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Sample records for cell tumor metastatic

  1. Regulatory T cells actively infiltrate metastatic brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Sugihara, Adam Quasar; Rolle, Cleo E; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2009-06-01

    Regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25+FoxP3+, Treg) have been shown to play a major role in suppression of the immune response to malignant gliomas. In this study, we investigated the kinetics of Treg infiltration in metastatic brain tumor models, including melanoma, breast and colon cancers. Our data indicate that both CD4+ and Treg infiltration are significantly increased throughout the time of metastatic tumor progression. These findings were recapitulated in human CNS tumor samples of metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung carcinoma. Collectively, these data support investigating immunotherapeutic strategies targeting Treg in metastatic CNS tumors. PMID:19424570

  2. Tumor cells as cellular vehicles to deliver gene therapies to metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    García-Castro, Javier; Martínez-Palacio, Jesús; Lillo, Rosa; García-Sánchez, Félix; Alemany, Ramón; Madero, Luis; Bueren, Juan A; Ramírez, Manuel

    2005-04-01

    A long-pursued goal in cancer treatment is to deliver a therapy specifically to metastases. As a result of the disseminated nature of the metastatic disease, carrying the therapeutic agent to the sites of tumor growth represents a major step for success. We hypothesized that tumor cells injected intravenously (i.v.) into an animal with metastases would respond to many of the factors driving the metastatic process, and would target metastases. Using a model of spontaneous metastases, we report here that i.v. injected tumor cells localized on metastatic lesions. Based on this fact, we used genetically transduced tumor cells for tumor targeting of anticancer agents such as a suicide gene or an oncolytic virus, with evident antitumoral effect and negligible systemic toxicity. Therefore, autologous tumor cells may be used as cellular vehicles for systemic delivery of anticancer therapies to metastatic tumors. PMID:15650763

  3. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Brain tumor - metastatic (secondary); Cancer - brain tumor (metastatic) ... For many people with metastatic brain tumors, the cancer is not curable. It will eventually spread to other areas of the body. Prognosis depends on the type of tumor ...

  4. Bone marrow as a metastatic niche for disseminated tumor cells from solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Shiozawa, Yusuke; Eber, Matthew R; Berry, Janice E; Taichman, Russell S

    2015-01-01

    Bone marrow is a heterogeneous organ containing diverse cell types, and it is a preferred metastatic site for several solid tumors such as breast and prostate cancer. Recently, it has been shown that bone metastatic cancer cells interact with the bone marrow microenvironment to survive and grow, and thus this microenvironment is referred to as the ‘metastatic niche'. Once cancer cells spread to distant organs such as bone, the prognosis for the patient is generally poor. There is an urgent need to establish a greater understanding of the mechanisms whereby the bone marrow niche influences bone metastasis. Here we discuss insights into the contribution of the bone marrow ‘metastatic niche' to progression of bone metastatic disease, with a particular focus on cells of hematopoietic and mesenchymal origin. PMID:26029360

  5. Immune cells in primary and metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST)

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Silke; Gieselmann, Marieke; Blaschke, Martina; Ramadori, Giuliano; Füzesi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    We have previously described immune cells in untreated primary gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST). Here we compare immune cells in metastatic and primary GIST, and describe their chemoattractants. For this purpose, tissue microarrays from 196 patients, 188 primary and 51 metastasized GIST were constructed for paraffin staining. Quantitative analysis was performed for cells of macrophage lineage (Ki-M1P, CD68), T-cells (CD3, CD56) and B-cells (CD20). Chemokine gene-expression was evaluated by real-time RT-PCR. Immuno-localisation was verified by immunofluorescence. Ki-M1P+ cells were the predominant immune cells in both primary and metastatic GIST (2 8.8% ± 7.1, vs. 26.7% ± 6.3). CD68+ macrophages were significantly fewer, with no significant difference between primary GIST (3.6% ± 2.1) and metastases (4.6% ± 1.5). CD3+ T-cells were the most dominant lymphocytes with a significant increase in metastases (7.3% ± 2.3 vs. 2.2% ± 1.8 in primary GIST, P < 0.01). The percentage of CD56+ NK-cells was 1.1% ± 0.9 in the primary, and 2.4 ± 0.7 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. The number of CD20+ B-cells was generally low with 0.6% ± 0.7 in the primary and 1.8% ± 0.3 (P < 0.05) in the metastases. Analysis of the metastases showed significantly more Ki-M1P+ cells in peritoneal metastases (31.8% ± 7.4 vs. 18.2% ± 3.7, P < 0.01), whilst CD3+ T-cells were more common in liver metastases (11.7% ± 1.8 vs. 4.4% ± 2.6, P < 0.01). The highest transcript expression was seen for monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP1/CCL2), macrophage inflammatory protein 1α (MIP-1α/CCL3) and the pro-angiogenic growth-related oncoprotein 1 (Gro-α/CXCL-1). Whilst the ligands were predominantly expressed in tumor cells, their receptors were mostly present in immune cells. This locally specific microenvironment might influence neoplastic progression of GIST at the different metastatic sites. PMID:25120735

  6. Differentiating Metastatic and Non-metastatic Tumor Cells from Their Translocation Profile through Solid-State Micropores.

    PubMed

    Ali, Waqas; Ilyas, Azhar; Bui, Loan; Sayles, Bailey; Hur, Yeun; Kim, Young-Tae; Iqbal, Samir M

    2016-05-17

    Cancer treatment, care, and outcomes are much more effective if started at early stages of the disease. The presence of malignant cancer cells in human samples such as blood or biopsied tissue can be used to reduce overtreatment and underdiagnosis as well as for prognosis monitoring. Reliable quantification of metastatic tumor cells (MTCs) and non-metastatic tumor cells (NMTCs) from human samples can help in cancer staging as well. We report a simple, fast, and reliable approach to identify and quantify metastatic and non-metastatic cancer cells from whole biological samples in a point-of-care manner. The metastatic (MDA MB-231) and non-metastatic (MCF7) breast cancer cells were pushed through a solid-state micropore made in a 200 nm thin SiO2 membrane while measuring current across the micropore. The cells generated very distinctive translocation profiles. The translocation differences stemmed from their peculiar mechanophysical properties. The detection efficiency of the device for each type of tumor cells was ∼75%. MTCs showed faster translocation (36%) and 34% less pore blockage than NMTCs. The micropore approach is simple, exact, and quantitative for metastatic cell detection in a lab-on-a chip setting, without the need for any preprocessing of the sample. PMID:27035212

  7. Is the Blood-Brain Barrier Relevant in Metastatic Germ Cell Tumor?

    SciTech Connect

    Azar, Jose M. Schneider, Bryan P.; Einhorn, Lawrence H.

    2007-09-01

    Purpose: Germ cell tumors are uniquely chemosensitive and curable, even with advanced metastatic disease. Central nervous system recurrence can terminate a complete remission in other chemosensitive tumors, such as small cell lung cancer, because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). We propose to document that the BBB is also relevant in germ cell tumors despite their dramatic chemosensitivity. Methods and Materials: We present five cases illustrating the concept of the BBB in patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy. Results: In our large series of patients with metastatic testicular cancer treated with chemotherapy, we identified 5 unique patients. These patients were rendered free of disease only to experience relapse in the brain alone. This included 1 patient who initially had good-risk metastatic disease by means of the International Germ Cell Collaborative Group staging system at the onset of chemotherapy. Conclusions: The BBB is relevant in patients with metastatic testicular cancer.

  8. Metastatic brain tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain from an unknown location. This is called cancer of unknown primary (CUP) origin. Growing brain tumors can place pressure ... not know the original location. This is called cancer of unknown primary (CUP) origin. Metastatic brain tumors occur in about ...

  9. Optical Detection and Virotherapy of Live Metastatic Tumor Cells in Body Fluids with Vaccinia Strains

    PubMed Central

    Minev, Boris R.; Zimmermann, Martina; Aguilar, Richard J.; Zhang, Qian; Sturm, Julia B.; Fend, Falko; Yu, Yong A.; Cappello, Joseph; Lauer, Ulrich M.; Szalay, Aladar A.

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic tumor cells in body fluids are important targets for treatment, and critical surrogate markers for evaluating cancer prognosis and therapeutic response. Here we report, for the first time, that live metastatic tumor cells in blood samples from mice bearing human tumor xenografts and in blood and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with cancer were successfully detected using a tumor cell-specific recombinant vaccinia virus (VACV). In contrast to the FDA-approved CellSearch system, VACV detects circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in a cancer biomarker-independent manner, thus, free of any bias related to the use of antibodies, and can be potentially a universal system for detection of live CTCs of any tumor type, not limited to CTCs of epithelial origin. Furthermore, we demonstrate for the first time that VACV was effective in preventing and reducing circulating tumor cells in mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Importantly, a single intra-peritoneal delivery of VACV resulted in a dramatic decline in the number of tumor cells in the ascitic fluid from a patient with gastric cancer. Taken together, these results suggest VACV to be a useful tool for quantitative detection of live tumor cells in liquid biopsies as well as a potentially effective treatment for reducing or eliminating live tumor cells in body fluids of patients with metastatic disease. PMID:24019862

  10. Metastatic pleural tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... persons. Alternative Names Tumor - metastatic pleural Images Pleural space References Arenberg D, Pickens A. Metastatic malignant tumors. In: Mason RJ, Murray JF, Broaddus VC, et al., eds. Murray and Nadel's Textbook of Respiratory Medicine . 5th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2010:chap ...

  11. Tumor cells disseminate early, but immunosurveillance limits metastatic outgrowth, in a mouse model of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Eyles, Jo; Puaux, Anne-Laure; Wang, Xiaojie; Toh, Benjamin; Prakash, Celine; Hong, Michelle; Tan, Tze Guan; Zheng, Lin; Ong, Lai Chun; Jin, Yi; Kato, Masashi; Prévost-Blondel, Armelle; Chow, Pierce; Yang, Henry; Abastado, Jean-Pierre

    2010-01-01

    Although metastasis is the leading cause of cancer-related death, it is not clear why some patients with localized cancer develop metastatic disease after complete resection of their primary tumor. Such relapses have been attributed to tumor cells that disseminate early and remain dormant for prolonged periods of time; however, little is known about the control of these disseminated tumor cells. Here, we have used a spontaneous mouse model of melanoma to investigate tumor cell dissemination and immune control of metastatic outgrowth. Tumor cells were found to disseminate throughout the body early in development of the primary tumor, even before it became clinically detectable. The disseminated tumor cells remained dormant for varying periods of time depending on the tissue, resulting in staggered metastatic outgrowth. Dormancy in the lung was associated with reduced proliferation of the disseminated tumor cells relative to the primary tumor. This was mediated, at least in part, by cytostatic CD8+ T cells, since depletion of these cells resulted in faster outgrowth of visceral metastases. Our findings predict that immune responses favoring dormancy of disseminated tumor cells, which we propose to be the seed of subsequent macroscopic metastases, are essential for prolonging the survival of early stage cancer patients and suggest that therapeutic strategies designed to reinforce such immune responses may produce marked benefits in these patients. PMID:20501944

  12. Circulating tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells in metastatic triple negative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Madic, Jordan; Kiialainen, Anna; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Birzele, Fabian; Ramey, Guillemette; Leroy, Quentin; Rio Frio, Thomas; Vaucher, Isabelle; Raynal, Virginie; Bernard, Virginie; Lermine, Alban; Clausen, Inga; Giroud, Nicolas; Schmucki, Roland; Milder, Maud; Horn, Carsten; Spleiss, Olivia; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Pierga, Jean-Yves; Weisser, Martin; Lebofsky, Ronald

    2015-05-01

    Circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) is a new circulating tumor biomarker which might be used as a prognostic biomarker in a way similar to circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Here, we used the high prevalence of TP53 mutations in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to compare ctDNA and CTC detection rates and prognostic value in metastatic TNBC patients. Forty patients were enrolled before starting a new line of treatment. TP53 mutations were characterized in archived tumor tissues and in plasma DNA using two next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms in parallel. Archived tumor tissue was sequenced successfully for 31/40 patients. TP53 mutations were found in 26/31 (84%) of tumor samples. The same mutation was detected in the matched plasma of 21/26 (81%) patients with an additional mutation found only in the plasma for one patient. Mutated allele fractions ranged from 2 to 70% (median 5%). The observed correlation between the two NGS approaches (R(2) = 0.903) suggested that ctDNA levels data were quantitative. Among the 27 patients with TP53 mutations, CTC count was ≥1 in 19 patients (70%) and ≥5 in 14 patients (52%). ctDNA levels had no prognostic impact on time to progression (TTP) or overall survival (OS), whereas CTC numbers were correlated with OS (p = 0.04) and marginally with TTP (p = 0.06). Performance status and elevated LDH also had significant prognostic impact. Here, absence of prognostic impact of baseline ctDNA level suggests that mechanisms of ctDNA release in metastatic TNBC may involve, beyond tumor burden, biological features that do not dramatically affect patient outcome. PMID:25307450

  13. Tracking sub-clonal TP53 mutated tumor cells in human metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bousquet, Guilhem; Bouchtaoui, Morad El; Leboeuf, Christophe; Battistella, Maxime; Varna, Mariana; Ferreira, Irmine; Plassa, Louis-François; Hamdan, Diaddin; Bertheau, Philippe; Feugeas, Jean-Paul; Damotte, Diane; Janin, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Renal Cell Carcinomas (RCCs) are heterogeneous tumors with late acquisition of TP53 abnormalities during their evolution. They harbor TP53 abnormalities in their metastases. We aimed to study TP53 gene alterations in tissue samples from primary and metastatic RCCs in 36 patients followed up over a median of 4.2 years, and in xenografted issued from primary RCCs. In 36 primary RCCs systematically xenografted in mice, and in biopsies of metastases performed whenever possible during patient follow-up, we studied p53-expressing tumor cells and TP53 gene abnormalities. We identified TP53 gene alterations in primary tumors, metastases and xenografts. Quantification of tumors cells with TP53 gene alterations showed a significant increase in the metastases compared to the primary RCCs, and, strikingly, the xenografts were similar to the metastases and not to the primary RCCs from which they were derived. Using laser-microdissection of p53-expressing tumor cells, we identified TP53-mutated tumor cells in the xenografts derived from the primary RCC, and in a lung metastasis later developed in one patient. The mutation enabled us to track back their origin to a minority sub-clone in the primary heterogeneous RCC. Combining in situ and molecular analyses, we demonstrated a clonal expansion in a living patient with metastatic RCC. PMID:26002555

  14. FRIZZLED7 Is Required for Tumor Inititation and Metastatic Growth of Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tiwary, Shweta; Xu, Lei

    2016-01-01

    Metastases are thought to arise from cancer stem cells and their tumor initiating abilities are required for the establishment of metastases. Nevertheless, in metastatic melanoma, the nature of cancer stem cells is under debate and their contribution to metastasis formation remains unknown. Using an experimental metastasis model, we discovered that high levels of the WNT receptor, FZD7, correlated with enhanced metastatic potentials of melanoma cell lines. Knocking down of FZD7 in a panel of four melanoma cell lines led to a significant reduction in lung metastases in animal models, arguing that FZD7 plays a causal role during metastasis formation. Notably, limiting dilution analyses revealed that FZD7 is essential for the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and FZD7 knockdown impeded the early expansion of metastatic melanoma cells shortly after seeding, in accordance with the view that tumor initiating ability of cancer cells is required for metastasis formation. FZD7 activated JNK in melanoma cell lines in vitro and the expression of a dominant negative JNK suppressed metastasis formation in vivo, suggesting that FZD7 may promote metastatic growth of melanoma cells via activation of JNK. Taken together, our findings uncovered a signaling pathway that regulates the tumor initiation of melanoma cells and contributes to metastasis formation in melanoma. PMID:26808375

  15. Clinical Significance of Tumor-Associated Inflammatory Cells in Metastatic Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Asgharzadeh, Shahab; Salo, Jill A.; Ji, Lingyun; Oberthuer, André; Fischer, Matthias; Berthold, Frank; Hadjidaniel, Michael; Liu, Cathy Wei-Yao; Metelitsa, Leonid S.; Pique-Regi, Roger; Wakamatsu, Peter; Villablanca, Judith G.; Kreissman, Susan G.; Matthay, Katherine K.; Shimada, Hiroyuki; London, Wendy B.; Sposto, Richard; Seeger, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Children diagnosed at age ≥ 18 months with metastatic MYCN-nonamplified neuroblastoma (NBL-NA) are at high risk for disease relapse, whereas those diagnosed at age < 18 months are nearly always cured. In this study, we investigated the hypothesis that expression of genes related to tumor-associated inflammatory cells correlates with the observed differences in survival by age at diagnosis and contributes to a prognostic signature. Methods Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) in localized and metastatic neuroblastomas (n = 71) were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Expression of 44 genes representing tumor and inflammatory cells was quantified in 133 metastatic NBL-NAs to assess age-dependent expression and to develop a logistic regression model to provide low- and high-risk scores for predicting progression-free survival (PFS). Tumors from high-risk patients enrolled onto two additional studies (n = 91) served as independent validation cohorts. Results Metastatic neuroblastomas had higher infiltration of TAMs than locoregional tumors, and metastatic tumors diagnosed in patients at age ≥ 18 months had higher expression of inflammation-related genes than those in patients diagnosed at age < 18 months. Expression of genes representing TAMs (CD33/CD16/IL6R/IL10/FCGR3) contributed to 25% of the accuracy of a novel 14-gene tumor classification score. PFS at 5 years for children diagnosed at age ≥ 18 months with NBL-NA with a low- versus high-risk score was 47% versus 12%, 57% versus 8%, and 50% versus 20% in three independent clinical trials, respectively. Conclusion These data suggest that interactions between tumor and inflammatory cells may contribute to the clinical metastatic neuroblastoma phenotype, improve prognostication, and reveal novel therapeutic targets. PMID:22927533

  16. Passive Entrapment of Tumor Cells Determines Metastatic Dissemination to Spinal Bone and Other Osseous Tissues.

    PubMed

    Broggini, Thomas; Piffko, Andras; Hoffmann, Christian J; Harms, Christoph; Vajkoczy, Peter; Czabanka, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    During the metastatic process tumor cells circulate in the blood stream and are carried to various organs. In order to spread to different organs tumor cell-endothelial cell interactions are crucial for extravasation mechanisms. It remains unclear if tumor cell dissemination to the spinal bone occurs by passive entrapment of circulating tumor cells or by active cellular mechanisms mediated by cell surface molecules or secreted factors. We investigated the seeding of three different tumor cell lines (melanoma, lung and prostate carcinoma) to the microvasculature of different organs. Their dissemination was compared to biologically passive microbeads. The spine and other organs were resected three hours after intraarterial injection of tumor cells or microbeads. Ex vivo homogenization and fluorescence analysis allowed quantification of tumor cells or microbeads in different organs. Interestingly, tumor cell distribution to the spinal bone was comparable to dissemination of microbeads independent of the tumor cell type (melanoma: 5.646% ± 7.614%, lung: 6.007% ± 1.785%, prostate: 3.469% ± 0.602%, 7 μm beads: 9.884% ± 7.379%, 16 μm beads: 7.23% ± 1.488%). Tumor cell seeding differed significantly between tumor cells and microbeads in all soft tissue organs. Moreover, there were significant differences between the different tumor cell lines in their dissemination behaviour to soft tissue organs only. These findings demonstrate that metastatic dissemination of tumor cells to spinal bone and other osseous organs is mediated by passive entrapment of tumor cells similar to passive plugging of microvasculature observed after intraarterial microbeads injection. PMID:27603673

  17. Sorafenib Tosylate in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-11-14

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  18. Regorafenib in Treating Patients With Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-29

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma

  19. Selection of Mesenchymal-Like Metastatic Cells in Primary Tumors – An in silico Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Narang, Vipin; Wong, Shek Yoon; Leong, Shiang Rong; Harish, Bindu; Abastado, Jean-Pierre; Gouaillard, Alexandre

    2012-01-01

    In order to metastasize, cancer cells must undergo phenotypic transition from an anchorage-dependent form to a motile form via a process referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transition. It is currently unclear whether metastatic cells emerge late during tumor progression by successive accumulation of mutations, or whether they derive from distinct cell populations already present during the early stages of tumorigenesis. Similarly, the selective pressures that drive metastasis are poorly understood. Selection of cancer cells with increased proliferative capacity and enhanced survival characteristics may explain how some transformations promote a metastatic phenotype. However, it is difficult to explain how cancer cells that disseminate can emerge due to such selective pressure, since these cells usually remain dormant for prolonged periods of time. In the current study, we have used in silico modeling and simulation to investigate the hypothesis that mesenchymal-like cancer cells evolve during the early stages of primary tumor development, and that these cells exhibit survival and proliferative advantages within the tumor microenvironment. In an agent-based tumor microenvironment model, cancer cell agents with distinct sets of attributes governing nutrient consumption, proliferation, apoptosis, random motility, and cell adhesion were allowed to compete for space and nutrients. These simulation data indicated that mesenchymal-like cancer cells displaying high motility and low adhesion proliferate more rapidly and display a survival advantage over epithelial-like cancer cells. Furthermore, the presence of mesenchymal-like cells within the primary tumor influences the macroscopic properties, emergent morphology, and growth rate of tumors. PMID:22566967

  20. Non-lethal heat treatment of cells results in reduction of tumor initiation and metastatic potential

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoo-Shin; Lee, Tae Hoon; O'Neill, Brian E.

    2015-08-14

    Non-lethal hyperthermia is used clinically as adjuvant treatment to radiation, with mixed results. Denaturation of protein during hyperthermia treatment is expected to synergize with radiation damage to cause cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Alternatively, hyperthermia is known to cause tissue level changes in blood flow, increasing the oxygenation and radiosensitivity of often hypoxic tumors. In this study, we elucidate a third possibility, that hyperthermia alters cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction, with particular impact on the cancer stem cell population. We demonstrate that cell heating results in a robust but temporary loss of cancer cell aggressiveness and metastatic potential in mouse models. In vitro, this heating results in a temporary loss in cell mobility, adhesion, and proliferation. Our hypothesis is that the loss of cellular adhesion results in suppression of cancer stem cells and loss of tumor virulence and metastatic potential. Our study suggests that the metastatic potential of cancer is particularly reduced by the effects of heat on cellular adhesion and mechanotransduction. If true, this could help explain both the successes and failures of clinical hyperthermia, and suggest ways to target treatments to those who would most benefit. - Highlights: • Non-lethal hyperthermia treatment of cancer cells is shown to cause a reduction in rates of tumor initiation and metastasis. • Dynamic imaging of cells during heat treatment shows temporary changes in cell shape, cell migration, and cell proliferation. • Loss of adhesion may lead to the observed effect, which may disproportionately impact the tumor initiating cell fraction. • Loss or suppression of the tumor initiating cell fraction results in the observed loss of metastatic potential in vivo. • This result may lead to new approaches to synergizing hyperthermia with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy.

  1. A rare cause in etiology of left atrial mass: metastatic testicular germ cell tumor

    PubMed Central

    Huseyin, Serhat; Okyay, Ahmet; Hacıbekiroğlu, İlhan; Tastekin, Ebru; Yılmaztepe, Mustafa; Taylan, Gökay; Canbaz, Suat; Çiçin, İrfan

    2016-01-01

    Although intracardiac metastasis of germ cell tumors is rare, it can be localized in the right or left heart by disseminating spread and give their cardiac symptoms depending on the location of metastatic mass. We present a 38-year-old male patient with a preliminary diagnosis of testicular tumor who was followed by the medical oncology clinic with cerebrovascular event and heart failure symptoms. PMID:27212979

  2. Curculigoside augments cell-mediated immune responses in metastatic tumor-bearing animals.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vishnu Priya; Kuttan, Girija

    2016-08-01

    A positive modulation of immune system is necessary for preparing the body to fight against malignant tumor cells. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of Curculigoside on cell-mediated immune response against the metastasis of B16F10 melanoma cells was analyzed in C57BL/6 mice. Curculigoside is a phenolic glucoside present in the plant Curculigo orchioides Gaertn. (Family - Amaryllidaceae). Administration of Curculigoside enhanced the natural killer (NK) cell activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in metastatic tumor-bearing animals, when compared to the untreated control animals. The compound was also found to be effective in reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF during metastasis. Besides these, levels of TH1 cytokines, such as IL-2 and IFN-γ, were significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) by Curculigoside administration and thereby reduces the metastatic lung colony formation along with an increased lifespan of the experimental animals. These studies provide an evidence for the stimulation of cell-mediated immune responses by Curculigoside against B16F10-induced metastatic tumor progression in experimental animals. PMID:27228189

  3. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Progressive Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatinoma; WDHA Syndrome

  4. Mesotheliomas show higher hyaluronan positivity around tumor cells than metastatic pulmonary adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Törrönen, Kari; Soini, Ylermi; Pääkkö, Paavo; Parkkinen, Jyrki; Sironen, Reijo; Rilla, Kirsi

    2016-10-01

    Hyaluronan is a unique glycosaminoglycan of the extracellular matrix, abundant in normal connective tissues but highly increased in many pathological conditions like cancer. Mesothelioma, one of the most malignant cancer types, is associated with high content of hyaluronan, with elevated levels of hyaluronan in pleural effusions and serum of the patients. Metastatic lung adenocarcinomas are typically less aggressive and have a better prognosis as compared to mesotheliomas, a reason why it is highly important to find reliable tools to differentiate these cancer types. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate the amount of hyaluronan, hyaluronan producing synthases (HAS's) and hyaluronan receptor CD44, in mesothelioma and metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. Furthermore, we wanted to clarify the role of hyaluronan, CD44 and HAS's as putative markers for differentiating malignant mesothelioma from metastatic lung adenocarcinomas. The main finding of this study was that mesotheliomas are significantly more positive for hyaluronan staining than metastatic adenocarcinomas. Unexceptionally, a trend of CD44 positivity of stromal cells was higher in adenocarcinomas as compared to mesotheliomas. However, no statistically significant differences were found between the staining of any of the HAS isoenzymes either in tumor cells or stromal cells of different groups of cases. The results show that there are significant differences in hyaluronan content between metastatic lung adenocarcinomas and mesotheliomas. However, as previous studies have suggested, hyaluronan alone is not a sufficient independent marker for diagnostic differentiation of these cancer types, but could be utilized as a combination together with other specific markers. PMID:26912058

  5. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551–554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations.

  6. Recovery from Choriocarcinoma Syndrome Associated with a Metastatic Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor Hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Komori, Koji; Takahari, Daisuke; Kimura, Kenya; Kinoshita, Takashi; Ito, Seiji; Abe, Tetsuya; Senda, Yoshiki; Misawa, Kazunari; Ito, Yuichi; Uemura, Norihisa; Natsume, Seiji; Kawakami, Jiro; Iwata, Yoshinori; Tsutsuyama, Masayuki; Shigeyoshi, Itaru; Akazawa, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Daisuke; Ouchi, Akira; Shimizu, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    A germ cell tumor is the most common form of malignancy in early male life, and can be classified as either seminomatous or nonseminomatous. Choriocarcinoma, comprised of nonseminomatous germ cells, is the most aggressive type of germ cell tumor and characteristically metastasizes to the retroperitoneal lymph nodes and less frequently to the lungs, liver, bone or brain [Shibuya et al., 2009;48: 551-554]. A 56-year-old man was admitted to another hospital complaining of abdominal distension. Symptoms included anorexia, vomiting, and diarrhea. The patient was diagnosed with an extragonadal germ cell tumor and referred to our hospital to receive chemotherapy. The day after admission, the patient's abdominal distension gradually worsened. An emergency operation revealed venous hemorrhage from the surface of a metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor between the ligament of Treitz and the inferior mesenteric vein in a horizontal position. Hemostatic treatment was performed with 4-0 proline thread attached to a medicated cotton sponge, rather than using a simple proline thread, and the closure area was manually compressed. Chemotherapy was initiated on postoperative day 10. A metastatic extragonadal germ cell tumor that causes massive hemorrhage and gastrointestinal hemorrhage is very rare, and represents a life-threatening emergency. If the patient's condition carries a substantial risk of bleeding to death, it may be worthwhile to attempt abdominal operations. PMID:27403124

  7. Retroperitoneal metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess: a diagnostic pitfall.

    PubMed

    Dieker, Carrie A; De Las Casas, Luis E; Davis, Brian R

    2013-07-01

    Most testicular neoplasms are germ cell tumors, the vast majority of which represent seminomas. Most seminomas present localized to the testis, whereas nonseminomatous germ cell tumors more often present with lymph node metastases. Psoas abscesses generally arise from a contiguous intra-abdominal or pelvic infectious process, an adjacent focus of osteomyelitis or septic emboli from distant infectious foci. In this study, the case of a 24-year-old man who presented with a right psoas mass presumptively diagnosed as an abscess secondary to fever and leukocytosis is presented. The patient had a history of right testicular seminoma, and normal serum levels of alpha-fetoprotein and human chorionic gonadotropin. Surgical exploration and biopsy demonstrated seminoma metastasis. This case represents an extremely unusual clinical presentation of metastatic germ cell tumor presenting as a psoas abscess. This unique case represents an unusual presentation of a recurrent germ cell tumor mimicking a psoas abscess. Awareness of possible metastatic testicular germ cell neoplasm as a psoas abscess could prevent diagnosis delay before retroperitoneal tumor debulking. PMID:23360792

  8. CSF1-ETS2-induced microRNA in myeloid cells promote metastatic tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Mathsyaraja, H; Thies, K; Taffany, D A; Deighan, C; Liu, T; Yu, L; Fernandez, S A; Shapiro, C; Otero, J; Timmers, C; Lustberg, M B; Chalmers, J; Leone, G; Ostrowski, M C

    2015-07-01

    Metastasis of solid tumors is associated with poor prognosis and bleak survival rates. Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) are known to promote metastasis, but the mechanisms underlying their collaboration with tumor cells remain unknown. Here, we report an oncogenic role for microRNA (miR) in driving M2 reprogramming in TIMs, characterized by the acquisition of pro-tumor and pro-angiogenic properties. The expression of miR-21, miR-29a, miR-142-3p and miR-223 increased in myeloid cells during tumor progression in mouse models of breast cancer and melanoma metastasis. Further, we show that these miRs are regulated by the CSF1-ETS2 pathway in macrophages. A loss-of-function approach utilizing selective depletion of the miR-processing enzyme Dicer in mature myeloid cells blocks angiogenesis and metastatic tumor growth. Ectopic expression of miR-21 and miR-29a promotes angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation through the downregulation of anti-angiogenic genes such as Col4a2, Spry1 and Timp3, whereas knockdown of the miRs impedes these processes. miR-21 and miR-29a are expressed in Csf1r+ myeloid cells associated with human metastatic breast cancer, and levels of these miRs in CD115+ non-classical monocytes correlates with metastatic tumor burden in patients. Taken together, our results suggest that miR-21 and miR-29a are essential for the pro-tumor functions of myeloid cells and the CSF1-ETS2 pathway upstream of the miRs serves as an attractive therapeutic target for the inhibition of M2 remodeling of macrophages during malignancy. In addition, miR-21 and miR-29a in circulating myeloid cells may potentially serve as biomarkers to measure therapeutic efficacy of targeted therapies for CSF1 signaling. PMID:25241894

  9. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow

    PubMed Central

    Evani, Shankar J.; Prabhu, Rajesh G.; Gnanaruban, V.; Finol, Ender A.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2013-01-01

    Endothelial adhesion is necessary for the hematogenous dissemination of tumor cells. However, the metastatic breast tumor cell MDA-MB-231 does not bind to the endothelium under physiological flow conditions, suggesting alternate mechanisms of adhesion. Since monocytes are highly represented in the tumor microenvironment, and also bind to endothelium during inflammation, we hypothesized that the monocytes assist in the arrest of MDA-MB-231 on the endothelium. Using in vitro models of the dynamic shear environment of the vasculature, we show that TNF-α-activated THP1/primary human monocytes and MDA-MB-231 cells form stable aggregates, and that the monocytes in these aggregates mediate the adhesion of otherwise nonadherent MDA-MB-231 cells to inflamed endothelium under flow (55±2.4 vs. 1.7±0.82 at a shear stress of 0.5 dyn/cm2, P<0.01). We also show that the hydrodynamic forces determine the size and orientation of aggregates adhered to the endothelium, and strongly favor the attachment of small aggregates with tumor cells downstream of flow (74–86% doublets at 0.5–2 dyn/cm2, P<0.01). The 5-fold up-regulation of ICAM-1 on TNF-α-activated MDA-MB-231 cells through the Nf-κB pathway was found to be critical in MDA-MB-231–monocyte aggregation and endothelial adhesion. Our results demonstrate that, under inflammatory conditions, monocytes may serve to disseminate tumor cells through circulation, and the tumor–monocyte–endothelial axis may represent a new therapeutic target to reduce cancer metastasis.—Evani, S. J., Prabhu, R. G., Gnanaruban, V., Finol, E. A., Ramasubramanian, A. K. Monocytes mediate metastatic breast tumor cell adhesion to endothelium under flow. PMID:23616566

  10. Tumor metastases and cell-mediated immunity in a model system in DBA/2 mice. VIII. Expression and shedding of Fc gamma receptors on metastatic tumor cell variants.

    PubMed

    Schirrmacher, V; Jacobs, W

    1979-01-01

    The expression of receptors for the Fc portion of IgG immunoglobin molecules was studied on tumor cell lines with high and low metastatic capacity. Two tumor cell lines from DBA/2 mice that had high metastatic activity, ESb and MDAY-D2, contained a high percentage of Fc receptor positive cells, as detected in a rosette assay with IgG antibody-coated erythrocytes (EA). In contrast, the low metastatic parental line Eb, from which ESb was derived, contained only a low percentage of EA-rosette-forming cells. ESb ascites tumor cells adapted to tissue culture in the presence of 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) had a high expression of Fc receptors, whereas a cell line adapted to tissue culture in the absence of 2ME had a low expression of Fc receptors. "Soluble" Fc receptors were detectable by their ability to bind to EA and to cause blocking of rosette formation. They were found to be present in fluids from tumor-bearing animals, such as serum and cell-free ascites. Even animals with an ascites tumor of the low-metastatic line Eb contained "soluble" Fc receptors. The results are discussed with regard to their possible significance for tumor metastasis. PMID:522481

  11. Isolation and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients with Localized and Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stott, Shannon L.; Lee, Richard J.; Nagrath, Sunitha; Yu, Min; Miyamoto, David T.; Ulkus, Lindsey; Inserra, Elizabeth J.; Ulman, Matthew; Springer, Simeon; Nakamura, Zev; Moore, Alessandra L.; Tsukrov, Dina I.; Kempner, Maria E.; Dahl, Douglas M.; Wu, Chin-Lee; Iafrate, A. John; Smith, Matthew R.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Toner, Mehmet; Haber, Daniel A.; Maheswaran, Shyamala

    2011-01-01

    Rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are present in the blood of patients with metastatic epithelial cancers but have been difficult to measure routinely. We report a quantitative automated imaging system for analysis of prostate CTCs, taking advantage of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a unique prostate tumor–associated marker. The specificity of PSA staining enabled optimization of criteria for baseline image intensity, morphometric measurements, and integration of multiple signals in a three-dimensional microfluidic device. In a pilot analysis, we detected CTCs in prostate cancer patients with localized disease, before surgical tumor removal in 8 of 19 (42%) patients (range, 38 to 222 CTCs per milliliter). For 6 of the 8 patients with preoperative CTCs, a precipitous postoperative decline (<24 hours) suggests a short half-life for CTCs in the blood circulation. Other patients had persistent CTCs for up to 3 months after prostate removal, suggesting early but transient disseminated tumor deposits. In patients with metastatic prostate cancer, CTCs were detected in 23 of 36 (64%) cases (range, 14 to 5000 CTCs per milliliter). In previously untreated patients followed longitudinally, the numbers of CTCs declined after the initiation of effective therapy. The prostate cancer–specific TMPRSS2-ERG fusion was detectable in RNA extracted from CTCs from 9 of 20 (45%) patients with metastatic disease, and dual staining of captured CTCs for PSA and the cell division marker Ki67 indicated a broad range for the proportion of proliferating cells among CTCs. This method for analysis of CTCs will facilitate the application of noninvasive tumor sampling to direct targeted therapies in advanced prostate cancer and warrants the initiation of long-term clinical studies to test the importance of CTCs in invasive localized disease. PMID:20424012

  12. Impact of Non-Pulmonary Visceral Metastases in the Prognosis and Practice of Metastatic Testicular Germ Cell Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Lorena; Martignano, Filippo; Gallà, Valentina; Maugeri, Antonio; Schepisi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Non-pulmonary visceral metastases, in bones, brain and liver, represent nearly the 10% of metastatic sites of advanced germ cell tumors and are associated with poor prognosis. This review article summarizes major evidences on the impact of different visceral sites on the prognosis, treatment and clinical outcome of patients with germ cell tumors. The clinic-biological mechanisms by which these metastatic sites are associated with poor clinical outcome remain unclear. The multimodality treatment showed a potential better survival, in particular in patients with relapsed disease. Patients with advanced germ cell tumors with visceral metastases should be referred to centers with high expertise in the clinical management of such disease. PMID:27471579

  13. Impact of Non-Pulmonary Visceral Metastases in the Prognosis and Practice of Metastatic Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Lorena; Martignano, Filippo; Gallà, Valentina; Maugeri, Antonio; Schepisi, Giuseppe

    2016-04-15

    Non-pulmonary visceral metastases, in bones, brain and liver, represent nearly the 10% of metastatic sites of advanced germ cell tumors and are associated with poor prognosis. This review article summarizes major evidences on the impact of different visceral sites on the prognosis, treatment and clinical outcome of patients with germ cell tumors. The clinic-biological mechanisms by which these metastatic sites are associated with poor clinical outcome remain unclear. The multimodality treatment showed a potential better survival, in particular in patients with relapsed disease. Patients with advanced germ cell tumors with visceral metastases should be referred to centers with high expertise in the clinical management of such disease. PMID:27471579

  14. KRAS Genotypic Changes of Circulating Tumor Cells during Treatment of Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kalikaki, Aristea; Politaki, Helen; Souglakos, John; Apostolaki, Stella; Papadimitraki, Elisavet; Georgoulia, Nefeli; Tzardi, Maria; Mavroudis, Dimitris; Georgoulias, Vassilis; Voutsina, Alexandra

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) could represent a non-invasive source of cancer cells used for longitudinal monitoring of the tumoral mutation status throughout the course of the disease. The aims of the present study were to investigate the detection of KRAS mutations in CTCs from patients with metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) and to compare their mutation status during treatment or disease progression with that of the corresponding primary tumors. Materials and Methods Identification of the seven most common KRAS mutations on codons 12 and 13 was performed by Peptide Nucleic Acid (PNA)-based qPCR method. The sensitivity of the assay was determined after isolation of KRAS mutant cancer cells spiked into healthy donors' blood, using the CellSearch Epithelial Cell kit. Consistent detection of KRAS mutations was achieved in samples containing at least 10 tumor cells/7.5 ml of blood. Results The clinical utility of the assay was assessed in 48 blood samples drawn from 31 patients with mCRC. All patients had PIK3CA and BRAF wild type primary tumors and 14 KRAS mutant tumors. CTCs were detected in 65% of specimens obtained from 74% of patients. KRAS mutation analysis in CTC-enriched specimens showed that 45% and 16.7% of patients with mutant and wild type primary tumors, respectively, had detectable mutations in their CTCs. Assessing KRAS mutations in serial blood samples revealed that individual patient's CTCs exhibited different mutational status of KRAS during treatment. Conclusions The current findings support the rationale for using the CTCs as a dynamic source of tumor cells which, by re-evaluating their KRAS mutation status, could predict, perhaps more accurately, the response of mCRC patients to targeted therapy. PMID:25137394

  15. Whole exome sequencing of circulating tumor cells provides a window into metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Jens G.; Adalsteinsson, Viktor A.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Choudhury, Atish D.; Rosenberg, Mara; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Francis, Joshua; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Trombetta, John T.; Lu, Diana; Tallapragada, Naren; Tahirova, Narmin; Kim, Sora; Blumenstiel, Brendan; Sougnez, Carrie; Lowe, Alarice; Wong, Bang; Auclair, Daniel; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Nakabayashi, Mari; Lis, Rosina T.; Lee, Gwo-Shu M.; Li, Tiantian; Chabot, Matthew S.; Ly, Amy; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Clancy, Thomas E.; Loda, Massimo; Regev, Aviv; Meyerson, Matthew; Hahn, William C.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Golub, Todd R.; Getz, Gad; Boehm, Jesse S.; Love, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analyses of cancer genomes promise to inform prognoses and precise cancer treatments. A major barrier, however, is inaccessibility of metastatic tissue. A potential solution is to characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs), but this requires overcoming the challenges of isolating rare cells and sequencing low-input material. Here we report an integrated process to isolate, qualify and sequence whole exomes of CTCs with high fidelity, using a census-based sequencing strategy. Power calculations suggest that mapping of >99.995% of the standard exome is possible in CTCs. We validated our process in two prostate cancer patients including one for whom we sequenced CTCs, a lymph node metastasis and nine cores of the primary tumor. Fifty-one of 73 CTC mutations (70%) were observed in matched tissue. Moreover, we identified 10 early-trunk and 56 metastatic-trunk mutations in the non-CTC tumor samples and found 90% and 73% of these, respectively, in CTC exomes. This study establishes a foundation for CTC genomics in the clinic. PMID:24752078

  16. Metastatic spread in patients with non-small cell lung cancer is associated with a reduced density of tumor-infiltrating T cells.

    PubMed

    Müller, Philipp; Rothschild, Sacha I; Arnold, Walter; Hirschmann, Petra; Horvath, Lukas; Bubendorf, Lukas; Savic, Spasenija; Zippelius, Alfred

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes play an important role in cell-mediated immune destruction of cancer cells and tumor growth control. We investigated the heterogeneity of immune cell infiltrates between primary non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) and corresponding metastases. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumors and corresponding metastases from 34 NSCLC patients were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for CD4, CD8, CD11c, CD68, CD163 and PD-L1. The percentage of positively stained cells within the stroma and tumor cell clusters was recorded and compared between primary tumors and metastases. We found significantly fewer CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells within tumor cell clusters as compared with the stromal compartment, both in primary tumors and corresponding metastases. CD8(+) T cell counts were significantly lower in metastatic lesions than in the corresponding primary tumors, both in the stroma and the tumor cell islets. Of note, the CD8/CD4 ratio was significantly reduced in metastatic lesions compared with the corresponding primary tumors in tumor cell islets, but not in the stroma. We noted significantly fewer CD11c(+) cells and CD68(+) as well as CD163(+) macrophages in tumor cell islets compared with the tumor stroma, but no difference between primary and metastatic lesions. Furthermore, the CD8/CD68 ratio was higher in primary tumors than in the corresponding metastases. We demonstrate a differential pattern of immune cell infiltration in matched primary and metastatic NSCLC lesions, with a significantly lower density of CD8(+) T cells in metastatic lesions compared with the primary tumors. The lower CD8/CD4 and CD8/CD68 ratios observed in metastases indicate a rather tolerogenic and tumor-promoting microenvironment at the metastatic site. PMID:26541588

  17. Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Prognostic and Predictive Marker

    PubMed Central

    Moussavi-Harami, Sayyed Farshid; Wisinski, Kari B.; Beebe, David J.

    2014-01-01

    The role of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as a marker for disease progression in metastatic cancer is controversial. The current review will serve to summarize the evidence on CTCs as a marker of disease progression in patients with metastatic breast cancer. The immunohistochemistry(IHC)-based CellSearch® is the only FDA-approved isolation technique for quantifying CTCs in patients with metastatic breast cancer. We searched PubMed and Web of Knowledge for clinical studies that assessed the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs using IHC-based isolation. The patient outcomes reported include median and Cox-proportional hazard ratios for overall-survival (OS) and progression-free-survival (PFS). All studies reported shorter OS for CTC-positive patients versus CTC-negative. A subset of the selected trials reported significant lower median PFS for CTC-positive patients. The reported trials support the utility of CTC enumeration for patient prognosis. But further studies are required to determine the utility of CTC enumeration for guiding patient therapy. There are three clinical trials ongoing to test this hypothesis. These studies, and others, will further establish the role of CTCs in clinical practice. PMID:25914894

  18. Romidepsin in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-03

    Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; Insulinoma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Pulmonary Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Somatostatinoma

  19. Tumor metastatic promoter ABCE1 interacts with the cytoskeleton protein actin and increases cell motility.

    PubMed

    Han, Xu; Tian, Ye; Tian, Dali

    2016-06-01

    ABCE1, a member of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) family, is a candidate tumor metastatic promoter in lung cancer. Overexpression of ABCE1 is correlated with aggressive growth and metastasis in lung cancer cells. However, the exact mechanism remains unclear. In the present study, GST pull-down assay provided evidence of the possible interaction between ABCE1 and β-actin using GST-ABCE1 as a bait protein. Co-immunoprecipitation manifested ABCE1 formed complexes with β-actin in vivo. ABCE1 overexpression significantly increased the migration of lung cancer cells which may be attributed to the promotion of F-actin rearrangements. Taken together, these data suggest that overexpression of ABCE1 produces an obvious effect on the motility of lung cancer cells through cytoskeleton rearrangement. PMID:27109616

  20. Self-targeting of TNF-releasing cancer cells in preclinical models of primary and metastatic tumors

    PubMed Central

    Dondossola, Eleonora; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Marchiò, Serena; Cardó-Vila, Marina; Hosoya, Hitomi; Libutti, Steven K.; Corti, Angelo; Sidman, Richard L.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cancer cells can putatively colonize distant organs to form metastases or to reinfiltrate primary tumors themselves through a process termed “tumor self-seeding.” Here we exploit this biological attribute to deliver tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF), a potent antitumor cytokine, directly to primary and metastatic tumors in a mechanism that we have defined as “tumor self-targeting.” For this purpose, we genetically engineered mouse mammary adenocarcinoma (TSA), melanoma (B16-F10), and Lewis lung carcinoma cells to produce and release murine TNF. In a series of intervention trials, systemic administration of TNF-expressing tumor cells was associated with reduced growth of both primary tumors and metastatic colonies in immunocompetent mice. We show that these malignant cells home to tumors, locally release TNF, damage neovascular endothelium, and induce massive cancer cell apoptosis. We also demonstrate that such tumor-cell–mediated delivery avoids or minimizes common side effects often associated with TNF-based therapy, such as acute inflammation and weight loss. Our study provides proof of concept that genetically modified circulating tumor cells may serve as targeted vectors to deliver anticancer agents. In a clinical context, this unique paradigm represents a personalized approach to be translated into applications potentially using patient-derived circulating tumor cells as self-targeted vectors for drug delivery. PMID:26858439

  1. Polyethylenimine-coated SPION exhibits potential intrinsic anti-metastatic properties inhibiting migration and invasion of pancreatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Mulens-Arias, Vladimir; Rojas, José Manuel; Pérez-Yagüe, Sonia; Morales, María del Puerto; Barber, Domingo F

    2015-10-28

    Due to its aggressive behavior, pancreatic cancer is one of the principal causes of cancer-related deaths. The highly metastatic potential of pancreatic tumor cells demands the development of more effective anti-metastatic approaches for this disease. Although polyethylenimine-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (PEI-coated SPIONs) have been studied for their utility as transfection agents, little is known of their effect on tumor cell biology. Here we demonstrated that PEI-coated SPIONs have potent inhibitory effects on pancreatic tumor cell migration/invasion, through inhibition of Src kinase and decreased expression of MT1-MMP and MMP2 metalloproteinases. When treated with PEI-coated SPIONs, the pancreatic tumor cell line Pan02 showed reduced invadosome density and thus, a decrease in their ability to invade through basement membrane. These nanoparticles temporarily downmodulated microRNA-21, thereby upregulating the cell migration inhibitors PTEN, PDCD4 and Sprouty-1. PEI-coated SPIONs thus show intrinsic, possibly anti-metastatic properties for modulating pancreatic tumor cell migration machinery, which indicates their potential as anti-metastatic agents for treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:26264831

  2. Can Biomarker Assessment on Circulating Tumor Cells Help Direct Therapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Natalie; Pestrin, Marta; Galardi, Francesca; De Luca, Francesca; Malorni, Luca; Di Leo, Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Circulating tumor cell (CTC) count has prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer, but the predictive utility of CTCs is uncertain. Molecular studies on CTCs have often been limited by a low number of CTCs isolated from a high background of leukocytes. Improved enrichment techniques are now allowing molecular characterisation of single CTCs, whereby molecular markers on single CTCs may provide a real-time assessment of tumor biomarker status from a blood test or “liquid biopsy”, potentially negating the need for a more invasive tissue biopsy. The predictive ability of CTC biomarker analysis has predominantly been assessed in relation to HER2, with variable and inconclusive results. Limited data exist for other biomarkers, such as the estrogen receptor. In addition to the need to define and validate the most accurate and reproducible method for CTC molecular analysis, the clinical relevance of biomarkers, including gain of HER2 on CTC after HER2 negative primary breast cancer, remains uncertain. This review summarises the currently available data relating to biomarker evaluation on CTCs and its role in directing management in metastatic breast cancer, discusses limitations, and outlines measures that may enable future development of this approach. PMID:24670368

  3. Nitric Oxide Inhibits Hetero-adhesion of Cancer Cells to Endothelial Cells: Restraining Circulating Tumor Cells from Initiating Metastatic Cascade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yusheng; Yu, Ting; Liang, Haiyan; Wang, Jichuang; Xie, Jingjing; Shao, Jingwei; Gao, Yu; Yu, Suhong; Chen, Shuming; Wang, Lie; Jia, Lee

    2014-03-01

    Adhesion of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to vascular endothelial bed becomes a crucial starting point in metastatic cascade. We hypothesized that nitric oxide (NO) may prevent cancer metastasis from happening by its direct vasodilation and inhibition of cell adhesion molecules (CAMs). Here we show that S-nitrosocaptopril (CAP-NO, a typical NO donor) produced direct vasorelaxation that can be antagonized by typical NO scavenger hemoglobin and guanylate cyclase inhibitor. Cytokines significantly stimulated production of typical CAMs by the highly-purified human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). CAP-NO inhibited expression of the stimulated CAMs (particularly VCAM-1) and the resultant hetero-adhesion of human colorectal cancer cells HT-29 to the HUVECs in a concentration-dependent manner. The same concentration of CAP-NO, however, did not significantly affect cell viability, cell cycle and mitochondrial membrane potential of HT-29, thus excluding the possibility that inhibition of the hetero-adhesion was caused by cytotoxicity by CAP-NO on HT-29. Hemoglobin reversed the inhibition of CAP-NO on both the hetero-adhesion between HT-29 and HUVECs and VCAM-1 expression. These data demonstrate that CAP-NO, by directly releasing NO, produces vasorelaxation and interferes with hetero-adhesion of cancer cells to vascular endothelium via down-regulating expression of CAMs. The study highlights the importance of NO in cancer metastatic prevention.

  4. Adrenalectomy for metastatic adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Kita, Masafumi; Tamaki, Gaku; Okuyama, Mitsuhiko; Saga, Yuji; Kakizaki, Hidehiro

    2007-11-01

    The indications for adrenalectomy in cases of metastatic adrenal tumor remain controversial. To clarify indications and outcomes of adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis, we performed a retrospective review of all 8 patients who underwent adrenalectomy for adrenal metastasis between 1990 and 2006 in Asahikawa Medical College Hospital. The Primary tumor was renal cell carcinoma in 2 cases, and eccrine poro carcinoma, rectal cancer, lung cancer, melanoma, bladder cancer and cancer of unknown origin in 1 case each. Open adrenalectomy was performed in all cases, including 1 case that was converted from laparoscopic adrenalectomy. Of the 4 patients with solitary adrenal metastasis, 3 were considered tumor-free after adrenalectomy, while the remaining patient was not due to unresectable primary tumor. Of the 3 patients with complete resection, one remained alive as of 88 months after adrenalectomy but was then lost to follow-up, and the other 2 patients remain alive 12 and 7 months after adrenalectomy. Of the 2 patients with other resectable metastasis who were tumor-free after removal of all metastases, one was alive 31 months postoperatively and the other died 23 months after operation. The remaining 2 cases with other unresectable metastasis died within 6 months after adrenalectomy. At least in cases of solitary adrenal metastasis, adrenalectomy can be effective if other valid methods are unavailable. PMID:18051798

  5. Large cell anaplastic medulloblastoma metastatic to the scalp: tumor and derived stem-like cells features

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Extraneural metastases (ENM) rarely occur in medulloblastoma (MBL) patients and only few cases of subcutaneous localizations have been described. ENM indicate an aggressive disease associated with a worse prognosis. The characterization of metastatic tumours might be useful to understand their pathogenesis and to identify the most appropriate therapeutic strategies. Case presentation We present the case of a child with Large Cell Anaplastic (LC/A) MBL, who developed multiple subcutaneous metastases in the scalp area after a ventriculo-peritoneal shunting procedure. The disease rapidly progressed and the child died despite chemotherapy and primary tumour surgical debulking. We molecularly classified the tumour as a group 3 MBL; in addition, we derived stem-like cells (SLC) from a metastatic lesion. Primary tumour, metastases and SLC were further analysed, particularly focusing on features linked to the cutaneous dissemination. Indeed, molecules involved in angiogenesis, cell invasion and epidermal growth factor signalling resulted highly expressed. Conclusions The present report describes a very rare case of subcutaneous metastatic MBL. The tumour, metastases and SLC have been clinically, pathologically and molecularly characterized. Our case is an example of multidisciplinary approach aiming to characterize MBL aggressive behaviour. PMID:24739212

  6. The expression of CK-19 gene in circulating tumor cells of blood samples of metastatic breast cancer women

    PubMed Central

    Soltani, Setareh; Mokarian, Fariborz; Panjehpour, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Breast cancer in one third of all patients will go on to metastasis, which is the main cause of mortality in cancer cases. Tumor cells detach from primary tumor and enter into the circulation as circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can form metastatic lesions. In this study, the expression of CK-19 gene in blood samples of metastatic breast cancer women was investigated and compared to control group. Twenty one patients with metastatic breast cancer and 20 healthy female volunteers enrolled in this study. For every patient and healthy donor 10 ml peripheral blood was collected. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated by gradient density centrifugation using Ficoll Hypaque. CK-19 gene expression was evaluated using SYBR green-based real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assays. The relative expression level of CK-19 was calculated using the 2−ΔΔCt analysis method. The mean of CK-19 expression was increased in metastatic breast cancer when compared to those of normal women (1.50 fold). 38.1% of the metastatic breast cancer patients showed CK-19 mRNA-detectable CTCs in their blood samples. There was no statistically significant difference between the relative expression level of CK-19 and the patient's clinicopathological characteristics. According to our knowledge, no study for determining CTC biomarkers in Iranian breast cancer women patients has yet been established. Our results suggest that the CK-19 mRNA expression investigation may be useful for monitoring CTCs in the blood of metastatic breast cancer patients, predicting early metastatic relapse or monitoring of anti-metastasis treatments. PMID:26779268

  7. Stem cell and epithelial-mesenchymal transition markers are frequently overexpressed in circulating tumor cells of metastatic breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Bahriye; Tewes, Mitra; Fehm, Tanja; Hauch, Siegfried; Kimmig, Rainer; Kasimir-Bauer, Sabine

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The persistence of circulating tumor cells (CTC) in breast cancer patients might be associated with stem cell like tumor cells which have been suggested to be the active source of metastatic spread in primary tumors. Furthermore, these cells also may undergo phenotypic changes, known as epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which allows them to travel to the site of metastasis formation without getting affected by conventional treatment. Here we evaluated 226 blood samples of 39 metastatic breast cancer patients during a follow-up of palliative chemo-, antibody – or hormonal therapy for the expression of the stem cell marker ALDH1 and markers for EMT and correlated these findings with the presence of CTC and response to therapy. Methods 2 × 5 ml blood was analyzed for CTC with the AdnaTest BreastCancer (AdnaGen AG) for the detection of EpCAM, MUC-1 and HER2 transcripts. The recovered c-DNA was additionally multiplex tested for three EMT markers [Twist1, Akt2, PI3Kα] and separately for the tumor stem-cell markers ALDH1. The identification of EMT markers was considered positive if at least one marker was detected in the sample. Results 97% of 30 healthy donor samples investigated were negative for EMT and 95% for ALDH1 transcripts. CTC were detected in 69/226 (31%) cancer samples. In the CTC (+) group, 62% were positive for at least one of the EMT markers and 69% for ALDH1, respectively. In the CTC (-) group the percentages were 7% and 14%, respectively. In non-responders, EMT and ALDH1 expression was found in 62% and 44% of patients, in responders the rates were 10% and 5%, respectively. Conclusions Our data indicate that a major proportion of CTC of metastatic breast cancer patients shows EMT and tumor stem cell characteristics. Further studies are needed to prove whether these markers might serve as an indicator for therapy resistant tumor cell populations and, therefore, an inferior prognosis. PMID:19589136

  8. FOXL2 molecular status in adult granulosa cell tumors of the ovary: A study of primary and metastatic cases

    PubMed Central

    Zannoni, Gian Franco; Improta, Giuseppina; Petrillo, Marco; Pettinato, Angela; Scambia, Giovanni; Fraggetta, Filippo

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the ovary are uncommon neoplasms, accounting for ~5% of all malignant ovarian tumors. GCTs are a relatively homogeneous group of tumors, categorized into two distinct subtypes, juvenile GCT and adult GCT (AGCT), likely arising from a limited set of molecular events usually involving the disruption of pathways that regulate granulosa cell proliferation. In the present study, the presence of forkheadbox L2 (FOXL2) c.402C>G mutation was investigated in a series of 42 samples of primary and metastatic AGCT of the ovary. The samples consisted of 37 primary and 5 metastatic ovarian AGCTs from 37 patients. FOXL2 mutational status was evaluated using a pyrosequencing approach on 2.5-µm sections of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. FOXL2 c.402C>G mutation was found in 33/37 (89.2%) primary AGCTs and in 4/5 (80.0%) metastases, with the molecular status of the metastases recapitulating that of the primary tumors (4 mutated cases and 1 wild-type case). Overall, FOXL2 mutation is present in the majority of primary and metastatic AGCTs, and could be used as a valid tool in the diagnosis of the disease and in cases of metastatic lesions from an unknown primary origin. Moreover the concordance of FOXL2 molecular status in primary and associated metastases suggests its early appearance and genomic stability in AGCT tumorigenesis. PMID:27446412

  9. Pivotal role of pervasive neoplastic and stromal cells reprogramming in circulating tumor cells dissemination and metastatic colonization.

    PubMed

    Meseure, Didier; Drak Alsibai, Kinan; Nicolas, Andre

    2014-12-01

    Reciprocal interactions between neoplastic cells and their microenvironment are crucial events in carcinogenesis and tumor progression. Pervasive stromal reprogramming and remodeling that transform a normal to a tumorigenic microenvironment modify numerous stromal cells functions, status redox, oxidative stress, pH, ECM stiffness and energy metabolism. These environmental factors allow selection of more aggressive cancer cells that develop important adaptive strategies. Subpopulations of cancer cells acquire new properties associating plasticity, stem-like phenotype, unfolded protein response, metabolic reprogramming and autophagy, production of exosomes, survival to anoikis, invasion, immunosuppression and therapeutic resistance. Moreover, by inducing vascular transdifferentiation of cancer cells and recruiting endothelial cells and pericytes, the tumorigenic microenvironment induces development of tumor-associated vessels that allow invasive cells to gain access to the tumor vessels and to intravasate. Circulating cancer cells can survive in the blood stream by interacting with the intravascular microenvironment, extravasate through the microvasculature and interact with the metastatic microenvironment of target organs. In this review, we will focus on many recent paradigms involved in the field of tumor progression. PMID:25523234

  10. EpCAM-Independent Enrichment of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schneck, Helen; Gierke, Berthold; Uppenkamp, Frauke; Behrens, Bianca; Niederacher, Dieter; Stoecklein, Nikolas H.; Templin, Markus F.; Pawlak, Michael; Fehm, Tanja; Neubauer, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are the potential precursors of metastatic disease. Most assays established for the enumeration of CTCs so far–including the gold standard CellSearch—rely on the expression of the cell surface marker epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM). But, these approaches may not detect CTCs that express no/low levels of EpCAM, e.g. by undergoing epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Here we present an enrichment strategy combining different antibodies specific for surface proteins and extracellular matrix (ECM) components to capture an EpCAMlow/neg cell line and EpCAMneg CTCs from blood samples of breast cancer patients depleted for EpCAM-positive cells. The expression of respective proteins (Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8, CD44, ADAM8, CD146, TEM8, CD47) was verified by immunofluorescence on EpCAMpos (e.g. MCF7, SKBR3) and EpCAMlow/neg (MDA-MB-231) breast cancer cell lines. To test antibodies and ECM proteins (e.g. hyaluronic acid (HA), collagen I, laminin) for capturing EpCAMneg cells, the capture molecules were first spotted in a single- and multi-array format onto aldehyde-coated glass slides. Tumor cell adhesion of EpCAMpos/neg cell lines was then determined and visualized by Coomassie/MitoTracker staining. In consequence, marginal binding of EpCAMlow/neg MDA-MB-231 cells to EpCAM-antibodies could be observed. However, efficient adhesion/capturing of EpCAMlow/neg cells could be achieved via HA and immobilized antibodies against CD49f and Trop2. Optimal capture conditions were then applied to immunomagnetic beads to detect EpCAMneg CTCs from clinical samples. Captured CTCs were verified/quantified by immunofluorescence staining for anti-pan-Cytokeratin (CK)-FITC/anti-CD45 AF647/DAPI. In total, in 20 out of 29 EpCAM-depleted fractions (69%) from 25 metastatic breast cancer patients additional EpCAMneg CTCs could be identified [range of 1–24 CTCs per sample] applying Trop2, CD49f, c-Met, CK8 and/or HA magnetic enrichment. Ep

  11. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Druggable Mutations in Primary Tumors, Metastatic Tissue, Circulating Tumor Cells, and Cell-Free Circulating DNA in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: The MIRROR Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Picornell, Antoni C; Alvarez, Enrique L; Martin, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the driver mutations in an individual metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patient is critical to selecting effective targeted therapies. Currently, it is believed that the limited efficacy of many targeted drugs may be due to the expansion of drug resistant clones with different genotypes that were already present in the primary tumor. Identifying the genomic alterations of these clones, and introducing combined or sequential targeted drug regimens, could lead to a significant increase in the efficacy of currently available targeted therapies. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess the concordance/discordance of mutations between the primary tumor and metastatic tissue in MBC patients. Secondary objectives include comparing the genomic profiles of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating free DNA (cfDNA) from peripheral blood with those of the primary tumor and metastatic tissue for each patient, evaluating these mutations in the signaling pathways that are relevant to the disease, and testing the feasibility of introducing liquid biopsy as a translational laboratory tool in clinical practice. Methods The multicenter, transversal, observational MIRROR study is currently ongoing in three participating hospitals. All consecutive patients with MBC confirmed by radiologic findings will be screened for eligibility, either at first relapse or if tumor regrowth occurs while on treatment for metastatic disease. Results Patient recruitment is currently ongoing. To date, 41 patients have a complete set of tissue samples available (plasma, CTCs, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumor and metastatic tumor). However, none of these samples have undergone nucleic acids extraction or targeted deep sequencing. Conclusions The results of this study may have a significant influence on the practical management of patients with MBC, and may provide clues to clinicians that lead towards a better stratification of patients

  12. Displaced granulosa cells in the fallopian tube mistaken for metastatic granulosa cell tumor.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Daniel L; Rambally, Brooke S; Lininger, Ruth A; DiFurio, Megan J

    2013-01-01

    A 44-yr-old woman underwent a total hysterectomy and bilateral salpingectomy secondary to uterine leiomyomas. Gross examination of the fallopian tubes revealed no masses or lesions; however, 2 small foci of granulosa cells were identified microscopically within one of the fallopian tubes. These foci were suspicious for granulosa cell tumor metastases. The patient subsequently underwent a bilateral oophorectomy, which revealed no primary granulosa cell tumor. Immunohistochemical studies were used to help support the benign nature of the granulosa cells within the fallopian tube. A review of the literature revealed only 1 similar case report of displaced benign granulosa cells within the fallopian tubes. The ovaries in both this case and the previous case report were found to contain multiple cystic follicles, suggesting ovulation as the likely mechanism of displacement. Knowledge of this rare occurrence and the use of immunohistochemical staining are paramount to making a correct diagnosis, thus preventing a misdiagnosis of malignancy and possible unnecessary treatment. PMID:23202782

  13. Surgical controversies in the management of post-chemotherapy nonretroperitoneal residual disease in metastatic nonseminomatous germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Durgatosh; Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Ray, Mukur Dipi; Mishra, Ashutosh

    2016-01-01

    Following the advent of platinum-based chemotherapy, Surgery, excepting orchidectomy, has become an adjunct treatment in the management of metastatic non-seminomatous germ cell tumors (NSGCT). Role of surgery comes into play in metastatic NSGCT when residual disease persists following standard chemotherapy. Surgical excision of all post chemotherapy residual disease at all places, whenever surgically feasible with acceptable morbidity and mortality, should be undertaken. As histopathological examination of the excised postchemotherapy residue shows only necrosis and fibrosis in significant number of patients; surgical exercise in this group of patients seems futile and unwarranted retrospectively. This issue becomes more contentious when surgeons are confronted with multiple nonretroperitoneal post chemotherapy residues. This article aims to deal with the management of postchemotherapy nonretroperitoneal residues in metastatic NSGCT. PMID:27169116

  14. Survival Outcomes and Tumor IMP3 Expression in Patients with Sarcomatoid Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Tantravahi, Srinivas K.; Albertson, Daniel; Agarwal, Archana M.; Poole, Austin; Patel, Shiven B.; Hawatmeh, Jamil S.; Straubhar, Alli M.; Liu, Ting; Stenehjem, David D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma with sarcomatoid histology (SmRCC) is associated with poor survival. No data is available from randomized trials on the efficacy of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) inhibitors in SmRCC. We identified SmRCC patients from a single institutional database. To identify predictive and prognostic biomarkers, immunohistochemistry (IHC) analysis was performed on the tumor samples for downstream targets of VEGF and mTOR pathways. Survival outcomes were stratified by IHC analysis, extent of sarcomatoid component, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC), and Heng risk criteria. Twenty-seven patients with SmRCC were included. First line therapy included targeted therapy (n = 19), immunotherapy (n = 4), cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 1), and no treatment (n = 3). Median OS was 8.2 months (95% CI 3.8–14.2 months). Median survival in months, based on MSKCC and Heng risk groups, was favorable 89.3 versus 84.5, intermediate 9.5 versus 12.7, and poor 3.9 versus 5.1. None of the IHC markers predicted outcomes of treatment with VEGF or mTOR inhibitors. Only tumor IMP3 expression was associated with inferior OS, although not statistically significant (IMP3 negative 14.2 versus IMP3 positive 4.9 months; HR 0.46, 95% CI 0.16–1.21; P = 0.12). The study was limited by small sample size. PMID:25688268

  15. Metastatic model of HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrates heterogeneity in tumor metastasis.

    PubMed

    Vermeer, Daniel W; Coppock, Joseph D; Zeng, Erliang; Lee, Kimberly M; Spanos, William C; Onken, Michael D; Uppaluri, Ravindra; Lee, John H; Vermeer, Paola D

    2016-04-26

    Human papillomavirus induced (HPV+) cancer incidence is rapidly rising, comprising 60-80% of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs); while rare, recurrent/metastatic disease accounts for nearly all related deaths. An in vivo pre-clinical model for these invasive cancers is necessary for testing new therapies. We characterize an immune competent recurrent/metastatic HPV+ murine model of OPSSC which consists of four lung metastatic (MLM) cell lines isolated from an animal with HPV+ OPSCC that failed cisplatin/radiation treatment. These individual metastatic clonal cell lines were tested to verify their origin (parental transgene expression and define their physiological properties: proliferation, metastatic potential, heterogeneity and sensitivity/resistance to cisplatin and radiation. All MLMs retain expression of parental HPV16 E6 and E7 and degrade P53 yet are heterogeneous from one another and from the parental cell line as defined by Illumina expression microarray. Consistent with this, reverse phase protein array defines differences in protein expression/activation between MLMs as well as the parental line. While in vitro growth rates of MLMs are slower than the parental line, in vivo growth of MLM clones is greatly enhanced. Moreover, in vivo resistance to standard therapies is dramatically increased in 3 of the 4 MLMs. Lymphatic and/or lung metastasis occurs 100% of the time in one MLM line. This recurrent/metastatic model of HPV+ OPSCC retains the characteristics evident in refractory human disease (heterogeneity, resistance to therapy, metastasis in lymph nodes/lungs) thus serving as an ideal translational system to test novel therapeutics. Moreover, this system may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of metastasis. PMID:27013584

  16. Assessment of the role of circulating breast cancer cells in tumor formation and metastatic potential using in vivo flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwu, Derrick; Boutrus, Steven; Greiner, Cherry; Dimeo, Theresa; Kuperwasser, Charlotte; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-04-01

    The identification of breast cancer patients who will ultimately progress to metastatic disease is of significant clinical importance. The quantification and assessment of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proposed as one strategy to monitor treatment effectiveness and disease prognosis. However, CTCs have been an elusive population of cells to study because of their small number and difficulties associated with isolation protocols. In vivo flow cytometry (IVFC) can overcome these limitations and provide insights in the role these cells play during primary and metastatic tumor growth. In this study, we used two-color IVFC to examine, for up to ten weeks following orthotopic implantation, changes in the number of circulating human breast cells expressing GFP and a population of circulating hematopoietic cells with strong autofluorescence. We found that the number of detected CTCs in combination with the number of red autofluorescent cells (650 to 690 nm) during the first seven days following implantation was predictive in development of tumor formation and metastasis eight weeks later. These results suggest that the combined detection of these two cell populations could offer a novel approach in the monitoring and prognosis of breast cancer progression, which in turn could aid significantly in their effective treatment.

  17. Circulating Tumor Cells: A Useful Predictor of Treatment Efficacy in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Minetta C.; Shields, Peter G.; Warren, Robert D.; Cohen, Philip; Wilkinson, Mary; Ottaviano, Yvonne L.; Rao, Suman B.; Eng-Wong, Jennifer; Seillier-Moiseiwitsch, Francoise; Noone, Anne-Michelle; Isaacs, Claudine

    2009-01-01

    Purpose Five or more circulating tumor cells (CTCs) per 7.5 mL of blood predicts for poorer progression-free survival (PFS) in patients with metastatic breast cancer (MBC). We conducted a prospective study to demonstrate that CTC results correlate strongly with radiographic disease progression at the time of and in advance of imaging. Patients and Methods Serial CTC levels were obtained in patients starting a new treatment regimen for progressive, radiographically measurable MBC. Peripheral blood was collected for CTC enumeration at baseline and at 3- to 4-week intervals. Clinical outcomes were based on radiographic studies performed in 9- to 12-week intervals. Results Sixty-eight patients were evaluable for the CTC-imaging correlations, and 74 patients were evaluable for the PFS analysis. Median follow-up was 13.3 months. A statistically significant correlation was demonstrated between CTC levels and radiographic disease progression in patients receiving chemotherapy or endocrine therapy. This correlation applied to CTC results obtained at the time of imaging (odds ratio [OR], 6.3), 3 to 5 weeks before imaging (OR, 3.1), and 7 to 9 weeks before imaging (OR, 4.9). Results from analyses stratified by type of therapy remained statistically significant. Shorter PFS was observed for patients with five or more CTCs at 3 to 5 weeks and at 7 to 9 weeks after the start of treatment. Conclusion We provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence of a strong correlation between CTC results and radiographic disease progression in patients receiving chemotherapy or endocrine therapy for MBC. These findings support the role of CTC enumeration as an adjunct to standard methods of monitoring disease status in MBC. PMID:19752342

  18. Circulating Tumor Cells and Response to Chemotherapy in Metastatic Breast Cancer: SWOG S0500

    PubMed Central

    Smerage, Jeffrey B.; Barlow, William E.; Hortobagyi, Gabriel N.; Winer, Eric P.; Leyland-Jones, Brian; Srkalovic, Gordan; Tejwani, Sheela; Schott, Anne F.; O'Rourke, Mark A.; Lew, Danika L.; Doyle, Gerald V.; Gralow, Julie R.; Livingston, Robert B.; Hayes, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Increased circulating tumor cells (CTCs; five or more CTCs per 7.5 mL of whole blood) are associated with poor prognosis in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). A randomized trial of patients with persistent increase in CTCs tested whether changing chemotherapy after one cycle of first-line chemotherapy would improve the primary outcome of overall survival (OS). Patients and Methods Patients with MBC who did not have increased CTCs at baseline remained on initial therapy until progression (arm A). Patients with initially increased CTCs that decreased after 21 days of therapy remained on initial therapy (arm B). Patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of therapy were randomly assigned to continue initial therapy (arm C1) or change to an alternative chemotherapy (arm C2). Results Of 595 eligible and evaluable patients, 276 (46%) did not have increased CTCs (arm A). Of those with initially increased CTCs, 31 (10%) were not retested, 165 were assigned to arm B, and 123 were randomly assigned to arm C1 or C2. No difference in median OS was observed between arm C1 and C2 (10.7 and 12.5 months, respectively; P = .98). CTCs were strongly prognostic. Median OS for arms A, B, and C (C1 and C2 combined) were 35 months, 23 months, and 13 months, respectively (P < .001). Conclusion This study confirms the prognostic significance of CTCs in patients with MBC receiving first-line chemotherapy. For patients with persistently increased CTCs after 21 days of first-line chemotherapy, early switching to an alternate cytotoxic therapy was not effective in prolonging OS. For this population, there is a need for more effective treatment than standard chemotherapy. PMID:24888818

  19. Complete Regression of Metastatic Cervical Cancer After Treatment With Human Papillomavirus–Targeted Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevanović, Sanja; Draper, Lindsey M.; Langhan, Michelle M.; Campbell, Tracy E.; Kwong, Mei Li; Wunderlich, John R.; Dudley, Mark E.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hinrichs, Christian S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Metastatic cervical cancer is a prototypical chemotherapy-refractory epithelial malignancy for which better treatments are needed. Adoptive T-cell therapy (ACT) is emerging as a promising cancer treatment, but its study in epithelial malignancies has been limited. This study was conducted to determine if ACT could mediate regression of metastatic cervical cancer. Patients and Methods Patients enrolled onto this protocol were diagnosed with metastatic cervical cancer and had previously received platinum-based chemotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. Patients were treated with a single infusion of tumor-infiltrating T cells selected when possible for human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 reactivity (HPV-TILs). Cell infusion was preceded by lymphocyte-depleting chemotherapy and was followed by administration of aldesleukin. Results Three of nine patients experienced objective tumor responses (two complete responses and one partial response). The two complete responses were ongoing 22 and 15 months after treatment, respectively. One partial response was 3 months in duration. The HPV reactivity of T cells in the infusion product (as measured by interferon gamma production, enzyme-linked immunospot, and CD137 upregulation assays) correlated positively with clinical response (P = .0238 for all three assays). In addition, the frequency of HPV-reactive T cells in peripheral blood 1 month after treatment was positively associated with clinical response (P = .0238). Conclusion Durable, complete regression of metastatic cervical cancer can occur after a single infusion of HPV-TILs. Exploratory studies suggest a correlation between HPV reactivity of the infusion product and clinical response. Continued investigation of this therapy is warranted. PMID:25823737

  20. Combination of NK Cells and Cetuximab to Enhance Anti-Tumor Responses in RAS Mutant Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Thijssen, Victor L.; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Verheul, Henk M. W.; de Gruijl, Tanja D.; van der Vliet, Hans J.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of Natural Killer (NK) cells to kill tumor targets has been extensively studied in various hematological malignancies. However, NK cell therapy directed against solid tumors is still in early development. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) targeted therapies using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as cetuximab and panitumumab are widely used for the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). Still, the clinical efficacy of this treatment is hampered by mutations in RAS gene, allowing tumors to escape from anti-EGFR mAb therapy. It is well established that NK cells kill tumor cells by natural cytotoxicity and can in addition be activated upon binding of IgG1 mAbs through Fc receptors (CD16/FcγRIIIa) on their surface, thereby mediating antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC). In the current study, activated Peripheral Blood NK cells (PBNK) were combined with anti-EGFR mAbs to study their effect on the killing of EGFR+/- cancer cell lines, including those with RAS mutations. In vitro cytotoxicity experiments using colon cancer primary tumors and cell lines COLO320, Caco-2, SW620, SW480 and HT-29, demonstrated that PBNK cells are cytotoxic for a range of tumor cells, regardless of EGFR, RAS or BRAF status and at low E:T ratios. Cetuximab enhanced the cytotoxic activity of NK cells on EGFR+ tumor cells (either RASwt, RASmut or BRAFmut) in a CD16 dependent manner, whereas it could not increase the killing of EGFR- COLO320. Our study provides a rationale to strengthen NK cell immunotherapy through a combination with cetuximab for RAS and BRAF mutant mCRC patients. PMID:27314237

  1. Metastatic Malignant Ovarian Steroid Cell Tumor: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jessica; John, Veena S.; Liang, Sharon X.; D'Agostino, Catherine A.; Menzin, Andrew W.

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of malignant ovarian steroid cell tumor not otherwise specified (NOS) in a 47-year-old female who presented with hirsutism, virilization, and amenorrhea. At the time of laparotomy, the tumor had already spread to the pelvic cul-de-sac. She underwent a total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, and tumor resection with no residual disease. She received three cycles of bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) and is now free of disease 24 months after surgery. Literature review of ovarian steroid cell tumors NOS including clinicopathological features and clinical management was performed. PMID:27375912

  2. Hypoxic Tumor Cell Modulates Its Microenvironment to Enhance Angiogenic and Metastatic Potential by Secretion of Proteins and Exosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung Eun; Tan, Hon Sen; Datta, Arnab; Lai, Ruenn Chai; Zhang, Huoming; Meng, Wei; Lim, Sai Kiang; Sze, Siu Kwan

    2010-01-01

    Under hypoxia, tumor cells produce a secretion that modulates their microenvironment to facilitate tumor angiogenesis and metastasis. Here, we observed that hypoxic or reoxygenated A431 carcinoma cells exhibited enhanced angiogenic and metastatic potential such as reduced cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix adhesion, increased invasiveness, and production of a secretion with increased chorioallantoic membrane angiogenic activity. Consistent with these observations, quantitative proteomics revealed that under hypoxia the tumor cells secreted proteins involved in angiogenesis, focal adhesion, extracellular matrix-receptor interaction, and immune cell recruitment. Unexpectedly, the secreted proteins were predominantly cytoplasmic and membrane proteins. Ultracentrifugation at 100,000 × g precipitated 54% of the secreted proteins and enriched for many exosome-associated proteins such as the tetraspanins and Alix and also proteins with the potential to facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. Two tetraspanins, CD9 and CD81, co-immunoprecipitated. Together, these data suggested that tumor cells secrete proteins and exosomes with the potential to modulate their microenvironment and facilitate angiogenesis and metastasis. PMID:20124223

  3. Exploiting natural anti-tumor immunity for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Katherine A; James, Britnie R; Guan, Yue; Torry, Donald S; Wilber, Andrew; Griffith, Thomas S

    2015-01-01

    Clinical observations of spontaneous disease regression in some renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients implicate a role for tumor immunity in controlling this disease. Puzzling, however, are findings that high levels of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) are common to RCC. Despite expression of activation markers by TILs, functional impairment of innate and adaptive immune cells has been consistently demonstrated contributing to the failure of the immune system to control RCC. Immunotherapy can overcome the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor and provide an opportunity for long-term disease free survival. Unfortunately, complete response rates remain sub-optimal indicating the effectiveness of immunotherapy remains limited by tumor-specific factors and/or cell types that inhibit antitumor immune responses. Here we discuss immunotherapies and the function of multiple immune system components to achieve an effective response. Understanding these complex interactions is essential to rationally develop novel therapies capable of renewing the immune system's ability to respond to these tumors. PMID:25996049

  4. Metastatic tumors of the oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Rao, Roopa S; Patil, Shankargouda; Sanketh, Ds; Amrutha, N

    2014-01-01

    The pivotal reason for morbidity and mortality of any type of cancer is due to metastasis that occurs as a result of adaptation of genetically unstable cancer cells, in an ectopic conducive environment. Oral metastasis in spite of being unusual or rare represents around 25% of the first signs of metastatic spread. Literature says there are more number of cases of jaw bone metastasis reported than in the oral soft tissues. The most common primary organs metastasizing to the jaw bones and the oral soft tissues are the breast and the lungs respectively. The issue in diagnosing a metastatic tumor arises either when the patient does not reveal the history of the primary illness he or she may be suffering from or when he or she is unaware of it. Diagnosis in such situations is a challenge to the clinician or pathologist. Diagnosing any lymph node or distant metastasis from oral cancer is very important for the prognosis of the patient. In this review we have made an attempt, to explain some recent concepts of pathophysiology of the metastatic process, the clinical manifestations of metastatic tumors to the oral region and to discuss their diagnostic workup. PMID:25095855

  5. Crosstalk from non-cancerous mitochondria can inhibit tumor properties of metastatic cells by suppressing oncogenic pathways.

    PubMed

    Kaipparettu, Benny Abraham; Ma, Yewei; Park, Jun Hyoung; Lee, Tin-Lap; Zhang, Yiqun; Yotnda, Patricia; Creighton, Chad J; Chan, Wai-Yee; Wong, Lee-Jun C

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondrial-nucleus cross talks and mitochondrial retrograde regulation can play a significant role in cellular properties. Transmitochondrial cybrid systems (cybrids) are an excellent tool to study specific effects of altered mitochondria under a defined nuclear background. The majority of the studies using the cybrid model focused on the significance of specific mitochondrial DNA variations in mitochondrial function or tumor properties. However, most of these variants are benign polymorphisms without known functional significance. From an objective of rectifying mitochondrial defects in cancer cells and to establish mitochondria as a potential anticancer drug target, understanding the role of functional mitochondria in reversing oncogenic properties under a cancer nuclear background is very important. Here we analyzed the potential reversal of oncogenic properties of a highly metastatic cell line with the introduction of non-cancerous mitochondria. Cybrids were established by fusing the mitochondria DNA depleted 143B TK- ρ0 cells from an aggressive osteosarcoma cell line with mitochondria from benign breast epithelial cell line MCF10A, moderately metastatic breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-468 and 143B cells. In spite of the uniform cancerous nuclear background, as observed with the mitochondria donor cells, cybrids with benign mitochondria showed high mitochondrial functional properties including increased ATP synthesis, oxygen consumption and respiratory chain activities compared to cybrids with cancerous mitochondria. Interestingly, benign mitochondria could reverse different oncogenic characteristics of 143B TK(-) cell including cell proliferation, viability under hypoxic condition, anti-apoptotic properties, resistance to anti-cancer drug, invasion, and colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumor growth in nude mice. Microarray analysis suggested that several oncogenic pathways observed in cybrids with cancer mitochondria are inhibited in cybrids with

  6. Gene silencing in primary and metastatic tumors by small interfering RNA delivery in mice: quantitative analysis using melanoma cells expressing firefly and sea pansy luciferases.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Kobayashi, Naoki; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2005-07-20

    Silencing of oncogenes or other genes contributing to tumor malignancy or progression by RNA interference (RNAi) offers a promising approach to treating tumor patients. To achieve RNAi-based tumor therapy, a small interfering RNA (siRNA) or siRNA-expressing vector needs to be delivered to tumor cells, but little information about its in vivo delivery has been reported. In this study, we examined whether the expression of the target gene in tumor cells can be suppressed by the delivery of RNAi effectors to primary and metastatic tumor cells. To quantitatively evaluate the RNAi effects in tumor cells, mouse melanoma B16-BL6 cells were stably transfected with both firefly (a model target gene) and sea pansy (an internal standard gene) luciferase genes to obtain B16-BL6/dual Luc cells. The target gene expression in subcutaneous primary tumors of B16-BL6/dual Luc cells was significantly suppressed by direct injection of the RNAi effectors followed by electroporation. The expression in metastatic hepatic tumors was also significantly reduced by an intravenous injection of either RNAi effector by the hydrodynamics-based procedure. These results indicate that the both RNAi effectors have a potential to silence target gene in tumor cells in vivo when successfully delivered to tumor cells. PMID:15936841

  7. Prognostic Impact of Modulators of G proteins in Circulating Tumor Cells from Patients with Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Barbazan, Jorge; Dunkel, Ying; Li, Hongying; Nitsche, Ulrich; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Messer, Karen; Ghosh, Pradipta

    2016-01-01

    The consequence of a loss of balance between G-protein activation and deactivation in cancers has been interrogated by studying infrequently occurring mutants of trimeric G-protein α-subunits and GPCRs. Prior studies on members of a newly identified family of non-receptor guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), GIV/Girdin, Daple, NUCB1 and NUCB2 have revealed that GPCR-independent hyperactivation of trimeric G proteins can fuel metastatic progression in a variety of cancers. Here we report that elevated expression of each GEF in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) isolated from the peripheral circulation of patients with metastatic colorectal cancer is associated with a shorter progression-free survival (PFS). The GEFs were stronger prognostic markers than two other markers of cancer progression, S100A4 and MACC1, and clustering of all GEFs together improved the prognostic accuracy of the individual family members; PFS was significantly lower in the high-GEFs versus the low-GEFs groups [H.R = 5, 20 (95% CI; 2,15–12,57)]. Because nucleotide exchange is the rate-limiting step in cyclical activation of G-proteins, the poor prognosis conferred by these GEFs in CTCs implies that hyperactivation of G-protein signaling by these GEFs is an important event during metastatic progression, and may be more frequently encountered than mutations in G-proteins and/or GPCRs. PMID:26916336

  8. Adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes and low-dose Interleukin-2 in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adoptive cell therapy may be based on isolation of tumor-specific T cells, e.g. autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), in vitro activation and expansion and the reinfusion of these cells into patients upon chemotherapy induced lymphodepletion. Together with high-dose interleukin (IL)-2 this treatment has been given to patients with advanced malignant melanoma and impressive response rates but also significant IL-2 associated toxicity have been observed. Here we present data from a feasibility study at a Danish Translational Research Center using TIL adoptive transfer in combination with low-dose subcutaneous IL-2 injections. Methods This is a pilot trial (ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT00937625) including patients with metastatic melanoma, PS ≤1, age <70, measurable and progressive disease and no involvement of the central nervous system. Six patients were treated with lymphodepleting chemotherapy, TIL infusion, and 14 days of subcutaneous low-dose IL-2 injections, 2 MIU/day. Results Low-dose IL-2 considerably decreased the treatment related toxicity with no grade 3–4 IL-2 related adverse events. Objective clinical responses were seen in 2 of 6 treated patients with ongoing complete responses (30+ and 10+ months), 2 patients had stable disease (4 and 5 months) and 2 patients progressed shortly after treatment. Tumor-reactivity of the infused cells and peripheral lymphocytes before and after therapy were analyzed. Absolute number of tumor specific T cells in the infusion product tended to correlate with clinical response and also, an induction of peripheral tumor reactive T cells was observed for 1 patient in complete remission. Conclusion Complete and durable responses were induced after treatment with adoptive cell therapy in combination with low-dose IL-2 which significantly decreased toxicity of this therapy. PMID:22909342

  9. Distinct organ-specific metastatic potential of individual breast cancer cells and primary tumors

    PubMed Central

    Minn, Andy J.; Kang, Yibin; Serganova, Inna; Gupta, Gaorav P.; Giri, Dilip D.; Doubrovin, Mikhail; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Gerald, William L.; Blasberg, Ronald; Massagué, Joan

    2005-01-01

    We used bioluminescence imaging to reveal patterns of metastasis formation by human breast cancer cells in immunodeficient mice. Individual cells from a population established in culture from the pleural effusion of a breast cancer patient showed distinct patterns of organ-specific metastasis. Single-cell progenies derived from this population exhibited markedly different abilities to metastasize to the bone, lung, or adrenal medulla, which suggests that metastases to different organs have different requirements. Transcriptomic profiling revealed that these different single-cell progenies similarly express a previously described “poor-prognosis” gene expression signature. Unsupervised classification using the transcriptomic data set supported the hypothesis that organ-specific metastasis by breast cancer cells is controlled by metastasis-specific genes that are separate from a general poor-prognosis gene expression signature. Furthermore, by using a gene expression signature associated with the ability of these cells to metastasize to bone, we were able to distinguish primary breast carcinomas that preferentially metastasized to bone from those that preferentially metastasized elsewhere. These results suggest that the bone-specific metastatic phenotypes and gene expression signature identified in a mouse model may be clinically relevant. PMID:15630443

  10. Specific expression of the human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 in highly metastatic breast cancer cells, promotes tumor progression and metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yifan; Li, Shu Jie; Pan, Juncheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yin, Jian; Zhao, Qing

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Hv1 is specifically expressed in highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues. {yields} Hv1 regulates breast cancer cytosolic pH. {yields} Hv1 acidifies extracellular milieu. {yields} Hv1 exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells. -- Abstract: The newly discovered human voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 is essential for proton transfer, which contains a voltage sensor domain (VSD) without a pore domain. We report here for the first time that Hv1 is specifically expressed in the highly metastatic human breast tumor tissues, but not in poorly metastatic breast cancer tissues, detected by immunohistochemistry. Meanwhile, real-time RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry showed that the expression levels of Hv1 have significant differences among breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-453, T-47D and SK-BR-3, in which Hv1 is expressed at a high level in highly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231, but at a very low level in poorly metastatic human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. Inhibition of Hv1 expression in the highly metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells by small interfering RNA (siRNA) significantly decreases the invasion and migration of the cells. The intracellular pH of MDA-MB-231 cells down-regulated Hv1 expression by siRNA is obviously decreased compared with MDA-MB-231 with the scrambled siRNA. The expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and gelatinase activity in MDA-MB-231 cells suppressed Hv1 by siRNA were reduced. Our results strongly suggest that Hv1 regulates breast cancer intracellular pH and exacerbates the migratory ability of metastatic cells.

  11. The carcinoembryonic antigen IgV-like N domain plays a critical role in the implantation of metastatic tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Abdul-Wahid, Aws; Huang, Eric H-B; Cydzik, Marzena; Bolewska-Pedyczak, Eleonora; Gariépy, Jean

    2014-03-01

    The human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell adhesion molecule involved in both homotypic and heterotypic interactions. The aberrant overexpression of CEA on adenocarcinoma cells correlates with their increased metastatic potential. Yet, the mechanism(s) by which its adhesive properties can lead to the implantation of circulating tumor cells and expansion of metastatic foci remains to be established. In this study, we demonstrate that the IgV-like N terminal domain of CEA directly participates in the implantation of cancer cells through its homotypic and heterotypic binding properties. Specifically, we determined that the recombinant N terminal domain of CEA directly binds to fibronectin (Fn) with a dissociation constant in the nanomolar range (K(D) 16 ± 3 nM) and interacts with itself (K(D) 100 ± 17 nM) and more tightly to the IgC-like A(3) domain (K(D) 18 ± 3 nM). Disruption of these molecular associations through the addition of antibodies specific to the CEA N or A(3)B(3) domains, or by adding soluble recombinant forms of the CEA N, A(3) or A(3)B(3) domains or a peptide corresponding to residues 108-115 of CEA resulted in the inhibition of CEA-mediated intercellular aggregation and adherence events in vitro. Finally, pretreating CEA-expressing murine colonic carcinoma cells (MC38.CEA) with rCEA N, A3 or A(3)B(3) modules blocked their implantation and the establishment of tumor foci in vivo. Together, these results suggest a new mechanistic insight into how the CEA IgV-like N domain participates in cellular events that can have a macroscopic impact in terms of cancer progression and metastasis. PMID:24388361

  12. Resistance to Antiangiogenic Therapy Is Associated with an Immunosuppressive Tumor Microenvironment in Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xian-De; Hoang, Anh; Zhou, Lijun; Kalra, Sarathi; Yetil, Alper; Sun, Mianen; Ding, Zhiyong; Zhang, Xuesong; Bai, Shanshan; German, Peter; Tamboli, Pheroze; Rao, Priya; Karam, Jose A; Wood, Christopher; Matin, Surena; Zurita, Amado; Bex, Axel; Griffioen, Arjan W; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee; Tannir, Nizar; Sircar, Kanishka; Jonasch, Eric

    2015-09-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is an immunogenic and proangiogenic cancer, and antiangiogenic therapy is the current mainstay of treatment. Patients with RCC develop innate or adaptive resistance to antiangiogenic therapy. There is a need to identify biomarkers that predict therapeutic resistance and guide combination therapy. We assessed the interaction between antiangiogenic therapy and the tumor immune microenvironment and determined their impact on clinical outcome. We found that antiangiogenic therapy-treated RCC primary tumors showed increased infiltration of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes, which was inversely related to patient overall survival and progression-free survival. Furthermore, specimens from patients treated with antiangiogenic therapy showed higher infiltration of CD4(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells and enhanced expression of checkpoint ligand programed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1). Both immunosuppressive features were correlated with T-lymphocyte infiltration and were negatively related to patient survival. Treatment of RCC cell lines and RCC xenografts in immunodeficient mice with sunitinib also increased tumor PD-L1 expression. Results from this study indicate that antiangiogenic treatment may both positively and negatively regulate the tumor immune microenvironment. These findings generate hypotheses on resistance mechanisms to antiangiogenic therapy and will guide the development of combination therapy with PD-1/PD-L1-blocking agents. PMID:26014097

  13. Decreased autocrine EGFR signaling in metastatic breast cancer cells inhibits tumor growth in bone and mammary fat pad.

    PubMed

    Nickerson, Nicole K; Mohammad, Khalid S; Gilmore, Jennifer L; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01), reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01), increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001), and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01). Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland. PMID:22276166

  14. Decreased Autocrine EGFR Signaling in Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells Inhibits Tumor Growth in Bone and Mammary Fat Pad

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Nicole K.; Mohammad, Khalid S.; Gilmore, Jennifer L.; Crismore, Erin; Bruzzaniti, Angela; Guise, Theresa A.; Foley, John

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone triggers a vicious cycle of tumor growth linked to osteolysis. Breast cancer cells and osteoblasts express the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and produce ErbB family ligands, suggesting participation of these growth factors in autocrine and paracrine signaling within the bone microenvironment. EGFR ligand expression was profiled in the bone metastatic MDA-MB-231 cells (MDA-231), and agonist-induced signaling was examined in both breast cancer and osteoblast-like cells. Both paracrine and autocrine EGFR signaling were inhibited with a neutralizing amphiregulin antibody, PAR34, whereas shRNA to the EGFR was used to specifically block autocrine signaling in MDA-231 cells. The impact of these was evaluated with proliferation, migration and gene expression assays. Breast cancer metastasis to bone was modeled in female athymic nude mice with intratibial inoculation of MDA-231 cells, and cancer cell-bone marrow co-cultures. EGFR knockdown, but not PAR34 treatment, decreased osteoclasts formed in vitro (p<0.01), reduced osteolytic lesion tumor volume (p<0.01), increased survivorship in vivo (p<0.001), and resulted in decreased MDA-231 growth in the fat pad (p<0.01). Fat pad shEGFR-MDA-231 tumors produced in nude mice had increased necrotic areas and decreased CD31-positive vasculature. shEGFR-MDA-231 cells also produced decreased levels of the proangiogenic molecules macrophage colony stimulating factor-1 (MCSF-1) and matrix metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9), both of which were decreased by EGFR inhibitors in a panel of EGFR-positive breast cancer cells. Thus, inhibiting autocrine EGFR signaling in breast cancer cells may provide a means for reducing paracrine factor production that facilitates microenvironment support in the bone and mammary gland. PMID:22276166

  15. Metastatic Granulosa Cell Tumor of the Testis: Clinical Presentation and Management

    PubMed Central

    Han, Min; Figenshau, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) of the testis are rare sex cord-stromal tumors that are present in both juvenile and adult subtypes. While most adult GCTs are benign, those that present with distant metastases manifest a grave prognosis. Treatments for aggressive GCTs are not well established. Options that have been employed in previous cases include retroperitoneal lymph node dissection (RPLND), radiation, chemotherapy, or a combination thereof. We describe the case of a 57-year-old man who presented with a painless left testicular mass and painful gynecomastia. Serum tumor markers (alpha fetoprotein, human chorionic gonadotropin, and lactate dehydrogenase) and computed tomography of the chest and abdomen were negative. The patient underwent left radical orchiectomy. Immunohistochemical staining was consistent with a testicular GCT. He underwent a left-template laparoscopic RPLND which revealed 2/19 positive lymph nodes. Final pathological stage was IIA. He remains free of disease 32 months after surgery. PMID:27293952

  16. Detection of metastatic tumors after γ-irradiation using longitudinal molecular imaging and gene expression profiling of metastatic tumor nodules.

    PubMed

    Jang, Su Jin; Kang, Joo Hyun; Lee, Yong Jin; Kim, Kwang Il; Lee, Tae Sup; Choe, Jae Gol; Lim, Sang Moo

    2016-04-01

    A few recent reports have indicated that metastatic growth of several human cancer cells could be promoted by radiotherapy. C6-L cells expressing the firefly luciferase (fLuc) gene were implanted subcutaneously into the right thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice. C6-L xenograft mice were treated locally with 50-Gy γ-irradiation (γ-IR) in five 10-Gy fractions. Metastatic tumors were evaluated after γ-IR by imaging techniques. Total RNA from non-irradiated primary tumor (NRPT), γ-irradiated primary tumor (RPT), and three metastatic lung nodule was isolated and analyzed by microarray. Metastatic lung nodules were detected by BLI and PET/CT after 6-9 weeks of γ-IR in 6 (17.1%) of the 35 mice. The images clearly demonstrated high [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG uptake into metastatic lung nodules. Whole mRNA expression patterns were analyzed by microarray to elucidate the changes among NRPT, RPT and metastatic lung nodules after γ-IR. In particular, expression changes in the cancer stem cell markers were highly significant in RPT. We observed the metastatic tumors after γ-IR in a tumor-bearing animal model using molecular imaging methods and analyzed the gene expression profile to elucidate genetic changes after γ-IR. PMID:26892334

  17. Detection of metastatic tumors after γ-irradiation using longitudinal molecular imaging and gene expression profiling of metastatic tumor nodules

    PubMed Central

    JANG, SU JIN; KANG, JOO HYUN; LEE, YONG JIN; KIM, KWANG IL; LEE, TAE SUP; CHOE, JAE GOL; LIM, SANG MOO

    2016-01-01

    A few recent reports have indicated that metastatic growth of several human cancer cells could be promoted by radiotherapy. C6-L cells expressing the firefly luciferase (fLuc) gene were implanted subcutaneously into the right thigh of BALB/c nu/nu mice. C6-L xenograft mice were treated locally with 50-Gy γ-irradiation (γ-IR) in five 10-Gy fractions. Metastatic tumors were evaluated after γ-IR by imaging techniques. Total RNA from non-irradiated primary tumor (NRPT), γ-irradiated primary tumor (RPT), and three metastatic lung nodule was isolated and analyzed by microarray. Metastatic lung nodules were detected by BLI and PET/CT after 6–9 weeks of γ-IR in 6 (17.1%) of the 35 mice. The images clearly demonstrated high [18F]FLT and [18F]FDG uptake into metastatic lung nodules. Whole mRNA expression patterns were analyzed by microarray to elucidate the changes among NRPT, RPT and metastatic lung nodules after γ-IR. In particular, expression changes in the cancer stem cell markers were highly significant in RPT. We observed the metastatic tumors after γ-IR in a tumor-bearing animal model using molecular imaging methods and analyzed the gene expression profile to elucidate genetic changes after γ-IR. PMID:26892334

  18. Hepatic metastatic disease in pediatric and adolescent solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Pineda, Israel; Sandoval, John A; Davidoff, Andrew M

    2015-01-01

    The management of hepatic metastatic disease from solid tumors in adults has been extensively described and resection of metastatic liver lesions from colorectal adenocarcinoma, renal adenocarcinoma, breast cancer, testicular cancer, and neuroendocrine tumors (NET) have demonstrated therapeutic benefits in select patients. However, there are few reports in the literature on the management of hepatic metastatic disease in the pediatric and adolescent populations and the effectiveness of hepatic metastasectomy. This may be due to the much lower incidence of pediatric malignancies and the higher chemosensitivity of childhood tumors which make hepatic metastasectomy less likely to be required. We review liver involvement with metastatic disease from the main pediatric solid tumors, including neuroblastoma and Wilms tumor focusing on the management and treatment options. We also review other solid malignant tumors which may have liver metastases including germ cell tumors, gastrointestinal stromal tumors, osteosarcoma, desmoplastic small round cell tumors and NET. However, these histological subtypes are so rare in the pediatric and adolescent populations that the exact incidence and best management of hepatic metastatic disease are unknown and can only be extrapolated from adult series. PMID:26207162

  19. Cure of metastatic growth of EMT6 tumor cells in mice following manipulation of CD200:CD200R signaling.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Chen, Zhiqi; Khatri, Ismat; Podnos, Anna; Yu, Kai

    2013-11-01

    In previous studies, we observed that regulation of expression of CD200, both on cells of a transplantable breast cancer, EMT6, and of the host, as well as of the receptor, CD200R in host mice, regulated local tumor growth and metastasis in immunocompetent animals. This in turn led to an improved ability to document immunity to EMT6 in CD200R1KO mice. In the current study, we have explored the ability to cure BALB/c CD200KO or CD200R1KO mice of tumors ≤1 cm(3) in size by surgical resection of localized tumor, followed by immunization with irradiated EMT6 cells along with CpG as adjuvant. While control animals treated in this fashion developed significant pulmonary and liver metastases within 30 days of surgery, significant protection was seen in both CD200KO or CD200R1KO mice, with no macroscopic lung/liver metastases observed in CD200R1KO mice on sacrifice at day 300. Following surgical resection and immunization, draining lymph nodes from control mice contained tumor cells cloned at limiting dilution in vitro even before pulmonary and hepatic metastasis was seen. In contrast, within the limits of detection of the assay used (sensitivity ~1 in 10(7) cells), no tumor cells were detected at limiting dilution in similarly treated CD200R1KO mice, and significant reductions were seen in CD200KO mice. Infusion of anti-CD4, but less so anti-CD8, mAb into surgically treated and immunized CD200R1KO mice attenuated protection from both macroscopic (liver/lung) and microscopic (assayed by limiting dilution of DLN) metastasis. Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes from treated CD200R1KO mice to surgically treated control mice also attenuated metastatic growth of tumor, which was abolished by pretreatment of transferred cells with anti-CD4 mAb. Our data suggest that CD200:CD200R attenuates a potentially tumor-protective CD4 host response to breast cancer. PMID:24166280

  20. Microenvironment-Modulated Metastatic CD133+/CXCR4+/EpCAM- Lung Cancer-Initiating Cells Sustain Tumor Dissemination and Correlate with Poor Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Giulia; D'Amico, Lucia; Moro, Massimo; Landoni, Elena; Perego, Paola; Miceli, Rosalba; Gatti, Laura; Andriani, Francesca; Wong, Donald; Caserini, Roberto; Tortoreto, Monica; Milione, Massimo; Ferracini, Riccardo; Mariani, Luigi; Pastorino, Ugo; Roato, Ilaria; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2015-09-01

    Metastasis is the main reason for lung cancer-related mortality, but little is known about specific determinants of successful dissemination from primary tumors and metastasis initiation. Here, we show that CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cancer-initiating cells (CIC) directly isolated from patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of non-small cell lung cancer are endowed with superior ability to seed and initiate metastasis at distant organs. We additionally report that CXCR4 inhibition successfully prevents the increase of cisplatin-resistant CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) cells in residual tumors and their metastatization. Immunophenotypic analysis of lung tumor cells intravenously injected or spontaneously disseminated to murine lungs demonstrated the survival advantage and increased colonization ability of a specific subset of CD133(+)/CXCR4(+) with reduced expression of epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM(-)), which also shows the greatest in vitro invasive potential. We next prove that recovered disseminated cells from lungs of PDX-bearing mice enriched for CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) CICs are highly tumorigenic and metastatic. Importantly, microenvironment stimuli eliciting epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, including signals from cancer-associated fibroblasts, are able to increase the dissemination potential of lung cancer cells through the generation of the CD133(+)/CXCR4(+)/EpCAM(-) subset. These findings also have correlates in patient samples where disseminating CICs are enriched in metastatic lymph nodes (20-fold, P = 0.006) and their detection in primary tumors is correlated with poor clinical outcome (disease-free survival: P = 0.03; overall survival: P = 0.05). Overall, these results highlight the importance of specific cellular subsets in the metastatic process, the need for in-depth characterization of disseminating tumor cells, and the potential of therapeutic strategies targeting both primary tumor and tumor-microenvironment interactions. PMID:26141860

  1. Case Report: Detection and quantification of tumor cells in peripheral blood and ascitic fluid from a metastatic esophageal cancer patient using the CellSearch (®) technology.

    PubMed

    Tu, Qian; Bittencourt, Marcelo De Carvalho; Cai, Huili; Bastien, Claire; Lemarie-Delaunay, Camille; Bene, Marie C; Faure, Gilbert C

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of ascitic fluid should help to identify and characterize malignant cells in gastrointestinal cancer. However, despite a high specificity, the sensitivity of traditional ascitic fluid cytology remains insufficient, at around 60%. Since 2004 the CellSearch (®) technology has shown its advantages in the detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood, which can perform an accurate diagnosis and molecular analysis at the same time. To our knowledge, no previous study has explored the potential utility of this technology for the detection and quantification of tumor cells in ascitic fluid samples. Herein we report a case of metastatic esophageal adenocarcinoma in a 70-year-old man presenting with dysphagia and a large amount of fluid in the peritoneal cavity. Analysis of a peripheral blood sample and ascites sample with the CellSearch (®) technology both revealed the presence of putative tumor cells that were positive for epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) and cytokeratin (CK) expression. This study confirmed the hematogenous dissemination of esophageal cancer by the detection of circulating tumor cells in the peripheral blood, and is the first to demonstrate that tumor cells can be identified in ascitic fluid by using CellSearch (®) technology. PMID:25075284

  2. Percutaneous Cryoablation of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma for Local Tumor Control: Feasibility, Outcomes, and Estimated Cost-effectiveness for Palliation

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun J.; Littrup, Peter J.; Goodrich, Dylan J.; Currier, Brandt P.; Aoun, Hussein D.; Heilbrun, Lance K.; Vaishampayan, Ulka; Adam, Barbara; Goodman, Allen C.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To assess complications, local tumor recurrences, overall survival (OS), and estimates of cost-effectiveness for multisite cryoablation (MCA) of oligometastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC). Materials and Methods A total of 60 computed tomography- and/or ultrasound-guided percutaneous MCA procedures were performed on 72 tumors in 27 patients (three women and 24 men). Average patient age was 63 years. Tumor location was grouped according to common metastatic sites. Established surgical selection criteria graded patient status. Median OS was determined by Kaplan–Meier method and defined life-years gained (LYGs). Estimates of MCA costs per LYG were compared with established values for systemic therapies. Results Total number of tumors and cryoablation procedures for each anatomic site are as follows: nephrectomy bed, 11 and 11; adrenal gland, nine and eight; paraaortic, seven and six; lung, 14 and 13; bone, 13 and 13; superficial, 12 and nine; intraperitoneal, five and three; and liver, one and one. A mean of 2.2 procedures per patient were performed, with a median clinical follow-up of 16 months. Major complication and local recurrence rates were 2% (one of 60) and 3% (two of 72), respectively. No patients were graded as having good surgical risk, but median OS was 2.69 years, with an estimated 5-year survival rate of 27%. Cryoablation remained cost-effective with or without the presence of systemic therapies according to historical cost comparisons, with an adjunctive cost-effectiveness ratio of $28,312–$59,554 per LYG. Conclusions MCA was associated with very low morbidity and local tumor recurrence rates for all anatomic sites, with apparent increased OS. Even as an adjunct to systemic therapies, MCA appeared cost-effective for palliation of oligometastatic RCC. PMID:22538119

  3. Adoptive chemoimmunotherapy using ex vivo activated memory T-cells and cyclophosphamide: tumor lysis syndrome of a metastatic soft tissue sarcoma.

    PubMed

    Gold, J E; Malamud, S C; LaRosa, F; Osband, M E

    1993-09-01

    Adoptively transferred immune cells in combination with chemotherapeutic agents form the basis for adoptive chemoimmunotherapy (ACIT) of neoplastic disease. Autolymphocytes (ALT-cells) are ex vivo activated peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from tumor-bearing hosts (TBH) that consist primarily of tumor-specific CD45RO+ (memory) T-cells. These ALT-cells combined with cimetidine (CIM) as autolymphocyte therapy (ALT), have previously been demonstrated to be a safe and active form of outpatient adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) in human TBH with metastatic renal cell cancer (RCC). We have previously described an effective ACIT protocol using ALT and cyclophosphamide (CY) for patients with relapsed and refractory non-RCC solid tumors. We now report a case of a patient with a metastatic gastric leiomyosarcoma to the liver, who developed a clinical picture consistent with a tumor-lysis syndrome (TLS), following salvage therapy for his tumor with ACIT using ALT and CY. TLS is a well-known complication resulting from the treatment of rapidly proliferating hematopoietic tumors such as Burkitt's lymphoma and acute lymphocytic leukemia. TLS has also been rarely described in chronic lymphocytic leukemia, as well as certain solid tumors such as breast cancer, small cell lung cancer, and medulloblastoma. However, there have been no previous reports of TLS occurring either secondary to immunotherapy or in sarcomas. The nature of these unusual findings is discussed. PMID:8342564

  4. Tumor tropism of intravenously injected human-induced pluripotent stem cell-derived neural stem cells and their gene therapy application in a metastatic breast cancer model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Lam, Dang Hoang; Goh, Sally Sallee; Lee, Esther Xingwei; Zhao, Ying; Tay, Felix Chang; Chen, Can; Du, Shouhui; Balasundaram, Ghayathri; Shahbazi, Mohammad; Tham, Chee Kian; Ng, Wai Hoe; Toh, Han Chong; Wang, Shu

    2012-05-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells can serve as an accessible and reliable source for the generation of functional human cells for medical therapies. In this study, we used a conventional lentiviral transduction method to derive human-induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells from primary human fibroblasts and then generated neural stem cells (NSCs) from the iPS cells. Using a dual-color whole-body imaging technology, we demonstrated that after tail vein injection, these human NSCs displayed a robust migratory capacity outside the central nervous system in both immunodeficient and immunocompetent mice and homed in on established orthotopic 4T1 mouse mammary tumors. To investigate whether the iPS cell-derived NSCs can be used as a cellular delivery vehicle for cancer gene therapy, the cells were transduced with a baculoviral vector containing the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase suicide gene and injected through tail vein into 4T1 tumor-bearing mice. The transduced NSCs were effective in inhibiting the growth of the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor and the metastatic spread of the cancer cells in the presence of ganciclovir, leading to prolonged survival of the tumor-bearing mice. The use of iPS cell-derived NSCs for cancer gene therapy bypasses the sensitive ethical issue surrounding the use of cells derived from human fetal tissues or human embryonic stem cells. This approach may also help to overcome problems associated with allogeneic transplantation of other types of human NSCs. PMID:22311724

  5. Autologous dendritic cells transfected with prostate-specific antigen RNA stimulate CTL responses against metastatic prostate tumors

    PubMed Central

    Heiser, Axel; Coleman, Doris; Dannull, Jens; Yancey, Donna; Maurice, Margaret A.; Lallas, Costas D.; Dahm, Philipp; Niedzwiecki, Donna; Gilboa, Eli; Vieweg, Johannes

    2002-01-01

    Autologous dendritic cells (DCs) transfected with mRNA encoding prostate-specific antigen (PSA) are able to stimulate potent, T cell–mediated antitumor immune responses in vitro. A phase I trial was performed to evaluate this strategy for safety, feasibility, and efficacy to induce T cell responses against the self-protein PSA in patients with metastatic prostate cancer. In 13 study subjects, escalating doses of PSA mRNA–transfected DCs were administered with no evidence of dose-limiting toxicity or adverse effects, including autoimmunity. Induction of PSA-specific T cell responses was consistently detected in all patients, suggesting in vivo bioactivity of the vaccine. Vaccination was further associated with a significant decrease in the log slope PSA in six of seven subjects; three patients that could be analyzed exhibited a transient molecular clearance of circulating tumor cells. The demonstration of vaccine safety, successful in vivo induction of PSA-specific immunity, and impact on surrogate clinical endpoints provides a scientific rationale for further clinical investigation of RNA-transfected DCs in the treatment of human cancer. PMID:11828001

  6. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk; Kim, Kyung Sik

    2016-05-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important. PMID:27212999

  7. Incidental detection of pancreatic hemangioma mimicking a metastatic tumor of renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung Hyun; Kim, Ji-Ye; Choi, Jin Young; Choi, Young Deuk

    2016-01-01

    Adult pancreatic hemangioma is a rare disease. We presented a case of a woman with pancreatic tail mass mimicking a distant metastasis from the kidney. A 68-year-old woman was found with a left kidney mass on medical checkup. Computed tomography scan showed a 4.3 cm-sized mass in the left kidney, suggesting renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and a strongly enhancing tiny nodule in the pancreatic tail. We could not rule the possibility of RCC metastasis, hence, surgical resection of the pancreatic mass simultaneously with radical nephrectomy for RCC was conducted. Gross pathologic examination revealed hemangioma. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the tumor was positive for CD34, CD31 and factor VIII-related antigen. There were no significant postoperative events, and the patient was discharged on postoperative day 7 without any complications. Treatment strategies for pancreatic hemangioma have not been established. To our knowledge, this was the first case report of asymptomatic pancreatic hemangioma. In previous literature, treatment differed on a case-by-case basis, ranging from observation to surgical resection. The most important factor in deciding whether to perform surgery is possibly risk-benefit effectiveness; however, tumor location, patient symptoms, and other factors are also important.

  8. Circulating Tumor Cell Biomarker Panel As an Individual-Level Surrogate for Survival in Metastatic Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scher, Howard I.; Heller, Glenn; Molina, Arturo; Attard, Gerhardt; Danila, Daniel C.; Jia, Xiaoyu; Peng, Weimin; Sandhu, Shahneen K.; Olmos, David; Riisnaes, Ruth; McCormack, Robert; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Kheoh, Thian; Fleisher, Martin; Buyse, Marc; de Bono, Johann S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Trials in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) need new clinical end points that are valid surrogates for survival. We evaluated circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration as a surrogate outcome measure. Patients and Methods Examining CTCs alone and in combination with other biomarkers as a surrogate for overall survival was a secondary objective of COU-AA-301, a multinational, randomized, double-blind phase III trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone versus prednisone alone in patients with metastatic CRPC previously treated with docetaxel. The biomarkers were measured at baseline and 4, 8, and 12 weeks, with 12 weeks being the primary measure of interest. The Prentice criteria were applied to test candidate biomarkers as surrogates for overall survival at the individual-patient level. Results A biomarker panel using CTC count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) level was shown to satisfy the four Prentice criteria for individual-level surrogacy. Twelve-week surrogate biomarker data were available for 711 patients. The abiraterone acetate plus prednisone and prednisone-alone groups demonstrated a significant survival difference (P = .034); surrogate distribution at 12 weeks differed by treatment (P < .001); the discriminatory power of the surrogate to predict mortality was high (weighted c-index, 0.81); and adding the surrogate to the model eliminated the treatment effect on survival. Overall, 2-year survival of patients with CTCs < 5 (low risk) versus patients with CTCs ≥ 5 cells/7.5 mL of blood and LDH > 250 U/L (high risk) at 12 weeks was 46% and 2%, respectively. Conclusion A biomarker panel containing CTC number and LDH level was shown to be a surrogate for survival at the individual-patient level in this trial of abiraterone acetate plus prednisone versus prednisone alone for patients with metastatic CRPC. Additional trials are ongoing to validate the findings. PMID:25800753

  9. Cervical squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to placenta.

    PubMed

    Can, Nhu Thuy T; Robertson, Patricia; Zaloudek, Charles J; Gill, Ryan M

    2013-09-01

    A pregnant 29-year-old gravida 4, para 3 woman with Stage IIB cervical cancer was admitted at 33 weeks and 4 days of gestation and delivered a healthy neonate. Her placenta was small but otherwise grossly unremarkable. Microscopic examination revealed metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. An immunohistochemical stain for p16 was positive in the carcinoma cells, supporting metastasis from the cervical tumor. Cervical squamous cell carcinoma metastatic to placenta is very rare. We report a case and discuss metastatic cancer during pregnancy with recommendations for infant follow-up. PMID:23896714

  10. Single-cell Analysis of Circulating Tumor Cells Identifies Cumulative Expression Patterns of EMT-related Genes in Metastatic Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chun-Liang; Mahalingam, Devalingam; Osmulski, Pawel; Jadhav, Rohit R.; Wang, Chiou-Miin; Leach, Robin J.; Chang, Tien-Cheng; Weitman, Steven D.; Kumar, Addanki Pratap; Sun, LuZhe; Gaczynska, Maria E.; Thompson, Ian M.; Huang, Tim Hui-Ming

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Prostate tumors shed circulating tumor cells (CTCs) into the blood stream. Increased evidence shows that CTCs are often present in metastatic prostate cancer and can be alternative sources for disease profiling and prognostication. Here we postulate that CTCs expressing genes related to epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) are strong predictors of metastatic prostate cancer. METHODS A microfiltration system was used to trap CTCs from peripheral blood based on size selection of large epithelial-like cells without CD45 leukocyte marker. These cells individually retrieved with a micromanipulator device were assessed for cell membrane physical properties using atomic force microscopy. Additionally, 38 CTCs from eight prostate cancer patients were used to determine expression profiles of 84 EMT-related and reference genes using a microfluidics-based PCR system. RESULTS Increased cell elasticity and membrane smoothness were found in CTCs compared to noncancerous cells, highlighting their potential invasiveness and mobility in the peripheral circulation. Despite heterogeneous expression patterns of individual CTCs, genes that promote mesenchymal transitioning into a more malignant state, including IGF1, IGF2, EGFR, FOXP3, and TGFB3, were commonly observed in these cells. An additional subset of EMT-related genes (e.g., PTPRN2, ALDH1, ESR2, and WNT5A) were expressed in CTCs of castration-resistant cancer, but less frequently in castration-sensitive cancer. CONCLUSIONS The study suggests that an incremental expression of EMT-related genes in CTCs is associated with metastatic castration-resistant cancer. Although CTCs represent a group of highly heterogeneous cells, their unique EMT-related gene signatures provide a new opportunity for personalized treatments with targeted inhibitors in advanced prostate cancer patients. PMID:23280481

  11. Establishment and evaluation of a new highly metastatic tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and green fluorescent protein.

    PubMed

    Sudo, Hitomi; Tsuji, Atsushi B; Sugyo, Aya; Takuwa, Hiroyuki; Masamoto, Kazuto; Tomita, Yutaka; Suzuki, Norihiro; Imamura, Takeshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Saga, Tsuneo

    2016-02-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Although advances in diagnostic imaging for early detection, surgical techniques and chemotherapy have improved overall survival, the prognosis of patients with metastatic breast cancer remains poor. Understanding cancer cell dynamics in the metastatic process is important to develop new therapeutic strategies. Experimental animal models and imaging would be powerful tools for understanding of the molecular events of multistep process of metastasis. In the present study, to develop a new cancer cell line that is applicable to bioluminescence and fluorescence imaging, we transfected the expression vector of a green fluorescent protein ZsGreen1 into a metastatic cell line 5a-D-Luc, which is a subclone of the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line expressing luciferase, and established a new tumor cell line 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen expressing both luciferase and ZsGreen1. The 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells proliferate more rapidly and have a more invasive phenotype compared with 5a-D-Luc cells following intracardiac injection. Metastasis sites were easily detected in the whole body by bioluminescence imaging and in excised tissues by ex vivo fluorescence imaging. The fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells was not lost after formalin fixation and decalcification. It enabled us to easily evaluate tumor spread and localization at the cellular level in microscopic analysis. The strong fluorescence of 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells allowed for real-time imaging of circulating tumor cells in cerebral blood vessels of live animals immediately after intracardiac injection of cells using two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. These findings suggest that the 5a-D-Luc-ZsGreen cells would be a useful tool for research on mechanisms of metastatic process in animal models. PMID:26691676

  12. Transcription of a novel mouse semaphorin gene, M-semaH, correlates with the metastatic ability of mouse tumor cell lines.

    PubMed

    Christensen, C R; Klingelhöfer, J; Tarabykina, S; Hulgaard, E F; Kramerov, D; Lukanidin, E

    1998-03-15

    In the attempt to identify genes associated with metastasis, we have compared gene expressions of two metastatic cell lines, 4T1 and 66cl4, and one noninvasive, nonmetastatic cell line, 67NR, which originate from the same mouse mammary adenocarcinoma. Using the technique of differential display, we identified a novel member of the semaphorin/collapsin family in the two metastatic cell lines. We have named it M-semaH. Northern hybridization to a panel of tumor cell lines revealed transcripts in 12 of 12 metastatic cell lines but in only 2 of 6 nonmetastatic cells and none in immortalized mouse fibroblasts. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the expression of a semaphorin gene has been shown to correlate positively with tumor progression. We have characterized two transcripts present in the tumor cells. One transcript, M-semaH-v, is a putative splice variant, which is less abundant in normal tissue and lacks 478 bp in the 3' untranslated region. Both transcripts encode the same 775 amino acids with the features of a secreted glycoprotein. Northern analysis suggests that the M-semaH gene is involved in embryonic development and in situ hybridization locates the M-semaH expression to the developing lungs, to developing skeletal elements, and to the ventral horns of the developing neural tube. PMID:9515811

  13. Molecular analysis of CD133-positive circulating tumor cells from patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, Edwin E; Gillard, Marc; Duggan, Ryan; Wroblewski, Kristen; Kregel, Steven; Isikbay, Masis; Kach, Jacob; Brechka, Hannah; Weele, David J Vander; Szmulewitz, Russell Z; Griend, Donald J Vander

    2015-01-01

    The function and clinical utility of stem cell markers in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) remains unresolved, and their expression may confer important therapeutic opportunities for staging and therapy. In the adult human prostate, CD133 (PROM1) expression identifies infrequent prostate epithelial progenitor cells and putative cancer stem cells. Previous work demonstrated an association with CD133 and cancer cell proliferation using in vitro model systems. The primary objective here was to investigate the expression of CD133 in circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patients with mCRPC and to test the hypothesis that patients with mCRPC had CD133-positive CTCs associated with increased cell proliferation, changes in the androgen receptor (AR) protein expression, or AR nuclear co-localization. We utilized ImageStreamX technology, which combines flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy, to capture and analyze CD45-negative/EpCAM-positive CTCs for CD133, Ki-67, and AR. All patient samples (20/20) contained CD133-positive populations of CTCs, and on average 50.9 ± 28.2% (range of 18.2% to 100%) of CTCs were CD133-positive. CD133-positive CTCs have increased Ki-67 protein expression compared to CD133-negative CTCs, implying that CD133-positive CTCs may have greater proliferative potential when compared to their CD133-negative counterparts. CD133-positive and CD133-negative CTCs have similar levels of AR protein expression and cellular co-localization with nuclear markers, implying that CD133 expression is independent of AR pathway activity and an AR-independent marker of mCRPC proliferation. These studies demonstrate the presence of CD133-positive populations in CTCs from mCRPC with increased proliferative potential. PMID:26753099

  14. Detection of live circulating tumor cells by a class of near-infrared heptamethine carbocyanine dyes in patients with localized and metastatic prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chen; Liao, Chun-Peng; Hu, Peizhen; Chu, Chia-Yi; Zhang, Lei; Bui, Matthew H T; Ng, Christopher S; Josephson, David Y; Knudsen, Beatrice; Tighiouart, Mourad; Kim, Hyung L; Zhau, Haiyen E; Chung, Leland W K; Wang, Ruoxiang; Posadas, Edwin M

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells are inherently heterogeneous and often exhibit diminished adhesion, resulting in the shedding of tumor cells into the circulation to form circulating tumor cells (CTCs). A fraction of these are live CTCs with potential of metastatic colonization whereas others are at various stages of apoptosis making them likely to be less relevant to understanding the disease. Isolation and characterization of live CTCs may augment information yielded by standard enumeration to help physicians to more accurately establish diagnosis, choose therapy, monitor response, and provide prognosis. We previously reported on a group of near-infrared (NIR) heptamethine carbocyanine dyes that are specifically and actively transported into live cancer cells. In this study, this viable tumor cell-specific behavior was utilized to detect live CTCs in prostate cancer patients. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from 40 patients with localized prostate cancer together with 5 patients with metastatic disease were stained with IR-783, the prototype heptamethine cyanine dye. Stained cells were subjected to flow cytometric analysis to identify live (NIR(+)) CTCs from the pool of total CTCs, which were identified by EpCAM staining. In patients with localized tumor, live CTC counts corresponded with total CTC numbers. Higher live CTC counts were seen in patients with larger tumors and those with more aggressive pathologic features including positive margins and/or lymph node invasion. Even higher CTC numbers (live and total) were detected in patients with metastatic disease. Live CTC counts declined when patients were receiving effective treatments, and conversely the counts tended to rise at the time of disease progression. Our study demonstrates the feasibility of applying of this staining technique to identify live CTCs, creating an opportunity for further molecular interrogation of a more biologically relevant CTC population. PMID:24551200

  15. The use of circulating tumor cells in guiding treatment decisions for patients with metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Onstenk, Wendy; de Klaver, Willemijn; de Wit, Ronald; Lolkema, Martijn; Foekens, John; Sleijfer, Stefan

    2016-05-01

    The therapeutic landscape of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC) has drastically changed over the past decade with the advent of several new anti-tumor agents. Oncologists increasingly face dilemmas concerning the best treatment sequence for individual patients since most of the novel compounds have been investigated and subsequently positioned either pre- or post-docetaxel. A currently unmet need exists for biomarkers able to guide treatment decisions and to capture treatment resistance at an early stage thereby allowing for an early change to an alternative strategy. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have in this context intensively been investigated over the last years. The CTC count, as determined by the CellSearch System (Janssen Diagnostics LLC, Raritan, NJ), is a strong, independent prognostic factor for overall survival in patients with mCRPC at various time points during treatment and, as an early response marker, outperforms traditional response evaluations using serum prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels, scintigraphy as well as radiography. The focus of research is now shifting toward the predictive value of CTCs and the use of the characterization of CTCs to guide the selection of treatments with the highest chance of success for individual patients. Recently, the presence of the androgen receptor splice variant 7 (AR-V7) has been shown to be a promising predictive factor. In this review, we have explored the clinical value of the enumeration and characterization of CTCs for the treatment of mCRPC and have put the results obtained from recent studies investigating the prognostic and predictive value of CTCs into clinical perspective. PMID:27107266

  16. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence. PMID:27075165

  17. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai, Jr-Ming; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence. PMID:27075165

  18. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had <5. In conclusion, by employing a sensitive device, CTC counts show good correlation with colorectal neoplasm, thus CTC may be as a simple, independent prognostic marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  19. 17β-estradiol inhibits spreading of metastatic cells from granulosa cell tumors through a non-genomic mechanism involving GPER1

    PubMed Central

    François, Charlotte M.; Wargnier, Richard; Petit, Florence; Goulvent, Thibaut; Rimokh, Ruth; Treilleux, Isabelle; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Zazzu, Valeria; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Guigon, Céline J.

    2015-01-01

    Granulosa cell tumor (GCT) is a rare and severe form of sex-cord stromal ovarian tumor that is characterized by its long natural history and tendency to recur years after surgical ablation. Because there is no efficient curative treatment beyond surgery, ~20% of patients die of the consequences of their tumor. However, very little is known of the molecular etiology of this pathology. About 70% of GCT patients present with elevated circulating estradiol (E2). Because this hormone is known to increase tumor growth and progression in a number of cancers, we investigated the possible role of E2 in GCTs. Cell-based studies with human GCT metastases and primary tumor-derived cells, ie KGN and COV434 cells, respectively, aimed at evaluating E2 effect on cell growth, migration and invasion. Importantly, we found that E2 did not affect GCT cell growth, but that it significantly decreased the migration and matrix invasion of metastatic GCT cells. Noteworthy, our molecular studies revealed that this effect was accompanied by the inhibition through non-genomic mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), which is constitutively activated in GCTs. By using pharmacological and RNA silencing approaches, we found that E2 action was mediated by G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) signaling pathway. Analyses of GPER1 expression on tissue microarrays from human GCTs confirmed its expression in ~90% of GCTs. Overall, our study reveals that E2 would act via non-classical pathways to prevent metastasis spreading in GCTs and also reveals GPER1 as a possible target in this disease. PMID:25823895

  20. 17β-estradiol inhibits spreading of metastatic cells from granulosa cell tumors through a non-genomic mechanism involving GPER1.

    PubMed

    François, Charlotte M; Wargnier, Richard; Petit, Florence; Goulvent, Thibaut; Rimokh, Ruth; Treilleux, Isabelle; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Zazzu, Valeria; Cohen-Tannoudji, Joëlle; Guigon, Céline J

    2015-05-01

    Granulosa cell tumor (GCT) is a rare and severe form of sex-cord stromal ovarian tumor that is characterized by its long natural history and tendency to recur years after surgical ablation. Because there is no efficient curative treatment beyond surgery, ~20% of patients die of the consequences of their tumor. However, very little is known of the molecular etiology of this pathology. About 70% of GCT patients present with elevated circulating estradiol (E2). Because this hormone is known to increase tumor growth and progression in a number of cancers, we investigated the possible role of E2 in GCTs. Cell-based studies with human GCT metastases and primary tumor-derived cells, ie KGN and COV434 cells, respectively, aimed at evaluating E2 effect on cell growth, migration and invasion. Importantly, we found that E2 did not affect GCT cell growth, but that it significantly decreased the migration and matrix invasion of metastatic GCT cells. Noteworthy, our molecular studies revealed that this effect was accompanied by the inhibition through non-genomic mechanisms of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), which is constitutively activated in GCTs. By using pharmacological and RNA silencing approaches, we found that E2 action was mediated by G protein-coupled estrogen receptor 1 (GPER1) signaling pathway. Analyses of GPER1 expression on tissue microarrays from human GCTs confirmed its expression in ~90% of GCTs. Overall, our study reveals that E2 would act via non-classical pathways to prevent metastasis spreading in GCTs and also reveals GPER1 as a possible target in this disease. PMID:25823895

  1. Repurposing the anti-malarial drug artesunate as a novel therapeutic agent for metastatic renal cell carcinoma due to its attenuation of tumor growth, metastasis, and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sharon; Lee, Se Jeong; Lim, Joung Eun; Nam, Do-Hyun; Joo, Kyeung Min; Jeong, Byong Chang; Jeon, Seong Soo; Choi, Han Yong; Lee, Hye Won

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is still incurable. Artesunate (ART), a well-known anti-malarial drug with low toxicity, exhibits highly selective anti-tumor actions against various tumors through generation of cytotoxic carbon-centered free radical in the presence of free iron. However, the therapeutic efficacy of ART against metastatic RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. In the analysis on a dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 469) and a tissue microarray set from Samsung Medical Center (n = 119) from a cohort of patients with clear cell RCC (ccRCC), up-regulation of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR1), which is a well-known predictive marker for ART, was correlated with the presence of distant metastasis and an unfavorable prognosis. Moreover, ART exerted potent selective cytotoxicity against human RCC cell lines (Caki-1, 786-O, and SN12C-GFP-SRLu2) and sensitized these cells to sorafenib in vitro, and the extent of ART cytotoxicity correlated with TfR1 expression. ART-mediated growth inhibition of human RCC cell lines was shown to result from the induction of cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and oncosis-like cell death. Furthermore, ART inhibited cell clonogenicity and invasion of human RCC cells and anti-angiogenic effects in vitro in a dose-dependent manner. Consistent with these in vitro data, anti-tumor, anti-metastatic and anti-angiogenic effects of ART were also validated in human 786-O xenografts. Taken together, ART is a promising novel candidate for treating human RCC, either alone or in combination with other therapies. PMID:26426994

  2. MiR-34a suppresses amphiregulin and tumor metastatic potential of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jiali; Wang, Yu; Chen, Xinming; Zhou, Yi; Jiang, Fangyan; Chen, Jirong; Wang, Li; Zhang, Wen-Feng

    2015-04-10

    MiR-34a is a well-known tumor metastasis inhibitor, but only a few target genes involved in metastasis have been identified. In HNSCC, the role of miR-34a in metastasis has not been fully elaborated, and the target gene of miR-34a is still blind. Here we addressed that, the relative lower expression of miR-34a is associated with HNSCC lymphatic metastasis. HNSCC metastasis was found to be strongly suppressed in vitro and in vivo by over-expressing miR-34a. In order to screen the possible target genes of miR-34a in HNSCC, a microarray-based differential mRNA profiling mediated by miR-34a over-expression was performed, and AREG was identified as a pivotal target. We demonstrated that the mRNA and protein levels of AREG were greatly reduced when forcing miR-34a expression. The correlation between AREG mRNA levels and HNSCC metastatic phenotype was also significant in HNSCC tissues (p < 0.01). Moreover, the results of luciferase assay provided the further evidence that miR-34a degraded AREG mRNA through targeting the 3'-UTR site. Restoration of AREG expression partially rescued miR-34a-mediated cell invasion defects in vivo and in vitro. Additionally, Over-expressing miR-34a greatly reduced EGFR and uPA, which were reversed by re-expression of AREG. Taken together, these findings indicate that miR-34a targets AREG, and is essential in inhibition of HNSCC metastasis. PMID:25762634

  3. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, I. Vijay; Jain, S. K.; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  4. Malignant metastatic carcinoid presenting as brain tumor.

    PubMed

    Sundar, I Vijay; Jain, S K; Kurmi, Dhrubajyoti; Sharma, Rakesh; Chopra, Sanjeev; Singhvi, Shashi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoid tumors are rarely known to metastasise to the brain. It is even more rare for such patients to present with symptoms related to metastases as the initial and only symptom. We present a case of a 60-year-old man who presented with hemiparesis and imaging features suggestive of brain tumor. He underwent surgery and the histopathology revealed metastatic malignant lesion of neuroendocrine origin. A subsequent work up for the primary was negative. Patient was treated with adjuvant radiotherapy. We present this case to highlight the pathophysiological features, workup and treatment options of this rare disease and discuss the methods of differentiating it from more common brain tumors. PMID:27366273

  5. Improved Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells in Metastatic Colorectal Cancer by the Combination of the CellSearch® System and the AdnaTest®

    PubMed Central

    Quidde, Julia; Hauch, Siegfried; Röck, Katharina; Riethdorf, Sabine; Joosse, Simon A.; Pantel, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the major causes of cancer-related death and reliable blood-based prognostic biomarkers are urgently needed. The enumeration and molecular characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has gained increasing interest in clinical practice. CTC detection by CellSearch® has already been correlated to an unfavorable outcome in metastatic CRC. However, the CTC detection rate in mCRC disease is low compared to other tumor entities. Thus, the use of alternative (or supplementary) assays might help to itemize the prognostic use of CTCs as blood-based biomarkers. In this study, blood samples from 47 mCRC patients were screened for CTCs using the FDA-cleared CellSearch® technology and / or the AdnaTest®. 38 samples could be processed in parallel. We demonstrate that a combined analysis of CellSearch® and the AdnaTest® leads to an improved detection of CTCs in our mCRC patient cohort (positivity rate CellSearch® 33%, AdnaTest® 30%, combined 50%). While CTCs detected with the CellSearch® system were significantly associated with progression-free survival (p = 0.046), a significant correlation regarding overall survival could be only seen when both assays were combined (p = 0.013). These findings could help to establish improved tools to detect CTCs as on-treatment biomarkers for clinical routine in future studies. PMID:27182774

  6. Serum-derived exosomes from mice with highly metastatic breast cancer transfer increased metastatic capacity to a poorly metastatic tumor.

    PubMed

    Gorczynski, Reginald M; Erin, Nuray; Zhu, Fang

    2016-02-01

    Altered interaction between CD200 and CD200R represents an example of "checkpoint blockade" disrupting an effective, tumor-directed, host response in murine breast cancer cells. In CD200R1KO mice, long-term cure of EMT6 breast cancer, including metastatic spread to lung and liver, was achieved in BALB/c mice. The reverse was observed with 4THM tumors, an aggressive, inflammatory breast cancer, with increased tumor metastasis in CD200R1KO. We explored possible explanations for this difference. We measured the frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood of tumor bearers, as well as lung/liver and draining lymph nodes. In some cases mice received infusions of exosomes from nontumor controls, or tumor bearers, with/without additional infusions of anticytokine antibodies. The measured frequency of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood was equivalent in the two models in WT and CD200R1KO mice. Increased metastasis in EMT6 tumor bearers was seen in vivo following adoptive transfer of serum, or serum-derived exosomes, from 4THM tumor bearers, an effect which was attenuated by anti-IL-6, and anti-IL-17, but not anti-TNFα, antibody. Anti-IL-6 also attenuated enhanced migration of EMT6 cells in vitro induced by 4THM serum or exosomes, or recombinant IL-6. Exosome cytokine proteomic profiles responses in 4THM and EMT6 tumor-bearing mice were regulated by CD200:CD200R interactions, with attenuation of both IL-6 and IL-17 in 4THM CD200(tg) mice, and enhanced levels in 4THM CD200R1KO mice. We suggest these cytokines act on the microenvironment at sites within the host, and/or directly on tumor cells themselves, to increase metastatic potential. PMID:26725371

  7. Therapy for metastatic pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Massironi, Sara; Conte, Dario; Peracchi, Maddalena

    2014-01-01

    Background Pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (pNETs) are frequently malignant (50-80%, except for insulinoma) and may show an aggressive course with metastases to the liver as well as more distant sites. These heterogeneous neoplasms include functioning tumors, which secrete a variety of peptide hormones, and non-functioning tumors (up to 90% of pNETs), which often show metastases at the time of diagnosis. Methods A PubMed search was performed for English-language publications from 1995 through December 2012. Reference lists from studies selected were manually searched to identify further relevant reports. Manuscripts comparing different therapeutic options and advances for metastatic pNETs were selected. Results The therapeutic options for metastatic pNETs are expanding and include surgery, which remains the only curative approach, liver-directed therapies, and medical therapy. In selected cases also liver transplantation (OLT) may be considered. The option of OLT for metastatic disease is unique to neuroendocrine tumors. Recently, novel promising targeted therapies have been proposed for progressive well-differentiated pNETs. Conclusions The best therapeutic approach for pNETs is still matter of debating. However, since pNETs often show a more indolent behavior compared to other malignancies, the preservation of the quality of life of the patient and the personalization of the therapy according to tumor’s and patient’s features are mandatory. PMID:25332984

  8. Bone-derived soluble factors and laminin-511 cooperate to promote migration, invasion and survival of bone-metastatic breast tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Denoyer, Delphine; Kusuma, Nicole; Burrows, Allan; Ling, Xiawei; Jupp, Lara; Anderson, Robin L; Pouliot, Normand

    2014-04-01

    Tumor intrinsic and extrinsic factors are thought to contribute to bone metastasis but little is known about how they cooperate to promote breast cancer spread to bone. We used the bone-metastatic 4T1BM2 mammary carcinoma model to investigate the cooperative interactions between tumor LM-511 and bone-derived soluble factors in vitro. We show that bone conditioned medium cooperates with LM-511 to enhance 4T1BM2 cell migration and invasion and is sufficient alone to promote survival in the absence of serum. These responses were associated with increased secretion of MMP-9 and activation of ERK and AKT signaling pathways and were partially blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of MMP-9, AKT-1/2 or MEK. Importantly, pre-treatment of 4T1BM2 cells with an AKT-1/2 inhibitor significantly reduced experimental metastasis to bone in vivo. Promotion of survival and invasive responses by bone-derived soluble factors and tumor-derived LM-511 are likely to contribute to the metastatic spread of breast tumors to bone. PMID:24601751

  9. Measuring the metastatic potential of cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R.; Gratzner, Howard; Atassi, M. Z.

    1993-01-01

    Cancer cells must secrete proteolytic enzymes to invade adjacent tissues and migrate to a new metastatic site. Urokinase (uPA) is a key enzyme related to metastasis in cancers of the lung, colon, gastric, uterine, breast, brain, and malignant melanoma. A NASA technology utilization project has combined fluorescence microscopy, image analysis, and flow cytometry, using fluorescent dyes, and urokinase-specific antibodies to measure uPA and abnormal DNA levels (related to cancer cell proliferation) inside the cancer cells. The project is focused on developing quantitative measurements to determine if a patient's tumor cells are actively metastasizing. If a significant number of tumor cells contain large amounts of uPA (esp. membrane-bound) then the post-surgical chemotherapy or radiotherapy can be targeted for metastatic cells that have already left the primary tumor. These analytical methods have been applied to a retrospective study of biopsy tissues from 150 node negative, stage 1 breast cancer patients. Cytopathology and image analysis has shown that uPA is present in high levels in many breast cancer cells, but not found in normal breast. Significant amounts of uPA also have been measured in glioma cell lines cultured from brain tumors. Commercial applications include new diagnostic tests for metastatic cells, in different cancers, which are being developed with a company that provides a medical testing service using flow cytometry for DNA analysis and hormone receptors on tumor cells from patient biopsies. This research also may provide the basis for developing a new 'magic bullet' treatment against metastasis using chemotherapeutic drugs or radioisotopes attached to urokinase-specific monoclonal antibodies that will only bind to metastatic cells.

  10. Targeting Mortalin by Embelin Causes Activation of Tumor Suppressor p53 and Deactivation of Metastatic Signaling in Human Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nigam, Nupur; Grover, Abhinav; Goyal, Sukriti; Katiyar, Shashank P.; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Wang, Pi-Chao; Sundar, Durai; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Embelin, a natural quinone found in the fruits of Embelia ribes, is commonly used in Ayurvedic home medicine for a variety of therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammation, anti-fever, anti-bacteria and anti-cancer. Molecular mechanisms of these activities and cellular targets have not been clarified to-date. We demonstrate that the embelin inhibits mortalin-p53 interactions, and activates p53 protein in tumor cells. We provide bioinformatics, molecular docking and experimental evidence to the binding affinity of embelin with mortalin and p53. Binding of embelin with mortalin/p53 abrogates their complex resulted in nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation function of p53 causing growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, analyses of growth factors and metastatic signaling using antibody membrane array revealed their downregulation in embelin-treated cells. We also found that the embelin causes transcriptional attenuation of mortalin and several other proteins involved in metastatic signaling in cancer cells. Based on these molecular dynamics and experimental data, it is concluded that the anticancer activity of embelin involves targeting of mortalin, activation of p53 and inactivation of metastatic signaling. PMID:26376435

  11. Targeting Mortalin by Embelin Causes Activation of Tumor Suppressor p53 and Deactivation of Metastatic Signaling in Human Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Nigam, Nupur; Grover, Abhinav; Goyal, Sukriti; Katiyar, Shashank P; Bhargava, Priyanshu; Wang, Pi-Chao; Sundar, Durai; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu

    2015-01-01

    Embelin, a natural quinone found in the fruits of Embelia ribes, is commonly used in Ayurvedic home medicine for a variety of therapeutic potentials including anti-inflammation, anti-fever, anti-bacteria and anti-cancer. Molecular mechanisms of these activities and cellular targets have not been clarified to-date. We demonstrate that the embelin inhibits mortalin-p53 interactions, and activates p53 protein in tumor cells. We provide bioinformatics, molecular docking and experimental evidence to the binding affinity of embelin with mortalin and p53. Binding of embelin with mortalin/p53 abrogates their complex resulted in nuclear translocation and transcriptional activation function of p53 causing growth arrest in cancer cells. Furthermore, analyses of growth factors and metastatic signaling using antibody membrane array revealed their downregulation in embelin-treated cells. We also found that the embelin causes transcriptional attenuation of mortalin and several other proteins involved in metastatic signaling in cancer cells. Based on these molecular dynamics and experimental data, it is concluded that the anticancer activity of embelin involves targeting of mortalin, activation of p53 and inactivation of metastatic signaling. PMID:26376435

  12. iTRAQ Quantitative Proteomic Comparison of Metastatic and Non-Metastatic Uveal Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Crabb, John W.; Hu, Bo; Crabb, John S.; Triozzi, Pierre; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Singh, Arun D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Uveal melanoma is the most common malignancy of the adult eye. The overall mortality rate is high because this aggressive cancer often metastasizes before ophthalmic diagnosis. Quantitative proteomic analysis of primary metastasizing and non-metastasizing tumors was pursued for insights into mechanisms and biomarkers of uveal melanoma metastasis. Methods Eight metastatic and 7 non-metastatic human primary uveal melanoma tumors were analyzed by LC MS/MS iTRAQ technology with Bruch’s membrane/choroid complex from normal postmortem eyes as control tissue. Tryptic peptides from tumor and control proteins were labeled with iTRAQ tags, fractionated by cation exchange chromatography, and analyzed by LC MS/MS. Protein identification utilized the Mascot search engine and the human Uni-Prot/Swiss-Protein database with false discovery ≤ 1%; protein quantitation utilized the Mascot weighted average method. Proteins designated differentially expressed exhibited quantitative differences (p ≤ 0.05, t-test) in a training set of five metastatic and five non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression models developed from the training set were used to classify the metastatic status of five independent tumors. Results Of 1644 proteins identified and quantified in 5 metastatic and 5 non-metastatic tumors, 12 proteins were found uniquely in ≥ 3 metastatic tumors, 28 were found significantly elevated and 30 significantly decreased only in metastatic tumors, and 31 were designated differentially expressed between metastatic and non-metastatic tumors. Logistic regression modeling of differentially expressed collagen alpha-3(VI) and heat shock protein beta-1 allowed correct prediction of metastasis status for each of five independent tumor specimens. Conclusions The present data provide new clues to molecular differences in metastatic and non-metastatic uveal melanoma tumors. While sample size is limited and validation required, the results support collagen alpha-3(VI) and

  13. Therapeutic Trial for Patients With Ewing Sarcoma Family of Tumor and Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor; Ewing Sarcoma of Bone or Soft Tissue; Localized Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor; Metastatic Ewing Sarcoma/Peripheral Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor

  14. Cannibalism: a way to feed on metastatic tumors.

    PubMed

    Fais, Stefano

    2007-12-18

    Cannibalism of tumors is an old story for pathologists, but it remained a mystery for at least one century. Recent data highlighted tumor cannibalism as a key advantage in tumor malignancy, possibly involved in resistance of tumors to the specific immune reaction. However, new data suggests also that metastatic tumor cells may use this peculiar function to feed in conditions of low nutrient supply. This makes malignant cancer cells more similar to microorganisms, rather than to normal cells undergoing malignant transformation. In cytological or histological samples of human tumors it is common to detect cells with one or many vacuoles, possibly containing cells under degradation, that push the nucleus to the periphery giving it the shape of a crescent moon. The cannibal cells may feed on sibling tumor cells, but also of the lymphocytes that should kill them. Cannibal cells eat everything without distinguishing between the feeding materials, with a mechanism that mostly differ from typical phagocytosis. Despite such phenomenon is considered mainly non-selective, a molecular framework of factors that contribute to cannibalism has been described. This machinery includes the presence of an acidic environment that allows a continuous activation of specific lytic enzymes, such as cathepsin B. Cannibalism occurs in apparently well defined structures whose main actors are big caveolar-like vacuoles and a connection between caveolin-1 and the actin cytoskeleton through the actin-linker molecule ezrin. Each of the components of the cannibal framework may represent specific tumor targets for future new strategies against cancer. PMID:17977647

  15. Effects of letrozole on breast cancer micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung in mice inoculated with murine 4T1 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wendan; Belosay, Aashvini; Yang, Xujuan; Hartman, James A; Song, Huaxin; Iwaniec, Urszula T; Turner, Russell T; Churchwell, Mona I; Doerge, Daniel R; Helferich, William G

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is the leading cancer in women worldwide. Metastasis occurs in stage IV BC with bone and lung being common metastatic sites. Here we evaluate the effects of the aromatase inhibitor letrozole on BC micro-metastatic tumor growth in bone and lung metastasis in intact and ovariectomized (OVX) mice with murine estrogen receptor negative (ER-) BC cells inoculated in tibia. Forty-eight BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to one of four groups: OVX, OVX + Letrozole, Intact, and Intact + Letrozole, and injected with 4T1 cells intra-tibially. Letrozole was subcutaneously injected daily for 23 days at a dose of 1.75 µg/g body weight. Tumor progression was monitored by bioluminescence imaging (BLI). Following necropsy, inoculated tibiae were scanned via µCT and bone response to tumor was scored from 0 (no ectopic mineralization/osteolysis) to 5 (extensive ectopic mineralization/osteolysis). OVX mice had higher tibial pathology scores indicative of more extensive bone destruction than intact mice, irrespective of letrozole treatment. Letrozole decreased serum estradiol levels and reduced lung surface tumor numbers in intact animals. Furthermore, mice receiving letrozole had significantly fewer tumor colonies and fewer proliferative cells in the lung than OVX and intact controls based on H&E and Ki-67 staining, respectively. In conclusion, BC-inoculated OVX animals had higher tibia pathology scores than BC-inoculated intact animals and letrozole reduced BC metastases to lungs. These findings suggest that, by lowering systemic estrogen level and/or by interacting with the host organ, the aromatase inhibitor letrozole has the potential to reduce ER- BC metastasis to lung. PMID:27209469

  16. Metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Gs; Manjunatha, Bs

    2013-01-01

    Cancer is a disease involving complex multiple sequential irreversible dysregulated processes showing metastasis that results in morbidity and mortality. Metastasis is a complex biological course that begins with detachment of tumor cells from the primary tumor, spreading into the distant tissues and/or organs, invading through the lymphovascular structures followed by their survival in the circulation. Metastatic tumors to the oro-facial region are uncommon and may occur in the oral soft tissues or jawbones. The clinical presentation of metastatic tumors can be variable, which may lead to erroneous diagnosis or may create diagnostic dilemma. Therefore, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of inflammatory and reactive lesions that are common to the oral region. Most of the literature on oral metastases involves either single case reports or reviews of these reported cases from scattered geographical areas. Hence this present article is an attempt to provide a detailed review of pathogenesis, epidemiological details including clinical and radiographic presentations, microscopic features and treatment of metastatic tumors to the jaws and oral cavity. PMID:23798834

  17. FDA Approval Summary: Pembrolizumab for the Treatment of Patients With Metastatic Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Whose Tumors Express Programmed Death-Ligand 1

    PubMed Central

    Blumenthal, Gideon M.; Jiang, Xiaoping; He, Kun; Keegan, Patricia; Pazdur, Richard

    2016-01-01

    On October 2, 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted accelerated approval for pembrolizumab, a breakthrough therapy-designated drug, for the treatment of patients with metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) whose tumors express programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1), as determined by an FDA-approved test, and who have disease progression on or after platinum-containing chemotherapy or targeted therapy against anaplastic lymphoma kinase or epidermal growth factor receptor, if appropriate. This indication was approved concurrently with the PD-L1 immunohistochemistry 22C3 pharmDx, a companion diagnostic test for patient selection based on PD-L1 tumor expression. The accelerated approval was granted based on durable objective response rate (ORR) and an acceptable toxicity profile demonstrated in a multicenter, open-label trial enrolling 550 patients with metastatic NSCLC. The efficacy population comprised 61 patients with tumors identified as strongly positive for PD-L1, and the confirmed ORR as determined by blinded independent central review was 41% (95% confidence interval: 28.6%, 54.3%); all were partial responses. At the time of the analysis, responses were ongoing in 21 of 25 patients (84%), with 11 patients (44%) having response duration of ≥6 months. The most commonly occurring (≥20%) adverse reactions included fatigue, decreased appetite, dyspnea, and cough. The most frequent (≥2%) serious adverse drug reactions were pleural effusion, pneumonia, dyspnea, pulmonary embolism, and pneumonitis. Immune-mediated adverse reactions occurred in 13% of patients and included pneumonitis, colitis, hypophysitis, and thyroid disorders. The accelerated approval regulations describe approval of drugs and biologic products for serious and life-threatening illnesses based on a surrogate endpoint likely to predict clinical benefit. Under these regulations, a confirmatory trial or trials is required to verify and describe the benefit of pembrolizumab

  18. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth and metastasis via targeting metastatic breast cancer by chlorotoxin-modified liposomes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Chao; He, Bing; Dai, Wenbing; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Xueqing; Wang, Jiancheng; Zhang, Xuan; Wang, Guangji; Yin, Lifang; Zhang, Qiang

    2014-10-01

    A liposome system modified with chlorotoxin (ClTx), a scorpion venom peptide previously utilized for targeting brain tumors, was established. Its targeting efficiency and antimetastasis behavior against metastatic breast cancer highly expressed MMP-2, the receptor of ClTx, were investigated. 4T1, a metastatic breast cancer cell line derived from a murine breast tumor, was selected as the cell model. As results, the ClTx-modified liposomes displayed specific binding to 4T1 as determined by flow cytometry and confocal imaging. The cytotoxicity assay revealed that the ClTx modification increased the toxicity compared with nonmodified liposomes. In addition, the modified liposomes also exhibited high in vivo targeting efficiency in the BALB/c mice bearing 4T1 tumors. Importantly, this system inhibited the growth of metastatic tumor and prevented the incidence of lung metastasis in mice bearing 4T1 tumors with only low systemic toxicity. The data obtained from the in vitro and in vivo studies confirmed that the ClTx-modified liposomes increased the drug delivery to metastatic breast cancers. This study proved that the ClTx-modified liposomes had targeting ability to metastatic breast cancer in addition to brain cancer, and displayed an obvious antimetastasis effect. Generally, it may provide a promising strategy for metastatic breast cancer therapy. PMID:24559485

  19. Molecular profiling of peripheral blood is associated with circulating tumor cells content and poor survival in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Marín-Aguilera, Mercedes; Reig, Òscar; Lozano, Juan José; Jiménez, Natalia; García-Recio, Susana; Erill, Nadina; Gaba, Lydia; Tagliapietra, Andrea; Ortega, Vanesa; Carrera, Gemma; Colomer, Anna; Gascón, Pedro; Mellado, Begoña

    2015-04-30

    The enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in peripheral blood correlates with clinical outcome in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We analyzed the molecular profiling of peripheral blood from 43 metastatic CRPC patients with known CTC content in order to identify genes that may be related to prostate cancer progression. Global gene expression analysis identified the differential expression of 282 genes between samples with ≥5 CTCs vs <5 CTCs, 58.6% of which were previously described as over-expressed in prostate cancer (18.9% in primary tumors and 56.1% in metastasis). Those genes were involved in survival functions such as metabolism, signal transduction, gene expression, cell growth, death, and movement. The expression of selected genes was evaluated by quantitative RT-PCR. This analysis revealed a two-gene model (SELENBP1 and MMP9) with a high significant prognostic ability (HR 6; 95% CI 2.61 - 13.79; P<0.0001). The combination of the two-gene signature plus the CTCs count showed a higher prognostic ability than CTCs enumeration or gene expression alone (P<0.05). This study shows a gene expression profile in PBMNC associated with CTCs count and clinical outcome in metastatic CRPC, describing genes and pathways potentially associated with CRPC progression. PMID:25871394

  20. Combination of circulating tumor cell enumeration and tumor marker detection in predicting prognosis and treatment effect in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Kun; Kong, Yun-Yi; Dai, Bo; Ye, Ding-Wei; Qu, Yuan-Yuan; Wang, Yue; Jia, Zhong-Wei; Li, Gao-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Although circulating tumor cell (CTC) enumeration in peripheral blood has already been validated as a reliable biomarker in predicting prognosis in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC), patients with favorable CTC counts (CTC < 5/7.5 ml) still experience various survival times. Assays that can reduce patients' risks are urgently needed. In this study, we set up a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) method to detect epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and stem cell gene expression status in peripheral blood to validate whether they could complement CTC enumeration. From January 2013 to June 2014 we collected peripheral blood from 70 mCRPC patients and enumerated CTC in these blood samples using CellSearch system. At the same time, stem cell-related genes (ABCG2, PROM1 and PSCA) and EMT-related genes (TWIST1 and vimentin) were detected in these peripheral blood samples using an RT-qPCR assay. Patient overall survival (OS) and treatment methods were recorded in the follow-up. For patients who received first-line chemotherapy, docetaxel plus prednisone, PSA progression-free survival (PSA-PFS) and PSA response rate were recorded. At the time of analysis, 35 patients had died of prostate cancer with a median follow-up of 16.0 months. Unfavorable CTC enumerations (CTC ≥5/7.5 ml) were predictive of shorter OS (p = 0.01). Also, positive stem cell gene expression indicated poor prognosis in mCRPC patients (p = 0.01). However, EMT gene expression status failed to show any prognostic value in OS (p = 0.78). A multivariate analysis indicated that serum albumin (p = 0.04), ECOG performance status (p < 0.01), CTC enumeration (p = 0.02) and stem cell gene expression status (p = 0.01) were independent prognostic factors for OS. For the 40 patients categorized into the favorable CTC enumeration group, positive stem cell gene expression also suggested poor prognosis (p < 0.01). A combined prognostic model consisting of stem cell gene

  1. Correlation of PD-L1 Expression of Tumor Cells with Survival Outcomes after Radical Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy for Non-Metastatic Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Victor H. F.; Lo, Anthony W. I.; Leung, Chun-Yin; Shek, Wai-Hung; Kwong, Dora L. W.; Lam, Ka-On; Tong, Chi-Chung; Sze, Chun-Kin; Leung, To-Wai

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We investigated if programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression levels were prognostic of survival outcomes after intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for non-metastatic nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Methods and Materials 104 patients with non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT were investigated for their PD-L1 expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) which were correlated with survival endpoints including locoregional failure-free survival (LRFFS), progression-free survival (PFS), distant metastasis-free survival (DMFS) and overall survival (OS). Results After a median follow-up of 7.6 years, 21 (20.2%), 19 (18.3%) and 31 (29.8%) patients suffered from locoregional failure, distant metastases and overall disease progression, respectively, and 31 (29.8%) patients died. Patients whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 2+ (moderate to strong membrane staining in ≥ 25% of tumor cells) enjoyed longer LRFFS (5-year 100% vs. 74.4%, Hazard ratio [HR], 0.159, 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.021–0.988; P = 0.042) and marginally longer PFS (5-year 95.0% vs. 65.2%, HR, 0.351, 95% CI, 0.08–0.999, P = 0.067) compared to those whose tumors had PD-L1 IHC 0 (minimal membrane staining with PD-L1 in < 5% tumor cells or no staining with PD-L1) or 1+ (minimal to moderate membrane staining with PD-L1 in between 5–24% tumor cells). PD-L1 IHC 2+ was independently prognostic of both LRFFS (P = 0.014) and PFS (P = 0.045) in multivariable analyses. Only induction chemotherapy followed by concurrent chemoradiation was prognostic of DMFS (P = 0.003) and no prognostic factor for OS was identified. Conclusion PD-L1 expression levels correlated with LRRFS and PFS in non-metastatic NPC treated with radical IMRT. It may play a role in radiosensitivity for NPC, which should be further confirmed in prospective studies using immunotherapy together with IMRT. PMID:27341634

  2. A nanoparticle formulation that selectively transfects metastatic tumors in mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jian; Hendricks, William; Liu, Guosheng; McCaffery, J. Michael; Kinzler, Kenneth W.; Huso, David L.; Vogelstein, Bert; Zhou, Shibin

    2013-01-01

    Nanoparticle gene therapy holds great promise for the treatment of malignant disease in light of the large number of potent, tumor-specific therapeutic payloads potentially available for delivery. To be effective, gene therapy vehicles must be able to deliver their therapeutic payloads to metastatic lesions after systemic administration. Here we describe nanoparticles comprised of a core of high molecular weight linear polyethylenimine (LPEI) complexed with DNA and surrounded by a shell of polyethyleneglycol-modified (PEGylated) low molecular weight LPEI. Compared with a state-of-the-art commercially available in vivo gene delivery formulation, i.v. delivery of the core/PEGylated shell (CPS) nanoparticles provided more than a 16,000-fold increase in the ratio of tumor to nontumor transfection. The vast majority of examined liver and lung metastases derived from a colorectal cancer cell line showed transgene expression after i.v. CPS injection in an animal model of metastasis. Histological examination of tissues from transfected mice revealed that the CPS nanoparticles selectively transfected neoplastic cells rather than stromal cells within primary and metastatic tumors. However, only a small fraction of neoplastic cells (<1%) expressed the transgene, and the extent of delivery varied with the tumor cell line, tumor site, and host mouse strain used. Our results demonstrate that these CPS nanoparticles offer substantial advantages over previously described formulations for in vivo nanoparticle gene therapeutics. At the same time, they illustrate that major increases in the effectiveness of such approaches are needed for utility in patients with metastatic cancer. PMID:23959886

  3. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma in the nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Atar, Yavuz; Topaloglu, Ilhan; Ozcan, Deniz

    2013-01-01

    Metastatic renal cell carcinoma of the nasopharynx, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses can be misdiagnosed as primary malignant or benign diseases. A 33-year-old male attended our outpatient clinic complaining of difficulty breathing through the nose, bloody nasal discharge, postnasal drop, snoring, and discharge of phlegm. Endoscopic nasopharyngeal examination showed a vascularized nasopharyngeal mass. Under general anesthesia, multiple punch biopsies were taken from the nasopharynx. Pathologically, the tumor cells had clear cytoplasm and were arranged in a trabecular pattern lined by a layer of endothelial cells. After the initial pathological examination, the pathologist requested more information about the patient's clinical status. A careful history revealed that the patient had undergone left a nephrectomy for a kidney mass diagnosed as renal cell carcinoma 3 years earlier. Subsequently, nasopharyngeal metastatic renal cell carcinoma was diagnosed by immunohistochemical staining with CD10 and vimentin. Radiotherapy was recommended for treatment. PMID:23924557

  4. Prospective blinded study of somatic mutation detection in cell-free DNA utilizing a targeted 54-gene next generation sequencing panel in metastatic solid tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanman, Richard B.; Mortimer, Stefanie; Zill, Oliver A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Kang, Won Ki; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jeeyun; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the mutant allele fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from tumors is increasingly utilized to detect actionable genomic alterations in cancer. We conducted a prospective blinded study of a comprehensive cfDNA sequencing panel with 54 cancer genes. To evaluate the concordance between cfDNA and tumor DNA (tDNA), sequencing results were compared between cfDNA from plasma and genomic tumor DNA (tDNA). Utilizing next generation digital sequencing technology (DST), we profiled approximately 78,000 bases encoding 512 complete exons in the targeted genes in cfDNA from plasma. Seventy-five patients were prospectively enrolled between February 2013 and March 2014, including 61 metastatic cancer patients and 14 clinical stage II CRC patients with matched plasma and tissue samples. Using the 54-gene panel, we detected at least one somatic mutation in 44 of 61 tDNA (72.1%) and 29 of 44 (65.9%) cfDNA. The overall concordance rate of cfDNA to tDNA was 85.9%, when all detected mutations were considered. We collected serial cfDNAs during cetuximab-based treatment in 2 metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC patients, one with acquired resistance and one with primary resistance. We demonstrate newly emerged KRAS mutation in cfDNA 1.5 months before radiologic progression. Another patient had a newly emerged PIK3CA H1047R mutation on cfDNA analysis at progression during cetuximab/irinotecan chemotherapy with gradual increase in allele frequency from 0.8 to 2.1%. This blinded, prospective study of a cfDNA sequencing showed high concordance to tDNA suggesting that the DST approach may be used as a non-invasive biopsy-free alternative to conventional sequencing using tumor biopsy. PMID:26452027

  5. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-05-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma. PMID:27418876

  6. Cystic Meningioma Masquerading as a Metastatic Tumor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ramanathan, Nithya; Kamaruddin, Khairul Azmi; Othman, Aizzat; Mustafa, Fadhli; Awang, Mohamed Saufi

    2016-01-01

    Cystic meningioma is a rare form of intracranial meningioma. Meningiomas are typically solid tumors but may rarely have cystic components. The diagnosis of cystic meningioma is clinically challenging as the finding of multiple intra-axial tumors, including metastatic tumors, is relatively common. We report a case of cystic meningioma initially diagnosed as a metastatic tumor from a recurrence of acute lymphoid leukemia. However, postoperative histopathological examination demonstrated an atypical meningioma.

  7. Anti-Metastatic and Anti-Tumor Growth Effects of Origanum majorana on Highly Metastatic Human Breast Cancer Cells: Inhibition of NFκB Signaling and Reduction of Nitric Oxide Production

    PubMed Central

    Al Dhaheri, Yusra; Attoub, Samir; Arafat, Kholoud; AbuQamar, Synan; Viallet, Jean; Saleh, Alaaeldin; Al Agha, Hala; Eid, Ali; Iratni, Rabah

    2013-01-01

    Background We have recently reported that Origanummajorana exhibits anticancer activity by promoting cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of the metastatic MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line. Here, we extended our study by investigating the effect of O. majorana on the migration, invasion and tumor growth of these cells. Results We demonstrate that non-cytotoxic concentrations of O. majorana significantly inhibited the migration and invasion of the MDA-MB-231 cells as shown by wound-healing and matrigel invasion assays. We also show that O. majorana induce homotypic aggregation of MDA-MB-231 associated with an upregulation of E-cadherin protein and promoter activity. Furthermore, we show that O. majorana decrease the adhesion of MDA-MB-231 to HUVECs and inhibits transendothelial migration of MDA-MB-231 through TNF-α-activated HUVECs. Gelatin zymography assay shows that O. majorana suppresses the activities of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and MMP-9). ELISA, RT-PCR and Western blot results revealed that O. majorana decreases the expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), ICAM-1 and VEGF. Further investigation revealed that O. majorana suppresses the phosphorylation of IκB, downregulates the nuclear level of NFκB and reduces Nitric Oxide (NO) production in MDA-MB-231 cells. Most importantly, by using chick embryo tumor growth assay, we also show that O. majorana promotes inhibition of tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Conclusion Our findings identify Origanummajorana as a promising chemopreventive and therapeutic candidate that modulate breast cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:23874773

  8. [Palliative radiotherapy for metastatic bone tumor].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenji; Hiratsuka, Junichi

    2006-04-01

    Bone metastases are one of the most common conditions requiring radiation therapy today. Its main aim is relief of bone pain, prevention of pathological bone fractures as well as its healing, with anticipated effect upon improving mobility, function, and quality of life. For localized bone pain, external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) will be successful in reducing pain in some 80% of patients. However, optimal fraction dose and total doses of EBRT required for pain relief have been unknown. According to the recent reports, carbon ion radiotherapy seems to be a safe and effective modality in the management of metastatic bone tumor not eligible for conventional EBRT. For scattered painful metastases, the systemic administration of radioisotopes is thought to be effective. PMID:16582516

  9. Expression Profiling of Primary and Metastatic Ovarian Tumors Reveals Differences Indicative of Aggressive Disease

    PubMed Central

    Brodsky, Alexander S.; Fischer, Andrew; Miller, Daniel H.; Vang, Souriya; MacLaughlan, Shannon; Wu, Hsin-Ta; Yu, Jovian; Steinhoff, Margaret; Collins, Colin; Smith, Peter J. S.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Brard, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The behavior and genetics of serous epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) metastasis, the form of the disease lethal to patients, is poorly understood. The unique properties of metastases are critical to understand to improve treatments of the disease that remains in patients after debulking surgery. We sought to identify the genetic and phenotypic landscape of metastatic progression of EOC to understand how metastases compare to primary tumors. DNA copy number and mRNA expression differences between matched primary human tumors and omental metastases, collected at the same time during debulking surgery before chemotherapy, were measured using microarrays. qPCR and immunohistochemistry validated findings. Pathway analysis of mRNA expression revealed metastatic cancer cells are more proliferative and less apoptotic than primary tumors, perhaps explaining the aggressive nature of these lesions. Most cases had copy number aberrations (CNAs) that differed between primary and metastatic tumors, but we did not detect CNAs that are recurrent across cases. A six gene expression signature distinguishes primary from metastatic tumors and predicts overall survival in independent datasets. The genetic differences between primary and metastatic tumors, yet common expression changes, suggest that the major clone in metastases is not the same as in primary tumors, but the cancer cells adapt to the omentum similarly. Together, these data highlight how ovarian tumors develop into a distinct, more aggressive metastatic state that should be considered for therapy development. PMID:24732363

  10. Tumor Exosomal RNAs Promote Lung Pre-metastatic Niche Formation by Activating Alveolar Epithelial TLR3 to Recruit Neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yanfang; Gu, Yan; Han, Yanmei; Zhang, Qian; Jiang, Zhengping; Zhang, Xiang; Huang, Bo; Xu, Xiaoqing; Zheng, Jianming; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-08-01

    The pre-metastatic niche educated by primary tumor-derived elements contributes to cancer metastasis. However, the role of host stromal cells in metastatic niche formation and organ-specific metastatic tropism is not clearly defined. Here, we demonstrate that lung epithelial cells are critical for initiating neutrophil recruitment and lung metastatic niche formation by sensing tumor exosomal RNAs via Toll-like receptor 3 (TLR3). TLR3-deficient mice show reduced lung metastasis in the spontaneous metastatic models. Mechanistically, primary tumor-derived exosomal RNAs, which are enriched in small nuclear RNAs, activate TLR3 in lung epithelial cells, consequently inducing chemokine secretion in the lung and promoting neutrophil recruitment. Identification of metastatic axis of tumor exosomal RNAs and host lung epithelial cell TLR3 activation provides potential targets to control cancer metastasis to the lung. PMID:27505671

  11. Sunitinib as Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in the Management of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking a Glomus Vagale Tumor in the Head and Neck: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Erkan, Serkan; Somner, Jessica; Rajan, Gunesh P.

    2016-01-01

    Background Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) of the head and neck with intracranial extension is rare and may pose difficulties to the diagnosis and management. Method We describe a unique case of a 76-year-old man with a metastatic RCC to the neck and lateral skull base with intracranial extension presenting with Collet-Sicard syndrome 8 years after initial diagnosis. The radiologic features were consistent with the diagnosis of a glomus vagale tumor on the basis of clinical and radiologic features. Results Despite radiotherapy, the intracranial extension progressed in size, resulting in early hydrocephalus. Sunitinib, a novel tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was instituted to treat the glomus vagale tumor with a marked reduction in tumor volume and resolution of the early hydrocephalus. The surgical resection of the tumor with its intracranial extension was achieved without additional postoperative morbidity. The histopathologic diagnosis surprisingly demonstrated metastatic RCC. Conclusion We present a case of metastatic RCC to the head and neck region mimicking a glomus vagale tumor and describe the first use of sunitinib as a neoadjuvant chemotherapy to achieve a single-stage radical en bloc resection of the tumor mass. PMID:27247912

  12. Tumor heterogeneity and circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chufeng; Guan, Yan; Sun, Yulan; Ai, Dan; Guo, Qisen

    2016-05-01

    In patients with cancer, individualized treatment strategies are generally guided by an analysis of molecular biomarkers. However, genetic instability allows tumor cells to lose monoclonality and acquire genetic heterogeneity, an important characteristic of tumors, during disease progression. Researchers have found that there is tumor heterogeneity between the primary tumor and metastatic lesions, between different metastatic lesions, and even within a single tumor (either primary or metastatic). Tumor heterogeneity is associated with heterogeneous protein functions, which lowers diagnostic precision and consequently becomes an obstacle to determining the appropriate therapeutic strategies for individual cancer patients. With the development of novel testing technologies, an increasing number of studies have attempted to explore tumor heterogeneity by examining circulating tumor cells (CTCs), with the expectation that CTCs may comprehensively represent the full spectrum of mutations and/or protein expression alterations present in the cancer. In addition, this strategy represents a minimally invasive approach compared to traditional tissue biopsies that can be used to dynamically monitor tumor evolution. The present article reviews the potential efficacy of using CTCs to identify both spatial and temporal tumor heterogeneity. This review also highlights current issues in this field and provides an outlook toward future applications of CTCs. PMID:26902424

  13. Metastatic Basal Cell Carcinoma Accompanying Gorlin Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bilir, Yeliz; Gokce, Erkan; Ozturk, Banu; Deresoy, Faik Alev; Yuksekkaya, Ruken; Yaman, Emel

    2014-01-01

    Gorlin-Goltz syndrome or basal cell nevus syndrome is an autosomal dominant syndrome characterized by skeletal anomalies, numerous cysts observed in the jaw, and multiple basal cell carcinoma of the skin, which may be accompanied by falx cerebri calcification. Basal cell carcinoma is the most commonly skin tumor with slow clinical course and low metastatic potential. Its concomitance with Gorlin syndrome, resulting from a mutation in a tumor suppressor gene, may substantially change morbidity and mortality. A 66-year-old male patient with a history of recurrent basal cell carcinoma was presented with exophthalmus in the left eye and the lesions localized in the left lateral orbita and left zygomatic area. His physical examination revealed hearing loss, gapped teeth, highly arched palate, and frontal prominence. Left orbital mass, cystic masses at frontal and ethmoidal sinuses, and multiple pulmonary nodules were detected at CT scans. Basal cell carcinoma was diagnosed from biopsy of ethmoid sinus. Based on the clinical and typical radiological characteristics (falx cerebri calcification, bifid costa, and odontogenic cysts), the patient was diagnosed with metastatic skin basal cell carcinoma accompanied by Gorlin syndrome. Our case is a basal cell carcinoma with aggressive course accompanying a rarely seen syndrome. PMID:25506011

  14. Dendritic Versus Tumor Cell Presentation of Autologous Tumor Antigens for Active Specific Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma: Impact on Long-Term Survival by Extent of Disease at the Time of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    McClay, Edward F.; Barth, Neil M.; Amatruda, Thomas T.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Mahdavi, Khosrow; de Leon, Cristina; Ellis, Robin E.; DePriest, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Abstract In patients with metastatic melanoma, sequential single-arm and randomized phase II trials with a therapeutic vaccine consisting of autologous dendritic cells (DCs) loaded with antigens from self-renewing, proliferating, irradiated autologous tumor cells (DC-TC) showed superior survival compared with similar patients immunized with irradiated tumor cells (TC). We wished to determine whether this difference was evident in cohorts who at the time of treatment had (1) no evidence of disease (NED) or (2) had detectable disease. Eligibility criteria and treatment schedules were the same for all three trials. Pooled data confirmed that overall survival (OS) was longer in 72 patients treated with DC-TC compared with 71 patients treated with TC (median OS 60 versus 22 months; 5-year OS 51% versus 32%, p=0.004). Treatment with DC-TC was associated with longer OS in both cohorts. Among 70 patients who were NED at the time that treatment was started, OS was better for DC-TC: 5-year OS 73% versus 43% (p=0.015). Among 73 patients who had detectable metastases, OS was better for DC-TC: median 38.8 months versus 14.7 months, 5-year OS 33% versus 20% (p=0.025). This approach is promising as an adjunct to other therapies in patients who have had metastatic melanoma. PMID:26083950

  15. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor

    PubMed Central

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O.; Gabordi, Robert C.; Smith, Prudence V.

    2016-01-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed. PMID:27293861

  16. Tumor-to-tumor metastasis: an unusual case of breast cancer metastatic to a solitary fibrous tumor.

    PubMed

    Velez-Cubian, Frank O; Gabordi, Robert C; Smith, Prudence V; Toloza, Eric M

    2016-06-01

    Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is a rare mesenchymal neoplasm that most commonly involves the visceral or parietal pleura, but that has also been described arising from virtually all organs. This neoplasm exhibits rich vascularity, a characteristic it shares with renal cell carcinoma, making these tumors especially suitable for harboring metastases. We present a case of a 64-year-old woman with history of right breast cancer treated six years previously and who presents with a left pulmonary SFT containing metastatic invasive ductal breast carcinoma as well as a synchronous contralateral primary adenocarcinoma of the lung. The literature on tumor-to-tumor metastasis is then reviewed. PMID:27293861

  17. Metastatic Stem Cells: Sources, Niches, and Vital Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Oskarsson, Thordur; Batlle, Eduard; Massagué, Joan

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis is powered by disseminated cancer cells that recreate a full-fledged tumor in unwelcoming tissues, away from the primary site. How cancer cells moving from a tumor into the circulation manage to infiltrate distant organs and initiate metastatic growth is of interest to cancer biologists and clinical oncologists alike. Recent findings have started to define the sources, phenotypic properties, hosting niches, and signaling pathways that support the survival, self-renewal, dormancy and reactivation of cancer cells that initiate metastasis–metastatic stem cells. By dissecting the biology of this process, vulnerabilities are being exposed that could be exploited to prevent metastasis. PMID:24607405

  18. Inhibition of metastatic tumor growth by targeted delivery of antioxidant enzymes.

    PubMed

    Nishikawa, Makiya; Hyoudou, Kenji; Kobayashi, Yuki; Umeyama, Yukari; Takakura, Yoshinobu; Hashida, Mitsuru

    2005-12-01

    To develop effective anti-metastatic therapy, targeted or sustained delivery of catalase was examined in mice. We found that mouse lung with metastatic colonies of adenocarcinoma colon26 cells exhibited reduced catalase activity. The interaction of the tumor cells with macrophages or hepatocytes generated detectable amounts of ROS, and increased the activity of matrix metalloproteinases. Hepatocyte-targeted delivery of catalase was successfully achieved by galactosylation, which was highly effective in inhibiting the hepatic metastasis of colon26 cells. PEGylation, which increased the retention of catalase in the circulation, effectively inhibited the pulmonary metastasis of the cells. To examine which processes in tumor metastasis are inhibited by catalase derivatives, the tissue distribution and proliferation of tumor cells in mice was quantitatively analyzed using firefly luciferase-expressing tumor cells. An injection of PEG-catalase just before the inoculation of melanoma B16-BL6/Luc cells significantly reduced the number of the tumor cells in the lung at 24 h. Daily dosing of PEG-catalase greatly inhibited the proliferation of the tumor cells, and increased the survival rate of the tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that targeted or sustained delivery of catalase to sites where tumor cells metastasize is a promising approach for inhibiting metastatic tumor growth. PMID:16256238

  19. Laser immunotherapy in treatment of metastatic prostate tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Ritchey, Jerry W.; Bartles, Kenneth E.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Liu, Hong; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-07-01

    Laser immunotherapy is a special cancer treatment modality using an intratumor injection of a special formulation consisting of a novel immunoadjuvant and a laser-absorbing dye, followed by a non-invasive near-IR laser irradiation. Our early experiments using a metastatic mammary rat tumor model showed that laser immunotherapy could cause acute selective photothermal tumor destruction and induce a systemic, long-term specific anti-tumor immunity. In the current study, laser immunotherapy was used to treat metastatic prostate tumors in Copenhagen male rats. The transplantable tumors metastasize mainly to the lung and the lung cancer is usually the cause of death. Two experimental were performed in our study. The first was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the tumor burdens, both the primary and the metastasis in the lung. The second was to study the effect of laser immunotherapy on the long-term survival of the tumor-bearing rats. For comparison, some rat tumors were also treated by the laser-dye combination to study the photothermal effect. Tour results showed that both the photothermal effect and the laser immunotherapy could slow the growth of primary tumors and the metastatic tumors. The laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment resulted in more than 20 percent long-term survival rate in tumor-bearing rats. Our experimental results indicate that the laser immunotherapy has a great potential in treating metastatic tumors.

  20. Veliparib, Capecitabine, and Temozolomide in Patients With Advanced, Metastatic, and Recurrent Neuroendocrine Tumor

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-10

    Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Malignant Somatostatinoma; Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Metastatic Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 1; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2A; Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia Type 2B; Neuroendocrine Neoplasm; Non-Functional Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor; Pancreatic Glucagonoma; Pancreatic Insulinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Recurrent Adrenal Gland Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Somatostatin-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Stage III Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage III Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IV Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Stage IV Merkel Cell Carcinoma; Stage IVA Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVB Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Stage IVC Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma; Thymic Carcinoid Tumor; VIP-Producing Neuroendocrine Tumor; Well Differentiated Adrenal Cortex Carcinoma; Zollinger Ellison Syndrome

  1. [Cancer cell plasticity and metastatic dissemination].

    PubMed

    Moyret-Lalle, Caroline; Pommier, Roxane; Bouard, Charlotte; Nouri, Ebticem; Richard, Geoffrey; Puisieux, Alain

    Metastatic dissemination consists of a sequence of events resulting in the invasion by cancer cells of tissues located away from the primary tumour. This process is highly inefficient, since each event represents an obstacle that only a limited number of cells can overcome. However, two biological phenomena intrinsically linked with tumour development facilitate the dissemination of cancer cells throughout the body and promote the formation of metastases, namely the genetic diversity of cancer cells within a given tumour, which arises from their genetic instability and from successive clonal expansions, and cellular plasticity conveyed to the cells by micro-environmental signals. Genetic diversity increases the probability of selecting cells that are intrinsically resistant to biological and physical constraints encountered during metastatic dissemination, whereas cellular plasticity provides cells with the capacity to adapt to stressful conditions and to changes in the microenvironment. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition, an embryonic trans-differentiation process frequently reactivated during tumour development, plays an important role in that context by endowing tumor cells with a unique capacity of motility, survival and adaptability to the novel environments and stresses encountered during the invasion-metastasis cascade. PMID:27615180

  2. Metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent girl: an unusually malignant tumor.

    PubMed

    Hoover, H C; Trestioreanu, A; Ketcham, A S

    1975-03-01

    The first case of metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent is reported. This case also represents the first reported response of this tumor to chemotherapy and irradiation. This tumor showed an unusually rapid rate of cell division probably making it more susceptible to these agents. The importance of an early diagnosis and definitive excision is stressed. PMID:165788

  3. STAT3 polymorphism rs4796793 may be a predictive factor of tumor response to multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitors in metastatic renal cell carcinoma in Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kazuhiro; Ioroi, Takeshi; Kanaya, Kazuya; Shinomiya, Kazuaki; Komoto, Shiho; Hirata, Sachi; Harada, Kenichi; Watanabe, Aimi; Suno, Manabu; Nishioka, Tatsuya; Kume, Manabu; Makimoto, Hiroo; Nakagawa, Tsutomu; Hirano, Takeshi; Miyake, Hideaki; Fujisawa, Masato; Hirai, Midori

    2016-03-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3 is a key factor in multiple tyrosine kinase inhibitor (mTKI)-induced growth inhibition and apoptosis of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells. This study aimed to identify associations between single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the STAT3 gene and tumor response to mTKIs in patients with metastatic RCC (mRCC). Seventy-one patients with clear cell RCC treated with any mTKI were retrospectively genotyped to elucidate a potential association between STAT3 SNPs and overall best response to drugs. Of 50 patients included for analysis, a partial or complete response was observed in 17. A significant association was found between rs4796793 alleles and tumor response [G vs. C, odds ratio (OR) 3.25, 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.30-8.07]. There were a higher percentage of responders with the C/C genotype at rs4796793 than with the G/C + G/G genotypes (OR 4.46, 95 % CI 1.31-15.28). Time-to-event analysis demonstrated a statistically significant difference between patients with the CC genotype and those with G/C + G/G genotypes in time-to-treatment response, but not in progression-free survival or time-to-treatment failure. The rs4796793 genotype is a novel predictive factor of the response to mTKIs in patients with mRCC. However, prospective translational trials with larger patient cohorts are required to confirm these results. PMID:26833481

  4. Beyond evidence-based data: scientific rationale and tumor behavior to drive sequential and personalized therapeutic strategies for the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Badalamenti, Giuseppe; Rizzo, Sergio; Pantuso, Gianni; Natoli, Clara; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    The recent advances in identification of the molecular mechanisms related to tumorigenesis and angiogenesis, along with the understanding of molecular alterations involved in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) pathogenesis, has allowed the development of several new drugs which have revolutionized the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). This process has resulted in clinically significant improvements in median overall survival and an increasing number of patients undergoes two or even three lines of therapy. Therefore, it is necessary a long-term perspective of the treatment: planning a sequential and personalized therapeutic strategy to improve clinical outcome, the potential to achieve long-term response, and to preserve quality of life (QOL), minimizing treatment-related toxicity and transforming mRCC into a chronically treatable condition. Because of the challenges still encountered to draw an optimal therapeutic sequence, the main focus of this article will be to propose the optimal sequencing of existing, approved, oral targeted agents for the treatment of mRCC using evidence-based data along with the knowledge available on the tumor behavior and mechanisms of resistance to anti-angiogenic treatment to provide complementary information and to help the clinicians to maximize the effectiveness of targeted agents in the treatment of mRCC. PMID:26872372

  5. Anti-tumor immunity generated by photodynamic therapy in a metastatic murine tumor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2005-04-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a modality for the treatment of cancer involving excitation of photosensitizers with harmless visible light producing reactive oxygen species. The major biological effects of PDT are apoptosis of tumor cells, destruction of the blood supply and activation of the immune system. The objective of this study is to compare in an animal model of metastatic cancer, PDT alone and PDT combined with low-dose cyclophosphamide (CY). Since the tumor we used is highly metastatic, it is necessary to generate anti-tumor immunity using PDT to both cure the primary tumor and prevent death from metastasis. This immunity may be potentiated by low dose CY. In our model we used J774 cells (a Balb/c reticulum cell sarcoma line with the characteristics of macrophages) and the following PDT regimen: benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A (BPD, 2mg/kg injected IV followed after 15 min by 150 J/cm2 of 690-nm light). CY (50 mg/kg i.p.) was injected 48 hours before light delivery. BPD-PDT led to complete regression of the primary tumor in more than half the mice but no permanent cures were obtained. BPD-PDT in combination with CY led to 60% permanent cures. CY alone gave no permanent cures but did provide a survival advantage. To probe permanent immunity cured animals were rechallenged with the same tumor cell line and the tumors were rejected in 71% of mice cured with BPD-PDT plus CY. We conclude that BPD-PDT in combination with CY gives best overall results and that this is attributable to immunological response activation in addition to PDT-mediated destruction of the tumor.

  6. Serial enumeration of circulating tumor cells predicts treatment response and prognosis in metastatic breast cancer: a prospective study in 393 patients

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To prospectively assess circulating tumor cell (CTC) status at baseline (CTCBL) and after one cycle of a new line of systemic therapy (CTC1C), and changes from CTCBL to CTC1C (CTC kinetics, CTCKIN) for their utility in predicting response, progression-free (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Methods CTCBL and CTC1C status was determined as negative (-) or positive (+) for < 5 or ≥ 5 CTCs/7.5 ml blood using CellSearch™ (Veridex). CTCKIN was categorized as favorable (CTC1C-) or unfavorable (CTC1C+). Tumor response was to be assessed every 2–3 months using the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) criteria. Statistical analysis focused on the relation between CTC status and CTCKIN, and response, PFS, and OS. Results 133/393 (34%) patients enrolled were CTCBL+. CTC1C status after one cycle and radiological tumor response were assessed after median (range) periods of 1.2 (0.5–3.2) and 2.9 (0.5–4.8) months, respectively. 57/201 (28%) were CTC1C+. Median [95% confidence interval] PFS and OS (months) were significantly reduced in CTCBL+ vs. CTCBL- patients (PFS 4.7 [3.7–6.1] vs. 7.8 [6.4–9.2]; OS 10.4 [7.9–15.0] vs. 27.2 [22.3–29.9]), and for CTC1C+ vs. CTC1C- patients (PFS 4.3 [3.6–6.0] vs. 8.5 [6.6–10.4]; OS 7.7 [6.4–13.9] vs. 30.6 [22.6–not available]). Unfavorable CTCKIN was significantly associated with progressive disease. Multivariate Cox regression analysis revealed prognostic factors for shorter PFS (CTCBL+, persistent CTCs after one cycle, ≥ 3rd-line therapy, and triple-negative receptor status) and shorter OS (CTCBL+, persistent CTCs after one cycle, bone-and-visceral/local metastases, ≥ 3rd-line therapy, and triple-negative receptor status). Conclusions CTCBL, CTC1C, and CTCKIN are predictive of outcome in MBC. Serial CTC enumeration is useful in tailoring systemic treatment of MBC. Trial registration Not applicable. PMID:25015676

  7. Transcription Factor Stat3 Stimulates Metastatic Behavior of Human Prostate Cancer Cells in Vivo, whereas Stat5b Has a Preferential Role in the Promotion of Prostate Cancer Cell Viability and Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Lei; Dagvadorj, Ayush; Lutz, Jacqueline; Leiby, Benjamin; Bonuccelli, Gloria; Lisanti, Michael P.; Addya, Sankar; Fortina, Paolo; Dasgupta, Abhijit; Hyslop, Terry; Bubendorf, Lukas; Nevalainen, Marja T.

    2010-01-01

    Identification of the molecular changes that promote viability and metastatic behavior of prostate cancer is critical for the development of improved therapeutic interventions. Stat5a/b and Stat3 are both constitutively active in locally-confined and advanced prostate cancer, and both transcription factors have been reported to be critical for the viability of prostate cancer cells. We recently showed that Stat3 promotes metastatic behavior of human prostate cancer cells not only in vitro but also in an in vivo experimental metastases model. In this work, we compare side-by-side Stat5a/b versus Stat3 in the promotion of prostate cancer cell viability, tumor growth, and induction of metastatic colonization in vivo. Inhibition of Stat5a/b induced massive death of prostate cancer cells in culture and reduced both subcutaneous and orthotopic prostate tumor growth, whereas Stat3 had a predominant role over Stat5a/b in promoting metastases formation of prostate cancer cells in vivo in nude mice. The molecular mechanisms underlying the differential biological effects induced by these two transcription factors involve largely different sets of genes regulated by Stat5a/b versus Stat3 in human prostate cancer model systems. Of the two Stat5 homologs, Stat5b was more important for supporting growth of prostate cancer cells than Stat5a. This work provides the first mechanistic comparison of the biological effects induced by transcription factors Stat5a/b versus Stat3 in prostate cancer. PMID:20167868

  8. Suppression of proliferation and migration in highly-metastatic lung cancer cells as well as tumor growth by a new synthesized compound TBrC and its molecular mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Ji, Dexin; Wang, Yishan; Zhang, Huarong; Chen, Linlin; Liu, Xin; Sun, Fujia; Liu, Kun; Yao, Jianwen; Zhang, Guoying

    2014-12-01

    To develop new anticancer agents has been considered as a useful and necessary strategy to suppress highly-metastatic lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. In this study, we synthesized a new compound ethyl 6-bromocoumarin-3-carboxylyl L-theanine (TBrC) and studied the anticancer activity of TBrC and its molecular mechanisms of action. Our results show that TBrC remarkably inhibits the proliferation and migration in highly-metastatic lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest as well as regulating related protein expressions. Further study indicated that TBrC not only enhances the protein levels of Bax, cytosolic cytochrome c, caspase-3 and PARP-1 but also reduces the protein expressions of Bcl-2, cyclin D1, VEGFR1 and NF-κB as well as inhibits the phosphorylation and expressions of VEGFR2 and Akt in the cancer cells. More importantly, TBrC displays strong suppression of highly-metastatic tumor growth and reduces the tumor weight by 61.6 % in tumor-bearing mice without toxicity to the mice. Our results suggest that TBrC suppresses the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells via VEGFR-Akt-NF-κB signaling pathways; TBrC may have a wide therapeutic and/or adjuvant therapeutic application in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:24132498

  9. Metastatic tumor: the complementary role of the marrow aspirate and biopsy.

    PubMed

    Atac, B; Lawrence, C; Goldberg, S N

    1991-10-01

    To determine whether bone marrow aspiration or biopsy is more sensitive in the detection of nonhematologic metastatic involvement of marrow, all 1569 consecutive paired biopsy and aspirate samples obtained between January 1975 and January 1, 1986 in an 800 bed municipal hospital were reviewed. At least eight aspirate slides and 10 biopsy cross sections were examined for each pair. In 39 samples, both biopsy and aspirate identified metastatic tumor. No biopsies contained tumor that was not also seen on the aspirate. However, five aspirate slides contained metastatic malignancies not identified on biopsy. The hematologist or oncologist viewing individual cells in a monolayer at 1000 x magnification has the advantage of identifying very small clusters of tumor cells. That accounted for three of the five positive aspirate samples in which the biopsies were negative. The other two positive aspirate slides each contained tumor on only one of eight slides. The results of our study indicate that when carefully reviewed, the aspirate is at least as sensitive as the marrow biopsy for identifying metastatic tumor. Our results indicate that marrow aspirates and biopsies are useful and complementary examinations for identifying metastatic malignancy. PMID:1928232

  10. T Cells Induce Pre-Metastatic Osteolytic Disease and Help Bone Metastases Establishment in a Mouse Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Leal, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Mercadante, Ana Carolina T.; Kestelman, Fabiola; Chaves, Sacha Braun; Azevedo, Ricardo Bentes; Monteiro, João P.; Bonomo, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Bone metastases, present in 70% of patients with metastatic breast cancer, lead to skeletal disease, fractures and intense pain, which are all believed to be mediated by tumor cells. Engraftment of tumor cells is supposed to be preceded by changes in the target tissue to create a permissive microenvironment, the pre-metastatic niche, for the establishment of the metastatic foci. In bone metastatic niche, metastatic cells stimulate bone consumption resulting in the release of growth factors that feed the tumor, establishing a vicious cycle between the bone remodeling system and the tumor itself. Yet, how the pre-metastatic niches arise in the bone tissue remains unclear. Here we show that tumor-specific T cells induce osteolytic bone disease before bone colonization. T cells pro-metastatic activity correlate with a pro-osteoclastogenic cytokine profile, including RANKL, a master regulator of osteoclastogenesis. In vivo inhibition of RANKL from tumor-specific T cells completely blocks bone loss and metastasis. Our results unveil an unexpected role for RANKL-derived from T cells in setting the pre-metastatic niche and promoting tumor spread. We believe this information can bring new possibilities for the development of prognostic and therapeutic tools based on modulation of T cell activity for prevention and treatment of bone metastasis. PMID:23935856

  11. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Pancreas: A Review.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaun Kian Hong; Chuah, Khoon Leong

    2016-06-01

    The pancreas is an unusual site for tumor metastasis, accounting for only 2% to 5% of all malignancies affecting the pancreas. The more common metastases affecting the pancreas include renal cell carcinomas, melanomas, colorectal carcinomas, breast carcinomas, and sarcomas. Although pancreatic involvement by nonrenal malignancies indicates widespread systemic disease, metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the pancreas often represents an isolated event and is thus amenable to surgical resection, which is associated with long-term survival. As such, it is important to accurately diagnose pancreatic involvement by metastatic renal cell carcinoma on histology, especially given that renal cell carcinoma metastasis may manifest more than a decade after its initial presentation and diagnosis. In this review, we discuss the clinicopathologic findings of isolated renal cell carcinoma metastases of the pancreas, with special emphasis on separating metastatic renal cell carcinoma and its various differential diagnoses in the pancreas. PMID:27232353

  12. Autophagy Promotes Focal Adhesion Disassembly and Cell Motility of Metastatic Tumor Cells through the Direct Interaction of Paxillin with LC3.

    PubMed

    Sharifi, Marina N; Mowers, Erin E; Drake, Lauren E; Collier, Chris; Chen, Hong; Zamora, Marta; Mui, Stephanie; Macleod, Kay F

    2016-05-24

    Autophagy is a conserved catabolic process that plays a housekeeping role in eliminating protein aggregates and organelles and is activated during nutrient deprivation to generate metabolites and energy. Autophagy plays a significant role in tumorigenesis, although opposing context-dependent functions of autophagy in cancer have complicated efforts to target autophagy for therapeutic purposes. We demonstrate that autophagy inhibition reduces tumor cell migration and invasion in vitro and attenuates metastasis in vivo. Numerous abnormally large focal adhesions (FAs) accumulate in autophagy-deficient tumor cells, reflecting a role for autophagy in FA disassembly through targeted degradation of paxillin. We demonstrate that paxillin interacts with processed LC3 through a conserved LIR motif in the amino-terminal end of paxillin and that this interaction is regulated by oncogenic SRC activity. Together, these data establish a function for autophagy in FA turnover, tumor cell motility, and metastasis. PMID:27184837

  13. Detection of circulating tumor cells in blood of metastatic breast cancer patients using a combination of cytokeratin and EpCAM antibodies

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are detectable in peripheral blood of metastatic breast cancer patients (MBC). In this paper we evaluate a new CTC separation method based on a combination of anti-EpCAM- and anti-cytokeratin magnetic cell separation with the aim to improve CTC detection with low target antigen densities. Methods Blood samples of healthy donors spiked with breast cancer cell line HCC1937 were used to determine accuracy and precision of the method. 10 healthy subjects were examined to evaluate specificity. CTC counts in 59 patients with MBC were measured to evaluate the prognostic value on overall survival. Results Regression analysis of numbers of recovered vs. spiked HCC1937 cells yielded a coefficient of determination of R2 = 0.957. The average percentage of cell recovery was 84%. The average within-run coefficient of variation for spiking of 185, 85 and 30 cells was 14%. For spiking of 10 cells the within-run CV was 30%. No CTCs were detected in blood of 10 healthy subjects examined. A standard threshold of 5 CTC/7.5 ml blood as a cut-off point between risk groups led to a highly significant prognostic marker (p < 0.001). To assess the prognostic value of medium CTC levels we additionally considered a low (CTC-L: 0 CTC), a medium (CTC-M: 1–4 CTC) and a high risk group (CTC-H: ≥5 CTC). The effect of this CTC-LMH marker on overall survival was significant as well (p < 0.001). A log-ratio test performed to compare the model with 3 vs. the model with 2 risk groups rejected the model with 2 risk groups (p = 0.026). For CTC as a count variable, we propose an offset reciprocal transformation 1/(1 + x) for overall survival prediction (p < 0.001). Conclusions We show that our CTC detection method is feasible and leads to accurate and reliable results. Our data suggest that a refined differentiation between patients with different CTC levels is reasonable. PMID:22646670

  14. 2-(4-Hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-benzothiazole suppresses tumor progression and metastatic potential of breast cancer cells by inducing ubiquitin ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Hiyoshi, Hiromi; Goto, Natsuka; Tsuchiya, Mai; Iida, Keisuke; Nakajima, Yuka; Hirata, Naoya; Kanda, Yasunari; Nagasawa, Kazuo; Yanagisawa, Junn

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women and has poor survival and high recurrence rates for aggressive metastatic disease. Notably, triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a highly aggressive cancer and there is no preferred agent for TNBC therapy. In this study, we show that a novel agent, 2-(4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenyl)-benzothiazole (YL-109), has ability to inhibit breast cancer cell growth and invasiveness in vitro and in vivo. In addition, YL-109 repressed the sphere-forming ability and the expression of stem cell markers in MDA-MB-231 mammosphere cultures. YL-109 increased the expression of carboxyl terminus of Hsp70-interacting protein (CHIP), which suppresses tumorigenic and metastatic potential of breast cancer cells by inhibiting the oncogenic pathway. YL-109 induced CHIP transcription because of the recruitment of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) to upstream of CHIP gene in MDA-MB-231 cells. Consistently, the antitumor effects of YL-109 were depressed by CHIP or AhR knockdown in MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, our findings indicate that a novel agent YL-109 inhibits cell growth and metastatic potential by inducing CHIP expression through AhR signaling and reduces cancer stem cell properties in MDA-MB-231 cells. It suggests that YL-109 is a potential candidate for breast cancer therapy. PMID:25403352

  15. Genetic mutations associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qingjian; Li, Fengjie; Zhao, Jiang; Wu, Kaijin; Qu, Cunye; Chen, Yibu; Li, Meng; Chen, Xuelian; Stucky, Andres; Zhong, Jiangjian; Li, Longkun; Zhong, Jiang F.

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of death among cancer patients, yet early detection and intervention of metastasis could significantly improve their clinical outcomes. We have sequenced and analyzed RNA (Expression) and DNA (Mutations) from the primary tumor (PT), tumor extension (TE) and lymphatic metastatic (LM) sites of patients with clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC) before treatment. Here, we report a three-nucleotide deletion near the C-region of Plk5 that is specifically associated with the lymphatic metastasis. This mutation is un-detectable in the PT, becomes detectable in the TE and dominates the LM tissue. So while only a few primary cancer cells carry this mutation, the majority of metastatic cells have this mutation. The increasing frequency of this mutation in metastatic tissue suggests that this Plk5 deletion could be used as an early indicator of CCRCC metastasis, and be identified by low cost PCR assay. A large scale clinical trial could reveal whether a simple PCR assay for this mutation at the time of nephrectomy could identify and stratify high-risk CCRCC patients for treatments. PMID:26908440

  16. Temsirolimus and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Unresectable or Metastatic Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-09

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Hereditary Paraganglioma; Male Breast Cancer; Malignant Paraganglioma; Metastatic Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Metastatic Pheochromocytoma; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Endometrial Carcinoma; Recurrent Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Recurrent Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Recurrent Pheochromocytoma; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Uterine Sarcoma; Regional Gastrointestinal Carcinoid Tumor; Regional Pheochromocytoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage III Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Neuroendocrine Carcinoma of the Skin; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Thyroid Gland Medullary Carcinoma

  17. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Terstappen, Leon W. M. M.

    2014-01-01

    The increasing number of treatment options for patients with metastatic carcinomas has created an accompanying need for methods to determine if the tumor will be responsive to the intended therapy and to monitor its effectiveness. Ideally, these methods would be noninvasive and provide quantitative real-time analysis of tumor activity in a variety of carcinomas. Assessment of circulating tumor cells shed into the blood during metastasis may satisfy this need. Here we review the CellSearch technology used for the detection of circulating tumor cells and discuss potential future directions for improvements. PMID:25133014

  18. Quantitative method of measuring cancer cell urokinase and metastatic potential

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, Dennis R. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    The metastatic potential of tumors can be evaluated by the quantitative detection of urokinase and DNA. The cell sample selected for examination is analyzed for the presence of high levels of urokinase and abnormal DNA using analytical flow cytometry and digital image analysis. Other factors such as membrane associated urokinase, increased DNA synthesis rates and certain receptors can be used in the method for detection of potentially invasive tumors.

  19. Head and Neck Metastatic Tumors: a Retrospective Survey of Iranian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sadri, Donia; Azizi, Arash; Farhadi, Sareh; Shokrgozar, Hojjat; Entezari, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The head and neck region is an uncommon site for metastatic involvement, but it can be the first and only symptom of primary cancer. The incidence of these tumors and their primary origins are limited in Iranian patients. Purpose Therefore, this retrospective study aimed to investigate the frequency and the common related clinical manifestations, as well as, the most common types of cancers and the prevalent sites of the primary tumor. Materials and Method All medical records related to patients with history of head and neck tumors between 1991 and 2011 at Iran Cancer Institute were evaluated and the essential information was statistically analyzed. Results Sixty cases of cervical lymph node metastasis (0.36%) and 26 cases of head and neck metastatic tumors (0.16%) including 17 cases of distant cancer (0.10%) were recorded among all 16232 registered cancers. Out of all distant head and neck metastatic tumors, 4 cases were related to oral and maxillofacial area. Pain, swelling of neck, oral mucosa ulcer and dryness were the chief complaints. Squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma were the most frequent types of cancers. The most common metastatic sites were cervical musculature, scalp and parotid gland, and the most prevalent sites of primary tumor in females were breast and lung in males. Conclusion According to these cases, the incidence rate of head and neck metastatic tumors seems to be low. However, feasible similarity of clinical presentation of oral metastatic lesions to benign lesions might result in misdiagnosis. Hence, biopsy is mandatory in any case with unusual clinical presentation, especially in patients with a known malignant disease. PMID:25759853

  20. Characterization of the MDSC proteome associated with metastatic murine mammary tumors using label-free mass spectrometry and shotgun proteomics.

    PubMed

    Boutté, Angela M; McDonald, W Hayes; Shyr, Yu; Yang, Li; Lin, P Charles

    2011-01-01

    Expansion of Gr-1+/CD11b+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) is governed by the presence of increasingly metastatic, malignant primary tumors. Metastasis, not the primary tumor, is often the cause of mortality. This study sought to fully characterize the MDSC proteome in response to metastatic and non-metastatic mammary tumors using label-free mass spectrometry shotgun proteomics in a mouse model with tumor cell lines, 67NR and 4T1, derived from the same tumor. 67NR cells form only primary mammary tumors, whereas 4T1 cells readily metastasize to the lungs, lymph nodes, and blood. Overall analysis identified a total of 2825 protein groups with a 0.78% false discovery rate. Of the 2814 true identifications, 43 proteins were exclusive to the 67NR group, 153 were exclusive to the 4T1 group, and 2618 were shared. Among the shared cohort, 26 proteins were increased and 31 were decreased in the metastatic 4T1 cohort compared to non-metastatic 67NR controls after filtering. MDSCs selectively express proteins involved in the γ-glutamyl transferase, glutathione synthase pathways, CREB transcription factor signaling, and other pathways involved in platelet aggregation, as well as lipid and amino acid metabolism, in response to highly metastatic 4T1 tumors. Cell cycle regulation dominated protein pathways and ontological groups of the 67NR non-metastatic group. Not only does this study provide a starting point to identify potential biomarkers of metastasis expressed by MDSCs; it identifies critical pathways that are unique to non-metastatic and metastatic conditions. Therapeutic interventions aimed at these pathways in MDSC may offer a new route to control malignancy and metastasis. PMID:21853032

  1. Cold Atmospheric Plasma for Selectively Ablating Metastatic Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atomospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy. PMID:24040051

  2. Capnocytophaga Lung Abscess in a Patient with Metastatic Neuroendocrine Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Thirumala, Raghu; Babady, N. Esther; Kamboj, Mini; Chawla, Mohit

    2012-01-01

    Capnocytophaga species are known commensals of the oral cavity of humans and animals (mainly dogs and cats) and are a rare cause of respiratory tract infections. We report a case of cavitary lung abscess caused by a Capnocytophaga species in a patient with a metastatic neuroendocrine tumor. PMID:22075586

  3. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth.

    PubMed

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  4. Extracellular Vesicles from Metastatic Rat Prostate Tumors Prime the Normal Prostate Tissue to Facilitate Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Halin Bergström, Sofia; Hägglöf, Christina; Thysell, Elin; Bergh, Anders; Wikström, Pernilla; Lundholm, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating data indicates that tumor-derived extracellular vesicles (EVs) are responsible for tumor-promoting effects. However, if tumor EVs also prepare the tumor-bearing organ for subsequent tumor growth, and if this effect is different in low and high malignant tumors is not thoroughly explored. Here we used orthotopic rat Dunning R-3327 prostate tumors to compare the role of EVs from fast growing and metastatic MatLyLu (MLL) tumors with EVs from more indolent and non-metastatic Dunning G (G) tumors. Prostate tissue pre-conditioned with MLL-EVs in vivo facilitated G tumor establishment compared to G-EVs. MLL-EVs increased prostate epithelial proliferation and macrophage infiltration into the prostate compared to G-EVs. Both types of EVs increased macrophage endocytosis and the mRNA expression of genes associated with M2 polarization in vitro, with MLL-EVs giving the most pronounced effects. MLL-EVs also altered the mRNA expression of growth factors and cytokines in primary rat prostate fibroblasts compared to G-EVs, suggesting fibroblast activation. Our findings propose that EVs from metastatic tumors have the ability to prime the prostate tissue and enhance tumor growth to a higher extent than EVs from non-metastatic tumors. Identifying these differences could lead to novel therapeutic targets and potential prognostic markers for prostate cancer. PMID:27550147

  5. Evaluation of response from axitinib per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors versus Choi criteria in previously treated patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Karakiewicz, Pierre I; Nott, Louise; Joshi, Abhishek; Kannourakis, George; Tarazi, Jamal; Alam, Mahmood

    2016-01-01

    Background Axitinib, a selective and potent tyrosine kinase inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor receptors, was available to patients from Canada and Australia, prior to regulatory approval of axitinib in these countries, for treatment of clear-cell metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) after failure of one prior systemic regimen. Methods This single-arm, open-label study of axitinib evaluated the efficacy, safety, and quality of life (QoL) in patients with mRCC whose disease progressed after one prior systemic first-line regimen. Primary objective was objective response rate evaluated per Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and Choi criteria. Progression-free survival, overall survival, safety, and QoL were secondary end points. Due to the small study size, analyses comprised of descriptive statistics. Results Fifteen patients were recruited, five from Canada and ten from Australia, over a limited recruitment period. Thirteen patients received sunitinib as prior therapy. All patients had clear-cell carcinoma, eleven had prior nephrectomy. Liver, lung, and lymph nodes were the most frequent sites of metastases; one patient had brain metastasis. Median time on axitinib was 118.0 days (range: 3.5–645.0 days); estimated survival probability at 12 months was 57.8%. Two (13.3%) patients had objective responses per RECIST versus nine (60.0%) per Choi criteria. Six patients had progressive disease based on RECIST versus three per Choi criteria. Nine (60.0%) events of progression or death occurred by the end of study, and three patients continued to receive the study drug. Fatigue (33%) and diarrhea (20%) were the most common grade ≥3 all-causality, treatment-emergent adverse events. The mean change in European Quality of Life – 5 Dimensions score from baseline to end of treatment was −0.0837. Conclusion The small number of patients and lack of a comparator arm limit the ability to draw definitive conclusions; however, safety and

  6. SIRT7 inactivation reverses metastatic phenotypes in epithelial and mesenchymal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Shivani; Villanova, Lidia; Tanaka, Shinji; Aonuma, Misato; Roy, Nilotpal; Berber, Elisabeth; Pollack, Jonathan R.; Michishita-Kioi, Eriko; Chua, Katrin F.

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is responsible for over 90% of cancer-associated mortality. In epithelial carcinomas, a key process in metastatic progression is the epigenetic reprogramming of an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition-like (EMT) change towards invasive cellular phenotypes. In non-epithelial cancers, different mechanisms must underlie metastatic change, but relatively little is known about the factors involved. Here, we identify the chromatin regulatory Sirtuin factor SIRT7 as a key regulator of metastatic phenotypes in both epithelial and mesenchymal cancer cells. In epithelial prostate carcinomas, high SIRT7 levels are associated with aggressive cancer phenotypes, metastatic disease, and poor patient prognosis, and depletion of SIRT7 can reprogram these cells to a less aggressive phenotype. Interestingly, SIRT7 is also important for maintaining the invasiveness and metastatic potential of non-epithelial sarcoma cells. Moreover, SIRT7 inactivation dramatically suppresses cancer cell metastasis in vivo, independent of changes in primary tumor growth. Mechanistically, we also uncover a novel link between SIRT7 and its family member SIRT1, providing the first demonstration of direct interaction and functional interplay between two mammalian sirtuins. Together with previous work, our findings highlight the broad role of SIRT7 in maintaining the metastatic cellular phenotype in diverse cancers. PMID:25923013

  7. Metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent girl: an unusually malignant tumor.

    PubMed Central

    Hoover, H C; Trestioreanu, A; Ketcham, A S

    1975-01-01

    The first case of metastatic cystosarcoma phylloides in an adolescent is reported. This case also represents the first reported response of this tumor to chemotherapy and irradiation. This tumor showed an unusually rapid rate of cell division probably making it more susceptible to these agents. The importance of an early diagnosis and definitive excision is stressed. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:165788

  8. Metastatic Periampullary Tumor from Hepatocellular Carcinoma Presenting as Gastrointestinal Bleeding

    PubMed Central

    Nissen, Nicholas N.; Guindi, Maha; Jamil, Laith H.

    2015-01-01

    Periampullary tumors constitute a number of diverse neoplastic lesions located within 2 cm of the major duodenal papilla; among these, metastatic lesions account for only a small proportion of the periampullary tumors. To our knowledge, a metastatic periampullary tumor from hepatocellular carcinoma has never been reported. A 62-year-old male reported to our institute for fatigue and low hemoglobin. His medical history was remarkable for multifocal hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) treated with selective transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE). An esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) was performed which revealed a periampullary mass. Histopathology was consistent with metastatic moderately differentiated HCC. Two endoloops were deployed around the base of the mass one month apart. The mass eventually sloughed off and patient's hemoglobin level stabilized. We postulated that periampullary metastasis in this patient was the result of tumor fragments migration through the biliary tracts and that TACE which increases tumor fragments burden might have played a contributory role. Metastasis of HCC to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract should be considered as a cause of GI bleeding. PMID:26064707

  9. Metastatic brain tumor from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Kohei; Oda, Masashi; Koyanagi, Masaomi; Saiki, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    Background: Urothelial carcinoma occurs in the bladder, upper urinary tract, and lower urinary tract, including prostatic urethra. A majority of the reported cases of intracranial metastasis from urothelial carcinoma originates from the bladder and upper urinary tract. Brain metastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra has not yet been reported in the literature. Case Description: A 72-year-old male presented with a metastatic brain tumor and a 3-year history of urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra treated with cystourethrectomy and chemotherapy with gemcitabine-cisplatin. Pathological diagnosis for tumor removal was compatible with metastatic brain tumor from urothelial carcinoma. Conclusion: Brain metastasis from urothelial carcinoma of the prostatic urethra has not yet been reported in the literature. It is an extremely rare case, however, we should be careful of brain metastasis during follow-up for urothelial carcinoma in the lower urinary tract. PMID:27512612

  10. Selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with augmentation of immunoadjuvants in treatment of DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-09-01

    Induced anti-tumor immunity can be the most effective and long-term cure for cancers, particularly for metastatic tumors. Laser immunotherapy has been developed to induce such immunological responses in rats bearing DMBA-4 metastatic mammary tumors. It involves an intratumoral administration of a laser-absorbing dye (indocyanine green) and a specially formulated immunoadjuvant (glycated chitosan), followed by an irradiation of a near-infrared laser (805-nm diode laser). To understand the immunity induced in this tumor model, immunization using freeze-thaw cell lysates against the DMBA-4 tumors was performed, followed by the tumor challenge twenty-one days later. Also performed is the surgical removal of the primary tumors of the rats before the observation of metastatic tumors. The immunization only delayed the emergence of the primary and metastases in the rats but did not provide immunity against the tumor challenge. After surgical removal of the primary tumors, the tumors re-emerged at the primary sites and the metastases developed at multiple remote sites. In contrast, laser immunotherapy cured rats experienced tumor regression and eradication. Our research has provided strong support for the working mechanism of laser immunotherapy. The experimental results showed that selective photothermal laser-tissue interaction with a complementary use of immunoadjuvant could be a potential therapy for treatment of metastatic tumors by inducing a tumor-specific, long-lasting immunity.

  11. Integrated imaging of hepatic tumors in childhood. Part I. Malignant lesions (primary and metastatic)

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.H.; Greenspan, B.S.

    1985-01-01

    Both the prognosis and treatment of hepatic tumors in children depend upon the histological diagnosis and the extent of disease. Recent advances in imaging techniques permit characterization of specific tumors and differentiation from other intrahepatic processes. An integrated imaging protocol involving a combination of ultrasound, computed tomography, and scintigraphy often provides a high degree of accuracy. Patterns derived from 40 cases of hepatoblastoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, monotypic small-cell sarcoma, and metastatic tumors are discussed and an algorithm for evaluation of hepatic tumors in children is presented.

  12. GTI-2040 and Docetaxel in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Metastatic, or Unresectable Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, Prostate Cancer, or Other Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-23

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Prostate Cancer; Stage III Prostate Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  13. High-Resolution Proton Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Analysis of Metastatic Cancer Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mountford, Carolyn E.; Wright, Lesley C.; Holmes, Kerry T.; MacKinnon, Wanda B.; Gregory, Patricia; Fox, Richard M.

    1984-12-01

    High-resolution proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of intact cancer cells revealed differences between cells with the capacity to metastasize and those that produce locally invasive tumors. The NMR resonances that characterize the metastatic cells were associated with an increased ratio of cholesterol to phospholipid and an increased amount of plasma membrane--bound cholesterol ester. High-resolution NMR spectroscopy could therefore be used to assess the metastatic potential of primary tumors.

  14. Early and multiple origins of metastatic lineages within primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zi-Ming; Zhao, Bixiao; Bai, Yalai; Iamarino, Atila; Gaffney, Stephen G; Schlessinger, Joseph; Lifton, Richard P; Rimm, David L; Townsend, Jeffrey P

    2016-02-23

    Many aspects of the evolutionary process of tumorigenesis that are fundamental to cancer biology and targeted treatment have been challenging to reveal, such as the divergence times and genetic clonality of metastatic lineages. To address these challenges, we performed tumor phylogenetics using molecular evolutionary models, reconstructed ancestral states of somatic mutations, and inferred cancer chronograms to yield three conclusions. First, in contrast to a linear model of cancer progression, metastases can originate from divergent lineages within primary tumors. Evolved genetic changes in cancer lineages likely affect only the proclivity toward metastasis. Single genetic changes are unlikely to be necessary or sufficient for metastasis. Second, metastatic lineages can arise early in tumor development, sometimes long before diagnosis. The early genetic divergence of some metastatic lineages directs attention toward research on driver genes that are mutated early in cancer evolution. Last, the temporal order of occurrence of driver mutations can be inferred from phylogenetic analysis of cancer chronograms, guiding development of targeted therapeutics effective against primary tumors and metastases. PMID:26858460

  15. Endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement: metastatic versus primary tumors.

    PubMed

    Potter, Benjamin K; Chow, Vincent E; Adams, Sheila C; Letson, G Douglas; Temple, H Thomas

    2009-12-01

    Few studies have examined the impact of underlying diagnosis on the functional and oncologic outcomes following endoprosthetic proximal femur replacement (PFR). We performed a retrospective review of 61 consecutive cemented bipolar PFR in 59 patients for treatment neoplastic lesions with a minimum follow-up of 24 months. Twenty-two patients had primary bone tumors and 39 had metastatic disease. Average follow-up for the 30 surviving patients was 55.4 months and the mean postoperative survival for the 29 patients who died was 12.2 months. Patients with primary tumors demonstrated significantly better functional outcomes than those with metastatic disease, with mean Musculoskeletal Tumor Society functional scores of 80.2 and 66.8%, respectively (p=0.0002). Age correlated inversely with functional scores (r=-0.48; p=0.0002), while femoral resection length did not. Preoperative pathologic fracture did not appear to adversely impact final functional outcomes. The Kaplan-Meier 5-year implant survival estimate was 92.5%, with aseptic loosening as the endpoint. Both functional results and survival are increased for primary tumors versus metastatic disease following PFR. However, PFR results in excellent local disease control, reliable pain relief and good functional results in both groups, with prosthesis survival exceeding that of the patient in many cases. PMID:18835153

  16. Changes in cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology with metastatic ability in cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coughlin, Mark F.; Fredberg, Jeffrey J.

    2013-12-01

    Metastatic outcome is impacted by the biophysical state of the primary tumor cell. To determine if changes in cancer cell biophysical properties facilitate metastasis, we quantified cytoskeletal biophysics in well-characterized human skin, bladder, prostate and kidney cell line pairs that differ in metastatic ability. Using magnetic twisting cytometry with optical detection, cytoskeletal dynamics was observed through spontaneous motion of surface bound marker beads and nonlinear rheology was characterized through large amplitude forced oscillations of probe beads. Measurements of cytoskeletal dynamics and nonlinear rheology differed between strongly and weakly metastatic cells. However, no set of biophysical parameters changed systematically with metastatic ability across all cell lines. Compared to their weakly metastatic counterparts, the strongly metastatic kidney cancer cells exhibited both increased cytoskeletal dynamics and stiffness at large deformation which are thought to facilitate the process of vascular invasion.

  17. V-ATPase regulates communication between microvascular endothelial cells and metastatic cells.

    PubMed

    Sennoune, S R; Arutunyan, A; del Rosario, C; Castro-Marin, R; Hussain, F; Martinez-Zaguilan, R

    2014-01-01

    To metastasize distant organs, tumor cells and endothelial cells lining the blood vessels must crosstalk. The nature of this communication that allows metastatic cells to intravasate and travel through the circulation and to extravasate to colonize different organs is poorly understood. In this study, we evaluated one of the first steps in this process—the proximity and physical interaction of endothelial and metastatic cells. To do this, we developed a cell separator chamber that allows endothelial and metastatic cells to grow side by side. We have shown in our previous studies that V-ATPases at the cell surface (pmV-ATPase) are involved in angiogenesis and metastasis. Therefore, we hypothesized that the physical proximity/interaction between endothelial and metastatic cells expressing pmV-ATPase will increase its activity in both cell types, and such activity in turn will increase pmV-ATPase expression on the membranes of both cell types. To determine pmV-ATPase activity we measured the proton fluxes (JH+) across the cell membrane. Our data indicated that interaction between endothelial and metastatic cells elicited a significant increase of JH+ via pmV-ATPase in both cell types. Bafilomycin, a V-ATPase inhibitor, significantly decrease JH+. In contrast, JH+ of the non-metastatic cells were not affected by the endothelial cells and vice-versa. Altogether, our data reveal that one of the early consequences of endothelial and metastatic cell interaction is an increase in pmV-ATPase that helps to acidify the extracellular medium and favors protease activity. These data emphasize the significance of the acidic tumor microenvironment enhancing a metastatic and invasive phenotype. PMID:24606724

  18. Nav1.5 regulates breast tumor growth and metastatic dissemination in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Michaela; Yang, Ming; Millican-Slater, Rebecca; Brackenbury, William J.

    2015-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) mediate action potential firing and regulate adhesion and migration in excitable cells. VGSCs are also expressed in cancer cells. In metastatic breast cancer (BCa) cells, the Nav1.5 α subunit potentiates migration and invasion. In addition, the VGSC-inhibiting antiepileptic drug phenytoin inhibits tumor growth and metastasis. However, the functional activity of Nav1.5 and its specific contribution to tumor progression in vivo has not been delineated. Here, we found that Nav1.5 is up-regulated at the protein level in BCa compared with matched normal breast tissue. Na+ current, reversibly blocked by tetrodotoxin, was retained in cancer cells in tumor tissue slices, thus directly confirming functional VGSC activity in vivo. Stable down-regulation of Nav1.5 expression significantly reduced tumor growth, local invasion into surrounding tissue, and metastasis to liver, lungs and spleen in an orthotopic BCa model. Nav1.5 down-regulation had no effect on cell proliferation or angiogenesis within the in tumors, but increased apoptosis. In vitro, Nav1.5 down-regulation altered cell morphology and reduced CD44 expression, suggesting that VGSC activity may regulate cellular invasion via the CD44-src-cortactin signaling axis. We conclude that Nav1.5 is functionally active in cancer cells in breast tumors, enhancing growth and metastatic dissemination. These findings support the notion that compounds targeting Nav1.5 may be useful for reducing metastasis. PMID:26452220

  19. Metabolomic Changes Accompanying Transformation and Acquisition of Metastatic Potential in a Syngeneic Mouse Mammary Tumor Model*

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xin; Bennet, Bryson; Mu, Euphemia; Rabinowitz, Joshua; Kang, Yibin

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer type for women in the western world. Despite decades of research, the molecular processes associated with breast cancer progression are still inadequately defined. Here, we focus on the systematic alteration of metabolism by using the state of the art metabolomic profiling techniques to investigate the changes of 157 metabolites during the progression of normal mouse mammary epithelial cells to an isogenic series of mammary tumor cell lines with increasing metastatic potentials. Our results suggest a two-step metabolic progression hypothesis during the acquisition of tumorigenic and metastatic abilities. Metabolite changes accompanying tumor progression are identified in the intracellular and secreted forms in several pathways, including glycolysis, the tricarboxylic acid cycle, the pentose phosphate pathway, fatty acid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and the GSH-dependent antioxidative pathway. These results suggest possible biomarkers of breast cancer progression as well as opportunities of interrupting tumor progression through the targeting of metabolic pathways. PMID:20139083

  20. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma imaging evaluation in the era of anti-angiogenic therapies.

    PubMed

    Sirous, Reza; Henegan, John C; Zhang, Xu; Howard, Candace M; Souza, Frederico; Smith, Andrew D

    2016-06-01

    During the last decade, the arsenal of anti-angiogenic (AAG) agents used to treat metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has grown and revolutionized the treatment of metastatic RCC, leading to improved overall survival compared to conventional chemotherapy and traditional immunotherapy agents. AAG agents include inhibitors of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor signaling pathways and mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors. Both of these classes of targeted agents are considered cytostatic rather than cytotoxic, inducing tumor stabilization rather than marked tumor shrinkage. As a result, decreases in tumor size alone are often minimal and/or occur late in the course of successful AAG therapy, while tumor devascularization is a distinct feature of AAG therapy. In successful AAG therapy, tumor devascularization manifests on computed tomography images as a composite of a decrease in tumor size, a decrease in tumor attenuation, and the development of tumor necrosis. In this article, we review Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST)-the current standard of care for tumor treatment response assessment which is based merely on changes in tumor length-and its assessment of metastatic RCC tumor response in the era of AAG therapies. We then review the features of an ideal tumor imaging biomarker for predicting metastatic RCC response to a particular AAG agent and serving as a longitudinal tumor response assessment tool. Finally, a discussion of the more recently proposed imaging response criteria and new imaging trends in metastatic RCC response assessment will be reviewed. PMID:27193601

  1. Identification of Genes Associated with Local Aggressiveness and Metastatic Behavior in Soft Tissue Tumors12

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, Isabela Werneck; Carvalho, Katia Candido; Martins, Waleska Keller; Marques, Sarah Martins; Muto, Nair Hideko; Falzoni, Roberto; Rocha, Rafael Malagoli; Aguiar, Samuel; Simoes, Ana C. Q.; Fahham, Lucas; Neves, Eduardo Jordão; Soares, Fernando Augusto; Reis, Luiz Fernando Lima

    2010-01-01

    Soft tissue tumors represent a group of neoplasia with different histologic and biological presentations varying from benign, locally confined to very aggressive and metastatic tumors. The molecular mechanisms responsible for such differences are still unknown. The understanding of these molecular alterations mechanism will be critical to discriminate patients who need systemic treatment from those that can be treated only locally and could also guide the development of new drugs' against this tumors. Using 102 tumor samples representing a large spectrum of these tumors, we performed expression profiling and defined differentially expression genes that are likely to be involved in tumors that are locally aggressive and in tumors with metastatic potential. We described a set of 12 genes (SNRPD3, MEGF9, SPTAN-1, AFAP1L2, ENDOD1, SERPIN5, ZWINTAS, TOP2A, UBE2C, ABCF1, MCM2, and ARL6IP5) showing opposite expression when these two conditions were compared. These genes are mainly related to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions and cell proliferation and might represent helpful tools for a more precise classification and diagnosis as well as potential drug targets. PMID:20165692

  2. Apoptosis Resistance and PKC Signaling: Distinguishing Features of High and Low Metastatic Cells12

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Ren, Ling; Mendoza, Arnulfo; Eleswarapu, Ananth; Khanna, Chand

    2012-01-01

    The complexity of the process of metastasis is widely recognized. We report herein on a recurrent feature of high compared to low metastatic cells that is linked to their ability to survive early after their arrival at secondary sites. Using novel fluorescent-based imaging strategies that assess tumor cell interaction with the lung microenvironment, we have determined that most high and low metastatic cells can be distinguished within 6 hours of their arrival in the lung and further that this difference is defined by the ability of high metastatic cells to resist apoptosis at the secondary site. Despite the complexity of the metastatic cascade, the performance of cells during this critical window is highly defining of their metastatic proclivity. To explore mechanisms, we next evaluated biochemical pathways that may be linked to this survival phenotype in highly metastatic cells. Interestingly, we found no association between the Akt survival pathway and this metastatic phenotype. Of all pathways examined, only protein kinase C (PKC) activation was significantly linked to survival of highly metastatic cells. These data provide a conceptual understanding of a defining difference between high and low metastatic cells. The connection to PKC activation may provide a biologic rationale for the use of PKC inhibition in the prevention of metastatic progression. PMID:22496624

  3. Selective events in the metastatic process defined by analysis of the sequential dissemination of subpopulations of a mouse mammary tumor.

    PubMed

    Aslakson, C J; Miller, F R

    1992-03-15

    To identify selective steps in metastasis, those that eliminate nonmetastatic tumor cells more efficiently than metastatic cells, we have evaluated the sequential dissemination of tumor cells from a mammary fatpad, using both metastatic (4T1 and 66cl4) and nonmetastatic (67NR, 168FARN, and 4TO7) subpopulations of a single mouse mammary tumor. Each of these variant subpopulations is resistant to one or more selective drugs so they could be quantitatively identified by colony formation in selective media. We found that the 2 metastatic cell lines metastasized by different routes and that the nonmetastatic tumor cell lines failed at different points in dissemination. Line 67NR did not leave the primary site; clonogenic tumor cells were not detected in the nodes, blood, or lungs during the experiment (7 weeks). Tumor line 168FARN disseminated from the primary tumor because clonogenic cells were cultured from the draining lymph nodes throughout the experiment. However, dissemination essentially stopped in the node as cells were rarely isolated from blood, lungs, or lives. Whether 168FARN cells failed to reach these tissues or were killed very rapidly after traversing the lymph node is unknown. Line 4TO7 cells disseminated via the blood and were consistently recovered from lungs by day 19 but failed to proliferate. This panel of 5 subpopulations thus identifies different points of selective failure in tumor cell dissemination and should be valuable in the assessment of antimetastatic therapies. PMID:1540948

  4. Pulmonary Metastatic Choriocarcinoma from a Burned-out Testicular Tumor.

    PubMed

    Nakazaki, Hirofumi; Tokuyasu, Hirokazu; Takemoto, Yu; Miura, Hiroshi; Yanai, Masaaki; Fukushima, Takehito; Shimizu, Eiji

    2016-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was referred to our hospital because of progressive dyspnea. Chest computed tomography showed multiple nodular shadows with a peripheral ground-glass halo. His clinical condition continued to deteriorate with the development of progressive respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. A histological examination of a transbronchial lung biopsy revealed choriocarcinoma. The patient died within nine days of admission. A histological examination of the right testis during an autopsy revealed a burned-out testicular tumor consisting of a teratoma and a fibrous scar. We herein report a rare case of pulmonary multiple metastatic choriocarcinoma originating from a burned-out testicular tumor. PMID:27250057

  5. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Oral Cavity.

    PubMed

    Guimarães, Douglas Magno; Pontes, Flavia Sirotheau Correa; Miyahara, Ligia Akiko Ninokata; Guerreiro, Marcella Yasmin Reis; de Almeida, Maria Clara Lopes; Pontes, Helder Antonio Rebelo; Pinto, Decio Dos Santos

    2016-09-01

    Metastases to the oral cavity are extremely rare events, representing less than 1% of all malignant oral tumors. Renal cell carcinoma constitutes about 3% of solid tumors in adults, and it is the most frequent kidney neoplasm, representing about 90% of kidney malignancies. Due to the silent growth of this neoplasm, most patients have no symptoms and the diagnosis is belated, usually after metastases. The present study reports an additional patient of metastatic renal cell carcinoma to the oral cavity regarding the clinical and pathologic features. PMID:27607131

  6. Autoantibodies targeting tumor-associated antigens in metastatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oaks, Martin; Taylor, Samuel; Shaffer, James

    2013-01-01

    In addition to the well-established effector functions of IgGs, including direct cytotoxicity and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, some populations of IgGs may exert anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we describe a population of antibodies that form in the natural course of metastatic cancer and contain glycans that terminate with sialic acid. We demonstrate that both the titer of these antibodies and their level of sialylation are relatively stable throughout the progression of metastatic melanoma. The sialylation pattern of these antibodies somehow correlates with their specificity for tumor-associated antigens, as IgGs targeting several antigens associated with infectious agents are relatively poor of sialic acid. We also show that some antibodies targeting the melanoma-associated antigen NY-ESO-1 bind to the human C-type lectin CD209 (DC-SIGN). We propose that these antibodies are candidate anti-inflammatory antibodies. The presence of anti-inflammatory antibodies in cancer patients may explain, at least in part, why tumors persist and spread in the host despite strong tumor-specific humoral responses. The elucidation of the cellular and molecular pathways involved in the induction of anti-inflammatory antibodies specific for tumor-associated antigens and their function may yield important insights into how tumors evade immune detection and progress. PMID:23894724

  7. Metastatic tumors to the stomach: Clinical and endoscopic features

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Giovanni D De; Masone, Stefania; Rega, Maria; Simeoli, Immacolata; Donisi, Mario; Addeo, Pietro; Iannone, Loredana; Pilone, Vincenzo; Persico, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate the clinical and endoscopic patterns in a large series of patients with metastatic tumors in the stomach. METHODS: A total of 64 patients with gastric meta-stases from solid malignant tumors were retros-pectively examined between 1990 and 2005. The clinicopathological findings were reviewed along with tumor characteristics such as endoscopic pattern, location, size and origin of the primary sites. RESULTS: Common indications for endoscopy were anemia, bleeding and epigastric pain. Metastases presented as solitary (62.5%) or multiple (37.5%) tumors were mainly located in the middle or upper third of stomach. The main primary metastatic tumors were from breast and lung cancer and malignant melanoma. CONCLUSION: As the prognosis of cancer patients has been improving gradually, gastrointestinal (GI) metastases will be encountered more often. Endoscopic examinations should be conducted carefully in patients with malignancies, and endoscopic biopsies and information on the patient’s clinical history are useful for correct diagnosis of gastric metastases. PMID:17143949

  8. Paired Tumor and Normal Whole Genome Sequencing of Metastatic Olfactory Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Glen J.; Liang, Winnie S.; Izatt, Tyler; Arora, Shilpi; Cherni, Irene; Raju, Robert N.; Hostetter, Galen; Kurdoglu, Ahmet; Christoforides, Alexis; Sinari, Shripad; Baker, Angela S.; Metpally, Raghu; Tembe, Waibhav D.; Phillips, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Background Olfactory neuroblastoma (ONB) is a rare cancer of the sinonasal tract with little molecular characterization. We performed whole genome sequencing (WGS) on paired normal and tumor DNA from a patient with metastatic-ONB to identify the somatic alterations that might be drivers of tumorigenesis and/or metastatic progression. Methodology/Principal Findings Genomic DNA was isolated from fresh frozen tissue from a metastatic lesion and whole blood, followed by WGS at >30X depth, alignment and mapping, and mutation analyses. Sanger sequencing was used to confirm selected mutations. Sixty-two somatic short nucleotide variants (SNVs) and five deletions were identified inside coding regions, each causing a non-synonymous DNA sequence change. We selected seven SNVs and validated them by Sanger sequencing. In the metastatic ONB samples collected several months prior to WGS, all seven mutations were present. However, in the original surgical resection specimen (prior to evidence of metastatic disease), mutations in KDR, MYC, SIN3B, and NLRC4 genes were not present, suggesting that these were acquired with disease progression and/or as a result of post-treatment effects. Conclusions/Significance This work provides insight into the evolution of ONB cancer cells and provides a window into the more complex factors, including tumor clonality and multiple driver mutations. PMID:22649506

  9. [Metastatic tumors in the ovary, difficulties of histologic diagnosis].

    PubMed

    Tamás, Judit; Vereczkey, Ildikó; Tóth, Erika

    2015-09-01

    The ovary is a common site of metastases. Secondary tumors account for 3-40% of all ovarian malignancies. Most ovarian metastases arise from the colon, although tumors of the breast, stomach and endometrium are also common places of origin. Clinical and histological features of metastatic tumors frequently mimic primary ovarian malignancies, causing serious diagnostic problems for the surgical pathologist. However, differentiation between primary ovarian cancer and ovarian metastasis is important in order to prevent inappropriate management and suboptimal treatment. The distinction between primary and secondary ovarian malignancies is especially difficult in cases when the metastasis is diagnosed before the primary tumor. Frozen section is widely used in the intra-operative assessment of patients with ovarian tumors but it can be very difficult to distinguish certain types of primary ovarian tumors and metastases from other sites. We examined 152 cases of secondary ovarian neoplasm diagnosed at the National Institute of Oncology, Hungary from 2000 to 2014. Colorectal cancer was the most common primary tumor (58 cases), followed by breast (33 cases), endometrium (30 cases) and stomach cancer (13 cases). The differential diagnosis proved the most difficult in cases when endometrioid and mucinous tumors were present in the ovaries. Metastases of colorectal and gastric adenocarcinomas may simulate benign or borderline cystadenomas too. In these cases the knowledge of the patient's history and immunohistochemical stains were helpful. In our study we discuss the diagnostic challenge of distinguishing these secondary ovarian tumors from primary ovarian neoplasms and the limits of the intraoperative frozen sections. PMID:26339910

  10. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients using multiplex gene expression measurements identifies new therapeutic targets in patients at high risk for the development of metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Siddappa, Chidananda M.; Watson, Mark A.; Pillai, Sreeraj; Trinkaus, Kathryn; Fleming, Timothy; Aft, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) detected in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients identifies women at high risk of recurrence. DTCs are traditionally detected by immunocytochemical staining for cytokeratins or single gene expression measurements, which limit both specificity and sensitivity. We evaluated the Nanostring nCounter™ (NC) platform for multi-marker, gene expression-based detection and classification of DTCs in the bone marrow of breast cancer patients. Experimental Design Candidate genes exhibiting tumor cell specific expression were identified from microarray data sets and validated by qRT-PCR analysis in non-malignant human BM and identical samples spiked with predefined numbers of molecularly diverse breast tumor cell lines. Thirty-eight validated transcripts were designed for the nCounter™ platform and a subset of these transcripts was technically validated against qRT-PCR measurements using identical spiked bone marrow controls. Bilateral iliac crest bone marrow aspirates were collected and analyzed from twenty breast cancer patients, prior to neoadjuvant therapy, using the full 38 gene nCounter™ code set. Results Tumor cell specific gene expression by nCounter™ was detected with a sensitivity of one cancer cell per 1×106 nucleated bone marrow cells after optimization. Measurements were quantitative, log linear over a twenty-fold range, and correlated with qRT-PCR measurements. Using the nCounter™ 38-gene panel, 6 of 8 patients (75%) who developed metastatic disease had detectable expression of at least one transcript. Notably, three of these patients had detectable expression of ERBB2 in their bone marrow, despite the fact that their corresponding primary tumors were HER2/ERBB2 negative and therefore did not receive trastuzumab therapy. Four of these patients also expressed the PTCH1 receptor, a newly recognized therapeutic target based on hedgehog signaling pathway inhibition. Conclusions The presumptive detection and

  11. Heparan Sulfate Degradation: Relation to Tumor Invasive and Metastatic Properties of Mouse B16 Melanoma Sublines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakajima, Motowo; Irimura, Tatsuro; di Ferrante, Daniela; di Ferrante, Nicola; Nicolson, Garth L.

    1983-05-01

    After transport in the blood and implantation in the microcirculation, metastatic tumor cells must invade the vascular endothelium and underlying basal lamina. Mouse B16 melanoma sublines were used to determine the relation between metastatic properties and the ability of the sublines to degrade enzymatically the sulfated glycosaminoglycans present in the extracellular matrix of cultured vascular endothelial cells. Highly invasive and metastatic B16 sublines degraded matrix glycosaminoglycans faster than did sublines of lower metastatic potential. The main products of this matrix degradation were heparan sulfate fragments. Intact B16 cells (or their cell-free homogenates) with a high potential for lung colonization degraded purified heparan sulfate from bovine lung at higher rates than did B16 cells with a poor potential for lung colonization. Analysis of the degradation fragments indicated that B16 cells have a heparan sulfate endoglycosidase. Thus the abilities of B16 melanoma cells to extravasate and successfully colonize the lung may be related to their capacities to degrade heparan sulfate in the walls of pulmonary blood vessels.

  12. The Fractalkine-Receptor Axis Improves Human Colorectal Cancer Prognosis by Limiting Tumor Metastatic Dissemination.

    PubMed

    Erreni, Marco; Siddiqui, Imran; Marelli, Giulia; Grizzi, Fabio; Bianchi, Paolo; Morone, Diego; Marchesi, Federica; Celesti, Giuseppe; Pesce, Samantha; Doni, Andrea; Rumio, Cristiano; Roncalli, Massimo G; Laghi, Luigi; Mantovani, Alberto; Allavena, Paola

    2016-01-15

    Human colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequent neoplasia in Western countries, and its metastatic progression is a major cause of cancer-related death. In search of specific molecules upregulated in CRC, with possible clinical relevance, we performed a differential gene-profiling analysis in surgery-derived CRC samples and adjacent uninvolved intestinal mucosa. The chemokine CX3CL1 and its specific receptor CX3CR1 were significantly upregulated in tumors. Higher expression of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 was confirmed by immunohistochemistry in 100 CRC tumor samples (stages I-III). Unexpectedly, high immune scores of CX3CL1 did not correlate with the density of tumor-infiltrating CD3(+) T cells or CD68(+) macrophages. Coexpression of ligand and receptor by tumor cells (axis-positive tumors) significantly associated with longer disease-free (p = 0.01) and disease-specific survival (p = 0.001). Conversely, axis-negative tumors (with low expression of both ligand and receptor) had increased risk of tumor relapse (p = 0.02), and increased likelihood of metachronous metastasis (p = 0.001), including after stage adjustment (p = 0.006). Transduction of CX3CL1 and CX3CR1 in CRC tumor cell lines induced cell aggregation that strongly inhibited in vitro migration in chemotaxis assays. In a mouse model of spleen-liver metastases, cancer dissemination to liver was dramatically reduced in CX3CL1-CX3CR1-expressing tumors, and ligand-receptor interaction was confirmed in cancer cells in vivo by fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis. In conclusion, tumoral expression of the CX3CL1-CX3CR1 chemokine axis functions as a retention factor, increasing homotypic cell adhesion and limiting tumor spreading to metastatic sites. Lack or low levels of expression of CX3CL1-CX3CR1 by tumor cells identifies a group of CRC patients at increased risk of metastatic progression. PMID:26673138

  13. Vaccination with autologous dendritic cells loaded with autologous tumor lysate or homogenate combined with immunomodulating radiotherapy and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α in patients with metastatic melanoma: a randomised “proof-of-principle” phase II study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vaccination with dendritic cells (DC) loaded with tumor antigens elicits tumor-specific immune responses capable of killing cancer cells without inducing meaningful side-effects. Patients with advanced melanoma enrolled onto our phase II clinical studies have been treated with autologous DC loaded with autologous tumor lysate/homogenate matured with a cytokine cocktail, showing a clinical benefit (PR + SD) in 55.5% of evaluable cases to date. The beneficial effects of the vaccine were mainly restricted to patients who developed vaccine-specific immune response after treatment. However, immunological responses were only induced in about two-thirds of patients, and treatments aimed at improving immunological responsiveness to the vaccine are needed. Methods/Design This is a phase II, “proof-of-principle”, randomized, open-label trial of vaccination with autologous DC loaded with tumor lysate or homogenate in metastatic melanoma patients combined with immunomodulating RT and/or preleukapheresis IFN-α. All patients will receive four bi-weekly doses of the vaccine during the induction phase and monthly doses thereafter for up to a maximum of 14 vaccinations or until confirmed progression. Patients will be randomized to receive: (1.) three daily doses of 8 Gy up to 12 Gy radiotherapy delivered to one non-index metastatic field between vaccine doses 1 and 2 and, optionally, between doses 7 and 8, using IMRT-IMAT techniques; (2.) daily 3 MU subcutaneous IFN-α for 7 days before leukapheresis; (3.) both 1 and 2; (4.) neither 1 nor 2. At least six patients eligible for treatment will be enrolled per arm. Daily 3 MU IL-2 will be administered subcutaneously for 5 days starting from the second day after each vaccine dose. Serial DTH testing and blood sampling to evaluate treatment-induced immune response will be performed. Objective response will be evaluated according to immune-related response criteria (irRC). Discussion Based upon the emerging role of

  14. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells.

    PubMed

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T; Hecht, Vivian C; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O; Manalis, Scott R

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  15. Deformability of Tumor Cells versus Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shaw Bagnall, Josephine; Byun, Sangwon; Begum, Shahinoor; Miyamoto, David T.; Hecht, Vivian C.; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Stott, Shannon L.; Toner, Mehmet; Hynes, Richard O.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2015-01-01

    The potential for circulating tumor cells (CTCs) to elucidate the process of cancer metastasis and inform clinical decision-making has made their isolation of great importance. However, CTCs are rare in the blood, and universal properties with which to identify them remain elusive. As technological advancements have made single-cell deformability measurements increasingly routine, the assessment of physical distinctions between tumor cells and blood cells may provide insight into the feasibility of deformability-based methods for identifying CTCs in patient blood. To this end, we present an initial study assessing deformability differences between tumor cells and blood cells, indicated by the length of time required for them to pass through a microfluidic constriction. Here, we demonstrate that deformability changes in tumor cells that have undergone phenotypic shifts are small compared to differences between tumor cell lines and blood cells. Additionally, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model, cells that are able to exit a tumor and enter circulation are not required to be more deformable than the cells that were first injected into the mouse. However, a limited study of metastatic prostate cancer patients provides evidence that some CTCs may be more mechanically similar to blood cells than to typical tumor cell lines. PMID:26679988

  16. Applications for quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA in the plasma of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schreuer, Max; Meersseman, Geert; van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Bott, Ambre; Chevolet, Ines; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Maertens, Geert; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Small fragments of cell-free DNA that are shed by normal and tumor cells can be detected in the plasma of patients with advanced melanoma. Quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant DNA within the cell-free DNA holds promise as a tumor-specific biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with BRAF V600 mutant melanoma. Allele-specific quantitative PCR analysis for BRAF V600 E/E2/D/K/R/M mutations on DNA extracted from 1 ml of plasma is currently under evaluation in a number of ongoing prospective clinical studies. We report five patient cases that indicate the potential applications and utility of quantitative measurements of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA as a diagnostic test and as a therapeutic monitoring tool in stage IV melanoma patients treated with BRAF-targeted therapy or immunotherapy. Finally, we offer novel insights into the dynamics of cell-free tumor DNA in melanoma. PMID:26636909

  17. Protective effects of dendrosomal curcumin on an animal metastatic breast tumor.

    PubMed

    Farhangi, Baharak; Alizadeh, Ali Mohammad; Khodayari, Hamid; Khodayari, Saeed; Dehghan, Mohammad Javad; Khori, Vahid; Heidarzadeh, Alemeh; Khaniki, Mahmood; Sadeghiezadeh, Majid; Najafi, Farhood

    2015-07-01

    Curcumin has been shown to inhibit migration and invasion of cancer angiogenesis via interacting with key regulatory molecules like NF-κB. Rapidly metabolized and conjugated in the liver, curcumin has the limited systemic bioavailability. Previous results have shown a new light of potential biocompatibility, biodegradability, as well as anti-cancer effects of dendrosomal curcumin (DNC) in biological systems. The present study aims to deliberate the protective effects of DNC on metastatic breast tumor in vitro and in vivo. After the dosing procedure, twenty-seven female mice were divided into 40 and 80mg/kg groups of DNC, along with a control group to investigate the anti-metastatic effects of DNC on mammary tumor-bearing mice. In vitro results showed that the different concentrations of DNC reduced the migration and the adhesion of 4T1 cells after 24h (P<0.05). Under the dosing procedure, DNC was safe at 80mg/kg and lower doses. The treated DNC animals had a higher survival rate and lower metastatic signs (14%) compared to control (100%) (P<0.05). The metastatic tumors were more common in control mice than the treated groups in the lung, the liver and the sternum tissues. Animals treated with DNC had smaller tumor volume in comparison with control group (P<0.05). Final mean tumor volume reached to approximately 1.11, 0.31 and 0.27cm(3) in the control, and 40 and 80mg/kg DNC groups, respectively (P<0.05). Furthermore, suppression of NF-κB expression by DNC led to down-regulation of VEGF, COX-2, and MMP-9 expressions in the breast tumor, the lung, the brain, the spleen and the liver tissues (P<0.05). These outcomes indicate that dendrosomal curcumin has a chemoprotective effect on the breast cancer metastasis through suppression of NF-κB and its regulated gene products. PMID:25863259

  18. Single cell metastatic phenotyping using pulsed nanomechanical indentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Babahosseini, Hesam; Strobl, Jeannine S.; Agah, Masoud

    2015-09-01

    The existing approach to characterize cell biomechanical properties typically utilizes switch-like models of mechanotransduction in which cell responses are analyzed in response to a single nanomechanical indentation or a transient pulsed stress. Although this approach provides effective descriptors at population-level, at a single-cell-level, there are significant overlaps in the biomechanical descriptors of non-metastatic and metastatic cells which precludes the use of biomechanical markers for single cell metastatic phenotyping. This study presents a new promising marker for biosensing metastatic and non-metastatic cells at a single-cell-level using the effects of a dynamic microenvironment on the biomechanical properties of cells. Two non-metastatic and two metastatic epithelial breast cell lines are subjected to a pulsed stresses regimen exerted by atomic force microscopy. The force-time data obtained for the cells revealed that the non-metastatic cells increase their resistance against deformation and become more stiffened when subjected to a series of nanomechanical indentations. On the other hand, metastatic cells become slightly softened when their mechanical microenvironment is subjected to a similar dynamical changes. This distinct behavior of the non-metastatic and metastatic cells to the pulsed stresses paradigm provided a signature for single-cell-level metastatic phenotyping with a high confidence level of ∼95%.

  19. Metastatic tumors in the duodenum: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Iwamuro, Masaya; Uetsuka, Hirokazu; Makihata, Kiyoshi; Yamamoto, Kazuhide

    2015-01-01

    Two cases are presented involving a 71-year-old male with adenocarcinoma of the lung and a 57-year-old male with adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon, each with metastatic lesions located in the duodenal bulb. Each lesion appeared as a submucosal tumor with an ulcer at the center. Lymph node swelling in the hepatoduodenal ligament was also found to precede the emergence of each duodenal metastasis. These cases indicate that involvement of the lymph node in the hepatoduodenal ligament may be a forerunner of duodenal metastasis. PMID:26458611

  20. The preclinical therapeutic response of residual metastatic disease is distinct from its primary tumor of origin

    PubMed Central

    Day, Chi-Ping; Carter, John; Bonomi, Carrie; Hollingshead, Melinda; Merlino, Glenn

    2011-01-01

    Cancer-related deaths are caused principally by recurrence and metastasis arising from residual disease, whose therapeutic responses has been suggested to be substantially different from primary tumors. However, experimental animal models designed for evaluating the therapeutic responses of residual disease are mostly lacking. To overcome this deficiency, we have developed a preclinical model that recapitulates the progression for advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An archived Lewis Lung Carcinoma mouse tumor, propagated only through serial in vivo transplantation and never adapted to cell culture, was stably labeled using lentivirus-encoded biomarkers, consistently expressed through an RNA polymerase II promoter. Labeled tumors were inoculated into syngeneic immunocompetent mice to ensure superior tumor-host interactions. Primary tumors were resected upon reaching a predetermined size, following by treatment in a setting akin to post-surgical first-line adjuvant chemotherapy and routine imaging to monitor the progression of pulmonary metastasis. We discovered that efficacious treatment, instead of reducing disease growth rates, significantly prolonged disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). As in the clinic, cisplatin-based regimes were more effective in this model. However, the response of metastases to specific agents could not be predicted from, and often opposed, their effects on subcutaneous “primary” tumors, possibly due to their distinct growth kinetics and host interactions. We here introduce a clinically relevant model of residual metastatic disease that may more accurately predict the therapeutic response of recurrent, metastatic disease. PMID:21312195

  1. Secretome identification of immune cell factors mediating metastatic cell homing

    PubMed Central

    Aguado, Brian A.; Wu, Jia J.; Azarin, Samira M.; Nanavati, Dhaval; Rao, Shreyas S.; Bushnell, Grace G.; Medicherla, Chaitanya B.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cell homing is a complex process mediated in part by diffusible factors secreted from immune cells found at a pre-metastatic niche. We report on connecting secretomics and TRanscriptional Activity CEll aRray (TRACER) data to identify functional paracrine interactions between immune cells and metastatic cells as novel mediators of homing. Metastatic breast cancer mouse models were used to generate a diseased splenocyte conditioned media (D-SCM) containing immune cell secreted factors. MDA-MB-231 metastatic cell activity including cell invasion, migration, transendothelial migration, and proliferation were increased in D-SCM relative to control media. Our D-SCM secretome analysis yielded 144 secreted factor candidates that contribute to increased metastatic cell activity. The functional mediators of homing were identified using MetaCore software to determine interactions between the immune cell secretome and the TRACER-identified active transcription factors within metastatic cells. Among the 5 candidate homing factors identified, haptoglobin was selected and validated in vitro and in vivo as a key mediator of homing. Our studies demonstrate a novel systems biology approach to identify functional signaling factors associated with a cellular phenotype, which provides an enabling tool that complements large-scale protein identification provided by proteomics. PMID:26634905

  2. In vivo capture and label-free detection of early metastatic cells

    PubMed Central

    Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Gower, Robert M.; Aguado, Brian A.; Sullivan, Megan E.; Goodman, Ashley G.; Jiang, Eric J.; Rao, Shreyas S.; Ren, Yinying; Tucker, Susan L.; Backman, Vadim; Jeruss, Jacqueline S.; Shea, Lonnie D.

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death for women, with mortality resulting from metastasis. Metastases are often detected once tumor cells affect the function of solid organs, with a high disease burden limiting effective treatment. Here we report a method for the early detection of metastasis using an implanted scaffold to recruit and capture metastatic cells in vivo, which achieves high cell densities and reduces the tumor burden within solid organs 10-fold. Recruitment is associated with infiltration of immune cells, which include Gr1hiCD11b+ cells. We identify metastatic cells in the scaffold through a label-free detection system using inverse-spectroscopic optical coherence tomography, which identifies changes to nanoscale tissue architecture associated with the presence of tumor cells. For patients at risk of recurrence, scaffold implantation following completion of primary therapy has the potential to identify metastatic disease at the earliest stage, enabling initiation of therapy while the disease burden is low. PMID:26348915

  3. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition, the tumor microenvironment, and metastatic behavior of epithelial malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Talbot, Lindsay J; Bhattacharya, Syamal D; Kuo, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    Objective The mechanisms of cancer metastasis have been intensely studied recently and may provide vital therapeutic targets for metastasis prevention. We sought to review the contribution of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and the tumor microenvironment to cancer metastasis. Summary Background Data Epithelial-mesenchymal transition is the process by which epithelial cells lose cell-cell junctions and baso-apical polarity and acquire plasticity, mobility, invasive capacity, stemlike characteristics, and resistance to apoptosis. This cell biology program is active in embryology, wound healing, and pathologically in cancer metastasis, and along with the mechanical and cellular components of the tumor microenvironment, provides critical impetus for epithelial malignancies to acquire metastatic capability. Methods A literature review was performed using PubMed for “epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “tumor microenvironment”, “TGF-β and cancer”, “Wnt and epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “Notch and epithelial-mesenchymal transition”, “Hedgehog and epithelial-mesenchymal transition” and “hypoxia and metastasis”. Relevant primary studies and review articles were assessed. Results Major signaling pathways involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition include TGF-β, Wnt, Notch, Hedgehog, and others. These pathways converge on several transcription factors, including zinc finger proteins Snail and Slug, Twist, ZEB 1/2, and Smads. These factors interact with one another and others to provide crosstalk between the relevant signaling pathways. MicroRNA suppression and epigenetic changes also influence the changes involved in epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Cellular and mechanical components of the tumor microenvironment are also critical in determining metastatic potential. Conclusions While the mechanisms promoting metastasis are extremely wide ranging and still under intense investigation, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition program and

  4. Pancreatic islet cell tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Islet cell tumors; Islet of Langerhans tumor; Neuroendocrine tumors ... In the healthy pancreas, cells called islet cells produce hormones that regulate a several bodily functions. These include blood sugar level and the production of ...

  5. Assessment of Tumor Radioresponsiveness and Metastatic Potential by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Ovrebo, Kirsti Marie; Gulliksrud, Kristine; Mathiesen, Berit; Rofstad, Einar K.

    2011-09-01

    Purpose: It has been suggested that gadolinium diethylene-triamine penta-acetic acid (Gd-DTPA)-based dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) may provide clinically useful biomarkers for personalized cancer treatment. In this preclinical study, we investigated the potential of DCE-MRI as a noninvasive method for assessing the radioresponsiveness and metastatic potential of tumors. Methods and Materials: R-18 melanoma xenografts growing in BALB/c nu/nu mice were used as experimental tumor models. Fifty tumors were subjected to DCE-MRI, and parametric images of K{sup trans} (the volume transfer constant of Gd-DTPA) and v{sub e} (the fractional distribution volume of Gd-DTPA) were produced by pharmacokinetic analysis of the DCE-MRI series. The tumors were irradiated after the DCE-MRI, either with a single dose of 10 Gy for detection of radiobiological hypoxia (30 tumors) or with five fractions of 4 Gy in 48 h for assessment of radioresponsiveness (20 tumors). The host mice were then euthanized and examined for lymph node metastases, and the primary tumors were resected for measurement of cell survival in vitro. Results: Tumors with hypoxic cells showed significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors without significant hypoxia (p < 0.0001, n = 30), and K{sup trans} decreased with increasing cell surviving fraction for tumors given fractionated radiation treatment (p < 0.0001, n = 20). Tumors in metastasis-positive mice had significantly lower K{sup trans} values than tumors in metastasis-negative mice (p < 0.0001, n = 50). Significant correlations between v{sub e} and tumor hypoxia, radioresponsiveness, or metastatic potential could not be detected. Conclusions: R-18 tumors with low K{sup trans} values are likely to be resistant to radiation treatment and have a high probability of developing lymph node metastases. The general validity of these observations should be investigated further by studying preclinical tumor models with biological

  6. Function of immunoadjuvants in laser immunotherapy for treatment of metastatic breast tumors in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Wolf, Roman F.; Lucroy, Michael D.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2002-06-01

    Tumor cell destruction usually induces host immune responses, such as local inflammation and increased activities of macrophages and neutrophils. Use of immunoadjuvant can usually enhance such immune activities. Laser immunotherapy is designed to use the combination of laser photothermal and immunological interactions to induce long-term antitumor immunity with the help of immunoadjuvant. It uses a selective hyperthermia for acute tumor destruction through an intratumor administration of indocyanine green and a noninvasive irradiation by an 805-nm laser. The concurrent in situ administration of immunoadjuvant helped achieve the desired effect: tumor eradication and antitumor immunity. The current study further explores the function of immunoadjuvants in laser immunotherapy by testing four different adjuvants: glycated chitosan, complete Freund's adjuvant, incomplete Freund's adjuvant, and c-parvum. Each adjuvant provided long-term tumor cure in the treatment of a metastatic mammary tumor model in rats. However, glycated chitosan and complete Freund's adjuvant were most effective with 25% and 18% long- term cure rates, respectively. Different concentrations of glycated chitosan were also used in treatment of rats bearing metastatic breast tumors.

  7. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  8. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  9. Identification of an aptamer through whole cell-SELEX for targeting high metastatic liver cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rong, Yuan; Chen, Hao; Zhou, Xue-Feng; Yin, Chang-Qing; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Peng, Chun-Wei; Liu, Shao-Ping; Wang, Fu-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most deadly human cancers due to its ability of invasion and metastasis. Thus, the approaches to identify potential compounds that inhibit invasion and metastasis of HCC are critical for treatment of this disease. In the present study, we used HCCLM9 cells with high metastatic potential and MHCC97L with low metastatic potential as a model system to study the molecular mechanisms of HCC metastasis. By applying cell- Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) against living cells, we used HCCLM9 as target cells and MHCC97L cells as control to screen a group of HCC metastasis- and cell-specific DNA aptamers. One of selected aptamers, LY-1, could specifically bind to metastatic HCC with a dissociation constant (Kd) in nanomolar range. In vitro studies demonstrated that LY-1 can recognize and bind to membrane protein of metastatic HCC cells. Furthermore, QD605 labeled LY-1 aptamer could recognize HCC cells in both local liver cancer tissues and pulmonary metastatic sites in a xenograft model of HCC with pulmonary metastasis. Further biochemical and immunostaining studies showed that LY-1 could selectively bind to a subpopulation of more metastatic cells in HCCLM9 cells, which express more CK19 and vimentin. Finally, treatment of highly metastatic cells with LY-1 led to reduced migration and invasiveness of HCCLM9 cells in vitro and suppression of xenograft growth in vivo. Taken together, the present study demonstrated the tumor targeting and tumor suppressive effects of LY-1, which could be a promising molecular probe for metastatic HCC and a potential candidate of chemotherapy for metastatic HCC. PMID:26882565

  10. Immunosuppressive cells in tumor immune escape and metastasis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yang; Cao, Xuetao

    2016-05-01

    Tumor immune escape and the initiation of metastasis are critical steps in malignant progression of tumors and have been implicated in the failure of some clinical cancer immunotherapy. Tumors develop numerous strategies to escape immune surveillance or metastasize: Tumors not only modulate the recruitment and expansion of immunosuppressive cell populations to develop the tumor microenvironment or pre-metastatic niche but also switch the phenotype and function of normal immune cells from a potentially tumor-reactive state to a tumor-promoting state. Immunosuppressive cells facilitate tumor immune escape by inhibiting antitumor immune responses and furthermore promote tumor metastasis by inducing immunosuppression, promoting tumor cell invasion and intravasation, establishing a pre-metastatic niche, facilitating epithelial-mesenchymal transition, and inducing angiogenesis at primary tumor or metastatic sites. Numerous translational studies indicate that it is possible to inhibit tumor immune escape and prevent tumor metastasis by blocking immunosuppressive cells and eliminating immunosuppressive mechanisms that are induced by either immunosuppressive cells or tumor cells. Furthermore, many clinical trials targeting immunosuppressive cells have also achieved good outcome. In this review, we focus on the underlying mechanisms of immunosuppressive cells in promoting tumor immune escape and metastasis, discuss our current understanding of the interactions between immunosuppressive cells and tumor cells in the tumor microenvironment, and suggest future research directions as well as potential clinical strategies in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26689709

  11. Hepatoma SK Hep-1 Cells Exhibit Characteristics of Oncogenic Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Highly Metastatic Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yanling; Zhang, Yanhong; Tschudy-Seney, Benjamin; Ramsamooj, Rajen; Wan, Yu-Jui Yvonne; Theise, Neil D.; Zern, Mark A.; Duan, Yuyou

    2014-01-01

    Background SK Hep-1 cells (SK cells) derived from a patient with liver adenocarcinoma have been considered a human hepatoma cell line with mesenchymal origin characteristics, however, SK cells do not express liver genes and exhibit liver function, thus, we hypothesized whether mesenchymal cells might contribute to human liver primary cancers. Here, we characterized SK cells and its tumourigenicity. Methods and Principal Findings We found that classical mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) markers were presented on SK cells, but endothelial marker CD31, hematopoietic markers CD34 and CD45 were negative. SK cells are capable of differentiate into adipocytes and osteoblasts as adipose-derived MSC (Ad-MSC) and bone marrow-derived MSC (BM-MSC) do. Importantly, a single SK cell exhibited a substantial tumourigenicity and metastatic capacity in immunodefficient mice. Metastasis not only occurred in circulating organs such as lung, liver, and kidneys, but also in muscle, outer abdomen, and skin. SK cells presented greater in vitro invasive capacity than those of Ad-MSC and BM-MSC. The xenograft cells from subcutaneous and metastatic tumors exhibited a similar tumourigenicity and metastatic capacity, and showed the same relatively homogenous population with MSC characteristics when compared to parental SK cells. SK cells could unlimitedly expand in vitro without losing MSC characteristics, its tumuorigenicity and metastatic capacity, indicating that SK cells are oncogenic MSC with enhanced self-renewal capacity. We believe that this is the first report that human MSC appear to be transformed into cancer stem cells (CSC), and that their derivatives also function as CSCs. Conclusion Our findings demonstrate that SK cells represent a transformation mechanism of normal MSC into an enhanced self-renewal CSC with metastasis capacity, SK cells and their xenografts represent a same relative homogeneity of CSC with substantial metastatic capacity. Thus, it represents a novel mechanism of

  12. Effects of dimethyltriazenes on in vitro Lewis lung carcinoma tumor lines with different metastatic capacity.

    PubMed

    Zupi, G; Corsi, A; Sacchi, A; Lassiani, L; Giraldi, T

    1984-01-01

    The effects of a selective antimetastatic agent: the aryldimethyltriazene derivative 1-p-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)benzoic acid potassium salt (DM-COOK) have been examined on two in vitro tumor cell lines derived from lung metastases of Lewis lung carcinoma. These stabilized in vitro tumor cell lines named C108 and BC215 have been reported to differ in their metastatic potential evaluated as lung colony forming ability and as the number of spontaneous metastases produced after intramuscular implant of tumor cells. The cytotoxic effect of DM-COOK in vitro was also compared with the one demonstrated by the structure-related compound 4-(3,3-dimethyl-1-triazeno)imidazole-5- carboxamide (DTIC) on the same variant lines. Survival curves show a different chemosensitivity of the two in vitro lines to the DM-COOK treatment, whereas no differences were detected between C108 and BC215 after exposure to DTIC. Moreover, DM-COOK and DTIC exhibit different trends of cell killing, implying different mechanisms of action for the two drugs. Results are discussed in view of the selective in vitro action of the aryldimethyltriazene derivative DM-COOK on cells which express a high metastatic potential. PMID:6480290

  13. Chemokine axes in breast cancer: factors of the tumor microenvironment reshape the CCR7-driven metastatic spread of luminal-A breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Weitzenfeld, Polina; Kossover, Olga; Körner, Cindy; Meshel, Tsipi; Wiemann, Stefan; Seliktar, Dror; Legler, Daniel F; Ben-Baruch, Adit

    2016-06-01

    Chemokine axes have been shown to mediate site-specific metastasis in breast cancer, but their relevance to different subtypes has been hardly addressed. Here, with the focus on the CCR7-CCL21 axis, patient datasets demonstrated that luminal-A tumors express relatively low CCR7 levels compared with more aggressive disease subtypes. Furthermore, lymph node metastasis was not associated with high CCR7 levels in luminal-A patients. The metastatic pattern of luminal-A breast tumors may be influenced by the way luminal-A tumor cells interpret signals provided by factors of the primary tumor microenvironment. Thus, CCR7-expressing human luminal-A cells were stimulated simultaneously by factors representing 3 tumor microenvironment arms typical of luminal-A tumors, hormonal, inflammatory, and growth stimulating: estrogen + TNF-α + epidermal growth factor. Such tumor microenvironment stimulation down-regulated the migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells toward CCL21 and inhibited the formation of directional protrusions toward CCL21 in a novel 3-dimensional hydrogel system. CCL21-induced migration of CCR7-expressing tumor cells depended on PI3K and MAPK activation; however, when CCR7-expressing cancer cells were prestimulated by tumor microenvironment factors, CCL21 could not effectively activate these signaling pathways. In vivo, pre-exposure of the tumor cells to tumor microenvironment factors has put restraints on CCL21-mediated lymph node-homing cues and shifted the metastatic pattern of CCR7-expressing cells to the aggressive phenotype of dissemination to bones. Several of the aspects were also studied in the CXCR4-CXCL12 system, demonstrating similar patient and in vitro findings. Thus, we provide novel evidence to subtype-specific regulation of the CCR7-CCL21 axis, with more general implications to chemokine-dependent patterns of metastatic spread, revealing differential regulation in the luminal-A subtype. PMID:26936935

  14. The HDAC Inhibitor Vorinostat Diminishes the In Vitro Metastatic Behavior of Osteosarcoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Xiaodong; Brynien, Daniel; Weiss, Kurt R.

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignancy of bone and affects patients in the first two decades of life. The greatest determinant of survival is the presence of pulmonary metastatic disease. The role of epigenetic regulation in OS, specifically the biology of metastases, is unknown. Our previous study with the murine OS cell populations K7M2 and K12 demonstrated a significant correlation of metastatic potential with the DNA methylation level of tumor suppressor genes. In the current study, we investigated if the histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, vorinostat, could regulate the metastatic potential of highly metastatic OS cells. Our results revealed that vorinostat treatment of highly metastatic K7M2 OS cells was able to greatly reduce the proliferation and metastatic potential of the cells. Morphological features related to cell motility and invasion were changed by vorinostat treatment. In addition, the gene expressions of mTOR, ALDH1, and PGC-1 were downregulated by vorinostat treatment. These data suggest that vorinostat may be an effective modulator of OS cell metastatic potential and should be studied in preclinical models of metastatic OS. PMID:25785263

  15. Circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors: are those biomarkers of real prognostic value? A review

    PubMed Central

    CEBOTARU, CRISTINA LIGIA; OLTEANU, ELENA DIANA; ANTONE, NICOLETA ZENOVIA; BUIGA, RARES; NAGY, VIORICA

    2016-01-01

    Analysis of circulating tumor cells from patients with different types of cancer is nowadays a fascinating new tool of research and their number is proven to be useful as a prognostic factor in metastatic breast, colon and prostate cancer patients. Studies are going beyond enumeration, exploring the circulating tumor cells to better understand the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, invasion and metastasis and their value for characterization, prognosis and tailoring of treatment. Few studies investigated the prognostic significance of circulating tumor cells in germ cell tumors. In this review, we examine the possible significance of the detection of circulating tumor cells in this setting. PMID:27152069

  16. Photothermal and immunological reactions against metastatic tumors using laser photosensitizer immunoadjuvant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; El-Samad, Ahmad; Nordquist, Robert E.

    1999-06-01

    Photothermal tissue interaction is the most common phenomenon when laser energy is deposited in tissue. Because of the sensitivity of cancer cells to temperature increase, photothermal reaction can be an effective mechanism of direct cancer destruction using lasers. Tumor-specific immune response is crucial in achieving systemic and long-term cures for cancers, particularly for metastatic cancers. Can photothermal interaction induce sufficient immunological reaction when the local destruction of tumor cells occurs? To achieve selective photothermal destruction, indocyanine green as a photosensitizer was directly injected into rat mammary tumors, followed by irradiation of 805 nm laser light. Although extensive photothermal tumor killing was achieved and tumor growth was slowed down immediately following the treatment, photothermal reaction alone was shown not sufficient in controlling the treated primary tumors and their metastases. When an immunoadjuvant was used with the indocyanine green, however, the same laser treatment not only could eventually eradicate the treated primary tumors but also eradicate the untreated metastases at remote sites. The tumor eradication went through a growth-regression process over a period of six to nine weeks post-treatment, indicating an induced immune response. The Western Blot analysis using the serum from a laser-immunotherapy cured rat showed that the tumor-specific antibody induced by the treatment had a long- lasting effect. Our experimental data indicated that photothermal interaction alone was not sufficient to slow and eventually reverse tumor growth. However, it can reduce the tumor burden and at the same time release tumor antigens to be recognized by the host immune system. Therefore, in conjunction with specific immunological stimulation using in situ immunoadjuvants, the selective thermal injury to tumors plays an important and a direct role in this laser immunotherapy.

  17. Breast cancer cells condition lymphatic endothelial cells within pre-metastatic niches to promote metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Esak; Fertig, Elana J.; Jin, Kideok; Sukumar, Saraswati; Pandey, Niranjan B.; Popel, Aleksander S.

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis involves lymphatic dissemination in addition to hematogenous spreading. Although stromal lymphatic vessels (LVs) serve as initial metastatic routes, roles of organ-residing LVs are under-investigated. Here we show that lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs), a component of LVs within pre-metastatic niches, are conditioned by triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells to accelerate metastasis. LECs within the lungs and lymph nodes, conditioned by tumor-secreted factors express CCL5 that is not expressed either in normal LECs or cancer cells, and direct tumor dissemination into these tissues. Moreover, tumor-conditioned LECs promote angiogenesis in these organs, allowing tumor extravasation and colonization. Mechanistically, tumor cell-secreted IL6 causes Stat3 phosphorylation in LECs. This pStat3 induces HIF-1α and VEGF, and a pStat3-pc-Jun-pATF-2 ternary complex induces CCL5 expression in LECs. This study demonstrates anti-metastatic activities of multiple repurposed drugs, blocking a self-reinforcing paracrine loop between breast cancer cells and LECs. PMID:25178650

  18. Tumor morphological evolution: directed migration and gain and loss of the self-metastatic phenotype

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Aside from the stepwise genetic alterations known to underlie cancer cell creation, the microenvironment is known to profoundly influence subsequent tumor development, morphology and metastasis. Invasive cluster formation has been assumed to be dependent on directed migration and a heterogeneous environment - a conclusion derived from complex models of tumor-environment interaction. At the same time, these models have not included the prospect, now supported by a preponderance of evidence, that only a minority of cancer cells may have stem cell capacity. This proves to weigh heavily on the microenvironmental requirements for the display of characteristic tumor growth phenotypes. We show using agent-based modeling that some defining features of tumor growth ascribed to directed migration might also be realized under random migration, and discuss broader implications for cause-and-effect determination in general. Results Considering only the properties of random migration in tumors composed of stem cells and committed cells, we are able to recapitulate a characteristic clustering feature of invasive tumor growth, a property we attribute to "self-metastatic" growth. When the additional influence of directed migrations under chemotactic environments are considered, we find that tumor growth and invasive morphology are supported while the tumor is distant from the source, but are progressively discouraged as the tumor converges about that source. Conclusions We show that invasive clustering can derive from basic kinetic assumptions often neglected in more complex models. While higher-order mechanisms, e.g. directed migration upon chemotactic stimuli, may result in clustering growth morphologies, exclusive attributions of this phenotype to this or other structured microenvironments would be inappropriate, in light of our finding these features are observable in a homogeneous environment. Furthermore, directed migration will result in loss of the invasive

  19. Cannibalism of live lymphocytes by human metastatic but not primary melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lugini, Luana; Matarrese, Paola; Tinari, Antonella; Lozupone, Francesco; Federici, Cristina; Iessi, Elisabetta; Gentile, Massimo; Luciani, Francesca; Parmiani, Giorgio; Rivoltini, Licia; Malorni, Walter; Fais, Stefano

    2006-04-01

    The phenomenon of cell cannibalism, which generally refers to the engulfment of cells within other cells, was described in malignant tumors, but its biological significance is still largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the occurrence, the in vivo relevance, and the underlying mechanisms of cannibalism in human melanoma. As first evidence, we observed that tumor cannibalism was clearly detectable in vivo in metastatic lesions of melanoma and often involved T cells, which could be found in a degraded state within tumor cells. Then, in vitro experiments confirmed that cannibalism of T cells was a property of metastatic melanoma cells but not of primary melanoma cells. In particular, morphologic analyses, including time-lapse cinematography and electron microscopy, revealed a sequence of events, in which metastatic melanoma cells were able to engulf and digest live autologous melanoma-specific CD8(+) T cells. Importantly, this cannibalistic activity significantly increased metastatic melanoma cell survival, particularly under starvation condition, supporting the evidence that tumor cells may use the eating of live lymphocytes as a way to "feed" in condition of low nutrient supply. The mechanism underlying cannibalism involved a complex framework, including lysosomal protease cathepsin B activity, caveolae formation, and ezrin cytoskeleton integrity and function. In conclusion, our study shows that human metastatic melanoma cells may eat live T cells, which are instead programmed to kill them, suggesting a novel mechanism of tumor immune escape. Moreover, our data suggest that cannibalism may represent a sort of "feeding" activity aimed at sustaining survival and progression of malignant tumor cells in an unfavorable microenvironment. PMID:16585188

  20. Modeling Spontaneous Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma (mRCC) in Mice Following Nephrectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tracz, Amanda; Mastri, Michalis; Lee, Christina R.; Pili, Roberto; Ebos, John M. L.

    2014-01-01

    One of the key challenges to improved testing of new experimental therapeutics in renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the development of models that faithfully recapitulate early- and late-stage metastatic disease progression. Typical tumor implantation models utilize ectopic or orthotopic primary tumor implantation, but few include systemic spontaneous metastatic disease that mimics the clinical setting. This protocol describes the key steps to develop RCC disease progression stages similar to patients. First, it uses a highly metastatic mouse tumor cell line in a syngeneic model to show orthotopic tumor cell implantation. Methods include superficial and internal implantation into the sub-capsular space with cells combined with matrigel to prevent leakage and early spread. Next it describes the procedures for excision of tumor-bearing kidney (nephrectomy), with critical pre- and post- surgical mouse care. Finally, it outlines the steps necessary to monitor and assess micro-and macro-metastatic disease progression, including bioluminescent imaging as well provides a detailed visual necropsy guide to score systemic disease distribution. The goal of this protocol description is to facilitate the widespread use of clinically relevant metastatic RCC models to improve the predictive value of future therapeutic testing.  PMID:24836396

  1. Regulation of the metastatic cell phenotype by sialylated glycans

    PubMed Central

    Schultz, Matthew J.; Swindall, Amanda F.

    2014-01-01

    Tumor cells exhibit striking changes in cell surface glycosylation as a consequence of dysregulated glycosyltransferases and glycosidases. In particular, an increase in the expression of certain sialylated glycans is a prominent feature of many transformed cells. Altered sialylation has long been associated with metastatic cell behaviors including invasion and enhanced cell survival; however, there is limited information regarding the molecular details of how distinct sialylated structures or sialylated carrier proteins regulate cell signaling to control responses such as adhesion/migration or resistance to specific apoptotic pathways. The goal of this review is to highlight selected examples of sialylated glycans for which there is some knowledge of molecular mechanisms linking aberrant sialylation to critical processes involved in metastasis. PMID:22699311

  2. Dietary Selenium Supplementation Modulates Growth of Brain Metastatic Tumors and Changes the Expression of Adhesion Molecules in Brain Microvessels.

    PubMed

    Wrobel, Jagoda K; Wolff, Gretchen; Xiao, Rijin; Power, Ronan F; Toborek, Michal

    2016-08-01

    Various dietary agents can modulate tumor invasiveness. The current study explored whether selenoglycoproteins (SeGPs) extracted from selenium-enriched yeast affect tumor cell homing and growth in the brain. Mice were fed diets enriched with specific SeGPs (SeGP40 or SeGP65, 1 mg/kg Se each), glycoproteins (GP40 or GP65, 0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se each) or a control diet (0.2-0.3 mg/kg Se) for 12 weeks. Then, murine Lewis lung carcinoma cells were infused into the brain circulation. Analyses were performed at early (48 h) and late stages (3 weeks) post tumor cell infusion. Imaging of tumor progression in the brain revealed that mice fed SeGP65-enriched diet displayed diminished metastatic tumor growth, fewer extravasating tumor cells and smaller metastatic lesions. While administration of tumor cells resulted in a significant upregulation of adhesion molecules in the early stage of tumor progression, overexpression of VCAM-1 (vascular call adhesion molecule-1) and ALCAM (activated leukocyte cell adhesion molecule) messenger RNA (mRNA) was diminished in SeGP65 supplemented mice. Additionally, mice fed SeGP65 showed decreased expression of acetylated NF-κB p65, 48 h post tumor cell infusion. The results indicate that tumor progression in the brain can be modulated by specific SeGPs. Selenium-containing compounds were more effective than their glycoprotein controls, implicating selenium as a potential negative regulator of metastatic process. PMID:26706037

  3. Stathmin Activity Influences Sarcoma Cell Shape, Motility, and Metastatic Potential

    PubMed Central

    Belletti, Barbara; Nicoloso, Milena S.; Schiappacassi, Monica; Berton, Stefania; Lovat, Francesca; Wolf, Katarina; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; D'Andrea, Sara; Zucchetto, Antonella; Friedl, Peter; Colombatti, Alfonso

    2008-01-01

    The balanced activity of microtubule-stabilizing and -destabilizing proteins determines the extent of microtubule dynamics, which is implicated in many cellular processes, including adhesion, migration, and morphology. Among the destabilizing proteins, stathmin is overexpressed in different human malignancies and has been recently linked to the regulation of cell motility. The observation that stathmin was overexpressed in human recurrent and metastatic sarcomas prompted us to investigate stathmin contribution to tumor local invasiveness and distant dissemination. We found that stathmin stimulated cell motility in and through the extracellular matrix (ECM) in vitro and increased the metastatic potential of sarcoma cells in vivo. On contact with the ECM, stathmin was negatively regulated by phosphorylation. Accordingly, a less phosphorylable stathmin point mutant impaired ECM-induced microtubule stabilization and conferred a higher invasive potential, inducing a rounded cell shape coupled with amoeboid-like motility in three-dimensional matrices. Our results indicate that stathmin plays a significant role in tumor metastasis formation, a finding that could lead to exploitation of stathmin as a target of new antimetastatic drugs. PMID:18305103

  4. Bone marrow-derived stem cell therapy for metastatic brain cancers.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Yuji; Tajiri, Naoki; Staples, Meaghan; Reyes, Stephanny; Lozano, Diego; Sanberg, Paul R; Freeman, Thomas B; van Loveren, Harry; Kim, Seung U; Borlongan, Cesar V

    2015-01-01

    We propose that stem cell therapy may be a potent treatment for metastatic melanoma in the brain. Here we discuss the key role of a leaky blood-brain barrier (BBB) that accompanies the development of brain metastases. We review the need to characterize the immunological and inflammatory responses associated with tumor-derived BBB damage in order to reveal the contribution of this brain pathological alteration to the formation and growth of brain metastatic cancers. Next, we discuss the potential repair of the BBB and attenuation of brain metastasis through transplantation of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells with the endothelial progenitor cell phenotype. In particular, we review the need for evaluation of the efficacy of stem cell therapy in repairing a disrupted BBB in an effort to reduce neuroinflammation, eventually attenuating brain metastatic cancers. The demonstration of BBB repair through augmented angiogenesis and vasculogenesis will be critical to establishing the potential of stem cell therapy for the treatment/prevention of metastatic brain tumors. The overarching hypothesis we advanced here is that BBB breakdown is closely associated with brain metastatic cancers of melanoma, exacerbating the inflammatory response of the brain during metastasis, and ultimately worsening the outcome of metastatic brain cancers. Abrogating this leaky BBB-mediated inflammation via stem cell therapy represents a paradigm-shifting approach to treating brain cancer. This review article discusses the pros and cons of cell therapy for melanoma brain metastases. PMID:25310691

  5. SKAP2 Promotes Podosome Formation to Facilitate Tumor-Associated Macrophage Infiltration and Metastatic Progression.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Masamitsu; Shimamura, Shintaro; Kuriyama, Sei; Maeda, Daichi; Goto, Akiteru; Aiba, Namiko

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) play complex and pivotal roles during cancer progression. A subset of metastasis-associated macrophages accumulates within metastatic sites to promote the invasion and growth of tumor cells. Src kinase-associated phosphoprotein 2 (SKAP2), a substrate of Src family kinases, is highly expressed in macrophages from various tumors, but its contribution to the tumor-promoting behavior of TAMs is unknown. Here, we report that SKAP2 regulates podosome formation in macrophages to promote tumor invasion and metastasis. SKAP2 physically interacted with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) and localized to podosomes, which were rarely observed in SKAP2-null macrophages. The invasion of peritoneal macrophages derived from SKAP2-null mice was significantly reduced compared with wild-type macrophages, but could be rescued by the restoration of functional SKAP2 containing an intact tyrosine phosphorylation site and the ability to interact with WASP. Furthermore, SKAP2-null mice inoculated with lung cancer cells exhibited markedly decreased lung metastases characterized by reduced macrophage infiltration compared with wild-type mice. Moreover, intravenously injected SKAP2-null macrophages failed to efficiently infiltrate established tumors and promote their growth. Taken together, these findings reveal a novel mechanism by which macrophages assemble the appropriate motile machinery to infiltrate tumors and promote disease progression, and implicate SKAP2 as an attractive candidate for therapeutically targeting TAMs. PMID:26577701

  6. Neuroblastoma-targeted nanocarriers improve drug delivery and penetration, delay tumor growth and abrogate metastatic diffusion.

    PubMed

    Cossu, Irene; Bottoni, Gianluca; Loi, Monica; Emionite, Laura; Bartolini, Alice; Di Paolo, Daniela; Brignole, Chiara; Piaggio, Francesca; Perri, Patrizia; Sacchi, Angelina; Curnis, Flavio; Gagliani, Maria Cristina; Bruno, Silvia; Marini, Cecilia; Gori, Alessandro; Longhi, Renato; Murgia, Daniele; Sementa, Angela Rita; Cilli, Michele; Tacchetti, Carlo; Corti, Angelo; Sambuceti, Gianmario; Marchiò, Serena; Ponzoni, Mirco; Pastorino, Fabio

    2015-11-01

    Selective tumor targeting is expected to enhance drug delivery and to decrease toxicity, resulting in an improved therapeutic index. We have recently identified the HSYWLRS peptide sequence as a specific ligand for aggressive neuroblastoma, a childhood tumor mostly refractory to current therapies. Here we validated the specific binding of HSYWLRS to neuroblastoma cell suspensions obtained either from cell lines, animal models, or Schwannian-stroma poor, stage IV neuroblastoma patients. Binding of the biotinylated peptide and of HSYWLRS-functionalized fluorescent quantum dots or liposomal nanoparticles was dose-dependent and inhibited by an excess of free peptide. In animal models obtained by the orthotopic implant of either MYCN-amplified or MYCN single copy human neuroblastoma cell lines, treatment with HSYWLRS-targeted, doxorubicin-loaded Stealth Liposomes increased tumor vascular permeability and perfusion, enhancing tumor penetration of the drug. This formulation proved to exert a potent antitumor efficacy, as evaluated by bioluminescence imaging and micro-PET, leading to (i) delay of tumor growth paralleled by decreased tumor glucose consumption, and (ii) abrogation of metastatic spreading, accompanied by absence of systemic toxicity and significant increase in the animal life span. Our findings are functional to the design of targeted nanocarriers with potentiated therapeutic efficacy towards the clinical translation. PMID:26276694

  7. The Trojan Horse Tale Revisited: An Eye on Metastatic Spread of Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Grajewski, Rafael S; Bosch, Jacobus J; Bruns, Heiko; Cursiefen, Claus; Heindl, Ludwig M

    2016-02-01

    The metastatic spread of carcinoma cells is not fully understood. Here, we compare the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and intraocular metastatic cells in parotid gland carcinoma with the PBMCs of healthy donors by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. We found Ber-EP4 tumor marker-positive carcinoma cells in the aqueous humor of the patient's right eye and a CD45 and Ber-EP4-expressing PBMC population in his blood. These Ber-EP4-expressing cells exhibited a monocytic-myeloid phenotype with coexpression of CD11b, CD115, and the macrophage marker CD172a (SIRP-α). Uptake of pHrodogreen revealed their phagocytic activity. Our findings suggest that the tumor cells in the anterior chamber originally derived from cell fusions between tumor cells and myeloid cells in the peripheral blood. Thus, metastases of a solid malignancy could use monocytes-macrophages as the Trojan horse to enter the eye. PMID:26608963

  8. Methyl Sulfone Blocked Multiple Hypoxia- and Non-Hypoxia-Induced Metastatic Targets in Breast Cancer Cells and Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Caron, Joan McIntyre; Caron, Jane McIntyre

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic cancer causes 90% of cancer deaths. Unlike many primary tumors, metastatic tumors cannot be cured by surgery alone. Metastatic cancer requires chemotherapy. However, metastatic cells are not easily killed by chemotherapy. These problems with chemotherapy are caused in part by the metastatic cell niche: hypoxia. Here we show that the molecule, methyl sulfone, normalized metastatic metabolism of hypoxic breast cancer and melanoma cells by altering several metabolic functions of the cells. Under hypoxia, methyl sulfone decreased expression of the master regulator of hypoxia, HIF-1α, and reduced levels of the glycolytic enzymes, PKM2, LDHA, GLUT1, the pro-angiogenic protein, VEGF, and the iron-sulfur metabolism molecules, miR-210 and transferrin, all of which promote metastasis. Conversely, methyl sulfone increased levels of ISCU1/2 and ferroportin, proteins associated with iron-sulfur cluster biogenesis and iron homeostasis in normal cells. These data identify methyl sulfone as a multi-targeting molecule that blocks the survival/proliferative effect of hypoxia on metastatic cells and brings normality back to cellular metabolism. PMID:26536104

  9. Endoglin targeting inhibits tumor angiogenesis and metastatic spread in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Paauwe, M; Heijkants, R C; Oudt, C H; van Pelt, G W; Cui, C; Theuer, C P; Hardwick, J C H; Sier, C F M; Hawinkels, L J A C

    2016-08-01

    Endoglin, a transforming growth factor-β co-receptor, is highly expressed on angiogenic endothelial cells in solid tumors. Therefore, targeting endoglin is currently being explored in clinical trials for anti-angiogenic therapy. In this project, the redundancy between endoglin and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) signaling in angiogenesis and the effects of targeting both pathways on breast cancer metastasis were explored. In patient samples, increased endoglin signaling after VEGF inhibition was observed. In vitro TRC105, an endoglin-neutralizing antibody, increased VEGF signaling in endothelial cells. Moreover, combined targeting of the endoglin and VEGF pathway, with the VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor SU5416, increased antiangiogenic effects in vitro and in a zebrafish angiogenesis model. Next, in a mouse model for invasive lobular breast cancer, the effects of TRC105 and SU5416 on tumor growth and metastasis were explored. Although TRC105 and SU5416 decreased tumor vascular density, tumor volume was unaffected. Strikingly, in mice treated with TRC105, or TRC105 and SU5416 combined, a strong inhibition in the number of metastases was seen. Moreover, upon resection of the primary tumor, strong inhibition of metastatic spread by TRC105 was observed in an adjuvant setting. To confirm these data, we assessed the effects of endoglin-Fc (an endoglin ligand trap) on metastasis formation. Similar to treatment with TRC105 in the resection model, endoglin-Fc-expressing tumors showed strong inhibition of distant metastases. These results show, for the first time, that targeting endoglin, either with neutralizing antibodies or a ligand trap, strongly inhibits metastatic spread of breast cancer in vivo. PMID:26804178

  10. Is There a Role for PET/CT Parameters to Characterize Benign, Malignant, and Metastatic Parotid Tumors?

    PubMed Central

    Kendi, Ayse Tuba Karagulle; Magliocca, Kelly R.; Corey, Amanda; Galt, James R.; Switchenko, Jeffrey; Wadsworth, J. Trad; El-Deiry, Mark W.; Schuster, David M.; Saba, Nabil F.; Hudgins, Patricia A.

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Assessment of benign and malignant lesions of the parotid gland, including metastatic lesions, is challenging with current imaging methods. Fluorine-18 FDG PET/CT is a noninvasive imaging modality that provides both anatomic and metabolic information. Semiquantitative data obtained from PET/CT, also known as PET/CT parameters, are maximum, mean, or peak standardized uptake values (SUVs); metabolic tumor volume; total lesion glycolysis; standardized added metabolic activity; and normalized standardized added metabolic activity. Our aim was to determine whether FDG PET/CT parameters can differentiate benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid tumors. MATERIALS AND METHODS Thirty-four patients with parotid neoplasms underwent PET/CT before parotidectomy; maximum SUV, mean SUV, peak SUV, total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity were calculated on a dedicated workstation. Univariate analyses were performed. A ROC analysis was used to determine the ability of PET/CT parameters to predict pathologically proven benign, malignant, and metastatic parotid gland neoplasms. RESULTS Fourteen patients had a benign or malignant primary parotid tumor. Twenty had metastases to the parotid gland. When the specificity was set to at least 85% for each parameter to identify cut points, the corresponding sensitivities ranged from 15% to 40%. Assessment of benign versus malignant lesions of parotid tumors, as well as metastasis from squamous cell carcinoma versus other metastatic causes, revealed that none of the PET/CT parameters has enough power to differentiate among these groups. CONCLUSION PET/CT parameters, including total lesion glycolysis, metabolic tumor volume, standardized added metabolic activity, and normalized standardized added metabolic activity, are not able to differentiate benign from malignant parotid tumors, primary parotid tumors from metastasis, or metastasis

  11. Novel Methylated Biomarkers and a Robust Assay to Detect Circulating Tumor DNA in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fackler, Mary Jo; Bujanda, Zoila Lopez; Umbricht, Christopher; Teo, Wei Wen; Cho, Soonweng; Zhang, Zhe; Visvanathan, Kala; Jeter, Stacie; Argani, Pedram; Wang, Chenguang; Lyman, Jaclyn P.; de Brot, Marina; Ingle, James N.; Boughey, Judy; McGuire, Kandace; King, Tari A.; Carey, Lisa A.; Cope, Leslie; Wolff, Antonio C.; Sukumar, Saraswati

    2015-01-01

    The ability to consistently detect cell-free tumor-specific DNA in peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer provides the opportunity to detect changes in tumor burden and to monitor response to treatment. We developed cMethDNA, a quantitative multiplexed methylation-specific PCR assay for a panel of ten genes, consisting of novel and known breast cancer hypermethylated markers identified by mining our previously reported study of DNA methylation patterns in breast tissue (103 cancer, 21 normal on the Illumina HumanMethylation27 Beadchip) and then validating the 10-gene panel in a TCGA breast cancer methylome database. For cMethDNA, a fixed physiological level (50 copies) of artificially constructed, standard non-human reference DNA specific for each gene is introduced into in a constant volume of serum (300 μl) prior to purification of the DNA, facilitating a sensitive, specific, robust and quantitative assay of tumor DNA, with broad dynamic range. Cancer-specific methylated DNA was detected in Training (28 normal, 24 cancer) and Test (27 normal, 33 cancer) sets of recurrent Stage 4 patient sera with a sensitivity of 91% and a specificity of 96% in the test set. In a pilot study, cMethDNA assay faithfully reflected patient response to chemotherapy (N = 29). A core methylation signature present in the primary breast cancer was retained in serum and metastatic tissues collected at autopsy 2–11 years after diagnosis of the disease. Together, our data suggest that the cMethDNA assay can detect advanced breast cancer, and monitor tumor burden and treatment response in women with metastatic breast cancer. PMID:24737128

  12. Exon-Level Transcriptome Profiling in Murine Breast Cancer Reveals Splicing Changes Specific to Tumors with Different Metastatic Abilities

    PubMed Central

    Bemmo, Amandine; Dias, Christel; Rose, April A. N.; Russo, Caterina; Siegel, Peter; Majewski, Jacek

    2010-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the second most frequent type of cancer affecting women. We are increasingly aware that changes in mRNA splicing are associated with various characteristics of cancer. The most deadly aspect of cancer is metastasis, the process by which cancer spreads from the primary tumor to distant organs. However, little is known specifically about the involvement of alternative splicing in the formation of macroscopic metastases. Our study investigates transcript isoform changes that characterize tumors of different abilities to form growing metastases. Methods and Findings To identify alternative splicing events (ASEs) that are associated with the fully metastatic phenotype in breast cancer, we used Affymetrix Exon Microarrays to profile mRNA isoform variations genome-wide in weakly metastatic (168FARN and 4T07) and highly metastatic (4T1) mammary carcinomas. Statistical analysis identified significant expression changes in 7606 out of 155,994 (4%) exons and in 1725 out of 189,460 (1%) intronic regions, which affect 2623 out of 16,654 (16%) genes. These changes correspond to putative alternative isoforms—several of which are novel—that are differentially expressed between tumors of varying metastatic phenotypes. Gene pathway analysis showed that 1224 of genes expressing alternative isoforms were involved in cell growth, cell interactions, cell proliferation, cell migration and cell death and have been previously linked to cancers and genetic disorders. We chose ten predicted splice variants for RT-PCR validation, eight of which were successfully confirmed (MED24, MFI2, SRRT, CD44, CLK1 and HNRNPH1). These include three novel intron retentions in CD44, a gene in which isoform variations have been previously associated with the metastasis of several cancers. Conclusion Our findings reveal that various genes are differently spliced and/or expressed in association with the metastatic phenotype of tumor cells. Identification of metastasis

  13. Dasatinib, Ifosfamide, Carboplatin, and Etoposide in Treating Young Patients With Metastatic or Recurrent Malignant Solid Tumors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-10

    Brain and Central Nervous System Tumors; Childhood Germ Cell Tumor; Extragonadal Germ Cell Tumor; Kidney Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lymphoma; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Sarcoma; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Unspecified Childhood Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  14. Metastatic clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma of the mandible: Review and case report.

    PubMed

    Shah, Ajaz; Jahan, Shahi; Najar, Latief; Hassan, Shahid; Mohammad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the mandible is reported. A 22-year-old man consulted us for hypoesthesia of the right lower lip. Panorama X-ray film showed a radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body. A diagnosis of a metastatic tumor to the mandible from the right kidney was made after evaluation by computed tomography and bone scan with Tc99 methyl diphosphonate which also revealed multiple bone metastases. Histologically diagnosis was clear cell variant of RCC. Patient has been put on radiotherapy for symptomatic treatment and a molecularly targeted drug. The therapy effectively stopped the progressive growth of oral and other metastatic lesions. The quality of life is relatively well maintained with tolerable adverse effects. The patient is still on our follow-up with an improved quality of life. PMID:27563625

  15. Metastatic clear cell variant of renal cell carcinoma of the mandible: Review and case report

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Ajaz; Jahan, Shahi; Najar, Latief; Hassan, Shahid; Mohammad, Manzoor

    2016-01-01

    A case of metastatic renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to the mandible is reported. A 22-year-old man consulted us for hypoesthesia of the right lower lip. Panorama X-ray film showed a radiolucent lesion in the right mandibular body. A diagnosis of a metastatic tumor to the mandible from the right kidney was made after evaluation by computed tomography and bone scan with Tc99 methyl diphosphonate which also revealed multiple bone metastases. Histologically diagnosis was clear cell variant of RCC. Patient has been put on radiotherapy for symptomatic treatment and a molecularly targeted drug. The therapy effectively stopped the progressive growth of oral and other metastatic lesions. The quality of life is relatively well maintained with tolerable adverse effects. The patient is still on our follow-up with an improved quality of life.

  16. Metastatic colonization by circulating tumour cells.

    PubMed

    Massagué, Joan; Obenauf, Anna C

    2016-01-21

    Metastasis is the main cause of death in people with cancer. To colonize distant organs, circulating tumour cells must overcome many obstacles through mechanisms that we are only now starting to understand. These include infiltrating distant tissue, evading immune defences, adapting to supportive niches, surviving as latent tumour-initiating seeds and eventually breaking out to replace the host tissue. They make metastasis a highly inefficient process. However, once metastases have been established, current treatments frequently fail to provide durable responses. An improved understanding of the mechanistic determinants of such colonization is needed to better prevent and treat metastatic cancer. PMID:26791720

  17. Combination therapy for metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Buonerba, Carlo; Di Lorenzo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Current therapy for metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (RCC) consists of the serial administration of single agents. Combinations of VEGF and mTOR inhibitors have been disappointing in previous randomized trials. However, the combination of lenvatinib, a multitargeted agent that inhibits VEGF as well as FGF receptors, and everolimus demonstrated promising results in a randomized phase II trial. Moreover, the emergence of programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitors has spawned the investigation of combinations of these agents with VEGF inhibitors and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4) inhibitors. These ongoing phase III trials in conjunction with the development of predictive biomarkers and agents inhibiting novel therapeutic targets may provide much needed advances in this still largely incurable disease. PMID:27047959

  18. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y C

    2016-04-15

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  19. Contemporary Treatment of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Stukalin, Igor; Alimohamed, Nimira; Heng, Daniel Y.C.

    2016-01-01

    The introduction of targeted therapy has revolutionized the treatment of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC). The current standard of care focuses on the inhibition of angiogenesis through the targeting of the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) and the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Over the past few years, research exploring novel targeted agents has blossomed, leading to the approval of various targeted therapies. Furthermore, results from the CheckMate025 and the METEOR trials have brought about two additional novel options: the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) checkpoint inhibitor nivolumab and the MET/VEGFR/AXL inhibitor cabozantinib, respectively. With the variety of therapeutic agents available for treatment of mRCC, research examining appropriate sequencing and combinations of the drugs is ongoing. This review discusses the role of prognostic criteria, such as those from the International Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Database Consortium (IMDC) criteria. It also covers the current standard of treatment for mRCC with targeted therapy in first-, second-, and third-line setting. Additionally, the novel mechanism of action of nivolumab and cabozantinib, therapeutic sequencing and ongoing clinical trials are discussed. PMID:27471582

  20. Molecular Characterization of an Endometrial Endometrioid Adenocarcinoma Metastatic to a Thyroid Hürthle Cell Adenoma Showing Cancerization of Follicles.

    PubMed

    Afrogheh, Amir H; Meserve, Emily; Sadow, Peter M; Stephen, Antonia E; Nosé, Vânia; Berlin, Suzanne; Faquin, William C

    2016-09-01

    Tumor-to-tumor metastasis is rare. Herein, we present a unique case of endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma metastatic to a thyroid Hürthle cell adenoma 9 years after initial diagnosis. On histologic examination of the thyroid, the malignant endometrioid glands and single cells (donor tumor) were dispersed within the Hürthle cell adenoma (recipient tumor). In several sections of the adenoma with still preserved microfollicular architecture, malignant endometrial adenocarcinoma cells were admixed within oncocytic adenomatous epithelium (so-called "cancerization of the follicles"). This unusual phenomenon, to our knowledge, is a novel finding in the thyroid gland. Immunohistochemistry, subsequently elicited clinical history, and morphologic comparison of the tumor in the thyroid to the primary endometrial tumor confirmed the origin of the donor tumor cells. Molecular analysis of both the metastatic and primary endometrial tumors demonstrated PIK3CA and PTEN mutations in both tumors, as is characteristic of well-differentiated endometrioid tumors of the endometrium. Amplification of chromosome 1q was detected in both sites; however, only the metastatic tumor showed loss of chromosomes 2, 9, and 22. The morphologic differential diagnosis of metastatic endometrioid adenocarcinoma in the thyroid includes columnar cell variant of papillary thyroid carcinoma (CCVPTC) arising in a preexisting adenoma, endocrine glandular atypia within an adenoma, and metastasis from other anatomic sites. Histomorphologic differences among these entities may be subtle; therefore, knowledge of and morphologic comparison with prior malignancies and immunohistochemistry can be helpful in rendering the correct diagnosis. PMID:26687112

  1. Candidate Antimetastasis Drugs Suppress the Metastatic Capacity of Breast Cancer Cells by Reducing Membrane Fluidity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weina; Prijic, Sara; Urban, Bettina C; Tisza, Michael J; Zuo, Yan; Li, Lin; Tan, Zhi; Chen, Xiaoling; Mani, Sendurai A; Chang, Jeffrey T

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high mortality from metastatic cancer, therapeutic targets to prevent metastasis are limited. Efforts to identify genetic aberrations that predispose tumors to metastasis have been mostly unsuccessful. To understand the nature of candidate targets for metastatic disease, we performed an in silico screen to identify drugs that can inhibit a gene expression signature associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Compounds discovered through this method, including those previously identified, appeared to restrict metastatic capacity through a common mechanism, the ability to modulate the fluidity of cell membranes. Treatment of breast cancer cell lines with the putative antimetastasis agents reduced membrane fluidity, resulting in decreased cell motility, stem cell-like properties, and EMT in vitro, and the drugs also inhibited spontaneous metastasis in vivo When fluidity was unchanged, the antimetastasis compounds could no longer restrict metastasis, indicating a causal association between fluidity and metastasis. We further demonstrate that fluidity can be regulated by cellular cholesterol flux, as the cholesterol efflux channel ABCA1 potentiated metastatic behaviors in vitro and in vivo The requirement for fluidity was further supported by the finding in breast cancer patients that ABCA1 was overexpressed in 41% of metastatic tumors, reducing time to metastasis by 9 years. Collectively, our findings reveal increased membrane fluidity as a necessary cellular feature of metastatic potential that can be controlled by many currently available drugs, offering a viable therapeutic opportunity to prevent cancer metastasis. Cancer Res; 76(7); 2037-49. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26825169

  2. Clinical Outcomes of Biological Effective Dose-Based Fractionated Stereotactic Radiation Therapy for Metastatic Brain Tumors From Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuyama, Tomohiko; Kogo, Kasei; Oya, Natsuo

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) based on biological effective dose (BED), a novel approach to deliver a fixed BED irrespective of dose fractionation, for brain metastases from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Between March 2005 and March 2009 we treated 299 patients with 1 to 5 lesions from NSCLC (573 total brain metastases) with FSRT using Novalis. The dose fractionation schedules were individually determined to deliver a peripheral BED10 (α/β ratio = 10) of approximately 80 Gy{sub 10}. The median number of fractions was 3 (range, 2-10), the median peripheral BED10 was 83.2 Gy (range, 19.1-89.6 Gy). Patients were followed up with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies performed at 1- to 2-month intervals. The local tumor control rate and overall local progression-free and intracranial relapse-free survival were calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Local control rates for all 573 lesions at 6 and 12 months were 96.3% and 94.5%, respectively. By multivariate analysis the tumor diameter was the only factor predictive of the local control rate (P=.001). The median overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival were 17.1, 14.9, and 4.4 months, respectively. The overall survival, local progression-free survival, and intracranial relapse-free survival rates at 6 and 12 months were 78.5% and 63.3%, 74.3% and 57.8%, and 41.0% and 21.8%, respectively. Six patients (2%) manifested progressive radiation injury to the brain even during therapy with corticosteroids; they underwent hyperbaric oxygen therapy, and follow-up MRI showed improvement. Conclusions: This study showed that BED-based FSRT for brain metastases from NSCLC is a promising strategy that may yield excellent outcomes with acceptable toxicity. Criteria must be established to determine the optimal dose fractionation for individual patients.

  3. Atypical presentations and rare metastatic sites of renal cell carcinoma: a review of case reports

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma is a potentially lethal cancer with aggressive behavior and a propensity for metastatic spread. Due to the fact that the patterns of metastases from renal cell carcinomas are not clearly defined, there have been several reports of cases of renal cell carcinoma associated with rare metastatic sites and atypical presenting symptoms. The present review focuses on these atypical rare clinical presentations of renal cell carcinomas both at the time of diagnosis of the primary tumor but also in the years after radical nephrectomy. PMID:21888643

  4. Transfusion of sickle cells may be a therapeutic option for patients suffering metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Joel S

    2010-04-01

    Red blood cells from patients with sickle cell disease will sickle under conditions of hypoxemia and acidosis which is a similar milieu found in malignant tumors. While control of tumor angiogenesis has long been a goal of cancer therapy, selective occlusion of tumor blood supply may be achieved by transfusion of sickle cells into patients who suffer metastatic cancer. Although this potential therapy has not been previously reported in the medical literature, the concept may have been elusive to medical mainstream thinking because it requires transfusion of diseased cells. For this therapy to be effective, other environmental factors may need to be manipulated such inducing mild hypoxemia or hypercarbia (respiratory acidosis) to induce red cell sickling. Preliminary evidence supportive of this therapeutic approach to cancer treatment is provided by case evidence that sickle cell occlusion of a malignant brain tumor (glioma) produced tumor necrosis. Also sickle cells have been successfully transfused into primates. Furthermore, donor blood is crossmatched and transfused into patients suffering from sickle cell disease regularly in clinics and this procedure is associated with acceptable morbidity. Most importantly, animal models of sickle cell disease and cancer currently exist, and this theory could be tried with available technologies including ultrasound detection of vaso-occlusion. While the proposed therapy may not cure metastatic cancer, this treatment could prove useful for decreasing the size and perhaps the pain from metastatic tumor burden. Therefore, it is hypothesized that ABO Rh compatible crossmatched sickle cells transfused into patients who suffer metastatic cancer under controlled conditions of blood oxygenation and pH will selectively produce vaso-occlusive infarcts in malignant tumors and be a useful therapy. The author hopes for further investigations. PMID:20022432

  5. Deficiency for endoglin in tumor vasculature weakens the endothelial barrier to metastatic dissemination

    PubMed Central

    Anderberg, Charlotte; Cunha, Sara I.; Zhai, Zhenhua; Cortez, Eliane; Pardali, Evangelia; Johnson, Jill R.; Franco, Marcela; Páez-Ribes, Marta; Cordiner, Ross; Fuxe, Jonas; Johansson, Bengt R.; Goumans, Marie-José; Casanovas, Oriol; ten Dijke, Peter; Arthur, Helen M.

    2013-01-01

    Therapy-induced resistance remains a significant hurdle to achieve long-lasting responses and cures in cancer patients. We investigated the long-term consequences of genetically impaired angiogenesis by engineering multiple tumor models deprived of endoglin, a co-receptor for TGF-β in endothelial cells actively engaged in angiogenesis. Tumors from endoglin-deficient mice adapted to the weakened angiogenic response, and refractoriness to diminished endoglin signaling was accompanied by increased metastatic capability. Mechanistic studies in multiple mouse models of cancer revealed that deficiency for endoglin resulted in a tumor vasculature that displayed hallmarks of endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a process of previously unknown significance in cancer biology, but shown by us to be associated with a reduced capacity of the vasculature to avert tumor cell intra- and extravasation. Nevertheless, tumors deprived of endoglin exhibited a delayed onset of resistance to anti-VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor) agents, illustrating the therapeutic utility of combinatorial targeting of multiple angiogenic pathways for the treatment of cancer. PMID:23401487

  6. Trial Watch: Therapeutic vaccines in metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Combe, Pierre; de Guillebon, Eleonore; Thibault, Constance; Granier, Clémence; Tartour, Eric; Oudard, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    Despite the renaissance of cancer immunotherapy, no novel immunotherapy has been approved for the treatment of renal cell cancer (RCC) since the availability of recombinant cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-α). All vaccine trials have failed to meet their endpoints although they have highlighted potential predictive biomarkers (e.g., pre-existing immune response, hematological parameters, tumor burden). Recent advances in immunomodulatory therapies have prompted the study of combination treatments targeting the tumor immunosuppressive microenvironment consisting of regulatory T-cells (Treg), myeloid suppressor cells, and cytokines. Approaches under investigation are use of inhibitors to curb the overexpression of immune checkpoint ligands by tumor cells (e.g., anti-CTLA-4, anti-PD-1/PD-L1) and exploiting the immunomodulatory effects of anti-angiogenic agents that are the current standard of metastatic RCC care. Phase III trials are focusing on the possible synergy between therapeutic vaccines (e.g., IMA-901 and AGS-003) and anti-angiogenic agents. PMID:26155388

  7. Metastatic Mantle Cell Lymphoma to the Pituitary Gland: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Arthur; Carberry, Nathan; Solli, Elena; Kleinman, George; Tandon, Adesh

    2016-01-01

    We present an unusual case of a metastatic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) to the pituitary gland. The patient had a known history of MCL for which she previously received chemotherapy. She presented with new-onset diplopia and confusion, and reported a history of progressive vision blurriness associated with headache, nausea, and vomiting. MRI of the brain showed an enhancing lesion within the sella turcica involving the cavernous sinuses bilaterally, extending into Meckel's cave on the left, and abutting the optic nerves bilaterally. Following surgical excision, histopathology revealed the tumor to be a MCL. Metastatic pituitary tumors are rare and have been estimated to make up 1% of tumors discovered in the sellar region. The two most common secondary metastatic lesions to the sella are breast and lung carcinoma followed by prostate, renal cell, and gastrointestinal carcinoma. Metastatic lymphoma to the pituitary gland is especially rare and is estimated to constitute 0.5% of all metastatic tumors to the sella turcica. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of MCL metastasizing to the pituitary gland. PMID:26933415

  8. When the endothelium scores an own goal: endothelial cells actively augment metastatic extravasation through endothelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Gasparics, Ákos; Rosivall, László; Krizbai, István A; Sebe, Attila

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial-mesenchymal transition (EndMT) is an important mechanism during organ development and in certain pathological conditions. For example, EndMT contributes to myofibroblast formation during organ fibrosis, and it has been identified as an important source of cancer-associated fibroblasts, facilitating tumor progression. Recently, EndMT was proposed to modulate endothelial function during intravasation and extravasation of metastatic tumor cells. Evidence suggests that endothelial cells are not passive actors during transendothelial migration (TEM) of cancer cells, as there are profound changes in endothelial junctional protein expression, signaling, permeability, and contractility. This review describes these alterations in endothelial characteristics during TEM of metastatic tumor cells and discusses them in the context of EndMT. EndMT could play an important role during metastatic intravasation and extravasation, a novel hypothesis that may lead to new therapeutic approaches to tackle metastatic disease. PMID:26993222

  9. Diffuse melanosis after chemotherapy-induced tumor lysis syndrome in a patient with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Busam, Klaus J; Wolchok, Jedd; Jungbluth, Achim A; Chapman, Paul

    2004-03-01

    Diffuse melanosis is a rare event associated with advanced metastatic malignant melanoma. A 35-year-old woman with stage IV melanoma is presented, who developed slate bluish-gray to brown discoloration of her skin after chemotherapy-induced tumor lysis syndrome. A number of studies were performed to re-evaluate possible mechanisms of melanosis. Skin tissue was examined on routine hematoxylin-and-eosin-stained sections, Fontana stains, immunohistochemical studies with antibodies for Melan-A, gp100, tyrosinase, FXIIIa, and CD68, and by electron microscopy. The main cell types found to contain melanin pigment were histiocytes and dendritic cells. In the dermis, they were distributed mainly around venules. In the subcutaneous fat, they were scattered throughout the fat lobule. Melanin pigment was not only seen within cells but also extracellularly. No melanoma cells were seen in the skin. No increase in melanin pigment or number of melanocytes was seen in the epidermis. A bone marrow biopsy contained melanophages but no melanoma cells. Ultrastructural examination of the patient's serum revealed the presence of melanosomes. Sequence analysis of the tumor's cDNA failed to identify any mutations in the tyrosinase gene, and no tyrosinase protein was detected in non-melanocytic cells, indicating that it was unlikely that a mutation had resulted in a secretory form of the protein. These findings document that diffuse melanosis may result from tumor lysis, with release of melanosomes into the bloodstream. PMID:14984582

  10. Response to Anti-PD-1 Therapy in Metastatic Merkel Cell Carcinoma Metastatic to the Heart and Pancreas

    PubMed Central

    Birnbaum, Ariel

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is a lethal, Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) cancer with no currently available effective therapy. Harnessing the immune system through an immune checkpoint blockade is an attractive option because the immune system appears to be dysfunctional in the Merkel cell tumor microenvironment. Although MCPyV is expressed in 80% of MCCs and serves as a powerful antigen for stimulating host immune response, intratumoral CD8+ T-cell infiltration is seen only in 18% of MCCs. In contrast, about 50% of MCPyV-positive MCCs express the programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) on multiple cell types in the tumor microenvironment. We present a case of a young patient with MCC involving the heart and pancreas that showed an impressive response after treatment with four cycles of the anti-PD-1 monoclonal antibody, nivolumab. PMID:26824006