot analysis, using KB (human oral epithelial) and F01 (human melanoma) as a positive and negative control, respectively. FR-positive and negative cell lines were treated with F-IgG or control immunoglobulin G (C-IgG) in the presence or absence of cytokines in order to determine NK cell ability to lyse FR-positive cell lines. NK cell activation was significantly upregulated and lysis of Mel 39 tumor cells enhanced following treatment with F-IgG, as compared to C-IgG at all effector:target (E:T) ratios (p<0.01). This trend was further enhanced by NK cell stimulation with the activating cytokine interleukin-12 (IL-12). NK cell production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), macrophage inflammatory protein 1 alpha (MIP-1α), and regulated on activation normal T-cell expressed and secreted (RANTES) were also significantly increased in response to co-stimulation with IL-12 stimulation and F-IgG-coated Mel 39 target cells, as compared to controls (p<0.01). In contrast, F-IgG did not bind to the FR-negative cell line F01 and had no significant effect on NK cell lysis or cytokine production. This research indicates the potential use of F-IgG for its ability to induce an immune response from NK cells against FR-positive melanoma tumor cells which can be further enhanced by the addition of cytokines. PMID:27035691

  1. Identification of tumorigenic cells and therapeutic targets in pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Krampitz, Geoffrey Wayne; George, Benson M; Willingham, Stephen B; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Weiskopf, Kipp; Jahchan, Nadine; Newman, Aaron M; Sahoo, Debashis; Zemek, Allison J; Yanovsky, Rebecca L; Nguyen, Julia K; Schnorr, Peter J; Mazur, Pawel K; Sage, Julien; Longacre, Teri A; Visser, Brendan C; Poultsides, George A; Norton, Jeffrey A; Weissman, Irving L

    2016-04-19

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (PanNETs) are a type of pancreatic cancer with limited therapeutic options. Consequently, most patients with advanced disease die from tumor progression. Current evidence indicates that a subset of cancer cells is responsible for tumor development, metastasis, and recurrence, and targeting these tumor-initiating cells is necessary to eradicate tumors. However, tumor-initiating cells and the biological processes that promote pathogenesis remain largely uncharacterized in PanNETs. Here we profile primary and metastatic tumors from an index patient and demonstrate that MET proto-oncogene activation is important for tumor growth in PanNET xenograft models. We identify a highly tumorigenic cell population within several independent surgically acquired PanNETs characterized by increased cell-surface protein CD90 expression and aldehyde dehydrogenase A1 (ALDHA1) activity, and provide in vitro and in vivo evidence for their stem-like properties. We performed proteomic profiling of 332 antigens in two cell lines and four primary tumors, and showed that CD47, a cell-surface protein that acts as a "don't eat me" signal co-opted by cancers to evade innate immune surveillance, is ubiquitously expressed. Moreover, CD47 coexpresses with MET and is enriched in CD90(hi)cells. Furthermore, blocking CD47 signaling promotes engulfment of tumor cells by macrophages in vitro and inhibits xenograft tumor growth, prevents metastases, and prolongs survival in vivo. PMID:27035983

  2. Identification of Novel Fusion Genes in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Andreas M; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2016-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their nonmalignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. PMID:26659575

  3. Identification of novel fusion genes in testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Andreas M.; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their non-malignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. PMID:26659575

  4. Global Conservation of Protein Status between Cell Lines and Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Biau, Julian; Chautard, Emmanuel; Court, Frank; Pereira, Bruno; Verrelle, Pierre; Devun, Flavien; De Koning, Leanne; Dutreix, Marie

    2016-08-01

    Common preclinical models for testing anticancer treatment include cultured human tumor cell lines in monolayer, and xenografts derived from these cell lines in immunodeficient mice. Our goal was to determine how similar the xenografts are compared with their original cell line and to determine whether it is possible to predict the stability of a xenograft model beforehand. We studied a selection of 89 protein markers of interest in 14 human cell cultures and respective subcutaneous xenografts using the reverse-phase protein array technology. We specifically focused on proteins and posttranslational modifications involved in DNA repair, PI3K pathway, apoptosis, tyrosine kinase signaling, stress, cell cycle, MAPK/ERK signaling, SAPK/JNK signaling, NFκB signaling, and adhesion/cytoskeleton. Using hierarchical clustering, most cell culture-xenograft pairs cluster together, suggesting a global conservation of protein signature. Particularly, Akt, NFkB, EGFR, and Vimentin showed very stable protein expression and phosphorylation levels highlighting that 4 of 10 pathways were highly correlated whatever the model. Other proteins were heterogeneously conserved depending on the cell line. Finally, cell line models with low Akt pathway activation and low levels of Vimentin gave rise to more reliable xenograft models. These results may be useful for the extrapolation of cell culture experiments to in vivo models in novel targeted drug discovery. PMID:27567954

  5. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26689709

  6. High-Dose Thiotepa Plus Peripheral Stem Cell Transplantation in Treating Patients With Refractory Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-03-06

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Ovarian Cancer; Retinoblastoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  7. Systematic variation in gene expression patterns in human cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Douglas T.; Scherf, Uwe; Eisen, Michael B.; Perou, Charles M.; Rees, Christian; Spellman, Paul; Iyer, Vishwanath; Jeffrey, Stefanie S.; Van de Rijn, Matt; Waltham, Mark; Pergamenschikov, Alexander; Lee, Jeffrey C.F.; Lashkari, Deval; Shalon, Dari; Myers, Timothy G.; Weinstein, John N.; Botstein, David; Brown, Patrick O.

    2000-01-01

    We used cDNA micro arrays to explore the variation in expression of approximately 8,000 unique genes among the 60 cell lines used in the National Cancer Institute s screen for anti-cancer drugs. Classification of the cell lines based solely on the observed patterns of gene expression revealed a correspondence to the ostensible origins of the tumors from which the cell lines were derived. The consistent relationship between the gene expression patterns and the tissue of origin allowed us to recognize outliers whose previous classification appeared incorrect. Specific features of the gene expression patterns appeared to be related to physiological properties of the cell lines, such as their doubling time in culture, drug metabolism or the interferon response. Comparison of gene expression patterns in the cell lines to those observed in normal breast tissue or in breast tumor specimens revealed features of the expression patterns in the tumors that had recognizable counterparts in specific cell lines, reflecting the tumor, stromal and inflammatory components of the tumor tissue. These results provided a novel molecular characterization of this important group of human cell lines and their relationships to tumors in vivo.

  8. Giant Cell Tumor of Bone - An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Sobti, Anshul; Agrawal, Pranshu; Agarwala, Sanjay; Agarwal, Manish

    2016-01-01

    Giant Cell tumors (GCT) are benign tumors with potential for aggressive behavior and capacity to metastasize. Although rarely lethal, benign bone tumors may be associated with a substantial disturbance of the local bony architecture that can be particularly troublesome in peri-articular locations. Its histogenesis remains unclear. It is characterized by a proliferation of mononuclear stromal cells and the presence of many multi- nucleated giant cells with homogenous distribution. There is no widely held consensus regarding the ideal treatment method selection. There are advocates of varying surgical techniques ranging from intra-lesional curettage to wide resection. As most giant cell tumors are benign and are located near a joint in young adults, several authors favor an intralesional approach that preserves anatomy of bone in lieu of resection. Although GCT is classified as a benign lesion, few patients develop progressive lung metastases with poor outcomes. Treatment is mainly surgical. Options of chemotherapy and radiotherapy are reserved for selected cases. Recent advances in the understanding of pathogenesis are essential to develop new treatments for this locally destructive primary bone tumor. PMID:26894211

  9. Maximum recovery potential of human tumor cells may predict clinical outcome in radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Weichselbaum, R.R.; Beckett, M.

    1987-05-01

    We studied inherent radiosensitivity/resistance (D0), ability to accumulate sublethal damage (n) and repair of potentially lethal damage (PLDR) in established human tumor cell lines as well as early passage human tumor cell lines derived from patients with known outcome following radiotherapy. Survival 24 hrs after treatment of human tumor cells with X rays in plateau phase cultures is a function of initial damage (D0, n), as well as recovery over 24 hrs (PLDR). A surviving fraction greater than .1 24 hrs following treatment with 7 Gy in plateau phase cultures is associated with tumor cell types (melanoma, osteosarcoma) with a high probability of radiotherapy failure or tumor cells derived from patients who actually failed radiotherapy. Therefore, total cellular recovery following radiation may be an important determinant of radiocurability. Accurate assays of radiotherapy outcome may need to account for all these radiobiological parameters.

  10. Using X-Ray In-Line Phase-Contrast Imaging for the Investigation of Nude Mouse Hepatic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors. PMID:22761929

  11. Using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging for the investigation of nude mouse hepatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qiang; Li, Dongyue; Zhang, Lu; Luo, Shuqian

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to report the noninvasive imaging of hepatic tumors without contrast agents. Both normal tissues and tumor tissues can be detected, and tumor tissues in different stages can be classified quantitatively. We implanted BEL-7402 human hepatocellular carcinoma cells into the livers of nude mice and then imaged the livers using X-ray in-line phase-contrast imaging (ILPCI). The projection images' texture feature based on gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and dual-tree complex wavelet transforms (DTCWT) were extracted to discriminate normal tissues and tumor tissues. Different stages of hepatic tumors were classified using support vector machines (SVM). Images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 6 days after inoculation with cancer cells show diffuse distribution of the tumor tissue, but images of livers from nude mice sacrificed 9, 12, or 15 days after inoculation with cancer cells show necrotic lumps in the tumor tissue. The results of the principal component analysis (PCA) of the texture features based on GLCM of normal regions were positive, but those of tumor regions were negative. The results of PCA of the texture features based on DTCWT of normal regions were greater than those of tumor regions. The values of the texture features in low-frequency coefficient images increased monotonically with the growth of the tumors. Different stages of liver tumors can be classified using SVM, and the accuracy is 83.33%. Noninvasive and micron-scale imaging can be achieved by X-ray ILPCI. We can observe hepatic tumors and small vessels from the phase-contrast images. This new imaging approach for hepatic cancer is effective and has potential use in the early detection and classification of hepatic tumors. PMID:22761929

  12. Granular cell tumor of the esophagus.

    PubMed

    Patel, R M; DeSota-LaPaix, F; Sika, J V; Mallaiah, L R; Purow, E

    1981-12-01

    Two cases of granular cell tumor of the esophagus are reported and the main features of the previously reported cases are summarized. Dysphagia and substernal discomfort or pain are the most common symptoms seen and are likely to occur with lesions greater than 1 cm. in diameter. The diagnosis should be considered in adult females with an intramural mass of the esophagus. The cell of origin is still disputed. The treatment of choice, when the patient is symptomatic or the lesion greater than 1 cm. in size, is local resection. The tumor, when incidentally discovered in an asymptomatic patient, may safely be followed endoscopically. PMID:6277183

  13. Tumor cohesion and glioblastoma cell dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Foty, Ramsey A

    2013-01-01

    Patients with glioblastoma typically present when tumors are at an advanced stage. Surgical resection, radiotherapy and adjuvant chemotherapy are currently the standard of care for glioblastoma. However, due to the infiltrative and dispersive nature of the tumor, recurrence rate remains high and typically results in very poor prognosis. Efforts to treat the primary tumor are, therefore, palliative rather than curative. From a practical perspective, controlling growth and dispersal of the recurrence may have a greater impact on disease-free survival, In order for cells to disperse, they must first detach from the mass. Preventing detachment may keep tumors that recur more localized and perhaps more amenable to therapy. Here we introduce a new perspective in which a quantifiable mechanical property, namely tissue surface tension, can provide novel information on tumor behavior. The overall theme of the discussion will attempt to integrate how adhesion molecules can alter a tumor’s mechanical properties and how, in turn, these properties can be modified to prevent tumor cell detachment and dispersal. PMID:23902244

  14. Lactate Activates HIF-1 in Oxidative but Not in Warburg-Phenotype Human Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    De Saedeleer, Christophe J.; Copetti, Tamara; Porporato, Paolo E.; Verrax, Julien

    2012-01-01

    Cancer can be envisioned as a metabolic disease driven by pressure selection and intercellular cooperativeness. Together with anaerobic glycolysis, the Warburg effect, formally corresponding to uncoupling glycolysis from oxidative phosphorylation, directly participates in cancer aggressiveness, supporting both tumor progression and dissemination. The transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1) is a key contributor to glycolysis. It stimulates the expression of glycolytic transporters and enzymes supporting high rate of glycolysis. In this study, we addressed the reverse possibility of a metabolic control of HIF-1 in tumor cells. We report that lactate, the end-product of glycolysis, inhibits prolylhydroxylase 2 activity and activates HIF-1 in normoxic oxidative tumor cells but not in Warburg-phenotype tumor cells which also expressed lower basal levels of HIF-1α. These data were confirmed using genotypically matched oxidative and mitochondria-depleted glycolytic tumor cells as well as several different wild-type human tumor cell lines of either metabolic phenotype. Lactate activates HIF-1 and triggers tumor angiogenesis and tumor growth in vivo, an activity that we found to be under the specific upstream control of the lactate transporter monocarboxylate transporter 1 (MCT1) expressed in tumor cells. Because MCT1 also gates lactate-fueled tumor cell respiration and mediates pro-angiogenic lactate signaling in endothelial cells, MCT1 inhibition is confirmed as an attractive anticancer strategy in which a single drug may target multiple tumor-promoting pathways. PMID:23082126

  15. Reliable in vitro studies require appropriate ovarian cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Francis; Nixdorf, Sheri; Hacker, Neville F; Heinzelmann-Schwarz, Viola A

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Of the 75% women diagnosed with locally advanced or disseminated disease, only 30% will survive five years following treatment. This poor prognosis is due to the following reasons: limited understanding of the tumor origin, unclear initiating events and early developmental stages of ovarian cancer, lack of reliable ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, and drug resistance in advanced cases. In the past, in vitro studies using cell line models have been an invaluable tool for basic, discovery-driven cancer research. However, numerous issues including misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines have hindered research efforts. In this study we examined all ovarian cancer cell lines available from cell banks. Hereby, we identified inconsistencies in the reporting, difficulties in the identification of cell origin or clinical data of the donor patients, restricted ethnic and histological type representation, and a lack of tubal and peritoneal cancer cell lines. We recommend that all cell lines should be distributed via official cell banks only with strict guidelines regarding the minimal available information required to improve the quality of ovarian cancer research in future. PMID:24936210

  16. Reliable in vitro studies require appropriate ovarian cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the fifth most common cause of cancer death in women and the leading cause of death from gynaecological malignancies. Of the 75% women diagnosed with locally advanced or disseminated disease, only 30% will survive five years following treatment. This poor prognosis is due to the following reasons: limited understanding of the tumor origin, unclear initiating events and early developmental stages of ovarian cancer, lack of reliable ovarian cancer-specific biomarkers, and drug resistance in advanced cases. In the past, in vitro studies using cell line models have been an invaluable tool for basic, discovery-driven cancer research. However, numerous issues including misidentification and cross-contamination of cell lines have hindered research efforts. In this study we examined all ovarian cancer cell lines available from cell banks. Hereby, we identified inconsistencies in the reporting, difficulties in the identification of cell origin or clinical data of the donor patients, restricted ethnic and histological type representation, and a lack of tubal and peritoneal cancer cell lines. We recommend that all cell lines should be distributed via official cell banks only with strict guidelines regarding the minimal available information required to improve the quality of ovarian cancer research in future. PMID:24936210

  17. Silicon Micropore based Electromechanical Transducer to Differentiate Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Waqas; Raza, Muhammad U.; Khanzada, Raja R.; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M.

    2015-03-01

    Solid-state micropores have been used before to differentiate cancer cells from normal cells using size-based filtering. Tumor cells differ