Science.gov

Sample records for cell window shielding

  1. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  2. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS AWAIT ATTACHMENT TO HAND CONTROLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9001. Unknown Photographer, photo is identified as taken 10/28/1953, but it may be an error as it shows progress since ID-33-G-266 of same date. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 4. DETAIL SHOWING PERISCOPE AND SHIELDED WINDOWS ON EAST SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING PERISCOPE AND SHIELDED WINDOWS ON EAST SIDE, NORTH PART. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 3. EAST SIDE FROM ATOP TUNNEL, SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST SIDE FROM ATOP TUNNEL, SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS AND PERISCOPE FACING TO TEST STAND 1-3. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  7. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  8. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  9. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  10. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  11. Predicted and measured EMI shielding effectiveness of a metallic mesh coating on a sapphire window over a broad frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Keith T.; Pieratt, Matthew W.; Halman, Jennifer I.; Ramsey, Keith A.

    2009-05-01

    Metallic mesh thin film coatings have been used for many years to provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding on infrared windows and domes. The level of EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of metallic mesh coatings when used in a high frequency application is understood and characterized. Conversely, the level of SE of these metallic mesh coatings when used in a low frequency application has been called into question. In a recent study, we applied an appropriately designed metallic mesh coating to a sapphire window, mounted that window in a fixture, and tested the SE of the window assembly over a frequency range that envelopes the various military platforms covered in MIL-STD-461 (10 kHz to 18 GHz) for a radiated emissions test. The test plan was devised in such a way as to independently assess the individual contributions of the aperture, the mounting, and the metallic mesh coating to the total shielding. The results of our testing will be described in this paper. Additionally, the test results will be compared to the predicted SE for both the aperture and the metallic mesh coated window in order to validate the predictive model. Finally, an assessment of the appropriateness of the use of metallic mesh coatings for EMI shielding in a low and/or broad range frequency application will be made.

  12. Absolute Position Sensing Based on a Robust Differential Capacitive Sensor with a Grounded Shield Window

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Lu, Yunfeng; Hu, Pengcheng; Wang, Gang; Xu, Jinxin; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhengkun; Zhang, Zhonghua; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    A simple differential capacitive sensor is provided in this paper to measure the absolute positions of length measuring systems. By utilizing a shield window inside the differential capacitor, the measurement range and linearity range of the sensor can reach several millimeters. What is more interesting is that this differential capacitive sensor is only sensitive to one translational degree of freedom (DOF) movement, and immune to the vibration along the other two translational DOFs. In the experiment, we used a novel circuit based on an AC capacitance bridge to directly measure the differential capacitance value. The experimental result shows that this differential capacitive sensor has a sensitivity of 2 × 10−4 pF/μm with 0.08 μm resolution. The measurement range of this differential capacitive sensor is 6 mm, and the linearity error are less than 0.01% over the whole absolute position measurement range. PMID:27187393

  13. Absolute Position Sensing Based on a Robust Differential Capacitive Sensor with a Grounded Shield Window.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Lu, Yunfeng; Hu, Pengcheng; Wang, Gang; Xu, Jinxin; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhengkun; Zhang, Zhonghua; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    A simple differential capacitive sensor is provided in this paper to measure the absolute positions of length measuring systems. By utilizing a shield window inside the differential capacitor, the measurement range and linearity range of the sensor can reach several millimeters. What is more interesting is that this differential capacitive sensor is only sensitive to one translational degree of freedom (DOF) movement, and immune to the vibration along the other two translational DOFs. In the experiment, we used a novel circuit based on an AC capacitance bridge to directly measure the differential capacitance value. The experimental result shows that this differential capacitive sensor has a sensitivity of 2 × 10(-4) pF/μm with 0.08 μm resolution. The measurement range of this differential capacitive sensor is 6 mm, and the linearity error are less than 0.01% over the whole absolute position measurement range. PMID:27187393

  14. Left-handed metastructures with selective frequency transmission window for gigahertz shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababei, G.; Olariu, C. S.; Lupu, N.; Chiriac, H.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental evidence of left-handed properties of the Fe-, CoFe-, and Co-based glass-covered amorphous microwires in free standing systems is demonstrated. A new broadband frequency shielding metastructure with selective transmission frequency in the microwave range is presented. The X-band microwave-guide and the free-space methods were used as experimental techniques in the frequency range from 1 to 12 GHz. The X-band experimental results show that the mixed metastructure presents left-handed behavior between 8.5 and 10.5 GHz. The mixed metastructure for large areas presents broadband frequency domains, with left-handed properties between 6.5 and 10.5 GHz (the sum of intrinsic ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic resonance frequencies domains of individual microwires) and a transmission window between 7.6 and 10.5 GHz. Double negative characteristics of the metastructures are in agreement with the computed results calculated based on Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations and Nicolson-Ross-Weir analytical method.

  15. Nutrient shielding in clusters of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude among different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ.

  16. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells’ spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude between different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ. PMID:23848711

  17. InP solar cell with window layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K. (Inventor); Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention features a thin light transmissive layer of the ternary semiconductor indium aluminum arsenide (InAlAs) as a front surface passivation or 'window' layer for p-on-n InP solar cells. The window layers of the invention effectively reduce front surface recombination of the object semiconductors thereby increasing the efficiency of the cells.

  18. Comparison of some lead and non-lead based glass systems, standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of shielding parameters in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Özdemir, Yüksel; Şimşek, Önder; Durak, Rıdvan

    2010-12-01

    The effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some glass systems with and without Pb have been calculated in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV including the K absorption edges of high Z elements present in the glass. Also, these glass systems have been compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of mean free paths and total mass attenuation coefficients in the continuous energy range. Comparisons with experiments were also provided wherever possible for glasses. It has been observed that the glass systems without Pb have higher values of Z eff than that of Pb based glasses at some high energy regions even if they have lower mean atomic numbers than Pb based glasses. When compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses, generally it has been shown that the given glass systems have superior properties than concretes and window glasses with respect to the radiation-shielding properties, thus confirming the availability of using these glasses as substitutes for some shielding concretes and commercial window glasses to improve radiation-shielding properties in the continuous energy region.

  19. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  20. Complex permittivity measurements during high temperature recycling of space shuttle antenna window and dielectric heat shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, H. L.; Bomar, S. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The research performed and the data obtained on candidate space shuttle antenna window and heat shield materials are presented. The measurement technique employs a free-space focused beam microwave bridge for obtaining RF transmission data, and a device which rotates a sample holder which is heated on one side by natural gas-air flames. The surface temperature of each sample is monitored by IR pyrometry; embedded and rear surface thermocouples are also used in obtaining temperature data. The surface of the sample undergoing test is subjected to approximately the same temperature/time profile that occurs at a proposed antenna position on the space shuttle as it re-enters. The samples are cycled through ten of these temperature profiles to determine the recycling effects. Very little change was noted in the materials due to the recycling.

  1. First-principles prediction of solar radiation shielding performance for transparent windows of GdB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lihua; Su, Yuchang; Ran, Jingyu; Liu, Yike; Qiu, Wei; Wu, Jianming; Lu, Fanghai; Shao, Fang; Tang, Dongsheng; Peng, Ping

    2016-04-01

    The structural, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of GdB6 are studied using the first-principles calculations. Calculated values for magnetic and optical properties and lattice constant are found to be consistent with previously reported experimental results. The calculated results show that GdB6 is a perfect near-infrared absorption/reflectance material that could serve as a solar radiation shielding material for windows with high visible light transmittance, similar to LaB6, which is assigned to its plasma oscillation and a collective oscillation (volume plasmon) of carrier electrons. It was found that the magnetic 4f electrons of Gd are not relevant to the important optical properties of GdB6. These theoretical studies serve as a reference for future studies.

  2. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  3. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  4. Shielded Cells D&D and Dismantlement System Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, R.L.

    1995-03-27

    This document describes the basis for the development of the System for Highly Radioactive Equipment Dismantlement or SHRED. It is the result of a thorough investigation into current and past dismantlement practices at shielded cell facilities around the DOE complex. This information has been used to formulate the development requirements for the SHRED.

  5. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  6. High-efficiency nanostructured window GaAs solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Kang, Yangsen; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Cui, Yi; Harris, James S

    2013-10-01

    Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary optical properties. In most nanostructured cells, high short circuit current has been obtained due to enhanced light absorption. However, most of them suffer from lowered open circuit voltage and fill factor. One of the main challenges is formation of good junction and electrical contact. In particular, nanostructures in GaAs only have shown unsatisfactory performances (below 5% in energy conversion efficiency) which cannot match their ideal material properties and the record photovoltaic performances in industry. Here we demonstrate a completely new design for nanostructured solar cells that combines nanostructured window layer, metal mesa bar contact with small area, high quality planar junction. In this way, we not only keep the advanced optical properties of nanostructures such as broadband and wide angle antireflection, but also minimize its negative impact on electrical properties. High light absorption, efficient carrier collection, leakage elimination, and good lateral conductance can be simultaneously obtained. A nanostructured window cell using GaAs junction and AlGaAs nanocone window demonstrates 17% energy conversion efficiency and 0.982 V high open circuit voltage. PMID:24021024

  7. Effects of Cell Windows on TwinSol Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, Kimmy

    2016-04-01

    In order to study reactions with unstable nuclei, radioactive-ion beams must be used. One method for producing radioactive beams is the TwinSol experimental setup at the University of Notre Dame. At TwinSol, stable and unstable isotope beams bombard a gas target, where one atmosphere of gas must be confined from the surrounding vacuum. Thin foil windows are used to contain the gas in the cell. In order to optimize the quality of secondary beams from TwinSol, it is necessary to understand and minimize the effects of energy loss and straggling in the windows. This work is the beginning of a process to improve the TwinSol design so that secondary beams produced with heavier ions such as Oxygen, Fluorine, and Neon can be pursued.

  8. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microfluidic chamber can be constructed for the imaging of samples in liquid in the electron microscope. We provide microchip design specifications, a fabrication outline, instructions on how to prepare them for biological samples, and examples of images obtained using different light-, and electron microscopy modalities. The use of these microchips is particularly advantageous for correlative light-, and electron microscopy. PMID:21770941

  9. Shielding analysis of the IEM cell offset adapter plate

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, R.L.

    1995-01-13

    The adapter plate for the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell ten foot ceiling valve was modified so that the penetration through the valve is offset to the north side of the steel plate. The modifications required that the shielding effectiveness be evaluated for several operating conditions. The highest gamma ray dose rate (51 mrem/hr) occurs when a Core Component Container (CCC) with six high burn-up driver fuel assemblies is transferred into or out of Solid Waste Cask (SWC). The neutron dose rate at the same source location is 2.5 mrem/hr. The total dose rate during the transfer is less than the 200 mrem/hr limit. If the ten foot ceiling valve is closed, the dose rate with twelve DFA in the cell will be less than 0.1 mrem/hr. However, with the ceiling valve open the dose rate will be as high as 12 mrem/hr. The latter condition will require controlled access to the area around the offset adapter plate when the ceiling valve is open. It was found that gaps in the shield block around the SWC floor valve will allow contact dose rates as high as 350 mrem/hr during the transfer of a fully loaded CCC. Although this situation does not pertain to the offset adapter plate, it will require controlled access around the SWC valve during the transfer of a fully loaded CCC.

  10. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues. PMID:27265778

  11. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues. PMID:27265778

  12. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues.

  13. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wallmore » allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.« less

  14. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wall allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.

  15. WESF hot cells waste minimization criteria hot cells window seals evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Walterskirchen, K.M.

    1997-03-31

    WESF will decouple from B Plant in the near future. WESF is attempting to minimize the contaminated solid waste in their hot cells and utilize B Plant to receive the waste before decoupling. WESF wishes to determine the minimum amount of contaminated waste that must be removed in order to allow minimum maintenance of the hot cells when they are placed in ''laid-up'' configuration. The remaining waste should not cause unacceptable window seal deterioration for the remaining life of the hot cells. This report investigates and analyzes the seal conditions and hot cell history and concludes that WESF should remove existing point sources, replace cerium window seals in F-Cell and refurbish all leaded windows (except for A-Cell). Work should be accomplished as soon as possible and at least within the next three years.

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS IN OPEN POSITION. DOOR SLIDES SHUT WITH HELP OF MANUALLY OPERATED CHAIN. STAIRWAY TO MEZZANINE IN VIEW AT LEFT. CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9000. Unknown Photographer, 10/28/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Wide-bandgap epitaxial heterojunction windows for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Loferski, Joseph J.; Beaulieu, Roland; Sekula-Moise, Patricia A.; Vernon, Stanley M.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of a solar cell can be improved if minority carriers are confined by use of a wide-bandgap heterojunction window. For silicon (lattice constant a = 5.43 A), nearly lattice-matched wide-bandgap materials are ZnS (a = 5.41 A) and GaP (a = 5.45 A). Isotype n-n heterojuntions of both ZnS/Si and GaP/Si were grown on silicon n-p homojunction solar cells. Successful deposition processes used were metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) for GaP and ZnS, and vacuum evaporation of ZnS. Planar (100) and (111) and texture-etched - (111)-faceted - surfaces were used. A decrease in minority-carrier surface recombination compared to a bare surface was seen from increased short-wavelength spectral response, increased open-circuit voltage, and reduced dark saturation current, with no degradation of the minority carrier diffusion length.

  18. Alkali-vapor cell with metal coated windows for efficient application of an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Sarkisyan, A. S.; Guéna, J.; Lintz, M.; Bouchiat, M.-A.

    2005-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no magnetic part. The use of this kind of cell has resulted in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement of parity violation in cesium vapor underway at ENS, Paris. The technique can be applied to other situations where a brazed assembly would give rise to unacceptably large birefringence in the windows.

  19. Effect of InAlAs window layer on efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide bandgap, lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In(0.52)Al(0.48)As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated by using the numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improved significantly with the use of the window layer. No improvement was seen for the n(+)p InP cells. The cell results were explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction band energy discontinuity. The calculated current voltage and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrated that In(0.52)Al(0.48)As is a very promising candidate for a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  20. Effect of InAlAs window layer on the efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide-bandgap lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In0.52Al0.48As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated using a numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improves significantly with the use of a window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p InP cells. Cell results are explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction-band energy discontinuity. The calculated I-V and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrate that In0.52Al0.48As is a promising candidate as a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  1. Effectiveness of Shield Termination Techniques Tested with TEM Cell and Bulk Current Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the effectiveness of various shield termination techniques. Each termination technique is evaluated by two independent noise injection methods; transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell operated from 3 MHz 400 MHz, and bulk current injection (BCI) operated from 50 kHz 400 MHz. Both single carrier and broadband injection tests were investigated. Recommendations as to how to achieve the best shield transfer impedance (i.e. reduced coupled noise) are made based on the empirical data. Finally, the noise injection techniques themselves are indirectly evaluated by comparing the results obtained from the TEM Cell to those from BCI.

  2. Filamentary pulse self-compression: The impact of the cell windows

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Bethge, Jens; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Skupin, Stefan; Berge, Luc; Steinmeyer, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    Self-compression of multi-millijoule laser pulses during filamentary propagation is usually explained by the interplay of self-focusing and defocusing effects, causing a substantial concentration of energy on the axis of the propagating optical pulse. Recently, it has been argued that cell windows may play a decisive role in the self-compression mechanism. As such windows have to be used for media other than air their presence is often unavoidable, yet they present a sudden nonadiabatic change in dispersion and nonlinearity that should lead to a destruction of the temporal and spatial integrity of the light bullets generated in the self-compression mechanism. We now experimentally prove that there is, in fact, a self-healing mechanism that helps to overcome the potentially destructive consequences of the cell windows. We show in two carefully conducted experiments that the cell window position decisively influences activation or inhibition of the self-healing mechanism. A comparison with a windowless cell shows that the presence of this mechanism is an important prerequisite for the exploitation of self-compression effects in windowed cells filled with inert gases.

  3. Early kinetic window of target T cell susceptibility to CD25+ regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Hughson, Angela; Sukiennicki, Teresa L; Fowell, Deborah J

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral tolerance is maintained in part by thymically derived CD25+CD4+ T cells (regulatory T cells (Tregs)). Their mechanism of action has not been well characterized. Therefore, to get a better understanding of Treg action, we investigated the kinetics of murine Treg activity in vitro. Tregs were suppressive within a surprisingly narrow kinetic window: necessary and sufficient only in the first 6-10 h of culture. Visualization of this time frame, using a sensitive single-cell assay for IL-2, revealed the early elaboration of target cell IL-2 producers in the first 6 h despite the presence of CD25+CD4+ Tregs. However, after 6 h, a rapid rise in the number of IL-2 producers in the absence of Tregs was dramatically abrogated by the presence of Tregs. Importantly, the timing of suppression was dictated by the kinetics of target T cell activation suggesting that early target T cell signals may alter susceptibility to suppression. Modulating target T cell activation signals with provision of CD28, IL-2, or high Ag dose all abrogated suppression of proliferation late in culture. However, only CD28 signals enabled target T cells to resist the early Treg-induced down-regulation of IL-2. Therefore the quality of early target T cell activation signals, in particular engagement of CD28, represents an important control point in the balance between vulnerability and resistance to Treg suppression. PMID:16301632

  4. Vitellogenin Recognizes Cell Damage through Membrane Binding and Shields Living Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Münch, Daniel; Baumann, Anne; Zhong, Shi; Halskau, Øyvind; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Amdam, Gro V.

    2013-01-01

    Large lipid transfer proteins are involved in lipid transportation and diverse other molecular processes. These serum proteins include vitellogenins, which are egg yolk precursors and pathogen pattern recognition receptors, and apolipoprotein B, which is an anti-inflammatory cholesterol carrier. In the honey bee, vitellogenin acts as an antioxidant, and elevated vitellogenin titer is linked to prolonged life span in this animal. Here, we show that vitellogenin has cell and membrane binding activity and that it binds preferentially to dead and damaged cells. Vitellogenin binds directly to phosphatidylcholine liposomes and with higher affinity to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, a lipid of the inner leaflet of cell membranes that is exposed in damaged cells. Vitellogenin binding to live cells, furthermore, improves cell oxidative stress tolerance. This study can shed more light on why large lipid transfer proteins have a well conserved α-helical domain, because we locate the lipid bilayer-binding ability of vitellogenin largely to this region. We suggest that recognition of cell damage and oxidation shield properties are two mechanisms that allow vitellogenin to extend honey bee life span. PMID:23897804

  5. Looking at plant cell cycle from the chromatin window

    PubMed Central

    Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Fernández-Marcos, María; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Otero, Sofía; Vergara, Zaida; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle is defined by a series of complex events, finely coordinated through hormonal, developmental and environmental signals, which occur in a unidirectional manner and end up in producing two daughter cells. Accumulating evidence reveals that chromatin is not a static entity throughout the cell cycle. In fact, there are many changes that include nucleosome remodeling, histone modifications, deposition and exchange, among others. Interestingly, it is possible to correlate the occurrence of several of these chromatin-related events with specific processes necessary for cell cycle progression, e.g., licensing of DNA replication origins, the E2F-dependent transcriptional wave in G1, the activation of replication origins in S-phase, the G2-specific transcription of genes required for mitosis or the chromatin packaging occurring in mitosis. Therefore, an emerging view is that chromatin dynamics must be considered as an intrinsic part of cell cycle regulation. In this article, we review the main features of several key chromatin events that occur at defined times throughout the cell cycle and discuss whether they are actually controlling the transit through specific cell cycle stages. PMID:25120553

  6. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using an environmental cell with silicon nitride membrane windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemi, Eika; Watanabe, Yoshio; Oji, Hiroshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-06-21

    We applied hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) to a sample under ambient pressure conditions using an environmental cell with an approximately 24 nm-thick SiN{sub x} membrane window. As a model chemical substance, europium (II) iodide (EuI{sub 2}) sealed in the cell with argon gas was investigated with HAXPES to identify the chemical species present inside the cell. The optical and morphological properties of the sample within the cell were measured with optical and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. We confirmed the effectiveness of the gas barrier properties of the cell with the SiN{sub x} window and demonstrated its applicability to various other optical and electron measurements as well as HAXPES.

  7. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  8. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  9. Spacecraft Shielding: An Experimental Comparison Between Open Cell Aluminium Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures and Whipple Shielding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D. L. S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Spacecraft shielding is generally provided by metallic plates in a Whipple shield type configuration [1] where possible. However, mission restrictions such as spacecraft payload mass, can prevent the inclusion of a dedicated protective structure for prevention against impact damage from micrometeoroids. Due to this, often the spacecraft's primary structure will act as the de facto shield. This is commonly an aluminium honeycomb backed with either glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP) or aluminium faceplates [2]. Such materials are strong, lightweight and relatively cheap due to their abundance used within the aerospace industry. However, these materials do not offer the best protection (per unit weight) against hypervelocity impact damage. A new material for shielding (porous aluminium foam [3]) is suggested for low risk space missions. Previous studies by NASA [4] have been performed to test this new material against hypervelocity impacts using spherical aluminium projectiles. This showed its potential for protection for satellites in Earth orbit, against metallic space debris. Here we demonstrate the material's protective capabilities against micrometeoroids, using soda-lime glass spheres as projectiles to accurately gauge its potential with relation to silicatious materials, such as micrometeoroids and natural solar system debris. This is useful for spacecraft missions beyond Earth orbit where solar system materials are the dominant threat (via hypervelocity impacts) to the spacecraft, rather than manmade debris.

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT DOOR WAS DARKROOM, AND THIRD DOOR LED TO ANOTHER OFFICE. ALL ARE ALONG NORTH WALL OF BUILDING (ETR EXTENSION OF 1958). CAMERA FACES NORTHEAST. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. New photoacoustic cell with diamond window for mid-infrared investigations on biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottmann, Jonas; Rey, Julien M.; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new photoacoustic (PA) cell, which is sealed on the sample side with a 163 μm thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond window. The investigation of samples containing volatile compounds with an openended PA cell leads to varying conditions in the PA chamber (changing light absorption or relative humidity) and thus causes unstable signals. In contrast the diamond cover ensures stable conditions in the PA chamber and thereby enables sensitive measurements. This is particularly important for the investigation of biological samples with a high water content. Due to the high thermal conductivity of CVD diamond (1800 W/mK) strong PA signals are generated and the broad optical transmission range (250 nm to THz) renders the cell useful for various applications. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by tracking glucose in aqueous keratinocyte solutions with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (1010-1095 cm-1). These measurements yield a detection limit of 100 mg/dl (SNR=3). Although glucose measurements within the human physiological range (30-500 mg/dl) are feasible, further improvements are needed for non-invasive glucose monitoring of diabetes patients. First in vivo measurements at the human forearm show an additional PA signal induced by blood pulsation at a frequency around 1 Hz and a steadily increasing relative humidity in the PA chamber due to transepidermal water loss if the cell is neither closed with a diamond window nor ventilated with N2.

  12. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  13. Self-sealing solar collector shield

    SciTech Connect

    Katona, J.W.

    1980-03-25

    Window structure for a solar collector shield or the like having a frame defining a row of separate window openings. A selfcontained window unit is installed in each opening. Each window unit comprises a pair of rectangular glass panes held in laterally spaced parallel relation by a peripheral window frame. A mounting frame is provided for mounting each window unit in its window opening. Each mounting frame has overlapping frame members. Adjacent side frame members of adjacent window units also overlap. The overlap is for the purpose of excluding moisture and preventing heat loss. A peripheral window seal is provided for the same purpose.

  14. Late Cenozoic deep weathering patterns on the Fennoscandian shield in northern Finland: A window on ice sheet bed conditions at the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adrian M.; Sarala, Pertti; Ebert, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The nature of the regolith that existed on the shields of the Northern Hemisphere at the onset of ice sheet glaciation is poorly constrained. In this paper, we provide the first detailed account of an exceptionally preserved, deeply weathered late Neogene landscape in the ice sheet divide zone in northern Finland. We mine data sets of drilling and pitting records gathered by the Geological Survey of Finland to reconstruct regional preglacial deep weathering patterns within a GIS framework. Using a large geochemical data set, we give standardised descriptions of saprolite geochemistry using a variant of the Weathering Index of Parker (WIP) as a proxy to assess the intensity of weathering. We also focus on mineral prospects and mines with dense pit and borehole data coverage in order to identify links between geology, topography, and weathering. Geology is closely linked to topography on the preglacial shield landscape of northern Finland and both factors influence weathering patterns. Upstanding, resistant granulite, granite, gabbro, metabasalt, and quartzite rocks were associated with fresh rock outcrops, including tors, or with thin (< 5 m) grusses. Plains developed across less resistant biotite gneisses, greenstones, and belts of alternating rock types were mainly weathered to thick (10-20 m) grusses with WIPfines values above 3000 and 4000. Beneath valley floors developed along mineralised shear and fracture zones, weathering penetrated locally to depths of > 50 m and included intensely weathered kaolinitic clays with WIPfines values below 1000. Late Neogene weathering profiles were varied in character. Tripartite clay-gruss-saprock profiles occur only in limited areas. Bipartite gruss-saprock profiles were widespread, with saprock thicknesses of > 10 m. Weathering profiles included two discontinuities in texture, materials and resistance to erosion, between saprolite and saprock and between saprock and rock. Limited core recovery when drilling below the soil

  15. Chemically deposited CdS by an ammonia-free process for solar cells window layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa-Landin, R.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Vigil-Galan, O.; Ramirez-Bon, R.

    2010-02-15

    Chemically deposited CdS window layers were studied on two different transparent conductive substrates, namely indium tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO), to determine the influence of their properties on CdS/CdTe solar cells performance. Three types of CdS films obtained from different chemical bath deposition (CBD) processes were studied. The three CBD processes employed sodium citrate as the complexing agent in partial or full substitution of ammonia. The CdS films were studied by X-ray diffraction, optical transmission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. CdS/CdTe devices were completed by depositing 3 {mu}m thick CdTe absorbent layers by means of the close-spaced vapor transport technique (CSVT). Evaporated Cu-Au was used as the back contact in all the solar cells. Dark and under illumination J-V characteristic and quantum efficiency measurements were done on the CdS/CdTe devices to determine their conversion efficiency and spectral response. The efficiency of the cells depended on the window layer and on the transparent contact with values between 5.7% and 8.7%. (author)

  16. Provision Of Carbon Nanotube Bucky Paper Cages For Immune Shielding Of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method for enclosing cells and/or tissue, for purposes of growth, cell differentiation, suppression of cell differentiation, biological processing and/or transplantation of cells and tissues (biological inserts), and for secretion, sensing and monitoring of selected chemical substances and activation of gene expression of biological inserts implanted into a human body. Selected cells and/or tissue are enveloped in a "cage" that is primarily carbon nanotube Bucky paper, with a selected thickness and porosity. Optionally, selected functional groups, proteins and/or peptides are attached to the carbon nanotube cage, or included within the cage, to enhance the growth and/or differentiation of the cells and/or tissue, to select for certain cellular sub-populations, to optimize certain functions of the cells and/or tissue and/or to optimize the passage of chemicals across the cage surface(s). A cage system is also used as an immuns shield and to control operation of a nano-device or macroscopic device, located within the cage, to provide or transform a selected chemical and/or a selected signal.

  17. Magnetic Shielding Accelerates the Proliferation of Human Neuroblastoma Cell by Promoting G1-Phase Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  18. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    PubMed

    Mo, Wei-chuan; Zhang, Zi-jian; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

    2011-11-07

    demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

  20. Transparent, near-infrared organic photovoltaic solar cells for window and energy-scavenging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lunt, Richard R; Bulovic, Vladimir

    2011-03-14

    We fabricate near-infrared absorbing organic photovoltaics that are highly transparent to visible light. By optimizing near-infrared optical-interference, we demonstrate power efficiencies of 1.3±0.1% with simultaneous average visible transmission of >65% . Subsequent incorporation of near-infrared distributed-Bragg-reflector mirrors leads to an increase in the efficiency to 1.7±0.1% , approaching the 2.4±0.2% efficiency of the opaque cell, while maintaining high visible-transparency of >55% . Finally, we demonstrate that a series-integrated array of these transparent cells is capable of powering electronic devices under near-ambient lighting. This architecture suggests strategies for high-efficiency power-generating windows and highlights an application uniquely benefiting from excitonic electronics.

  1. Enhanced near-infrared shielding ability of (Li,K)-codoped WO3 for smart windows: DFT prediction validated by experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenxi; Chen, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Xiaofei; Cheng, Daojian; Huan, Haifeng; Cao, Dapeng

    2016-02-19

    By means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) computations, we found that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 shows a significantly enhanced near-infrared (NIR) absorption ability for smart windows, and investigated the influence of doping through the analysis of the electronic structures of pure and doped hexagonal WO3. Furthermore, this codoped material, with a hexagonal tungsten bronze nanostructure, was successfully prepared via a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction for the first time. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared products possessed a nanorod-like morphology with diameters of about 5-10 nm. It was demonstrated that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 presents a better NIR absorption ability than pure, Li-monodoped or K-monodoped WO3, which is in good agreement with our theoretical predictions. The experiment and simulation results reveal that this enhanced optical property in NIR can be explained by the existence of high free electrons existing in (Li,K)-codoped WO3. PMID:26783034

  2. Enhanced near-infrared shielding ability of (Li,K)-codoped WO3 for smart windows: DFT prediction validated by experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenxi; Chen, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Xiaofei; Cheng, Daojian; Huang, Haifeng; Cao, Dapeng

    2016-02-01

    By means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) computations, we found that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 shows a significantly enhanced near-infrared (NIR) absorption ability for smart windows, and investigated the influence of doping through the analysis of the electronic structures of pure and doped hexagonal WO3. Furthermore, this codoped material, with a hexagonal tungsten bronze nanostructure, was successfully prepared via a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction for the first time. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared products possessed a nanorod-like morphology with diameters of about 5–10 nm. It was demonstrated that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 presents a better NIR absorption ability than pure, Li-monodoped or K-monodoped WO3, which is in good agreement with our theoretical predictions. The experiment and simulation results reveal that this enhanced optical property in NIR can be explained by the existence of high free electrons existing in (Li,K)-codoped WO3.

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    SciTech Connect

    Biemann, Ronald; Navarrete Santos, Anne; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Riemann, Dagmar; Knelangen, Julia; Blueher, Matthias; Koch, Holger; Fischer, Bernd

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  4. Neural stem cell-encoded temporal patterning delineates an early window of malignant susceptibility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine; Lanet, Elodie; Dillard, Caroline; Foppolo, Sophie; Chen, Ching-Huan; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Sokol, Nicholas S; Maurange, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric neural tumors are often initiated during early development and can undergo very rapid transformation. However, the molecular basis of this early malignant susceptibility remains unknown. During Drosophila development, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide asymmetrically and generate intermediate progenitors that rapidly differentiate in neurons. Upon gene inactivation, these progeny can dedifferentiate and generate malignant tumors. Here, we find that intermediate progenitors are prone to malignancy only when born during an early window of development while expressing the transcription factor Chinmo, and the mRNA-binding proteins Imp/IGF2BP and Lin-28. These genes compose an oncogenic module that is coopted upon dedifferentiation of early-born intermediate progenitors to drive unlimited tumor growth. In late larvae, temporal transcription factor progression in NSCs silences the module, thereby limiting mitotic potential and terminating the window of malignant susceptibility. Thus, this study identifies the gene regulatory network that confers malignant potential to neural tumors with early developmental origins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13463.001 PMID:27296804

  5. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  6. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  7. Distinguishing hair cell from neural potentials recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Forgues, Mathieu; Koehn, Heather A.; Dunnon, Askia K.; Pulver, Stephen H.; Buchman, Craig A.; Adunka, Oliver F.

    2013-01-01

    Almost all patients who receive cochlear implants have some acoustic hearing prior to surgery. Electrocochleography (ECoG), or electrophysiological measures of cochlear response to sound, can identify remaining auditory nerve activity that is the basis for this residual hearing and can record potentials from hair cells that are no longer functionally connected to nerve fibers. The ECoG signal is therefore complex, being composed of both hair cell and neural signals. To identify signatures of different sources in the recorded potentials, we collected ECoG data across frequency and intensity from the round window of gerbils before and after treatment with kainic acid, a neurotoxin. Distortions in the recorded waveforms were produced by different sources over different ranges of frequency and intensity. In response to tones at low frequencies and low-to-moderate intensities, the major source of distortion was from neural phase-locking that was sensitive to kainic acid. At high intensities at all frequencies, the distortion was not sensitive to kainic acid and was consistent with asymmetric saturation of the hair cell transducer current. In addition to loss of phase-locking, changes in the envelope after kainic acid treatment indicate that sustained neural firing combines with receptor potentials from hair cells to produce the envelope of the response to tones. These results provide baseline data to interpret comparable recordings from human cochlear implant recipients. PMID:24133227

  8. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Fanny; De Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-10-14

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields. PMID:26349675

  9. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  10. Lattice-mismatched In(0. 40)Al(0. 60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.K.; Landis, G.A.; Wilt, D.M.; Flood, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  11. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  12. Chemical Reactivity Window Determines Prodrug Efficiency toward Glutathione Transferase Overexpressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    van Gisbergen, Marike W; Cebula, Marcus; Zhang, Jie; Ottosson-Wadlund, Astrid; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Haenen, Guido R M M; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Saneyoshi, Hisao; Araki, Mika; Shishido, Yuko; Ito, Yoshihiro; Arnér, Elias S J; Abe, Hiroshi; Morgenstern, Ralf; Johansson, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    mechanisms in cells. Here we propose that GST-dependent prodrugs require a conversion rate "window" in order to selectively target GST overexpressing cells, while limiting their effects on normal cells. Prodrugs are furthermore a suitable system to specifically target GSTs and to overcome various drug resistance mechanisms that apply to the parental drug. PMID:27093577

  13. Cosmological Parameter Estimation and Window Function in Counts-in-Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Y.; Matsubara, T.

    2006-11-01

    We estimate the cosmological parameter bounds expected from the counts-in-cells analysis of the galaxy distributions of SDSS samples, which are the Main Galaxies (MGs) and the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We use the m-weight Epanechnikov kernel as window function with expectation of improving the bounds of parameters. We apply the Fisher Information Matrix Analysis, which can estimate the minimum expected parameter bounds without any data. In this analysis, we derive the covariance matrix that includes the consideration of overlapping of cells. As a result, we found that the signal to noise of the LRG sample is bigger than that of the MG sample because the range of data using is only linear scale. Therefore, the LRG sample is more suitable for parameter estimation. For the LRG sample, about six hundred data points are sufficient to get maximum effect on parameter bounds. Large parameter set results in poor bounds because of degeneracy, the matter density, the baryon fraction, the neutrino density and σ2 8 including the amplitude of the power spectrum, the linear bias and the Kaiser effect seems to be an appropriate set.

  14. Phase-diverse Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging of malaria parasite-infected red blood cells in the water window.

    PubMed

    Jones, M W M; Abbey, B; Gianoncelli, A; Balaur, E; Millet, C; Luu, M B; Coughlan, H D; Carroll, A J; Peele, A G; Tilley, L; van Riessen, G A

    2013-12-30

    Phase-diverse Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging has been shown to reveal the structure and composition of biological specimens with high sensitivity at nanoscale resolution. However, the method has yet to be applied using X-ray illumination with energy in the so-called 'water-window' that lies between the carbon and oxygen K edges. In this range, differences in the strength of the X-ray interaction for protein based biological materials and water is increased. Here we demonstrate a proof-of-principle application of FCDI at an X-ray energy within the water-window to a dehydrated cellular sample composed of red blood cells infected with the trophozoite stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Comparison of the results to both optical and electron microscopy shows that the correlative imaging methods that include water-window FCDI will find utility in studying cellular architecture. PMID:24514809

  15. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation. PMID:27029216

  16. Power coupler and cold window for seven-cell superconducting cavity vertical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.R.; Spalek, G.

    1992-10-01

    For tests of the LANL 805MHz seven cell superconducting cavity, we are developing a variable coaxial rf power coupler. Its Q{sub ext} will be variable over a range from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 12}. It will operate nominally at 3kW CW and lOOkW peak for high power processing. The coupler consists of a 3 inch driveline and window, a 3.45 inch T supported by a {lambda}/4 shorted stub followed by a step transition to a 2 inch coupler port. A {approximately} 6.6 Ohm impedance choke joint located at the step transition allows the large center conductor travel necessary for the Q{sub ext} variation. The folded choke joint is located at a standing wave current node to keep its excitation below the multipacting level even at high power levels. A low contact-pressure sliding rf seal prevents arcing at the choke joints current node during its filling time.

  17. Power coupler and cold window for seven-cell superconducting cavity vertical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.R.; Spalek, G.

    1992-01-01

    For tests of the LANL 805MHz seven cell superconducting cavity, we are developing a variable coaxial rf power coupler. Its Q[sub ext] will be variable over a range from 10[sup 5] to 10[sup 12]. It will operate nominally at 3kW CW and lOOkW peak for high power processing. The coupler consists of a 3 inch driveline and window, a 3.45 inch T supported by a [lambda]/4 shorted stub followed by a step transition to a 2 inch coupler port. A [approximately] 6.6 Ohm impedance choke joint located at the step transition allows the large center conductor travel necessary for the Q[sub ext] variation. The folded choke joint is located at a standing wave current node to keep its excitation below the multipacting level even at high power levels. A low contact-pressure sliding rf seal prevents arcing at the choke joints current node during its filling time.

  18. Aortopulmonary window

    MedlinePlus

    Aortopulmonary window is a rare heart defect in which there is a hole connecting the major artery taking blood ... rest of the body. Babies with an aortopulmonary window have a hole in between the aorta and ...

  19. Micro-abrasion package capture cell experiment on the trailing edge of LDEF: Impactor chemistry and whipple bumper shield efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Howard J.; Yano, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    Four of the eight available double layer microparticle capture cells, flown as the experiment A0023 on the trailing (West) face of LDEF, have been extensively studied. An investigation of the chemistry of impactors has been made using SEM/EDX techniques and the effectiveness of the capture cells as bumper shields has also been examined. Studies of these capture cells gave positive EDX results, with 53 percent of impact sites indicating the presence of some chemical residues, the predominant residue identified as being silicon in varying quantities.

  20. [The impact of ZnS/CdS composite window layer on the quantun efficiency of CdTe solar cell in short wavelength].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-xiang; Feng, Liang-huan; Wang, Wen-wu; Xu, Hang; Wu, Li-li; Zhang, Jing-quan; Li, Wei; Zeng, Guang-gen

    2015-02-01

    ZnS/CdS composite window layer was prepared by magnetron sputtering method and then applied to CdTe solar cell. The morphology and structure of films were measured. The data of I-V in light and the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with different window layers were also measured. The effect of ZnS films prepared in different conditions on the performance of CdTe solar cells was researched. The effects of both CdS thickness and ZnS/CdS composite layer on the transmission in short wavelength were studied. Particularly, the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer was measured. The results show as follows. With the thickness of CdS window layer reducing from 100 to 50 nm, the transmission increase 18.3% averagely in short wavelength and the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells increase 27.6% averagely. The grain size of ZnS prepared in 250 degrees C is smaller than prepared at room temperature. The performance of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer is much better if ZnS deposited at 250 degrees C. This indicates grain size has some effect on the electron transportation. When the CdS holds the same thickness, the transmission of ZnS/CdS window layer was improved about 2% in short wavelength compared with CdS window layer. The quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer was also improved about 2% in short wavelength compared with that based on CdS window layer. These indicate ZnS/CdS composite window layer can increase the photon transmission in short wavelength so that more photons can be absorbed by the absorbent layer of CdTe solar cells. PMID:25970885

  1. Electrodeposition of ZnO-doped films as window layer for Cd-free CIGS-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsin, Fabien; Vénérosy, Amélie; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Naghavi, Negar; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell technology has made a steady progress within the last decade reaching efficiency up to 22.3% on laboratory scale, thus overpassing the highest efficiency for polycrystalline silicon solar cells. High efficiency CIGS modules employ a so-called buffer layer of cadmium sulfide CdS deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), which presence and Cd-containing waste present some environmental concerns. A second potential bottleneck for CIGS technology is its window layer made of i-ZnO/ZnO:Al, which is deposited by sputtering requiring expensive vacuum equipment. A non-vacuum deposition of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) relying on simpler equipment with lower investment costs will be more economically attractive, and could increase competitiveness of CIGS-based modules with the mainstream silicon-based technologies. In the frame of Novazolar project, we have developed a low-cost aqueous solution photo assisted electrodeposition process of the ZnO-based window layer for high efficiency CIGS-based solar cells. The window layer deposition have been first optimized on classical CdS buffer layer leading to cells with efficiencies similar to those measured with the sputtered references on the same absorber (15%). The the optimized ZnO doped layer has been adapted to cadmium free devices where the CdS is replaced by chemical bath deposited zinc oxysulfide Zn(S,O) buffer layer. The effect of different growth parameters has been studied on CBD-Zn(S,O)-plated co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 substrates provided by the Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW). This optimization of the electrodeposition of ZnO:Cl on CIGS/Zn(S,O) stacks led to record efficiency of 14%, while the reference cell with a sputtered (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO:Al window layer has an efficiency of 15.2%.

  2. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  3. Light management and efficient carrier generation with a highly transparent window layer for a multijunction amorphous silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftiquar, Sk Md; Lee, Jeong Chul; Lee, Jieun; Kim, Youngkuk; Jang, Juyeon; Lee, Yeun-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2013-01-01

    P-layer of a p-i-n type amorphous silicon solar cell helps in creating a built-in electric field inside the cell; it also contributes to parasitic absorption loss of incident light. Here, we report optimization of these two characteristic contributions of the p-layer of the cell. We used a highly transparent p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (p-a-Si1-xCx:H) window layer in an amorphous silicon solar cell. With the increased transparency of the p-type layer, the solar cell showed an improvement in short-circuit current density by 17%, along with improvement in blue response of its external quantum efficiency, although further thinner p-layer showed lower open-circuit voltage. Such a cell shows low light-induced degradation and a promise to be used in high-efficiency multijunction solar cell.

  4. Evaluation of UV radiation-induced toxicity and biophysical changes in various skin cells with photo-shielding molecules.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Devasier; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-09-21

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) triggers many complex events in different types of skin cells, including benign, malignant and normal cells. Chromophores present in these cells play a crucial role in various cellular processes. Unprecedented methods are required for the real-time monitoring of changes in an in vitro model exposed to intermittent mild and intense UVR to determine the mechanisms underlying cell degeneration and the effects of unexpected toxic, agonist and antagonist agents. This study reports the analytical application of a whole cell-based sensor platform for examining the biophysical effects of UVR. We used human keratinocyte, melanocyte and fibroblast cell lines to determine the normal, pathological and protective roles of UVR. In addition, we examined the real-time morphological, biophysical and biomechanical changes associated with cell degeneration induced by UVR at 254 and 365 nm. Information on UVR-induced changes in the cytoskeleton ultrastructure, cellular integrity, cell spreading area, actin microfilament distribution inflammation, microtubule damage, membrane damage, rupture and death was characterized by examining the loss or increase in biophysical and biomechanical properties of these cells. All cells exposed to UVR at 254 and 365 nm showed a significant increase in surface roughness and stiffness in a time-dependent manner. UVR-induced toxicity in differently pigmented skin cells was compared with that in cells pretreated with melanin, keratin and basic fibroblast growth factor to analyze the shielding efficiency of these agents. Melanin exerted a significant shielding effect compared to the other two agents. The biophysical and biomechanical information obtained in this study could advance our understanding of the UVR-induced degeneration process, and help in developing new interventions strategies. PMID:26247629

  5. Flexible shielding system for radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Modular construction of low cost flexible radiation shielding panels consists of water filled steels cans, zinc bromide windows, turntable unit, master-slave manipulators, and interlocking lead bricks. Easy modifications of shielding wall thicknesses are obtained by rearranging overall geometry of portable components.

  6. Fabrication and electromagnetic interference shielding performance of open-cell foam of a Cu-Ni alloy integrated with CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Keju; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Jia; Dai, Zhendong

    2014-08-01

    A lightweight multi-layered electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material made of open-cell foam of a Cu-Ni alloy integrated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was prepared by electroless copper plating, then nickel electroplating, and finally electrophoretic deposition of CNTs. The foamed Cu-Ni-CNT composite comprises, from inside to outside, Cu, Ni, and CNT layers. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and EMI tests were employed to characterize the morphology, composition, and EMI performance of the composite, respectively. The results indicated that the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite increased with increasing pore density (indicated as pores per inch (PPI)) and increasing thickness. A specimen with a PPI of 110 and a 1.5-mm thickness had a maximum SE of up to 54.6 dB, and a SE as high as 47.5 dB on average in the 8-12 GHz range. Integrating the inherent superiority of Cu, Ni, and CNTs, the porous structure of the composite can attenuate the incident electromagnetic microwaves by reflecting, scattering, and absorbing them between the metallic skeleton and the CNT layer. The multiple reflections and absorptions make it difficult for the microwaves to escape from the composite before being absorbed, thereby making the composite a potential shielding material.

  7. Transparent self-cleaning dust shield

    DOEpatents

    Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

    2005-06-28

    A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

  8. CAVE WINDOW

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, M.

    1960-10-25

    A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

  9. Human umbilical-cord-blood mononucleated cells enhance the survival of lethally irradiated mice: dosage and the window of time

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Olga A.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Ende, Norman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the window of time and dose of human umbilical-cord-blood (HUCB) mononucleated cells necessary for successful treatment of radiation injury in mice. Female A/J mice (27–30 weeks old) were exposed to an absorbed dose of 9–10 Gy of 137Cs γ-rays delivered acutely to the whole body. They were treated either with 1 × 108 or 2 × 108 HUCB mononucleated cells at 24–52 h after the irradiation. The antibiotic Levaquin was applied 4 h postirradiation. The increased dose of cord-blood cells resulted in enhanced survival. The enhancement of survival in animals that received 2 × 108 HUCB mononucleated cells relative to irradiated but untreated animals was highly significant (P < 0.01). Compared with earlier studies, the increased dose of HUCB mononucleated cells, coupled with early use of an antibiotic, extended the window of time for effective treatment of severe radiation injury from 4 to 24–52 h after exposure. PMID:23792493

  10. Calculated performance of p(+)n InP solar cells with In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of indium phosphide solar cells with lattice matched wide band-gap In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layers was calculated using the PC-1D computer code. The conversion efficiency of p(+)n InP solar cells is improved significantly by the window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p structures. The improvement in InP cell efficiency was studied as a function of In(0.52)Al(0.48)As layer thickness. The use of the window layer improves both the open circuit voltage and short circuit current.For a typical In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layer thickness of 20 nm, the cell efficiency improves in excess of 27 percent to a value of 18.74 percent.

  11. DNA fragmentation induced by fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M.A.

    2003-11-19

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used small gamma, Greek-rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by small gamma, Greek-rays in the size range 123 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions.

  12. DNA fragmentation induced by Fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used gamma rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by gamma rays in the size range 1-23 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposited a novel CdS/CdSe composite window layer for CdTe thin film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Bo; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-03-01

    A novel CdS/CdSe composite window structure was designed and then the corresponding films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an improved window layer for CdTe-based solar cells. Two types of this composite window structure with 5 cycles and 10 cycles CdS/CdSe respectively both combined with CdS layers were prepared at 200 °C compared with pure CdS window layer and finally were applied into CdTe thin film solar cells. The cross section and surface morphology of the two composite window layers were monitored by using scanning electron microscopy and the result shows that the pulsed laser deposited composite window layers with good crystallinity are stacking together as the design. The devices based on CdS/CdSe composite window layers have demonstrated the enhanced photocurrent collection from both short and long wavelength regions compared to CdS/CdTe solar cell. The efficiency of the best reference CdS/CdTe solar cell was 10.72%. And the device with 5 cycles CdS/CdSe composite window showed efficiency of 12.61% with VOC of 772.92 mV, JSC of 25.11 mA/cm2 and FF of 64.95%. In addition, there are some differences which exist within the optical transmittance spectra and QE curves between the two CdS/CdSe composite window samples, indicating that the volume proportion of CdSe may influence the performance of CdTe thin film solar cell.

  14. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  15. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  16. Electron and proton damage on InGaAs solar cells having an InP window layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Cotal, Hector L.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    As part of a continuing program to determine the space radiation resistance of InP/ln(0.53)Ga(0.47)As tandem solar cells, n/p In(0.53)Ga(0. 47)As solar cells fabricated by RTI were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and with 3 MeV protons. The cells were grown with a 3 micron n-lnP window layer to mimic the top cell in the tandem cell configuration for both AMO solar absorption and radiation effects. The results have been plotted against 'displacement damage dose' which is the product of the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) and the particle fluence. A characteristic radiation damage curve can then be obtained for predicting the effect of all particles and energies. AMO, 1 sun solar illumination IV measurements were performed on the irradiated InGaAs solar cells and a characteristic radiation degradation curve was obtained using the solar cell conversion efficiency as the model parameter. Also presented are data comparing the radiation response of both n/p and p/n (fabricated by NREL) InGaAs solar cells as a function of base doping concentration. For the solar cell efficiency, the radiation degradation was found to be independent of the sample polarity for the same base doping concentration.

  17. ZnSe Window Layers for GaAs and GaInP2 Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.

    1995-01-01

    This report concerns studies of the use of ZnSe as a window layer for GaAs solar cells. Well-oriented crystalline ZnSe films on (100) single crystal GaAs substrates were grown by MOCVD. In particular, ZnSe films were grown by reacting a zinc adduct with hydrogen selenide at temperatures in the range of 200 C to 400 C. X-ray diffraction studies and images obtained with an atomic force microscope determined that the films were highly oriented but were polycrystalline. Particular emphasis was placed on the use of a substrate temperature of 350 C. Using iodine as a dopant, n-type ZnSe films with resistivities in the range of .01 to .05 ohm-cm were grown on semi-insulating GaAs. Thus procedures have been developed for investigating the utility of n-type ZnSe window layers on n/p GaAs structures. Studies of recombination at n-ZnSe/n-GaAs interfaces in n-ZnSe/n-GaAs/p-GaAs cell structures are planned for future work.

  18. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  19. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. 2 SHOWS MANIPULATION INSTRUMENTS AND SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS. PENETRATIONS FOR OPERATING INSTRUMENTS GO THROUGH SHIELDING ABOVE WINDOWS. CONDUIT FOR UTILITIES AND CONTROLS IS BEHIND METAL CABINET BELOW WINDOWS NEAR FLOOR. CAMERA FACES WEST. WARNING SIGN LIMITS FISSILE MATERIAL TO SPECIFIED NUMBER OF GRAMS OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Impairment of Rat Fetal Beta-Cell Development by Maternal Exposure to Dexamethasone during Different Time-Windows

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Olivier; Theys, Nicolas; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Remacle, Claude; Reusens, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Aim Glucocorticoids (GCs) take part in the direct control of cell lineage during the late phase of pancreas development when endocrine and exocrine cell differentiation occurs. However, other tissues such as the vasculature exert a critical role before that phase. This study aims to investigate the consequences of overexposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during different time-windows of gestation for the development of the fetal endocrine pancreas. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats received dexamethasone acetate in their drinking water (1 µg/ml) during the last week or throughout gestation. Fetuses and their pancreases were analyzed at day 15 and 21 of gestation. Morphometrical analysis was performed on pancreatic sections after immunohistochemistry techniques and insulin secretion was evaluated on fetal islets collected in vitro. Results Dexamethasone given the last week or throughout gestation reduced the beta-cell mass in 21-day-old fetuses by respectively 18% or 62%. This was accompanied by a defect in insulin secretion. The alpha-cell mass was reduced similarly. Neither islet vascularization nor beta-cell proliferation was affected when dexamethasone was administered during the last week, which was however the case when given throughout gestation. When given from the beginning of gestation, dexamethasone reduced the number of cells expressing the early marker of endocrine lineage neurogenin-3 when analyzed at 15 days of fetal age. Conclusions GCs reduce the beta- and alpha-cell mass by different mechanisms according to the stage of development during which the treatment was applied. In fetuses exposed to glucocorticoids the last week of gestation only, beta-cell mass is reduced due to impairment of beta-cell commitment, whereas in fetuses exposed throughout gestation, islet vascularization and lower beta-cell proliferation are involved as well, amplifying the reduction of the endocrine mass. PMID:21991320

  1. [Aortopulmonary window].

    PubMed

    González-Marín, María Arántzazu; Jiménez-Díaz, Javier; Centeno-Jiménez, Miriam; García-Cabezas, M Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The aortopulmonary window is a rare cause of heart failure in the neonate. It must be ruled out if there are signs of pulmonary edema without the most frequent left-right shunts. We report the echocardiographic images of a newborn who was admitted with symptoms of heart failure at our institution. PMID:25698530

  2. Thermocouple shield

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  3. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. PMID:27102116

  4. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells.The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental materials, apparatus, experimental procedures and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02178f

  5. NLRC5 shields T lymphocytes from NK-cell-mediated elimination under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ludigs, Kristina; Jandus, Camilla; Utzschneider, Daniel T.; Staehli, Francesco; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Dang, Anh Thu; Rota, Giorgia; Castro, Wilson; Zehn, Dietmar; Vivier, Eric; Held, Werner; Romero, Pedro; Guarda, Greta

    2016-01-01

    NLRC5 is a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I (MHCI), which maintains high MHCI expression particularly in T cells. Recent evidence highlights an important NK–T-cell crosstalk, raising the question on whether NLRC5 specifically modulates this interaction. Here we show that NK cells from Nlrc5-deficient mice exhibit moderate alterations in inhibitory receptor expression and responsiveness. Interestingly, NLRC5 expression in T cells is required to protect them from NK-cell-mediated elimination upon inflammation. Using T-cell-specific Nlrc5-deficient mice, we show that NK cells surprisingly break tolerance even towards ‘self' Nlrc5-deficient T cells under inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, during chronic LCMV infection, the total CD8+ T-cell population is severely decreased in these mice, a phenotype reverted by NK-cell depletion. These findings strongly suggest that endogenous T cells with low MHCI expression become NK-cell targets, having thus important implications for T-cell responses in naturally or therapeutically induced inflammatory conditions. PMID:26861112

  6. Human iPSC-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Tendon Repair in a Rat Patellar Tendon Window Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yequan; Liu, Erfu; Sun, Yanjun; Luo, Ziwei; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Wanqian; Zhong, Li; Lv, Yonggang; Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent that are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal lineages. In this study, we investigated whether iPSC-derived NCSCs (iPSC-NCSCs) have potential for tendon repair. Human iPSC-NCSCs were suspended in fibrin gel and transplanted into a rat patellar tendon window defect. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, macroscopical observation showed that the repair of iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons was superior to that of non-iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons. Histological and mechanical examinations revealed that iPSC-NCSCs treatment significantly enhanced tendon healing as indicated by the improvement in matrix synthesis and mechanical properties. Furthermore, transplanted iPSC-NCSCs produced fetal tendon-related matrix proteins, stem cell recruitment factors, and tenogenic differentiation factors, and accelerated the host endogenous repair process. This study demonstrates a potential strategy of employing iPSC-derived NCSCs for tendon tissue engineering. PMID:23815150

  7. Predicting the location of missing outer hair cells using the electrical signal recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Chertoff, Mark E.; Earl, Brian R.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Sorensen, Janna L.; Thomas, Megan L. A.; Kamerer, Aryn M.; Peppi, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The electrical signal recorded at the round window was used to estimate the location of missing outer hair cells. The cochlear response was recorded to a low frequency tone embedded in high-pass filtered noise conditions. Cochlear damage was created by either overexposure to frequency-specific tones or laser light. In animals with continuous damage along the partition, the amplitude of the cochlear response increased as the high-pass cutoff frequency increased, eventually reaching a plateau. The cochlear distance at the onset of the plateau correlated with the anatomical onset of outer hair cell loss. A mathematical model replicated the physiologic data but was limited to cases with continuous hair cell loss in the middle and basal turns. The neural contribution to the cochlear response was determined by recording the response before and after application of Ouabain. Application of Ouabain eliminated or reduced auditory neural activity from approximately two turns of the cochlea. The amplitude of the cochlear response was reduced for moderate signal levels with a limited effect at higher levels, indicating that the cochlear response was dominated by outer hair cell currents at high signal levels and neural potentials at low to moderate signal levels. PMID:25190395

  8. Window comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A window comparator is described, comprising two operational amplifiers, one with two feedback circuits, each feedback circuit having a diode connected to the amplifier output and poled for forward current conduction of opposite polarity, to provide an algebraic difference between an input signal and a selected set-point voltage. Differential input terminals of the second operational amplifier were connected to the separate feedback circuits of the first operational amplifier, one input terminal to the output of one diode, and the other to the output of the other diode. A selected window-width voltage was connected through a coupling resistor to one of the input terminals of the second operational amplifier to determine when the algebraic difference of the input signal and the setpoint voltage has exceeded a predetermined tolerance after that difference has changed signs.

  9. Sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Beckwith, I. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved test section for a supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is disclosed wherein the model tested is shielded from the noise normally radiated by the turbulent tunnel wall boundary layer. A vacuum plenum surrounds spaced rod elements making up the test chamber to extract some of the boundary layer as formed along the rod elements during a test to thereby delay the tendency of the rod boundary layers to become turbulent. Novel rod construction involves bending each rod slightly prior to machining the bent area to provide a flat segment on each rod for connection with the flat entrance fairing. Rods and fairing are secured to provide a test chamber incline on the order of 1 deg outward from the noise shield centerline to produce up to 65% reduction of the root mean square (rms) pressure over previously employed wind tunnel test sections at equivalent Reynolds numbers.

  10. A Transient Cell-Shielding Method for Viable MSC Delivery within Hydrophobic Scaffolds Polymerized In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fast-degrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  11. A transient cell-shielding method for viable MSC delivery within hydrophobic scaffolds polymerized in situ.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Duvall, Craig L; Wenke, Joseph C; Guelcher, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fastdegrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  12. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS OF THE BUILDING, SHEET STEEL DEFINES THE HOT CELL "BOX" ITSELF. THREE OPERATING WINDOWS ON LEFT; ONE VIEWING WINDOW ON RIGHT. TUBES WILL CONTAIN SERVICE AND CONTROL LEADS. SPACE BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER BOX WALLS WILL BE FILLED WITH SHIELDED WINDOWS AND BARETES CONCRETE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7933. Unknown Photographer, ca. 5/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. The role of buffer layers and double windows layers in a solar cell CZTS performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarkia, C.; Dib, D.; Zerfaoui, H.; Belghit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In the overall context of the diversification of the use of natural resources, the use of renewable energy including solar photovoltaic has become increasingly indispensable. As such, the development of a new generation of photovoltaic cells based on CuZnSnS4 (CZTS) looks promising. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a new film absorber, with good physical properties (band gap energy 1.4-1.6 eV with a large absorption coefficient over 104 cm-1). Indeed, the performance of these cells exceeded 30% in recent years. In the present paper, our work based on modeling and numerical simulation, we used SCAPS to study the performance of solar cells based on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and thus evaluate the electrical efficiency η for typical structures of n-ZnO:Al / i-ZnO / n-CdS / p-CZTS and n-ITO / n-ZnO:Al / n-CdS /p-CZTS. Furthermore, the influence of the change of CdS by ZnSeand In2S3buffer layer was treated in this paper.

  14. Electrodeposition of Mg doped ZnO thin film for the window layer of CIGS solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mang; Yi, Jie; Yang, Sui; Cao, Zhou; Huang, Xiaopan; Li, Yuanhong; Li, Hongxing; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-09-01

    Mg doped ZnO (ZMO) film with the tunable bandgap can adjust the conduction band offset of the window/chalcopyrite absorber heterointerface to positive to reduce the interface recombination and resulting in an increasement of chalcopyrite based solar cell efficiency. A systematic study of the effect of the electrodeposition potential on morphology, crystalline structure, crystallographic orientation and optical properties of ZMO films was investigated. It is interestingly found that the prepared doped samples undergo a significant morphological change induced by the deposition potential. With negative shift of deposition potential, an obvious morphology evolution from nanorod structrue to particle covered films was observed. A possible growth mechanism for explaining the morphological change is proposed and briefly discussed. The combined optical techniques including absorption, transmission and photoluminescence were used to study the obtained ZMO films deposited at different potential. The sample deposited at -0.9 V with the hexagonal nanorods morphology shows the highest optical transparency of 92%. The photoluminescence spectra reveal that the crystallization of the hexagonal nanorod ZMO thin film deoposited at -0.9 V is much better than the particles covered ZMO thin film. Combining the structural and optical properties analysis, the obtained normal hexagonal nanorod ZMO thin film could potentially be useful in nanostructured chalcopyrite solar cells to improve the device performance.

  15. Wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, Tommy; Karr, Gerald R.

    1987-01-01

    Progress on the modeling of the flow field around a wake shield using a recently obtained code based on the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is a method for solving the Boltzman Equation using an approximation to the collision integral term. The collision integrand is evaluated for randomly selected values of its arguments and the summation will approach the integral for large enough samples. The collision effects may be modeled for either hard sphere or various power law potentials. The convective side of the Boltzman equation is approximated over a time step using a simple trajectory calculation of molecules as they travel through the domain of interest.

  16. Heat Shield Employing Cured Thermal Protection Material Blocks Bonded in a Large-Cell Honeycomb Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a new way to integrate thermal protection materials on external surfaces of vehicles that experience the severe heating environments of atmospheric entry from space. Cured blocks of thermal protection materials are bonded into a compatible, large-cell honeycomb matrix that can be applied on the external surfaces of the vehicles. The honeycomb matrix cell size, and corresponding thermal protection material block size, is envisioned to be between 1 and 4 in. (.2.5 and 10 cm) on a side, with a depth required to protect the vehicle. The cell wall thickness is thin, between 0.01 and 0.10 in. (.0.025 and 0.25 cm). A key feature is that the honeycomb matrix is attached to the vehicle fs unprotected external surface prior to insertion of the thermal protection material blocks. The attachment integrity of the honeycomb can then be confirmed over the full range of temperature and loads that the vehicle will experience. Another key feature of the innovation is the use of uniform-sized thermal protection material blocks. This feature allows for the mass production of these blocks at a size that is convenient for quality control inspection. The honeycomb that receives the blocks must have cells with a compatible set of internal dimensions. The innovation involves the use of a faceted subsurface under the honeycomb. This provides a predictable surface with perpendicular cell walls for the majority of the blocks. Some cells will have positive tapers to accommodate mitered joints between honeycomb panels on each facet of the subsurface. These tapered cells have dimensions that may fall within the boundaries of the uniform-sized blocks.

  17. Scx-transduced tendon-derived stem cells (tdscs) promoted better tendon repair compared to mock-transduced cells in a rat patellar tendon window injury model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chunlai; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa; Wong, Yin Mei

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the transplantation of Scx-transduced tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) promoted better tendon repair compared to the transplantation of mock-transduced cells. This study thus aimed to investigate the effect of Scx transduction on the expression of lineage markers in TDSCs and the effect of the resulting cell line in the promotion of tendon repair. Rat non-GFP or GFP-TDSCs were transduced with Scx or empty lentiviral vector (Mock) and selected by blasticidin. The mRNA expressions of Scx and different lineage markers were examined by qRT-PCR. The effect of the transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Scx on tendon repair was then tested in a rat unilateral patellar tendon window injury model. The transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Mock and scaffold-only served as controls. At week 2, 4 and 8 post-transplantation, the repaired patellar tendon was harvested for ex vivo fluorescent imaging, vivaCT imaging, histology, immunohistochemistry and biomechanical test. GFP-TDSC-Scx consistently showed higher expressions of most of tendon- and cartilage- related markers compared to the GFP-TDSC-Mock. However, the effect of Scx transduction on the expressions of bone-related markers was inconclusive. The transplanted GFP-TDSCs could be detected in the window wound at week 2 but not at week 4. Ectopic mineralization was detected in some samples at week 8 but there was no difference among different groups. The GFP-TDSC-Scx group only statistically significantly improved tendon repair histologically and biomechanically compared to the Scaffold-only group and the GFP-TDSC-Mock group at the early stage of tendon repair. There was significant higher expression of collagen type I in the window wound in the GFP-TDSC-Scx group compared to the other two groups at week 2. The transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Scx promoted healing at the early stage of tendon repair in a rat patellar tendon window injury model. PMID:24831949

  18. Whole exome sequencing of circulating tumor cells provides a window into metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Jens G.; Adalsteinsson, Viktor A.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Choudhury, Atish D.; Rosenberg, Mara; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Francis, Joshua; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Trombetta, John T.; Lu, Diana; Tallapragada, Naren; Tahirova, Narmin; Kim, Sora; Blumenstiel, Brendan; Sougnez, Carrie; Lowe, Alarice; Wong, Bang; Auclair, Daniel; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Nakabayashi, Mari; Lis, Rosina T.; Lee, Gwo-Shu M.; Li, Tiantian; Chabot, Matthew S.; Ly, Amy; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Clancy, Thomas E.; Loda, Massimo; Regev, Aviv; Meyerson, Matthew; Hahn, William C.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Golub, Todd R.; Getz, Gad; Boehm, Jesse S.; Love, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analyses of cancer genomes promise to inform prognoses and precise cancer treatments. A major barrier, however, is inaccessibility of metastatic tissue. A potential solution is to characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs), but this requires overcoming the challenges of isolating rare cells and sequencing low-input material. Here we report an integrated process to isolate, qualify and sequence whole exomes of CTCs with high fidelity, using a census-based sequencing strategy. Power calculations suggest that mapping of >99.995% of the standard exome is possible in CTCs. We validated our process in two prostate cancer patients including one for whom we sequenced CTCs, a lymph node metastasis and nine cores of the primary tumor. Fifty-one of 73 CTC mutations (70%) were observed in matched tissue. Moreover, we identified 10 early-trunk and 56 metastatic-trunk mutations in the non-CTC tumor samples and found 90% and 73% of these, respectively, in CTC exomes. This study establishes a foundation for CTC genomics in the clinic. PMID:24752078

  19. Window layer with p doped silicon oxide for high Voc thin-film silicon n-i-p solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, Rémi; Pahud, Celine; Haug, Franz-Josef; Escarré, Jordi; Söderström, Karin; Ballif, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the oxygen content in boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon oxide films (p-nc-SiOx) and introduce this material as window layer in n-i-p solar cells. The dependence of both, optical and electrical properties on the oxygen content is consistent with a bi-phase model which describes the p-nc-SiOx material as a mixture of an oxygen-rich (O-rich) phase and a silicon-rich (Si-rich) phase. We observe that increasing the oxygen content enhances the optical gap E04 while deteriorating the activation energy and the planar conductivity. These trends are ascribed to a higher volume fraction of the O-rich phase. Incorporated into n-i-p a-Si:H cells, p-nc-SiOx layers with moderate oxygen content yield open circuit voltage (Voc) up to 945 mV, which corresponds to a relative gain of 11% compared to an oxygen-free p-layer. As a similar gain is obtained on planar and on textured substrates, we attribute the increase in Voc to the higher work function of the p-nc-SiOx layer made possible by its wider band gap. These results are attained without changing the dilution ratio of the 250 nm thick intrinsic layer. We also observe an enhancement of 0.6 mA cm-2 in short circuit current density in the short wavelengths due to the higher transparency of the p-nc-SiOx layer. Finally, an initial efficiency of 9.9% for a single junction 250 nm a-Si:H n-i-p solar cell on plastic foil is achieved with the optimization of the p layer thickness, the doping ratio of the front transparent conductive oxide, and the optical properties of the back reflector.

  20. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  1. ZnSe Window Layers for GaAs and GaInP2 Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.

    1997-01-01

    This report concerns studies of the use of n-type ZnSe as a window layer for n/p GaAs and GaInP2 solar cells. Emphasis was placed in this phase of the project on characterizing the interface between n-type ZnSe films grown on epi-GaAs films grown onto single crystal GaAs. Epi-GaAs and heteroepitaxial ZnSe films were grown by MOCVD with a Spire 50OXT Reactor. After growing epitaxial GaAs films on single crystal GaAs wafers, well-oriented crystalline ZnSe films were grown by MOCVD. ZnSe films were grown with substrate temperatures ranging from 250 C to 450 C. Photoluminescence studies carried out by researchers at NASA Lewis determined that the surface recombination velocity at a GaAs surface was significantly reduced after the deposition of a heteroepitaxial layer of ZnSe. The optimum temperature for ZnSe deposition appears to be on the order of 350 C.

  2. Efficient polymer solar cells enabled by low temperature processed ternary metal oxide as electron transport interlayer with large stoichiometry window.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wei Lin; Ren, Yi; Seng, Hwee Leng; Huang, Zihao; Chiam, Sing Yang; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-06-01

    Highly efficient organic photovoltaic cells are demonstrated by incorporating low temperature solution processed indium zinc oxide (IZO) as cathode interlayers. The IZOs are synthesized using a combustion synthesis method, which enables low temperature processes (150-250 °C). We investigated the IZO films with different electron mobilities (1.4×10(-3) to 0.23 cm2/(V·s)), hydroxide-oxide content (38% to 47%), and surface roughness (0.19-5.16 nm) by modulating the ternary metal oxide stoichiometry. The photovoltaic performance was found to be relatively insensitive to the composition ratio of In:Zn over the range of 0.8:0.2 to 0.5:0.5 despite the differences in their electrical and surface properties, achieving high power conversion efficiencies of 6.61%-7.04%. Changes in composition ratio of IZO do not lead to obvious differences in energy levels, diode parameters and morphology of the photoactive layer, as revealed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), dark current analysis and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements, correlating well with the large IZO stoichiometry window that enables efficient photovoltaic devices. Our results demonstrate the robustness of this ETL system and provide a convenient approach to realize a wide range of multicomponent oxides and compatible with processing on flexible plastic substrates. PMID:25978551

  3. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  4. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE FIRST BUILT) IN LABORATORY 101. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS ARE ON LEFT (NORTH) SIDE. OBSERVATION WINDOW IS AT LEFT OF VIEW (ON WEST SIDE). PLASTIC COVERS SHROUD MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATORS AT WINDOWS IN LEFT OF VIEW. NOTE MINERAL OIL RESERVOIR ABOVE "CELL 1" SIGN, INDICATING LEVEL OF THE FLUID INSIDE THE THICK WINDOWS. HOT CELL HAS BEVELED CORNER BECAUSE A SQUARED CORNER WOULD HAVE SUPPLIED UNNECESSARY SHIELDING. NOTE PUMICE BLOCK WALL AT LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  6. Influence of shieldings or antioxidants on DNA damage and early and delyed cell death induced in human fibroblasts by accelerated 595 MeV/u Fe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Dini, Valentina; Belli, Mauro; Campa, Alessandro; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria; Lobascio, Cesare; Berra, Bruno

    HZE particles from space radiation raise an important protection concern during long-term astronauts' travels. As high charge, high energy particles interact with a shield, both projec-tile and target fragmentation may occurs, so that the biological properties of the emerging radiation field depend on the nature and energy of the incident particles, and on the nature and thickness of the shield. We have studied the influence of PMMA and Kevlar shielding as well as the antioxidant compounds Rosmarinic acid or Resveratrol on DNA damage induction and processing (as evaluated by the g-H2AX phosphorylation assay) and on early and delayed cell death in AG01522 human fibroblasts irradiated with Fe ions of 595 MeV/u at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, USA). Insertion of PMMA or Kevlar shields (10 g/cm2 thick) gave no substantial change in the bio-logical effect per unit dose on the sample for all the end points studied. When irradiation was performed in the presence of 300 mM Rosmarinic acid or Resveratrol no difference were found for both early and delayed cell death, while a slight protective effect was observed for the initial and residual DNA damage. For both early and delayed cell death, Fe-ions are more effective than g-rays. The number of Fe-ion induced g-H2AX foci is instead lower than that induced by g-rays, due to the presence of multiple DSB within a single focus induced by Fe-ions. From a comparison of the g-H2AX data with the results on DNA fragmentation obtained with 414 MeV/u Fe ions at the Heavy Ions Medical Accelerator (HIMAC, Chiba, Japan) and with 1 GeV/u Fe ions at BNL, in the absence or in the presence of PMMA shields (Esposito et al, Advance in Space Research 2004) we speculate that the overall effect of the shield is a balance between the contributions due to the slowing down of the primary particles and that due to the nuclear fragmentation. Acknowledgment: Financial support from ASI project

  7. Defining the Optimal Window for Cranial Transplantation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cells to Ameliorate Radiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Christie, Lori-Ann; Riparip, Lara; Strnadel, Jan; Parihar, Vipan K.

    2015-01-01

    Past preclinical studies have demonstrated the capability of using human stem cell transplantation in the irradiated brain to ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Intrahippocampal transplantation of human embryonic stem cells and human neural stem cells (hNSCs) was found to functionally restore cognition in rats 1 and 4 months after cranial irradiation. To optimize the potential therapeutic benefits of human stem cell transplantation, we have further defined optimal transplantation windows for maximizing cognitive benefits after irradiation and used induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hNSCs (iPSC-hNSCs) that may eventually help minimize graft rejection in the host brain. For these studies, animals given an acute head-only dose of 10 Gy were grafted with iPSC-hNSCs at 2 days, 2 weeks, or 4 weeks following irradiation. Animals receiving stem cell grafts showed improved hippocampal spatial memory and contextual fear-conditioning performance compared with irradiated sham-surgery controls when analyzed 1 month after transplantation surgery. Importantly, superior performance was evident when stem cell grafting was delayed by 4 weeks following irradiation compared with animals grafted at earlier times. Analysis of the 4-week cohort showed that the surviving grafted cells migrated throughout the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the host hippocampus and differentiated into neuronal (∼39%) and astroglial (∼14%) subtypes. Furthermore, radiation-induced inflammation was significantly attenuated across multiple hippocampal subfields in animals receiving iPSC-hNSCs at 4 weeks after irradiation. These studies expand our prior findings to demonstrate that protracted stem cell grafting provides improved cognitive benefits following irradiation that are associated with reduced neuroinflammation. PMID:25391646

  8. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  9. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  10. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  11. Solution Processing of Cadmium Sulfide Buffer Layer and Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Window Layer for Thin Films Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mahboob; Islam, Mohammad; Achour, Amine; Hayat, Ansar; Ahsan, Bilal; Rasheed, Haroon; Salam, Shahzad; Mujahid, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO) thin films are used as buffer layer and front window layer, respectively, in thin film solar cells. CdS and Al:ZnO thin films were produced using chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sol-gel technique, respectively. For CBD CdS, the effect of bath composition and temperature, dipping time and annealing temperature on film properties was investigated. The CdS films are found to be polycrystalline with metastable cubic crystal structure, dense, crack-free surface morphology and the crystallite size of either few nanometers or 12-17 nm depending on bath composition. In case of CdS films produced with 1:2 ratio of Cd and S precursors, spectrophotometer studies indicate quantum confinement effect, owing to extremely small crystallite size, with an increase in Eg value from 2.42 eV (for bulk CdS) to 3.76 eV along with a shift in the absorption edge toward 330 nm wavelength. The optimum annealing temperature is 400°C beyond which film properties deteriorate through S evaporation and CdO formation. On the other hand, Al:ZnO films prepared via spin coating of precursor sols containing 0.90-1.10 at.% Al show that, with an increase in Al concentration, the average grain size increases from 28 nm to 131 nm with an associated decrease in root-mean-square roughness. The minimum value of electrical resistivity, measured for the films prepared using 0.95 at.% Al in the precursor sol, is 2.7 × 10-4 Ω ṡ cm. The electrical resistivity value rises upon further increase in Al doping level due to introduction of lattice defects and Al segregation to the grain boundary area, thus limiting electron transport through it.

  12. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  13. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  14. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  15. Short-term plasticity regulates the E/I ratio and the temporal window for spike integration in CA1 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Aundrea F.; Dobrunz, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders have an imbalance between excitation (E) and inhibition (I) caused by synaptic alterations. The proper E/I balance is especially critical in CA1 pyramidal cells because they control hippocampal output. Activation of Schaffer collateral axons causes direct excitation of CA1 pyramidal cells, quickly followed by disynaptic feed-forward inhibition, stemming from synaptically induced firing of GABAergic interneurons. Both excitatory and inhibitory synapses are modulated by short-term plasticity, potentially causing dynamic tuning of the E/I ratio. However, the effects of short-term plasticity on the E/I ratio in CA1 pyramidal cells are not yet known. To determine this we recorded disynaptic IPSCs and E/I ratio in CA1 pyramidal cells in acute hippocampal slices from juvenile mice. We find that while inhibitory synapses have paired-pulse depression, disynaptic inhibition instead expresses paired-pulse facilitation (≤ 200 ms intervals), caused by increased recruitment of feed-forward interneurons. Although enhanced disynaptic inhibition helps constrain paired-pulse facilitation of excitation, the E/I ratio is still larger on the second pulse, increasing pyramidal cell spiking. Surprisingly, this occurs without compromising the precision of spike timing. The E/I balance regulates the temporal spike integration window from multiple inputs; here we show that paired-pulse stimulation can broaden the spike integration window. Together, we find that the combined effects of short-term plasticity of disynaptic inhibition and monosynaptic excitation alter the E/I balance onto CA1 pyramidal cells, leading to dynamic modulation of spike probability and spike integration window. Short-term plasticity is therefore an important mechanism for modulating signal processing of hippocampal output. PMID:25903384

  16. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  17. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-07-28

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270 °C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270 °C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270 °C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  18. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non

  19. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  20. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  1. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  2. Effects of Kapton Sample Cell Windows on the Detection Limit of Smectite: Implications for CheMin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of providing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus X-ray tube with a Co target, transmission geometry, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CheMin has two different window materials used for sample cells -- Mylar and Kapton. Instrument details are provided elsewhere. Fe/Mg-smectite (e.g., nontronite) has been identified in Gale Crater, the MSL future landing site, by CRISM spectra. While large quantities of phyllosilicate minerals will be easily detected by CheMin, it is important to establish detection limits of such phases to understand capabilities and limitations of the instrument. A previous study indicated that the (001) peak of smectite at 15 Ang was detectable in a mixture of 1 wt.% smectite with olivine when Mylar is the window material for the sample cell. Complications arise when Kapton is the window material because Kapton itself also has a diffraction peak near 15 Ang (6.8 deg 2 Theta). This study presents results of mineral mixtures of smectite and olivine to determine smectite detection limits for Kapton sample cells. Because the intensity and position of the smectite (001) peak depends on the hydration state, we also analyzed mixtures with "hydrated" and "dehydrated"h smectite to examine the effects of hydration state on detection limits.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  4. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  5. Use of a CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility.

  6. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  7. Doping-free silicon thin film solar cells using a vanadium pentoxide window layer and a LiF/Al back electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyung Hwan; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Lee, Sunghun; Su Kim, Chang; Nam, Kee-Seok; Jeong, Yongsoo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Yoon Ryu, Seung; Ocak, Tülay; Eray, Aynur; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Sung-Gyu

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the preparation of a doped layer-free hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film solar cell consisting of a vanadium pentoxide (V2O5-x) window layer, an intrinsic a-Si:H absorber layer, and a lithium fluoride (LiF)/aluminum (Al) back electrode. The large difference between the work functions of the V2O5-x layer and the LiF/Al electrode permitted photogenerated carriers in the i-a-Si:H absorber layer to be effectively separated and collected. The effects of the V2O5-x layer thickness and the oxidation states on the photovoltaic performance were investigated in detail. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the major species of the sputtered V2O5-x thin films were V5+ and V4+. Optimization of the V2O5-x window layer yielded a power conversion efficiency of 7.04%, which was comparable to the power conversion efficiency of a typical a-Si:H solar cell (7.09%).

  8. Hybrid Theranostic Platform for Second Near-IR Window Light Triggered Selective Two-Photon Imaging and Photothermal Killing of Targeted Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Christine; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Viraka Nellore, Bhanu Priya; Pramanik, Avijit; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Jones, Stacy; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-23

    Despite advances in the medical field, even in the 21st century cancer is one of the leading causes of death for men and women in the world. Since the second near-infrared (NIR) biological window light between 950 and 1350 nm offers highly efficient tissue penetration, the current article reports the development of hybrid theranostic platform using anti-GD2 antibody attached gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) for second near-IR light triggered selective imaging and efficient photothermal therapy of human melanoma cancer cell. Reported results demonstrate that due to strong plasmon-coupling, two-photon luminescence (TPL) intensity from theranostic GNP attached SWCNT materials is 6 orders of magnitude higher than GNP or SWCNT alone. Experimental and FDTD simulation data indicate that the huge enhancement of TPL intensity is mainly due to strong resonance enhancement coupled with the stronger electric field enhancement. Due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic material serves as a local nanoantennae to enhance the photothermal capability via strong optical energy absorption. Reported data show that theranostic SWCNT can be used for selective two-photon imaging of melanoma UACC903 cell using 1100 nm light. Photothermal killing experiment with 1.0 W/cm(2) 980 nm laser light demonstrates that 100% of melanoma UACC903 cells can be killed using theranostic SWCNT bind melanoma cells after just 8 min of exposure. These results demonstrate that due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic GNP attached SWCNT material serves as a two-photon imaging and photothermal source for cancer cells in biological window II. PMID:26327304

  9. How Your Car Side Window May Be Harming Your Skin, Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158809.html How Your Car Side Window May Be Harming Your Skin, Eyes ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The front windshield of your car probably shields you from the sun's UV-A ...

  10. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  11. The Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp150 Forms an Immune-Evasive Glycan Shield at the Surface of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Anna M.; Oosenbrug, Timo; Lindenbergh, Marthe F. S.; Büll, Christian; Comvalius, Anouskha; Dickson, Kathryn J. I.; Wiegant, Joop; Vrolijk, Hans; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wolterbeek, Ron; Adema, Gosse J.; Griffioen, Marieke; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Tscharke, David C.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.; Ressing, Maaike E.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in host control of viral infection. This is exemplified by life-threatening reactivations of e.g. herpesviruses in individuals with impaired T-cell and/or iNKT cell responses. To allow lifelong persistence and virus production in the face of primed immunity, herpesviruses exploit immune evasion strategies. These include a reduction in viral antigen expression during latency and a number of escape mechanisms that target antigen presentation pathways. Given the plethora of foreign antigens expressed in virus-producing cells, herpesviruses are conceivably most vulnerable to elimination by cell-mediated immunity during the replicative phase of infection. Here, we show that a prototypic herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), encodes a novel, broadly acting immunoevasin, gp150, that is expressed during the late phase of viral replication. In particular, EBV gp150 inhibits antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and the non-classical, lipid-presenting CD1d molecules. The mechanism of gp150-mediated T-cell escape does not depend on degradation of the antigen-presenting molecules nor does it require gp150’s cytoplasmic tail. Through its abundant glycosylation, gp150 creates a shield that impedes surface presentation of antigen. This is an unprecedented immune evasion mechanism for herpesviruses. In view of its likely broader target range, gp150 could additionally have an impact beyond escape of T cell activation. Importantly, B cells infected with a gp150-null mutant EBV displayed rescued levels of surface antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and CD1d, supporting an important role for iNKT cells next to classical T cells in fighting EBV infection. At the same time, our results indicate that EBV gp150 prolongs the timespan for producing viral offspring at the most vulnerable stage of the viral life cycle. PMID:27077376

  12. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  13. High-Efficiency Polycrystalline CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells with an Oxygenated Amorphous CdS (a-CdS:O) Window Layer: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Dhere, R. G.; Yan, Y.; Romero, M. J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, J.; DeHart, C.; Duda, A.; Perkins, C.; To, B.

    2002-05-01

    In the conventional CdS/CdTe device structure, the poly-CdS window layer has a bandgap of {approx}2.4 eV, which causes absorption in the short-wavelength region. Higher short-circuit current densities (Jsc) can be achieved by reducing the CdS thickness, but this can adversely impact device open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). Also, poly-CdS film has about 10% lattice mismatch related to the CdTe film, which limits the improvement of device Voc and FF. In this paper, we report a novel window material: oxygenated amorphous CdS film (a-CdS:O) prepared at room temperature by rf sputtering. The a-CdS:O film has a higher optical bandgap (2.5-3.1 eV) than the poly-CdS film and an amorphous structure. The preliminary device results have demonstrated that Jsc of the CdTe device can be greatly improved while maintaining higher Voc and FF. We have fabricated a CdTe cell demonstrating an NREL-confirmed Jsc of 25.85 mA/cm2 and a total-area efficiency of 15.4%.

  14. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  15. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp-Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 {micro}m to a modest 0.50 {micro}m over an underlying 0.10-{micro}m intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 {micro}m/3 {micro}m) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85 C and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  16. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 μm to a modest 0.50 μm over an underlying 0.10-μm intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 μm/3 μm) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85oC and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  17. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  18. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  19. Highly conducting and wide band gap phosphorous doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC films as n-type window layers for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    Nano-crystalline silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in the phosphorous doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) matrix has been successfully prepared at a low temperature (300 °C) by inductively coupled plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) system from (SiH4 + CH4)-plasma with PH3 as the doping gas. The effect of PH3 flow rate on structural, optical and electrical properties of the films has been studied. Phosphorous doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC films with high optical band gap (>1.9 eV) and superior conductivity (~10-2 S cm-1) are obtained, which could be appropriately used as n-type window layers for nc-Si solar cells in n-i-p configuration.

  20. Effect of heat treatments and window layer processing on the characteristics of CuInGaSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.; Contreras, M.A.; Tuttle, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    Interaction between chemical bath deposited CdS and ZnO window layers are a focus of this paper. Low temperature anneals were used to follow the changes at the interface. Optical absorption spectra show that CdS and ZnO intermix upon annealing. When applied to ZnO/CdS/CuInGaSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells, changes in the short and long wavelength response were observed. The latter is attributed to an increase in the energy gap of the absorber by diffusion of S. The interdiffusion is shown to increase the short wavelength collection, and hence the current density of the devices. Photoluminescence data provides some indication of the quality of the interface.

  1. Wake Shield Facility in grasp of the Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A wintry scene of Lake Winnipeg and surrounding area in Manitoba, Canada forms the backdrop for the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) in the grasp of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm. The image was exposed with a 35mm camera through one of the windows on Discovery's aft flight deck.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  3. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  4. Development of electrodeposited ZnTe layers as window materials in ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe multi-layer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A.B.M.O. Chaure, N.B.; Wellings, J.; Tolan, G.; Dharmadasa, I.M.

    2009-02-15

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin films have been deposited on glass/conducting glass substrates using a low-cost electrodeposition method. The resulting films have been characterized using various techniques in order to optimize growth parameters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been used to identify the phases present in the films. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and optical absorption measurements have been performed to determine the electrical conductivity type, and the bandgap of the layers, respectively. It has been confirmed by XRD measurement that the deposited layers mainly consist of ZnTe phases. The PEC measurements indicate that the ZnTe layers are p-type in electrical conduction and optical absorption measurements show that their bandgap is in the range 2.10-2.20 eV. p-Type ZnTe window materials have been used in CdTe based solar cell structures, following new designs of graded bandgap multi-layer solar cells. The structures of FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/metal and FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe/metal have been investigated. The results are presented in this paper using observed experimental data.

  5. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Derek; Manivannan, A.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2014-11-04

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). We present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. As a result, we expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.

  6. Metal-electrode-free Window-like Organic Solar Cells with p-Doped Carbon Nanotube Thin-film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Il; Delacou, Clement; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells are flexible and inexpensive, and expected to have a wide range of applications. Many transparent organic solar cells have been reported and their success hinges on full transparency and high power conversion efficiency. Recently, carbon nanotubes and graphene, which meet these criteria, have been used in transparent conductive electrodes. However, their use in top electrodes has been limited by mechanical difficulties in fabrication and doping. Here, expensive metal top electrodes were replaced with high-performance, easy-to-transfer, aerosol-synthesized carbon nanotubes to produce transparent organic solar cells. The carbon nanotubes were p-doped by two new methods: HNO3 doping via 'sandwich transfer', and MoOx thermal doping via 'bridge transfer'. Although both of the doping methods improved the performance of the carbon nanotubes and the photovoltaic performance of devices, sandwich transfer, which gave a 4.1% power conversion efficiency, was slightly more effective than bridge transfer, which produced a power conversion efficiency of 3.4%. Applying a thinner carbon nanotube film with 90% transparency decreased the efficiency to 3.7%, which was still high. Overall, the transparent solar cells had an efficiency of around 50% that of non-transparent metal-based solar cells (7.8%). PMID:27527565

  7. Metal-electrode-free Window-like Organic Solar Cells with p-Doped Carbon Nanotube Thin-film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Il; Delacou, Clement; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells are flexible and inexpensive, and expected to have a wide range of applications. Many transparent organic solar cells have been reported and their success hinges on full transparency and high power conversion efficiency. Recently, carbon nanotubes and graphene, which meet these criteria, have been used in transparent conductive electrodes. However, their use in top electrodes has been limited by mechanical difficulties in fabrication and doping. Here, expensive metal top electrodes were replaced with high-performance, easy-to-transfer, aerosol-synthesized carbon nanotubes to produce transparent organic solar cells. The carbon nanotubes were p-doped by two new methods: HNO3 doping via ‘sandwich transfer’, and MoOx thermal doping via ‘bridge transfer’. Although both of the doping methods improved the performance of the carbon nanotubes and the photovoltaic performance of devices, sandwich transfer, which gave a 4.1% power conversion efficiency, was slightly more effective than bridge transfer, which produced a power conversion efficiency of 3.4%. Applying a thinner carbon nanotube film with 90% transparency decreased the efficiency to 3.7%, which was still high. Overall, the transparent solar cells had an efficiency of around 50% that of non-transparent metal-based solar cells (7.8%). PMID:27527565

  8. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moy, Derek; Manivannan, A.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2014-11-04

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). Wemore » present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. As a result, we expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.« less

  9. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  10. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  11. Color Wheel Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a painting and drawing lesson which was inspired by the beautiful circular windows found in cathedrals and churches (also known as "rose windows"). This two-week lesson would reinforce both the concept of symmetry and students' understanding of the color wheel. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  12. Multi-functional windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Nagendra; Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the physical properties of optically transparent materials currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows held in weight bearing frames. Novel material systems will have to be developed which combine different materials (e.g. ductile metals with transparent ceramics) into structures that combine transparency with structural integrity. Surmet's demonstrated ability to produce novel transparent ceramic/metal structures will allow us to produce such structures in the types of conformal shapes required for future aircraft applications. Furthermore, the ability to incorporate transparencies into such structures also holds out the promise of creating multi-functional windows which provide a broad range of capabilities that might include RF antennas and de-icing in addition to transparency. Recent results in this area will be presented.

  13. Windows technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

  14. A redox-flow electrochromic window.

    PubMed

    Jennings, James R; Lim, Wei Yang; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Wang, Qing

    2015-02-01

    A low-cost electrochromic (EC) window based on a redox-flow system that does not require expensive transparent conductive oxide (TCO) substrates is introduced and demonstrated for the first time. An aqueous I3–/I– redox electrolyte is used in place of a TCO to oxidize/reduce a molecular layer of an EC triphenylamine derivative that is anchored to a mesoporous TiO2 scaffold on the inner faces of a double-paned window. The redox electrolyte is electrochemically oxidized/reduced in an external two-compartment cell and circulated through the window cavity using an inexpensive peristaltic pump, resulting in coloration or decoloration of the window due to reaction of the redox solution with the triphenylamine derivative. The absorption characteristics, coloration/decoloration times, and cycling stability of the prototype EC window are evaluated, and prospects for further development are discussed. PMID:25584903

  15. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  16. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-01

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300 °C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline silicon wafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450 °C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450 °C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltage of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.

  17. Zero Energy Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, Dariush; Selkowitz, Steve; Apte, Josh; LaFrance, Marc

    2006-05-17

    Windows in the U.S. consume 30 percent of building heating and cooling energy, representing an annual impact of 4.1 quadrillion BTU (quads) of primary energy. Windows have an even larger impact on peak energy demand and on occupant comfort. An additional 1 quad of lighting energy could be saved if buildings employed effective daylighting strategies. The ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program has made standard windows significantly more efficient. However, even if all windows in the stock were replaced with today's efficient products, window energy consumption would still be approximately 2 quads. However, windows can be ''net energy gainers'' or ''zero-energy'' products. Highly insulating products in heating applications can admit more useful solar gain than the conductive energy lost through them. Dynamic glazings can modulate solar gains to minimize cooling energy needs and, in commercial buildings, allow daylighting to offset lighting requirements. The needed solutions vary with building type and climate. Developing this next generation of zero-energy windows will provide products for both existing buildings undergoing window replacements and products which are expected to be contributors to zero-energy buildings. This paper defines the requirements for zero-energy windows. The technical potentials in terms of national energy savings and the research and development (R&D) status of the following technologies are presented: (1) Highly insulating systems with U-factors of 0.1 Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}-F; (2) Dynamic windows: glazings that modulate transmittance (i.e., change from clear to tinted and/or reflective) in response to climate conditions; and (3) Integrated facades for commercial buildings to control/ redirect daylight. Market transformation policies to promote these technologies as they emerge into the marketplace are then described.

  18. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  19. Different affinity windows for virus and cancer-specific T-cell receptors: implications for therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Milos; Liddy, Nathaniel; Molloy, Peter E; Pumphrey, Nick; Vuidepot, Annelise; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-12-01

    T-cell destiny during thymic selection depends on the affinity of the TCR for autologous peptide ligands presented in the context of MHC molecules. This is a delicately balanced process; robust binding leads to negative selection, yet some affinity for the antigen complex is required for positive selection. All TCRs of the resulting repertoire thus have some intrinsic affinity for an MHC type presenting an assortment of peptides. Generally, TCR affinities of peripheral T cells will be low toward self-derived peptides, as these would have been presented during thymic selection, whereas, by serendipity, binding to pathogen-derived peptides that are encountered de novo could be stronger. A crucial question in assessing immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer is whether natural TCR repertoires have the capacity for efficiently recognizing tumor-associated peptide antigens. Here, we report a comprehensive comparison of TCR affinities to a range of HLA-A2 presented antigens. TCRs that bind viral antigens fall within a strikingly higher affinity range than those that bind cancer-related antigens. This difference may be one of the key explanations for tumor immune escape and for the deficiencies of T-cell vaccines against cancer. PMID:22949370

  20. Surface plasmon effect of Ag nanodots embedded in amorphous Si window layers deposited on Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungil; Ji, HyungYong; Kim, Myeong Jun; Peck, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Keunjoo

    2014-12-01

    We investigated solar cells containing temperature-dependent Ag nanodots embedded in an amorphous Si thin film layer by using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition in order to improve the properties of crystalline Si solar cells. An Ag thin film with a thickness of 10 nm was deposited by DC sputtering followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 250 to 850 degrees C for 15 min under N2 gas. As increasing the annealing temperature, the Ag nanodots were enlarged and the photoreflectances of the samples with Ag nanodots were lower than the reference samples in the spectral range of 200-600 nm, demonstrating the plasmon effect of Ag nanodots. The cell properties on photoluminescence spectra, quantum efficiency, and conversion efficiency were measured with the maximum values for the sample annealed at 450 degrees C, indicating that there exists an optimal size of the Ag nanodots about 15-35 nm to be effective on the enhancement of surface plasmon effect. PMID:25971039

  1. Hydrogenated indium oxide window layers for high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Timo; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Fuchs, Peter; Gretener, Christina; Döbeli, Max; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2015-05-01

    High mobility hydrogenated indium oxide is investigated as a transparent contact for thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. Hydrogen doping of In2O3 thin films is achieved by injection of H2O water vapor or H2 gas during the sputter process. As-deposited amorphous In2O3:H films exhibit a high electron mobility of ˜50 cm2/Vs at room temperature. A bulk hydrogen concentration of ˜4 at. % was measured for both optimized H2O and H2-processed films, although the H2O-derived film exhibits a doping gradient as detected by elastic recoil detection analysis. Amorphous IOH films are implemented as front contacts in CIGS based solar cells, and their performance is compared with the reference ZnO:Al electrodes. The most significant feature of IOH containing devices is an enhanced open circuit voltage (VOC) of ˜20 mV regardless of the doping approach, whereas the short circuit current and fill factor remain the same for the H2O case or slightly decrease for H2. The overall power conversion efficiency is improved from 15.7% to 16.2% by substituting ZnO:Al with IOH (H2O) as front contacts. Finally, stability tests of non-encapsulated solar cells in dry air at 80 °C and constant illumination for 500 h demonstrate a higher stability for IOH-containing devices.

  2. Endogenous zinc depresses GABAergic transmission via T-type Ca2+ channels and broadens the time window for integration of glutamatergic inputs in dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Grauert, Antonia; Engel, Dominique; Ruiz, Arnaud J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Zinc actions on synaptic transmission span the modulation of neurotransmitter receptors, transporters, activation of intracellular cascades and alterations in gene expression. Whether and how zinc affects inhibitory synaptic signalling in the dentate gyrus remains largely unexplored. We found that mono- and di-synaptic GABAergic inputs onto dentate granule cells were reversibly depressed by exogenous zinc application and enhanced by zinc chelation. Blocking T-type Ca2+ channels prevented the effect of zinc chelation. When recording from dentate fast-spiking interneurones, zinc chelation facilitated T-type Ca2+ currents, increased action potential half-width and decreased spike threshold. It also increased the offset of the input–output relation in a manner consistent with enhanced excitability. In granule cells, chelation of zinc reduced the time window for the integration of glutamatergic inputs originating from perforant path synapses, resulting in reduced spike transfer. Thus, zinc-mediated modulation of dentate interneurone excitability and GABA release regulates information flow to local targets and hippocampal networks. PMID:24081159

  3. Selecting windows for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    New window technologies have increased energy benefits and comfort, and have provided more practical options for consumers. This selection guide will help homeowners, architects, and builders take advantage of the expanding window market. The guide contains three sections: an explanation of energy-related window characteristics, a discussion of window energy performance ratings, and a convenient checklist for window selection.

  4. GA microwave window development

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.; Kasugai, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1994-10-01

    The GA prototype distributed window was tested in a 32 mm diam. waveguide system at a power density suitable for a MW gyrotron, using the JAERI/Toshiba 110 GHz long pulse internal converter gyrotron in the JAERI test stand. The presence of the untilted distributed window had no adverse effect on the gyrotron operation. A pulse length of 10 times the calculated thermal equilibrium time (1/e time) of 30 msec was reached, and the window passed at least 750 pulses greater than 30 msec and 343 pulses greater than 60 msec. Beyond 100 msec, the window calorimetry reached steady state, allowing the window dissipation to be measured in a single pulse. The measured loss of 4.0% agrees both with the estimated loss, on which the stress calculations are based, and with the attenuation measured at low power in the HE{sub 11} mode. After the end of the tests, the window was examined; no evidence of arcing air coating was found in the part of the window directly illuminated by the microwaves, although there was discoloration in a recess containing an optical diagnostic which outgassed, causing a local discharge to occur in that recess. Finally, there was no failure of the metal-sapphire joints during a total operating time of 50 seconds consisting of pulses longer than 30 msec.

  5. Boron-doped amorphous diamondlike carbon as a new p-type window material in amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Lim, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    A boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-DLC:H) was prepared using a mercury-sensitized photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) method. The source gases were B{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. By increasing the boron doping ratio (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) from 0 to 12000 ppm, the dark conductivity increased from {approximately}10{sup {minus}9} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}7} S/cm. A boron-doped a-DLC:H with an energy band gap of 3.8 eV and a dark conductivity of 1.3{times}10{sup {minus}8} S/cm was obtained at a doping ratio of 3600 ppm. By using this film, amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells with a novel p-a-DLC:H/p-a-SiC double p-layer structure were fabricated using the photo-CVD method and the cell photovoltaic characteristics were investigated as a function of a-DLC:H layer thickness. The open circuit voltage increased from 0.766 V for the conventional cell with a 40-{Angstrom}-thick p-a-SiC to 0.865 V for the cell with a p-a-DLC:H (15 {Angstrom})/p-a-SiC (40 {Angstrom}) double p-layer structure. The thin ({lt}15 {Angstrom}) p-a-DLC:H layer proved to be an excellent hole emitter as a wide band gap window layer. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Hydrogenated indium oxide window layers for high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jäger, Timo Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Fuchs, Peter; Gretener, Christina; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.; Döbeli, Max

    2015-05-28

    High mobility hydrogenated indium oxide is investigated as a transparent contact for thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells. Hydrogen doping of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films is achieved by injection of H{sub 2}O water vapor or H{sub 2} gas during the sputter process. As-deposited amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:H films exhibit a high electron mobility of ∼50 cm{sup 2}/Vs at room temperature. A bulk hydrogen concentration of ∼4 at. % was measured for both optimized H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}-processed films, although the H{sub 2}O-derived film exhibits a doping gradient as detected by elastic recoil detection analysis. Amorphous IOH films are implemented as front contacts in CIGS based solar cells, and their performance is compared with the reference ZnO:Al electrodes. The most significant feature of IOH containing devices is an enhanced open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of ∼20 mV regardless of the doping approach, whereas the short circuit current and fill factor remain the same for the H{sub 2}O case or slightly decrease for H{sub 2}. The overall power conversion efficiency is improved from 15.7% to 16.2% by substituting ZnO:Al with IOH (H{sub 2}O) as front contacts. Finally, stability tests of non-encapsulated solar cells in dry air at 80 °C and constant illumination for 500 h demonstrate a higher stability for IOH-containing devices.

  7. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  8. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  9. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  10. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  11. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  12. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>1020 cm−3) and mobilities (up to 20 cm2 V−1 s−1) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell. PMID:25753657

  13. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>10(20) cm(-3)) and mobilities (up to 20 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell. PMID:25753657

  14. Space Station MMOD Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes International Space Station (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.

  15. double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  16. Optimization of the preform shape in the three-stage forming process of the shielded slot plate in fuel cell manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong-Yol; Lee, Chang-Whan; Kang, Dong-Woo; Chang, In-Gab; Lee, Tae-Won

    2013-05-01

    The shielded slot plate, a repeated structure of high sheared protrusions, is a major component of metallic bipolar plates for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the MCFC and long-term operation capability, the sheared protrusion should have a relatively large flat contact area. In addition, defects from the forming process such as local thinning should be minimized. In this work, the preform shape in the three-stage forming process that integrates the slitting process, the preforming process, and the final forming process was optimized to minimize the effective plastic strain. In the simulation of the forming process, the ductile fracture criterion was employed to the user material subroutine VUMAT in ABAQUS/Explicit. Steepest descent method was utilized in the design of the forming process to minimize equivalent plastic strain. High sheared protrusions were manufactured without defects from the three-stage forming process using the optimized preform shape. The minimum thickness of one sheared protrusion was increased by 25% over that of the two-stage forming process. The three-stage forming process using the optimized preform shape enables more uniformly distributed deformation and reduces localized deformation.

  17. Cordilleran slab windows

    SciTech Connect

    Thorkelson, D.J.; Taylor, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The geometry and geologic implications of subducted spreading ridges are topics that have bedeviled earth scientists ever since the recognition of plate tectonics. As a consequence of subduction of the Kula-Farallon and East Pacific rises, slab windows formed and migrated beneath the North American Cordillera. The probable shape and extent of these windows, which represent the asthenosphere-filled gaps between two separating, subducting oceanic plates, are depicted from the Late Cretaceous to the present. Possible effects of the existence and migration of slab windows on the Cordillera at various times include cessation of arc volcanism and replacement by rift or plate-edge volcanism; lithospheric uplift, attenuation, and extension; and increased intensity of compressional tectonism. Eocene extensional tectonism and alkaline magmatism in southern British Columbia and the northwestern United States were facilitated by slab-window development.

  18. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  19. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  20. Energy-efficient windows

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes energy efficient windows for the reduction of home heating and cooling energy consumption. It discusses controlling air leaks by caulking and weatherstripping and by replacing window frames. Reducing heat loss and condensation is discussed by describing the types of glazing materials, the number of glass and air spaces, frame and spacer materials, and the use of movable insulation (shutters, drapes, etc.). A resource list is provided for further information.

  1. The deep oval window.

    PubMed

    Kapur, T R

    1991-09-01

    This article presents the results of an analysis of the variable and surgically important relationship between the oval window, the fossular walls and the related posterior tympanic recesses in 50 temporal bones. The visual impressions of superficial and deep oval windows seem to correspond fairly closely to the depth of the inferior wall of the fossula fenestra vestibuli (FFV). The depth of the superior and anterior walls of the FFV by themselves, did not appear to have such a dominating relationship in determining the deep oval window. There does not appear to be a well defined posterior wall in the vast majority of the specimens (86 per cent). In the event of scar tissue forming between the superior, inferior and anterior walls, the gap between the postero-superior part of the promontory and the posterior tympanic wall (posterior communication) could allow aeration of the region of the deep oval window in such an instance. Closure of this gap by a solid shelf of ponticulus or scar tissue could cause a localized malaeration of the fossula in most cases of deep oval windows. This is an entirely new concept of the likely problems of malaeration of a deep oval window which could arise due to anatomical variations and of the possible safety valve mechanism which could prevent such malaeration and its consequences. PMID:1919338

  2. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  3. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-06-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  4. Measurements of shielding effectiveness and cavity characteristics of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. A.; Crawford, M. L.; Johnk, R. T.; Ondrejka, A. R.; Camell, D. G.

    1994-07-01

    We present measured data for shielding effectiveness, cavity Q, and cavity time constant of three small (twin-engine) airplanes for frequencies from 400 MHz to 18 GHz. Both CW and time-domain measurement methods were used, and the time-domain method yields higher values of cavity Q. Both methods yield Q values below a theoretical upper bound determined by window leakage losses. The measured shielding effectiveness is quite variable, but averages about 15 dB. The measured time constants are also variable and average about 15 ns. This short time constant is a result of the low Q of the aircraft cavities.

  5. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Crandall, R.S.; Deb, S.K.; Stone, J.L.

    1995-01-24

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired. 11 figures.

  6. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Crandall, Richard S.; Deb, Satyendra K.; Stone, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired.

  7. High performance sapphire windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.; Liou, Larry

    1993-01-01

    High-quality, wide-aperture optical access is usually required for the advanced laser diagnostics that can now make a wide variety of non-intrusive measurements of combustion processes. Specially processed and mounted sapphire windows are proposed to provide this optical access to extreme environment. Through surface treatments and proper thermal stress design, single crystal sapphire can be a mechanically equivalent replacement for high strength steel. A prototype sapphire window and mounting system have been developed in a successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 project. A large and reliable increase in sapphire design strength (as much as 10x) has been achieved, and the initial specifications necessary for these gains have been defined. Failure testing of small windows has conclusively demonstrated the increased sapphire strength, indicating that a nearly flawless surface polish is the primary cause of strengthening, while an unusual mounting arrangement also significantly contributes to a larger effective strength. Phase 2 work will complete specification and demonstration of these windows, and will fabricate a set for use at NASA. The enhanced capabilities of these high performance sapphire windows will lead to many diagnostic capabilities not previously possible, as well as new applications for sapphire.

  8. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  9. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  11. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  12. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS WITH TANK 40 AND H CANYON NEPTUNIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M

    2009-04-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40. SB5 contains the contents of Tank 51 from November 2008, qualified by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the heel in Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 4. Current Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) plans are to (1) decant supernatant from Tank 40 to remove excess liquid caused by a leaking slurry pump and (2) receive a Np stream from H Canyon It should be noted that the Np stream contains significant nitrate requiring addition of nitrite to Tank 40 to maintain a high nitrite to nitrate ratio for corrosion control. SRNL has been requested to qualify the proposed changes; determine the impact on DWPF processability in terms of hydrogen generation, rheology, etc.; evaluate antifoam addition strategy; and evaluate mercury stripping. Therefore, SRNL received a 3 L sample of Tank 40 following the transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40 (Tank Farm Sample HTF-40-08-157 to be used in testing and to perform the required Waste Acceptance Product Specifications radionuclide analyses). Based on Tank Farm projections, SRNL decanted a portion* of the sample, added sodium nitrite, and added a Np solution from H Canyon representative of the Np to be dispositioned to Tank 40 (neutralized to 0.6 M excess hydroxide). The resulting material was used in a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration -- a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle. Preliminary data from the demonstration has been reported previously. This report includes discussion of these results and additional results, including comparisons to Tank Farm projections and the SB5 demonstration.

  14. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  15. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  16. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  17. Bumper shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyer, A.T.

    1986-07-01

    To initially examine the effectiveness of a shield surrounding a reentry vehicle, we used the hypervelocity hydrodynamic impact code, LASOIL. We completed a four-by-four matrix of 16 two-dimensional numerical impact simulations of 1-g tungsten cylinders striking circular plates. The variable parameters were the projectile impact velocity (10, 20, 40, and 80 km/s) and the plate thickness (1, 2, 4, and 8 mm). In each case, the projectile was destroyed in the impact. The shield was penetrated but retained negliible momentum from the impact. The resultant debris cloud was low-density debris and vapor.

  18. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  19. Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

  20. WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

    2008-04-28

    The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus

  1. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to

  2. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records frommore » IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of

  3. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen; Mitchell, Robin D.; Kohler, Christian; Vidanovic, Simon V.; Huizenga, Charlie

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the

  4. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  5. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  6. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  7. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  8. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  9. Shielding analysis of glove boxes for handling of plutonium materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rainisch, R.

    1996-12-31

    The end of the Cold War has led the U.S. Department of Energy to adopt new programs for the management of excess plutonium materials. The programs center on placing plutonium is safe, long-term storage (50 yr) prior to final disposition. Before the plutonium can be placed in storage, materials will have to be stabilized and repackaged. Savannah River site (SRS) is pursuing the design of facilities for the stabilization of plutonium materials. Plutonium handling is to be performed in airtight glove boxes or similar enclosures. Glove boxes will incorporate radiation shielding for the protection of operators. This paper addresses the shielding configuration of the glove boxes and protection of operating personnel from external radiation. Shielding analysis of the glove boxes included (a) identification of plutonium source terms; (b) analysis of extremity exposures, which pertains to workers hands and forearms exposure; (c) shielding analysis, which includes shielding windows (transparent shielding) and glove-box walls; and (d) measures to enhance the radiological design of the enclosures.

  10. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  11. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  12. Apollo window meteoroid experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, B. G.; Flaherty, R. E.; Brown, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Apollo window meteoroid experiment for obtaining data from crater counts and analysis of meteoroid residue combined with fused glass in described. A preliminary estimate of the flux resulting from seven Apollo spacecraft is found to be in agreement with the Surveyor 3 data, but is lower than the model environment.

  13. Software: Looking Through WINDOW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the educational value, design quality, and ease of use of "WINDOW," an educational "magazine" on a disk for the Apple II/IIe microcomputer. Indicates that the articles, software reviews, and other informative material are greatly enhanced by sound, graphics, and the chance to try out reviewed programs. (JN)

  14. Candles in Our Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    "Candles in Our Windows"--also titled "Nightlights"--is a play developed for elementary and middle school students about how residents in Billings, Montana, took a stand against hate. Last March, the 6th-grade students of Woodland Elementary School in New Jersey performed an early version of the play based on a children's book, "The Christmas…

  15. Migration to Windows NT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doles, Daniel T.

    In the constantly changing world of technology, migration is not only inevitable but many times necessary for survival, especially when the end result is simplicity for both users and IT support staff. This paper describes the migration at Franklin College (Indiana). It discusses the reasons for selecting Windows NT, the steps taken to complete…

  16. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  17. Exploring Shop Window Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopoulou, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Using visual resources from everyday life in art lessons can enrich students' knowledge about the creation of visual images, artifacts, and sites, and develop their critical understanding about the cultural impact of these images and their effects on people's lives. Through examining an exhibition in the windows of Selfridges department store in…

  18. Opening the Literature Window

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jago, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Great literature gives students a window to other places and times, but it often requires students to step outside their comfort zones and take on challenges they wouldn't usually attempt. Unfortunately, research shows that many schools are not assigning literature that pushes students beyond their current reading level. Jago encourages teachers…

  19. Foamglass solar window collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, P. C.

    Solar heating of a living area by means of a foamglass window collector is reported. The collector was built with readily available materials available at most local hardware stores. The payback period was found to be 3.7 years, slightly longer than anticipated.

  20. Windows and lighting program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity -- factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout the indoor environment, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Windows and lighting are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program. Despite important achievements in reducing building energy consumption over the past decade, significant additional savings are still possible. These will come from two complementary strategies: (1) improve building designs so that they effectively apply existing technologies and extend the market penetration of these technologies; and (2) develop advanced technologies that increase the savings potential of each application. Both the Windows and Daylighting Group and the Lighting System Research Group have made substantial contributions in each of these areas, and continue to do so through the ongoing research summarized here. 23 refs., 16 figs.

  1. Sliding window construction

    SciTech Connect

    Klompenburg, M.V.

    1987-07-28

    A window assembly is described in a window frame. The frame includes a head, a sill, and opposite jambs, the assembly comprising: first and second sashes each having interior and exterior surfaces, a top, a bottom, and opposite first and second sides extending between the top and the bottom: the first sash being laterally movably within the window frame between a closed position and an open position wherein the first sash is substantially in a non-planar position relative to the second sash; track means extending along one of the sill or head of the window frame; first track follower means connected to one of the top or the bottom of the first sash adjacent the first side and cooperating with the track means for supporting and guiding the first sash during lateral movement between the open and closed positions; and the track means having an opening for releasing the track follower means for cooperation only when the first sash is in the open position such that the first sash is pivotal about a vertical axis adjacent the second side between the open position and a maintenance position.

  2. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  3. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  4. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  5. Windows into Art Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

  6. Windows to Art Excitement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley; Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that aimed to bring more attention to an art program. Explains that the students created themed murals on the windows of the art classroom, such as a "Jungle,""Ocean,""Masterpiece Paintings," and "Rainforest Tree Frogs." Discusses how the murals were created. (CMK)

  7. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  8. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  9. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  10. A proposed performance index for galactic cosmic ray shielding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Wood, J. S.; Shinn, Judy L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Nealy, John E.

    1993-01-01

    In past studies, the reductions in absorbed dose and dose equivalent due to choice of material composition have been used to indicate shield effectiveness against exposure to galactic cosmic rays. However, these quantities are highly inaccurate in assessing shield effectiveness for protection against the biological effects of long-term exposure to the galactic heavy ions. A new quantity for shield performance is defined that correlates well with cell killing and cell transformation behind various shield thicknesses and materials. In addition, a relative performance index is identified that is inversely related to biological injury for different materials at a fixed shield mass and is directly related to the ratio of the fourth- and the second-order linear energy transfer (LET) moments.