Science.gov

Sample records for cell window shielding

  1. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    SciTech Connect

    Chad L. Pope; Wade W. Scates; J. Todd Taylor

    2009-05-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  2. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDED WINDOWS HAVE BEEN INSTALLED. MANIPULATORS AWAIT ATTACHMENT TO HAND CONTROLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9001. Unknown Photographer, photo is identified as taken 10/28/1953, but it may be an error as it shows progress since ID-33-G-266 of same date. - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  3. 7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. Edwards ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. DETAIL SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS, WEST SIDE. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  4. 4. DETAIL SHOWING PERISCOPE AND SHIELDED WINDOWS ON EAST SIDE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. DETAIL SHOWING PERISCOPE AND SHIELDED WINDOWS ON EAST SIDE, NORTH PART. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  5. 3. EAST SIDE FROM ATOP TUNNEL, SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. EAST SIDE FROM ATOP TUNNEL, SHOWING BLAST SHIELDED WINDOWS AND PERISCOPE FACING TO TEST STAND 1-3. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Instrumentation & Control Building, Test Area 1-115, northwest end of Saturn Boulevard, Boron, Kern County, CA

  6. Shielded cells transfer automation

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, J J

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures.

  7. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-02-01

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  8. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Deng, Xunming; Liao, Xianbo; Du, Wenhui

    2011-10-04

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  9. Hybrid window layer for photovoltaic cells

    DOEpatents

    Deng, Xunming

    2010-02-23

    A novel photovoltaic solar cell and method of making the same are disclosed. The solar cell includes: at least one absorber layer which could either be a lightly doped layer or an undoped layer, and at least a doped window-layers which comprise at least two sub-window-layers. The first sub-window-layer, which is next to the absorber-layer, is deposited to form desirable junction with the absorber-layer. The second sub-window-layer, which is next to the first sub-window-layer, but not in direct contact with the absorber-layer, is deposited in order to have transmission higher than the first-sub-window-layer.

  10. Hot cell shield plug extraction apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Knapp, Philip A.; Manhart, Larry K.

    1995-01-01

    An apparatus is provided for moving shielding plugs into and out of holes in concrete shielding walls in hot cells for handling radioactive materials without the use of external moving equipment. The apparatus provides a means whereby a shield plug is extracted from its hole and then swung approximately 90 degrees out of the way so that the hole may be accessed. The apparatus uses hinges to slide the plug in and out and to rotate it out of the way, the hinge apparatus also supporting the weight of the plug in all positions, with the load of the plug being transferred to a vertical wall by means of a bolting arrangement.

  11. Predicted and measured EMI shielding effectiveness of a metallic mesh coating on a sapphire window over a broad frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacoby, Keith T.; Pieratt, Matthew W.; Halman, Jennifer I.; Ramsey, Keith A.

    2009-05-01

    Metallic mesh thin film coatings have been used for many years to provide electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding on infrared windows and domes. The level of EMI shielding effectiveness (SE) of metallic mesh coatings when used in a high frequency application is understood and characterized. Conversely, the level of SE of these metallic mesh coatings when used in a low frequency application has been called into question. In a recent study, we applied an appropriately designed metallic mesh coating to a sapphire window, mounted that window in a fixture, and tested the SE of the window assembly over a frequency range that envelopes the various military platforms covered in MIL-STD-461 (10 kHz to 18 GHz) for a radiated emissions test. The test plan was devised in such a way as to independently assess the individual contributions of the aperture, the mounting, and the metallic mesh coating to the total shielding. The results of our testing will be described in this paper. Additionally, the test results will be compared to the predicted SE for both the aperture and the metallic mesh coated window in order to validate the predictive model. Finally, an assessment of the appropriateness of the use of metallic mesh coatings for EMI shielding in a low and/or broad range frequency application will be made.

  12. Absolute Position Sensing Based on a Robust Differential Capacitive Sensor with a Grounded Shield Window.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yang; Lu, Yunfeng; Hu, Pengcheng; Wang, Gang; Xu, Jinxin; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhengkun; Zhang, Zhonghua; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    A simple differential capacitive sensor is provided in this paper to measure the absolute positions of length measuring systems. By utilizing a shield window inside the differential capacitor, the measurement range and linearity range of the sensor can reach several millimeters. What is more interesting is that this differential capacitive sensor is only sensitive to one translational degree of freedom (DOF) movement, and immune to the vibration along the other two translational DOFs. In the experiment, we used a novel circuit based on an AC capacitance bridge to directly measure the differential capacitance value. The experimental result shows that this differential capacitive sensor has a sensitivity of 2 × 10(-4) pF/μm with 0.08 μm resolution. The measurement range of this differential capacitive sensor is 6 mm, and the linearity error are less than 0.01% over the whole absolute position measurement range. PMID:27187393

  13. Absolute Position Sensing Based on a Robust Differential Capacitive Sensor with a Grounded Shield Window

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yang; Lu, Yunfeng; Hu, Pengcheng; Wang, Gang; Xu, Jinxin; Zeng, Tao; Li, Zhengkun; Zhang, Zhonghua; Tan, Jiubin

    2016-01-01

    A simple differential capacitive sensor is provided in this paper to measure the absolute positions of length measuring systems. By utilizing a shield window inside the differential capacitor, the measurement range and linearity range of the sensor can reach several millimeters. What is more interesting is that this differential capacitive sensor is only sensitive to one translational degree of freedom (DOF) movement, and immune to the vibration along the other two translational DOFs. In the experiment, we used a novel circuit based on an AC capacitance bridge to directly measure the differential capacitance value. The experimental result shows that this differential capacitive sensor has a sensitivity of 2 × 10−4 pF/μm with 0.08 μm resolution. The measurement range of this differential capacitive sensor is 6 mm, and the linearity error are less than 0.01% over the whole absolute position measurement range. PMID:27187393

  14. Left-handed metastructures with selective frequency transmission window for gigahertz shielding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ababei, G.; Olariu, C. S.; Lupu, N.; Chiriac, H.

    2015-05-01

    Experimental evidence of left-handed properties of the Fe-, CoFe-, and Co-based glass-covered amorphous microwires in free standing systems is demonstrated. A new broadband frequency shielding metastructure with selective transmission frequency in the microwave range is presented. The X-band microwave-guide and the free-space methods were used as experimental techniques in the frequency range from 1 to 12 GHz. The X-band experimental results show that the mixed metastructure presents left-handed behavior between 8.5 and 10.5 GHz. The mixed metastructure for large areas presents broadband frequency domains, with left-handed properties between 6.5 and 10.5 GHz (the sum of intrinsic ferromagnetic and antiferromagnetic resonance frequencies domains of individual microwires) and a transmission window between 7.6 and 10.5 GHz. Double negative characteristics of the metastructures are in agreement with the computed results calculated based on Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations and Nicolson-Ross-Weir analytical method.

  15. Nutrient shielding in clusters of cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2013-06-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells' spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude among different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ.

  16. Nutrient Shielding in Clusters of Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lavrentovich, Maxim O.; Koschwanez, John H.; Nelson, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Cellular nutrient consumption is influenced by both the nutrient uptake kinetics of an individual cell and the cells’ spatial arrangement. Large cell clusters or colonies have inhibited growth at the cluster's center due to the shielding of nutrients by the cells closer to the surface. We develop an effective medium theory that predicts a thickness ℓ of the outer shell of cells in the cluster that receives enough nutrient to grow. The cells are treated as partially absorbing identical spherical nutrient sinks, and we identify a dimensionless parameter ν that characterizes the absorption strength of each cell. The parameter ν can vary over many orders of magnitude between different cell types, ranging from bacteria and yeast to human tissue. The thickness ℓ decreases with increasing ν, increasing cell volume fraction ϕ, and decreasing ambient nutrient concentration ψ∞. The theoretical results are compared with numerical simulations and experiments. In the latter studies, colonies of budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are grown on glucose media and imaged under a confocal microscope. We measure the growth inside the colonies via a fluorescent protein reporter and compare the experimental and theoretical results for the thickness ℓ. PMID:23848711

  17. InP solar cell with window layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K. (Inventor); Landis, Geoffrey A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention features a thin light transmissive layer of the ternary semiconductor indium aluminum arsenide (InAlAs) as a front surface passivation or 'window' layer for p-on-n InP solar cells. The window layers of the invention effectively reduce front surface recombination of the object semiconductors thereby increasing the efficiency of the cells.

  18. Comparison of some lead and non-lead based glass systems, standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of shielding parameters in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurudirek, Murat; Özdemir, Yüksel; Şimşek, Önder; Durak, Rıdvan

    2010-12-01

    The effective atomic numbers, Z eff of some glass systems with and without Pb have been calculated in the energy region of 1 keV-100 GeV including the K absorption edges of high Z elements present in the glass. Also, these glass systems have been compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses in terms of mean free paths and total mass attenuation coefficients in the continuous energy range. Comparisons with experiments were also provided wherever possible for glasses. It has been observed that the glass systems without Pb have higher values of Z eff than that of Pb based glasses at some high energy regions even if they have lower mean atomic numbers than Pb based glasses. When compared with some standard shielding concretes and commercial window glasses, generally it has been shown that the given glass systems have superior properties than concretes and window glasses with respect to the radiation-shielding properties, thus confirming the availability of using these glasses as substitutes for some shielding concretes and commercial window glasses to improve radiation-shielding properties in the continuous energy region.

  19. DWPF Recycle Evaporator Shielded Cells Testing

    SciTech Connect

    Fellinger, T. L.; Herman, D. T.; Stone, M.E

    2005-07-01

    Testing was performed to determine the feasibility and processing characteristics of evaporation of actual Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) recycle material. Samples of the Off Gas Condensate Tank (OGCT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator Condensate Tank (SMECT) were transferred from DWPF to the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) Shielded Cells and blended with De-Ionized (DI) water and a small amount of Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) product. A total of 3000 mL of this feed was concentrated to approximately 90 mL during a semi-batch evaporation test of approximately 17 hours. One interruption occurred during the run when the feed tube developed a split and was replaced. Samples of the resulting condensate and concentrate were collected and analyzed. The resulting analysis of the condensate was compared to the Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) limits for the F/H Effluent Treatment Plant (ETP). Results from the test were compared to previous testing using simulants and OLI modeling. Conclusions from this work included the following: (1) The evaporation of DWPF recycle to achieve a 30X concentration factor was successfully demonstrated. The feed blend of OGCT and SMECT material was concentrated from 3000 mL to approximately 90 mL during testing, a concentration of approximately 33X. (2) Foaming was observed during the run. Dow Corning 2210 antifoam was added seven times throughout the run at 100 parts per million (ppm) per addition. The addition of this antifoam was very effective in reducing the foam level, but the impact diminished over time and additional antifoam was required every 2 to 3 hours during the run. (3) No scale or solids formed on the evaporator vessel, but splatter was observed in the headspace of the evaporator vessel. No scaling formed on the stainless steel thermocouple. (4) The majority of the analytes met the F/H ETP WAC. However, the detection limits for selected species (Sr-90, Pu-238, Pu-240, Am-243, and Cm-244) exceeded the ETP WAC limits. (5) I

  20. Complex permittivity measurements during high temperature recycling of space shuttle antenna window and dielectric heat shield materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bassett, H. L.; Bomar, S. H., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The research performed and the data obtained on candidate space shuttle antenna window and heat shield materials are presented. The measurement technique employs a free-space focused beam microwave bridge for obtaining RF transmission data, and a device which rotates a sample holder which is heated on one side by natural gas-air flames. The surface temperature of each sample is monitored by IR pyrometry; embedded and rear surface thermocouples are also used in obtaining temperature data. The surface of the sample undergoing test is subjected to approximately the same temperature/time profile that occurs at a proposed antenna position on the space shuttle as it re-enters. The samples are cycled through ten of these temperature profiles to determine the recycling effects. Very little change was noted in the materials due to the recycling.

  1. First-principles prediction of solar radiation shielding performance for transparent windows of GdB6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Lihua; Su, Yuchang; Ran, Jingyu; Liu, Yike; Qiu, Wei; Wu, Jianming; Lu, Fanghai; Shao, Fang; Tang, Dongsheng; Peng, Ping

    2016-04-01

    The structural, electronic, magnetic, and optical properties of GdB6 are studied using the first-principles calculations. Calculated values for magnetic and optical properties and lattice constant are found to be consistent with previously reported experimental results. The calculated results show that GdB6 is a perfect near-infrared absorption/reflectance material that could serve as a solar radiation shielding material for windows with high visible light transmittance, similar to LaB6, which is assigned to its plasma oscillation and a collective oscillation (volume plasmon) of carrier electrons. It was found that the magnetic 4f electrons of Gd are not relevant to the important optical properties of GdB6. These theoretical studies serve as a reference for future studies.

  2. Window structure for passivating solar cells based on gallium arsenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnett, Allen M. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Passivated gallium arsenide solar photovoltaic cells with high resistance to moisture and oxygen are provided by means of a gallium arsenide phosphide window graded through its thickness from arsenic rich to phosphorus rich.

  3. Indium Phosphide Window Layers for Indium Gallium Arsenide Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.

    2005-01-01

    Window layers help in reducing the surface recombination at the emitter surface of the solar cells resulting in significant improvement in energy conversion efficiency. Indium gallium arsenide (In(x)Ga(1-x)As) and related materials based solar cells are quite promising for photovoltaic and thermophotovoltaic applications. The flexibility of the change in the bandgap energy and the growth of InGaAs on different substrates make this material very attractive for multi-bandgap energy, multi-junction solar cell approaches. The high efficiency and better radiation performance of the solar cell structures based on InGaAs make them suitable for space power applications. This work investigates the suitability of indium phosphide (InP) window layers for lattice-matched In(0.53)Ga(0.47)As (bandgap energy 0.74 eV) solar cells. We present the first data on the effects of the p-type InP window layer on p-on-n lattice-matched InGaAs solar cells. The modeled quantum efficiency results show a significant improvement in the blue region with the InP window. The bare InGaAs solar cell performance suffers due to high surface recombination velocity (10(exp 7) cm/s). The large band discontinuity at the InP/InGaAs heterojunction offers a great potential barrier to minority carriers. The calculated results demonstrate that the InP window layer effectively passivates the solar cell front surface, hence resulting in reduced surface recombination and therefore, significantly improving the performance of the InGaAs solar cell.

  4. Shielded Cells D&D and Dismantlement System Requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Witherspoon, R.L.

    1995-03-27

    This document describes the basis for the development of the System for Highly Radioactive Equipment Dismantlement or SHRED. It is the result of a thorough investigation into current and past dismantlement practices at shielded cell facilities around the DOE complex. This information has been used to formulate the development requirements for the SHRED.

  5. Light shield for solar concentrators

    DOEpatents

    Plesniak, Adam P.; Martins, Guy L.

    2014-08-26

    A solar receiver unit including a housing defining a recess, a cell assembly received in the recess, the cell assembly including a solar cell, and a light shield received in the recess and including a body and at least two tabs, the body defining a window therein, the tabs extending outward from the body and being engaged with the recess, wherein the window is aligned with the solar cell.

  6. High-efficiency nanostructured window GaAs solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liang, Dong; Kang, Yangsen; Huo, Yijie; Chen, Yusi; Cui, Yi; Harris, James S

    2013-10-01

    Nanostructures have been widely used in solar cells due to their extraordinary optical properties. In most nanostructured cells, high short circuit current has been obtained due to enhanced light absorption. However, most of them suffer from lowered open circuit voltage and fill factor. One of the main challenges is formation of good junction and electrical contact. In particular, nanostructures in GaAs only have shown unsatisfactory performances (below 5% in energy conversion efficiency) which cannot match their ideal material properties and the record photovoltaic performances in industry. Here we demonstrate a completely new design for nanostructured solar cells that combines nanostructured window layer, metal mesa bar contact with small area, high quality planar junction. In this way, we not only keep the advanced optical properties of nanostructures such as broadband and wide angle antireflection, but also minimize its negative impact on electrical properties. High light absorption, efficient carrier collection, leakage elimination, and good lateral conductance can be simultaneously obtained. A nanostructured window cell using GaAs junction and AlGaAs nanocone window demonstrates 17% energy conversion efficiency and 0.982 V high open circuit voltage. PMID:24021024

  7. Effects of Cell Windows on TwinSol Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cushman, Kimmy

    2016-04-01

    In order to study reactions with unstable nuclei, radioactive-ion beams must be used. One method for producing radioactive beams is the TwinSol experimental setup at the University of Notre Dame. At TwinSol, stable and unstable isotope beams bombard a gas target, where one atmosphere of gas must be confined from the surrounding vacuum. Thin foil windows are used to contain the gas in the cell. In order to optimize the quality of secondary beams from TwinSol, it is necessary to understand and minimize the effects of energy loss and straggling in the windows. This work is the beginning of a process to improve the TwinSol design so that secondary beams produced with heavier ions such as Oxygen, Fluorine, and Neon can be pursued.

  8. Silicon Nitride Windows for Electron Microscopy of Whole Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ring, E. A.; Peckys, D. B.; Dukes, M. J.; Baudoin, J. P.; de Jonge, N.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Silicon microchips with thin electron transparent silicon nitride windows provide a sample support that accommodates both light-, and electron microscopy of whole eukaryotic cells in vacuum or liquid, with minimum sample preparation steps. The windows are robust enough that cellular samples can be cultured directly onto them, with no addition of a supporting film, and no need to embed or section the sample, as is typically required in electron microscopy. By combining two microchips, a microfluidic chamber can be constructed for the imaging of samples in liquid in the electron microscope. We provide microchip design specifications, a fabrication outline, instructions on how to prepare them for biological samples, and examples of images obtained using different light-, and electron microscopy modalities. The use of these microchips is particularly advantageous for correlative light-, and electron microscopy. PMID:21770941

  9. Shielding analysis of the IEM cell offset adapter plate

    SciTech Connect

    Simons, R.L.

    1995-01-13

    The adapter plate for the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) cell ten foot ceiling valve was modified so that the penetration through the valve is offset to the north side of the steel plate. The modifications required that the shielding effectiveness be evaluated for several operating conditions. The highest gamma ray dose rate (51 mrem/hr) occurs when a Core Component Container (CCC) with six high burn-up driver fuel assemblies is transferred into or out of Solid Waste Cask (SWC). The neutron dose rate at the same source location is 2.5 mrem/hr. The total dose rate during the transfer is less than the 200 mrem/hr limit. If the ten foot ceiling valve is closed, the dose rate with twelve DFA in the cell will be less than 0.1 mrem/hr. However, with the ceiling valve open the dose rate will be as high as 12 mrem/hr. The latter condition will require controlled access to the area around the offset adapter plate when the ceiling valve is open. It was found that gaps in the shield block around the SWC floor valve will allow contact dose rates as high as 350 mrem/hr during the transfer of a fully loaded CCC. Although this situation does not pertain to the offset adapter plate, it will require controlled access around the SWC valve during the transfer of a fully loaded CCC.

  10. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wallmore » allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.« less

  11. Thermal Stress in HFEF Hot Cell Windows Due to an In-Cell Metal Fire

    SciTech Connect

    Solbrig, Charles W.; Warmann, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    This work investigates an accident during the pyrochemical extraction of Uranium and Plutonium from PWR spent fuel in an argon atmosphere hot cell. In the accident, the heavy metals (U and Pu) being extracted are accidentally exposed to air from a leaky instrument penetration which goes through the cell walls. The extracted pin size pieces of U and Pu metal readily burn when exposed to air. Technicians perform the electrochemical extraction using manipulators through a 4 foot thick hot cell concrete wall which protects them from the radioactivity of the spent fuel. Four foot thick windows placed in the wall allow the technicians to visually control the manipulators. These windows would be exposed to the heat of the metal fire. As a result, this analysis determines if the thermal stress caused by the fire would crack the windows and if the heat would degrade the window seals allowing radioactivity to escape from the cell.

  12. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues. PMID:27265778

  13. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-01-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues. PMID:27265778

  14. Smart window coating based on F-TiO2-KxWO3 nanocomposites with heat shielding, ultraviolet isolating, hydrophilic and photocatalytic performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Tongyao; Liu, Bin; Wang, Jing; Yang, Linfen; Ma, Xinlong; Li, Hao; Zhang, Yihong; Yin, Shu; Sato, Tsugio; Sekino, Tohru; Wang, Yuhua

    2016-06-01

    A series of smart window coated multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic films were fabricated successfully through KxWO3 and F-TiO2 in a low-cost and environmentally friendly process. Based on the synergistic effect of KxWO3 and F-TiO2, the optimal proportion of KxWO3 to F-TiO2 was investigated and the FT/2KWO nanocomposite film exhibited strong near-infrared, ultraviolet light shielding ability, good visible light transmittance, high photocatalytic activity and excellent hydrophilic capacity. This film exhibited better thermal insulation capacity than ITO and higher photocatalytic activity than P25. Meanwhile, the excellent stability of this film was examined by the cycle photocatalytic degradation and thermal insulation experiments. Overall, this work is expected to provide a possibility in integrating KxWO3 with F-TiO2, so as to obtain a multifunctional NIR shielding-photocatalytic nanocomposite film in helping solve the energy crisis and deteriorating environmental issues.

  15. WESF hot cells waste minimization criteria hot cells window seals evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Walterskirchen, K.M.

    1997-03-31

    WESF will decouple from B Plant in the near future. WESF is attempting to minimize the contaminated solid waste in their hot cells and utilize B Plant to receive the waste before decoupling. WESF wishes to determine the minimum amount of contaminated waste that must be removed in order to allow minimum maintenance of the hot cells when they are placed in ''laid-up'' configuration. The remaining waste should not cause unacceptable window seal deterioration for the remaining life of the hot cells. This report investigates and analyzes the seal conditions and hot cell history and concludes that WESF should remove existing point sources, replace cerium window seals in F-Cell and refurbish all leaded windows (except for A-Cell). Work should be accomplished as soon as possible and at least within the next three years.

  16. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. SHIELDING DOOR TO HOT CELL IS IN OPEN POSITION. DOOR SLIDES SHUT WITH HELP OF MANUALLY OPERATED CHAIN. STAIRWAY TO MEZZANINE IN VIEW AT LEFT. CAMERA FACES NORTHWEST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 9000. Unknown Photographer, 10/28/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  17. Wide-bandgap epitaxial heterojunction windows for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Loferski, Joseph J.; Beaulieu, Roland; Sekula-Moise, Patricia A.; Vernon, Stanley M.

    1990-01-01

    It is shown that the efficiency of a solar cell can be improved if minority carriers are confined by use of a wide-bandgap heterojunction window. For silicon (lattice constant a = 5.43 A), nearly lattice-matched wide-bandgap materials are ZnS (a = 5.41 A) and GaP (a = 5.45 A). Isotype n-n heterojuntions of both ZnS/Si and GaP/Si were grown on silicon n-p homojunction solar cells. Successful deposition processes used were metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MO-CVD) for GaP and ZnS, and vacuum evaporation of ZnS. Planar (100) and (111) and texture-etched - (111)-faceted - surfaces were used. A decrease in minority-carrier surface recombination compared to a bare surface was seen from increased short-wavelength spectral response, increased open-circuit voltage, and reduced dark saturation current, with no degradation of the minority carrier diffusion length.

  18. Alkali-vapor cell with metal coated windows for efficient application of an electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkisyan, D.; Sarkisyan, A. S.; Guéna, J.; Lintz, M.; Bouchiat, M.-A.

    2005-05-01

    We describe the implementation of a cylindrical T-shaped alkali-vapor cell for laser spectroscopy in the presence of a longitudinal electric field. The two windows are used as two electrodes of the high-voltage assembly, which is made possible by a metallic coating which entirely covers the inner and outer sides of the windows except for a central area to let the laser beams in and out of the cell. This allows very efficient application of the electric field, up to 2kV/cm in a rather dense superheated vapor, even when significant photoemission takes place at the windows during pulsed laser irradiation. The body of the cell is made of sapphire or alumina ceramic to prevent large currents resulting from surface conduction observed in cesiated glass cells. The technique used to attach the monocrystalline sapphire windows to the cell body causes minimal stress birefringence in the windows. In addition, reflection losses at the windows can be made very small. The vapor cell operates with no buffer gas and has no magnetic part. The use of this kind of cell has resulted in an improvement of the signal-to-noise ratio in the measurement of parity violation in cesium vapor underway at ENS, Paris. The technique can be applied to other situations where a brazed assembly would give rise to unacceptably large birefringence in the windows.

  19. Effect of InAlAs window layer on efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1992-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide bandgap, lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In(0.52)Al(0.48)As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated by using the numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improved significantly with the use of the window layer. No improvement was seen for the n(+)p InP cells. The cell results were explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction band energy discontinuity. The calculated current voltage and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrated that In(0.52)Al(0.48)As is a very promising candidate for a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  20. Effect of InAlAs window layer on the efficiency of indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cell efficiencies are limited by surface recombination. The effect of a wide-bandgap lattice-matched indium aluminum arsenide (In0.52Al0.48As) window layer on the performance of InP solar cells was investigated using a numerical code PC-1D. The p(+)n InP solar cell performance improves significantly with the use of a window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p InP cells. Cell results are explained by the band diagram of the heterostructure and the conduction-band energy discontinuity. The calculated I-V and internal quantum efficiency results clearly demonstrate that In0.52Al0.48As is a promising candidate as a window layer material for p(+)n InP solar cells.

  1. Effectiveness of Shield Termination Techniques Tested with TEM Cell and Bulk Current Injection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, Arthur T.; Hare, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results of the effectiveness of various shield termination techniques. Each termination technique is evaluated by two independent noise injection methods; transverse electromagnetic (TEM) cell operated from 3 MHz 400 MHz, and bulk current injection (BCI) operated from 50 kHz 400 MHz. Both single carrier and broadband injection tests were investigated. Recommendations as to how to achieve the best shield transfer impedance (i.e. reduced coupled noise) are made based on the empirical data. Finally, the noise injection techniques themselves are indirectly evaluated by comparing the results obtained from the TEM Cell to those from BCI.

  2. Filamentary pulse self-compression: The impact of the cell windows

    SciTech Connect

    Bree, Carsten; Demircan, Ayhan; Bethge, Jens; Nibbering, Erik T. J.; Skupin, Stefan; Berge, Luc; Steinmeyer, Guenter

    2011-04-15

    Self-compression of multi-millijoule laser pulses during filamentary propagation is usually explained by the interplay of self-focusing and defocusing effects, causing a substantial concentration of energy on the axis of the propagating optical pulse. Recently, it has been argued that cell windows may play a decisive role in the self-compression mechanism. As such windows have to be used for media other than air their presence is often unavoidable, yet they present a sudden nonadiabatic change in dispersion and nonlinearity that should lead to a destruction of the temporal and spatial integrity of the light bullets generated in the self-compression mechanism. We now experimentally prove that there is, in fact, a self-healing mechanism that helps to overcome the potentially destructive consequences of the cell windows. We show in two carefully conducted experiments that the cell window position decisively influences activation or inhibition of the self-healing mechanism. A comparison with a windowless cell shows that the presence of this mechanism is an important prerequisite for the exploitation of self-compression effects in windowed cells filled with inert gases.

  3. Early kinetic window of target T cell susceptibility to CD25+ regulatory T cell activity.

    PubMed

    Sojka, Dorothy K; Hughson, Angela; Sukiennicki, Teresa L; Fowell, Deborah J

    2005-12-01

    Peripheral tolerance is maintained in part by thymically derived CD25+CD4+ T cells (regulatory T cells (Tregs)). Their mechanism of action has not been well characterized. Therefore, to get a better understanding of Treg action, we investigated the kinetics of murine Treg activity in vitro. Tregs were suppressive within a surprisingly narrow kinetic window: necessary and sufficient only in the first 6-10 h of culture. Visualization of this time frame, using a sensitive single-cell assay for IL-2, revealed the early elaboration of target cell IL-2 producers in the first 6 h despite the presence of CD25+CD4+ Tregs. However, after 6 h, a rapid rise in the number of IL-2 producers in the absence of Tregs was dramatically abrogated by the presence of Tregs. Importantly, the timing of suppression was dictated by the kinetics of target T cell activation suggesting that early target T cell signals may alter susceptibility to suppression. Modulating target T cell activation signals with provision of CD28, IL-2, or high Ag dose all abrogated suppression of proliferation late in culture. However, only CD28 signals enabled target T cells to resist the early Treg-induced down-regulation of IL-2. Therefore the quality of early target T cell activation signals, in particular engagement of CD28, represents an important control point in the balance between vulnerability and resistance to Treg suppression. PMID:16301632

  4. Looking at plant cell cycle from the chromatin window

    PubMed Central

    Desvoyes, Bénédicte; Fernández-Marcos, María; Sequeira-Mendes, Joana; Otero, Sofía; Vergara, Zaida; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2014-01-01

    The cell cycle is defined by a series of complex events, finely coordinated through hormonal, developmental and environmental signals, which occur in a unidirectional manner and end up in producing two daughter cells. Accumulating evidence reveals that chromatin is not a static entity throughout the cell cycle. In fact, there are many changes that include nucleosome remodeling, histone modifications, deposition and exchange, among others. Interestingly, it is possible to correlate the occurrence of several of these chromatin-related events with specific processes necessary for cell cycle progression, e.g., licensing of DNA replication origins, the E2F-dependent transcriptional wave in G1, the activation of replication origins in S-phase, the G2-specific transcription of genes required for mitosis or the chromatin packaging occurring in mitosis. Therefore, an emerging view is that chromatin dynamics must be considered as an intrinsic part of cell cycle regulation. In this article, we review the main features of several key chromatin events that occur at defined times throughout the cell cycle and discuss whether they are actually controlling the transit through specific cell cycle stages. PMID:25120553

  5. Vitellogenin Recognizes Cell Damage through Membrane Binding and Shields Living Cells from Reactive Oxygen Species*

    PubMed Central

    Havukainen, Heli; Münch, Daniel; Baumann, Anne; Zhong, Shi; Halskau, Øyvind; Krogsgaard, Michelle; Amdam, Gro V.

    2013-01-01

    Large lipid transfer proteins are involved in lipid transportation and diverse other molecular processes. These serum proteins include vitellogenins, which are egg yolk precursors and pathogen pattern recognition receptors, and apolipoprotein B, which is an anti-inflammatory cholesterol carrier. In the honey bee, vitellogenin acts as an antioxidant, and elevated vitellogenin titer is linked to prolonged life span in this animal. Here, we show that vitellogenin has cell and membrane binding activity and that it binds preferentially to dead and damaged cells. Vitellogenin binds directly to phosphatidylcholine liposomes and with higher affinity to liposomes containing phosphatidylserine, a lipid of the inner leaflet of cell membranes that is exposed in damaged cells. Vitellogenin binding to live cells, furthermore, improves cell oxidative stress tolerance. This study can shed more light on why large lipid transfer proteins have a well conserved α-helical domain, because we locate the lipid bilayer-binding ability of vitellogenin largely to this region. We suggest that recognition of cell damage and oxidation shield properties are two mechanisms that allow vitellogenin to extend honey bee life span. PMID:23897804

  6. Hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy using an environmental cell with silicon nitride membrane windows

    SciTech Connect

    Tsunemi, Eika; Watanabe, Yoshio; Oji, Hiroshi; Cui, Yi-Tao; Son, Jin-Young

    2015-06-21

    We applied hard x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (HAXPES) to a sample under ambient pressure conditions using an environmental cell with an approximately 24 nm-thick SiN{sub x} membrane window. As a model chemical substance, europium (II) iodide (EuI{sub 2}) sealed in the cell with argon gas was investigated with HAXPES to identify the chemical species present inside the cell. The optical and morphological properties of the sample within the cell were measured with optical and fluorescent microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence, and energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry. We confirmed the effectiveness of the gas barrier properties of the cell with the SiN{sub x} window and demonstrated its applicability to various other optical and electron measurements as well as HAXPES.

  7. High resolution electron microscopy and spectroscopy of ferritin in thin window liquid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Canhui; Qiao, Qiao; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Klie, Robert

    2014-03-01

    In-situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) has seen a dramatic increase in interest in recent years with the commercial development of liquid and gas stages. High-resolution TEM characterization of samples in a liquid environment remains limited by radiation damage and loss of resolution due to the thick window-layers required by the in-situ stages. We introduce thin-window static-liquid cells that enable sample imaging with atomic resolution and electron energy-loss (EEL) spectroscopy with 1.3 nm resolution. Using this approach, atomic and electronic structures of biological samples such as ferritin is studied via in-situ transmission electron microscopy experiments. Ferritin in solution is encapsulated using the static liquid cells with reduced window thickness. The integrity of the thin window liquid cell is maintained by controlling the electron dose rate. Radiation damage of samples, such as liquid water and protein, is quantitatively studied to allow precision control of radiation damage level within the liquid cells. Biochemical reactions, such as valence change of the iron in a functioning ferritin, is observed and will be quantified. Relevant biochemical activity: the release and uptake of Fe atoms through the channels of ferritin protein shell is also imaged at atomic resolution. This work is funded by Michigan Technological University. The UIC JEOL JEM-ARM200CF is supported by an MRI-R2 grant from the National Science Foundation (Grant No. DMR-0959470).

  8. Passivating Window/First Layer AR Coating for Space Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faur, Mircea; Faur, Maria; Bailey, S. G.; Flood, D. J.; Brinker, D. J.; Alterovitz, S. A.; Wheeler, D. R.; Matesscu, G.; Goradia, C.; Goradia, M.

    2004-01-01

    Chemically grown oxides, if well designed, offer excellent surface passivation of the emitter surface of space solar cells and can be used as effective passivating window/first layer AR coating. In this paper, we demonstrate the effectiveness of using a simple room temperature wet chemical technique to grow cost effective passivating layers on solar cell front surfaces after the front grid metallization step. These passivating layers can be grown both on planar and porous surfaces. Our results show that these oxide layers: (i) can effectively passivate the from the surface, (ii) can serve as an effective optical window/first layer AR coating, (iii) are chemically, thermally and UV stable, and (iv) have the potential of improving the BOL and especially the EOL efficiency of space solar cells. The potential of using this concept to simplify the III-V based space cell heterostructures while increasing their BOL and EOL efficiency is also discussed.

  9. Spacecraft Shielding: An Experimental Comparison Between Open Cell Aluminium Foam Core Sandwich Panel Structures and Whipple Shielding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasini, D. L. S.; Price, M. C.; Burchell, M. J.; Cole, M. J.

    2013-09-01

    Spacecraft shielding is generally provided by metallic plates in a Whipple shield type configuration [1] where possible. However, mission restrictions such as spacecraft payload mass, can prevent the inclusion of a dedicated protective structure for prevention against impact damage from micrometeoroids. Due to this, often the spacecraft's primary structure will act as the de facto shield. This is commonly an aluminium honeycomb backed with either glass fibre reinforced plastic (GFRP) or aluminium faceplates [2]. Such materials are strong, lightweight and relatively cheap due to their abundance used within the aerospace industry. However, these materials do not offer the best protection (per unit weight) against hypervelocity impact damage. A new material for shielding (porous aluminium foam [3]) is suggested for low risk space missions. Previous studies by NASA [4] have been performed to test this new material against hypervelocity impacts using spherical aluminium projectiles. This showed its potential for protection for satellites in Earth orbit, against metallic space debris. Here we demonstrate the material's protective capabilities against micrometeoroids, using soda-lime glass spheres as projectiles to accurately gauge its potential with relation to silicatious materials, such as micrometeoroids and natural solar system debris. This is useful for spacecraft missions beyond Earth orbit where solar system materials are the dominant threat (via hypervelocity impacts) to the spacecraft, rather than manmade debris.

  10. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. WINDOWED ROOM IS OFFICE; NEXT DOOR WAS DARKROOM, AND THIRD DOOR LED TO ANOTHER OFFICE. ALL ARE ALONG NORTH WALL OF BUILDING (ETR EXTENSION OF 1958). CAMERA FACES NORTHEAST. PUMICE BLOCK WALLS. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-29-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  11. New photoacoustic cell with diamond window for mid-infrared investigations on biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kottmann, Jonas; Rey, Julien M.; Sigrist, Markus W.

    2012-02-01

    We present a new photoacoustic (PA) cell, which is sealed on the sample side with a 163 μm thick chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond window. The investigation of samples containing volatile compounds with an openended PA cell leads to varying conditions in the PA chamber (changing light absorption or relative humidity) and thus causes unstable signals. In contrast the diamond cover ensures stable conditions in the PA chamber and thereby enables sensitive measurements. This is particularly important for the investigation of biological samples with a high water content. Due to the high thermal conductivity of CVD diamond (1800 W/mK) strong PA signals are generated and the broad optical transmission range (250 nm to THz) renders the cell useful for various applications. The performance of the cell is demonstrated by tracking glucose in aqueous keratinocyte solutions with an external-cavity quantum cascade laser (1010-1095 cm-1). These measurements yield a detection limit of 100 mg/dl (SNR=3). Although glucose measurements within the human physiological range (30-500 mg/dl) are feasible, further improvements are needed for non-invasive glucose monitoring of diabetes patients. First in vivo measurements at the human forearm show an additional PA signal induced by blood pulsation at a frequency around 1 Hz and a steadily increasing relative humidity in the PA chamber due to transepidermal water loss if the cell is neither closed with a diamond window nor ventilated with N2.

  12. Rotating shielded crane system

    DOEpatents

    Commander, John C.

    1988-01-01

    A rotating, radiation shielded crane system for use in a high radiation test cell, comprises a radiation shielding wall, a cylindrical ceiling made of radiation shielding material and a rotatable crane disposed above the ceiling. The ceiling rests on an annular ledge intergrally attached to the inner surface of the shielding wall. Removable plugs in the ceiling provide access for the crane from the top of the ceiling into the test cell. A seal is provided at the interface between the inner surface of the shielding wall and the ceiling.

  13. Self-sealing solar collector shield

    SciTech Connect

    Katona, J.W.

    1980-03-25

    Window structure for a solar collector shield or the like having a frame defining a row of separate window openings. A selfcontained window unit is installed in each opening. Each window unit comprises a pair of rectangular glass panes held in laterally spaced parallel relation by a peripheral window frame. A mounting frame is provided for mounting each window unit in its window opening. Each mounting frame has overlapping frame members. Adjacent side frame members of adjacent window units also overlap. The overlap is for the purpose of excluding moisture and preventing heat loss. A peripheral window seal is provided for the same purpose.

  14. Late Cenozoic deep weathering patterns on the Fennoscandian shield in northern Finland: A window on ice sheet bed conditions at the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Adrian M.; Sarala, Pertti; Ebert, Karin

    2015-10-01

    The nature of the regolith that existed on the shields of the Northern Hemisphere at the onset of ice sheet glaciation is poorly constrained. In this paper, we provide the first detailed account of an exceptionally preserved, deeply weathered late Neogene landscape in the ice sheet divide zone in northern Finland. We mine data sets of drilling and pitting records gathered by the Geological Survey of Finland to reconstruct regional preglacial deep weathering patterns within a GIS framework. Using a large geochemical data set, we give standardised descriptions of saprolite geochemistry using a variant of the Weathering Index of Parker (WIP) as a proxy to assess the intensity of weathering. We also focus on mineral prospects and mines with dense pit and borehole data coverage in order to identify links between geology, topography, and weathering. Geology is closely linked to topography on the preglacial shield landscape of northern Finland and both factors influence weathering patterns. Upstanding, resistant granulite, granite, gabbro, metabasalt, and quartzite rocks were associated with fresh rock outcrops, including tors, or with thin (< 5 m) grusses. Plains developed across less resistant biotite gneisses, greenstones, and belts of alternating rock types were mainly weathered to thick (10-20 m) grusses with WIPfines values above 3000 and 4000. Beneath valley floors developed along mineralised shear and fracture zones, weathering penetrated locally to depths of > 50 m and included intensely weathered kaolinitic clays with WIPfines values below 1000. Late Neogene weathering profiles were varied in character. Tripartite clay-gruss-saprock profiles occur only in limited areas. Bipartite gruss-saprock profiles were widespread, with saprock thicknesses of > 10 m. Weathering profiles included two discontinuities in texture, materials and resistance to erosion, between saprolite and saprock and between saprock and rock. Limited core recovery when drilling below the soil

  15. Chemically deposited CdS by an ammonia-free process for solar cells window layers

    SciTech Connect

    Ochoa-Landin, R.; Sastre-Hernandez, J.; Vigil-Galan, O.; Ramirez-Bon, R.

    2010-02-15

    Chemically deposited CdS window layers were studied on two different transparent conductive substrates, namely indium tin oxide (ITO) and fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO), to determine the influence of their properties on CdS/CdTe solar cells performance. Three types of CdS films obtained from different chemical bath deposition (CBD) processes were studied. The three CBD processes employed sodium citrate as the complexing agent in partial or full substitution of ammonia. The CdS films were studied by X-ray diffraction, optical transmission spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy. CdS/CdTe devices were completed by depositing 3 {mu}m thick CdTe absorbent layers by means of the close-spaced vapor transport technique (CSVT). Evaporated Cu-Au was used as the back contact in all the solar cells. Dark and under illumination J-V characteristic and quantum efficiency measurements were done on the CdS/CdTe devices to determine their conversion efficiency and spectral response. The efficiency of the cells depended on the window layer and on the transparent contact with values between 5.7% and 8.7%. (author)

  16. Magnetic Shielding Accelerates the Proliferation of Human Neuroblastoma Cell by Promoting G1-Phase Progression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  17. Provision Of Carbon Nanotube Bucky Paper Cages For Immune Shielding Of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method for enclosing cells and/or tissue, for purposes of growth, cell differentiation, suppression of cell differentiation, biological processing and/or transplantation of cells and tissues (biological inserts), and for secretion, sensing and monitoring of selected chemical substances and activation of gene expression of biological inserts implanted into a human body. Selected cells and/or tissue are enveloped in a "cage" that is primarily carbon nanotube Bucky paper, with a selected thickness and porosity. Optionally, selected functional groups, proteins and/or peptides are attached to the carbon nanotube cage, or included within the cage, to enhance the growth and/or differentiation of the cells and/or tissue, to select for certain cellular sub-populations, to optimize certain functions of the cells and/or tissue and/or to optimize the passage of chemicals across the cage surface(s). A cage system is also used as an immuns shield and to control operation of a nano-device or macroscopic device, located within the cage, to provide or transform a selected chemical and/or a selected signal.

  18. Magnetic shielding accelerates the proliferation of human neuroblastoma cell by promoting G1-phase progression.

    PubMed

    Mo, Wei-chuan; Zhang, Zi-jian; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F; He, Rong-qiao

    2013-01-01

    Organisms have been exposed to the geomagnetic field (GMF) throughout evolutionary history. Exposure to the hypomagnetic field (HMF) by deep magnetic shielding has recently been suggested to have a negative effect on the structure and function of the central nervous system, particularly during early development. Although changes in cell growth and differentiation have been observed in the HMF, the effects of the HMF on cell cycle progression still remain unclear. Here we show that continuous HMF exposure significantly increases the proliferation of human neuroblastoma (SH-SY5Y) cells. The acceleration of proliferation results from a forward shift of the cell cycle in G1-phase. The G2/M-phase progression is not affected in the HMF. Our data is the first to demonstrate that the HMF can stimulate the proliferation of SH-SY5Y cells by promoting cell cycle progression in the G1-phase. This provides a novel way to study the mechanism of cells in response to changes of environmental magnetic field including the GMF. PMID:23355897

  19. DEMONSTRATION OF THE GLYCOLIC-FORMIC FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ACTUAL WASTE

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.; Pareizs, J.; Click, D.

    2011-11-07

    demonstrated the same behavior. The second risk is related to potential downstream impacts of glycolate on Tank Farm processes. The downstream impacts will be evaluated by a separate research team. Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested a radioactive demonstration of the Glycolic-Formic Flowsheet with radioactive sludge slurry be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the SRNL. The Shielded Cells demonstration only included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, and not a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle or the co-processing of salt products. Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) slurry was used for the demonstration since it was readily available, had been previously characterized, and was generally representative of sludges being processing in DWPF. This sample was never used in the planned Shielded Cells Run 7 (SC-7).

  20. Transparent, near-infrared organic photovoltaic solar cells for window and energy-scavenging applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lunt, Richard R; Bulovic, Vladimir

    2011-03-14

    We fabricate near-infrared absorbing organic photovoltaics that are highly transparent to visible light. By optimizing near-infrared optical-interference, we demonstrate power efficiencies of 1.3±0.1% with simultaneous average visible transmission of >65% . Subsequent incorporation of near-infrared distributed-Bragg-reflector mirrors leads to an increase in the efficiency to 1.7±0.1% , approaching the 2.4±0.2% efficiency of the opaque cell, while maintaining high visible-transparency of >55% . Finally, we demonstrate that a series-integrated array of these transparent cells is capable of powering electronic devices under near-ambient lighting. This architecture suggests strategies for high-efficiency power-generating windows and highlights an application uniquely benefiting from excitonic electronics.

  1. Enhanced near-infrared shielding ability of (Li,K)-codoped WO3 for smart windows: DFT prediction validated by experiment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chenxi; Chen, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Xiaofei; Cheng, Daojian; Huan, Haifeng; Cao, Dapeng

    2016-02-19

    By means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) computations, we found that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 shows a significantly enhanced near-infrared (NIR) absorption ability for smart windows, and investigated the influence of doping through the analysis of the electronic structures of pure and doped hexagonal WO3. Furthermore, this codoped material, with a hexagonal tungsten bronze nanostructure, was successfully prepared via a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction for the first time. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared products possessed a nanorod-like morphology with diameters of about 5-10 nm. It was demonstrated that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 presents a better NIR absorption ability than pure, Li-monodoped or K-monodoped WO3, which is in good agreement with our theoretical predictions. The experiment and simulation results reveal that this enhanced optical property in NIR can be explained by the existence of high free electrons existing in (Li,K)-codoped WO3. PMID:26783034

  2. Enhanced near-infrared shielding ability of (Li,K)-codoped WO3 for smart windows: DFT prediction validated by experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chenxi; Chen, Jian-Feng; Zeng, Xiaofei; Cheng, Daojian; Huang, Haifeng; Cao, Dapeng

    2016-02-01

    By means of hybrid density functional theory (DFT) computations, we found that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 shows a significantly enhanced near-infrared (NIR) absorption ability for smart windows, and investigated the influence of doping through the analysis of the electronic structures of pure and doped hexagonal WO3. Furthermore, this codoped material, with a hexagonal tungsten bronze nanostructure, was successfully prepared via a simple one-step hydrothermal reaction for the first time. Transmission electron microscopy images showed that the as-prepared products possessed a nanorod-like morphology with diameters of about 5–10 nm. It was demonstrated that (Li,K)-codoped WO3 presents a better NIR absorption ability than pure, Li-monodoped or K-monodoped WO3, which is in good agreement with our theoretical predictions. The experiment and simulation results reveal that this enhanced optical property in NIR can be explained by the existence of high free electrons existing in (Li,K)-codoped WO3.

  3. Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells in distinct ontogenetic windows

    SciTech Connect

    Biemann, Ronald; Navarrete Santos, Anne; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Riemann, Dagmar; Knelangen, Julia; Blueher, Matthias; Koch, Holger; Fischer, Bernd

    2012-01-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Endocrine disrupting chemicals affect adipogenesis in mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The adipogenic impact depends strongly on the window of exposure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bisphenol A reduces the potential of MSC to differentiate into adipocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DEHP and TBT trigger the adipogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer BPA, DEHP and TBT did not affect adipogenesis in embryonic stem cells. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) like bisphenol A (BPA), bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) and tributyltin (TBT) are ubiquitously present in the environment and in human tissues. They bind to nuclear hormone receptors and affect cellular and developmental processes. In this study, we show that BPA, DEHP and TBT affect the adipogenic differentiation of murine mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, C3H/10T1/2) in a concentration-, stage- and compound-specific manner. C3H/10T1/2 cells and embryonic stem cells (CGR8) were exposed to BPA, DEHP or TBT at different stages of cell determination and differentiation (undifferentiated growth, adipogenic induction and terminal adipogenic differentiation). The final amount of differentiated adipocytes, cellular triglyceride content and mRNA expression of adipogenic marker genes (adiponectin, FABP4, PPAR{gamma}2, LPL) were quantified and compared with corresponding unexposed cells. BPA (10 {mu}M) decreased subsequent adipogenic differentiation of MSC, when cells were exposed during undifferentiated growth. In contrast, DEHP (100 {mu}M) during the hormonal induction period, and TBT (100 nM) in all investigated stages, enhanced adipogenesis. Importantly, exposure of undifferentiated murine embryonic stem cells did not show any effect of the investigated EDC on subsequent adipogenic differentiation.

  4. Neural stem cell-encoded temporal patterning delineates an early window of malignant susceptibility in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Narbonne-Reveau, Karine; Lanet, Elodie; Dillard, Caroline; Foppolo, Sophie; Chen, Ching-Huan; Parrinello, Hugues; Rialle, Stéphanie; Sokol, Nicholas S; Maurange, Cédric

    2016-01-01

    Pediatric neural tumors are often initiated during early development and can undergo very rapid transformation. However, the molecular basis of this early malignant susceptibility remains unknown. During Drosophila development, neural stem cells (NSCs) divide asymmetrically and generate intermediate progenitors that rapidly differentiate in neurons. Upon gene inactivation, these progeny can dedifferentiate and generate malignant tumors. Here, we find that intermediate progenitors are prone to malignancy only when born during an early window of development while expressing the transcription factor Chinmo, and the mRNA-binding proteins Imp/IGF2BP and Lin-28. These genes compose an oncogenic module that is coopted upon dedifferentiation of early-born intermediate progenitors to drive unlimited tumor growth. In late larvae, temporal transcription factor progression in NSCs silences the module, thereby limiting mitotic potential and terminating the window of malignant susceptibility. Thus, this study identifies the gene regulatory network that confers malignant potential to neural tumors with early developmental origins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13463.001 PMID:27296804

  5. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  6. GCR Transport in the Brain: Assessment of Self-Shielding, Columnar Damage, and Nuclear Reactions on Cell Inactivation Rates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shavers, M. R.; Atwell, W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Badhwar, G. D. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Radiation shield design is driven by the need to limit radiation risks while optimizing risk reduction with launch mass/expense penalties. Both limitation and optimization objectives require the development of accurate and complete means for evaluating the effectiveness of various shield materials and body-self shielding. For galactic cosmic rays (GCR), biophysical response models indicate that track structure effects lead to substantially different assessments of shielding effectiveness relative to assessments based on LET-dependent quality factors. Methods for assessing risk to the central nervous system (CNS) from heavy ions are poorly understood at this time. High-energy and charge (HZE) ion can produce tissue events resulting in damage to clusters of cells in a columnar fashion, especially for stopping heavy ions. Grahn (1973) and Todd (1986) have discussed a microlesion concept or model of stochastic tissue events in analyzing damage from HZE's. Some tissues, including the CNS, maybe sensitive to microlesion's or stochastic tissue events in a manner not illuminated by either conventional dosimetry or fluence-based risk factors. HZE ions may also produce important lateral damage to adjacent cells. Fluences of high-energy proton and alpha particles in the GCR are many times higher than HZE ions. Behind spacecraft and body self-shielding the ratio of protons, alpha particles, and neutrons to HZE ions increases several-fold from free-space values. Models of GCR damage behind shielding have placed large concern on the role of target fragments produced from tissue atoms. The self-shielding of the brain reduces the number of heavy ions reaching the interior regions by a large amount and the remaining light particle environment (protons, neutrons, deuterons. and alpha particles) may be the greatest concern. Tracks of high-energy proton produce nuclear reactions in tissue, which can deposit doses of more than 1 Gv within 5 - 10 cell layers. Information on rates of

  7. Distinguishing hair cell from neural potentials recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Forgues, Mathieu; Koehn, Heather A.; Dunnon, Askia K.; Pulver, Stephen H.; Buchman, Craig A.; Adunka, Oliver F.

    2013-01-01

    Almost all patients who receive cochlear implants have some acoustic hearing prior to surgery. Electrocochleography (ECoG), or electrophysiological measures of cochlear response to sound, can identify remaining auditory nerve activity that is the basis for this residual hearing and can record potentials from hair cells that are no longer functionally connected to nerve fibers. The ECoG signal is therefore complex, being composed of both hair cell and neural signals. To identify signatures of different sources in the recorded potentials, we collected ECoG data across frequency and intensity from the round window of gerbils before and after treatment with kainic acid, a neurotoxin. Distortions in the recorded waveforms were produced by different sources over different ranges of frequency and intensity. In response to tones at low frequencies and low-to-moderate intensities, the major source of distortion was from neural phase-locking that was sensitive to kainic acid. At high intensities at all frequencies, the distortion was not sensitive to kainic acid and was consistent with asymmetric saturation of the hair cell transducer current. In addition to loss of phase-locking, changes in the envelope after kainic acid treatment indicate that sustained neural firing combines with receptor potentials from hair cells to produce the envelope of the response to tones. These results provide baseline data to interpret comparable recordings from human cochlear implant recipients. PMID:24133227

  8. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Fanny; de Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-09-01

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce3+/Ce4+ redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields.

  9. Cerium oxide nanoparticles, combining antioxidant and UV shielding properties, prevent UV-induced cell damage and mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Caputo, Fanny; De Nicola, Milena; Sienkiewicz, Andrzej; Giovanetti, Anna; Bejarano, Ignacio; Licoccia, Silvia; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2015-10-14

    Efficient inorganic UV shields, mostly based on refracting TiO2 particles, have dramatically changed the sun exposure habits. Unfortunately, health concerns have emerged from the pro-oxidant photocatalytic effect of UV-irradiated TiO2, which mediates toxic effects on cells. Therefore, improvements in cosmetic solar shield technology are a strong priority. CeO2 nanoparticles are not only UV refractors but also potent biological antioxidants due to the surface 3+/4+ valency switch, which confers anti-inflammatory, anti-ageing and therapeutic properties. Herein, UV irradiation protocols were set up, allowing selective study of the extra-shielding effects of CeO2vs. TiO2 nanoparticles on reporter cells. TiO2 irradiated with UV (especially UVA) exerted strong photocatalytic effects, superimposing their pro-oxidant, cell-damaging and mutagenic action when induced by UV, thereby worsening the UV toxicity. On the contrary, irradiated CeO2 nanoparticles, via their Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) redox couple, exerted impressive protection on UV-treated cells, by buffering oxidation, preserving viability and proliferation, reducing DNA damage and accelerating repair; strikingly, they almost eliminated mutagenesis, thus acting as an important tool to prevent skin cancer. Interestingly, CeO2 nanoparticles also protect cells from the damage induced by irradiated TiO2, suggesting that these two particles may also complement their effects in solar lotions. CeO2 nanoparticles, which intrinsically couple UV shielding with biological and genetic protection, appear to be ideal candidates for next-generation sun shields. PMID:26349675

  10. Lattice-mismatched In(0. 40)Al(0. 60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, R.K.; Landis, G.A.; Wilt, D.M.; Flood, D.J.

    1993-11-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  11. Lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layers for indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Landis, Geoffrey A.; Wilt, David M.; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    The efficiency of indium phosphide (InP) solar cells is limited by its high surface recombination velocity (approximately 10(exp 7) cm/s). This might be reduced by a wide-bandgap window layer. The performance of InP solar cells with wide-bandgap (1.8 eV) lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As as a window layer was calculated. Because the required window layer thickness is less than the critical layer thickness, growth of strained (pseudomorphic) layers without interfacial misfit dislocations should be possible. Calculations using the PC-lD numerical code showed that the efficiencies of baseline and optimized p(+)n (p-on-n) cells are increased to more than 22 and 24 percent, (air mass zero (AMO), 25 C), respectively for a lattice-mismatched In(0.40)Al(0.60)As window layer of 10-nm thickness. Currently, most cell development work has been focused on n(+)p (n-on-p) structures although comparatively little improvement has been found for n(+)p cells.

  12. Chemical Reactivity Window Determines Prodrug Efficiency toward Glutathione Transferase Overexpressing Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    van Gisbergen, Marike W; Cebula, Marcus; Zhang, Jie; Ottosson-Wadlund, Astrid; Dubois, Ludwig; Lambin, Philippe; Tew, Kenneth D; Townsend, Danyelle M; Haenen, Guido R M M; Drittij-Reijnders, Marie-José; Saneyoshi, Hisao; Araki, Mika; Shishido, Yuko; Ito, Yoshihiro; Arnér, Elias S J; Abe, Hiroshi; Morgenstern, Ralf; Johansson, Katarina

    2016-06-01

    mechanisms in cells. Here we propose that GST-dependent prodrugs require a conversion rate "window" in order to selectively target GST overexpressing cells, while limiting their effects on normal cells. Prodrugs are furthermore a suitable system to specifically target GSTs and to overcome various drug resistance mechanisms that apply to the parental drug. PMID:27093577

  13. Cosmological Parameter Estimation and Window Function in Counts-in-Cell Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murata, Y.; Matsubara, T.

    2006-11-01

    We estimate the cosmological parameter bounds expected from the counts-in-cells analysis of the galaxy distributions of SDSS samples, which are the Main Galaxies (MGs) and the Luminous Red Galaxies (LRGs). We use the m-weight Epanechnikov kernel as window function with expectation of improving the bounds of parameters. We apply the Fisher Information Matrix Analysis, which can estimate the minimum expected parameter bounds without any data. In this analysis, we derive the covariance matrix that includes the consideration of overlapping of cells. As a result, we found that the signal to noise of the LRG sample is bigger than that of the MG sample because the range of data using is only linear scale. Therefore, the LRG sample is more suitable for parameter estimation. For the LRG sample, about six hundred data points are sufficient to get maximum effect on parameter bounds. Large parameter set results in poor bounds because of degeneracy, the matter density, the baryon fraction, the neutrino density and σ2 8 including the amplitude of the power spectrum, the linear bias and the Kaiser effect seems to be an appropriate set.

  14. Phase-diverse Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging of malaria parasite-infected red blood cells in the water window.

    PubMed

    Jones, M W M; Abbey, B; Gianoncelli, A; Balaur, E; Millet, C; Luu, M B; Coughlan, H D; Carroll, A J; Peele, A G; Tilley, L; van Riessen, G A

    2013-12-30

    Phase-diverse Fresnel coherent diffractive imaging has been shown to reveal the structure and composition of biological specimens with high sensitivity at nanoscale resolution. However, the method has yet to be applied using X-ray illumination with energy in the so-called 'water-window' that lies between the carbon and oxygen K edges. In this range, differences in the strength of the X-ray interaction for protein based biological materials and water is increased. Here we demonstrate a proof-of-principle application of FCDI at an X-ray energy within the water-window to a dehydrated cellular sample composed of red blood cells infected with the trophozoite stage of the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum. Comparison of the results to both optical and electron microscopy shows that the correlative imaging methods that include water-window FCDI will find utility in studying cellular architecture. PMID:24514809

  15. Shielding of the Geomagnetic Field Alters Actin Assembly and Inhibits Cell Motility in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Wei-Chuan; Zhang, Zi-Jian; Wang, Dong-Liang; Liu, Ying; Bartlett, Perry F.; He, Rong-Qiao

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has shown that absence of the geomagnetic field (GMF), the so-called hypomagnetic field (HMF) environment, alters the biological functions in seemingly non-magnetosensitive cells and organisms, which indicates that the GMF could be sensed by non-iron-rich and non-photo-sensing cells. The underlying mechanisms of the HMF effects on those cells are closely related to their GMF sensation but remain poorly understood so far. Previously, we found that the HMF represses expressions of genes associated with cell migration and cytoskeleton assembly in human neuroblastoma cells (SH-SY5Y cell line). Here, we measured the HMF-induced changes on cell morphology, adhesion, motility and actin cytoskeleton in SH-SY5Y cells. The HMF inhibited cell adhesion and migration accompanied with a reduction in cellular F-actin amount. Moreover, following exposure to the HMF, the number of cell processes was reduced and cells were smaller in size and more round in shape. Furthermore, disordered kinetics of actin assembly in vitro were observed during exposure to the HMF, as evidenced by the presence of granule and meshed products. These results indicate that elimination of the GMF affects assembly of the motility-related actin cytoskeleton, and suggest that F-actin is a target of HMF exposure and probably a mediator of GMF sensation. PMID:27029216

  16. Aortopulmonary window

    MedlinePlus

    Aortopulmonary window is a rare heart defect in which there is a hole connecting the major artery taking blood ... rest of the body. Babies with an aortopulmonary window have a hole in between the aorta and ...

  17. Power coupler and cold window for seven-cell superconducting cavity vertical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.R.; Spalek, G.

    1992-10-01

    For tests of the LANL 805MHz seven cell superconducting cavity, we are developing a variable coaxial rf power coupler. Its Q{sub ext} will be variable over a range from 10{sup 5} to 10{sup 12}. It will operate nominally at 3kW CW and lOOkW peak for high power processing. The coupler consists of a 3 inch driveline and window, a 3.45 inch T supported by a {lambda}/4 shorted stub followed by a step transition to a 2 inch coupler port. A {approximately} 6.6 Ohm impedance choke joint located at the step transition allows the large center conductor travel necessary for the Q{sub ext} variation. The folded choke joint is located at a standing wave current node to keep its excitation below the multipacting level even at high power levels. A low contact-pressure sliding rf seal prevents arcing at the choke joints current node during its filling time.

  18. Power coupler and cold window for seven-cell superconducting cavity vertical tests

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, E.R.; Spalek, G.

    1992-01-01

    For tests of the LANL 805MHz seven cell superconducting cavity, we are developing a variable coaxial rf power coupler. Its Q[sub ext] will be variable over a range from 10[sup 5] to 10[sup 12]. It will operate nominally at 3kW CW and lOOkW peak for high power processing. The coupler consists of a 3 inch driveline and window, a 3.45 inch T supported by a [lambda]/4 shorted stub followed by a step transition to a 2 inch coupler port. A [approximately] 6.6 Ohm impedance choke joint located at the step transition allows the large center conductor travel necessary for the Q[sub ext] variation. The folded choke joint is located at a standing wave current node to keep its excitation below the multipacting level even at high power levels. A low contact-pressure sliding rf seal prevents arcing at the choke joints current node during its filling time.

  19. Micro-abrasion package capture cell experiment on the trailing edge of LDEF: Impactor chemistry and whipple bumper shield efficiencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, Howard J.; Yano, Hajime

    1995-01-01

    Four of the eight available double layer microparticle capture cells, flown as the experiment A0023 on the trailing (West) face of LDEF, have been extensively studied. An investigation of the chemistry of impactors has been made using SEM/EDX techniques and the effectiveness of the capture cells as bumper shields has also been examined. Studies of these capture cells gave positive EDX results, with 53 percent of impact sites indicating the presence of some chemical residues, the predominant residue identified as being silicon in varying quantities.

  20. [The impact of ZnS/CdS composite window layer on the quantun efficiency of CdTe solar cell in short wavelength].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li-xiang; Feng, Liang-huan; Wang, Wen-wu; Xu, Hang; Wu, Li-li; Zhang, Jing-quan; Li, Wei; Zeng, Guang-gen

    2015-02-01

    ZnS/CdS composite window layer was prepared by magnetron sputtering method and then applied to CdTe solar cell. The morphology and structure of films were measured. The data of I-V in light and the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with different window layers were also measured. The effect of ZnS films prepared in different conditions on the performance of CdTe solar cells was researched. The effects of both CdS thickness and ZnS/CdS composite layer on the transmission in short wavelength were studied. Particularly, the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer was measured. The results show as follows. With the thickness of CdS window layer reducing from 100 to 50 nm, the transmission increase 18.3% averagely in short wavelength and the quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells increase 27.6% averagely. The grain size of ZnS prepared in 250 degrees C is smaller than prepared at room temperature. The performance of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer is much better if ZnS deposited at 250 degrees C. This indicates grain size has some effect on the electron transportation. When the CdS holds the same thickness, the transmission of ZnS/CdS window layer was improved about 2% in short wavelength compared with CdS window layer. The quantum efficiency of CdTe solar cells with ZnS/CdS window layer was also improved about 2% in short wavelength compared with that based on CdS window layer. These indicate ZnS/CdS composite window layer can increase the photon transmission in short wavelength so that more photons can be absorbed by the absorbent layer of CdTe solar cells. PMID:25970885

  1. Electrodeposition of ZnO-doped films as window layer for Cd-free CIGS-based solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsin, Fabien; Vénérosy, Amélie; Hildebrandt, Thibaud; Hariskos, Dimitrios; Naghavi, Negar; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2016-02-01

    The Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin film solar cell technology has made a steady progress within the last decade reaching efficiency up to 22.3% on laboratory scale, thus overpassing the highest efficiency for polycrystalline silicon solar cells. High efficiency CIGS modules employ a so-called buffer layer of cadmium sulfide CdS deposited by Chemical Bath Deposition (CBD), which presence and Cd-containing waste present some environmental concerns. A second potential bottleneck for CIGS technology is its window layer made of i-ZnO/ZnO:Al, which is deposited by sputtering requiring expensive vacuum equipment. A non-vacuum deposition of transparent conductive oxide (TCO) relying on simpler equipment with lower investment costs will be more economically attractive, and could increase competitiveness of CIGS-based modules with the mainstream silicon-based technologies. In the frame of Novazolar project, we have developed a low-cost aqueous solution photo assisted electrodeposition process of the ZnO-based window layer for high efficiency CIGS-based solar cells. The window layer deposition have been first optimized on classical CdS buffer layer leading to cells with efficiencies similar to those measured with the sputtered references on the same absorber (15%). The the optimized ZnO doped layer has been adapted to cadmium free devices where the CdS is replaced by chemical bath deposited zinc oxysulfide Zn(S,O) buffer layer. The effect of different growth parameters has been studied on CBD-Zn(S,O)-plated co-evaporated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 substrates provided by the Zentrum für Sonnenenergie-und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW). This optimization of the electrodeposition of ZnO:Cl on CIGS/Zn(S,O) stacks led to record efficiency of 14%, while the reference cell with a sputtered (Zn,Mg)O/ZnO:Al window layer has an efficiency of 15.2%.

  2. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1994-01-01

    A composite window structure is described for transmitting x-ray radiation and for shielding radiation generated debris. In particular, separate layers of different x-ray transmissive materials are laminated together to form a high strength, x-ray transmissive debris shield which is particularly suited for use in high energy fluences. In one embodiment, the composite window comprises alternating layers of beryllium and a thermoset polymer.

  3. Light management and efficient carrier generation with a highly transparent window layer for a multijunction amorphous silicon solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iftiquar, Sk Md; Lee, Jeong Chul; Lee, Jieun; Kim, Youngkuk; Jang, Juyeon; Lee, Yeun-Jung; Yi, Junsin

    2013-01-01

    P-layer of a p-i-n type amorphous silicon solar cell helps in creating a built-in electric field inside the cell; it also contributes to parasitic absorption loss of incident light. Here, we report optimization of these two characteristic contributions of the p-layer of the cell. We used a highly transparent p-type hydrogenated amorphous silicon carbide (p-a-Si1-xCx:H) window layer in an amorphous silicon solar cell. With the increased transparency of the p-type layer, the solar cell showed an improvement in short-circuit current density by 17%, along with improvement in blue response of its external quantum efficiency, although further thinner p-layer showed lower open-circuit voltage. Such a cell shows low light-induced degradation and a promise to be used in high-efficiency multijunction solar cell.

  4. Evaluation of UV radiation-induced toxicity and biophysical changes in various skin cells with photo-shielding molecules.

    PubMed

    Bennet, Devasier; Kim, Sanghyo

    2015-09-21

    Ultraviolet radiation (UVR) triggers many complex events in different types of skin cells, including benign, malignant and normal cells. Chromophores present in these cells play a crucial role in various cellular processes. Unprecedented methods are required for the real-time monitoring of changes in an in vitro model exposed to intermittent mild and intense UVR to determine the mechanisms underlying cell degeneration and the effects of unexpected toxic, agonist and antagonist agents. This study reports the analytical application of a whole cell-based sensor platform for examining the biophysical effects of UVR. We used human keratinocyte, melanocyte and fibroblast cell lines to determine the normal, pathological and protective roles of UVR. In addition, we examined the real-time morphological, biophysical and biomechanical changes associated with cell degeneration induced by UVR at 254 and 365 nm. Information on UVR-induced changes in the cytoskeleton ultrastructure, cellular integrity, cell spreading area, actin microfilament distribution inflammation, microtubule damage, membrane damage, rupture and death was characterized by examining the loss or increase in biophysical and biomechanical properties of these cells. All cells exposed to UVR at 254 and 365 nm showed a significant increase in surface roughness and stiffness in a time-dependent manner. UVR-induced toxicity in differently pigmented skin cells was compared with that in cells pretreated with melanin, keratin and basic fibroblast growth factor to analyze the shielding efficiency of these agents. Melanin exerted a significant shielding effect compared to the other two agents. The biophysical and biomechanical information obtained in this study could advance our understanding of the UVR-induced degeneration process, and help in developing new interventions strategies. PMID:26247629

  5. Flexible shielding system for radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Babin, A.

    1972-01-01

    Modular construction of low cost flexible radiation shielding panels consists of water filled steels cans, zinc bromide windows, turntable unit, master-slave manipulators, and interlocking lead bricks. Easy modifications of shielding wall thicknesses are obtained by rearranging overall geometry of portable components.

  6. Fabrication and electromagnetic interference shielding performance of open-cell foam of a Cu-Ni alloy integrated with CNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Keju; Zhao, Huihui; Zhang, Jun; Chen, Jia; Dai, Zhendong

    2014-08-01

    A lightweight multi-layered electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding material made of open-cell foam of a Cu-Ni alloy integrated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) was prepared by electroless copper plating, then nickel electroplating, and finally electrophoretic deposition of CNTs. The foamed Cu-Ni-CNT composite comprises, from inside to outside, Cu, Ni, and CNT layers. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive spectroscopy, and EMI tests were employed to characterize the morphology, composition, and EMI performance of the composite, respectively. The results indicated that the shielding effectiveness (SE) of the composite increased with increasing pore density (indicated as pores per inch (PPI)) and increasing thickness. A specimen with a PPI of 110 and a 1.5-mm thickness had a maximum SE of up to 54.6 dB, and a SE as high as 47.5 dB on average in the 8-12 GHz range. Integrating the inherent superiority of Cu, Ni, and CNTs, the porous structure of the composite can attenuate the incident electromagnetic microwaves by reflecting, scattering, and absorbing them between the metallic skeleton and the CNT layer. The multiple reflections and absorptions make it difficult for the microwaves to escape from the composite before being absorbed, thereby making the composite a potential shielding material.

  7. Transparent self-cleaning dust shield

    DOEpatents

    Mazumder, Malay K.; Sims, Robert A.; Wilson, James D.

    2005-06-28

    A transparent electromagnetic shield to protect solar panels and the like from dust deposition. The shield is a panel of clear non-conducting (dielectric) material with embedded parallel electrodes. The panel is coated with a semiconducting film. Desirably the electrodes are transparent. The electrodes are connected to a single-phase AC signal or to a multi-phase AC signal that produces a travelling electromagnetic wave. The electromagnetic field produced by the electrodes lifts dust particles away from the shield and repels charged particles. Deposited dust particles are removed when the electrodes are activated, regardless of the resistivity of the dust. Electrostatic charges on the panel are discharged by the semiconducting film. When used in conjunction with photovoltaic cells, the power for the device may be obtained from the cells themselves. For other surfaces, such as windshields, optical windows and the like, the power must be derived from an external source. One embodiment of the invention employs monitoring and detection devices to determine when the level of obscuration of the screen by dust has reached a threshold level requiring activation of the dust removal feature.

  8. CAVE WINDOW

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, M.

    1960-10-25

    A cave window is described. It is constructed of thick glass panes arranged so that interior panes have smaller windowpane areas and exterior panes have larger areas. Exterior panes on the radiation exposure side are remotely replaceable when darkened excessively. Metal shutters minimize exposure time to extend window life.

  9. Human umbilical-cord-blood mononucleated cells enhance the survival of lethally irradiated mice: dosage and the window of time

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Olga A.; Azzam, Edouard I.; Ende, Norman

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the window of time and dose of human umbilical-cord-blood (HUCB) mononucleated cells necessary for successful treatment of radiation injury in mice. Female A/J mice (27–30 weeks old) were exposed to an absorbed dose of 9–10 Gy of 137Cs γ-rays delivered acutely to the whole body. They were treated either with 1 × 108 or 2 × 108 HUCB mononucleated cells at 24–52 h after the irradiation. The antibiotic Levaquin was applied 4 h postirradiation. The increased dose of cord-blood cells resulted in enhanced survival. The enhancement of survival in animals that received 2 × 108 HUCB mononucleated cells relative to irradiated but untreated animals was highly significant (P < 0.01). Compared with earlier studies, the increased dose of HUCB mononucleated cells, coupled with early use of an antibiotic, extended the window of time for effective treatment of severe radiation injury from 4 to 24–52 h after exposure. PMID:23792493

  10. Calculated performance of p(+)n InP solar cells with In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, R. K.; Landis, G. A.

    1991-01-01

    The performance of indium phosphide solar cells with lattice matched wide band-gap In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layers was calculated using the PC-1D computer code. The conversion efficiency of p(+)n InP solar cells is improved significantly by the window layer. No improvement is seen for n(+)p structures. The improvement in InP cell efficiency was studied as a function of In(0.52)Al(0.48)As layer thickness. The use of the window layer improves both the open circuit voltage and short circuit current.For a typical In(0.52)Al(0.48)As window layer thickness of 20 nm, the cell efficiency improves in excess of 27 percent to a value of 18.74 percent.

  11. Preparation and characterization of pulsed laser deposited a novel CdS/CdSe composite window layer for CdTe thin film solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaoyan; Liu, Bo; Li, Bing; Zhang, Jingquan; Li, Wei; Wu, Lili; Feng, Lianghuan

    2016-03-01

    A novel CdS/CdSe composite window structure was designed and then the corresponding films were prepared by pulsed laser deposition as an improved window layer for CdTe-based solar cells. Two types of this composite window structure with 5 cycles and 10 cycles CdS/CdSe respectively both combined with CdS layers were prepared at 200 °C compared with pure CdS window layer and finally were applied into CdTe thin film solar cells. The cross section and surface morphology of the two composite window layers were monitored by using scanning electron microscopy and the result shows that the pulsed laser deposited composite window layers with good crystallinity are stacking together as the design. The devices based on CdS/CdSe composite window layers have demonstrated the enhanced photocurrent collection from both short and long wavelength regions compared to CdS/CdTe solar cell. The efficiency of the best reference CdS/CdTe solar cell was 10.72%. And the device with 5 cycles CdS/CdSe composite window showed efficiency of 12.61% with VOC of 772.92 mV, JSC of 25.11 mA/cm2 and FF of 64.95%. In addition, there are some differences which exist within the optical transmittance spectra and QE curves between the two CdS/CdSe composite window samples, indicating that the volume proportion of CdSe may influence the performance of CdTe thin film solar cell.

  12. DNA fragmentation induced by fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    SciTech Connect

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M.A.

    2003-11-19

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used small gamma, Greek-rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by small gamma, Greek-rays in the size range 123 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions.

  13. DNA fragmentation induced by Fe ions in human cells: shielding influence on spatially correlated damage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Antonelli, F.; Belli, M.; Campa, A.; Chatterjee, A.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Rydberg, B.; Simone, G.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    2004-01-01

    Outside the magnetic field of the Earth, high energy heavy ions constitute a relevant part of the biologically significant dose to astronauts during the very long travels through space. The typical pattern of energy deposition in the matter by heavy ions on the microscopic scale is believed to produce spatially correlated damage in the DNA which is critical for radiobiological effects. We have investigated the influence of a lucite shielding on the initial production of very small DNA fragments in human fibroblasts irradiated with 1 GeV/u iron (Fe) ions. We also used gamma rays as reference radiation. Our results show: (1) a lower effect per incident ion when the shielding is used; (2) an higher DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSB) induction by Fe ions than by gamma rays in the size range 1-23 kbp; (3) a non-random DNA DSB induction by Fe ions. c2004 COSPAR. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Modular shield

    DOEpatents

    Snyder, Keith W.

    2002-01-01

    A modular system for containing projectiles has a sheet of material including at least a polycarbonate layer held by a metal frame having a straight frame member corresponding to each straight edge of the sheet. Each frame member has a U-shaped shield channel covering and holding a straight edge of the sheet and an adjacent U-shaped clamp channel rigidly held against the shield channel. A flexible gasket separates each sheet edge from its respective shield channel; and each frame member is fastened to each adjacent frame member only by clamps extending between adjacent clamp channels.

  15. REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  16. Electron and proton damage on InGaAs solar cells having an InP window layer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott R.; Cotal, Hector L.; Walters, Robert J.; Summers, Geoffrey P.

    1995-01-01

    As part of a continuing program to determine the space radiation resistance of InP/ln(0.53)Ga(0.47)As tandem solar cells, n/p In(0.53)Ga(0. 47)As solar cells fabricated by RTI were irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and with 3 MeV protons. The cells were grown with a 3 micron n-lnP window layer to mimic the top cell in the tandem cell configuration for both AMO solar absorption and radiation effects. The results have been plotted against 'displacement damage dose' which is the product of the nonionizing energy loss (NIEL) and the particle fluence. A characteristic radiation damage curve can then be obtained for predicting the effect of all particles and energies. AMO, 1 sun solar illumination IV measurements were performed on the irradiated InGaAs solar cells and a characteristic radiation degradation curve was obtained using the solar cell conversion efficiency as the model parameter. Also presented are data comparing the radiation response of both n/p and p/n (fabricated by NREL) InGaAs solar cells as a function of base doping concentration. For the solar cell efficiency, the radiation degradation was found to be independent of the sample polarity for the same base doping concentration.

  17. ZnSe Window Layers for GaAs and GaInP2 Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.

    1995-01-01

    This report concerns studies of the use of ZnSe as a window layer for GaAs solar cells. Well-oriented crystalline ZnSe films on (100) single crystal GaAs substrates were grown by MOCVD. In particular, ZnSe films were grown by reacting a zinc adduct with hydrogen selenide at temperatures in the range of 200 C to 400 C. X-ray diffraction studies and images obtained with an atomic force microscope determined that the films were highly oriented but were polycrystalline. Particular emphasis was placed on the use of a substrate temperature of 350 C. Using iodine as a dopant, n-type ZnSe films with resistivities in the range of .01 to .05 ohm-cm were grown on semi-insulating GaAs. Thus procedures have been developed for investigating the utility of n-type ZnSe window layers on n/p GaAs structures. Studies of recombination at n-ZnSe/n-GaAs interfaces in n-ZnSe/n-GaAs/p-GaAs cell structures are planned for future work.

  18. Measurement of the transient shielding effectiveness of shielding cabinets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herlemann, H.; Koch, M.

    2008-05-01

    Recently, new definitions of shielding effectiveness (SE) for high-frequency and transient electromagnetic fields were introduced by Klinkenbusch (2005). Analytical results were shown for closed as well as for non closed cylindrical shields. In the present work, the shielding performance of different shielding cabinets is investigated by means of numerical simulations and measurements inside a fully anechoic chamber and a GTEM-cell. For the GTEM-cell-measurements, a downscaled model of the shielding cabinet is used. For the simulations, the numerical tools CONCEPT II and COMSOL MULTIPHYSICS were available. The numerical results agree well with the measurements. They can be used to interpret the behaviour of the shielding effectiveness of enclosures as function of frequency. From the measurement of the electric and magnetic fields with and without the enclosure in place, the electric and magnetic shielding effectiveness as well as the transient shielding effectiveness of the enclosure are calculated. The transient SE of four different shielding cabinets is determined and discussed.

  19. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. DETAIL OF HOT CELL NO. 2 SHOWS MANIPULATION INSTRUMENTS AND SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS. PENETRATIONS FOR OPERATING INSTRUMENTS GO THROUGH SHIELDING ABOVE WINDOWS. CONDUIT FOR UTILITIES AND CONTROLS IS BEHIND METAL CABINET BELOW WINDOWS NEAR FLOOR. CAMERA FACES WEST. WARNING SIGN LIMITS FISSILE MATERIAL TO SPECIFIED NUMBER OF GRAMS OF URANIUM AND PLUTONIUM. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-2. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  20. Impairment of Rat Fetal Beta-Cell Development by Maternal Exposure to Dexamethasone during Different Time-Windows

    PubMed Central

    Dumortier, Olivier; Theys, Nicolas; Ahn, Marie-Thérèse; Remacle, Claude; Reusens, Brigitte

    2011-01-01

    Aim Glucocorticoids (GCs) take part in the direct control of cell lineage during the late phase of pancreas development when endocrine and exocrine cell differentiation occurs. However, other tissues such as the vasculature exert a critical role before that phase. This study aims to investigate the consequences of overexposure to exogenous glucocorticoids during different time-windows of gestation for the development of the fetal endocrine pancreas. Methods Pregnant Wistar rats received dexamethasone acetate in their drinking water (1 µg/ml) during the last week or throughout gestation. Fetuses and their pancreases were analyzed at day 15 and 21 of gestation. Morphometrical analysis was performed on pancreatic sections after immunohistochemistry techniques and insulin secretion was evaluated on fetal islets collected in vitro. Results Dexamethasone given the last week or throughout gestation reduced the beta-cell mass in 21-day-old fetuses by respectively 18% or 62%. This was accompanied by a defect in insulin secretion. The alpha-cell mass was reduced similarly. Neither islet vascularization nor beta-cell proliferation was affected when dexamethasone was administered during the last week, which was however the case when given throughout gestation. When given from the beginning of gestation, dexamethasone reduced the number of cells expressing the early marker of endocrine lineage neurogenin-3 when analyzed at 15 days of fetal age. Conclusions GCs reduce the beta- and alpha-cell mass by different mechanisms according to the stage of development during which the treatment was applied. In fetuses exposed to glucocorticoids the last week of gestation only, beta-cell mass is reduced due to impairment of beta-cell commitment, whereas in fetuses exposed throughout gestation, islet vascularization and lower beta-cell proliferation are involved as well, amplifying the reduction of the endocrine mass. PMID:21991320

  1. [Aortopulmonary window].

    PubMed

    González-Marín, María Arántzazu; Jiménez-Díaz, Javier; Centeno-Jiménez, Miriam; García-Cabezas, M Ángel

    2015-01-01

    The aortopulmonary window is a rare cause of heart failure in the neonate. It must be ruled out if there are signs of pulmonary edema without the most frequent left-right shunts. We report the echocardiographic images of a newborn who was admitted with symptoms of heart failure at our institution. PMID:25698530

  2. Thermocouple shield

    SciTech Connect

    Ripley, Edward B.

    2009-11-24

    A thermocouple shield for use in radio frequency fields. In some embodiments the shield includes an electrically conductive tube that houses a standard thermocouple having a thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube protects the thermocouple from damage by an RF (including microwave) field and mitigates erroneous temperature readings due to the microwave or RF field. The thermocouple may be surrounded by a ceramic sheath to further protect the thermocouple. The ceramic sheath is generally formed from a material that is transparent to the wavelength of the microwave or RF energy. The microwave transparency property precludes heating of the ceramic sheath due to microwave coupling, which could affect the accuracy of temperature measurements. The ceramic sheath material is typically an electrically insulating material. The electrically insulative properties of the ceramic sheath help avert electrical arcing, which could damage the thermocouple junction. The electrically conductive tube is generally disposed around the thermocouple junction and disposed around at least a portion of the ceramic sheath. The concepts of the thermocouple shield may be incorporated into an integrated shielded thermocouple assembly.

  3. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. PMID:27102116

  4. Ultrastable BSA-capped gold nanoclusters with a polymer-like shielding layer against reactive oxygen species in living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenjuan; Cao, Yuqing; Sui, Dandan; Guan, Weijiang; Lu, Chao; Xie, Jianping

    2016-05-01

    The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells.The prevalence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and the enzyme-containing intracellular environment could lead to the fluorescence quenching of bovine serum albumin (BSA)-capped gold nanoclusters (AuNCs). Here we report an efficient strategy to address this issue, where a polymer-like shielding layer is designed to wrap around the Au core to significantly improve the stability of AuNCs against ROS and protease degradation. The key of our design is to covalently incorporate a thiolated AuNC into the BSA-AuNC via carbodiimide-activated coupling, leading to the formation of a AuNC pair inside the cross-linked BSA molecule. The as-designed paired AuNCs in BSA (or BSA-p-AuNCs for short) show improved performances in living cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Detailed experimental materials, apparatus, experimental procedures and characterization data. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02178f

  5. Human iPSC-Derived Neural Crest Stem Cells Promote Tendon Repair in a Rat Patellar Tendon Window Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Yequan; Liu, Erfu; Sun, Yanjun; Luo, Ziwei; Xu, Zhiling; Liu, Wanqian; Zhong, Li; Lv, Yonggang; Wang, Aijun; Tang, Zhenyu; Li, Song

    2013-01-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great potential for cell therapy and tissue engineering. Neural crest stem cells (NCSCs) are multipotent that are capable of differentiating into mesenchymal lineages. In this study, we investigated whether iPSC-derived NCSCs (iPSC-NCSCs) have potential for tendon repair. Human iPSC-NCSCs were suspended in fibrin gel and transplanted into a rat patellar tendon window defect. At 4 weeks post-transplantation, macroscopical observation showed that the repair of iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons was superior to that of non-iPSC-NCSC-treated tendons. Histological and mechanical examinations revealed that iPSC-NCSCs treatment significantly enhanced tendon healing as indicated by the improvement in matrix synthesis and mechanical properties. Furthermore, transplanted iPSC-NCSCs produced fetal tendon-related matrix proteins, stem cell recruitment factors, and tenogenic differentiation factors, and accelerated the host endogenous repair process. This study demonstrates a potential strategy of employing iPSC-derived NCSCs for tendon tissue engineering. PMID:23815150

  6. Predicting the location of missing outer hair cells using the electrical signal recorded at the round window

    PubMed Central

    Chertoff, Mark E.; Earl, Brian R.; Diaz, Francisco J.; Sorensen, Janna L.; Thomas, Megan L. A.; Kamerer, Aryn M.; Peppi, Marcello

    2014-01-01

    The electrical signal recorded at the round window was used to estimate the location of missing outer hair cells. The cochlear response was recorded to a low frequency tone embedded in high-pass filtered noise conditions. Cochlear damage was created by either overexposure to frequency-specific tones or laser light. In animals with continuous damage along the partition, the amplitude of the cochlear response increased as the high-pass cutoff frequency increased, eventually reaching a plateau. The cochlear distance at the onset of the plateau correlated with the anatomical onset of outer hair cell loss. A mathematical model replicated the physiologic data but was limited to cases with continuous hair cell loss in the middle and basal turns. The neural contribution to the cochlear response was determined by recording the response before and after application of Ouabain. Application of Ouabain eliminated or reduced auditory neural activity from approximately two turns of the cochlea. The amplitude of the cochlear response was reduced for moderate signal levels with a limited effect at higher levels, indicating that the cochlear response was dominated by outer hair cell currents at high signal levels and neural potentials at low to moderate signal levels. PMID:25190395

  7. NLRC5 shields T lymphocytes from NK-cell-mediated elimination under inflammatory conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ludigs, Kristina; Jandus, Camilla; Utzschneider, Daniel T.; Staehli, Francesco; Bessoles, Stéphanie; Dang, Anh Thu; Rota, Giorgia; Castro, Wilson; Zehn, Dietmar; Vivier, Eric; Held, Werner; Romero, Pedro; Guarda, Greta

    2016-01-01

    NLRC5 is a transcriptional regulator of MHC class I (MHCI), which maintains high MHCI expression particularly in T cells. Recent evidence highlights an important NK–T-cell crosstalk, raising the question on whether NLRC5 specifically modulates this interaction. Here we show that NK cells from Nlrc5-deficient mice exhibit moderate alterations in inhibitory receptor expression and responsiveness. Interestingly, NLRC5 expression in T cells is required to protect them from NK-cell-mediated elimination upon inflammation. Using T-cell-specific Nlrc5-deficient mice, we show that NK cells surprisingly break tolerance even towards ‘self' Nlrc5-deficient T cells under inflammatory conditions. Furthermore, during chronic LCMV infection, the total CD8+ T-cell population is severely decreased in these mice, a phenotype reverted by NK-cell depletion. These findings strongly suggest that endogenous T cells with low MHCI expression become NK-cell targets, having thus important implications for T-cell responses in naturally or therapeutically induced inflammatory conditions. PMID:26861112

  8. Window comparator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, J. M. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A window comparator is described, comprising two operational amplifiers, one with two feedback circuits, each feedback circuit having a diode connected to the amplifier output and poled for forward current conduction of opposite polarity, to provide an algebraic difference between an input signal and a selected set-point voltage. Differential input terminals of the second operational amplifier were connected to the separate feedback circuits of the first operational amplifier, one input terminal to the output of one diode, and the other to the output of the other diode. A selected window-width voltage was connected through a coupling resistor to one of the input terminals of the second operational amplifier to determine when the algebraic difference of the input signal and the setpoint voltage has exceeded a predetermined tolerance after that difference has changed signs.

  9. Sound shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Creel, T. R., Jr.; Beckwith, I. E. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    An improved test section for a supersonic or hypersonic wind tunnel is disclosed wherein the model tested is shielded from the noise normally radiated by the turbulent tunnel wall boundary layer. A vacuum plenum surrounds spaced rod elements making up the test chamber to extract some of the boundary layer as formed along the rod elements during a test to thereby delay the tendency of the rod boundary layers to become turbulent. Novel rod construction involves bending each rod slightly prior to machining the bent area to provide a flat segment on each rod for connection with the flat entrance fairing. Rods and fairing are secured to provide a test chamber incline on the order of 1 deg outward from the noise shield centerline to produce up to 65% reduction of the root mean square (rms) pressure over previously employed wind tunnel test sections at equivalent Reynolds numbers.

  10. A Transient Cell-Shielding Method for Viable MSC Delivery within Hydrophobic Scaffolds Polymerized In Situ

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L.; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Duvall, Craig L.; Wenke, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fast-degrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  11. A transient cell-shielding method for viable MSC delivery within hydrophobic scaffolds polymerized in situ.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ruijing; Ward, Catherine L; Davidson, Jeffrey M; Duvall, Craig L; Wenke, Joseph C; Guelcher, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    Cell-based therapies have emerged as promising approaches for regenerative medicine. Hydrophobic poly(ester urethane)s offer the advantages of robust mechanical properties, cell attachment without the use of peptides, and controlled degradation by oxidative and hydrolytic mechanisms. However, the application of injectable hydrophobic polymers to cell delivery is limited by the challenges of protecting cells from reaction products and creating a macroporous architecture post-cure. We designed injectable carriers for cell delivery derived from reactive, hydrophobic polyisocyanate and polyester triol precursors. To overcome cell death caused by reaction products from in situ polymerization, we encapsulated bone marrow-derived stem cells (BMSCs) in fastdegrading, oxidized alginate beads prior to mixing with the hydrophobic precursors. Cells survived the polymerization at >70% viability, and rapid dissolution of oxidized alginate beads after the scaffold cured created interconnected macropores that facilitated cellular adhesion to the scaffold in vitro. Applying this injectable system to deliver BMSCs to rat excisional skin wounds showed that the scaffolds supported survival of transplanted cells and infiltration of host cells, which improved new tissue formation compared to both implanted, pre-formed scaffolds seeded with cells and acellular controls. Our design is the first to enable injectable delivery of settable, hydrophobic scaffolds where cell encapsulation provides a mechanism for both temporary cytoprotection during polymerization and rapid formation of macropores post-polymerization. This simple approach provides potential advantages for cell delivery relative to hydrogel technologies, which have weaker mechanical properties and require incorporation of peptides to achieve cell adhesion and degradability. PMID:25907036

  12. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632. WHILE STEEL BEAMS DEFINE FUTURE WALLS OF THE BUILDING, SHEET STEEL DEFINES THE HOT CELL "BOX" ITSELF. THREE OPERATING WINDOWS ON LEFT; ONE VIEWING WINDOW ON RIGHT. TUBES WILL CONTAIN SERVICE AND CONTROL LEADS. SPACE BETWEEN INNER AND OUTER BOX WALLS WILL BE FILLED WITH SHIELDED WINDOWS AND BARETES CONCRETE. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. INL NEGATIVE NO. 7933. Unknown Photographer, ca. 5/1953 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  13. The role of buffer layers and double windows layers in a solar cell CZTS performances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mebarkia, C.; Dib, D.; Zerfaoui, H.; Belghit, R.

    2016-07-01

    In the overall context of the diversification of the use of natural resources, the use of renewable energy including solar photovoltaic has become increasingly indispensable. As such, the development of a new generation of photovoltaic cells based on CuZnSnS4 (CZTS) looks promising. Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) is a new film absorber, with good physical properties (band gap energy 1.4-1.6 eV with a large absorption coefficient over 104 cm-1). Indeed, the performance of these cells exceeded 30% in recent years. In the present paper, our work based on modeling and numerical simulation, we used SCAPS to study the performance of solar cells based on Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) and thus evaluate the electrical efficiency η for typical structures of n-ZnO:Al / i-ZnO / n-CdS / p-CZTS and n-ITO / n-ZnO:Al / n-CdS /p-CZTS. Furthermore, the influence of the change of CdS by ZnSeand In2S3buffer layer was treated in this paper.

  14. Electrodeposition of Mg doped ZnO thin film for the window layer of CIGS solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mang; Yi, Jie; Yang, Sui; Cao, Zhou; Huang, Xiaopan; Li, Yuanhong; Li, Hongxing; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-09-01

    Mg doped ZnO (ZMO) film with the tunable bandgap can adjust the conduction band offset of the window/chalcopyrite absorber heterointerface to positive to reduce the interface recombination and resulting in an increasement of chalcopyrite based solar cell efficiency. A systematic study of the effect of the electrodeposition potential on morphology, crystalline structure, crystallographic orientation and optical properties of ZMO films was investigated. It is interestingly found that the prepared doped samples undergo a significant morphological change induced by the deposition potential. With negative shift of deposition potential, an obvious morphology evolution from nanorod structrue to particle covered films was observed. A possible growth mechanism for explaining the morphological change is proposed and briefly discussed. The combined optical techniques including absorption, transmission and photoluminescence were used to study the obtained ZMO films deposited at different potential. The sample deposited at -0.9 V with the hexagonal nanorods morphology shows the highest optical transparency of 92%. The photoluminescence spectra reveal that the crystallization of the hexagonal nanorod ZMO thin film deoposited at -0.9 V is much better than the particles covered ZMO thin film. Combining the structural and optical properties analysis, the obtained normal hexagonal nanorod ZMO thin film could potentially be useful in nanostructured chalcopyrite solar cells to improve the device performance.

  15. Scx-transduced tendon-derived stem cells (tdscs) promoted better tendon repair compared to mock-transduced cells in a rat patellar tendon window injury model.

    PubMed

    Tan, Chunlai; Lui, Pauline Po Yee; Lee, Yuk Wa; Wong, Yin Mei

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that the transplantation of Scx-transduced tendon-derived stem cells (TDSCs) promoted better tendon repair compared to the transplantation of mock-transduced cells. This study thus aimed to investigate the effect of Scx transduction on the expression of lineage markers in TDSCs and the effect of the resulting cell line in the promotion of tendon repair. Rat non-GFP or GFP-TDSCs were transduced with Scx or empty lentiviral vector (Mock) and selected by blasticidin. The mRNA expressions of Scx and different lineage markers were examined by qRT-PCR. The effect of the transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Scx on tendon repair was then tested in a rat unilateral patellar tendon window injury model. The transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Mock and scaffold-only served as controls. At week 2, 4 and 8 post-transplantation, the repaired patellar tendon was harvested for ex vivo fluorescent imaging, vivaCT imaging, histology, immunohistochemistry and biomechanical test. GFP-TDSC-Scx consistently showed higher expressions of most of tendon- and cartilage- related markers compared to the GFP-TDSC-Mock. However, the effect of Scx transduction on the expressions of bone-related markers was inconclusive. The transplanted GFP-TDSCs could be detected in the window wound at week 2 but not at week 4. Ectopic mineralization was detected in some samples at week 8 but there was no difference among different groups. The GFP-TDSC-Scx group only statistically significantly improved tendon repair histologically and biomechanically compared to the Scaffold-only group and the GFP-TDSC-Mock group at the early stage of tendon repair. There was significant higher expression of collagen type I in the window wound in the GFP-TDSC-Scx group compared to the other two groups at week 2. The transplantation of GFP-TDSC-Scx promoted healing at the early stage of tendon repair in a rat patellar tendon window injury model. PMID:24831949

  16. Wake shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bannister, Tommy; Karr, Gerald R.

    1987-01-01

    Progress on the modeling of the flow field around a wake shield using a recently obtained code based on the Monte Carlo method is discussed. The direct simulation Monte Carlo method is a method for solving the Boltzman Equation using an approximation to the collision integral term. The collision integrand is evaluated for randomly selected values of its arguments and the summation will approach the integral for large enough samples. The collision effects may be modeled for either hard sphere or various power law potentials. The convective side of the Boltzman equation is approximated over a time step using a simple trajectory calculation of molecules as they travel through the domain of interest.

  17. Heat Shield Employing Cured Thermal Protection Material Blocks Bonded in a Large-Cell Honeycomb Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    A document describes a new way to integrate thermal protection materials on external surfaces of vehicles that experience the severe heating environments of atmospheric entry from space. Cured blocks of thermal protection materials are bonded into a compatible, large-cell honeycomb matrix that can be applied on the external surfaces of the vehicles. The honeycomb matrix cell size, and corresponding thermal protection material block size, is envisioned to be between 1 and 4 in. (.2.5 and 10 cm) on a side, with a depth required to protect the vehicle. The cell wall thickness is thin, between 0.01 and 0.10 in. (.0.025 and 0.25 cm). A key feature is that the honeycomb matrix is attached to the vehicle fs unprotected external surface prior to insertion of the thermal protection material blocks. The attachment integrity of the honeycomb can then be confirmed over the full range of temperature and loads that the vehicle will experience. Another key feature of the innovation is the use of uniform-sized thermal protection material blocks. This feature allows for the mass production of these blocks at a size that is convenient for quality control inspection. The honeycomb that receives the blocks must have cells with a compatible set of internal dimensions. The innovation involves the use of a faceted subsurface under the honeycomb. This provides a predictable surface with perpendicular cell walls for the majority of the blocks. Some cells will have positive tapers to accommodate mitered joints between honeycomb panels on each facet of the subsurface. These tapered cells have dimensions that may fall within the boundaries of the uniform-sized blocks.

  18. Whole exome sequencing of circulating tumor cells provides a window into metastatic prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lohr, Jens G.; Adalsteinsson, Viktor A.; Cibulskis, Kristian; Choudhury, Atish D.; Rosenberg, Mara; Cruz-Gordillo, Peter; Francis, Joshua; Zhang, Cheng-Zhong; Shalek, Alex K.; Satija, Rahul; Trombetta, John T.; Lu, Diana; Tallapragada, Naren; Tahirova, Narmin; Kim, Sora; Blumenstiel, Brendan; Sougnez, Carrie; Lowe, Alarice; Wong, Bang; Auclair, Daniel; Van Allen, Eliezer M.; Nakabayashi, Mari; Lis, Rosina T.; Lee, Gwo-Shu M.; Li, Tiantian; Chabot, Matthew S.; Ly, Amy; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Clancy, Thomas E.; Loda, Massimo; Regev, Aviv; Meyerson, Matthew; Hahn, William C.; Kantoff, Philip W.; Golub, Todd R.; Getz, Gad; Boehm, Jesse S.; Love, J. Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analyses of cancer genomes promise to inform prognoses and precise cancer treatments. A major barrier, however, is inaccessibility of metastatic tissue. A potential solution is to characterize circulating tumor cells (CTCs), but this requires overcoming the challenges of isolating rare cells and sequencing low-input material. Here we report an integrated process to isolate, qualify and sequence whole exomes of CTCs with high fidelity, using a census-based sequencing strategy. Power calculations suggest that mapping of >99.995% of the standard exome is possible in CTCs. We validated our process in two prostate cancer patients including one for whom we sequenced CTCs, a lymph node metastasis and nine cores of the primary tumor. Fifty-one of 73 CTC mutations (70%) were observed in matched tissue. Moreover, we identified 10 early-trunk and 56 metastatic-trunk mutations in the non-CTC tumor samples and found 90% and 73% of these, respectively, in CTC exomes. This study establishes a foundation for CTC genomics in the clinic. PMID:24752078

  19. Window layer with p doped silicon oxide for high Voc thin-film silicon n-i-p solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, Rémi; Pahud, Celine; Haug, Franz-Josef; Escarré, Jordi; Söderström, Karin; Ballif, Christophe

    2011-12-01

    We investigate the influence of the oxygen content in boron-doped nanocrystalline silicon oxide films (p-nc-SiOx) and introduce this material as window layer in n-i-p solar cells. The dependence of both, optical and electrical properties on the oxygen content is consistent with a bi-phase model which describes the p-nc-SiOx material as a mixture of an oxygen-rich (O-rich) phase and a silicon-rich (Si-rich) phase. We observe that increasing the oxygen content enhances the optical gap E04 while deteriorating the activation energy and the planar conductivity. These trends are ascribed to a higher volume fraction of the O-rich phase. Incorporated into n-i-p a-Si:H cells, p-nc-SiOx layers with moderate oxygen content yield open circuit voltage (Voc) up to 945 mV, which corresponds to a relative gain of 11% compared to an oxygen-free p-layer. As a similar gain is obtained on planar and on textured substrates, we attribute the increase in Voc to the higher work function of the p-nc-SiOx layer made possible by its wider band gap. These results are attained without changing the dilution ratio of the 250 nm thick intrinsic layer. We also observe an enhancement of 0.6 mA cm-2 in short circuit current density in the short wavelengths due to the higher transparency of the p-nc-SiOx layer. Finally, an initial efficiency of 9.9% for a single junction 250 nm a-Si:H n-i-p solar cell on plastic foil is achieved with the optimization of the p layer thickness, the doping ratio of the front transparent conductive oxide, and the optical properties of the back reflector.

  20. Sludge Washing And Demonstration Of The DWPF Flowsheet In The SRNL Shielded Cells For Sludge Batch 8 Qualification

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J. M.; Crawford, C. L.

    2013-04-26

    The current Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks to Tank 51. Tank 51 sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) typically simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes using a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). WSE requested the SRNL to perform characterization on a Sludge Batch 8 (SB8) sample and demonstrate the DWPF flowsheet in the SRNL shielded cells for SB8 as the final qualification process required prior to SB8 transfer from Tank 51 to Tank 40. A 3-L sample from Tank 51 (the SB8 qualification sample; Tank Farm sample HTF-51-12-80) was received by SRNL on September 20, 2012. The as-received sample was characterized prior to being washed. The washed material was further characterized and used as the material for the DWPF process simulation including a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, and glass fabrication and chemical durability measurements.

  1. Efficient polymer solar cells enabled by low temperature processed ternary metal oxide as electron transport interlayer with large stoichiometry window.

    PubMed

    Leong, Wei Lin; Ren, Yi; Seng, Hwee Leng; Huang, Zihao; Chiam, Sing Yang; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2015-06-01

    Highly efficient organic photovoltaic cells are demonstrated by incorporating low temperature solution processed indium zinc oxide (IZO) as cathode interlayers. The IZOs are synthesized using a combustion synthesis method, which enables low temperature processes (150-250 °C). We investigated the IZO films with different electron mobilities (1.4×10(-3) to 0.23 cm2/(V·s)), hydroxide-oxide content (38% to 47%), and surface roughness (0.19-5.16 nm) by modulating the ternary metal oxide stoichiometry. The photovoltaic performance was found to be relatively insensitive to the composition ratio of In:Zn over the range of 0.8:0.2 to 0.5:0.5 despite the differences in their electrical and surface properties, achieving high power conversion efficiencies of 6.61%-7.04%. Changes in composition ratio of IZO do not lead to obvious differences in energy levels, diode parameters and morphology of the photoactive layer, as revealed by ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), dark current analysis and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) measurements, correlating well with the large IZO stoichiometry window that enables efficient photovoltaic devices. Our results demonstrate the robustness of this ETL system and provide a convenient approach to realize a wide range of multicomponent oxides and compatible with processing on flexible plastic substrates. PMID:25978551

  2. ZnSe Window Layers for GaAs and GaInP2 Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olsen, Larry C.

    1997-01-01

    This report concerns studies of the use of n-type ZnSe as a window layer for n/p GaAs and GaInP2 solar cells. Emphasis was placed in this phase of the project on characterizing the interface between n-type ZnSe films grown on epi-GaAs films grown onto single crystal GaAs. Epi-GaAs and heteroepitaxial ZnSe films were grown by MOCVD with a Spire 50OXT Reactor. After growing epitaxial GaAs films on single crystal GaAs wafers, well-oriented crystalline ZnSe films were grown by MOCVD. ZnSe films were grown with substrate temperatures ranging from 250 C to 450 C. Photoluminescence studies carried out by researchers at NASA Lewis determined that the surface recombination velocity at a GaAs surface was significantly reduced after the deposition of a heteroepitaxial layer of ZnSe. The optimum temperature for ZnSe deposition appears to be on the order of 350 C.

  3. Corium shield

    DOEpatents

    McDonald, Douglas B.; Buchholz, Carol E.

    1994-01-01

    A shield for restricting molten corium from flowing into a water sump disposed in a floor of a containment vessel includes upper and lower walls which extend vertically upwardly and downwardly from the floor for laterally bounding the sump. The upper wall includes a plurality of laterally spaced apart flow channels extending horizontally therethrough, with each channel having a bottom disposed coextensively with the floor for channeling water therefrom into the sump. Each channel has a height and a length predeterminedly selected for allowing heat from the molten corium to dissipate through the upper and lower walls as it flows therethrough for solidifying the molten corium therein to prevent accumulation thereof in the sump.

  4. HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    HOT CELL BUILDING, TRA-632, INTERIOR. HOT CELL NO. 1 (THE FIRST BUILT) IN LABORATORY 101. CAMERA FACES SOUTHEAST. SHIELDED OPERATING WINDOWS ARE ON LEFT (NORTH) SIDE. OBSERVATION WINDOW IS AT LEFT OF VIEW (ON WEST SIDE). PLASTIC COVERS SHROUD MASTER/SLAVE MANIPULATORS AT WINDOWS IN LEFT OF VIEW. NOTE MINERAL OIL RESERVOIR ABOVE "CELL 1" SIGN, INDICATING LEVEL OF THE FLUID INSIDE THE THICK WINDOWS. HOT CELL HAS BEVELED CORNER BECAUSE A SQUARED CORNER WOULD HAVE SUPPLIED UNNECESSARY SHIELDING. NOTE PUMICE BLOCK WALL AT LEFT OF VIEW. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD46-28-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 2/2005 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  5. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Deep space missions must contend with a harsh radiation environment Impacts to crew and electronics. Need to invest in multifunctionality for spacecraft optimization. MMOD shield. Goals: Increase radiation mitigation potential. Retain overall MMOD shielding performance.

  6. Defining the Optimal Window for Cranial Transplantation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cells to Ameliorate Radiation-Induced Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Munjal M.; Martirosian, Vahan; Christie, Lori-Ann; Riparip, Lara; Strnadel, Jan; Parihar, Vipan K.

    2015-01-01

    Past preclinical studies have demonstrated the capability of using human stem cell transplantation in the irradiated brain to ameliorate radiation-induced cognitive dysfunction. Intrahippocampal transplantation of human embryonic stem cells and human neural stem cells (hNSCs) was found to functionally restore cognition in rats 1 and 4 months after cranial irradiation. To optimize the potential therapeutic benefits of human stem cell transplantation, we have further defined optimal transplantation windows for maximizing cognitive benefits after irradiation and used induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hNSCs (iPSC-hNSCs) that may eventually help minimize graft rejection in the host brain. For these studies, animals given an acute head-only dose of 10 Gy were grafted with iPSC-hNSCs at 2 days, 2 weeks, or 4 weeks following irradiation. Animals receiving stem cell grafts showed improved hippocampal spatial memory and contextual fear-conditioning performance compared with irradiated sham-surgery controls when analyzed 1 month after transplantation surgery. Importantly, superior performance was evident when stem cell grafting was delayed by 4 weeks following irradiation compared with animals grafted at earlier times. Analysis of the 4-week cohort showed that the surviving grafted cells migrated throughout the CA1 and CA3 subfields of the host hippocampus and differentiated into neuronal (∼39%) and astroglial (∼14%) subtypes. Furthermore, radiation-induced inflammation was significantly attenuated across multiple hippocampal subfields in animals receiving iPSC-hNSCs at 4 weeks after irradiation. These studies expand our prior findings to demonstrate that protracted stem cell grafting provides improved cognitive benefits following irradiation that are associated with reduced neuroinflammation. PMID:25391646

  7. Influence of shieldings or antioxidants on DNA damage and early and delyed cell death induced in human fibroblasts by accelerated 595 MeV/u Fe ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonelli, Francesca; Esposito, Giuseppe; Dini, Valentina; Belli, Mauro; Campa, Alessandro; Sorrentino, Eugenio; Antonella Tabocchini, Maria; Lobascio, Cesare; Berra, Bruno

    HZE particles from space radiation raise an important protection concern during long-term astronauts' travels. As high charge, high energy particles interact with a shield, both projec-tile and target fragmentation may occurs, so that the biological properties of the emerging radiation field depend on the nature and energy of the incident particles, and on the nature and thickness of the shield. We have studied the influence of PMMA and Kevlar shielding as well as the antioxidant compounds Rosmarinic acid or Resveratrol on DNA damage induction and processing (as evaluated by the g-H2AX phosphorylation assay) and on early and delayed cell death in AG01522 human fibroblasts irradiated with Fe ions of 595 MeV/u at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL, Upton, USA). Insertion of PMMA or Kevlar shields (10 g/cm2 thick) gave no substantial change in the bio-logical effect per unit dose on the sample for all the end points studied. When irradiation was performed in the presence of 300 mM Rosmarinic acid or Resveratrol no difference were found for both early and delayed cell death, while a slight protective effect was observed for the initial and residual DNA damage. For both early and delayed cell death, Fe-ions are more effective than g-rays. The number of Fe-ion induced g-H2AX foci is instead lower than that induced by g-rays, due to the presence of multiple DSB within a single focus induced by Fe-ions. From a comparison of the g-H2AX data with the results on DNA fragmentation obtained with 414 MeV/u Fe ions at the Heavy Ions Medical Accelerator (HIMAC, Chiba, Japan) and with 1 GeV/u Fe ions at BNL, in the absence or in the presence of PMMA shields (Esposito et al, Advance in Space Research 2004) we speculate that the overall effect of the shield is a balance between the contributions due to the slowing down of the primary particles and that due to the nuclear fragmentation. Acknowledgment: Financial support from ASI project

  8. Solution Processing of Cadmium Sulfide Buffer Layer and Aluminum-Doped Zinc Oxide Window Layer for Thin Films Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Mahboob; Islam, Mohammad; Achour, Amine; Hayat, Ansar; Ahsan, Bilal; Rasheed, Haroon; Salam, Shahzad; Mujahid, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) and aluminum-doped zinc oxide (Al:ZnO) thin films are used as buffer layer and front window layer, respectively, in thin film solar cells. CdS and Al:ZnO thin films were produced using chemical bath deposition (CBD) and sol-gel technique, respectively. For CBD CdS, the effect of bath composition and temperature, dipping time and annealing temperature on film properties was investigated. The CdS films are found to be polycrystalline with metastable cubic crystal structure, dense, crack-free surface morphology and the crystallite size of either few nanometers or 12-17 nm depending on bath composition. In case of CdS films produced with 1:2 ratio of Cd and S precursors, spectrophotometer studies indicate quantum confinement effect, owing to extremely small crystallite size, with an increase in Eg value from 2.42 eV (for bulk CdS) to 3.76 eV along with a shift in the absorption edge toward 330 nm wavelength. The optimum annealing temperature is 400°C beyond which film properties deteriorate through S evaporation and CdO formation. On the other hand, Al:ZnO films prepared via spin coating of precursor sols containing 0.90-1.10 at.% Al show that, with an increase in Al concentration, the average grain size increases from 28 nm to 131 nm with an associated decrease in root-mean-square roughness. The minimum value of electrical resistivity, measured for the films prepared using 0.95 at.% Al in the precursor sol, is 2.7 × 10-4 Ω ṡ cm. The electrical resistivity value rises upon further increase in Al doping level due to introduction of lattice defects and Al segregation to the grain boundary area, thus limiting electron transport through it.

  9. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1985-02-12

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  10. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, J.A.; Stone, R.R.; Fabyan, J.

    1987-10-06

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines. 3 figs.

  11. Magnetic shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kerns, John A.; Stone, Roger R.; Fabyan, Joseph

    1987-01-01

    A magnetically-conductive filler material bridges the gap between a multi-part magnetic shield structure which substantially encloses a predetermined volume so as to minimize the ingress or egress of magnetic fields with respect to that volume. The filler material includes a heavy concentration of single-magnetic-domain-sized particles of a magnetically conductive material (e.g. soft iron, carbon steel or the like) dispersed throughout a carrier material which is generally a non-magnetic material that is at least sometimes in a plastic or liquid state. The maximum cross-sectional particle dimension is substantially less than the nominal dimension of the gap to be filled. An epoxy base material (i.e. without any hardening additive) low volatility vacuum greases or the like may be used for the carrier material. The structure is preferably exposed to the expected ambient magnetic field while the carrier is in a plastic or liquid state so as to facilitate alignment of the single-magnetic-domain-sized particles with the expected magnetic field lines.

  12. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2011-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). By increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate concept MLI blankets for MMOD shields. In conjunction, these MLI blankets and the subsequent MMOD shields were also evaluated for their radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. These concepts were evaluated against the ISS MLI blankets and the ISS MMOD shield, which acted as the baseline. These radiation shielding assessments were performed using the high charge and energy transport software (HZETRN). This software is based on a one-dimensional formula of the Boltzmann transport equation with a straight-ahead approximation. Each configuration was evaluated against the following environments to provide a diverse view of radiation shielding effectiveness in most space environments within the heliosphere: August 1972 solar particle event, October 1989 solar particle event, 1982 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar maximum), 1987 galactic cosmic ray environment (during solar minimum), and a low earth orbit environment in 1970 that corresponded to an altitude of 400 km and inclination of 51.6 . Both the absorbed dose and the dose equivalent were analyzed, but the focus of the discussion was on the dose equivalent since the data is most concerned with radiation shielding of the crew. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for

  13. Space reactor shielding fabrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Welch, F. H.

    1972-01-01

    The fabrication of space reactor neutron shielding by a melting and casting process utilizing lithium hydride is described. The first neutron shield fabricated is a large pancake shape 86 inches in diameter, containing about 1700 pounds of lithium hydride. This shield, fabricated by the unique melting and casting process, is the largest lithium hydride shield ever built.

  14. Advanced Multifunctional MMOD Shield: Radiation Shielding Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rojdev, Kristina; Christiansen, Eric

    2013-01-01

    As NASA is looking to explore further into deep space, multifunctional materials are a necessity for decreasing complexity and mass. One area where multifunctional materials could be extremely beneficial is in the micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) shield. A typical MMOD shield on the International Space Station (ISS) is a stuffed whipple shield consisting of multiple layers. One of those layers is the thermal blanket, or multi-layer insulation (MLI). Increasing the MMOD effectiveness of MLI blankets, while still preserving their thermal capabilities, could allow for a less massive MMOD shield. Thus, a study was conducted to evaluate a concept MLI blanket for an MMOD shield. In conjunction, this MLI blanket and the subsequent MMOD shield was also evaluated for its radiation shielding effectiveness towards protecting crew. The overall MMOD shielding system using the concept MLI blanket proved to only have a marginal increase in the radiation mitigating properties. Therefore, subsequent analysis was performed on various conceptual MMOD shields to determine the combination of materials that may prove superior for radiation mitigating purposes. The following paper outlines the evaluations performed and discusses the results and conclusions of this evaluation for radiation shielding effectiveness.

  15. Short-term plasticity regulates the E/I ratio and the temporal window for spike integration in CA1 pyramidal cells

    PubMed Central

    Bartley, Aundrea F.; Dobrunz, Lynn E.

    2016-01-01

    Many neurodevelopmental and neuropsychiatric disorders have an imbalance between excitation (E) and inhibition (I) caused by synaptic alterations. The proper E/I balance is especially critical in CA1 pyramidal cells because they control hippocampal output. Activation of Schaffer collateral axons causes direct excitation of CA1 pyramidal cells, quickly followed by disynaptic feed-forward inhibition, stemming from synaptically induced firing of GABAergic interneurons. Both excitatory and inhibitory synapses are modulated by short-term plasticity, potentially causing dynamic tuning of the E/I ratio. However, the effects of short-term plasticity on the E/I ratio in CA1 pyramidal cells are not yet known. To determine this we recorded disynaptic IPSCs and E/I ratio in CA1 pyramidal cells in acute hippocampal slices from juvenile mice. We find that while inhibitory synapses have paired-pulse depression, disynaptic inhibition instead expresses paired-pulse facilitation (≤ 200 ms intervals), caused by increased recruitment of feed-forward interneurons. Although enhanced disynaptic inhibition helps constrain paired-pulse facilitation of excitation, the E/I ratio is still larger on the second pulse, increasing pyramidal cell spiking. Surprisingly, this occurs without compromising the precision of spike timing. The E/I balance regulates the temporal spike integration window from multiple inputs; here we show that paired-pulse stimulation can broaden the spike integration window. Together, we find that the combined effects of short-term plasticity of disynaptic inhibition and monosynaptic excitation alter the E/I balance onto CA1 pyramidal cells, leading to dynamic modulation of spike probability and spike integration window. Short-term plasticity is therefore an important mechanism for modulating signal processing of hippocampal output. PMID:25903384

  16. The effects of high temperature processing on the structural and optical properties of oxygenated CdS window layers in CdTe solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paudel, Naba R.; Grice, Corey R.; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Yan, Yanfa

    2014-07-28

    High efficiency CdTe solar cells typically use oxygenated CdS (CdS:O) window layers. We synthesize CdS:O window layers at room temperature (RT) and 270 °C using reactive sputtering. The band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at RT increase when O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios in the deposition chamber increase. On the other hand, the band gaps of CdS:O layers deposited at 270 °C decrease as the O{sub 2}/(O{sub 2} + Ar) ratios increase. Interestingly, however, our high temperature closed-space sublimation (CSS) processed CdTe solar cells using CdS:O window layers deposited at RT and 270 °C exhibit very similar cell performance, including similar short-circuit current densities. To understand the underlying reasons, CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C are annealed at temperatures that simulate the CSS process of CdTe deposition. X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, and UV-visible light absorption spectroscopy characterization of the annealed films reveals that the CdS:O films deposited at RT undergo grain regrowth and/or crystallization and exhibit reduced band gaps after the annealing. Our results suggest that CdS:O thin films deposited at RT and 270 °C should exhibit similar optical properties after the deposition of CdTe layers, explaining the similar cell performance.

  17. Meteoroid/Debris Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2003-01-01

    This report provides innovative, low-weight shielding solutions for spacecraft and the ballistic limit equations that define the shield's performance in the meteoroid/debris environment. Analyses and hypervelocity impact testing results are described that have been used in developing the shields and equations. Spacecraft shielding design and operational practices described in this report are used to provide effective spacecraft protection from meteoroid and debris impacts. Specific shield applications for the International Space Station (ISS), Space Shuttle Orbiter and the CONTOUR (Comet Nucleus Tour) space probe are provided. Whipple, Multi-Shock and Stuffed Whipple shield applications are described.

  18. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 7A QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Billings, A.; Click, D.

    2011-07-08

    Waste Solidification Engineering (WSE) has requested that characterization and a radioactive demonstration of the next batch of sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 7a*) be completed in the Shielded Cells Facility of the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) via a Technical Task Request (TTR). This characterization and demonstration, or sludge batch qualification process, is required prior to transfer of the sludge from Tank 51 to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) feed tank (Tank 40). The current WSE practice is to prepare sludge batches in Tank 51 by transferring sludge from other tanks. Discharges of nuclear materials from H Canyon are often added to Tank 51 during sludge batch preparation. The sludge is washed and transferred to Tank 40, the current DWPF feed tank. Prior to transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40, SRNL simulates the Tank Farm and DWPF processes with a Tank 51 sample (referred to as the qualification sample). Sludge Batch 7a (SB7a) is composed of portions of Tanks 4, 7, and 12; the Sludge Batch 6 heel in Tank 51; and a plutonium stream from H Canyon. SRNL received the Tank 51 qualification sample (sample ID HTF-51-10-125) following sludge additions to Tank 51. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernate) and concentration (decanting of supernate) of the SB7a - Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. The simulation included a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid was added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and reduce mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit was added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters were based on work with a non

  19. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, Rick B.

    1996-01-01

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  20. X-ray transmissive debris shield

    DOEpatents

    Spielman, R.B.

    1996-05-21

    An X-ray debris shield for use in X-ray lithography that is comprised of an X-ray window having a layer of low density foam exhibits increased longevity without a substantial increase in exposure time. The low density foam layer serves to absorb the debris emitted from the X-ray source and attenuate the shock to the window so as to reduce the chance of breakage. Because the foam is low density, the X-rays are hardly attenuated by the foam and thus the exposure time is not substantially increased.

  1. Effects of Kapton Sample Cell Windows on the Detection Limit of Smectite: Implications for CheMin on the Mars Science Laboratory Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Achilles, C. N.; Ming, Douglas W.; Morris, R. V.; Blake, D. F.

    2012-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity is an X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) instrument capable of providing the mineralogical and chemical compositions of rocks and soils on the surface of Mars. CheMin uses a microfocus X-ray tube with a Co target, transmission geometry, and an energy-discriminating X-ray sensitive CCD to produce simultaneous 2-D XRD patterns and energy-dispersive X-ray histograms from powdered samples. CheMin has two different window materials used for sample cells -- Mylar and Kapton. Instrument details are provided elsewhere. Fe/Mg-smectite (e.g., nontronite) has been identified in Gale Crater, the MSL future landing site, by CRISM spectra. While large quantities of phyllosilicate minerals will be easily detected by CheMin, it is important to establish detection limits of such phases to understand capabilities and limitations of the instrument. A previous study indicated that the (001) peak of smectite at 15 Ang was detectable in a mixture of 1 wt.% smectite with olivine when Mylar is the window material for the sample cell. Complications arise when Kapton is the window material because Kapton itself also has a diffraction peak near 15 Ang (6.8 deg 2 Theta). This study presents results of mineral mixtures of smectite and olivine to determine smectite detection limits for Kapton sample cells. Because the intensity and position of the smectite (001) peak depends on the hydration state, we also analyzed mixtures with "hydrated" and "dehydrated"h smectite to examine the effects of hydration state on detection limits.

  2. Testing the bioelectric shield.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, Susan J; Rose, Nicholas

    2002-01-01

    A pendant was claimed to provide numerous health benefits, including reduced stress, increased strength, and protection from electromagnetic radiation from computers and mobile phones. Three experiments tested the effectiveness of this pendant's effect as a bioelectric shield. In the first experiment, 12 subjects who work with computers wore shields (6 real, 6 sham) for several weeks and were regularly tested for hand strength and mood changes. Both types of shield increased calmness, but the real shields did not have any greater effect. In 2 further studies (in each N=40) hand strength was measured at baseline, with mobile phone, and with mobile phone and bioelectric or sham shield. The shields did not differ in their effects. Both studies showed a significant correlation between the change in strength with and without the shield and subjects'scores on a questionnaire concerning their belief in and use of alternative therapies. The shields appear to produce a measurable placebo effect but are otherwise ineffective. PMID:12233804

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Zinn, W.H.

    1957-09-24

    The reactor radiation shield material is comprised of alternate layers of iron-containing material and compressed cellulosic material, such as masonite. The shielding material may be prefabricated in the form of blocks, which can be stacked together in ary desired fashion to form an effective shield.

  4. Ion beam thruster shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Power, J. L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion thruster beam shield is provided that comprises a cylindrical housing that extends downstream from the ion thruster and a plurality of annular vanes which are spaced along the length of the housing, and extend inwardly from the interior wall of the housing. The shield intercepts and stops all charge exchange and beam ions, neutral propellant, and sputter products formed due to the interaction of beam and shield emanating from the ion thruster outside of a fixed conical angle from the thruster axis. Further, the shield prevents the sputter products formed during the operation of the engine from escaping the interior volume of the shield.

  5. Use of a CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system to decontaminate radiological waste and equipment in shielded hot cells at the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Bench, T.R.

    1997-05-01

    This paper details how the Bettis Atomic Power Laboratory modified and utilized a commercially available, solid carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) pellet, non-destructive cleaning system to support the disposition and disposal of radioactive waste from shielded hot cells. Some waste materials and equipment accumulated in the shielded hot cells cannot be disposed directly because they are contaminated with transuranic materials (elements with atomic numbers greater than that of uranium) above waste disposal site regulatory limits. A commercially available CO{sub 2} pellet non-destructive cleaning system was extensively modified for remote operation inside a shielded hot cell to remove the transuranic contaminants from the waste and equipment without generating any secondary waste in the process. The removed transuranic contaminants are simultaneously captured, consolidated, and retained for later disposal at a transuranic waste facility.

  6. Doping-free silicon thin film solar cells using a vanadium pentoxide window layer and a LiF/Al back electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Hyung Hwan; Kwon, Jung-Dae; Lee, Sunghun; Su Kim, Chang; Nam, Kee-Seok; Jeong, Yongsoo; Chung, Kwun-Bum; Yoon Ryu, Seung; Ocak, Tülay; Eray, Aynur; Kim, Dong-Ho; Park, Sung-Gyu

    2013-08-01

    This work describes the preparation of a doped layer-free hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film solar cell consisting of a vanadium pentoxide (V2O5-x) window layer, an intrinsic a-Si:H absorber layer, and a lithium fluoride (LiF)/aluminum (Al) back electrode. The large difference between the work functions of the V2O5-x layer and the LiF/Al electrode permitted photogenerated carriers in the i-a-Si:H absorber layer to be effectively separated and collected. The effects of the V2O5-x layer thickness and the oxidation states on the photovoltaic performance were investigated in detail. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis confirmed that the major species of the sputtered V2O5-x thin films were V5+ and V4+. Optimization of the V2O5-x window layer yielded a power conversion efficiency of 7.04%, which was comparable to the power conversion efficiency of a typical a-Si:H solar cell (7.09%).

  7. Hybrid Theranostic Platform for Second Near-IR Window Light Triggered Selective Two-Photon Imaging and Photothermal Killing of Targeted Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Tchounwou, Christine; Sinha, Sudarson Sekhar; Viraka Nellore, Bhanu Priya; Pramanik, Avijit; Kanchanapally, Rajashekhar; Jones, Stacy; Chavva, Suhash Reddy; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2015-09-23

    Despite advances in the medical field, even in the 21st century cancer is one of the leading causes of death for men and women in the world. Since the second near-infrared (NIR) biological window light between 950 and 1350 nm offers highly efficient tissue penetration, the current article reports the development of hybrid theranostic platform using anti-GD2 antibody attached gold nanoparticle (GNP) conjugated, single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) for second near-IR light triggered selective imaging and efficient photothermal therapy of human melanoma cancer cell. Reported results demonstrate that due to strong plasmon-coupling, two-photon luminescence (TPL) intensity from theranostic GNP attached SWCNT materials is 6 orders of magnitude higher than GNP or SWCNT alone. Experimental and FDTD simulation data indicate that the huge enhancement of TPL intensity is mainly due to strong resonance enhancement coupled with the stronger electric field enhancement. Due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic material serves as a local nanoantennae to enhance the photothermal capability via strong optical energy absorption. Reported data show that theranostic SWCNT can be used for selective two-photon imaging of melanoma UACC903 cell using 1100 nm light. Photothermal killing experiment with 1.0 W/cm(2) 980 nm laser light demonstrates that 100% of melanoma UACC903 cells can be killed using theranostic SWCNT bind melanoma cells after just 8 min of exposure. These results demonstrate that due to plasmon coupling, the theranostic GNP attached SWCNT material serves as a two-photon imaging and photothermal source for cancer cells in biological window II. PMID:26327304

  8. Integrated Solar Concentrator and Shielded Radiator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David Larry

    2010-01-01

    A shielded radiator is integrated within a solar concentrator for applications that require protection from high ambient temperatures with little convective heat transfer. This innovation uses a reflective surface to deflect ambient thermal radiation, shielding the radiator. The interior of the shield is also reflective to provide a view factor to deep space. A key feature of the shield is the parabolic shape that focuses incoming solar radiation to a line above the radiator along the length of the trough. This keeps the solar energy from adding to the radiator load. By placing solar cells along this focal line, the concentration of solar energy reduces the number and mass of required cells. By shielding the radiator, the effective reject temperature is much lower, allowing lower radiator temperatures. This is particularly important for lower-temperature processes, like habitat heat rejection and fuel cell operations where a high radiator temperature is not feasible. Adding the solar cells in the focal line uses the concentrating effect of the shield to advantage to accomplish two processes with a single device. This shield can be a deployable, lightweight Mylar structure for compact transport.

  9. How Your Car Side Window May Be Harming Your Skin, Eyes

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158809.html How Your Car Side Window May Be Harming Your Skin, Eyes ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- The front windshield of your car probably shields you from the sun's UV-A ...

  10. Wake Shield Target Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-05-15

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed.

  11. The Epstein-Barr Virus Glycoprotein gp150 Forms an Immune-Evasive Glycan Shield at the Surface of Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gram, Anna M.; Oosenbrug, Timo; Lindenbergh, Marthe F. S.; Büll, Christian; Comvalius, Anouskha; Dickson, Kathryn J. I.; Wiegant, Joop; Vrolijk, Hans; Lebbink, Robert Jan; Wolterbeek, Ron; Adema, Gosse J.; Griffioen, Marieke; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Tscharke, David C.; Hutt-Fletcher, Lindsey M.; Ressing, Maaike E.

    2016-01-01

    Cell-mediated immunity plays a key role in host control of viral infection. This is exemplified by life-threatening reactivations of e.g. herpesviruses in individuals with impaired T-cell and/or iNKT cell responses. To allow lifelong persistence and virus production in the face of primed immunity, herpesviruses exploit immune evasion strategies. These include a reduction in viral antigen expression during latency and a number of escape mechanisms that target antigen presentation pathways. Given the plethora of foreign antigens expressed in virus-producing cells, herpesviruses are conceivably most vulnerable to elimination by cell-mediated immunity during the replicative phase of infection. Here, we show that a prototypic herpesvirus, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), encodes a novel, broadly acting immunoevasin, gp150, that is expressed during the late phase of viral replication. In particular, EBV gp150 inhibits antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and the non-classical, lipid-presenting CD1d molecules. The mechanism of gp150-mediated T-cell escape does not depend on degradation of the antigen-presenting molecules nor does it require gp150’s cytoplasmic tail. Through its abundant glycosylation, gp150 creates a shield that impedes surface presentation of antigen. This is an unprecedented immune evasion mechanism for herpesviruses. In view of its likely broader target range, gp150 could additionally have an impact beyond escape of T cell activation. Importantly, B cells infected with a gp150-null mutant EBV displayed rescued levels of surface antigen presentation by HLA class I, HLA class II, and CD1d, supporting an important role for iNKT cells next to classical T cells in fighting EBV infection. At the same time, our results indicate that EBV gp150 prolongs the timespan for producing viral offspring at the most vulnerable stage of the viral life cycle. PMID:27077376

  12. High-Efficiency Polycrystalline CdTe Thin-Film Solar Cells with an Oxygenated Amorphous CdS (a-CdS:O) Window Layer: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, X.; Dhere, R. G.; Yan, Y.; Romero, M. J.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, J.; DeHart, C.; Duda, A.; Perkins, C.; To, B.

    2002-05-01

    In the conventional CdS/CdTe device structure, the poly-CdS window layer has a bandgap of {approx}2.4 eV, which causes absorption in the short-wavelength region. Higher short-circuit current densities (Jsc) can be achieved by reducing the CdS thickness, but this can adversely impact device open-circuit voltage (Voc) and fill factor (FF). Also, poly-CdS film has about 10% lattice mismatch related to the CdTe film, which limits the improvement of device Voc and FF. In this paper, we report a novel window material: oxygenated amorphous CdS film (a-CdS:O) prepared at room temperature by rf sputtering. The a-CdS:O film has a higher optical bandgap (2.5-3.1 eV) than the poly-CdS film and an amorphous structure. The preliminary device results have demonstrated that Jsc of the CdTe device can be greatly improved while maintaining higher Voc and FF. We have fabricated a CdTe cell demonstrating an NREL-confirmed Jsc of 25.85 mA/cm2 and a total-area efficiency of 15.4%.

  13. Cable shield connecting device

    DOEpatents

    Silva, Frank A.

    1979-01-01

    A cable shield connecting device for installation on a high voltage cable of the type having a metallic shield, the device including a relatively conformable, looped metal bar for placement around a bared portion of the metallic shield to extend circumferentially around a major portion of the circumference of the metallic shield while being spaced radially therefrom, a plurality of relatively flexible metallic fingers affixed to the bar, projecting from the bar in an axial direction and spaced circumferentially along the bar, each finger being attached to the metallic shield at a portion located remote from the bar to make electrical contact with the metallic shield, and a connecting conductor integral with the bar.

  14. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp-Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 {micro}m to a modest 0.50 {micro}m over an underlying 0.10-{micro}m intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 {micro}m/3 {micro}m) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85 C and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  15. Thickness Effect of Al-Doped ZnO Window Layer on Damp Heat Stability of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Pern, F. J.; Mansfield, L.; DeHart, C.; Glick, S. H.; Yan, F.; Noufi, R.

    2011-07-01

    We investigated the damp heat (DH) stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells as a function of thickness of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) window layer from the 'standard' 0.12 μm to a modest 0.50 μm over an underlying 0.10-μm intrinsic ZnO buffer layer. The CIGS cells were prepared with external electrical contact using fine Au wire to the tiny 'standard' Ni/Al (0.05 μm/3 μm) metal grid contact pads. Bare cell coupons and sample sets encapsulated in a specially designed, Al-frame test structure with an opening for moisture ingress control using a TPT backsheet were exposed to DH at 85oC and 85% relative humidity, and characterized by current-voltage (I-V), quantum efficiency (QE), and (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS). The results show that bare cells exhibited rapid degradation within 50-100 h, accompanied by film wrinkling and delamination and corrosion of Mo and AlNi grid, regardless of AZO thickness. In contrast, the encapsulated cells did not show film wrinkling, delamination, and Mo corrosion after 168 h DH exposure; but the trend of efficiency degradation rate showed a weak correlation to the AZO thickness.

  16. RADIATION SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Young, G.J.

    1958-09-23

    ABS>A radiation shield that is suitable for the protection of personnel from both gamma rays and nentrons is described. The shield is comprised of a hollow wall and an aggregate consisting of iron and water in approximately equal amounts by volume substantially filling the wall. A means is provided to circulate the water through the wall to cool the shield when in use.

  17. Performance of solar shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab I, about 63 seconds after lift-off, proved to be the harbinger of a prodigious effort to quickly develop a workable substitute for the carefully tailored passive portion of the thermal-control system. The paper describes the intensive ten-day around-the-clock effort in which numerous potential thermal-shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal-shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material 'memory' properties.

  18. RADIATION SHIELDING COMPOSITION

    DOEpatents

    Dunegan, H.L.

    1963-01-29

    A light weight radiation shielding composition is described whose mechanical and radiological properties can be varied within wide limits. The composition of this shielding material consists of four basic ingredients: powder of either Pb or W, a plastic resin, a resin plasticizer, and a polymerization catalyst to promote an interaction of the plasticizer with the plastic resin. Air may be mixed into the above ingredients in order to control the density of the final composition. For equivalent gamma attenuation, the shielding composition weighs one-third to one-half as much as conventional Pb shielding. (AEC)

  19. Highly conducting and wide band gap phosphorous doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC films as n-type window layers for solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kar, Debjit; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    Nano-crystalline silicon quantum dots (Si-QDs) embedded in the phosphorous doped amorphous silicon carbide (a-SiC) matrix has been successfully prepared at a low temperature (300 °C) by inductively coupled plasma assisted chemical vapor deposition (ICP-CVD) system from (SiH4 + CH4)-plasma with PH3 as the doping gas. The effect of PH3 flow rate on structural, optical and electrical properties of the films has been studied. Phosphorous doped nc-Si-QD/a-SiC films with high optical band gap (>1.9 eV) and superior conductivity (~10-2 S cm-1) are obtained, which could be appropriately used as n-type window layers for nc-Si solar cells in n-i-p configuration.

  20. Effect of heat treatments and window layer processing on the characteristics of CuInGaSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ramanathan, K.; Contreras, M.A.; Tuttle, J.R.

    1996-05-01

    Interaction between chemical bath deposited CdS and ZnO window layers are a focus of this paper. Low temperature anneals were used to follow the changes at the interface. Optical absorption spectra show that CdS and ZnO intermix upon annealing. When applied to ZnO/CdS/CuInGaSe{sub 2} thin film solar cells, changes in the short and long wavelength response were observed. The latter is attributed to an increase in the energy gap of the absorber by diffusion of S. The interdiffusion is shown to increase the short wavelength collection, and hence the current density of the devices. Photoluminescence data provides some indication of the quality of the interface.

  1. Wake Shield Facility in grasp of the Remote Manipulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A wintry scene of Lake Winnipeg and surrounding area in Manitoba, Canada forms the backdrop for the Wake Shield Facility (WSF) in the grasp of the Canadian-built Remote Manipulator System (RMS) arm. The image was exposed with a 35mm camera through one of the windows on Discovery's aft flight deck.

  2. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELDING

    DOEpatents

    Borst, L.B.

    1961-07-11

    A special hydrogenous concrete shielding for reactors is described. In addition to Portland cement and water, the concrete essentially comprises 30 to 60% by weight barytes aggregate for enhanced attenuation of fast neutrons. The biological shields of AEC's Oak Ridge Graphite Reactor and Materials Testing Reactor are particular embodiments.

  3. Gamma ray detector shield

    DOEpatents

    Ohlinger, R.D.; Humphrey, H.W.

    1985-08-26

    A gamma ray detector shield comprised of a rigid, lead, cylindrical-shaped vessel having upper and lower portions with an pneumatically driven, sliding top assembly. Disposed inside the lead shield is a gamma ray scintillation crystal detector. Access to the gamma detector is through the sliding top assembly.

  4. Development of electrodeposited ZnTe layers as window materials in ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe multi-layer solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, A.B.M.O. Chaure, N.B.; Wellings, J.; Tolan, G.; Dharmadasa, I.M.

    2009-02-15

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) thin films have been deposited on glass/conducting glass substrates using a low-cost electrodeposition method. The resulting films have been characterized using various techniques in order to optimize growth parameters. X-ray diffraction (XRD) has been used to identify the phases present in the films. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) cell and optical absorption measurements have been performed to determine the electrical conductivity type, and the bandgap of the layers, respectively. It has been confirmed by XRD measurement that the deposited layers mainly consist of ZnTe phases. The PEC measurements indicate that the ZnTe layers are p-type in electrical conduction and optical absorption measurements show that their bandgap is in the range 2.10-2.20 eV. p-Type ZnTe window materials have been used in CdTe based solar cell structures, following new designs of graded bandgap multi-layer solar cells. The structures of FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/metal and FTO/ZnTe/CdTe/CdHgTe/metal have been investigated. The results are presented in this paper using observed experimental data.

  5. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Moy, Derek; Manivannan, A.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2014-11-04

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). Wemore » present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. As a result, we expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.« less

  6. Direct measurement of polysulfide shuttle current: A window into understanding the performance of lithium-sulfur cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, Derek; Manivannan, A.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2014-11-04

    The shuttling of polysulfide ions between the electrodes in a lithium-sulfur battery is a major technical issue limiting the self-discharge and cycle life of this high-energy rechargeable battery. Although there have been attempts to suppress the shuttling process, there has not been a direct measurement of the rate of shuttling. We report here a simple and direct measurement of the rate of the shuttling (that we term “shuttle current”), applicable to the study of any type of lithium-sulfur cell. We demonstrate the effectiveness of this measurement technique using cells with and without lithium nitrate (a widely-used shuttle suppressor additive). We present a phenomenological analysis of the shuttling process and simulate the shuttle currents as a function of the state-of-charge of a cell. We also demonstrate how the rate of decay of the shuttle current can be used to predict the capacity fade in a lithium-sulfur cell due to the shuttle process. As a result, we expect that this new ability to directly measure shuttle currents will provide greater insight into the performance differences observed with various additives and electrode modifications that are aimed at suppressing the rate of shuttling of polysulfide ions and increasing the cycle life of lithium-sulfur cells.

  7. Metal-electrode-free Window-like Organic Solar Cells with p-Doped Carbon Nanotube Thin-film Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Il; Delacou, Clement; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells are flexible and inexpensive, and expected to have a wide range of applications. Many transparent organic solar cells have been reported and their success hinges on full transparency and high power conversion efficiency. Recently, carbon nanotubes and graphene, which meet these criteria, have been used in transparent conductive electrodes. However, their use in top electrodes has been limited by mechanical difficulties in fabrication and doping. Here, expensive metal top electrodes were replaced with high-performance, easy-to-transfer, aerosol-synthesized carbon nanotubes to produce transparent organic solar cells. The carbon nanotubes were p-doped by two new methods: HNO3 doping via 'sandwich transfer', and MoOx thermal doping via 'bridge transfer'. Although both of the doping methods improved the performance of the carbon nanotubes and the photovoltaic performance of devices, sandwich transfer, which gave a 4.1% power conversion efficiency, was slightly more effective than bridge transfer, which produced a power conversion efficiency of 3.4%. Applying a thinner carbon nanotube film with 90% transparency decreased the efficiency to 3.7%, which was still high. Overall, the transparent solar cells had an efficiency of around 50% that of non-transparent metal-based solar cells (7.8%). PMID:27527565

  8. Metal-electrode-free Window-like Organic Solar Cells with p-Doped Carbon Nanotube Thin-film Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Il; Delacou, Clement; Kaskela, Antti; Kauppinen, Esko I.; Maruyama, Shigeo; Matsuo, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Organic solar cells are flexible and inexpensive, and expected to have a wide range of applications. Many transparent organic solar cells have been reported and their success hinges on full transparency and high power conversion efficiency. Recently, carbon nanotubes and graphene, which meet these criteria, have been used in transparent conductive electrodes. However, their use in top electrodes has been limited by mechanical difficulties in fabrication and doping. Here, expensive metal top electrodes were replaced with high-performance, easy-to-transfer, aerosol-synthesized carbon nanotubes to produce transparent organic solar cells. The carbon nanotubes were p-doped by two new methods: HNO3 doping via ‘sandwich transfer’, and MoOx thermal doping via ‘bridge transfer’. Although both of the doping methods improved the performance of the carbon nanotubes and the photovoltaic performance of devices, sandwich transfer, which gave a 4.1% power conversion efficiency, was slightly more effective than bridge transfer, which produced a power conversion efficiency of 3.4%. Applying a thinner carbon nanotube film with 90% transparency decreased the efficiency to 3.7%, which was still high. Overall, the transparent solar cells had an efficiency of around 50% that of non-transparent metal-based solar cells (7.8%). PMID:27527565

  9. Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Nils Petermann

    2010-02-28

    The project goals covered both the residential and commercial windows markets and involved a range of audiences such as window manufacturers, builders, homeowners, design professionals, utilities, and public agencies. Essential goals included: (1) Creation of 'Master Toolkits' of information that integrate diverse tools, rating systems, and incentive programs, customized for key audiences such as window manufacturers, design professionals, and utility programs. (2) Delivery of education and outreach programs to multiple audiences through conference presentations, publication of articles for builders and other industry professionals, and targeted dissemination of efficient window curricula to professionals and students. (3) Design and implementation of mechanisms to encourage and track sales of more efficient products through the existing Window Products Database as an incentive for manufacturers to improve products and participate in programs such as NFRC and ENERGY STAR. (4) Development of utility incentive programs to promote more efficient residential and commercial windows. Partnership with regional and local entities on the development of programs and customized information to move the market toward the highest performing products. An overarching project goal was to ensure that different audiences adopt and use the developed information, design and promotion tools and thus increase the market penetration of energy efficient fenestration products. In particular, a crucial success criterion was to move gas and electric utilities to increase the promotion of energy efficient windows through demand side management programs as an important step toward increasing the market share of energy efficient windows.

  10. Air transparent soundproof window

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Sang-Hoon; Lee, Seong-Hyun

    2014-11-15

    A soundproof window or wall which is transparent to airflow is presented. The design is based on two wave theories: the theory of diffraction and the theory of acoustic metamaterials. It consists of a three-dimensional array of strong diffraction-type resonators with many holes centered on each individual resonator. The negative effective bulk modulus of the resonators produces evanescent wave, and at the same time the air holes with subwavelength diameter existed on the surfaces of the window for macroscopic air ventilation. The acoustic performance levels of two soundproof windows with air holes of 20mm and 50mm diameters were measured. The sound level was reduced by about 30 - 35dB in the frequency range of 400 - 5,000Hz with the 20mm window, and by about 20 - 35dB in the frequency range of 700 - 2,200Hz with the 50mm window. Multi stop-band was created by the multi-layers of the window. The attenuation length or the thickness of the window was limited by background noise. The effectiveness of the soundproof window with airflow was demonstrated by a real installation.

  11. Color Wheel Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Stephanie

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes a painting and drawing lesson which was inspired by the beautiful circular windows found in cathedrals and churches (also known as "rose windows"). This two-week lesson would reinforce both the concept of symmetry and students' understanding of the color wheel. (Contains 1 online resource.)

  12. Multi-functional windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nag, Nagendra; Goldman, Lee M.; Balasubramanian, Sreeram; Sastri, Suri

    2013-06-01

    The requirements for modern aircraft are driving the need for conformal windows for future sensor systems. However, limitations on optical systems and the physical properties of optically transparent materials currently limit the geometry of existing windows and window assemblies to faceted assemblies of flat windows held in weight bearing frames. Novel material systems will have to be developed which combine different materials (e.g. ductile metals with transparent ceramics) into structures that combine transparency with structural integrity. Surmet's demonstrated ability to produce novel transparent ceramic/metal structures will allow us to produce such structures in the types of conformal shapes required for future aircraft applications. Furthermore, the ability to incorporate transparencies into such structures also holds out the promise of creating multi-functional windows which provide a broad range of capabilities that might include RF antennas and de-icing in addition to transparency. Recent results in this area will be presented.

  13. Windows technology assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Baron, J.J.

    1995-10-01

    This assessment estimates that energy loss through windows is approximately 15 percent of all the energy used for space heating and cooling in residential and commercial buildings in New York State. The rule of thumb for the nation as a whole is about 25 percent. The difference may reflect a traditional assumption of single-pane windows while this assessment analyzed installed window types in the region. Based on the often-quoted assumption, in the United States some 3.5 quadrillion British thermal units (Btu) of primary energy, costing some $20 billion, is annually consumed as a result of energy lost through windows. According to this assessment, in New York State, the energy lost due to heat loss through windows is approximately 80 trillion Btu at an annual cost of approximately $1 billion.

  14. A redox-flow electrochromic window.

    PubMed

    Jennings, James R; Lim, Wei Yang; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M; Grätzel, Michael; Wang, Qing

    2015-02-01

    A low-cost electrochromic (EC) window based on a redox-flow system that does not require expensive transparent conductive oxide (TCO) substrates is introduced and demonstrated for the first time. An aqueous I3–/I– redox electrolyte is used in place of a TCO to oxidize/reduce a molecular layer of an EC triphenylamine derivative that is anchored to a mesoporous TiO2 scaffold on the inner faces of a double-paned window. The redox electrolyte is electrochemically oxidized/reduced in an external two-compartment cell and circulated through the window cavity using an inexpensive peristaltic pump, resulting in coloration or decoloration of the window due to reaction of the redox solution with the triphenylamine derivative. The absorption characteristics, coloration/decoloration times, and cycling stability of the prototype EC window are evaluated, and prospects for further development are discussed. PMID:25584903

  15. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation of amorphous silicon to increase the temperature processing window of silicon heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Jianwei; Boccard, Mathieu; Holman, Zachary

    2016-07-01

    The dehydrogenation of intrinsic hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) at temperatures above approximately 300 °C degrades its ability to passivate silicon wafer surfaces. This limits the temperature of post-passivation processing steps during the fabrication of advanced silicon heterojunction or silicon-based tandem solar cells. We demonstrate that a hydrogen plasma can rehydrogenate intrinsic a-Si:H passivation layers that have been dehydrogenated by annealing. The hydrogen plasma treatment fully restores the effective carrier lifetime to several milliseconds in textured crystalline silicon wafers coated with 8-nm-thick intrinsic a-Si:H layers after annealing at temperatures of up to 450 °C. Plasma-initiated rehydrogenation also translates to complete solar cells: A silicon heterojunction solar cell subjected to annealing at 450 °C (following intrinsic a-Si:H deposition) had an open-circuit voltage of less than 600 mV, but an identical cell that received hydrogen plasma treatment reached a voltage of over 710 mV and an efficiency of over 19%.

  16. Zero Energy Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Arasteh, Dariush; Selkowitz, Steve; Apte, Josh; LaFrance, Marc

    2006-05-17

    Windows in the U.S. consume 30 percent of building heating and cooling energy, representing an annual impact of 4.1 quadrillion BTU (quads) of primary energy. Windows have an even larger impact on peak energy demand and on occupant comfort. An additional 1 quad of lighting energy could be saved if buildings employed effective daylighting strategies. The ENERGY STAR{reg_sign} program has made standard windows significantly more efficient. However, even if all windows in the stock were replaced with today's efficient products, window energy consumption would still be approximately 2 quads. However, windows can be ''net energy gainers'' or ''zero-energy'' products. Highly insulating products in heating applications can admit more useful solar gain than the conductive energy lost through them. Dynamic glazings can modulate solar gains to minimize cooling energy needs and, in commercial buildings, allow daylighting to offset lighting requirements. The needed solutions vary with building type and climate. Developing this next generation of zero-energy windows will provide products for both existing buildings undergoing window replacements and products which are expected to be contributors to zero-energy buildings. This paper defines the requirements for zero-energy windows. The technical potentials in terms of national energy savings and the research and development (R&D) status of the following technologies are presented: (1) Highly insulating systems with U-factors of 0.1 Btu/hr-ft{sup 2}-F; (2) Dynamic windows: glazings that modulate transmittance (i.e., change from clear to tinted and/or reflective) in response to climate conditions; and (3) Integrated facades for commercial buildings to control/ redirect daylight. Market transformation policies to promote these technologies as they emerge into the marketplace are then described.

  17. Magnetic shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille M.; Reid, Clark; Sergatskov, Dmitri A.; /Fermilab

    2008-09-01

    A superconducting RF cavity has to be shielded from magnetic fields present during cool down below the critical temperature to avoid freezing in the magnetic flux at localized impurities, thereby degrading the cavity intrinsic quality factor Q{sub 0}. The magnetic shielding designed for the Fermilab vertical cavity test facility (VCTF), a facility for CW RF vertical testing of bare ILC 1.3 GHz 9-cell SRF cavities, was recently completed. For the magnetic shielding design, we used two cylindrical layers: a room temperature 'outer' shield of Amumetal (80% Ni alloy), and a 2K 'inner' shield of Cryoperm 10. The magnetic and mechanical design of the magnetic shielding and measurement of the remanent magnetic field inside the shielding are described.

  18. MEANS FOR SHIELDING REACTORS

    DOEpatents

    Garrison, W.M.; McClinton, L.T.; Burton, M.

    1959-03-10

    A reactor of the heterageneous, heavy water moderated type is described. The reactor is comprised of a plurality of vertically disposed fuel element tubes extending through a tank of heavy water moderator and adapted to accommodate a flow of coolant water in contact with the fuel elements. A tank containing outgoing coolant water is disposed above the core to function is a radiation shield. Unsaturated liquid hydrocarbon is floated on top of the water in the shield tank to reduce to a minimum the possibility of the occurrence of explosive gaseous mixtures resulting from the neutron bombardment of the water in the shield tank.

  19. Surface plasmon effect of Ag nanodots embedded in amorphous Si window layers deposited on Si solar cells.

    PubMed

    Park, Seungil; Ji, HyungYong; Kim, Myeong Jun; Peck, Jong Hyeon; Kim, Keunjoo

    2014-12-01

    We investigated solar cells containing temperature-dependent Ag nanodots embedded in an amorphous Si thin film layer by using hot-wire chemical vapor deposition in order to improve the properties of crystalline Si solar cells. An Ag thin film with a thickness of 10 nm was deposited by DC sputtering followed by annealing at various temperatures ranging from 250 to 850 degrees C for 15 min under N2 gas. As increasing the annealing temperature, the Ag nanodots were enlarged and the photoreflectances of the samples with Ag nanodots were lower than the reference samples in the spectral range of 200-600 nm, demonstrating the plasmon effect of Ag nanodots. The cell properties on photoluminescence spectra, quantum efficiency, and conversion efficiency were measured with the maximum values for the sample annealed at 450 degrees C, indicating that there exists an optimal size of the Ag nanodots about 15-35 nm to be effective on the enhancement of surface plasmon effect. PMID:25971039

  20. Different affinity windows for virus and cancer-specific T-cell receptors: implications for therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Aleksic, Milos; Liddy, Nathaniel; Molloy, Peter E; Pumphrey, Nick; Vuidepot, Annelise; Chang, Kyong-Mi; Jakobsen, Bent K

    2012-12-01

    T-cell destiny during thymic selection depends on the affinity of the TCR for autologous peptide ligands presented in the context of MHC molecules. This is a delicately balanced process; robust binding leads to negative selection, yet some affinity for the antigen complex is required for positive selection. All TCRs of the resulting repertoire thus have some intrinsic affinity for an MHC type presenting an assortment of peptides. Generally, TCR affinities of peripheral T cells will be low toward self-derived peptides, as these would have been presented during thymic selection, whereas, by serendipity, binding to pathogen-derived peptides that are encountered de novo could be stronger. A crucial question in assessing immunotherapeutic strategies for cancer is whether natural TCR repertoires have the capacity for efficiently recognizing tumor-associated peptide antigens. Here, we report a comprehensive comparison of TCR affinities to a range of HLA-A2 presented antigens. TCRs that bind viral antigens fall within a strikingly higher affinity range than those that bind cancer-related antigens. This difference may be one of the key explanations for tumor immune escape and for the deficiencies of T-cell vaccines against cancer. PMID:22949370

  1. Hydrogenated indium oxide window layers for high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jäger, Timo; Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Fuchs, Peter; Gretener, Christina; Döbeli, Max; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.

    2015-05-01

    High mobility hydrogenated indium oxide is investigated as a transparent contact for thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. Hydrogen doping of In2O3 thin films is achieved by injection of H2O water vapor or H2 gas during the sputter process. As-deposited amorphous In2O3:H films exhibit a high electron mobility of ˜50 cm2/Vs at room temperature. A bulk hydrogen concentration of ˜4 at. % was measured for both optimized H2O and H2-processed films, although the H2O-derived film exhibits a doping gradient as detected by elastic recoil detection analysis. Amorphous IOH films are implemented as front contacts in CIGS based solar cells, and their performance is compared with the reference ZnO:Al electrodes. The most significant feature of IOH containing devices is an enhanced open circuit voltage (VOC) of ˜20 mV regardless of the doping approach, whereas the short circuit current and fill factor remain the same for the H2O case or slightly decrease for H2. The overall power conversion efficiency is improved from 15.7% to 16.2% by substituting ZnO:Al with IOH (H2O) as front contacts. Finally, stability tests of non-encapsulated solar cells in dry air at 80 °C and constant illumination for 500 h demonstrate a higher stability for IOH-containing devices.

  2. Selecting windows for energy efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    New window technologies have increased energy benefits and comfort, and have provided more practical options for consumers. This selection guide will help homeowners, architects, and builders take advantage of the expanding window market. The guide contains three sections: an explanation of energy-related window characteristics, a discussion of window energy performance ratings, and a convenient checklist for window selection.

  3. Endogenous zinc depresses GABAergic transmission via T-type Ca2+ channels and broadens the time window for integration of glutamatergic inputs in dentate granule cells

    PubMed Central

    Grauert, Antonia; Engel, Dominique; Ruiz, Arnaud J

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Zinc actions on synaptic transmission span the modulation of neurotransmitter receptors, transporters, activation of intracellular cascades and alterations in gene expression. Whether and how zinc affects inhibitory synaptic signalling in the dentate gyrus remains largely unexplored. We found that mono- and di-synaptic GABAergic inputs onto dentate granule cells were reversibly depressed by exogenous zinc application and enhanced by zinc chelation. Blocking T-type Ca2+ channels prevented the effect of zinc chelation. When recording from dentate fast-spiking interneurones, zinc chelation facilitated T-type Ca2+ currents, increased action potential half-width and decreased spike threshold. It also increased the offset of the input–output relation in a manner consistent with enhanced excitability. In granule cells, chelation of zinc reduced the time window for the integration of glutamatergic inputs originating from perforant path synapses, resulting in reduced spike transfer. Thus, zinc-mediated modulation of dentate interneurone excitability and GABA release regulates information flow to local targets and hippocampal networks. PMID:24081159

  4. GA microwave window development

    SciTech Connect

    Moeller, C.P.; Kasugai, A.; Sakamoto, K.; Takahashi, K.

    1994-10-01

    The GA prototype distributed window was tested in a 32 mm diam. waveguide system at a power density suitable for a MW gyrotron, using the JAERI/Toshiba 110 GHz long pulse internal converter gyrotron in the JAERI test stand. The presence of the untilted distributed window had no adverse effect on the gyrotron operation. A pulse length of 10 times the calculated thermal equilibrium time (1/e time) of 30 msec was reached, and the window passed at least 750 pulses greater than 30 msec and 343 pulses greater than 60 msec. Beyond 100 msec, the window calorimetry reached steady state, allowing the window dissipation to be measured in a single pulse. The measured loss of 4.0% agrees both with the estimated loss, on which the stress calculations are based, and with the attenuation measured at low power in the HE{sub 11} mode. After the end of the tests, the window was examined; no evidence of arcing air coating was found in the part of the window directly illuminated by the microwaves, although there was discoloration in a recess containing an optical diagnostic which outgassed, causing a local discharge to occur in that recess. Finally, there was no failure of the metal-sapphire joints during a total operating time of 50 seconds consisting of pulses longer than 30 msec.

  5. Boron-doped amorphous diamondlike carbon as a new p-type window material in amorphous silicon p-i-n solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.H.; Lim, K.S.

    1998-01-01

    A boron-doped hydrogenated amorphous diamondlike carbon (a-DLC:H) was prepared using a mercury-sensitized photochemical vapor deposition (photo-CVD) method. The source gases were B{sub 2}H{sub 6} and C{sub 2}H{sub 4}. By increasing the boron doping ratio (B{sub 2}H{sub 6}/C{sub 2}H{sub 4}) from 0 to 12000 ppm, the dark conductivity increased from {approximately}10{sup {minus}9} to {approximately}10{sup {minus}7} S/cm. A boron-doped a-DLC:H with an energy band gap of 3.8 eV and a dark conductivity of 1.3{times}10{sup {minus}8} S/cm was obtained at a doping ratio of 3600 ppm. By using this film, amorphous silicon (a-Si) solar cells with a novel p-a-DLC:H/p-a-SiC double p-layer structure were fabricated using the photo-CVD method and the cell photovoltaic characteristics were investigated as a function of a-DLC:H layer thickness. The open circuit voltage increased from 0.766 V for the conventional cell with a 40-{Angstrom}-thick p-a-SiC to 0.865 V for the cell with a p-a-DLC:H (15 {Angstrom})/p-a-SiC (40 {Angstrom}) double p-layer structure. The thin ({lt}15 {Angstrom}) p-a-DLC:H layer proved to be an excellent hole emitter as a wide band gap window layer. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  6. Hydrogenated indium oxide window layers for high-efficiency Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Jäger, Timo Romanyuk, Yaroslav E.; Nishiwaki, Shiro; Bissig, Benjamin; Pianezzi, Fabian; Fuchs, Peter; Gretener, Christina; Tiwari, Ayodhya N.; Döbeli, Max

    2015-05-28

    High mobility hydrogenated indium oxide is investigated as a transparent contact for thin film Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) solar cells. Hydrogen doping of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} thin films is achieved by injection of H{sub 2}O water vapor or H{sub 2} gas during the sputter process. As-deposited amorphous In{sub 2}O{sub 3}:H films exhibit a high electron mobility of ∼50 cm{sup 2}/Vs at room temperature. A bulk hydrogen concentration of ∼4 at. % was measured for both optimized H{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}-processed films, although the H{sub 2}O-derived film exhibits a doping gradient as detected by elastic recoil detection analysis. Amorphous IOH films are implemented as front contacts in CIGS based solar cells, and their performance is compared with the reference ZnO:Al electrodes. The most significant feature of IOH containing devices is an enhanced open circuit voltage (V{sub OC}) of ∼20 mV regardless of the doping approach, whereas the short circuit current and fill factor remain the same for the H{sub 2}O case or slightly decrease for H{sub 2}. The overall power conversion efficiency is improved from 15.7% to 16.2% by substituting ZnO:Al with IOH (H{sub 2}O) as front contacts. Finally, stability tests of non-encapsulated solar cells in dry air at 80 °C and constant illumination for 500 h demonstrate a higher stability for IOH-containing devices.

  7. The Efficient Windows Collaborative

    SciTech Connect

    Petermann, Nils

    2006-03-31

    The Efficient Windows Collaborative (EWC) is a coalition of manufacturers, component suppliers, government agencies, research institutions, and others who partner to expand the market for energy efficient window products. Funded through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Department of Energy, the EWC provides education, communication and outreach in order to transform the residential window market to 70% energy efficient products by 2005. Implementation of the EWC is managed by the Alliance to Save Energy, with support from the University of Minnesota and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory.

  8. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell

    PubMed Central

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>1020 cm−3) and mobilities (up to 20 cm2 V−1 s−1) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell. PMID:25753657

  9. Electrodeposition of ZnO window layer for an all-atmospheric fabrication process of chalcogenide solar cell.

    PubMed

    Tsin, Fabien; Venerosy, Amélie; Vidal, Julien; Collin, Stéphane; Clatot, Johnny; Lombez, Laurent; Paire, Myriam; Borensztajn, Stephan; Broussillou, Cédric; Grand, Pierre Philippe; Jaime, Salvador; Lincot, Daniel; Rousset, Jean

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents the low cost electrodeposition of a transparent and conductive chlorine doped ZnO layer with performances comparable to that produced by standard vacuum processes. First, an in-depth study of the defect physics by ab-initio calculation shows that chlorine is one of the best candidates to dope the ZnO. This result is experimentally confirmed by a complete optical analysis of the ZnO layer deposited in a chloride rich solution. We demonstrate that high doping levels (>10(20) cm(-3)) and mobilities (up to 20 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1)) can be reached by insertion of chlorine in the lattice. The process developed in this study has been applied on a CdS/Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 p-n junction produced in a pilot line by a non vacuum process, to be tested as solar cell front contact deposition method. As a result efficiency of 14.3% has been reached opening the way of atmospheric production of Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 solar cell. PMID:25753657

  10. What Is Radiation Shielding?

    NASA Video Gallery

    Kerry Lee, NASA Orion radiation system manager, explains how radiation shielding is used to block harmful particles coming into the spacecraft without producing secondary particles that can cause e...

  11. ALS synchrotron radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, R.J.

    1995-10-01

    This note discusses the assumptions and results of synchrotron radiation shielding estimates for ALS bend magnet and wiggler beamlines. Estimates of gas bremsstrahlung production are not included and are dealt with elsewhere.

  12. SNS shielding analyses overview

    SciTech Connect

    Popova, Irina; Gallmeier, Franz; Iverson, Erik B; Lu, Wei; Remec, Igor

    2015-01-01

    This paper gives an overview on on-going shielding analyses for Spallation Neutron Source. Presently, the most of the shielding work is concentrated on the beam lines and instrument enclosures to prepare for commissioning, save operation and adequate radiation background in the future. There is on-going work for the accelerator facility. This includes radiation-protection analyses for radiation monitors placement, designing shielding for additional facilities to test accelerator structures, redesigning some parts of the facility, and designing test facilities to the main accelerator structure for component testing. Neutronics analyses are required as well to support spent structure management, including waste characterisation analyses, choice of proper transport/storage package and shielding enhancement for the package if required.

  13. Adhesive particle shielding

    DOEpatents

    Klebanoff, Leonard Elliott; Rader, Daniel John; Walton, Christopher; Folta, James

    2009-01-06

    An efficient device for capturing fast moving particles has an adhesive particle shield that includes (i) a mounting panel and (ii) a film that is attached to the mounting panel wherein the outer surface of the film has an adhesive coating disposed thereon to capture particles contacting the outer surface. The shield can be employed to maintain a substantially particle free environment such as in photolithographic systems having critical surfaces, such as wafers, masks, and optics and in the tools used to make these components, that are sensitive to particle contamination. The shield can be portable to be positioned in hard-to-reach areas of a photolithography machine. The adhesive particle shield can incorporate cooling means to attract particles via the thermophoresis effect.

  14. double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    double hung window details, hall window details, entrance door profiles - Chopawamsic Recreational Demonstration Area - Cabin Camp 1, Help's Quarters, Prince William Forest Park, Triangle, Prince William County, VA

  15. Space Station MMOD Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes International Space Station (ISS) shielding for micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) protection, requirements for protection, and the technical approach to meeting requirements. Current activities in MMOD protection for ISS will be described, including efforts to augment MMOD protection by adding shields on-orbit. Observed MMOD impacts on ISS elements such as radiators, modules and returned hardware will be described. Comparisons of the observed damage with predicted damage using risk assessment software will be made.

  16. Cordilleran slab windows

    SciTech Connect

    Thorkelson, D.J.; Taylor, R.P. )

    1989-09-01

    The geometry and geologic implications of subducted spreading ridges are topics that have bedeviled earth scientists ever since the recognition of plate tectonics. As a consequence of subduction of the Kula-Farallon and East Pacific rises, slab windows formed and migrated beneath the North American Cordillera. The probable shape and extent of these windows, which represent the asthenosphere-filled gaps between two separating, subducting oceanic plates, are depicted from the Late Cretaceous to the present. Possible effects of the existence and migration of slab windows on the Cordillera at various times include cessation of arc volcanism and replacement by rift or plate-edge volcanism; lithospheric uplift, attenuation, and extension; and increased intensity of compressional tectonism. Eocene extensional tectonism and alkaline magmatism in southern British Columbia and the northwestern United States were facilitated by slab-window development.

  17. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1997-03-11

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  18. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, H.L.; Elliott, T.S.

    1998-05-19

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The SRF window assembly has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The SRF window assembly comprises a superconducting frame, a ceramic plate having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet for sealing plate into frame. The plate is brazed to eyelet which is then electron beam welded to frame. A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the SRF window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator. 11 figs.

  19. Optimization of the preform shape in the three-stage forming process of the shielded slot plate in fuel cell manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Dong-Yol; Lee, Chang-Whan; Kang, Dong-Woo; Chang, In-Gab; Lee, Tae-Won

    2013-05-01

    The shielded slot plate, a repeated structure of high sheared protrusions, is a major component of metallic bipolar plates for the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC). In order to increase the efficiency of the MCFC and long-term operation capability, the sheared protrusion should have a relatively large flat contact area. In addition, defects from the forming process such as local thinning should be minimized. In this work, the preform shape in the three-stage forming process that integrates the slitting process, the preforming process, and the final forming process was optimized to minimize the effective plastic strain. In the simulation of the forming process, the ductile fracture criterion was employed to the user material subroutine VUMAT in ABAQUS/Explicit. Steepest descent method was utilized in the design of the forming process to minimize equivalent plastic strain. High sheared protrusions were manufactured without defects from the three-stage forming process using the optimized preform shape. The minimum thickness of one sheared protrusion was increased by 25% over that of the two-stage forming process. The three-stage forming process using the optimized preform shape enables more uniformly distributed deformation and reduces localized deformation.

  20. Energy-efficient windows

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-01

    This fact sheet describes energy efficient windows for the reduction of home heating and cooling energy consumption. It discusses controlling air leaks by caulking and weatherstripping and by replacing window frames. Reducing heat loss and condensation is discussed by describing the types of glazing materials, the number of glass and air spaces, frame and spacer materials, and the use of movable insulation (shutters, drapes, etc.). A resource list is provided for further information.

  1. The deep oval window.

    PubMed

    Kapur, T R

    1991-09-01

    This article presents the results of an analysis of the variable and surgically important relationship between the oval window, the fossular walls and the related posterior tympanic recesses in 50 temporal bones. The visual impressions of superficial and deep oval windows seem to correspond fairly closely to the depth of the inferior wall of the fossula fenestra vestibuli (FFV). The depth of the superior and anterior walls of the FFV by themselves, did not appear to have such a dominating relationship in determining the deep oval window. There does not appear to be a well defined posterior wall in the vast majority of the specimens (86 per cent). In the event of scar tissue forming between the superior, inferior and anterior walls, the gap between the postero-superior part of the promontory and the posterior tympanic wall (posterior communication) could allow aeration of the region of the deep oval window in such an instance. Closure of this gap by a solid shelf of ponticulus or scar tissue could cause a localized malaeration of the fossula in most cases of deep oval windows. This is an entirely new concept of the likely problems of malaeration of a deep oval window which could arise due to anatomical variations and of the possible safety valve mechanism which could prevent such malaeration and its consequences. PMID:1919338

  2. High Performance Window Retrofit

    SciTech Connect

    Shrestha, Som S; Hun, Diana E; Desjarlais, Andre Omer

    2013-12-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy (EERE) and Traco partnered to develop high-performance windows for commercial building that are cost-effective. The main performance requirement for these windows was that they needed to have an R-value of at least 5 ft2 F h/Btu. This project seeks to quantify the potential energy savings from installing these windows in commercial buildings that are at least 20 years old. To this end, we are conducting evaluations at a two-story test facility that is representative of a commercial building from the 1980s, and are gathering measurements on the performance of its windows before and after double-pane, clear-glazed units are upgraded with R5 windows. Additionally, we will use these data to calibrate EnergyPlus models that we will allow us to extrapolate results to other climates. Findings from this project will provide empirical data on the benefits from high-performance windows, which will help promote their adoption in new and existing commercial buildings. This report describes the experimental setup, and includes some of the field and simulation results.

  3. Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoppe, Daniel J.; Perez, Raul M.; Glazer, Stuart D.

    1990-06-01

    Temperature measurements of a high-power microwave feedhorn window, obtained using an imaging IR radiometer during transmitter operation at 365 kW CW and 8.5 GHz, are discussed. The window under investigation was constructed of HTP-6, a high-thermal-performance material developed to shield the Space Shuttle Orbiter from the heat of reentry. The measurement technique is described, and experimental results are presented. The window performed adequately at 365 kW CW with a center temperature of 475 C. The tests verify that HTP-6 can be used as a window material or a support structure in high-power waveguides at power densities of 1.47 kW/sq cm for extended periods of time, with no change in its mechanical characteristics.

  4. Measurements of shielding effectiveness and cavity characteristics of airplanes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, D. A.; Crawford, M. L.; Johnk, R. T.; Ondrejka, A. R.; Camell, D. G.

    1994-07-01

    We present measured data for shielding effectiveness, cavity Q, and cavity time constant of three small (twin-engine) airplanes for frequencies from 400 MHz to 18 GHz. Both CW and time-domain measurement methods were used, and the time-domain method yields higher values of cavity Q. Both methods yield Q values below a theoretical upper bound determined by window leakage losses. The measured shielding effectiveness is quite variable, but averages about 15 dB. The measured time constants are also variable and average about 15 ns. This short time constant is a result of the low Q of the aircraft cavities.

  5. High performance sapphire windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bates, Stephen C.; Liou, Larry

    1993-01-01

    High-quality, wide-aperture optical access is usually required for the advanced laser diagnostics that can now make a wide variety of non-intrusive measurements of combustion processes. Specially processed and mounted sapphire windows are proposed to provide this optical access to extreme environment. Through surface treatments and proper thermal stress design, single crystal sapphire can be a mechanically equivalent replacement for high strength steel. A prototype sapphire window and mounting system have been developed in a successful NASA SBIR Phase 1 project. A large and reliable increase in sapphire design strength (as much as 10x) has been achieved, and the initial specifications necessary for these gains have been defined. Failure testing of small windows has conclusively demonstrated the increased sapphire strength, indicating that a nearly flawless surface polish is the primary cause of strengthening, while an unusual mounting arrangement also significantly contributes to a larger effective strength. Phase 2 work will complete specification and demonstration of these windows, and will fabricate a set for use at NASA. The enhanced capabilities of these high performance sapphire windows will lead to many diagnostic capabilities not previously possible, as well as new applications for sapphire.

  6. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Crandall, R.S.; Deb, S.K.; Stone, J.L.

    1995-01-24

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired. 11 figures.

  7. Stand-alone photovoltaic (PV) powered electrochromic window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Crandall, Richard S.; Deb, Satyendra K.; Stone, Jack L.

    1995-01-01

    A variable transmittance double pane window includes an electrochromic material that has been deposited on one pane of the window in conjunction with an array of photovoltaic cells deposited along an edge of the pane to produce the required electric power necessary to vary the effective transmittance of the window. A battery is placed in a parallel fashion to the array of photovoltaic cells to allow the user the ability to manually override the system when a desired transmittance is desired.

  8. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    1998-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  9. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, William J.; Lessing, Paul A.

    2000-12-26

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm.sup.3 and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile.

  10. Radiation shielding composition

    DOEpatents

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A.

    1998-07-28

    A composition is disclosed for use as a radiation shield. The shield is a concrete product containing a stable uranium aggregate for attenuating gamma rays and a neutron absorbing component, the uranium aggregate and neutron absorbing component being present in the concrete product in sufficient amounts to provide a concrete having a density between about 4 and about 15 grams/cm{sup 3} and which will at a predetermined thickness, attenuate gamma rays and absorb neutrons from a radioactive material of projected gamma ray and neutron emissions over a determined time period. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing radioactive materials that emit gamma rays and neutrons. The concrete container preferably comprises a metal liner and/or a metal outer shell. The resulting radiation shielding container has the potential of being structurally sound, stable over a long period of time, and, if desired, readily mobile. 5 figs.

  11. Shields-1, A SmallSat Radiation Shielding Technology Demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomsen, D. Laurence, III; Kim, Wousik; Cutler, James W.

    2015-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center Shields CubeSat initiative is to develop a configurable platform that would allow lower cost access to Space for materials durability experiments, and to foster a pathway for both emerging and commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) radiation shielding technologies to gain spaceflight heritage in a relevant environment. The Shields-1 will be Langleys' first CubeSat platform to carry out this mission. Radiation shielding tests on Shields-1 are planned for the expected severe radiation environment in a geotransfer orbit (GTO), where advertised commercial rideshare opportunities and CubeSat missions exist, such as Exploration Mission 1 (EM-1). To meet this objective, atomic number (Z) graded radiation shields (Zshields) have been developed. The Z-shield properties have been estimated, using the Space Environment Information System (SPENVIS) radiation shielding computational modeling, to have 30% increased shielding effectiveness of electrons, at half the thickness of a corresponding single layer of aluminum. The Shields-1 research payload will be made with the Z-graded radiation shields of varying thicknesses to create dose-depth curves to be compared with baseline materials. Additionally, Shields-1 demonstrates an engineered Z-grade radiation shielding vault protecting the systems' electronic boards. The radiation shielding materials' performances will be characterized using total ionizing dose sensors. Completion of these experiments is expected to raise the technology readiness levels (TRLs) of the tested atomic number (Z) graded materials. The most significant contribution of the Z-shields for the SmallSat community will be that it enables cost effective shielding for small satellite systems, with significant volume constraints, while increasing the operational lifetime of ionizing radiation sensitive components. These results are anticipated to increase the development of CubeSat hardware design for increased mission lifetimes, and enable

  12. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 5 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Amanda Billings, A; Ned Bibler, N

    2008-11-10

    Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) is predominantly a combination of H-modified (HM) sludge from Tank 11 that underwent aluminum dissolution in late 2007 to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and aluminum being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Purex sludge transferred from Tank 7. Following aluminum dissolution, the addition of Tank 7 sludge and excess Pu to Tank 51, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB5 qualification. SB5 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of a Pu/Be stream from H Canyon), DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass chemical durability evaluation. This report documents: (1) The washing (addition of water to dilute the sludge supernatant) and concentration (decanting of supernatant) of the Tank 51 qualification sample to adjust sodium content and weight percent insoluble solids to Tank Farm projections. (2) The performance of a DWPF CPC simulation using the washed Tank 51 sample. This includes a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle, where acid is added to the sludge to destroy nitrite and remove mercury, and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle, where glass frit is added to the sludge in preparation for vitrification. The SME cycle also included replication of five canister decontamination additions and concentrations. Processing parameters for the CPC processing were based on work with a non radioactive simulant. (3) Vitrification of a portion of the SME product and Product Consistency Test (PCT) evaluation of the resulting glass. (4) Rheology measurements of the initial slurry samples and samples after each phase of CPC processing. This work is controlled by a Task Technical and Quality Assurance Plan (TTQAP) , and analyses are guided by an Analytical Study Plan. This work is Technical Baseline Research and Development (R

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS WITH TANK 40 AND H CANYON NEPTUNIUM

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M

    2009-04-28

    The Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) is currently processing Sludge Batch 5 (SB5) from Tank 40. SB5 contains the contents of Tank 51 from November 2008, qualified by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) and the heel in Tank 40 remaining from Sludge Batch 4. Current Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) plans are to (1) decant supernatant from Tank 40 to remove excess liquid caused by a leaking slurry pump and (2) receive a Np stream from H Canyon It should be noted that the Np stream contains significant nitrate requiring addition of nitrite to Tank 40 to maintain a high nitrite to nitrate ratio for corrosion control. SRNL has been requested to qualify the proposed changes; determine the impact on DWPF processability in terms of hydrogen generation, rheology, etc.; evaluate antifoam addition strategy; and evaluate mercury stripping. Therefore, SRNL received a 3 L sample of Tank 40 following the transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40 (Tank Farm Sample HTF-40-08-157 to be used in testing and to perform the required Waste Acceptance Product Specifications radionuclide analyses). Based on Tank Farm projections, SRNL decanted a portion* of the sample, added sodium nitrite, and added a Np solution from H Canyon representative of the Np to be dispositioned to Tank 40 (neutralized to 0.6 M excess hydroxide). The resulting material was used in a DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) demonstration -- a Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle and a Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycle. Preliminary data from the demonstration has been reported previously. This report includes discussion of these results and additional results, including comparisons to Tank Farm projections and the SB5 demonstration.

  14. Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Taheri, Bahman; Bodnar, Volodymyr

    2011-12-31

    Energy consumption by private and commercial sectors in the U.S. has steadily grown over the last decade. The uncertainty in future availability of imported oil, on which the energy consumption relies strongly, resulted in a dramatic increase in the cost of energy. About 20% of this consumption are used to heat and cool houses and commercial buildings. To reduce dependence on the foreign oil and cut down emission of greenhouse gases, it is necessary to eliminate losses and reduce total energy consumption by buildings. To achieve this goal it is necessary to redefine the role of the conventional windows. At a minimum, windows should stop being a source for energy loss. Ideally, windows should become a source of energy, providing net gain to reduce energy used to heat and cool homes. It is possible to have a net energy gain from a window if its light transmission can be dynamically altered, ideally electronically without the need of operator assistance, providing optimal control of the solar gain that varies with season and climate in the U.S. In addition, the window must not require power from the building for operation. Resolution of this problem is a societal challenge and of national interest and will have a broad global impact. For this purpose, the year-round, allclimate window solution to provide an electronically variable solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC) with a wide dynamic range is needed. AlphaMicron, Inc. (AMI) developed and manufactured 1ft × 1ft prototype panels for the world’s first auto-adjusting Adaptive Liquid Crystal Windows (ALCWs) that can operate from sunlight without the need for external power source and demonstrate an electronically adjustable SHGC. This novel windows are based on AlphaMicron’s patented e-Tint® technology, a guesthost liquid crystal system implemented on flexible, optically clear plastic films. This technology is suitable both for OEM and aftermarket (retro-fitting) lamination to new and existing windows. Low level of

  15. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, Larry W.; Hoenes, Glenn R.

    1981-01-01

    According to the present invention, a shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user withdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  16. Glove box shield

    DOEpatents

    Brackenbush, L.W.; Hoenes, G.R.

    A shield for a glove box housing radioactive material is comprised of spaced apart clamping members which maintain three overlapping flaps in place therebetween. There is a central flap and two side flaps, the side flaps overlapping at the interior edges thereof and the central flap extending past the intersection of the side flaps in order to insure that the shield is always closed when the user wthdraws his hand from the glove box. Lead loaded neoprene rubber is the preferred material for the three flaps, the extent of lead loading depending upon the radiation levels within the glove box.

  17. Bumper shield analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Oyer, A.T.

    1986-07-01

    To initially examine the effectiveness of a shield surrounding a reentry vehicle, we used the hypervelocity hydrodynamic impact code, LASOIL. We completed a four-by-four matrix of 16 two-dimensional numerical impact simulations of 1-g tungsten cylinders striking circular plates. The variable parameters were the projectile impact velocity (10, 20, 40, and 80 km/s) and the plate thickness (1, 2, 4, and 8 mm). In each case, the projectile was destroyed in the impact. The shield was penetrated but retained negliible momentum from the impact. The resultant debris cloud was low-density debris and vapor.

  18. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, James W.

    1994-01-01

    A composition for use as a radiation shield. The shield has a depleted urum core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container.

  19. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records frommore » IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of

  20. BERKELEY LAB WINDOW

    SciTech Connect

    Curcija, Dragan Charlie; Zhu, Ling; Czarnecki, Stephen; Mitchell, Robin D.; Kohler, Christian; Vidanovic, Simon V.; Huizenga, Charlie

    2015-03-06

    WINDOW features include: - Microsoft Windows TM interface - algorithms for the calculation of total fenestration product U-values and Solar Heat Gain Coefficient consistent with ASHRAE SPC 142, ISO 15099, and the National Fenestration Rating Council - a Condensation Resistance Index in accordance with the NFRC 500 Standard - and integrated database of properties - imports data from other LBNL window analysis software: - Import THERM file into the Frame Library - Import records from IGDB and OPtics5 into the Glass Library for the optical properties of coated and uncoated glazings, laminates, and applied films. Program Capabilities WINDOW 7.2 offers the following features: The ability to analyze products made from any combination of glazing layers, gas layers, frames, spacers, and dividers under any environmental conditions and at any tilt; The ability to model complex glazing systems such as venetian blinds and roller shades. Directly accessible libraries of window system components, (glazing systems, glazing layers, gas fills, frame and divider elements), and environmental conditions; The choice of working in English (IP), or Systeme International (SI) units; The ability to specify the dimensions and thermal properties of each frame element (header, sills, jamb, mullion) in a window; A multi-band (wavelength-by-wavelength) spectral model; A Glass Library which can access spectral data files for many common glazing materials from the Optics5database; A night-sky radiative model; A link with the DOE-2.1E and Energy Plus building energy analysis program. Performance Indices and Other Results For a user-defined fenestration system and user-defined environmental conditions, WINDOW calculates: The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the complete window system; The U-value, solar heat gain coefficient, shading coefficient, and visible transmittance for the glazing system (center-of-glass values); The U-values of the

  1. Demonstration of an optimized TRUEX flowsheet for partitioning of actinides from actual ICPP sodium-bearing waste using centrifugal contactors in a shielded cell facility

    SciTech Connect

    Law, J.D.; Brewer, K.N.; Herbst, R.S.; Todd, T.A.; Olson, L.G.

    1998-01-01

    The TRUEX process is being evaluated at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant (ICPP) for the separation of the actinides from acidic radioactive wastes stored at the ICPP. These efforts have culminated in recent demonstrations of the TRUEX process with actual tank waste. The first demonstration was performed in 1996 using 24 stages of 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. Based on the results of this flowsheet demonstration, the flowsheet was optimized and a second flowsheet demonstration was performed. This test also was performed using 2-cm diameter centrifugal contactors and waste from tank WM-183. However, the total number of contactor stages was reduced from 24 to 20. Also, the concentration of HEDPA in the strip solution was reduced from 0.04 M to 0.01 M in order to minimize the amount of phosphate in the HLW fraction, which would be immobilized into a glass waste form. This flowsheet demonstration was performed using centrifugal contactors installed in the shielded hot cell at the ICPP Remote Analytical Laboratory. The flowsheet tested consisted of six extraction stages, four scrub stages, six strip stages, two solvent was stages, and two acid rinse stages. An overall removal efficiency of 99.79% was obtained for the actinides. As a result, the activity of the actinides was reduced from 540 nCi/g in the feed to 0.90 nCi/g in the aqueous raffinate, which is well below the NRC Class A LLW requirement of 10 nCi/g for non-TRU waste. Removal efficiencies of 99.84%, 99.97%, 99.97%, 99.85%, and 99.76% were obtained for {sup 241}Am, {sup 238}Pu, {sup 239}Pu, {sup 235}U, and {sup 238}U, respectively.

  2. WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING POST ALUMINUM DISSOLUTION TANK 51 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J; Cj Bannochie, C; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Dan Lambert, D; Michael Stone, M

    2008-04-28

    The remaining contents of Tank 51 from Sludge Batch 4 will be blended with Purex sludge from Tank 7 to constitute Sludge Batch 5 (SB5). The Savannah River Site (SRS) Liquid Waste Organization (LWO) has completed caustic addition to Tank 51 to perform low temperature Al dissolution on the H-Modified (HM) sludge material to reduce the total mass of sludge solids and Al being fed to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) has also completed aluminum dissolution tests using a 3-L sample of Tank 51 sludge slurry through funding by DOE EM-21. This report documents assessment of downstream impacts of the aluminum dissolved sludge, which were investigated so technical issues could be identified before the start of SB5 processing. This assessment included washing the aluminum dissolved sludge to a Tank Farm projected sodium concentration and weight percent insoluble solids content and DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) processing using the washed sludge. Based on the limited testing, the impact of aluminum dissolution on sludge settling is not clear. Settling was not predictable for the 3-L sample. Compared to the post aluminum dissolution sample, settling after the first wash was slower, but settling after the second wash was faster. For example, post aluminum dissolution sludge took six days to settle to 60% of the original sludge slurry height, while Wash 1 took nearly eight days, and Wash 2 only took two days. Aluminum dissolution did impact sludge rheology. A comparison between the as-received, post aluminum dissolution and washed samples indicate that the downstream materials were more viscous and the concentration of insoluble solids less than that of the starting material. This increase in viscosity may impact Tank 51 transfers to Tank 40. The impact of aluminum dissolution on DWPF CPC processing cannot be determined because acid addition for the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) cycle was under-calculated and thus

  3. SLUDGE WASHING AND DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS FOR SLUDGE BATCH 6 QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Pareizs, J.; Pickenheim, B.; Bannochie, C.; Billings, A.; Bibler, N.; Click, D.

    2010-10-01

    Prior to initiating a new sludge batch in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) is required to simulate this processing, including Chemical Process Cell (CPC) simulation, waste glass fabrication, and chemical durability testing. This report documents this simulation for the next sludge batch, Sludge Batch 6 (SB6). SB6 consists of Tank 12 material that has been transferred to Tank 51 and subjected to Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution (LTAD), Tank 4 sludge, and H-Canyon Pu solutions. Following LTAD and the Tank 4 addition, Liquid Waste Operations (LWO) provided SRNL a 3 L sample of Tank 51 sludge for SB6 qualification. Pu solution from H Canyon was also received. SB6 qualification included washing the sample per LWO plans/projections (including the addition of Pu from H Canyon), DWPF CPC simulations, waste glass fabrication (vitrification), and waste glass characterization and chemical durability evaluation. The following are significant observations from this demonstration. Sludge settling improved slightly as the sludge was washed. SRNL recommended (and the Tank Farm implemented) one less wash based on evaluations of Tank 40 heel projections and projections of the glass composition following transfer of Tank 51 to Tank 40. Thorium was detected in significant quantities (>0.1 wt % of total solids) in the sludge. In past sludge batches, thorium has been determined by Inductively Coupled Plasma-Mass Spectroscopy (ICP-MS), seen in small quantities, and reported with the radionuclides. As a result of the high thorium, SRNL-AD has added thorium to their suite of Inductively Coupled Plasma-Atomic Emission Spectroscopy (ICP-AES) elements. The acid stoichiometry for the DWPF Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) processing of 115%, or 1.3 mol acid per liter of SRAT receipt slurry, was adequate to accomplish some of the goals of SRAT processing: nitrite was destroyed to below 1,000 mg/kg and mercury was removed to

  4. Lightweight blast shield

    DOEpatents

    Mixon, Larry C.; Snyder, George W.; Hill, Scott D.; Johnson, Gregory L.; Wlodarski, J. Frank; von Spakovsky, Alexis P.; Emerson, John D.; Cole, James M.; Tipton, John P.

    1991-01-01

    A tandem warhead missile arrangement that has a composite material housing structure with a first warhead mounted at one end and a second warhead mounted near another end of the composite structure with a dome shaped composite material blast shield mounted between the warheads to protect the second warhead from the blast of the first warhead.

  5. Magsat investigation. [Canadian shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, D. H. (Principal Investigator)

    1980-01-01

    A computer program was prepared for modeling segments of the Earth's crust allowing for heterogeneity in magnetization in calculating the Earth's field at Magsat heights. This permits investigation of a large number of possible models in assessing the magnetic signatures of subprovinces of the Canadian shield. The fit between the model field and observed fields is optimized in a semi-automatic procedure.

  6. Analysis of shield tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, W. Q.; Yue, Z. Q.; Tham, L. G.; Zhu, H. H.; Lee, C. F.; Hashimoto, T.

    2004-01-01

    This paper proposes a two-dimensional finite element model for the analysis of shield tunnels by taking into account the construction process which is divided into four stages. The soil is assumed to behave as an elasto-plastic medium whereas the shield is simulated by beam-joint discontinuous model in which curved beam elements and joint elements are used to model the segments and joints, respectively. As grout is usually injected to fill the gap between the lining and the soil, the property parameters of the grout are chosen in such a way that they can reflect the state of the grout at each stage. Furthermore, the contact condition between the soil and lining will change with the construction stage, and therefore, different stress-releasing coefficients are used to account for the changes. To assess the accuracy that can be attained by the method in solving practical problems, the shield tunnelling in the No. 7 Subway Line Project in Osaka, Japan, is used as a case history for our study. The numerical results are compared with those measured in the field. The results presented in the paper show that the proposed numerical procedure can be used to effectively estimate the deformation, stresses and moments experienced by the surrounding soils and the concrete lining segments. The analysis and method presented in this paper can be considered to be useful for other subway construction projects involving shield tunnelling in soft soils. Copyright

  7. Shield against radiations

    SciTech Connect

    Grifoni, S.

    1988-02-23

    This patent describes a shield against ionizing radiations that comprises at least one layer of an aggregate-containing cement-based conglomerate or an aggregate-containing cement-based mortar wherein the aggregate consists essentially of floated galena or mixtures thereof which at least one boron mineral.

  8. Shield For Flexible Pipe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ponton, Michael K.; Williford, Clifford B.; Lagen, Nicholas T.

    1995-01-01

    Cylindrical shield designed to fit around flexible pipe to protect nearby workers from injury and equipment from damage if pipe ruptures. Designed as pressure-relief device. Absorbs impact of debris ejected radially from broken flexible pipe. Also redirects flow of pressurized fluid escaping from broken pipe onto flow path allowing for relief of pressure while minimizing potential for harm.

  9. "Stained Glass" Landscape Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vannata, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Both adults and children alike marvel at the grand vivid stained-glass windows created by American artist Louis Comfort Tiffany. Today he is commonly recognized as one of America's most influential designers and artists throughout the last nineteenth and early twentieth century. In the lesson described in this article, students created their own…

  10. Exploring Shop Window Displays

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Christopoulou, Martha

    2011-01-01

    Using visual resources from everyday life in art lessons can enrich students' knowledge about the creation of visual images, artifacts, and sites, and develop their critical understanding about the cultural impact of these images and their effects on people's lives. Through examining an exhibition in the windows of Selfridges department store in…

  11. Opening the Literature Window

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jago, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Great literature gives students a window to other places and times, but it often requires students to step outside their comfort zones and take on challenges they wouldn't usually attempt. Unfortunately, research shows that many schools are not assigning literature that pushes students beyond their current reading level. Jago encourages teachers…

  12. Foamglass solar window collector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grande, P. C.

    Solar heating of a living area by means of a foamglass window collector is reported. The collector was built with readily available materials available at most local hardware stores. The payback period was found to be 3.7 years, slightly longer than anticipated.

  13. Apollo window meteoroid experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, B. G.; Flaherty, R. E.; Brown, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Apollo window meteoroid experiment for obtaining data from crater counts and analysis of meteoroid residue combined with fused glass in described. A preliminary estimate of the flux resulting from seven Apollo spacecraft is found to be in agreement with the Surveyor 3 data, but is lower than the model environment.

  14. Software: Looking Through WINDOW.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Classroom Computer News, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Reviews the educational value, design quality, and ease of use of "WINDOW," an educational "magazine" on a disk for the Apple II/IIe microcomputer. Indicates that the articles, software reviews, and other informative material are greatly enhanced by sound, graphics, and the chance to try out reviewed programs. (JN)

  15. Candles in Our Windows

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, Kathryn

    2005-01-01

    "Candles in Our Windows"--also titled "Nightlights"--is a play developed for elementary and middle school students about how residents in Billings, Montana, took a stand against hate. Last March, the 6th-grade students of Woodland Elementary School in New Jersey performed an early version of the play based on a children's book, "The Christmas…

  16. Migration to Windows NT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doles, Daniel T.

    In the constantly changing world of technology, migration is not only inevitable but many times necessary for survival, especially when the end result is simplicity for both users and IT support staff. This paper describes the migration at Franklin College (Indiana). It discusses the reasons for selecting Windows NT, the steps taken to complete…

  17. Windows to Art Excitement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laird, Shirley; Crumpecker, Cheryl

    2003-01-01

    Describes an art project that aimed to bring more attention to an art program. Explains that the students created themed murals on the windows of the art classroom, such as a "Jungle,""Ocean,""Masterpiece Paintings," and "Rainforest Tree Frogs." Discusses how the murals were created. (CMK)

  18. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  19. Windows and lighting program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-06-01

    More than 30% of all energy use in buildings is attributable to two sources: windows and lighting. Together they account for annual consumer energy expenditures of more than $50 billion. Each affects not only energy use by other major building systems, but also comfort and productivity -- factors that influence building economics far more than does direct energy consumption alone. Windows play a unique role in the building envelope, physically separating the conditioned space from the world outside without sacrificing vital visual contact. Throughout the indoor environment, lighting systems facilitate a variety of tasks associated with a wide range of visual requirements while defining the luminous qualities of the indoor environment. Windows and lighting are thus essential components of any comprehensive building science program. Despite important achievements in reducing building energy consumption over the past decade, significant additional savings are still possible. These will come from two complementary strategies: (1) improve building designs so that they effectively apply existing technologies and extend the market penetration of these technologies; and (2) develop advanced technologies that increase the savings potential of each application. Both the Windows and Daylighting Group and the Lighting System Research Group have made substantial contributions in each of these areas, and continue to do so through the ongoing research summarized here. 23 refs., 16 figs.

  20. Windows into Art Classrooms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grauer, Kit, Ed.

    1995-01-01

    An editorial by Kit Grauer introduces this collection of articles which establish that there is no such thing as a simple definition of art education even within one culture, and that people's views can be reflected by art educators across the world. The first article, "A Window on Three Singapore Art Classrooms" (Jane Chia; John Matthews; Paul…

  1. Sliding window construction

    SciTech Connect

    Klompenburg, M.V.

    1987-07-28

    A window assembly is described in a window frame. The frame includes a head, a sill, and opposite jambs, the assembly comprising: first and second sashes each having interior and exterior surfaces, a top, a bottom, and opposite first and second sides extending between the top and the bottom: the first sash being laterally movably within the window frame between a closed position and an open position wherein the first sash is substantially in a non-planar position relative to the second sash; track means extending along one of the sill or head of the window frame; first track follower means connected to one of the top or the bottom of the first sash adjacent the first side and cooperating with the track means for supporting and guiding the first sash during lateral movement between the open and closed positions; and the track means having an opening for releasing the track follower means for cooperation only when the first sash is in the open position such that the first sash is pivotal about a vertical axis adjacent the second side between the open position and a maintenance position.

  2. Superconductive radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry Lawrence; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  3. Superconducting radiofrequency window assembly

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Harry L.; Elliott, Thomas S.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention is a superconducting radiofrequency window assembly for use in an electron beam accelerator. The srf window assembly (20) has a superconducting metal-ceramic design. The srf window assembly (20) comprises a superconducting frame (30), a ceramic plate (40) having a superconducting metallized area, and a superconducting eyelet (50) for sealing plate (40) into frame (30). The plate (40) is brazed to eyelet (50) which is then electron beam welded to frame (30). A method for providing a ceramic object mounted in a metal member to withstand cryogenic temperatures is also provided. The method involves a new metallization process for coating a selected area of a ceramic object with a thin film of a superconducting material. Finally, a method for assembling an electron beam accelerator cavity utilizing the srf window assembly is provided. The procedure is carried out within an ultra clean room to minimize exposure to particulates which adversely affect the performance of the cavity within the electron beam accelerator.

  4. Shielding analysis of glove boxes for handling of plutonium materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rainisch, R.

    1996-12-31

    The end of the Cold War has led the U.S. Department of Energy to adopt new programs for the management of excess plutonium materials. The programs center on placing plutonium is safe, long-term storage (50 yr) prior to final disposition. Before the plutonium can be placed in storage, materials will have to be stabilized and repackaged. Savannah River site (SRS) is pursuing the design of facilities for the stabilization of plutonium materials. Plutonium handling is to be performed in airtight glove boxes or similar enclosures. Glove boxes will incorporate radiation shielding for the protection of operators. This paper addresses the shielding configuration of the glove boxes and protection of operating personnel from external radiation. Shielding analysis of the glove boxes included (a) identification of plutonium source terms; (b) analysis of extremity exposures, which pertains to workers hands and forearms exposure; (c) shielding analysis, which includes shielding windows (transparent shielding) and glove-box walls; and (d) measures to enhance the radiological design of the enclosures.

  5. Efficacy of Cosmic Ray Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhodes, Nicholas

    2015-10-01

    This research involved testing various types of shielding with a self-constructed Berkeley style cosmic ray detector, in order to evaluate the materials of each type of shielding's effectiveness at blocking cosmic rays and the cost- and size-efficiency of the shields as well. The detector was constructed, then tested for functionality and reliability. Following confirmation, the detector was then used at three different locations to observe it altitude or atmospheric conditions had any effect on the effectiveness of certain shields. Multiple types of shielding were tested with the detector, including combinations of several shields, primarily aluminum, high-iron steel, polyethylene plastic, water, lead, and a lead-alternative radiation shield utilized in radiology. These tests regarding both the base effectiveness and the overall efficiency of shields is designed to support future space exploratory missions where the risk of exposure to possibly lethal amounts of cosmic rays for crew and the damage caused to unshielded electronics are of serious concern.

  6. Lightweight Shield Against Space Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr.; Lawson, Bobby E.; Miller, Andre E.; Cobb, W. E.

    1992-01-01

    Report presents concept for lightweight, deployable shield protecting orbiting spacecraft against meteoroids and debris, and functions as barrier to conductive and radiative losses of heat. Shield made in four segments providing 360 degree coverage of cylindrical space-station module.

  7. SSC environmental radiation shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, J.D.

    1987-07-01

    The environmental radiation shielding requirements of the SSC have been evaluated using currently available computational tools that incorporate the well known processes of energy loss and degradation of high energy particles into Monte Carlo computer codes. These tools permit determination of isodose contours in the matter surrounding a source point and therefore the specification of minimum thicknesses or extents of shielding in order to assure annual dose equivalents less than some specified design amount. For the general public the annual dose equivalent specified in the design is 10 millirem, small compared to the dose from naturally occurring radiation. The types of radiation fall into two classes for the purposes of shielding determinations-hadrons and muons. The sources of radiation at the SSC of concern for the surrounding environment are the interaction regions, the specially designed beam dumps into which the beams are dumped from time to time, and beam clean-up regions where stops remove the beam halo in order to reduce experimental backgrounds. A final, unlikely source of radiation considered is the accidental loss of the full beam at some point around the ring. Conservative choices of a luminosity of 10{sup 34} cm{sup {minus}2}s{sup {minus}1} and a beam current three times design have been made in calculating the required shielding and boundaries of the facility. In addition to determination of minimum distances for the annual dose equivalents, the question of possible radioactivity produced in nearby wells or in municipal water supplies is addressed. The designed shielding distances and beam dumps are such that the induced radioactivity in ground water is safely smaller than the levels permitted by EPA and international agencies.

  8. Spacecraft Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This project analyzed the feasibility of placing an electrostatic field around a spacecraft to provide a shield against radiation. The concept was originally proposed in the 1960s and tested on a spacecraft by the Soviet Union in the 1970s. Such tests and analyses showed that this concept is not only feasible but operational. The problem though is that most of this work was aimed at protection from 10- to 100-MeV radiation. We now appreciate that the real problem is 1- to 2-GeV radiation. So, the question is one of scaling, in both energy and size. Can electrostatic shielding be made to work at these high energy levels and can it protect an entire vehicle? After significant analysis and consideration, an electrostatic shield configuration was proposed. The selected architecture was a torus, charged to a high negative voltage, surrounding the vehicle, and a set of positively charged spheres. Van de Graaff generators were proposed as the mechanism to move charge from the vehicle to the torus to generate the fields necessary to protect the spacecraft. This design minimized complexity, residual charge, and structural forces and resolved several concerns raised during the internal critical review. But, it still is not clear if such a system is costeffective or feasible, even though several studies have indicated usefulness for radiation protection at energies lower than that of the galactic cosmic rays. Constructing such a system will require power supplies that can generate voltages 10 times that of the state of the art. Of more concern is the difficulty of maintaining the proper net charge on the entire structure and ensuring that its interaction with solar wind will not cause rapid discharge. Yet, if these concerns can be resolved, such a scheme may provide significant radiation shielding to future vehicles, without the excessive weight or complexity of other active shielding techniques.

  9. Flexible Multi-Shock Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne L. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Flexible multi-shock shield system and method are disclosed for defending against hypervelocity particles. The flexible multi-shock shield system and method may include a number of flexible bumpers or shield layers spaced apart by one or more resilient support layers, all of which may be encapsulated in a protective cover. Fasteners associated with the protective cover allow the flexible multi-shock shield to be secured to the surface of a structure to be protected.

  10. A proposed performance index for galactic cosmic ray shielding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Wood, J. S.; Shinn, Judy L.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Nealy, John E.

    1993-01-01

    In past studies, the reductions in absorbed dose and dose equivalent due to choice of material composition have been used to indicate shield effectiveness against exposure to galactic cosmic rays. However, these quantities are highly inaccurate in assessing shield effectiveness for protection against the biological effects of long-term exposure to the galactic heavy ions. A new quantity for shield performance is defined that correlates well with cell killing and cell transformation behind various shield thicknesses and materials. In addition, a relative performance index is identified that is inversely related to biological injury for different materials at a fixed shield mass and is directly related to the ratio of the fourth- and the second-order linear energy transfer (LET) moments.

  11. Double window viewing chamber assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, V. W. (Inventor); Owen, R. B. (Inventor); Elkins, B. R. (Inventor); White, W. T. (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    A viewing chamber which permits observation of a sample retained therein includes a pair of double window assemblies mounted in opposed openings in the walls thereof so that a light beam can directly enter and exit from the chamber. A flexible mounting arrangement for the outer windows of the window assemblies enables the windows to be brought into proper alignment. An electrical heating arrangement prevents fogging of the outer windows whereas desiccated air in the volume between the outer and inner windows prevents fogging of the latter.

  12. VIEW OF THREE SOUTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THREE SOUTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED ADJACENT TO THE ALTER. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  13. VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED ADJACENT TO THE ALTAR. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  14. VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THREE NORTH FACING STAINED GLASS WINDOWS. THESE WINDOWS ARE LOCATED JUST BELOW THE CHOIR LOFT. - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Chapel, Corner of Oakley & Nimitz Street, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. details: window jamb from first period of construction; window jamb, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    details: window jamb from first period of construction; window jamb, sill profile, and transom profile from second period of construction - Joseph Poffenberger Farm, House, 17834 Mansfield Avenue, Sharpsburg, Washington County, MD

  16. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-01

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 102-104 are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  17. Shielding in ungated field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.; Petillo, J. J.

    2015-05-18

    Cathodes consisting of arrays of high aspect ratio field emitters are of great interest as sources of electron beams for vacuum electronic devices. The desire for high currents and current densities drives the cathode designer towards a denser array, but for ungated emitters, denser arrays also lead to increased shielding, in which the field enhancement factor β of each emitter is reduced due to the presence of the other emitters in the array. To facilitate the study of these arrays, we have developed a method for modeling high aspect ratio emitters using tapered dipole line charges. This method can be used to investigate proximity effects from similar emitters an arbitrary distance away and is much less computationally demanding than competing simulation approaches. Here, we introduce this method and use it to study shielding as a function of array geometry. Emitters with aspect ratios of 10{sup 2}–10{sup 4} are modeled, and the shielding-induced reduction in β is considered as a function of tip-to-tip spacing for emitter pairs and for large arrays with triangular and square unit cells. Shielding is found to be negligible when the emitter spacing is greater than the emitter height for the two-emitter array, or about 2.5 times the emitter height in the large arrays, in agreement with previously published results. Because the onset of shielding occurs at virtually the same emitter spacing in the square and triangular arrays, the triangular array is preferred for its higher emitter density at a given emitter spacing. The primary contribution to shielding in large arrays is found to come from emitters within a distance of three times the unit cell spacing for both square and triangular arrays.

  18. Micrometeoroid and Orbital Debris (MMOD) Shield Ballistic Limit Analysis Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon

    2013-01-01

    This software implements penetration limit equations for common micrometeoroid and orbital debris (MMOD) shield configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems. Allowable MMOD risk is formulated in terms of the probability of penetration (PNP) of the spacecraft pressure hull. For calculating the risk, spacecraft geometry models, mission profiles, debris environment models, and penetration limit equations for installed shielding configurations are required. Risk assessment software such as NASA's BUMPERII is used to calculate mission PNP; however, they are unsuitable for use in shield design and preliminary analysis studies. The software defines a single equation for the design and performance evaluation of common MMOD shielding configurations, windows, and thermal protection systems, along with a description of their validity range and guidelines for their application. Recommendations are based on preliminary reviews of fundamental assumptions, and accuracy in predicting experimental impact test results. The software is programmed in Visual Basic for Applications for installation as a simple add-in for Microsoft Excel. The user is directed to a graphical user interface (GUI) that requires user inputs and provides solutions directly in Microsoft Excel workbooks.

  19. Roof Shield for Advance and Retreat Mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, E. V.

    1985-01-01

    Shield sections change their configuration to suit mining mode. Articulation cylinders raise rear shield to advance position, and locking cylinders hold it there. To change to retreat position articulation cylinders lower shield. Locking pins at edge of outermost shield plate latch shield to chock base. Shield accommodates roof heights ranging from 36 to 60 inches (0.9 to 1.52 meters).

  20. Capacitive Proximity Sensors With Additional Driven Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnell, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Improved capacitive proximity sensors constructed by incorporating one or more additional driven shield(s). Sensitivity and range of sensor altered by adjusting driving signal(s) applied to shield(s). Includes sensing electrode and driven isolating shield that correspond to sensing electrode and driven shield.

  1. Composition for radiation shielding

    DOEpatents

    Kronberg, J.W.

    1994-08-02

    A composition for use as a radiation shield is disclosed. The shield has a depleted uranium core for absorbing gamma rays and a bismuth coating for preventing chemical corrosion and absorbing gamma rays. Alternatively, a sheet of gadolinium may be positioned between the uranium core and the bismuth coating for absorbing neutrons. The composition is preferably in the form of a container for storing materials that emit radiation such as gamma rays and neutrons. The container is preferably formed by casting bismuth around a pre-formed uranium container having a gadolinium sheeting, and allowing the bismuth to cool. The resulting container is a structurally sound, corrosion-resistant, radiation-absorbing container. 2 figs.

  2. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, Daniel

    1985-01-01

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  3. Multilayer radiation shield

    SciTech Connect

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  4. Gas shielding apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Brandt, D.

    1984-06-05

    An apparatus for preventing oxidation by uniformly distributing inert shielding gas over the weld area of workpieces such as pipes being welded together. The apparatus comprises a chamber and a gas introduction element. The chamber has an annular top wall, an annular bottom wall, an inner side wall and an outer side wall connecting the top and bottom walls. One side wall is a screen and the other has a portion defining an orifice. The gas introduction element has a portion which encloses the orifice and can be one or more pipes. The gas introduction element is in fluid communication with the chamber and introduces inert shielding gas into the chamber. The inert gas leaves the chamber through the screen side wall and is dispersed evenly over the weld area.

  5. Whipple bumper shield simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Hertel, E.S.; Chhabildas, L.C. ); Hill, S.A. . George C. Marshall Space Flight Center)

    1991-01-01

    The Whipple bumper is a space shield designed to protect a space station from the most hazardous orbital space debris environment. A series of numerical simulations has been performed using the multi-dimensional hydrodynamics code CTH to estimate the effectiveness of the thin Whipple bumper design. These simulations are performed for impact velocities of {approximately}10 km/s which are now accessible by experiments using the Sandia hypervelocity launcher facility. For a {approximately}10 km/s impact by a 0.7 gm aluminum flier plate, the experimental results indicate that the debris cloud resulting upon impact of the bumper shield by the flier plate, completely penetrates the sub-structure. The CTH simulations also predict complete penetration by the subsequent debris cloud. 5 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. T25 ITER ECH window development 110 GHz ECH distributed window development. Final report, May 1, 1994--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Olstad, R.A.; Moeller, C.P.; Grunloh, H.J.

    1998-01-01

    Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) is one of the major candidates for Heating and Current Drive on ITER. ECH is extremely attractive from a reactor engineering point of view, offering compact launch structures, high injected power density, and a simple interface with the shield/blanket. Economic deployment of ECH for ITER requires MW unit microwave sources (gyrotrons). The present technology limitation is the availability of suitable low loss output windows. These are needed for the torus as well as the tube. The torus window, in particular, is a demanding application as it also serves as a tritium barrier. Several distinct window concepts are under development by the various Parties. This report summarizes the efforts to make and test a {open_quotes}distributed{close_quotes} window suitable for 1 MW cw operation at 110 GHz. A companion report (Final Report on Task 245+) describes the efforts to make a distributed window suitable for 1 MW cw operation at 170 GHz, the main frequency of interest to ITER. General Atomics (GA) fabricated a 4 in. x 4 in. 110 GHz distributed window which was delivered in September 1995 to Communications and Power Industries (CPI). Hot tests at CPI confirmed the power handling capability of the window. Tests were conducted with a reduced beam size at 200 kW with 0.7 s pulses without any arcing or excessive window temperatures. The power density and pulse length were equivalent to that in a full size 1.2 MW CW beam with a peak-to-average power ratio of 2.7. This window was assembled using a gold braze material to bond the sapphire strips to the niobium frame. The braze was successful except for small leaks at two locations, and re-braze efforts were unsuccessful.

  7. Combustor bulkhead heat shield assembly

    SciTech Connect

    Zeisser, M.H.

    1990-06-19

    This paper describes a gas turbine engine having an annular combustion chamber defined by an annular, inner liner, a concentric outer liner, and an upstream annular combustor head, wherein the head includes a radially extending bulkhead having circumferentially distributed openings for each receiving an individual fuel nozzle therethrough. It comprises: a segmented heat shield assembly, disposed between the combustion chamber interior and the bulkhead, including generally planar, sector shaped heat shields, each shield abutting circumferentially with two next adjacent shields and extending radially from proximate the inner liner to proximate the outer liner, the plurality of shields collectively defining an annular protective barrier, and wherein each sector shaped shield further includes an opening, corresponding to one of the bulkhead nozzle openings for likewise receiving the corresponding nozzle therethrough, the shield opening further including an annular lip extending toward the bulkhead and being received within the bulkhead opening, raised ridges on the shield backside, the ridges contacting the facing bulkhead surface and defining a flow path for a flow of cooling air issuing from a sized supply opening disposed in the bulkhead, the flow path running ultimately from adjacent the annular lip to the edges of each shield segment, wherein the raised edges extend fully along the lateral, circumferentially spaced edges of each shield segment and about the adjacent shield segments wherein the raised ridges further extend circumferentially between the annular lip and the abutting edge ridges.

  8. Shielding considerations for satellite microelectronics

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, W.C.; Drumm, C.R.; Roeske, S.B.; Scrivner, G.J.

    1996-12-01

    Shielding for space microelectronics needs to provide an acceptable dose rate with minimum shield mass. The analysis presented here shows that the best approach is, in general, to use a graded-Z shield, with a high-Z layer sandwiched between two low-Z materials. A graded-Z shield is shown to reduce the electron dose rate by more than sixty percent over a single-material shield of the same areal density. For protons, the optimal shield would consist of a single, low-Z material layer. However, it is shown that a graded-Z shield is nearly as effective as a single-material shield, as long as a low-Z layer is located adjacent to the microelectronics. A specific shield design depends upon the details of the radiation environment, system model, design margins/levels, compatibility of shield materials, etc. Therefore, the authors present here general principles for designing effective shields and describe how the computer codes are used for this application.

  9. Lens window simplifies TDL housing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, D. M.; Rowland, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Lens window seal in tunable-diode-laser housing replaces plan parallel window. Lens seals housing and acts as optical-output coupler, thus eliminating need for additional reimaging or collimating optics.

  10. Residual malignant and normal plasma cells shortly after high dose melphalan and stem cell transplantation. Highlight of a putative therapeutic window in Multiple Myeloma?

    PubMed Central

    Caraux, Anouk; Vincent, Laure; Bouhya, Salahedine; Quittet, Philippe; Moreaux, Jérôme; Requirand, Guilhem; Veyrune, Jean-Luc; Olivier, Gaëlle; Cartron, Guillaume; Rossi, Jean-François; Klein, Bernard

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Myeloma (MM) is an incurable malignant plasma cell disorder. We have evaluated the counts of Multiple Myeloma Cells (MMCs) and normal plasma cells (N-PCs), seven days after high-dose melphalan (HDM) and autologous stem transplantation (ASCT). Two third of patients had detectable minimal residual disease (MRD+) (71.7 MMCs/μL) after induction treatment with dexamethasone and proteasome inhibitor. MMC counts were reduced by 92% (P ≤ .05) but not eradicated 7 days after HDM+ASCT. Post-HDM+ASCT MMCs were viable and bathed in a burst of MMC growth factors, linked with post-HDM aplasia. In one third of patients (MRD− patients), MMCs were not detectable after induction treatment and remained undetectable after HDM+ASCT. Major difference between MRD− and MRD+ patients is that N-PC counts were increased 3 fold (P < .05) by HDM+ASCT in MRD− patients, but were unaffected in MRD+ patients. Possible explanation could be that clearance of MMCs in MRD− patients makes more niches available for N-PCs. Thus, MMCs are not fully eradicated shortly after HDM, are bathed in high concentrations of MMC growth factors in an almost desert BM, are viable in short-term culture, which suggests providing additional therapies shortly after HDM to kill resistant MMCs before full repair of lesions. PMID:23154454

  11. Skylab Solar Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A sail like sunshade for possible use as a sunscreen for the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) is shown being fabricated in the GE Building across the street from Johnson Space Center, Houston Texas. Three people help the steamstress feed the material through the sewing machine. The three-layered sunshade will be composed of a top layer of aluminized mylar, a middle layer of laminated nylon ripstop, and a bottom layer of thin nylon. Working on the sunshade are from left to right: Dale Gentry, Elizabeth Gauldin, Alyene Baker, and James H. Barnett Jr. Mrs. Baker, a GE employee, operates the double needle Singer sewing machine. Barnett is head of the Crew Equipment Development Section of JSC Crew Systems Division. Mrs. Gauldin is also with the Crew Systems Division. Gentry works for GE. The work shown here is part of the crash program underway to prepare a sunshield for Skylab to replace the orginal shield which was lost when Skylab 1 was launched on May 14, 1973. The improvised solar shield selected to be used will be carried to Earth orbit by the Skylab 2 crewman who will then deploy the reflective parasol to shade part of the OWS from the hot rays of the sun. Loss of the orginal sun shield has caused an overheating problem. in the Orbital Work Shop.

  12. Crumpled Heat Shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    The Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager took this image of the spacecraft's crumpled heat shield on Sept. 16, 2008, the 111th Martian day of the mission.

    The 2-1/2 meter (about 8-1/2 feet) heat shield landed southeast of Phoenix, about halfway between the spacecraft and its backshell/parachute. The backshell/parachute touched ground 300 meters (1,000 ft) to the south of the lander.

    The dark area to the right of the heat shield is the 'bounce mark' it made on impact with the Red Planet. This image is the highest-resolution image that will likely be taken by the lander, and is part of the 1,500-image 'Happily Ever After' panorama.

    The Phoenix mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is led by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver.

  13. A Window-Washing Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2010-01-01

    Skyscrapers sure do have a lot of windows, and these windows are cleaned and checked regularly. All this takes time, money, and puts workers at potential risk. Might there be a better way to do it? In this article, the author discusses a window-washing challenge and describes how students can tackle this task, pick up the challenge, and creatively…

  14. Beam Window for Pressure Chambers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bransford, J. W.; Austin, J. G., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Window resists products of combustion experiments. Sodium chloride window seals over chamber pressures from 0.1 to 13.8 MPa while absorbing minimal energy from CO2 laser beam that passes through it into chamber. Window inexpensive and easily replacable.

  15. Windows: The Benefits Are Clear.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sturgeon, Julie

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the importance of specifying windows in a school renovation or building project in order to energize a campus. Explains how windows are psychologically uplifting, how glass accentuates excitement and its shapes signal stability, and how windows convey the institution's confidence in the present. (GR)

  16. DEMONSTRATION OF THE DWPF FLOWSHEET IN THE SRNL SHIELDED CELLS USING ARP PRODUCT SIMULANT AND SB4 TANK 40 SLUDGE SLURRY

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D; John Pareizs, J; Bradley Pickenheim, B; Cj Bannochie, C; Michael Stone, M; Damon Click, D; Erich Hansen, E; Kim Crapse, K; David Hobbs, D

    2008-05-14

    The radioactive startup of two new SRS processing facilities, the Actinide Removal Process (ARP) and the Modular Caustic-Side-Solvent-Extraction Unit (MCU) will add two new waste streams to the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). The ARP will remove actinides from the 5.6 M salt solution resulting in a sludge-like product that is roughly half monosodium titanate (MST) insoluble solids and half sludge insoluble solids. The ARP product will be added to the Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) at boiling and dewatered prior to pulling a SRAT receipt sample. The cesium rich MCU stream will be added to the SRAT at boiling after both formic and nitric acid have been added and the SRAT contents concentrated to the appropriate endpoint. A concern was raised by an external hydrogen review panel that the actinide loaded MST could act as a catalyst for hydrogen generation (Mar 15, 2007 report, Recommendation 9). Hydrogen generation, and it's potential to form a flammable mixture in the off-gas, under SRAT and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) processing conditions has been a concern since the discovery that noble metals catalyze the decomposition of formic acid. Radiolysis of water also generates hydrogen, but the radiolysis rate is orders of magnitude lower than the noble metal catalyzed generation. As a result of the concern raised by the external hydrogen review panel, hydrogen generation was a prime consideration in this experiment. Testing was designed to determine whether the presence of the irradiated ARP simulant containing MST caused uncontrolled or unexpected hydrogen production during experiments simulating the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC) due to activation of titanium. A Shielded Cells experiment, SC-5, was completed using SB4 sludge from Tank 405 combined with an ARP product produced from simulants by SRNL researchers. The blend of sludge and MST was designed to be prototypic of planned DWPF SRAT and SME cycles. As glass quality was not an objective in

  17. Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic Window System

    SciTech Connect

    Millett, F,A; Byker,H, J

    2006-10-27

    Pleotint has embarked on a novel approach with our Sunlight Responsive Thermochromic, SRT™, windows. We are integrating dynamic sunlight control, high insulation values and low solar heat gain together in a high performance window. The Pleotint SRT window is dynamic because it reversibly changes light transmission based on thermochromics activated directly by the heating effect of sunlight. We can achieve a window package with low solar heat gain coefficient (SHGC), a low U value and high insulation. At the same time our windows provide good daylighting. Our innovative window design offers architects and building designers the opportunity to choose their desired energy performance, excellent sound reduction, external pane can be self-cleaning, or a resistance to wind load, blasts, bullets or hurricanes. SRT windows would provide energy savings that are estimated at up to 30% over traditional window systems. Glass fabricators will be able to use existing equipment to make the SRT window while adding value and flexibility to the basic design. Glazing installers will have the ability to fit the windows with traditional methods without wires, power supplies and controllers. SRT windows can be retrofit into existing buildings,

  18. Spacecraft ceramic protective shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larriva, Rene F. (Inventor); Nelson, Anne (M.); Czechanski, James G. (Inventor); Poff, Ray E. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A low areal density protective shield apparatus, and method for making same, for protecting spacecraft structures from impact with hypervelocity objects, including a bumper member comprising a bumper ceramic layer, a bumper shock attenuator layer, and a bumper confining layer. The bumper ceramic layer can be SiC or B.sub.4 C; the bumper shock attenuator layer can be zirconia felt; and the bumper confining layer can be aluminum. A base armor member can be spaced from the bumper member and a ceramic fiber-based curtain can be positioned between the bumper and base armor members.

  19. Passive Shielding in CUORE

    SciTech Connect

    Bellini, F.; Cosmelli, C.; Dafinei, I.; Diemoz, S.; Faccini, R.; Ferroni, F.; Gargiulo, C.; Longo, E.; Morganti, S.; Tomei, C.; Vignati, M.; Alessandria, F.; Andreotti, E.; Foggetta, L.; Giuliani, A.; Pedretti, M.; Sangiorgio, S.; Ardito, R.; Arnaboldi, C.; Brofferio, C.

    2007-03-28

    The nature of neutrino mass is one of the friontier problems of fundamental physics. Neutrinoless Double Beta Decay (0{nu}DBD) is a powerful tool to investigate the mass hierarchy and possible extensions of the Standard Model. CUORE is a 1-Ton next generation experiment, made of 1000 Te bolometers, aiming at reaching a background of 0.01 (possibly 0.001) counts keV-1kg-1y-1 and therefore a mass sensitivity of few tens of meV The background contribution due to environmental neutrons, muon-induced neutrons in the shieldings and external gamma is discussed.

  20. Windows on the axion

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, M.S.

    1989-04-01

    Peccei-Quinn symmetry with attendant axion is a most compelling, and perhaps the most minimal, extension of the standard model, as it provides a very elegant solution to the nagging strong CP-problem associated with the THETA vacuum structure of QCD. However, particle physics gives little guidance as to the axion mass; a priori, the plausible values span the range: 10/sup /minus/12/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup 6/ eV, some 18 orders-of-magnitude. Axions have a host of interesting astrophysical and cosmological effects, including, modifying the evolution of stars of all types (our sun, red giants, white dwarfs, and neutron stars), contributing significantly to the mass density of the Universe today, and producing detectable line radiation through the decays of relic axions. Consideration of these effects has probed 14 orders-of-magnitude in axion mass, and has left open only two windows for further exploration: 10/sup /minus/6/ eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 10/sup /minus/3/ eV and 1 eV /approx lt/ m/sub a/ /approx lt/ 5 eV (hadronic axions only). Both these windows are accessible to experiment, and a variety of very interesting experiments, all of which involve ''heavenly axions,'' are being planned or are underway. 58 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Effects of shields on cables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Aircraft wiring subjected to rapidly changing electromagnetic fields was considered. The ways in which shielded cables reduce surge voltages were studied along with the ways in which common practice regarding the use of shields may be at variance with the use required for the control of lightning effects. Courses in which this apparent conflict of use may be resolved were suggested. Noise currents flowing on shields of cables related to the noise signals coupled onto signal conductors were also investigated.

  2. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom was used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations were determined by controlled displacement loading of longwall shields in the Bureau's Mine Roof Simulator. These two-legged longwall shields of different manufacture were investigated. The stiffness characteristics of these shields were evaluated relative to two parameters, namely, shield height and setting pressure. The tests results indicate a reduction in shield stiffness for increasing height. Setting pressure was found to have less of an effect on shield stiffness, producing only a slight increase in stiffness as setting pressure increased. Similar trends were observed for all three shields, indicating a similarity in stiffness characteristics for shields of the same basic configuration.

  3. Actively driven thermal radiation shield

    DOEpatents

    Madden, Norman W.; Cork, Christopher P.; Becker, John A.; Knapp, David A.

    2002-01-01

    A thermal radiation shield for cooled portable gamma-ray spectrometers. The thermal radiation shield is located intermediate the vacuum enclosure and detector enclosure, is actively driven, and is useful in reducing the heat load to mechanical cooler and additionally extends the lifetime of the mechanical cooler. The thermal shield is electrically-powered and is particularly useful for portable solid-state gamma-ray detectors or spectrometers that dramatically reduces the cooling power requirements. For example, the operating shield at 260K (40K below room temperature) will decrease the thermal radiation load to the detector by 50%, which makes possible portable battery operation for a mechanically cooled Ge spectrometer.

  4. Hypervelocity impact shield

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cour-Palais, Burton G. (Inventor); Crews, Jeanne Lee (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A hypervelocity impact shield and method for protecting a wall structure, such as a spacecraft wall, from impact with particles of debris having densities of about 2.7 g/cu cm and impact velocities up to 16 km/s are disclosed. The shield comprises a stack of ultra thin sheets of impactor disrupting material supported and arranged by support means in spaced relationship to one another and mounted to cover the wall in a position for intercepting the particles. The sheets are of a number and spacing such that the impacting particle and the resulting particulates of the impacting particle and sheet material are successively impact-shocked to a thermal state of total melt and/or vaporization to a degree as precludes perforation of the wall. The ratio of individual sheet thickness to the theoretical diameter of particles of debris which may be of spherical form is in the range of 0.03 to 0.05. The spacing between adjacent sheets is such that the debris cloud plume of liquid and vapor resulting from an impacting particle penetrating a sheet does not puncture the next adjacent sheet prior to the arrival thereat of fragment particulates of sheet material and the debris particle produced by a previous impact.

  5. Iron shielded MRI optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, C. A.; Fabbri, M.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the main current systems of an actively shielded and of an iron shielded MRI device for nuclear resonance imaging, is considered. The model for the analysis of the magnetic induction produced by the current system, is based on the combination of a Boundary Element technique and of the integration of two Fredholm integral equations of the first and the second kind. The equivalent current magnetization model is used for the calculation of the magnetization produced by the iron shield. High field uniformity in a spherical region inside the device, and a low stray field in the neighborhood of the device are required. In order to meet the design requirements a multi-objective global minimization problem is solved. The minimization method is based on the combination of the filled function technique and the (1+1) evolution strategy algorithm. The multi-objective problem is treated by means of a penalty method. The actively shielded MRI system results to utilize larger amount of conductor and produce higher magnetic energy than the iron shield device. On veut étudier le projet du système des courants principaux d'un MRI à écran en fer et d'un MRI à écran actif. Le modèle d'analyse du champ magnétique produit par le système de courants est basé sur la combinaison d'une technique Boundary Element et de l'intégration de deux équations intégrales de Fredholm de première et de seconde sorte. On utilise pour calculer la magnétisation produite par l'écran en fer le modèle à cou rants de magné ti sa tion équivalents. On exige une élévation uniforme du champ dans une région sphérique au cœur de l'appareil et un bas champ magnétique dispersé à proximité de l'appareil. Dans le but de répondre aux impératifs du projet, on va résoudre un problème multiobjectif de minimisation globale. On utilise une technique de minimisation obtenue par la combinaison des méthodes “Filled Function” et “(1+1) Evolution Strategy”. Le probl

  6. PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    PBF Cubicle 13. Shield wall details illustrate shielding technique of stepped penetrations and brick layout scheme for valve stem extension sleeve. Aerojet Nuclear Company. Date: May 1976. INEEL index no. 761-0620-00-400-195280 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, SPERT-I & Power Burst Facility Area, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  7. Pivotably mounted reactor shroud shield and shielding method

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.

    1987-03-31

    A method is described for shielding persons working around a nuclear reactor having a reactor head an a shroud extending upward from the reactor head, comprising: (a) mounting a plurality of swingout arms around the shroud, each swingout arm being pivotable about a respective axis that is substantially vertical and that is fixed with respect to the shroud; (b) positioning a shielding member adjacent a swingout arm with a hoist; (c) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally away from the shroud and toward the hoist; (d) transferring the shielding member from the hoist to the swingout arm so that the swingout arm supports the shielding member; (e) pivoting the swingout arm horizontally back toward the shroud; and (f) repeating steps (b) through (c) until the shroud is substantially surrounded by shielding members.

  8. Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry Concept

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, R.A.; Cron, J.

    2000-03-29

    This design analysis has shown that, on a conceptual level, the emplacement of drip shields is feasible with current technology and equipment. A plan for drip shield emplacement was presented using a Drip Shield Transporter, a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry, a locomotive, and a Drip Shield Gantry Carrier. The use of a Drip Shield Emplacement Gantry as an emplacement concept results in a system that is simple, reliable, and interfaces with the numerous other exising repository systems. Using the Waste Emplacement/Retrieval System design as a basis for the drip shield emplacement concept proved to simplify the system by using existing equipment, such as the gantry carrier, locomotive, Electrical and Control systems, and many other systems, structures, and components. Restricted working envelopes for the Drip Shield Emplacement System require further consideration and must be addressed to show that the emplacement operations can be performed as the repository design evolves. Section 6.1 describes how the Drip Shield Emplacement System may use existing equipment. Depending on the length of time between the conclusion of waste emplacement and the commencement of drip shield emplacement, this equipment could include the locomotives, the gantry carrier, and the electrical, control, and rail systems. If the exisiting equipment is selected for use in the Drip Shield Emplacement System, then the length of time after the final stages of waste emplacement and start of drip shield emplacement may pose a concern for the life cycle of the system (e.g., reliability, maintainability, availability, etc.). Further investigation should be performed to consider the use of existing equipment for drip shield emplacement operations. Further investigation will also be needed regarding the interfaces and heat transfer and thermal effects aspects. The conceptual design also requires further design development. Although the findings of this analysis are accurate for the assumptions made

  9. Window defect planar mapping technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minton, F. R.; Minton, U. O. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A method of planar mapping defects in a window having an edge surface and a planar surface. The method is comprised of steps for mounting the window on a support surface. Then a light sensitive paper is placed adjacent to the window surface. A light source is positioned adjacent to the window edge. The window is then illuminated with the source of light for a predetermined interval of time. Defects on the surface of the glass, as well as in the interior of the glass are detected by analyzing the developed light sensitive paper. The light source must be in the form of optical fibers or a light tube whose light transmitting ends are placed near the edge surface of the window.

  10. Thermoelastic Analysis of Hyper-X Camera Windows Suddenly Exposed to Mach 7 Stagnation Aerothermal Shock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Gong, Leslie

    2000-01-01

    To visually record the initial free flight event of the Hyper-X research flight vehicle immediately after separation from the Pegasus(registered) booster rocket, a video camera was mounted on the bulkhead of the adapter through which Hyper-X rides on Pegasus. The video camera was shielded by a protecting camera window made of heat-resistant quartz material. When Hyper-X separates from Pegasus, this camera window will be suddenly exposed to Mach 7 stagnation thermal shock and dynamic pressure loading (aerothermal loading). To examine the structural integrity, thermoelastic analysis was performed, and the stress distributions in the camera windows were calculated. The critical stress point where the tensile stress reaches a maximum value for each camera window was identified, and the maximum tensile stress level at that critical point was found to be considerably lower than the tensile failure stress of the camera window material.

  11. Window Observational Research Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pelfrey, Joseph; Sledd, Annette

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph document concerns the Window Observational Research Facility (WORF) Rack, a unique facility designed for use with the US Lab Destiny Module window. WORF will provide valuable resources for Earth Science payloads along with serving the purpose of protecting the lab window. The facility can be used for remote sensing instrumentation test and validation in a shirt sleeve environment. WORF will also provide a training platform for crewmembers to do orbital observations of other planetary bodies. WORF payloads will be able to conduct terrestrial studies utilizing the data collected from utilizing WORF and the lab window.

  12. Subject Responses to Electrochromic Windows

    SciTech Connect

    Clear, Robert; Inkarojrit, Vorapat; Lee, Eleanor

    2006-03-03

    Forty-three subjects worked in a private office with switchable electrochromic windows, manually-operated Venetian blinds, and dimmable fluorescent lights. The electrochromic window had a visible transmittance range of approximately 3-60%. Analysis of subject responses and physical data collected during the work sessions showed that the electrochromic windows reduced the incidence of glare compared to working under a fixed transmittance (60%) condition. Subjects used the Venetian blinds less often and preferred the variable transmittance condition, but used slightly more electric lighting with it than they did when window transmittance was fixed.

  13. Integrated smart electrochromic windows for energy saving and storage applications.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhong; Jin, Xiujuan; Chen, Gui; Xu, Jing; Chen, Di; Shen, Guozhen

    2014-01-18

    A self-powered electrochromic smart window with tunable transmittance driven by dye-sensitized solar cells has been designed, which also acts as a photocharged electrochromic supercapacitor with high areal capacitance and reversible color changes. PMID:24281715

  14. Evaluation of SNS Beamline Shielding Configurations using MCNPX Accelerated by ADVANTG

    SciTech Connect

    Risner, Joel M; Johnson, Seth R.; Remec, Igor; Bekar, Kursat B.

    2015-01-01

    Shielding analyses for the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory pose significant computational challenges, including highly anisotropic high-energy sources, a combination of deep penetration shielding and an unshielded beamline, and a desire to obtain well-converged nearly global solutions for mapping of predicted radiation fields. The majority of these analyses have been performed using MCNPX with manually generated variance reduction parameters (source biasing and cell-based splitting and Russian roulette) that were largely based on the analyst's insight into the problem specifics. Development of the variance reduction parameters required extensive analyst time, and was often tailored to specific portions of the model phase space. We previously applied a developmental version of the ADVANTG code to an SNS beamline study to perform a hybrid deterministic/Monte Carlo analysis and showed that we could obtain nearly global Monte Carlo solutions with essentially uniform relative errors for mesh tallies that cover extensive portions of the model with typical voxel spacing of a few centimeters. The use of weight window maps and consistent biased sources produced using the FW-CADIS methodology in ADVANTG allowed us to obtain these solutions using substantially less computer time than the previous cell-based splitting approach. While those results were promising, the process of using the developmental version of ADVANTG was somewhat laborious, requiring user-developed Python scripts to drive much of the analysis sequence. In addition, limitations imposed by the size of weight-window files in MCNPX necessitated the use of relatively coarse spatial and energy discretization for the deterministic Denovo calculations that we used to generate the variance reduction parameters. We recently applied the production version of ADVANTG to this beamline analysis, which substantially streamlined the analysis process. We also tested importance function

  15. Reflective Shields for Artificial Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.

    1986-01-01

    Report proposes reflective shield that protects spacecraft from radiant energy. Also gives some protection against particle beams and cosmic rays. Conceptual shield essentially advanced version of decorative multifaceted mirror balls often hung over dance floors. Mirror facets disperse radiant energy in many directions.

  16. Radiation Shielding Optimization on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slaba, Tony C.; Mertens, Chris J.; Blattnig, Steve R.

    2013-01-01

    Future space missions to Mars will require radiation shielding to be optimized for deep space transit and an extended stay on the surface. In deep space, increased shielding levels and material optimization will reduce the exposure from most solar particle events (SPE) but are less effective at shielding against galactic cosmic rays (GCR). On the surface, the shielding provided by the Martian atmosphere greatly reduces the exposure from most SPE, and long-term GCR exposure is a primary concern. Previous work has shown that in deep space, additional shielding of common materials such as aluminum or polyethylene does not significantly reduce the GCR exposure. In this work, it is shown that on the Martian surface, almost any amount of aluminum shielding increases exposure levels for humans. The increased exposure levels are attributed to neutron production in the shield and Martian regolith as well as the electromagnetic cascade induced in the Martian atmosphere. This result is significant for optimization of vehicle and shield designs intended for the surface of Mars.

  17. Shielded Canister Transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-08-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB.

  18. NEUTRON SHIELDING STRUCTURE

    DOEpatents

    Mattingly, J.T.

    1962-09-25

    A lightweight neutron shielding structure comprises a honeycomb core which is filled with a neutron absorbing powder. The honeycomb core is faced with parallel planar facing sheets to form a lightweight rigid unit. Suitable absorber powders are selected from among the following: B, B/sub 4/C, B/sub 2/O/ sub 3/, CaB/sub 6/, Li/sub 2/CO3, LiOH, LiBO/sub 2/, Li/s ub 2/O. The facing sheets are constructed of a neutron moderating material, so that fast neutrons will be moderated while traversing the facing sheets, and ultimately be absorbed by the absorber powder in the honeycomb. Beryllium is a preferred moderator material for use in the facing sheets. The advantage of the structure is that it combines the rigidity and light weight of a honeycomb construction with the neutron absorption properties of boron and lithium. (AEC)

  19. Shielding and fragmentation studies.

    PubMed

    Zeitlin, C; Guetersloh, S; Heilbronn, L; Miller, J

    2005-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry for manned spaced missions depends on the ability to adequately describe the process of high-energy ion transport through many materials. Since the types of possible nuclear interactions are many and complex, transport models are used which depend upon a reliable source of experimental data. To expand the heavy ion database used in the models we have been measuring charge-changing cross sections and fragment production cross sections from heavy-ion interactions in various elementa targets. These include materials flown on space missions such as carbon and aluminium, as well as those important in radiation dosimetry such as hydrogen, nitrogen and water. Measuring heavy-ion fragmentation through these targets also gives us the ability to determine the effectiveness of new materials proposed for shielding such as graphite composites and polyethylene hybrids. Measurement without a target present gives an indication of the level of contamination of the primary beam, which is also important in radiobiology experiments. PMID:16604611

  20. INTERIOR DETAIL, RETRACTABLE WINDOW SHUTTERS, VENETIAN WINDOW IN THE SOUTHEAST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR DETAIL, RETRACTABLE WINDOW SHUTTERS, VENETIAN WINDOW IN THE SOUTHEAST CABINET. (NOTE THE MIRRORED PANEL IN THE FORWARD SHUTTER’S LOWER SECTION. DURING THE HAMILTONIAN OCCUPANCY, MIRRORS LIKE THESE WERE USED LIBERALLY THROUGHOUT THE HOUSE’S PUBLIC ROOMS - The Woodlands, 4000 Woodlands Avenue, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  1. Welding shield for coupling heaters

    DOEpatents

    Menotti, James Louis

    2010-03-09

    Systems for coupling end portions of two elongated heater portions and methods of using such systems to treat a subsurface formation are described herein. A system may include a holding system configured to hold end portions of the two elongated heater portions so that the end portions are abutted together or located near each other; a shield for enclosing the end portions, and one or more inert gas inlets configured to provide at least one inert gas to flush the system with inert gas during welding of the end portions. The shield may be configured to inhibit oxidation during welding that joins the end portions together. The shield may include a hinged door that, when closed, is configured to at least partially isolate the interior of the shield from the atmosphere. The hinged door, when open, is configured to allow access to the interior of the shield.

  2. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    King, Shawn; Lipinksi, Ronald; McAlpine, William

    2006-01-01

    Nuclear reactor system could provide power to support a long term human exploration to the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor (GCR) system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency (Wright, 2003). The goals of the shielding studies were to provide optimal material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX code, a Monte Carlo transport code.

  3. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2007-05-22

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  4. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler, Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A.

    2011-03-15

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more frusto-conically-tapered telescoping rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration by the friction fit of adjacent pairs of frusto-conically-tapered rings to each other.

  5. Portable convertible blast effects shield

    DOEpatents

    Pastrnak, John W.; Hollaway, Rocky; Henning, Carl D.; Deteresa, Steve; Grundler, Walter; Hagler,; Lisle B.; Kokko, Edwin; Switzer, Vernon A

    2010-10-26

    A rapidly deployable portable convertible blast effects shield/ballistic shield includes a set two or more telescoping cylindrical rings operably connected to each other to convert between a telescopically-collapsed configuration for storage and transport, and a telescopically-extended upright configuration forming an expanded inner volume. In a first embodiment, the upright configuration provides blast effects shielding, such as against blast pressures, shrapnel, and/or fire balls. And in a second embodiment, the upright configuration provides ballistic shielding, such as against incoming weapons fire, shrapnel, etc. Each ring has a high-strength material construction, such as a composite fiber and matrix material, capable of substantially inhibiting blast effects and impinging projectiles from passing through the shield. And the set of rings are releasably securable to each other in the telescopically-extended upright configuration, such as by click locks.

  6. Performance of solar shields. [Skylab 1 micrometeoroid shield difficulties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwinghamer, R. J.

    1974-01-01

    The loss of the micrometeoroid shield from the Orbital Workshop section of Skylab 1 about 63 seconds after lift-off, was the catalyst for a prodigious effort to develop a substitute for the passive portion of the thermal control system. An intensive effort is described in which numerous potential thermal shield materials were assessed, and during which period ten specific shield designs were developed and carried through various stages of development and test. Thermal shield materials data are discussed, including optical, strength, fatigue, outgassing, tackiness, ultraviolet radiation, and material memory properties. Specifically addressed are thermal shield materials selection criteria and the design, development, and test requirements associated with the successful development of Skylab thermal shields, and specifically the two thermal shields subsequently deployed over the exposed gold foil skin of the Orbital Workshop. Also considered are the general performance and thermal improvements provided by both the parasol design deployed by the Skylab 1 crew, and the sail design deployed by the Skylab 2 crew.

  7. Assessment of the ovarian reserve with anti-Müllerian hormone in women who underwent allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using reduced-intensity conditioning regimens or myeloablative regimens with ovarian shielding.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Hirofumi; Ashizawa, Masahiro; Akahoshi, Yu; Ugai, Tomotaka; Wada, Hidenori; Yamasaki, Ryoko; Ishihara, Yuko; Kawamura, Koji; Sakamoto, Kana; Sato, Miki; Terasako-Saito, Kiriko; Kimura, Shun-Ichi; Kikuchi, Misato; Nakasone, Hideki; Kako, Shinichi; Kanda, Junya; Yamazaki, Rie; Tanihara, Aki; Nishida, Junji; Kanda, Yoshinobu

    2016-07-01

    Conditioning regimens that include cyclophosphamide (CY) and total body irradiation (TBI) induce severe gonadal toxicity and permanent infertility in approximately 90 % of female patients who undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). However, the use of ovarian shielding or non-myeloablative regimens may preserve ovarian function. To evaluate the ovarian reserve, serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels were retrospectively measured in 11 female HSCT recipients aged less than 40 years, including seven with acute leukemia (AL) and four with aplastic anemia (AA), who received a myeloablative conditioning regimen with ovarian shielding or a reduced-intensity conditioning regimen. In most patients, menstruation had stopped and AMH level had decreased to an undetectable level (<0.1 ng/ml) after HSCT. Most patients showed a recovery of regular menstruation, but AMH levels did not increase immediately after the resumption of menstruation. However, in three AL patients and two AA patients who were evaluable for long-term recovery, AMH level increased gradually beyond 1 year after HSCT. In conclusion, recovery of the serum AMH level may be delayed after HSCT, and the AMH level early after HSCT may not accurately reflect ovarian reserve. A prospective study is required to address the usefulness of measuring the AMH level in HSCT recipients. PMID:27084256

  8. Efficient Adjustable Reflectivity Smart Window

    SciTech Connect

    D. Morgan Tench

    2005-12-01

    This project addressed the key technical issues for development of an efficient smart window based on reversible electrochemical transfer of silver between a mirror electrode and a localized counter electrode. Effort to provide uniform switching over large areas focused on use of a resistive transparent electrode innerlayer to increase the interelectrode resistance. An effective edge seal was developed in collaboration with adhesive suppliers and an electrochromic device manufacturer. Work to provide a manufacturable counter electrode focused on fabricating a dot matrix electrode without photolithography by electrodeposition of Pt nuclei on inherent active sites on a transparent oxide conductor. An alternative counter electrode based on a conducting polymer and an ionic liquid electrolyte was also investigated. Work in all of these areas was successful. Sputtered large-bandgap oxide innerlayers sandwiched between conductive indium tin oxide (ITO) layers were shown to provide sufficient cross-layer resistance (>300 ohm/cm{sup 2}) without significantly affecting the electrochemical properties of the ITO overlayer. Two edge seal epoxies, one procured from an epoxy manufacturer and one provided by an electrochromic device manufacturer in finished seals, were shown to be effective barriers against oxygen intrusion up to 80 C. The optimum density of nuclei for the dot matrix counter electrode was attained without use of photolithography by electrodeposition from a commercial alkaline platinum plating bath. Silver loss issues for cells with dot matrix electrodes were successfully addressed by purifying the electrolyte and adjusting the cell cycling parameters. More than 30K cycles were demonstrated for a REM cell (30-cm square) with a dot matrix counter electrode. Larger cells (30-cm square) were successfully fabricated but could not be cycled since the nucleation layers (provided by an outside supplier) were defective so that mirror deposits could not be produced.

  9. Toward a new methodology for measuring the threshold Shields number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rousseau, Gauthier; Dhont, Blaise; Ancey, Christophe

    2016-04-01

    A number of bedload transport equations involve the threshold Shields number (corresponding to the threshold of incipient motion for particles resting on the streambed). Different methods have been developed for determining this threshold Shields number; they usually assume that the initial streambed is plane prior to sediment transport. Yet, there are many instances in real-world scenarios, in which the initial streambed is not free of bed forms. We are interested in developing a new methodology for determining the threshold of incipient motion in gravel-bed streams in which smooth bed forms (e.g., anti-dunes) develop. Experiments were conducted in a 10-cm wide, 2.5-m long flume, whose initial inclination was 3%. Flows were supercritical and fully turbulent. The flume was supplied with water and sediment at fixed rates. As bed forms developed and migrated, and sediment transport rates exhibited wide fluctuations, measurements had to be taken over long times (typically 10 hr). Using a high-speed camera, we recorded the instantaneous bed load transport rate at the outlet of the flume by taking top-view images. In parallel, we measured the evolution of the bed slope, water depth, and shear stress by filming through a lateral window of the flume. These measurements allowed for the estimation of the space and time-averaged slope, from which we deduced the space and time-averaged Shields number under incipient bed load transport conditions. In our experiments, the threshold Shields number was strongly dependent on streambed morphology. Experiments are under way to determine whether taking the space and time average of incipient motion experiments leads to a more robust definition of the threshold Shields number. If so, this new methodology will perform better than existing approaches at measuring the threshold Shields number.

  10. Perovskite-organic hybrid tandem solar cells using a nanostructured perovskite layer as the light window and a PFN/doped-MoO3/MoO3 multilayer as the interconnecting layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Jian; Lu, Shunmian; Zhu, Lu; Li, Xinchen; Choy, Wallace C. H.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we present a two-terminal perovskite (PVSK)-organic hybrid tandem solar cell with a nanostructured PVSK as the light window and a PFN/doped MoO3/MoO3 structure as the interconnecting layer (ICL). In this tandem structure, the PVSK layer is specially designed with a nanostructured surface morphology; thus the PCBM could be filled-up for forming intimately contacted interface with PVSK layers. This design could not only efficiently increase the device performance, it could also greatly remove the hysteresis of PVSK solar cells. The study indicates that doped MoO3 as the step layer plays a key role in protecting the underlying layer against multi-solution processes and aids in the efficient recombination of electrons and holes generated from the sub-cells. The hybrid tandem solar cell could achieve a high VOC of 1.58 V, which is the sum of those in the two sub-cells, and a high FF of 0.68, indicating the effectiveness of the multilayer ICL.In this study, we present a two-terminal perovskite (PVSK)-organic hybrid tandem solar cell with a nanostructured PVSK as the light window and a PFN/doped MoO3/MoO3 structure as the interconnecting layer (ICL). In this tandem structure, the PVSK layer is specially designed with a nanostructured surface morphology; thus the PCBM could be filled-up for forming intimately contacted interface with PVSK layers. This design could not only efficiently increase the device performance, it could also greatly remove the hysteresis of PVSK solar cells. The study indicates that doped MoO3 as the step layer plays a key role in protecting the underlying layer against multi-solution processes and aids in the efficient recombination of electrons and holes generated from the sub-cells. The hybrid tandem solar cell could achieve a high VOC of 1.58 V, which is the sum of those in the two sub-cells, and a high FF of 0.68, indicating the effectiveness of the multilayer ICL. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10

  11. Destiny's Earth Observation Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Astronaut Michael J. Bloomfield, STS-110 mission commander, looks through the Earth observation window in the Destiny laboratory aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The STS-110 mission prepared the ISS for future spacewalks by installing and outfitting the S0 (S-zero) truss and the Mobile Transporter. The 43-foot-long S0 Truss, weighing in at 27,000 pounds, was the first of 9 segments that will make up the Station's external framework that will eventually stretch 356 feet (109 meters), or approximately the length of a football field. This central truss segment also includes a flatcar called the Mobile Transporter and rails that will become the first 'space railroad,' which will allow the Station's robotic arm to travel up and down the finished truss for future assembly and maintenance. The completed truss structure will hold solar arrays and radiators to provide power and cooling for additional international research laboratories from Japan and Europe that will be attached to the Station. Milestones of the STS-110 mission included the first time the ISS robotic arm was used to maneuver spacewalkers around the Station and marked the first time all spacewalks were based out of the Station's Quest Airlock. It was also the first Shuttle to use three Block II Main Engines. The Space Shuttle Orbiter Atlantis, STS-110 mission, was launched April 8, 2002 and returned to Earth April 19, 2002.

  12. Prism Window for Optical Alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    A prism window has been devised for use, with an autocollimator, in aligning optical components that are (1) required to be oriented parallel to each other and/or at a specified angle of incidence with respect to a common optical path and (2) mounted at different positions along the common optical path. The prism window can also be used to align a single optical component at a specified angle of incidence. Prism windows could be generally useful for orienting optical components in manufacture of optical instruments. "Prism window" denotes an application-specific unit comprising two beam-splitter windows that are bonded together at an angle chosen to obtain the specified angle of incidence.

  13. Lunar Surface Reactor Shielding Study

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Shawn; McAlpine, William; Lipinski, Ronald

    2006-01-20

    A nuclear reactor system could provide power to support long term human exploration of the moon. Such a system would require shielding to protect astronauts from its emitted radiations. Shielding studies have been performed for a Gas Cooled Reactor system because it is considered to be the most suitable nuclear reactor system available for lunar exploration, based on its tolerance of oxidizing lunar regolith and its good conversion efficiency. The goals of the shielding studies were to determine a material shielding configuration that reduces the dose (rem) to the required level in order to protect astronauts, and to estimate the mass of regolith that would provide an equivalent protective effect if it were used as the shielding material. All calculations were performed using MCNPX, a Monte Carlo transport code. Lithium hydride must be kept between 600 K and 700 K to prevent excessive swelling from large amounts of gamma or neutron irradiation. The issue is that radiation damage causes separation of the lithium and the hydrogen, resulting in lithium metal and hydrogen gas. The proposed design uses a layer of B4C to reduce the combined neutron and gamma dose to below 0.5Grads before the LiH is introduced. Below 0.5Grads the swelling in LiH is small (less than about 1%) for all temperatures. This approach causes the shield to be heavier than if the B4C were replaced by LiH, but it makes the shield much more robust and reliable.

  14. NEUTRON ABSORPTION AND SHIELDING DEVICE

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-06-21

    A neutron absorption and shielding device is described which is adapted for mounting in a radiation shielding wall surrounding a radioactive area through which instrumentation leads and the like may safely pass without permitting gamma or neutron radiation to pass to the exterior. The shielding device comprises a container having at least one nonrectilinear tube or passageway means extending therethrough, which is adapted to contain instrumentation leads or the like, a layer of a substance capable of absorbing gamma rays, and a solid resinous composition adapted to attenuate fast-moving neutrons and capture slow- moving or thermal neutrons.

  15. New Materials for EMI Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.

    1999-01-01

    Graphite fibers intercalated with bromine or similar mixed halogen compounds have substantially lower resistivity than their pristine counterparts, and thus should exhibit higher shielding effectiveness against electromagnetic interference. The mechanical and thermal properties are nearly unaffected, and the shielding of high energy x-rays and gamma rays is substantially increased. Characterization of the resistivity of the composite materials is subtle, but it is clear that the composite resistivity is substantially lowered. Shielding effectiveness calculations utilizing a simple rule of mixtures model yields results that are consistent with available data on these materials.

  16. Two-leg longwall shield mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Barczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1989-01-01

    This report investigates shield mechanics by describing the elastic response and interaction of shield components to applied vertical and horizontal displacements for various canopy and base contact configurations. This research provides information on generalized shield mechanics, which is applicable in describing the behavior of all two-leg shield supports. Utilizing mechanics of materials concepts and known kinematic relationships for two-leg shield supports, free-body diagrams are constructed for each shield component illustrating internal axial, shear, and bending moment responses required to maintain equilibrium for each load case evaluated. Predicted shield (component) responses are verified by controlled displacements of instrumented longwall shields in a mine roof simulator. Conclusions drawn from these analyses indicate shield structural responses are significantly dependent upon canopy and base contact configurations. Applications of shield mechanics to in situ support monitoring are discussed. An objective of this research program is to establish unique shield responses to identify in situ load conditions.

  17. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, S. L.; Ghosh, V. J.; Breitfeller, M.

    2016-08-01

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  18. Tokamak physics experiment: Diagnostic windows study

    SciTech Connect

    Merrigan, M.; Wurden, G.A.

    1995-11-01

    We detail the study of diagnostic windows and window thermal stress remediation in the long-pulse, high-power Tokamak Physics Experiment (TPX) operation. The operating environment of the TPX diagnostic windows is reviewed, thermal loads on the windows estimated, and cooling requirements for the windows considered. Applicable window-cooling technology from other fields is reviewed and its application to the TPX windows considered. Methods for TPX window thermal conditioning are recommended, with some discussion of potential implementation problems provided. Recommendations for further research and development work to ensure performance of windows in the TPX system are presented.

  19. Investigation of polycrystalline thin film CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells based on ZnSe windows. Annual subcontract report, 15 February, 1993--14 February, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.C.

    1995-03-01

    This report concerns studies of CIS solar cells based on ZnSe window layers. ZnSe/CIS devices are fabricated by growing ZnSe films by MOCVD onto Siemens CIS and graded absorber substrates. ZnSe films are grown by reacting H{sub 2}Se with a zinc adduct. ZnSe/CIS heterojunctions have been studied by depositing transparent aluminum contacts onto ZnSe. These studies indicate that ZnSe/CIS solar cells can be fabricated with an efficiency greater than 14%. Open circuit voltages are typically larger than 500 mV and the optimum range of ZnSe film thickness for maximum efficiency is between 100 {angstrom} and 250 {angstrom}. Photocurrents are significantly reduced as the film thickness exceeds 250 {angstrom}. Photoluminescence spectroscopy has been utilized to characterize the physical nature of CIS substrate surfaces, and ZnSe-CIS interfaces. These studies indicate that a segregated phase(s) exists at the surface of as received Siemens substrates. Additionally, it is determined that the segregated phase(s) still exist after the ZnSe growth process. To date, sputtered ZnO top contact layers have caused degradation of the photovoltaic properties of the ZnSe/CIS structure. Investigations of the effects of MOCVD grown ZnO upon ZnSe/CIS structures will soon be initiated. To establish the feasibility of ZnSe as a window layer, cells have been fabricated by incorporating a protective layer of CdS between the ZnSe and ZnO. A total area efficiency of 11% was obtained with such a structure.

  20. Tailoring the potential window of negative electrodes: A diagnostic method for understanding parasitic oxidation reactions in cells with 5 V LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 positive electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levi, Mikhael D.; Dargel, Vadim; Shilina, Yuliya; Borgel, Valentina; Aurbach, Doron; Halalay, Ion C.

    2015-03-01

    We present herein a diagnostic method which provides insights into the interactions between parasitic reactions at battery electrodes and their consequences for battery performance degradation. We also provide a cautionary tale about misinterpreting or misrepresenting the significance of test data, as is sometimes found in the peer-reviewed literature or in developers' claims. Reversible cycling of the LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 positive electrode in a full cell with an electrolyte solution containing no additives may appear achievable through tailoring of the operating potential window of the cell. Self-discharging of the negative stems from parasitic oxidation products formed on the positive. We show that either excess negative electrode capacity over the positive or initial pre-lithiation of the negative suppresses their detrimental effect on capacity retention. Simultaneous monitoring the potentials of the two electrodes vs. Li/Li+ during galvanostatic cycling of a full cell shows, however, that self-discharging of the negative still takes place. The latter process was tracked by the drift of the average potential of the cell towards higher values and leads to two characteristic patterns in the failure of full cells during their long-term cycling, depending on whether a cut-off voltage or a capacity limit is used as the control criterion during cycling.

  1. Perovskite-organic hybrid tandem solar cells using a nanostructured perovskite layer as the light window and a PFN/doped-MoO3/MoO3 multilayer as the interconnecting layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian; Lu, Shunmian; Zhu, Lu; Li, Xinchen; Choy, Wallace C H

    2016-02-14

    In this study, we present a two-terminal perovskite (PVSK)-organic hybrid tandem solar cell with a nanostructured PVSK as the light window and a PFN/doped MoO3/MoO3 structure as the interconnecting layer (ICL). In this tandem structure, the PVSK layer is specially designed with a nanostructured surface morphology; thus the PCBM could be filled-up for forming intimately contacted interface with PVSK layers. This design could not only efficiently increase the device performance, it could also greatly remove the hysteresis of PVSK solar cells. The study indicates that doped MoO3 as the step layer plays a key role in protecting the underlying layer against multi-solution processes and aids in the efficient recombination of electrons and holes generated from the sub-cells. The hybrid tandem solar cell could achieve a high VOC of 1.58 V, which is the sum of those in the two sub-cells, and a high FF of 0.68, indicating the effectiveness of the multilayer ICL. PMID:26809656

  2. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J. C.

    2006-11-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions.

  3. Holography through optically active windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, A. J.

    1979-01-01

    By using two orthogonally polarized reference beams, holograms can be recorded through stressed windows and the reconstructed virtual image will show no stress pattern. As shown analytically, the stress-pattern-free hologram is recordable for any polarization state of the object illumination. Hence, the more efficient nondepolarizing diffuser can be used in performing holography through stressed windows if two reference beams are used. Results are presented for a pair of machined polysulfone windows intended for use in a holographic flow-visualization setup in a single-stage-compressor test rig.

  4. Switchable Solar Window Devices Based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, Joseph; Ma, Dakang; Munday, Jeremy

    Windows are an interesting target for photovoltaics due to the potential for large area of deployment and because glass is already a ubiquitous component of solar cell devices. Many demonstrations of solar windows in recent years have used photovoltaic devices which are semitransparent in the visible region. Much research has focused on enhancing device absorption in the UV and IR ranges as a means to circumvent the basic tradeoff between efficiency and transparency to visible light. Use of switchable solar window is a less investigated alternative approach; these windows utilize the visible spectrum but can toggle between high transparency and high efficiency as needed. We present a novel switchable solar window device based on Polymer Dispersed Liquid Crystals (PDLC). By applying an electric field to the PDLC layer, the device can be switched from an opaque, light diffusing, efficient photovoltaic cell to a clear, transparent window. In the off state (i.e. scattering state), these devices have the added benefits of increased reflectivity for reduced lighting and cooling costs and haze for privacy. Further, we demonstrate that these windows have the potential for self-powering due to the very low power required to maintain the on, or high transparency, state. Support From: University of Maryland and Maryland Nano-center and its Fablab.

  5. Composite Aerogel Multifoil Protective Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    New technologies are needed to survive the temperatures, radiation, and hypervelocity particles that exploration spacecraft encounter. Multilayer insulations (MLIs) have been used on many spacecraft as thermal insulation. Other materials and composites have been used as micrometeorite shielding or radiation shielding. However, no material composite has been developed and employed as a combined thermal insulation, micrometeorite, and radiation shielding. By replacing the scrims that have been used to separate the foil layers in MLIs with various aerogels, and by using a variety of different metal foils, the overall protective performance of MLIs can be greatly expanded to act as thermal insulation, radiation shielding, and hypervelocity particle shielding. Aerogels are highly porous, low-density solids that are produced by the gelation of metal alkoxides and supercritical drying. Aerogels have been flown in NASA missions as a hypervelocity particle capture medium (Stardust) and as thermal insulation (2003 MER). Composite aerogel multifoil protective shielding would be used to provide thermal insulation, while also shielding spacecraft or components from radiation and hypervelocity particle impacts. Multiple layers of foil separated by aerogel would act as a thermal barrier by preventing the transport of heat energy through the composite. The silica aerogel would act as a convective and conductive thermal barrier, while the titania powder and metal foils would absorb and reflect the radiative heat. It would also capture small hypervelocity particles, such as micrometeorites, since it would be a stuffed, multi-shock Whipple shield. The metal foil layers would slow and break up the impacting particles, while the aerogel layers would convert the kinetic energy of the particles to thermal and mechanical energy and stop the particles.

  6. Investigation on the Cyclability of Lithium-Oxygen Cells in a Confined Potential Window using Cathodes with Pre-filled Discharge Products.

    PubMed

    Geng, Dongsheng; Ding, Ning; Hor, T S Andy; Chien, Sheau Wei; Liu, Zhaolin; Zong, Yun

    2015-10-01

    With new chemistry and advantageous configuration, the lithium-oxygen (Li-O2) battery promises a much higher specific energy than traditional lithium-ion batteries. The limited understanding on the complicated battery reactions therein, however, has become a major bottleneck of its development for applications requiring a high energy efficiency and long cycle-life. Herein, in a confined potential window with negligible electrolyte degradation, we studied the rechargeability of Li-O2 cathodes with pre-filled well-defined discharge products of Li2O2, Li2CO3, LiOH, or their combinations. Our results suggest Li2CO3 as the most difficult species to be electrochemically decomposed among the three lithium compounds, whereas the presence of LiOH notably increases the initial charge potential. The clearly visible difference in the charge behavior and cycling stability of these artificially "discharged" electrodes provides a guideline for the development of future high-performance Li-O2 batteries. PMID:26011604

  7. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-12-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small ``storm cellar`` for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Magnetic shielding for interplanetary spacecraft

    SciTech Connect

    Herring, J.S.; Merrill, B.J.

    1991-01-01

    The protection of spacecraft crews from the radiation produced by high energy electrons, protons and heavier ions in the space environment is a major health concern on long duration missions. Conventional approaches to radiation shielding in space have relied on thicker spacecraft walls to stop the high energy charged particles and to absorb the resulting gamma and bremsstrahlung photons. The shielding concept described here uses superconducting magnets to deflect charged particles before they collide with the spacecraft, thus avoiding the production of secondary particles. A number of spacecraft configurations and sizes have been analyzed, ranging from a small storm cellar'' for use during solar flares to continuous shielding for space stations having a crew of 15--25. The effectiveness of the magnetic shielding has been analyzed using a Monte Carlo program with incident proton energies from 0.5 to 1000 MeV. Typically the shield deflects 35--99 percent of the incident particles, depending, of course on particle energy and magnetic field strength. Further evaluation studies have been performed to assess weight comparisons between magnetic and conventional shielding; to determine magnet current distributions which minimize the magnetic field within the spacecraft itself; and to assess the potential role of ceramic superconductors. 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  9. Integral Face Shield Concept for Firefighter's Helmet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abeles, F.; Hansberry, E.; Himel, V.

    1982-01-01

    Stowable face shield could be made integral part of helmet worn by firefighters. Shield, made from same tough clear plastic as removable face shields presently used, would be pivoted at temples to slide up inside helmet when not needed. Stowable face shield, being stored in helmet, is always available, ready for use, and is protected when not being used.

  10. Magnetic Shield for Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerators (ADR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, Talso C.; Haddad, Nicolas E.

    2013-01-01

    A new method was developed for creating a less expensive shield for ADRs using 1018 carbon steel. This shield has been designed to have similar performance to the expensive vanadium permendur shields, but the cost is 30 to 50% less. Also, these shields can be stocked in a variety of sizes, eliminating the need for special forgings, which also greatly reduces cost.

  11. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Metzger, Bert Clayton; Brindza, Paul Daniel

    2014-03-04

    A thermal neutron shield comprising boron shielding panels with a high percentage of the element Boron. The panel is least 46% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of boron shielding panels which includes enriching the pre-cursor mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  12. Transient heat flux shielding using thermal metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narayana, Supradeep; Savo, Salvatore; Sato, Yuki

    2013-05-01

    We have developed a heat shield based on a metamaterial engineering approach to shield a region from transient diffusive heat flow. The shield is designed with a multilayered structure to prescribe the appropriate spatial profile for heat capacity, density, and thermal conductivity of the effective medium. The heat shield was experimentally compared to other isotropic materials.

  13. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    DOEpatents

    Lowe, Paul E.

    1976-06-15

    1. The combination with a plurality of parallel horizontal members arranged in horizontal and vertical rows, the spacing of the members in all horizontal rows being equal throughout, the spacing of the members in all vertical rows being equal throughout; of a shield for a nuclear reactor comprising two layers of rectangular blocks through which the members pass generally perpendicularly to the layers, each block in each layer having for one of the members an opening equally spaced from vertical sides of the block and located closer to the top of the block than the bottom thereof, whereby gravity tends to make each block rotate about the associated member to a position in which the vertical sides of the block are truly vertical, the openings in all the blocks of one layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, the openings in all the blocks of the other layer having one equal spacing from the tops of the blocks, which spacing is different from the corresponding spacing in the said one layer, all the blocks of both layers having the same vertical dimension or length, the blocks of both layers consisting of relatively wide blocks and relatively narrow blocks, all the narrow blocks having the same horizontal dimension or width which is less than the horizontal dimension or width of the wide blocks, which is the same throughout, each layer consisting of vertical rows of narrow blocks and wide blocks alternating with one another, each vertical row of narrow blocks of each layer being covered by a vertical row of wide blocks of the other layer which wide blocks receive the same vertical row of members as the said each vertical row of narrow blocks, whereby the rectangular perimeters of each block of each layer is completely out of register with that of each block in the other layer.

  14. VO2 thermochromic smart window for energy savings and generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jiadong; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zongtao; Luo, Hongjie; Cao, Chuanxiang; Chen, Zhang; Dai, Lei; Liu, Xinling

    2013-10-01

    The ability to achieve energy saving in architectures and optimal solar energy utilisation affects the sustainable development of the human race. Traditional smart windows and solar cells cannot be combined into one device for energy saving and electricity generation. A VO2 film can respond to the environmental temperature to intelligently regulate infrared transmittance while maintaining visible transparency, and can be applied as a thermochromic smart window. Herein, we report for the first time a novel VO2-based smart window that partially utilises light scattering to solar cells around the glass panel for electricity generation. This smart window combines energy-saving and generation in one device, and offers potential to intelligently regulate and utilise solar radiation in an efficient manner.

  15. VO₂ thermochromic smart window for energy savings and generation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jiadong; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zongtao; Luo, Hongjie; Cao, Chuanxiang; Chen, Zhang; Dai, Lei; Liu, Xinling

    2013-01-01

    The ability to achieve energy saving in architectures and optimal solar energy utilisation affects the sustainable development of the human race. Traditional smart windows and solar cells cannot be combined into one device for energy saving and electricity generation. A VO2 film can respond to the environmental temperature to intelligently regulate infrared transmittance while maintaining visible transparency, and can be applied as a thermochromic smart window. Herein, we report for the first time a novel VO2-based smart window that partially utilises light scattering to solar cells around the glass panel for electricity generation. This smart window combines energy-saving and generation in one device, and offers potential to intelligently regulate and utilise solar radiation in an efficient manner. PMID:24157625

  16. An assessment of the MCNP4C weight window

    SciTech Connect

    Christopher N. Culbertson; John S. Hendricks

    1999-12-01

    A new, enhanced weight window generator suite has been developed for MCNP version 4C. The new generator correctly estimates importances in either a user-specified, geometry-independent, orthogonal grid or in MCNP geometric cells. The geometry-independent option alleviates the need to subdivide the MCNP cell geometry for variance reduction purposes. In addition, the new suite corrects several pathologies in the existing MCNP weight window generator. The new generator is applied in a set of five variance reduction problems. The improved generator is compared with the weight window generator applied in MCNP4B. The benefits of the new methodology are highlighted, along with a description of its limitations. The authors also provide recommendations for utilization of the weight window generator.

  17. VO2 thermochromic smart window for energy savings and generation

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiadong; Gao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Zongtao; Luo, Hongjie; Cao, Chuanxiang; Chen, Zhang; Dai, Lei; Liu, Xinling

    2013-01-01

    The ability to achieve energy saving in architectures and optimal solar energy utilisation affects the sustainable development of the human race. Traditional smart windows and solar cells cannot be combined into one device for energy saving and electricity generation. A VO2 film can respond to the environmental temperature to intelligently regulate infrared transmittance while maintaining visible transparency, and can be applied as a thermochromic smart window. Herein, we report for the first time a novel VO2-based smart window that partially utilises light scattering to solar cells around the glass panel for electricity generation. This smart window combines energy-saving and generation in one device, and offers potential to intelligently regulate and utilise solar radiation in an efficient manner. PMID:24157625

  18. Window Design for Manned Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoure, Richard; Kitchingman, Ian; Novo, Francisco; Sinnema, Gerben

    2012-07-01

    The Window Design for Manned Spacecraft (WDM) project being undertaken by Magna Parva Ltd, under contract with the European Space Agency, aims to develop and improve the current structural integrity verification program for manned spacecraft pressurised windows. A critical review of the existing requirements and current state-of-the-art in spacecraft window design, materials and verification practice is conducted. Possible areas for improvement are identified. An experimental test programme is designed to perform and assess mechanical characterisation methods at material level. Tests are intended to increase familiarity with material testing methods and investigate the effects of sample size, surface finish and load type on material characterisation. Novel methods and their applicability are investigated. Results of characterisation testing will be employed in the design and verification of a breadboard window.

  19. Window-closing safety system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1997-08-26

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only an inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window. 5 figs.

  20. Window-closing safety system

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    A safety device includes a wire loop embedded in the glass of a passenger car window and routed near the closing leading-edge of the window. The wire loop carries microwave pulses around the loop to and from a transceiver with separate output and input ports. An evanescent field only and inch or two in radius is created along the wire loop by the pulses. Just about any object coming within the evanescent field will dramatically reduce the energy of the microwave pulses received back by the transceiver. Such a loss in energy is interpreted as a closing area blockage, and electrical interlocks are provided to halt or reverse a power window motor that is actively trying to close the window.

  1. Profiles of cytokines secreted by isolated human endometrial cells under the influence of chorionic gonadotropin during the window of embryo implantation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Several studies have indicated that human pre-implantation embryo-derived chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) may influence the implantation process by its action on human endometrial epithelial and stromal cells. Despite reports indicating that hCG acts on these cells to affect the production of several cytokines and growth factors (e.g., MIF, IGF-I, VEGF, LIF, IL-11, GMCSF, CXL10 and FGF2), our understanding of the integral influence of hCG on paracrine interactions between endometrial stromal and epithelial cells during implantation is very limited. Methods In the present study, we examined the profile of 48 cytokines in the conditioned media of primary cell cultures of human implantation stage endometrium. Endometrial epithelial cells (group 1; n = 20), stromal cells (group 2; n = 20), and epithelial plus stromal cells (group 3; n = 20) obtained from mid-secretory stage endometrial samples (n = 60) were grown on collagen and exposed to different doses (0, 1, 10 and 100 IU/ml) of rhCG for 24 h in vitro. Immunochemical and qRT-PCR methods were used to determine cytokine profiles. Enrichment and process networks analyses were implemented using a list of cytokines showing differential secretion in response to hCG. Results Under basal conditions, endometrial epithelial and stromal cells exhibited cell type-specific profiles of secreted cytokines. Administration of hCG (100 IU) resulted in significantly (P < 0.05) different cytokine secretion profiles indicative of macropinocytic transport (HGF, MCSF) in epithelial cells, signal transduction (CCL4, FGF2, IL-1b, IL-6, IL-17, VEGF) in stromal cells, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition (FGF2, HGF, IL-1b, TNF) in mixed cells. Overall, the administration of hCG affected cytokines involved in the immune response, chemotaxis, inflammatory changes, proliferation, cell adhesion and apoptosis. Conclusions CG can influence the function of the endometrium during blastocyst implantation via its

  2. High-Reliability Waveguide Vacuum/Pressure Window

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Britcliffe, Michael J.; Hanson, Theodore R.; Long, Ezra M.; Montanez, Steven

    2013-01-01

    The NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) uses commercial waveguide windows on the output waveguide of Ka-band (32 GHz) low-noise amplifiers. Mechanical failure of these windows resulted in an unacceptable loss in tracking time. To address this issue, a new Ka-band WR-28 waveguide window has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The window uses a slab of low-loss, low-dielectric constant foam that is bonded into a 1/2-wave-thick waveguide/flange. The foam is a commercially available, rigid, closed-cell polymethacrylimide. It has excellent electrical properties with a dielectric constant of 1.04, and a loss tangent of 0.01. It is relatively strong with a tensile strength of 1 MPa. The material is virtually impermeable to helium. The finished window exhibits a leak rate of less than 3x10(exp -3)cu cm/s with helium. The material is also chemically resistant and can be cleaned with acetone. The window is constructed by fabricating a window body by brazing a short length of WR-28 copper waveguide into a standard rectangular flange, and machining the resulting part to a thickness of 4.6 mm. The foam is machined to a rectangular shape with a dimension of 7.06x3.53 mm. The foam is bonded into the body with a two-part epoxy. After curing, the excess glue and foam are knife-trimmed by hand. The finished window has a loss of less than 0.08 dB (2%) and a return loss of greater than 25 dB at 32 GHz. This meets the requirements for the DSN application. The window is usable for most applications over the entire 26-to-40-GHz waveguide band. The window return loss can be tuned to a required frequency by var y in g the thickness of the window slightly. Most standard waveguide windows use a thin membrane of material bonded into a recess in a waveguide flange, or sandwiched between two flanges with a polymer seal. Designs using the recessed window are prone to mechanical failure over time due to constraints on the dimensions of the recess that allow the bond to fail. Designs using the

  3. Effects of various radiation source characteristics on shielding requirements at the potential Yucca Mountain repository

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.W.; Miller, D.D.; Hill, R.R.

    1992-02-01

    This radiation shielding study provides dose rate information that can be used to estimate required shielding thicknesses for different repository configurations, including various hot cells and vaults in the waste-handling building, the boreholes in the underground emplacement area, and the transfer casks. The study determines gamma and neutron source strengths for various waste types and source geometries representative of conditions at the repository and determines dose rates as a function of shielding thickness for selected materials.

  4. A window on urban sustainability

    SciTech Connect

    Stigt, Rien van; Driessen, Peter P.J.; Spit, Tejo J.M.

    2013-09-15

    Sustainable urban development requires the integration of environmental interests in urban planning. Although various methods of environmental assessment have been developed, plan outcomes are often disappointing due to the complex nature of decision-making in urban planning, which takes place in multiple arenas within multiple policy networks involving diverse stakeholders. We argue that the concept of ‘decision windows’ can structure this seemingly chaotic chain of interrelated decisions. First, explicitly considering the dynamics of the decision-making process, we further conceptualized decision windows as moments in an intricate web of substantively connected deliberative processes where issues are reframed within a decision-making arena, and interests may be linked within and across arenas. Adopting this perspective in two case studies, we then explored how decision windows arise, which factors determine their effectiveness and how their occurrence can be influenced so as to arrive at more sustainable solutions. We conclude that the integration of environmental interests in urban planning is highly dependent on the ability of the professionals involved to recognize and manipulate decision windows. Finally, we explore how decision windows may be opened. -- Highlights: • Decision-making about sustainable urban development occurs in networks. • The concept of ‘decision windows’ was further elaborated. • Decision windows help understand how environmental interests enter decision-making. • Decision windows can, to some extent, be influenced.

  5. Mechanical and thermal analysis of beryllium windows for RF cavities in a muon cooling channel

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Derun; Ladran, A.; Lozano, D.; Rimmer, R.

    2002-05-30

    Thin beryllium windows (foils) may be utilized to increase shunt impedance of closed-cell RF cavities. These windows are subject to ohmic heating from RF currents. The resulting temperature gradients in the windows can produce out of plane displacements that detune the cavity frequency. The window displacement can be reduced or eliminated by pre-stressing the foils in tension. Because of possible variations during manufacture, it is important to quantify the actual prestress of a Be window before it is put into service. We present the thermal and mechanical analyses of such windows under typical operating conditions and describe a simple non-destructive means to quantify the pre-stress using the acoustic signature of a window. Using finite element analysis, thin plate theory and physical measurements of the vibration modes of a window we attempted to characterize the actual Be window pre-stress in a small number of commercially sourced windows (30% of yield strength is typical). This method can be used for any window material and size, but this study focused on 16 cm diameter Be Windows ranging in thickness from 125 microns to 508 microns and with varying pre-stresses. The method can be used to nondestructively test future Be windows for the desired prestress.

  6. Radiation shielding for the Fermilab Vertical Cavity Test Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsburg, Camille; Rakhno, Igor; /Fermilab

    2010-03-01

    The results of radiation shielding studies for the vertical test cryostat VTS1 at Fermilab performed with the codes FISHPACT and MARS15 are presented and discussed. The analysis is focused on operations with two RF cavities in the cryostat. The vertical cavity test facility (VCTF) for superconducting RF cavities in Industrial Building 1 at Fermilab has been in operation since 2007. The facility currently consists of a single vertical test cryostat VTS1. Radiation shielding for VTS1 was designed for operations with single 9-cell 1.3 GHz cavities, and the shielding calculations were performed using a simplified model of field emission as the radiation source. The operations are proposed to be extended in such a way that two RF cavities will be in VTS1 at a time, one above the other, with tests for each cavity performed sequentially. In such a case the radiation emitted during the tests from the lower cavity can, in part, bypass the initially designed shielding which can lead to a higher dose in the building. Space for additional shielding, either internal or external to VTS1, is limited. Therefore, a re-evaluation of the radiation shielding was performed. An essential part of the present analysis is in using realistic models for cavity geometry and spatial, angular and energy distributions of field-emitted electrons inside the cavities. The calculations were performed with the computer codes FISHPACT and MARS15.

  7. Paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Xu, Weiyu; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Buatti, John M.; Dadkhah, Hossein; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: The authors present a novel paddle-based rotating-shield brachytherapy (P-RSBT) method, whose radiation-attenuating shields are formed with a multileaf collimator (MLC), consisting of retractable paddles, to achieve intensity modulation in high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Methods: Five cervical cancer patients using an intrauterine tandem applicator were considered to assess the potential benefit of the P-RSBT method. The P-RSBT source used was a 50 kV electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™). The paddles can be retracted independently to form multiple emission windows around the source for radiation delivery. The MLC was assumed to be rotatable. P-RSBT treatment plans were generated using the asymmetric dose–volume optimization with smoothness control method [Liu et al., Med. Phys. 41(11), 111709 (11pp.) (2014)] with a delivery time constraint, different paddle sizes, and different rotation strides. The number of treatment fractions (fx) was assumed to be five. As brachytherapy is delivered as a boost for cervical cancer, the dose distribution for each case includes the dose from external beam radiotherapy as well, which is 45 Gy in 25 fx. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated until the minimum dose to the hottest 2 cm{sup 3} (D{sub 2cm{sup 3}}) of either the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached their tolerance doses of 75, 75, and 90 Gy{sub 3}, respectively, expressed as equivalent doses in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β = 3 Gy). Results: P-RSBT outperformed the two other RSBT delivery techniques, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT) and dynamic-shield RSBT (D-RSBT), with a properly selected paddle size. If the paddle size was angled at 60°, the average D{sub 90} increases for the delivery plans by P-RSBT on the five cases, compared to S-RSBT, were 2.2, 8.3, 12.6, 11.9, and 9.1 Gy{sub 10}, respectively, with delivery times of 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 min/fx. The increases in HR-CTV D{sub 90}, compared to D-RSBT, were 16

  8. Shielding Ddsign and analyses of KIPT neutron source facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2011-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of USA and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of a neutron source facility. An electron accelerator drives a sub-critical facility (ADS) is used for generating the neutron source. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear researches, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. Monte Carlo code MCNPX has been utilized as the major design tool for the design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons at high energies. However the ADS shielding calculations with MCNPX need enormous computational resources and the small neutron yield per electron makes sampling difficulty for the Monte Carlo calculations. The high energy electrons (E > 100 MeV) generate very high energy neutrons and these neutrons dominant the total radiation dose outside the shield. The radiation dose caused by high energy neutrons is {approx}3-4 orders of magnitude higher than that of the photons. However, the high energy neutron fraction within the total generated neutrons is very small, which increases the sampling difficulty and the required computational time. To solve these difficulties, the user subroutines of MCNPX are utilized to generate a neutron source file, which record the generated neutrons from the photonuclear reactions caused by electrons. This neutron source file is utilized many times in the following MCNPX calculations for weight windows (importance function) generation and radiation dose calculations. In addition, the neutron source file can be sampled multiple times to improve the statistics of the calculated results. In this way the expensive electron transport calculations can be performed once with good statistics for the different ADS shielding problems. This paper presents the method of generating and utilizing the neutron source file by MCNPX for the ADS shielding calculation

  9. A Visualization Code System for Gamma and Neutron Shielding Calculations, Version 2.0

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2008-08-01

    EASYQAD, Version 2.0, is a standalone Windows XP or Windows 7 code system which facilitates gamma and neutron shielding calculations with user friendly graphical interfaces. It is used to analyze radiation shielding problems and includes: - 8 kinds of geometry types - Various flexible source options - Common material library - Various detector types The update contents of EASYQAD Version 2.0 are below: - Addition of starting option with ‘P-code’ files - Addition of multi-sourcemore » calculation function - Expansion of source geometries - Addition of warning message - Modifications of EASYQAD program errors a. Coordination application problem in source division b. Source position error c. Rotation problem of source geometry d. Program running error in using more than six gamma energy distribution e. EASYQAD display problem of the right elliptic cylinder, ellipsoid and truncated right cone geometries Through intuitive windows and their interactions inside EASYQAD, the user can specify the dimensions of 3D-shapes, their material compositions, their densities, the type of radioactive sources, the locations of the sources, the type and positions of detectors. With the ease of using these sequences, shielding problems will become simpler and more clearly understandable to the analyzer. Furthermore, the error checking system can prevent users from making mistakes by automatically debugging the user inputs and giving modal dialog windows. The included AECL implementation of QAD-CGGP-A, Version 95.2 (C00645MNYCP00), is run from the user interface.« less

  10. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  11. Honeycomb vs. Foam: Evaluating Potential Upgrades to ISS Module Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, Shannon J.; Christiansen, Eric L.

    2009-01-01

    The presence of honeycomb cells in a dual-wall structure is advantageous for mechanical performance and low weight in spacecraft primary structures but detrimental for shielding against impact of micrometeoroid and orbital debris particles (MMOD). The presence of honeycomb cell walls acts to restrict the expansion of projectile and bumper fragments, resulting in the impact of a more concentrated (and thus lethal) fragment cloud upon the shield rear wall. The Multipurpose Laboratory Module (MLM) is a Russian research module scheduled for launch and ISS assembly in 2011 (currently under review). Baseline shielding of the MLM is expected to be predominantly similar to that of the existing Functional Energy Block (FGB), utilizing a baseline triple wall configuration with honeycomb sandwich panels for the dual bumpers and a thick monolithic aluminum pressure wall. The MLM module is to be docked to the nadir port of the Zvezda service module and, as such, is subject to higher debris flux than the FGB module (which is aligned along the ISS flight vector). Without upgrades to inherited shielding, the MLM penetration risk is expected to be significantly higher than that of the FGB module. Open-cell foam represents a promising alternative to honeycomb as a sandwich panel core material in spacecraft primary structures as it provides comparable mechanical performance with a minimal increase in weight while avoiding structural features (i.e. channeling cells) detrimental to MMOD shielding performance. In this study, the effect of replacing honeycomb sandwich panel structures with metallic open-cell foam structures on MMOD shielding performance is assessed for an MLM-representative configuration. A number of hypervelocity impact tests have been performed on both the baseline honeycomb configuration and upgraded foam configuration, and differences in target damage, failure limits, and derived ballistic limit equations are discussed.

  12. Alcohol-induced Purkinje cell loss with a single binge exposure in neonatal rats: a stereological study of temporal windows of vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Goodlett, C R; Eilers, A T

    1997-06-01

    Previous research has shown that the early neonatal period of rats is one of enhanced vulnerability to cerebellar Purkinje cell loss associated with binge-like alcohol exposure, with a prominent sensitive period during the first neonatal week. In this study, an unbiased count of the total number of Purkinje cells was obtained using the stereological optical fractionator, in groups of rats given a single binge-like alcohol exposure either during the most vulnerable neonatal period [postnatal day (PD) 4] or during a later, less vulnerable period (PD 9). Using artificial rearing methods, rats were given 6.6 g/kg of alcohol either on PD 4 or on PD 9, delivered as a 15% (v/v) solution in milk formula on two consecutive feedings of the designated day. Control groups included an artificially reared gastrostomy control and a normally reared suckle control. The mean peak blood alcohol concentrations were not different between the PD 4 and PD 9 alcohol groups, averaging 374 and 347 mg/dl, respectively. The rats were perfused on PD 27. A uniform random sample of sections was obtained from serial frozen sections through the cerebellum, stained with thionin, and Purkinje cells were counted from a uniform random sample of locations on each section with the three-dimensional optical fractionator. The number of Purkinje cells in the suckle control and gastrostomy control groups did not differ from each other, averaging 3.94 (+/- 0.19) and 3.58 (+/- 0.22) x 10(5) cells, respectively. Binge exposure on PD 4 induced significant cell loss (mean of 2.05 +/- 0.20 x (10(5) Purkinje cells), whereas binge exposure on PD 9 did not induce significant Purkinje cell loss (3.70 +/- 0.39 x 10(5) Purkinje cells). These findings confirm that a single neonatal binge alcohol exposure produces pathological Purkinje cell loss, provided that it occurs during the period of enhanced vulnerability coinciding with the early stages of dendritic outgrowth. PMID:9194933

  13. Efficiency enhancement using a Zn1‑ x Ge x -O thin film as an n-type window layer in Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minami, Tadatsugu; Nishi, Yuki; Miyata, Toshihiro

    2016-05-01

    Efficiency enhancement was achieved in Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells fabricated with a zinc–germanium-oxide (Zn1‑ x Ge x -O) thin film as the n-type window layer and a p-type Na-doped Cu2O (Cu2O:Na) sheet prepared by thermally oxidizing Cu sheets. The Ge content (x) dependence of the obtained photovoltaic properties of the heterojunction solar cells is mainly explained by the conduction band discontinuity that results from the electron affinity difference between Zn1‑ x Ge x -O and Cu2O:Na. The optimal value of x in Zn1‑ x Ge x -O thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition was observed to be 0.62. An efficiency of 8.1% was obtained in a MgF2/Al-doped ZnO/Zn0.38Ge0.62-O/Cu2O:Na heterojunction solar cell.

  14. Tough graphene-polymer microcellular foams for electromagnetic interference shielding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao-Bin; Yan, Qing; Zheng, Wen-Ge; He, Zhixian; Yu, Zhong-Zhen

    2011-03-01

    Functional polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA)/graphene nanocomposite microcellular foams were prepared by blending of PMMA with graphene sheets followed by foaming with subcritical CO(2) as an environmentally benign foaming agent. The addition of graphene sheets endows the insulating PMMA foams with high electrical conductivity and improved electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency with microwave absorption as the dominant EMI shielding mechanism. Interestingly, because of the presence of the numerous microcellular cells, the graphene-PMMA foam exhibits greatly improved ductility and tensile toughness compared to its bulk counterpart. This work provides a promising methodology to fabricate tough and lightweight graphene-PMMA nanocomposite microcellular foams with superior electrical and EMI shielding properties by simultaneously combining the functionality and reinforcement of the graphene sheets and the toughening effect of the microcellular cells. PMID:21366239

  15. Trailer shield assembly for a welding torch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyer, Gerald E. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    This invention relates generally to trailer shields for gas shielded arc welding torches, and more particularly to a trailer shield assembly provided with a shield gas manifold for providing an even dispersion of shield gas to the interior of the shield assembly, which generally encloses a joint being welded and a welding trailing portion of hot welded metal. The novelty of the invention lies in providing trailer shield with a manifold tube having a plurality of openings from which shield gas is distributed. A gas manifold region ahead of the torch is also provided with shield gas from a tube to protect metal preheated by the torch. Further novelty lies in constructing portions of sides and housing and portions of side walls of the guide of stainless steel screen having a tight mesh.

  16. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    SciTech Connect

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  17. Carbon microfiber material for electromagnetic (shielding) applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafiq, Muhammad Nadeem

    Electromagnetic shielding is becoming more and more important with the abundance of wireless devices. Therefore a need has arisen for more versatile, flexible and low-cost solutions for shielding. For these requirements, carbon microfiber material has been proposed for electromagnetic shielding applications. For this purpose its shielding effectiveness has been measured and modeled in a simulation environment. A parametric simulation was conducted for the material property 'conductivity' and the results were compared to measured ones. These simulation results were also verified by the analytical solution for the shielding effectiveness and the agreement between the simulated values and analytical results demonstrated that the carbon microfiber material, though having less conductivity than the traditional metallic shields is a good candidate for electromagnetic shielding applications. Carbon microfiber not only provides comparable shielding effectiveness to a metallic shield but it can be advantageous because of its light weight, corrosion resistance and flexibility. Also, its porous nature can help with cooling of enclosed electronic circuits.

  18. Radiation shielding materials and containers incorporating same

    DOEpatents

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound ("PYRUC") shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  19. Proteomic-Based Approach To Gain Insight into Reprogramming of THP-1 Cells Exposed to Leishmania donovani over an Early Temporal Window

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Alok Kumar; Pandey, Rajeev Kumar; Siqueira-Neto, Jair Lage; Kwon, Yong-Jun; Freitas-Junior, Lucio H.; Shaha, Chandrima

    2015-01-01

    Leishmania donovani, a protozoan parasite, is the causative agent of visceral leishmaniasis. It lives and multiplies within the harsh environment of macrophages. In order to investigate how intracellular parasite manipulate the host cell environment, we undertook a quantitative proteomic study of human monocyte-derived macrophages (THP-1) following infection with L. donovani. We used the isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantification (iTRAQ) method and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) to compare expression profiles of noninfected and L. donovani-infected THP-1 cells. We detected modifications of protein expression in key metabolic pathways, including glycolysis and fatty acid oxidation, suggesting a global reprogramming of cell metabolism by the parasite. An increased abundance of proteins involved in gene transcription, RNA splicing (heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins [hnRNPs]), histones, and DNA repair and replication was observed at 24 h postinfection. Proteins involved in cell survival and signal transduction were more abundant at 24 h postinfection. Several of the differentially expressed proteins had not been previously implicated in response to the parasite, while the others support the previously identified proteins. Selected proteomics results were validated by real-time PCR and immunoblot analyses. Similar changes were observed in L. donovani-infected human monocyte-derived primary macrophages. The effect of RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated gene knockdown of proteins validated the relevance of the host quantitative proteomic screen. Our findings indicate that the host cell proteome is modulated after L. donovani infection, provide evidence for global reprogramming of cell metabolism, and demonstrate the complex relations between the host and parasite at the molecular level. PMID:25690103

  20. Accelerator shield design of KIPT neutron source facility

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.

    2013-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology (KIPT) of Ukraine have been collaborating on the design development of a neutron source facility at KIPT utilizing an electron-accelerator-driven subcritical assembly. Electron beam power is 100 kW, using 100 MeV electrons. The facility is designed to perform basic and applied nuclear research, produce medical isotopes, and train young nuclear specialists. The biological shield of the accelerator building is designed to reduce the biological dose to less than 0.5-mrem/hr during operation. The main source of the biological dose is the photons and the neutrons generated by interactions of leaked electrons from the electron gun and accelerator sections with the surrounding concrete and accelerator materials. The Monte Carlo code MCNPX serves as the calculation tool for the shield design, due to its capability to transport electrons, photons, and neutrons coupled problems. The direct photon dose can be tallied by MCNPX calculation, starting with the leaked electrons. However, it is difficult to accurately tally the neutron dose directly from the leaked electrons. The neutron yield per electron from the interactions with the surrounding components is less than 0.01 neutron per electron. This causes difficulties for Monte Carlo analyses and consumes tremendous computation time for tallying with acceptable statistics the neutron dose outside the shield boundary. To avoid these difficulties, the SOURCE and TALLYX user subroutines of MCNPX were developed for the study. The generated neutrons are banked, together with all related parameters, for a subsequent MCNPX calculation to obtain the neutron and secondary photon doses. The weight windows variance reduction technique is utilized for both neutron and photon dose calculations. Two shielding materials, i.e., heavy concrete and ordinary concrete, were considered for the shield design. The main goal is to maintain the total

  1. Extending the X Window System

    SciTech Connect

    Brenkosh, J.P.

    1993-12-23

    The X Window System was originally developed in 1984 at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It provides client-server computing functionality and also facilitates the establishment of a distributed computing environment. Since its inception the X Window System has undergone many enhancements. Despite these enhancements there will always be a functionality desired in the standard released version of X that is not supported or commercially or academically available. The developers of the X Window System have designed it in such a way that it is possible to add functionality that is not included in the standard release. This is called an extension. Extensions are one method used to develop a customized version of the X Window System to support a specialized application. This report presents the mechanics of adding an extension and examines a particular extension that was developed at Sandia National Laboratories to support data compression in X Windows which was one aspect of the Desktop Video and Collaborative Engineering Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD).

  2. Switchable Materials for Smart Windows.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Runnerstrom, Evan L; Milliron, Delia J

    2016-06-01

    This article reviews the basic principles of and recent developments in electrochromic, photochromic, and thermochromic materials for applications in smart windows. Compared with current static windows, smart windows can dynamically modulate the transmittance of solar irradiation based on weather conditions and personal preferences, thus simultaneously improving building energy efficiency and indoor human comfort. Although some smart windows are commercially available, their widespread implementation has not yet been realized. Recent advances in nanostructured materials provide new opportunities for next-generation smart window technology owing to their unique structure-property relations. Nanomaterials can provide enhanced coloration efficiency, faster switching kinetics, and longer lifetime. In addition, their compatibility with solution processing enables low-cost and high-throughput fabrication. This review also discusses the importance of dual-band modulation of visible and near-infrared (NIR) light, as nearly 50% of solar energy lies in the NIR region. Some latest results show that solution-processable nanostructured systems can selectively modulate the NIR light without affecting the visible transmittance, thus reducing energy consumption by air conditioning, heating, and artificial lighting. PMID:27023660

  3. Analysis of the new GCFR upper and lower plenum flow-through shields

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, S.N.; Reed, D.A.; Emmett, M.B.; Rouse, C.A.

    1980-09-14

    Analysis of the proposed GCFR upper and lower plenum flow-through shields has been performed using both discrete ordinate (DOT) and Monte Carlo (MORSE) methods. Several shields having one change of direction in the coolant path (chevron) and two changes of direction (herringbone) were investigated. The shields were modeled as unit cells with periodic boundary conditions. From plenum fluence calculations and design constraints at the reactor vessel liner, it was determined that all the shield configurations analyzed should be adequate for the necessary radiation attenuation.

  4. Jet shielding of jet noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simonich, J. C.; Amiet, R. K.; Schlinker, R. H.

    1986-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical study was conducted to develop a validated first principle analysis for predicting the jet noise reduction achieved by shielding one jet exhaust flow with a second, closely spaced, identical jet flow. A generalized fuel jet noise analytical model was formulated in which the acoustic radiation from a source jet propagates through the velocity and temperature discontinuity of the adjacent shielding jet. Input variables to the prediction procedure include jet Mach number, spacing, temperature, diameter, and source frequency. Refraction, diffraction, and reflection effects, which control the dual jet directivity pattern, are incorporated in the theory. The analysis calculates the difference in sound pressure level between the dual jet configuration and the radiation field based on superimposing two independent jet noise directivity patterns. Jet shielding was found experimentally to reduce noise levels in the common plane of the dual jet system relative to the noise generated by two independent jets.

  5. 16 CFR 455.3 - Window form.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Window form. 455.3 Section 455.3 Commercial... Window form. (a) Form given to buyer. Give the buyer of a used vehicle sold by you the window form...) Incorporated into contract. The information on the final version of the window form is incorporated into...

  6. Windows and daylighting: A brighter outlook

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-11-01

    This is an overview of energy efficient window glazing and framing technology. The topics of the report include: windows and energy use, a point of view; a challenging federal opportunity; DOE window research; advanced optical technologies such as spectrally selective glazing, switchable glazing, super windows with low-emissivity coatings and noble gas fills; and performance evaluation and design tools.

  7. A robust industrial accelerator window design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Marlin N.; Vroom, David A.

    1998-06-01

    An improved design for the thin metal foil window associated with high power industrial accelarators has been developed and tested. This design, which employs specifically shaped flanges, greatly reduce the stresses normally present on accelerators windows and has lead to longer window lifetime and a better means of window cooling.

  8. Music@Microsoft.Windows: Composing Ambience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rickert, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    It is well known, of course, that all Windows versions except for 3.1 have a brief (four to six second) piece of music indicating that Windows is booted and ready for use. While the music may indicate Windows has booted, it bears no immediately discernable relation to the various uses we might actually put Windows to--working, gaming,…

  9. [Analyse Output Specurum in Miniature Transmission X-Ray Tube of Aluminum Window and Silver Target by MC Simulation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Zhang, Qing-xian; Ge, Liang-quan; Lu, Zhen-rui; Luo, Yao-yao; Zhao, Jian-kun; Chen, Shuang

    2015-10-01

    The miniature transmission X-ray tube is widely used in energy dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Analysis (EDXRFA). The miniature transmission X-ray tube with a small, low power consumption, X-ray emission efficiency that can be made the excitation source of handheld X-ray energy dispersive fluorescence analyzer. Beryllium (Be) is the most commonly used X-ray window material. But beryllium is expensive and toxic. At the same time set filtering window by aluminum (Al) to reducing low-energy scattering rays. This paper be adopted Al for exit window material of miniature transmission X-ray tube, achieve high-energy rays transmission and low-energy scattered radiation shielding, at the same time reduce production cost and difficulty. The present paper simulate the X-ray tube output spectrum of silver (Ag) target and aluminum window with different thickness by MCNP5. We consider the X-ray of low energy part is completely shielded when aluminum windows thickness is greater than 1.5 mm. We can conclude that 2 μm and 0.8 mm are the best combination of target thickness and aluminum windows through comparative analysis of existing research results. Then we can get flux of high energy part is big and low energy part is small when the target is 2 μm thick Ag and the window is 0.8 mm thick Al. PMID:26904839

  10. Stiffness characteristics of longwall shields

    SciTech Connect

    Bayczak, T.M.; Schwemmer, D.E.

    1988-01-01

    The stiffness characteristics of longwall shields have been investigated the this study. Since longwall strata activity is characterized by roof-to-floor and face-to-waste displacements, a model with two degrees of freedom is used to describe the load-displacement relationship of the shield structure. The model considers the support as an elastic body and relates horizontal and vertical resultant forces acting on the support to associated displacements as a function of the stiffness of the support structure. Stiffness coefficients under full canopy and base contact configurations have been determined.

  11. Shielding of elliptic guides with direct sight to the moderator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böni, P.; Grünauer, F.; Schanzer, C.

    2010-12-01

    With the invention of elliptic guides, the neutron flux at instruments can be increased significantly even without sacrificing resolution. In addition, the phase space homogeneity of the delivered neutrons is improved. Using superpolished metal substrates that are coated with supermirror, it is now possible to install neutron guides close to the moderator thus decreasing the illumination losses of the guide and reducing the background because the entrance window of the elliptic guide can be decreased significantly. We have performed Monte Carlo simulations using the program package MCNP5 to calculate the shielding requirements for an elliptic guide geometry assuming that the initial guide section elements are composed of Al substrates. We show that shielding made from heavy concrete shields the neutron and γ-radiation effectively to levels below 1 μSv/h. It is shown that the elliptic geometry allows to match the phase space of the transported neutrons easily to the needs of the instruments to be installed. In particular it is possible to maintain a compact phase space during the transport of the neutrons because the reflection losses are strongly reduced.

  12. Investigation of the Effect of I-ZnO Window Layer on the Device Performance of the Cd-Free CIGS Based Solar Cells (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Hasoon, F. S.; al-Thani, H. A.; Li, X.; Kanevce, A.; Perkins, C.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    This research work focuses on preparing Cd-free CIGS based solar cells with intrinsic high resistivity ZnO (I-ZnO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique at different deposition substrate temperature and I-ZnO film thickness, and the effect of the prior treatment of CIGS films by ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) diluted solution on the device performance.

  13. Investigation of the Effect of I-ZnO Window Layer on the Device Performance of the Cd-Free CIGS Based Solar Cells: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Hasoon, F. S.; Al-Thani, H. A.; Li, X.; Kanevce, A.; Perkins, C.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    This paper focuses on preparing Cd-free, CIGS-based solar cells with intrinsic high resistivity ZnO (I-ZnO) films deposited by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique at different deposition substrate temperature and I-ZnO film thickness, and the effect of the prior treatment of CIGS films by ammonium hydroxide (NH4OH) diluted solution on the device performance.

  14. Simulation Study to Improve Focalization of a Figure Eight Coil by Using a Conductive Shield Plate and a Ferromagnetic Block.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chen; Zhang, Shunqi; Liu, Zhipeng; Yin, Tao

    2015-07-01

    A new method to improve the focalization and efficiency of the Figure of Eight (FOE) coil in rTMS is discussed in this paper. In order to decrease the half width of the distribution curve (HWDC), as well to increase the ratio of positive peak value to negative peak value (RPN) of the induced electric field, a shield plate with a window and a ferromagnetic block are assumed to enhance the positive peak value of the induced electrical field. The shield is made of highly conductive copper, and the block is made of highly permeable soft magnetic ferrite. A computer simulation is conducted on ANSYS® software to conduct the finite element analysis (FEA). Two comparing coefficients were set up to optimize the sizes of the shield window and the block. Simulation results show that a shield with a 60 mm × 30 mm sized window, together with a block 40 mm thick, can decrease the focal area of a FOE coil by 46.7%, while increasing the RPN by 135.9%. The block enhances the peak value of the electrical field induced by a shield-FOE by 8.4%. A real human head model was occupied in this paper to further verify our method. PMID:25594972

  15. The refined shielding design for the cyclotron room of the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital.

    PubMed

    Sheu, R D; Chen, C C; Sheu, R J; Kao, C H; Jiang, S H

    2005-01-01

    Full-scale Monte Carlo simulations of the cyclotron room of the Buddhist Tzu Chi General Hospital were carried out to improve the inadequate maze design. The double differential neutron source from the 18O(p,n)18F reaction was adopted for the calculation. The weight window variance reduction technique, where the weight window was set by applying the adjoint flux, has been implemented in the MCNP run to facilitate the calculation of the dose rates outside the cyclotron room. Dose rates including neutron and gamma-ray components were calculated for some maze shielding modifications. PMID:16381715

  16. Alternative window schemes for CuInSe{sub 2}-based solar cells. Annual report, 1 November 1995--31 October 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L.C.

    1997-10-01

    The objectives of this program are to develop alternate heterojunction partner layers (buffer layers) for high efficiency CuInSe{sub 2}-based thin-film solar cells, and improve the understanding of how these layers and the details of processing affect cell performance. Investigations have primarily involved three tasks: (1) MOCVD growth of non-cadmium containing buffer layers; (2) optimized processing of buffer layers for high efficiency solar cells; and (3) electrical and physical characterization of layers and devices. Investigations of alternative buffer layers emphasized studies of ZnO grown by MOCVD. Using CIS substrates obtained form Siemens for process development, it was determined that growth procedures that resulted in good results with Siemens CIS (non-sulfur containing material) substrates also worked well with NREL CIGS material. A two step process was developed for growing highly resistive ZnO buffer layers (i-ZnO). In particular, after growing 100 to 150 {angstrom} of ZnO at 250 C, an additional 600 {angstrom} to 800 {angstrom} were grown at 100 C. Collaboration with NREL resulted in a n-ZnO/i-ZnO/CIGS cell which was determined to have a total area efficiency of 12.7%, and an active area efficiency greater than 13%. After growing i-ZnO with the two-step process onto NREL CIGS material, the i-ZnO/CIGS film structure was sent to NREL for deposition of a TCO, namely, conducting ZnO (n-ZnO). Collector grids and a MgF{sub 2} AR coating were also deposited at NREL. Low level efforts were devoted to studies of ZnSe and InSe buffer layers. A total area efficiency of 9.5% was achieved for a completed ZnSe/CIS cell making use of a RF sputtered ZnO for a TCO. Investigations of In{sub x}Se{sub y} (InSe) buffer layers were also initiated this past year.

  17. FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA665. CAMERA FACING NORTH. NOTE BRICKEDIN WINDOW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FAST CHOPPER BUILDING, TRA-665. CAMERA FACING NORTH. NOTE BRICKED-IN WINDOW ON RIGHT SIDE (BELOW PAINTED NUMERALS "665"). SLIDING METAL DOOR ON COVERED RAIL AT UPPER LEVEL. SHELTERED ENTRANCE TO STEEL SHIELDING DOOR. DOOR INTO MTR SERVICE BUILDING, TRA-635, STANDS OPEN. MTR BEHIND CHOPPER BUILDING. INL NEGATIVE NO. HD42-1. Mike Crane, Photographer, 3/2004 - Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Test Reactor Area, Materials & Engineering Test Reactors, Scoville, Butte County, ID

  18. Effect of infrared transparency on the heat transfer through windows: a clarification of the greenhouse effect.

    PubMed

    Silverstein, S D

    1976-07-16

    The various radiative, convective, and conductive components of the net heat transfer are calculated and illustrated for various infrared transparencies of covers such as would be used in architectural, greenhouse, or solar collector windows. It is shown that in the limiting cases of infrared opacity and infrared transparency the relative contributions of the three modes of heat transfer are altered, but all contribute significantly. The radiation shielding arguments pertain to the analogous green-house effect in the atmosphere. PMID:17796153

  19. Highly conducting and preferred <220> oriented boron doped nc-Si films for window layers in nc-Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Praloy; Das, Debajyoti

    2016-05-01

    Growth and optimization of the boron dopednanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si) films have been studied by varyingthe gaspressure applied to the hydrogendiluted silane plasma in RF (13.56 MHz) plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) system, using diborane (B2H6) as the dopant gas. High magnitudeof electrical conductivity (~102 S cm-1) and<220>orientedcrystallographic lattice planes have been obtained with high crystalline volume fraction (~86 %) at an optimum pressure of 2.5 Torr. XRD and Raman studies reveal good crystallinity with preferred orientation, suitable for applications in stacked layer devices, particularly in nc-Si solar cells.

  20. Material Effectiveness for Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Materials with a smaller mean atomic mass, such as lithium (Li) hydride and polyethylene, make the best radiation shields for astronauts. The materials have a higher density of nuclei and are better able to block incoming radiation. Also, they tend to produce fewer and less dangerous secondary particles after impact with incoming radiation.

  1. Predictions for Radiation Shielding Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiefer, Richard L.

    2002-01-01

    Radiation from galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and solar particle events (SPE) is a serious hazard to humans and electronic instruments during space travel, particularly on prolonged missions outside the Earth s magnetic fields. Galactic cosmic radiation (GCR) is composed of approx. 98% nucleons and approx. 2% electrons and positrons. Although cosmic ray heavy ions are 1-2% of the fluence, these energetic heavy nuclei (HZE) contribute 50% of the long-term dose. These unusually high specific ionizations pose a significant health hazard acting as carcinogens and also causing microelectronics damage inside spacecraft and high-flying aircraft. These HZE ions are of concern for radiation protection and radiation shielding technology, because gross rearrangements and mutations and deletions in DNA are expected. Calculations have shown that HZE particles have a strong preference for interaction with light nuclei. The best shield for this radiation would be liquid hydrogen, which is totally impractical. For this reason, hydrogen-containing polymers make the most effective practical shields. Shielding is required during missions in Earth orbit and possibly for frequent flying at high altitude because of the broad GCR spectrum and during a passage into deep space and LunarMars habitation because of the protracted exposure encountered on a long space mission. An additional hazard comes from solar particle events (SPEs) which are mostly energetic protons that can produce heavy ion secondaries as well as neutrons in materials. These events occur at unpredictable times and can deliver a potentially lethal dose within several hours to an unshielded human. Radiation protection for humans requires safety in short-term missions and maintaining career exposure limits within acceptable levels on future long-term exploration missions. The selection of shield materials can alter the protection of humans by an order of magnitude. If improperly selected, shielding materials can actually

  2. Reliability-Based Electronics Shielding Design Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; O'Neill, P. J.; Zang, T. A.; Pandolf, J. E.; Tripathi, R. K.; Koontz, Steven L.; Boeder, P.; Reddell, B.; Pankop, C.

    2007-01-01

    Shielding design on large human-rated systems allows minimization of radiation impact on electronic systems. Shielding design tools require adequate methods for evaluation of design layouts, guiding qualification testing, and adequate follow-up on final design evaluation.

  3. Improved Connector Shell for Cable Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prisk, A. L.; Rotta, J. W., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Cable connector shell improves electrostatic and electromagnetic shielding by electrically connecting cable braid around entire circumference. Connector cable braid is slipped over ferrule and sleeve is slipped over braid, clamping it tightly to shell. Connector shell completely shields cable conductors.

  4. The Benefits of Aluminum Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goyal, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses benefits of aluminum windows for college construction and renovation projects, including that aluminum is the most successfully recycled material, that it meets architectural glass deflection standards, that it has positive thermal energy performance, and that it is a preferred exterior surface. (EV)

  5. Creating a Window Cleaner Company.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarquis, A. M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Provides a description of a project used in the Cool Science and Technology Camps in which campers are presented with the challenge of developing and marketing their own brand of window cleaner. Topics such as chemistry, marketing, and cost analysis are intertwined as students prepare and plan their approach to product development. (DDR)

  6. Notes on UHV beryllium windows

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, P.L.

    1986-10-01

    Techniques are described for making large ultrahigh vacuum beryllium windows for use in synchrotron radiation installations. Procedures are given for affecting both hard brazed seals and demountable seals involving either lead or copper gaskets. Brazed seals can be made to either stainless steel or copper. Possible alternative methods are suggested.

  7. Closing the Windows on Opportunity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombs, Norman

    1995-01-01

    The rapid adoption of graphic user interface (GUI), as indicated by Microsoft's Windows95 and the Internet's increased use of graphics, is threatening information technology opportunities for people with disabilities. Recent legislation requires that schools provide access to computers and information technology, and producers of Mosaic are…

  8. Debris shield survivability and lifetimes for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, S; Duewer, T; Eder, D; Ertel, J; Horton, R; Latkowski, Brereton, S; MacGowan, B; Thomas, I; Tobin, M; Zaka, F

    1999-09-01

    The survivability and performance of the NIF debris shields on the National Ignition Facility are a key factor for the successful conduct and affordable operation of the facility. Estimates of debris shield lifetime in the presence of target emissions indicate severely shortened lifetimes. We have tested a new coating design that improves debris shield cleaning. A combination of modeling and continuous data collection on NIF is described/recommended to allow cost effective debris shield operation.

  9. Optimized Shielding for Space Radiation Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M.-H. Y.; Schimmerling, W.

    2000-01-01

    Abstract. Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  10. Optimized shielding for space radiation protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Kim, M. H.; Schimmerling, W.

    2001-01-01

    Future deep space mission and International Space Station exposures will be dominated by the high-charge and -energy (HZE) ions of the Galactic Cosmic Rays (GCR). A few mammalian systems have been extensively tested over a broad range of ion types and energies. For example, C3H10T1/2 cells, V79 cells, and Harderian gland tumors have been described by various track-structure dependent response models. The attenuation of GCR induced biological effects depends strongly on the biological endpoint, response model used, and material composition. Optimization of space shielding is then driven by the nature of the response model and the transmission characteristics of the given material.

  11. Metal Foam Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.

    2006-01-01

    This paper compares the ballistic performance of metallic foam sandwich structures with honeycomb structures. Honeycomb sandwich structures, consisting of metallic or composite facesheets and honeycomb cores, are often used in spacecraft construction due to their light-weight and structural stiffness. Honeycomb panels, however, are considered rather poor candidates for protection from micrometeoroid orbital debris (MMOD) particles because the honeycomb channels the debris cloud from MMOD impacts on outer facesheet causing a concentrated load on the second facesheet. Sandwich structures with light-weight, open-cell metallic cores and metal or composite facesheets provide improved MMOD protection because channeling does not occur and because the core is more effective at disrupting hypervelocity impacts then honeycomb. This paper describes hypervelocity impact tests on metallic foam sandwich structures (aluminum and titanium) with metallic facesheets, compare them to equivalent mass and thickness honeycomb panels, based on the results of hypervelocity impact tests.

  12. Effect of a Coadsorbent on the Performance of Dye-Sensitized TiO2 Solar Cells: Shielding versus Band-Edge Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, A. J.; Neale, N. R.; Kopidakis, N.; van de Lagemaat, J.; Gratzel, M.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this research is to determine the operational characteristics key to efficient, low-cost, stable solar cells based on dye-sensitized mesoporous films (in collaboration with DOE's Office of Science Program). Toward this end, we have investigated the mechanism by which the adsorbent chenodeoxycholate, cografted with a sensitizer onto TiO2 nanocrystals, improves the open-circuit photovoltage (VOC) and short-circuit photocurrent density (JSC). We find that adding chenodeoxycholate not only shifts the TiO2 conduction-band edge to negative potentials but also accelerates the rate of recombination. The net effect of these opposing phenomena is to produce a higher photovoltage. It is also found that chenodeoxycholate reduces the dye loading significantly but has only a modest effect on JSC. Implications of these results to developing more efficient cells are discussed.

  13. GCFR shielding design and supporting experimental programs

    SciTech Connect

    Perkins, R.G.; Hamilton, C.J.; Bartine, D.

    1980-05-01

    The shielding for the conceptual design of the gas-cooled fast breeder reactor (GCFR) is described, and the component exposure design criteria which determine the shield design are presented. The experimental programs for validating the GCFR shielding design methods and data (which have been in existence since 1976) are also discussed.

  14. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  15. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  16. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  17. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  18. 21 CFR 880.5630 - Nipple shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nipple shield. 880.5630 Section 880.5630 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... Nipple shield. (a) Identification. A nipple shield is a device consisting of a cover used to protect...

  19. Self-shielding models of MICROX-2 code

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, J.; Ivanov, K.; Choi, H.

    2013-07-01

    The MICROX-2 is a transport theory code that solves for the neutron slowing-down and thermalization equations of a two-region lattice cell. In the previous study, a new fine-group cross section library of the MICROX-2 was generated and tested against reference calculations and measurement data. In this study, existing physics models of the MICROX-2 are reviewed and updated to improve the physics calculation performance of the MICROX-2 code, including the resonance self-shielding model and spatial self-shielding factor. The updated self-shielding models have been verified through a series of benchmark calculations against the Monte Carlo code, using homogeneous and pin cell models selected for this study. The results have shown that the updates of the self-shielding factor calculation model are correct and improve the physics calculation accuracy even though the magnitude of error reduction is relatively small. Compared to the existing models, the updates reduced the prediction error of the infinite multiplication factor by approximately 0.1 % and 0.2% for the homogeneous and pin cell models, respectively, considered in this study. (authors)

  20. Removable Window System for Space Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, James P. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A window system for a platform comprising a window pane, a retention frame, and a biasing system. The window pane may be configured to contact a sealing system. The retention frame may be configured to contact the sealing system and hold the window pane against the support frame. The biasing system may be configured to bias the retention frame toward the support frame while the support frame and the retention frame are in a configuration that holds the window pane. Removal of the biasing system may cause the retention frame and the window pane to be removable.

  1. Measured winter performance of storm windows

    SciTech Connect

    Klems, Joseph H.

    2002-08-23

    Direct comparison measurements were made between various prime/storm window combinations and a well-weatherstripped, single-hung replacement window with a low-E selective glazing. Measurements were made using an accurate outdoor calorimetric facility with the windows facing north. The doublehung prime window was made intentionally leaky. Nevertheless, heat flows due to air infiltration were found to be small, and performance of the prime/storm combinations was approximately what would be expected from calculations that neglect air infiltration. Prime/low-E storm window combinations performed very similarly to the replacement window. Interestingly, solar heat gain was not negligible, even in north-facing orientation.

  2. Design of an Aluminum Proton Beam Window for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Jim G; McClintock, David A

    2012-01-01

    An aluminum proton beam window design is being considered at the Spallation Neutron Source primarily to increase the lifetime of the window, with secondary advantages of higher beam transport efficiency and lower activation. The window separates the core vessel, the location of the mercury target, from the vacuum of the accelerator, while withstanding the pass through of a proton beam of up to 2 MW with 1.0 GeV proton energy. The current aluminum alloy being investigated for the window material is 6061-T651 due to its combination of high strength, high thermal conductivity, and good resistance to aqueous corrosion, as well as demonstrated dependability in previous high-radiation environments. The window design will feature a thin plate with closely spaced cross drilled cooling holes. An analytical approach was used to optimize the dimensions of the window before finite element analysis was used to simulate temperature profiles and stress fields resulting from thermal and static pressure loading. The resulting maximum temperature of 60 C and Von Mises stress of 71 MPa are very low compared to allowables for Al 6061-T651. A significant challenge in designing an aluminum proton beam window for SNS is integrating the window with the current 316L SS shield blocks. Explosion bonding was chosen as a joining technique because of the large bonding area required. A test program has commenced to prove explosion bonding can produce a robust vacuum joint. Pending successful explosion bond testing, the aluminum proton beam window design will be proven acceptable for service in the Spallation Neutron Source.

  3. LEF1 and B9L shield β-catenin from inactivation by Axin, desensitizing colorectal cancer cells to tankyrase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    de la Roche, Marc; Ibrahim, Ashraf E K; Mieszczanek, Juliusz; Bienz, Mariann

    2014-03-01

    Hyperactive β-catenin drives colorectal cancer, yet inhibiting its activity remains a formidable challenge. Interest is mounting in tankyrase inhibitors (TNKSi), which destabilize β-catenin through stabilizing Axin. Here, we confirm that TNKSi inhibit Wnt-induced transcription, similarly to carnosate, which reduces the transcriptional activity of β-catenin by blocking its binding to BCL9, and attenuates intestinal tumors in Apc(Min) mice. By contrast, β-catenin's activity is unresponsive to TNKSi in colorectal cancer cells and in cells after prolonged Wnt stimulation. This TNKSi insensitivity is conferred by β-catenin's association with LEF1 and BCL9-2/B9L, which accumulate during Wnt stimulation, thereby providing a feed-forward loop that converts transient into chronic β-catenin signaling. This limits the therapeutic value of TNKSi in colorectal carcinomas, most of which express high LEF1 levels. Our study provides proof-of-concept that the successful inhibition of oncogenic β-catenin in colorectal cancer requires the targeting of its interaction with LEF1 and/or BCL9/B9L, as exemplified by carnosate. PMID:24419084

  4. New facility shield design criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources.

  5. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Mocko, Michal

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  6. Radiation shielding for diagnostic radiology.

    PubMed

    Martin, Colin J

    2015-07-01

    Scattered radiation makes up the majority of the stray radiation field around an X-ray unit. The scatter is linked to the amount of radiation incident on the patient. It can be estimated from quantities used to assess patient dose such as the kerma-area product, and factors have been established linking this to levels of scattered radiation for radiography and fluoroscopy. In radiography shielding against primary radiation is also needed, but in other modalities this is negligible, as the beam is intercepted by the image receptor. In the same way scatter from CT can be quantified in terms of dose-length product, but because of higher radiation levels, exposure to tertiary scatter from ceilings needs to be considered. Transmission requirements are determined from comparisons between calculated radiation levels and agreed dose criteria, taking into account the occupancy of adjacent areas. Thicknesses of shielding material required can then be calculated from simple equations. PMID:25813477

  7. INERT GAS SHIELD FOR WELDING

    DOEpatents

    Jones, S.O.; Daly, F.V.

    1958-10-14

    S>An inert gas shield is presented for arc-welding materials such as zirconium that tend to oxidize rapidly in air. The device comprises a rectangular metal box into which the welding electrode is introduced through a rubber diaphragm to provide flexibility. The front of the box is provided with a wlndow having a small hole through which flller metal is introduced. The box is supplied with an inert gas to exclude the atmosphere, and with cooling water to promote the solidification of the weld while in tbe inert atmosphere. A separate water-cooled copper backing bar is provided underneath the joint to be welded to contain the melt-through at the root of the joint, shielding the root of the joint with its own supply of inert gas and cooling the deposited weld metal. This device facilitates the welding of large workpieces of zirconium frequently encountered in reactor construction.

  8. Windows in the Milky Way

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, William H.; Tacconi-Garman, Lowell Evan; Boulanger, Francois; Okumura, Koryo

    1991-01-01

    The objectives were twofold: (1) to study the IRAS emission levels in the vicinity of Baade's Window and in other optically transparent regions near the Galactic Center; and (2) to study the IRAS emission levels along sightlines in the Milky Way that exhibit very little CO emission. Tests were attempted to see whether the optically transparent 'windows' near the Galactic center can be identified (as FIR-weak regions) in the IRAS data base; and if so, whether the CO weak regions found elsewhere in the Milky Way represent similarly FIR weak and thus optically transparent sightlines through the Galaxy. The CO weak regions were also targeted in an effort to study the diffuse intercloud dust and its warming by the interstellar radiation field.

  9. S8DR shield examination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, D. G.; Mccurnin, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The SNAP 8 developmental reactor lithium hydride shield was examined after being irradiated for over 7000 hours at relatively low temperature. A crack was located in the seam weld of the containment vessel, probably the result of hot short cracking under thermal stress. The LiH was visually examined at two locations and its appearance was typical of low temperature irradiated LiH. The adherence of the chrome oxide emittance coating was found to be excellent.

  10. SETTABLE NEUTRON RADIATION SHIELDING MATERIAL

    DOEpatents

    Axelrad, I.R.

    1960-11-22

    A settable, viscous, putty-like shielding composition is described. It consists of an intimate admixture of a major proportion of a compound having a ratio of hydrogen atoms to all other atoms therein within the range of from 0.5: 1 to 2:l. from 0.5 to 10% by weight of boron, and a fluid resinous carrier This composition when cured is adapted to attenuate fast moving neutrons and capture slow moving neutrons.

  11. Thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, John W., Jr. (Inventor); Miller, Andre E. (Inventor); Lawson, Bobby E. (Inventor); Cobb, William E. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A thermally isolated deployable shield for spacecraft is provided utilizing a plurality of lattice panels stowable generally against the craft and deployable to some fixed distance from the craft. The lattice panels are formed from replaceable shield panels affixed to lattice structures. The lattice panels generally encircle the craft providing 360 degree coverage therearound. Actuation means are provided from translating the shield radially outward from the craft and thermally isolating the shield from the craft. The lattice panels are relatively flexible, allowing the shield to deploy to variable diameters while retaining uniform curvature thereof. Restraining means are provided for holding the shield relatively tight in its stowed configuration. Close-out assemblies provide light sealing and protection of the annular spaces between the deployed shield and the crafts end structure.

  12. Electrochromic Windows: Advanced Processing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    SAGE Electrochromics, Inc

    2006-12-13

    This project addresses the development of advanced fabrication capabilities for energy saving electrochromic (EC) windows. SAGE EC windows consist of an inorganic stack of thin films deposited onto a glass substrate. The window tint can be reversibly changed by the application of a low power dc voltage. This property can be used to modulate the amount of light and heat entering buildings (or vehicles) through the glazings. By judicious management of this so-called solar heat gain, it is possible to derive significant energy savings due to reductions in heating lighting, and air conditioning (HVAC). Several areas of SAGE’s production were targeted during this project to allow significant improvements to processing throughput, yield and overall quality of the processing, in an effort to reduce the cost and thereby improve the market penetration. First, the overall thin film process was optimized to allow a more robust set of operating points to be used, thereby maximizing the yield due to the thin film deposition themselves. Other significant efforts aimed at improving yield were relating to implementing new procedures and processes for the manufacturing process, to improve the quality of the substrate preparation, and the quality of the IGU fabrication. Furthermore, methods for reworking defective devices were developed, to enable devices which would otherwise be scrapped to be made into useful product. This involved the in-house development of some customized equipment. Finally, the improvements made during this project were validated to ensure that they did not impact the exceptional durability of the SageGlass® products. Given conservative estimates for cost and market penetration, energy savings due to EC windows in residences in the US are calculated to be of the order 0.026 quad (0.026×1015BTU/yr) by the year 2017.

  13. Investigation of polycrystalline thin-film CuInSe{sub 2} solar cells based on ZnSe windows. Annual subcontract report, 15 Febraury 1992--14 February 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, L C

    1994-05-01

    Investigations of ZnSe/CIS solar cells are being carried out in an effort to improve the efficiencies CIS cells and to determine if ZnSe is a viable alternative to CdS as a window material. MOCVD growth of ZnSe is accomplished in a SPIRE 500XT reactor housed in the Electronic Materials Laboratory at WSU Tri-Cities by reacting a zinc adduct with H{sub 2}Se. Conductive n-type ZnSe is grown by using iodine as a dopant. Ethyliodide was mixed with helium and installed on one of the gas lines to the system. ZnSe films have been grown on CIS substrates at 200{degrees}C to 250{degrees}C. ZnO is also being deposited by MOCVD by reacting tetrahydrofuran (THF) with a zinc adduct. ZnSe/CIS heterojunctions have been studied by growing n-ZnSe films onto 2 cm x 2 cm CIS substrates diced from materials supplied by Siemens and then depositing an array of aluminum circular areas 2.8.mm in diameter on top of the ZnSe to serve as contacts. Al films are deposited with a thickness of 80 to l00 {angstrom}so that light can pass through the film, thus allowing the illuminated characteristics of the ZnSe/CIS junction to be tested. Accounting for the 20 to 25 % transmittance through the Al film into the ZnSe/CIS structure, current devices have estimated, active-area AM1.5 efficiencies of 14 %. Open circuit voltages > 500 mV are often attained.

  14. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    SciTech Connect

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-05-09

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs.

  15. Steam generator hand hole shielding.

    PubMed

    Cox, W E

    2000-05-01

    Seabrook Station is an 1198 MWE Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) that began commercial operation in 1990. Expensive and dose intensive Steam Generator Replacement Projects among PWR operators have led to an increase in steam generator preventative maintenance. Most of this preventative maintenance is performed through access ports in the shell of the steam generator just above the tube sheet known as secondary side hand holes. Secondary side work activities performed through the hand holes are typically performed without the shielding benefit of water in the secondary side of the steam generator. An increase in cleaning and inspection work scope has led to an increase in dose attributed to steam generator secondary side maintenance. This increased work scope and the station goal of maintaining personnel radiation dose ALARA led to the development of the shielding concept described in this article. This shield design saved an estimated 2.5 person-rem (25 person-Smv) the first time it was deployed and is expected to save an additional 50 person-rem (500 person-mSv) over the remaining life of the plant. PMID:10770158

  16. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) Shielding Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bastin, Gary L.

    2007-01-01

    Photonic Bandgap (PBG) shielding technology is a new approach to designing electromagnetic shielding materials for mitigating Electromagnetic Interference (EM!) with small, light-weight shielding materials. It focuses on ground planes of printed wiring boards (PWBs), rather than on components. Modem PSG materials also are emerging based on planar materials, in place of earlier, bulkier, 3-dimensional PBG structures. Planar PBG designs especially show great promise in mitigating and suppressing EMI and crosstalk for aerospace designs, such as needed for NASA's Constellation Program, for returning humans to the moon and for use by our first human visitors traveling to and from Mars. Photonic Bandgap (PBG) materials are also known as artificial dielectrics, meta-materials, and photonic crystals. General PBG materials are fundamentally periodic slow-wave structures in I, 2, or 3 dimensions. By adjusting the choice of structure periodicities in terms of size and recurring structure spacings, multiple scatterings of surface waves can be created that act as a forbidden energy gap (i.e., a range of frequencies) over which nominally-conductive metallic conductors cease to be a conductor and become dielectrics. Equivalently, PBG materials can be regarded as giving rise to forbidden energy gaps in metals without chemical doping, analogous to electron bandgap properties that previously gave rise to the modem semiconductor industry 60 years ago. Electromagnetic waves cannot propagate over bandgap regions that are created with PBG materials, that is, over frequencies for which a bandgap is artificially created through introducing periodic defects

  17. RUGGED CERAMIC WINDOW FOR RF APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    MIKE NEUBAUER

    2012-11-01

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  18. Rugged Ceramic Window for RF Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, Michael; Johnson, Rolland P.; Rimmer, Robert; Elliot, Tom; Stirbet, Mircea

    2009-05-04

    High-current RF cavities that are needed for many accelerator applications are often limited by the power transmission capability of the pressure barriers (windows) that separate the cavity from the power source. Most efforts to improve RF window design have focused on alumina ceramic, the most popular historical choice, and have not taken advantage of new materials. Alternative window materials have been investigated using a novel Merit Factor comparison and likely candidates have been tested for the material properties which will enable construction in the self-matched window configuration. Window assemblies have also been modeled and fabricated using compressed window techniques which have proven to increase the power handling capability of waveguide windows. Candidate materials have been chosen to be used in fabricating a window for high power testing at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility.

  19. CAUSAL ANALYSIS OF THE UNCONTROLLED MODERATOR IN THE HFEF MAIN CELL

    SciTech Connect

    Charles R. Posegate; Bryan P. Crofts

    2012-12-01

    On 11/07/2012 while investigating the cause of defects in neutron radiography film at HFEF, oil was discovered near the elevator shaft located at the 4M location within the Main Cell. Subsequent investigation identified oil (untracked moderator) in several locations ofthe HFEF Main Cell. Initial analysis determined that oil leaking from a 1M shielding window had leaked past a compensatory containment system resulting in a thin layer of oil found in several locations on the main cell floor. The result of this condition is uncontrolled moderator in moderator controlled zones, which is a violation of Criticality Hazard Control Statements (CHCS) for HFEF.

  20. Beryllium window for an APS diagnostics beamline

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Yang, B.X.; Sharma, Y.S.

    1997-09-01

    A beryllium (Be) window for an Advanced Photon Source (APS) diagnostics beamline has been designed and built. The window, which has a double concave axisymmetrical profile with a thickness of 0.5 mm at the center, receives 160 W/mm{sup 2} (7 GeV/100 mA stored beam) from an undulator beam. The window design as well as thermal and thermomechanical analyses, including thermal buckling of the Be window, are presented.

  1. Window and dome technologies and materials; Proceedings of the Meeting, Orlando, FL, Mar. 27-29, 1989

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klocek, Paul

    1989-09-01

    Papers on window and dome technologies and methodologies are presented, covering the processing and application of window and dome materials such as polycrystalline MgAl2O4 spinel, yttria and lanthana-doped yttria, transparent aluminum oxynitride, sapphire materials, fluoride glass, zinc sulfide, and germanium materials. Other topics include high modulus layers as protective coatings for window materials, ultrahard coatings for IR materials, IR applications of GeC thin filems, CVD diamond for IR applications, amorphic diamond films grown with a laser-ion source, dome cooling, microwave shielding effectiveness of electrically conductive coated optical windows, and the window evaluation program for an airborne FLIR system. In addition, papers are presented on modeling optical properties of window materials, lattice symmetries and thermal expansion, rain damage protection for IR materials, optical window materials for hypersonic flow, the IR emission due to aerodynamic heating of missile domes, a ZnS window for the IR instrumentation system, hypersonic aerooptical effects, optical and semiconductor properties of lead telluride coatings, boron phosphide for coating IR transparencies, and the measurement of high out-of-band filter rejection characteristics.

  2. Novel light-weight materials for shielding gamma ray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Bourham, Mohamed; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2014-03-01

    A comparison of gamma ray attenuation effectiveness of bulk aluminum, close-cell composite metal foams and open-cell aluminum foam infiltrated with variety of second phase materials were investigated and reported in this study. Mass attenuation coefficients for six sets of samples with three different areal densities of 2, 5 and 10 g/cm2 were determined at photon energies of 0.060, 0.662, 1.173, and 1.332 MeV. Theoretical values were calculated using XCOM software package. A complete agreement was observed between experimental and theoretical results. It is observed that close-cell composite metal foams exhibit a better shielding capability compared to open-cell Al foam with fillers. It is also observed that close-cell composite metal foams offer superior shielding effectiveness compared to bulk aluminum for energies below 0.662 MeV, the mass attenuation coefficients of steel-steel composite metal foam and Al-steel composite metal foam were measured 400 and 300% higher than that of aluminum A356. This study indicates the potential of utilizing the light-weight composite metal foams as shielding material replacing current heavy materials used for attenuation of low energy gamma ray with additional advantages such as high energy absorption and excellent heat rejection capabilities.

  3. EMI Shields made from intercalated graphite composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaier, James R.; Terry, Jennifer

    1995-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding typically makes up about twenty percent of the mass of a spacecraft power system. Graphite fiber/polymer composites have significantly lower densities and higher strengths than aluminum, the present material of choice for EMI shields, but they lack the electrical conductivity that enables acceptable shielding effectiveness. Bromine intercalated pitch-based graphite/epoxy composites have conductivities fifty times higher than conventional structural graphite fibers. Calculations are presented which indicate that EMI shields made from such composites can have sufficient shielding at less than 20% of the mass of conventional aluminum shields. EMI shields provide many functions other than EMI shielding including physical protection, thermal management, and shielding from ionizing radiation. Intercalated graphite composites perform well in these areas also. Mechanically, they have much higher specific strength and modulus than aluminum. They also have shorter half thicknesses for x-rays and gamma radiation than aluminum. Thermally, they distribute infra-red radiation by absorbing and re-radiating it rather than concentrating it by reflection as aluminum does. The prospects for intercalated graphite fiber/polymer composites for EMI shielding are encouraging.

  4. Flexible Shields for Protecting Spacecraft Against Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, Eric L.; Crews, Jeanne Lee

    2004-01-01

    A report presents the concept of Flexshield a class of versatile, lightweight, flexible shields for protecting spacecraft against impacts by small meteors and orbiting debris. The Flexshield concept incorporates elements of, but goes beyond, prior spacecraft-shielding concepts, including those of Whipple shields and, more recently, multi-shock shields and multi-shock blankets. A shield of the Flexshield type includes multiple outer layers (called bumpers in the art) made, variously, of advanced ceramic and/or polymeric fibers spaced apart from each other by a lightweight foam. As in prior such shields, the bumpers serve to shock an impinging hypervelocity particle, causing it to disintegrate vaporize, and spread out over a larger area so that it can be stopped by an innermost layer (back sheet). The flexibility of the fabric layers and compressibility of the foam make it possible to compress and fold the shield for transport, then deploy the shield for use. The shield can be attached to a spacecraft by use of snaps, hook-and-pile patches, or other devices. The shield can also contain multilayer insulation material, so that it provides some thermal protection in addition to mechanical protection.

  5. Heat-shield design for glovebox applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Frigo, A. A.

    1998-07-10

    Heat shields can often be used in place of insulation materials as an effective means of insulating glovebox furnace vessels. If used properly, shields can accomplish two important objectives: thermal insulation of the vessel to maintain a desired process temperature and protection of the glovebox, equipment, and user. A heat-shield assembly can be described as an arrangement of thin, properly-spaced, metal sheets that reduce radiation heat transfer. The main problem encountered in the design of a heat shield assembly is choosing the number of shields. In determining the heat transfer characteristics of a heat-shield assembly, a number of factors must be taken into consideration. The glovebox or outside environment, material properties, geometry, and operating temperature all have varying effects on the expected results. A simple method, for planar-horizontal and cylindrical-vertical shields, allowing the approximation of the outermost shield temperature, the practical number of shields, and the net heat-transfer rate will be presented. Methods used in the fabrication of heat-shield assemblies will also be discussed.

  6. Exploratory Environmental Tests of Several Heat Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodman, George P.; Betts, John, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    Exploratory tests have been conducted with several conceptual radiative heat shields of composite construction. Measured transient temperature distributions were obtained for a graphite heat shield without insulation and with three types of insulating materials, and for a metal multipost heat shield, at surface temperatures of approximately 2,000 F and 1,450 F, respectively, by use of a radiant-heat facility. The graphite configurations suffered loss of surface material under repeated irradiation. Temperature distribution calculated for the metal heat shield by a numerical procedure was in good agreement with measured data. Environmental survival tests of the graphite heat shield without insulation, an insulated multipost heat shield, and a stainless-steel-tile heat shield were made at temperatures of 2,000 F and dynamic pressures of approximately 6,000 lb/sq ft, provided by an ethylene-heated jet operating at a Mach number of 2.0 and sea-level conditions. The graphite heat shield survived the simulated aerodynamic heating and pressure loading. A problem area exists in the design and materials for heat-resistant fasteners between the graphite shield and the base structure. The insulated multipost heat shield was found to be superior to the stainless-steel-tile heat shield in retarding heat flow. Over-lapped face-plate joints and surface smoothness of the insulated multi- post heat shield were not adversely affected by the test environment. The graphite heat shield without insulation survived tests made in the acoustic environment of a large air jet. This acoustic environment is random in frequency and has an overall noise level of 160 decibels.

  7. The Feasibility of Multipole Electrostatic Radiation Shielding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    Although passive shielding appears to be the only workable solution for galactic cosmic radiation (GCR), active shielding may play an important augmenting role to control the dose from solar particle events (SPEs). It has been noted that, to meet the guidelines of NCRP Report No. 98 through the six SPEs of 1989, a crew member would need roughly double the passive shielding that is necessary to control the GCR dose . This would dramatically increase spacecraft mass, and so it has been proposed that a small but more heavily shielded storm shelter may be used to protect the crew during SPEs. Since a gradual SPE may last 5 or more days, staying in a storm shelter may be psychologically and physiologically distressing to the crew. Storm shelters do not provide shielding for the spacecraft itself against the SPE radiation, and radiation damage to critical electronics may result in loss of mission and life. Single-event effects during the radiation storm may require quick crew response to maintain the integrity of the spacecraft, and confining the crew to a storm shelter prohibits their attending to the spacecraft at the precise time when that attention is needed the most. Active shielding cannot protect against GCR because the particle energies are too high. Although lower energy particles are easier to stop in a passive shield, such shielding is more satisfactory against GCR than against SPE radiation because of the tremendous difference in their initial fluences. Even a small fraction of the SPE fluence penetrating the passive shielding may result in an unacceptably high dose. Active shielding is more effective than passive shielding against SPE radiation because it offers 100% shielding effectiveness up to the cutoff energy, and significant shielding effectiveness beyond the cutoff as well.

  8. Space station proximity operations and window design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haines, Richard F.

    1988-01-01

    On-orbit proximity operations (PROX-OPS) consist of all extravehicular activity (EVA) within 1 km of the space station. Because of the potentially large variety of PROX-OPS, very careful planning for space station windows is called for and must consider a great many human factors. The following topics are discussed: (1) basic window design philosophy and assumptions; (2) the concept of the local horizontal - local vertical on-orbit; (3) window linear dimensions; (4) selected anthropomorphic considerations; (5) displays and controls relative to windows; and (6) full window assembly replacement.

  9. Purged window apparatus utilizing heated purge gas

    DOEpatents

    Ballard, Evan O.

    1984-01-01

    A purged window apparatus utilizing tangentially injected heated purge gases in the vicinity of electromagnetic radiation transmitting windows, and a tapered external mounting tube to accelerate these gases to provide a vortex flow on the window surface and a turbulent flow throughout the mounting tube. Use of this apparatus prevents backstreaming of gases under investigation which are flowing past the mouth of the mounting tube which would otherwise deposit on the windows. Lengthy spectroscopic investigations and analyses can thereby be performed without the necessity of interrupting the procedures in order to clean or replace contaminated windows.

  10. Rigid thin windows for vacuum applications

    DOEpatents

    Meyer, Glenn Allyn; Ciarlo, Dino R.; Myers, Booth Richard; Chen, Hao-Lin; Wakalopulos, George

    1999-01-01

    A thin window that stands off atmospheric pressure is fabricated using photolithographic and wet chemical etching techniques and comprises at least two layers: an etch stop layer and a protective barrier layer. The window structure also comprises a series of support ribs running the width of the window. The windows are typically made of boron-doped silicon and silicon nitride and are useful in instruments such as electron beam guns and x-ray detectors. In an electron beam gun, the window does not impede the electrons and has demonstrated outstanding gun performance and survivability during the gun tube manufacturing process.

  11. Shielded Coaxial Optrode Arrays for Neurophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Naughton, Jeffrey R.; Connolly, Timothy; Varela, Juan A.; Lundberg, Jaclyn; Burns, Michael J.; Chiles, Thomas C.; Christianson, John P.; Naughton, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Recent progress in the study of the brain has been greatly facilitated by the development of new tools capable of minimally-invasive, robust coupling to neuronal assemblies. Two prominent examples are the microelectrode array (MEA), which enables electrical signals from large numbers of neurons to be detected and spatiotemporally correlated, and optogenetics, which enables the electrical activity of cells to be controlled with light. In the former case, high spatial density is desirable but, as electrode arrays evolve toward higher density and thus smaller pitch, electrical crosstalk increases. In the latter, finer control over light input is desirable, to enable improved studies of neuroelectronic pathways emanating from specific cell stimulation. Here, we introduce a coaxial electrode architecture that is uniquely suited to address these issues, as it can simultaneously be utilized as an optical waveguide and a shielded electrode in dense arrays. Using optogenetically-transfected cells on a coaxial MEA, we demonstrate the utility of the architecture by recording cellular currents evoked from optical stimulation. We also show the capability for network recording by radiating an area of seven individually-addressed coaxial electrode regions with cultured cells covering a section of the extent. PMID:27375415

  12. Biological shield design and analysis of KIPT accelerator-driven subcritical facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2009-12-01

    Argonne National Laboratory of the United States and Kharkov Institute of Physics and Technology of Ukraine have been collaborating on the conceptual design development of an electron accelerator-driven subcritical facility. The facility will be utilized for performing basic and applied nuclear research, producing medical isotopes, and training young nuclear specialists. This paper presents the design and analyses of the biological shield performed for the top section of the facility. The neutron source driving the subcritical assembly is generated from the interaction of a 100-kW electron beam with a natural uranium target. The electron energy is in the range of 100 to 200 MeV, and it has a uniform spatial distribution. The shield design and the associated analyses are presented including different parametric studies. In the analyses, a significant effort was dedicated to the accurate prediction of the radiation dose outside the shield boundary as a function of the shield thickness without geometrical approximations or material homogenization. The MCNPX Monte Carlo code was utilized for the transport calculation of electrons, photons, and neutrons. Weight window variance-reduction techniques were introduced, and the dose equivalent outside the shield can be calculated with reasonably good statistics.

  13. Development of the water window imaging X-ray microscope utilizing normal-incidence multilayer optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoover, Richard B.; Shealy, David L.; Brinkley, B. R.; Baker, Phillip C.; Barbee, Troy W., Jr.; Walker, Arthur B. C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    A water-window imaging X-ray telescope configured with normal-incidence multilayer X-ray mirrors has been developed to obtain images with unprecedented spatial resolution and contrast of carbon-based microstructures within living cells. The narrow bandpass response inherent in multilayer X-ray optics is accurately tuned to wavelengths within the water window.

  14. Solutes determine the temperature windows for microbial survival and growth

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Jason P.; Megaw, Julianne; Magill, Caroline L.; Nowotarski, Krzysztof; Williams, Jim P.; Bhaganna, Prashanth; Linton, Mark; Patterson, Margaret F.; Underwood, Graham J. C.; Mswaka, Allen Y.; Hallsworth, John E.

    2010-01-01

    Microbial cells, and ultimately the Earth's biosphere, function within a narrow range of physicochemical conditions. For the majority of ecosystems, productivity is cold-limited, and it is microbes that represent the failure point. This study was carried out to determine if naturally occurring solutes can extend the temperature windows for activity of microorganisms. We found that substances known to disorder cellular macromolecules (chaotropes) did expand microbial growth windows, fungi preferentially accumulated chaotropic metabolites at low temperature, and chemical activities of solutes determined microbial survival at extremes of temperature as well as pressure. This information can enhance the precision of models used to predict if extraterrestrial and other hostile environments are able to support life; furthermore, chaotropes may be used to extend the growth windows for key microbes, such as saprotrophs, in cold ecosystems and manmade biomes. PMID:20404182

  15. Low heat transfer, high strength window materials

    DOEpatents

    Berlad, Abraham L.; Salzano, Francis J.; Batey, John E.

    1978-01-01

    A multi-pane window with improved insulating qualities; comprising a plurality of transparent or translucent panes held in an essentially parallel, spaced-apart relationship by a frame. Between at least one pair of panes is a convection defeating means comprising an array of parallel slats or cells so designed as to prevent convection currents from developing in the space between the two panes. The convection defeating structures may have reflective surfaces so as to improve the collection and transmittance of the incident radiant energy. These same means may be used to control (increase or decrease) the transmittance of solar energy as well as to decouple the radiative transfer between the interior surfaces of the transparent panes.

  16. Optimation of cooled shields in insulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chato, J. C.; Khodadadi, J. M.; Seyed-Yagoobi, J.

    1984-01-01

    A method to optimize the location, temperature, and heat dissipation rate of each cooled shield inside an insulation layer was developed. The method is based on the minimization of the entropy production rate which is proportional to the heat leak across the insulation. It is shown that the maximum number of shields to be used in most practical applications is three. However, cooled shields are useful only at low values of the overall, cold wall to hot wall absolute temperature ratio. The performance of the insulation system is relatively insensitive to deviations from the optimum values of the temperature and location of the cooling shields. Design curves for rapid estimates of the locations and temperatures of cooling shields in various types of insulations, and an equation for calculating the cooling loads for the shields are presented.

  17. Heat flow from the West African shield

    SciTech Connect

    Brigaud, F.; Lucazeau, F.; Ly, S.; Sauvage, J.F.

    1985-09-01

    The heat flow over Precambrian shields is generally lower than over other continental provinces. Previous observations at 9 sites of the West African shield have shown that heat flow ranges from 20 mW m/sup -2/ in Niger to 38-42 mW m/sup -2/ in Liberia, Ghana and Nigeria. Since some of these values are lower than expected for Precambrian shields, it is important to find out whether or not they are representative of the entire shield before trying to derive its thermal structure. In this paper, we present new heat flow determinations from seven sites of the West African shield. These indicate that the surface heat flow is comparable with that of other Precambrian shields in the world.

  18. VAPOR SHIELD FOR INDUCTION FURNACE

    DOEpatents

    Reese, S.L.; Samoriga, S.A.

    1958-03-11

    This patent relates to a water-cooled vapor shield for an inductlon furnace that will condense metallic vapors arising from the crucible and thus prevent their condensation on or near the induction coils, thereby eliminating possible corrosion or shorting out of the coils. This is accomplished by placing, about the top, of the crucible a disk, apron, and cooling jacket that separates the area of the coils from the interior of the cruclbIe and provides a cooled surface upon whlch the vapors may condense.

  19. Studying the Heat Shield's Seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity highlights the seal on the rover's protective heat shield. Engineers evaluated the performance of the protective shell's seal during a 36-sol investigation.

    After viewing these images, engineers were pleased with how the seal performed.

    This is an approximately true-color rendering of the scene acquired around 1:07 p.m. local solar time on Opportunity's sol 339 (Jan. 6, 2005) in an image mosaic using panoramic camera filters at wavelengths of 750, 530, and 430 nanometers.

  20. Dynamic rotating-shield brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yunlong; Flynn, Ryan T.; Kim, Yusung; Yang, Wenjun; Wu, Xiaodong

    2013-12-15

    Purpose: To present dynamic rotating shield brachytherapy (D-RSBT), a novel form of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR-BT) with electronic brachytherapy source, where the radiation shield is capable of changing emission angles during the radiation delivery process.Methods: A D-RSBT system uses two layers of independently rotating tungsten alloy shields, each with a 180° azimuthal emission angle. The D-RSBT planning is separated into two stages: anchor plan optimization and optimal sequencing. In the anchor plan optimization, anchor plans are generated by maximizing the D{sub 90} for the high-risk clinical-tumor-volume (HR-CTV) assuming a fixed azimuthal emission angle of 11.25°. In the optimal sequencing, treatment plans that most closely approximate the anchor plans under the delivery-time constraint will be efficiently computed. Treatment plans for five cervical cancer patients were generated for D-RSBT, single-shield RSBT (S-RSBT), and {sup 192}Ir-based intracavitary brachytherapy with supplementary interstitial brachytherapy (IS + ICBT) assuming five treatment fractions. External beam radiotherapy doses of 45 Gy in 25 fractions of 1.8 Gy each were accounted for. The high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) doses were escalated such that the D{sub 2cc} of the rectum, sigmoid colon, or bladder reached its tolerance equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2 with α/β= 3 Gy) of 75 Gy, 75 Gy, or 90 Gy, respectively.Results: For the patients considered, IS + ICBT had an average total dwell time of 5.7 minutes/fraction (min/fx) assuming a 10 Ci{sup 192}Ir source, and the average HR-CTV D{sub 90} was 78.9 Gy. In order to match the HR-CTV D{sub 90} of IS + ICBT, D-RSBT required an average of 10.1 min/fx more delivery time, and S-RSBT required 6.7 min/fx more. If an additional 20 min/fx of delivery time is allowed beyond that of the IS + ICBT case, D-RSBT and S-RSBT increased the HR-CTV D{sub 90} above IS + ICBT by an average of 16.3 Gy and 9.1 Gy, respectively

  1. Calculation of dose rates during replacement of the 3CL seal tube in the FFTF IEM cell

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, J.V.

    1997-11-12

    In September 1996, the seal tube at the 3CL window of the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) failed. Replacement of the seal tube required removing the 3CL master slave manipulator (MSM) and shielding creating a streaming path for radiation from irradiated fuel and activated hardware in the IEM Cell. As a part of the preparation for the seal tube replacement, expected dose rates in the IEM Cell gallery outside the open 3CL penetration during the repair work were evaluated.

  2. Disposable blast shields for use on NIF imaging diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Cal A.; Wang, Karen M.; Masters, Nathan

    2015-08-01

    The NIFs 192 lasers can deliver 2 MJ of energy to Target Chamber Center (TCC) to produce environments not available in any other experimental laboratory. The NIFs ability to deliver such intense energy to a small volume causes harsh consequences to experimental equipment and supporting diagnostics such as holhraums, support packages, target positioners, diagnostic equipment, and laser optics. Of these, the hohlraum and support packages are typically quickly vaporized and transformed into an expanding shell of high-hypersonic gases referred to as debris wind. During an experimental event such as fusion implosion, the target diagnostic components used to measure key observables in the experiment are subjected to extreme pressures and impact shocks due to incident debris wind loading. As diagnostics are positioned closer to TCC, the diagnostic pinhole stacks and other components along the diagnostic structure become more likely to be at or above the yield strength of the materials commonly used. In particular, the pinhole stack components and data recording instruments behind the pinholes are the most costly to replace. Thus, a conceptual configuration for a pinhole shield is proposed, analyzed, and tested with the intent of mitigating damage to the pinhole stack and imaging equipment and allowing immediate re-use of this diagnostic equipment. This pinhole shield would be a replaceable window that can be replaced quickly by inserting and removing it before and after each experimental laser shot, which will allow NIF to benefit from significant material and labor costs.

  3. Shielding considerations for the small animal radiation research platform (SARRP).

    PubMed

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2013-05-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1-3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field. PMID:23532076

  4. SHIELDING CONSIDERATIONS FOR THE SMALL ANIMAL RADIATION RESEARCH PLATFORM (SARRP)

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, Elaine; Dolney, Derek; Avery, Stephen; Koch, Cameron

    2014-01-01

    The Small Animal Radiation Research Platform (SARRP) is a commercially available platform designed to deliver conformal, image-guided radiation to small animals using a dual-anode kV x-ray source. At the University of Pennsylvania, a free-standing 2 m3 enclosure was designed to shield the SARRP according to federal code regulating cabinet x-ray systems. The initial design consisted of 4.0-mm-thick lead for all secondary barriers and proved wholly inadequate. Radiation levels outside the enclosure were 15 times higher than expected. Additionally, the leakage appeared to be distributed broadly within the enclosure, so concern arose that a subject might receive significant doses outside the intended treatment field. Thus, a detailed analysis was undertaken to identify and block all sources of leakage. Leakage sources were identified by Kodak X-OmatV (XV) film placed throughout the enclosure. Radiation inside the enclosure was quantified using Gafchromic film. Outside the enclosure, radiation was measured using a survey meter. Sources of leakage included (1) an unnecessarily broad beam exiting the tube, (2) failure of the secondary collimator to confine the primary beam entirely, (3) scatter from the secondary collimator, (4) lack of beam-stop below the treatment volume, and (5) incomplete shielding of the x-ray tube. The exit window was restricted, and a new collimator was designed to address problems (1–3). A beam-stop and additional tube shielding were installed. These modifications reduced internal scatter by more than 100-fold. Radiation outside the enclosure was reduced to levels compliant with federal regulations, provided the SARRP is operated using tube potentials of 175 kV or less. In addition, these simple and relatively inexpensive modifications eliminate the possibility of exposing a larger animal (such as a rat) to significant doses outside the treatment field. PMID:23532076

  5. Durable coatings for IR windows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, Lee M.; Jha, Santosh K.; Gunda, Nilesh; Cooke, Rick; Agarwal, Neeta; Sastri, Suri A.; Harker, Alan; Kirsch, Jim

    2005-05-01

    Durable coatings of silicon-carbon-oxy-nitride (a.k.a. SiCON) are being developed to protect high-speed missile windows from the environmental loads during flight. Originally developed at Rockwell Scientific Corporation (RSC) these coatings exhibited substantial promise, but were difficult to deposit. Under a DoD DARPA SBIR Phase I program, Surmet Corporation, working closely with RSC, is depositing these coatings using an innovative vacuum vapor deposition process. High rate of coating deposition and the ease of manipulating the process variables, make Surmet"s process suitable for the deposition of substantially thick films (up to 30 μm) with precisely controlled chemistry. Initial work has shown encouraging results, and the refinement of the coating and coating process is still underway. Coupons of SiN and SiCON coatings with varying thickness on a variety of substrates such as Si-wafer, ZnS and ALON were fabricated and used for the study. This paper will present and discuss the results of SiN and SiCON coatings deposition and characterization (physical, mechanical and optical properties) as a basis for evaluating their suitability for high speed missile windows application.

  6. Interferometer for Space Station Windows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Gregory

    2003-01-01

    Inspection of space station windows for micrometeorite damage would be a difficult task insitu using current inspection techniques. Commercially available optical profilometers and inspection systems are relatively large, about the size of a desktop computer tower, and require a stable platform to inspect the test object. Also, many devices currently available are designed for a laboratory or controlled environments requiring external computer control. This paper presents an approach using a highly developed optical interferometer to inspect the windows from inside the space station itself using a self- contained hand held device. The interferometer would be capable as a minimum of detecting damage as small as one ten thousands of an inch in diameter and depth while interrogating a relatively large area. The current developmental state of this device is still in the proof of concept stage. The background section of this paper will discuss the current state of the art of profilometers as well as the desired configuration of the self-contained, hand held device. Then, a discussion of the developments and findings that will allow the configuration change with suggested approaches appearing in the proof of concept section.

  7. NEUTRONIC REACTOR SHIELD AND SPACER CONSTRUCTION

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.

    1958-11-18

    Reactors of the heterogeneous, graphite moderated, fluid cooled type and shielding and spacing plugs for the coolant channels thereof are reported. In this design, the coolant passages extend horizontally through the moderator structure, accommodating the fuel elements in abutting end-to-end relationship, and have access openings through the outer shield at one face of the reactor to facilitate loading of the fuel elements. In the outer ends of the channels which extend through the shields are provided spacers and shielding plugs designed to offer minimal reslstance to coolant fluid flow while preventing emanation of harmful radiation through the access openings when closed between loadings.

  8. Nipple Shields: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    McKechnie, Anne Chevalier

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Nipple shields have become commonplace in the United States for a wide range of breastfeeding problems. This article is a summary of the current literature describing the evidence for nipple shield use. The authors reviewed all available articles on nipple shields and selected 13 studies for inclusion. The studies were organized into three categories: physiologic responses, premature infants, and mothers' experiences. This review concludes that current published research does not provide evidence for safety or effectiveness of contemporary nipple shield use. PMID:20807104

  9. Shielding for thermoacoustic tomography with RF excitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, M.; Becker, G.; Dey, P.; Generotzky, J.; Patch, S. K.

    2008-02-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) pulses used to generate thermoacoustic computerized tomography (TCT) signal couple directly into the pulser-receiver and oscilloscope, swamping true TCT signal. We use a standard RF enclosure housing both RF amplifier and object being imaged. This is similar to RF shielding of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) suites and protects electronics outside from stray RF. Unlike MRI, TCT receivers are ultrasound transducers, which must also be shielded from RF. A transducer housing that simultaneously shields RF and permits acoustic transmission was developed specifically for TCT. We compare TCT signals measured with and without RF shielding.

  10. The ORNL-SNAP shielding program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mynatt, F. R.; Clifford, C. E.; Muckenthaler, F. J.; Gritzner, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    The effort in the ORNL-SNAP shielding program is directed toward the development and verification of computer codes using numerical solutions to the transport equation for the design of optimized radiation shields for SNAP power systems. A brief discussion is given for the major areas of the SNAP shielding program, which are cross-section development, transport code development, and integral experiments. Detailed results are presented for the integral experiments utilizing the TSF-SNAP reactor. Calculated results are compared with experiments for neutron and gamma-ray spectra from the bare reactor and as transmitted through slab shields.

  11. Accelerator magnet designs using superconducting magnetic shields

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, B.C.

    1990-10-01

    Superconducting dipoles and quadrupoles for existing accelerators have a coil surrounded by an iron shield. The shield limits the fringe field of the magnet while having minimal effect on the field shape and providing a small enhancement of the field strength. Shields using superconducting materials can be thinner and lighter and will not experience the potential of a large de-centering force. Boundary conditions for these materials, material properties, mechanical force considerations, cryostat considerations and some possible geometrical configurations for superconducting shields will be described. 7 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  12. Shield topology in lightning transient control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vance, E. F.; Tesche, F. M.

    1980-01-01

    A formalism in which the interaction of a system with an electromagnetic source is described by sets of scattering, penetrations, and propagation functions is reviewed and interpreted in the context of the lightning interaction problem. In this formalism, the system is decomposed into simple volumes separated by closed shield surfaces. These surfaces are nested and interconnected to produce higher levels of shielding and subvolumes within a given level. The interaction analysis uses scattering theory to define current and charge densities on the shield surface in conjunction with the diffusion, apertures, and transmission line analysis to define penetration through shield imperfections and propagation within the protected volume.

  13. THEMIS discovers holes in Earth's solar shield

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation shows the latest findings from the Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) mission. Earth's magnetic field; which shields our planet from severe ...

  14. Downsampling Photodetector Array with Windowing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patawaran, Ferze D.; Farr, William H.; Nguyen, Danh H.; Quirk, Kevin J.; Sahasrabudhe, Adit

    2012-01-01

    In a photon counting detector array, each pixel in the array produces an electrical pulse when an incident photon on that pixel is detected. Detection and demodulation of an optical communication signal that modulated the intensity of the optical signal requires counting the number of photon arrivals over a given interval. As the size of photon counting photodetector arrays increases, parallel processing of all the pixels exceeds the resources available in current application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) and gate array (GA) technology; the desire for a high fill factor in avalanche photodiode (APD) detector arrays also precludes this. Through the use of downsampling and windowing portions of the detector array, the processing is distributed between the ASIC and GA. This allows demodulation of the optical communication signal incident on a large photon counting detector array, as well as providing architecture amenable to algorithmic changes. The detector array readout ASIC functions as a parallel-to-serial converter, serializing the photodetector array output for subsequent processing. Additional downsampling functionality for each pixel is added to this ASIC. Due to the large number of pixels in the array, the readout time of the entire photodetector is greater than the time between photon arrivals; therefore, a downsampling pre-processing step is done in order to increase the time allowed for the readout to occur. Each pixel drives a small counter that is incremented at every detected photon arrival or, equivalently, the charge in a storage capacitor is incremented. At the end of a user-configurable counting period (calculated independently from the ASIC), the counters are sampled and cleared. This downsampled photon count information is then sent one counter word at a time to the GA. For a large array, processing even the downsampled pixel counts exceeds the capabilities of the GA. Windowing of the array, whereby several subsets of pixels are designated

  15. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ``hands-on`` procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment.

  16. Resonant Faraday shield ICRH antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattanei, G.; W7-AS Team

    2002-05-01

    ICRH has proved to be an efficient method of heating the plasma in toroidal devices. The high voltages needed at the coupling structure are, however, a severe handicap of this method. The possibility is investigated of having the highest voltages between the bars of the Faraday shield (FS), where they are both necessary and easier to maintain. For this purpose a resonant Faraday shield (RFS) antenna where the first and last bars of the FS are connected by an inductive strip is proposed. In front of this strip there is a second strip, fed, as in a conventional antenna, by an RF generator. It is shown that if the toroidal length of the FS is larger than λ/2 the strip connecting the bars of the FS acts as the secondary coil of a tuned transformer, the strip fed by the generator being the primary. It is therefore possible, by varying the frequency and the distance between the two strips, i.e. the coupling coefficient, to match the impedance of the primary to that of the generator.

  17. Target station shielding issues at the spallation neutron source.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, P D; Gallmeier, F X; Iverson, E B; Popova, I I

    2005-01-01

    Recent spallation neutron source shielding activities in support of the neutron beam shutters and the hot cell walls are presented. Existing neutron beam shutters can be replaced with concrete at low power or with concrete and steel at approximately 500 kW of beam power. Potential voids in the hot cell walls are analysed to determine the impact on dose rates as a function of void size. A change in the type of shielding work is noted as the project moved from the early design stages as a 'green field' site to the current stage as a construction project nearing completion, where issues to be addressed are approaching retrofit-type analyses. PMID:16381707

  18. Challenger Center's Window on the Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livengood, T. A.; Goldstein, J. J.; Smith, S.; Bobrowsky, M.; Radnofsky, M.; Perelmuter, J.-M.; Jaggar, L.

    2001-11-01

    Challenger Center for Space Science Education's Window on the Universe program aims to create a network of under-served communities across the nation dedicated to sustained science, math, and technology education. Window communities presently include Broken Arrow, OK; Muncie, IN; Moscow, ID; Nogales, AZ; Tuskegee, AL; Marquette, MI; Altamont, KS; Washington, D.C.; and other emerging sites. Window uses themes of human space flight and the space sciences as interdisciplinary means to inspire entire communities. Practicing scientists and engineers engaged in these disciplines are invited to volunteer to become a part of these communities for a week, each visitor reaching roughly 2000 K-12 students through individual classroom visits and Family Science Night events during an intense Window on the Universe Week. In the same Window Week, Challenger Center scientists and educators present a workshop for local educators to provide training in the use of a K-12 educational module built around a particular space science and exploration theme. Window communities follow a 3-year development: Year 1, join the network, experience Window Week presented by Challenger Center and visiting researchers; Year 2, same as Year 1 plus workshop on partnering with local organizations to develop sources of visiting researchers and to enhance connections with local resources; Year 3 and subsequent, the community stages its own Window Week, with Challenger Center providing new education modules and training workshops for "master educators" from the Window community, after which the master educators return home to conduct training workshops of their own. Challenger Center remains a resource and clearinghouse for Window communities to acquire experience, technical information, and opportunities for distance collaboration with other Window communities. Window on the Universe is dedicated to assessing degree of success vs. failure in each program component and as a whole, using pre- and post

  19. Development of the Next Generation of Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, S.J.; Christiansen, E.L.; Lear, D.M.

    2009-01-01

    The novel structure of metallic foams is of interest in the design of next-generation debris shields as it introduces physical mechanisms that are advantageous to hypervelocity impact shielding (e.g. increased fragmentation/melt/vaporization, energy dissipation, etc.). Preliminary investigations have shown improved shielding capability over traditional spacecraft primary structures. In this paper, the results of a current hypervelocity impact test program on metallic open-cell foam core sandwich panels are reported. A preliminary ballistic limit equation has been derived from the experimental results, and is presented in a form suitable for implementation in risk assessment software codes.

  20. Radiation environment and shielding for early manned Mars missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Stephen B.; Mccann, Michael E.

    1986-01-01

    The problem of shielding a crew during early manned Mars missions is discussed. Requirements for shielding are presented in the context of current astronaut exposure limits, natural ionizing radiation sources, and shielding inherent in a particular Mars vehicle configuration. An estimated range for shielding weight is presented based on the worst solar flare dose, mission duration, and inherent vehicle shielding.

  1. Lithography process window analysis with calibrated model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Wenzhan; Yu, Jin; Lo, James; Liu, Johnson

    2004-05-01

    As critical-dimension shrink below 0.13 μm, the SPC (Statistical Process Control) based on CD (Critical Dimension) control in lithography process becomes more difficult. Increasing requirements of a shrinking process window have called on the need for more accurate decision of process window center. However in practical fabrication, we found that systematic error introduced by metrology and/or resist process can significantly impact the process window analysis result. Especially, when the simple polynomial functions are used to fit the lithographic data from focus exposure matrix (FEM), the model will fit these systematic errors rather than filter them out. This will definitely impact the process window analysis and determination of the best process condition. In this paper, we proposed to use a calibrated first principle model to do process window analysis. With this method, the systematic metrology error can be filtered out efficiently and give a more reasonable window analysis result.

  2. Laser sealed vacuum insulation window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Tracy, C. Edwin

    1987-01-01

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the glass panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  3. Laser sealed vacuum insulating window

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Tracy, C.E.

    1985-08-19

    A laser sealed evacuated window panel is comprised of two glass panes held spaced apart in relation to each other by a plurality of spherical glass beads and glass welded around the edges to provide an evacuated space between the glass panes that is completely glass sealed from the exterior. The glass welded edge seal is obtained by welding the edges of the glass panes together with a laser beam while the glass panes and bead spacers are positioned in a vacuum furnace and heated to the annealing point of the glass to avoid stress fracture in the area of the glass weld. The laser welding in the furnace can be directed around the perimeter of the galss panel by a combination of rotating the glass panel and linearly translating or aiming the laser with a relay mirror.

  4. Testicular shielding in penile brachytherapy

    PubMed Central

    Bindal, Arpita; Tambe, Chandrashekhar M.; Ghadi, Yogesh; Murthy, Vedang; Shrivastava, Shyam Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Penile cancer, although rare, is one of the common genitourinary cancers in India affecting mostly aged uncircumcised males. For patients presenting with small superficial lesions < 3 cm restricted to glans, surgery, radical external radiation or brachytherapy may be offered, the latter being preferred as it allows organ and function preservation. In patients receiving brachytherapy, testicular morbidity is not commonly addressed. With an aim to minimize and document the doses to testis after adequate shielding during radical interstitial brachytherapy for penile cancers, we undertook this study in 2 patients undergoing brachytherapy and forms the basis of this report. Material and methods Two patients with early stage penile cancer limited to the glans were treated with radical high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy using interstitial implant. A total of 7-8 tubes were implanted in two planes, parallel to the penile shaft. A total dose of 44-48 Gy (55-60 Gy EQD2 doses with α/β = 10) was delivered in 11-12 fractions of 4 Gy each delivered twice daily. Lead sheets adding to 11 mm (4-5 half value layer) were interposed between the penile shaft and scrotum. The testicular dose was measured using thermoluminescent dosimeters. For each patient, dosimetry was done for 3 fractions and mean calculated. Results The cumulative testicular dose to left and right testis was 31.68 cGy and 42.79 cGy for patient A, and 21.96 cGy and 23.28 cGy for patient B. For the same patients, the mean cumulative dose measured at the posterior aspect of penile shaft was 722.15 cGy and 807.72 cGy, amounting to 16.4% and 16.8% of the prescribed dose. Hence, the application of lead shield 11 mm thick reduced testicular dose from 722-808 cGy to 21.96-42.57 cGy, an “absolute reduction” of 95.99 ± 1.5%. Conclusions With the use of a simple lead shield as described, we were able to effectively reduce testicular dose from “spermicidal” range to “oligospermic” range with possible

  5. Window Observational Rack Facility (WORF)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Developed by Boeing, at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Space Station Manufacturing building, the Window Observational Rack Facility (WORF) will help Space Station crews take some of the best photographs ever snapped from an orbiting spacecraft by eliminating glare and allowing researchers to control their cameras and other equipment from the ground. The WORF is designed to make the best possible use of the high-quality research window in the Space Station's U.S. Destiny laboratory module. Engineers at the MSFC proposed a derivative of the EXPRESS (Expedite the Processing of Experiments to the Space Station) Rack already used on the Space Station and were given the go-ahead. The EXPRESS rack can hold a wide variety of experiments and provide them with power, communications, data, cooling, fluids, and other utilities - all the things that Earth-observing experiment instruments would need. WORF will supply payloads with power, data, cooling, video downlink, and stable, standardized interfaces for mounting imaging instruments. Similar to specialized orbital observatories, the interior of the rack is sealed against light and coated with a special low-reflectant black paint, so payloads will be able to observe low-light-level subjects such as the faint glow of auroras. Cameras and remote sensing instruments in the WORF can be preprogrammed, controlled from the ground, or operated by a Station crewmember by using a flexible shroud designed to cinch tightly around the crewmember's waist. The WORF is scheduled to be launched aboard the STS-114 Space Shuttle mission in the year 2003.

  6. The Use of Variable Q1 Isolation Windows Improves Selectivity in LC-SWATH-MS Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Bilbao, Aivett; Bruderer, Tobias; Luban, Jeremy; Strambio-De-Castillia, Caterina; Lisacek, Frédérique; Hopfgartner, Gérard; Varesio, Emmanuel

    2015-10-01

    As tryptic peptides and metabolites are not equally distributed along the mass range, the probability of cross fragment ion interference is higher in certain windows when fixed Q1 SWATH windows are applied. We evaluated the benefits of utilizing variable Q1 SWATH windows with regards to selectivity improvement. Variable windows based on equalizing the distribution of either the precursor ion population (PIP) or the total ion current (TIC) within each window were generated by an in-house software, swathTUNER. These two variable Q1 SWATH window strategies outperformed, with respect to quantification and identification, the basic approach using a fixed window width (FIX) for proteomic profiling of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells (MDDCs). Thus, 13.8 and 8.4% additional peptide precursors, which resulted in 13.1 and 10.0% more proteins, were confidently identified by SWATH using the strategy PIP and TIC, respectively, in the MDDC proteomic sample. On the basis of the spectral library purity score, some improvement warranted by variable Q1 windows was also observed, albeit to a lesser extent, in the metabolomic profiling of human urine. We show that the novel concept of "scheduled SWATH" proposed here, which incorporates (i) variable isolation windows and (ii) precursor retention time segmentation further improves both peptide and metabolite identifications. PMID:26302369

  7. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    DOEpatents

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  8. 40 CFR 72.51 - Permit shield.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 16 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permit shield. 72.51 Section 72.51 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) PERMITS REGULATION Acid Rain Permit Contents § 72.51 Permit shield. Each affected unit operated in accordance with the Acid Rain permit that governs the...

  9. Current status of methods for shielding analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Engle, W.W.

    1980-01-01

    Current methods used in shielding analysis and recent improvements in those methods are discussed. The status of methods development is discussed based on needs cited at the 1977 International Conference on Reactor Shielding. Additional areas where methods development is needed are discussed.

  10. Preliminary radiation shielding design for BOOMERANG

    SciTech Connect

    Donahue, Richard J.

    2002-10-23

    Preliminary radiation shielding specifications are presented here for the 3 GeV BOOMERANG Australian synchrotron light source project. At this time the bulk shield walls for the storage ring and injection system (100 MeV Linac and 3 GeV Booster) are considered for siting purposes.

  11. Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson J. W. (Editor); Miller, J. (Editor); Konradi, A. (Editor); Cucinotta, F. A. (Editor)

    1997-01-01

    A group of twenty-nine scientists and engineers convened a 'Workshop on Shielding Strategies for Human Space Exploration' at the Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. The provision of shielding for a Mars mission or a Lunar base from the hazards of space radiations is a critical technology since astronaut radiation safety depends on it and shielding safety factors to control risk uncertainty appear to be great. The purpose of the workshop was to define requirements for the development and evaluation of high performance shield materials and designs and to develop ideas regarding approaches to radiation shielding. The workshop was organized to review the recent experience on shielding strategies gained in studies of the 'Space Exploration Initiative (SEI),' to review the current knowledge base for making shield assessment, to examine a basis for new shielding strategies, and to recommend a strategy for developing the required technologies for a return to the moon or for Mars exploration. The uniqueness of the current workshop arises from the expected long duration of the missions without the protective cover of the geomagnetic field in which the usually small and even neglected effects of the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) can no longer be ignored. It is the peculiarity of these radiations for which the inter-action physics and biological action are yet to be fully understood.

  12. Calculations of nuclear electric shielding in molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazzeretti, P.; Zanasi, R.

    1980-05-01

    The electric shielding tensor at nuclei in the molecules H 2O, NH 3, CH 4 and CO has been evaluated via coupled Hartree-Fock perturbation theory. The average trace of the shielding tensor is linearly dependent on atomic electronegativities in the isoelectronic series H 2O, NH 3, CH 4.

  13. 10 CFR 36.25 - Shielding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Shielding. 36.25 Section 36.25 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION LICENSES AND RADIATION SAFETY REQUIREMENTS FOR IRRADIATORS Design and Performance Requirements for Irradiators § 36.25 Shielding. (a) The radiation dose rate in areas that are normally occupied during operation of a panoramic irradiator...

  14. Add-On Shielding for Unshielded Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. C.; Billitti, J. W.; Tallon, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Fabrication sequence used to produce compact shields slipped into place from free ends of wires already soldered into connectors at other ends. Single shields are formed into harnesses by connecting grounding jumpers. Technique is especially useful for small diameter wire attached to microminiature connectors.

  15. Working through the Maze of Liability Shields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Jeff; Schmiesing, Ryan

    1998-01-01

    Liability shields that can be incorporated into an Extension risk management program include permission slips, informed consent forms, waivers and releases, and indemnification agreements. Risk identification should be part of youth program planning; communication with parents is essential; the best shields are most specific; and legal counsel…

  16. Performance analysis of superconducting generator electromagnetic shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, D.; Xia, Z.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the shielding performance of electromagnetic shielding systems is analyzed using the finite element method. Considering the non-iron-core rotor structure of superconducting generators, it is proposed that the stator alternating magnetic field generated under different operating conditions could decompose into oscillating and rotating magnetic field, so that complex issues could be greatly simplified. A 1200KW superconducting generator was analyzed. The distribution of the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field in rotor area, which are generated by stator winding currents, and the distribution of the eddy currents in electromagnetic shielding tube, which are induced by these stator winding magnetic fields, are calculated without electromagnetic shielding system and with three different structures of electromagnetic shielding system respectively. On the basis of the results of FEM, the shielding factor of the electromagnetic shielding systems is calculated and the shielding effect of the three different structures on the oscillating magnetic field and the rotating magnetic field is compared. The method and the results in this paper can provide reference for optimal design and loss calculation of superconducting generators.

  17. Alignment modification for pencil eye shields

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, M.D.; Pla, M.; Podgorsak, E.B. )

    1989-01-01

    Accurate alignment of pencil beam eye shields to protect the lens of the eye may be made easier by means of a simple modification of existing apparatus. This involves drilling a small hole through the center of the shield to isolate the rayline directed to the lens and fabricating a suitable plug for this hole.

  18. Contoured insulation window for evacuated solar collector

    SciTech Connect

    Coppola, F. T.; Lentz, W. P.; Vandewoestine, R. V.

    1980-02-05

    An insulating contoured window is provided for use with an enclosed chamber such as an evacuated flat plate solar heat collector with the contoured solar window being of minimum thickness and supported solely about its peripheral edge portions. The window is contoured in both its longitudinal and transverse directions, such that in its longitudinal direction the window is composed of a plurality of sinusoidal corrugations whereas in its transverse direction the peaks of such corrugations are contoured in the form of paraboloids so that the structure may withstand the forces generated thereon by the atmosphere.

  19. Manufacturing of diamond windows for synchrotron radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schildkamp, W.; Nikitina, L.

    2012-09-15

    A new diamond window construction is presented and explicit manufacturing details are given. This window will increase the power dissipation by about a factor of 4 over present day state of the art windows to absorb 600 W of power. This power will be generated by in-vacuum undulators with the storage ring ALBA operating at a design current of 400 mA. Extensive finite element (FE) calculations are included to predict the windows behavior accompanied by explanations for the chosen boundary conditions. A simple linear model was used to cross-check the FE calculations.

  20. Energy efficiency by use of automated energy-saving windows with heat-reflective screens and solar battery for power supply systems of European and Russian buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. M.; Smirnov, N. N.; Tyutikov, V. V.; Flament, B.

    2015-10-01

    The new energy saving windows with heat-reflecting shields have been developed, and for their practical use they need to be integrated into the automated system for controlling heat supply in buildings and the efficiency of their use together with the existing energy-saving measures must be determined. The study was based on the results of field tests of windows with heat-reflective shields in a certified climate chamber. The method to determine the minimum indoor air temperature under standby heating using heat-reflective shields in the windows and multifunctional energy-efficient shutter with solar battery have been developed. Annual energy saving for the conditions of different regions of Russia and France was determined. Using windows with heat-reflecting screens and a solar battery results in a triple power effect: reduced heat losses during the heating season due to increased window resistance; lower cost of heating buildings due to lowering of indoor ambient temperature; also electric power generation.

  1. Radiation Shielding Systems Using Nanotechnology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Bin (Inventor); McKay, Christoper P. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A system for shielding personnel and/or equipment from radiation particles. In one embodiment, a first substrate is connected to a first array or perpendicularly oriented metal-like fingers, and a second, electrically conducting substrate has an array of carbon nanostructure (CNS) fingers, coated with an electro-active polymer extending toward, but spaced apart from, the first substrate fingers. An electric current and electric charge discharge and dissipation system, connected to the second substrate, receives a current and/or voltage pulse initially generated when the first substrate receives incident radiation. In another embodiment, an array of CNSs is immersed in a first layer of hydrogen-rich polymers and in a second layer of metal-like material. In another embodiment, a one- or two-dimensional assembly of fibers containing CNSs embedded in a metal-like matrix serves as a radiation-protective fabric or body covering.

  2. How Concentration Shields Against Distraction

    PubMed Central

    Marsh, John E.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we outline our view of how concentration shields against distraction. We argue that higher levels of concentration make people less susceptible to distraction for two reasons. One reason is that the undesired processing of the background environment is reduced. For example, when people play a difficult video game, as opposed to an easy game, they are less likely to notice what people in the background are saying. The other reason is that the locus of attention becomes more steadfast. For example, when people are watching an entertaining episode of their favorite television series, as opposed to a less absorbing show, attention is less likely to be diverted away from the screen by a ringing telephone. The theoretical underpinnings of this perspective, and potential implications for applied settings, are addressed. PMID:26300594

  3. Spacesuit Radiation Shield Design Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Anderson, Brooke M.; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ware, J.; Zeitlin, Cary J.

    2006-01-01

    Meeting radiation protection requirements during EVA is predominantly an operational issue with some potential considerations for temporary shelter. The issue of spacesuit shielding is mainly guided by the potential of accidental exposure when operational and temporary shelter considerations fail to maintain exposures within operational limits. In this case, very high exposure levels are possible which could result in observable health effects and even be life threatening. Under these assumptions, potential spacesuit radiation exposures have been studied using known historical solar particle events to gain insight on the usefulness of modification of spacesuit design in which the control of skin exposure is a critical design issue and reduction of blood forming organ exposure is desirable. Transition to a new spacesuit design including soft upper-torso and reconfigured life support hardware gives an opportunity to optimize the next generation spacesuit for reduced potential health effects during an accidental exposure.

  4. Foam Core Shielding for Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Marc

    2007-01-01

    A foam core shield (FCS) system is now being developed to supplant multilayer insulation (MLI) systems heretofore installed on spacecraft for thermal management and protection against meteoroid impacts. A typical FCS system consists of a core sandwiched between a face sheet and a back sheet. The core can consist of any of a variety of low-to-medium-density polymeric or inorganic foams chosen to satisfy application-specific requirements regarding heat transfer and temperature. The face sheet serves to shock and thereby shatter incident meteoroids, and is coated on its outer surface to optimize its absorptance and emittance for regulation of temperature. The back sheet can be dimpled to minimize undesired thermal contact with the underlying spacecraft component and can be metallized on the surface facing the component to optimize its absorptance and emittance. The FCS systems can perform better than do MLI systems, at lower mass and lower cost and with greater volumetric efficiency.

  5. Shielding measurements for 230-Mev protons

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, J.V.; DeLuca, P.M. Jr.; Pearson, D.W. . Dept. of Medical Physics); Coutrakon, G. . Medical Center)

    1993-09-01

    Energetic neutrons, produced as protons interact with matter, dominate the radiation shielding environment for proton accelerators. Because of the scarcity of data describing the shielding required to protect personnel from these neutrons, absorbed dose and dose-equivalent values are measured as a function of depth in a thick concrete shield at neutron emission angles of 0, 22, 45, and 90 deg for 230-MeV protons incident upon stopping-length aluminum, iron, and lead targets. Neutron attenuation lengths vary sharply with angle but are independent of the target material. Comparing results with prior shielding calculations, the High-Energy Transport Code overestimates neutron production and attenuation lengths in the forward direction. Analytical methods compare favorably in the forward direction but overestimate the production and attenuation lengths at large angles. The results presented are useful for determining the shielding requirements for proton radiotherapy facilities and as a benchmark for future calculations.

  6. A perturbation technique for shield weight minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, E.F.; Greenspan, E. )

    1993-01-01

    The radiation shield optimization code SWAN (Ref. 1) was originally developed for minimizing the thickness of a shield that will meet a given dose (or another) constraint or for extremizing a performance parameter of interest (e.g., maximizing energy multiplication or minimizing dose) while maintaining the shield volume constraint. The SWAN optimization process proved to be highly effective (e.g., see Refs. 2, 3, and 4). The purpose of this work is to investigate the applicability of the SWAN methodology to problems in which the weight rather than the volume is the relevant shield characteristic. Such problems are encountered in shield design for space nuclear power systems. The investigation is carried out using SWAN with the coupled neutron-photon cross-section library FLUNG (Ref. 5).

  7. Mars Exploration Rover Heat Shield Recontact Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiszadeh, Behzad; Desai, Prasun N.; Michelltree, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The twin Mars Exploration Rover missions landed successfully on Mars surface in January of 2004. Both missions used a parachute system to slow the rover s descent rate from supersonic to subsonic speeds. Shortly after parachute deployment, the heat shield, which protected the rover during the hypersonic entry phase of the mission, was jettisoned using push-off springs. Mission designers were concerned about the heat shield recontacting the lander after separation, so a separation analysis was conducted to quantify risks. This analysis was used to choose a proper heat shield ballast mass to ensure successful separation with low probability of recontact. This paper presents the details of such an analysis, its assumptions, and the results. During both landings, the radar was able to lock on to the heat shield, measuring its distance, as it descended away from the lander. This data is presented and is used to validate the heat shield separation/recontact analysis.

  8. Radiation Shielding for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caffrey, Jarvis A.

    2016-01-01

    Design and analysis of radiation shielding for nuclear thermal propulsion has continued at Marshall Space Flight Center. A set of optimization tools are in development, and strategies for shielding optimization will be discussed. Considerations for the concurrent design of internal and external shielding are likely required for a mass optimal shield design. The task of reducing radiation dose to crew from a nuclear engine is considered to be less challenging than the task of thermal mitigation for cryogenic propellant, especially considering the likely implementation of additional crew shielding for protection from solar particles and cosmic rays. Further consideration is thus made for the thermal effects of radiation absorption in cryogenic propellant. Materials challenges and possible methods of manufacturing are also discussed.

  9. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-02-02

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight.

  10. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of monolayer graphene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seul Ki; Kim, Ki Yeong; Kim, Taek Yong; Kim, Jong Hoon; Park, Seong Wook; Kim, Joung Ho; Cho, Byung Jin

    2012-11-16

    We report the first experimental results on the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding effectiveness (SE) of monolayer graphene. The monolayer CVD graphene has an average SE value of 2.27 dB, corresponding to ~40% shielding of incident waves. CVD graphene shows more than seven times (in terms of dB) greater SE than gold film. The dominant mechanism is absorption rather than reflection, and the portion of absorption decreases with an increase in the number of graphene layers. Our modeling work shows that plane-wave theory for metal shielding is also applicable to graphene. The model predicts that ideal monolayer graphene can shield as much as 97.8% of EMI. This suggests the feasibility of manufacturing an ultrathin, transparent, and flexible EMI shield by single or few-layer graphene. PMID:23085718

  11. Shielding analysis of a small compact space nuclear reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodrow, Lee L., Jr.

    1987-08-01

    The SP-100 reactor, currently in its developmental stage, has a layered tungsten-lithium hydride shield. Studies indicate that this shield configuration is the lightest weight shield. This configuration and three other shielding concepts were analyzed to determine the lightest shield and to determine the shield configuration with the smallest volume. The other concepts were a boron carbide-beryllium layered shield, and a lithium hydride-beryllium shield. FEMP2D and FEMP1D codes were used in this analysis. These codes were developed at Sandia National Laboatory (SNL), using the input from another code, RFCC, which produced enery dependent dose conversion factors, and determined the shields' ability to attenuate the neutron and gamma radiation to permissible dose limits. The results of this analysis show that the lithium hydribe-tungsten layered shield was indeed the lightest weight shield. Volume, not weight, may be the driving factor in determining the shield configuration.

  12. Dislocation shielding of a cohesive crack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhandakkar, Tanmay K.; Chng, Audrey C.; Curtin, W. A.; Gao, Huajian

    2010-04-01

    Dislocation interaction with a cohesive crack is of increasing importance to computational modelling of crack nucleation/growth and related toughening mechanisms in confined structures and under cyclic fatigue conditions. Here, dislocation shielding of a Dugdale cohesive crack described by a rectangular traction-separation law is studied. The shielding is completely characterized by three non-dimensional parameters representing the effective fracture toughness, the cohesive strength, and the distance between the dislocations and the crack tip. A closed form analytical solution shows that, while the classical singular crack model predicts that a dislocation can shield or anti-shield a crack depending on the sign of its Burgers vector, at low cohesive strengths a dislocation always shields the cohesive crack irrespective of the Burgers vector. A numerical study shows the transition in shielding from the classical solution of Lin and Thomson (1986) in the high strength limit to the solution in the low strength limit. An asymptotic analysis yields an approximate analytical model for the shielding over the full range of cohesive strengths. A discrete dislocation (DD) simulation of a large (>10 3) number of edge dislocations interacting with a cohesive crack described by a trapezoidal traction-separation law confirms the transition in shielding, showing that the cohesive crack does behave like a singular crack at very high cohesive strengths (˜7 GPa), but that significant deviations in shielding between singular and cohesive crack predictions arise at cohesive strengths around 1GPa, consistent with the analytic models. Both analytical and numerical studies indicate that an appropriate crack tip model is essential for accurately quantifying dislocation shielding for cohesive strengths in the GPa range.

  13. On the morphometry of terrestrial shield volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosse, Pablo; Kervyn, Matthieu

    2016-04-01

    Shield volcanoes are described as low angle edifices that have convex up topographic profiles and are built primarily by the accumulation of lava flows. This generic view of shields' morphology is based on a limited number of monogenetic shields from Iceland and Mexico, and a small set of large oceanic islands (Hawaii, Galapagos). Here, the morphometry of over 150 monogenetic and polygenetic shield volcanoes, identified inthe Global Volcanism Network database, are analysed quantitatively from 90-meter resolution DEMs using the MORVOLC algorithm. An additional set of 20 volcanoes identified as stratovolcanoes but having low slopes and being dominantly built up by accumulation of lava flows are documented for comparison. Results show that there is a large variation in shield size (volumes range from 0.1 to >1000 km3), profile shape (height/basal width ratios range from 0.01 to 0.1), flank slope gradients, elongation and summit truncation. Correlation and principal component analysis of the obtained quantitative database enables to identify 4 key morphometric descriptors: size, steepness, plan shape and truncation. Using these descriptors through clustering analysis, a new classification scheme is proposed. It highlights the control of the magma feeding system - either central, along a linear structure, or spatially diffuse - on the resulting shield volcano morphology. Genetic relationships and evolutionary trends between contrasted morphological end-members can be highlighted within this new scheme. Additional findings are that the Galapagos-type morphology with a central deep caldera and steep upper flanks are characteristic of other shields. A series of large oceanic shields have slopes systematically much steeper than the low gradients (<4-8°) generally attributed to large Hawaiian-type shields. Finally, the continuum of morphologies from flat shields to steeper complex volcanic constructs considered as stratovolcanoes calls for a revision of this oversimplified

  14. Development and Evaluation of the Next Generation of Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christiansen, E.; Lear, D.; Ryan, S.

    2009-01-01

    Recent events such as the Chinese anti-satellite missile test in January 2007 and the collision between a Russian Cosmos satellite and US Iridium satellite in February 2009 are responsible for a rapid increase in the population of orbital debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Without active debris removal strategies the debris population in key orbits will continue to increase, requiring enhanced shielding capabilities to maintain allowable penetration risks. One of the more promising developments in recent years for meteoroid and orbital debris shielding (MMOD) is the application of open cell foams. Although shielding onboard the International Space Station is the most capable ever flown, the most proficient configuration (stuffed Whipple shield) requires an additional 30% of the shielding mass for non-ballistic requirements (e.g. stiffeners, fasteners, etc.). Open cell foam structures provide similar mechanical performance to more traditional structural components such as honeycomb sandwich panels, as well as improved projectile fragmentation and melting as a result of repeated shocking by foam ligaments. In this paper, the preliminary results of an extensive hypervelocity impact test program on next generation MMOD shielding configurations incorporating open-cell metallic foams are reported.

  15. Development and Evaluation of the Next Generation of Meteoroid and Orbital Debris Shields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Shannon; Christiansen, Eric

    2009-06-01

    Recent events such as the Chinese anti-satellite missile test in January 2007 and the collision between a Russian Cosmos satellite and US Iridium satellite in February 2009 are responsible for a rapid increase in the population of orbital debris in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). Without active debris removal strategies the debris population in key orbits will continue to increase, requiring enhanced shielding capabilities to maintain allowable penetration risks. One of the more promising developments in recent years for meteoroid and orbital debris shielding (MMOD) is the application of open cell foams. Although shielding onboard the International Space Station is the most capable ever flown, the most proficient configuration (stuffed Whipple shield) requires an additional ˜30% of the shielding mass for non-ballistic requirements (e.g. stiffeners, fasteners, etc.). Open cell foam structures provide similar mechanical performance to more traditional structural components such as honeycomb sandwich panels, as well as improved projectile fragmentation and melting as a result of repeated shocking by foam ligaments. In this paper, the preliminary results of an extensive hypervelocity impact test program on next generation MMOD shielding configurations incorporating open-cell metallic foams are reported.

  16. Thermally insulated window sash construction for a casement window

    SciTech Connect

    Biro, A.J.

    1987-09-01

    A window sash member is described comprising: first and second generally parallel sidewalls; first and second spaced, generally parallel transverse walls connecting the first and second sidewalls, extending between and oriented generally perpendicular to the first and second sidewalls to define a first hollow chamber; a third transverse wall, located without the first hollow chamber adjacent to and generally parallel to the first transverse wall, extending from the first sidewall and terminating short of the second sidewall; a first interior wall extending from the third transverse wall to the first transverse wall and oriented generally parallel to the first sidewall to define a second hollow chamber; a fourth transverse wall, located without the first hollow chamber adjacent to and generally to the second transverse wall, extending from the first sidewall and terminating short of the second sidewall; and a second interior wall extending from the fourth transverse wall to the second transverse wall and oriented generally parallel to the second sidewall to define a third hollow chamber.

  17. Window type: 2x3 fixed multipaned steel window flanked by 1x3 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Window type: 2x3 fixed multipaned steel window flanked by 1x3 multipaned steel casements. Concrete sill and spandrel also illustrated. Building 43, facing east - Harbor Hills Housing Project, 26607 Western Avenue, Lomita, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Glass-windowed ultrasound transducers.

    PubMed

    Yddal, Tostein; Gilja, Odd Helge; Cochran, Sandy; Postema, Michiel; Kotopoulis, Spiros

    2016-05-01

    In research and industrial processes, it is increasingly common practice to combine multiple measurement modalities. Nevertheless, experimental tools that allow the co-linear combination of optical and ultrasonic transmission have rarely been reported. The aim of this study was to develop and characterise a water-matched ultrasound transducer architecture using standard components, with a central optical window larger than 10 mm in diameter allowing for optical transmission. The window can be used to place illumination or imaging apparatus such as light guides, miniature cameras, or microscope objectives, simplifying experimental setups. Four design variations of a basic architecture were fabricated and characterised with the objective to assess whether the variations influence the acoustic output. The basic architecture consisted of a piezoelectric ring and a glass disc, with an aluminium casing. The designs differed in piezoelectric element dimensions: inner diameter, ID=10 mm, outer diameter, OD=25 mm, thickness, TH=4 mm or ID=20 mm, OD=40 mm, TH=5 mm; glass disc dimensions OD=20-50 mm, TH=2-4 mm; and details of assembly. The transducers' frequency responses were characterised using electrical impedance spectroscopy and pulse-echo measurements, the acoustic propagation pattern using acoustic pressure field scans, the acoustic power output using radiation force balance measurements, and the acoustic pressure using a needle hydrophone. Depending on the design and piezoelectric element dimensions, the resonance frequency was in the range 350-630 kHz, the -6 dB bandwidth was in the range 87-97%, acoustic output power exceeded 1 W, and acoustic pressure exceeded 1 MPa peak-to-peak. 3D stress simulations were performed to predict the isostatic pressure required to induce material failure and 4D acoustic simulations. The pressure simulations indicated that specific design variations could sustain isostatic pressures up to 4.8 MPa.The acoustic simulations were able to

  19. Vibratory compaction tests on graphite powders for neutron shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, W.C.

    1982-05-01

    Mistures of three size ranges of graphite powders have been vibratory packed to densities as high as 1.40 gm/cm/sup 3/, which is 87.5 percent of the design density for the graphte segment of the FMIT test cell shield. Ultrasonic resonance vibration of the particles was determined to be an impractical method for achieving the required density. Possible options for fabricating the shield are: (1) revert to solid graphite, rather than vibratory packed powder, or (2) develop the mechanical vibratory compaction method, which would require (a) designing for the higher heat-load attendant with the reduced graphite density, or (b) increasing the thickness of the graphite segment by 15 percent or (c) seeking a new source of graphite powder with higher particle density.

  20. Resonance self-shielding effects on Eigenvalue sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Dion, M.; Marleau, G.

    2013-07-01

    We present a quick and accurate way to compute the eigenvalue sensitivity coefficients in multigroup lattice cell calculations. We look at both the explicit and implicit sensitivities, the latter resulting from the resonance self-shielding process. A self-shielding model is presented, and we show how to obtain cross section sensitivities to a variation on a light isotope density. As an example, we look at how a perturbation on the hydrogen density affects the multigroup cross sections for resonant reactions such as U'capture and U'fission, in two uranium spheres with different enrichments. Explicit sensitivities are also computed, and we discuss the relative importance of the implicit sensitivities. (authors)