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Sample records for cell-free plasma dna

  1. Controls to validate plasma samples for cell free DNA quantification.

    PubMed

    Pallisgaard, Niels; Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Andersen, Rikke Fredslund; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2015-06-15

    Recent research has focused on the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in serum and plasma for clinical application, especially in oncology. The literature holds promise of cfDNA as a valuable tumour marker to be used for treatment selection, monitoring and follow-up. The results, however, are diverging due to methodological differences with lack of standardisation and definition of sensitivity. The new biological information has not yet come into routine use. The present study presents external standardisation by spiking with non-human DNA fragments to control for loss of DNA during sample preparation and measurement. It also suggests a method to control for admixture of DNA from normal lymphocytes by utilizing the unique immunoglobulin gene rearrangement in the B-cells. The results show that this approach improves the quality of the analysis and lowers the risk of falsely increased values. In conclusion we suggest a new method to improve the accuracy of cfDNA measurements easily incorporated in the current technology. PMID:25896958

  2. Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Mussolin, Lara; Burnelli, Roberta; Pillon, Marta; Carraro, Elisa; Farruggia, Piero; Todesco, Alessandra; Mascarin, Maurizio; Rosolen, Angelo

    2013-01-01

    Background: Extracellular circulating DNA (cfDNA) can be found in small amounts in plasma of healthy individuals. Increased levels of cfDNA have been reported in patients with cancer of breast, cervix, colon, liver and it was shown that cfDNA can originate from both tumour and non-tumour cells. Objectives: Levels of cfDNA of a large series of children with lymphoma were evaluated and analyzed in relation with clinical characteristics. Methods: plasma cfDNA levels obtained at diagnosis in 201 paediatric lymphoma patients [43 Hodgkin lymphomas (HL), 45 anaplastic large cell lymphomas (ALCL), 88 Burkitt lymphomas (BL), 17 lymphoblastic (LBL), 8 diffuse large B cell lymphoma (DLBCL)] and 15 healthy individuals were determined using a quantitative PCR assay for POLR2 gene and, in addition, for NPM-ALK fusion gene in ALCL patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare plasma levels among different patient subgroups and controls and to analyze relationship between levels of cfDNA and clinical characteristics. Results: Levels of cfDNA in lymphoma patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p<0.0001). CfDNA was associated with median age (p=0.01) in HL, and with stage in ALCL (p=0.01). In HL patients high cfDNA levels were correlated with poor prognosis (p=0.03). In ALCL we found that most of the cfDNA (77%) was non-tumor DNA. Conclusion: level of plasma cfDNA might constitute an important non-invasive tool at diagnosis in lymphoma patients' management; in particular in patients with HL, cfDNA seems to be a promising prognostic biomarker. PMID:23678368

  3. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  4. Kinetics of Circulating Plasma Cell-Free DNA in Paediatric Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Primerano, Simona; Burnelli, Roberta; Carraro, Elisa; Pillon, Marta; Elia, Caterina; Farruggia, Piero; Sala, Alessandra; Vinti, Luciana; Buffardi, Salvatore; Basso, Giuseppe; Mascarin, Maurizio; Mussolin, Lara

    2016-01-01

    Levels of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) of a large series of children with classical Hodgkin lymphoma (cHL) were evaluated and analyzed at diagnosis and during chemotherapy treatment in relation with clinical characteristics. CfDNA levels in cHL patients were significantly higher compared with controls (p=0.002). CfDNA at diagnosis was correlated with presence of B symptoms (p=0.027) and high erythrocyte sedimentation rate (p=0.049). We found that the increasing of plasma cfDNA after first chemotherapy cycle seems to be associated with a worse prognosis (p=0.049). Levels of plasma cfDNA might constitute an interesting non-invasive tool in cHL patients' management. PMID:26918050

  5. Chimeric External Control to Quantify Cell Free DNA in Plasma Samples by Real Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Eini, Maryam; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Takhshid, Mohammad Ali; Ramezani, Amin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Farhadi, Ali; Alavi, Parniyan

    2016-01-01

    Background: DNA isolation procedure can significantly influence the quantification of DNA by real time PCR specially when cell free DNA (cfDNA) is the subject. To assess the extraction efficiency, linearity of the extraction yield, presence of co-purified inhibitors and to avoid problems with fragment size relevant to cfDNA, development of appropriate External DNA Control (EDC) is challenging. Using non-human chimeric nucleotide sequences, an EDC was developed for standardization of qPCR for monitoring stability of cfDNA concentration in blood samples over time. Methods: A0 DNA fragment of 167 bp chimeric sequence of parvovirus B19 and pBHA designated as EDC fragment was designed. To determine the impact of different factors during DNA extraction processing on quantification of cfDNA, blood samples were collected from normal subjects and divided into aliquots with and without specific treatment. In time intervals, the plasma samples were isolated. The amplicon of 167 bp EDC fragment in final concentration of 1.1 pg/500 μl was added to each plasma sample and total DNA was extracted by an in house method. Relative and absolute quantification real time PCR was performed to quantify both EDC fragment and cfDNA in extracted samples. Results: Comparison of real time PCR threshold cycle (Ct) for cfDNA fragment in tubes with and without specific treatment indicated a decrease in untreated tubes. In contrast, the threshold cycle was constant for EDC fragment in treated and untreated tubes, indicating the difference in Ct values of the cfDNA is because of specific treatments that were made on them. Conclusions: Spiking of DNA fragment size relevant to cfDNA into the plasma sample can be useful to minimize the bias due to sample preparation and extraction processing. Therefore, it is highly recommended that standard external DNA control be employed for the extraction and quantification of cfDNA for accurate data analysis. PMID:27141267

  6. Both maternal and fetal cell-free DNA in plasma fluctuate.

    PubMed

    Hahn, S; Zhong, X Y; Bürk, M R; Troeger, C; Kang, A; Holzgreve, W

    2001-09-01

    Elevations in the concentration of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma have recently been determined in various pregnancy-related disorders, including preeclampsia, preterm labor, and polyhydramnios. In addition, almost 2-fold increments in cell-free fetal DNA levels have been recorded in pregnancies with certain aneuploid fetuses, in particular trisomy 21. These findings have led to the speculation that quantitative assessment of circulatory fetal DNA may be useful in the noninvasive prenatal diagnosis of certain fetal genetic constellations or pregnancy-related disorders. A premise for any quantitative analysis is that the quantity of the analyte being assayed does not vary greatly over time. As this aspect has not been examined for circulatory DNA levels, we examined these in normal healthy individuals as well as in pregnant women. Our data indicate that severalfold alterations in circulatory DNA amounts do occur over short periods of time. Of particular note is that we observed almost 2-fold variations in free fetal DNA levels over a period of 3 days, which are in a similar range to the elevations noted in aneuploid pregnancies. Our results, therefore, imply that caution should be used when using small increments in circulatory fetal DNA concentrations for potential diagnostic applications. PMID:11708468

  7. Plasma circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA in the assessment of Friedreich's ataxia.

    PubMed

    Dantham, Subrahamanyam; Srivastava, Achal K; Gulati, Sheffali; Rajeswari, Moganty R

    2016-06-15

    Friedreich's ataxia (FRDA) is one of the most devastating childhood onset neurodegenerative disease affecting multiple organs in the course of progression. FRDA is associated with mitochondrial dysfunction due to deficit in a nuclear encoded mitochondrial protein, frataxin. Identification of disease-specific biomarker for monitoring the severity remains to be a challenging topic. This study was aimed to identify whether circulating cell-free nuclear DNA (nDNA) and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in blood plasma can be a potential biomarker for FRDA. Clinical information was assessed using International Cooperative Ataxia Rating Scale and the disease was confirmed using Long-range PCR for GAA repeat expansion within the gene encoding frataxin. The frataxin expression was measured using Western blot. Plasma nDNA and mtDNA levels were quantified by Multiplex real-time PCR. The major observation is that the levels of nDNA found to be increased, whereas mtDNA levels were reduced significantly in the plasma of FRDA patients (n=21) as compared to healthy controls (n=21). Further, plasma mtDNA levels showed high sensitivity (90%) and specificity (76%) in distinguishing from healthy controls with optimal cutoff indicated at 4.1×10(5)GE/mL. Interestingly, a small group of follow-up patients (n=9) on intervention with, a nutrient supplement, omega-3 fatty acid (a known enhancer of mitochondrial metabolism) displayed a significant improvement in the levels of plasma mtDNA, supporting our hypothesis that plasma mtDNA can be a potential monitoring or prognosis biomarker for FRDA. PMID:27206881

  8. Plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA declines in response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise.

    PubMed

    Shockett, Penny E; Khanal, Januka; Sitaula, Alina; Oglesby, Christopher; Meachum, William A; Castracane, V Daniel; Kraemer, Robert R

    2016-01-01

    Increased plasma cell-free mitochondrial DNA (cf-mDNA), a damage-associated molecular pattern (DAMP) produced by cellular injury, contributes to neutrophil activation/inflammation in trauma patients and arises in cancer and autoimmunity. To further understand relationships between cf-mDNA released by tissue injury, inflammation, and health benefits of exercise, we examined cf-mDNA response to prolonged moderate aerobic exercise. Seven healthy moderately trained young men (age = 22.4 ± 1.2) completed a treadmill exercise trial for 90 min at 60% VO2 max and a resting control trial. Blood was sampled immediately prior to exercise (0 min = baseline), during (+18, +54 min), immediately after (+90 min), and after recovery (R40). Plasma was analyzed for cf-mDNA, IL-6, and lactate. A significant difference in cf-mDNA response was observed between exercise and control trials, with cf-mDNA levels reduced during exercise at +54 and +90 (with or without plasma volume shift correction). Declines in cf-mDNA were accompanied by increased lactate and followed by an increase in IL-6, suggesting a temporal association with muscle stress and inflammatory processes. Our novel finding of cf-mDNA decline with prolonged moderate treadmill exercise provides evidence for increased clearance from or reduced release of cf-mDNA into the blood with prolonged exercise. These studies contrast with previous investigations involving exhaustive short-term treadmill exercise, in which no change in cf-mDNA levels were reported, and contribute to our understanding of differences between exercise- and trauma-induced inflammation. We propose that transient declines in cf-mDNA may induce health benefits, by reducing systemic inflammation. PMID:26755735

  9. Single-stranded DNA library preparation uncovers the origin and diversity of ultrashort cell-free DNA in plasma

    PubMed Central

    Burnham, Philip; Kim, Min Seong; Agbor-Enoh, Sean; Luikart, Helen; Valantine, Hannah A.; Khush, Kiran K.; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is emerging as a powerful monitoring tool in cancer, pregnancy and organ transplantation. Nucleosomal DNA, the predominant form of plasma cfDNA, can be adapted for sequencing via ligation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) adapters. dsDNA library preparations, however, are insensitive to ultrashort, degraded cfDNA. Drawing inspiration from advances in paleogenomics, we have applied a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method to sequencing of cfDNA in the plasma of lung transplant recipients (40 samples, six patients). We found that ssDNA library preparation yields a greater portion of sub-100 bp nuclear genomic cfDNA (p 10−5, Mann-Whitney U Test), and an increased relative abundance of mitochondrial (10.7x, p 10−5) and microbial cfDNA (71.3x, p 10−5). The higher yield of microbial sequences from this method increases the sensitivity of cfDNA-based monitoring for infections following transplantation. We detail the fragmentation pattern of mitochondrial, nuclear genomic and microbial cfDNA over a broad fragment length range. We report the observation of donor-specific mitochondrial cfDNA in the circulation of lung transplant recipients. A ssDNA library preparation method provides a more informative window into understudied forms of cfDNA, including mitochondrial and microbial derived cfDNA and short nuclear genomic cfDNA, while retaining information provided by standard dsDNA library preparation methods. PMID:27297799

  10. Single-stranded DNA library preparation uncovers the origin and diversity of ultrashort cell-free DNA in plasma.

    PubMed

    Burnham, Philip; Kim, Min Seong; Agbor-Enoh, Sean; Luikart, Helen; Valantine, Hannah A; Khush, Kiran K; De Vlaminck, Iwijn

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is emerging as a powerful monitoring tool in cancer, pregnancy and organ transplantation. Nucleosomal DNA, the predominant form of plasma cfDNA, can be adapted for sequencing via ligation of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) adapters. dsDNA library preparations, however, are insensitive to ultrashort, degraded cfDNA. Drawing inspiration from advances in paleogenomics, we have applied a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) library preparation method to sequencing of cfDNA in the plasma of lung transplant recipients (40 samples, six patients). We found that ssDNA library preparation yields a greater portion of sub-100 bp nuclear genomic cfDNA (p 10(-5), Mann-Whitney U Test), and an increased relative abundance of mitochondrial (10.7x, p 10(-5)) and microbial cfDNA (71.3x, p 10(-5)). The higher yield of microbial sequences from this method increases the sensitivity of cfDNA-based monitoring for infections following transplantation. We detail the fragmentation pattern of mitochondrial, nuclear genomic and microbial cfDNA over a broad fragment length range. We report the observation of donor-specific mitochondrial cfDNA in the circulation of lung transplant recipients. A ssDNA library preparation method provides a more informative window into understudied forms of cfDNA, including mitochondrial and microbial derived cfDNA and short nuclear genomic cfDNA, while retaining information provided by standard dsDNA library preparation methods. PMID:27297799

  11. Genome aberrations in canine mammary carcinomas and their detection in cell-free plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Beck, Julia; Hennecke, Silvia; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Urnovitz, Howard B; Neumann, Stephan; Ströbel, Philipp; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20). Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants. PMID:24098698

  12. Genome Aberrations in Canine Mammary Carcinomas and Their Detection in Cell-Free Plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Julia; Hennecke, Silvia; Bornemann-Kolatzki, Kirsten; Urnovitz, Howard B.; Neumann, Stephan; Ströbel, Philipp; Kaup, Franz-Josef; Brenig, Bertram; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2013-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most frequent cancers in female dogs exhibiting a variety of histopathological differences. There is lack of knowledge about the genomes of these common dog tumors. Five tumors of three different histological subtypes were evaluated. Massive parallel sequencing (MPS) was performed in comparison to the respective somatic genome of each animal. Copy number and structural aberrations were validated using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Using mate-pair sequencing chromosomal aneuploidies were found in two tumors, frequent smaller deletions were found in one, inter-chromosomal fusions in one other, whereas one tumor was almost normal. These aberrations affect several known cancer associated genes such as cMYC, and KIT. One common deletion of the proximal end of CFA27, harboring the tumor suppressor gene PFDN5 was detected in four tumors. Using ddPCR, this deletion was validated and detected in 50% of tumors (N = 20). Breakpoint specific dPCRs were established for four tumors and tumor specific cell-free DNA (cfDNA) was detected in the plasma. In one animal tumor-specific cfDNA was found >1 year after surgery, attributable to a lung metastasis. Paired-end sequencing proved that copy-number imbalances of the tumor are reflected by the cfDNA. This report on chromosomal instability of canine mammary cancers reveals similarities to human breast cancers as well as special canine alterations. This animal model provides a framework for using MPS for screening for individual cancer biomarkers with cost effective confirmation and monitoring using ddPCR. The possibility exists that ddPCR can be expanded to screening for common cancer related variants. PMID:24098698

  13. Comprehensive evaluation of methods to isolate, quantify, and characterize circulating cell-free DNA from small volumes of plasma.

    PubMed

    Mauger, Florence; Dulary, Cécile; Daviaud, Christian; Deleuze, Jean-François; Tost, Jorg

    2015-09-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) has great potential for non-invasive diagnostics, and prediction and monitoring of treatment response, but its amount is usually limited. Therefore, the choice of methods to extract and characterize ccfDNA is crucial. In the current study, we performed the most comprehensive comparison of methods for ccfDNA extraction (11 methods), quantification (3 methods), and estimation of the integrity index (2 methods) from small quantities of different kinds of plasma. The QIAamp® Circulating Nucleic Acid Kit and the Norgen Plasma/Serum Circulating DNA Purification Mini Kit showed the best accuracy and reproducibility, but the Norgen kit allowed to extract a higher amount of ccfDNA. This workflow provides a reliable protocol for the multiple applications of ccfDNA in biomedicine. PMID:26123439

  14. Increased plasma cell-free DNA is associated with low pregnancy rates among women undergoing IVF-embryo transfer.

    PubMed

    Czamanski-Cohen, Johanna; Sarid, Orly; Cwikel, Julie; Lunenfeld, Eitan; Douvdevani, Amos; Levitas, Eliahu; Har-Vardi, Iris

    2013-01-01

    This prospective repeated measures study was designed to examine the cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations during ovarian stimulation and the relationship between cfDNA concentration and pregnancy rates in women undergoing IVF-embryo transfer. The study examined 37 women undergoing IVF treatment in an IVF unit in a university medical centre in southern Israel. cfDNA concentrations were measured by a direct fluorescence assay, pregnancy rates were identified by plasma β human chorionic gonadotrophin (HCG) concentrations and verified by vaginal ultrasound to determine gestational sac and fetal heart beats. Throughout the IVF cycle, at the three time points measured, the mean concentration of plasma cfDNA among all participants did not statistically significantly change. However, on the day of βHCG test in patients undergoing IVF-embryo transfer, plasma cfDNA concentrations were statistically significantly higher among women who did not conceive in comparison to those who conceived. Plasma cfDNA may reflect the presence of factors which interfere with embryo implantation. Further research is required to determine the usefulness of cfDNA as a biomarker of IVF outcome and to examine the underlying pathologies as potential sources for increased plasma cfDNA concentrations. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is particles of DNA which are released from the cell nucleus and are found in high concentrations during a variety of illnesses and injuries. This study was designed to examine the cfDNA concentrations during IVF treatment and the relationship between cfDNA concentration in the bloodstream and pregnancy rates in women undergoing IVF. This study examined 37 women in treatment at the IVF unit of the University Medical Centre in southern Israel. cfDNA concentrations in the bloodstream were measured at three time points by a direct test. Pregnancy rates were identified by pregnancy hormone concentrations in the bloodstream and verified by vaginal ultrasound to determine a pregnancy

  15. Elevated Cell-Free Plasma DNA Level as an Independent Predictor of Mortality in Patients with Severe Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Simon, Daniel; Ikuta, Nilo; Klovan, Caroline; Dannebrock, Fernando Augusto; Oliveira de Oliveira, Carla

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Trauma is the leading cause of death in individuals less than 45 years old worldwide, and up to 50% of trauma fatalities are because of brain injury. Prediction of outcome is one of the major problems associated with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and research efforts have focused on the investigation of biomarkers with prognostic value after TBI. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether cell-free DNA concentrations correlated to short-term primary outcome (survival or death) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores after severe TBI. A total of 188 patients with severe TBI were enrolled in this prospective study; outcome variables comprised survival and neurological assessment using the GCS at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. Control blood samples were obtained from 25 healthy volunteers. Peripheral venous blood was collected at admission to the ICU. Plasma DNA was measured using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the β-globin gene. There was correlation between higher DNA levels and both fatal outcome and lower hospital admission GCS scores. Plasma DNA concentrations at the chosen cutoff point (≥171,381 kilogenomes-equivalents/L) predicted mortality with a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 43%. Logistic regression analysis showed that elevated plasma DNA levels were independently associated with death (p<0.001). In conclusion, high cell-free DNA concentration was a predictor of short-term mortality after severe TBI. PMID:24827371

  16. Elevated cell-free plasma DNA level as an independent predictor of mortality in patients with severe traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues Filho, Edison Moraes; Simon, Daniel; Ikuta, Nilo; Klovan, Caroline; Dannebrock, Fernando Augusto; Oliveira de Oliveira, Carla; Regner, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Trauma is the leading cause of death in individuals less than 45 years old worldwide, and up to 50% of trauma fatalities are because of brain injury. Prediction of outcome is one of the major problems associated with severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), and research efforts have focused on the investigation of biomarkers with prognostic value after TBI. Therefore, our aim was to investigate whether cell-free DNA concentrations correlated to short-term primary outcome (survival or death) and Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) scores after severe TBI. A total of 188 patients with severe TBI were enrolled in this prospective study; outcome variables comprised survival and neurological assessment using the GCS at intensive care unit (ICU) discharge. Control blood samples were obtained from 25 healthy volunteers. Peripheral venous blood was collected at admission to the ICU. Plasma DNA was measured using a real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay for the β-globin gene. There was correlation between higher DNA levels and both fatal outcome and lower hospital admission GCS scores. Plasma DNA concentrations at the chosen cutoff point (≥171,381 kilogenomes-equivalents/L) predicted mortality with a specificity of 90% and a sensitivity of 43%. Logistic regression analysis showed that elevated plasma DNA levels were independently associated with death (p<0.001). In conclusion, high cell-free DNA concentration was a predictor of short-term mortality after severe TBI. PMID:24827371

  17. Plasma cell-free DNA levels and integrity in patients with chest radiological findings: NSCLC versus benign lung nodules.

    PubMed

    Szpechcinski, Adam; Rudzinski, Piotr; Kupis, Wlodzimierz; Langfort, Renata; Orlowski, Tadeusz; Chorostowska-Wynimko, Joanna

    2016-05-01

    Effective discrimination between lung cancer and benign tumours is a common clinical problem in the differential diagnosis of solitary pulmonary nodules. The analysis of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in blood may greatly aid the early detection of lung cancer by evaluating cancer-related alterations. The plasma cfDNA levels and integrity were analysed in 65 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, 28 subjects with benign lung tumours, and 16 healthy controls using real-time PCR. The NSCLC patients demonstrated significantly higher mean plasma cfDNA levels compared with those with benign tumours (P = 0.0009) and healthy controls (P < 0.0001). The plasma cfDNA integrity in healthy individuals was significantly different than that found in patients with NSCLC or benign lung tumours (P < 0.0003). In ROC curve analysis, plasma cfDNA levels >2.8 ng/ml provided 86.4% sensitivity and 61.4% specificity in discriminating NSCLC from benign lung pathologies and healthy controls. cfDNA integrity showed better discriminatory power (91% sensitivity, 68.2% specificity). These data demonstrate that plasma cfDNA concentration and integrity analyses can significantly differentiate between NSCLC and benign lung tumours. The diagnostic capacity of the quantitative cfDNA assay is comparable to the values presented by conventional imaging modalities used in clinical practice. PMID:26854716

  18. Effect of blood pressure and glycemic control on the plasma cell-free DNA in hemodialysis patients

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Da Wun; Moon, Ju-Young; Choi, Young-Wook; Moon, Haena; Kim, Kipyo; Lee, Yu-Ho; Kim, Se-Yeun; Kim, Yang-Gyun; Jeong, Kyung-Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Background The plasma levels of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) are known to be elevated under inflammatory or apoptotic conditions. Increased cfDNA levels have been reported in hemodialysis (HD) patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical significance of cfDNA in HD patients. Methods A total of 95 patients on HD were enrolled. We measured their predialysis cfDNA levels using real-time EIF2C1 gene sequence amplification and analyzed its association with certain clinical parameters. Results The mean plasma cfDNA level in the HD patients was 3,884 ± 407 GE/mL, and the mean plasma cfDNA level in the control group was 1,420 ± 121 GE/mL (P < 0.05). Diabetic patients showed higher plasma cfDNA levels compared with nondiabetic patients (P < 0.01). Patients with cardiovascular complications also showed higher plasma cfDNA levels compared with those without cardiovascular complication (P < 0.05). In univariable analysis, the cfDNA level was associated with 3-month mean systolic blood pressure (SBP), white blood cell, serum albumin, creatinine (Cr), normalized protein catabolic rate in HD patients. In diabetic patients, it was significantly correlated with SBP, hemoglobin A1c, and serum albumin. In multivariate analysis, SBP was the independent determinant for the cfDNA level. In diabetic patients, cfDNA level was independently associated with hemoglobin A1c and SBP. Conclusions In patients with HD, cfDNA is elevated in diabetic patients and patients with cardiovascular diseases. Uncontrolled hypertension and poor glycemic control are independent determinants for the elevated cfDNA. Our data suggest that cfDNA might be a marker of vascular injury rather than proinflammatory condition in HD patients. PMID:26779422

  19. Cell-free DNA levels in plasma of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer and inflammatory lung disease

    PubMed Central

    Szpechcinski, A; Chorostowska-Wynimko, J; Struniawski, R; Kupis, W; Rudzinski, P; Langfort, R; Puscinska, E; Bielen, P; Sliwinski, P; Orlowski, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: The analysis of plasma cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is expected to provide useful biomarkers for early diagnosis of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, it remains unclear whether the intense release of cfDNA into the bloodstream of NSCLC patients results from malignancy or chronic inflammatory response. Consequently, the current diagnostic utility of plasma cfDNA quantification has not been thoroughly validated in subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation. Here we assess the effect of chronic respiratory inflammation on plasma cfDNA levels and evaluate the potential clinical value of this phenomenon as an early lung cancer diagnostic tool. Methods: We measured plasma cfDNA concentrations in 50 resectable NSCLC patients, 101 patients with chronic respiratory inflammation (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sarcoidosis, or asthma) and 40 healthy volunteers using real-time PCR. Results: We found significantly higher plasma cfDNA levels in NSCLC patients than in subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation and healthy individuals (P<0.0001). There were no significant differences in plasma cfDNA levels between patients with chronic respiratory inflammation and healthy volunteers. The cutoff point of >2.8 ng ml−1 provided 90% sensitivity and 80.5% specificity in discriminating NSCLC from healthy individuals (area under the curve (AUC)=0.90). The receiver-operating characteristics curve distinguishing NSCLC patients from subjects with chronic respiratory inflammation indicated 56% sensitivity and 91% specificity at the >5.25-ng ml−1 cutoff (AUC=0.76). Conclusions: We demonstrated that elevated plasma cfDNA levels in NSCLC resulted primarily from tumour development rather than inflammatory response, raising the potential clinical implications for lung cancer screening and early diagnosis. Further research is necessary to better characterise and identify factors and processes regulating cfDNA levels in the blood under normal and

  20. BRAF V600E mutations in urine and plasma cell-free DNA from patients with Erdheim-Chester disease

    PubMed Central

    Janku, Filip; Vibat, Cecile Rose T.; Kosco, Karena; Holley, Veronica R.; Cabrilo, Goran; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Stepanek, Vanda M.; Lin, Patrick P.; Leppin, Lorieta; Hassaine, Latifa; Poole, Jason C.; Kurzrock, Razelle; Erlander, Mark G.

    2014-01-01

    Erdheim-Chester disease (ECD) is a rare histiocytosis with a high prevalence of BRAF V600E mutation (>50% of patients). Patients with BRAF-mutant ECD can respond to BRAF inhibitors. Unfortunately, the lack of adequate archival tissue often precludes BRAF testing. We hypothesized that cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from plasma or urine can offer an alternative source of biologic material for testing. We tested for BRAF V600E mutation in cfDNA from the plasma and urine of 6 ECD patients. In patients with available archival tissue, the result of BRAF mutation analysis was concordant with plasma and urine cfDNA results in all 3 patients (100% agreement, kappa 1.00). In all 6 patients, BRAF mutation analysis of plasma and urine cfDNA was concordant in 5 of 6 patients (83% agreement, kappa 0.67). Testing for BRAF V600E mutation in plasma and urine cfDNA should be further investigated as an alternative to archival tissue mutation analysis. PMID:25003820

  1. Aberrant reduction of telomere repetitive sequences in plasma cell-free DNA for early breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Tanaka, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive telomere shortening is observed in breast cancer lesions when compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues, suggesting that telomere length may represent a key biomarker for early cancer detection. Because tumor-derived, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is often released from cancer cells and circulates in the bloodstream, we hypothesized that breast cancer development is associated with changes in the amount of telomeric cfDNA that can be detected in the plasma. To test this hypothesis, we devised a novel, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, termed telomeric cfDNA qPCR, to quantify plasma telomeric cfDNA levels. Indeed, the internal reference primers of our design correctly reflected input cfDNA amount (R2 = 0.910, P = 7.82 × 10−52), implying accuracy of this assay. We found that plasma telomeric cfDNA levels decreased with age in healthy individuals (n = 42, R2 = 0.094, P = 0.048), suggesting that cfDNA is likely derived from somatic cells in which telomere length shortens with increasing age. Our results also showed a significant decrease in telomeric cfDNA level from breast cancer patients with no prior treatment (n = 47), compared to control individuals (n = 42) (P = 4.06 × 10−8). The sensitivity and specificity for the telomeric cfDNA qPCR assay was 91.49% and 76.19%, respectively. Furthermore, the telomeric cfDNA level distinguished even the Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) group (n = 7) from the healthy group (n = 42) (P = 1.51 × 10−3). Taken together, decreasing plasma telomeric cfDNA levels could be an informative genetic biomarker for early breast cancer detection. PMID:26356673

  2. Cell-Free Fetal DNA and Cell-Free Total DNA Levels in Spontaneous Abortion with Fetal Chromosomal Aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ji Hyae; Kim, Min Hyoung; Han, You Jung; Lee, Da Eun; Park, So Yeon; Han, Jung Yeol; Kim, Moon Young; Ryu, Hyun Mee

    2013-01-01

    Background Cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in maternal circulation have been proposed as potential markers for noninvasive monitoring of the placental condition during the pregnancy. However, the correlation of and change in cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA in spontaneous abortion (SA) with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy have not yet been reported. Therefore, we investigated cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Methodology/Principal Findings A nested case-control study was conducted with maternal plasma collected from 268 women in their first trimester of pregnancy. Subjects included 41 SA with normal fetal karyotype, 26 SA with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy, and 201 normal controls. The unmethylated PDE9A gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free fetal DNA. The GAPDH gene was used to measure the maternal plasma levels of cell-free total DNA. The diagnostic accuracy was measured using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curves. Levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were significantly higher in both SA women with normal fetal karyotype and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy in comparison with the normal controls (P<0.001 in both). The correlation between cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA levels was stronger in the normal controls (r = 0.843, P<0.001) than in SA women with normal karyotype (r = 0.465, P = 0.002) and SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy (r = 0.412, P = 0.037). The area under the ROC curve for cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA was 0.898 (95% CI, 0.852–0.945) and 0.939 (95% CI, 0.903–0.975), respectively. Conclusions Significantly high levels of cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA were found in SA women with fetal chromosomal aneuploidy. Our findings suggest that cell-free fetal DNA and cell-free total DNA may be useful biomarkers for the prediction of SA with fetal

  3. Relationship of plasma cell-free DNA level with mortality and prognosis in patients with Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever.

    PubMed

    Bakir, Mehmet; Engin, Aynur; Kuskucu, Mert Ahmet; Bakir, Sevtap; Gündag, Omür; Midilli, Kenan

    2016-07-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a viral infection. Circulating plasma cell-free DNA (pcf-DNA) is a novel marker indicating cellular damage. So far, the role of pcf-DNA did not investigate in CCHF patients. In the current study, pcf-DNA levels were investigated in CCHF patients with different clinical severity grades to explore the relationship between circulating pcf-DNA level, virus load, and disease severity. Seventy-two patients were categorized as mild, intermediate, and severe based on severity grading scores. The pcf-DNA level was obtained from all participants on admission and from the survivors on the day of the discharge. The controls consisted of 31 healthy. Although the pcf-DNA level at admission was higher in patients than in the controls, the difference was not statistically significant (P = 0.291). However, at admission and in the convalescent period, the difference between pcf-DNA levels in mild, intermediate, and severe patient groups was significant. The pcf-DNA level in severe patients was higher than in the others. Furthermore, compared to survivors, non-survivors had higher pcf-DNA levels at admission (P = 0.001). A direct relationship was found between the pcf-DNA level and the viral load on the day of discharge in surviving patients. ROC curve analysis identified a pcf-DNA level of 0.42 as the optimal cut-off for prediction of mortality. The positive predictive value, negative predictive value, specificity, and sensitivity for predicting mortality was 100%, 72%, 100%, and 79%, respectively. In summary, our findings revealed that pcf-DNA levels may be used as a biomarker in predicting CHHF prognosis. J. Med. Virol. 88:1152-1158, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26680021

  4. Actionable mutations in plasma cell-free DNA in patients with advanced cancers referred for experimental targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Janku, Filip; Angenendt, Philipp; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M.; Fu, Siqing; Naing, Aung; Falchook, Gerald S.; Hong, David S.; Holley, Veronica R.; Cabrilo, Goran; Wheler, Jennifer J.; Piha-Paul, Sarina A.; Zinner, Ralph G.; Bedikian, Agop Y.; Overman, Michael J.; Kee, Bryan K.; Kim, Kevin B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Diehl, Frank; Meric-Bernstam, Funda; Kurzrock, Razelle

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA in the plasma of cancer patients offers an easily obtainable source of biologic material for mutation analysis. Plasma samples from 157 patients with advanced cancers who progressed on systemic therapy were tested for 21 mutations in BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, and PIK3CA using the BEAMing method and results were compared to mutation analysis of archival tumor tissue from a CLIA-certified laboratory obtained as standard of care from diagnostic or therapeutic procedures. Results were concordant for archival tissue and plasma cfDNA in 91% cases for BRAF mutations (kappa = 0.75, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.63 – 0.88), in 99% cases for EGFR mutations (kappa = 0.90, 95% CI 0.71– 1.00), in 83% cases for KRAS mutations (kappa = 0.67, 95% CI 0.54 – 0.80) and in 91% cases for PIK3CA mutations (kappa = 0.65, 95% CI 0.46 – 0.85). Patients (n = 41) with > 1% of KRAS mutant cfDNA had a shorter median survival compared to 20 patients with DNA (4.8 vs. 7.3 months, p = 0.008). Similarly, 67 patients with > 1% of mutant cfDNA (BRAF, EGFR, KRAS, or PIK3CA) had a shorter median survival compared to 33 patients with DNA (5.5 vs. 9.8 months, p = 0.001), which was confirmed in multivariable analysis. PMID:25980577

  5. Non-Invasive Prenatal RHD Genotyping Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA from Maternal Plasma: An Italian Experience

    PubMed Central

    Picchiassi, Elena; Di Renzo, Gian Carlo; Tarquini, Federica; Bini, Vittorio; Centra, Michela; Pennacchi, Luana; Galeone, Fabiana; Micanti, Mara; Coata, Giuliana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background This study assessed the diagnostic accuracy of a non-invasive approach to fetal RHD genotyping using cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma and a combination of methodological strategies. Methods Real-time PCR (qPCR) was performed on 216 RhD-negative women between weeks 10+0 and 14+6 of gestation (1st qPCR). qPCR was repeated (2nd qPCR) to increase the amount of each sample for analysis, on 95 plasma aliquots that were available from first trimester blood collection (group 1) and on 13 samples that were collected between weeks 18+0 and 25+6 of gestation (group 2). qPCR was specific for exons 5 and 7 of the RHD gene (RHD5 and RHD7). The results were interpreted according to the number of positive replicates of both exons. Results 1st qPCR: diagnostic accuracy was of 93.3%. Diagnostic accuracy increased from 90.5% (1st qPCR) to 93.7% (2nd qPCR) in group 1 and from 84.6% (1st qPCR) to 92.3% (2nd qPCR) in group 2. These increments were not statistically significant. Conclusion Our approach to RHD genotyping in early pregnancy yielded high diagnostic accuracy. Increasing the amount of DNA analyzed in each sample did not improve significantly the diagnostic accuracy of the test. PMID:25960712

  6. Applications for quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA in the plasma of patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Schreuer, Max; Meersseman, Geert; van Den Herrewegen, Sari; Jansen, Yanina; Seremet, Teofila; Bott, Ambre; Chevolet, Ines; Wilgenhof, Sofie; Maertens, Geert; Neyns, Bart

    2016-04-01

    Small fragments of cell-free DNA that are shed by normal and tumor cells can be detected in the plasma of patients with advanced melanoma. Quantitative measurement of BRAF V600 mutant DNA within the cell-free DNA holds promise as a tumor-specific biomarker for diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring in patients with BRAF V600 mutant melanoma. Allele-specific quantitative PCR analysis for BRAF V600 E/E2/D/K/R/M mutations on DNA extracted from 1 ml of plasma is currently under evaluation in a number of ongoing prospective clinical studies. We report five patient cases that indicate the potential applications and utility of quantitative measurements of BRAF V600 mutant cell-free tumor DNA as a diagnostic test and as a therapeutic monitoring tool in stage IV melanoma patients treated with BRAF-targeted therapy or immunotherapy. Finally, we offer novel insights into the dynamics of cell-free tumor DNA in melanoma. PMID:26636909

  7. Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing Using Cell Free DNA in Maternal Plasma: Recent Developments and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in molecular genetic technologies have facilitated non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) through the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA in maternal plasma. NIPT can be used to identify monogenic disorders including the identification of autosomal recessive disorders where the maternally inherited mutation needs to be identified in the presence of an excess of maternal DNA that contains the same mutation. In the future, simultaneous screening for multiple monogenic disorders is anticipated. Several NIPT methods have been developed to screen for trisomy. These have been shown to be effective for fetal trisomy 21, 18 and 13. Although the testing has been extended to sex chromosome aneuploidy, robust estimates of the efficacy are not yet available and maternal mosaicism for gain or loss of an X-chromosome needs to be considered. Using methods based on the analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms, diandric triploidy can be identified. NIPT is being developed to identify a number of microdeletion syndromes including α-globin gene deletion. NIPT is a profoundly important development in prenatal care that is substantially advancing the individual patient and public health benefits achieved through conventional prenatal screening and diagnosis. PMID:26237390

  8. Fetal cell-free DNA fraction in maternal plasma is affected by fetal trisomy.

    PubMed

    Suzumori, Nobuhiro; Ebara, Takeshi; Yamada, Takahiro; Samura, Osamu; Yotsumoto, Junko; Nishiyama, Miyuki; Miura, Kiyonori; Sawai, Hideaki; Murotsuki, Jun; Kitagawa, Michihiro; Kamei, Yoshimasa; Masuzaki, Hideaki; Hirahara, Fumiki; Saldivar, Juan-Sebastian; Dharajiya, Nilesh; Sago, Haruhiko; Sekizawa, Akihiko

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) study was to compare the fetal fraction of singleton gestations by gestational age, maternal characteristics and chromosome-specific aneuploidies as indicated by z-scores. This study was a multicenter prospective cohort study. Test data were collected from women who underwent NIPT by the massively parallel sequencing method. We used sequencing-based fetal fraction calculations in which we estimated fetal DNA fraction by simply counting the number of reads aligned within specific autosomal regions and applying a weighting scheme derived from a multivariate model. Relationships between fetal fractions and gestational age, maternal weight and height, and z-scores for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13 were assessed. A total of 7740 pregnant women enrolled in the study, of which 6993 met the study criteria. As expected, fetal fraction was inversely correlated with maternal weight (P<0.001). The median fetal fraction of samples with euploid result (n=6850) and trisomy 21 (n=70) were 13.7% and 13.6%, respectively. In contrast, the median fetal fraction values for samples with trisomies 18 (n=35) and 13 (n=9) were 11.0% and 8.0%, respectively. The fetal fraction of samples with trisomy 21 NIPT result is comparable to that of samples with euploid result. However, the fetal fractions of samples with trisomies 13 and 18 are significantly lower compared with that of euploid result. We conclude that it may make detecting these two trisomies more challenging. PMID:26984559

  9. A Method to Quantify Cell-Free Fetal DNA Fraction in Maternal Plasma Using Next Generation Sequencing: Its Application in Non-Invasive Prenatal Chromosomal Aneuploidy Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xu-Ping; Gan, Hai-Yan; Li, Fen-Xia; Tian, Qi; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Rong-Liang; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Objective The fraction of circulating cell-free fetal (cff) DNA in maternal plasma is a critical parameter for aneuploidy screening with non-invasive prenatal testing, especially for those samples located in equivocal zones. We developed an approach to quantify cff DNA fractions directly with sequencing data, and increased cff DNAs by optimizing library construction procedure. Methods Artificial DNA mixture samples (360), with known cff DNA fractions, were used to develop a method to determine cff DNA fraction through calculating the proportion of Y chromosomal unique reads, with sequencing data generated by Ion Proton. To validate our method, we investigated cff DNA fractions of 2,063 pregnant women with fetuses who were diagnosed as high risk of fetal defects. The z-score was calculated to determine aneuploidies for chromosomes 21, 18 and 13. The relationships between z-score and parameters of pregnancies were also analyzed. To improve cff DNA fractions in our samples, two groups were established as follows: in group A, the large-size DNA fragments were removed, and in group B these were retained, during library construction. Results A method to determine cff DNA fractions was successfully developed using 360 artificial mixture samples in which cff DNA fractions were known. A strong positive correlation was found between z-score and fetal DNA fraction in the artificial mixture samples of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, as well as in clinical maternal plasma samples. There was a positive correlation between gestational age and the cff DNA fraction in the clinical samples, but no correlation for maternal age. Moreover, increased fetal DNA fractions were found in group A compared to group B. Conclusion A relatively accurate method was developed to determine the cff DNA fraction in maternal plasma. By optimizing, we can improve cff DNA fractions in sequencing samples, which may contribute to improvements in detection rate and reliability. PMID:26765738

  10. Branched DNA-based Alu quantitative assay for cell-free plasma DNA levels in patients with sepsis or systemic inflammatory response syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hou, Yan-Qiang; Liang, Dong-Yu; Lou, Xiao-Li; Zhang, Mei; Zhang, Zhen-huan; Zhang, Lu-rong

    2016-02-01

    Cell-free circulating DNA (cf-DNA) can be detected by various of laboratory techniques. We described a branched DNA-based Alu assay for measuring cf-DNA in septic patients. Compared to healthy controls and systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) patients, serum cf-DNA levels were significantly higher in septic patients (1426.54 ± 863.79 vs 692.02 ± 703.06 and 69.66 ± 24.66 ng/mL). The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA for normal vs sepsis and SIRS vs sepsis were 0.955 (0.884-1.025), and 0.856 (0.749-0.929), respectively. There was a positive correlation between cf-DNA and interleukin 6 or procalcitonin or Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II. The cf-DNA concentration was higher in intensive care unit nonsurviving patients compared to surviving patients (2183.33 ± 615.26 vs 972.46 ± 648.36 ng/mL; P < .05). Branched DNA-based Alu assays are feasible and useful to quantify serum cf-DNA levels. Increased cf-DNA levels in septic patients might complement C-reactive protein and procalcitonin in a multiple marker format. Cell-free circulating DNA might be a new marker in discrimination of sepsis and SIRS. PMID:26589770

  11. Quick recovery and characterization of cell-free DNA in seminal plasma of normozoospermia and azoospermia: implications for non-invasive genetic utilities.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Gang; Huang, Shi-Yun; Zhou, Hui; Liao, Ai-Hua; Xiong, Cheng-Liang

    2009-11-01

    We established a quick and reliable method for recovering cell-free seminal DNA (cfsDNA), by using the binding-washing-elution procedure on the DNA purification column. Low variations (below 15%) among the triplicate values of cfsDNA quantity verified the reproducibility of our cfsDNA recovery method. Similar cfsDNA yield and size distribution between seminal plasma acquired by filtration and centrifugation confirmed the presence of cfsDNA. To investigate the general characterization of cfsDNA, the quantitation and size distribution of cfsDNA from normozoospermic and azoospermic semen were analyzed by real-time PCR and electrophoresis, respectively. CfsDNA concentration in semen with normozoospermia (n = 11) was 1.34 +/- 0.65 microg mL(-1), whereas a higher cfsDNA concentration was observed in azoospermia (2.56 +/- 1.43 microg mL(-1), n = 9). The continuous distribution of DNA fragments ranging from approximately 1 kb to 15 kb and a spectrum of multiples of 180-bp fragments were observed in each normozoospermic and azoospermic sample. Distinct characteristic DNA ladder fragmentations in some azoospermic samples implicated that cfsDNA originate partly from apoptotic cells. CfsDNAs of 36 selected azoospermic patients with known information of Y chromosome microdeletion were subjected to the same microdeletion analysis by multiplex PCR and PCR amplification of sY114 (1450 bp). All multiplex PCR reactions with cfsDNA amplified successfully and provided the same result as leukocyte DNA. PCR amplification of sY114 gave a 1450-bp amplicon as expected. Our data suggested the potential use of cfsDNA in search of biomarker or diagnostic procedures. PMID:19823179

  12. BRAF Mutation Testing in Cell-Free DNA from the Plasma of Patients with Advanced Cancers Using a Rapid, Automated Molecular Diagnostics System.

    PubMed

    Janku, Filip; Huang, Helen J; Claes, Bart; Falchook, Gerald S; Fu, Siqing; Hong, David; Ramzanali, Nishma M; Nitti, Giovanni; Cabrilo, Goran; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Naing, Aung; Piha-Paul, Sarina A; Wheler, Jennifer J; Karp, Daniel D; Holley, Veronica R; Zinner, Ralph G; Subbiah, Vivek; Luthra, Rajyalakshmi; Kopetz, Scott; Overman, Michael J; Kee, Bryan K; Patel, Sapna; Devogelaere, Benoit; Sablon, Erwin; Maertens, Geert; Mills, Gordon B; Kurzrock, Razelle; Meric-Bernstam, Funda

    2016-06-01

    Cell-free (cf) DNA from plasma offers an easily obtainable material for BRAF mutation analysis for diagnostics and response monitoring. In this study, plasma-derived cfDNA samples from patients with progressing advanced cancers or malignant histiocytosis with known BRAF(V600) status from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tumors were tested using a prototype version of the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test, a fully integrated real-time PCR-based test with turnaround time about 90 minutes. Of 160 patients, BRAF(V600) mutations were detected in 62 (39%) archival FFPE tumor samples and 47 (29%) plasma cfDNA samples. The two methods had overall agreement in 141 patients [88%; κ, 0.74; SE, 0.06; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.63-0.85]. Idylla had a sensitivity of 73% (95% CI, 0.60-0.83) and specificity of 98% (95% CI, 0.93-1.00). A higher percentage, but not concentration, of BRAF(V600) cfDNA in the wild-type background (>2% vs. ≤ 2%) was associated with shorter overall survival (OS; P = 0.005) and in patients with BRAF mutations in the tissue, who were receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors, shorter time to treatment failure (TTF; P = 0.001). Longitudinal monitoring demonstrated that decreasing levels of BRAF(V600) cfDNA were associated with longer TTF (P = 0.045). In conclusion, testing for BRAF(V600) mutations in plasma cfDNA using the Idylla BRAF Mutation Test has acceptable concordance with standard testing of tumor tissue. A higher percentage of mutant BRAF(V600) in cfDNA corresponded with shorter OS and in patients receiving BRAF/MEK inhibitors also with shorter TTF. Mol Cancer Ther; 15(6); 1397-404. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27207774

  13. Circulating Cell Free DNA in the Diagnosis of Trophoblastic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Openshaw, Mark R.; Harvey, Richard A.; Sebire, Neil J.; Kaur, Baljeet; Sarwar, Naveed; Seckl, Michael J.; Fisher, Rosemary A.

    2015-01-01

    Gestational trophoblastic neoplasia (GTN) represents a group of diseases characterized by production of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). Since non-gestational tumors may occasionally secrete hCG, histopathological diagnosis is important for appropriate clinical management. However, a histopathological diagnosis is not always available. We therefore investigated the feasibility of extracting cell free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of women with GTN for use as a “liquid biopsy” in patients without histopathological diagnosis. cfDNA was prepared from the plasma of 20 women with a diagnosis of GTN and five with hCG-secreting tumors of unknown origin. Genotyping of cfDNA from the patient, genomic DNA from her and her partner and DNA from the tumor tissue identified circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) (from 9% to 53% of total cfDNA) in 12 of 20 patients with GTN. In one case without a tissue diagnosis, ctDNA enabled a diagnosis of GTN originating in a non-molar conception and in another a diagnosis of non-gestational tumor, based on the high degree of allelic instability and loss of heterozygosity in the ctDNA. In summary ctDNA can be detected in the plasma of women with GTN and can facilitate the diagnosis of both gestational and non-gestational trophoblastic tumors in cases without histopathological diagnosis. PMID:26981554

  14. Cell-free DNA: Comparison of Technologies.

    PubMed

    Dar, Pe'er; Shani, Hagit; Evans, Mark I

    2016-06-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA screening for Down syndrome has gained rapid acceptance over the past few years with increasing market penetration. Three main laboratory methodologies are currently used: a massive parallel shotgun sequencing (MPSS), a targeted massive parallel sequencing (t-MPS) and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) based approach. Although each of these technologies has its own advantages and disadvantages, the performance of all was shown to be comparable and superior to that of traditional first-trimester screening for the detection of trisomy 21 in a routine prenatal population. Differences in performance were predominantly shown for chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21. Understanding the limitations and benefits of each technology is essential for proper counseling to patients. These technologies, as well as few investigational technologies described in this review, carry a great potential beyond screening for the common aneuploidies. PMID:27235906

  15. High-fidelity target sequencing of individual molecules identified using barcode sequences: de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA from cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Kukita, Yoji; Matoba, Ryo; Uchida, Junji; Hamakawa, Takuya; Doki, Yuichiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kato, Kikuya

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an emerging field of cancer research. However, current ctDNA analysis is usually restricted to one or a few mutation sites due to technical limitations. In the case of massively parallel DNA sequencers, the number of false positives caused by a high read error rate is a major problem. In addition, the final sequence reads do not represent the original DNA population due to the global amplification step during the template preparation. We established a high-fidelity target sequencing system of individual molecules identified in plasma cell-free DNA using barcode sequences; this system consists of the following two steps. (i) A novel target sequencing method that adds barcode sequences by adaptor ligation. This method uses linear amplification to eliminate the errors introduced during the early cycles of polymerase chain reaction. (ii) The monitoring and removal of erroneous barcode tags. This process involves the identification of individual molecules that have been sequenced and for which the number of mutations have been absolute quantitated. Using plasma cell-free DNA from patients with gastric or lung cancer, we demonstrated that the system achieved near complete elimination of false positives and enabled de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA. PMID:26126624

  16. High-fidelity target sequencing of individual molecules identified using barcode sequences: de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA from cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kukita, Yoji; Matoba, Ryo; Uchida, Junji; Hamakawa, Takuya; Doki, Yuichiro; Imamura, Fumio; Kato, Kikuya

    2015-08-01

    Circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) is an emerging field of cancer research. However, current ctDNA analysis is usually restricted to one or a few mutation sites due to technical limitations. In the case of massively parallel DNA sequencers, the number of false positives caused by a high read error rate is a major problem. In addition, the final sequence reads do not represent the original DNA population due to the global amplification step during the template preparation. We established a high-fidelity target sequencing system of individual molecules identified in plasma cell-free DNA using barcode sequences; this system consists of the following two steps. (i) A novel target sequencing method that adds barcode sequences by adaptor ligation. This method uses linear amplification to eliminate the errors introduced during the early cycles of polymerase chain reaction. (ii) The monitoring and removal of erroneous barcode tags. This process involves the identification of individual molecules that have been sequenced and for which the number of mutations have been absolute quantitated. Using plasma cell-free DNA from patients with gastric or lung cancer, we demonstrated that the system achieved near complete elimination of false positives and enabled de novo detection and absolute quantitation of mutations in plasma cell-free DNA. PMID:26126624

  17. Strategies for Implementing Cell-Free DNA Testing.

    PubMed

    Cuckle, Howard

    2016-06-01

    Maternal plasma cell-free (cf) DNA testing has higher discriminatory power for aneuploidy than any conventional multi-marker screening test. Several strategies have been suggested for introducing it into clinical practice. Secondary cfDNA, restricted only to women with positive conventional screening test, is generally cost saving and minimizes the need for invasive prenatal diagnosis but leads to a small loss in detection. Primary cfDNA, replacing conventional screening or retaining the nuchal translucency scan, is not currently cost-effective for third-party payers. Contingent cfDNA, testing about 20% of women with the highest risks based on a conventional test, is the preferred approach. PMID:27235907

  18. Detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma for Down syndrome, Edward syndrome and Patau syndrome of high risk fetus

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Wei-Lin; Zhao, Wei-Hua; Wang, Xin-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The study aimed to validate the efficacy of detection of fetal cell-free DNA in maternal plasma of trisomy 21, 18 and 13 in a clinical setting. Methods: A total of 2340 women at high risk for Down syndrome based on maternal age, prenatal history or a positive sesum or sonographic screening test were offered prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test. According to the prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test, the pregnant women at high risk were offered amniocentesis karyotype analysis and the pregnant at low risk were followed up to make sure the newborn outcome. Results: The prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test was positive for trisomy 21 in 17 cases, for trisomy 18 in 6 cases and for trisomy 13 in 1 case, which of all were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Newborns of low risk gestational woman detected by prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy for trisomy 21, 18, 13 were followed up and no one was found with trisomy. Conclusions: The prenatal noninvasive aneuploidy test is highly accurate for detection of trisomy 21, 18 and 13, which can be considered as a practical alternative for traditional invasive diagnostic procedures. PMID:26309618

  19. Highly Sensitive Droplet Digital PCR Method for Detection of EGFR-Activating Mutations in Plasma Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guanshan; Ye, Xin; Dong, Zhengwei; Lu, Ya Chao; Sun, Yun; Liu, Yi; McCormack, Rose; Gu, Yi; Liu, Xiaoqing

    2015-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutation testing in plasma cell-free DNA from lung cancer patients is an emerging clinical tool. However, compared with tissue testing, the sensitivity of plasma testing is not yet satisfactory because of the highly fragmented nature of plasma cell-free DNA, low fraction of tumor DNA, and limitations of available detection technologies. We therefore developed a highly sensitive and specific droplet digital PCR method for plasma EGFR mutation (exon19 deletions and L858R) testing. Plasma from 86 EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitor-naive lung cancer patients was tested and compared with EGFR mutation status of matched tumor tissues tested by amplification refractory mutation system. By using EGFR mutation-positive cell DNA, we optimized the droplet digital PCR assays to reach 0.04% sensitivity. The plasma testing sensitivity and specificity, compared with the matched tumor tissues tested by amplification refractory mutation system, were 81.82% (95% CI, 59.72%-94.81%) and 98.44% (95% CI, 91.60%-99.96%), respectively, for exon19 deletions, with 94.19% concordance rate (κ = 0.840; 95% CI, 0.704-0.976; P < 0.0001), whereas they were 80.00% (95% CI, 51.91%-95.67%) and 95.77% (95% CI, 88.14%-99.12%), respectively, for L858R, with 93.02% concordance rate (κ = 0.758; 95% CI, 0.571-0.945; P < 0.0001). The reported highly sensitive and specific droplet digital PCR assays for EGFR mutation detection have potential in clinical blood testing. PMID:25769900

  20. Construction of a Sequencing Library from Circulating Cell-Free DNA.

    PubMed

    Fang, Nan; Löffert, Dirk; Akinci-Tolun, Rumeysa; Heitz, Katja; Wolf, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Circulating DNA is cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in serum or plasma that can be used for non-invasive prenatal testing, as well as cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and stratification. High-throughput sequence analysis of the cfDNA with next-generation sequencing technologies has proven to be a highly sensitive and specific method in detecting and characterizing mutations in cancer and other diseases, as well as aneuploidy during pregnancy. This unit describes detailed procedures to extract circulating cfDNA from human serum and plasma and generate sequencing libraries from a wide concentration range of circulating DNA. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27038390

  1. Relationships between Cell-Free DNA and Serum Analytes in First and Second Trimesters of Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Neeta L.; Johnson, Kirby L.; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn; Tighiouart, Hocine; Peter, Inga; Urato, Adam C.; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Circulating cell-free DNA and maternal serum analytes are indicators of fetal and placental condition. Little is known about the relationship of these noninvasive markers to each other, particularly in the first trimester. Our goal was to assess the relationship between first and second trimester cell-free DNA levels and maternal serum screening markers. Methods First and second trimester residual maternal serum samples from 50 women were obtained. First trimester (pregnancy-associated plasma protein A [PAPP-A] and β-hCG), and second trimester serum analytes (β-hCG, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], unconjugated estriol and inhibin A) had been measured at the time of sample receipt. All fetuses were male, as confirmed by birth records. Cell-free DNA was extracted and measured by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using glyceraldehyde phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and DYS1 as markers of total DNA and fetal DNA, respectively. Determination of linear associations between first and second trimester serum markers and cell-free DNA levels using Pearson correlations was performed. Results Statistically significant correlations between first trimester PAPP-A multiples of the median (MoMs) and both total (r=0.36, p=0.016) and fetal (r= 0.41, p=0.006) DNA in the first trimester were observed. There were no significant correlations between first trimester serum hCG or any second trimester serum marker with DNA levels. Conclusions Correlation between serum PAPP-A and first trimester circulating cell-free fetal and total DNA levels is a novel finding. PAPP-A is a glycoprotein of placental origin, and its correlation to cell-free fetal DNA in maternal serum suggests a common tissue origin, through apoptosis of placental cells. However, since PAPP-A and cell-free DNA were only marginally correlated and cell-free DNA can be reliably detected in the first trimester, the addition of cell-free DNA to serum screening strategies may be helpful in

  2. Cell-free DNA screening and sex chromosome aneuploidies.

    PubMed

    Mennuti, Michael T; Chandrasekaran, Suchitra; Khalek, Nahla; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2015-10-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing is increasingly being used to screen pregnant women for fetal aneuploidies. This technology may also identify fetal sex and can be used to screen for sex chromosome aneuploidies (SCAs). Physicians offering this screening will need to be prepared to offer comprehensive prenatal counseling about these disorders to an increasing number of patients. The purpose of this article is to consider the source of information to use for counseling, factors in parental decision-making, and the performance characteristics of cfDNA testing in screening for SCAs. Discordance between ultrasound examination and cfDNA results regarding fetal sex is also discussed. PMID:26088741

  3. Digital PCR analysis of plasma cell-free DNA for non-invasive detection of drug resistance mechanisms in EGFR mutant NSCLC: Correlation with paired tumor samples

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Hidenobu; Azuma, Koichi; Sakai, Kazuko; Kawahara, Akihiko; Yamada, Kazuhiko; Tokito, Takaaki; Okamoto, Isamu; Nishio, Kazuto; Hoshino, Tomoaki

    2015-01-01

    As the development of resistance to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has become an issue of concern, identification of the mechanisms responsible has become an urgent priority. However, for research purposes, it is not easy to obtain tumor samples from patients with EGFR mutation-positive non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) that has relapsed after treatment with EGFR-TKIs. Here, using digital PCR assay as an alternative and noninvasive method, we examined plasma and tumor samples from patients with relapsed NSCLC to establish the inter-relationships existing among T790M mutation, activating EGFR mutations, HER2 amplification, and MET amplification. Paired samples of tumor and blood were obtained from a total of 18 patients with NSCLC after they had developed resistance to EGFR-TKI treatment, and the mechanisms of resistance were analyzed by digital PCR. Digital PCR analysis of T790M mutation in plasma had a sensitivity of 81.8% and specificity of 85.7%, the overall concordance between plasma and tissue samples being 83.3%. MET gene copy number gain in tumor DNA was observed by digital PCR in three patients, of whom one exhibited positivity for MET amplification by FISH, whereas no patient demonstrated MET and HER2 copy number gain in plasma DNA. Digital PCR analysis of plasma is feasible and accurate for detection of T790M mutation in NSCLC that becomes resistant to treatment with EGFR-TKIs. PMID:26334838

  4. Use of cell free DNA in breast oncology.

    PubMed

    Canzoniero, Jenna VanLiere; Park, Ben Ho

    2016-04-01

    Cell free DNA (cfDNA) are short fragments of nucleic acids present in circulation outside of cells. In patients with cancer, some portion of cfDNA is derived from tumor cells, termed circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA), and contains the same mutations and genetic changes as the cancer. The development of new, more effective methods to detect these changes has led to increased interest in developing ctDNA as a biomarker for cancer. Here we will review current literature on the use of ctDNA, with an emphasis on breast cancer, for cancer detection, prognosis, monitoring response to therapy, and tracking the rise of new mutant subclones. PMID:27012505

  5. Implementing Prenatal Diagnosis Based on Cell-Free Fetal DNA: Accurate Identification of Factors Affecting Fetal DNA Yield

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Angela N.; Zimmermann, Bernhard G.; Wang, Darrell; Holloway, Andrew; Chitty, Lyn S.

    2011-01-01

    Objective Cell-free fetal DNA is a source of fetal genetic material that can be used for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. Usually constituting less than 10% of the total cell free DNA in maternal plasma, the majority is maternal in origin. Optimizing conditions for maximizing yield of cell-free fetal DNA will be crucial for effective implementation of testing. We explore factors influencing yield of fetal DNA from maternal blood samples, including assessment of collection tubes containing cell-stabilizing agents, storage temperature, interval to sample processing and DNA extraction method used. Methods Microfluidic digital PCR was performed to precisely quantify male (fetal) DNA, total DNA and long DNA fragments (indicative of maternal cellular DNA). Real-time qPCR was used to assay for the presence of male SRY signal in samples. Results Total cell-free DNA quantity increased significantly with time in samples stored in K3EDTA tubes, but only minimally in cell stabilizing tubes. This increase was solely due to the presence of additional long fragment DNA, with no change in quantity of fetal or short DNA, resulting in a significant decrease in proportion of cell-free fetal DNA over time. Storage at 4°C did not prevent these changes. Conclusion When samples can be processed within eight hours of blood draw, K3EDTA tubes can be used. Prolonged transfer times in K3EDTA tubes should be avoided as the proportion of fetal DNA present decreases significantly; in these situations the use of cell stabilising tubes is preferable. The DNA extraction kit used may influence success rate of diagnostic tests. PMID:21998643

  6. Monitoring of organ transplants through genomic analyses of circulating cell-free DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vlaminck, Iwijn

    Solid-organ transplantation is the preferred treatment for patients with end-stage organ diseases, but complications due to infection and acute rejection undermine its long-term benefits. While clinicians strive to carefully monitor transplant patients, diagnostic options are currently limited. My colleagues and I in the lab of Stephen Quake have found that a combination of next-generation sequencing with a phenomenon called circulating cell-free DNA enables non-invasive diagnosis of both infection and rejection in transplantation. A substantial amount of small fragments of cell-free DNA circulate in blood that are the debris of dead cells. We discovered that donor specific DNA is released in circulation during injury to the transplant organ and we show that the proportion of donor DNA in plasma is predictive of acute rejection in heart and lung transplantation. We profiled viral and bacterial DNA sequences in plasma of transplant patients and discovered that the relative representation of different viruses and bacteria is informative of immunosuppression. This discovery suggested a novel biological measure of a person's immune strength, a finding that we have more recently confirmed via B-cell repertoire sequencing. Lastly, our studies highlight applications of shotgun sequencing of cell-free DNA in the broad, hypothesis free diagnosis of infection.

  7. #36: Prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA.

    PubMed

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in technology have created exciting opportunities to expand and improve genetic testing options that are available to women during pregnancy. However, the novelty and complexity of these technologies, combined with the commercial interest to implement these tests rapidly into routine clinical care, have created challenges for physicians and patients and potentially will lead to misunderstanding, misuse, and unintended consequences. The purpose of this document was to aid clinicians in their day-to-day practice of counseling patients regarding prenatal aneuploidy testing options with cell-free DNA screening, which includes how it compares to current testing methods, potential benefits and harms, and its limitations and caveats. PMID:25813012

  8. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in cancer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Zhen; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Zhou, Cuiqi; Tong, Yunguang; Liang, Jimin

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a common cause of death worldwide. Despite significant advances in cancer treatments, the morbidity and mortality are still enormous. Tumor heterogeneity, especially intratumoral heterogeneity, is a significant reason underlying difficulties in tumor treatment and failure of a number of current therapeutic modalities, even of molecularly targeted therapies. The development of a virtually noninvasive "liquid biopsy" from the blood has been attempted to characterize tumor heterogeneity. This review focuses on cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the bloodstream as a versatile biomarker. ctDNA analysis is an evolving field with many new methods being developed and optimized to be able to successfully extract and analyze ctDNA, which has vast clinical applications. ctDNA has the potential to accurately genotype the tumor and identify personalized genetic and epigenetic alterations of the entire tumor. In addition, ctDNA has the potential to accurately monitor tumor burden and treatment response, while also being able to monitor minimal residual disease, reducing the need for harmful adjuvant chemotherapy and allowing more rapid detection of relapse. There are still many challenges that need to be overcome prior to this biomarker getting wide adoption in the clinical world, including optimization, standardization, and large multicenter trials. PMID:27056366

  9. Quantitative analysis of cell-free DNA in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    SHAO, XUEFENG; He, YAN; JI, MIN; CHEN, XIAOFANG; QI, JING; SHI, WEI; HAO, TIANBO; JU, SHAOQING

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) levels and clinicopathological characteristics of patients with ovarian cancer using a branched DNA (bDNA) technique, and to determine the value of quantitative cf-DNA detection in assisting with the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Serum specimens were collected from 36 patients with ovarian cancer on days 1, 3 and 7 following surgery, and additional serum samples were also collected from 22 benign ovarian tumor cases, and 19 healthy, non-cancerous ovaries. bDNA techniques were used to detect serum cf-DNA concentrations. All data were analyzed using SPSS version 18.0. The cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in the ovarian cancer group compared with those of the benign ovarian tumor group and healthy ovarian group (P<0.01). Furthermore, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased in stage III and IV ovarian cancer compared with those of stages I and II (P<0.01). In addition, cf-DNA levels were significantly increased on the first day post-surgery (P<0.01), and subsequently demonstrated a gradual decrease. In the ovarian cancer group, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of cf-DNA and the sensitivity were 0.917 and 88.9%, respectively, which was higher than those of cancer antigen 125 (0.724, 75%) and human epididymis protein 4 (0.743, 80.6%). There was a correlation between the levels of serum cf-DNA and the occurrence and development of ovarian cancer in the patients evaluated. bDNA techniques possessed higher sensitivity and specificity than other methods for the detection of serum cf-DNA in patients exhibiting ovarian cancer, and bDNA techniques are more useful for detecting cf-DNA than other factors. Thus, the present study demonstrated the potential value for the use of bDNA as an adjuvant diagnostic method for ovarian cancer. PMID:26788153

  10. False Negative Cell-Free DNA Screening Result in a Newborn with Trisomy 13

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Yang; Hoppman, Nicole L.; Kerr, Sarah E.; Sattler, Christopher A.; Borowski, Kristi S.; Wick, Myra J.; Highsmith, W. Edward; Aypar, Umut

    2016-01-01

    Background. Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) is revolutionizing prenatal screening as a result of its increased sensitivity, specificity. NIPS analyzes cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) circulating in maternal plasma to detect fetal chromosome abnormalities. However, cffDNA originates from apoptotic placental trophoblast; therefore cffDNA is not always representative of the fetus. Although the published data for NIPS testing states that the current technique ensures high sensitivity and specificity for aneuploidy detection, false positives are possible due to isolated placental mosaicism, vanishing twin or cotwin demise, and maternal chromosome abnormalities or malignancy. Results. We report a case of false negative cell-free DNA (cfDNA) screening due to fetoplacental mosaicism. An infant male with negative cfDNA screening result was born with multiple congenital abnormalities. Postnatal chromosome and FISH studies on a blood specimen revealed trisomy 13 in 20/20 metaphases and 100% interphase nuclei, respectively. FISH analysis on tissues collected after delivery revealed extraembryonic mosaicism. Conclusions. Extraembryonic tissue mosaicism is likely responsible for the false negative cfDNA screening result. This case illustrates that a negative result does not rule out the possibility of a fetus affected with a trisomy, as cffDNA is derived from the placenta and therefore may not accurately represent the fetal genetic information. PMID:26998368

  11. The Long and Short of Circulating Cell-Free DNA and the Ins and Outs of Molecular Diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Peiyong; Lo, Y M Dennis

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of cell-free tumor and fetal DNA molecules in the plasma of cancer patients and pregnant women, respectively, has opened up exciting opportunities in molecular diagnosis. The understanding of the biological properties of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) molecules would be essential for us to make the best use of such molecules in different clinical settings. In this review we start by exploring the technologies that have been used for analyzing the size profiles of cfDNA in plasma. We then review the size profiles of cfDNA in different clinical scenarios, including cancer, pregnancy, transplantation, and autoimmune diseases. Finally, we discuss the potential diagnostic applications of plasma DNA size profiling. PMID:27129983

  12. Non-random fragmentation patterns in circulating cell-free DNA reflect epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background The assessment of cell-free circulating DNA fragments, also known as a "liquid biopsy" of the patient's plasma, is an important source for the discovery and subsequent non-invasive monitoring of cancer and other pathological conditions. Although the nucleosome-guided fragmentation patterns of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have not yet been studied in detail, non-random representation of cfDNA sequencies may reflect chromatin features in the tissue of origin at gene-regulation level. Results In this study, we investigated the association between epigenetic landscapes of human tissues evident in the patterns of cfDNA in plasma by deep sequencing of human cfDNA samples. We have demonstrated that baseline characteristics of cfDNA fragmentation pattern are in concordance with the ones corresponding to cell lines-derived. To identify the loci differentially represented in cfDNA fragment, we mapped the transcription start sites within the sequenced cfDNA fragments and tested for association of these genomic coordinates with the relative strength and the patterns of gene expressions. Preselected sets of house-keeping and tissue specific genes were used as models for actively expressed and silenced genes. Developed measure of gene regulation was able to differentiate these two sets based on sequencing coverage near gene transcription start site. Conclusion Experimental outcomes suggest that cfDNA retains characteristics previously noted in genome-wide analysis of chromatin structure, in particular, in MNase-seq assays. Thus far the analysis of the DNA fragmentation pattern may aid further developing of cfDNA based biomarkers for a variety of human conditions. PMID:26693644

  13. Utility of KRAS mutation detection using circulating cell-free DNA from patients with colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Takeshi; Iwai, Takuma; Takahashi, Goro; Kan, Hayato; Koizumi, Michihiro; Matsuda, Akihisa; Shinji, Seiichi; Yamagishi, Aya; Yokoyama, Yasuyuki; Tatsuguchi, Atsushi; Kawagoe, Tatsuro; Kitano, Shiro; Nakayama, Masato; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Uchida, Eiji

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we evaluated the clinical utility of detecting KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free (ccf)DNA of metastatic colorectal cancer patients. We prospectively recruited 94 metastatic colorectal cancer patients. Circulating cell-free DNA was extracted from plasma samples and analyzed for the presence of seven KRAS point mutations. Using the Invader Plus assay with peptide nucleic acid clamping method and digital PCR, KRAS mutations were detected in the ccfDNA in 35 of 39 patients previously determined to have primary tumors containing KRAS mutations using the Luminex method, and in 5 of 55 patients with tumors containing wild-type KRAS. Curative resection was undertaken in 7 of 34 patients with primary and ccfDNA KRAS mutations, resulting in the disappearance of the mutation from the cell-free DNA in five of seven patients. Three of these patients had tumor recurrence and KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA reappeared. Epidermal growth factor receptor blockade was administered to 24 of the KRAS tumor wild-type patients. Of the 24 patients with wild-type KRAS in their primary tumors, three patients had KRAS mutations in their ccfDNA and did not respond to treatment with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) blockade. We also detected a new KRAS mutation in five patients during chemotherapy with EGFR blockade, before disease progression was detectable with imaging. The detection of KRAS mutations in ccfDNA is an attractive approach for predicting both treatment response and acquired resistance to EGFR blockade, and for detecting disease recurrence. PMID:27116474

  14. Quantification of Cell-Free DNA in Normal and Complicated Pregnancies: Overcoming Biological and Technical Issues

    PubMed Central

    Manokhina, Irina; Singh, Tanjot K.; Peñaherrera, Maria S.; Robinson, Wendy P.

    2014-01-01

    The characterization of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) originating from placental trophoblast in maternal plasma provides a powerful tool for non-invasive diagnosis of fetal and obstetrical complications. Due to its placental origin, the specific epigenetic features of this DNA (commonly known as cell-free fetal DNA) can be utilized in creating universal ‘fetal’ markers in maternal plasma, thus overcoming the limitations of gender- or rhesus-specific ones. The goal of this study was to compare the performance of relevant approaches and assays evaluating the amount of cfDNA in maternal plasma throughout gestation (7.2–39.5 weeks). Two fetal- or placental- specific duplex assays (RPP30/SRY and RASSF1A/β-Actin) were applied using two technologies, real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and droplet digital PCR (ddPCR). Both methods revealed similar performance parameters within the studied dynamic range. Data obtained using qPCR and ddPCR for these assays were positively correlated (total cfDNA (RPP30): R = 0.57, p = 0.001/placental cfDNA (SRY): R = 0.85, p<0.0001; placental cfDNA (RASSF1A): R = 0.75, p<0.0001). There was a significant correlation in SRY and RASSF1A results measured with qPCR (R = 0.68, p = 0.013) and ddPCR (R = 0.56, p = 0.039). Different approaches also gave comparable results with regard to the correlation of the placental cfDNA concentration with gestational age and pathological outcome. We conclude that ddPCR is a practical approach, adaptable to existing qPCR assays and well suited for analysis of cell-free DNA in plasma. However, it may need further optimization to surpass the performance of qPCR. PMID:24987984

  15. A novel Alu-based real-time PCR method for the quantitative detection of plasma circulating cell-free DNA: Sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    LOU, XIAOLI; HOU, YANQIANG; LIANG, DONGYU; PENG, LIANG; CHEN, HONGWEI; MA, SHANYUAN; ZHANG, LURONG

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we aimed to develop and validate a rapid and sensitive, Alu-based real-time PCR method for the detection of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA). This method targeted repetitive elements of the Alu reduplicative elements in the human genome, followed by signal amplification using fluorescence quantification. Standard Alu-puc57 vectors were constructed and 5 pairs of specific primers were designed. Valuation was conducted concerning linearity, variation and recovery. We found 5 linear responses (R1–5=0.998–0.999). The average intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variance were 12.98 and 10.75%, respectively. The recovery was 82.33–114.01%, with a mean recovery index of 101.26%. This Alu-based assay was reliable, accurate and sensitive for the quantitative detection of cfDNA. Plasma from normal controls and patients with myocardial infarction (MI) were analyzed, and the baseline levels of cfDNA were higher in the MI group. The area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve for Alu1, Alu2, Alu3, Alu4, Alu5 and Alu (Alu1 + Alu2 + Alu3 + Alu4 + Alu5) was 0.887, 0.758, 0.857, 0.940, 0.968 and 0.933, respectively. The optimal cut-off value for Alu1, Alu2, Alu3, Alu4, Alu5 and Alu to predict MI was 3.71, 1.93, 0.22, 3.73, 6.13 and 6.40 log copies/ml. We demonstrate that this new method is a reliable, accurate and sensitive method for the quantitative detection of cfDNA and that it is useful for studying the regulation of cfDNA in certain pathological conditions. Alu4, Alu5 and Alu showed better sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of MI compared with cardiac troponin I (cTnI), creatine kinase MB (CK-MB) isoenzyme and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH). Alu5 had the best prognostic ability. PMID:25374065

  16. Circulating Cell-Free DNA Enables Noninvasive Diagnosis of Heart Transplant Rejection

    PubMed Central

    De Vlaminck, Iwijn; Valantine, Hannah A.; Snyder, Thomas M.; Strehl, Calvin; Cohen, Garrett; Luikart, Helen; Neff, Norma F.; Okamoto, Jennifer; Bernstein, Daniel; Weisshaar, Dana; Quake, Stephen R.; Khush, Kiran K.

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring allograft health is an important component of posttransplant therapy. Endomyocardial biopsy is the current gold standard for cardiac allograft monitoring but is an expensive and invasive procedure. Proof of principle of a universal, noninvasive diagnostic method based on high-throughput screening of circulating cell-free donor-derived DNA (cfdDNA) was recently demonstrated in a small retrospective cohort. We present the results of a prospective cohort study (65 patients, 565 samples) that tested the utility of cfdDNA in measuring acute rejection after heart transplantation. Circulating cell-free DNA was purified from plasma and sequenced (mean depth, 1.2 giga–base pairs) to quantify the fraction of cfdDNA. Through a comparison with endomyocardial biopsy results, we demonstrate that cfdDNA enables diagnosis of acute rejection after heart transplantation, with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of 0.83 and sensitivity and specificity that are comparable to the intrinsic performance of the biopsy itself. This noninvasive genome transplant dynamics approach is a powerful and informative method for routine monitoring of allograft health without incurring the risk, discomfort, and expense of an invasive biopsy. PMID:24944192

  17. Circulating Cell-Free Tumour DNA in the Management of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Glenn; Stein, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    With the development of new sensitive molecular techniques, circulating cell-free tumour DNA containing mutations can be identified in the plasma of cancer patients. The applications of this technology may result in significant changes to the care and management of cancer patients. Whilst, currently, these “liquid biopsies” are used to supplement the histological diagnosis of cancer and metastatic disease, in the future these assays may replace the need for invasive procedures. Applications include the monitoring of tumour burden, the monitoring of minimal residual disease, monitoring of tumour heterogeneity, monitoring of molecular resistance and early diagnosis of tumours and metastatic disease. PMID:26101870

  18. Noninvasive Fetal Sex Determination Using Cell-Free Fetal DNA

    PubMed Central

    Devaney, Stephanie A.; Palomaki, Glenn E.; Scott, Joan A.; Bianchi, Diana W.

    2015-01-01

    Context Noninvasive prenatal determination of fetal sex using cell-free fetal DNA provides an alternative to invasive techniques for some heritable disorders. In some countries this testing has transitioned to clinical care, despite the absence of a formal assessment of performance. Objective To document overall test performance of noninvasive fetal sex determination using cell-free fetal DNA and to identify variables that affect performance. Data Sources Systematic review and meta-analysis with search of PubMed (January 1, 1997–April 17, 2011) to identify English-language human studies reporting primary data. References from review articles were also searched. Study Selection and Data Extraction Abstracts were read independently to identify studies reporting primary data suitable for analysis. Covariates included publication year, sample type, DNA amplification methodology, Y chromosome sequence, and gestational age. Data were independently extracted by 2 reviewers. Results From 57 selected studies, 80 data sets (representing 3524 male-bearing pregnancies and 3017 female-bearing pregnancies) were analyzed. Overall performance of the test to detect Y chromosome sequences had the following characteristics: sensitivity, 95.4% (95% confidence interval [CI], 94.7%–96.1%) and specificity, 98.6% (95% CI, 98.1%–99.0%); diagnostic odds ratio (OR), 885; positive predictive value, 98.8%; negative predictive value, 94.8%; area under curve (AUC), 0.993 (95% CI, 0.989–0.995), with significant interstudy heterogeneity. DNA methodology and gestational age had the largest effects on test performance. Methodology test characteristics were AUC, 0.988 (95% CI, 0.979–0.993) for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and AUC, 0.996 (95% CI, 0.993–0.998) for real-time quantitative PCR (RTQ-PCR) (P=.02). Gestational age test characteristics were AUC, 0.989 (95% CI, 0.965–0.998) (<7 weeks); AUC, 0.994 (95% CI, 0.987–0.997) (7–12 weeks); AUC, 0.992 (95% CI, 0.983–0.996) (13

  19. Evaluation of a Modified DNA Extraction Method for Isolation of Cell-Free Fetal DNA from Maternal Serum

    PubMed Central

    Keshavarz, Zeinab; Moezzi, Leili; Ranjbaran, Reza; Aboualizadeh, Farzaneh; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Abdullahi, Masooma; Sharifzadeh, Sedigheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Discovery of short cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) fragments in maternal plasma has created major changes in the field of prenatal diagnosis. The use of cffDNA to set up noninvasive prenatal test is limited due to the low concentration of fetal DNA in maternal plasma therefore, employing a high efficiency extraction method leads to more accurate results. The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficiency of Triton/Heat/Phenol (THP) protocol in comparison with the QIAamp DNA Blood mini Kit for cffDNA purification. Methods: In order to evaluate the efficiency of THP protocol, DNA of Rhesus D (RhD) negative pregnant women's plasma was collected, then real-time PCR for RHD exon 7 was performed. The Ct value data of real time PCR obtained by two different methods were compared and after delivery serology test on cord blood was done to validate the real time PCR results. Results: The results indicated significant differences between two extraction methods (p=0.001). The mean±SD of Ct-value using THP protocol was 33.8±1.6 and 36.1±2.47 using QIAamp DNA Blood mini Kit. Conclusion: Our finding demonstrated that THP protocol was more effective than the QIAamp DNA Blood mini Kits for cffDNA extraction and lead to decrease the false negative results. PMID:26140187

  20. Methylation of cell-free circulating DNA in the diagnosis of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Warton, Kristina; Samimi, Goli

    2015-01-01

    A range of molecular alterations found in tumor cells, such as DNA mutations and DNA methylation, is reflected in cell-free circulating DNA (circDNA) released from the tumor into the blood, thereby making circDNA an ideal candidate for the basis of a blood-based cancer diagnosis test. In many cancer types, mutations driving tumor development and progression are present in a wide range of oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. However, even when a gene is consistently mutated in a particular cancer, the mutations can be spread over very large regions of its sequence, making evaluation difficult. This diversity of sequence changes in tumor DNA presents a challenge for the development of blood tests based on DNA mutations for cancer diagnosis. Unlike mutations, DNA methylation that can be consistently measured, as it tends to occur in specific regions of the DNA called CpG islands. Since DNA methylation is reflected within circDNA, detection of tumor-specific DNA methylation in patient plasma is a feasible approach for the development of a blood-based test. Aberrant circDNA methylation has been described in most cancer types and is actively being investigated for clinical applications. A commercial blood test for colorectal cancer based on the methylation of the SEPT9 promoter region in circDNA is under review for approval by the Federal Drug Administration (FDA) for clinical use. In this paper, we review the state of research in circDNA methylation as an application for blood-based diagnostic tests in colorectal, breast, lung, pancreatic and ovarian cancers, and we consider some of the future directions and challenges in this field. There are a number of potential circDNA biomarkers currently under investigation, and experience with SEPT9 shows that the time to clinical translation can be relatively rapid, supporting the promise of circDNA as a biomarker. PMID:25988180

  1. Modifying Risk of Aneuploidy with a Positive Cell-Free Fetal DNA Result.

    PubMed

    Long, A Ashleigh; Abuhamad, Alfred Z; Warsof, Steven L

    2016-06-01

    Noninvasive genomic assessments of the fetus while in utero have been made possible by the analysis of cell-free fetal DNA fragments from the serum of pregnant women, as part of a noninvasive prenatal testing screening strategy. Between 7% and 10% of total cell-free DNA in the maternal blood comes from placental trophoblasts, allowing for identification of the DNA associated with the fetal component of the placenta. Using simple venipuncture in the outpatient setting, this cell-free, extracellular fetal DNA can be isolated in the maternal serum from a single blood draw as early as the seventh week of gestation. PMID:27235910

  2. Quantification of Somatic Chromosomal Rearrangements in Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Faye R.; Kovtun, Irina V.; Smadbeck, James; Multinu, Francesco; Jatoi, Aminah; Kosari, Farhad; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Murphy, Stephen J.; Halling, Geoffrey C.; Johnson, Sarah H.; Liu, Minetta C.; Mariani, Andrea; Vasmatzis, George

    2016-01-01

    Recently, the use of a liquid biopsy has shown promise in monitoring tumor burden. While point mutations have been extensively studied, chromosomal rearrangements have demonstrated greater tumor specificity. Such rearrangements can be identified in the tumor and subsequently detected in the plasma of patients using quantitative PCR (qPCR). In this study we used a whole-genome mate-pair protocol to characterize a landscape of genomic rearrangements in the primary tumors of ten ovarian cancer patients. Individualized tumor-specific primer panels of aberrant chromosomal junctions were identified for each case and detected by qPCR within the cell-free DNA. Selected chromosomal junctions were detected in pre-surgically drawn blood in eight of the ten patients. Of these eight, three demonstrated the continued presence of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) post-surgery, consistent with their documented presence of disease, and in five ctDNA was undetectable in the post-surgical blood collection, consistent with their lack of detectable disease. The ctDNA fraction was calculated using a novel algorithm designed for the unique challenges of quantifying ctDNA using qPCR to allow observations of real-time tumor dynamics. In summary, a panel of individualized junctions derived from tumor DNA could be an effective way to monitor cancer patients for relapse and therapeutic efficacy using cfDNA. PMID:27436510

  3. Tumor-Related Methylated Cell-Free DNA and Circulating Tumor Cells in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Salvianti, Francesca; Orlando, Claudio; Massi, Daniela; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Grazzini, Marta; Pazzagli, Mario; Pinzani, Pamela

    2016-01-01

    Solid tumor release into the circulation cell-free DNA (cfDNA) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which represent promising biomarkers for cancer diagnosis. Circulating tumor DNA may be studied in plasma from cancer patients by detecting tumor specific alterations, such as genetic or epigenetic modifications. Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) is a tumor suppressor gene silenced by promoter hypermethylation in a variety of human cancers including melanoma. The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic performance of a tumor-related methylated cfDNA marker in melanoma patients and to compare this parameter with the presence of CTCs. RASSF1A promoter methylation was quantified in cfDNA by qPCR in a consecutive series of 84 melanoma patients and 68 healthy controls. In a subset of 68 cases, the presence of CTCs was assessed by a filtration method (Isolation by Size of Epithelial Tumor Cells, ISET) as well as by an indirect method based on the detection of tyrosinase mRNA by RT-qPCR. The distribution of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA was investigated in cases and controls and the predictive capability of this parameter was assessed by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC). The percentage of cases with methylated RASSF1A promoter in cfDNA was significantly higher in each class of melanoma patients (in situ, invasive and metastatic) than in healthy subjects (Pearson chi-squared test, p < 0.001). The concentration of RASSF1A methylated cfDNA in the subjects with a detectable quantity of methylated alleles was significantly higher in melanoma patients than in controls. The biomarker showed a good predictive capability (in terms of AUC) in discriminating between melanoma patients and healthy controls. This epigenetic marker associated to cfDNA did not show a significant correlation with the presence of CTCs, but, when the two parameters are jointly considered, we obtain a higher sensitivity of the detection of positive cases in invasive and

  4. Value of urinary topoisomerase-IIA cell-free DNA for diagnosis of bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ye-Hwan; Yan, Chunri; Lee, Il-Seok; Piao, Xuan-Mei; Byun, Young Joon; Jeong, Pildu; Kim, Won Tae; Yun, Seok-Joong

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Topoisomerase-II alpha (TopoIIA ), a DNA gyrase isoform that plays an important role in the cell cycle, is present in normal tissues and various human cancers, and can show altered expression in both. The aim of the current study was to examine the value of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA as a noninvasive diagnosis of bladder cancer (BC). Materials and Methods Two patient cohorts were examined. Cohort 1 (73 BC patients and seven controls) provided bladder tissue samples, whereas cohort 2 (83 BC patients, 54 nonmalignant hematuric patients, and 61 normal controls) provided urine samples. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction was used to measure expression of TopoIIA mRNA in tissues and TopoIIA cell-free DNA in urine samples. Results The results showed that expression of TopoIIA mRNA in BC tissues was significantly higher than that in noncancer control tissues (p<0.001). The expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA in BC patients was also significantly higher than that in noncancer patient controls and hematuria patients (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). High expression of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA was also detected in muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) when compared with nonmuscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (p=0.002). Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was performed to examine the sensitivity/specificity of urinary TopoIIA cell-free DNA for diagnosing BC, NMIBC, and MIBC. The areas under the ROC curve for BC, NMIBC, and MIBC were 0.741, 0.701, and 0.838, respectively. Conclusions In summary, the results of this study provide evidence that cell-free TopoIIA DNA may be a potential biomarker for BC. PMID:26981592

  5. Adjustments to the preanalytical phase of quantitative cell-free DNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bronkhorst, Abel Jacobus; Aucamp, Janine; Pretorius, Piet J.

    2015-01-01

    Evaluating the kinetics of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in the blood of cancer patients could be a strong auxiliary component to the molecular characterization of cfDNA, but its potential clinical significance is obscured by the absence of an analytical consensus. To utilize quantitative cfDNA assessment with confidence, it is crucial that the preanalytical phase is standardized. In a previous publication, several preanalytical variables that may affect quantitative measurements of cfDNA were identified, and the most confounding variables were assessed further using the growth medium of cultured cancer cells as a source of cfDNA (“Cell-free DNA: Preanalytical variables” [1]). The data accompanying this report relates to these experiments, which includes numerous changes to the sample handling and isolation protocols, and can be used for the interpretation of these results and other similar experiments by different researchers. PMID:26862578

  6. Cell-free DNA for diagnosing myocardial infarction: not ready for prime time.

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian; Cervellin, Gianfranco

    2015-11-01

    A modest amount of cell-free DNA is constantly present in human blood, originating from programmed cell death, apoptosis and rupture of blood cells or pathogens. Acute or chronic cell injury contributes to enhance the pool of circulating nucleic acids, so that their assessment may be regarded as an appealing perspective for diagnosing myocardial ischemia. We performed a search in Medline, Web of Science and Scopus to identify clinical studies that investigated the concentration of cell-free DNA in patients with myocardial ischemia. Overall, eight case-control studies could be detected and reviewed. Although the concentration of cell-free DNA was found to be higher in the diseased than in the healthy population, the scenario was inconclusive due to the fact that the overall number of subjects studied was modest, the populations were unclearly defined, cases and controls were not adequately matched, the methodology for measuring the reference cardiac biomarkers was inadequately described, and the diagnostic performance of cell-free DNA was not benchmarked against highly sensitive troponin immunoassays. Several biological and technical hurdles were also identified in cell-free DNA testing, including the lack of specificity and unsuitable kinetics for early diagnosis of myocardial ischemia, the long turnaround time and low throughput, the need for specialized instrumentation and dedicated personnel, the lack of standardization or harmonization of analytical techniques, the incremental costs and the high vulnerability to preanalytical variables. Hence it seems reasonable to conclude that the analysis of cell-free DNA is not ready for prime time in diagnostics of myocardial ischemia. PMID:25883207

  7. Cell-free fetal DNA in amniotic fluid supernatant for prenatal diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Soltani, M; Nemati, M; Maralani, M; Estiar, M A; Andalib, S; Fardiazar, Z; Sakhinia, E

    2016-01-01

    In widespread conviction, amniotic fluid is utilized for prenatal diagnosis. Amniotic fluid supernatant is usually discarded, notwithstanding being a good source of fetal DNA. The aim of the present study was to assess cell-free fetal DNA extracted from amniotic fluid supernatant for application in prenatal diagnosis such as gender determination and early diagnosis of β-thalassemia. Samples of amniotic fluid of 70 pregnant women were collected and went through routine tests along with tests for cell-free fetal DNA from amniotic fluid supernatant. The DNA in the amniotic fluid supernatant was extracted and analyzed for gender determination by PCR and Real-time PCR. ARMS-PCR was applied to test early diagnosis of IVS II-I mutation (common β-thalassemia mutation) and E7V mutation for sickle cell anemia using DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant. Using the cell-free fetal DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant, the sensitivity of PCR and Real-time PCR for gender detection was compared with the routine cytogenetic method. The fetus tested for sickle cell anemia and β-thalassemia was observed to be healthy but heterozygous for IVS II-I mutation. The findings indicated that cell-free fetal DNA from amniotic fluid supernatant can be a good source of fetal DNA and be used in early prenatal diagnosis since because of its fast and accurate application. Therefore, it would be suggested that the amniotic fluid supernatant's disposal is prevented because if the tests needs to be repeated, cell-free fetal DNA extracted from the amniotic fluid supernatant can be used as an alternative source for prenatal diagnosis. PMID:27188728

  8. Maternal Cell free DNA based screening for fetal microdeletion and the importance of careful diagnostic follow up

    PubMed Central

    Yatsenko, Svetlana A.; Peters, David; Saller, Devereux; Chu, Tianjiao; Clemens, Michelle; Rajkovic, Aleksandar

    2014-01-01

    Background Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) by next-generation sequencing of cell free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal plasma is used to screen for common aneuploidies such as trisomy 21, in high risk pregnancies. NIPS can identify fetal genomic microdeletions, however sensitivity and specificity have not been systematically evaluated. Commercial companies have begun to offer expanded panels including screening for common microdeletion syndromes such as 22q11.2 deletion (DiGeorge syndrome) without reporting the genomic coordinates or whether the deletion is maternal or fetal. Here we describe a phenotypically normal mother and fetus that tested positive for atypical 22q deletion via maternal plasma cell free DNA testing. Methods We performed cfDNA sequencing on saved maternal plasma obtained at 11 weeks of gestation from a phenotypically normal woman with a singleton pregnancy whose earlier screening at a commercial laboratory was reported to be positive for a 22q11.2 microdeletion. FISH and chromosomal microarray diagnostic genetic tests were done postnatally. Conclusion NIPS detected a 22q microdeletion that upon diagnostic work up, did not include the DiGeorge critical region. Diagnostic prenatal or postnatal testing with chromosomal microarray and appropriate parental studies to determine precise genomic coordinates and inheritance should follow a positive microdeletion NIPS result. PMID:25569438

  9. Circulating cell-free DNA: an up-coming molecular marker in exercise physiology.

    PubMed

    Breitbach, Sarah; Tug, Suzan; Simon, Perikles

    2012-07-01

    The phenomenon of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) concentrations is of importance for many biomedical disciplines including the field of exercise physiology. Increases of cfDNA due to exercise are described to be a potential hallmark for the overtraining syndrome and might be related to, or trigger adaptations of, immune function induced by strenuous exercise. At the same time, exercise provides a practicable model for studying the phenomenon of cfDNA that is described to be of pathophysiological relevance for different topics in clinical medicine like autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review, we are summarizing the current knowledge of exercise-based acute and chronic alterations in cfDNA levels and their physiological significance. The effects of acute exercise on cfDNA concentrations have been investigated in resistance exercises and in continuous, stepwise and interval endurance exercises of different durations. cfDNA concentrations peaked immediately after acute exercise and showed a rapid return to baseline levels. Typical markers of skeletal muscle damage (creatine kinase, uric acid, C-reactive protein) show delayed kinetics compared with the cfDNA peak response. Exercise parameters such as intensity, duration or average energy expenditure do not explain the extent of increasing cfDNA concentrations after strenuous exercise. This could be due to complex processes inside the human organism during and after physical activity. Therefore, we hypothesize composite effects of different physiological stress parameters that come along with exercise to be responsible for increasing cfDNA concentrations. We suggest that due to acute stress, cfDNA levels increase rapidly by a spontaneous active or passive release mechanism that is not yet known. As a result of the rapid and parallel increase of cfDNA and lactate in an incremental treadmill test leading to exhaustion within 15-20 minutes, it is unlikely that cfDNA is released into the plasma by typical necrosis

  10. SMFM Statement: clarification of recommendations regarding cell-free DNA aneuploidy screening.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this statement is to clarify that the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) does not recommend that cell-free DNA aneuploidy screening be offered to all pregnant women, nor does it suggest a requirement for insurance coverage for cell-free DNA screening in women at low risk of aneuploidy. However, SMFM believes, due to the ethics of patient autonomy, that the option should be available to women who request additional testing beyond what is currently recommended by professional societies. PMID:26458766

  11. Understanding the Limitations of Circulating Cell Free Fetal DNA: An Example of Two Unique Cases.

    PubMed

    Clark-Ganheart, Cecily A; Iqbal, Sara N; Brown, Donna L; Black, Susan; Fries, Melissa H

    2014-05-01

    Circulating cell free fetal DNA (cffDNA) is an effective screening modality for fetal aneuploidy. We report two cases of false positive results. The first case involves a female, with self-reported Down syndrome. CffDNA returned positive for trisomy 18 leading to a maternal diagnosis of mosaicism chromosome 18 with normal fetal karyotype. The second case involves a patient with an anomalous fetal ultrasound and cffDNA positive for trisomy 13. Amniocentesis demonstrated a chromosome 8p duplication/deletion. False positive cffDNA may arise in clinical scenarios where diagnostic testing is clearly indicated. Practitioners should recognize the limitations of cffDNA. PMID:25298847

  12. Real-time PCR evaluation of cell-free DNA subjected to various storage and shipping conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Q; Cai, Y; Brady, P; Vermeesch, J R

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we attempted to explore the factors affecting the yield of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) obtained from maternal blood samples, including the use of different types of collection tubes, the interval between sample processing, and sample shipping under extreme weather conditions. Blood samples were drawn into K3EDTA tubes and cell-stabilizing tubes (Streck blood collection tube, BCT) from women pregnant with male fetuses. Real time PCR was used to amplify a β-actin gene fragment to measure the total plasma cell-free DNA concentration, while an SRY gene fragment was used to quantify the cffDNA. The samples in the K3EDTA tubes revealed a decreased quantity of SRY after 5 days of transportation, with a median of 25.9 copies/mL (P < 0.01); however, the value remained stable at 33.4 copies/mL in the BCT tubes. We observed a statistically significant increase in stability of the amount of total DNA in the blood samples stored in K3EDTA tubes (P < 0.01) and transportated under extreme outdoor temperatures (-20°-0°C) than that of the control values. These results indicate that it could be possible to avoid the presence of excess maternal DNA in samples shipped under extreme weather conditions for no more than 2 days, by collecting the blood samples in BCT tubes. PMID:26505430

  13. Cell free fetal DNA testing in maternal blood of Romanian pregnant women

    PubMed Central

    Radoi, Viorica E; Bohiltea, Camil L; Bohiltea, Roxana E; Albu, Dragos N

    2015-01-01

    Background: The discovery of circulating fetal DNA in maternal blood led to the discovery of new strategies to perform noninvasive testing for prenatal diagnosis. Objective: The purpose of the study was to detect fetal aneuploidy at chromosomes 13, 18, 21, X, and Y by analysis of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal blood, without endangering pregnancy. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study has been performed in Bucharest at Medlife Maternal and Fetal Medicine Department between 2013-2014. In total 201 women were offered noninvasive prenatal test. Maternal plasma samples were collected from women at greater than 9 weeks of gestation after informed consent and genetics counseling. Results: From 201 patients; 28 (13.93%) had screening test with high risk for trisomy 21, 116 (57.71%) had advanced maternal age, 1 (0.49%) had second trimester ultrasound markers and the remaining 56 patients (27.86%) performed the test on request. Of those patients, 189 (94.02%) had a “low risk” result (<1/10,000). Of those who had a low risk result, 2 continued on to have amniocentesis with normal results.Five patients (2.48%) received “high risk” results (>99% risk) all for trisomy 21 (T21). T21 was confirmed by amniocentesis in 1 patient and the other 4 patients declined confirmation. The 7 remaining patients (3.48%) had a low fetal fraction of DNA. Conclusion: It is probably that prenatal diagnosis using fetal DNA in maternal blood would play an increasingly role in the future practice of prenatal testing because of high accuracy. PMID:26644790

  14. Cell-free DNA in healthy individuals, noncancerous disease and strong prognostic value in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Spindler, Karen-Lise Garm; Appelt, Ane L; Pallisgaard, Niels; Andersen, Rikke F; Brandslund, Ivan; Jakobsen, Anders

    2014-12-15

    The purpose was to investigate total cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in colorectal cancer (CRC) patients during treatment with second-line chemotherapy and in healthy controls and patients with different comorbidities. Patient treated with second-line irinotecan for metastatic CRC (n = 100), a cohort of healthy controls with and without comorbidity (n = 70 and 100, respectively) were included. cfDNA was quantified by an in-house developed quantitative polymerase chain reaction from plasma samples drawn prior to the first cycle of chemotherapy and at time of progression. cfDNA levels were significantly higher in CRC compared to controls, with a clear capability for discriminating between the groups (receiver operation curve analysis; area under the curve 0.82, p < 0.0001). Patients with high levels had a shorter survival from irinotecan compared to those with lover levels. The cohort independent upper normal limit divided patients into high and low risk groups. The progression-free survival (PFS) was 2.1 months [95% confidence interval (CI) 2.0-3.4] and 6.5 (95% CI 4.2-7.2) months [hazard ratio (HR) 2.53; 95% CI 1.57-4.06, p < 0.0001] and overall survival (OS) 7.4 months (95% CI 4.3-8.7) and 13.8 months (95% CI 11.9-18.9; HR 2.52; 95% CI 1.54-4.13, p < 0.0000), respectively. Cox regression multivariate analysis showed a PFS HR of 1.4 (95% CI 1.1-1.7) for each increase in cfDNA quartile, p = 0.03 and 1.6 (1.3-2.0) for OS, p < 0.0001, respectively. A combined marker analysis with plasma KRAS mutations added further prognostic impact, which was consistent when performed on the samples drawn at time of progression. In conclusion, cfDNA measurement holds important clinical information and could become a useful tool for prediction of outcome from chemotherapy in mCRC. PMID:24798213

  15. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Ben Yehezkel, Tuval; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-02-29

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. PMID:26481354

  16. Synthesis and cell-free cloning of DNA libraries using programmable microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Yehezkel, Tuval Ben; Rival, Arnaud; Raz, Ofir; Cohen, Rafael; Marx, Zipora; Camara, Miguel; Dubern, Jean-Frédéric; Koch, Birgit; Heeb, Stephan; Krasnogor, Natalio; Delattre, Cyril; Shapiro, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidics may revolutionize our ability to write synthetic DNA by addressing several fundamental limitations associated with generating novel genetic constructs. Here we report the first de novo synthesis and cell-free cloning of custom DNA libraries in sub-microliter reaction droplets using programmable digital microfluidics. Specifically, we developed Programmable Order Polymerization (POP), Microfluidic Combinatorial Assembly of DNA (M-CAD) and Microfluidic In-vitro Cloning (MIC) and applied them to de novo synthesis, combinatorial assembly and cell-free cloning of genes, respectively. Proof-of-concept for these methods was demonstrated by programming an autonomous microfluidic system to construct and clone libraries of yeast ribosome binding sites and bacterial Azurine, which were then retrieved in individual droplets and validated. The ability to rapidly and robustly generate designer DNA molecules in an autonomous manner should have wide application in biological research and development. PMID:26481354

  17. Vanished Twins and Misdiagnosed Sex: A Case Report with Implications in Prenatal Counseling Using Noninvasive Cell-Free DNA Screening.

    PubMed

    Kelley, James F; Henning, George; Ambrose, Anthony; Adelman, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA testing is a recently introduced method for screening pregnant women for fetal trisomy, which is associated with some common significant genetic diseases, as well as the sex of the fetus. The case described here demonstrates the connection between the ultrasound "vanishing twin" phenomenon and the misdiagnosis of prenatal sex using cell-free DNA testing. PMID:27170800

  18. Quantification of Cell-Free mSHOX2 Plasma DNA for Therapy Monitoring in Advanced Stage Non-Small Cell (NSCLC) and Small-Cell Lung Cancer (SCLC) Patients

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Bernd; Beyer, Julia; Dietrich, Dimo; Bork, Ines; Liebenberg, Volker; Fleischhacker, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Most patients suffering from advanced lung cancer die within a few months. To exploit new therapy regimens we need better methods for the assessment of a therapy response. Material and Methods In a pilot study we prospectively enrolled 36 patients with advanced NSCLC and SCLC (34 stage IV, 2 stage IIIB) of whom 34 received standard platinum-based chemo/radiotherapy and two were treated with a tyrosine kinase inhibitor. We measured the levels of extracellular methylated SHOX2 DNA (mSHOX2) in plasma before and during therapy until re-staging. The mSHOX2 analysis was blinded with respect to the clinical data making it an observational study. Results According to the re-staging of 31 first-line patients, 19 patients were classified as non-responders while 12 patients were in the responder group. We observed a tight correlation between radiological data and the change of plasma mSHOX2 level as the equivalent for a therapy response. A ROC analysis showed a high discriminatory power for both patient groups already one week after therapy start (AUC 0.844). Additionally, a Kaplan-Meier and Cox Proportional Hazards analyses revealed a strong relationship between survival and plasma mSHOX2 value p≤0.001 (hazard ratio 11.08) providing some evidence for mSHOX2 also being a predictive marker. Conclusion The longitudinal measurement of extracellular plasma mSHOX2 DNA yields information about the response to cytotoxic treatment and allows an early assessment of treatment response for lung cancer patients. If confirmed in a larger study this would be a valuable tool for selecting and guiding a cytotoxic treatment. PMID:25675432

  19. DNA synthesis in yeast cell-free extracts dependent on recombinant DNA plasmids purified from Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Jong, A Y; Scott, J F

    1985-01-01

    In our attempts to establish a cell-free DNA replication system for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we have observed that recombinant DNA plasmids purified from Escherichia coli by a common procedure (lysozyme-detergent lysis and equilibrium banding in cesium chloride ethidium bromide gradients) often serve as templates for DNA synthesis by elongation enzymes. The templates could be elongated equally well by enzymes present in the yeast cell-free extracts, by the large proteolytic fragment of E. coli DNA polymerase I or by T4 DNA polymerase. The template activity of the purified plasmids was dependent on the presence of heterologous DNA segments in the bacterial vectors. The template activity could be diminished by treatment with alkali. We propose that the ability of recombinant plasmids isolated from bacterial hosts to serve as elongation templates may lead to erroneous conclusions when these plasmids are used as templates for in vitro replication or transcription reactions. Images PMID:3889851

  20. Cell-Free DNA as a Diagnostic Tool for Human Parasitic Infections.

    PubMed

    Weerakoon, Kosala G; McManus, Donald P

    2016-05-01

    Parasites often cause devastating diseases and represent a significant public health and economic burden. More accurate and convenient diagnostic tools are needed in support of parasite control programmes in endemic regions, and for rapid point-of-care diagnosis in nonendemic areas. The detection of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a relatively new concept that is being applied in the current armamentarium of diagnostics. Here, we review the application of cfDNA detection with nucleic acid amplification tests for the diagnosis and evaluation of different human parasitic infections and highlight the significant benefits of the approach using non-invasive clinical samples. PMID:26847654

  1. Mutation-based detection and monitoring of cell-free tumor DNA in peripheral blood of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Benesova, L; Belsanova, B; Suchanek, S; Kopeckova, M; Minarikova, P; Lipska, L; Levy, M; Visokai, V; Zavoral, M; Minarik, M

    2013-02-15

    Prognosis of solid cancers is generally more favorable if the disease is treated early and efficiently. A key to long cancer survival is in radical surgical therapy directed at the primary tumor followed by early detection of possible progression, with swift application of subsequent therapeutic intervention reducing the risk of disease generalization. The conventional follow-up care is based on regular observation of tumor markers in combination with computed tomography/endoscopic ultrasound/magnetic resonance/positron emission tomography imaging to monitor potential tumor progression. A recent development in methodologies allowing screening for a presence of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) brings a new viable tool in early detection and management of major cancers. It is believed that cfDNA is released from tumors primarily due to necrotization, whereas the origin of nontumorous cfDNA is mostly apoptotic. The process of cfDNA detection starts with proper collection and treatment of blood and isolation and storage of blood plasma. The next important steps include cfDNA extraction from plasma and its detection and/or quantification. To distinguish tumor cfDNA from nontumorous cfDNA, specific somatic DNA mutations, previously localized in the primary tumor tissue, are identified in the extracted cfDNA. Apart from conventional mutation detection approaches, several dedicated techniques have been presented to detect low levels of cfDNA in an excess of nontumorous (nonmutated) DNA, including real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), "BEAMing" (beads, emulsion, amplification, and magnetics), and denaturing capillary electrophoresis. Techniques to facilitate the mutant detection, such as mutant-enriched PCR and COLD-PCR (coamplification at lower denaturation temperature PCR), are also applicable. Finally, a number of newly developed miniaturized approaches, such as single-molecule sequencing, are promising for the future. PMID:22750103

  2. CpG Methylation as a Tool to Characterize Cell-Free Kaposi Sarcoma Herpesvirus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Shamay, Meir; Hand, Nicholas; Lemas, M. Victor; Koon, Henry B.; Krown, Susan E.; Wrangle, John; Desai, Prashant; Ramos, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    (See the editorial commentary by Stebbing and Bower, on pages 1032–4.) We studied the presence of Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus sequences in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) isolated from the blood of patients with AIDS-related Kaposi sarcoma (KS) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL). The use of paramagnetic beads linked to methyl-CpG binding domain protein allowed separation of virion and cell-derived DNA. Only virion DNA was detected in the blood of KS patients, whereas cell-derived DNA was detected in a patient with AIDS-related PEL. The difference in the origins of cfDNA in these settings may in part reflect very different proliferative indices in KS and PEL tumor tissue. PMID:22357696

  3. Genome-scale detection of hypermethylated CpG islands in circulating cell-free DNA of hepatocellular carcinoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Lu; Li, Jingyi; Guo, Huahu; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zheng, Shengmin; Zhang, Dafang; Zhu, Weihua; Qu, Jianhui; Guo, Limin; Du, Dexiao; Jin, Xiao; Zhang, Yuhao; Gao, Yun; Shen, Jie; Ge, Hao; Tang, Fuchou; Huang, Yanyi; Peng, Jirun

    2015-01-01

    Despite advances in DNA methylome analyses of cells and tissues, current techniques for genome-scale profiling of DNA methylation in circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) remain limited. Here we describe a methylated CpG tandems amplification and sequencing (MCTA-Seq) method that can detect thousands of hypermethylated CpG islands simultaneously in ccfDNA. This highly sensitive technique can work with genomic DNA as little as 7.5 pg, which is equivalent to 2.5 copies of the haploid genome. We have analyzed a cohort of tissue and plasma samples (n = 151) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and control subjects, identifying dozens of high-performance markers in blood for detecting small HCC (≤ 3 cm). Among these markers, 4 (RGS10, ST8SIA6, RUNX2 and VIM) are mostly specific for cancer detection, while the other 15, classified as a novel set, are already hypermethylated in the normal liver tissues. Two corresponding classifiers have been established, combination of which achieves a sensitivity of 94% with a specificity of 89% for the plasma samples from HCC patients (n = 36) and control subjects including cirrhosis patients (n = 17) and normal individuals (n = 38). Notably, all 15 alpha-fetoprotein-negative HCC patients were successfully identified. Comparison between matched plasma and tissue samples indicates that both the cancer and noncancerous tissues contribute to elevation of the methylation markers in plasma. MCTA-Seq will facilitate the development of ccfDNA methylation biomarkers and contribute to the improvement of cancer detection in a clinical setting. PMID:26516143

  4. Genome-scale detection of hypermethylated CpG islands in circulating cell-free DNA of hepatocellular carcinoma patients.

    PubMed

    Wen, Lu; Li, Jingyi; Guo, Huahu; Liu, Xiaomeng; Zheng, Shengmin; Zhang, Dafang; Zhu, Weihua; Qu, Jianhui; Guo, Limin; Du, Dexiao; Jin, Xiao; Zhang, Yuhao; Gao, Yun; Shen, Jie; Ge, Hao; Tang, Fuchou; Huang, Yanyi; Peng, Jirun

    2015-11-01

    Despite advances in DNA methylome analyses of cells and tissues, current techniques for genome-scale profiling of DNA methylation in circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) remain limited. Here we describe a methylated CpG tandems amplification and sequencing (MCTA-Seq) method that can detect thousands of hypermethylated CpG islands simultaneously in ccfDNA. This highly sensitive technique can work with genomic DNA as little as 7.5 pg, which is equivalent to 2.5 copies of the haploid genome. We have analyzed a cohort of tissue and plasma samples (n = 151) of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients and control subjects, identifying dozens of high-performance markers in blood for detecting small HCC (≤ 3 cm). Among these markers, 4 (RGS10, ST8SIA6, RUNX2 and VIM) are mostly specific for cancer detection, while the other 15, classified as a novel set, are already hypermethylated in the normal liver tissues. Two corresponding classifiers have been established, combination of which achieves a sensitivity of 94% with a specificity of 89% for the plasma samples from HCC patients (n = 36) and control subjects including cirrhosis patients (n = 17) and normal individuals (n = 38). Notably, all 15 alpha-fetoprotein-negative HCC patients were successfully identified. Comparison between matched plasma and tissue samples indicates that both the cancer and noncancerous tissues contribute to elevation of the methylation markers in plasma. MCTA-Seq will facilitate the development of ccfDNA methylation biomarkers and contribute to the improvement of cancer detection in a clinical setting. PMID:26516143

  5. Chimerism Analysis of Cell-Free DNA in Patients Treated with Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation May Predict Early Relapse in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Aljurf, Mahmoud; Abalkhail, Hala; Alseraihy, Amal; Mohamed, Said Y.; Ayas, Mouhab; Alsharif, Fahad; Alzahrani, Hazza; Al-Jefri, Abdullah; Aldawsari, Ghuzayel; Al-Ahmari, Ali; Belgaumi, Asim F.; Walter, Claudia Ulrike; El-Solh, Hassan; Rasheed, Walid; Albitar, Maher

    2016-01-01

    Background. We studied DNA chimerism in cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in patients treated with HSCT. Methods. Chimerism analysis was performed on CD3+ cells, polymorphonuclear (PMN) cells, and cfDNA using 16 small tandem repeat loci. The resulting labeled PCR-products were size-fractionated and quantified. Results. Analyzing samples from 191 patients treated with HSCT for nonneoplastic hematologic disorders demonstrated that the cfDNA chimerism is comparable to that seen in PMN cells. Analyzing leukemia patients (N = 126) showed that, of 84 patients with 100% donor DNA in PMN, 16 (19%) had evidence of clinical relapse and >10% recipient DNA in the plasma. Additional 16 patients of the 84 (19%) showed >10% recipient DNA in plasma, but without evidence of relapse. Eight patients had mixed chimerism in granulocytes, lymphocytes, and plasma, but three of these patients had >10% recipient DNA in plasma compared to PMN cells and these three patients had clinical evidence of relapse. The remaining 34 patients showed 100% donor DNA in both PMN and lymphocytes, but cfDNA showed various levels of chimerism. Of these patients 14 (41%) showed laboratory or clinical evidence of relapse and all had >10% recipient DNA in cfDNA. Conclusion. Monitoring patients after HSCT using cfDNA might be more reliable than cellular DNA in predicting early relapse. PMID:27006832

  6. SNPase-ARMS qPCR: Ultrasensitive Mutation-Based Detection of Cell-Free Tumor DNA in Melanoma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Stadler, Julia; Eder, Johanna; Pratscher, Barbara; Brandt, Sabine; Schneller, Doris; Müllegger, Robert; Vogl, Claus; Trautinger, Franz; Brem, Gottfried; Burgstaller, Joerg P.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free circulating tumor DNA in the plasma of cancer patients has become a common point of interest as indicator of therapy options and treatment response in clinical cancer research. Especially patient- and tumor-specific single nucleotide variants that accurately distinguish tumor DNA from wild type DNA are promising targets. The reliable detection and quantification of these single-base DNA variants is technically challenging. Currently, a variety of techniques is applied, with no apparent “gold standard”. Here we present a novel qPCR protocol that meets the conditions of extreme sensitivity and specificity that are required for detection and quantification of tumor DNA. By consecutive application of two polymerases, one of them designed for extreme base-specificity, the method reaches unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Three qPCR assays were tested with spike-in experiments, specific for point mutations BRAF V600E, PTEN T167A and NRAS Q61L of melanoma cell lines. It was possible to detect down to one copy of tumor DNA per reaction (Poisson distribution), at a background of up to 200 000 wild type DNAs. To prove its clinical applicability, the method was successfully tested on a small cohort of BRAF V600E positive melanoma patients. PMID:26562020

  7. DNA Microgels as a Platform for Cell-Free Protein Expression and Display.

    PubMed

    Kahn, Jason S; Ruiz, Roanna C H; Sureka, Swati; Peng, Songming; Derrien, Thomas L; An, Duo; Luo, Dan

    2016-06-13

    Protein expression and selection is an essential process in the modification of biological products. Expressed proteins are selected based on desired traits (phenotypes) from diverse gene libraries (genotypes), whose size may be limited due to the difficulties inherent in diverse cell preparation. In addition, not all genes can be expressed in cells, and linking genotype with phenotype further presents a great challenge in protein engineering. We present a DNA gel-based platform that demonstrates the versatility of two DNA microgel formats to address fundamental challenges of protein engineering, including high protein yield, isolation of gene sets, and protein display. We utilize microgels to show successful protein production and capture of a model protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), which is further used to demonstrate a successful gene enrichment through fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) of a mixed population of microgels containing the GFP gene. Through psoralen cross-linking of the hydrogels, we have synthesized DNA microgels capable of surviving denaturing conditions while still possessing the ability to produce protein. Lastly, we demonstrate a method of producing extremely high local gene concentrations of up to 32 000 gene repeats in hydrogels 1 to 2 μm in diameter. These DNA gels can serve as a novel cell-free platform for integrated protein expression and display, which can be applied toward more powerful, scalable protein engineering and cell-free synthetic biology with no physiological boundaries and limitations. PMID:27112709

  8. Characterization of the cell-free DNA released by cultured cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bronkhorst, Abel Jacobus; Wentzel, Johannes F; Aucamp, Janine; van Dyk, Etresia; du Plessis, Lissinda; Pretorius, Piet J

    2016-01-01

    The most prominent factor that delays the translation of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) analyses to clinical practice is the lack of knowledge regarding its origin and composition. The elucidation of the former is complicated by the seemingly random fluctuation of quantitative and qualitative characteristics of cfDNA in the blood of healthy and diseased individuals. Besides methodological discrepancies, this could be ascribed to a web of cellular responses to various environmental cues and stressors. Since all cells release cfDNA, it follows that the cfDNA in the blood of cancer patients is not only representative of tumor derived DNA, but also of DNA released by healthy cells under different conditions. Additionally, cfDNA released by malignant cells is not necessarily just aberrant, but likely includes non-mutated chromosomal DNA fragments. This may cause false positive/negative results. Although many have acknowledged that this is a major problem, few have addressed it. We propose that many of the current stumbling blocks encountered in in vivo cfDNA studies can be partially circumvented by in vitro models. Accordingly, the purpose of this work was to evaluate the release of cfDNA from cultured cells and to gauge its potential use for elucidating the nature of cfDNA. Results suggest that the occurrence of cfDNA is not a consequence of apoptosis or necrosis, but primarily a result of actively secreted DNA, perhaps in association with a protein complex. This study demonstrates the potential of in vitro cell culture models to obtain useful information about the phenomenon of cfDNA. PMID:26529550

  9. A novel cell-free system reveals a mechanism of circular DNA formation from tandem repeats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, S; Mechali, M

    2001-06-15

    One characteristic of genomic plasticity is the presence of extrachromosomal circular DNA (eccDNA). High levels of eccDNA are associated with genomic instability, exposure to carcinogens and aging. We have recently reported developmentally regulated formation of eccDNA that occurs preferentially in pre-blastula Xenopus laevis embryos. Multimers of tandemly repeated sequences were over-represented in the circle population while dispersed sequences were not detected, indicating that circles were not formed at random from any chromosomal sequence. Here we present detailed mechanistic studies of eccDNA formation in a cell-free system derived from Xenopus egg extracts. We show that naked chromosomal DNA from sperm or somatic tissues serves as a substrate for direct tandem repeat circle formation. Moreover, a recombinant bacterial tandem repeat can generate eccDNA in the extract through a de novo mechanism which is independent of DNA replication. These data suggest that the presence of a high level of any direct tandem repeat can confer on DNA the ability to be converted into circular multimers in the early embryo irrespective of its sequence and that homologous recombination is involved in this process. PMID:11410662

  10. Urine Cell-Free DNA Integrity Analysis for Early Detection of Prostate Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Salvi, Samanta; Gurioli, Giorgia; Martignano, Filippo; Foca, Flavia; Gunelli, Roberta; Cicchetti, Giacomo; De Giorgi, Ugo; Zoli, Wainer; Calistri, Daniele; Casadio, Valentina

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The detection of tumor-specific markers in urine has paved the way for new early noninvasive diagnostic approaches for prostate cancer. We evaluated the DNA integrity in urine supernatant to verify its capacity to discriminate between prostate cancer and benign diseases of the urogenital tract. Patients and Methods. A total of 131 individuals were enrolled: 67 prostate cancer patients and 64 patients with benign diseases of the urogenital tract (control group). Prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels were determined. Urine cell-free (UCF) DNA was isolated and sequences longer than 250 bp corresponding to 3 genes (c-MYC, HER2, and AR) were quantified by Real-Time PCR to assess UCF-DNA integrity. Results. UCF-DNA was quantifiable in all samples, while UCF-DNA integrity was evaluable in all but 16 samples. Receiver operating characteristic analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.5048 for UCF-DNA integrity and 0.8423 for PSA. Sensitivity was 0.58 and 0.95 for UCF-DNA integrity and PSA, respectively. Specificity was 0.44 and 0.69, respectively. Conclusions. UCF-DNA integrity showed lower accuracy than PSA and would not seem to be a reliable marker for early prostate cancer diagnosis. Despite this, we believe that UCF-DNA could represent a source of other biomarkers and could detect gene alterations. PMID:26412928

  11. Cell-free DNA next-generation sequencing in pancreatobiliary carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Oliver A.; Greene, Claire; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Siew, LaiMun; Leng, Jim; Vu, Mary; Hendifar, Andrew E.; Wang, Zhen; Atreya, Chloe E.; Kelley, Robin K.; Van Loon, Katherine; Ko, Andrew H.; Tempero, Margaret A.; Bivona, Trever G.; Munster, Pamela N.; Talasaz, AmirAli; Collisson, Eric A.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with pancreatic and biliary carcinomas lack personalized treatment options, in part because biopsies are often inadequate for molecular characterization. Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing may enable a precision oncology approach in this setting. We attempted to prospectively analyze 54 genes in tumor and cfDNA for 26 patients. Tumor sequencing failed in nine patients (35%). In the remaining 17, 90.3% (95% CI: 73.1–97.5%) of mutations detected in tumor biopsies were also detected in cfDNA. The diagnostic accuracy of cfDNA sequencing was 97.7%, with 92.3% average sensitivity and 100% specificity across five informative genes. Changes in cfDNA correlated well with tumor marker dynamics in serial sampling (r=0.93). We demonstrate that cfDNA sequencing is feasible, accurate, and sensitive in identifying tumor-derived mutations without prior knowledge of tumor genotype or the abundance of circulating tumor DNA. cfDNA sequencing should be considered in pancreatobiliary cancer trials where tissue sampling is unsafe, infeasible, or otherwise unsuccessful. PMID:26109333

  12. Feasibility of cell-free circulating tumor DNA testing for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Giovannetti, Elisa; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-04-01

    Tumor tissue genotyping is used routinely for lung cancer to identify specific targetable oncogenic alterations, including EGFR mutations and ALK rearrangements. However, tumor tissue from a single biopsy is often insufficient for molecular testing, may offer a limited evaluation because of tumor heterogeneity and can be difficult to obtain. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA has been widely investigated as a potential surrogate for tissue biopsy for noninvasive assessment of tumor-related genomic alterations. New techniques have improved EGFR mutations detection in ctDNA, thus supporting the use of this liquid biopsy for predicting response to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and monitoring the emergence of resistance. The serial evaluation of ctDNA during treatment is feasible and can be used to track tumor changes in real time and for a wide range of clinically useful applications. PMID:26974841

  13. The Prognostic Value of Circulating Cell-Free DNA in Colorectal Cancer: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Basnet, Shiva; Zhang, Zhen-yu; Liao, Wen-qiang; Li, Shu-heng; Li, Ping-shu; Ge, Hai-yan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a promising candidate biomarker for detection, monitoring and survival prediction of colorectal cancer (CRC). However, its prognostic significance for patients with CRC remains controversial. To derive a precise estimation of the prognostic significance of cfDNA, a meta-analysis was performed. Methods: We made a systematic search in data base of the Science Citation Index Embase and Pubmed for studies reporting prognostic data of cfDNA in CRC patients. The data of cfDNA on recurrences-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were extracted and measured in hazard rates (HRs) and 95% confident intervals (CIs). Subgroup analyses were carried out as well. Finally, the meta-analysis is accompanied with nine studies including 19 subunits. Results: The pooled HRs with 95% CIs revealed strong associations between cfDNA and RFS (HR [95%CI]=2.78[2.08-3.72], I2=32.23%, n=7) along with OS (HR [95%CI]=3.03[2.51-3.66], I2=29.24%, n=12) in patients with CRC. Entire subgroup analyses indicated strong prognostic value of cfDNA irrespective tumor stage, study size, tumor markers, detection methods and marker origin. Conclusions: All the results exhibits that appearance of cfDNA in blood is an indicator for adverse RFS and OS in CRC patients. PMID:27326254

  14. KRAS G12V Mutation Detection by Droplet Digital PCR in Circulating Cell-Free DNA of Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Olmedillas López, Susana; García-Olmo, Dolores C; García-Arranz, Mariano; Guadalajara, Héctor; Pastor, Carlos; García-Olmo, Damián

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations are responsible for resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in colorectal cancer patients. These mutations sometimes appear once treatment has started. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free DNA in plasma ("liquid biopsy") by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has emerged as a very sensitive and promising alternative to serial biopsies for disease monitoring. In this study, KRAS G12V mutation was analyzed by ddPCR in plasma DNA from 10 colorectal cancer patients and compared to six healthy donors. The percentage of KRAS G12V mutation relative to wild-type sequences in tumor-derived DNA was also determined. KRAS G12V mutation circulating in plasma was detected in 9 of 10 colorectal cancer patients whose tumors were also mutated. Colorectal cancer patients had 35.62 copies of mutated KRAS/mL plasma, whereas in healthy controls only residual copies were found (0.62 copies/mL, p = 0.0066). Interestingly, patients with metastatic disease showed a significantly higher number of mutant copies than M0 patients (126.25 versus 9.37 copies/mL, p = 0.0286). Wild-type KRAS was also significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy controls (7718.8 versus 481.25 copies/mL, p = 0.0002). In conclusion, KRAS G12V mutation is detectable in plasma of colorectal cancer patients by ddPCR and could be used as a non-invasive biomarker. PMID:27043547

  15. KRAS G12V Mutation Detection by Droplet Digital PCR in Circulating Cell-Free DNA of Colorectal Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Olmedillas López, Susana; García-Olmo, Dolores C.; García-Arranz, Mariano; Guadalajara, Héctor; Pastor, Carlos; García-Olmo, Damián

    2016-01-01

    KRAS mutations are responsible for resistance to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapy in colorectal cancer patients. These mutations sometimes appear once treatment has started. Detection of KRAS mutations in circulating cell-free DNA in plasma (“liquid biopsy”) by droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) has emerged as a very sensitive and promising alternative to serial biopsies for disease monitoring. In this study, KRAS G12V mutation was analyzed by ddPCR in plasma DNA from 10 colorectal cancer patients and compared to six healthy donors. The percentage of KRAS G12V mutation relative to wild-type sequences in tumor-derived DNA was also determined. KRAS G12V mutation circulating in plasma was detected in 9 of 10 colorectal cancer patients whose tumors were also mutated. Colorectal cancer patients had 35.62 copies of mutated KRAS/mL plasma, whereas in healthy controls only residual copies were found (0.62 copies/mL, p = 0.0066). Interestingly, patients with metastatic disease showed a significantly higher number of mutant copies than M0 patients (126.25 versus 9.37 copies/mL, p = 0.0286). Wild-type KRAS was also significantly elevated in colorectal cancer patients compared to healthy controls (7718.8 versus 481.25 copies/mL, p = 0.0002). In conclusion, KRAS G12V mutation is detectable in plasma of colorectal cancer patients by ddPCR and could be used as a non-invasive biomarker. PMID:27043547

  16. Cell-Free DNA Screening: Complexities and Challenges of Clinical Implementation.

    PubMed

    Grace, Matthew R; Hardisty, Emily; Dotters-Katz, Sarah K; Vora, Neeta L; Kuller, Jeffrey A

    2016-08-01

    Screening for fetal aneuploidy in pregnant women using cell-free DNA has increased dramatically since the technology became commercially available in 2011. Since that time, numerous trials have demonstrated high sensitivity and specificity to screen for common aneuploidies in high-risk populations. Studies assessing the performance of these tests in low-risk populations have also demonstrated improved detection rates compared with traditional, serum-based screening strategies. Concurrent with the increased use of this technology has been a decrease in invasive procedures (amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling). As the technology becomes more widely understood, available, and utilized, challenges regarding its clinical implementation have become apparent. Some of these challenges include test failures, false-positive and false-negative results, limitations in positive predictive value in low-prevalence populations, and potential maternal health implications of abnormal results. In addition, commercial laboratories are expanding screening beyond common aneuploidies to include microdeletion screening and whole genome screening. This review article is intended to provide the practicing obstetrician with a summary of the complexities of cell-free DNA screening and the challenges of implementing it in the clinical setting. PMID:27526871

  17. Cell-free mitochondrial DNA in CSF is associated with early viral rebound, inflammation, and severity of neurocognitive deficits in HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Schrier, Rachel D; de Oliveira, Michelli F; Gianella, Sara; Var, Susanna R; Day, Tyler R C; Ramirez-Gaona, Miguel; Suben, Jesse D; Murrell, Ben; Massanella, Marta; Cherner, Mariana; Smith, Davey M; Ellis, Ronald J; Letendre, Scott L; Mehta, Sanjay R

    2016-04-01

    Cell-free mitochondiral DNA (mtDNA) is an immunogenic molecule associated with many inflammatory conditions. We evaluated the relationship between cell-free mtDNA in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and neurocognitive performance and inflammation during HIV infection. In a cross-sectional analysis, we evaluated the association of mtDNA levels with clinical assessments, inflammatory markers, and neurocognitive performance in 28 HIV-infected individuals. In CSF, we measured mtDNA levels by droplet digital PCR, and soluble CD14 and CD163, neurofilament light, and neopterin by ELISA. In blood and CSF, we measured soluble IP-10, MCP-1, TNF-α, and IL-6 by ELISA, and intracellular expression of IL-2, IFN-γ, and TNF-α in CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells by flow cytometry. We also evaluated the relationship between CSF pleocytosis and mtDNA longitudinally in another set of five individuals participating in an antiretroviral treatment (ART) interruption study. Cell-free CSF mtDNA levels strongly correlated with neurocognitive performance among individuals with neurocognitive impairment (NCI) (r = 0.77, p = 0.001). CSF mtDNA also correlated with levels of IP-10 in CSF (r = 0.70, p = 0.007) and MCP-1 in blood plasma (r = 0.66, p = 0.01) in individuals with NCI. There were no significant associations between inflammatory markers and mtDNA in subjects without NCI, and levels of mtDNA did not differ between subjects with and without NCI. MtDNA levels preceded pleocytosis and HIV RNA following ART interruption. Cell-free mtDNA in CSF was strongly associated with the severity of neurocognitive dysfunction and inflammation only in individuals with NCI. Our findings suggest that within a subset of subjects cell-free CSF mtDNA is associated with inflammation and degree of NCI. PMID:26428514

  18. Identification of dually acylated proteins from complementary DNA resources by cell-free and cellular metabolic labeling.

    PubMed

    Moriya, Koko; Kimoto, Mayumi; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kiwado, Aya; Takamitsu, Emi; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2016-10-15

    To establish a strategy to identify dually fatty acylated proteins from cDNA resources, seven N-myristoylated proteins with cysteine (Cys) residues within the 10 N-terminal residues were selected as potential candidates among 27 N-myristoylated proteins identified from a model human cDNA resource. Seven proteins C-terminally tagged with FLAG tag or EGFP were generated and their susceptibility to protein N-myristoylation and S-palmitoylation were evaluated by metabolic labeling with [(3)H]myristic acid or [(3)H]palmitic acid either in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system or in transfected mammalian cells. As a result, EEPD1, one of five proteins (RFTN1, EEPD1, GNAI1, PDE2A, RNF11) found to be dually acylated, was shown to be a novel dually fatty acylated protein. Metabolic labeling experiments using G2A and C7S mutants of EEPD1-EGFP revealed that the palmitoylation site of EEPD1 is Cys at position 7. Analysis of the intracellular localization of EEPD1 C-terminally tagged with FLAG tag or EGFP and its G2A and C7S mutants revealed that the dual acylation directs EEPD1 to localize to the plasma membrane. Thus, dually fatty acylated proteins can be identified from cDNA resources by cell-free and cellular metabolic labeling of N-myristoylated proteins with Cys residue(s) close to the N-myristoylated N-terminus. PMID:27480498

  19. Cell-free DNA screening for fetal aneuploidy as a clinical service.

    PubMed

    Cuckle, Howard; Benn, Peter; Pergament, Eugene

    2015-10-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) through the analysis of cell free (cf)DNA is revolutionizing prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy. Current methods used in clinical practice include shotgun massively parallel sequencing (s-MPS); targeted (t-MPS); and an approach that takes advantage of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) differences between mother and fetus. Efficacy of cfDNA testing for the common autosomal trisomies far exceeds that of conventional screening. Depending on the methodology used, reasons for discordancy between cfDNA results and fetal karyotype can include true fetal mosaicism, confined placental mosaicism, presence of a maternal karyotype abnormality, insufficient counting due to low fetal fraction, and a vanishing twin. Among the possible cfDNA strategies a Primary test has the highest performance but is expensive, while a Contingent cfDNA test can achieve high performance at a relatively low cost. Practicalities to be considered in the provision of testing include pretest counseling about the scope and accuracy of the testing, the interpretation of results when there is a low fetal fraction and follow-up studies for positive test results. The role of first trimester nuchal translucency measurement and conventional biochemical testing needs to be reassessed in the context of the use of cfDNA. PMID:25732593

  20. Efficient Capture and Isolation of Tumor-Related Circulating Cell-Free DNA from Cancer Patients Using Electroactive Conducting Polymer Nanowire Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, SeungHyun; Lee, HyungJae; Bae, Kieun; Yoon, Kyong-Ah; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is currently recognized as a key non-invasive biomarker for cancer diagnosis and progression and therapeutic efficacy monitoring. Because cfDNA has been detected in patients with diverse types of cancers, the use of efficient strategies to isolate cfDNA not only provides valuable insights into tumour biology, but also offers the potential for developing new cancer-specific targets. However, the challenges associated with conventional cfDNA extraction methods prevent their further clinical applications. Here, we developed a nanostructured conductive polymer platform for the efficient capture and release of circulating cfDNA and demonstrated its potential clinical utility using unprocessed plasma samples from patients with breast and lung cancers. Our results confirmed that the platform's enhanced efficiency allows tumor-specific circulating cfDNA to be recovered at high yield and purity. PMID:27162553

  1. Quantification of Maternal Serum Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Early-Onset Preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hong; Shen, Yanting; Ge, Qinyu; He, Youji; Qiao, Dongyan; Ren, Mulan; Zhang, Jianqiong

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the increased serum cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) level of gravidas developed into early-onset preeclampsia (EOPE) subsequently in the early second trimesters is related to prenatal screening markers. Serum was collected from 1011 gravidas. The level of cffDNA and prenatal screening markers were analyzed in 20 cases with EOPE and 20 controls. All fetuses were male. The maternal serum cffDNA level was assessed by amplification of the Y chromosome specific gene. Correlations between the variables were examined. (Logged) cffDNA in EOPE (median, 3.08; interquartile range, 2.93–3.68) was higher than controls (median, 1.79; interquartile range, 1.46–2.53). The increased level of (logged) cffDNA was correlated significantly with the increased human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) level (r = 0.628, p < 0.001). Significant reciprocal correlations between cffDNA and babies’ birth weight as well as gestation weeks at delivery were noted (r = −0.516, p = 0.001; r = −0.623, p < 0.001, respectively). The sensitivity and specificity of cffDNA to discriminate between the EOPE cases and the controls were 90% and 85%, respectively. CffDNA is a potential marker for EOPE, which had a significant reciprocal correlation with babies’ birth weight and gestation weeks at delivery. Moreover, it may help in indicating the underlying hypoxic condition in the placenta. PMID:23567271

  2. Cell-free fetal DNA and pregnancy-related complications (Review)

    PubMed Central

    SIFAKIS, STAVROS; KOUKOU, ZETA; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free fetal DNA (cff-DNA) is a novel promising biomarker that has been applied in various aspects of obstetrical research, notably in prenatal diagnosis and complicated pregnancies. It is easily detected by semi-quantitative PCR for the SRY target gene. It is well recognized that the levels of circulating cff-DNA play a role in various complications of pregnancy. In this review, we explore the implications of the detection of cff-DNA in a range of pregnancy-related complications, such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm labor, placenta previa and hyperemesis gravidarum. cff-DNA is released due to apoptotic mechanisms occurring on trophoblastic cells, although recent in vivo studies support the existence of additional mechanisms. The increase in the levels of cff-DNA can be used to predict pregnancy-related complications and has great value in the field of prenatal diagnosis and in common pregnancy-related complications, as it precedes the clinical symptoms of the disease. Gestational age is a factor that determines the elevation in cff-DNA levels in response to pathological conditions. In conclusion, the detection of cff-DNA levels has a number of valuable applications in prenatal screening; however, the detection of cff-DNA levels has not yet been applied in clinical practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy-related disorders. Thus, studies are focusing on unraveling the etiology of alterations in its levels under pathological conditions during pregnancy, in order to determine the potenial predictive and diagnostic applications of this biomarker. PMID:25530428

  3. Demographic and experiential correlates of public attitudes towards cell-free fetal DNA screening

    PubMed Central

    Sayres, Lauren C.; Allyse, Megan; Goodspeed, Taylor A.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2014-01-01

    This study seeks to inform clinical application of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) screening as a novel method for prenatal trisomy detection by investigating public attitudes towards this technology and demographic and experiential characteristics related to these attitudes. Two versions of a 25-item survey assessing interest in cffDNA and existing first-trimester combined screening for either trisomy 13 and 18 or trisomy 21 were distributed among 3,164 members of the United States public. Logistic regression was performed to determine variables predictive of interest in screening options. Approximately 47% of respondents expressed an interest in cffDNA screening for trisomy 13, 18, and 21, with a majority interested in cffDNA screening as a stand-alone technique. A significantly greater percent would consider termination of pregnancy following a diagnosis of trisomy 13 or 18 (52%) over one of trisomy 21 (44%). Willingness to consider abortion of an affected pregnancy was the strongest correlate to interest in both cffDNA and first-trimester combined screening, although markedly more respondents expressed an interest in some form of screening (69% and 71%, respectively) than would consider termination. Greater educational attainment, higher income, and insurance coverage predicted interest in cffDNA screening; stronger religious identification also corresponded to decreased interest. Prior experience with disability and genetic testing was associated with increased interest in cffDNA screening. Several of these factors, in addition to advanced age and Asian race, were, in turn, predictive of respondents’ increased willingness to consider post-diagnosis termination of pregnancy. In conclusion, divergent attitudes towards cffDNA screening - and prenatal options more generally – appear correlated with individual socioeconomic and religious backgrounds and experiences with disability and genetic testing. Clinical implementation and counseling for novel prenatal

  4. Circulating cell-free DNA indicates M1/M2 responses during septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yi; Gao, Xingjuan; Wang, Wenxiao; Xu, Xiaojuan; Yu, Lijuan; Ju, Xiuli; Li, Aimin

    2016-09-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has been widely suggested as clinical indicator in diseases, including sepsis. It was thought that the cfDNA was coming from the cell lysis, necrosis and apoptosis caused by tissue damages during sepsis. M1 or M2 macrophage-type responses kill or repair in vivo, which is highly relevant with the tissue damages in sepsis. The correlation between cfDNA and M1/M2 responses during sepsis was never investigated. Here, we used bacteria injection induced septic peritonitis mouse model in both M1-dominant C57bl/6 and M2-dominant Balb/c mouse strains. We found that M2-dominant Balb/c mice showed better prognosis of septic peritonitis than C57bl/6 mice, which is corresponded with lower level of cfDNA in septic Balb/c mice compared to septic C57bl/6 mice. By assessing the M1 and M2 related cytokines in both septic Balb/c and C57bl/6 mice, we found out that Balb/c mice has lower tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα) and higher interleukin 10 (IL-10) productions than C57bl/6 mice during septic peritonitis. Especially, when monitoring the monocyte subtypes in peripheral blood of these septic mice, we found out that C57bl/6 showed higher inflammatory (Ly6C(high)) monocyte (corresponding to M1 macrophage) proportion than Balb/c mice. Interestingly, we find out that cfDNA is highly correlated with the ratio of Ly6C(high) monocytes versus Ly6C(low) monocytes, which represents M1/M2 (killing/healing) responses. Our study suggested that the cfDNA is a good indicator for evaluating M1/M2 responses in septic peritonitis. PMID:27335257

  5. Unfair discrimination in prenatal aneuploidy screening using cell-free DNA?

    PubMed

    Rolfes, Vasilija; Schmitz, Dagmar

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing on the basis of cell-free DNA of placental origin (NIPT) changed the landscape of prenatal care and is seen as superior to all other up to now implemented prenatal screening procedures - at least in the high-risk population. NIPT has spread almost worldwide commercially, but only in a few countries the costs of NIPT are covered by insurance companies. Such financial barriers in prenatal testing can lead to significant restrictions to the average range of opportunities of pregnant women and couples, which on an intersubjective level can be defined as unfair discrimination and on an individual level weakens reproductive autonomy. Given that enabling reproductive autonomy is the main ethical justification for offering prenatal (genetic) testing, these barriers are not only an issue of justice in health care, but are potentially counteracting the primary purpose of these testing procedures. PMID:26773245

  6. Prospective blinded study of somatic mutation detection in cell-free DNA utilizing a targeted 54-gene next generation sequencing panel in metastatic solid tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Lanman, Richard B.; Mortimer, Stefanie; Zill, Oliver A.; Kim, Kyoung-Mee; Jang, Kee Taek; Kim, Seok-Hyung; Park, Se Hoon; Park, Joon Oh; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Kang, Won Ki; Lee, Woo Yong; Kim, Hee-Cheol; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jeeyun; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of the mutant allele fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) derived from tumors is increasingly utilized to detect actionable genomic alterations in cancer. We conducted a prospective blinded study of a comprehensive cfDNA sequencing panel with 54 cancer genes. To evaluate the concordance between cfDNA and tumor DNA (tDNA), sequencing results were compared between cfDNA from plasma and genomic tumor DNA (tDNA). Utilizing next generation digital sequencing technology (DST), we profiled approximately 78,000 bases encoding 512 complete exons in the targeted genes in cfDNA from plasma. Seventy-five patients were prospectively enrolled between February 2013 and March 2014, including 61 metastatic cancer patients and 14 clinical stage II CRC patients with matched plasma and tissue samples. Using the 54-gene panel, we detected at least one somatic mutation in 44 of 61 tDNA (72.1%) and 29 of 44 (65.9%) cfDNA. The overall concordance rate of cfDNA to tDNA was 85.9%, when all detected mutations were considered. We collected serial cfDNAs during cetuximab-based treatment in 2 metastatic KRAS wild-type CRC patients, one with acquired resistance and one with primary resistance. We demonstrate newly emerged KRAS mutation in cfDNA 1.5 months before radiologic progression. Another patient had a newly emerged PIK3CA H1047R mutation on cfDNA analysis at progression during cetuximab/irinotecan chemotherapy with gradual increase in allele frequency from 0.8 to 2.1%. This blinded, prospective study of a cfDNA sequencing showed high concordance to tDNA suggesting that the DST approach may be used as a non-invasive biopsy-free alternative to conventional sequencing using tumor biopsy. PMID:26452027

  7. PIK3CA mutation detection in metastatic biliary cancer using cell-free DNA.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Tae; Lira, Maruja; Deng, Shibing; Lee, Sujin; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Mao, Mao; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh

    2015-11-24

    PIK3CA mutation is considered a good candidate for targeted therapies in cancers, especially biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) from serum by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as an alternative source for PIK3CA mutation analysis. To identify matching archival tumour specimens from serum samples of advanced BTC patients, mutation detection using ddPCR with Bio-Rad's PrimePCR mutation and wild type assays were performed for PIK3CA p.E542K, p.E545K, and p.H1047R. Thirty-eight patients with metastatic BTC were enrolled. Only one (BTC 29T) sample (n = 38) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K and another (BTC 27T) for p.H1047R mutation; none was positive for PIK3CA p.E545K. Matched serum sample (BTC 29P) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K with 28 mutant copies detected, corresponding to 48 copies/ml of serum and an allelic prevalence of 0.3%. Another matched serum sample (BTC 27P) was positive for PIK3CA p.H1047R with 10 mutant copies detected, i.e. 18 copies/ml and an allelic frequency of 0.2%. High correlation was noted in the PIK3CA mutation status between tumour gDNA and serum cfDNA. Low-level PIK3CA mutations were detectable in the serum indicating the utility of cfDNA as a DNA source to detect cancer-derived mutations in metastatic biliary cancers. PMID:26498688

  8. PIK3CA mutation detection in metastatic biliary cancer using cell-free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Shibing; Lee, Sujin; Park, Young Suk; Lim, Ho Yeong; Kang, Won Ki; Mao, Mao; Heo, Jin Seok; Kwon, Wooil; Jang, Kee-Taek; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Joon Oh

    2015-01-01

    PIK3CA mutation is considered a good candidate for targeted therapies in cancers, especially biliary tract cancer (BTC). We evaluated the utility of cell free DNA (cfDNA) from serum by using droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) as an alternative source for PIK3CA mutation analysis. To identify matching archival tumour specimens from serum samples of advanced BTC patients, mutation detection using ddPCR with Bio-Rad's PrimePCR mutation and wild type assays were performed for PIK3CA p.E542K, p.E545K, and p.H1047R. Thirty-eight patients with metastatic BTC were enrolled. Only one (BTC 29T) sample (n = 38) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K and another (BTC 27T) for p.H1047R mutation; none was positive for PIK3CA p.E545K. Matched serum sample (BTC 29P) was positive for PIK3CA p.E542K with 28 mutant copies detected, corresponding to 48 copies/ml of serum and an allelic prevalence of 0.3%. Another matched serum sample (BTC 27P) was positive for PIK3CA p.H1047R with 10 mutant copies detected, i.e. 18 copies/ml and an allelic frequency of 0.2%. High correlation was noted in the PIK3CA mutation status between tumour gDNA and serum cfDNA. Low-level PIK3CA mutations were detectable in the serum indicating the utility of cfDNA as a DNA source to detect cancer-derived mutations in metastatic biliary cancers. PMID:26498688

  9. Cell-Free Fetal DNA, Telomeres, and the Spontaneous Onset of Parturition.

    PubMed

    Phillippe, Mark

    2015-10-01

    Multiple previous reports have provided compelling support for the premise that spontaneous parturition is mediated by activation of inflammation-related signaling pathways leading to increased secretion of cytokines and chemokines, the influx of neutrophils and macrophages into the pregnant uterus, increased production of uterine activation proteins (eg, connexin-43, cyclo-oxygenase-2, oxytocin receptors, etc), activation of matrix metalloproteinases, and the release of uterotonins leading to cervical ripening, membrane rupture, and myometrial contractions. The missing link has been the fetal/placental signal that triggers these proinflammatory events in the absence of microbial invasion and intrauterine infection. This article reviews the biomedical literature regarding the increase in cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA), which is released during apoptosis in the placenta and fetal membranes at term, the ability of apoptosis modified vertebrate DNA to stimulate toll-like receptor-9 (TLR9) leading to increased release of cytokines and chemokines, and the potential "fail-safe" role for the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10. This article also reviews the literature supporting the key role that telomere loss plays in regard to increasing the ability of vertebrate (including placental) DNA to stimulate TLR9, and in regard to signaling the onset of apoptosis in the placenta and fetal membranes, thereby providing a biologic clock that determines the length of gestation and the timing for the onset of parturition. In summary, this literature review provides a strong rationale for future research to test the hypothesis that telomere loss and increased cffDNA levels trigger the proinflammatory events leading to the spontaneous onset of parturition in mammals: the "cffDNA/telomere hypothesis." PMID:26134037

  10. Cell free DNA testing-interpretation of results using an online calculator.

    PubMed

    Grace, Matthew R; Hardisty, Emily; Green, Noah S; Davidson, Emily; Stuebe, Alison M; Vora, Neeta L

    2015-07-01

    All pregnant women, regardless of age, should be offered screening or invasive testing for chromosomal abnormalities at <20 weeks' gestation. Noninvasive prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidy with the use of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is a screening method that offers high sensitivity and specificity in validation studies and has reduced the need for unnecessary invasive procedures. Laboratories often advertise and report a test's sensitivity and specificity as a means to describe the test's accuracy. The positive predictive value (PPV) of a screening test (the proportion of positive results that are truly positive) is a function of the prevalence of the condition in a population and often is not reported in direct-to-patient advertising. False-positive cfDNA screening tests have been reported, and there is evidence that some women are deciding to terminate their pregnancy without confirmatory testing. We believe that laboratories should disclose the patient-specific PPV of cfDNA screening for aneuploidy on result reports. To assist with counseling patients about the benefits, risks, and limitations of aneuploidy screening with the use of cfDNA and to demonstrate the relationship between an a priori risk and PPV, we developed a web-based calculator to estimate the PPV of the 4 commercially available cfDNA testing platforms for which data have been published. Estimates are made with the use of a patient's age and gestational age-related risk of trisomy 21, 18 and 13 or an a priori risk that is based on other findings. This web-based calculator is an aid for providers and genetic counselors to illustrate the relationship between disease prevalence and a test's PPV. It has enhanced our counseling of patients both before they elect noninvasive prenatal screening and after they receive a positive result. PMID:25957020

  11. Graft-Derived Cell-Free DNA as a Marker of Transplant Graft Injury.

    PubMed

    Oellerich, Michael; Walson, Philip D; Beck, Julia; Schmitz, Jessica; Kollmar, Otto; Schütz, Ekkehard

    2016-04-01

    Although short-term success after solid organ transplantation is good, long-term graft and recipient survival are both not satisfactory. Despite therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) of immunosuppressive drugs (ISDs), both excessive and insufficient immunosuppression still do occur. There is a need for new biomarkers that, when combined with TDM, can be used to provide more effective and less toxic, personalized immunosuppression to improve long-term survival. Currently used methods are insufficient to rapidly, cost-effectively, and directly interrogate graft integrity after solid organ transplantation. However, because organ transplants are also genome transplants, measurement of graft-derived circulating cell-free DNA (GcfDNA) has shown promise as a way to improve both graft and recipient outcomes after solid organ transplantation through the early detection of severe graft injury, enabling an early intervention. A newly developed droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) method has advantages over expensive high-throughput sequencing methods to rapidly quantify GcfDNA percentages and absolute amounts. This procedure does not require donor DNA and therefore can be applied to any organ donor/recipient pair. The droplet digital polymerase chain reaction method allows for the early, sensitive, specific, and cost-effective direct assessment of graft integrity and can be used to define individual responses to ISDs including the minimal ISD exposures necessary to prevent rejection. This is especially important in patients undergoing ISD switches due to ISD toxicity, infections, or malignancies. Although prospective, multicenter clinical trials in liver, heart, and kidney transplantation have not been completed, early results suggest that GcfDNA can be combined with TDM to guide changes in immunosuppression to provide more effective, and less toxic treatment. Personalized immunosuppression will shift emphasis in transplantation from reaction to prevention and could

  12. Fetal Aneuploidy Detection by Cell-Free DNA Sequencing for Multiple Pregnancies and Quality Issues with Vanishing Twins

    PubMed Central

    Grömminger, Sebastian; Yagmur, Erbil; Erkan, Sanli; Nagy, Sándor; Schöck, Ulrike; Bonnet, Joachim; Smerdka, Patricia; Ehrich, Mathias; Wegner, Rolf-Dieter; Hofmann, Wera; Stumm, Markus

    2014-01-01

    Non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) by random massively parallel sequencing of maternal plasma DNA for multiple pregnancies is a promising new option for prenatal care since conventional non-invasive screening for fetal trisomies 21, 18 and 13 has limitations and invasive diagnostic methods bear a higher risk for procedure related fetal losses in the case of multiple gestations compared to singletons. In this study, in a retrospective blinded analysis of stored twin samples, all 16 samples have been determined correctly, with four trisomy 21 positive and 12 trisomy negative samples. In the prospective part of the study, 40 blood samples from women with multiple pregnancies have been analyzed (two triplets and 38 twins), with two correctly identified trisomy 21 cases, confirmed by karyotyping. The remaining 38 samples, including the two triplet pregnancies, had trisomy negative results. However, NIPT is also prone to quality issues in case of multiple gestations: the minimum total amount of cell-free fetal DNA must be higher to reach a comparable sensitivity and vanishing twins may cause results that do not represent the genetics of the living sibling, as described in two case reports. PMID:26237471

  13. Evaluation of patient education materials: the example of circulating cell free DNA testing for aneuploidy.

    PubMed

    Kloza, Edward M; Haddow, Paula K; Halliday, Jacquelyn V; O'Brien, Barbara M; Lambert-Messerlian, Geralyn M; Palomaki, Glenn E

    2015-04-01

    Informed consent is the process by which the treating health care provider discloses appropriate information to a competent patient so that the patient may make a voluntary choice to accept or refuse treatment. When the analysis of circulating cell free DNA (ccfDNA) became commercially available in 2011 through the Prenatal Diagnostic Laboratory at Women & Infants Hospital of Providence, Rhode Island to "high-risk" women, it provided an opportunity to examine how commercial laboratories informed potential consumers. We identified, via an internet search, four laboratories offering such testing in the United States and one in Europe. We evaluated patient educational materials (PEMs) from each using the Flesch Reading Ease method and a modified version of the Suitability Assessment of Materials (SAM) criteria. Pamphlets were also reviewed for their inclusion of content recommendations from the International Society for Prenatal Diagnosis, the National Society of Genetic Counselors, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists jointly with the Society of Maternal Fetal Medicine, and the American College of Genetics and Genomics. Reading levels were typically high (10th-12th grade). None of the pamphlets met all SAM criteria evaluated nor did any pamphlet include all recommended content items. To comply with readability and content recommendations more closely, Women & Infants Hospital created a new pamphlet to which it applied the same criteria, and also subjected it to focus group assessment. These types of analyses can serve as a model for future evaluations of similar patient educational materials. PMID:25204423

  14. A novel strategy for highly efficient isolation and analysis of circulating tumor-specific cell-free DNA from lung cancer patients using a reusable conducting polymer nanostructure.

    PubMed

    Lee, HyungJae; Jeon, SeungHyun; Seo, Jin-Suck; Goh, Sung-Ho; Han, Ji-Youn; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-09-01

    We have developed a reusable nanostructured polypyrrole nanochip and demonstrated its use in the electric field-mediated recovery of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) from the plasma of lung cancer patients. Although cfDNA has been recognized and widely studied as a versatile and promising biomarker for the diagnosis and prognosis of cancers, the lack of efficient strategies to directly isolate cfDNA from the plasma has become a great hindrance to its potential clinical use. As a proof-of-concept study, we demonstrated a technique for the rapid and efficient isolation of cfDNA with high yield and purity. In particular, the synergistic effects of the electro-activity and the nanostructured features of the polypyrrole polymer enabled repeated retrieval of cfDNA using a single platform. Moreover, polypyrrole nanochip facilitated the amplification of tumor-specific DNA fragments from the plasma samples of patients with lung cancer characterized by mutations in exons 21 of the epidermal growth factor receptor gene (EGFR). Overall, the proposed polypyrrole nanochip has enormous potential for industrial and clinical applications with significantly enhanced efficiency in the recovery of tumor-associated circulating cfDNA. This may ultimately contribute to more robust and reliable evaluation of gene mutations in peripheral blood. PMID:27294542

  15. Cell-free fetal DNA in the maternal circulation originates from the cytotrophoblast: proof from an unique case

    PubMed Central

    Hochstenbach, Ron; Nikkels, Peter G J; Elferink, Martin G; Oudijk, Martijn A; van Oppen, Carla; van Zon, Patrick; van Harssel, Jeske; Schuring-Blom, Heleen; Page-Christiaens, Godelieve C M L

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) and direct karyotyping of cytotrophoblast were normal for a male fetus, but cultured chorionic villus mesenchymal cells and umbilical cord fibroblasts showed nonmosaic trisomy 18. This observation provides direct evidence for the cytotrophoblastic origin of cell-free fetal DNA and yields a biological explanation for falsely reassuring NIPT results. PMID:26185654

  16. Review: Cell-free fetal DNA in the maternal circulation as an indication of placental health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Taglauer, E.S.; Wilkins-Haug, L.; Bianchi, D.W.

    2016-01-01

    In human pregnancy, the constant turnover of villous trophoblast results in extrusion of apoptotic material into the maternal circulation. This material includes cell-free (cf) DNA, which is commonly referred to as “fetal”, but is actually derived from the placenta. As the release of cf DNA is closely tied to placental morphogenesis, conditions associated with abnormal placentation, such as preeclampsia, are associated with high DNA levels in the blood of pregnant women. Over the past five years, the development and commercial availability of techniques of massively parallel DNA sequencing have facilitated noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for fetal trisomies 13, 18, and 21. Clinical experience accrued over the past two years has highlighted the importance of the fetal fraction (ff) in cf DNA analysis. The ff is the amount of cell-free fetal DNA in a given sample divided by the total amount of cell-free DNA. At any gestational age, ff has a bell-shaped distribution that peaks between 10 and 20% at 10–21 weeks. ff is affected by maternal body mass index, gestational age, fetal aneuploidy, and whether the gestation is a singleton or multiple. In approximately 0.1% of clinical cases, the NIPT result and a subsequent diagnostic karyotype are discordant; confined placental mosaicism has been increasingly reported as an underlying biologic explanation. Cell-free fetal DNA is a new biomarker that can provide information about the placenta and potentially be used to predict clinical problems. Knowledge gaps still exist with regard to what affects production, metabolism, and clearance of feto-placental DNA. PMID:24388429

  17. Cerebrovascular response to decreased hematocrit: effect of cell-free hemoglobin, plasma viscosity, and CO2.

    PubMed

    Rebel, Annette; Ulatowski, John A; Kwansa, Herman; Bucci, Enrico; Koehler, Raymond C

    2003-10-01

    The effect of transfusing a nonextravasating, zero-link polymer of cell-free hemoglobin on pial arteriolar diameter, cerebral blood flow (CBF), and O2 transport (CBF x arterial O2 content) was compared with that of transfusing an albumin solution at equivalent reductions in hematocrit (approximately 19%) in anesthetized cats. The influence of viscosity was assessed by coinfusion of a high-viscosity solution of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP), which increased plasma viscosity two- to threefold. Exchange transfusion of a 5% albumin solution resulted in pial arteriolar dilation, increased CBF, and unchanged O2 transport, whereas there were no significant changes over time in a control group. Exchange transfusion of a 12% polymeric hemoglobin solution resulted in pial arteriolar constriction and unchanged CBF and O2 transport. Coinfusion of PVP with albumin produced pial arteriolar dilation that was similar to that obtained with transfusion of albumin alone. In contrast, coinfusion of PVP with hemoglobin converted the constrictor response to a dilator response that prevented a decrease in CBF. Pial arteriolar dilation to hypercapnia was unimpaired in groups transfused with albumin or hemoglobin alone but was attenuated in the largest vessels in albumin and hemoglobin groups coinfused with PVP. Unexpectedly, hypocapnic vasoconstriction was blunted in all groups after transfusion of albumin or hemoglobin alone or with PVP. We conclude that 1) the increase in arteriolar diameter after albumin transfusion represents a compensatory response that prevents decreased O2 transport at reduced O2-carrying capacity, 2) the decrease in diameter associated with near-normal O2-carrying capacity after cell-free polymeric hemoglobin transfusion represents a compensatory mechanism that prevents increased O2 transport at reduced blood viscosity, 3) pial arterioles are capable of dilating to an increase in plasma viscosity when hemoglobin is present in the plasma, 4) decreasing hematocrit does

  18. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    PubMed

    Butler, Timothy M; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J; Macey, Tara A; Korkola, James E; Koppie, Theresa M; Corless, Christopher L; Gray, Joe W; Spellman, Paul T

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  19. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  20. Cell-free plasma hemoglobin removal by dialyzers with various permeability profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hulko, Michael; Kunz, Melanie; Yildirim, Mehmet; Homeyer, Sandra; Amon, Oliver; Krause, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The release of hemoglobin from mechanically stressed erythrocytes into plasma is a general side effect of extracorporeal therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or hemodialysis. In many reported cases dialysis patients showed elevated cell-free plasma hemoglobin (CPH) levels which are associated with pathophysiological effects. In this in vitro study, the CPH clearance capacity of various filters with different permeability profiles was measured. Simulated dialysis treatments were conducted and clearance was calculated from variations in CPH concentrations over time by measuring plasma absorbance at 405 nm. Conventional high-flux filters exhibited no detectable clearance of CPH. High-flux filters with extended permeability exhibited clearances between 5.8 ± 1.2 and 12.7 ± 1.7 ml/min when tested with plasma and between 5.8 ± 1.2 and 11.3 ± 1.6 ml/min when tested with whole blood. septeX high-cutoff filters had clearances between 13.8 ± 1.8 and 15.5 ± 1.7 ml/min when tested with plasma and of 22.6 ± 2.9 ml/min when tested with whole blood. This study demonstrated that filters with extended permeability and the septeX filter enable CPH removal when used as in chronic and acute settings. PMID:26553708

  1. [Molecular Karyotyping of Cell-Free DNA from Blastocoele Fluid as a Basis for Noninvasive Preimplantation Genetic Screening of Aneuploidy].

    PubMed

    Skryabin, N A; Lebedev, I N; Artukhova, V G; Zhigalina, D I; Stepanov, I A; Krivoschekova, G V; Svetlakov, A V

    2015-11-01

    The discovery of DNA fragments in the blastocoele fluid is promising for the development of new noninvasive methods for the preimplantation genetic diagnosis of chromosomal diseases. However, to date there are no data confirming the concordance between the molecular karyotype of cell-free DNA from blastocoele fluid and the blastocyst cells per se. This paper reports on this concordance according to the results of molecular-cytogenetic analysis of the chromosomal set with the use of comparative genomic hybridization. PMID:26845860

  2. Urine Cell-Free DNA Integrity as a Marker for Early Prostate Cancer Diagnosis: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Casadio, Valentina; Calistri, Daniele; Salvi, Samanta; Gunelli, Roberta; Carretta, Elisa; Amadori, Dino; Silvestrini, Rosella; Zoli, Wainer

    2013-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA has been recognized as an accurate marker for the diagnosis of prostate cancer, whereas the role of urine cell-free DNA (UCF DNA) has never been evaluated in this setting. It is known that normal apoptotic cells produce highly fragmented DNA while cancer cells release longer DNA. We thus verified the potential role of UCF DNA integrity for early prostate cancer diagnosis. UCF DNA was isolated from 29 prostate cancer patients and 25 healthy volunteers. Sequences longer than 250 bp (c-Myc, BCAS1, and HER2) were quantified by real-time PCR to verify UCF DNA integrity. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis revealed an area under the curve of 0.7959 (95% CI 0.6729–0.9188). At the best cut-off value of 0.04 ng/μL, UCF DNA integrity analysis showed a sensitivity of 0.79 (95% CI 0.62–0.90) and a specificity of 0.84 (95% CI 0.65–0.94). These preliminary findings indicate that UCF DNA integrity could be a promising noninvasive marker for the early diagnosis of prostate cancer and pave the way for further research into this area. PMID:23509700

  3. Trapping of DNA topoisomerase I on nick-containing DNA in cell free extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lebedeva, Natalia; Auffret Vander Kemp, Patricia; Bjornsti, Mary-Ann; Lavrik, Olga; Boiteux, Serge

    2006-07-13

    The aim of the present study was to identify proteins that bind nicked DNA intermediates formed in the course of base excision repair (BER) in cell free extracts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In mammalian cells, nicks in DNA are targets of proteins such as PARP-1 or XRCC1 that have no homologues in yeast. One of the most promising methodologies to trap proteins that interact with damaged DNA lies in using a photocrosslinking technique with photoactivable dNTP analogues such as exo-N-{2-[N-(4-azido-2,5-difluoro-3-chloropyridine-6-yl)-3-aminopropionyl]-aminoethyl}-2'-deoxycytidine-5'-triphosphate (FAP-dCTP) for enzymatic synthesis of DNA probes with a photoreactive dNMP residue at the 3'-margin of a nick. Using this approach, we identified a major covalent DNA-protein adduct between a nick-containing 34-mer DNA duplex and a protein of a molecular mass of around 100-kDa. Unexpectedly, the formation of the 100-kDa adduct did not require the incorporation of the photoreactive dNMP residue at the 3'-margin of the nick nor exposure to near UV-light. However, the formation of the 100-kDa adduct strictly required a nick or a short gap in the DNA probe. Furthermore, the 100-kDa adduct was not detected in yeast extracts lacking DNA topoisomerase I (Top1). To further establish the nature of crosslinked protein, yeast Top1 was tagged with a Myc-epitope. In this case, the mobility of the Top1-DNA adduct increased by 7- kDa. Therefore, our data speak in favor of Top1 trapping by nicked DNA. In support of this hypothesis, purified yeast Top1 was also crosslinked to nicked DNA structures. Undamaged, uracil- and abasic (AP) site-containing DNAs were unable to trap Top1 under the same assay conditions. Since nicked DNA structures are frequently formed in the course of BER, their covalent linkage to Top1 has the potential to interfere with BER in vivo. PMID:16713756

  4. Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of β-thalassemia by detection of the cell-free fetal DNA in maternal circulation: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zafari, Mandana; Kosaryan, Mehrnoush; Gill, Pooria; Alipour, Abbass; Shiran, Mohammadreza; Jalalli, Hossein; Banihashemi, Ali; Fatahi, Fatemeh

    2016-08-01

    The discovery of fetal DNA (f-DNA) opens the possibility of early non-invasive procedure for detection of paternally inherited mutation of beta-thalassemia. Since 2002, some studies have examined the sensitivity and specificity of this method for detection of paternally inherited mutation of thalassemia in pregnant women at risk of having affected babies. We conducted a systematic review of published articles that evaluated using this method for early detection of paternally inherited mutation in maternal plasma. A sensitive search of multiple databases was done in which nine studies met our inclusion criteria. The sensitivity and specificity was 99 and 99 %, respectively. The current study found that detection of paternally inherited mutation of thalassemia using analysis of cell-free fetal DNA is highly accurate. This method could replace conventional and invasive methods. PMID:26968552

  5. Integrating stakeholder perspectives into the translation of cell-free fetal DNA testing for aneuploidy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The translation of novel genomic technologies from bench to bedside enjoins the comprehensive consideration of the perspectives of all stakeholders who stand to influence, or be influenced by, the translational course. Non-invasive prenatal aneuploidy testing that utilizes cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) circulating in maternal blood is one example of an innovative technology that promises significant benefits for its intended end users; however, it is currently uncertain whether it will achieve widespread clinical implementation. We conducted qualitative interviews with 18 diverse stakeholders in this domain, including prospective users of the technology and healthcare personnel, researchers and developers, and experts in social, legal, and regulatory aspects of genetic technology, and a pilot survey of 62 obstetric healthcare providers. Analysis of interview and survey data was combined with a review of the proceedings of a full-day, multidisciplinary conference on the topic and published scientific and ethics literature surrounding this and other relevant technologies. Discussion We constructed potential pathways for technological implementation, identified broad stakeholder classes party to these translational processes, and performed a preliminary assessment of the viewpoints and interrelations among these diverse stakeholders. Some of the stakeholders whose priorities are critical to understand and integrate into translation include pregnant women and their families; healthcare providers; scientists, their institutions or companies, and the funding agencies that support them; regulatory and judicial bodies; third-party payers; professional societies; educational systems; disability rights communities; and other representatives from civil society. Stakeholder interviews, survey findings, and conference proceedings add complexity to these envisioned pathways and also demonstrate a paramount need to incorporate an iterative stakeholder analysis early and

  6. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Zill, Oliver A.; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A.; Divers, Stephen G.; Hoon, Dave S. B.; Kopetz, E. Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G.; Baca, Arthur M.; Kermani, Bahram G.; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital SequencingTM is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient’s cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  7. Analytical and Clinical Validation of a Digital Sequencing Panel for Quantitative, Highly Accurate Evaluation of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA.

    PubMed

    Lanman, Richard B; Mortimer, Stefanie A; Zill, Oliver A; Sebisanovic, Dragan; Lopez, Rene; Blau, Sibel; Collisson, Eric A; Divers, Stephen G; Hoon, Dave S B; Kopetz, E Scott; Lee, Jeeyun; Nikolinakos, Petros G; Baca, Arthur M; Kermani, Bahram G; Eltoukhy, Helmy; Talasaz, AmirAli

    2015-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing of cell-free circulating solid tumor DNA addresses two challenges in contemporary cancer care. First this method of massively parallel and deep sequencing enables assessment of a comprehensive panel of genomic targets from a single sample, and second, it obviates the need for repeat invasive tissue biopsies. Digital Sequencing™ is a novel method for high-quality sequencing of circulating tumor DNA simultaneously across a comprehensive panel of over 50 cancer-related genes with a simple blood test. Here we report the analytic and clinical validation of the gene panel. Analytic sensitivity down to 0.1% mutant allele fraction is demonstrated via serial dilution studies of known samples. Near-perfect analytic specificity (> 99.9999%) enables complete coverage of many genes without the false positives typically seen with traditional sequencing assays at mutant allele frequencies or fractions below 5%. We compared digital sequencing of plasma-derived cell-free DNA to tissue-based sequencing on 165 consecutive matched samples from five outside centers in patients with stage III-IV solid tumor cancers. Clinical sensitivity of plasma-derived NGS was 85.0%, comparable to 80.7% sensitivity for tissue. The assay success rate on 1,000 consecutive samples in clinical practice was 99.8%. Digital sequencing of plasma-derived DNA is indicated in advanced cancer patients to prevent repeated invasive biopsies when the initial biopsy is inadequate, unobtainable for genomic testing, or uninformative, or when the patient's cancer has progressed despite treatment. Its clinical utility is derived from reduction in the costs, complications and delays associated with invasive tissue biopsies for genomic testing. PMID:26474073

  8. Properties of damage-dependent DNA incision by nucleotide excision repair in human cell-free extracts.

    PubMed Central

    Calsou, P; Salles, B

    1994-01-01

    Nucleotide excision repair (NER) is the primary mechanism for the removal of many lesions from DNA. This repair process can be broadly divided in two stages: first, incision at damaged sites and second, synthesis of new DNA to replace the oligonucleotide removed by excision. In order to dissect the repair mechanism, we have recently devised a method to analyze the incision reaction in vitro in the absence of repair synthesis (1). Damage-specific incisions take place in a repair reaction in which mammalian cell-free extracts are mixed with undamaged and damaged plasmids. Most of the incision events are accompanied by excision. Using this assay, we investigated here various parameters that specifically affect the level of damage-dependent incision activity by cell-free extracts in vitro. We have defined optimal conditions for the reaction and determined the kinetics of the incision with cell-free extracts from human cells. We present direct evidence that the incision step of NER is ATP-dependent. In addition, we observe that Mn2+ but no other divalent cation can substitute for Mg2+ in the incision reaction. Images PMID:7800483

  9. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baohong; Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue; Ding, Guohui

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods-the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method-together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  10. DASAF: An R Package for Deep Sequencing-Based Detection of Fetal Autosomal Abnormalities from Maternal Cell-Free DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoyan; Qiu, Feng; Tao, Chunmei; Gao, Junhui; Ma, Mengmeng; Zhong, Tingyan; Cai, JianPing; Li, Yixue

    2016-01-01

    Background. With the development of massively parallel sequencing (MPS), noninvasive prenatal diagnosis using maternal cell-free DNA is fast becoming the preferred method of fetal chromosomal abnormality detection, due to its inherent high accuracy and low risk. Typically, MPS data is parsed to calculate a risk score, which is used to predict whether a fetal chromosome is normal or not. Although there are several highly sensitive and specific MPS data-parsing algorithms, there are currently no tools that implement these methods. Results. We developed an R package, detection of autosomal abnormalities for fetus (DASAF), that implements the three most popular trisomy detection methods—the standard Z-score (STDZ) method, the GC correction Z-score (GCCZ) method, and the internal reference Z-score (IRZ) method—together with one subchromosome abnormality identification method (SCAZ). Conclusions. With the cost of DNA sequencing declining and with advances in personalized medicine, the demand for noninvasive prenatal testing will undoubtedly increase, which will in turn trigger an increase in the tools available for subsequent analysis. DASAF is a user-friendly tool, implemented in R, that supports identification of whole-chromosome as well as subchromosome abnormalities, based on maternal cell-free DNA sequencing data after genome mapping. PMID:27437397

  11. Cell-free DNA Fragmentation Patterns in Amniotic Fluid Identify Genetic Abnormalities and Changes due to Storage

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Inga; Tighiouart, Hocine; Lapaire, Olav; Johnson, Kirby L.; Bianchi, Diana W.; Terrin, Norma

    2015-01-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has become a promising biomarker in prenatal diagnosis. However, despite extensive studies in different body fluids, cfDNA predictive value is uncertain owing to the confounding factors that can affect its levels, such as gestational age, maternal weight, smoking status, and medications. Residual fresh and archived amniotic fluid (AF) supernatants were obtained from gravid women (mean gestational age 17 wk) carrying euploid (N = 36) and aneuploid (N = 29) fetuses, to characterize cfDNA-fragmentation patterns with regard to aneuploidy and storage time (−80°C). AF cfDNA was characterized by the real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction amplification of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, gel electrophoresis, and pattern recognition of the DNA fragmentation. The distributions of cfDNA fragment lengths were compared using 6 measures that defined the locations and slopes for the first and last peaks, after elimination of the confounding variables. This method allowed for the unique classification of euploid and aneuploid cfDNA samples in AF, which had been matched for storage time. In addition, we showed that archived euploid AF samples gradually lose long cfDNA fragments: this loss accurately distinguishes them from the fresh samples. We present preliminary data using cfDNA-fragmentation patterns, to uniquely distinguish between AF samples of pregnant women with regard to aneuploidy and storage time, independent of gestational age and initial DNA amount. In addition to potential applications in prenatal diagnosis, these data suggest that archived AF samples consist of large amounts of short cfDNA fragments, which are undetectable using standard real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification. PMID:18382362

  12. Cell-free circulating mitochondrial DNA content and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic HBV infection.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Hann, Hie-Won; Wan, Shaogui; Hann, Richard S; Wang, Chun; Lai, Yinzhi; Ye, Xishan; Evans, Alison; Myers, Ronald E; Ye, Zhong; Li, Bingshan; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a potential link between circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cancers. However, there is no study evaluating the association between circulating mtDNA as a non-invasive marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to determine circulating mtDNA content in serum samples from 116 HBV-related HCC cases and 232 frequency-matched cancer-free HBV controls, and evaluate the retrospective association between mtDNA content and HCC risk using logistic regression and their temporal relationship using a mixed effects model. HCC cases had significantly lower circulating mtDNA content than controls (1.06 versus 2.47, P = 1.7 × 10(-5)). Compared to HBV patients with higher mtDNA content, those with lower mtDNA content had a significantly increased risk of HCC with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28-3.72, P = 0.004). Quartile analyses revealed a significant dose-dependent effect (Ptrend = 0.001) for this association. In a pilot longitudinal sub-cohort of 14 matched cases-control pairs, we observed a trend of dramatically decreased mtDNA content in cases and slightly decreased mtDNA content in controls, with a significant interaction of case-control status with time (Pinteraction = 0.049). Our findings suggest that circulating mtDNA is a potential novel non-invasive biomarker of HCC risk in HBV patients. PMID:27063412

  13. Cell-free circulating mitochondrial DNA content and risk of hepatocellular carcinoma in patients with chronic HBV infection

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling; Hann, Hie-Won; Wan, Shaogui; Hann, Richard S.; Wang, Chun; Lai, Yinzhi; Ye, Xishan; Evans, Alison; Myers, Ronald E.; Ye, Zhong; Li, Bingshan; Xing, Jinliang; Yang, Hushan

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a potential link between circulating cell-free mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cancers. However, there is no study evaluating the association between circulating mtDNA as a non-invasive marker of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) risk. We conducted a nested case-control study to determine circulating mtDNA content in serum samples from 116 HBV-related HCC cases and 232 frequency-matched cancer-free HBV controls, and evaluate the retrospective association between mtDNA content and HCC risk using logistic regression and their temporal relationship using a mixed effects model. HCC cases had significantly lower circulating mtDNA content than controls (1.06 versus 2.47, P = 1.7 × 10−5). Compared to HBV patients with higher mtDNA content, those with lower mtDNA content had a significantly increased risk of HCC with an odds ratio (OR) of 2.19 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.28–3.72, P = 0.004). Quartile analyses revealed a significant dose-dependent effect (Ptrend = 0.001) for this association. In a pilot longitudinal sub-cohort of 14 matched cases-control pairs, we observed a trend of dramatically decreased mtDNA content in cases and slightly decreased mtDNA content in controls, with a significant interaction of case-control status with time (Pinteraction = 0.049). Our findings suggest that circulating mtDNA is a potential novel non-invasive biomarker of HCC risk in HBV patients. PMID:27063412

  14. PCR assay for the cell-free copro-DNA detection of Angiostrongylus cantonensis in rat faeces.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenzhen; Wang, Jiaxu; Liu, Jiang; Xu, Changmao; Cai, Weifeng; Luo, Damin

    2012-02-10

    To facilitate improved detection of the first stage larvae (L1) of Angiostrongylus cantonensis from rat faeces, a TaqMan(®) probe real-time PCR method for the detection in situ was developed targeting the second internal transcribed region of the ribosomal DNA (ITS2) of A. cantonensis. The assay was capable of detecting a single L1 in a grain of fresh faeces (weight 320 ± 125 mg) from the experimental infected Sprague-Dawley rats, and the method can also detect cell-free copro-DNA from positive faeces placed for up to 12 months at ambient environment. The present study exhibited a high level of specificity for A. cantonensis, with no fluorescence signals were observed in reference control consisting of four parasite species commonly found in the intestine of rat. This approach can overcome the limitations of DNA-based identification that faecal materials should be stored in 70% ethanol or kept as frozen samples for further tests, and thus it might be suitable and feasible for the detection of target DNA in faecal materials preserved at ambient temperature, but the detecting efficiency will depend on the amount of DNA in the samples and the time placed for the samples due to DNA degradation. PMID:21820808

  15. Fetal blood grouping using cell free DNA - an improved service for RhD negative pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Bills, V L; Soothill, P W

    2014-04-01

    Red cell alloimmunisation involves the transplacental movement of maternally derived red cell antibodies into the fetal circulation, causing red cell haemolysis, fetal anaemia and ultimately fetal death. Current standard UK practice is to prevent sensitisation to the D antigen by administering anti-D at about 28 weeks' gestation to all RhD negative pregnancies. The determination of fetal blood group by non-invasive cell free fetal DNA testing offers an improved and more efficient service to RhD negative pregnant women and avoids the potential iatrogenic harm associated with standard practice. It also has significantly improved the management of women with red cell alloimunisation to D and other antigens. This review summarises the past and future management of red cell alloimmunisation during pregnancy and the impact of ffDNA tests. PMID:24679596

  16. Protein synthesis directly from PCR: progress and applications of cell-free protein synthesis with linear DNA.

    PubMed

    Schinn, Song-Min; Broadbent, Andrew; Bradley, William T; Bundy, Bradley C

    2016-06-25

    A rapid, versatile method of protein expression and screening can greatly facilitate the future development of therapeutic biologics, proteomic drug targets and biocatalysts. An attractive candidate is cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS), a cell-lysate-based in vitro expression system, which can utilize linear DNA as expression templates, bypassing time-consuming cloning steps of plasmid-based methods. Traditionally, such linear DNA expression templates (LET) have been vulnerable to degradation by nucleases present in the cell lysate, leading to lower yields. This challenge has been significantly addressed in the recent past, propelling LET-based CFPS as a useful tool for studying, screening and engineering proteins in a high-throughput manner. Currently, LET-based CFPS has promise in fields such as functional proteomics, protein microarrays, and the optimization of complex biological systems. PMID:27085957

  17. Detection of Clonal and Subclonal Copy-Number Variants in Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Breast Cancer Using a Massively Multiplexed PCR Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Kirkizlar, Eser; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Constantin, Tudor; Swenerton, Ryan; Hoang, Bin; Wayham, Nicholas; Babiarz, Joshua E.; Demko, Zachary; Pelham, Robert J.; Kareht, Stephanie; Simon, Alexander L.; Jinnett, Kristine N.; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Hill, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate proof-of-concept for the use of massively multiplexed PCR and next-generation sequencing (mmPCR-NGS) to identify both clonal and subclonal copy-number variants (CNVs) in circulating tumor DNA. This is the first report of a targeted methodology for detection of CNVs in plasma. Using an in vitro model of cell-free DNA, we show that mmPCR-NGS can accurately detect CNVs with average allelic imbalances as low as 0.5%, an improvement over previously reported whole-genome sequencing approaches. Our method revealed differences in the spectrum of CNVs detected in tumor tissue subsections and matching plasma samples from 11 patients with stage II breast cancer. Moreover, we showed that liquid biopsies are able to detect subclonal mutations that may be missed in tumor tissue biopsies. We anticipate that this mmPCR-NGS methodology will have broad applicability for the characterization, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring of CNV-enriched cancers, such as breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. PMID:26500031

  18. Cell-free transcription at 95 degrees: thermostability of transcriptional components and DNA topology requirements of Pyrococcus transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Hethke, C; Bergerat, A; Hausner, W; Forterre, P; Thomm, M

    1999-01-01

    Cell-free transcription of archaeal promoters is mediated by two archaeal transcription factors, aTBP and TFB, which are orthologues of the eukaryotic transcription factors TBP and TFIIB. Using the cell-free transcription system described for the hyperthermophilic Archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus by Hethke et al., the temperature limits and template topology requirements of archaeal transcription were investigated. aTBP activity was not affected after incubation for 1 hr at 100 degrees. In contrast, the half-life of RNA polymerase activity was 23 min and that of TFB activity was 3 min. The half-life of a 328-nt RNA product was 10 min at 100 degrees. Best stability of RNA was observed at pH 6, at 400 mm K-glutamate in the absence of Mg(2+) ions. Physiological concentrations of K-glutamate were found to stabilize protein components in addition, indicating that salt is an important extrinsic factor contributing to thermostability. Both RNA and proteins were stabilized by the osmolyte betaine at a concentration of 1 m. The highest activity for RNA synthesis at 95 degrees was obtained in the presence of 1 m betaine and 400 mm K-glutamate. Positively supercoiled DNA, which was found to exist in Pyrococcus cells, can be transcribed in vitro both at 70 degrees and 90 degrees. However, negatively supercoiled DNA was the preferred template at all temperatures tested. Analyses of transcripts from plasmid topoisomers harboring the glutamate dehydrogenase promoter and of transcription reactions conducted in the presence of reverse gyrase indicate that positive supercoiling of DNA inhibits transcription from this promoter. PMID:10430563

  19. Prognostic role of PIK3CA mutations of cell-free DNA in early-stage triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Takashi; Yamamoto, Yutaka; Yamamoto-Ibusuki, Mutsuko; Inao, Toko; Sueta, Aiko; Fujiwara, Saori; Omoto, Yoko; Iwase, Hirotaka

    2015-11-01

    PIK3CA is an oncogene that encodes the p110α component of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K); it is the second most frequently mutated gene following the TP53 gene. In the clinical setting, PIK3CA mutations may have favorable prognostic value for hormone receptor-positive breast cancer patients and, during the past few years, PIK3CA mutations of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) have attracted attention as a potential noninvasive biomarker of cancer. However, there are few reports on the clinical implications of PIK3CA mutations for TNBC patients. We investigated the PIK3CA major mutation status of cfDNA as a noninvasive biomarker of cancer using droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR), which has high level sensitivity and specificity for cancer mutation, in early-stage 49 triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. A total of 12 (24.4%) of 49 patients had PIK3CA mutations of cfDNA. In a median follow up of 54.4 months, the presence of PIK3CA mutations of cfDNA had significant impacts on relapse-free survival (RFS; P = 0.0072) and breast cancer-specific survival (BCSS; P = 0.016), according to the log-lank test. In a Cox proportional hazards model, the presence of PIK3CA mutations of cfDNA had significant prognostic value in the univariate and multivariate analysis. Additionally, the presence of PIK3CA mutations of cfDNA was significantly correlated with positive androgen receptor phosphorylated form depending on PI3K signaling pathway (pAR) which is independent favorable prognostic factors of TNBC. We demonstrated that the presence of PIK3CA major mutations of cfDNA could be a discriminatory predictor of RFS and BCSS in early-stage TNBC patients and it was associated with PI3K pathway-dependent AR phosphorylation. PMID:26353837

  20. Cell-free fetal DNA and pregnancy-related complications (review).

    PubMed

    Sifakis, Stavros; Koukou, Zeta; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-04-01

    Cell‑free fetal DNA (cff‑DNA) is a novel promising biomarker that has been applied in various aspects of obstetrical research, notably in prenatal diagnosis and complicated pregnancies. It is easily detected by semi‑quantitative PCR for the SRY target gene. It is well recognized that the levels of circulating cff‑DNA play a role in various complications of pregnancy. In this review, we explore the implications of the detection of cff‑DNA in a range of pregnancy-related complications, such as preeclampsia, intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), preterm labor, placenta previa and hyperemesis gravidarum. cff‑DNA is released due to apoptotic mechanisms occurring on trophoblastic cells, although recent in vivo studies support the existence of additional mechanisms. The increase in the levels of cff‑DNA can be used to predict pregnancy-related complications and has great value in the field of prenatal diagnosis and in common pregnancy-related complications, as it precedes the clinical symptoms of the disease. Gestational age is a factor that determines the elevation in cff‑DNA levels in response to pathological conditions. In conclusion, the detection of cff‑DNA levels has a number of valuable applications in prenatal screening; however, the detection of cff‑DNA levels has not yet been applied in clinical practice for the diagnosis of pregnancy-related disorders. Thus, studies are focusing on unraveling the etiology of alterations in its levels under pathological conditions during pregnancy, in order to determine the potential predictive and diagnostic applications of this biomarker. PMID:25530428

  1. Is it time to sound an alarm about false-positive cell-free DNA testing for fetal aneuploidy?

    PubMed

    Mennuti, Michael T; Cherry, Athena M; Morrissette, Jennifer J D; Dugoff, Lorraine

    2013-11-01

    Testing cell-free DNA (cfDNA) in maternal blood samples has been shown to have very high sensitivity for the detection of fetal aneuploidy with very low false-positive results in high-risk patients who undergo invasive prenatal diagnosis. Recent observation in clinical practice of several cases of positive cfDNA tests for trisomy 18 and trisomy 13, which were not confirmed by cytogenetic testing of the pregnancy, may reflect a limitation of the positive predictive value of this quantitative testing, particularly when it is used to detect rare aneuploidies. Analysis of a larger number of false-positive cases is needed to evaluate whether these observations reflect the positive predictive value that should be expected. Infrequently, mechanisms (such as low percentage mosaicism or confined placental mosaicism) might also lead to positive cfDNA testing that is not concordant with standard prenatal cytogenetic diagnosis. The need to explore these and other possible causes of false-positive cfDNA testing is exemplified by 2 of these cases. Additional evaluation of cfDNA testing in clinical practice and a mechanism for the systematic reporting of false-positive and false-negative cases will be important before this test is offered widely to the general population of low-risk obstetric patients. In the meantime, incorporating information about the positive predictive value in pretest counseling and in clinical laboratory reports is recommended. These experiences reinforce the importance of offering invasive testing to confirm cfDNA results before parental decision-making. PMID:23529082

  2. Diagnostic and prognostic value of cell free circulating Schistosoma mansoni DNA: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Eraky, Maysa Ahmad; Aly, Nagwa Shaban Mohamed

    2016-09-01

    Searching for a more sensitive and accurate marker for schistosomiasis diagnosis and treatment follow up is a potential necessity. Hereby, we evaluated usefulness of circulating free DNA as a marker for schistosomiasis diagnosis, assessing drug efficacy and monitoring the control interventions impact using SYBR green real-time PCR. A batch of mice were infected by 90 ± 10 Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. Starting from the 2nd day post infection (p.i.), groups of 2 or 3 mice were sacrificed every 3 days until 30 days p.i. The remaining animals were treated by a single dose of 400 mg/kg mefloquine and sacrificed in group at 5, 10, 21 days post treatment (35, 40, 51 days p.i.). Using SYBR green real time qPCR, pooled sera DNA were extracted and amplified. The results showed that, circulating free S. mansoni DNA was detected from the 2nd day post infection (p.i.) onwards with gradual decrease in the cycle threshold value Ct which indicates the gradual elevation of the DNA level (Log quantity was 2.6-3.1 IU/ml), As the infection progressed, DNA quantity was increased(Log quantity was 6.29 IU/ml). Initial increase of circulating free DNA was observed 10 days post treatment (40 days p.i.) (Log quantity was 7.38 IU/ml). That was followed by a progressive decrease in DNA level by the end of 21st day, post treatment (51 p.i.) (Log quantity 4.35 IU/ml). In conclusion, circulating free S. mansoni DNA is a reliable marker in the diagnosis of schistosomiasis and for assessing drug efficacy and monitoring the impact of control interventions. PMID:27605830

  3. Cell Free DNA of Tumor Origin Induces a ‘Metastatic’ Expression Profile in HT-29 Cancer Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Fűri, István; Kalmár, Alexandra; Wichmann, Barnabás; Spisák, Sándor; Schöller, Andrea; Barták, Barbara; Tulassay, Zsolt; Molnár, Béla

    2015-01-01

    Background Epithelial cells in malignant conditions release DNA into the extracellular compartment. Cell free DNA of tumor origin may act as a ligand of DNA sensing mechanisms and mediate changes in epithelial-stromal interactions. Aims To evaluate and compare the potential autocrine and paracrine regulatory effect of normal and malignant epithelial cell-related DNA on TLR9 and STING mediated pathways in HT-29 human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells and normal fibroblasts. Materials and Methods DNA isolated from normal and tumorous colonic epithelia of fresh frozen surgically removed tissue samples was used for 24 and 6 hour treatment of HT-29 colon carcinoma and HDF-α fibroblast cells. Whole genome mRNA expression analysis and qRT-PCR was performed for the elements/members of TLR9 signaling pathway. Immunocytochemistry was performed for epithelial markers (i.e. CK20 and E-cadherin), DNA methyltransferase 3a (DNMT3a) and NFκB (for treated HDFα cells). Results Administration of tumor derived DNA on HT29 cells resulted in significant (p<0.05) mRNA level alteration in 118 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including overexpression of metallothionein genes (i.e. MT1H, MT1X, MT1P2, MT2A), metastasis-associated genes (i.e. TACSTD2, MACC1, MALAT1), tumor biomarker (CEACAM5), metabolic genes (i.e. INSIG1, LIPG), messenger molecule genes (i.e. DAPP, CREB3L2). Increased protein levels of CK20, E-cadherin, and DNMT3a was observed after tumor DNA treatment in HT-29 cells. Healthy DNA treatment affected mRNA expression of 613 genes (logFc≥1, p≤0.05), including increased expression of key adaptor molecules of TLR9 pathway (e.g. MYD88, IRAK2, NFκB, IL8, IL-1β), STING pathway (ADAR, IRF7, CXCL10, CASP1) and the FGF2 gene. Conclusions DNA from tumorous colon epithelium, but not from the normal epithelial cells acts as a pro-metastatic factor to HT-29 cells through the overexpression of pro-metastatic genes through TLR9/MYD88 independent pathway. In contrast, DNA derived from

  4. Cell-free DNA in Human Follicular Microenvironment: New Prognostic Biomarker to Predict in vitro Fertilization Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mullet, Tiffany; Molinari, Nicolas; Vincens, Claire; Anahory, Tal; Hamamah, Samir

    2015-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) fragments, detected in blood and in other biological fluids, are released from apoptotic and/or necrotic cells. CfDNA is currently used as biomarker for the detection of many diseases such as some cancers and gynecological and obstetrics disorders. In this study, we investigated if cfDNA levels in follicular fluid (FF) samples from in vitro fertilization (IVF) patients, could be related to their ovarian reserve status, controlled ovarian stimulation (COS) protocols and IVF outcomes. Therefore, 117 FF samples were collected from women (n = 117) undergoing IVF/Intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) procedure and cfDNA concentration was quantified by ALU-quantitative PCR. We found that cfDNA level was significantly higher in FF samples from patients with ovarian reserve disorders (low functional ovarian reserve or polycystic ovary syndrome) than from patients with normal ovarian reserve (2.7 ± 2.7 ng/μl versus 1.7 ± 2.3 ng/μl, respectively, p = 0.03). Likewise, FF cfDNA levels were significant more elevated in women who received long ovarian stimulation (> 10 days) or high total dose of gonadotropins (≥ 3000 IU/l) than in women who received short stimulation duration (7–10 days) or total dose of gonadotropins < 3000 IU/l (2.4 ± 2.8 ng/μl versus 1.5 ± 1.9 ng/μl, p = 0.008; 2.2 ± 2.3 ng/μl versus 1.5 ± 2.1 ng/μl, p = 0.01, respectively). Finally, FF cfDNA level was an independent and significant predictive factor for pregnancy outcome (adjusted odds ratio = 0.69 [0.5; 0.96], p = 0.03). In multivariate analysis, the Receiving Operator Curve (ROC) analysis showed that the performance of FF cfDNA in predicting clinical pregnancy reached 0.73 [0.66–0.87] with 88% specificity and 60% sensitivity. CfDNA might constitute a promising biomarker of follicular micro-environment quality which could be used to predict IVF prognosis and to enhance female infertility management. PMID:26288130

  5. Molecular Monitoring of Cell-Free Circulating Tumor DNA in Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Melani, Christopher; Roschewski, Mark

    2016-08-01

    The ability to precisely monitor the effectiveness of therapy for non-Hodgkin lymphoma has important clinical implications. In patients with curable lymphomas, such as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, the eradication of all disease is necessary for cure. In patients with incurable lymphomas, such as follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma, deep and durable remissions are associated with improvements in survival. Radiographic imaging modalities such as computed tomography and positron emission tomography are the current gold standard for monitoring therapy, but they are fundamentally limited by radiation risks, costs, lack of tumor specificity, and inability to detect disease at the molecular level. Novel sequencing-based methods can detect circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the peripheral blood with great sensitivity, which opens new opportunities for molecular monitoring before, during, and after therapy. Beyond monitoring, ctDNA can also be used as a "liquid biopsy" to assess for molecular changes after therapy that may identify treatment-resistant clones. ctDNA is an emerging tool that may transform our ability to offer precision therapy in non-Hodgkin lymphoma. PMID:27539624

  6. Determining efficacy of cancer chemopreventive agents using a cell-free system concomitant with DNA adduction.

    PubMed

    Smith, W A; Gupta, R C

    1999-03-10

    The large (>2000) and expanding number of natural and synthetic agents with potential cancer chemopreventive properties renders it economically and physically impossible to test each of these agents for their efficacy in the widely accepted 2-year animal bioassay and clinical trials. Therefore, there is a growing need for relevant short-term screening tests to study these compounds such that only the most efficacious ones undergo extensive long-term studies. We have previously reported in a pilot study that the use of a microsome-mediated test system concomitant with DNA adduction is a pertinent and relevant model for rapidly studying the efficacy and mechanisms of cancer chemopreventive agents. We have extended this study to investigate 26 additional agents for their potential chemopreventive abilities by studying their effects on microsome-mediated benzo[a]pyrene (BP)-DNA adduction. These agents had differential effects on the two major adducts of BP-DNA, i.e., BP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE)-deoxyguanosine (dG) and 9-OH-BP-dG-derived adducts. These agents were therefore categorized into five classes. Three test agents (ellagic acid, genistein and oltipraz) were strong inhibitors of both adducts. These agents diminished BP-DNA adduction by 65-95% and were categorized as Class I agents. Six other agents (benzyl isocyanate, R(+)-1-phenylethyl isocyanate, linoleic acid ethyl ester, (+)-biotin, indole-3-carboxylic acid and beta-carotene) moderately inhibited both BP-DNA adducts (25-64%); these compounds were identified as Class II agents. Six additional test agents inhibited only one adduct selectively and nine others were ineffective; these agents were categorized as Class III and Class IV, respectively. Interestingly, seven test agents enhanced BPDE-dG or 9-OH-BP-dG or both adducts and were categorized as Class V agents. Four of these Class V agents concomitantly inhibited BPDE-dG while enhancing 9-OH-BP-dG. This emphasizes the importance of studying individual DNA

  7. A robust two-step PCR method of template DNA production for high-throughput cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Yabuki, Takashi; Motoda, Yoko; Hanada, Kazuharu; Nunokawa, Emi; Saito, Miyuki; Seki, Eiko; Inoue, Makoto; Kigawa, Takanori; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-12-01

    A two-step PCR method has been developed for the robust, high-throughput production of linear templates ready for cell-free protein synthesis. The construct made from the cDNA expresses a target protein region with N- and/or C-terminal tags. The procedure consists only of mixing, dilution, and PCR steps, and is free from cloning and purification steps. In the first step of the two-step PCR, a target region within the coding sequence is amplified using two gene-specific forward and reverse primers, which contain the linker sequences and the terminal sequences of the target region. The second PCR concatenates the first PCR product with the N- and C-terminal double-stranded fragments, which contain the linker sequences as well as the sequences for the tag(s) and the initiation and termination, respectively, for T7 transcription and ribosomal translation, and amplifies it with the universal primer. Proteins can be fused with a variety of tags, such as natural poly-histidine, glutathione-S-transferase, maltose-binding protein, and/or streptavidin-binding peptide. The two-step PCR method was successfully applied to 42 human target protein regions with various GC contents (38-77%). The robustness of the two-step PCR method against possible fluctuations of experimental conditions in practical use was explored. The second PCR product was obtained at 60-120 microg/ml, and was used without purification as a template at a concentration of 2-4 microg/ml in an Escherichia coli coupled transcription-translation system. This combination of two-step PCR with cell-free protein synthesis is suitable for the rapid production of proteins in milligram quantities for genome-scale studies. PMID:18167031

  8. Studying nucleotide excision repair of mammalian DNA in a cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.D.

    1994-12-31

    During nucleotide excision repair, a multiprotein system locates a lesion in DNA and catalyzes enzymatic cleavage of the altered strand. The damaged oligonucleotide and the incision proteins are then displaced, DNA synthesis proceeds to form a short patch using the nonmodified strand as a template, and repair is completed by a DNA ligase. Many gene products participate in these reactions, the best known of which correspond to the seven genetic complementation groups XP-A to XP-G of the disease xeroderma pigmentosum (XP). Cells representing any of these XP groups appear to exhibit, to varying degrees, defects in the first steps of nucleotide excision repair. Individuals affected with XP are hypersensitive to sunlight; most have a predisposition to skin cancer, and some patients show severe neurological abnormalities. In addition to XP, other UV-sensitive mutants of mammalian cells are providing insight into nucleotide excision repair. Of particular interest are mutants isolated from the rodent cells, which have been assigned to 11 different complementation groups. Human genes that can correct the repair defects of rodent mutants in these complementation groups are denoted. ERCC (excision repair cross-complementing) genes are are referred to by number, ERCC1 to ERCC11. Some of these genes are proving to be equivalent to particular XP-complementing genes, while others are distinct. The process of nucleotide excision repair is evolutionarily conserved in eukaryotes, and functional homologues of many of the ERCC and XP genes have been identified in other organisms; studies in yeast are proving to be particularly informative.

  9. Prenatal screening for fetal aneuploidies with cell-free DNA in the general pregnancy population: a cost-effectiveness analysis

    PubMed Central

    Fairbrother, Genevieve; Burigo, John; Sharon, Thomas; Song, Ken

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of fetal aneuploidy screening in the general pregnancy population using non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) as compared to first trimester combined screening (FTS) with serum markers and NT ultrasound. Methods: Using a decision-analytic model, we estimated the number of fetal T21, T18, and T13 cases identified prenatally, the number of invasive procedures performed, corresponding normal fetus losses, and costs of screening using FTS or NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA). Modeling was based on a 4 million pregnant women cohort, which represents annual births in the U.S. Results: For the general pregnancy population, NIPT identified 15% more trisomy cases, reduced invasive procedures by 88%, and reduced iatrogenic fetal loss by 94% as compared to FTS. The cost per trisomy case identified with FTS was $497 909. At a NIPT unit, cost of $453 and below, there were cost savings as compared to FTS. Accounting for additional trisomy cases identified by NIPT, a NIPT unit cost of $665 provided the same per trisomy cost as that of FTS. Conclusions: NIPT in the general pregnancy population leads to more prenatal identification of fetal trisomy cases as compared to FTS and is more economical at a NIPT unit cost of $453. PMID:26000626

  10. Silver Nanoscale Hexagonal Column Chips for Detecting Cell-free DNA and Circulating Nucleosomes in Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hiroaki; Hasegawa, Katsuyuki; Hasegawa, Yuuki; Nishimaki, Tadashi; Hosomichi, Kazuyoshi; Kimura, Satoshi; Ohba, Motoi; Yao, Hiroshi; Onimaru, Manabu; Inoue, Ituro; Inoue, Haruhiro

    2015-01-01

    Blood tests, which are commonly used for cancer screening, generally have low sensitivity. Here, we developed a novel rapid and simple method to generate silver nanoscale hexagonal columns (NHCs) for use in surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). We reported that the intensity of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from gastrointestinal cancer patients is was significantly higher than that of SERS spectra of clinical serum samples obtained from non-cancer patients. We estimated the combined constituents on silver NHCs by using a field emission-type scanning electron microscope, Raman microscopes, and a 3D laser scanning confocal microscope. We obtained the Raman scattering spectra of samples of physically fractured cells and clinical serum. No spectra were obtained for chemically lysed cultured cells and DNA, RNA, and protein extracted from cultured cells. We believe that our method, which uses SERS with silver NHCs to detect circulating nucleosomes bound by methylated cell-free DNA, may be successfully implemented in blood tests for cancer screening. PMID:25994878

  11. Circulating Cell Free DNA as the Diagnostic Marker for Ovarian Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Leng, Bingjie; Zheng, Wenfei; He, Ze; Zuo, Manzhen; Chen, Aihua

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantitative analyses of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) are potential methods for the detection of ovarian cancer. Many studies have evaluated these approaches, but the results were too inconsistent to be conclusive. This study is the first to systematically evaluate the accuracy of circulating cfDNA for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer by conducting meta-analysis. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase, Cochrane Library and the Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases systematically for relevant literatures up to December 10, 2015. All analyses were conducted using Meta-DiSc1.4 and Stata 12.0 software. Sensitivity, specificity and other measures of accuracy of circulating cfDNA for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer were pooled. Meta-regression was performed to identify the sources of heterogeneity. Results This meta-analysis included a total of 9 studies, including 462 ovarian cancer patients and 407 controls. The summary estimates for quantitative analysis of circulating cfDNA in ovarian cancer screen were as follows: sensitivity, 0.70 (95% confidence interval (CI), 0.65–0.74); specificity, 0.90 (95% CI, 0.87–0.93); positive likelihood ratio, 6.60 (95% CI, 3.90–11.17); negative likelihood ratio, 0.34 (95% CI, 0.25–0.47); diagnostic odds ratio, 26.05 (95% CI, 14.67–46.26); and area under the curve, 0.89 (95% CI, 0.83–0.95), respectively. There was no statistical significance for the evaluation of publication bias. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that quantitative analysis of cfDNA has unsatisfactory sensitivity but acceptable specificity for the diagnosis of ovarian cancer. Further large-scale prospective studies are required to validate the potential applicability of using circulating cfDNA alone or in combination with conventional markers as diagnostic biomarker for ovarian cancer and explore potential factors that may influence the accuracy of ovarian cancer diagnosis. PMID:27253331

  12. Methylation status of the APC and RASSF1A promoter in cell-free circulating DNA and its prognostic role in patients with colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    MATTHAIOS, DIMITRIOS; BALGKOURANIDOU, IOANNA; KARAYIANNAKIS, ANASTASIOS; BOLANAKI, HELEN; XENIDIS, NIKOLAOS; AMARANTIDIS, KYRIAKOS; CHELIS, LEONIDAS; ROMANIDIS, KONSTANTINOS; CHATZAKI, AIKATERINI; LIANIDOU, EVI; TRYPSIANIS, GRIGORIOS; KAKOLYRIS, STYLIANOS

    2016-01-01

    DNA methylation is the most frequent epigenetic alteration. Using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), the methylation status of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) and Ras association domain family 1 isoform A (RASSF1A) genes was examined in cell-free circulating DNA from 155 plasma samples obtained from patients with early and advanced colorectal cancer (CRC). APC and RASSF1A hypermethylation was frequently observed in both early and advanced disease, and was significantly associated with a poorer disease outcome. The methylation status of the APC and RASSF1A promoters was investigated in cell-free DNA of patients with CRC. Using MSP, the promoter methylation status of APC and RASSF1A was examined in 155 blood samples obtained from patients with CRC, 88 of whom had operable CRC (oCRC) and 67 had metastatic CRC (mCRC). The frequency of APC methylation in patients with oCRC was 33%. Methylated APC promoter was significantly associated with older age (P=0.012), higher stage (P=0.014) and methylated RASSF1A status (P=0.050). The frequency of APC methylation in patients with mCRC was 53.7%. In these patients, APC methylation was significantly associated with methylated RASSF1A status (P=0.016). The frequency of RASSF1A methylation in patients with oCRC was 25%. Methylated RASSF1A in oCRC was significantly associated with higher stage (P=0.021). The frequency of RASSF1A methylation in mCRC was 44.8%. Methylated RASSF1A in mCRC was associated with moderate differentiation (P=0.012), high levels of carcinoembryonic antigen (P=0.023) and methylated APC status (P=0.016). Patients with an unmethylated APC gene had better survival in both early (81±5 vs. 27±4 months, P<0.001) and advanced disease (37±7 vs. 15±3 months, P<0.001), compared with patients with methylated APC. Patients with an unmethylated RASSF1A gene had better survival in both early (71±6 vs. 46±8 months, P<0.001) and advanced disease (28±4 vs. 16±3 months, P<0.001) than patients with

  13. Evaluation of INK4A promoter methylation using pyrosequencing and circulating cell-free DNA from patients with hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, Jason L.; Merwat, Shehzad N.; Ju, Hyunsu; Soloway, Roger D.; Wieck, Lucas R.; Li, Albert; Okorodudu, Anthony O.; Petersen, John R.; Abdulla, Nihal E.; Duchini, Andrea; Cicalese, Luca; Rastellini, Cristiana; Hu, Peter C.; Dong, Jianli

    2015-01-01

    Background Hyper-methylation of CpG dinucleotides in the promoter region of inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4A (INK4A) has been reported in 60%–80% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). As INK4A promoter hypermethylation event occurs early in HCC progression, the quantification of INK4A promoter methylation in blood sample may represent a useful biomarker for non-invasive diagnosis and prediction of response to therapy. Methods We examined INK4A promoter methylation using circulating cell-free DNA (ccfDNA) in a total of 109 serum specimens, including 66 HCC and 43 benign chronic liver diseases. Methylation of the individual seven CpG sites was examined using pyrosequencing. Results Our results showed that there were significantly higher levels of methylated INK4A in HCC specimens than controls and that the seven CpG sites had different levels of methylation and might exist in different PCR amplicons. The area under receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was 0.82, with 65.3% sensitivity and 87.2% specificity at 5% (LOD), 39.0% sensitivity and 96.5% specificity at 7% LOD, and 20.3% sensitivity and 98.8% specificity at 10% LOD, respectively. Conclusions Our results support additional studies incorporating INK4A methylation testing of ccfDNA to further validate the diagnostic, predictive, and prognostic characteristics of this biomarker in HCC patients. The knowledge of the existence of epi-alleles should help improve assay design to maximize detection. PMID:24406287

  14. Serial Next Generation Sequencing of Circulating Cell Free DNA Evaluating Tumour Clone Response To Molecularly Targeted Drug Administration

    PubMed Central

    Frenel, Jean Sebastien; Carreira, Suzanne; Goodall, Jane; Roda, Desam; Perez-Lopez, Raquel; Tunariu, Nina; Riisnaes, Ruth; Miranda, Susana; Figueiredo, Ines; NavaRodrigues, Daniel; Smith, Alan; Leux, Christophe; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Ferraldeschi, Roberta; Lorente, David; Mateo, Joaquin; Ong, Michael; Yap, Timothy A; Banerji, Udai; Tandefelt, Delila Gasi; Turner, Nick; Attard, Gerhardt; de Bono, Johann S

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated whether next generation sequencing (NGS) of cfDNA could be used for patient selection and as a tumor clone response biomarker in patients with advanced cancers participating in early phase clinical trials of targeted drugs. Methods Plasma samples from patients with known tumor mutations who completed at least 2 courses of investigational targeted therapy were collected monthly, until disease progression. NGS was performed sequentially on the Ion Torrent PGM platform. Results cfDNA was extracted from 39 patients with various tumor types. Treatments administered targeted mailnly the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway (n=28) or MEK (n=7). Overall 159 plasma samples were sequenced with a mean sequencing coverage achieved of 1,685X across experiments. At trial initiation (C1D1), 23 of 39 (59%) patients had at least one mutation identified in cfDNA (mean 2, range 1-5). TP53, PIK3CA and KRAS were the top 3 mutated genes identified, with 16 (39%), 9 (22%) and 8 (17%) different mutations, respectively. Out of these 23 patients, 13 received a targeted drug matching their tumor profile. For the 23 patients with cfDNA mutation at C1D1, the monitoring of mutation allele frequency (AF) in consecutive plasma samples during treatment with targeted drugs demonstrated potential treatment associated clonal responses. Longitudinal monitoring of cfDNA samples with multiple mutations indicated the presence of separate clones behaving discordantly. Molecular changes at cfDNA mutation level were associated with time to disease progression by RECIST criteria. Conclusion Targeted NGS of cfDNA has potential clinical utility to monitor the delivery of targeted therapies. PMID:26085511

  15. Circulating Tumor Cells (CTC) and Cell-Free DNA (cfDNA) Workshop 2016: Scientific Opportunities and Logistics for Cancer Clinical Trial Incorporation.

    PubMed

    Lowes, Lori E; Bratman, Scott V; Dittamore, Ryan; Done, Susan; Kelley, Shana O; Mai, Sabine; Morin, Ryan D; Wyatt, Alexander W; Allan, Alison L

    2016-01-01

    Despite the identification of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and cell-free DNA (cfDNA) as potential blood-based biomarkers capable of providing prognostic and predictive information in cancer, they have not been incorporated into routine clinical practice. This resistance is due in part to technological limitations hampering CTC and cfDNA analysis, as well as a limited understanding of precisely how to interpret emergent biomarkers across various disease stages and tumor types. In recognition of these challenges, a group of researchers and clinicians focused on blood-based biomarker development met at the Canadian Cancer Trials Group (CCTG) Spring Meeting in Toronto, Canada on 29 April 2016 for a workshop discussing novel CTC/cfDNA technologies, interpretation of data obtained from CTCs versus cfDNA, challenges regarding disease evolution and heterogeneity, and logistical considerations for incorporation of CTCs/cfDNA into clinical trials, and ultimately into routine clinical use. The objectives of this workshop included discussion of the current barriers to clinical implementation and recent progress made in the field, as well as fueling meaningful collaborations and partnerships between researchers and clinicians. We anticipate that the considerations highlighted at this workshop will lead to advances in both basic and translational research and will ultimately impact patient management strategies and patient outcomes. PMID:27618023

  16. Measurement of circulating cell-free DNA levels by a new simple fluorescent test in patients with primary colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Czeiger, David; Shaked, Gad; Eini, Hadar; Vered, Ilan; Belochitski, Olga; Avriel, Avital; Ariad, Samuel; Douvdevani, Amos

    2011-02-01

    Elevated circulating cell-free DNA (CFD) levels were found in patients with cancer. The standard CFD assays are work-intensive and expensive. The aim was to evaluate in patients with cancer a new simple CFD assay. In mice inoculated with cancer cells, CFD levels correlated with tumor size. Compared with healthy subjects, 38 patients with colorectal cancer (CRC) had higher preoperative CFD levels (798 ± 409 vs 308 ± 256 ng/mL; P < .0001). Compared with patients free of disease at 1 year, CFD levels were elevated in patients who remained with disease or died (DD). CFD correlated with DD (P = .033), and a combined index of carcinoembryonic antigen × CFD exhibited a better correlation to DD than did pathologic staging (P = .0027 vs P = .0065). For patients with CRC, CFD levels were prognostic of death and disease. A large prospective study will need to be performed to truly evaluate the efficacy of this method for early detection, follow-up, and evaluation of patient response to treatment. PMID:21228367

  17. An Economic Analysis of Cell-Free DNA Non-Invasive Prenatal Testing in the US General Pregnancy Population

    PubMed Central

    Benn, Peter; Curnow, Kirsten J.; Chapman, Steven; Michalopoulos, Steven N.; Hornberger, John; Rabinowitz, Matthew

    2015-01-01

    Objective Analyze the economic value of replacing conventional fetal aneuploidy screening approaches with non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) in the general pregnancy population. Methods Using decision-analysis modeling, we compared conventional screening to NIPT with cell-free DNA (cfDNA) analysis in the annual US pregnancy population. Sensitivity and specificity for fetal aneuploidies, trisomy 21, trisomy 18, trisomy 13, and monosomy X, were estimated using published data and modeling of both first- and second trimester screening. Costs were assigned for each prenatal test component and for an affected birth. The overall cost to the healthcare system considered screening costs, the number of aneuploid cases detected, invasive procedures performed, procedure-related euploid losses, and affected pregnancies averted. Sensitivity analyses evaluated the effect of variation in parameters. Costs were reported in 2014 US Dollars. Results Replacing conventional screening with NIPT would reduce healthcare costs if it can be provided for $744 or less in the general pregnancy population. The most influential variables were timing of screening entry, screening costs, and pregnancy termination rates. Of the 13,176 affected pregnancies undergoing screening, NIPT detected 96.5% (12,717/13,176) of cases, compared with 85.9% (11,314/13,176) by conventional approaches. NIPT reduced invasive procedures by 60.0%, with NIPT and conventional methods resulting in 24,596 and 61,430 invasive procedures, respectively. The number of procedure-related euploid fetal losses was reduced by 73.5% (194/264) in the general screening population. Conclusion Based on our analysis, universal application of NIPT would increase fetal aneuploidy detection rates and can be economically justified. Offering this testing to all pregnant women is associated with substantial prenatal healthcare benefits. PMID:26158465

  18. The severity of alpha-particle-induced DNA damage is revealed by exposure to cell-free extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Hodgkins, P.S.; O`Neill, P.; Stevens, D.; Fairman, M.P.

    1996-12-01

    The rejoining of single-strand breaks induced by {alpha}-particle and {gamma} irradiation in plasmid DNA under two scavenging conditions has been compared. At the two scavenger conditions has been compared. At the two scavenger capacities used of 1.5 {times} 10{sup 7} and 3 {times} 10{sup 8}s{sup {minus}1} using Tris-HCl as the scavenger, the ratio of single- to double-strand breaks for {alpha} particles is fivefold less than the corresponding ratios for {gamma} irradiation. The repair of such radiation-induced single-strand breaks has been examined using a cell-free system derived from human whole-cell extracts. We show that the rejoining of single-strand breaks for both {alpha}-particle- and {gamma}-irradiated plasmid is dependent upon the scavenging capacity and that the efficiency of rejoining of {alpha}-particle-induced single-strand breaks is significantly less than that observed for {gamma}-ray-induced breaks. In addition, for DNA that had been irradiated under conditions that mimic the cellular environment with respect to the radical scavenging capacity, 50 of {alpha}-particle-induced single-strand breaks are converted to double-strand breaks, in contrast with only {approximately}12% conversion of {gamma}-ray-induced single-strand breaks, indicating that the initial damage caused by {alpha} particles is more severe. These studies provide experimental evidence for increased clustering of damage which may have important implications for the induction of cancer by low-level {alpha}-particle sources such as domestic radon. 37 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  19. National decline in invasive prenatal diagnostic procedures in association with uptake of combined first trimester and cell-free DNA aneuploidy screening.

    PubMed

    Robson, Stephen J; Hui, Lisa

    2015-10-01

    In late 2012, a new screening test for fetal aneuploidy based on circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) became available to Australian women. The introduction of this technology in the United States has led to a reduction in invasive diagnostic procedures. Analysis of the number of amniocentesis and chorionic villus sampling (CVS) procedures performed in Australia from 1994 to 2014 shows that the introduction of cfDNA testing has been associated with the most rapid decline in invasive procedures in the last 20 years. This change has important implications for training in, and maintenance of, the procedural skills of amniocentesis and CVS. PMID:26259499

  20. Value of Quantitative and Qualitative Analyses of Circulating Cell-Free DNA as Diagnostic Tools for Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wenjun; Mao, Yilei; Ge, Penglei; Yang, Huayu; Xu, Haifeng; Lu, Xin; Sang, Xinting; Zhong, Shouxian

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Qualitative and quantitative analyses of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) are potential methods for the detection of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Many studies have evaluated these approaches, but the results have been variable. This meta-analysis is the first to synthesize these published results and evaluate the use of circulating cfDNA values for HCC diagnosis. All articles that met our inclusion criteria were assessed using QUADAS guidelines after the literature research. We also investigated 3 subgroups in this meta-analysis: qualitative analysis of abnormal concentrations of circulating cfDNA; qualitative analysis of single-gene methylation alterations; and multiple analyses combined with alpha-fetoprotein (AFP). Statistical analyses were performed using the software Stata 12.0. We synthesized these published results and calculated accuracy measures (pooled sensitivity and specificity, positive/negative likelihood ratios [PLRs/NLRs], diagnostic odds ratios [DORs], and corresponding 95% confidence intervals [95% CIs]). Data were pooled using bivariate generalized linear mixed model. Furthermore, summary receiver operating characteristic curves and area under the curve (AUC) were used to summarize overall test performance. Heterogeneity and publication bias were also examined. A total of 2424 subjects included 1280 HCC patients in 22 studies were recruited in this meta-analysis. Pooled sensitivity and specificity, PLR, NLR, DOR, AUC, and CIs of quantitative analysis were 0.741 (95% CI: 0.610–0.840), 0.851 (95% CI: 0.718–0.927), 4.970 (95% CI: 2.694–9.169), 0.304 (95% CI: 0.205–0.451), 16.347 (95% CI: 8.250–32.388), and 0.86 (95% CI: 0.83–0.89), respectively. For qualitative analysis, the values were 0.538 (95% CI: 0.401–0.669), 0.944 (95% CI: 0.889–0.972), 9.545 (95% CI: 5.298–17.196), 0.490 (95% CI: 0.372–0.646), 19.491 (95% CI: 10.458–36.329), and 0.87 (95% CI: 0.84–0.90), respectively. After combining with AFP assay, the

  1. Detection of Hot-Spot Mutations in Circulating Cell-Free DNA From Patients With Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms of the Pancreas.

    PubMed

    Berger, Andreas W; Schwerdel, Daniel; Costa, Ivan G; Hackert, Thilo; Strobel, Oliver; Lam, Sandra; Barth, Thomas F; Schröppel, Bernd; Meining, Alexander; Büchler, Markus W; Zenke, Martin; Hermann, Patrick C; Seufferlein, Thomas; Kleger, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs) are the most frequent cystic pancreatic tumors. Little is known about their molecular alterations, but mutations in GNAS have been reported to promote IPMN formation. A tumor-derived fraction of circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA), isolated from blood samples, contains many of the same mutations as the primary tumor, and could be a tool for noninvasive disease monitoring. We found that the total amount of cfDNA can discriminate between individuals without pancreatic lesions (controls) and patients with Fukuoka-negative branch-duct IPMN or pancreatic cancer. Furthermore, we detected GNAS mutations in cfDNA from patients with IPMN, but not in patients with serous cystadenoma or controls. Analyses of cfDNA might therefore be used in the diagnosis of patients with IPMN or in monitoring disease progression. PMID:27343369

  2. Genetic alteration and mutation profiling of circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) for diagnosis and targeted therapy of gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

    PubMed

    Yan, Weixin; Zhang, Aiguo; Powell, Michael J

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) have been recognized as a biologically distinctive type of tumor, different from smooth muscle and neural tumors of the gastrointestinal tract. The identification of genetic aberrations in proto-oncogenes that drive the growth of GISTs is critical for improving the efficacy of cancer therapy by matching targeted drugs to specific mutations. Research into the oncogenic mechanisms of GISTs has found that these tumors frequently contain activating gene mutations in either platelet-derived growth factor receptor A (PDGFRA) or a receptor tyrosine protein associated with a mast cell growth factor receptor encoded by the KIT gene. Mutant cancer subpopulations have the potential to disrupt durable patient responses to molecularly targeted therapy for GISTs, yet the prevalence and size of subpopulations remain largely unexplored. Detection of the cancer subpopulations that harbor low-frequency mutant alleles of target proto-oncogenes through the use of molecular genetic methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) target amplification technology, is hampered by the high abundance of wild-type alleles, which limit the sensitivity of detection of these minor mutant alleles. This is especially true in the case of mutant tumor DNA derived "driver" and "drug-resistant" alleles that are present in the circulating cell-free tumor DNA (cfDNA) in the peripheral blood circulation of GIST patients. So-called "liquid biopsy" allows for the dynamic monitoring of the patients' tumor status during treatment using minimally invasive sampling. New methodologies, such as a technology that employs a xenonucleic acid (XNA) clamping probe to block the PCR amplification of wild-type templates, have allowed improved molecular detection of these low-frequency alleles both in tissue biopsy samples and in cfDNA. These new methodologies could be widely applied for minimally invasive molecular testing in the therapeutic management of GISTs. PMID:27443349

  3. Comparison of HIV type 1 sequences from plasma, cell-free breast milk, and cell-associated breast milk viral populations in treated and untreated women in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Andreotti, Mauro; Galluzzo, Clementina M; Guidotti, Giovanni; Germano, Paola; Altan, Annamaria Doro; Pirillo, Maria Franca; Marazzi, Maria Cristina; Vella, Stefano; Palombi, Leonardo; Giuliano, Marina

    2009-07-01

    We analyzed the sequences of the HIV viral populations obtained from plasma, cell-free breast milk, and breast milk cells of HAART-treated (23) and untreated (30) HIV-infected women to obtain information about the origin of the breast milk virus. Sequence analyses of viruses were performed using the TruGene HIV-1 assay. Direct sequences of the reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (PR) genes were analyzed using the Phylip 3.68 suite of sequence analysis program and pairwise evolutionary distances were calculated with the Kimura two parameter model for estimation of distances. We found that the genetic distances between the plasma and the cell-free breast milk viruses and between the cell-free and cell-associated breast milk viruses for RT were higher in HAART-receiving women than in untreated women, suggesting viral evolution under selective drug pressure in breast milk. Our data support the hypothesis of the presence of an actively replicating viral population in the breast milk compartment, distinct from that present in plasma. PMID:19552594

  4. [Cell-free DNA fragments increase transcription in human mesenchymal stem cells, activate TLR-dependent signal pathway and supress apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Kostiuk, S V; Malinovskaia, E M; Ermakov, A V; Smirnova, T D; Kameneva, L V; Chvartatskaia, O V; Loseva, P A; Ershova, E S; Liubchenko, L N; Veĭko, N N

    2012-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are now widely adopted in regenerative medicine. However, many questions on the role of different signaling pathways in the regulation of stem cell (SC) functional activity within the organism remain unaswered. In damaged regions the level of cell death increases and DNA fragments from dead cells (cell-free DNA, cfDNA) are accumulated in blood. We showed that in adipose-derived MSCs exposed in vitro to cfDNA fragments the transcription level increased (the total amount of cellular RNA and the rRNA amount rose). GC-rich CfDNA fragments (GC-DNA) activated the TLR9-dependent signal pathway: the expression of TLR9 and of TLR9-signaling pathway adapter--MyD88--was up-regulated. AT-rich DNA fragments did not increase the TLR9 expression, though, the MyD88 expression level rose. So we suggest that AT-DNA acts via some other receptors that nevertheless activate MyD88-dependent signalling in MSCs. We also showed that cfDNA fragments decreased the activity of caspase, an apoptotic enzyme. So, ctDNA can significantly influence the functional activity ofMSC by activating TLR9- and MyD88-dependent signal pathways and lowering the apoptosis level. PMID:23350199

  5. Noninvasive Prenatal Screening for Genetic Diseases Using Massively Parallel Sequencing of Maternal Plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Chitty, Lyn S; Lo, Y M Dennis

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in maternal plasma in 1997 heralded the most significant change in obstetric care for decades, with the advent of safer screening and diagnosis based on analysis of maternal blood. Here, we describe how the technological advances offered by next-generation sequencing have allowed for the development of a highly sensitive screening test for aneuploidies as well as definitive prenatal molecular diagnosis for some monogenic disorders. PMID:26187875

  6. Impact of Cell-Free Fetal DNA Screening on Patients’ Choice of Invasive Procedures after a Positive California Prenatal Screen Result

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Forum T.; Steinhaus French, Kathryn; Osann, Kathryn E.; Bocian, Maureen; Jones, Marilyn C.; Korty, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, maternal serum analyte levels paired with sonographic fetal nuchal translucency measurement was the most accurate prenatal screen available for Trisomies 18 and 21, (91% and 94% detection and false positive rates of 0.31% and 4.5% respectively). Women with positive California Prenatal Screening Program (CPSP) results have the option of diagnostic testing to determine definitively if the fetus has a chromosomal abnormality. Cell-free fetal (cff-) DNA screening for Trisomies 13, 18, and 21 was first offered in 2012, allowing women with positive screens to choose additional screening before diagnostic testing. Cff-DNA sensitivity rates are as high as 99.9% and 99.1%, with false positive rates of 0.4% and 0.1%, for Trisomies 18 and 21, respectively. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2012 on 500 CPSP referrals at the University of California, San Diego Thornton Hospital. Data were collected prior to and after the introduction of cff-DNA. There was a significant increase in the number of participants who chose to pursue additional testing and a decrease in the number of invasive procedures performed after cff-DNA screening was available. We conclude that as fetal aneuploidy screening improves, the number of invasive procedures will continue to decrease. PMID:26237481

  7. Impact of Cell-Free Fetal DNA Screening on Patients' Choice of Invasive Procedures after a Positive California Prenatal Screen Result.

    PubMed

    Shah, Forum T; French, Kathryn Steinhaus; Osann, Kathryn E; Bocian, Maureen; Jones, Marilyn C; Korty, Lauren

    2014-01-01

    Until recently, maternal serum analyte levels paired with sonographic fetal nuchal translucency measurement was the most accurate prenatal screen available for Trisomies 18 and 21, (91% and 94% detection and false positive rates of 0.31% and 4.5% respectively). Women with positive California Prenatal Screening Program (CPSP) results have the option of diagnostic testing to determine definitively if the fetus has a chromosomal abnormality. Cell-free fetal (cff-) DNA screening for Trisomies 13, 18, and 21 was first offered in 2012, allowing women with positive screens to choose additional screening before diagnostic testing. Cff-DNA sensitivity rates are as high as 99.9% and 99.1%, with false positive rates of 0.4% and 0.1%, for Trisomies 18 and 21, respectively. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2012 on 500 CPSP referrals at the University of California, San Diego Thornton Hospital. Data were collected prior to and after the introduction of cff-DNA. There was a significant increase in the number of participants who chose to pursue additional testing and a decrease in the number of invasive procedures performed after cff-DNA screening was available. We conclude that as fetal aneuploidy screening improves, the number of invasive procedures will continue to decrease. PMID:26237481

  8. Identification of Human N-Myristoylated Proteins from Human Complementary DNA Resources by Cell-Free and Cellular Metabolic Labeling Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Takamitsu, Emi; Otsuka, Motoaki; Haebara, Tatsuki; Yano, Manami; Matsuzaki, Kanako; Kobuchi, Hirotsugu; Moriya, Koko; Utsumi, Toshihiko

    2015-01-01

    To identify physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins, 90 cDNA clones predicted to encode human N-myristoylated proteins were selected from a human cDNA resource (4,369 Kazusa ORFeome project human cDNA clones) by two bioinformatic N-myristoylation prediction systems, NMT-The MYR Predictor and Myristoylator. After database searches to exclude known human N-myristoylated proteins, 37 cDNA clones were selected as potential human N-myristoylated proteins. The susceptibility of these cDNA clones to protein N-myristoylation was first evaluated using fusion proteins in which the N-terminal ten amino acid residues were fused to an epitope-tagged model protein. Then, protein N-myristoylation of the gene products of full-length cDNAs was evaluated by metabolic labeling experiments both in an insect cell-free protein synthesis system and in transfected human cells. As a result, the products of 13 cDNA clones (FBXL7, PPM1B, SAMM50, PLEKHN, AIFM3, C22orf42, STK32A, FAM131C, DRICH1, MCC1, HID1, P2RX5, STK32B) were found to be human N-myristoylated proteins. Analysis of the role of protein N-myristoylation on the intracellular localization of SAMM50, a mitochondrial outer membrane protein, revealed that protein N-myristoylation was required for proper targeting of SAMM50 to mitochondria. Thus, the strategy used in this study is useful for the identification of physiologically important human N-myristoylated proteins from human cDNA resources. PMID:26308446

  9. Prognostic and diagnostic value of eosinopenia, C-reactive protein, procalcitonin, and circulating cell-free DNA in critically ill patients admitted with suspicion of sepsis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aims of this study were to assess the reliability of circulating cell-free DNA (cf-DNA) concentrations, compared with C-reactive protein (CRP), procalcitonin (PCT) and eosinophil count, in the diagnosis of infections in patients with systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) and their prognostic values in a cohort of critically ill patients. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study in a medical-surgical intensive care unit of a university hospital. Eosinophil count and concentrations of cf-DNA, CRP, and PCT were measured in patients who fulfilled SIRS criteria at admission to the intensive care unit (ICU) and a second determination 24 hours later. DNA levels were determined by a PCR method using primers for the human beta-haemoglobin gene. Results One hundred and sixty consecutive patients were included: 43 SIRS without sepsis and 117 with sepsis. Levels of CRP and PCT, but not cf-DNA or eosinophil count, were significantly higher in patients with sepsis than in SIRS-no sepsis group on days 1 and 2. PCT on day 1 achieves the best area under the curve (AUC) for sepsis diagnosis (0.87; 95% confidence interval = 0.81-0.94). Levels of cf-DNA do not predict outcome and the accuracy of these biomarkers for mortality prediction was lower than that shown by APACHE II score. PCT decreases significantly from day 1 to day 2 in survivors in the entire cohort and in patients with sepsis without significant changes in the other biomarkers. Conclusions Our data do not support the clinical utility of cf-DNA measurement in critical care patients with SIRS. PCT is of value especially for infection identification in patients with SIRS at admission to the ICU. PMID:24903083

  10. Accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing using cell-free DNA for detection of Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Phillips, Sian; Freeman, Karoline; Geppert, Julia; Agbebiyi, Adeola; Uthman, Olalekan A; Madan, Jason; Clarke, Angus; Quenby, Siobhan; Clarke, Aileen

    2016-01-01

    Objective To measure test accuracy of non-invasive prenatal testing (NIPT) for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes using cell-free fetal DNA and identify factors affecting accuracy. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis of published studies. Data sources PubMed, Ovid Medline, Ovid Embase and the Cochrane Library published from 1997 to 9 February 2015, followed by weekly autoalerts until 1 April 2015. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies English language journal articles describing case–control studies with ≥15 trisomy cases or cohort studies with ≥50 pregnant women who had been given NIPT and a reference standard. Results 41, 37 and 30 studies of 2012 publications retrieved were included in the review for Down, Edwards and Patau syndromes. Quality appraisal identified high risk of bias in included studies, funnel plots showed evidence of publication bias. Pooled sensitivity was 99.3% (95% CI 98.9% to 99.6%) for Down, 97.4% (95.8% to 98.4%) for Edwards, and 97.4% (86.1% to 99.6%) for Patau syndrome. The pooled specificity was 99.9% (99.9% to 100%) for all three trisomies. In 100 000 pregnancies in the general obstetric population we would expect 417, 89 and 40 cases of Downs, Edwards and Patau syndromes to be detected by NIPT, with 94, 154 and 42 false positive results. Sensitivity was lower in twin than singleton pregnancies, reduced by 9% for Down, 28% for Edwards and 22% for Patau syndrome. Pooled sensitivity was also lower in the first trimester of pregnancy, in studies in the general obstetric population, and in cohort studies with consecutive enrolment. Conclusions NIPT using cell-free fetal DNA has very high sensitivity and specificity for Down syndrome, with slightly lower sensitivity for Edwards and Patau syndrome. However, it is not 100% accurate and should not be used as a final diagnosis for positive cases. Trial registration number CRD42014014947. PMID:26781507

  11. Posttest risk calculation following positive noninvasive prenatal screening using cell-free DNA in maternal plasma.

    PubMed

    Benn, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Noninvasive prenatal screening (NIPS) for fetal chromosome defects has high sensitivity and specificity but is not fully diagnostic. In response to a desire to provide more information to individual women with positive NIPS results, 2 online calculators have been developed to calculate posttest risk (PTR). Use of these calculators is critically reviewed. There is a mathematically dictated requirement for a precise estimate for the specificity to provide an accurate PTR. This is illustrated by showing that a 0.1% decrease in the value for specificities for trisomies 21, 18, and 13 can reduce the PTR from 79-64% for trisomy 21, 39-27% for trisomy 18, and 21-13% for trisomy 13, respectively. Use of the calculators assumes that sensitivity and specificity are constant for all women receiving the test but there is evidence that discordancy between screening results and true fetal karyotype is more common for older women. Use of an appropriate value for the prior risk is also important and for rare disorders there is considerable uncertainty regarding prevalence. For example, commonly used rates for trisomy 13, monosomy-X, triploidy, and 22q11.2 deletion syndrome can vary by >4-fold and this can translate into large differences in PTR. When screening for rare disorders, it may not be possible to provide a reliable PTR if there is uncertainty over the false-positive rate and/or prevalence. These limitations, per se, do not negate the value of screening for rare conditions. However, counselors need to carefully weigh the validity of PTR before presenting them to patients. Additional epidemiologic and NIPS outcome data are needed. PMID:26772793

  12. Non-invasive prenatal diagnostic test accuracy for fetal sex using cell-free DNA a review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) can be detected in maternal blood during pregnancy, opening the possibility of early non-invasive prenatal diagnosis for a variety of genetic conditions. Since 1997, many studies have examined the accuracy of prenatal fetal sex determination using cffDNA, particularly for pregnancies at risk of an X-linked condition. Here we report a review and meta-analysis of the published literature to evaluate the use of cffDNA for prenatal determination (diagnosis) of fetal sex. We applied a sensitive search of multiple bibliographic databases including PubMed (MEDLINE), EMBASE, the Cochrane library and Web of Science. Results Ninety studies, incorporating 9,965 pregnancies and 10,587 fetal sex results met our inclusion criteria. Overall mean sensitivity was 96.6% (95% credible interval 95.2% to 97.7%) and mean specificity was 98.9% (95% CI = 98.1% to 99.4%). These results vary very little with trimester or week of testing, indicating that the performance of the test is reliably high. Conclusions Based on this review and meta-analysis we conclude that fetal sex can be determined with a high level of accuracy by analyzing cffDNA. Using cffDNA in prenatal diagnosis to replace or complement existing invasive methods can remove or reduce the risk of miscarriage. Future work should concentrate on the economic and ethical considerations of implementing an early non-invasive test for fetal sex. PMID:22937795

  13. Microarray-Based Analysis of Methylation Status of CpGs in Placental DNA and Maternal Blood DNA – Potential New Epigenetic Biomarkers for Cell Free Fetal DNA-Based Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Hatt, Lotte; Aagaard, Mads M.; Graakjaer, Jesper; Bach, Cathrine; Sommer, Steffen; Agerholm, Inge E.; Kølvraa, Steen; Bojesen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic markers for cell free fetal DNA in the maternal blood circulation are highly interesting in the field of non-invasive prenatal testing since such markers will offer a possibility to quantify the amount of fetal DNA derived from different chromosomes in a maternal blood sample. The aim of the present study was to define new fetal specific epigenetic markers present in placental DNA that can be utilized in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis. We have conducted a high-resolution methylation specific beadchip microarray study assessing more than 450.000 CpG sites. We have analyzed the DNA methylation profiles of 10 maternal blood samples and compared them to 12 1st trimesters chorionic samples from normal placentas, identifying a number of CpG sites that are differentially methylated in maternal blood cells compared to chorionic tissue. To strengthen the utility of these differentially methylated CpG sites to be used with methyl-sensitive restriction enzymes (MSRE) in PCR-based NIPD, we furthermore refined the list of selected sites, containing a restriction sites for one of 16 different methylation-sensitive restriction enzymes. We present a list of markers on chromosomes 13, 18 and 21 with a potential for aneuploidy testing as well as a list of markers for regions harboring sub-microscopic deletion- or duplication syndromes. PMID:26230497

  14. Maternal Plasma DNA and RNA Sequencing for Prenatal Testing.

    PubMed

    Tamminga, Saskia; van Maarle, Merel; Henneman, Lidewij; Oudejans, Cees B M; Cornel, Martina C; Sistermans, Erik A

    2016-01-01

    Cell-free DNA (cfDNA) testing has recently become indispensable in diagnostic testing and screening. In the prenatal setting, this type of testing is often called noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT). With a number of techniques, using either next-generation sequencing or single nucleotide polymorphism-based approaches, fetal cfDNA in maternal plasma can be analyzed to screen for rhesus D genotype, common chromosomal aneuploidies, and increasingly for testing other conditions, including monogenic disorders. With regard to screening for common aneuploidies, challenges arise when implementing NIPT in current prenatal settings. Depending on the method used (targeted or nontargeted), chromosomal anomalies other than trisomy 21, 18, or 13 can be detected, either of fetal or maternal origin, also referred to as unsolicited or incidental findings. For various biological reasons, there is a small chance of having either a false-positive or false-negative NIPT result, or no result, also referred to as a "no-call." Both pre- and posttest counseling for NIPT should include discussing potential discrepancies. Since NIPT remains a screening test, a positive NIPT result should be confirmed by invasive diagnostic testing (either by chorionic villus biopsy or by amniocentesis). As the scope of NIPT is widening, professional guidelines need to discuss the ethics of what to offer and how to offer. In this review, we discuss the current biochemical, clinical, and ethical challenges of cfDNA testing in the prenatal setting and its future perspectives including novel applications that target RNA instead of DNA. PMID:27117661

  15. Calcium fluxes across the plasma membrane of Commelina communis L. assayed in a cell-free system

    SciTech Connect

    Siebers, B.; Graef, P.; Weiler, E.W. )

    1990-07-01

    The inside-out fraction of plasma membrane-rich vesicles prepared from leaves of Commelina communis L. by aqueous two-phase partitioning was loaded with {sup 45}Ca{sup 2+} through the action of the plasma membrane Ca{sup 2+}-ATPase. Results suggest the presence of a Ca{sup 2+} channel in the plasma membrane of C. communis. The channel is obtained in a Ca{sup 2+}-inactivated state after preparation and Ca{sup 2+}-loading of the vesicles. The inactivation is removed by TFP (trifluoperazine) or W-7 (N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalenesulfonamide), presumably due to the Ca{sup 2+}-mobilizing effect of these compounds. The activated Ca{sup 2+} channel is La{sup 3+} sensitive and, in the cell, would allow for passage of Ca{sup 2+} into the cell. The possibility that TFP or W-7 act independent of CM, or through CM tightly associated with the plasma membrane, is discussed.

  16. Fetal RHD Genotyping Using Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Analysis of Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Pregnancy of RhD Negative Women in South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Moezzi, Leili; Keshavarz, Zeinab; Ranjbaran, Reza; Aboualizadeh, Farzaneh; Behzad-Behbahani, Abbas; Abdullahi, Masooma; Ramezani, Amin; Samsami, Alamtaj; Sharifzadeh, Sedigheh

    2016-01-01

    Background Maternal-fetal RhD antigen incompatibility causes approximately 50% of clinically significant alloimmunization cases. The routine use of prophylactic anti-D immunoglobulin has dramatically reduced hemolytic disease of the fetus and newborn. Recently, fetal RHD genotyping in RhD negative pregnant women has been suggested for appropriate use of anti-D immunoglobulin antenatal prophylaxis and decrease unnecessary prenatal interventions. Materials and Methods In this prospective cohort study, in order to develop a reliable and non-invasive method for fetal RHD genotyping, cell free fetal DNA (cffD- NA) was extracted from maternal plasma. Real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) for detection of RHD exons 7, 5, 10 and intron 4 was performed and the results were compared to the serological results of cord blood cells as the gold standard method. SRY gene and hypermethylated Ras-association domain family member 1 (RASSF1A) gene were used to confirm the presence of fetal DNA in male and female fetuses, respectively. Results Out of 48 fetuses between 8 and 32 weeks (wks) of gestational age (GA), we correctly diagnosed 45 cases (93.75%) of RHD positive fetuses and 2 cases (4.16%) of the RHD negative one. Exon 7 was amplified in one sample, while three other RHD gene sequences were not detected; the sample was classified as inconclusive, and the RhD serology result after birth showed that the fetus was RhD-negative. Conclusion Our results showed high accuracy of the qPCR method using cffDNA for fetal RHD genotyping and implicate on the efficiency of this technique to predict the competence of anti-D immunoglobulin administration. PMID:27123202

  17. Evaluation of KRAS Gene Expression and LCS6 Variant in Genomic and Cell-Free DNA of Iranian Women With Endometriosis

    PubMed Central

    Farahani, Maryam Shahrabi; Moghaddam, Soheila Amini; Mahdian, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Since the activation of KRAS results in de novo endometriosis in mice, KRAS is regarded as a crucial gene in ectopic endometrial implantation. Recently, it has been reported that 31% of women with endometriosis have KRAS let-7 complementary binding site 6 single-nucleotide polymorphism (LCS6 SNP). This study addresses the correlation between KRAS LCS6 SNP and endometriosis in a case–control study. To detect probable somatic mutation in ectopic endometrial tissue, we evaluated LCS6 SNP in cell-free DNA samples. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression of KRAS transcripts in eutopic endometrial tissue. Our results suggest that the variant is not associated with the development of endometriosis in Iranian women. We observed higher levels of KRAS messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in eutopic endometrium of patients with endometriosis compared to controls. Although, the KRAS LCS6 is neither constitutional nor somatic biomarker for endometriosis, increased expression ratio of KRAS mRNA indicates its role in the implantation of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. PMID:25361550

  18. Evaluation of KRAS Gene Expression and LCS6 Variant in Genomic and Cell-Free DNA of Iranian Women With Endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Farahani, Maryam Shahrabi; Shahbazi, Shirin; Moghaddam, Soheila Amini; Mahdian, Reza

    2015-06-01

    Since the activation of KRAS results in de novo endometriosis in mice, KRAS is regarded as a crucial gene in ectopic endometrial implantation. Recently, it has been reported that 31% of women with endometriosis have KRAS let-7 complementary binding site 6 single-nucleotide polymorphism (LCS6 SNP). This study addresses the correlation between KRAS LCS6 SNP and endometriosis in a case-control study. To detect probable somatic mutation in ectopic endometrial tissue, we evaluated LCS6 SNP in cell-free DNA samples. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the expression of KRAS transcripts in eutopic endometrial tissue. Our results suggest that the variant is not associated with the development of endometriosis in Iranian women. We observed higher levels of KRAS messenger RNA (mRNA) expression in eutopic endometrium of patients with endometriosis compared to controls. Although, the KRAS LCS6 is neither constitutional nor somatic biomarker for endometriosis, increased expression ratio of KRAS mRNA indicates its role in the implantation of endometrial tissue outside the uterine cavity. PMID:25361550

  19. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-11-24

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  20. Noninvasive detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities by semiconductor sequencing of maternal plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Ai-hua; Peng, Chun-fang; Zhao, Xin; Caughey, Bennett A.; Yang, Jie-xia; Liu, Jian; Huang, Wei-wei; Liu, Chang; Luo, Dong-hong; Liu, Hai-liang; Chen, Yang-yi; Wu, Jing; Hou, Rui; Zhang, Mindy; Ai, Michael; Zheng, Lianghong; Xue, Rachel Q.; Mai, Ming-qin; Guo, Fang-fang; Qi, Yi-ming; Wang, Dong-mei; Krawczyk, Michal; Zhang, Daniel; Wang, Yu-nan; Huang, Quan-fei; Karin, Michael; Zhang, Kang

    2015-01-01

    Noninvasive prenatal testing (NIPT) using sequencing of fetal cell-free DNA from maternal plasma has enabled accurate prenatal diagnosis of aneuploidy and become increasingly accepted in clinical practice. We investigated whether NIPT using semiconductor sequencing platform (SSP) could reliably detect subchromosomal deletions/duplications in women carrying high-risk fetuses. We first showed that increasing concentration of abnormal DNA and sequencing depth improved detection. Subsequently, we analyzed plasma from 1,456 pregnant women to develop a method for estimating fetal DNA concentration based on the size distribution of DNA fragments. Finally, we collected plasma from 1,476 pregnant women with fetal structural abnormalities detected on ultrasound who also underwent an invasive diagnostic procedure. We used SSP of maternal plasma DNA to detect subchromosomal abnormalities and validated our results with array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH). With 3.5 million reads, SSP detected 56 of 78 (71.8%) subchromosomal abnormalities detected by aCGH. With increased sequencing depth up to 10 million reads and restriction of the size of abnormalities to more than 1 Mb, sensitivity improved to 69 of 73 (94.5%). Of 55 false-positive samples, 35 were caused by deletions/duplications present in maternal DNA, indicating the necessity of a validation test to exclude maternal karyotype abnormalities. This study shows that detection of fetal subchromosomal abnormalities is a viable extension of NIPT based on SSP. Although we focused on the application of cell-free DNA sequencing for NIPT, we believe that this method has broader applications for genetic diagnosis, such as analysis of circulating tumor DNA for detection of cancer. PMID:26554006

  1. Routine testing of fetal Rhesus D status in Rhesus D negative women using cell-free fetal DNA: an investigation into the preferences and information needs of women

    PubMed Central

    Oxenford, Kerry; Silcock, Caroline; Hill, Melissa; Chitty, Lyn

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study is to investigate women's preferences and information needs for routine implementation of fetal Rhesus D (RhD) typing using cell-free fetal DNA. Methods A questionnaire was developed following focus groups and interviews with both health professionals and RhD negative (RhD−) women offered fetal RhD genotyping within a research study and distributed to RhD− women attending routine antenatal appointments in four National Health Service hospitals. Current knowledge of blood types, anti-D administration, fetal RhD genotyping and future practices were explored. Results A total of 19 respondents participated in interviews and focus groups, and 270 respondents completed the questionnaires. Questionnaire respondents overwhelmingly felt that the test should be offered to all RhD− women (92.1%), and 75.9% said that they would accept this test. Most were happy to have the test even if it involved extra blood tests (89.3%) or appointments (79%). The knowledge of blood groups was poor. Although 90.7% knew that the baby could have a different blood group from themselves, only 34% knew that blood groups are inherited from both parents. More than 40% were not aware that anti-D would not be required if their baby was RhD−. Conclusions Women would welcome the introduction of routine fetal RhD genotyping. Information leaflets and training of midwives will be essential for implementation to ensure good understanding regarding testing. © 2013 The Authors. Prenatal Diagnosis published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:23625761

  2. A Non-Invasive Droplet Digital PCR (ddPCR) Assay to Detect Paternal CFTR Mutations in the Cell-Free Fetal DNA (cffDNA) of Three Pregnancies at Risk of Cystic Fibrosis via Compound Heterozygosity

    PubMed Central

    Debrand, Emmanuel; Lykoudi, Alexandra; Bradshaw, Elizabeth; Allen, Stephanie K.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Non-invasive prenatal diagnosis (NIPD) makes use of cell-free fetal DNA (cffDNA) in the mother’s bloodstream as an alternative to invasive sampling methods such as amniocentesis or CVS, which carry a 0.5–1% risk of fetal loss. We describe a droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assay designed to inform the testing options for couples whose offspring are at risk of suffering from cystic fibrosis via compound heterozygosity. By detecting the presence or absence of the paternal mutation in the cffDNA, it is possible to predict whether the fetus will be an unaffected carrier (absence) or whether further invasive testing is indicated (presence). Methods We selected a family in which the parents were known to carry different mutated CFTR alleles as our test system. NIPD was performed for three of their pregnancies during the first trimester (at around 11–12 weeks of gestation). Taqman probes were designed against an amplicon in exon 11 of the CFTR gene, to quantify the proportion of mutant (ΔF508-MUT; FAM) and normal (ΔF508-NOR; VIC) alleles at position c.1521_1523 of the CFTR gene. Discussion The assay correctly and unambiguously recognized the ΔF508-MUT CFTR allele in the cffDNA of all three proband fetuses and none of the six unaffected control fetuses. In conclusion, the Bio-Rad QX100 was found to be a cost-effective and technically undemanding platform for designing bespoke NIPD assays. PMID:26561302

  3. Direct injection of cell-free Kir1.1 protein into Xenopus oocytes replicates single-channel currents derived from Kir1.1 mRNA

    PubMed Central

    Sackin, Henry; Nanazashvili, Mikheil; Makino, Shin-ichi

    2015-01-01

    The development of integral membrane protein cell-free synthesis permits in-vitro labeling of accessible cysteines for real-time FRET and LRET measurements. The functional integrity of these synthetic ion channel proteins has been verified at the whole oocyte level by direct injection into, and recording from, Xenopus oocytes. However, the microscopic single-channel properties of cell-free translated protein have not been systematically examined. In the present study, we compare patch-clamp currents originating from cell-free protein with currents derived from mRNA injection, using the same (single-Cys) inward rectifier DNA template (C189-Kir1.1b). Results indicate that cell-free Kir protein, incorporated into liposomes and injected into oocytes, is trafficked to the plasma membrane where it inserts in an outside-out orientation and exhibits single-channel characteristics identical to that derived from a corresponding mRNA. PMID:26102359

  4. Raman spectroscopic study of plasma-treated salmon DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Geon Joon; Kim, Yong Hee; Choi, Eun Ha; Kwon, Young-Wan

    2013-01-14

    In this research, we studied the effect of plasma treatment on the optical/structural properties of the deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) extracted from salmon sperm. DNA-cetyltrimethylammonium (CTMA) films were obtained by complexation of DNA with CTMA. Circular dichroism (CD) and Raman spectra indicated that DNA retained its double helical structure in the solid film. The Raman spectra exhibited several vibration modes corresponding to the nuclear bases and the deoxyribose-phosphate backbones of the DNA, as well as the alkylchains of CTMA. Dielectric-barrier-discharge (DBD) plasma treatment induced structural modification and damage to the DNA, as observed by changes in the ultraviolet-visible absorption, CD, and Raman spectra. The optical emission spectra of the DBD plasma confirmed that DNA modification was induced by plasma ions such as reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species.

  5. Non-invasive analysis of acquired resistance to cancer therapy by sequencing of plasma DNA.

    PubMed

    Murtaza, Muhammed; Dawson, Sarah-Jane; Tsui, Dana W Y; Gale, Davina; Forshew, Tim; Piskorz, Anna M; Parkinson, Christine; Chin, Suet-Feung; Kingsbury, Zoya; Wong, Alvin S C; Marass, Francesco; Humphray, Sean; Hadfield, James; Bentley, David; Chin, Tan Min; Brenton, James D; Caldas, Carlos; Rosenfeld, Nitzan

    2013-05-01

    Cancers acquire resistance to systemic treatment as a result of clonal evolution and selection. Repeat biopsies to study genomic evolution as a result of therapy are difficult, invasive and may be confounded by intra-tumour heterogeneity. Recent studies have shown that genomic alterations in solid cancers can be characterized by massively parallel sequencing of circulating cell-free tumour DNA released from cancer cells into plasma, representing a non-invasive liquid biopsy. Here we report sequencing of cancer exomes in serial plasma samples to track genomic evolution of metastatic cancers in response to therapy. Six patients with advanced breast, ovarian and lung cancers were followed over 1-2 years. For each case, exome sequencing was performed on 2-5 plasma samples (19 in total) spanning multiple courses of treatment, at selected time points when the allele fraction of tumour mutations in plasma was high, allowing improved sensitivity. For two cases, synchronous biopsies were also analysed, confirming genome-wide representation of the tumour genome in plasma. Quantification of allele fractions in plasma identified increased representation of mutant alleles in association with emergence of therapy resistance. These included an activating mutation in PIK3CA (phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate 3-kinase, catalytic subunit alpha) following treatment with paclitaxel; a truncating mutation in RB1 (retinoblastoma 1) following treatment with cisplatin; a truncating mutation in MED1 (mediator complex subunit 1) following treatment with tamoxifen and trastuzumab, and following subsequent treatment with lapatinib, a splicing mutation in GAS6 (growth arrest-specific 6) in the same patient; and a resistance-conferring mutation in EGFR (epidermal growth factor receptor; T790M) following treatment with gefitinib. These results establish proof of principle that exome-wide analysis of circulating tumour DNA could complement current invasive biopsy approaches to identify

  6. Insights Into Fetal and Neonatal Development Through Analysis of Cell-Free RNA in Body Fluids

    PubMed Central

    Bianchi, Diana W.; Maron, Jill L.; Johnson, Kirby L.

    2010-01-01

    The use of cell-free nucleic acids in the circulation of pregnant women for noninvasive prenatal diagnosis is arguably one of the hottest current topics in prenatal medicine. Between 1997 and the present era this field has gone from basic research to clinical application for diagnosis of fetal gender and Rhesus D status. Over the next few years it is likely that noninvasive prenatal diagnosis for Down syndrome will also be possible. Here we summarize current and future clinical applications of analyzing cell-free fetal DNA and RNA in both maternal and neonatal body fluids, including maternal plasma, serum, whole blood, amniotic fluid, and neonatal saliva. We describe methods to evaluate normal and abnormal fetal and neonatal development using gene expression microarrays. We also discuss the ways in which differentially-regulated gene lists can advance knowledge of both fetal and neonatal biology, as well as suggest novel possibilities for fetal and neonatal treatment. PMID:20851538

  7. The study of responses to 'model' DNA breaks induced by restriction endonucleases in cells and cell-free systems: achievements and difficulties.

    PubMed

    Thacker, J

    1994-11-01

    The use of restriction endonucleases (RE) as a means of implicating DNA double-strand breaks (dsb) in cellular responses is reviewed. The introduction of RE into cells leads to many of the responses known to be characteristic of radiation damage--cell killing, chromosomal aberration, oncogenic transformation, gene mutation and amplification. Additionally, radiosensitive cell lines are hypersensitive to RE, including those from the human disorder ataxia-telangiectasia. However, quantitation of response and comparisons of the effectiveness of different RE are difficult, partly because of unknown activity and lifetime of RE in the cell. RE-induced dsb have also been used to reveal molecular mechanisms of repair and misrepair at specific sites in DNA. Dsb have been implicated in recombination processes including those leading to illegitimate rejoining (formation of deletions and rearrangements) at short sequence features in DNA. Also model dsb act as a signal to activate other cellular processes, which may influence or indirectly cause some responses, including cell death. In these signalling responses the detailed chemistry at the break site may not be very important, perhaps explaining why there is considerable overlap in responses to RE and to ionizing radiations. PMID:7983451

  8. Plasmid DNA damage induced by helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Cantrell, William A.; Escobar, Erika E.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2014-03-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) is applied to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The resulting fractions of the DNA conformers, which indicate intact molecules or DNA with single- or double-strand breaks, are determined using agarose gel electrophoresis. The DNA strand breaks increase with a decrease in the distance between the APPJ and DNA samples under two working conditions of the plasma source with different parameters of applied electric pulses. The damage level induced in the plasmid DNA is also enhanced with increased plasma irradiation time. The reactive species generated in the APPJ are characterized by optical emission spectra, and their roles in possible DNA damage processes occurring in an aqueous environment are also discussed.

  9. Free DNA in serum and plasma from normal adults.

    PubMed Central

    Steinman, C R

    1975-01-01

    Circulating DNA has been associated with several human disorders, including the nephritis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), in which it is thought to play an etiological role. However, it remains unclear whether its appearance in the circulation is truly pathological. Several reports, each generally based on a single assay method, have disagreed as to whether DNA may circulate in normals. Some, but not all, of this disagreement may be explained by the recently described appearance of DNA in serum, but not plasma, apparently as the result of release from leukocytes in vitro. In the present report an attempt is made to clarify this problem. Normal plasma and serum samples were examined by four assays for DNA that were newly modified to enhance their specificity and/or sensitivity. Plasma DNA was undetectable by all four methods, the most sensitive of which could detect 0.05 mug/ml of native DNA (nDNA) or 0.1 mug/ml of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). Serum DNA was present in 14 of 16 samples tested in variable concentrations with an estimated mean of 1.9 mug/ml. It is concluded that the appearance of DNA in adult human plasma is a pathological event. Presumably, previous reports describing detection of DNA in normal plasma were based on the measurement of non-DNAase-sensitive interfering substance. Furthermore, it is emphasized that the use of serum in studies dependent on sensitive assays for DNA (or anti-DNA antibody) introduces an ambiguity that may be avoided by substitution of carefully collected plasma for serum. PMID:1150882

  10. Immune Reactivation by Cell-Free Fetal DNA in Healthy Pregnancies Re-Purposed to Target Tumors: Novel Checkpoint Inhibition in Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Enninga, Elizabeth Ann L.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Holtan, Shernan G.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2015-01-01

    The role of the immune system in cancer progression has become increasingly evident over the past decade. Chronic inflammation in the promotion of tumorigenesis is well established, and cancer-associated tolerance/immune evasion has long been appreciated. Recent developments of immunotherapies targeting cancer-associated inflammation and immune tolerance, such as cancer vaccines, cell therapies, neutralizing antibodies, and immune checkpoint inhibitors, have shown promising clinical results. However, despite significant therapeutic advances, most patients diagnosed with metastatic cancer still succumb to their malignancy. Treatments are often toxic, and the financial burden of novel therapies is significant. Thus, new methods for utilizing similar biological systems to compare complex biological processes can give us new hypotheses for combating cancer. One such approach is comparing trophoblastic growth and regulation to tumor invasion and immune escape. Novel concepts regarding immune activation in pregnancy, especially reactivation of the immune system at labor through toll like receptor engagement by fetal derived DNA, may be applicable to cancer immunotherapy. This review summarizes mechanisms of inflammation in cancer, current immunotherapies used in the clinic, and suggestions for looking beyond oncology for novel methods to reverse cancer-associated tolerance and immunologic exhaustion utilizing mechanisms encountered in normal human pregnancy. PMID:26379664

  11. Temporal changes of EGFR mutations and T790M levels in tumour and plasma DNA following AZD9291 treatment.

    PubMed

    Chia, Puey Ling; Do, Hongdo; Morey, Adrienne; Mitchell, Paul; Dobrovic, Alexander; John, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    AZD9291, a T790M specific epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI), has demonstrated impressive response rates in tumours harbouring the EGFR T790M resistance mutation. Emergence of resistance to AZD9291 has been shown to occur through several different mechanisms including the development of new mutations (e.g. C797S) in the EGFR tyrosine kinase domain. We studied two patients with paired tumour biopsies and blood samples pre- and post-progression on AZD9291 to explore possible resistance mechanisms. Pre- and Post-AZD9291 tumour biopsies as well as serial plasma samples were collected from two patients on the AURA clinical study (AZD9291 First Time in Patients Ascending Dose study). Droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays were used to quantify T790M, the driver EGFR mutation, and the C797S mutation in genomic DNA from paired tumour biopsies and plasma cell-free DNA. In the first patient, both EGFR T790M and L858R became undetectable in the plasma within 1 month after treatment with AZD9291. However, the T790M and the original L858R mutation re-emerged with radiologically confirmed resistance to AZD9291. In patient two, the levels of T790M were undetectable at the time of radiological resistance to AZD9291 but increasing levels of the original EGFR exon 19 deletion was detected. MET amplification was detected in a biopsy performed on progression. The EGFR C797S mutation was not detected in either patient at the time of relapse. ddPCR of cell free DNA enables real time monitoring of patients on 3rd generation TKIs. As resistance mechanisms are variable, monitoring levels of the initial activating EGFR mutation may facilitate more reliable detection of progression. PMID:27393503

  12. Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) DNA in plasma is not encapsidated in patients with EBV-related malignancies.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Julie L; Fan, Hongxin; Swinnen, Lode J; Schichman, Steven A; Raab-Traub, Nancy; Covington, Mary; Elmore, Sandra; Gulley, Margaret L

    2004-06-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV), a ubiquitous gamma herpes virus, infects more than 95% of the human population before adulthood. Life-long persistence, usually without adverse health consequences, relies on a balance between viral latency, viral replication, and host immune response. Patients with EBV-related disease often have high levels of EBV DNA in their plasma. This study addresses whether this circulating, cell-free EBV DNA is encapsidated in virions or exists as naked genomes. First, an assay was developed, combining DNase I and quantitative real-time PCR, to discriminate encapsidated from naked EBV DNA. EBV DNA was almost always naked in the plasma of AIDS-related lymphoma patients (n = 11) and immunosuppressed/posttransplantation patients (n = 8). In contrast, infectious mononucleosis patients (n = 30) often had a mixture of encapsidated and naked EBV DNA. These findings may be important in understanding how viral load relates to disease status and in predicting response to nucleoside analogs and other antiviral therapies. PMID:15167006

  13. Clinical significance of circulating plasma DNA in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wen-Liang; Lan, Yuan-Tzu; Huang, Kuo-Hung; Liu, Chien-An; Hung, Yi-Ping; Lin, Chien-Hsing; Jhang, Fang-Yu; Chang, Shih-Ching; Chen, Ming-Huang; Chao, Yee; Lin, Wen-Chang; Lo, Su-Shun; Fen-Yau Li, Anna; Wu, Chew-Wun; Chiou, Shih-Hwa; Shyr, Yi-Ming

    2016-06-15

    With the progression of molecular techniques, the detection of circulating plasma DNA (cpDNA) is clinically feasible. However, the role of the cpDNA levels in gastric cancer is not well understood. This study assessed the mutational profile in primary tumors and clarified the clinical utility of quantitative and qualitative cpDNA alterations in 277 patients with advanced gastric cancer. The concentrations of cpDNA were measured by TaqMan qPCR, and 68 mutations in 8 genes were studied for cpDNA mutations. The median cpDNA concentrations in patients with stages I, II, and III gastric cancer were 3979, 3390 and 4278 copies/mL, respectively, and increased to 11,380 copies/mL in patients with Stage IV gastric cancer (p < 0.001). Among the 35 patients harboring cpDNA mutations, Stage IV patients (100%) were more likely to display high cpDNA levels than were Stage I (33.3%), II (75%) and III patients (66.7%) (p = 0.037). Patients displaying high cpDNA levels were more likely to experience peritoneal recurrence and exhibited significantly lower 5-year overall survival rates (39.2% vs. 45.8%, p = 0.039) than did patients displaying low cpDNA levels. Only for late stage (Stages III or IV) gastric cancer, patients harboring cpDNA mutations were more likely to experience vascular invasion (20% vs. 2.4%, p = 0.036) and exhibited a lower 5-year overall survival rate than did those lacking cpDNA mutations (5.6% vs. 31.5%, p = 0.028). High cpDNA levels are associated with peritoneal recurrence and poor prognosis in patients with advanced gastric cancer; harboring cpDNA mutations is associated with poor prognosis among patients with late stage gastric cancer. PMID:26815009

  14. Optimization of a Plasma Facilitated DNA Delivery Method

    PubMed Central

    Connolly, Richard J.; Hoff, Andrew M.; Gilbert, Richard; Jaroszeski, Mark J.

    2014-01-01

    Plasma-based methods have recently emerged as a technique for augmenting plasmid DNA delivery to skin. This delivery modality relies on the deposition of ionized gas molecules on to targeted cells or tissue to establish an electric field. It is hypothesized that this electric field results in the dielectric breakdown of cell membranes, making cells permeable to exogenous molecules. This in vivo investigation sought to optimize the intradermal delivery of a luciferase expressing plasmid DNA by modulating the total exposure to the plasma source and the plasmid DNA dose. Varying the plasma exposure time from 2, 5, 10, and 20 minutes allowed the conditions resulting in the highest expression of luciferase to be found. These conditions correlated to the 10 minute exposure time for a plasma derived from either +8 kV or −8 kV, when the generator was operated 3 cm from the epidermal tissue surface with a helium flow rate of 15 L/min. Exposing the injected flank skin for 10 minutes resulted in a rise of 37.3-fold for a plasma created with +8 kV and 27.1-fold for a plasma created with −8 kV. When using this treatment time with 50, 100, or 200 μg of a luciferase expressing plasmid, it was found that 100 μg resulted in the highest peak luminescence. PMID:25455213

  15. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  16. Plasma-activated air mediates plasmid DNA delivery in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Heller, Loree C; Malik, Muhammad A; Bulysheva, Anna; Heller, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Plasma-activated air (PAA) provides a noncontact DNA transfer platform. In the current study, PAA was used for the delivery of plasmid DNA in a 3D human skin model, as well as in vivo. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding luciferase to recellularized dermal constructs was enhanced, resulting in a fourfold increase in luciferase expression over 120 hours compared to injection only (P < 0.05). Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) was confirmed in the epidermal layers of the construct. In vivo experiments were performed in BALB/c mice, with skin as the delivery target. PAA exposure significantly enhanced luciferase expression levels 460-fold in exposed sites compared to levels obtained from the injection of plasmid DNA alone (P < 0.001). Expression levels were enhanced when the plasma reactor was positioned more distant from the injection site. Delivery of plasmid DNA encoding GFP to mouse skin was confirmed by immunostaining, where a 3-minute exposure at a 10 mm distance displayed delivery distribution deep within the dermal layers compared to an exposure at 3 mm where GFP expression was localized within the epidermis. Our findings suggest PAA-mediated delivery warrants further exploration as an alternative approach for DNA transfer for skin targets. PMID:27110584

  17. Plasma Mitochondrial DNA-a Novel DAMP in Pediatric Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Di Caro, Valentina; Walko, Thomas D; Bola, R Aaron; Hong, John D; Pang, Diana; Hsue, Victor; Au, Alicia K; Halstead, E Scott; Carcillo, Joseph A; Clark, Robert S B; Aneja, Rajesh K

    2016-05-01

    Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is a novel danger-associated molecular pattern that on its release into the extracellular milieu acts via toll-like receptor-9, a pattern recognition receptor of the immune system. We hypothesized that plasma mtDNA concentrations will be elevated in septic children, and these elevations are associated with an increase in the severity of illness. In a separate set of in vitro experiments, we test the hypothesis that exposing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) to mtDNA activates the immune response and induces tumor necrosis factor (TNF) release. Children with sepsis/systemic inflammatory response syndrome or control groups were enrolled within 24 h of admission to the pediatric intensive care unit. Mitochondrial gene cytochrome c oxidase 1 (COX1) concentrations were measured by real-time quantitative PCR in the DNA extracted from plasma. PBMCs were treated with mtDNA (10 μg/mL) and supernatant TNF levels were measured. The median plasma mtDNA concentrations were significantly elevated in the septic patients as compared with the critically ill non-septic and healthy control patients [1.75E+05 (IQR 6.64E+04-3.67E+05) versus 5.73E+03 (IQR 3.90E+03-1.28E+04) and 6.64E+03 (IQR 5.22E+03-1.63E+04) copies/μL respectively]. The median concentrations of plasma mtDNA were significantly greater in patients with MOF as compared with patients without MOF (3.2E+05 (IQR 1.41E+05-1.08E+06) vs. 2.9E+04 (IQR 2.47E+04-5.43E+04) copies/μL). PBMCs treated with mtDNA demonstrated higher supernatant TNF levels as compared with control cells (6.5 ± 1.8 vs. 3.5 ± 0.5 pg/mL, P > 0.05). Our data suggest that plasma mtDNA is a novel danger-associated molecular pattern in pediatric sepsis and appears to be associated with MOF. PMID:26682947

  18. Fragment Length of Circulating Tumor DNA

    PubMed Central

    Underhill, Hunter R.; Kitzman, Jacob O.; Hellwig, Sabine; Welker, Noah C.; Daza, Riza; Gligorich, Keith M.; Rostomily, Robert C.; Shendure, Jay

    2016-01-01

    Malignant tumors shed DNA into the circulation. The transient half-life of circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) may afford the opportunity to diagnose, monitor recurrence, and evaluate response to therapy solely through a non-invasive blood draw. However, detecting ctDNA against the normally occurring background of cell-free DNA derived from healthy cells has proven challenging, particularly in non-metastatic solid tumors. In this study, distinct differences in fragment length size between ctDNAs and normal cell-free DNA are defined. Human ctDNA in rat plasma derived from human glioblastoma multiforme stem-like cells in the rat brain and human hepatocellular carcinoma in the rat flank were found to have a shorter principal fragment length than the background rat cell-free DNA (134–144 bp vs. 167 bp, respectively). Subsequently, a similar shift in the fragment length of ctDNA in humans with melanoma and lung cancer was identified compared to healthy controls. Comparison of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA between a melanoma patient and healthy controls found that the BRAF V600E mutant allele occurred more commonly at a shorter fragment length than the fragment length of the wild-type allele (132–145 bp vs. 165 bp, respectively). Moreover, size-selecting for shorter cell-free DNA fragment lengths substantially increased the EGFR T790M mutant allele frequency in human lung cancer. These findings provide compelling evidence that experimental or bioinformatic isolation of a specific subset of fragment lengths from cell-free DNA may improve detection of ctDNA. PMID:27428049

  19. Translation in cell-free systems

    SciTech Connect

    Jagus, R.

    1987-01-01

    The simplest, unambiguous identification of a particular mRNA is the identification of its protein product. This can be established by translation of the mRNA of interest in a cell-free protein-synthesizing system. Messenger RNA protein product identification is important in the isolation of a particular mRNA species for cDNA cloning and in the identification of positive cDNA clones. The two high-activity translation systems in common use are those prepared from rabbit reticulocytes and from wheat germ. Both systems are easy to prepare, and both are available commercially. Each has advantages and disadvantages over the other and a choice between the two will depend on the type of mRNAs to be translated, the prejudices of experience, and availability. The main disadvantage of the reticulocyte system is that it requires removal of endogenous mRNA. However, this is a relatively simple procedure. The wheat germ system does not require removal of endogenous mRNA and may translate weakly initiating mRNAs more efficiently. However, ionic optima for translation in the wheat germ system are more sensitive to the nature and concentration of mRNA and may need to be determined for each template. The biggest problem with the use of the wheat germ system is its tendency to produce incomplete translation products due to premature termination.

  20. Advances in the medical research and clinical applications on the plasma DNA

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuanyuan; Wu, Zhanhe

    2014-01-01

    Plasma DNA has had a strong impact and influence on basic medical research and clinical practice since the discovery of low levels of plasma DNA in healthy individuals under different physiological conditions. Although the source of circulating DNA still requires further investigation, a wide range of research has also proven the value of qualitative and quantitative measurements of plasma DNA in many disease conditions. The use of plasma DNA has a biomarker is advantageous due to accessibility, reliability, reproducibility, sensitivity, specific and relatively low cost. Recently, the detection of circulating (plasma) DNA quantitative changes have been using in the studies on the tumor gene mutations and to monitor disease progressing and to predict the disease prognosis. Such technique also has been using other many different fields, particularly in prenatal diagnosis, for which plasma DNA testing is preferable due to non-invasiveness. This article reviews the research progression and clinical applications of plasma DNA in the last several years. PMID:26835332

  1. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet interactions with plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connell, D.; Cox, L. J.; Hyland, W. B.; McMahon, S. J.; Reuter, S.; Graham, W. G.; Gans, T.; Currell, F. J.

    2011-01-24

    The effect of a cold (<40 deg. C) radio frequency-driven atmospheric pressure plasma jet on plasmid DNA has been investigated. Gel electrophoresis was used to analyze the DNA forms post-treatment. The experimental data are fitted to a rate equation model that allows for quantitative determination of the rates of single and double strand break formation. The formation of double strand breaks correlates well with the atomic oxygen density. Taken with other measurements, this indicates that neutral components in the jet are effective in inducing double strand breaks.

  2. Measuring DNA through a Nanopore Fabricated Using Plasma Processing Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossnagel, S. M.

    2009-10-01

    We have been developing a device based on a 2-3 nm diameter pore between two electrolyte volumes for the transit of DNA by means of a potential gradient. The nanopore is configured with 3 electrodes, each about 3 nm thick with 2-3nm dielectric spacers. The nanopore electrodes can be used to trap DNA in-transit, and ideally measure the impedance and hence the identity of each nucleotide as it passes through the nanopore, allowing real time sequencing of the DNA. The goal is to operate at megahertz, allowing sequencing of the entire genome within a few hours a fairly modest cost. This project has lead to numerous new developments in nanoscale fabrication, particularly for nanofluidics. The nanopore devices are fabricated using a number of critical plasma processing steps, both deposition and etch, in our 200mm pilot facility.

  3. Cell-free nucleic acids as a non-invasive route for investigating atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Cerne, Darko; Bajalo, Jana Lukac

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome is directly linked with atherosclerotic burden and cell-free nucleic acids (cf-NA) analysis has recently emerged as a novel research tool in atherosclerosis practice and research. cf-NA are nucleic acids (DNA, mRNA, miRNA, mitochondrial DNA) found in plasma and cell-free fractions of various other biological fluids. They have all the characteristics of the nucleic acids in the cells of their origin, thus constituting an emerging field for non-invasive assessment. Initially, quantitative and qualitative analysis of cf-NA has been accepted as clinically useful in non-invasive prenatal diagnosis, and in the diagnosis and monitoring of numerous cancers. As to atherosclerosis, cf-NA analysis poses an important challenge in diagnosis and prognostic evaluation of acute coronary syndrome, in prediction of cardiovascular disease, in non-invasive early detection of atherosclerosis and understanding its pathological mechanism in vivo, in assessing various issues of treatment for atherosclerosis in vivo, and in the unique simultaneous measurement of mRNA levels and protein concentrations in a single sample of plasma. Examples of its use are presented in this review. Besides the advances in technologies, the precise evaluation and optimization of pre-analytical and analytical aspects of cf-NA analysis have impacted importantly on the reliability of test results. We have, therefore, reviewed the most important analytical considerations. Further clinical studies and analytical improvements will answer the question as to whether cf-NA, as novel biomarkers, can be reliably applied clinically in non-invasive, early diagnosis and monitoring of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques of patients who could suffer from acute coronary syndrome. PMID:24320033

  4. A Cross-Sectional Comparison of Druggable Mutations in Primary Tumors, Metastatic Tissue, Circulating Tumor Cells, and Cell-Free Circulating DNA in Patients with Metastatic Breast Cancer: The MIRROR Study Protocol

    PubMed Central

    Picornell, Antoni C; Alvarez, Enrique L; Martin, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Background Characterization of the driver mutations in an individual metastatic breast cancer (MBC) patient is critical to selecting effective targeted therapies. Currently, it is believed that the limited efficacy of many targeted drugs may be due to the expansion of drug resistant clones with different genotypes that were already present in the primary tumor. Identifying the genomic alterations of these clones, and introducing combined or sequential targeted drug regimens, could lead to a significant increase in the efficacy of currently available targeted therapies. Objective The primary objective of this study is to assess the concordance/discordance of mutations between the primary tumor and metastatic tissue in MBC patients. Secondary objectives include comparing the genomic profiles of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and circulating free DNA (cfDNA) from peripheral blood with those of the primary tumor and metastatic tissue for each patient, evaluating these mutations in the signaling pathways that are relevant to the disease, and testing the feasibility of introducing liquid biopsy as a translational laboratory tool in clinical practice. Methods The multicenter, transversal, observational MIRROR study is currently ongoing in three participating hospitals. All consecutive patients with MBC confirmed by radiologic findings will be screened for eligibility, either at first relapse or if tumor regrowth occurs while on treatment for metastatic disease. Results Patient recruitment is currently ongoing. To date, 41 patients have a complete set of tissue samples available (plasma, CTCs, and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded primary tumor and metastatic tumor). However, none of these samples have undergone nucleic acids extraction or targeted deep sequencing. Conclusions The results of this study may have a significant influence on the practical management of patients with MBC, and may provide clues to clinicians that lead towards a better stratification of patients

  5. Laser Plasma Jet Driven Microparticles for DNA/Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Menezes, Viren; Mathew, Yohan; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Kanno, Akira; Hosseini, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a microparticle delivery device that generates a plasma jet through laser ablation of a thin metal foil and uses the jet to accomplish particle delivery into soft living targets for transferring biological agents. Pure gold microparticles of 1 µm size were coated with a plasmid DNA, pIG121Hm, and were deposited as a thin layer on one surface of an aluminum foil. The laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm wavelength) ablation of the foil generated a plasma jet that carried the DNA coated particles into the living onion cells. The particles could effectively penetrate the target cells and disseminate the DNA, effecting the transfection of the cells. Generation of the plasma jet on laser ablation of the foil and its role as a carrier of microparticles was visualized using a high-speed video camera, Shimadzu HPV-1, at a frame rate of 500 kfps (2 µs interframe interval) in a shadowgraph optical set-up. The particle speed could be measured from the visualized images, which was about 770 m/s initially, increased to a magnitude of 1320 m/s, and after a quasi-steady state over a distance of 10 mm with an average magnitude of 1100 m/s, started declining, which typically is the trend of a high-speed, pulsed, compressible jet. Aluminum launch pad (for the particles) was used in the present study to make the procedure cost-effective, whereas the guided, biocompatible launch pads made of gold, silver or titanium can be used in the device during the actual clinical operations. The particle delivery device has a potential to have a miniature form and can be an effective, hand-held drug/DNA delivery device for biological applications. PMID:23226394

  6. Laser plasma jet driven microparticles for DNA/drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Viren; Mathew, Yohan; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Kanno, Akira; Hosseini, Hamid

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a microparticle delivery device that generates a plasma jet through laser ablation of a thin metal foil and uses the jet to accomplish particle delivery into soft living targets for transferring biological agents. Pure gold microparticles of 1 µm size were coated with a plasmid DNA, pIG121Hm, and were deposited as a thin layer on one surface of an aluminum foil. The laser (Nd:YAG, 1064 nm wavelength) ablation of the foil generated a plasma jet that carried the DNA coated particles into the living onion cells. The particles could effectively penetrate the target cells and disseminate the DNA, effecting the transfection of the cells. Generation of the plasma jet on laser ablation of the foil and its role as a carrier of microparticles was visualized using a high-speed video camera, Shimadzu HPV-1, at a frame rate of 500 kfps (2 µs interframe interval) in a shadowgraph optical set-up. The particle speed could be measured from the visualized images, which was about 770 m/s initially, increased to a magnitude of 1320 m/s, and after a quasi-steady state over a distance of 10 mm with an average magnitude of 1100 m/s, started declining, which typically is the trend of a high-speed, pulsed, compressible jet. Aluminum launch pad (for the particles) was used in the present study to make the procedure cost-effective, whereas the guided, biocompatible launch pads made of gold, silver or titanium can be used in the device during the actual clinical operations. The particle delivery device has a potential to have a miniature form and can be an effective, hand-held drug/DNA delivery device for biological applications. PMID:23226394

  7. Relationship between pretreatment level of plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA, tumor burden, and metabolic activity in advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Brigette; King, Ann; Lo, Y.M. Dennis; Yau, Y.Y.; Zee, Benny; Hui, Edwin P.; Leung, Sing F.; Mo, Frankie; Kam, Michael K.; Ahuja, Anil; Kwan, Wing H.; Chan, Anthony . E-mail: anthony@clo.cuhk.edu.hk

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: Plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA (pEBV DNA) is an important prognostic marker in nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). This study tested the hypotheses that pEBV DNA reflects tumor burden and metabolic activity by evaluating its relationship with tumor volume and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) uptake in NPC. Methods and Materials: Pre-treatment pEBV DNA analysis, {sup 18}F-FDG positron emission tomography-computed tomography scan (PET-CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the head and neck were performed in 57 patients. Net volume (cm{sup 3}) of the primary tumor (T{sub vol}) and regional nodes (N{sub vol}) were quantified on MRI. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was expressed as the maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) at the primary tumor (T{sub suv}) and regional nodes (N{sub suv}). Lesions with SUV{sub max} {>=} 2.5 were considered malignant. Relationship between SUV{sub max}, natural logarithm (log) of pEBV DNA, and square root (sq) of MRI volumes was analyzed using the Wilcoxon test. A linear regression model was constructed to test for any interaction between variables and disease stage. Results: Log-pEBV DNA showed significant correlation with sq-T{sub vol} (r = 0.393), sq-N{sub vol} (r = 0.452), total tumor volume (sq-Total{sub vol} = T{sub vol} + N{sub vol}, r = 0.554), T{sub suv} (r = 0.276), N{sub suv} (r = 0.434), and total SUV{sub max} (Total{sub suv} = T{sub suv} + N{sub suv}, r = 0.457). Likewise, sq-T{sub vol} was correlated to T{sub suv} (r 0.426), and sq-N{sub vol} with N{sub suv} (r = 0.651). Regression analysis showed that only log-pEBV DNA was significantly associated with sq-Total{sub vol} (p < 0.001; parameter estimate = 8.844; 95% confidence interval = 3.986-13.703), whereas Sq-T{sub vol} was significantly associated with T{sub suv} (p = 0.002; parameter estimate = 3.923; 95% confidence interval = 1.498-6.348). Conclusion: This study supports the hypothesis that cell-free plasma EBV DNA is a marker of tumor burden in EBV

  8. Increased Levels of Plasma Epstein Barr Virus DNA Identify a Poor-Risk Subset of Patients With Advanced Stage Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Haverkos, Bradley M.; Gru, Alejandro A.; Geyer, Susan M.; Bingman, Anissa K.; Hemminger, Jessica A.; Mishra, Anjali; Wong, Henry K.; Pancholi, Preeti; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.; Baiocchi, Robert A.; Porcu, Pierluigi

    2016-01-01

    Discovering prognostic factors that simultaneously describe tumor characteristics and improve risk stratification is a priority in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). More than a third of advanced stage CTCL patients in this cohort had detectable cell free plasma Epstein–Barr virus (EBV)-DNA (pEBVd) using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. An increased level of pEBVd was highly concordant with EBV (ie, Epstein–Barr virus RNAs) in tumor tissue and was associated with inferior survival. Introduction Outcomes in advanced stage (AS) cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) are poor but with great variability. Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a subset of non-Hodgkin lymphomas. Frequency of plasma EBV-DNA (pEBVd) detection, concordance with EBV RNA (EBER) in tumor tissue, codetection of plasma cytomegalovirus DNA (pCMVd), and prognostic effect in AS CTCL are unknown. Patients and Methods Patients (n = 46; 2006–2013) with AS CTCL (≥IIB) were retrospectively studied. pEBVd and pCMVd were longitudinally measured using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. EBER in situ hybridization (ISH) was performed on tumor samples. Survival from time of diagnosis (ToD) and time of progression to AS was assessed. Results Plasma EBV-DNA and pCMVd were detected in 37% (17 of 46) and 17% (8 of 46) of AS CTCL patients, respectively. pCMVd detection was significantly more frequent in pEBVd-positive (pEBVd+) than pEBVd− patients (35% vs. 7%; P = .038). Tumor tissue for EBER-ISH was available in 14 of 17 pEBVd+ and 22 of 29 pEBVd− patients; 12 of 14 (85.7%) pEBVd+ patients were EBER+ versus 0 of 22 pEBVd− patients. Frequency of large cell transformation (LCT) tended to be greater in pEBVd+ patients, but was not significant (10 of 14 pEBVd+ vs. 10 of 23 pEBVd−; P = .17). No notable differences in rates of increased levels of serum lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) were observed (17 of 17 pEBVd+ vs. 27 of 29 pEBVd−). pEBVd detection was associated with

  9. A new biodosimetric method: branched DNA-based quantitative detection of B1 DNA in mouse plasma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Yang, S; Cao, Y; Bingrong Zhang, S; Yin, L; Tian, Y; Ma, Y; Zhang, A; Okunieff, P; Zhang, L

    2010-01-01

    A simple and accurate method for measuring the biological effects of radiation is of increasing importance, especially in mass casualty scenarios. We have therefore developed a new biodosimetric technique targeting circulating B1 DNA in mouse plasma by branched DNA signal amplification for rapid quantification of plasma DNA. This technology targets repetitive elements of the B1 retrotransposon in the mouse genome, followed by signal amplification using Panomics Quantigene 2.0 reagents. Evaluation was conducted concerning precision, accuracy and linearity. Plasma samples were collected from mice 0–24 h after 0–10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). The average inter- and intra-assay coefficients of variance were 8.7% and 12.3%, respectively. The average recovery rate of spiked DNA into plasma was 89.5%. This assay revealed that when BALB/c and NIH Swiss mice were exposed to 6 Gy TBI, plasma B1 DNA levels increased significantly at 3 h post-TBI, peaked at 9 h and gradually returned toward baseline levels in 24 h. A dose-dependent change in plasma DNA was observed at 9 h post-TBI; the dose–response relation was monotonic, exhibiting linearity for BALB/c mice from 3 to 6 Gy (r = 0.993) and NIH Swiss mice from 3 to 7 Gy (r = 0.98). This branched DNA-based assay is reliable, accurate and sensitive in detecting plasma B1 DNA quantitatively. A radiation dose-correlated increase in plasma B1 DNA was demonstrated in BALB/c and NIH Swiss mice in the dose range from 3 to 6 Gy, suggesting that plasma B1 DNA has potential as a biomarker for radiation biological effect. PMID:20675464

  10. Transformable DNA nanocarriers for plasma membrane targeted delivery of cytokine.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wujin; Ji, Wenyan; Hu, Quanyin; Yu, Jicheng; Wang, Chao; Qian, Chenggen; Hochu, Gabrielle; Gu, Zhen

    2016-07-01

    Direct delivery of cytokines using nanocarriers holds great promise for cancer therapy. However, the nanometric scale of the vehicles made them susceptible to size-dependent endocytosis, reducing the plasma membrane-associated apoptosis signaling. Herein, we report a tumor microenvironment-responsive and transformable nanocarrier for cell membrane targeted delivery of cytokine. This formulation is comprised of a phospholipase A2 (PLA2) degradable liposome as a shell, and complementary DNA nanostructures (designated as nanoclews) decorated with cytokines as the cores. Utilizing the tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a model cytokine, we demonstrate that the TRAIL loaded DNA nanoclews are capable of transforming into nanofibers after PLA2 activation. The nanofibers with micro-scaled lengths efficiently present the loaded TRAIL to death receptors on the cancer cell membrane and amplified the apoptotic signaling with reduced TRAIL internalization. PMID:27131597

  11. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, G. J.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.; Lee, J. K.

    2010-01-01

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  12. DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction in cell apoptosis induced by nonthermal air plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, G. J.; Lee, J. K.; Kim, W.; Kim, K. T.

    2010-01-11

    Nonthermal plasma is known to induce animal cell death but the mechanism is not yet clear. Here, cellular and biochemical regulation of cell apoptosis is demonstrated for plasma treated cells. Surface type nonthermal air plasma triggered apoptosis of B16F10 mouse melanoma cancer cells causing DNA damage and mitochondria dysfunction. Plasma treatment activated caspase-3, apoptosis executioner. The plasma treated cells also accumulated gamma-H2A.X, marker for DNA double strand breaks, and p53 tumor suppressor gene as a response to DNA damage. Interestingly, cytochrome C was released from mitochondria and its membrane potential was changed significantly.

  13. Uracil excision repair in Mycobacterium tuberculosis cell-free extracts.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Bharti, Sanjay Kumar; Varshney, Umesh

    2011-05-01

    Uracil excision repair is ubiquitous in all domains of life and initiated by uracil DNA glycosylases (UDGs) which excise the promutagenic base, uracil, from DNA to leave behind an abasic site (AP-site). Repair of the resulting AP-sites requires an AP-endonuclease, a DNA polymerase, and a DNA ligase whose combined activities result in either short-patch or long-patch repair. Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, has an increased risk of accumulating uracils because of its G + C-rich genome, and its niche inside host macrophages where it is exposed to reactive nitrogen and oxygen species, two major causes of cytosine deamination (to uracil) in DNA. In vitro assays to study DNA repair in this important human pathogen are limited. To study uracil excision repair in mycobacteria, we have established assay conditions using cell-free extracts of M. tuberculosis and M. smegmatis (a fast-growing mycobacterium) and oligomer or plasmid DNA substrates. We show that in mycobacteria, uracil excision repair is completed primarily via long-patch repair. In addition, we show that M. tuberculosis UdgB, a newly characterized family 5 UDG, substitutes for the highly conserved family 1 UDG, Ung, thereby suggesting that UdgB might function as backup enzyme for uracil excision repair in mycobacteria. PMID:21371942

  14. Quantitation of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Plasma of Oropharyngeal Carcinoma Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Cao Hongbin; Banh, Alice; Kwok, Shirley; Shi Xiaoli; Wu, Simon; Krakow, Trevor; Khong, Brian; Bavan, Brindha; Bala, Rajeev; Pinsky, Benjamin A.; Colevas, Dimitrios; Pourmand, Nader; Koong, Albert C.; Kong, Christina S.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To determine whether human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA can be detected in the plasma of patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) and to monitor its temporal change during radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: We used polymerase chain reaction to detect HPV DNA in the culture media of HPV-positive SCC90 and VU147T cells and the plasma of SCC90 and HeLa tumor-bearing mice, non-tumor-bearing controls, and those with HPV-negative tumors. We used real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction to quantify the plasma HPV DNA in 40 HPV-positive OPC, 24 HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients and 10 non-cancer volunteers. The tumor HPV status was confirmed by p16{sup INK4a} staining and HPV16/18 polymerase chain reaction or HPV in situ hybridization. A total of 14 patients had serial plasma samples for HPV DNA quantification during radiotherapy. Results: HPV DNA was detectable in the plasma samples of SCC90- and HeLa-bearing mice but not in the controls. It was detected in 65% of the pretreatment plasma samples from HPV-positive OPC patients using E6/7 quantitative polymerase chain reaction. None of the HPV-negative head-and-neck cancer patients or non-cancer controls had detectable HPV DNA. The pretreatment plasma HPV DNA copy number correlated significantly with the nodal metabolic tumor volume (assessed using {sup 18}F-deoxyglucose positron emission tomography). The serial measurements in 14 patients showed a rapid decline in HPV DNA that had become undetectable at radiotherapy completion. In 3 patients, the HPV DNA level had increased to a discernable level at metastasis. Conclusions: Xenograft studies indicated that plasma HPV DNA is released from HPV-positive tumors. Circulating HPV DNA was detectable in most HPV-positive OPC patients. Thus, plasma HPV DNA might be a valuable tool for identifying relapse.

  15. Effect of cold atmospheric pressure He-plasma jet on DNA change and mutation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaopromsiri, C.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Thopan, P.; Boonyawan, D.

    2015-12-01

    Cold atmospheric pressure plasma jet (CAPPJ) effect on DNA change was studied for assessment of its safety. The experiment utilized a home-developed CAPPJ using 100% helium to directly treat naked DNA plasmid pGFP (plasmid green fluorescent protein). A traversal electric field was applied to separate the plasma components and both dry and wet sample conditions were adopted to investigate various factor roles in changing DNA. Plasma species were measured by using optical emission spectroscopy. DNA topological form change was analyzed by gel electrophoresis. The plasma jet treated DNA was transferred into bacterial Escherichia coli cells for observing mutation. The results show that the He-CAPPJ could break DNA strands due to actions from charge, radicals and neutrals and potentially cause genetic modification of living cells.

  16. Effect of the atmospheric pressure nonequilibrium plasmas on the conformational changes of plasmid DNA

    SciTech Connect

    Yan Xu; He Guangyuan; Shi Mengjun; Gao Xuan; Li Yin; Ma Fengyun; Yu Men; Wang Changdong; Wang Yuesheng; Yang Guangxiao; Zou Fei; Lu Xinpei; Xiong Qing; Xiong Zilan

    2009-08-24

    The cold atmospheric pressure plasma, which has been widely used for biomedical applications, may potentially affect the conformation of DNA. In this letter, an atmospheric pressure plasma plume is used to investigate its effects on the conformational changes of DNA of plasmid pAHC25. It is found that the plasma plume could cause plasmid DNA topology alteration, resulting in the percentage of the supercoiled plasmid DNA form decreased while that of the open circular and linearized form of plasmid DNA increased as detected by agrose gel electrophoresis. On the other hand, further investigation by using polymerase chain reaction method shows that the atmospheric pressure plasma jet treatments under proper conditions does not affect the genes of the plasmid DNA, which may have potential application in increasing the transformation frequency by genetic engineering.

  17. Identification of DNA-binding proteins on human umbilical vein endothelial cell plasma membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, T M; Frampton, G; Cameron, J S

    1993-01-01

    The binding of anti-DNA antibodies to the endothelial cell is mediated through DNA, which forms a bridge between the immunoglobulin and the plasma membrane. We have shown that 32P-labelled DNA bound to the plasma membrane of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) by a saturable process, which could be competitively inhibited by non-radiolabelled DNA. In addition, DNA-binding was enhanced in HUVEC that had been treated with IL-1 alpha or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha). DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000, 92,000, and 84,000 were identified by the binding of 32P-labelled DNA to plasma membrane proteins separated on SDS-PAGE. DNA-binding proteins of mol. wt 46,000 and 84,000 were also present in the cytosol and nucleus. Murine anti-DNA MoAb410 bound to a single band, at mol. wt 46,000, of plasma membrane protein, in the presence of DNA. Our results showed that DNA-binding proteins are present in different cellular fractions of endothelial cells. DNA-binding proteins on the cell membrane could participate in the in situ formation of immune deposits; and their presence in the cell nucleus suggests a potential role in the modulation of cell function. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8419070

  18. Reactive oxygen species controllable non-thermal helium plasmas for evaluation of plasmid DNA strand breaks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young Kim, Jae; Lee, Dong-Hoon; Ballato, John; Cao, Weiguo; Kim, Sung-O.

    2012-11-01

    Non-thermal, oxygen-rich helium plasmas were investigated to achieve an enhanced reactive oxygen species concentration at low voltage driving conditions. A non-thermal plasma device was fabricated based on a theta-shaped tube, and its potential was investigated for use in topological alteration of plasmid DNA. The optical emission spectra of the plasma showed that the oxygen flow affected the plasma properties, even though an oxygen plasma was not produced. The plasmid DNA strand breaks became more significant with the addition of oxygen flow to the helium in a single hollow, theta-shaped tube with other experimental conditions being unchanged.

  19. Low-energy plasma immersion ion implantation to induce DNA transfer into bacterial E. coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangwijit, K.; Yu, L. D.; Sarapirom, S.; Pitakrattananukool, S.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2015-12-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) at low energy was for the first time applied as a novel biotechnology to induce DNA transfer into bacterial cells. Argon or nitrogen PIII at low bias voltages of 2.5, 5 and 10 kV and fluences ranging from 1 × 1012 to 1 × 1017 ions/cm2 treated cells of Escherichia coli (E. coli). Subsequently, DNA transfer was operated by mixing the PIII-treated cells with DNA. Successes in PIII-induced DNA transfer were demonstrated by marker gene expressions. The induction of DNA transfer was ion-energy, fluence and DNA-size dependent. The DNA transferred in the cells was confirmed functioning. Mechanisms of the PIII-induced DNA transfer were investigated and discussed in terms of the E. coli cell envelope anatomy. Compared with conventional ion-beam-induced DNA transfer, PIII-induced DNA transfer was simpler with lower cost but higher efficiency.

  20. A novel method for the detection of plasma jet boundaries by exploring DNA damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahnev, Blagovest; Bowden, Mark D.; Stypczyńska, Agnieszka; Ptasińska, Sylwia; Mason, Nigel J.; Braithwaite, Nicholas St. J.

    2014-06-01

    In this study we have investigated the plasma-air boundary of an atmospheric pressure discharge by exposing samples of dry plasmid DNA to a plasma jet. While visible emission from excited plasma species suggested that the plasma jet had dimensions approximately 5.5 cm long and 0.4 cm wide, damage to DNA samples was detected at distances of up to 20 cm from the tip of the jet with observable effects far outside the luminous plasma volume. Reactive oxygen species were identified as the most likely cause of DNA damage at these long distances. These results provide a novel method for determining the extent of any kind of plasma jet generated in the open atmosphere.

  1. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Xu; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.

    2013-06-10

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  2. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Sharon Stack, M.; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-06-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) was applied to induce DNA damage of SCC-25 oral cancer cells. Optical emission spectra were taken to characterize the reactive species produced in APPJ. In order to explore the spatial distribution of plasma effects, cells were placed onto photo-etched grid slides and the antibody H2A.X was used to locate double strand breaks of DNA inside nuclei using an immunofluorescence assay. The number of cells with double strand breaks in DNA was observed to be varied due to the distance from the irradiation center and duration of plasma treatment.

  3. Noninvasive prenatal testing by maternal plasma DNA analysis: current practice and future applications.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Rossa W K

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal screening of fetal chromosomal aneuploidies and some common genetic diseases is an integral part of antenatal care. Definitive prenatal diagnosis is conventionally achieved by the sampling of fetal genetic material by amniocentesis or chorionic villus sampling. Due to the invasiveness of those procedures, they are associated with a 1 in 200 chance of fetal miscarriage. Hence, researchers have been exploring noninvasive ways to sample fetal genetic material. The presence of cell-free DNA released by the fetus into the circulation of its mother was demonstrated in 1997. Circulating fetal DNA is therefore obtainable through the collection of a blood sample from the pregnant woman without posing any physical harm to the fetus. By analyzing this source of fetal genetic material, researchers have succeeded in developing DNA-based noninvasive tests for the assessment of Down syndrome and single gene diseases. Since the end of 2011, tests for the noninvasive assessment of chromosomal aneuploidies have become commercially available in parts of the world. Recommendations from professional groups have since been made regarding how these tests could be incorporated into the framework of existing prenatal screening programs. More recently, cell-free circulating fetal DNA analysis have been shown to be applicable to the deciphering of the fetal molecular karyotype, genome and methylome. It is envisioned that an increasing number of the noninvasive prenatal tests will become clinically available. The ethical, social and legal implications of the introduction of some of these tests would need to be discussed in the context of different cultures, societal values and the legal framework. PMID:25083893

  4. Plasma Concentration of Parasite DNA as a Measure of Disease Severity in Falciparum Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Imwong, Mallika; Woodrow, Charles J.; Hendriksen, Ilse C. E.; Veenemans, Jacobien; Verhoef, Hans; Faiz, M. Abul; Mohanty, Sanjib; Mishra, Saroj; Mtove, George; Gesase, Samwel; Seni, Amir; Chhaganlal, Kajal D.; Day, Nicholas P. J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.; White, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    In malaria-endemic areas, Plasmodium falciparum parasitemia is common in apparently healthy children and severe malaria is commonly misdiagnosed in patients with incidental parasitemia. We assessed whether the plasma Plasmodium falciparum DNA concentration is a useful datum for distinguishing uncomplicated from severe malaria in African children and Asian adults. P. falciparum DNA concentrations were measured by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in 224 African children (111 with uncomplicated malaria and 113 with severe malaria) and 211 Asian adults (100 with uncomplicated malaria and 111 with severe malaria) presenting with acute falciparum malaria. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations in identifying severe malaria was 0.834 for children and 0.788 for adults, similar to that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 levels and substantially superior to that of parasite densities (P < .0001). The diagnostic accuracy of plasma P. falciparum DNA concentrations plus plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations was significantly greater than that of plasma P. falciparum HRP2 concentrations alone (0.904 for children [P = .004] and 0.847 for adults [P = .003]). Quantitative real-time PCR measurement of parasite DNA in plasma is a useful method for diagnosing severe falciparum malaria on fresh or archived plasma samples. PMID:25344520

  5. Cell-free microRNAs in blood and other body fluids, as cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Quintero, Blanca

    2016-06-01

    The discovery of cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) in serum, plasma and other body fluids has yielded an invaluable potential source of non-invasive biomarkers for cancer and other non-malignant diseases. miRNAs in the blood and other body fluids are highly stable in biological samples and are resistant to environmental conditions, such as freezing, thawing or enzymatic degradation, which makes them convenient as potential biomarkers. In addition, they are more easily sampled than tissue miRNAs. Altered levels of cell-free miRNAs have been found in every type of cancer analysed, and increasing evidence indicates that they may participate in carcinogenesis by acting as cell-to-cell signalling molecules. This review summarizes the biological characteristics and mechanisms of release of cell-free miRNAs that make them promising candidates as non-invasive biomarkers of cancer. PMID:27218664

  6. Analysis of tumor-derived DNA in plasma and bone marrow fluid in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Goto, Taichiro; Hirotsu, Yosuke; Oyama, Toshio; Amemiya, Kenji; Omata, Masao

    2016-03-01

    Liquid biopsies such as circulating tumor DNA in plasma and disseminated tumor cells in the bone marrow are currently available. However, it is unclear which types of samples are appropriate for detecting tumor DNA in these biopsies. Here, we collected primary tumors, pulmonary venous blood, peripheral blood, and rib bone marrow fluid from 10 lung cancer patients. Targeted deep sequencing was performed to identify mutations across 70 specimens. As a result, a total of 43 mutations were identified in the primary tumors. The mutation in the tumors was also identified in circulating tumor DNA in the pulmonary venous and peripheral blood in two patients. These patients showed poor prognosis, as compared to the other patients. However, no mutation was identified in the bone marrow in any of the patients. These results demonstrated that circulating tumor DNA in plasma is more sensitive and clinically useful as a biomarker as compared to DNA in bone marrow fluid. PMID:26897174

  7. Cell-free production of transducible transcription factors for nuclear reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Yang, William C; Patel, Kedar G; Lee, Jieun; Ghebremariam, Yohannes T; Wong, H Edward; Cooke, John P; Swartz, James R

    2009-12-15

    Ectopic expression of a defined set of transcription factors chosen from Oct3/4, Sox2, c-Myc, Klf4, Nanog, and Lin28 can directly reprogram somatic cells to pluripotency. These reprogrammed cells are referred to as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). To date, iPSCs have been successfully generated using lentiviruses, retroviruses, adenoviruses, plasmids, transposons, and recombinant proteins. Nucleic acid-based approaches raise concerns about genomic instability. In contrast, a protein-based approach for iPSC generation can avoid DNA integration concerns as well as provide greater control over the concentration, timing, and sequence of transcription factor stimulation. Researchers recently demonstrated that polyarginine peptide conjugation can deliver recombinant protein reprogramming factor (RF) cargoes into cells and reprogram somatic cells into iPSCs. However, the protein-based approach requires a significant amount of protein for the reprogramming process. Producing fusion RFs in the large amounts required for this approach using traditional heterologous in vivo production methods is difficult and cumbersome since toxicity, product aggregation, and proteolysis by endogenous proteases limit yields. In this work, we show that cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) is a viable option for producing soluble and functional transducible transcription factors for nuclear reprogramming. We used an E. coli-based CFPS system to express the above set of six human RFs as fusion proteins, each with a nona-arginine (R9) protein transduction domain. Using the flexibility offered by the CFPS platform, we successfully addressed proteolysis and protein solubility problems to produce full-length and soluble R9-RF fusions. We subsequently showed that R9-Oct3/4, R9-Sox2, and R9-Nanog exhibit cognate DNA-binding activities, R9-Nanog translocates across the plasma and nuclear membranes, and R9-Sox2 exerts transcriptional activity on a known downstream gene target. PMID:19718703

  8. Characterization of Atmospheric Pressure Plasma Jet (APPJ) and Its Effect on Plasmid DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Ek; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2015-09-01

    A helium atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) source was constructed and then characterized by monitoring a deflected current on a high voltage electrode and a potential difference between two electrodes. The deflected current was also monitored for the APPJ source with varied electrical and fed gas composition e.g. admixtures of He and water vapor. The deflected power per cycle for gas admixtures was decreased with the increase in fraction of water vapor. In addition, this APPJ source was used to induce damage to aqueous plasmid DNA. The fraction of supercoiled, single-strand breaks and double-strand breaks in DNA were quantified by using agarose gel electrophoresis. The number of DNA strand breaks increased as a function of plasma irradiation time and decrease as a distance between APPJ and DNA sample increased. The APPJ with the gas admixture, in which the fraction of water vapor was varied, was also used to induce damage to aqueous DNA samples. The damage level decreased with the increase in a fraction of water vapor under specific experimental conditions. The change in numbers of DNA strand breaks irradiated by a pure He plasma and a plasma with a gas admixture is predicted by different physical and chemical process in the APPJ. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences under Award Number DE-FC02-04ER15533.

  9. Detection of Cancer DNA in Plasma of Early Stage Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Balukrishna, Sasidharan; Cochran, Rory; Croessmann, Sarah; Zabransky, Daniel J.; Wong, Hong Yuen; Toro, Patricia Valda; Cidado, Justin; Blair, Brian G.; Chu, David; Burns, Timothy; Higgins, Michaela J.; Stearns, Vered; Jacobs, Lisa; Habibi, Mehran; Lange, Julie; Hurley, Paula J.; Lauring, Josh; VanDenBerg, Dustin; Kessler, Jill; Jeter, Stacie; Samuels, Michael L.; Maar, Dianna; Cope, Leslie; Cimino-Mathews, Ashley; Argani, Pedram; Wolff, Antonio C.; Park, Ben H.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Detecting circulating plasma tumor DNA (ptDNA) in early stage cancer patients has the potential to change how oncologists recommend systemic therapies for solid tumors after surgery. Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction (ddPCR) is a novel sensitive and specific platform for mutation detection. Experimental Design In this prospective study, primary breast tumors and matched pre- and post-surgery blood samples were collected from early stage breast cancer patients (n=29). Tumors (n=30) were analyzed by Sanger sequencing for common PIK3CA mutations, and DNA from these tumors and matched plasma were then analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using ddPCR. Results Sequencing of tumors identified seven PIK3CA exon 20 mutations (H1047R) and three exon 9 mutations (E545K). Analysis of tumors by ddPCR confirmed these mutations and identified five additional mutations. Pre-surgery plasma samples (n=29) were then analyzed for PIK3CA mutations using ddPCR. Of the fifteen PIK3CA mutations detected in tumors by ddPCR, fourteen of the corresponding mutations were detected in pre-surgical ptDNA, while no mutations were found in plasma from patients with PIK3CA wild type tumors (sensitivity 93.3%, specificity 100%). Ten patients with mutation positive ptDNA pre-surgery had ddPCR analysis of post-surgery plasma, with five patients having detectable ptDNA post-surgery. Conclusions This prospective study demonstrates accurate mutation detection in tumor tissues using ddPCR, and that ptDNA can be detected in blood before and after surgery in early stage breast cancer patients. Future studies can now address whether ptDNA detected after surgery identifies patients at risk for recurrence, which could guide chemotherapy decisions for individual patients. PMID:24504125

  10. Plasma DNA integrity index as a potential molecular diagnostic marker for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Azza M; Teama, Salwa; Fawzy, Amal; El Deftar, Mervat

    2016-06-01

    Plasma DNA integrity index is increased in various malignancies including breast cancer, the most common cancer in women worldwide; early detection is crucial for successful treatment. Current screening methods fail to detect many cases of breast cancer at an early stage. In this study, we evaluated the level of plasma DNA integrity index in 260 females (95 with breast cancer, 95 with benign breast lesions, and 70 healthy controls) to verify its potential value in discriminating malignant from benign breast lesions. The criteria of the American Joint Committee on Cancer were used for staging of breast cancer patients. DNA integrity index was measured by real-time PCR. DNA integrity index was significantly higher in breast cancer than in benign breast patients and healthy subjects (P = <0.001). DNA integrity index is correlated with TNM stage. Given 100 % specificity, the highest sensitivity achieved in detecting cancer group was 85.3 % at 0.55 DNA integrity index cutoff. In conclusion, the plasma DNA integrity index may be a promising molecular diagnostic marker of malignancy in breast lesions. PMID:26684805

  11. Oxidized Extracellular DNA as a Stress Signal in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ermakov, Aleksei V.; Konkova, Marina S.; Kostyuk, Svetlana V.; Izevskaya, Vera L.; Veiko, Natalya N.

    2013-01-01

    The term “cell-free DNA” (cfDNA) was recently coined for DNA fragments from plasma/serum, while DNA present in in vitro cell culture media is known as extracellular DNA (ecDNA). Under oxidative stress conditions, the levels of oxidative modification of cellular DNA and the rate of cell death increase. Dying cells release their damaged DNA, thus, contributing oxidized DNA fragments to the pool of cfDNA/ecDNA. Oxidized cell-free DNA could serve as a stress signal that promotes irradiation-induced bystander effect. Evidence points to TLR9 as a possible candidate for oxidized DNA sensor. An exposure to oxidized ecDNA stimulates a synthesis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that evokes an adaptive response that includes transposition of the homologous loci within the nucleus, polymerization and the formation of the stress fibers of the actin, as well as activation of the ribosomal gene expression, and nuclear translocation of NF-E2 related factor-2 (NRF2) that, in turn, mediates induction of phase II detoxifying and antioxidant enzymes. In conclusion, the oxidized DNA is a stress signal released in response to oxidative stress in the cultured cells and, possibly, in the human body; in particular, it might contribute to systemic abscopal effects of localized irradiation treatments. PMID:23533696

  12. Exercise-induced oxidatively damaged DNA in humans: evaluation in plasma or urine?

    PubMed

    Karpouzi, Christina; Nikolaidis, Stefanos; Kabasakalis, Athanasios; Tsalis, George; Mougios, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Physical exercise can induce oxidative damage in humans. 8-Hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) is a widely known biomarker of DNA oxidation, which can be determined in blood and urine. The aim of the present study was to compare these two biological fluids in terms of which is more suitable for the estimation of the oxidative damage of DNA by measuring the concentration of 8-OHdG one hour after maximal exercise by enzyme immunoassay. The concentration of 8-OHdG increased with exercise only in plasma (p < 0.001), and values differed between exercise tests in both plasma and urine (p < 0.05). In conclusion, plasma appears to be more sensitive to exercise-induced 8-OHdG changes than urine and, hence, a more appropriate medium for assessing oxidative damage of DNA, although the poor repeatability of the measurement needs to be addressed in future studies. PMID:26849281

  13. Plasma induced DNA damage: Comparison with the effects of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Puač, N.; Malović, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.; Leskovac, A.; Filipović, J.; Joksić, G.

    2014-09-22

    We use human primary fibroblasts for comparing plasma and gamma rays induced DNA damage. In both cases, DNA strand breaks occur, but of fundamentally different nature. Unlike gamma exposure, contact with plasma predominantly leads to single strand breaks and base-damages, while double strand breaks are mainly consequence of the cell repair mechanisms. Different cell signaling mechanisms are detected confirming this (ataxia telangiectasia mutated - ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related - ATR, respectively). The effective plasma doses can be tuned to match the typical therapeutic doses of 2 Gy. Tailoring the effective dose through plasma power and duration of the treatment enables safety precautions mainly by inducing apoptosis and consequently reduced frequency of micronuclei.

  14. Plasma induced DNA damage: Comparison with the effects of ionizing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lazović, S.; Maletić, D.; Leskovac, A.; Filipović, J.; Puač, N.; Malović, G.; Joksić, G.; Petrović, Z. Lj.

    2014-09-01

    We use human primary fibroblasts for comparing plasma and gamma rays induced DNA damage. In both cases, DNA strand breaks occur, but of fundamentally different nature. Unlike gamma exposure, contact with plasma predominantly leads to single strand breaks and base-damages, while double strand breaks are mainly consequence of the cell repair mechanisms. Different cell signaling mechanisms are detected confirming this (ataxia telangiectasia mutated - ATM and ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3 related - ATR, respectively). The effective plasma doses can be tuned to match the typical therapeutic doses of 2 Gy. Tailoring the effective dose through plasma power and duration of the treatment enables safety precautions mainly by inducing apoptosis and consequently reduced frequency of micronuclei.

  15. The comparison of DNA damage induced by micro DBD plasma and low energy electron for curing human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yeunsoo

    2015-09-01

    It is well known that low energy electrons (LEE, especially below 10 eV) can generate DNA damage via indirect action named dissociative electron attachment (DEA). We can now explain some parts of the exact mechanism on DNA damage by LEE collision with direct ionization effect when cancer patients get the radiotherapy. It is kind of remarkable information in the field of radiation therapy. However, it is practically very difficult to directly apply this finding to human disease cure due to difficulty of LEE therapy actualization and request of further clinical studies. Recently, there is a novel challenge in plasma application, that is, how we can apply plasma technology to diagnosis and treatment of many serious diseases like cancer. Cold atmospheric pressure plasma (CAPP) is a very good source to apply to plasma medicine and bio-applications because of low temperature, low cost, and easy handling. Some scientists have already reported good results related to clinical plasma application. The purposes of this study are to further find out exact mechanisms of DNA damage by LEE at the molecular level, to verify new DNA damage like structural alteration on DNA subunits and to compare DNA damage by LEE and plasma source. We will keep expanding our study to DNA damage by plasma source to develop plasma-based new medical and biological applications. We will show some recent results, DNA damage by LEE and non-thermal plasma.

  16. Atmospheric Nonthermal Plasma-Treated PBS Inactivates Escherichia coli by Oxidative DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Yost, Adam D.; Joshi, Suresh G.

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) treated with nonthermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma (plasma) acquires strong antimicrobial properties, but the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation were not known. The goal of this study is to understand the cellular responses of Escherichia coli and to investigate the properties of plasma-activated PBS. The plasma-activated PBS induces severe oxidative stress in E. coli cells and reactive-oxygen species scavengers, α-tocopherol and catalase, protect E. coli from cell death. Here we show that the response of E. coli to plasma-activated PBS is regulated by OxyR and SoxyRS regulons, and mediated predominantly through the expression of katG that deactivates plasma-generated oxidants. During compensation of E. coli in the absence of both katG and katE, sodA and sodB are significantly overexpressed in samples exposed to plasma-treated PBS. Microarray analysis found that up-regulation of genes involved in DNA repair, and E. coli expressing recA::lux fusion was extremely sensitive to the SOS response upon exposure to plasma-treated PBS. The cellular changes include rapid loss of E. coli membrane potential and membrane integrity, lipid peroxidation, accumulation of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguinosine (8OHdG), and severe oxidative DNA damage; reveal ultimate DNA disintegration, and cell death. Together, these data suggest that plasma-treated PBS contains hydrogen peroxide and superoxide like reactive species or/and their products which lead to oxidative changes to cell components, and are eventually responsible for cell death. PMID:26461113

  17. Atmospheric Nonthermal Plasma-Treated PBS Inactivates Escherichia coli by Oxidative DNA Damage.

    PubMed

    Yost, Adam D; Joshi, Suresh G

    2015-01-01

    We recently reported that phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) treated with nonthermal dielectric-barrier discharge plasma (plasma) acquires strong antimicrobial properties, but the mechanisms underlying bacterial inactivation were not known. The goal of this study is to understand the cellular responses of Escherichia coli and to investigate the properties of plasma-activated PBS. The plasma-activated PBS induces severe oxidative stress in E. coli cells and reactive-oxygen species scavengers, α-tocopherol and catalase, protect E. coli from cell death. Here we show that the response of E. coli to plasma-activated PBS is regulated by OxyR and SoxyRS regulons, and mediated predominantly through the expression of katG that deactivates plasma-generated oxidants. During compensation of E. coli in the absence of both katG and katE, sodA and sodB are significantly overexpressed in samples exposed to plasma-treated PBS. Microarray analysis found that up-regulation of genes involved in DNA repair, and E. coli expressing recA::lux fusion was extremely sensitive to the SOS response upon exposure to plasma-treated PBS. The cellular changes include rapid loss of E. coli membrane potential and membrane integrity, lipid peroxidation, accumulation of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguinosine (8OHdG), and severe oxidative DNA damage; reveal ultimate DNA disintegration, and cell death. Together, these data suggest that plasma-treated PBS contains hydrogen peroxide and superoxide like reactive species or/and their products which lead to oxidative changes to cell components, and are eventually responsible for cell death. PMID:26461113

  18. [Sequencing of low-molecular-weight DNA in blood plasma of irradiated rats].

    PubMed

    Vasilieva, I N; Bespalov, V G; Zinkin, V N; Podgornaya, O I

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular low-molecular-weight DNA in blood of irradiated rats was sequenced for the first time. The screening of sequences in the DDBJ database displayed homology of various parts of the rodent genome. Sequences of low-molecular-weight DNA in rat's plasma are enriched with G/C pairs and long interspersed elements relative to rat genome. DNA sequences in blood of rats irradiated at the doses of 8 and 100 Gy have marked distinctions. Data of sequencing of extracellular DNA from normal humans and with pathology were analyzed. DNA sequences of irradiated rats differ from the human ones by a wealth of long interspersed elements. This new knowledge lays the foundation for development of minimally invasive technologies of diagnosing the probability of pathology and controlling the adaptive resources of people in extreme environments. PMID:25958466

  19. Percutaneous Mitral Valve Repair in Mitral Regurgitation Reduces Cell-Free Hemoglobin and Improves Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    Rammos, Christos; Zeus, Tobias; Balzer, Jan; Kubatz, Laura; Hendgen-Cotta, Ulrike B.; Veulemans, Verena; Hellhammer, Katharina; Totzeck, Matthias; Luedike, Peter; Kelm, Malte; Rassaf, Tienush

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective Endothelial dysfunction is predictive for cardiovascular events and may be caused by decreased bioavailability of nitric oxide (NO). NO is scavenged by cell-free hemoglobin with reduction of bioavailable NO up to 70% subsequently deteriorating vascular function. While patients with mitral regurgitation (MR) suffer from an impaired prognosis, mechanisms relating to coexistent vascular dysfunctions have not been described yet. Therapy of MR using a percutaneous mitral valve repair (PMVR) approach has been shown to lead to significant clinical benefits. We here sought to investigate the role of endothelial function in MR and the potential impact of PMVR. Methods and Results Twenty-seven patients with moderate-to-severe MR treated with the MitraClip® device were enrolled in an open-label single-center observational study. Patients underwent clinical assessment, conventional echocardiography, and determination of endothelial function by measuring flow-mediated dilation (FMD) of the brachial artery using high-resolution ultrasound at baseline and at 3-month follow-up. Patients with MR demonstrated decompartmentalized hemoglobin and reduced endothelial function (cell-free plasma hemoglobin in heme 28.9±3.8 μM, FMD 3.9±0.9%). Three months post-procedure, PMVR improved ejection fraction (from 41±3% to 46±3%, p = 0.03) and NYHA functional class (from 3.0±0.1 to 1.9±1.7, p<0.001). PMVR was associated with a decrease in cell free plasma hemoglobin (22.3±2.4 μM, p = 0.02) and improved endothelial functions (FMD 4.8±1.0%, p<0.0001). Conclusion We demonstrate here that plasma from patients with MR contains significant amounts of cell-free hemoglobin, which is accompanied by endothelial dysfunction. PMVR therapy is associated with an improved hemoglobin decompartmentalization and vascular function. PMID:26986059

  20. Role of plasma EBV DNA levels in predicting recurrence of nasopharyngeal carcinoma in a western population

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinomas can be cured by the combination of chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In Eastern countries, plasma levels of viral Epstein-Barr deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) are accurate in predicting recurrence, but few data are available in Western populations. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the relationship between viral Epstein-Barr DNA copy numbers in plasma and the response rate, progression-free survival and overall survival in a cohort of Western patients with stage IIb-IVb nasopharyngeal cancer. Methods We evaluated plasma samples from 36 consecutive patients treated with induction chemotherapy followed by chemoradiation. EBV copy numbers were determined after DNA extraction using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Survival curves were estimated using the Kaplan–Meier method. Results Circulating Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels were measured before treatment, at the end of concomitant chemo- and radiotherapy, and during the follow-up period. Pre-treatment levels significantly correlated with the initial stage and probability of relapse. Their increase was 100% specific and 71.3% sensitive in detecting loco-regional or metastatic recurrence (an overall accuracy of 94.4%). Three-year progression-free and overall survival were respectively 78.2% and 97.1%. Conclusions The results of this study confirm that patients from a Western country affected by loco-regionally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma have high plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA levels at diagnosis. The monitoring of plasma levels is sensitive and highly specific in detecting disease recurrence and metastases. PMID:22646734

  1. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Collier, Pat; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  2. Diagnostic Performance of Plasma DNA Methylation Profiles in Lung Cancer, Pulmonary Fibrosis and COPD.

    PubMed

    Wielscher, Matthias; Vierlinger, Klemens; Kegler, Ulrike; Ziesche, Rolf; Gsur, Andrea; Weinhäusel, Andreas

    2015-08-01

    Disease-specific alterations of the cell-free DNA methylation status are frequently found in serum samples and are currently considered to be suitable biomarkers. Candidate markers were identified by bisulfite conversion-based genome-wide methylation screening of lung tissue from lung cancer, fibrotic ILD, and COPD. cfDNA from 400 μl serum (n = 204) served to test the diagnostic performance of these markers. Following methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme digestion and enrichment of methylated DNA via targeted amplification (multiplexed MSRE enrichment), a total of 96 markers were addressed by highly parallel qPCR. Lung cancer was efficiently separated from non-cancer and controls with a sensitivity of 87.8%, (95%CI: 0.67-0.97) and specificity 90.2%, (95%CI: 0.65-0.98). Cancer was distinguished from ILD with a specificity of 88%, (95%CI: 0.57-1), and COPD from cancer with a specificity of 88% (95%CI: 0.64-0.97). Separation of ILD from COPD and controls was possible with a sensitivity of 63.1% (95%CI: 0.4-0.78) and a specificity of 70% (95%CI: 0.54-0.81). The results were confirmed using an independent sample set (n = 46) by use of the four top markers discovered in the study (HOXD10, PAX9, PTPRN2, and STAG3) yielding an AUC of 0.85 (95%CI: 0.72-0.95). This technique was capable of distinguishing interrelated complex pulmonary diseases suggesting that multiplexed MSRE enrichment might be useful for simple and reliable diagnosis of diverse multifactorial disease states. PMID:26425700

  3. DNA damage in oral cancer cells induced by nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xu; Klas, Matej; Liu, Yueying; Stack, M. Sharon; Ptasinska, Sylwia

    2013-09-01

    The nitrogen atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) has been shown to effectively induce DNA double strand breaks in SCC-25 oral cancer cells. The APPJ source constructed in our laboratory consists of two external electrodes wrapping around a quartz tube and nitrogen as a feed gas and operates based on dielectric barrier gas discharge. Generally, it is more challenging to ignite plasma in N2 atmosphere than in noble gases. However, this design provides additional advantages such as lower costs compared to the noble gases for future clinical operation. Different parameters of the APPJ configuration were tested in order to determine radiation dosage. To explore the effects of delayed damage and cell self-repairing, various incubation times of cells after plasma treatment were also performed. Reactive species generated in plasma jet and in liquid environment are essential to be identified and quantified, with the aim of unfolding the mystery of detailed mechanisms for plasma-induced cell apoptosis. Moreover, from the comparison of plasma treatment effect on normal oral cells OKF6T, an insight to the selectivity for cancer treatment by APPJ can be explored. All of these studies are critical to better understand the damage responses of normal and abnormal cellular systems to plasma radiation, which are useful for the development of advanced plasma therapy for cancer treatment at a later stage.

  4. A cell free system for functional centromere and kinetochore assembly Authors

    PubMed Central

    Guse, Annika; Fuller, Colin J.; Straight, Aaron F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary This protocol describes a cell free system to study vertebrate centromere and kinetochore formation. We reconstitute tandem arrays of centromere protein A (CENP-A) nucleosomes as a substrate for centromere and kinetochore assembly. These chromatin substrates are immobilized on magnetic beads and then incubated in Xenopus egg extracts that provide a source for centromere and kinetochore proteins and that can be cycled between mitotic and interphase cell cycle states. This cell free system lends itself to protein immunodepletion, complementation and drug inhibition as tools to perturb centromere and kinetochore assembly, cytoskeletal dynamics, DNA modification, and protein post-translational modification. This system provides a distinct advantage over cell-based investigations where perturbing centromere and kinetochore function often results in lethality. Reconstituted CENP-A chromatin specifically assembles centromere and kinetochore proteins after incubation in egg extract that locally stabilize microtubules and, upon microtubule depolymerization with nocodazole, activate the mitotic checkpoint. A typical experiment occupies 3 days. PMID:23018190

  5. Clinical relevance of circulating cell-free microRNAs in ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Koji; Sawada, Kenjiro; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kinose, Yasuto; Nakatsuka, Erika; Kimura, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is the leading cause of death among gynecologic malignancies. Since ovarian cancer develops asymptomatically, it is often diagnosed at an advanced and incurable stage. Despite many years of research, there is still a lack of reliable diagnostic markers and methods for early detection and screening. Recently, it was discovered that cell-free microRNAs (miRNAs) circulate in the body fluids of healthy and diseased patients, suggesting that they may serve as a novel diagnostic marker. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the potential clinical relevance of circulating cell-free miRNA for ovarian cancer diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. Despite the high levels of ribonucleases in many types of body fluids, most of the circulating miRNAs are packaged in microvesicles, exosomes, or apoptotic bodies, are binding to RNA-binding protein such as argonaute 2 or lipoprotein complexes, and are thus highly stable. Cell-free miRNA signatures are known to be parallel to those from the originating tumor cells, indicating that circulating miRNA profiles accurately reflect the tumor profiles. Since it is well established that the dysregulation of miRNAs is involved in the tumorigenesis of ovarian cancer, cell-free miRNAs circulating in body fluids such as serum, plasma, whole blood, and urine may reflect not only the existence of ovarian cancer but also tumor histology, stage, and prognoses of the patients. Several groups have successfully demonstrated that serum or plasma miRNAs are able to discriminate patients with ovarian cancer patients from healthy controls, suggesting that the addition of these miRNAs to current testing regimens may improve diagnosis accuracies for ovarian cancer. Furthermore, recent studies have revealed that changes in levels of cell-free circulating miRNAs are associated with the condition of cancer patients. Discrepancies between the results across studies due to the lack of an established endogenous miRNA control to

  6. GEC Student Award for Excellence Finalist: Interaction of Non-Thermal Dielectric Barrier Discharge Plasma with DNA inside Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalghatgi, Sameer; Kelly, Crystal; Fridman, Gregory; Clifford-Azizkhan, Jane; Fridman, Alexander; Friedman, Gary

    2008-10-01

    Direct non-thermal plasma is now being widely considered for various medical applications, viz; cancer treatment, coagulation, wound healing. However, the understanding of the interaction between non-thermal plasma and cells is lacking. Here we study the possibility that effects of the plasma treatment can penetrate though cellular membranes without destroying them. One of the most important of such effects to investigate would be DNA double strand breaks (DSB's) since these are some of the important events in a cell's life cycle. We measured DNA DSB's in mammalian cells using immunofluorescence and western blots. Hydrogen peroxide treatment was used as a positive control since it is known to induce massive DNA double strand breaks. The results indicate that short (5 seconds) direct plasma treatment at low power (0.2 W/cm^2) does produce DNA DSB's in mammalian cells. This means that somehow plasma penetrates inside the cells. Several questions arise about what is the mechanism of penetration and do the cells repair the DNA DSB's. We show that the cells do repair the DNA DSB's produced by short exposure of low power plasma. Although the detailed mechanisms are being investigated we confirmed that reactive oxygen species mediate interaction between plasma and DNA.

  7. Overview of Production of Protein Using Cell-free Systems

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Fei Philip

    2014-01-01

    One of the most important steps in protein research is production of the target protein. Cell based systems are mature tools that have long been used to express recombinant proteins by manipulation of the expression organisms. However, it is often challenging to find suitable cell systems that allow for rapid screening of conditions and constructs to produce properly folded, functional proteins in a cost effective manner. As a result, cell-free protein production emerged as an attractive alternative to cell-based protein expression methods because of its advantages including speed, simplicity, and adaptability to various formats. Efforts have been made in recent years to overcome a few major obstacles that had been preventing the system from being more widely used. These advances have led to the revitalization of cell-free expression systems to meet the increasing demands for protein production, and many research institutions and companies have developed unique and innovative cell-free systems. This poster will present the history and development of the cell-free method, and the updated techniques of various cell-free systems. Examples will be presented to demonstrate that the cell-free system can be a true alternative to cell based protein expression systems and offers a powerful technology for accelerating the production of recombinant protein.

  8. Risk stratification based on change in plasma Epstein-Barr virus DNA load after treatment in nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yan-Ping; Guo, Rui; Tang, Ling-Long; Peng, Hao; Sun, Ying; Liu, Qing; Chen, Lei; Ma, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Background: Nasopharyngeal carcinoma is associated with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The current study investigated change in the plasma EBV DNA load in the first 3 months after treatment and its clinical significance in NPC. Methods: A total of 273 patients with non-metastatic, histologically-proven NPC treated with radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy were retrospectively reviewed. Results: EBV DNA was detectable in 19/273 (7.0%) patients at the end of therapy (end-DNA). Three months later, 16/273 (5.9%) patients had detectable EBV DNA (3-month-DNA). To investigate risk stratified by the pattern of change in post-treatment EBV-DNA, we divided patients into four subgroups: Group 1, undetectable end-DNA and 3-month-DNA (n = 244); Group 2, detectable end-DNA and undetectable 3-month-DNA (n = 13); Group 3, undetectable end-DNA and detectable 3-month-DNA (n = 7); and Group 4, detectable end-DNA and 3-month-DNA (n = 2). Patients with delayed remission of EBV DNA after treatment (Group 2) had significantly poorer 3-year DFS (48.6% vs. 89.7%, P < 0.001), DMFS (48.6% vs. 94.6%, P < 0.001) and OS (91.7% vs. 97.5%, P < 0.001) than those with persistently undetectable EBV DNA post-treatment (Group 1). Five of the seven patients with re-emergent EBV DNA (Group 3) and both patients with persistent EBV DNA post-treatment (Group 4) developed disease failure. Conclusion: Plasma EBV DNA load continues to change during the first 3 months after treatment. The pattern of change in EBV DNA load post-treatment could help identify patients with different prognoses. PMID:26840023

  9. In Vitro Evolution of Bovine Foamy Virus Variants with Enhanced Cell-Free Virus Titers and Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Qiuying; Hipp, Michaela; Hugo, Annette; Lei, Janet; Liu, Yang; Kehl, Timo; Hechler, Torsten; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Virus transmission is essential for spreading viral infections and is a highly coordinated process which occurs by cell-free transmission or cell–cell contact. The transmission of Bovine Foamy Virus (BFV) is highly cell-associated, with undetectable cell-free transmission. However, BFV particle budding can be induced by overexpression of wild-type (wt) BFV Gag and Env or artificial retargeting of Gag to the plasma membrane via myristoylation membrane targeting signals, closely resembling observations in other foamy viruses. Thus, the particle release machinery of wt BFV appears to be an excellent model system to study viral adaption to cell-free transmission by in vitro selection and evolution. Using selection for BFV variants with high cell-free infectivity in bovine and non-bovine cells, infectivity dramatically increased from almost no infectious units to about 105–106 FFU (fluorescent focus forming units)/mL in both cell types. Importantly, the selected BFV variants with high titer (HT) cell-free infectivity could still transmit via cell-cell contacts and were neutralized by serum from naturally infected cows. These selected HT–BFV variants will shed light into virus transmission and potential routes of intervention in the spread of viral infections. It will also allow the improvement or development of new promising approaches for antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26569290

  10. In Vitro Evolution of Bovine Foamy Virus Variants with Enhanced Cell-Free Virus Titers and Transmission.

    PubMed

    Bao, Qiuying; Hipp, Michaela; Hugo, Annette; Lei, Janet; Liu, Yang; Kehl, Timo; Hechler, Torsten; Löchelt, Martin

    2015-11-01

    Virus transmission is essential for spreading viral infections and is a highly coordinated process which occurs by cell-free transmission or cell-cell contact. The transmission of Bovine Foamy Virus (BFV) is highly cell-associated, with undetectable cell-free transmission. However, BFV particle budding can be induced by overexpression of wild-type (wt) BFV Gag and Env or artificial retargeting of Gag to the plasma membrane via myristoylation membrane targeting signals, closely resembling observations in other foamy viruses. Thus, the particle release machinery of wt BFV appears to be an excellent model system to study viral adaption to cell-free transmission by in vitro selection and evolution. Using selection for BFV variants with high cell-free infectivity in bovine and non-bovine cells, infectivity dramatically increased from almost no infectious units to about 105-106 FFU (fluorescent focus forming units)/mL in both cell types. Importantly, the selected BFV variants with high titer (HT) cell-free infectivity could still transmit via cell-cell contacts and were neutralized by serum from naturally infected cows. These selected HT-BFV variants will shed light into virus transmission and potential routes of intervention in the spread of viral infections. It will also allow the improvement or development of new promising approaches for antiretroviral therapies. PMID:26569290