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Sample records for cell-mediated immunity adoptive

  1. Cell-mediated immunity in epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Gliński, W; Jablonska, S; Langner, A; Obalek, S; Haftek, M; Proniewska, M

    1976-01-01

    Investigations were performed in 6 cases of epidermodysplasia verruciformis and 2 healthy family members. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) was studied by measuring response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and concanavalin A (Con A), percentrages of E- and EAC-rosette-forming lymphocytes, bacterial skin tests, and allergic reactions to dinitrochloro-benzene (DNCB). Impairment of CMI was manifested by reduction in the percentage of E rosettes, and lowered response to PHA, and- to a lesser degree- to Con A. The immune response to DNCB sensitization was invariably negative. Impairment of CMI was greater in cases of long duration and with extensive lesions. The cases of similar duration and extent of lesions, which never showed tendency to tumor formation, were not different in CMI in comparison with cases with numerous tumors. Only in cases with very advanced tumors CMI was impaired parallel to the gravity of the patient's general condition. PMID:1017532

  2. Cell-mediated immunity in anorexia nervosa.

    PubMed Central

    Cason, J; Ainley, C C; Wolstencroft, R A; Norton, K R; Thompson, R P

    1986-01-01

    Twelve patients with anorexia nervosa were studied for cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed hypersensitivity reactions to recall antigens, lymphocyte transformation responses to T-cell mitogens, and numbers of circulating leucocytes and T-cell subpopulations. Compared to controls, all patients had reduced cutaneous reactions and four were anergic. There was a mild leucopenia in patients and both T4+ and T3+ numbers were slightly reduced. Mean peak transformation responses for patients were slightly lower than controls for phytohaemagglutinin, but not for concanavalin A; however, patients required greater doses of mitogens to elicit peak transformation responses. Plasmas from patients did not contain inhibitors of transformation responses. We conclude that there are functional cellular abnormalities associated with the under-nutrition of anorexia nervosa. PMID:3742879

  3. Cell-mediated immune deficiency in Hodgkin's disease.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R K; Penny, R

    1982-10-01

    Disturbances of the immune system frequently accompany the development of lymphomas in man. In the early stages of non-Hodgkin's lymphomas, abnormalities of immunological function are usually minimal, but impairment of both antibody- and cell-mediated immunity is often noted in advanced disease. In contrast, while antibody-mediated immune responses in patients with Hodgkin's disease usually remain intact until late in the course of the illness, cell-mediated immune dysfunction is an early and consistent feature. Here Rakesh Kumar and Ronald Penny discuss the abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity in Hodgkin's disease. PMID:25290229

  4. Cell mediated immune regulation in autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Gillissen, G; Pusztai-Markos, Z

    1979-01-01

    Autoimmunity is the term for the immune conditions characterized by a specific humoral or cell mediated response to the body's own tissues. The termination of the natural state of self tolerance may lead to immunopathological manifestations with clinical consequences, i.e. autoimmune diseases. In a very general sense, one may classify autoimmune diseases into two groups with respect to the underlying mechanism: 1. There are autoimmune diseases which develop in the presence of a normal intact regulation mechanism. 2. Another group whose development must be understood on the basis of a cellular dysfunction. In the first case, dequestered or semi-sequestered autoantigens are liberated as a consequence of exogenic influences inducing the sensitization of immunocompetent cells. The immune system then reacts with these autoantigens in the same way as with foreign substances. This kind of autoimmune disease will, however, not be dealt with here. In the second case, autoantigens are normally, i.e. in healthy individuals, accessible to the immunocompetent cells. To understand the reason for the development of an autoimmune reaction one must first clarify the mechanism of self tolerance. Then one must examine the way in which a break of this physiological state takes place. One of the major unanswered questions is the relative importance of antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immune mechanisms in the onset and further development of autoimmune diseases. Recently it has been suggested that a dysfunction at the cellular level might represent the basic cause which induces the termination of selftolerance. Most of the conceptions about the mechanism by which autoimmune diseases are triggered were gained through experiments with animals. It is, however, difficult to use these experimental results to explain human diseases; in humans many questions are still open. Undoubtedly, the mechanisms of induction and maintenance of self tolerance and also the ways in which autoimmune

  5. Cutaneous sensitivity induced by immunization with irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. I. Induction, elicitation, and adoptive transfer analysis of cell-mediated cutaneous sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-06-01

    Exposure of C57BL/6 mice to highly irradiated (50 kR) cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni leads to the development of partial resistance against subsequent challenge with unattenuated cercariae. We have analyzed the cellular immune responses that occur during the afferent and efferent phases of this protective sensitization. Mice were immunized by exposure to irradiated S. mansoni cercariae. After challenge with irradiated cercariae, delayed-type (18-72 hr) cutaneous sensitivity reaction sites were rich in mononuclear cells and eosinophils. This reactivity was established by 4 days after sensitization, reached its maximum between 7 and 14 days after sensitization, and was maintained for over 20 weeks. These challenge reactions could be abrogated by treatment with either 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or 5 mg of hydrocortisone. Syngeneic adoptive transfer of cutaneous sensitivity was accomplished with lymphoid cells from the draining lymph nodes or spleens of mice sensitized 7-14 days previously. Negative selection studies of nylon-wool non-adherent cells from sensitized donors demonstrated that the cells responsible for transferring this eosinophil-rich, delayed-type cutaneous sensitivity to S. mansoni irradiated cercariae were Thy/sup -1 +/, Lyt/sup 1 +/, Lyt/sup 2 -/, surface Ig/sup -/ lymphocytes.

  6. Cell-mediated immunity in experimental Nocardia asteroides infection.

    PubMed Central

    Sundararaj, T; Agarwal, S C

    1977-01-01

    Experimental mycetoma-like lesions developed in guinea pigs after subcutaneous injection of Nocardia asteroides. Although delayed hypersensitivity appeared earlier, increased macrophage migration inhibition and microbicidal activity appeared after 7 weeks. When the lesions healed, high cell-mediated immunity was present. Cell-mediated immunity was transferred to normal recipient guinea pigs from healed donor guinea pigs by spleen cell transfer. Recipient guinea pigs showed marked protection against challenge with N. asteroides. PMID:321348

  7. EFFECTS OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS ON CELL MEDIATED IMMUNITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of lead and cadmium on cell-mediated immunity was studied in peritoneal macrophages, B-, and T-lymphocytes of mice. Lead and cadmium were administered in drinking water for 10 weeks in short-term experiments and up to 18 months to deal with immune responses in aged mic...

  8. Detection of cell mediated immune response to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In birds, lymphomyeloid tissues develop from epithelial (Bursa of Fabricus or thymus) or mesenchymal tissue which are populated by heamatopoietic stem cells. These stem cells develop directly into immunologically competent B (bursa) and T (thymus) cells. Cell-mediated immunity (CMI) is a part of the...

  9. Effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mandel, A. D.; Balish, E.

    1977-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune response to Listeria monocytogenes was studied in rats subjected to 20 days of flight aboard the Soviet biosatellite Kosmos 7820. Groups of rats were immunized with 1,000,000 formalin-killed Listeria suspended in Freunds Complete Adjuvant, 5 days prior to flight. Immunized rats subjected to the same environmental factors as the flight rats, except flight itself, and immunized and nonimmunized rats held in a normal animal colony served as controls. Following recovery, lymphocyte cultures were harvested from spleens of all rats, cultured in vitro in the presence of L. monocytogenes antigens, Phytohemagglutinin, Conconavlin A, or purified protein derivative (PPD), and measured for their uptake of H-3-thymidine. Although individual rats varied considerably, all flight and immunized control rats gave a blastogenic response to the Listeria antigens and PPD. With several mitogens, the lymphocytes of flight rats showed a significantly increased blastogenic response over the controls. The results of this study do not support a hypothesis of a detrimental effect of space flight on cell-mediated immunity. The data suggest a possible suppressive effect of stress and gravity on an in vitro correlate of cell-mediated immunity.

  10. Depressed cell-mediated immunity in coeliac disease.

    PubMed Central

    Scott, B B; Losowsky, M S

    1976-01-01

    Fourteen coeliac patients on a gluten free diet (GFD) and 10 on a normal diet were studied by lymphocyte transformation in response to PHA to assess the integrity of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Transformation was depressed in the majority taking a normal diet, with improvement after a GFD. In some patients the depression may have been due to a serum factor, as transformation was more nearly normal when the lymphocytes were cultured in pooled AB serum than in their own serum. There was no correlation between transformation and nutritional deficiencies. Mantoux tests were performed in some of these and other coeliac patients and there was a very significant reduction in the incidence of positive tests compared with controls. These findings provide evidence of depressed CMI in coeliac patients taking a normal diet with improvement on a GFD and may be of relevance to the high risk of malignancy in coeliac disease, further strengthening the case for a strict GFD. PMID:1087262

  11. Nonspecific cell-mediated immunity in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Pereira de Oliveira, Walmar Roncalli; Carrasco, Solange; Neto, Cyro Festa; Rady, Peter; Tyring, Stephen K

    2003-03-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare disease that usually begins in childhood and is characterized by a generalized infection by human papilloma virus (HPV), frequent associations with cutaneous carcinomas, and abnormalities of cell-mediated immunity (CMI). We studied nonspecific CMI in 13 patients with EV by bacterial skin tests, allergic reactions to dinitrochlorobenzene (DNCB), measurement of responses to phytohemagglutinin (PHA), and quantification of T lymphocytes and T lymphocytes subsets in peripheral blood. Impairment of CMI was manifested by the cutaneous anergy to a variety of common skin antigens and, by the reduction of the lymphocyte transformation to PHA. There were no correlation between the severity of cases and abnormalities of CMI in our patients, however; the impairment of CMI was lower in cases of short duration, suggesting that the impairment of CMI in EV might reflect a long period of disease. PMID:12692356

  12. Establishment of Stable, Cell-Mediated Immunity that Makes "Susceptible" Mice Resistant to Leishmania major

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bretscher, Peter A.; Wei, Guojian; Menon, Juthika N.; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle

    1992-07-01

    Cell-mediated, but not antibody-mediated, immune responses protect humans against certain pathogens that produce chronic diseases such as leishmaniasis. Effective vaccination against such pathogens must therefore produce an immunological "imprint" so that stable, cell-mediated immunity is induced in all individuals after natural infection. BALB/c mice "innately susceptible" to Leishmania major produce antibodies after substantial infection. In the present study, "susceptible" mice injected with a small number of parasites mounted a cell-mediated response and acquired resistance to a larger, normally pathogenic, challenge. This vaccination strategy may be applicable in diseases in which protection is dependent on cell-mediated immunity.

  13. Essential oil of clove (Eugenia caryophyllata) augments the humoral immune response but decreases cell mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Halder, Sumita; Mehta, Ashish K; Mediratta, Pramod K; Sharma, Krishna K

    2011-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to explore the effect of the essential oil isolated from the buds of Eugenia caryophyllata on some immunological parameters. Humoral immunity was assessed by measuring the hemagglutination titre to sheep red blood cells and delayed type hypersensitivity was assessed by measuring foot pad thickness. Clove oil administration produced a significant increase in the primary as well as secondary humoral immune response. In addition, it also produced a significant decrease in foot pad thickness compared with the control group. Thus, these results suggest that clove oil can modulate the immune response by augmenting humoral immunity and decreasing cell mediated immunity. PMID:21796701

  14. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  15. Cell-mediated immune responses to respiratory syncytial virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Geevarghese, Bessey; Weinberg, Adriana

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated the cell-mediated immune (CMI) response to RSV acute infection including the magnitude, kinetics and correlates with morbidity and age. Twenty-nine RSV-infected patients with mean ± SD age of 15 ± 14 months were enrolled during their first week of disease. Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17 and Th22 responses were measured at entry and 2 and 6 weeks later. All subjects were hospitalized for a median (range) of 5 (3–11) days. RSV-specific effector and memory Th1 CMI measured by lymphocyte proliferation and IFNγ ELISPOT significantly increased over time (P ≤ 0.03). In contrast, Th22 responses decreased over time (P ≤ 0.03). Other changes did not reach statistical significance. The severity of RSV disease measured by the length of hospitalization positively correlated with the magnitude of Th9, Th22 and TNFα inflammatory responses (rho ≥ 0.4; P ≤ 0.04) and negatively with memory CMI (rho = –0.45; P = 0.04). The corollary of this observation is that robust Th1 and/or low Th9, Th22, and TNFα inflammatory responses may be associated with efficient clearance of RSV infection and therefore desirable characteristics of an RSV vaccine. Young age was associated with low memory and effector Th1 responses (rho ≥ 0.4; P ≤ 0.04) and high Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22 and TNFα inflammatory responses (rho ≤ –0.4; P ≤ 0.04), indicating that age at vaccination may be a major determinant of the CMI response pattern. PMID:24513666

  16. Micronutrient supplementation and T-cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examine the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T cell mitogens in a randomize...

  17. Cell-Mediated Immune Function and Cytokine Regulation During Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Pierson, Duane L.; Paloski, W. H. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The changes in immune function which occur during space flight potentially expose the crews to an increased risk for development of illness. Decreased cellular immune function has been repeatedly documented after space flight and confirmed during flight by in vivo delayed-type hypersensitivity testing. However, correlation of immune changes with a clinically significant risk factor has not yet been performed. Our hypothesis is that space flight induces a decrease in cell-mediated immune function accompanied by a shift from a type 1 cytokine pattern (favoring cell-mediated immunity) to a type 2 cytokine pattern (favoring humoral immunity). We further hypothesize that reactivation of latent viruses will occur during space flight in association with the decreased cellular immunity. To test these hypotheses, we will determine the effects of space flight on cell-mediated immunity and viral reactivation. We will utilize delayed-type hypersensitivity testing as an in vivo measure of integrated cell-mediated immune function. The production of cytokines and immunoregulatory factors by lymphocytes and monocytes will be measured to determine whether changes in cytokine patterns are associated with the space flight-induced immune dysregulation. Correlation of antigen-specific immune changes with reactivation of latent herpes viruses will be determined by measuring peripheral levels of viral (CMV, VZV, EBV) antigen-specific T cells and comparing to the levels of EBV-infected B-cells by fluorescence in situ hybridization and flow cytometry. A comparison of cell-mediated immune function, cytokine regulation and viral reactivation will provide new insights into crew member health risks during flight.

  18. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity after infection with attenuated rubella virus.

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, R; Cusumano, C L; Waldman, R H

    1976-01-01

    The effects of attenuated rubella virus infection upon cell-mediated immunity of human volunteers were studied. The volunteers received the vaccine either by nose drops or by the subcutaneous route. Changes in cell-mediated immunity in terms of delayed cutaneous sensitivity to recall antigens, phytohemagglutination stimulation, and spontaneous migration inhibitory factor-like activity were studied at various time periods after infection. Spontaneous migration inhibitory factor-like activity was studied on supernatants of the lymphocytes obtained from the volunteers and incubated for 72 h in the absence of any antigens. A significant proportion of the volunteers showed suppression of one or more parameters of cell-medicated immunity tested by week 2 of infection compared to the control; however, there was no correlation between suppression of the various parameters studied. No difference was noticed in the incidence of cell-mediated immunity suppression between nose drops and subcutaneous route groups. PMID:770329

  19. Maternal immunity enhances Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae vaccination induced cell-mediated immune responses in piglets

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Passively acquired maternal derived immunity (MDI) is a double-edged sword. Maternal derived antibody-mediated immunity (AMI) and cell-mediated immunity (CMI) are critical immediate defenses for the neonate; however, MDI may interfere with the induction of active immunity in the neonate, i.e. passive interference. The effect of antigen-specific MDI on vaccine-induced AMI and CMI responses to Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae (M. hyopneumoniae) was assessed in neonatal piglets. To determine whether CMI and AMI responses could be induced in piglets with MDI, piglets with high and low levels of maternal M. hyopneumoniae-specific immunity were vaccinated against M. hyopneumoniae at 7 d of age. Piglet M. hyopneumoniae-specific antibody, lymphoproliferation, and delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were measured 7 d and 14 d post vaccination. Results Piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI failed to show vaccine-induced AMI responses; there was no rise in M. hyopneumoniae antibody levels following vaccination of piglets in the presence of M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI. However, piglets with M. hyopneumoniae-specific MDI had primary (antigen-specific lymphoproliferation) and secondary (DTH) M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses following vaccination. Conclusions In this study neonatal M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI was not subject to passive interference by MDI. Further, it appears that both maternal derived and endogenous CMI contribute to M. hyopneumoniae-specific CMI responses in piglets vaccinated in the face of MDI. PMID:24903770

  20. Cell mediated immunity to corn starch in starch-induced granulomatous peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Goodacre, R L; Clancy, R L; Davidson, R A; Mullens, J E

    1976-03-01

    Two patients with histologically diagnosed starch induced granulomatous peritonitis (SGP) have been shown to have cell mediated immunity to corn starch using the techniques of macrophage migration inhibition and lymphocyte DNA synthesis. Control groups of normal subjects, patients with uncomplicated laparotomy, and patients with Crohn's disease were negative in both tests. Lymphocytes from two patients with band adhesions, one of whom had biopsy evidence of a granulomatous reaction to starch, were sensitized to starch. Cell mediated immunity to starch may contribute to the pathogenesis of SGP, and some band adhesions may be a chronic low grade manifestation of this disorder. PMID:1269987

  1. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika PMID:27212842

  2. Hypothalamus-Pituitary-Adrenal cell-mediated immunity regulation in the Immune Restoration Inflammatory Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Khakshooy, Allen; Chiappelli, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Over one third of the patients sero-positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) with signs of the acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS), and under treatment with anti-retroviral therapy (ART), develop the immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). It is not clear what variables are that determine whether a patient with HIV/AIDS will develop ART-related IRIS, but the best evidence base thus far indicates that HIV/AIDS patients with low CD4 cell count, and HIV/AIDS patients whose CD4 count recovery shows a sharp slope, suggesting a particularly fast "immune reconstitution", are at greater risk of developing IRIS. Here, we propose the hypothesis that one important variable that can contribute to low CD4 cell count number and function in ART-treated HIV/AIDS patients is altered hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) cell-mediated immune (CMI) regulation. We discuss HPA-CMI deregulation in IRIS as the new frontier in comparative effectiveness research (CRE) for obtaining and utilizing the best evidence base for treatment of patients with HIV/AIDS in specific clinical settings. We propose that our hypothesis about altered HPA-CMI may extend to the pathologies observed in related viral infection, including Zika. PMID:27212842

  3. Cell-mediated immune responses after immunization of healthy seronegative children with varicella vaccine: kinetics and specificity.

    PubMed

    Watson, B; Keller, P M; Ellis, R W; Starr, S E

    1990-10-01

    Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses were determined in seronegative children immunized with live attenuated Oka strain varicella vaccine. At 2 weeks after immunization, 80% of children had detectable lymphocyte proliferation to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) antigens, while only 40% had antibodies to VZV as detected by ELISA. By 6 weeks after immunization, 97% of children seroconverted, and 95% of these responded to VZV antigens in the proliferation assay. A high proportion of immunized children also responded in the proliferation assay to purified glycoproteins I, II, and III of VZV. These results indicate that most children develop a broad cell-mediated immune response to VZV antigens within weeks after immunization with varicella vaccine. PMID:2169495

  4. Cell-mediated immunity in the course of cervical ectropion.

    PubMed

    De Luca Brunori, I; Facchini, V; Filippeschi, M; Battini, L; Giusti, G; Romani, L; Scida, P; Urbano, M

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we evaluated cellular immunitary response in course of asymptomatic ectropion. Biopsies of the injured and healthy zones of the exocervix were carried out. All biopsies were examined by an immuno-histo-chemical method (Avidin-Biotin Complex, ABC) with monoclonal antibodies, in order to phenotype T lymphocytic subpopulations, in particular T helper lymphocytes (CD4), T suppressor lymphocytes (CD8) and Langerhans cells (CD1), which are basic elements of the monocytic-macrophagic series. Our preliminary findings showed a reduction of CD4, CD8 and CD1 lymphocytic subpopulations in ectropion zones, while these subpopulations are normally present in healthy zones of the exocervix. These findings support the hypothesis that, in ectropion, as in HPV infections and in CIN, a localized immuno-deficiency may appear and depress immuno-surveillance and cell-mediated response. In conclusion, it may be supposed that ectropion represents a non-stable lesion, which therefore needs suitable therapeutic intervention. PMID:7915218

  5. CALORIE RESTRICTION ENHANCES T CELL MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE IN OVERWEIGHT MEN AND WOMEN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It is well known that dietary energy restriction prolongs lifespan and enhances immune responsiveness in a wide range of laboratory animals. However, information on the applicability of these results to humans is limited. In this study we examined the effects of calorie restriction on T cell mediate...

  6. Biomarkers of CD4+ CTL cell Mediated Immunity to Tuberculosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The immune responses mediated by interactions between T-lymphocyte subsets and mycobacteria-infected macrophages are critical for control of tuberculosis. In these studies, the bovine model was used to characterize the cytolytic and mycobactericidal CD4+ T cell response induced by BCG vaccination. ...

  7. Siglecs as targets for therapy in immune cell mediated disease

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Mary K.; Paulson, James C.

    2010-01-01

    The sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprise a family of receptors that are differentially expressed on leukocytes and other immune cells. The restricted expression of several siglecs to one or a few cell types makes them attractive targets for cell-directed therapies. The anti-CD33 (Siglec-3) antibody Gemtuzumab (Mylotarg™) is approved for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and antibodies targeting CD22 (Siglec-2) are currently in clinical trials for treatment of B cell non-Hodgkins lymphomas and autoimmune diseases. Because siglecs are endocytic receptors, they are well suited for a ‘Trojan horse’ strategy, whereby therapeutic agents conjugated to an antibody, or multimeric glycan ligand, bind to the siglec and are efficiently carried into the cell. Although the rapid internalization of unmodified siglec antibodies reduces their utility for induction of antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) or complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC), antibody binding of Siglec-8, Siglec-9, and CD22 have been demonstrated to induce apoptosis of eosinophils, neutrophils, and depletion of B cells, respectively. Here we review the properties of siglecs that make them attractive for cell-targeted therapies. PMID:19359050

  8. Effect of microencapsulated ampicillin on cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Barsoum, I S; Kopydlowski, K M; Burge, J R; Setterstrom, J A

    1997-11-01

    The effects of free ampicillin, microencapsulated ampicillin anhydrate (MEAA) and antibiotic-free microspheres on the cell-mediated immune response in Balb/c mice were measured by lymphoproliferation assay, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and cytokine production. Injection into mice for seven consecutive days with equivalent subcutaneous doses of ampicillin, MEAA or placebo microspheres did not produce any consistent change in lymphocyte proliferation nor did it affect DTH responses or interleukin-2 production. Although the production of interleukin-4 in mice treated with ampicillin or MEAA increased compared with the control mice, this increase was not statistically significant. These results indicate that ampicillin and MEAA have similar effects on cell-mediated immunity in mice. PMID:9421323

  9. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd. PMID:808340

  10. Curculigoside augments cell-mediated immune responses in metastatic tumor-bearing animals.

    PubMed

    Murali, Vishnu Priya; Kuttan, Girija

    2016-08-01

    A positive modulation of immune system is necessary for preparing the body to fight against malignant tumor cells. In the present study, the stimulatory effect of Curculigoside on cell-mediated immune response against the metastasis of B16F10 melanoma cells was analyzed in C57BL/6 mice. Curculigoside is a phenolic glucoside present in the plant Curculigo orchioides Gaertn. (Family - Amaryllidaceae). Administration of Curculigoside enhanced the natural killer (NK) cell activity, antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and complement-mediated cytotoxicity in metastatic tumor-bearing animals, when compared to the untreated control animals. The compound was also found to be effective in reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6 and GM-CSF during metastasis. Besides these, levels of TH1 cytokines, such as IL-2 and IFN-γ, were significantly enhanced (p < 0.001) by Curculigoside administration and thereby reduces the metastatic lung colony formation along with an increased lifespan of the experimental animals. These studies provide an evidence for the stimulation of cell-mediated immune responses by Curculigoside against B16F10-induced metastatic tumor progression in experimental animals. PMID:27228189

  11. Activation of cell-mediated immunity by Morinda citrifolia fruit extract and its constituents.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuya; Abe, Yumi; Futamura-Masudaa, Megumi; Uwaya, Akemi; Isami, Fumiyuki; Matsuda, Hideaki

    2014-04-01

    Morinda citrifolia, commonly known as noni, is a traditional natural medicine in French Polynesia and Hawaii. Functional foods derived from M. citrifolia fruit have been marketed to help prevent diseases and promote good health. The objective of this study was to assess the effects of M. citrifolia fruit on cell-mediated immunity. In the picryl chloride-induced contact dermatitis test, M. citrifolia fruit extract (Noni-ext) inhibited the suppression of cell-mediated immunity by immunosuppressive substances isolated from freeze-dried ascites of Ehrlich carcinoma-bearing mice (EC-sup). In addition, Noni-ext inhibited reduction of IL-2 production in EC-sup-treated mice and activated natural killer cells in normal mice. These results suggest that Noni-ext has multiple effects on the recovery of cell-mediated immunity. Furthermore, we investigated the active principles of Noni-ext and identified an iridoid glycoside, deacetylasperulosidic acid. Oral administration of deacetylasperulosidic acid inhibited the reduction of ear swelling, and also cancelled the suppression of IL-2 production along with the activation of natural killer cells in the same manner as that of Noni-ext. PMID:24868850

  12. Cell-Mediated Immunity in Elite Controllers Naturally Controlling HIV Viral Load.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Nebuloni, Manuela; Alfano, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The natural course of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection is characterized by high viral load, depletion of immune cells, and immunodeficiency, ultimately leading to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome phase and the occurrence of opportunistic infections and diseases. Since the discovery of HIV in the early 1980s a naturally selected population of infected individuals has been emerged in the last years, characterized by being infected for many years, with viremia constantly below detectable level and poor depletion of immune cells. These individuals are classified as "elite controllers (EC) or suppressors" and do not develop disease in the absence of anti-retroviral therapy. Unveiling host factors and immune responses responsible for the elite status will likely provide clues for the design of therapeutic vaccines and functional cures. Scope of this review was to examine and discuss differences of the cell-mediated immune responses between HIV+ individuals with disease progression and EC. PMID:23577012

  13. Optimistic Expectancies and Cell-Mediated Immunity: The Role of Positive Affect

    PubMed Central

    Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Sephton, Sandra E.

    2014-01-01

    Optimistic expectancies affect many psychosocial outcomes and may also predict immune system changes and health, but the nature and mechanisms of any such physiological effects have not been identified. The present study related law-school expectancies to cell-mediated immunity (CMI), examining the within- and between-person components of this relationship and affective mediators. First-year law students (N = 124) completed questionnaire measures of expectancies and affect and received delayed-type hypersensitivity skin tests at five time points. A positive relationship between optimistic expectancies and CMI occurred, in which that changes in optimism correlated with changes in CMI. Likewise, changes in optimism predicted changes in positive and, to a lesser degree, negative affect, but the relationship between optimism and immunity was partially accounted for only by positive affect. This dynamic relationship between expectancies and immunity has positive implications for psychological interventions to improve health, particularly those that increase positive affect. PMID:20424083

  14. Mast cells mediate the immune suppression induced by dermal exposure to JP-8 jet fuel.

    PubMed

    Limón-Flores, Alberto Y; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel; Ramos, Gerardo; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2009-11-01

    Applying jet propulsion-8 (JP-8) jet fuel to the skin of mice induces immune suppression. Applying JP-8 to the skin of mice suppresses T-cell-mediated immune reactions including, contact hypersensitivity (CHS) delayed-type hypersensitivity and T-cell proliferation. Because dermal mast cells play an important immune regulatory role in vivo, we tested the hypothesis that mast cells mediate jet fuel-induced immune suppression. When we applied JP-8 to the skin of mast cell deficient mice CHS was not suppressed. Reconstituting mast cell deficient mice with wild-type bone marrow derived mast cells (mast cell "knock-in mice") restored JP-8-induced immune suppression. When, however, mast cells from prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2))-deficient mice were used, the ability of JP-8 to suppress CHS was not restored, indicating that mast cell-derived PGE(2) was activating immune suppression. Examining the density of mast cells in the skin and lymph nodes of JP-8-treated mice indicated that jet fuel treatment caused an initial increase in mast cell density in the skin, followed by increased numbers of mast cells in the subcutaneous space and then in draining lymph nodes. Applying JP-8 to the skin increased mast cell expression of CXCR4, and increased the expression of CXCL12 by draining lymph node cells. Because CXCL12 is a chemoattractant for CXCR4+ mast cells, we treated JP-8-treated mice with AMD3100, a CXCR4 antagonist. AMD3100 blocked the mobilization of mast cells to the draining lymph node and inhibited JP-8-induced immune suppression. Our findings demonstrate the importance of mast cells in mediating jet fuel-induced immune suppression. PMID:19726579

  15. Ornamental comb colour predicts T-cell-mediated immunity in male red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mougeot, Francois

    2008-02-01

    Sexual ornaments might reliably indicate the ability to cope with parasites and diseases, and a better ability to mount a primary inflammatory response to a novel challenge. Carotenoid-based ornaments are amongst the commonest sexual signals of birds and often influence mate choice. Because carotenoids are immuno-stimulants, signallers may trade-off allocating these to ornamental colouration or using them for immune responses, so carotenoid-based ornaments might be particularly useful as honest indicators of immuno-compentence. Tetraonid birds, such as the red grouse Lagopus lagopus scoticus, exhibit supra-orbital yellow red combs, a conspicuous ornament which functions in intra- and inter-sexual selection. The colour of combs is due to epidermal pigmentation by carotenoids, while their size is testosterone-dependent. In this study, I investigated whether comb characteristics, and in particular, comb colour, indicated immuno-competence in free-living male red grouse. I assessed T-cell-mediated immunity using a standardised challenge with phytohaemagglutinin. Red grouse combs reflect in the red and in the ultraviolet spectrum of light, which is not visible to humans but that grouse most likely see, so I measured comb colour across the whole bird visible spectrum (300 700 nm) using a reflectance spectrometer. I found that males with bigger and redder combs, but with less ultraviolet reflectance, had greater T-cell-mediated immune response. Comb colour predicted T-cell-mediated immune response better than comb size, indicating that the carotenoid-based colouration of this ornament might reliably signal this aspect of male quality.

  16. Female Iberian wall lizards prefer male scents that signal a better cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    López, Pilar; Martín, José

    2005-12-22

    In spite of the importance of chemoreception in sexual selection of lizards, only a few studies have examined the composition of chemical signals, and it is unknown whether and how chemicals provide honest information. Chemical signals might be honest if there were a trade-off between sexual advertisement and the immune system. Here, we show that proportions of cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol in femoral secretions of male Iberian wall lizards (Podarcis hispanica) were related to their T-cell-mediated immune response. Thus, only males with a good immune system may allocate higher amounts of this chemical to signalling. Furthermore, females selected scents of males with higher proportions of cholesta-5,7-dien-3-ol and lower proportions of cholesterol. Thus, females might base their mate choice on the males' quality as indicated by the composition of their chemical signals. PMID:17148218

  17. Explanatory style and cell-mediated immunity in elderly men and women.

    PubMed

    Kamen-Siegel, L; Rodin, J; Seligman, M E; Dwyer, J

    1991-01-01

    Correlated pessimistic explanatory style--the belief that negative events are caused by internal, stable, and global factors--with lowered immunocompetence in a sample of 26 older adults. Two measures of cell-mediated immunity--T-helper cell/T-suppressor cell ratio and T-lymphocyte response to mitogen challenge--were lower in individuals with a pessimistic style, controlling for the influence of current health, depression, medication, recent weight change, sleep, and alcohol use. A relative increase in the percentage of T-suppressor cells seemed to underlie this immunosuppression. Although the mechanism by which explanatory style might influence immune function remains unknown, we speculate that a pessimistic style might be an important psychological risk factor--at least among older people--in the early course of certain immune-mediated diseases. PMID:1915208

  18. Cordyceps militaris Enhances Cell-Mediated Immunity in Healthy Korean Men.

    PubMed

    Kang, Ho Joon; Baik, Hyun Wook; Kim, Sang Jung; Lee, Seong Gyu; Ahn, Hong Yup; Park, Ju Sang; Park, Sang Jong; Jang, Eun Jeong; Park, Sang Woon; Choi, Jin Young; Sung, Ji Hee; Lee, Seung Min

    2015-10-01

    Cordyceps militaris is a mushroom traditionally used for diverse pharmaceutical purposes in East Asia, including China, and has been found to be effective for enhancing immunity through various types of animal testing. The aim of this study is to determine the efficacy of C. militaris for enhancing cell-mediated immunity and its safety in healthy male adults. Healthy male adults were divided into the experimental group (n = 39), given 1.5 g/day of ethanol treated C. militaris in capsules, and the control group (n = 40), given the same number of identical placebo capsules filled with microcrystalline cellulose and lactose for 4 weeks from February 13 to March 14, 2012; the natural killer (NK) cell activity, lymphocyte proliferation index (PI), and T-helper cell 1 (Th1) cytokine cluster (interferon [IFN]-γ, interleukin [IL]-12, IL-2, and tumor necrosis factor [TNF]-α) were measured, along with stability test, at weeks 0, 2, and 4. The C. militaris group showed a statistically significant greater increase in NK200 (P = .0010), lymphocyte PI (P ≤ .0001), IL-2 (P = .0096), and IFN-γ (P = .0126), compared with the basal level, than the placebo group. There was no statistically significant adverse reaction. C. militaris enhanced the NK cell activity and lymphocyte proliferation and partially increased Th1 cytokine secretion. Therefore, C. militaris is safe and effective for enhancing cell-mediated immunity of healthy male adults. PMID:26284906

  19. The 3 major types of innate and adaptive cell-mediated effector immunity.

    PubMed

    Annunziato, Francesco; Romagnani, Chiara; Romagnani, Sergio

    2015-03-01

    The immune system has tailored its effector functions to optimally respond to distinct species of microbes. Based on emerging knowledge on the different effector T-cell and innate lymphoid cell (ILC) lineages, it is clear that the innate and adaptive immune systems converge into 3 major kinds of cell-mediated effector immunity, which we propose to categorize as type 1, type 2, and type 3. Type 1 immunity consists of T-bet(+) IFN-γ-producing group 1 ILCs (ILC1 and natural killer cells), CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells (TC1), and CD4(+) TH1 cells, which protect against intracellular microbes through activation of mononuclear phagocytes. Type 2 immunity consists of GATA-3(+) ILC2s, TC2 cells, and TH2 cells producing IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which induce mast cell, basophil, and eosinophil activation, as well as IgE antibody production, thus protecting against helminthes and venoms. Type 3 immunity is mediated by retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt(+) ILC3s, TC17 cells, and TH17 cells producing IL-17, IL-22, or both, which activate mononuclear phagocytes but also recruit neutrophils and induce epithelial antimicrobial responses, thus protecting against extracellular bacteria and fungi. On the other hand, type 1 and 3 immunity mediate autoimmune diseases, whereas type 2 responses can cause allergic diseases. PMID:25528359

  20. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: can cell mediated immunity markers predict clinical outcome?

    PubMed Central

    Meliconi, R; Lalli, E; Borzì, R M; Sturani, C; Galavotti, V; Gunella, G; Miniero, R; Facchini, A; Gasbarrini, G

    1990-01-01

    Most of the cells found in lung parenchyma in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis are activated T lymphocytes and macrophages. The serum levels of three markers of cell mediated immunity were measured in 20 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in 20 normal subjects and in 12 patients with sarcoidosis to evaluate their clinical and prognostic significance in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. The three markers were: soluble CD8 (from activated suppressor-cytotoxic lymphocytes), soluble interleukin (IL)-2 receptors (from activated T cells and macrophages), and neopterin (from activated macrophages). Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis had higher levels of all three markers than the control subjects. Soluble IL-2 receptor and neopterin tended to be lower (though not significantly) in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis than in those with sarcoidosis, whereas soluble CD8 was similar in the two groups of patients. No correlation was found between soluble IL-2 receptors or soluble CD8 and the clinical, radiological, and physiological measures of disease activity or with clinical outcome (after a mean follow up of 23 months). Tumour necrosis factor levels were also determined. Only 30% of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis or sarcoidosis had detectable circulating tumour necrosis factor; these patients had a lower percentage of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid neutrophils in their lavage fluid. Tumour necrosis factor levels did not correlate with clinical measures of severity or outcome. Thus our data support the hypothesis that cell mediated alveolitis occurs in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. They do not, however, provide evidence to support the use of these markers of cell mediated immunity to monitor the clinical course in these patients. PMID:2118691

  1. Tetherin promotes the innate and adaptive cell-mediated immune response against retrovirus infection in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Li, Sam X.; Barrett, Bradley S.; Heilman, Karl J.; Messer, Ronald J.; Liberatore, Rachel A.; Bieniasz, Paul D.; Kassiotis, George; Hasenkrug, Kim J.; Santiago, Mario L.

    2014-01-01

    Tetherin/BST-2 is a host restriction factor that could directly inhibit retroviral particle release by tethering nascent virions to the plasma membrane. However, the immunological impact of Tetherin during retrovirus infection remains unknown. We now show that Tetherin influences antiretroviral cell-mediated immune responses. In contrast to the direct antiviral effects of Tetherin, which are dependent on cell surface expression, the immunomodulatory effects are linked to the endocytosis of the molecule. Mice encoding endocytosis-competent C57BL/6 Tetherin exhibited lower viremia and pathology at 7 days post-infection with Friend retrovirus (FV) compared to mice encoding endocytosis-defective NZW/LacJ Tetherin. Notably, antiretroviral protection correlated with stronger NK cell responses. In addition, FV infection levels were significantly lower in wild-type C57BL/6 mice than in Tetherin knock-out mice at 2 weeks post-infection, and antiretroviral protection correlated with stronger NK cell and virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses. The results demonstrate that Tetherin acts as a modulator of the cell-mediated immune response against retrovirus infection in vivo. PMID:24872193

  2. In vivo and in vitro effects of lead on humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, D A

    1981-01-01

    The humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of murine lymphocytes exposed to lead in vivo and in vitro were investigated. In vivo Pb was administered via the drinking water (0 to 10 mM) for 1 to 10 weeks. In vivo exposure of the mice to Pb did not alter significantly their plaque-forming cell response to sheep erythrocytes; however, their susceptibility to Listeria infection was reduced significantly with Pb dosages of greater than 0.4 mM. Although the in vivo plaque-forming cell responses did not appear to be altered, in vitro assessment of the reactivity of these in vivo Pb-exposed lymphocytes indicated that intermediate doses enhanced, but a high dose (10 mM) was suppressive. The 10 mM in vivo Pb dose suppressed the in vitro plaque-forming cell response, the mixed-lymphocyte culture response, and lipopolysaccharide-induced proliferation, but it did not affect concanavalin A- or phytohemagglutinin-induced proliferation. Interestingly, in vitro Pb exposure (10(-6) to 10(-4) M) of murine spleen cells caused an enhancement of most activities even though these in vitro concentrations of Pb were slightly above the in vivo concentrations. Direct in vitro Pb effects on the lymphocytes could be measured, and Pb consistently enhanced humoral and cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6971260

  3. Foxa2 programs Th2 cell-mediated innate immunity in the developing lung.

    PubMed

    Chen, Gang; Wan, Huajing; Luo, Fengming; Zhang, Liqian; Xu, Yan; Lewkowich, Ian; Wills-Karp, Marsha; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2010-06-01

    After birth, the respiratory tract adapts to recurrent exposures to pathogens, allergens, and toxicants by inducing the complex innate and acquired immune systems required for pulmonary homeostasis. In this study, we show that Foxa2, expressed selectively in the respiratory epithelium, plays a critical role in regulating genetic programs influencing Th2 cell-mediated pulmonary inflammation. Deletion of the Foxa2 gene, encoding a winged helix/forkhead box transcription factor that is selectively expressed in respiratory epithelial cells, caused spontaneous pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation and goblet cell metaplasia. Loss of Foxa2 induced the recruitment and activation of myeloid dendritic cells and Th2 cells in the lung, causing increased production of Th2 cytokines and chemokines. Loss of Foxa2-induced expression of genes regulating Th2 cell-mediated inflammation and goblet cell differentiation, including IL-13, IL-4, eotaxins, thymus and activation-regulated chemokine, Il33, Ccl20, and SAM pointed domain-containing Ets transcription factor. Pulmonary inflammation and goblet cell differentiation were abrogated by treatment of neonatal Foxa2(Delta/Delta) mice with mAb against IL-4Ralpha subunit. The respiratory epithelium plays a central role in the regulation of Th2-mediated inflammation and innate immunity in the developing lung in a process regulated by Foxa2. PMID:20483781

  4. Salmonella Modulates B Cell Biology to Evade CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Medina, Marcela; Perez-Lopez, Araceli; Alpuche-Aranda, Celia; Ortiz-Navarrete, Vianney

    2014-01-01

    Although B cells and antibodies are the central effectors of humoral immunity, B cells can also produce and secrete cytokines and present antigen to helper T cells. The uptake of antigen is mainly mediated by endocytosis; thus, antigens are often presented by MHC-II molecules. However, it is unclear if B cells can present these same antigens via MHC-I molecules. Recently, Salmonella bacteria were found to infect B cells, allowing possible antigen cross-processing that could generate bacterial peptides for antigen presentation via MHC-I molecules. Here, we will discuss available knowledge regarding Salmonella antigen presentation by infected B cell MHC-I molecules and subsequent inhibitory effects on CD8+ T cells for bacterial evasion of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:25484884

  5. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-01-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B*57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B*57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  6. T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity: immune mechanisms and their clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yun, James; Cai, Fenfen; Lee, Frederick J; Pichler, Werner J

    2016-04-01

    T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity represents a significant proportion of immune mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions. In the recent years, there has been an increase in understanding the immune mechanisms behind T-cell-mediated drug hypersensitivity. According to hapten mechanism, drug specific T-cell response is stimulated by drug-protein conjugate presented on major histocompatibility complex (MHC) as it is presented as a new antigenic determinant. On the other hand, p-i concept suggests that a drug can stimulate T cells via noncovalent direct interaction with T-cell receptor and/or peptide-MHC. The drug binding site is quite variable and this leads to several different mechanisms within p-i concept. Altered peptide repertoire can be regarded as an 'atypical' subset of p-i concept since the mode of the drug binding and the binding site are essentially identical to p-i concept. However, the intracellular binding of abacavir to HLA-B(*)57:01 additionally results in alteration in peptide repertoire. Furthermore the T-cell response to altered peptide repertoire model is only shown for abacavir and HLA-B(*)57:01 and therefore it may not be generalised to other drug hypersensitivity. Danger hypothesis has been postulated to play an important role in drug hypersensitivity by providing signal 2 but its experimental data is lacking at this point in time. Furthermore, the recently described allo-immune response suggests that danger signal may be unnecessary. Finally, in view of these new understanding, the classification and the definition of type B adverse drug reaction should be revised. PMID:27141480

  7. Inhibition of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in man by distinct suppressor cell systems.

    PubMed Central

    Lobo, P I; Spencer, C E

    1979-01-01

    Studies were designed to investigate whether the suppressor cell systems that regulate the humoral and cell-mediated immune responses belong to the same subsets of T cells or different subsets. Mitogen-activated suppressor cells were simultaneously assayed for their ability to inhibit (a) pokeweed mitogen-induced generation of plasma cells, (b) blastogenic response of lymphocytes to allogeneic cells, and (c) generation of killer cells in the cell-mediated lymphocytotoxicity assay. We found that suppressor cells that inhibited the generation of plasma cells were activated by concanavalin A (Con A) and were both radiation and prednisone sensitive. Suppressors that inhibited the blastogenic response in lymphocytes to allogenic cells were also activated by Con A but differed in that they were both radiation and prednisone resistant. In contrast, suppressors that inhibited the generation of the killer cells were activated with phytohemagglutinin and not Con A. These suppressors were prednisone and radiation resistant. These observations cannot be explained by differences at the pro-suppressor or suppressor activator levels as both T cell subsets are radiosensitive. Alternatively, heterogeneity of suppressor cell systems may explain these differences. PMID:156197

  8. Interleukin 2-diphtheria toxin fusion protein can abolish cell-mediated immunity in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, V E; Bacha, P; Pankewycz, O; Nichols, J C; Murphy, J R; Strom, T B

    1988-01-01

    De novo expression of the interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R) is a critical and pivotal event in initiation of an immune response. Targeting the low-affinity IL-2-binding p55 subunit of the high-affinity IL-2R with the rat anti-mouse IgM monoclonal antibody M7/20 suppresses a variety of T-cell-mediated reactions, including transplant rejection, autoimmunity, and delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH). A hybrid IL-2-toxin gene was constructed from the diphtheria toxin gene by replacing the DNA encoding the diphtheria toxin receptor-binding domain with the DNA encoding the receptor-binding domain of IL-2, and the fusion protein encoded by the hybrid gene was expressed in Escherichia coli [Williams, D.P., Parker, K., Bacha, P., Bishai, W., Borowski, M., Genbauffe, F., Strom, T.B. & Murphy, J.R. (1987) Protein Eng. 1, 493-498]. We examined the action of the chimeric IL-2-toxin fusion protein on an in vivo T-cell mediated response, DTH. The IL-2-toxin fusion protein was found to be a potent immunosuppressive agent. Treatment of mice with the IL-2-toxin blocks DTH and prevents expansion of IL-2R+ T cells. Indeed, IL-2-toxin treatment targets IL-2R+ T cells in vivo and is shown to selectively eliminate their appearance in draining lymph nodes. DTH suppression was observed even in mice possessing high titers of antibodies to diphtheria toxoid. PMID:3131768

  9. Cell mediated immune responses in the placenta following challenge of vaccinated pregnant heifers with Neospora caninum.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Y P; Cantón, G; Regidor-Cerrillo, J; Chianini, F; Morrell, E; Lischinsky, L; Ortega-Mora, L M; Innes, E A; Odeón, A; Campero, C M; Moore, D P

    2015-12-15

    The aim of the present study was to investigate and correlate the cell-mediated immune response and pathological changes at the maternal-fetal interface of Neospora-challenged pregnant cattle previously immunized with live and inactivated experimental vaccines. Pregnant heifers naïve to Neospora caninum were divided in 5 groups of 4 animals, each one immunized before mating: Group A heifers were intravenously (iv) immunized with 6.25 × 10(7) live tachyzoites of the NC-6 strain; group B heifers were immunized twice subcutaneously (sc) 3 weeks apart with native antigen extract of the NC-6 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group C heifers were sc immunized twice 3 weeks apart with three recombinant proteins (rNcSAG1, rNcHSP20, rNcGRA7) of the NC-1 strain formulated with ISCOMs; group D heifers were sc injected with sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and group E heifers received sc ISCOM-matrix (ISCOMs without antigen). All groups were iv-challenged with 4.7 × 10(7) NC-1 tachyzoites at 70 days of gestation. Heifers were culled at day 104 of gestation and placentomes were examined to evaluate lesions and local cellular immune responses using histopathology, immunohistochemistry and real time-PCR. Immunohistochemistry was performed using bovine leucocyte specific antibodies. Cytokine expression and levels (IFN-γ, IL-4, IL-10, IL-12 and TNF-α) were measured using real-time reverse transcription-PCR and ELISA, respectively. Minimal inflammation was observed in group A placentomes; while placentomes from group B, C, D and E had moderate to severe infiltration with CD3(+), CD4(+), γδ-T cells, CD8(+) cells and macrophages being more numerous in groups B and E placentomes, when compared with groups C and D (P<0.001). Cytokine levels were significantly increased in the caruncles of animals of groups B and C in comparison with the other animal groups (P < 0.001). The results from this study showed that the strongest cellular immune responses were observed in the

  10. Micronutrient supplementation and T cell-mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculosis in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    Kawai, K; Meydani, S N; Urassa, W; Wu, D; Mugusi, F M; Saathoff, E; Bosch, R J; Villamor, E; Spiegelman, D; Fawzi, W W

    2014-07-01

    Limited studies exist regarding whether incorporating micronutrient supplements during tuberculosis (TB) treatment may improve cell-mediated immune response. We examined the effect of micronutrient supplementation on lymphocyte proliferation response to mycobacteria or T-cell mitogens in a randomized trial conducted on 423 patients with pulmonary TB. Eligible participants were randomly assigned to receive a daily dose of micronutrients (vitamins A, B-complex, C, E, and selenium) or placebo at the time of initiation of TB treatment. We found no overall effect of micronutrient supplements on lymphocyte proliferative responses to phytohaemagglutinin or purified protein derivatives in HIV-negative and HIV-positive TB patients. Of HIV-negative TB patients, the micronutrient group tended to show higher proliferative responses to concanavalin A than the placebo group, although the clinical relevance of this finding is not readily notable. The role of nutritional intervention in this vulnerable population remains an important area of future research. PMID:24093552

  11. Cell mediated immune response of the Mediterranean sea urchin Paracentrotus lividus after PAMPs stimulation.

    PubMed

    Romero, A; Novoa, B; Figueras, A

    2016-09-01

    The Mediterranean sea urchin (Paracentrotus lividus) is of great ecological and economic importance for the European aquaculture. Yet, most of the studies regarding echinoderm's immunological defense mechanisms reported so far have used the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus purpuratus as a model, and information on the immunological defense mechanisms of Paracentrotus lividus and other sea urchins, is scarce. To remedy this gap in information, in this study, flow cytometry was used to evaluate several cellular immune mechanisms, such as phagocytosis, cell cooperation, and ROS production in P. lividus coelomocytes after PAMP stimulation. Two cell populations were described. Of the two, the amoeboid-phagocytes were responsible for the phagocytosis and ROS production. Cooperation between amoeboid-phagocytes and non-adherent cells resulted in an increased phagocytic response. Stimulation with several PAMPs modified the phagocytic activity and the production of ROS. The premise that the coelomocytes were activated by the bacterial components was confirmed by the expression levels of two cell mediated immune genes: LPS-Induced TNF-alpha Factor (LITAF) and macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). These results have helped us understand the cellular immune mechanisms in P. lividus and their modulation after PAMP stimulation. PMID:27113124

  12. Colostral antibody-mediated and cell-mediated immunity contributes to innate and antigen-specific immunity in piglets.

    PubMed

    Bandrick, Meggan; Ariza-Nieto, Claudia; Baidoo, Samuel K; Molitor, Thomas W

    2014-03-01

    Immunoglobulins and immune cells are critical components of colostral immunity; however, their transfer to and function in the neonate, especially maternal lymphocytes, is unclear. Cell-mediated and antibody-mediated immunity in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood before (PS) and after (AS) suckling were assessed to investigate transfer and function of maternal immunity in the piglet. CD4, CD8, and γδ lymphocytes were found in sow blood and colostrum and piglet blood PS and AS; each had a unique T lymphocyte profile. Immunoglobulins were detected in sow blood, colostrum, and in piglet blood AS; the immunoglobulin profile of piglet serum AS mimicked that of sow serum. These results suggest selectivity in lymphocyte concentration into colostrum and subsequent lymphocyte transfer into the neonate, but that immunoglobulin transfer is unimpeded. Assessment of colostral natural killer activity and antigen-specific proliferation revealed that colostral cells are capable of influencing the innate and specific immune response of neonatal pigs. PMID:24252519

  13. Protection against henipaviruses in swine requires both, cell-mediated and humoral immune response.

    PubMed

    Pickering, Brad S; Hardham, John M; Smith, Greg; Weingartl, Eva T; Dominowski, Paul J; Foss, Dennis L; Mwangi, Duncan; Broder, Christopher C; Roth, James A; Weingartl, Hana M

    2016-09-14

    Hendra virus (HeV) and Nipah virus (NiV) are members of the genus Henipavirus, within the family Paramyxoviridae. Nipah virus has caused outbreaks of human disease in Bangladesh, Malaysia, Singapore, India and Philippines, in addition to a large outbreak in swine in Malaysia in 1998/1999. Recently, NiV was suspected to be a causative agent of an outbreak in horses in 2014 in the Philippines, while HeV has caused multiple human and equine outbreaks in Australia since 1994. A swine vaccine able to prevent shedding of infectious virus is of veterinary and human health importance, and correlates of protection against henipavirus infection in swine need to be better understood. In the present study, three groups of animals were employed. Pigs vaccinated with adjuvanted recombinant soluble HeV G protein (sGHEV) and challenged with HeV, developed antibody levels considered to be protective prior to the challenge (titers of 320). However, activation of the cell-mediated immune response was not detected, and the animals were only partially protected against challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of HeV per animal. In the second group, cross-neutralizing antibody levels against NiV in the sGHEV vaccinated animals did not reach protective levels, and with no activation of cellular immune memory, these animals were not protected against NiV. Only pigs orally infected with 5×10(4) PFU of NiV per animal were protected against nasal challenge with 5×10(5) PFU of NiV per animal. This group of pigs developed protective antibody levels, as well as cell-mediated immune memory. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells restimulated with UV-inactivated NiV upregulated IFN-gamma, IL-10 and the CD25 activation marker on CD4(+)CD8(+) T memory helper cells and to lesser extent on CD4(-)CD8(+) T cells. In conclusion, both humoral and cellular immune responses were required for protection of swine against henipaviruses. PMID:27544586

  14. Cell-mediated immunity in patients with chronic fatigue syndrome, healthy control subjects and patients with major depression.

    PubMed Central

    Lloyd, A; Hickie, I; Hickie, C; Dwyer, J; Wakefield, D

    1992-01-01

    The chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is characterized by severe persistent fatigue and neuropsychiatric symptoms. It has been proposed that the abnormalities in cell-mediated immunity which have been documented in patients with CFS may be attributable to a clinical depression, prevalent in patients with this disorder. Cell-mediated immune status was evaluated in patients with carefully defined CFS and compared with that of matched subjects with major depression (non-melancholic, non-psychotic) as well as healthy control subjects. Patients with CFS demonstrated impaired lymphocyte responses to phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation, and reduced or absent delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin responses when compared either with subjects with major depression or with healthy control subjects (P less than 0.05 for each analysis). Although depression is common in patients with CFS, the disturbances of cell-mediated immunity in this disorder differ in prevalence and magnitude from those associated with major depression. These observations strengthen the likelihood of a direct relationship between abnormal cell-mediated immunity and the etiology of CFS. PMID:1733640

  15. Stimulatory effect of Eucalyptus essential oil on innate cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    Serafino, Annalucia; Vallebona, Paola Sinibaldi; Andreola, Federica; Zonfrillo, Manuela; Mercuri, Luana; Federici, Memmo; Rasi, Guido; Garaci, Enrico; Pierimarchi, Pasquale

    2008-01-01

    Background Besides few data concerning the antiseptic properties against a range of microbial agents and the anti-inflammatory potential both in vitro and in vivo, little is known about the influence of Eucalyptus oil (EO) extract on the monocytic/macrophagic system, one of the primary cellular effectors of the immune response against pathogen attacks. The activities of this natural extract have mainly been recognized through clinical experience, but there have been relatively little scientific studies on its biological actions. Here we investigated whether EO extract is able to affect the phagocytic ability of human monocyte derived macrophages (MDMs) in vitro and of rat peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes in vivo in absence or in presence of immuno-suppression induced by the chemotherapeutic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU). Methods Morphological activation of human MDMs was analysed by scanning electron microscopy. Phagocytic activity was tested: i) in vitro in EO treated and untreated MDMs, by confocal microscopy after fluorescent beads administration; ii) in vivo in monocytes/granulocytes from peripheral blood of immuno-competent or 5-FU immuno-suppressed rats, after EO oral administration, by flow cytometry using fluorescein-labelled E. coli. Cytokine release by MDMs was determined using the BD Cytometric Bead Array human Th1/Th2 cytokine kit. Results EO is able to induce activation of MDMs, dramatically stimulating their phagocytic response. EO-stimulated internalization is coupled to low release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and requires integrity of the microtubule network, suggesting that EO may act by means of complement receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Implementation of innate cell-mediated immune response was also observed in vivo after EO administration, mainly involving the peripheral blood monocytes/granulocytes. The 5-FU/EO combined treatment inhibited the 5-FU induced myelotoxicity and raised the phagocytic activity of the granulocytic

  16. Dynamics of an HIV-1 infection model with cell mediated immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Pei; Huang, Jianing; Jiang, Jiao

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of an improved mathematical model on HIV-1 virus with cell mediated immunity. This new 5-dimensional model is based on the combination of a basic 3-dimensional HIV-1 model and a 4-dimensional immunity response model, which more realistically describes dynamics between the uninfected cells, infected cells, virus, the CTL response cells and CTL effector cells. Our 5-dimensional model may be reduced to the 4-dimensional model by applying a quasi-steady state assumption on the variable of virus. However, it is shown in this paper that virus is necessary to be involved in the modeling, and that a quasi-steady state assumption should be applied carefully, which may miss some important dynamical behavior of the system. Detailed bifurcation analysis is given to show that the system has three equilibrium solutions, namely the infection-free equilibrium, the infectious equilibrium without CTL, and the infectious equilibrium with CTL, and a series of bifurcations including two transcritical bifurcations and one or two possible Hopf bifurcations occur from these three equilibria as the basic reproduction number is varied. The mathematical methods applied in this paper include characteristic equations, Routh-Hurwitz condition, fluctuation lemma, Lyapunov function and computation of normal forms. Numerical simulation is also presented to demonstrate the applicability of the theoretical predictions.

  17. Candida mannan: chemistry, suppression of cell-mediated immunity, and possible mechanisms of action.

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, R D; Shibata, N; Podzorski, R P; Herron, M J

    1991-01-01

    The ability of Candida albicans to establish an infection involves multiple components of this fungal pathogen, but its ability to persist in host tissue may involve primarily the immunosuppressive property of a major cell wall glycoprotein, mannan. Mannan and oligosaccharide fragments of mannan are potent inhibitors of cell-mediated immunity and appear to reproduce the immune deficit of patients with the mucocutaneous form of candidiasis. However, neither the exact structures of these inhibitory species nor their mechanisms of action have yet been clearly defined. Different investigators have proposed that mannan or mannan catabolites act upon monocytes or suppressor T lymphocytes, but research from unrelated areas has provided still other possibilities for consideration. These include interference with cytokine activities, lymphocyte-monocyte interactions, and leukocyte homing. To stimulate further research of the immunosuppressive property of C. albicans mannan, we have reviewed (i) the relationship of mannan to other antigens and virulence factors of the fungus; (ii) the chemistry of mannan, together with methods for preparation of mannan and mannan fragments; and (iii) the historical evidence for immunosuppression by Candida mannan and the mechanisms currently proposed for this property; and (iv) we have speculated upon still other mechanisms by which mannan might influence host defense functions. It is possible that understanding the immunosuppressive effects of mannan will provide clues to novel therapies for candidiasis that will enhance the efficacy of both available and future anti-Candida agents. PMID:2004345

  18. TRESK channel as a potential target to treat T-cell mediated immune dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jaehee; Kang, Dawon

    2009-12-25

    In this review, we propose that TRESK background K{sup +} channel could serve as a potential therapeutic target for T-cell mediated immune dysfunction. TRESK has many immune function-related properties. TRESK is abundantly expressed in the thymus, the spleen, and human leukemic T-lymphocytes. TRESK is highly activated by Ca{sup 2+}, calcineurin, acetylcholine, and histamine which induce hypertrophy, whereas TRESK is inhibited by immunosuppressants, such as cyclosporin A and FK506. Cyclosporine A and FK506 target the binding site of nuclear factor of activated T-cells (NFAT) to inhibit calcineurin. Interestingly, TRESK possesses an NFAT-like docking site that is present at its intracellular loop. Calcineurin has been found to interact with TRESK via specific NFAT-like docking site. When the T-cell is activated, calcineurin can bind to the NFAT-docking site of TRESK. The activation of both TRESK and NFAT via Ca{sup 2+}-calcineurin-NFAT/TRESK pathway could modulate the transcription of new genes in addition to regulating several aspects of T-cell function.

  19. Astaxanthin stimulates cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in cats.

    PubMed

    Park, Jean Soon; Mathison, Bridget D; Hayek, Michael G; Massimino, Stefan; Reinhart, Gregory A; Chew, Boon P

    2011-12-15

    Astaxanthin is a potent antioxidant carotenoid and may play a role in modulating immune response in cats. Blood was taken from female domestic shorthair cats (8-9 mo old; 3.2 ± 0.04 kg body weight) fed 0, 1, 5 or 10mg astaxanthin daily for 12 wk to assess peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) proliferation response, leukocyte subpopulations, natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxic activity, and plasma IgG and IgM concentration. Cutaneous delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response against concanavalin A and an attenuated polyvalent vaccine was assessed on wk 8 (prior to vaccination) and 12 (post-vaccination). There was a dose-related increase in plasma astaxanthin concentrations, with maximum concentrations observed on wk 12. Dietary astaxanthin enhanced DTH response to both the specific (vaccine) and nonspecific (concanavalin A) antigens. In addition, cats fed astaxanthin had heightened PBMC proliferation and NK cell cytotoxic activity. The population of CD3(+) total T and CD4(+) T helper cells were also higher in astaxanthin-fed cats; however, no treatment difference was found with the CD8(+) T cytotoxic and MHC II(+) activated lymphocyte cell populations. Dietary astaxanthin increased concentrations of plasma IgG and IgM. Therefore, dietary astaxanthin heightened cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in cats. PMID:21930306

  20. Is cell-mediated immunity related to the evolution of life-history strategies in birds?

    PubMed Central

    Tella, José L; Scheuerlein, Alex; Ricklefs, Robert E

    2002-01-01

    According to life-history theory, the development of immune function should be balanced through evolutionary optimization of the allocation of resources to reproduction and through mechanisms that promote survival. We investigated interspecific variability in cell-mediated immune response (CMI), as measured by the phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) assay, in relation to clutch size, longevity and other life-history traits in 50 species of birds. CMI exhibited significant repeatability within species, and PHA responses in chicks were consistently stronger than in adults. Univariate tests showed a variety of significant relationships between the CMI of both chicks and adults with respect to size, development period and lifespan, but not clutch size or prevalence of blood parasites in adults. Multivariate analyses confirmed these patterns but independent variables were too highly correlated to isolate unique influences on CMI. The positive relationship of chick CMI to nestling period is further complicated by a parallel relationship of chick CMI to the age at testing. However, multivariate analysis showed that chick CMI varies uniquely with length of the nestling period. Adult CMI was associated with a strong life-history axis of body size, development rate and longevity. Therefore, adult CMI may be associated with prevention and repair mechanisms related to long lifespan, but it also may be allometrically related to body size through other pathways. Neither chick CMI nor adult CMI was related to clutch size, contradicting previous results linking parasite-related mortality to CMI and the evolution of clutch size (reproductive investment) in birds. PMID:12028764

  1. Essential role for caspase 8 in T-cell homeostasis and T-cell-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Salmena, Leonardo; Lemmers, Benedicte; Hakem, Anne; Matysiak-Zablocki, Elzbieta; Murakami, Kiichi; Au, P.Y. Billie; Berry, Donna M.; Tamblyn, Laura; Shehabeldin, Amro; Migon, Eva; Wakeham, Andrew; Bouchard, Denis; Yeh, Wen Chen; McGlade, Jane C.; Ohashi, Pamela S.; Hakem, Razqallah

    2003-01-01

    Defects in death receptor-mediated apoptosis have been linked to cancer and autoimmune disease in humans. The in vivo role of caspase 8, a component of this pathway, has eluded analysis in postnatal tissues because of the lack of an appropriate animal model. Targeted disruption of caspase 8 is lethal in utero. We generated mice with a targeted caspase 8 mutation that is restricted to the T-cell lineage. Despite normal thymocyte development in the absence of caspase 8, we observed a marked decrease in the number of peripheral T-cells and impaired T-cell response ex vivo to activation stimuli. caspase 8 ablation protected thymocytes and activated T-cells from CD95 ligand but not anti-CD3-induced apoptosis, or apoptosis activated by agents that are known to act through the mitochondria. caspase 8 mutant mice were unable to mount an immune response to viral infection, indicating that caspase 8 deletion in T-cells leads to immunodeficiency. These findings identify an essential, cell-stage-specific role for caspase 8 in T-cell homeostasis and T-cell-mediated immunity. This is consistent with the recent identification of caspase 8 mutations in human immunodeficiency. PMID:12654726

  2. Possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kamimura, Yosuke; Kobori, Hiroko; Piao, Jinhua; Hashiguchi, Masaaki; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Hirose, Sachiko; Azuma, Miyuki

    2009-11-13

    B7-H4, a newly identified B7 family molecule, is reported to regulate T cell activation. However, the expression and function of B7-H4 remain controversial. Here, we demonstrated that B7-H4 expression in immune cells was undetectable at both the transcription and cell-surface protein levels. B7-H4 transfectants augmented anti-CD3 mAb-induced re-directed cytotoxicity and this was inhibited by anti-B7-H4 mAb. In a hapten-induced contact hypersensitivity model, treatment with anti-B7-H4 mAb at sensitization, but not at challenge, efficiently suppressed the ear swelling and CD8(+) T cell activation assessed by CD25 expression and IFN-gamma production. We found that cells expressing B7-H4 secreted soluble B7-H4 and the serum B7-H4 level increased with disease progression in lupus-prone and collagen-induced arthritis autoimmune mice and after the antigen challenge in allergic inflammatory diseases. Our results suggest a different action of B7-H4 in T cell-mediated inflammatory responses and the possible involvement of soluble B7-H4 in inflammatory immune responses. PMID:19723502

  3. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1997-01-01

    Our proposed experiments included: (1) immunzing mice with synthetic peptides; (2) preparing spleen and lymph node cells; (3) growing them under conventional conditions as well as in the rotatory vessel in appropriate medium reconstituting with synthetic peptides and/or cytokines as needed; and (4) comparing at regular time intervals the specific CTL activity as well as helper T-cell activity (in terms of both proliferative responses and cytokine production) using established procedures in my laboratory. We further proposed that once we demonstrated the merit of rotatory vessel technology to achieve desired results, these studies would be expanded to include immune cells from non-human primates (rhesus monkeys and chimpanzees) and also humans. We conducted a number of experiments to determine CTL induction by the synthetic peptides corresponding to antigenic proteins in HIV and HPV in different mouse strains that express MHC haplotypes H-2b or H-2d. We immunized mice with 100 ug of the synthetic peptide, suspended in sterile water, and emulsified in CFA (1:1). The immune lymph node cells obtained after 7 days were restimulated by culturing in T25 flask, HARV-10, or STLV-50, in the presence of the peptide at 20 ug/ml. The results from the 5'Cr-release assay consistently revealed complete abrogation of CTL activity of cells grown in the bioreactors (both HARV and STLV), while significant antigen-specific CTL activity was observed with cells cultured in tissue culture flasks. Thus, overall the data we generated in this study proved the usefulness of the NASA-developed developed technology for understanding the known immune deficiency during space travel. Additionally, this ex vivo microgravity technology since it mimics effectively the in vivo situation, it is also useful in understanding immune disorders in general. Thus, our proposed studies in TMC-NASA contract round II application benefit from data generated in this TMC-NASA contract round I study.

  4. Effect of chronic microwave radiation on T cell-mediated immunity in the rabbit.

    PubMed

    Nageswari, K S; Sarma, K R; Rajvanshi, V S; Sharan, R; Sharma, M; Barathwal, V; Singh, V

    1991-09-01

    Experiments were conducted to elucidate the effects of chronic low power-level microwave radiation on the immunological systems of rabbits. Fourteen male Belgian white rabbits were exposed to microwave radiation at 5 mW/cm2, 2.1 GHz, 3 h daily, 6 days/week for 3 months in two batches of 7 each in specially designed miniature anechoic chambers. Seven rabbits were subjected to sham exposure for identical duration. The microwave energy was provided through S band standard gain horns connected to a 4K3SJ2 Klystron power amplifier. The first batch of animals were assessed for T lymphocyte-mediated cellular immune response mechanisms and the second batch of animals for B lymphocyte-mediated humoral immune response mechanisms. The peripheral blood samples collected monthly during microwave/sham exposure and during follow-up (5/14 days after termination of exposures, in the second batch animals only) were analysed for T lymphocyte numbers and their mitogen responsiveness to ConA and PHA. Significant suppression of T lymphocyte numbers was noted in the microwave group at 2 months (P less than 0.01, delta % 21.5%) and during follow-up (P less than 0.01, delta % 30.2%). The first batch animals were initially sensitised with BCG and challenged with tuberculin (0.03 ml) at the termination of microwave irradiation/sham exposure and the increase in foot pad thickness (delta mm), which is a measure of T cell-mediated immunity (delayed type hypersensitivity response, DTH) was noted in both the groups. The microwave group revealed a better response than the control group (delta % +12.4 vs. +7.54). The animals were sacrificed and the tissue T lymphocyte counts (spleen and lymph node) were analysed.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1743776

  5. Studies of Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Immune Disorders Using Synthetic Peptides and Rotating Bioreactor System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, Jagannadha K.

    1998-01-01

    We conducted a series of experiments using mouse immune-precursor cells, and observed that bioreactor culturing results in the loss of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) function. The reason for the abrogation of CTL function is microgravity conditions in the bioreactor, but not the antigen per se or its MHC restriction. Similarly, we observed that allostimulation of human PBMC in the bioreactor, but not in the T flask, resulted in the blunting of both allo-CTL function and the NK activity, indicating that the microgravity-associated functional defects are not unique to the mouse system. These results provide further confirmation to the microgravity-associated immune dysfunction, and constitute ground-based confirmatory data for those related to space-travel.

  6. Antiviral protection following immunization correlates with humoral but not cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Panchanathan, Vijay; Chaudhri, Geeta; Karupiah, Gunasegaran

    2010-01-01

    Smallpox was a deadly disease when it was rife yet despite its eradication more than 30 years ago, the possibility of accidental or intentional release has driven research in search of better definitions of correlates of protective immunity. Mousepox, a disease caused by ectromelia virus (ECTV), is arguably one of the best surrogate small animal models for smallpox. Correlates of protection in mousepox are well defined during primary infection, whereas those in a secondary infection, which have definite relevance to vaccination strategies, are less well understood. We previously established that neutralizing antibody (Ab), which is generated far more rapidly during a secondary infection compared with a primary infection, has a key role during a secondary virus challenge. In this study, we show that the route of immunization or the use of homologous or heterologous virus vaccines for immunization does not influence the ability of mice to control high-dose virulent ECTV challenge or to mount a substantial secondary neutralizing Ab response. In contrast, the recall cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses generated under these regimes of immunization were varied and did not correlate with virus control. Furthermore, unlike the recall Ab response that was generated rapidly, the kinetics of the secondary antiviral CTL response was no different to a primary infection and peaked only at day 8 post-challenge. This finding further underscores the importance of Ab in conferring protection during secondary poxvirus infection. This information could potentially prove useful in the design of safer and more efficacious vaccines against poxviruses or other diseases using poxvirus vectors. PMID:20066003

  7. Immune regulatory effects of simvastatin on regulatory T cell-mediated tumour immune tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, K J; Moon, J Y; Choi, H K; Kim, H O; Hur, G Y; Jung, K H; Lee, S Y; Kim, J H; Shin, C; Shim, J J; In, K H; Yoo, S H; Kang, K H; Lee, S Y

    2010-08-01

    Statins are potent inhibitors of hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl co-enzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, and have emerged as potential anti-cancer agents based on preclinical evidence. In particular, compelling evidence suggests that statins have a wide range of immunomodulatory properties. However, little is known about the role of statins in tumour immune tolerance. Tumour immune tolerance involves the production of immunosuppressive molecules, such as interleukin (IL)-10, transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) by tumours, which induce a regulatory T cell (T(reg)) response. In this study, we investigated the effect of simvastatin on the production of IL-10, TGF-beta and IDO production and the proliferation of T(regs) using several cancer cell lines, and Lewis lung cancer (3LL) cells-inoculated mouse tumour model. Simvastatin treatment resulted in a decrease in the number of cancer cells (3LL, A549 and NCI-H292). The production of the immune regulatory markers IL-10, TGF-beta in 3LL and NCI-H292 cells increased after treatment with simvastatin. The expression of IDO and forkhead box P3 (FoxP3) transcription factor was also increased in the presence of simvastatin. In a murine 3LL model, there were no significant differences in tumour growth rate between untreated and simvastatin-treated mice groups. Therefore, while simvastatin had an anti-proliferative effect, it also exhibited immune tolerance-promoting properties during tumour development. Thus, due to these opposing actions, simvastatin had no net effect on tumour growth. PMID:20491794

  8. Suppression of cell-mediated immunity to challenge with P 815 mastocytoma in concanavalin A-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Ekstedt, R D; Merdian, D J

    1983-01-01

    C57Bl/6 (B6) mice allogeneic to the P 815 mastocytoma tumor cell line when treated with concanavalin A prior to and at frequent intervals following challenge intraperitoneally with 10(7) tumor cells showed a significant suppression of their cell-mediated immune response at 9-10 days when compared with untreated animals. Suppression of the immune response of mice syngeneic (DBA/2) or hybrid (BDF1) to the tumor was also evidenced by increased mortality rates in concanavalin A-treated animals. The suppression of cell-mediated cytotoxicity observed in B6 mice treated with concanavalin A could be reversed by pretreatment with 20 mg silica injected intraperitoneally 7 days prior to challenge. These results suggest that macrophages play a significant role in the concanavalin A-induced immune suppression observed in this in vivo tumor-host system. PMID:6297806

  9. Comparison of the effectiveness of antibody and cell-mediated immunity against inhaled and instilled influenza virus challenge

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To evaluate immunity against influenza, mouse challenge studies are typically performed by intranasal instillation of a virus suspension to anesthetized animals. This results in an unnatural environment in the lower respiratory tract during infection, and therefore there is some concern that immune mechanisms identified in this model may not reflect those that protect against infectious virus particles delivered directly to the lower respiratory tract as an aerosol. Method To evaluate differences in protection against instilled and inhaled virus, mice were immunized with influenza antigens known to induce antibody or cell-mediated responses and then challenged with 100 LD50 A/PR/8/34 (PR8) in the form of aerosol (inhaled) or liquid suspension (instilled). Results Mice immunized with recombinant adenovirus (Ad) expressing hemagglutinin were protected against weight loss and death in both challenge models, however immunization with Ad expressing nucleoprotein of influenza A (NPA) or M2 resulted in greater protection against inhaled aerosolized virus than virus instilled in liquid suspension. Ad-M2, but not Ad-NPA-immunized mice were protected against a lower instillation challenge dose. Conclusions These results demonstrate differences in protection that are dependent on challenge method, and suggest that cell-mediated immunity may be more accurately demonstrated in mouse inhalation studies. Furthermore, the data suggest immune mechanisms generally characterized as incomplete or weak in mouse models using liquid intranasal challenge may offer greater immunity against influenza infection than previously thought. PMID:23777453

  10. Epstein-Barr Virus Reactivation Associated with Diminished Cell-Mediated Immunity in Antarctic Expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierson, Duane L.; Mehta, Satish K.; Cooley, Helen; Dubow, Robin; Lugg, Desmond

    1999-01-01

    Reactivation of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at two Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, which was evaluated two times before winter isolation and three times during isolation. At all five evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished. CMI response. Diminished CMI was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal CMI responses for all five tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, after, and during the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least one occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (p=0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (p<0.0005) when CMI responsiveness was diminished than when CMI status was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter results in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus reactivation associated with diminished cell-mediated immunity in antarctic expeditioners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehta, S. K.; Pierson, D. L.; Cooley, H.; Dubow, R.; Lugg, D.

    2000-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) reactivation and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses were followed in 16 Antarctic expeditioners during winter-over isolation at 2 Australian National Antarctic Research Expedition stations. Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin testing was used as an indicator of the CMI response, that was evaluated 2 times before winter isolation and 3 times during isolation. At all 5 evaluation times, 8 or more of the 16 subjects had a diminished CMI response. Diminished DTH was observed on every test occasion in 4/16 subjects; only 2/16 subjects exhibited normal DTH responses for all 5 tests. A polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay was used to detect EBV DNA in saliva specimens collected before, during, and after the winter isolation. EBV DNA was present in 17% (111/642) of the saliva specimens; all 16 subjects shed EBV in their saliva on at least 1 occasion. The probability of EBV shedding increased (P = 0.013) from 6% before or after winter isolation to 13% during the winter period. EBV appeared in saliva during the winter isolation more frequently (P < 0.0005) when DTH response was diminished than when DTH was normal. The findings indicate that the psychosocial, physical, and other stresses associated with working and living in physical isolation during the Antarctic winter result in diminished CMI and an accompanying increased reactivation and shedding of latent viruses.

  12. Effect of Biophytum sensitivum on cell-mediated immune response in mice.

    PubMed

    Guruvayoorappan, C; Kuttan, G

    2007-01-01

    Effect of Biophytum sensitivum on cell-mediated immune response was studied in normal as well as Ehrlich ascites tumor bearing BALB/c mice. Administration of Biophytum sensitivum significantly enhanced the proliferation of splenocytes, thymocytes and bone marrow cells by stimulating the mitogenic potential of various mitogens such as Lipopolysaccharide (LPS), Concanavalin A (Con A), Phytohaemagglutinin (PHA) and Poke Weed Mitogen (PWM). Natural killer (NK) cell activity was enhanced significantly by Biophytum sensitivum in both the normal (43.6% cell lysis on day 5) and the tumor bearing group (48.2% cell lysis on day 5), and it was found to be earlier than tumor bearing control animals (maximum of 13.4% cell lysis on day 9). Antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) was also enhanced significantly in both Biophytum treated normal (35% cell lysis on day 7) as well as tumor bearing animals (40.2% cell lysis on day 7) compared to untreated control tumor bearing animals (maximum of 12.3% cell lysis on day 11). An early antibody dependent complement mediated cytotoxicity (ACC) was also observed in the Biophytum treated normal (22.6% cell lysis, on day 15) and tumor bearing animals (26.4% cell lysis, on day 15). Results of our present study suggest the immunomodulatory property of Biophytum sensitivum. PMID:18075848

  13. CIS is a potent checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Delconte, Rebecca B; Kolesnik, Tatiana B; Dagley, Laura F; Rautela, Jai; Shi, Wei; Putz, Eva M; Stannard, Kimberley; Zhang, Jian-Guo; Teh, Charis; Firth, Matt; Ushiki, Takashi; Andoniou, Christopher E; Degli-Esposti, Mariapia A; Sharp, Phillip P; Sanvitale, Caroline E; Infusini, Giuseppe; Liau, Nicholas P D; Linossi, Edmond M; Burns, Christopher J; Carotta, Sebastian; Gray, Daniel H D; Seillet, Cyril; Hutchinson, Dana S; Belz, Gabrielle T; Webb, Andrew I; Alexander, Warren S; Li, Shawn S; Bullock, Alex N; Babon, Jeffery J; Smyth, Mark J; Nicholson, Sandra E; Huntington, Nicholas D

    2016-07-01

    The detection of aberrant cells by natural killer (NK) cells is controlled by the integration of signals from activating and inhibitory ligands and from cytokines such as IL-15. We identified cytokine-inducible SH2-containing protein (CIS, encoded by Cish) as a critical negative regulator of IL-15 signaling in NK cells. Cish was rapidly induced in response to IL-15, and deletion of Cish rendered NK cells hypersensitive to IL-15, as evidenced by enhanced proliferation, survival, IFN-γ production and cytotoxicity toward tumors. This was associated with increased JAK-STAT signaling in NK cells in which Cish was deleted. Correspondingly, CIS interacted with the tyrosine kinase JAK1, inhibiting its enzymatic activity and targeting JAK for proteasomal degradation. Cish(-/-) mice were resistant to melanoma, prostate and breast cancer metastasis in vivo, and this was intrinsic to NK cell activity. Our data uncover a potent intracellular checkpoint in NK cell-mediated tumor immunity and suggest possibilities for new cancer immunotherapies directed at blocking CIS function. PMID:27213690

  14. Influence of brachytherapy ( sup 192 Ir afterloading) on cell-mediated immune reactions in patients with stage I endometrial cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gerstner, G.J.; Kucera, H.; Kudlacek, S.; Micksche, M. )

    1989-11-01

    The influence of radiation therapy on cell-mediated immune reactions in cancer patients seems to depend on source, dose, and area of irradiation, as well as on the variables reflected by the patient population investigated. In the present study we demonstrated that brachytherapy ({sup 192}Ir afterloading), applied to patients with inoperable stage I endometrial cancer, has no immediate or sustained effect on lymphocyte function. Both lymphocyte mitogen response and natural killer cell (NK) activity are not significantly changed in terms of baseline values compared with test results during and after therapy. Brachytherapy, as used in this study, has no influence on cell-mediated immunity in patients with endometrial cancer stage I.

  15. Sequestration of inhaled particulate antigens by lung phagocytes. A mechanism for the effective inhibition of pulmonary cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, J. A.; Xia, W.; Pinto, C. E.; Zhao, L.; Liu, H. W.; Kradin, R. L.

    1996-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) have emerged as the dominant antigen-presenting cells (APCs) of the lung, playing a vital role in the induction of cell-mediated immunity to inhaled antigens. We have previously demonstrated that an airway challenge with the soluble antigen hen egg lysozyme yields rapid acquisition of specific antigen-presenting cell activity by purified pulmonary DCs and a cell-mediated immune response in the lung upon secondary challenge. To examine how a particulate antigen leads to a cell-mediated response in vivo, graded concentrations of heat-killed Listeria (HKL) were injected intratracheally into Lewis rats. The bacteria were rapidly ingested by lung macrophages and polymorphonuclear leukocytes. The ability of purified pulmonary DCs pulsed in vivo by an airway challenge with HKL to subsequently stimulate HKL-specific responses ex vivo showed a threshold response, requiring a dose in excess of 10(9) organisms/rat. By contrast, all dosages of HKL yielded specific sensitization of lymphocytes in the draining bilar nodes. Pulmonary DCs purified from rats after a secondary in vivo airway challenge with HKL at day 14 were ineffective antigen-presenting cells except at high dosages of antigen. The generation of cell-mediated pulmonary inflammation paralleled the antigen-presenting cell activity of pulmonary DCs and was observed only at high antigen dosages. Hen egg lysozyme immobilized onto polystyrene beads and injected intratracheally yielded comparable results to those observed with HKL. We suggest that a pulmonary cellular immune response is generated to an inhaled particulate antigen when the protective phagocytic capacities of the lung are exceeded and antigen is able to interact directly with interstitial DCs. The diversion of particulate antigens by pulmonary phagocytes may help to limit undesirable pulmonary inflammation while allowing the generation of antigen-specific immune lymphocytes in vivo. Images Figure 2 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 7 Figure 9

  16. Modulation by gamma interferon of antiviral cell-mediated immune responses in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Utermöhlen, O; Dangel, A; Tárnok, A; Lehmann-Grube, F

    1996-01-01

    Mice were infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus and injected once 24 h later with a monoclonal antibody directed against gamma interferon. In comparison with controls, the increase of numbers of CD8+ T cells and the generation of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in spleens and virus clearance from organs were diminished, as was the ability of spleen cells to transmit adoptive immunity to infected recipients. The same treatment slightly but consistently lessened rather than augmented the virus titers early in infection, which was also observed in thymusless nu/nu mice. Injection into infected mice of the lymphokine itself in quantities probably higher than are produced endogenously resulted in lower virus titers in spleens but higher titers in livers. The adoptive immunity in infected mice achieved by infusion of immune spleen cells was not altered by treating the recipients with gamma interferon monoclonal antibody. Such treatment did not measurably affect the production of antiviral serum antibodies. We conclude that in lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus-infected mice, gamma interferon is needed for the generation of antivirally active CD8+ T lymphocytes, and furthermore that in this experimental model, direct antiviral effects of the lymphokine elude detection. PMID:8627670

  17. Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Four-Year-Old Children after Primary Immunization with Acellular Pertussis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ausiello, Clara M.; Lande, Roberto; Urbani, Francesca; la Sala, Andrea; Stefanelli, Paola; Salmaso, Stefania; Mastrantonio, Paola; Cassone, Antonio

    1999-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to Bordetella pertussis antigens (pertussis toxin [PT], pertactin [PRN], and filamentous hemagglutinin [FHA]) were assessed in 48-month-old recipients of acellular pertussis [aP] vaccines (either from Chiron-Biocine [aP-CB] or from SmithKline Beecham [aP-SB]) and compared to CMI responses to the same antigens at 7 months of age, i.e., 1 month after completion of the primary immunization cycle. None of the children enrolled in this study received any booster of pertussis vaccines or was affected by pertussis during the whole follow-up period. Overall, around 75% of 4-year-old children showed a CMI-positive response to at least one B. pertussis antigen, independently of the type of aP vaccine received, and the proportion of CMI responders were at least equal at 48 and 7 months of age. However, longitudinal examination of individual responses showed that from 20 (against PT) to 37% (against FHA) of CMI responders after primary immunization became negative at 48 months of age. This loss was more than compensated for by conversion to positive CMI responses, ranging from 36% against FHA to 69% against PRN, in other children who were CMI negative at 7 months of age. In 60 to 80% of these CMI converters, a lack of decline or even marked elevation of antibody (Ab) titers against B. pertussis antigens also occurred between 20 and 48 months of age. In particular, the frequency of seropositivity to PRN and FHA (but not to PT) was roughly three times higher in CMI converters than in nonconverters. The acquisition of CMI response to B. pertussis antigens in 48-month-old children was not associated with a greater frequency of coughing episodes lasting ≥7 days and was characterized by a prevalent type 1 cytokine profile, with high gamma interferon and low or no production of interleukin-5, reminiscent of cytokine patterns following immunization with whole-cell pertussis vaccine or natural infection. Our data imply that vaccination

  18. Autochthonous primary and metastatic melanomas in Hgf-Cdk4 R24C mice evade T-cell-mediated immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Jennifer; Gaffal, Evelyn; Cron, Mira; Kohlmeyer, Judith; Renn, Marcel; Tüting, Thomas

    2010-10-01

    Genetically engineered mouse models offer new opportunities to investigate the role of cell-mediated immunity in the natural progression of melanoma in an immunocompetent host. Here we report that Hgf-Cdk4(R24C) mice spontaneously develop a spectrum of primary melanomas with high penetrance during their first year of life. Malignant transformation proceeds in a stepwise manner from multiple melanocytic nevi to single nodular melanomas and disseminated metastases in most mice. Migrating melanoma cells invade the draining lymph nodes without activating the immune system. Autochthonous primary tumors are destroyed following experimental introduction of immune surveillance using an adoptive lymphocyte transfer approach. However, some tumor cells are able to survive, evade immune cell control, and recur both locally and systemically. Immune tolerance in recurring tumors may be supported by immunosuppressive Gr1(+) myeloid cells. Taken together, our results demonstrate that primary and metastatic melanomas developing spontaneously in Hgf-Cdk4(R24C) mice effectively evade cellular immune surveillance. PMID:20649939

  19. Cell-mediated immunity to insulin: a new criterion for differentiation of diabetes mellitus?

    PubMed

    Asfandiyarova, Nailya S

    2012-03-01

    Any classification is a step forward and it should help to determine the reason, the course, the prognosis, the treatment of a disease. The current classification of diabetes mellitus (DM) is really very convenient for work, but it has some drawbacks, and the absence of differentiation of type 2 diabetes is the main. The problem is the absence of an adequate criterion, based on pathogenesis for differentiation. We suppose that cell mediated immunity (CMI) to insulin plays the central role in the diabetes genesis. Autoimmune process may be triggered by viruses family Paramyxoviridae, in 10-20% of type 1 diabetes patients the disease is a consequence of direct cytotoxic effect of other viruses to the islet cells of pancreas. In acute phase of viral infection (measles, mumps, parainfluenza) CMI against viruses is developed, in some patients CMI to insulin appeared. We suppose that autoimmune reactions in these cases are the result of cross reaction between viral antigens and insulin. The majorities of patients suppress these reactions and recover from acute infection diseases with the antiviral immunity development and without any complications. Other patients are not able to suppress autoimmune reactions to insulin and pathological process is triggered. Type 1A diabetes is a result of direct CMI to insulin, and this process is responsible for beta-cells destruction; may be type 1B DM is due to the direct cytotoxic effect of other viruses or toxins to them. Some patients with acute viral infection cannot destroy the aggressive clone and they suppress autoimmune reaction to insulin by prostaglandin synthesizing cells (PGSC) or сells with histamine receptors (CHR). As a result of this process the insulin resistance is developed, because these cells or their cytokines form a block to the insulin receptors not only on immunocompetent cells, but in insulin sensitive tissues too. Patients with different reactions to insulin have different courses and outcomes of DM. We

  20. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in pigs following primary and challenge-exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    To investigate immune responses upon re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis, local and peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to primary and challenge inoculations were studied in 22 pigs. Pigs were orally inoculated with virulent L. intracellularis at the age of 5-6 weeks, treated with antibiotics and challenged with a re-inoculation (RE) at the age of 12 weeks. Treatment control (TC) pigs received only the primary inoculation and challenge control (CC) pigs received only the secondary inoculation at 12 weeks of age. Following this regimen, all RE pigs were protected against the re-infection as defined by reduced colonisation and pathology of intestinal mucosa, absence of bacterial shedding and without increase in serum acute phase protein response. In the protected RE pigs, serum IgG responses were variable with both high and low responders. Serum IgA responses were not boosted by the re-inoculation, since identical intestinal IgA responses developed in response to the inoculation in both the susceptible CC pigs and the protected RE pigs. A memory recall cell-mediated immune response developed in RE pigs which was significantly stronger compared to the primary response in age-matched CC pigs as assessed by whole blood IFN-γ assay and by calculation of IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) after flow cytometry. The major IFN-γ producing cells were identified as CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ double positive lymphocytes. The results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses are likely mediators of protective immunity against L. intracellularis, with CD8+ effector cells and CD4+CD8+ double positive memory T cells as main contributors to the antigen-specific IFN-γ production. PMID:22316065

  1. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in pigs following primary and challenge-exposure to Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Cordes, Henriette; Riber, Ulla; Jensen, Tim K; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-01-01

    To investigate immune responses upon re-infection with Lawsonia intracellularis, local and peripheral humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to primary and challenge inoculations were studied in 22 pigs. Pigs were orally inoculated with virulent L. intracellularis at the age of 5-6 weeks, treated with antibiotics and challenged with a re-inoculation (RE) at the age of 12 weeks. Treatment control (TC) pigs received only the primary inoculation and challenge control (CC) pigs received only the secondary inoculation at 12 weeks of age. Following this regimen, all RE pigs were protected against the re-infection as defined by reduced colonisation and pathology of intestinal mucosa, absence of bacterial shedding and without increase in serum acute phase protein response. In the protected RE pigs, serum IgG responses were variable with both high and low responders. Serum IgA responses were not boosted by the re-inoculation, since identical intestinal IgA responses developed in response to the inoculation in both the susceptible CC pigs and the protected RE pigs. A memory recall cell-mediated immune response developed in RE pigs which was significantly stronger compared to the primary response in age-matched CC pigs as assessed by whole blood IFN-γ assay and by calculation of IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) after flow cytometry. The major IFN-γ producing cells were identified as CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ double positive lymphocytes. The results indicate that cell-mediated immune responses are likely mediators of protective immunity against L. intracellularis, with CD8+ effector cells and CD4+CD8+ double positive memory T cells as main contributors to the antigen-specific IFN-γ production. PMID:22316065

  2. Polypropylene Sulfide Nanoparticle p24 Vaccine Promotes Dendritic Cell-Mediated Specific Immune Responses against HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Caucheteux, Stephan M; Mitchell, John P; Ivory, Matthew O; Hirosue, Sachiko; Hakobyan, Svetlana; Dolton, Garry; Ladell, Kristin; Miners, Kelly; Price, David A; Kan-Mitchell, June; Sewell, Andrew K; Nestle, Frank; Moris, Arnaud; Karoo, Richard O; Birchall, James C; Swartz, Melody A; Hubbel, Jeffrey A; Blanchet, Fabien P; Piguet, Vincent

    2016-06-01

    Delivery of vaccine formulations into the dermis using antigen-coated microneedle patches is a promising and safe approach because of efficient antigen delivery and safety. We evaluated an intradermal vaccine using HIV-1 p24 Gag peptide-conjugated polypropylene sulfide nanoparticles to induce immunity against HIV-1. This peptide-conjugated polypropylene sulfide nanoparticle formulation did not accelerate the maturation of blood- or skin-derived subsets of dendritic cells, either generated in vitro or purified ex vivo, despite efficient uptake in the absence of adjuvant. Moreover, dendritic cell-mediated capture of particulate antigen in this form induced potent HIV-1-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses, as well as B-cell-mediated antibody production. Nanoparticle-based intradermal antigen delivery may therefore provide a new option in the global effort to develop an effective vaccine against HIV-1. PMID:26896775

  3. In vivo sensitized and in vitro activated B cells mediate tumor regression in cancer adoptive immunotherapy1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiao; Song, Hongbin; Teitz-Tennenbaum, Seagal; Donald, Elizabeth J.; Li, Mu; Chang, Alfred E.

    2011-01-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy utilizing tumor-reactive T cells has proven to be a promising strategy for cancer treatment. However, we hypothesize that successful treatment strategies will have to appropriately stimulate not only cellular immunity, but also humoral immunity. We previously reported that B cells in tumor-draining lymph nodes (TDLN) may function as antigen-presenting cells. In this study, we identified TDLN B cells as effector cells in an adoptive immunotherapy model. In vivo primed and in vitro activated TDLN B cells alone mediated effective (p<0.05) tumor regression after adoptive transfer into two histologically distinct murine pulmonary metastatic tumor models. Prior lymphodepletion of the host with either chemotherapy or whole-body irradiation augmented the therapeutic efficacy of the adoptively transferred TDLN B cells in the treatment of subcutaneous tumors as well as metastatic pulmonary tumors. Furthermore, B cell plus T cell transfers resulted in substantially more efficient antitumor responses than B cells or T cells alone (p<0.05). Activated TDLN B cells conferred strong humoral responses to tumor. This was evident by the production of IgM, IgG and IgG2b, which bound specifically to tumor cells and led to specific tumor cell lysis in the presence of complement. Collectively, these data indicate that in vivo primed and in vitro activated B cells can be employed as effector cells for cancer therapy. The synergistic antitumor efficacy of co-transferred activated B effector cells and T effector cells represents a novel approach for cancer adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:19667089

  4. Self-adjuvanting influenza candidate vaccine presenting epitopes for cell-mediated immunity on a proteinaceous multivalent nanoplatform.

    PubMed

    Szurgot, Inga; Szolajska, Ewa; Laurin, David; Lambrecht, Benedicte; Chaperot, Laurence; Schoehn, Guy; Chroboczek, Jadwiga

    2013-09-13

    We exploit the features of a virus-like particle, adenoviral dodecahedron (Ad Dd), for engineering a multivalent vaccination platform carrying influenza epitopes for cell-mediated immunity. The delivery platform, Ad Dd, is a proteinaceous, polyvalent, and biodegradable nanoparticle endowed with remarkable endocytosis activity that can be engineered to carry 60 copies of a peptide. Influenza M1 is the most abundant influenza internal protein with the conserved primary structure. Two different M1 immunodominant epitopes were separately inserted in Dd external positions without destroying the particles' dodecahedric structure. Both kinds of DdFluM1 obtained through expression in baculovirus system were properly presented by human dendritic cells triggering efficient activation of antigen-specific T cells responses. Importantly, the candidate vaccine was able to induce cellular immunity in vivo in chickens. These results warrant further investigation of Dd as a platform for candidate vaccine, able to stimulate cellular immune responses. PMID:23880363

  5. Regulation of NKT cell-mediated immune responses to tumours and liver inflammation by mitochondrial PGAM5-Drp1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Young Jun; Bang, Bo-Ram; Han, Kyung Ho; Hong, Lixin; Shim, Eun-Jin; Ma, Jianhui; Lerner, Richard A.; Otsuka, Motoyuki

    2015-01-01

    The receptor-interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) plays crucial roles in programmed necrosis and innate inflammatory responses. However, a little is known about the involvement of RIPK3 in NKT cell-mediated immune responses. Here, we demonstrate that RIPK3 plays an essential role in NKT cell function via activation of the mitochondrial phosphatase phosphoglycerate mutase 5 (PGAM5). RIPK3-mediated activation of PGAM5 promotes the expression of cytokines by facilitating nuclear translocation of NFAT and dephosphorylation of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1), a GTPase is essential for mitochondrial homoeostasis. Ripk3−/− mice show reduced NKT cell responses to metastatic tumour cells, and both deletion of RIPK3 and pharmacological inhibition of Drp1 protects mice from NKT cell-mediated induction of acute liver damage. Collectively, the results identify a crucial role for RIPK3-PGAM5-Drp1/NFAT signalling in NKT cell activation, and further suggest that RIPK3-PGAM5 signalling may mediate crosstalk between mitochondrial function and immune signalling. PMID:26381214

  6. TRAF3 is required for T cell-mediated immunity and T cell receptor/CD28 signaling1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ping; Kraus, Zachary J.; Stunz, Laura L.; Liu, Yan; Bishop, Gail A.

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that TRAF3, a ubiquitously expressed adaptor protein, promotes mature B cell apoptosis. However, the specific function of TRAF3 in T cells has remained unclear. Here we report the generation and characterization of T cell-specific TRAF3−/− mice, in which the TRAF3 gene was deleted from thymocytes and T cells. Ablation of TRAF3 in the T cell-lineage did not affect the numbers or proportions of CD4+,CD8+ or double positive or negative thymocytes, or CD4 or CD8 T cell populations in secondary lymphoid organs except that the T cell specific TRAF3−/− mice had a two-fold increase in FoxP3+ T cells.. In striking contrast to mice lacking TRAF3 in B cells, the T cell TRAF3 deficient mice exhibited defective IgG1 responses to a T dependent antigen, and impaired T cell-mediated immunity to infection with Listeria monocytogenes. Surprisingly, we found that TRAF3 was recruited to the TCR/CD28 signaling complex upon co-stimulation, and that TCR/CD28-mediated proximal and distal signaling events were compromised by TRAF3 deficiency. These findings provide new insights into the roles played by TRAF3 in T cell activation and T cell-mediated immunity. PMID:21084666

  7. Serotype-Specific Cell-Mediated Immunity Associated With Clearance of Homotypic Group B Streptococcus Rectovaginal Colonization in Pregnant Women.

    PubMed

    Kwatra, Gaurav; Adrian, Peter V; Shiri, Tinevimbo; Izu, Alane; Cutland, Clare L; Buchmann, Eckhart J; Madhi, Shabir A

    2016-06-15

    We investigated the association between group B Streptococcus (GBS) serotype-specific capsular polysaccharide cellular immunity, measured with enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISPOT) interferon γ release assay at 20 weeks gestation in pregnant women, and its effect on rectovaginal serotype-specific GBS colonization up to 37 weeks gestation. Among women colonized by serotype III at enrollment, interferon γ ELISPOT positivity was more common in those in whom colonization was cleared (44.4%) than in those in whom colonization persisted (7.4%; P = .008), with a similar trend observed for serotype Ia. Presence of serotype-specific capsular polysaccharide cell-mediated immunity contributes to the clearance of GBS rectovaginal colonization. PMID:27029777

  8. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  9. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses after vaccination of human volunteers with the live vaccine strain of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed

    Waag, D M; McKee, K T; Sandstrom, G; Pratt, L L; Bolt, C R; England, M J; Nelson, G O; Williams, J C

    1995-03-01

    The specific humoral and cell-mediated immune responses of human volunteers vaccinated with the Francisella tularensis live vaccine strain (LVS) were evaluated. In the search for an optimal antigen to measure the immunogenicity of the vaccine in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we tested irradiation-killed LVS, an aqueous ether extract of the LVS (EEx), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) from LVS, and a virulent strain (SCHU4). Volunteers were immunized with LVS by scarification. Immunoglobulin G (IgG) responses to LVS and LPS gave the highest background titers when tested with sera from unimmunized volunteers, whereas IgA, IgG, and IgM background titers to EEx and SCHU4 were low. Vaccination caused a significant rise (P < 0.01) in IgA, IgG, and IgM titers to all antigens tested, except for the IgG response to LPS. Eighty percent of vaccinated volunteers developed a positive IgG response to EEx 14 days postvaccination, while 50% were positive to LVS. By day 14 after vaccination, 70% of immunized volunteers exhibited a positive response to EEx in an in vitro peripheral blood lymphocyte proliferation assay. EEx, a specific and sensitive antigen for evaluating immune responses of vaccinated volunteers, may be a superior antigen for the diagnosis of tularemia. PMID:7697521

  10. Obesity impairs cell-mediated immunity during the second trimester of pregnancy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Obesity is associated with impaired immunity. In obese pregnancy, both mother and fetus are susceptible to the short- and long-term deleterious effects of infectious illness. The objective of the study was to determine the impact of obesity on maternal blood immune cell subsets, intracellular and s...

  11. The cell mediated and humoral immune response to vaccination with acellular and whole cell pertussis vaccine in adult humans.

    PubMed

    Petersen, J W; Ibsen, P H; Bentzon, M W; Capiau, C; Heron, I

    1991-10-01

    The cell mediated immune response (CMI) against pertussis antigens following vaccination with the traditional Danish whole cell pertussis vaccine (WC-P) and the Japanese acellular pertussis vaccine (A-PV) JNIH-3 was studied in four adult human volunteers. Vaccination with the A-PV induced an in vitro proliferative response of peripheral blood lymphocytes to pertussis toxin (PT) subunits S2-S4, S3-S4 and S5 and the filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), and a better serological response to native PT, detoxified PT (dPT) and FHA than the WC-PV. The induced CMI and serological response were followed over a period of 17 weeks, and were not seen to decline during this period. Further, an in vitro proliferative response to Bordetella pertussis agglutinogen 2 and 3 were demonstrated using lymphocytes from recently and not-so-recently pertussis-vaccinated adults. PMID:1797049

  12. In vivo testing confirms a blunting of the human cell-mediated immune mechanism during space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Janney, R. P.

    1992-01-01

    The cell-mediated immune (CMI) mechanism was evaluated in 10 space shuttle astronauts by measuring their delayed-type hypersensitivity response to seven common recall antigens. The Multitest CMI test system was used to administer antigens of tetanus, diphtheria, Streptococcus, Proteus, old tuberculin, Candida, and Trichophyton to the forearm 46 h before nominal mission termination; readings were conducted 2 h after landing. The mean number of reactions was reduced from 4.5 preflight to 3.0 inflight, and the mean reaction score was reduced from 21.4 to 13.7 mm inflight. The data presented suggest that the CMI system is still being degraded by space flight conditions on day 4 and that between day 5 and day 10, the depression maximizes and the system begins to adjust to the new conditions. The relation of these in vivo findings to previously reported in vitro results is discussed.

  13. Analysis of leukocyte populations in Canadian Holsteins classified as high or low immune responders for antibody- or cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Hine, Brad C; Cartwright, Shannon L; Mallard, Bonnie A

    2012-04-01

    Selection of dairy cattle for increased milk production with little or no emphasis on health traits leads to an increased prevalence of disease. A possible genetic solution to this problem is to combine production and immune response traits in a weighted selection index. In the current study, leukocyte populations in heifers identified as having a high antibody-mediated immune response (HiAMIR) or high cell-mediated immune response (HiCMIR) phenotype were compared before and after immunization in order to identify leukocyte population profiles associated with these phenotypes. The results demonstrated that the HiCMIR-phenotype animals had a higher baseline proportion of gamma-delta T-cells in peripheral blood. Also, the observed increase in the proportion of B-cells in peripheral blood in response to immunization was greater in the HiAMIR-phenotype animals. It is expected that identifying leukocyte population profiles associated with immune response phenotypes will improve our ability to identify animals with enhanced overall immune responsiveness. PMID:23024458

  14. Intradermal delivery of DNA encoding HCV NS3 and perforin elicits robust cell-mediated immunity in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Grubor-Bauk, B; Yu, W; Wijesundara, D; Gummow, J; Garrod, T; Brennan, A J; Voskoboinik, I; Gowans, E J

    2016-01-01

    Currently, no vaccine is available against hepatitis C virus (HCV), and although DNA vaccines have considerable potential, this has not been realised. Previously, the efficacy of DNA vaccines for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and HCV was shown to be enhanced by including the gene for a cytolytic protein, viz. perforin. In this study, we examined the mechanism of cell death by this bicistronic DNA vaccine, which encoded the HCV non-structural protein 3 (NS3) under the control of the CMV promoter and perforin is controlled by the SV40 promoter. Compared with a canonical DNA vaccine and a bicistronic DNA vaccine encoding NS3 and the proapoptotic gene NSP4, the perforin-containing vaccine elicited enhanced cell-mediated immune responses against the NS3 protein in vaccinated mice and pigs, as determined by ELISpot and intracellular cytokine staining, whereas a mouse challenge model suggested that the immunity was CD8(+) T-cell-dependent. The results of the study showed that the inclusion of perforin in the DNA vaccine altered the fate of NS3-positive cells from apoptosis to necrosis, and this resulted in more robust immune responses in mice and pigs, the latter of which represents an accepted large animal model in which to test vaccine efficacy. PMID:26262584

  15. Empirical evidence of cold stress induced cell mediated and humoral immune response in common myna ( Sturnus tristis)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhu, Mansur A.; Zaib, Anila; Anjum, Muhammad S.; Qayyum, Mazhar

    2015-11-01

    Common myna ( Sturnus tristis) is a bird indigenous to the Indian subcontinent that has invaded many parts of the world. At the onset of our investigation, we hypothesized that the immunological profile of myna makes it resistant to harsh/new environmental conditions. In order to test this hypothesis, a number of 40 mynas were caught and divided into two groups, i.e., 7 and 25 °C for 14 days. To determine the effect of cold stress, cell mediated and humoral immune responses were assessed. The macrophage engulfment percentage was significantly ( P < 0.05) higher at 25 °C rather than 7 °C either co-incubated with opsonized or unopsonized sheep red blood cells (SRBC). Macrophage engulfment/cell and nitric oxide production behaved in a similar manner. However, splenic cells plaque formation, heterophil to lymphocyte (H/L) ratio, and serum IgM or IgG production remained non-significant. There was a significant increase of IgG antibody production after a second immunization by SRBC. To the best of our knowledge, these findings have never been reported in the progression of this bird's invasion in frosty areas of the world. The results revealed a strengthened humoral immune response of myna and made this bird suitable for invasion in the areas of harsh conditions.

  16. Tumoral NKG2D alters cell cycle of acute myeloid leukemic cells and reduces NK cell-mediated immune surveillance.

    PubMed

    Tang, Mingying; Acheampong, Desmond Omane; Wang, Youfu; Xie, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Juan

    2016-06-01

    The stimulatory natural killer group 2 member D (NKG2D) lymphocyte receptor, initially discovered and expressed mostly on natural killer (NK) cells, T cells and natural killer T cells, can promote tumor immune surveillance. However, with increasing tumor grade, tumors themselves express NKG2D to self-stimulate oncogenic pathways. To confirm that cancer cells themselves express NKG2D, we have now investigated the role of the tumoral NKG2D in NK cell-mediated immune surveillance. Both anti-NKG2D and shRNA to that down-regulated tumoral NKG2D increased the number of cells in G1 phase and S phase, increased the expression of cyclin E-CDK2 and decreased P21. In addition, CD107a, IFN-γ and TNF-α increased when the cells were treated with anti-NKG2D which suggests that blocking tumoral NKG2D could augment tumor surveillance of NK cells. Altogether, tumoral NKG2D stimulates cell propagation and immune escape in acute myeloid leukemia cells. PMID:26740330

  17. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, S.; Fonseca, L.S.; Hunter, J.T.; Rapp, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity.

  18. Humanized Mouse Models to Study Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Liver-Stage Malaria Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Good, Michael F; Hawkes, Michael T; Yanow, Stephanie K

    2015-11-01

    Malaria vaccine development is hampered by the lack of small animal models that recapitulate human immune responses to Plasmodium falciparum. We review the burgeoning literature on humanized mice for P. falciparum infection, including challenges in engraftment of human immune cells, hepatocytes, and erythrocytes. Recent advances in immune-compromised mouse models and stem cell technology have already enabled proof of concept that the entire parasite life cycle can be sustained in a murine model and that adaptive human immune responses to several parasite stages can be measured. Nonetheless, optimization is needed to achieve a reproducible and relevant murine model for malaria vaccine development. This review is focused on the complexities of T cell development in a mouse humanized with both a lymphoid system and hepatocytes. An understanding of this will facilitate the use of humanized mice in the development of liver-stage vaccines. PMID:26458783

  19. Protective cell-mediated immunity by DNA vaccination against Papillomavirus L1 capsid protein in the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus model.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jiafen; Cladel, Nancy M; Budgeon, Lynn R; Reed, Cynthia A; Pickel, Martin D; Christensen, Neil D

    2006-01-01

    Papillomavirus major capsid protein L1 has successfully stimulated protective immunity against virus infection by induction of neutralizing antibodies in animal models and in clinical trials. However, the potential impact of L1-induced protective cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses is difficult to measure in vivo because of the coincidence of anti-L1 antibody. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that L1 could activate CMI, using the Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus (CRPV)-rabbit model. A unique property of this model is that infections can be initiated with viral DNA, thus bypassing all contributions to protection via neutralizing anti-L1 antibody. DNA vaccines containing either CRPV L1, or subfragments of L1 (amino-terminal two-thirds of L1 [L1N] and the carboxylterminal two-thirds of L1 [L1C]), were delivered intracutaneously into rabbits, using a gene gun. After three booster immunizations, the rabbits were challenged with several viral DNA constructs: wild-type CRPV, CRPV L1ATGko (an L1 ATG knockout mutation), and CRPV-ROPV hybrid (CRPV with a replacement L1 from Rabbit Oral Papillomavirus). Challenge of L1 DNA-vaccinated rabbits with wild-type CRPV resulted in significantly fewer papillomas when compared with challenge with CRPV L1ATGko DNA. Significantly smaller papillomas were found in CRPV L1-, L1N-, and L1C-vaccinated rabbits. In addition, rabbits vaccinated with either L1 or L1N grew significantly fewer and smaller papillomas when challenged with CRPV-ROPV hybrid DNA. Therefore, CRPV L1 DNA vaccination induced CMI responses to CRPV DNA infections that can contribute to protective immunity. Cross-protective immunity against CRPV L1 and ROPV L1 was elicited in these CRPV L1- and subfragment-vaccinated rabbits. PMID:16987067

  20. Immunization of Mice with a Live Transconjugant Shigella Hybrid Strain Induced Th1 and Th17 Cell-Mediated Immune Responses and Confirmed Passive Protection Against Heterologous Shigellae.

    PubMed

    Nag, D; Koley, H; Sinha, R; Mukherjee, P; Sarkar, C; Withey, J H; Gachhui, R

    2016-02-01

    An avirulent, live transconjugant Shigella hybrid (LTSHΔstx) strain was constructed in our earlier study by introducing a plasmid vector, pPR1347, into a Shiga toxin gene deleted Shigella dysenteriae 1. Three successive oral administrations of LTSHΔstx to female adult mice produced comprehensive passive heterologous protection in their offspring against challenge with wild-type shigellae. Production of NO and different cytokines such asIL-12p70, IL-1β and IL-23 in peritoneal mice macrophages indicated that LTSHΔstx induced innate and adaptive immunity in mice. Furthermore, production of IFN-γ, IL-10 and IL-17 in LTSH-primed splenic CD4+ T cell suggested that LTSHΔstx may induce Th1 and Th17 cell-mediated immune responses. Exponential increase of the serum IgG and IgA titre against whole shigellae was observed in immunized adult mice during and after the immunization with the highest peak on day 35. Antigen-specific sIgA was also determined from intestinal lavage of immunized mice. The stomach extracts of neonates from immunized mice, mainly containing mother's milk, contained significant levels of anti-LTSHΔstx immunoglobulin. These studies suggest that the LTSHΔstx could be a new live oral vaccine candidate against shigellosis in the near future. PMID:26478541

  1. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  2. Genetic Adjuvantation of Recombinant MVA with CD40L Potentiates CD8 T Cell Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lauterbach, Henning; Pätzold, Juliane; Kassub, Ronny; Bathke, Barbara; Brinkmann, Kay; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hochrein, Hubertus

    2013-01-01

    Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) is a safe and promising viral vaccine vector that is currently investigated in several clinical and pre-clinical trials. In contrast to inactivated or sub-unit vaccines, MVA is able to induce strong humoral as well as cellular immune responses. In order to further improve its CD8 T cell inducing capacity, we genetically adjuvanted MVA with the coding sequence of murine CD40L, a member of the tumor necrosis factor superfamily. Immunization of mice with this new vector led to strongly enhanced primary and memory CD8 T cell responses. Concordant with the enhanced CD8 T cell response, we could detect stronger activation of dendritic cells and higher systemic levels of innate cytokines (including IL-12p70) early after immunization. Interestingly, acquisition of memory characteristics (i.e., IL-7R expression) was accelerated after immunization with MVA-CD40L in comparison to non-adjuvanted MVA. Furthermore, the generated cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) also showed improved functionality as demonstrated by intracellular cytokine staining and in vivo killing activity. Importantly, the superior CTL response after a single MVA-CD40L immunization was able to protect B cell deficient mice against a fatal infection with ectromelia virus. Taken together, we show that genetic adjuvantation of MVA can change strength, quality, and functionality of innate and adaptive immune responses. These data should facilitate a rational vaccine design with a focus on rapid induction of large numbers of CD8 T cells able to protect against specific diseases. PMID:23986761

  3. LACK OF IMMUNODEPRESSION IN THE ANTIGEN SPECIFIC CELL MEDIATED IMMUNE RESPONSE AFTER CHALLENGE WITH VIRULENT OR VERY VIRULENT MAREK'S DISEASE VIRUS STRAINS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Infection with Marek's disease is known to produce a generalized "immunodepression" to the cell-mediated immune response as measured by reduced mitogen stimulation. We used the major histocompatibility complex restricted (MHC) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response to the avian leukosis virus (ALV) ...

  4. Characteristics of Cell-mediated, Anti-listerial Immunity Induced by A Naturally Avirulent Listeria monocytogenes Serotype 4a Strain HCC23

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The characteristics of cell-mediated, anti-listerial immune response initiated by an avirulent Listeria monocytogenes serotype 4a strain HCC23 was assessed. Similar to virulent strain EGD, avirulent strain HCC23 grew readily within macrophage-like J774 cells, but nonhemolytic strain ATCC 15313 did n...

  5. Evaluating the cell mediated immune response of avian species to avian influenza viruses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The measurement of avian cellular immunity is critical to understanding the role and regulation of avian lymphocytes following avian influenza virus infection. Although the ability to measure avian T cell responses has steadily increased over the last few years, few studies have examined the role o...

  6. Calorie restriction (CR) enhances T cell mediated immune response in overweight men and women

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calorie restriction (CR) enhances immunity and prolongs life-spans in animals. However, information on applying these results to humans is limited. A hallmark of aging is declining T-cell function. We examined the effects of CR on human T-cell function. Forty-six subjects aged 20-42 were randomly as...

  7. Cell-mediated Immunity to Human Tamm-Horsfall Glycoprotein in Autoimmune Liver Disease with Renal Tubular Acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsantoulas, D. C.; McFarlane, I. G.; Portmann, B.; Eddleston, A. L. W. F.; Williams, Roger

    1974-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune responses to Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein isolated from human urine were investigated using the leucocyte migration test. Abnormal responses were found in 91% of patients with active chronic hepatitis or primary biliary cirrhosis with an associated renal tubular acidosis (R.T.A.) but in only 19% of those without R.T.A. In nearly all of a group of patients without autoimmune liver disease and in a control group of normal subjects results were within normal limits. In addition, using an immunofluorescent technique with rabbit antibody to human Tamm-Horsfall glycoprotein, it was possible to show the presence in human liver cell membrane of material reacting immunologically as Tamm-Horsfall. These findings suggest that the development of an immune response to this glycoprotein, initiated by release of cross-reacting antigens from damaged hepatocytes, could be the mechanism underlying the occurrence of R.T.A. in some patients with autoimmune liver disease. ImagesFIG. 3 PMID:4611578

  8. Coupling of HIV-1 Antigen to the Selective Autophagy Receptor SQSTM1/p62 Promotes T-Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Aram Nikolai; Landsverk, Ole Jørgen; Simonsen, Anne; Bogen, Bjarne; Corthay, Alexandre; Øynebråten, Inger

    2016-01-01

    Vaccines aiming to promote T-cell-mediated immune responses have so far showed limited efficacy, and there is a need for novel strategies. Studies indicate that autophagy plays an inherent role in antigen processing and presentation for CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Here, we report a novel vaccine strategy based on fusion of antigen to the selective autophagy receptor sequestosome 1 (SQSTM1)/p62. We hypothesized that redirection of vaccine antigen from proteasomal degradation into the autophagy pathway would increase the generation of antigen-specific T cells. A hybrid vaccine construct was designed in which the antigen is fused to the C-terminus of p62, a signaling hub, and a receptor that naturally delivers ubiquitinated cargo for autophagic degradation. Fusion of the human immunodeficiency virus-1 antigen Gagp24 to p62 resulted in efficient antigen delivery into the autophagy pathway. Intradermal immunization of mice revealed that, in comparison to Gagp24 delivered alone, fusion to p62 enhanced the number of Gagp24-specific interferon-γ-producing T cells, including CD8+ T cells. The strategy may also have the potential to modulate the antigenic peptide repertoire. Because p62 and autophagy are highly conserved between species, we anticipate this strategy to be a candidate for the development of T-cell-based vaccines in humans. PMID:27242780

  9. Effect of early vitamin A supplementation on cell-mediated immunity in infants younger than 6 mo.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M M; Mahalanabis, D; Alvarez, J O; Wahed, M A; Islam, M A; Habte, D

    1997-01-01

    One hundred twenty infants were randomly assigned to receive either 15 mg vitamin A or placebo with each of three DPT/OPV (diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus/oral polio vaccine) immunizations at monthly intervals. Sixty-two received vitamin A and 58 received placebo. One month after the third supplementation dose, the response to the delayed cutaneous hypersensitivity test [multitest cell-mediated immunity (CMI) skin evaluation] for tetanus, diphtheria, and tuberculin (purified protein derivative, PPD) was the same in the vitamin A and placebo infants. The number of anergic infants was 17 (27%) and 19 (33%) in the vitamin A and placebo groups, respectively. The number of positive tests among well-nourished infants was significantly higher than that in malnourished infants irrespective of supplementation (P < 0.001). Among the infants with adequate serum retinol concentrations (> 0.7 mumol/L) after supplementation, the vitamin A-supplemented infants had a significantly higher proportion of positive CMI tests than the placebo infants (chi-square test: 8.99, P = 0.008). Among the infants with low serum retinol concentrations (< 0.7 mumol/L) after supplementation, vitamin A supplementation had no effect on CMI response. These results indicate that CMI in young infants was positively affected by vitamin A supplementation only in those infants whose vitamin A status was adequate (ie, serum retinol > 0.7 mumol/L) at the time of the CMI test. CMI was consistently better in well-nourished infants irrespective of supplementation. PMID:8988926

  10. T cell mediated immune responses in patients with tuberculous lymphadenitis from Butajira, southern Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Habte, Abebe; Geletu, Mulu; Olobo, Joseph Okao; Kidane, Dawit; Negesse, Yohannes; Yassin, Mohammed Ahmed; Kifle, Bereda; Abate, Getahun; Harboe, Morten; Aseff, Abraham

    2004-04-01

    The control of tuberculosis (TB) requires improved vaccines in addition to chemotherapy. It is essential to understand the immune response in tuberculosis to successfully evaluate potential vaccines. Current investigations have focused on immune responses in pulmonary forms. We studied the T-cell response of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from HIV-infected (n=8) and non-infected patients (n=19) with lymph node tuberculosis to PPD and short-term culture filtrates (ST-CF) of M. tuberculosis. PBMC from HIV-negative TB lymphadenitis patients proliferated in response to both antigens (p<0.001) and produced variably higher levels of IFN-gamma compared to healthy controls (p=0.02) (n=19) from the same area. Such responses were suppressed in HIV co-infected subjects. The results indicate that circulating PBMC in the apparently localized form of tuberculous lymphadenitis react to mycobacterial antigens in a similar pattern as those of patients with pulmonary disease. PMID:16895017

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells mediate immune suppression in spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Yu, Wei-bo; Tao, Lian-yuan; Xu, Qing

    2016-01-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is characterized by the loss of motor and sensory functions in areas below the level of the lesion and numerous accompanying deficits. Previous studies have suggested that myeloid-derived suppressor cell (MDSC)-induced immune depression may play a pivotal role in the course of SCI. However, the concrete mechanism of these changes regarding immune suppression remains unknown. Here, we created an SCI mouse model to gain further evidence regarding the relationship between MDSCs following SCI and T lymphocyte suppression. We showed that in the SCI mouse model, the expanding MDSCs have the capacity to suppress T cell proliferation, and this suppression could be reversed by blocking the arginase. PMID:26711577

  12. Different immune cells mediate mechanical pain hypersensitivity in male and female mice

    PubMed Central

    Sorge, Robert E.; Mapplebeck, Josiane C.S.; Rosen, Sarah; Beggs, Simon; Taves, Sarah; Alexander, Jessica K.; Martin, Loren J.; Austin, Jean-Sebastien; Sotocinal, Susana G.; Chen, Di; Yang, Mu; Shi, Xiang Qun; Huang, Hao; Pillon, Nicolas J.; Bilan, Philip J.; Tu, Yu Shan; Klip, Amira; Ji, Ru-Rong; Zhang, Ji; Salter, Michael W.; Mogil, Jeffrey S.

    2016-01-01

    A large and rapidly increasing body of evidence indicates that microglia-neuron signaling is essential for chronic pain hypersensitivity. Here we show using multiple approaches that microglia are not required for mechanical pain hypersensitivity in female mice; female mice achieve similar levels of pain hypersensitivity using adaptive immune cells, likely T-lymphocytes. This sexual dimorphism suggests that male mice cannot be used as proxies for females in pain research. PMID:26120961

  13. Activated T cells sustain myeloid-derived suppressor cell-mediated immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Pinton, Laura; Solito, Samantha; Damuzzo, Vera; Francescato, Samuela; Pozzuoli, Assunta; Berizzi, Antonio; Mocellin, Simone; Rossi, Carlo Riccardo; Bronte, Vincenzo; Mandruzzato, Susanna

    2016-01-12

    The expansion of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), a suppressive population able to hamper the immune response against cancer, correlates with tumor progression and overall survival in several cancer types. We have previously shown that MDSCs can be induced in vitro from precursors present in the bone marrow and observed that these cells are able to actively proliferate in the presence of activated T cells, whose activation level is critical to drive the suppressive activity of MDSCs. Here we investigated at molecular level the mechanisms involved in the interplay between MDSCs and activated T cells. We found that activated T cells secrete IL-10 following interaction with MDSCs which, in turn, activates STAT3 phosphorylation on MDSCs then leading to B7-H1 expression. We also demonstrated that B7-H1+ MDSCs are responsible for immune suppression through a mechanism involving ARG-1 and IDO expression. Finally, we show that the expression of ligands B7-H1 and MHC class II both on in vitro-induced MDSCs and on MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment of cancer patients is paralleled by an increased expression of their respective receptors PD-1 and LAG-3 on T cells, two inhibitory molecules associated with T cell dysfunction. These findings highlight key molecules and interactions responsible for the extensive cross-talk between MDSCs and activated T cells that are at the basis of immune suppression. PMID:26700461

  14. Plasmodium berghei: immunosuppression of the cell-mediated immune response induced by nonviable antigenic preparations

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, A.; Frankenburg, S.

    1989-01-01

    In this work, plasmodial antigens were examined for their ability to suppress the cellular immune response during lethal Plasmodium berghei infection. Splenic enlargement and the number and function of white spleen cells were assessed after injection of normal mice with irradiated parasitized erythrocytes (IPE) or with parasitized erythrocytes (PE) membranes. Both IPE and PE membranes caused splenomegaly and an increase in the number of splenic white cells with concurrent alteration of the relative proportions of T cells and macrophages. The percentage of T lymphocytes was fractionally diminished, but there was a marked increase in Lyt 2.2 positive (suppressor and cytotoxic) T subsets and in the number of splenic macrophage precursors. The pathological enlargement of the spleen was induced by various plasma membrane-derived antigens containing both proteins and carbohydrates. Splenocytes of mice injected with liposomes containing deoxycholate-treated PE or PE fractions showed both diminished interleukin 2 production and a decreased response to mitogen. It appears that some of the changes in the cellular immune response during P. berghei infection are a consequence of the massive provision of a wide spectrum of antigens, capable of suppressing the immune response. Thus, it may be appropriate to evaluate the possible negative effect of parasite epitopes that are candidates for vaccine.

  15. Cell-mediated immunity to Toxoplasma gondii develops primarily by local Th-1 host immune responses in the absence of parasite replication1

    PubMed Central

    Gigley, Jason P.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.

    2008-01-01

    A single inoculation of mice with the live attenuated Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph strain cps1-1 induces long-lasting immunity against lethal challenge with hyper-virulent strain RH. The mechanism for this robust immunity in the absence of parasite replication has not been addressed. The mechanism of long-lasting immunity, the importance of route of immunization, cellular recruitment to the site of infection, and local and systemic inflammation were evaluated. Our results show that infection with cps1-1 elicits long-lasting CD8+ T cell mediated immunity. We show that immunization with cps1-1 infected DCs elicits long-lasting immunity. Intraperitoneal infection with cps1-1 induced a rapid influx of GR1+ neutrophils and 2 stages of GR1+ CD68+ inflammatory monocyte infiltration into the site of inoculation. CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cells steadily increase for 8 days after infection. CD8+ T cells were rapidly recruited to the site of infection and increased faster than CD4+ T cells. Surprisingly, cps1-1 infection induced high systemic levels of bioactive IL-12p70 and very low level and transient systemic Ifn-γ. Furthermore, we show significant levels of these inflammatory cytokines were locally produced at the site of cps1-1 inoculation. These findings offer new insight into immunological mechanisms and local host responses to a non-replicating Type I parasite infection associated with development of long-lasting immunity to Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:19124750

  16. Cell-mediated immunity to Toxoplasma gondii develops primarily by local Th1 host immune responses in the absence of parasite replication.

    PubMed

    Gigley, Jason P; Fox, Barbara A; Bzik, David J

    2009-01-15

    A single inoculation of mice with the live, attenuated Toxoplasma gondii uracil auxotroph strain cps1-1 induces long-lasting immunity against lethal challenge with hypervirulent strain RH. The mechanism for this robust immunity in the absence of parasite replication has not been addressed. The mechanism of long-lasting immunity, the importance of route of immunization, cellular recruitment to the site of infection, and local and systemic inflammation were evaluated. Our results show that infection with cps1-1 elicits long-lasting CD8+ T cell- mediated immunity. We show that immunization with cps1-1-infected dendritic cells elicits long-lasting immunity. Intraperitoneal infection with cps1-1 induced a rapid influx of GR1+ neutrophils and two stages of GR1+CD68+ inflammatory monocyte infiltration into the site of inoculation. CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cells steadily increase for 8 days after infection. CD8+ T cells were rapidly recruited to the site of infection and increased faster than CD4+ T cells. Surprisingly, cps1-1 infection induced high systemic levels of bioactive IL-12p70 and a very low level and transient systemic IFN-gamma. Furthermore, we show significant levels of these inflammatory cytokines were locally produced at the site of cps1-1 inoculation. These findings offer new insight into immunological mechanisms and local host responses to a non-replicating type I parasite infection associated with development of long-lasting immunity to Toxoplasma gondii. PMID:19124750

  17. Low-Affinity Memory CD8+ T Cells Mediate Robust Heterologous Immunity.

    PubMed

    Krummey, Scott M; Martinez, Ryan J; Andargachew, Rakieb; Liu, Danya; Wagener, Maylene; Kohlmeier, Jacob E; Evavold, Brian D; Larsen, Christian P; Ford, Mandy L

    2016-03-15

    Heterologous immunity is recognized as a significant barrier to transplant tolerance. Whereas it has been established that pathogen-elicited memory T cells can have high or low affinity for cross-reactive allogeneic peptide-MHC, the role of TCR affinity during heterologous immunity has not been explored. We established a model with which to investigate the impact of TCR-priming affinity on memory T cell populations following a graft rechallenge. In contrast to high-affinity priming, low-affinity priming elicited fully differentiated memory T cells with a CD45RB(hi) status. High CD45RB status enabled robust secondary responses in vivo, as demonstrated by faster graft rejection kinetics and greater proliferative responses. CD45RB blockade prolonged graft survival in low affinity-primed mice, but not in high affinity-primed mice. Mechanistically, low affinity-primed memory CD8(+) T cells produced more IL-2 and significantly upregulated IL-2Rα expression during rechallenge. We found that CD45RB(hi) status was also a stable marker of priming affinity within polyclonal CD8(+) T cell populations. Following high-affinity rechallenge, low affinity-primed CD45RB(hi) cells became CD45RB(lo), demonstrating that CD45RB status acts as an affinity-based differentiation switch on CD8(+) T cells. Thus, these data establish a novel mechanism by which CD45 isoforms tune low affinity-primed memory CD8(+) T cells to become potent secondary effectors following heterologous rechallenge. These findings have direct implications for allogeneic heterologous immunity by demonstrating that despite a lower precursor frequency, low-affinity priming is sufficient to generate memory cells that mediate potent secondary responses against a cross-reactive graft challenge. PMID:26864034

  18. Humoral and cell mediated immune responses to a pertussis containing vaccine in pregnant and nonpregnant women.

    PubMed

    Huygen, Kris; Caboré, Raïssa Nadège; Maertens, Kirsten; Van Damme, Pierre; Leuridan, Elke

    2015-08-01

    Vaccination of pregnant women is recommended for some infectious diseases in order to protect both women and offspring through high titres of maternal IgG antibodies. Less is known on the triggering of cellular immune responses by vaccines administered during pregnancy. In an ongoing study on maternal pertussis vaccination (2012-2014) 18 pregnant women were vaccinated with a tetanus-diphtheria-acellular pertussis (Tdap) containing vaccine (Boostrix®) during the third pregnancy trimester. Sixteen age-matched nonpregnant women received the same vaccine in the same time period. A blood sample was taken at the moment of, but before vaccination and one month and one year after vaccination. Anti-Pertussis Toxin (PT), filamentous hemagglutinin (FHA), pertactin (Prn), tetanus toxin (TT) and diphtheria toxin (DT) antibodies were measured by ELISA. Cellular immune responses were analyzed using a diluted whole blood assay, measuring proliferation, and cytokine release in response to vaccine antigens PT, FHA, TT, and to pokeweed mitogen (PWM) as polyclonal stimulus. Antibody levels to all five vaccine components increased significantly and to the same extent after vaccination in pregnant and nonpregnant women. One year after vaccination, antibody titres had decreased particularly to PT, but they were still significantly higher to all antigens than before vaccination. In contrast, proliferative and IFN-γ responses were increased to TT, PT, and FHA in nonpregnant women one month after vaccination, whereas in pregnant women only TT specific T cell responses were increased and to a lesser extent than in the control group. One year after vaccination, cellular responses equaled the baseline levels detected prior to vaccination in both groups. In conclusion, a Tdap vaccination can increase vaccine specific IgG antibodies to the same extent in pregnant and in nonpregnant women, whereas the stimulation of vaccine specific Th1 type cellular immune responses with this acellular vaccine

  19. Suppression of in vivo cell-mediated immunity during experimental influenza A virus infection of adults.

    PubMed

    Skoner, D P; Angelini, B L; Jones, A; Seroky, J; Doyle, W J; Fireman, P

    1996-12-20

    A variety of recent evidence documents that otitis media is a frequent complication of upper respiratory tract viral infections. This relationship has been attributed to the interaction of a number of virus-provoked host responses, including eustachian tube dysfunction, changes in nasopharyngeal bacterial flora and suppressed immune function. The present study examined the effect of experimental influenza A virus infection on immune function as assessed by delayed skin test reactivity to candida, tetanus, and diphtheria/tetanus antigens in healthy adults with (n = 12) and without (n = 15) allergic rhinitis. All subjects became infected with the challenge virus as evidenced by viral shedding into nasal secretions and/or a four-fold rise in convalescent serum antibody titers compared to baseline. Intradermal skin tests were placed at baseline and 2, 4, 17, and 24 days after intranasal influenza A inoculation, the reactions were imaged and recorded 48 h after placement, and response areas were calculated by computerized digitization. The average combined areas for the three antigens (+/- S.T.D.) on each of the 5 study days were 1.4 +/- 1.4, 0.7 +/- 0.7, 0.6 +/- 0.6, 1.4 +/- 1.4, and 1.2 +/- 1.2 cm2, respectively. The responses to candida, but not tetanus and diphtheria/tetanus, returned to baseline levels by day 17. Repeated measures ANOVA documented significant effects of study day and antigen, but not allergy status. These results show that experimental influenza A infection suppressed delayed hypersensitivity skin tests in both allergic and non-allergic subjects, and suggest that alterations in immune function may contribute to otitis media. PMID:9119602

  20. Flow cytometric assessment of chicken T cell-mediated immune responses after Newcastle disease virus vaccination and challenge.

    PubMed

    Dalgaard, T S; Norup, L R; Pedersen, A R; Handberg, K J; Jørgensen, P H; Juul-Madsen, H R

    2010-06-17

    The objective of this study was to use flow cytometry to assess chicken T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study two inbred genetic chicken lines (L130 and L133) were subjected to two times vaccination against Newcastle disease (ND) and a subsequent challenge by ND virus (NDV) infection. Despite a delayed NDV-specific antibody response to vaccination, L133 appeared to be better protected than L130 in the subsequent infection challenge as determined by the presence of viral genomes. Peripheral blood was analyzed by flow cytometry and responses in vaccinated/challenged birds were studied by 5-color immunophenotyping as well as by measuring the proliferative capacity of NDV-specific T cells after recall stimulation. Immunophenotyping identified L133 as having a significantly lower CD4/CD8 ratio and a lower frequency of gammadelta T cells than L130 in the peripheral T cell compartment. Furthermore, peripheral lymphocytes from L133 exhibited a significantly higher expression of CD44 and CD45 throughout the experiment. Interestingly, also vaccine-induced differences were observed in L133 as immune chickens had a significantly higher CD45 expression on their lymphocytes than the naïve controls. Immune chickens from both lines had a significantly higher frequency of circulating gammadelta T cells than the naïve controls both after vaccination and challenge. Finally, the proliferative capacity of peripheral CD4+ and CD8+ cells specific for NDV was addressed 3 weeks after vaccination and 1 week after infection and found to be significantly higher in L133 than in L130 at both sampling times. In conclusion, we found the applied flow cytometric methods very useful for the study of chicken T cell biology. PMID:20434546

  1. Multivalent TB vaccines targeting the esx gene family generate potent and broad cell-mediated immune responses superior to BCG

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Walters, Jewell; Laddy, Dominick J; Yan, Jian; Weiner, David B

    2014-01-01

    Development of a broad-spectrum synthetic vaccine against TB would represent an important advance to the limited vaccine armamentarium against TB. It is believed that the esx family of TB antigens may represent important vaccine candidates. However, only 4 esx antigens have been studied as potential vaccine antigens. The challenge remains to develop a vaccine that simultaneously targets all 23 members of the esx family to induce enhanced broad-spectrum cell-mediated immunity. We sought to investigate if broader cellular immune responses could be induced using a multivalent DNA vaccine representing the esx family protein members delivered via electroporation. In this study, 15 designed esx antigens were created to cross target all members of the esx family. They were distributed into groups of 3 self-processing antigens each, resulting in 5 trivalent highly optimized DNA plasmids. Vaccination with all 5 constructs elicited robust antigen-specific IFN-γ responses to all encoded esx antigens and induced multifunctional CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell responses. Importantly, we show that when all constructs are combined into a cocktail, the RSQ-15 vaccine, elicited substantial broad Ag-specific T cell responses to all esx antigens as compared with vaccination with BCG. Moreover, these vaccine-induced responses were highly cross-reactive with BCG encoded esx family members and were highly immune effective in a BCG DNA prime-boost format. Furthermore, we demonstrate the vaccine potential and immunopotent profile of several novel esx antigens never previously studied. These data highlight the likely importance of these novel immunogens for study as preventative or therapeutic synthetic TB vaccines in combination or as stand alone antigens. PMID:25424922

  2. Trypanosoma cruzi Adjuvants Potentiate T Cell-Mediated Immunity Induced by a NY-ESO-1 Based Antitumor Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Junqueira, Caroline; Guerrero, Ana Tereza; Galvão-Filho, Bruno; Andrade, Warrison A.; Salgado, Ana Paula C.; Cunha, Thiago M.; Ropert, Catherine; Campos, Marco Antônio; Penido, Marcus L. O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lúcia; Previato, José Oswaldo; Ritter, Gerd; Cunha, Fernando Q.; Gazzinelli, Ricardo T.

    2012-01-01

    Immunological adjuvants that induce T cell-mediate immunity (TCMI) with the least side effects are needed for the development of human vaccines. Glycoinositolphospholipids (GIPL) and CpGs oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG ODNs) derived from the protozoa parasite Trypanosoma cruzi induce potent pro-inflammatory reaction through activation of Toll-Like Receptor (TLR)4 and TLR9, respectively. Here, using mouse models, we tested the T. cruzi derived TLR agonists as immunological adjuvants in an antitumor vaccine. For comparison, we used well-established TLR agonists, such as the bacterial derived monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), lipopeptide (Pam3Cys), and CpG ODN. All tested TLR agonists were comparable to induce antibody responses, whereas significant differences were noticed in their ability to elicit CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses. In particular, both GIPLs (GTH, and GY) and CpG ODNs (B344, B297 and B128) derived from T. cruzi elicited interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) production by CD4+ T cells. On the other hand, the parasite derived CpG ODNs, but not GIPLs, elicited a potent IFN-γ response by CD8+ T lymphocytes. The side effects were also evaluated by local pain (hypernociception). The intensity of hypernociception induced by vaccination was alleviated by administration of an analgesic drug without affecting protective immunity. Finally, the level of protective immunity against the NY-ESO-1 expressing melanoma was associated with the magnitude of both CD4+ T and CD8+ T cell responses elicited by a specific immunological adjuvant. PMID:22567144

  3. Host Genetic Background Influences the Response to the Opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infection Altering Cell-Mediated Immunity and Bacterial Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A.; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  4. Host genetic background influences the response to the opportunistic Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection altering cell-mediated immunity and bacterial replication.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Maura; Spagnuolo, Lorenza; Lorè, Nicola Ivan; Rossi, Giacomo; Cigana, Cristina; De Fino, Ida; Iraqi, Fuad A; Bragonzi, Alessandra

    2014-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a common cause of healthcare-associated infections including pneumonia, bloodstream, urinary tract, and surgical site infections. The clinical outcome of P. aeruginosa infections may be extremely variable among individuals at risk and patients affected by cystic fibrosis. However, risk factors for P. aeruginosa infection remain largely unknown. To identify and track the host factors influencing P. aeruginosa lung infections, inbred immunocompetent mouse strains were screened in a pneumonia model system. A/J, BALB/cJ, BALB/cAnNCrl, BALB/cByJ, C3H/HeOuJ, C57BL/6J, C57BL/6NCrl, DBA/2J, and 129S2/SvPasCRL mice were infected with P. aeruginosa clinical strain and monitored for body weight and mortality up to seven days. The most deviant survival phenotypes were observed for A/J, 129S2/SvPasCRL and DBA/2J showing high susceptibility while BALB/cAnNCrl and C3H/HeOuJ showing more resistance to P. aeruginosa infection. Next, one of the most susceptible and resistant mouse strains were characterized for their deviant clinical and immunological phenotype by scoring bacterial count, cell-mediated immunity, cytokines and chemokines profile and lung pathology in an early time course. Susceptible A/J mice showed significantly higher bacterial burden, higher cytokines and chemokines levels but lower leukocyte recruitment, particularly neutrophils, when compared to C3H/HeOuJ resistant mice. Pathologic scores showed lower inflammatory severity, reduced intraluminal and interstitial inflammation extent, bronchial and parenchymal involvement and diminished alveolar damage in the lungs of A/J when compared to C3H/HeOuJ. Our findings indicate that during an early phase of infection a prompt inflammatory response in the airways set the conditions for a non-permissive environment to P. aeruginosa replication and lock the spread to other organs. Host gene(s) may have a role in the reduction of cell-mediated immunity playing a critical role in the control of P

  5. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation.

    PubMed

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation. PMID:27621729

  6. Cyclic AMP Represents a Crucial Component of Treg Cell-Mediated Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Matthias; Bopp, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    T regulatory (Treg) cells are one of the key players in the immune tolerance network, and a plethora of manuscripts have described their development and function in the course of the last two decades. Nevertheless, it is still a matter of debate as to which mechanisms and agents are employed by Treg cells, providing the basis of their suppressive potency. One of the important candidates is cyclic AMP (cAMP), which is long known as a potent suppressor at least of T cell activation and function. While this suppressive function by itself is widely accepted, the source and the mechanism of action of cAMP are less clear, and a multitude of seemingly contradictory data allow for, in principle, two different scenarios of cAMP-mediated suppression. In one scenario, Treg cells contain high amounts of cAMP and convey this small molecule via gap junction intercellular communication directly to the effector T cells (Teff) leading to their suppression. Alternatively, it was shown that Treg cells represent the origin of considerable amounts of adenosine, which trigger the adenylate cyclases in Teff cells via A2A and A2B receptors, thus strongly increasing intracellular cAMP. This review will present and discuss initial findings and recent developments concerning the function of cAMP for Treg cells and its impact on immune regulation.

  7. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Immunity during Trypanosoma cruzi Infection: A Path for Vaccine Development?

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos Virgilio, Fernando; Pontes, Camila; Dominguez, Mariana Ribeiro; Ersching, Jonatan; Rodrigues, Mauricio Martins; Vasconcelos, José Ronnie

    2014-01-01

    MHC-restricted CD8+ T cells are important during infection with the intracellular protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, the causative agent of Chagas disease. Experimental studies performed in the past 25 years have elucidated a number of features related to the immune response mediated by these T cells, which are important for establishing the parasite/host equilibrium leading to chronic infection. CD8+ T cells are specific for highly immunodominant antigens expressed by members of the trans-sialidase family. After infection, their activation is delayed, and the cells display a high proliferative activity associated with high apoptotic rates. Although they participate in parasite control and elimination, they are unable to clear the infection due to their low fitness, allowing the parasite to establish the chronic phase when these cells then play an active role in the induction of heart immunopathology. Vaccination with a number of subunit recombinant vaccines aimed at eliciting specific CD8+ T cells can reverse this path, thereby generating a productive immune response that will lead to the control of infection, reduction of symptoms, and reduction of disease transmission. Due to these attributes, activation of CD8+ T lymphocytes may constitute a path for the development of a veterinarian or human vaccine. PMID:25104879

  8. The ability of Hepatitis B surface antigen DNA vaccine to elicit cell-mediated immune responses, but not antibody responses, was affected by the deglysosylation of S antigen.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yiping; Huang, Zuhu; Lin, Yan; Li, Jun; Chou, Te-Hui; Lu, Shan; Wang, Shixia

    2008-09-19

    Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) infection remains a major worldwide infectious disease with serious long-term morbidity and mortality. The limited selections of drug treatment are not able to control the progress of disease in people with active and persistent HBV infection. Immunotherapy to control the degree of viral infection is one possible alternative solution to this challenge. HBV DNA vaccines, with their strong ability to induce cell-mediated immune responses, offer an attractive option. HBV surface protein is important in viral immunity. Re-establishing anti-S immunity in chronic HBV infected patients will bring significant benefit to the patients. Previous studies have shown that HBV S DNA vaccines are immunogenic in a number of animal studies. In the current study, we further investigated the effect of glycosylation to the expression and immunogenicity of S DNA vaccines. Our results demonstrate that deglycosylation at the two potential N-linked glycosylation sites in S protein resulted in a significant decrease of S-specific cell-mediated immune responses, but did not affect anti-S antibody responses. This finding provides important direction to the development of S DNA vaccines to elicit the optimal and balanced antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to treat people with HBV chronic infections. PMID:18462847

  9. Cell-mediated immune response of patients with meningiomas defined in vitro by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test.

    PubMed Central

    Pees, H W; Seidel, B

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated cytotoxicity (CTX) of meningioma patients was assessed postoperatively by a [3H]proline microcytotoxicity test. Autologous and allogeneic tumour cells were used for prelabelling with isotope and peripheral blood lymphocytes added in a ratio of 200:1. After 60 hg the plates were washed and residual CMP counted. Control target cells consisted of normal skin fibroblasts. CTX was calculated in percentage reduction compared to cultures incubated with control lymphocytes. Specific CTX on meningioma cells (i.e. not destroying control cells) greater than 20% was considered 'positive' if significant at P less than 0-05. Fifteen of twenty-three meningiomas showed specific CTX (65%). Among eight CNS tumours of different type and thirteen non-malignant diseases and normals only three (14%) were specifically cytotoxic for meningioma cells. A cross-reaction could be demonstrated between autologous and allogeneic meningioma target cells. However, no activity of lymphocytes from patients with meningiomas on glioblastoma cells and foetal brain tissue could be found at the ratio used for evaluation. Evidence is presented indicating that a cellular immune response as measured in the microcytotoxic test may be dependent on a residual or recurrent tumour in the body. PMID:1277580

  10. Bacterial kidney disease as a model for studies of cell mediated immunity in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Jansson, Eva; Hongslo, Thorbjörn; Johannisson, Anders; Pilström, Lars; Timmusk, Sirje; Norrgren, Leif

    2003-04-01

    A cell mediated immune (CMI) response was measured in vitro to heat-killed and to paraformaldehyde fixed Renibacterium salmoninarum (Rs) in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) experimentally challenged with live Rs. The mitogenic response to the T lymphocyte mitogen Concanavalin A (Con A) was reduced during samplings 4 to 6 weeks after immersion, but no effect of the response to the B lymphocyte mitogen lipopolysaccharide (LPS) was detected. The subpopulation of lymphocytes, detected by the monoclonal antibody 1C2, was decreased from the 4th week to the 5th week of infection, and remained at the decreased level up to 10 weeks post immersion. The proportion of Immunoglobulin (Ig) bearing lymphocytes was not affected during the Rs infection period. The humoral antibody level to heat-stable Rs-antigens was increased up to 10 weeks after immersion but after 27 weeks was reduced to a level similar to that of the non-challenged fish. An anamnestic response was demonstrated in challenged fish, as intraperitoneal injection of heat-treated Rs bacteria into Rs challenged fish elicited a stronger humoral antibody response compared with injection into non-challenged fish. PMID:12657537

  11. Dendritic cell based immunotherapy using tumor stem cells mediates potent antitumor immune responses.

    PubMed

    Dashti, Amir; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Hadjati, Jamshid; Memarnejadian, Arash; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-04-28

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are demonstrated to be usually less sensitive to conventional methods of cancer therapies, resulting in tumor relapse. It is well-known that an ideal treatment would be able to selectively target and kill CSCs, so as to avoid the tumor reversion. The aim of our present study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a dendritic cell (DC) based vaccine against CSCs in a mouse model of malignant melanoma. C57BL/6 mouse bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with a murine melanoma cell line (B16F10) or CSC lysates were used as a vaccine. Immunization of mice with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs was able to induce a significant prophylactic effect by a higher increase in lifespan and obvious depression of tumor growth in tumor bearing mice. The mice vaccinated with DCs loaded with CSC-lysate were revealed to produce specific cytotoxic responses to CSCs. The proliferation assay and cytokine (IFN-γ and IL-4) secretion of mice vaccinated with CSC lysate-pulsed DCs also showed more favorable results, when compared to those receiving B16F10 lysate-pulsed DCs. These findings suggest a potential strategy to improve the efficacy of DC-based immunotherapy of cancers. PMID:26803056

  12. Cell-Mediated Immune Response of Ragweed-Sensitive Patients to Ragweed Antigen E

    PubMed Central

    Rocklin, Ross E.; Pence, Hobert; Kaplan, Hyman; Evans, Richard

    1974-01-01

    The in vivo and in vitro responses to ragweed antigen E were evaluated in 28 untreated atopic patients with ragweed hayfever. The methods employed included direct skin testing, measurement of total serum IgE, measurement of specific IgE anti-ragweed antibodies, leukocyte histamine release, lymphocyte transformation, and release of lymphocyte mediators (migration inhibitory factor and mitogenic factor). The patients could be divided into sensitive and insensitive groups on the basis of their in vitro reactivity to antigen E. 20 patients in the sensitive group had statistically higher levels of total serum IgE, higher levels of specific IgE anti-ragweed antibodies, and greater leukocyte sensitivity as measured by antigen-induced histamine release than did eight patients in the insensitive group. Lymphocytes from sensitive patients produced greater amounts of migration inhibitory factor and mitogenic factor when challenged by antigen E than did lymphocytes from insensitive patients. A possible role for the lymphocyte in this allergic disease is discussed. The results of this study indicate that the immune response to ragweed antigen is complex and involves components of both immediate and delayed hypersensitivity. PMID:4130213

  13. Cell-mediated immune responses to a cloned Plasmodium falciparum antigen

    SciTech Connect

    Rollwagen, F.M.; Pacheco, N.D.; Wistar, R. Jr.

    1986-03-05

    A peptide fragment of the Plasmodium falciparum (P.f.) circumsporozoite protein (CSP) containing 32 repeats of the immunodominant tetrapeptide ASN-ALA-ASN-PRO (R32tet32) is currently being evaluated as a vaccine in man. This R32tet32 peptide, prepared by recombinant DNA technology from a cloned P.f. gene fragment, has been examined for its ability to stimulate T-cell proliferation in experimental animals. Groups of mice were injected with either R32tet32 emulsified in Freund's complete adjuvant (CFA), or live, or frozen-thawed P.f. sporozoites. Lymphocytes from such mice were cocultured with varying doses of R32tet32 or irrelevant antigen. Proliferation was assessed by /sup 3/H-thymidine uptake; serum antibody was analyzed by ELISA. A proliferative response was found in mice immunized with R32tet32+CFA as early as day 7 post-injection, and was persistent through at least day 23. No proliferation in response to R32tet32 was observed in lymphocytes taken from mice injected with live or frozen-thawed sporozoites. All three immunogens induced both IgM and IgG antibody to R32tet32. They conclude that exposure to live or frozen-thawed P.f. sporozoites alone is sufficient to generate T-cell helper activity for subsequent antibody production, but that antigen+CFA was necessary to generate significant T-cell proliferative activity.

  14. Induction of Potent Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses by Attenuated Vaccinia Virus Vectors with Deleted Serpin Genes

    PubMed Central

    Legrand, Fatema A.; Verardi, Paulo H.; Jones, Leslie A.; Chan, Kenneth S.; Peng, Yue; Yilma, Tilahun D.

    2004-01-01

    Vaccinia virus (VV) has been effectively utilized as a live vaccine against smallpox as well as a vector for vaccine development and immunotherapy. Increasingly there is a need for a new generation of highly attenuated and efficacious VV vaccines, especially in light of the AIDS pandemic and the threat of global bioterrorism. We therefore developed recombinant VV (rVV) vaccines that are significantly attenuated and yet elicit potent humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. B13R (SPI-2) and B22R (SPI-1) are two VV immunomodulating genes with sequence homology to serine protease inhibitors (serpins) that possess antiapoptotic and anti-inflammatory properties. We constructed and characterized rVVs that have the B13R or B22R gene insertionally inactivated (vΔB13R and vΔB22R) and coexpress the vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (v50ΔB13R and v50ΔB22R). Virulence studies with immunocompromised BALB/cBy nude mice indicated that B13R or B22R gene deletion decreases viral replication and significantly extends time of survival. Viral pathogenesis studies in immunocompetent CB6F1 mice further demonstrated that B13R or B22R gene inactivation diminishes VV virulence, as measured by decreased levels of weight loss and limited viral spread. Finally, rVVs with B13R and B22R deleted elicited potent humoral, T-helper, and cytotoxic T-cell immune responses, revealing that the observed attenuation did not reduce immunogenicity. Therefore, inactivation of immunomodulating genes such as B13R or B22R represents a general method for enhancing the safety of rVV vaccines while maintaining a high level of immunogenicity. Such rVVs could serve as effective vectors for vaccine development and immunotherapy. PMID:14990697

  15. Immunization status of internationally adopted children in Italy.

    PubMed

    Viviano, Enza; Cataldo, Francesco; Accomando, Salvatore; Firenze, Alberto; Valenti, Rosalia Maria; Romano, Nino

    2006-05-01

    An increasing number of internationally adopted children is coming to Italy, and their immunization status is unknown. We evaluated the immunization status of such children in Palermo, Italy. We searched for the presence of a BCG scar in 88 children, 49 boys and 39 girls (mean age 76+/-32 months), most of whom (98%) came from Eastern Europe. Presence of BCG scar was observed in 59 (67.1%) of them, included five children without any pre-adoptive medical records. Twenty-three out of 29 children without any evidence of BCG scar were tested by Mantoux. Seven (30.4%) of 23 were tuberculin positive and diagnosed as having latent tuberculosis infection. We also examined immunization status against poliovirus 1-3, tetanus, diphtheria, pertussis, measles, mumps, rubella and hepatitis B of 70 internationally adopted children and we compared it with the pre-adoptive immunization records of their birth country. Protective titers (>1:8) against poliovirus 1-3, were found respectively in 67.1%, 91.4%, 42.8% of 70 immunized children, and only 38.5% of them had at the same time full protection against all three types of poliovirus. Protective titers against tetanus and diphtheria were found in 91.4% and 95.7% of 70 vaccinated children. Presence of antibodies against pertussis, measles, mumps and rubella was observed respectively in 16 (32.6%) of 49, 40 (62.5%) of 64, 28 (56%) of 50 and 24 (85.7%) of 28 children who had received the vaccine. As regards hepatitis B, only 20 of 29 vaccinated children had detectable hepatitis B surface antibodies, while four of 29 vaccinated and two of 41 not vaccinated children were positive for both hepatitis B surface antibodies and hepatitis B core antibodies. Finally three of 41 not vaccinated children were both hepatitis B surface antigen and hepatitis B core antibodies positive. No relation was found between health status and immunization and between age and antibody positiveness of vaccinated children except for hepatitis B, therefore the

  16. Propanil Exposure Induces Delayed but Sustained Abrogation of Cell-Mediated Immunity through Direct Interference with Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Effectors

    PubMed Central

    Sheil, James M.; Frankenberry, Marc A.; Schell, Todd D.; Brundage, Kathleen M.; Barnett, John B.

    2006-01-01

    The postemergent herbicide propanil (PRN; also known as 3,4-dichloropropionanilide) is used on rice and wheat crops and has well-known immunotoxic effects on various compartments of the immune system, including T-helper lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, and macrophages. It is unclear, however, whether PRN also adversely affects cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), the primary (1°) effectors of cell-mediated immunity. In this study we examined both the direct and indirect effects of PRN exposure on CTL activation and effector cell function to gauge its likely impact on cell-mediated immunity. Initial experiments addressed whether PRN alters the class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) pathway for antigen processing and presentation by antigen-presenting cells (APCs), thereby indirectly affecting effector function. These experiments demonstrated that PRN does not impair the activation of CTLs by PRN-treated APCs. Subsequent experiments addressed whether PRN treatment of CTLs directly inhibits their activation and revealed that 1° alloreactive CTLs exposed to PRN are unimpaired in their proliferative response and only marginally inhibited in their lytic activity. Surprisingly, secondary stimulation of these alloreactive CTL effectors, however, even in the absence of further PRN exposure, resulted in complete abrogation of CTL lytic function and a delayed but significant long-term effect on CTL responsiveness. These findings may have important implications for the diagnosis and clinical management of anomalies of cell-mediated immunity resulting from environmental exposure to various herbicides and other pesticides. PMID:16835059

  17. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus

    PubMed Central

    Uddback, Ida E. M.; Pedersen, Line M. I.; Pedersen, Sara R.; Steffensen, Maria A.; Holst, Peter J.; Thomsen, Allan R.; Christensen, Jan P.

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  18. Combined local and systemic immunization is essential for durable T-cell mediated heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Uddback, Ida E M; Pedersen, Line M I; Pedersen, Sara R; Steffensen, Maria A; Holst, Peter J; Thomsen, Allan R; Christensen, Jan P

    2016-01-01

    The threat from unpredictable influenza virus pandemics necessitates the development of a new type of influenza vaccine. Since the internal proteins are highly conserved, induction of T cells targeting these antigens may provide the solution. Indeed, adenoviral (Ad) vectors expressing flu nucleoprotein have previously been found to induce short-term protection in mice. In this study we confirm that systemic (subcutaneous (s.c.) immunization rapidly induced heterosubtypic protection predominantly mediated by CD8 T cells, but within three months clinical protection completely disappeared. Local (intranasal (i.n.)) immunization elicited delayed, but more lasting protection despite relatively inefficient immunization. However, by far, the most robust protection was induced by simultaneous, combined (i.n. + s.c.) vaccination, and, notably, in this case clinical protection lasted at least 8 months without showing any evidence of fading. Interestingly, the superior ability of the latter group to resist reinfection correlated with a higher number of antigen-specific CD8 T cells in the spleen. Thus, detailed analysis of the underlying CD8 T cell responses highlights the importance of T cells already positioned in the lungs prior to challenge, but at the same time underscores an important back-up role for circulating antigen-specific cells with the capacity to expand and infiltrate the infected lungs. PMID:26831578

  19. Alarmin IL-33 acts as an immunoadjuvant for enhancing antigen-specific cell-mediated immunity resulting in potent anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Villarreal, Daniel O.; Wise, Megan C.; Walters, Jewell N.; Reuschel, Emma; Choi, Min Joung; Obeng-Adjei, Nyamekye; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P.; Weiner, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Interleukin 33 (IL-33) has emerged as a cytokine that can exhibit pleiotropic properties. Here we examine IL-33 for its immunoadjuvant effects in an HPV-associated cancer immune therapy model in which cell-mediated immunity is critical for protection. It is known that two biologically active forms of IL-33 exist: full-length IL-33 and mature IL-33. The potential ability of both isoforms to act as vaccine adjuvants to influence the CD4 Th1 and CD8 T cell immune responses has not been well defined. We show that both isoforms of IL-33 are capable of enhancing potent antigen (Ag)-specific effector and memory T cell immunity in vivo in a DNA vaccine setting. We also show that while both forms of IL-33 drove robust IFN-γ responses, neither form drove high secretion of IL-4 or any elevation of IgE levels. Moreover, both isoforms augmented vaccine-induced Ag-specific polyfunctional CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses, with a large proportion of CD8+ T cells undergoing cytolytic plurifunctional degranulation. Therapeutic studies indicated that established TC-1-bearing mice undergo rapid and complete regression after therapeutic vaccination with both IL-33 adjuvant isoforms used in conjunction with an HPV DNA vaccine. Furthermore, using the P14 transgenic mouse model, we show that IL-33 can significantly expand the magnitude of Ag-specific CD8+ T cell responses and elicit bonafide effector-memory CD8+ T cells. Overall, the data suggests the potential use of these two IL-33 isoforms as immunoadjuvant candidates in future vaccination against other pathogens and in the context of anti-tumor immune-based therapy. PMID:24448242

  20. Single immunizing dose of recombinant adenovirus efficiently induces CD8+ T cell-mediated protective immunity against malaria.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, E G; Zavala, F; Eichinger, D; Wilson, J M; Tsuji, M

    1997-02-01

    The immunogenicity of a recombinant replication defective adenovirus expressing a major malaria Ag, the circumsporozoite (CS) protein (AdPyCS), was determined using a rodent malaria model. A single immunizing dose of this construct induced a large number of CS-specific CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in the spleens of these animals, particularly when given by the s.c. or i.m. route. A single dose of AdPyCS also induced high titers of Abs to Plasmodium yoelii sporozoites in mice. No other form of presentation of the CS protein given as a single immunizing dose, i.e., irradiated sporozoites, recombinant vaccinia, or influenza virus, etc., elicits comparably high numbers of CS-specific CD8+ T cells. The high concentration of CS-specific CD8+ T cells in the spleen was relatively short-lived, decreasing to half of its original value by 4 wk and to one-third at 8 wk after AdPyCS inoculation. The decrease in splenic CS-specific CD4+ T cells was even more rapid. Most importantly, a single dose of inoculation of AdPyCS into mice rendered them highly resistant to sporozoite challenge, resulting in a 93% inhibition of liver stage development of the parasites. This protective effect was primarily mediated by CD8+ T cells, as shown by depletion of this T cell population, while depletion of the CD4+ T cell population had only a minor effect on anti-plasmodial activity. Moreover, the inoculation of mice with AdPyCS induces sterile immunity in a significant proportion of mice, preventing the occurrence of parasitemia. PMID:9013969

  1. Ascaridia galli infection influences the development of both humoral and cell-mediated immunity after Newcastle Disease vaccination in chickens.

    PubMed

    Pleidrup, Janne; Dalgaard, Tina S; Norup, Liselotte R; Permin, Anders; Schou, Torben W; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Vadekær, Dorte F; Jungersen, Gregers; Sørensen, Poul; Juul-Madsen, Helle R

    2014-01-01

    Potent vaccine efficiency is crucial for disease control in both human and livestock vaccination programmes. Free range chickens and chickens with access to outdoor areas have a high risk of infection with parasites including Ascaridia galli, a gastrointestinal nematode with a potential influence on the immunological response to vaccination against other infectious diseases. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether A. galli infection influences vaccine-induced immunity to Newcastle Disease (ND) in chickens from an MHC-characterized inbred line. Chickens were experimentally infected with A. galli at 4 weeks of age or left as non-parasitized controls. At 10 and 13 weeks of age half of the chickens were ND-vaccinated and at 16 weeks of age, all chickens were challenged with a lentogenic strain of Newcastle disease virus (NDV). A. galli infection influenced both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses after ND vaccination. Thus, significantly lower NDV serum titres were found in the A. galli-infected group as compared to the non-parasitized group early after vaccination. In addition, the A. galli-infected chickens showed significantly lower frequencies of NDV-specific T cells in peripheral blood three weeks after the first ND vaccination as compared to non-parasitized chickens. Finally, A. galli significantly increased local mRNA expression of IL-4 and IL-13 and significantly decreased TGF-ß4 expression in the jejunum two weeks after infection with A. galli. At the time of vaccination (six and nine weeks after A. galli infection) the local expression in the jejunum of both IFN-? and IL-10 was significantly decreased in A. galli-infected chickens. Upon challenge with the NDV LaSota strain, viral genomes persisted in the oral cavity for a slightly longer period of time in A. galli-infected vaccinees as compared to non-parasitized vaccinees. However, more work is needed in order to determine if vaccine-induced protective immunity is impaired in A. galli

  2. Exercise-induced stress inhibits both the induction and elicitation phases of in vivo T-cell-mediated immune responses in humans.

    PubMed

    Harper Smith, Adam D; Coakley, Sarah L; Ward, Mark D; Macfarlane, Andrew W; Friedmann, Peter S; Walsh, Neil P

    2011-08-01

    Little is known about the influence of exercise on induction and elicitation phases of in vivo immunity in humans. We used experimental contact-hypersensitivity, a clinically relevant in vivo measure of T cell-mediated immunity, to investigate the effects of exercise on induction and elicitation phases of immune responses to a novel antigen. The effects of 2 h-moderate-intensity-exercise upon the induction (Study One) and elicitation of in vivo immune memory (Study Two) to diphenylcyclopropenone (DPCP) were examined. Study One: matched, healthy males were randomly-assigned to exercise (N=16) or control (N=16) and received a primary DPCP exposure (sensitization), 20 min after either 2 h running at 60% V O(2peak) (EX) or 2 h seated rest (CON). Four weeks later, participants received a low, dose-series DPCP challenge (elicitation) on their upper inner arm, which was read at 24 and 48 h as clinical score, oedema (skinfold thickness) and redness (erythema). Study Two: pilot; 13 healthy males were sensitized to DPCP. Elicitation challenges were repeated every 4 weeks until responses reached a reproducible plateau. Then, N=9 from the pilot study completed both EX and CON trials in a randomized order. Elicitation challenges were applied and evaluated as in Study One. Results demonstrate that exercise-induced stress significantly impairs both the induction (oedema -53% at 48 h; P<0.001) and elicitation (oedema -19% at 48 h; P<0.05) phases of the in vivo T-cell-mediated immune response. These findings demonstrate that prolonged moderate-intensity exercise impairs the induction and elicitation phases of in vivo T-cell-mediated immunity. Moreover, the induction component of new immune responses appears more sensitive to systemic-stress-induced modulation than the elicitation component. PMID:21362469

  3. Investigational treatment suspension and enhanced cell-mediated immunity at rebound followed by drug-free remission of simian AIDS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background HIV infection persists despite antiretroviral treatment (ART) and is reignited as soon as therapies are suspended. This vicious cycle is fueled by the persistence of viral reservoirs that are invulnerable to standard ART protocols, and thus therapeutic agents able to target these reservoirs are needed. One such agent, auranofin, has recently been shown to decrease the memory T-cell reservoir in chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques. Moreover, auranofin could synergize with a fully suppressive ART protocol and induce a drug-free post-therapy containment of viremia. Results We administered buthionine sulfoximine (BSO), an inhibitor of glutathione synthesis currently in clinical trials for cancer, in combination with auranofin to chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques under highly-intensified ART (H-iART). The ART/auranofin/BSO therapeutic protocol was followed, after therapy suspension, by a significant decrease of viral RNA and DNA in peripheral blood as compared to pre-therapy levels. Drug-free post-therapy control of the infection was achieved in animals with pre-therapy viral loads ranging from values comparable to average human set points to levels largely higher. This control was dependent on the presence CD8+ cells and associated with enhanced levels of cell-mediated immune responses. Conclusions The level of post-therapy viral set point reduction achieved in this study is the largest reported so far in chronically SIVmac251-infected macaques and may represent a promising strategy to improve over the current “ART for life” plight. PMID:23866829

  4. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase 1 reverse the immune evasion phenotype to enhance T-cell mediated lysis of prostate and breast carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Gameiro, Sofia R; Malamas, Anthony S; Tsang, Kwong Y; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W

    2016-02-16

    The clinical promise of cancer immunotherapy relies on the premise that the immune system can recognize and eliminate tumor cells identified as non-self. However, tumors can evade host immune surveillance through multiple mechanisms, including epigenetic silencing of genes involved in antigen processing and immune recognition. Hence, there is an unmet clinical need to develop effective therapeutic strategies that can restore tumor immune recognition when combined with immunotherapy, such as immune checkpoint blockade and therapeutic cancer vaccines. We sought to examine the potential of clinically relevant exposure of prostate and breast human carcinoma cells to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to reverse tumor immune escape to T-cell mediated lysis. Here we demonstrate that prostate (LNCAP) and breast (MDA-MB-231) carcinoma cells are more sensitive to T-cell mediated lysis in vitro after clinically relevant exposure to epigenetic therapy with either the pan-HDAC inhibitor vorinostat or the class I HDAC inhibitor entinostat. This pattern of immunogenic modulation was observed against a broad range of tumor-associated antigens, such as CEA, MUC1, PSA, and brachyury, and associated with augmented expression of multiple proteins involved in antigen processing and tumor immune recognition. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition studies identified HDAC1 as a key determinant in the reversal of carcinoma immune escape. Further, our findings suggest that the observed reversal of tumor immune evasion is driven by a response to cellular stress through activation of the unfolded protein response. This offers the rationale for combining HDAC inhibitors with immunotherapy, including therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:26862729

  5. Inhibitors of histone deacetylase 1 reverse the immune evasion phenotype to enhance T-cell mediated lysis of prostate and breast carcinoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Gameiro, Sofia R.; Malamas, Anthony S.; Tsang, Kwong Y.; Ferrone, Soldano; Hodge, James W.

    2016-01-01

    The clinical promise of cancer immunotherapy relies on the premise that the immune system can recognize and eliminate tumor cells identified as non-self. However, tumors can evade host immune surveillance through multiple mechanisms, including epigenetic silencing of genes involved in antigen processing and immune recognition. Hence, there is an unmet clinical need to develop effective therapeutic strategies that can restore tumor immune recognition when combined with immunotherapy, such as immune checkpoint blockade and therapeutic cancer vaccines. We sought to examine the potential of clinically relevant exposure of prostate and breast human carcinoma cells to histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors to reverse tumor immune escape to T-cell mediated lysis. Here we demonstrate that prostate (LNCAP) and breast (MDA-MB-231) carcinoma cells are more sensitive to T-cell mediated lysis in vitro after clinically relevant exposure to epigenetic therapy with either the pan-HDAC inhibitor vorinostat or the class I HDAC inhibitor entinostat. This pattern of immunogenic modulation was observed against a broad range of tumor-associated antigens, such as CEA, MUC1, PSA, and brachyury, and associated with augmented expression of multiple proteins involved in antigen processing and tumor immune recognition. Genetic and pharmacological inhibition studies identified HDAC1 as a key determinant in the reversal of carcinoma immune escape. Further, our findings suggest that the observed reversal of tumor immune evasion is driven by a response to cellular stress through activation of the unfolded protein response. This offers the rationale for combining HDAC inhibitors with immunotherapy, including therapeutic cancer vaccines. PMID:26862729

  6. Influence of Ganoderma lucidum (Curt.: Fr.) P. Karst. on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice line CBA/Ca.

    PubMed

    Nizhenkovska, Iryna V; Pidchenko, Vitalii T; Bychkova, Nina G; Bisko, Nina A; Rodnichenko, Angela Y; Kozyko, Natalya O

    2015-09-01

    The article presents the results of the investigation of the effect of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum on T-cell-mediated immunity in normal and immunosuppressed mice CBA/Ca. Delayed-type hypersensitivity assay was used. Experimental immunodeficiency was established with intraperitoneal injection of the immunosuppressant cyclophosphamide at a single dose of 150 mg/kg on the first day of the experiment. Results of the study show that the administration of biomass powder of Ganoderma lucidum in a dose of 0.5 mg/kg orally for 10 days increases the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in normal mice CBA/Ca. Administration of 0.5 mg/kg of biomass powder of the fungus Ganoderma lucidum for 10 days blocked the development of the T-cell-mediated immunosuppression, induced by administration of cyclophosphamide and restored the delayed-type hypersensitivity response in immunosuppressed mice. Key words: fungus Ganoderma lucidum cyclophosphamide immunodeficiency T-cell-mediated immunity delayed-type hypersensitivity. PMID:26459128

  7. Recombinant Bivalent Fusion Protein rVE Induces CD4+ and CD8+ T-Cell Mediated Memory Immune Response for Protection Against Yersinia enterocolitica Infection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit K.; Kingston, Joseph J.; Gupta, Shishir K.; Batra, Harsh V.

    2015-01-01

    Studies investigating the correlates of immune protection against Yersinia infection have established that both humoral and cell mediated immune responses are required for the comprehensive protection. In our previous study, we established that the bivalent fusion protein (rVE) comprising immunologically active regions of Y. pestis LcrV (100–270 aa) and YopE (50–213 aa) proteins conferred complete passive and active protection against lethal Y. enterocolitica 8081 challenge. In the present study, cohort of BALB/c mice immunized with rVE or its component proteins rV, rE were assessed for cell mediated immune responses and memory immune protection against Y. enterocolitica 8081. rVE immunization resulted in extensive proliferation of both CD4 and CD8 T cell subsets; significantly high antibody titer with balanced IgG1: IgG2a/IgG2b isotypes (1:1 ratio) and up-regulation of both Th1 (TNF-α, IFN-γ, IL-2, and IL-12) and Th2 (IL-4) cytokines. On the other hand, rV immunization resulted in Th2 biased IgG response (11:1 ratio) and proliferation of CD4+ T-cell; rE group of mice exhibited considerably lower serum antibody titer with predominant Th1 response (1:3 ratio) and CD8+ T-cell proliferation. Comprehensive protection with superior survival (100%) was observed among rVE immunized mice when compared to the significantly lower survival rates among rE (37.5%) and rV (25%) groups when IP challenged with Y. enterocolitica 8081 after 120 days of immunization. Findings in this and our earlier studies define the bivalent fusion protein rVE as a potent candidate vaccine molecule with the capability to concurrently stimulate humoral and cell mediated immune responses and a proof of concept for developing efficient subunit vaccines against Gram negative facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens. PMID:26733956

  8. Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to Alternate Booster Schedules of Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed in Humans.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Conrad P; Sabourin, Carol L; Schiffer, Jarad M; Niemuth, Nancy A; Semenova, Vera A; Li, Han; Rudge, Thomas L; Brys, April M; Mittler, Robert S; Ibegbu, Chris C; Wrammert, Jens; Ahmed, Rafi; Parker, Scott D; Babcock, Janiine; Keitel, Wendy; Poland, Gregory A; Keyserling, Harry L; El Sahly, Hana; Jacobson, Robert M; Marano, Nina; Plikaytis, Brian D; Wright, Jennifer G

    2016-04-01

    Protective antigen (PA)-specific antibody and cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to annual and alternate booster schedules of anthrax vaccine adsorbed (AVA; BioThrax) were characterized in humans over 43 months. Study participants received 1 of 6 vaccination schedules: a 3-dose intramuscular (IM) priming series (0, 1, and 6 months) with a single booster at 42 months (4-IM); 3-dose IM priming with boosters at 18 and 42 months (5-IM); 3-dose IM priming with boosters at 12, 18, 30, and 42 months (7-IM); the 1970 licensed priming series of 6 doses (0, 0.5, 1, 6, 12, and 18 months) and two annual boosters (30 and 42 months) administered either subcutaneously (SQ) (8-SQ) or IM (8-IM); or saline placebo control at all eight time points. Antibody response profiles included serum anti-PA IgG levels, subclass distributions, avidity, and lethal toxin neutralization activity (TNA). CMI profiles included frequencies of gamma interferon (IFN-γ)- and interleukin 4 (IL-4)-secreting cells and memory B cells (MBCs), lymphocyte stimulation indices (SI), and induction of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) mRNA. All active schedules elicited high-avidity PA-specific IgG, TNA, MBCs, and T cell responses with a mixed Th1-Th2 profile and Th2 dominance. Anti-PA IgG and TNA were highly correlated (e.g., month 7,r(2)= 0.86,P< 0.0001, log10 transformed) and declined in the absence of boosters. Boosters administered IM generated the highest antibody responses. Increasing time intervals between boosters generated antibody responses that were faster than and superior to those obtained with the final month 42 vaccination. CMI responses to the 3-dose IM priming remained elevated up to 43 months. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00119067.). PMID:26865594

  9. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non-obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Meydani, Simin N.; Das, Sai K.; Pieper, Carl F.; Lewis, Michael R.; Klein, Sam; Dixit, Vishwa D.; Gupta, Alok K.; Villareal, Dennis T.; Bhapkar, Manjushri; Huang, Megan; Fuss, Paul J.; Roberts, Susan B.; Holloszy, John O.; Fontana, Luigi

    2016-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-center, randomized clinical trial to determine CR's effect on inflammation and cell-mediated immunity, 218 healthy non-obese adults (20-50 y), were assigned 25% CR (n=143) or an ad-libitum (AL) diet (n=75), and outcomes tested at baseline, 12, and 24 months of CR. CR induced a 10.4% weight loss over the 2-y period. Relative to AL group, CR reduced circulating inflammatory markers, including total WBC and lymphocyte counts, ICAM-1 and leptin. Serum CRP and TNF-α concentrations were about 40% and 50% lower in CR group, respectively. CR had no effect on the delayed-type hypersensitivity skin response or antibody response to vaccines, nor did it cause difference in clinically significant infections. In conclusion, long-term moderate CR without malnutrition induces a significant and persistent inhibition of inflammation without impairing key in vivo indicators of cell-mediated immunity. Given the established role of these pro-inflammatory molecules in the pathogenesis of multiple chronic diseases, these CR-induced adaptations suggest a shift toward a healthy phenotype. PMID:27410480

  10. A novel liposome adjuvant DPC mediates Mycobacterium tuberculosis subunit vaccine well to induce cell-mediated immunity and high protective efficacy in mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xun; Da, Zejiao; Wang, Yue; Niu, Hongxia; Li, Ruiying; Yu, Hongjuan; He, Shanshan; Guo, Ming; Wang, Yong; Luo, Yanping; Ma, Xingming; Zhu, Bingdong

    2016-03-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is a serious disease around the world, and protein based subunit vaccine is supposed to be a kind of promising novel vaccine against it. However, there is no effective adjuvant available in clinic to activate cell-mediated immune responses which is required for TB subunit vaccine. Therefore, it is imperative to develop new adjuvant. Here we reported an adjuvant composed of dimethyl dioctadecylammonium (DDA), Poly I:C and cholesterol (DPC for short). DDA can form a kind of cationic liposome with the ability to deliver and present antigen and can induce Th1 type cell-mediated immune response. Poly I:C, a ligand of TLR3 receptor, could attenuate the pathologic reaction induced by following Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge. Cholesterol, which could enhance rigidity of lipid bilayer, is added to DDA and Poly I:C to improve the stability of the adjuvant. The particle size and Zeta-potential of DPC were analyzed in vitro. Furthermore, DPC was mixed with a TB fusion protein ESAT6-Ag85B-MPT64(190-198)-Mtb8.4-Rv2626c (LT70) to construct a subunit vaccine. The subunit vaccine-induced immune responses and protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis H37Rv infection in C57BL/6 mice were investigated. The results showed that the DPC adjuvant with particle size of 400nm and zeta potential of 40mV was in good stability. LT70 in the adjuvant of DPC generated strong antigen-specific humoral and cell-mediated immunity, and induced long-term higher protective efficacy against M. tuberculosis infection (5.41±0.38log10CFU) than traditional vaccine Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) (6.01±0.33log10CFU) and PBS control (6.53±0.26log10CFU) at 30 weeks post-vaccination. In conclusion, DPC would be a promising vaccine adjuvant with the ability to stimulate Th1 type cell-mediated immunity, and could be used in TB subunit vaccine. PMID:26845736

  11. Role of p47phox in Antigen-Presenting Cell-Mediated Regulation of Humoral Immunity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Vasilevsky, Sam; Liu, Qi; Koontz, Sherry M.; Kastenmayer, Robin; Shea, Katherine; Jackson, Sharon H.

    2011-01-01

    Microbial-induced inflammation is important for eliciting humoral immunity. Genetic defects of NADPH oxidase 2–based proteins interrupt phagocyte superoxide generation and are the basis for the human immunodeficiency chronic granulomatous disease (CGD). Hyperinflammation is also a significant clinical manifestation of CGD. Herein, we evaluated humoral immunity in the phagocyte oxidase p47phox-deficient model of CGD and found that UV-inactivated Streptococcus pneumoniae and Listeria monocytogenes (Lm) elicited higher specific antibody (Ab) titers in p47phox-/- mice than wild-type (WT) mice. Both organisms elicited robust and distinct antigen-presenting cell maturation phenotypes, including IL-12 hypersecretion, and higher major histocompatibility complex II and costimulatory protein expression in Lm-stimulated p47phox-/- dendritic cells (DCs) relative to WT DCs. Furthermore, p47phox-/- DCs pulsed with Lm and adoptively transferred into naïve WT mice elicited Ab titers, whereas Lm-pulsed WT DCs did not elicit these titers. The observed robust p47phox-/- mouse humoral response was recapitulated with live Lm and sustained in vivo in p47phox-/- mice. Notably, anti–serum samples from p47phox-/- mice that survived secondary Lm infection were protective in WT and p47phox-/- mice that were rechallenged with secondary lethal Lm infection. These findings demonstrate a novel benefit of NADPH oxidase 2 deficiency (ie, dependent inflammation in antigen-presenting cell–mediated humoral immunity) and that anti-Lm Ab can be protective in an immunodeficient CGD host. PMID:21641399

  12. Effects of feed supplementation with glycine chelate and iron sulfate on selected parameters of cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens.

    PubMed

    Jarosz, Łukasz; Kwiecień, Małgorzata; Marek, Agnieszka; Grądzki, Zbigniew; Winiarska-Mieczan, Anna; Kalinowski, Marcin; Laskowska, Ewa

    2016-08-01

    Because little is known about the impact of chelated (Fe-Gly, Fe-Gly+F) and inorganic (FeSO4, FeSO4+F) iron products on immune response parameters in broiler chickens, the objective of the study was to determine the effects of inorganic and organic forms of iron on selected parameters of the cell-mediated immune response in broiler chickens by assessing the percentage of CD3(+)CD4(+), CD3(+)CD8(+), CD25(+), and MHC Class II lymphocytes, as well as the CD4(+)/CD8(+) ratio and IL-2 concentration in the peripheral blood. The experiments were conducted using 50day-old Ross 308 roosters. The test material was peripheral blood. Flow cytometry was used to determine selected cell-mediated immune response parameters. The results obtained indicate that the use of iron chelates in the diet of broiler chickens may stimulate cellular defense mechanisms. As a result of the experiment an increase was observed in the percentage of Th1, mainly T CD4(+) and T CD8(+). It was also noted that application of chelated iron can increase production of T CD8(+) cytotoxic cells and IL-2, which promotes the body's natural response to developing inflammation. There were no changes in T CD4(+), T CD8(+), T CD25(+) or MHC II lymphocyte subpopulations in the chickens following application of the inorganic form of iron. PMID:27473977

  13. Primary vaccination with the LiESP/QA-21 vaccine (CaniLeish) produces a cell-mediated immune response which is still present 1 year later.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Javier; Vouldoukis, Ioannis; Schreiber, Paul; Martin, Virginie; McGahie, David; Gueguen, Sylvie; Cuisinier, Anne-Marie

    2014-04-15

    Canine leishmaniasis, an important zoonotic disease of dogs, is the result of an ineffective and inappropriate immune response to infection with Leishmania infantum. It is widely accepted that the appropriate immune response is characterised by a T-helper (Th)1-dominated profile in an overall mixed Th1/Th2 response. The absence of a strong Th1 response is associated with progression to the clinical disease. Thus, there is a need for an effective vaccine that could modulate the immune response to a more appropriate profile against the parasite. In this study we measured the impact of the LiESP/QA-21 canine vaccine, recently launched commercially in Europe, on selected humoral and cellular immune markers for one year after a primary vaccination course. The humoral response to vaccination was characterised by a predominantly IgG2 profile. Vaccinated dogs developed long-lasting cell-mediated immune responses against L. infantum, specifically with a stronger ability of macrophages to reduce intracellular parasite burdens in co-culture with autologous lymphocytes compared to control dogs (p=0.0002), which was correlated with induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and production of nitric oxide (NO) derivatives. These results confirm that vaccination with LiESP/QA-21 is capable of inducing an appropriate Th1-dominated immune profile which persists for a full year. PMID:24560650

  14. Cell-mediated and humoral immune responses induced by scarification vaccination of human volunteers with a new lot of the live vaccine strain of Francisella tularensis.

    PubMed Central

    Waag, D M; Galloway, A; Sandstrom, G; Bolt, C R; England, M J; Nelson, G O; Williams, J C

    1992-01-01

    Tularemia is a disease caused by the facultative intracellular bacterium Francisella tularensis. We evaluated a new lot of live F. tularensis vaccine for its immunogenicity in human volunteers. Scarification vaccination induced humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Indications of a positive immune response after vaccination included an increase in specific antibody levels, which were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent and immunoblot assays, and the ability of peripheral blood lymphocytes to respond to whole F. tularensis bacteria as recall antigens. Vaccination caused a significant rise (P less than 0.05) in immunoglobulin A (IgA), IgG, and IgM titers. Lymphocyte stimulation indices were significantly increased (P less than 0.01) in vaccinees 14 days after vaccination. These data verify that this new lot of live F. tularensis vaccine is immunogenic. Images PMID:1400988

  15. Erlotinib inhibits T-cell-mediated immune response via down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Luo Qiong; Gu Yanhong; Zheng Wei; Wu Xingxin; Gong Fangyuan; Gu Liyun; Sun Yang; Xu Qiang

    2011-03-01

    Erlotinib is a potent inhibitor of epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase and has been demonstrated to treat advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer to prolong survival after failure of first-line or second-line chemotherapy. However, little is known about its effects on immune system. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the immunosuppressive activity of erlotinib on T lymphocytes both in vitro and in vivo, and further explore its potential molecular mechanism. Erlotinib exerted a significant inhibition on the T cell proliferation and activation induced by concanavalin A, anti-CD3 plus anti-CD28, staphylococcal enterotoxin B or phorbol myristate acetate respectively in a concentration-dependent manner and it also inhibited the secretion of the proinflammatory cytokines such as IL-2 and IFN-{gamma} of activated T cells. Further study showed that erlotinib caused G0/G1 arrest and suppressed the phosphorylations of c-Raf, ERK and Akt in activated T cells. Moreover, erlotinib significantly ameliorated picryl chloride-induced ear contact dermatitis in a dose-dependent manner in vivo. In summary, these findings suggest that erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. - Graphical abstract: Erlotinib may cause the impairment of T-cell-mediated immune response both in vitro and in vivo through inhibiting T cell proliferation and activation, which is closely associated with its potent down-regulation of the c-Raf/ERK cascade and Akt signaling pathway. Display Omitted

  16. Dietary fatty acid effects on T-cell-mediated immunity in mice infected with mycoplasma pulmonis or given carcinogens by injection.

    PubMed Central

    Bennett, M.; Uauy, R.; Grundy, S. M.

    1987-01-01

    To test whether or not diets enriched in w-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids are significantly immunosuppressive, B10.D2, DBA/2, and C3B6F1 mice were fed diets enriched for fatty acids: linoleic (POLY), oleic (MONO), palmitic (SAT), or eicosapentanoic (FISH). The B10.D2 and DBA/2 mice were given injected methylcholanthrene several weeks later, and immune studies were performed several months after carcinogen treatment. In conventional quarters, DBA/2 fed the POLY diet survived poorly, and many were infected with Mycoplasma pulmonis, even if given the vehicle, tractinoin, only. B10.D2 mice survived well unless on the POLY diet and given methylcholanthrene. Nevertheless, only mice on the POLY diet were significantly immunosuppressed, and only T-cell-mediated cutaneous sensitivity reactions were affected. Antibody, natural killer cell, and natural cytotoxic cell responses were not influenced by the diets. The C3B6F1 mice were assessed for immune functions prior to carcinogen (ethylnitrosourea) instillation into the trachea, and no immunosuppression was detected. After instillation, mice on the POLY and MONO diets were suppressed for T-cell cutaneous responses. Deliberate infection with Mycoplasma pulmonis resulted in suppressed cutaneous T-cell responses in the POLY group of C3B6F1 mice, and aspirin partially reversed the immunosuppression. Mice on the FISH diet were resistant to immunosuppression. It is tentatively concluded that diets rich in w-6 polyunsaturated diets, while not directly immunosuppressive, do predispose animals to suppression of certain T-cell-mediated immune responses. This immunosuppression can be "triggered" by infection and/or by exposure to carcinogens. PMID:3812635

  17. The effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice

    PubMed Central

    Jafarian-Dehkordi, A.; Zolfaghari, B.; Mirdamadi, M.

    2013-01-01

    Turnips with a long history of usage, are helpful in preventing breast and prostate cancer, inflammation and body`s immune system dysfunction. In this study, we investigated the effects of chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of Brassica rapa L. on cell-mediated immune response in mice. Chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands were prepared by maceration method. To study the effects of B. rapa on acquired immunity, groups of Balb/c mice (n=8) were used. Sheep red blood cell (SRBC) was injected (s.c., 1×108cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and 5 days later, different extracts (10, 100 and 500 mg/kg), betamethasone (4 mg/kg) and Levamisol (4 mg/kg) as a positive control and normal saline as a negative control were given i.p. After 1 h SRBC was injected to footpad (s.c., 1×108cells/ml, 0.02 ml) and footpad swelling was measured up to 72 h. To investigate the effects of B. rapa on innate immunity the same procedure was used, but animals only received one injection of SRBC 1 h after i.p. injection of test compounds. Our findings showed that SRBC induced an increase in paw swelling with maximum response at 6-8 and 2-4 h for innate and acquired immunity, respectively. Betamethasone inhibited and levamisol increased paw thickness in both models. In both innate and acquired immunity models, chloroform, ethyl acetate and methanolic extracts of B. rapa glands significantly and dose-dependently reduced paw thickness. Ethyl acetate extract showed better effect. As glucosinolates are better extracted by ethyl acetate, it may be concluded that they are contributed in the more pronounced effects of ethyl acetate extract. PMID:24019825

  18. Humoral and cell-mediated immunity to the Plasmodium falciparum ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen in an adult population exposed to highly endemic malaria.

    PubMed Central

    Beck, H P; Felger, I; Genton, B; Alexander, N; al-Yaman, F; Anders, R F; Alpers, M

    1995-01-01

    A parasitological and immunological survey was carried out in an area in Papua New Guinea highly endemic for malaria. Two hundred fourteen adult individuals were selected for studies to assess their immune responses against the malaria vaccine candidate ring-infected erythrocyte surface antigen (RESA). Total immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies directed against RESA as well as specific IgG1, IgG2, and IgG3 antibodies were determined. Humoral responses directed against RESA were frequent in all IgG subclasses. Only IgG3 responses were found to be age dependent. Total anti-RESA IgG antibodies were not correlated with protection against malaria as measured by parasite prevalence, parasite density, or health center attendance. In contrast, cytophilic antibodies (IgG1 and IgG3) were associated with reduced Plasmodium falciparum prevalence and reduced health center attendance. T-cell proliferation in general was low and very infrequent. No correlation between humoral and cellular immune responses could be found. Parasite density, parasite prevalence, and health center visits tended to be reduced in individuals with good humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. PMID:7822028

  19. Hemagglutinin-based polyanhydride nanovaccines against H5N1 influenza elicit protective virus neutralizing titers and cell-mediated immunity

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Kathleen A; Loyd, Hyelee; Wu, Wuwei; Huntimer, Lucas; Ahmed, Shaheen; Sambol, Anthony; Broderick, Scott; Flickinger, Zachary; Rajan, Krishna; Bronich, Tatiana; Mallapragada, Surya; Wannemuehler, Michael J; Carpenter, Susan; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2015-01-01

    H5N1 avian influenza is a significant global concern with the potential to become the next pandemic threat. Recombinant subunit vaccines are an attractive alternative for pandemic vaccines compared to traditional vaccine technologies. In particular, polyanhydride nanoparticles encapsulating subunit proteins have been shown to enhance humoral and cell-mediated immunity and provide protection upon lethal challenge. In this work, a recombinant H5 hemagglutinin trimer (H53) was produced and encapsulated into polyanhydride nanoparticles. The studies performed indicated that the recombinant H53 antigen was a robust immunogen. Immunizing mice with H53 encapsulated into polyanhydride nanoparticles induced high neutralizing antibody titers and enhanced CD4+ T cell recall responses in mice. Finally, the H53-based polyanhydride nanovaccine induced protective immunity against a low-pathogenic H5N1 viral challenge. Informatics analyses indicated that mice receiving the nanovaccine formulations and subsequently challenged with virus were similar to naïve mice that were not challenged. The current studies provide a basis to further exploit the advantages of polyanhydride nanovaccines in pandemic scenarios. PMID:25565816

  20. Cell mediated innate responses of cattle and swine are diverse during foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection: a unique landscape of innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Toka, Felix N; Golde, William T

    2013-05-01

    Pathogens in general and pathogenic viruses in particular have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to escape the immune response of mammalian species. Viruses that cause acute disease tend to bear characteristics that make them very contagious, as survival does not derive from chronicity of infection, but spread of disease throughout the herd. Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) is one of the most contagious viruses known. Upon infection of susceptible species, cloven-hoofed animals, the virus proliferates rapidly and causes a vesicular disease within 2-4 days. Disease symptoms resolve by 10 days to 2 weeks and in most cases, virus can no longer be detected. Periods of fever and viremia are usually brief, 1-3 days. In vivo control of virus infection and clearance of the virus during and following acute infection is of particular interest. The interaction of this virus with cells mediating the early, innate immune response has been analyzed in a number of recent studies. In most reports, the virus has a distinct inhibitory effect on the response of cells early in infection. Here we review these new data and discuss the dynamics of the interaction of virus with different cell types mediating the immune response to infection. PMID:23727070

  1. [Partial deficiency of cell-mediated immunity in a child with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis. Intercurrent meningeal and pulmonary cryptococcosis].

    PubMed

    Gerbeaux, J; Baculard, A; Tournier, G; Moulias, R; Goust, J M; Drouhet, E d; Saint-Martin, J

    1975-01-01

    The authors report a new case of partial immune deficiency of cellular immunity, associated with chronic mucocutaneous candidiasis in a 12 Years-old boy. The disease began very early during the first few weeks of life, with thrush in the mouth. This candidiasis then evolved intermittently and was still present. Numerous cutaneous, pulmonary and ear infections occured throughout this child's life. This morbid association led to a search for an immune deficiency. Humoral immunity was normal. Abnormalities of cellular immunity were as follows: apart from candidine skin anergy, there was a deficiency in the factor which inhibits leukocyte migration, secretion of a factor favouring this migration (MEF). It was also noted the presence of the patient's serum, of a factor inhibiting lymphocyte transformation in the presence of candidine. In spite of treatment with intravenous route, amphotericin B, followed by transfer factor, the oral candidiasis persisted together with the skin anergy to candidine. On the other hand, the serum inhibitory factor disappeared. Pulmonary cryptococcosis probably favoured by corticosteroid treatment, developed on this background of immune deficiency; as usual it spread to the meninges. Treatment associating intraveinous amphotericin B and 5 fluorocytosine oral and later intravenous, total duration 6 months, grave a recovery maintained on a 8 months follow up. PMID:1217770

  2. Dim light at night interferes with the development of the short-day phenotype and impairs cell-mediated immunity in Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus).

    PubMed

    Aubrecht, Taryn G; Weil, Zachary M; Nelson, Randy J

    2014-10-01

    Winter is a challenging time to survive and breed outside of the tropics. Animals use day length (photoperiod) to regulate seasonally appropriate adaptations in anticipation of challenging winter conditions. The net result of these photoperiod-mediated adjustments is enhanced immune function and increased survival. Thus, the ability to discriminate day length information is critical for survival and reproduction in small animals. However, during the past century, urban and suburban development has rapidly expanded and filled the night sky with light from various sources, obscuring crucial light-dark signals, which alters physiological interpretation of day lengths. Furthermore, reduced space, increased proximity to people, and the presence of light at night may act as stressors for small animals. Whereas acute stressors typically enhance immune responses, chronic exposure to stressors often impairs immune responses. Therefore, we hypothesized that the combination of dim light at night and chronic stress interferes with enhanced cell-mediated immunity observed during short days. Siberian hamsters (Phodopus sungorus) were assigned to short or long days with dark nights (0 lux) or dim (5 lux) light at night for 10 weeks. Following 2 weeks of chronic restraint (6 hr/day), a model of chronic stress, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses were assessed. Both dim light at night and restraint reduced the DTH response. Dim light at night during long nights produced an intermediate short day phenotype. These results suggest the constant presence of light at night could negatively affect survival of photoperiodic rodents by disrupting the timing of breeding and immune responses. PMID:24962267

  3. DNA Prime/Adenovirus Boost Malaria Vaccine Encoding P. falciparum CSP and AMA1 Induces Sterile Protection Associated with Cell-Mediated Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Ilin; Sedegah, Martha; Cicatelli, Susan; Spring, Michele; Polhemus, Mark; Tamminga, Cindy; Patterson, Noelle; Guerrero, Melanie; Bennett, Jason W.; McGrath, Shannon; Ganeshan, Harini; Belmonte, Maria; Farooq, Fouzia; Abot, Esteban; Banania, Jo Glenna; Huang, Jun; Newcomer, Rhonda; Rein, Lisa; Litilit, Dianne; Richie, Nancy O.; Wood, Chloe; Murphy, Jittawadee; Sauerwein, Robert; Hermsen, Cornelus C.; McCoy, Andrea J.; Kamau, Edwin; Cummings, James; Komisar, Jack; Sutamihardja, Awalludin; Shi, Meng; Epstein, Judith E.; Maiolatesi, Santina; Tosh, Donna; Limbach, Keith; Angov, Evelina; Bergmann-Leitner, Elke; Bruder, Joseph T.; Doolan, Denise L.; King, C. Richter; Carucci, Daniel; Dutta, Sheetij; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter; Hollingdale, Michael R.; Ockenhouse, Christian F.; Richie, Thomas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene-based vaccination using prime/boost regimens protects animals and humans against malaria, inducing cell-mediated responses that in animal models target liver stage malaria parasites. We tested a DNA prime/adenovirus boost malaria vaccine in a Phase 1 clinical trial with controlled human malaria infection. Methodology/Principal Findings The vaccine regimen was three monthly doses of two DNA plasmids (DNA) followed four months later by a single boost with two non-replicating human serotype 5 adenovirus vectors (Ad). The constructs encoded genes expressing P. falciparum circumsporozoite protein (CSP) and apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1). The regimen was safe and well-tolerated, with mostly mild adverse events that occurred at the site of injection. Only one AE (diarrhea), possibly related to immunization, was severe (Grade 3), preventing daily activities. Four weeks after the Ad boost, 15 study subjects were challenged with P. falciparum sporozoites by mosquito bite, and four (27%) were sterilely protected. Antibody responses by ELISA rose after Ad boost but were low (CSP geometric mean titer 210, range 44–817; AMA1 geometric mean micrograms/milliliter 11.9, range 1.5–102) and were not associated with protection. Ex vivo IFN-γ ELISpot responses after Ad boost were modest (CSP geometric mean spot forming cells/million peripheral blood mononuclear cells 86, range 13–408; AMA1 348, range 88–1270) and were highest in three protected subjects. ELISpot responses to AMA1 were significantly associated with protection (p = 0.019). Flow cytometry identified predominant IFN-γ mono-secreting CD8+ T cell responses in three protected subjects. No subjects with high pre-existing anti-Ad5 neutralizing antibodies were protected but the association was not statistically significant. Significance The DNA/Ad regimen provided the highest sterile immunity achieved against malaria following immunization with a gene-based subunit vaccine (27%). Protection was

  4. Eimeria maxima recombinant Gam82 gametocyte antigen vaccine protects against coccidiosis and augments humoral and cell-mediated immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Intestinal infection with Eimeria, the etiologic agent of avian coccidiosis, stimulates protective immunity to subsequent colonization by the homologous parasite, whilst cross-protection against heterologous species is poor. As a first step toward the development of a broad specificity Eimeria vacci...

  5. Humoral, Mucosal, and Cell-Mediated Immunity Against Vaccine and Nonvaccine Genotypes After Administration of Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine to HIV-Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Weinberg, Adriana; Song, Lin-Ye; Saah, Alfred; Brown, Martha; Moscicki, Anna B.; Meyer, William A.; Bryan, Janine; Levin, Myron J.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To characterize the immunogenicity of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (QHPV) in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)–infected children, we studied their immune responses to 3 or 4 doses. Methods. HIV-infected children aged 7–12 years with a CD4 cell percentage of ≥15% of lymphocytes, received 3 doses of QHPV with or without a fourth dose after 72 weeks. Type-specific and cross-reactive antibodies and cell-mediated immunity were measured. Results. Type-specific antibodies to HPV6, 11, and 16 were detected in 100% and ≥94% of children at 4 and 72 weeks, respectively, after the third QHPV dose. Corresponding numbers for HPV18 were 97% and 76%, respectively. A fourth QHPV dose increased seropositivity to ≥96% for all vaccine genotypes. Four weeks after the third QHPV dose, 67% of vaccinees seroconverted to HPV31, an HPV16-related genotype not in the vaccine; 69% and 39% of vaccinees developed mucosal HPV16 and 18 immunoglobulin G antibodies, respectively; and 60% and 52% of vaccinees developed cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) for HPV16 and 31, respectively. Conclusions. Three QHPV doses generated robust and persistent antibodies to HPV6, 11, and 16 but comparatively weaker responses to HPV18. A fourth dose increased antibodies against all vaccine genotypes in an anamnestic fashion. CTLs and mucosal antibodies against vaccine genotypes, as well as cross-reactive antibodies and CTL against nonvaccine genotypes, were detected. PMID:22859825

  6. Recombinant Listeria monocytogenes as a Live Vaccine Vehicle for the Induction of Protective Anti-Viral Cell-Mediated Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Hao; Slifka, Mark K.; Matloubian, Mehrdad; Jensen, Eric R.; Ahmed, Rafi; Miller, Jeff F.

    1995-04-01

    Listeria monocytogenes (LM) is a Gram-positive bacterium that is able to enter host cells, escape from the endocytic vesicle, multiply within the cytoplasm, and spread directly from cell to cell without encountering the extracellular milieu. The ability of LM to gain access to the host cell cytosol allows proteins secreted by the bacterium to efficiently enter the pathway for major histocompatibility complex class I antigen processing and presentation. We have established a genetic system for expression and secretion of foreign antigens by recombinant strains, based on stable site-specific integration of expression cassettes into the LM genome. The ability of LM recombinants to induce protective immunity against a heterologous pathogen was demonstrated with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). LM strains expressing the entire LCMV nucleoprotein or an H-2L^d-restricted nucleoprotein epitope (aa 118-126) were constructed. Immunization of mice with LM vaccine strains conferred protection against challenge with virulent strains of LCMV that otherwise establish chronic infection in naive adult mice. In vivo depletion of CD8^+ T cells from vaccinated mice abrogated their ability to clear viral infection, showing that protective anti-viral immunity was due to CD8^+ T cells.

  7. The determination of in vivo envelope-specific cell-mediated immune responses in equine infectious anemia virus-infected ponies.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chong; Cook, Frank R; Cook, Sheila J; Craigo, Jodi K; Even, Deborah L; Issel, Charles J; Montelaro, Ronald C; Horohov, David W

    2012-08-15

    novel method for detecting in vivo cell-mediated immune responses to EIAV-specific peptides that is readily applicable to other host/pathogen systems. PMID:22795699

  8. The effect of Beauveria bassiana infection on cell mediated and humoral immune response in house fly, Musca domestica L.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sapna; Kumar, Peeyush; Malik, Anushree

    2015-10-01

    Entomopathogenic fungi that manifest infections by overcoming insect's immune response could be a successful control agent for the house fly, Musca domestica L. which is a major domestic, medical, and veterinary pest. In this study, the immune response of house fly to Beauveria bassiana infection was investigated to reveal fundamental aspects of house fly hemocyte biology, such as hemocyte numbers and size, which is poorly understood. The total hemocyte counts (THCs) in B. bassiana-infected house fly showed an initial increase (from 6 to 9 h), followed by subsequent decrease (9 to 12 h) with increase in time of infection. The THCs was slightly greater in infected flies than the non-infected ones. Insight into relative hemocyte counts depicted a significant increase in prohemocyte (PR) and decrease in granulocyte (GR) in infected house flies compared to non-infected ones. The relative cell area of hemocyte cells showed a noticeable increase in PR and intermediate cells (ICs), while a considerable reduction was observed for plasmatocyte (PL) and GR. The considerable variation in relative cell number and cell area in the B. bassiana-infected house flies indicated stress development during infection. The present study highlights changes occurring during B. bassiana invasion to house fly leading to establishment of infection along with facilitation in understanding of basic hemocyte biology. The results of the study is expected to help in better understanding of house fly immune response during fungal infection, so as to assist production of more efficient mycoinsecticides for house fly control using B. bassiana. PMID:26233748

  9. Complementing T-cell Function: An Inhibitory Role of the Complement System in T-cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Weiyi; McKenzie, Jodi A; Hwu, Patrick

    2016-09-01

    New data from Wang and colleagues show that complement C3 suppresses the function of CD8(+) tumor-infiltrating T cells by inhibiting IL10 production, and targeting the complement receptors C3aR and C5aR enhances the antitumor activity of immune checkpoint blockade. Their results not only define a new role of complement receptors as T-cell coinhibitory receptors, but also are useful in the development of novel strategies to improve the effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy. Cancer Discov; 6(9); 953-5. ©2016 AACR.See related article by Wang et al., p. 1022. PMID:27587467

  10. Toll-like receptor activation enhances cell-mediated immunity induced by an antibody vaccine targeting human dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramakrishna, Venky; Vasilakos, John P; Tario, Joseph D; Berger, Marc A; Wallace, Paul K; Keler, Tibor

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we have successfully targeted the mannose receptor (MR) expressed on monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) using a fully human MR-specific antibody, B11, as a vehicle to deliver whole protein tumor antigens such as the human chorionic gonadotropin hormone (hCGβ). Since MRs play a role in bridging innate immunity with adaptive immunity we have explored several toll-like receptor (TLR)-specific ligands that may synergize with MR targeting and be applicable as adjuvants in the clinic. We demonstrate that antigen-specific helper and cytolytic T cells from both healthy donors and cancer patients were effectively primed with B11-hCGβ-treated autologous DCs when a combination of one or several TLR ligands is used. Specifically, concomitant signaling of DCs via TLR3 with dsRNA (poly I:C) and DC TLR 7/8 with Resiquimod (R-848), respectively, elicited efficient antigen presentation-mediated by MR-targeting. We demonstrate that MR and TLRs contribute towards maturation and activation of DCs by a mechanism that may be driven by a combination of adjuvant and antibody vaccines that specifically deliver antigenic targets to DCs. PMID:17254349

  11. Combination of Liposomal CpG Oligodeoxynucleotide 2006 and Miltefosine Induces Strong Cell-Mediated Immunity during Experimental Visceral Leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Shivahare, Rahul; Vishwakarma, Preeti; Parmar, Naveen; Yadav, Pawan Kumar; Haq, Wahajul; Srivastava, Mrigank; Gupta, Suman; Kar, Susanta

    2014-01-01

    Immuno-modulators in combination with antileishmanial drug miltefosine is a better therapeutic approach for treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis (VL) as it not only reduces the dose of miltefosine but also shortens the treatment regimen. However, immunological mechanisms behind the perceived benefits of this combination therapy have not been investigated in detail. In the present study, we hypothesized that potential use of drugs that target the host in addition to the parasite might represent an alternative strategy for combination therapy. We investigated immune responses generated in Leishmania donovani infected animals (hamsters and mice) treated with combination of CpG-ODN-2006 and miltefosine at short dose regimen. Infected animals were administered CpG-ODN-2006 (0.4 mg/kg, single dose), as free and liposomal form, either alone or in combination with miltefosine for 5 consecutive days and parasite clearance was evaluated at day 4 and 7 post treatment. Animals that received liposomal CpG-ODN-2006 (lipo-CpG-ODN-2006) and sub-curative miltefosine (5 mg/kg) showed the best inhibition of parasite multiplication (∼97%) which was associated with a biased Th1 immune response in. Moreover, compared to all the other treated groups, we observed increased mRNA expression levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-12) and significantly suppressed levels of Th2 cytokines (IL-10 and TGF-β) on day 4 post treatment in animals that underwent combination therapy with lipo-CpG-ODN-2006 and sub-curative miltefosine. Additionally, same therapy also induced heightened iNOS mRNA levels and NO generation, increased IgG2 antibody level and strong T-cell response in these hamsters compared with all the other treated groups. Collectively, our results suggest that combination of lipo-CpG-ODN-2006 and sub-curative miltefosine generates protective T-cell response in an animal model of visceral leishmaniasis which is characterized by strong Th1 biased immune response

  12. Equine neonates have attenuated humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to a killed adjuvanted vaccine compared to adult horses.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Clare; Giguère, Steeve

    2010-12-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare relative vaccine-specific serum immunoglobulin concentrations, vaccine-specific lymphoproliferative responses, and cytokine profiles of proliferating lymphocytes between 3-day-old foals, 3-month-old foals, and adult horses after vaccination with a killed adjuvanted vaccine. Horses were vaccinated intramuscularly twice at 3-week intervals with a vaccine containing antigens from bovine viral respiratory pathogens to avoid interference from maternal antibody. Both groups of foals and adult horses responded to the vaccine with a significant increase in vaccine-specific IgGa and IgG(T) concentrations. In contrast, only adult horses and 3-month-old foals mounted significant vaccine-specific total IgG, IgGb, and IgM responses. Vaccine-specific concentrations of IgM and IgG(T) were significantly different between all groups, with the highest concentrations occurring in adult horses, followed by 3-month-old foals and, finally, 3-day-old foals. Only the adult horses mounted significant vaccine-specific lymphoproliferative responses. Baseline gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) concentrations were significantly lower in 3-day-old foals than in adult horses. Vaccination resulted in a significant decrease in IFN-γ concentrations in adult horses and a significant decrease in IL-4 concentrations in 3-day-old foals. After vaccination, the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 in both groups of foals was significantly higher than that in adult horses. The results of this study indicate that the humoral and lymphoproliferative immune responses to this killed adjuvanted vaccine are modest in newborn foals. Although immune responses improve with age, 3-month-old foals do not respond with the same magnitude as adult horses. PMID:20943883

  13. A novel dengue virus serotype-2 nanovaccine induces robust humoral and cell-mediated immunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Hunsawong, Taweewun; Sunintaboon, Panya; Warit, Saradee; Thaisomboonsuk, Butsaya; Jarman, Richard G; Yoon, In-Kyu; Ubol, Sukathida; Fernandez, Stefan

    2015-03-30

    Dengue virus (DENV), a member of the Flaviviridae family, can be transmitted to humans through the bite of infected Aedes mosquitoes. The incidence of dengue has increased worldwide over the past few decades. Inadequate vector control, changing global ecology, increased urbanization, and faster global travel are factors enhancing the rapid spread of the virus and its vector. In the absence of specific antiviral treatments, the search for a safe and effective vaccine grows more imperative. Many strategies have been utilized to develop dengue vaccines. Here, we demonstrate the immunogenic properties of a novel dengue nanovaccine (DNV), composed of ultraviolet radiation (UV)-inactivated DENV-2, which has been loaded into the nanoparticles containing chitosan/Mycobacterium bovis Bacillus Calmette-Guerin cell wall components (CS/BCG-NPs). We investigated the immunogenicity of DNV in a Swiss albino mouse model. Inoculation with various concentrations of vaccine (0.3, 1, 3 and 10μg/dose) with three doses, 15-day apart, induced strong anti-dengue IgM and IgG antibodies in the mouse serum along with neutralizing antibody against DENV-2 reference strain (16681), a clinical-isolate strain (00745/10) and the mouse-adapted New Guinea-C (NGC) strain. Cytokine and chemokine secretion in the serum of DNV-immunized mice showed elevated levels of IFN-γ, IL-2, IL-5, IL-12p40, IL-12p70, IL-17, eotaxin and RANTES, all of which have varying immune functions. Furthermore, we observed a DNV dose-dependent increase in the frequencies of IFN-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells after in vitro stimulation of nucleated cells. Based on these findings, DNV has the potential to become a candidate dengue vaccine. PMID:25701315

  14. Development of Protective Inflammation and Cell-Mediated Immunity against Cryptococcus neoformans after Exposure to Hyphal Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Zhai, Bing; Wozniak, Karen L.; Masso-Silva, Jorge; Upadhyay, Srijana; Hole, Camaron; Rivera, Amariliz; Wormley, Floyd L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Morphological switch is tightly coupled with the pathogenesis of many dimorphic fungal pathogens. Cryptococcus neoformans, the major causative agent of cryptococcal meningitis, mostly presents as the yeast form but is capable of switching to the hyphal form. The filamentous form has long been associated with attenuated virulence, yet the underlying mechanism remains elusive. We previously identified the master regulator Znf2 that controls the yeast-to-hypha transition in Cryptococcus. Activation of Znf2 promotes hyphal formation and abolishes fungal virulence in vivo. Here we demonstrated that the cryptococcal strain overexpressing ZNF2 elicited strong and yet temporally confined proinflammatory responses in the early stage of infection. In contrast, exacerbated inflammation in mice infected with the wild-type (WT) strain showed that they were unable to control the infection. Animals inoculated with this filamentous Cryptococcus strain had fewer pulmonary eosinophils and CD11c+ CD11b+ cells than animals inoculated with WT yeast. Moreover, mice infected with this strain developed protective Th1- or Th17-type T cell responses. These findings suggest that the virulence attenuation of the filamentous form is likely due to its elicitation of protective host responses. The antivirulence effect of Znf2 was independent of two previously identified factors downstream of Znf2. Interestingly, mucosal immunizations with high doses of ZNF2-overexpressing cells, either in the live or heat-killed form, offered 100% protection to the host from a subsequent challenge with the otherwise lethal clinical strain H99. Our results demonstrate that heat-resistant cellular components presented in cryptococcal cells with activated ZNF2 elicit protective host immune responses. These findings could facilitate future research on novel immunological therapies. PMID:26443458

  15. Immunoregulatory CD4+ CD45R+ suppressor/inducer T lymphocyte subsets and impaired cell-mediated immunity in patients with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Raziuddin, S; Elawad, M E

    1990-01-01

    The monoclonal antibodies 2H4 and 4B4 allow CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes to be subdivided into CD45R+ and CDW29+ functional subpopulations. The CD4+ CD45R+ lymphocytes are designated as suppressor/inducer and CD4+ CDW29+ as helper/inducer subsets. Peripheral blood lymphocytes from 19 patients with Down's syndrome and 19 age- and sex-matched normal controls were analysed for the CD45R+ and CDW29+ subsets from the CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes. The percentage of CD4+ CD45R+ cells (suppressor inducer) was markedly increased and of CD4+ CDW29+ cells (helper/inducer) decreased in all patients with Down's syndrome. In contract, the percentage of CD8+ CD45R+ and CD8+ CDW29+ subsets showed no major differences between patients with Down's syndrome and normal controls. Moreover, an alteration in the CD4+ and CD45R+ and CD4+ CDW29+ T cell subsets was accompanied by a markedly reduced proliferative response to phytohaemagglutinin and concanavalin A stimulation of the CD4+ T lymphocytes. Thus, a deficiency exists in patients with Down's syndrome in the CD4+ CDW29+ helper/inducer T cell subset which may contribute to their impaired cell-mediated immunity. PMID:1967994

  16. Antigens from Rhipicephalus sanguineus ticks elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in resistant but not in susceptible animals.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Beatriz R; Szabó, Matias J P; Cavassani, Karen A; Bechara, Gervásio H; Silva, João S

    2003-07-10

    In the present study we compared the immunological reactions between Rhipicephalus sanguineus tick-infested susceptible (dogs and mice) and tick-resistant hosts (guinea pigs), elucidating some of the components of efficient protective responses against ticks. We found that T-cells from guinea pigs infested with adult ticks proliferate vigorously in the presence of concanavalin A (ConA), whereas ConA-induced cell proliferation of tick-infested mice and dogs was significantly decreased at 43.1 and 94.0%, respectively, compared to non-infested controls. Moreover, cells from mice and dogs submitted to one or three successive infestations did not exhibit a T-cell proliferative response to tick antigens, whilst cells from thrice tick-infested guinea pigs, when cultured with either a tick extract or tick saliva, displayed a significant increase in cell proliferation. Also, we evaluated the response of tick-infested mice to a cutaneous hypersensitivity test induced by a tick extract. Tick-infested mice developed a significant immediate reaction, whereby a 29.9% increase in the footpad thickness was observed. No delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction was detected. Finally, the differential cell count at the tick attachment site in repeatedly infested mice exhibited a 6.6- and 4.1-fold increase in the percentage of eosinophils and neutrophils, respectively, compared to non-infested animals, while a decrease of 77.0-40.9 in the percentage of mononuclear cells was observed. The results of the cutaneous hypersensitivity test and the cellular counts at the tick feeding site for mice support the view that tick-infested mice develop an immune response to R. sanguineus ticks very similar to dogs, the natural host of this species of tick, but very different from guinea pigs (resistant host), which develop a DTH reaction in addition to a basophil and mononuclear cell infiltration at the tick-attachment site. In conclusion, saliva introduced during tick infestations reduces the

  17. Cell intrinsic role of NF-κB-inducing kinase in regulating T cell-mediated immune and autoimmune responses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanchuan; Wang, Hui; Zhou, Xiaofei; Xie, Xiaoping; Chen, Xiang; Jie, Zuliang; Zou, Qiang; Hu, Hongbo; Zhu, Lele; Cheng, Xuhong; Brightbill, Hans D; Wu, Lawren C.; Wang, Linfang; Sun, Shao-Cong

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB inducing kinase (NIK) is a central component of the noncanonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Although NIK has been extensively studied for its function in the regulation of lymphoid organ development and B-cell maturation, the role of NIK in regulating T cell functions remains unclear and controversial. Using T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice, we here demonstrate that although NIK is dispensable for thymocyte development, it has a cell-intrinsic role in regulating the homeostasis and function of peripheral T cells. T cell-specific NIK ablation reduced the frequency of effector/memory-like T cells and impaired T cell responses to bacterial infection. The T cell-conditional NIK knockout mice were also defective in generation of inflammatory T cells and refractory to the induction of a T cell-dependent autoimmune disease, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Our data suggest a crucial role for NIK in mediating the generation of effector T cells and their recall responses to antigens. Together, these findings establish NIK as a cell-intrinsic mediator of T cell functions in both immune and autoimmune responses. PMID:26912039

  18. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing.

    PubMed

    Akhmetzyanova, Ilseyar; Drabczyk, Malgorzata; Neff, C Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S; Palmer, Brent E; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-10-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells. PMID:26484769

  19. PD-L1 Expression on Retrovirus-Infected Cells Mediates Immune Escape from CD8+ T Cell Killing

    PubMed Central

    Neff, C. Preston; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dietze, Kirsten K.; Werner, Tanja; Liu, Jia; Chen, Lieping; Lang, Karl S.; Palmer, Brent E.; Dittmer, Ulf; Zelinskyy, Gennadiy

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic CD8+ T Lymphocytes (CTL) efficiently control acute virus infections but can become exhausted when a chronic infection develops. Signaling of the inhibitory receptor PD-1 is an important mechanism for the development of virus-specific CD8+ T cell dysfunction. However, it has recently been shown that during the initial phase of infection virus-specific CD8+ T cells express high levels of PD-1, but are fully competent in producing cytokines and killing virus-infected target cells. To better understand the role of the PD-1 signaling pathway in CD8+ T cell cytotoxicity during acute viral infections we analyzed the expression of the ligand on retrovirus-infected cells targeted by CTLs. We observed increased levels of PD-L1 expression after infection of cells with the murine Friend retrovirus (FV) or with HIV. In FV infected mice, virus-specific CTLs efficiently eliminated infected target cells that expressed low levels of PD-L1 or that were deficient for PD-L1 but the population of PD-L1high cells escaped elimination and formed a reservoir for chronic FV replication. Infected cells with high PD-L1 expression mediated a negative feedback on CD8+ T cells and inhibited their expansion and cytotoxic functions. These findings provide evidence for a novel immune escape mechanism during acute retroviral infection based on PD-L1 expression levels on virus infected target cells. PMID:26484769

  20. Thiol dependent NF-κB suppression and inhibition of T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses by a naturally occurring steroidal lactone Withaferin A.

    PubMed

    Gambhir, Lokesh; Checker, Rahul; Sharma, Deepak; Thoh, M; Patil, Anand; Degani, M; Gota, Vikram; Sandur, Santosh K

    2015-12-01

    Withaferin A (WA), a steroidal lactone isolated from ayurvedic medicinal plant Withania somnifera, was shown to inhibit tumor growth by inducing oxidative stress and suppressing NF-κB pathway. However, its effect on T-cell mediated adaptive immune responses and the underlying mechanism has not been investigated. Since both T-cell responses and NF-κB pathway are known to be redox sensitive, the present study was undertaken to elucidate the effect of WA on adaptive immune responses in vitro and in vivo. WA inhibited mitogen induced T-cell and B-cell proliferation in vitro without inducing any cell death. It inhibited upregulation of T-cell (CD25, CD69, CD71 and CD54) and B-cell (CD80, CD86 and MHC-II) activation markers and secretion of Th1 and Th2 cytokines. WA induced oxidative stress by increasing the basal ROS levels and the immunosuppressive effects of WA were abrogated only by thiol anti-oxidants. The redox modulatory effects of WA in T-cells were attributed to its ability to directly interact with free thiols. WA inhibited NF-κB nuclear translocation in lymphocytes and prevented the direct binding of nuclear NF-κB to its consensus sequence. MALDI-TOF analysis using a synthetic NF-κB-p50 peptide containing Cys-62 residue suggested that WA can modify the cysteine residue of NF-κB. The pharmacokinetic studies for WA were also carried out and in vivo efficacy of WA was studied using mouse model of Graft-versus-host disease. In conclusion, WA is a potent inhibitor of T-cell responses and acts via a novel thiol dependent mechanism and inhibition of NF-κB pathway. PMID:26408225

  1. Silica vesicles as nanocarriers and adjuvants for generating both antibody and T-cell mediated immune resposes to Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Mody, Karishma T; Mahony, Donna; Zhang, Jun; Cavallaro, Antonino S; Zhang, Bing; Popat, Amirali; Mahony, Timothy J; Yu, Chengzhong; Mitter, Neena

    2014-12-01

    Bovine Viral Diarrhoea Virus (BVDV) is widely distributed in cattle industries and causes significant economic losses worldwide annually. A limiting factor in the development of subunit vaccines for BVDV is the need to elicit both antibody and T-cell-mediated immunity as well as addressing the toxicity of adjuvants. In this study, we have prepared novel silica vesicles (SV) as the new generation antigen carriers and adjuvants. With small particle size of 50 nm, thin wall (~6 nm), large cavity (~40 nm) and large entrance size (5.9 nm for SV-100 and 16 nm for SV-140), the SV showed high loading capacity (∼ 250 μg/mg) and controlled release of codon-optimised E2 (oE2) protein, a major immunogenic determinant of BVDV. The in vivo functionality of the system was validated in mice immunisation trials comparing oE2 plus Quil A (50 μg of oE2 plus 10 μg of Quil A, a conventional adjuvant) to the oE2/SV-140 (50 μg of oE2 adsorbed to 250 μg of SV-140) or oE2/SV-140 together with 10 μg of Quil A. Compared to the oE2 plus Quil A, which generated BVDV specific antibody responses at a titre of 10(4), the oE2/SV-140 group induced a 10 times higher antibody response. In addition, the cell-mediated response, which is essential to recognise and eliminate the invading pathogens, was also found to be higher [1954-2628 spot forming units (SFU)/million cells] in mice immunised with oE2/SV-140 in comparison to oE2 plus Quil A (512-1369 SFU/million cells). Our study has demonstrated that SV can be used as the next-generation nanocarriers and adjuvants for enhanced veterinary vaccine delivery. PMID:25239045

  2. [Two recombinant adenovirus vaccine candidates containing neuraminidase Gene of H5N1 influenza virus (A/Anhui/1/2005) elicited effective cell-mediated immunity in mice].

    PubMed

    Ma, Jing; Zhang, Xiao-Guang; Chen, Hong; Li, Kui-Biao; Zhang, Xiao-Mei; Zhang, Ke; Yang, Liang; Xu, Hong; Shu, Yue-Long; Tan, Wen-Jie; Zeng, Yi

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this study is to develop the recombinant adenovirus vaccine (rAdV) candidates containing neuraminidase (NA) gene of H5N1 influenza virus and test in BALB/c mice the effect of cell-mediated immunity. In this study, two kind of NA gene (WtNA gene, the wild type; Mod. NA gene, the codon-modified type) derived from H5N1 influenza virus (A/Anhui/1/2005) were cloned and inserted respectively into plasmid of adenovirus vector, then the rAdV vaccines candidates (rAdV-WtNA and rAdV-Mod. NA) were developed and purified, followed by immunization intramuscularly (10(9) TCID50 per dose, double injection at 0 and 4th week) in BALB/c mice, the effect of cell-mediated immunity were analysed at 5th week. Results indicated that: (i) NA protein expression was detected in two rAdV vaccines candidates by Western blotting; (ii) the rAdV-Mod. NA vaccine could elicit more robust NA specific cell-mediated immunity in mice than that of rAdV-WtNA vaccine (P = 0. 016) by IFN-gamma ELIspot assay. These findings suggested rAdV-Mod. NA vaccine was a potential vaccine candidate against H5N1 influenza and worthy of further investigation. PMID:19954107

  3. "Immuknow" to measurement of cell-mediated immunity in renal transplant recipients undergoing short-term evaluation.

    PubMed

    De Paolis, P; Favarò, A; Piola, A; Martini, F; Cristiana, G; Agrati, C; Iappelli, M; Di Giulio, S

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this preliminary, observational study was to evaluate the value of ImmuKnow (IK), a new tool to measure the net state of immunefunction among renal transplant recipients, in correlation with clinical and laboratory data among unselected renal transplant recipients. Forty-nine recipients of mean age of 51 years were enrolled and followed for 1 year after transplantation. All subjects received the same immunosuppressive strategy with basiliximab induction and tacrolimus, mycophenolate mofetil and steroid maintenance therapy. Samples for IK were collected before transplantation as well as at 7, 14, 21 and 42 days and after 3, 6, and 12 months. There were 54 samples with IK <225 ng/mL, 201 samples with normal IK values, and 135 samples with >525 ng/mL. We divided recipients into 3 groups with respect to their basal IK values: Group 1 (Gr1; IK <225 ng/mL); Group 2 (Gr2; normal values of IK between 226 and 524 ng/mL); and Group 3 (Gr3; IK >525 ng/mL). At 1 year, we observed a significant difference among IK values at the start and the end of the study: Gr1 vs Gr2, P<.0001; Gr2 vs Gr3, P<.06 and Gr 1 vs Gr 3, P<.01). We observed reduced IK values to predict an increased risk of infection, particularly with cytomegalovirus (CMV) replication while higher IK value did not correlate with an increased risk of acute rejection episodes. Reduction of serum creatine levels occurred within 1 year in all groups (P<.005), but there was a significant difference between Gr 2 versus Grs 1 and 3 (P<.0001 and P<.0005, respectively). There findings suggested that more stable IK values were associated with clinical quiescence and laboratory stability. In conclusion, our preliminary analysis showed a beneficial capacity of this assay to represent the global depression of the immune system. We noted that reduced IK values, as a sign of excessive immunosuppressive therapy, were associated with an increased risk of infection. We did not confirm the predictive value of higher IK

  4. Increased influenza pneumonia mortality of mice adoptively immunized with node and spleen cells sensitized by inactivated but not live virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cate, T R; Mold, N G

    1975-01-01

    Syngeneic mice adoptively immunized intravenously with 25 million washed node and spleen cells from donors vaccinated subcutaneously with formolized influenza A PR8 had a higher mortality with influenza pneumonia after challenge with homologous virus than occurred in recipients of similar cells from unsensitized donors, and this increased mortality was prevented by treatment of the sensitized cells with antithymocyte serum. Mice adoptively immunized with cells from donors vaccinated with formolized influenza A PR8 also had a higher mortality than recipients of unsensitized cells after challenge with heterologous influenza B Lee. Mice who received PR8-sensitized cells and survived challenge with influenza B Lee developed antibody only to the challenge virus, and serum antibody titers to the challenge virus in surviving recipients of sensitized cells were similar to those of recipients of unsensitized cells in all studies. Influenza mortality of recipients of antibody-containing mouse serum after homologous virus challenge was similar to that of recipients of antibody-free mouse serum in this model. Washed node and spleen cells from donor mice who had survived respiratory infection or received subcutaneous vaccination with live influenza A PR8 and those from donor mice given typhoid vaccine subcutaneously all failed to alter mortality from that observed in recipients of unsensitized cells after challenge with influenza A PR8. These results suggest that subcutaneous vaccination with inactivated influenza establishes a reactivity of the cell-mediated immunologic system which can increase the severity of influenza infection of the respiratory tract under certain conditions, and that sensitization by live influenza fails to produce this effect. PMID:47313

  5. Effect of Bed Rest with Amino Acid Supplementation on Cell-Mediated Immune Response in Healthy Men: Indications for Immune Status of Astronauts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Space flight can induce changes on human physiological systems including adverse effects on immune function. Due to enormous variability in flight conditions and restricted access to space flights, there is a lack of reproducible data and consistent results. Microgravity is one of the causes implica...

  6. Hepatitis C Virus-Specific Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Children Born to Mothers Infected with Hepatitis C Virus

    PubMed Central

    El-Kamary, Samer S.; Hashem, Mohamed; Saleh, Doaa A.; Abdelwahab, Sayed F.; Sobhy, Maha; Shebl, Fatma M.; Shardell, Michelle D.; Strickland, G. Thomas; Shata, Mohamed Tarek

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the association between hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific cell-mediated immunity (CMI) responses and viral clearance in children born to mothers infected with HCV. Study design A cross-sectional study of children from a mother-infant cohort in Egypt were enrolled to detect CMI responses to recombinant core and nonstructural HCV antigens (nonstructural segments NS3, NS4a/b, and NS5 of the HCV genome) using an interferon-gamma enzyme-linked immunospot assay. Children born to mothers with chronic HCV were enrolled into 3 groups: transiently viremic (n = 5), aviremic (n = 36), and positive control (n = 6), which consisted of 1 child with chronic HCV from this cohort and another 5 children with chronic HCV from a companion study. Children without HCV born to mothers without HCV (n = 27) served as a negative control group. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to compare the magnitude of CMI responses between groups. Results None of the 6 control children who were positive for HCV responded to any HCV antigen, and 4 (80%) of 5 children with transient viremia responded to at least one HCV antigen, compared with 5 (14%) of 36 and 3 (11%) of 27 children in the aviremic and negative control groups, respectively. Children with transient viremia elicited stronger responses than did negative controls (P = .005), positive controls (P = .011), or children without HCV viremia (P = .012), particularly to nonstructural antigens. Conclusions HCV-specific CMI responses were significantly higher in magnitude and frequency among transiently infected children compared with those persistently infected. This suggests CMI responses may be associated with past viral clearance and can identify children at high risk of infection, who can be targeted for health education, screening, and follow-up. PMID:22883419

  7. Gene Expression Profiles Underlying Selective T-Cell-Mediated Immunity Activity of a Chinese Medicine Granule on Mice Infected with Influenza Virus H1N1

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Na-na; Liu, Qi; Gu, Li-gang; Ge, Shi-jie; Wu, Jun; Ze-ji, Qiu; Qiu, Ze-ji; Zhang, Hong-chun; Chao, En-xiang; Yu, Zhuo-nan

    2014-01-01

    A Chinese medicine granule, Shu-Feng-Xuan-Fei (SFXF), is critical for viral clearance in early phase of influenza virus infection. In this study, 72 ICR mice were randomly divided into six groups: normal control group, virus control group, Oseltamivir group, low-dose SFXF, medium-dose SFXF, and high-dose SFXF. Mice were anesthetized and inoculated with 4LD50 of influenza virus A (H1N1) except normal control group. Oseltamivir group received 11.375 mg·kg−1·d−1 Oseltamivir Phosphate. SFXF 3.76, 1.88 and 0.94 g·kg−1·d−1 were administrated to mice in all SFXF groups. Each group was in equal dose of 0.2ml daily for 4 consecutive days. Mice were sacrificed and then total RNA was extracted in lung tissue. Some genes involved in T-cell-mediated immunity were selected by DNA microarray. These candidate genes were verified by Real-Time PCR and western immunoblotting. Compared with virus control group, in Toll-like receptor signaling pathway, 12 virus-altered genes were significantly reduced following medium-dose SFXF treatment. Eighteen antigen processing presentation-associated genes were upregulated by medium-dose SFXF. In the process of T cell receptor signaling pathway, 19 genes were downregulated by medium-dose SFXF treatment. On exploration into effector T cells activation and cytokines, all of altered genes in virus control group were reversed by medium-dose SFXF. Real-time PCR and western immunoblotting showed that the regulation of medium-dose SFXF in IL-4, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-1β, TLR7, MyD88, p38, and JNK was superior to Oseltamivir and high-dose SFXF group. Therefore, SFXF granules could reduce influenza infected cells and activation of T cells. PMID:24527057

  8. Adoptive transfer of Tc1 or Tc17 cells elicits antitumor immunity against established melanoma through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Cho, Hyun-Ii; Wang, Dapeng; Kaosaard, Kane; Anasetti, Claudio; Celis, Esteban; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2013-02-15

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of ex vivo-activated autologous tumor-reactive T cells is currently one of the most promising approaches for cancer immunotherapy. Recent studies provided some evidence that IL-17-producing CD8(+) (Tc17) cells may exhibit potent antitumor activity, but the specific mechanisms have not been completely defined. In this study, we used a murine melanoma lung-metastasis model and tested the therapeutic effects of gp100-specific polarized type I CD8(+) cytotoxic T (Tc1) or Tc17 cells combined with autologous bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation. Bone marrow transplantation combined with ACT of antitumor (gp100-specific) Tc17 cells significantly suppressed the growth of established melanoma, whereas Tc1 cells induced long-term tumor regression. After ACT, Tc1 cells maintained their phenotype to produce IFN-γ, but not IL-17. However, although Tc17 cells largely preserved their ability to produce IL-17, a subset secreted IFN-γ or both IFN-γ and IL-17, indicating the plasticity of Tc17 cells in vivo. Furthermore, after ACT, the Tc17 cells had a long-lived effector T cell phenotype (CD127(hi)/KLRG-1(low)) as compared with Tc1 cells. Mechanistically, Tc1 cells mediated antitumor immunity primarily through the direct effect of IFN-γ on tumor cells. In contrast, despite the fact that some Tc17 cells also secreted IFN-γ, Tc17-mediated antitumor immunity was independent of the direct effects of IFN-γ on the tumor. Nevertheless, IFN-γ played a critical role by creating a microenvironment that promoted Tc17-mediated antitumor activity. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that both Tc1 and Tc17 cells can mediate effective antitumor immunity through distinct effector mechanisms, but Tc1 cells are superior to Tc17 cells in mediating tumor regression. PMID:23315072

  9. Cell-Mediated and Humoral Immune Responses after Immunization of Calves with a Recombinant Multiantigenic Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis Subunit Vaccine at Different Ages

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Aneesh; Aagaard, Claus; Stockmarr, Anders; Andersen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Neonates and juvenile ruminants are very susceptible to paratuberculosis infection. This is likely due to a high degree of exposure from their dams and an immature immune system. To test the influence of age on vaccine-induced responses, a cocktail of recombinant Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis proteins (MAP0217, MAP1508, MAP3701c, MAP3783, and MAP1609c/Ag85B) was formulated in a cationic liposome adjuvant (CAF01) and used to vaccinate animals of different ages. Male jersey calves were divided into three groups that were vaccinated at 2, 8, or 16 weeks of age and boosted twice at weeks 4 and 12 relative to the first vaccination. Vaccine-induced immune responses, the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) cytokine secretion and antibody responses, were followed for 20 weeks. In general, the specific responses were significantly elevated in all three vaccination groups after the first booster vaccination with no or only a minor effect from the second booster. However, significant differences were observed in the immunogenicity levels of the different proteins, and it appears that the older age group produced a more consistent IFN-γ response. In contrast, the humoral immune response is seemingly independent of vaccination age as we found no difference in the IgG1 responses when we compared the three vaccination groups. Combined, our results suggest that an appropriate age of vaccination should be considered in vaccination protocols and that there is a possible interference of vaccine-induced immune responses with weaning (week 8). PMID:23389934

  10. Immunization with a Recombinant Expression Vector Encoding NS3/NS4A of Hepatitis C Virus Genotype 3a Elicits Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in C57BL/6 Mice.

    PubMed

    Behzadi, Mohammad Amin; Alborzi, Abdolvahab; Kalani, Mehdi; Pouladfar, Gholamreza; Dianatpour, Mehdi; Ziyaeyan, Mazyar

    2016-04-01

    Today, hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is considered as one of the most significant international health concerns. Although novel therapeutic regimens against the infection have shown satisfactory results, no approved vaccine exists yet. This study aimed to evaluate the immunogenicity of a DNA vaccine candidate for HCV-3a, based on nonstructural proteins NS3/NS4A, in C57BL/6 mice. Immunogenicity effect of pDisplay-NS3/NS4A was analyzed through immunization with 100 and 200 μg concentrations of the construct with complete Freund's adjuvant, monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), or without adjuvant. The frequencies of different splenic mononuclear cells were measured using the Mouse Th1/Th2/Th17 Phenotyping Kit. Moreover, the number of T-CD8(+) cells was determined using conjugated anti-CD8a and anti-CD3e antibodies by flow cytometry. As observed, the frequencies of Th1, T-CD8(+), and Th2 cells increased in all the experimental groups, compared with the controls. The highest levels of the respective cells were seen in the group immunized with 200 μg of the construct with MPL. Also, there were positive correlations between the frequency of Th1 cells and those of Th2 and T-CD8(+) cells in all the immunized groups, but were significant in those receiving adjuvants. The frequency of Th17 cells did not statistically change among the groups. Taken together, our findings revealed that the constructed DNA vaccine encoding HCV-3a NS3/NS4A gene induces the cell-mediated immune responses significantly. However, its coadministration with adjuvants exhibits more efficient results than the recombinant plasmid alone. Further study is currently underway to evaluate the specific immune responses and recognize the responsible antigenic epitopes. PMID:26909520

  11. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth nor adoptive parents know the others' identities. Other adoptions are handled more openly. Open adoptions, ... desire to seek out more information about the identity of the birth family. Most of us (whether ...

  12. B Cells Are Critical to T-cell-Mediated Antitumor Immunity Induced by a Combined Immune-Stimulatory/Conditionally Cytotoxic Therapy for Glioblastoma12

    PubMed Central

    Candolfi, Marianela; Curtin, James F; Yagiz, Kader; Assi, Hikmat; Wibowo, Mia K; Alzadeh, Gabrielle E; Foulad, David; Muhammad, AKM G; Salehi, Sofia; Keech, Naomi; Puntel, Mariana; Liu, Chunyan; Sanderson, Nicholas R; Kroeger, Kurt M; Dunn, Robert; Martins, Gislaine; Lowenstein, Pedro R; Castro, Maria G

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated that modifying the tumor microenvironment through intratumoral administration of adenoviral vectors (Ad) encoding the conditional cytotoxic molecule, i.e., HSV1-TK and the immune-stimulatory cytokine, i.e., fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) leads to T-cell-dependent tumor regression in rodent models of glioblastoma. We investigated the role of B cells during immune-mediated glioblastoma multiforme regression. Although treatment with Ad-TK+Ad-Flt3L induced tumor regression in 60% of wild-type (WT) mice, it completely failed in B-cell-deficient Igh6-/- mice. Tumor-specific T-cell precursors were detected in Ad-TK+Ad-Flt3L-treated WT mice but not in Igh6-/- mice. The treatment also failed in WT mice depleted of total B cells or marginal zone B cells. Because we could not detect circulating antibodies against tumor cells and the treatment was equally efficient in WT mice and in mice with B-cell-specific deletion of Prdm 1 (encoding Blimp-1), in which B cells are present but unable to fully differentiate into antibody-secreting plasma cells, tumor regression in this model is not dependent on B cells' production of tumor antigen-specific immunoglobulins. Instead, B cells seem to play a role as antigen-presenting cells (APCs). Treatment with Ad-TK+Ad-Flt3L led to an increase in the number of B cells in the cervical lymph nodes, which stimulated the proliferation of syngeneic T cells and induced clonal expansion of antitumor T cells. Our data show that B cells act as APCs, playing a critical role in clonal expansion of tumor antigen-specific T cells and brain tumor regression. PMID:22028620

  13. Comparative immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide and cyclophosphamide: Evaluation of L1210 tumor cell resistance, cell-mediated immunity, and humoral immunity. (Reannouncement with new availability information)

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, J.A.; Joiner, R.L.; Houchens, D.P.; Dill, G.S.; Hobson, D.W.

    1991-12-31

    The immunotoxicity of 2,2`-dichlorodiethyl sulfide (sulfur mustard, SM),on humoral and cell-mediated immunity was compared with that of the nitrogen mustard 2-(bis(2-chloroethyl) amino)tetrahydro- 2H-1,3,2-oxazophosphorine 2-oxide (cyclophosphamide, CP). SM and CP had similar effects on thymic and splenic weights, spleen cell number, and the formation of antibody producing cells to sheep red blood cells (sRBC) when examined 5 days after exposure, but differed in their effects on body weights. Although there were no differences in the delayed hypersensitivity response to keyhole limpet hemocyanin, CP and SM had different effects in the L1210 tumor cell allograft rejection assay. CP, but not SM, decreased the 28 day survival rate of allogeneic mice exposed to a sublethal L1210 tumor challenge. The differing effects on survival to the L1210 tumor challenge could not be attributed to a direct cytotoxic effect of SM on the L1210 tumor cells as SM did not increase the survival rate or mediansurvival time of syngeneic mice exposed to a lethal L1210 tumor cell challenge. In summary, SM and CP had immunosuppressive effects in the humoral immune assay. Although neither compound suppressed the delayed hypersensitivity response, CP was found to suppress host resistance to L1210 tumor cells.

  14. [Adoption].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue addresses adoption and the young child's life. Contributors suggest ways in which practitioners in many professions and settings can better understand and support adoptive families. The first article, "Adoption, 1990" by Barbara F. Nordhaus and Albert J. Solnit, reviews the history of adoption and notes obstacles to…

  15. Adoptive transfer of pTRP2-specific CTLs expanding by bead-based artificial antigen-presenting cells mediates anti-melanoma response.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xiaoling; Jiang, Xiaobing; Liu, Ruen; Zhao, Hongyang; Liang, Zhihui

    2008-11-18

    Cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells are key effectors in the immunotherapy of malignant and viral diseases. However, the lack of efficient methods for their in vitro priming and expansion has become a bottleneck to the development of vaccines and adoptive transfer strategies. Synthetic artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) are now emerging as an attractive tool for eliciting and expanding CTL responses. This study reported a novel approach for targeting malignant melanoma with pTRP2-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) expanded from the C57BL/6 splenocytes by multiple stimulations with aAPCs made by coating H-2K(b)-Ig/pTRP2 dimeric complexes, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL molecules and CD83 molecules to cell-sized latex beads. The induced CTLs exhibited specific lysis against RMA-S cells pulsed with the peptide pTRP2 and H-2K(b+) melanoma cells expressing TRP2, while a murine Lewis lung carcinoma cell line 3LL could not be recognized by the CTLs. The peptide-specific activity was inhibited by anti-H-2K(b) monoclonal antibody Y3. Adoptive Transfer of CTLs specific for malignant melanoma expanding by the aAPCs can mediate effective anti-melanoma response. These results suggested the bead-based aAPCs coated with an MHC-Ig/peptide complex, anti-CD28 antibody, 4-1BBL and CD83 could provide a useful tool for the reproducible expansion of specific CTLs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:18621475

  16. Processing of blood samples influences PBMC viability and outcome of cell-mediated immune responses in antiretroviral therapy-naïve HIV-1-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Bourguignon, Patricia; Clément, Frédéric; Renaud, Frédéric; Le Bras, Vivien; Koutsoukos, Marguerite; Burny, Wivine; Moris, Philippe; Lorin, Clarisse; Collard, Alix; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Roman, François; Janssens, Michel; Vandekerckhove, Linos

    2014-12-01

    Intracellular cytokine staining (ICS) assay is increasingly used in vaccine clinical trials to measure antigen-specific T-cell mediated immune (CMI) responses in cryopreserved peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and whole blood. However, recent observations indicate that several parameters involved in blood processing can impact PBMC viability and CMI responses, especially in antiretroviral therapy (ART)-naïve HIV-1-infected individuals. In this phase I study (NCT01610427), we collected blood samples from 22 ART-naïve HIV-1-infected adults. PBMCs were isolated and processed for ICS assay. The individual and combined effects of the following parameters were investigated: time between blood collection and PBMC processing (time-to-process: 2, 7 or 24 h); time between PBMC thawing and initiation of in vitro stimulation with HIV-1 antigens (resting-time: 0, 2, 6 and 18 h); and duration of antigen-stimulation in PBMC cultures (stimulation-time: 6h or overnight). The cell recovery after thawing, cell viability after ICS and magnitude of HIV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses were considered to determine the optimal combination of process conditions. The impact of time-to-process (2 or 4 h) on HIV-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses was also assessed in a whole blood ICS assay. A higher quality of cells in terms of recovery and viability (up to 81% and >80% respectively) was obtained with shorter time-to-process (less than 7 h) and resting-time (less than 2 h) intervals. Longer (overnight) rather than shorter (6 h) stimulation-time intervals increased the frequency of CD8(+)-specific T-cell responses using ICS in PBMCs without change of the functionality. The CD8(+) specific T-cell responses detected using fresh whole blood showed a good correlation with the responses detected using frozen PBMCs. Our results support the need of standardized procedures for the evaluation of CMI responses, especially in HIV-1-infected, ART-naïve patients. PMID:25224748

  17. Adoptive transfer of natural antibodies to non-immunized chickens affects subsequent antigen-specific humoral and cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Lammers, Aart; Klomp, Marcel E V; Nieuwland, Mike G B; Savelkoul, Huub F J; Parmentier, Henk K

    2004-01-01

    To determine a regulatory function of natural antibodies in the immune response of chickens, pooled plasma obtained from non-immunized (naïve) 15 months old hens was subjected to keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) antigen-affinity chromatography. Purified KLH-binding antibodies were adoptively transferred intravenously to 5 weeks-old cocks that were subsequently immunized subcutaneously 24 h later with KLH. Control groups consisted of birds that were either adoptively transferred with KLH-binding antibodies purified from plasma of KLH-immunized chickens, or PBS, or a salt precipitated total immunoglobulin fraction obtained from the corresponding pooled nai;ve chicken plasma, respectively.Total, IgM and IgY antibody titers to KLH in the plasma of recipients adoptively transferred with KLH-NAb, but not in the plasma of the groups transferred with salt precipitate or KLH-binding specific antibodies, were significantly enhanced as compared to the non-treated, KLH immunized group. Titers of IgA antibodies binding KLH were decreased in the plasma of the group that received specific KLH-binding antibodies, but not in the plasma of the other groups. Proliferation from peripheral blood leucocytes in whole blood from the KLH-NAb treated group, the group treated with KLH-binding specific antibodies and the group treated with salt precipitate, respectively, to both concanavalin A and KLH were significantly decreased as compared to the group receiving PBS. Our data show that antigen-specific antibodies can be isolated from plasma obtained from non-immunized chickens. Such antibodies that resemble natural antibodies as described in mammals may perform an important role in the enhancement of subsequent antigen-specific antibody responses or the maturation of the immune system, which may differ from the role of specific antibodies. PMID:12962982

  18. Intramuscular Immunization of Mice with a Live-Attenuated Triple Mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 Induces Robust Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity To Completely Protect Animals against Pneumonic Plague

    PubMed Central

    Tiner, Bethany L.; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B.; Fitts, Eric C.; Popov, Vsevolod L.; van Lier, Christina J.; Erova, Tatiana E.

    2015-01-01

    Earlier, we showed that the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 with deleted genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acyltransferase (MsbB), and the attachment invasion locus (Ail), respectively, was avirulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. In this study, we further evaluated the immunogenic potential of the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant and its derivative by different routes of vaccination. Mice were immunized via the subcutaneous (s.c.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) route with two doses (2 × 106 CFU/dose) of the above-mentioned triple mutant with 100% survivability of the animals. Upon subsequent pneumonic challenge with 70 to 92 50% lethal doses (LD50) of wild-type (WT) strain CO92, all of the mice survived when immunization occurred by the i.m. route. Since Ail has virulence and immunogenic potential, a mutated version of Ail devoid of its virulence properties was created, and the genetically modified ail replaced the native ail gene on the chromosome of the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant, creating a Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 vaccine strain. This newly generated mutant was attenuated similarly to the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant when administered by the i.m. route and provided 100% protection to animals against subsequent pneumonic challenge. Not only were the two above-mentioned mutants cleared rapidly from the initial i.m. site of injection in animals with no histopathological lesions, the immunized mice did not exhibit any disease symptoms during immunization or after subsequent exposure to WT CO92. These two mutants triggered balanced Th1- and Th2-based antibody responses and cell-mediated immunity. A substantial increase in interleukin-17 (IL-17) from the T cells of vaccinated mice, a cytokine of the Th17 cells, further augmented their vaccine potential. Thus, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants represent excellent vaccine candidates for plague, with the latter mutant still retaining Ail immunogenicity but with

  19. Intramuscular Immunization of Mice with a Live-Attenuated Triple Mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 Induces Robust Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity To Completely Protect Animals against Pneumonic Plague.

    PubMed

    Tiner, Bethany L; Sha, Jian; Ponnusamy, Duraisamy; Baze, Wallace B; Fitts, Eric C; Popov, Vsevolod L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Chopra, Ashok K

    2015-12-01

    Earlier, we showed that the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant of Yersinia pestis CO92 with deleted genes encoding Braun lipoprotein (Lpp), an acyltransferase (MsbB), and the attachment invasion locus (Ail), respectively, was avirulent in a mouse model of pneumonic plague. In this study, we further evaluated the immunogenic potential of the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant and its derivative by different routes of vaccination. Mice were immunized via the subcutaneous (s.c.) or the intramuscular (i.m.) route with two doses (2 × 10(6) CFU/dose) of the above-mentioned triple mutant with 100% survivability of the animals. Upon subsequent pneumonic challenge with 70 to 92 50% lethal doses (LD(50)) of wild-type (WT) strain CO92, all of the mice survived when immunization occurred by the i.m. route. Since Ail has virulence and immunogenic potential, a mutated version of Ail devoid of its virulence properties was created, and the genetically modified ail replaced the native ail gene on the chromosome of the Δlpp ΔmsbB double mutant, creating a Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 vaccine strain. This newly generated mutant was attenuated similarly to the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail triple mutant when administered by the i.m. route and provided 100% protection to animals against subsequent pneumonic challenge. Not only were the two above-mentioned mutants cleared rapidly from the initial i.m. site of injection in animals with no histopathological lesions, the immunized mice did not exhibit any disease symptoms during immunization or after subsequent exposure to WT CO92. These two mutants triggered balanced Th1- and Th2-based antibody responses and cell-mediated immunity. A substantial increase in interleukin-17 (IL-17) from the T cells of vaccinated mice, a cytokine of the Th17 cells, further augmented their vaccine potential. Thus, the Δlpp ΔmsbB Δail and Δlpp ΔmsbB::ailL2 mutants represent excellent vaccine candidates for plague, with the latter mutant still retaining Ail immunogenicity but

  20. Impact of oral meloxicam and long-distance transport on cell-mediated and humoral immune responses in feedlot steers receiving modified live BVDV booster vaccination on arrival.

    PubMed

    Van Engen, N K; Platt, R; Roth, J A; Stock, M L; Engelken, T; Vann, R C; Wulf, L W; Busby, W D; Wang, C; Kalkwarf, E M; Coetzee, J F

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the impact of oral meloxicam (MEL) and long-distance transportation on cell-mediated immunity (CMI) in preconditioned steers receiving a booster vaccination on arrival. We hypothesized that steers treated with MEL at 1mg/kg body weight, 6h before night-time transport, would be less immunocompromised on arrival (day 0) and after 7days, and that CMI following vaccination with a modified live bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) recall antigen would be increased. Brahman crossbreed steers, 13-17 months of age (n=87), were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups: MEL, transported (MTR) (n=22), MEL, non-transported (MNT) (n=22), lactose placebo, transported (CTR) (n=21), and lactose placebo, non-transported (CNT) (n=22). MTR and CTR steers were transported for approximately 16h non-stop on a truck from Mississippi to Iowa (approximately 1300km), whereas steers in the MNT and CNT groups remained in Mississippi as non-transported controls. Body weight was measured and jugular blood was collected at -1, 0, and 7days from all steers at the same time, regardless of location. Multi-parameter flow cytometry (MP-FCM) was used to identify T-cell subsets and detect the expression of three activation markers (CD25 [interleukin (IL)-2 receptor], intracellular interferon-gamma [IFNγ], and IL-4) after in vitro stimulation with BVDV recall antigen. Plasma cortisol concentration was measured on day -1, 0, and 7 as a marker of transport-associated stress. Serum antibody titer to BVDV was assessed on day -1 and day 7 post-booster vaccination. Whole-blood samples were analyzed using MP-FCM on days 0 and 7. Results were log transformed and analyzed using repeated measures of analysis of variance. Compared with non-transported controls, transport led to an increase in BVDV-induced expression of CD25, IFNγ, and IL-4 in CD4(+), CD8(+), and γδ(+) T-cell subsets (P<0.05). MEL treatment mitigated the transportation-associated increase in

  1. Cross-Reactive, Cell-Mediated Immunity and Protection of Chickens from Lethal H5N1 Influenza Virus Infection in Hong Kong Poultry Markets

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Sang Heui; Webster, Robert G.

    2001-01-01

    In 1997, avian H5N1 influenza virus transmitted from chickens to humans resulted in 18 confirmed infections. Despite harboring lethal H5N1 influenza viruses, most chickens in the Hong Kong poultry markets showed no disease signs. At this time, H9N2 influenza viruses were cocirculating in the markets. We investigated the role of H9N2 influenza viruses in protecting chickens from lethal H5N1 influenza virus infections. Sera from chickens infected with an H9N2 influenza virus did not cross-react with an H5N1 influenza virus in neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition assays. Most chickens primed with an H9N2 influenza virus 3 to 70 days earlier survived the lethal challenge of an H5N1 influenza virus, but infected birds shed H5N1 influenza virus in their feces. Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes or CD8+ T cells from inbred chickens (B2/B2) infected with an H9N2 influenza virus to naive inbred chickens (B2/B2) protected them from lethal H5N1 influenza virus. In vitro cytotoxicity assays showed that T lymphocytes or CD8+ T cells from chickens infected with an H9N2 influenza virus recognized target cells infected with either an H5N1 or H9N2 influenza virus in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings indicate that cross-reactive cellular immunity induced by H9N2 influenza viruses protected chickens from lethal infection with H5N1 influenza viruses in the Hong Kong markets in 1997 but permitted virus shedding in the feces. Our findings are the first to suggest that cross-reactive cellular immunity can change the outcome of avian influenza virus infection in birds in live markets and create a situation for the perpetuation of H5N1 influenza viruses. PMID:11222674

  2. Soluble β-glucan from Grifola frondosa induces tumor regression in synergy with TLR9 agonist via dendritic cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Yuki; Nawa, Daiki; Nakayama, Yoshiaki; Konishi, Morichika; Nanba, Hiroaki

    2015-12-01

    The maturation of dendritic cells into more-immunostimulatory dendritic cells by stimulation with different combinations of immunologic agents is expected to provide efficient, adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Soluble β-glucan maitake D-fraction, extracted from the maitake mushroom Grifola frondosa, acts as a potent immunotherapeutic agent, eliciting innate and adoptive immune responses, thereby contributing to its antitumor activity. Here, we evaluated the efficacy of maitake D-fraction, in combination with a Toll-like receptor agonist, to treat tumors in a murine model. Our results showed that maitake D-fraction, in combination with the Toll-like receptor 9 agonist, cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide, synergistically increased the expression of dendritic cell maturation markers and interleukin-12 production in dendritic cells, but it did not increase interleukin-10 production, generating strong effector dendritic cells with an augmented capacity for efficiently priming an antigen-specific, T helper 1-type T cell response. Maitake D-fraction enhances cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide-induced dendritic cell maturation and cytokine responses in a dectin-1-dependent pathway. We further showed that a combination therapy using cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide and maitake D-fraction was highly effective, either as adjuvants for dendritic cell vaccination or by direct administration against murine tumor. Therapeutic responses to direct administration were associated with increased CD11c(+) dendritic cells in the tumor site and the induction of interferon-γ-producing CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Our results indicate that maitake D-fraction and cytosine-phosphate-guanine oligodeoxynucleotide synergistically activated dendritic cells, resulting in tumor regression via an antitumor T helper cell 1-type response. Our findings provide the basis for a potent antitumor therapy using a novel combination of immunologic agents for

  3. Immune Checkpoint Blockade to Improve Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Adoptive Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kodumudi, Krithika N.; Siegel, Jessica; Weber, Amy M.; Scott, Ellen; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been associated with improved survival in cancer patients. Within the tumor microenvironment, regulatory cells and expression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules can lead to the inactivation of TIL. Hence, there is a need to develop strategies that disrupt these negative regulators to achieve robust anti-tumor immune responses. We evaluated the blockade of immune checkpoints and their effect on T cell infiltration and function. We examined the ability of TIL to induce tumor-specific immune responses in vitro and in vivo. TIL isolated from tumor bearing mice were tumor-specific and expressed co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules. Administration of monoclonal antibodies against immune checkpoints led to a significant delay in tumor growth. However, anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice had a significant increase in T cell infiltration and IFN-γ production compared to other groups. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded TIL from tumors of anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice led to a significant delay in tumor growth. Blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints could be an effective strategy to improve TIL infiltration and function. PMID:27050669

  4. CTLA-4 blockade plus adoptive T cell transfer promotes optimal melanoma immunity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Mahvi, David A.; Meyers, Justin V.; Tatar, Andrew J.; Contreras, Amanda; Suresh, M.; Leverson, Glen E.; Sen, Siddhartha; Cho, Clifford S.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic approaches to the treatment of advanced melanoma have relied on strategies that augment the responsiveness of endogenous tumor-specific T cell populations (e.g., CTLA-4 blockade-mediated checkpoint inhibition) or introduce exogenously-prepared tumor-specific T cell populations (e.g., adoptive cell transfer). Although both approaches have shown considerable promise, response rates to these therapies remain suboptimal. We hypothesized that a combinatorial approach to immunotherapy using both CTLA-4 blockade and non-lymphodepletional adoptive cell transfer could offer additive therapeutic benefit. C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with syngeneic B16F10 melanoma tumors transfected to express low levels of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus peptide GP33 (B16GP33), and treated with no immunotherapy, CTLA-4 blockade, adoptive cell transfer, or combination immunotherapy of CTLA-4 blockade with adoptive cell transfer. Combination immunotherapy resulted in optimal control of B16GP33 melanoma tumors. Combination immunotherapy promoted a stronger local immune response reflected by enhanced tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte populations, as well as a stronger systemic immune responses reflected by more potent tumor antigen-specific T cell activity in splenocytes. In addition, whereas both CTLA-4 blockade and combination immunotherapy were able to promote long-term immunity against B16GP33 tumors, only combination immunotherapy was capable of promoting immunity against parental B16F10 tumors as well. Our findings suggest that a combinatorial approach using CTLA-4 blockade with non-lymphodepletional adoptive cell transfer may promote additive endogenous and exogenous T cell activities that enable greater therapeutic efficacy in the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25658614

  5. CD8+ T Cells Mediate Robust Stage-Specific Immunity to P. berghei under Chemoprophylaxis and This Protective Environment Is Not Downregulated by the Presence of Blood-Stage Infection

    PubMed Central

    Heiss, Kirsten; Mueller, Ann-Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Sterile protection against malaria infection can be achieved by the inoculation of intact sporozoites while treating concomitantly with the 4-aminoquinoline chloroquine. We present an analysis of protective immunity elicited by successive immunization with Plasmodium berghei sporozoites under chemoprophylaxis. Immunization resulted in a protective, stage-specific immune response. Protection appeared to be mediated by CD8+ T cells and was abrogated upon their specific depletion. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes rendered recipient animals resistant to sporozoite infection, but not to blood-stage challenge. Immunization with sporozoites under chemoprophylaxis results in robust immunity, and the presence of blood-stage infection at sporozoite immunization had no downregulating effect on the protective immune response. PMID:24516592

  6. A novel dendritic cell-targeted lentiviral vector, encoding Ag85A-ESAT6 fusion gene of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, could elicit potent cell-mediated immune responses in mice.

    PubMed

    Shakouri, Mehdi; Moazzeni, Seyed Mohammad; Ghanei, Mostafa; Arashkia, Arash; Etemadzadeh, Mohammad Hossein; Azadmanesh, Kayhan

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), leading to high mortality worldwide. It is well-established that cellular immunity plays a critical role to control Mtb infection. Dendritic Cells (DCs) are potent antigen presenting cells, which play an important role to prime cell-mediated immune responses. In vivo targeting of DCs has been shown to induce both strong cellular immunity and protection against tumor challenges. The aim of the present study was not only to assess the immunizing potential of a novel DC-targeted recombinant lentivirus expressing fusion antigen Ag85A-ESAT6 of Mtb, but also to compare it with a recombinant lentivirus with broad cellular tropism expressing the same antigen in mice. The findings demonstrated that our novel recombinant DC-targeted lentivector was able to successfully transduce and express the fusion antigen Ag85A-E6 in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, a single footpad injection of targeted lentivectors could elicit strong T-helper 1 (Th1) immunity against the above mentioned antigen, as indicated by the specific high-level production of IFN-γ and IL-2 using spleen lymphocytes and lymphoproliferative responses. Despite of these promising results, more attempts are required to elucidate the protective and therapeutic efficacy of this approach in future. PMID:27267270

  7. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  8. Humoral and cell-mediated immune response, and growth factor synthesis after direct intraarticular injection of rAAV2-IGF-I and rAAV5-IGF-I in the equine middle carpal joint.

    PubMed

    Ortved, Kyla; Wagner, Bettina; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James; Schaefer, Deanna; Nixon, Alan

    2015-03-01

    Intraarticular (IA) administration of viral vectors expressing a therapeutic transgene is an attractive treatment modality for osteoarthritis (OA) as the joint can be treated as a contained unit. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo can limit vector effectiveness. Transduction of articular tissues has been investigated; however, the immune response to IA vectors remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that IA rAAV2 and rAAV5 overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) would result in long-term IGF-I formation but would also induce neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and anti-capsid effector T cells. Twelve healthy horses were assigned to treatment (rAAV2 or rAAV5) or control (saline) groups. Middle carpal joints were injected with 5×10(11) vector genomes/joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for changes in composition, NAb titers, immunoglobulin isotypes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IGF-I. Serum was analyzed for antibody titers and cytokines. A T cell restimulation assay was used to assess T cell responses. Injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I did not induce greater inflammation compared with saline. Synovial fluid IGF-I was significantly increased in both rAAV2- and rAAV5-IGF-I joints by day 14 and remained elevated until day 56; however, rAAV5 achieved the highest concentrations. A capsid-specific T cell response was not noted although all virus-treated horses had increased NAbs in serum and synovial fluid after treatment. Taken together, our data show that IA injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I does not incite a clinically detectable inflammatory or cell-mediated immune response and that IA gene therapy using minimally immunogenic vectors represents a clinically relevant tool for treating articular disorders including OA. PMID:25705927

  9. Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Response, and Growth Factor Synthesis After Direct Intraarticular Injection of rAAV2-IGF-I and rAAV5-IGF-I in the Equine Middle Carpal Joint

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Bettina; Calcedo, Roberto; Wilson, James; Schaefer, Deanna; Nixon, Alan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Intraarticular (IA) administration of viral vectors expressing a therapeutic transgene is an attractive treatment modality for osteoarthritis (OA) as the joint can be treated as a contained unit. Humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo can limit vector effectiveness. Transduction of articular tissues has been investigated; however, the immune response to IA vectors remains largely unknown. We hypothesized that IA rAAV2 and rAAV5 overexpressing insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) would result in long-term IGF-I formation but would also induce neutralizing antibodies (NAb) and anti-capsid effector T cells. Twelve healthy horses were assigned to treatment (rAAV2 or rAAV5) or control (saline) groups. Middle carpal joints were injected with 5×1011 vector genomes/joint. Synovial fluid was analyzed for changes in composition, NAb titers, immunoglobulin isotypes, proinflammatory cytokines, and IGF-I. Serum was analyzed for antibody titers and cytokines. A T cell restimulation assay was used to assess T cell responses. Injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I did not induce greater inflammation compared with saline. Synovial fluid IGF-I was significantly increased in both rAAV2- and rAAV5-IGF-I joints by day 14 and remained elevated until day 56; however, rAAV5 achieved the highest concentrations. A capsid-specific T cell response was not noted although all virus-treated horses had increased NAbs in serum and synovial fluid after treatment. Taken together, our data show that IA injection of rAAV2- or rAAV5-IGF-I does not incite a clinically detectable inflammatory or cell-mediated immune response and that IA gene therapy using minimally immunogenic vectors represents a clinically relevant tool for treating articular disorders including OA. PMID:25705927

  10. Vaccination of calves using the BRSV nucleocapsid protein in a DNA prime-protein boost strategy stimulates cell-mediated immunity and protects the lungs against BRSV replication and pathology.

    PubMed

    Letellier, Carine; Boxus, Mathieu; Rosar, Laurent; Toussaint, Jean-François; Walravens, Karl; Roels, Stefan; Meyer, Gilles; Letesson, Jean-Jacques; Kerkhofs, Pierre

    2008-09-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a major cause of respiratory disease in both cattle and young children. Despite the development of vaccines against bovine (B)RSV, incomplete protection and exacerbation of subsequent RSV disease have occurred. In order to circumvent these problems, calves were vaccinated with the nucleocapsid protein, known to be a major target of CD8(+) T cells in cattle. This was performed according to a DNA prime-protein boost strategy. The results showed that DNA vaccination primed a specific T-cell-mediated response, as indicated by both a lymphoproliferative response and IFN-gamma production. These responses were enhanced after protein boost. After challenge, mock-vaccinated calves displayed gross pneumonic lesions and viral replication in the lungs. In contrast, calves vaccinated by successive administrations of plasmid DNA and protein exhibited protection against the development of pneumonic lesions and the viral replication in the BAL fluids and the lungs. The protection correlated to the cell-mediated immunity and not to the antibody response. PMID:18644416

  11. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non obese humans

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-cen...

  12. A Murine Model in Which Protection Correlates with Pertussis Vaccine Efficacy in Children Reveals Complementary Roles for Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immunity in Protection against Bordetella pertussis

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Kingston H. G.; Ryan, Mark; Ryan, Elizabeth; Mahon, Bernard P.

    1998-01-01

    The results of phase 3 efficacy trials have shown that acellular and whole-cell pertussis vaccines can confer protection against whooping cough. However, despite the advances in vaccine development, clinical trials have not provided significant new information on the mechanism of protective immunity against Bordetella pertussis. Classical approaches based on measurement of antibody responses to individual antigens failed to define an immunological correlate of protection. A reliable animal model, predictive of acellular and whole-cell pertussis vaccine potency in children, would facilitate an elucidation of the mechanism of immune protection against B. pertussis and would assist in the regulatory control and future development of pertussis vaccines. In this study, we have shown that the rate of B. pertussis clearance following respiratory challenge of immunized mice correlated with vaccine efficacy in children. Using this model together with mice with targeted disruptions of the gamma interferon (IFN-γ) receptor, interleukin-4 or immunoglobulin heavy-chain genes, we have demonstrated an absolute requirement for B cells or their products in bacterial clearance and a role for IFN-γ in immunity generated by previous infection or immunization with the whole-cell pertussis vaccine. The results of passive immunization experiments suggested that protection early after immunization with acellular pertussis vaccines is mediated by antibody against multiple protective antigens. In contrast, more complete protection conferred by previous infection or immunization with whole-cell pertussis vaccines reflected the induction of Th1 cells. Our findings suggest that the mechanism of immunity against B. pertussis involves humoral and cellular immune responses which are not directed against a single protective antigen and thus provide an explanation for previous failures to define an immunological correlate of protection. PMID:9453614

  13. Synthetic B- and T-cell epitope peptides of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus with Gp96 as adjuvant induced humoral and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Caiwei; Li, Jing; Bi, Yuhai; Yang, Limin; Meng, Shanshan; Zhou, Yuancheng; Jia, Xiaojuan; Meng, Songdong; Sun, Lei; Liu, Wenjun

    2013-04-01

    Highly pathogenic porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (HP-PRRSV) has recently caused huge economic losses in the pig industry worldwide. Commercial vaccines, including inactivated vaccines and attenuated live vaccines, are available but fail to provide sustainable protection, especially against genetically heterologous strains. Thus several approaches have been used to develop more effective PRRSV vaccines and/or immune modulators to accelerate and magnify immune responses to PRRSV vaccines. Heat shock protein Gp96 is one such modulator that enhances both the innate and adaptive immune responses. In the present study, two B-cell epitopes and seven T-cell epitopes from PRRSV and a Pan DR T-helper cell epitope were synthesized and mixed with the N-terminal 22-355 aa of Gp96 (Gp96N) as an adjuvant, and immune responses were evaluated. Our results show that Gp96N activated PRRSV-specific humoral immune responses elicited by BCE-peptides and promoted the PRRSV-specific cellular immunity induced by TCE-peptides. Moreover, higher levels of IL-12 and TNF-α and lower levels of IL-4 and IL-10 were observed in the serum of Gp96N-vaccinated piglets compared to piglets immunized with no Gp96N, displaying a predominant Th1 type of immune response induced by Gp96N. Following challenge with the virulent HP-PRRSV isolate JXwn06, piglets vaccinated with the mixture of peptides and Gp96N presented with milder clinical symptoms, lower viremia, and less pathological lesions in their lungs, however, this vaccine could not provide lasting and effective protection against HP-PRRSV infection. These data provide important bases for the development of PRRSV epitope-based synthetic peptide vaccines combined with Gp96N as attractive immunomodulators in swine. PMID:23395588

  14. Immune response

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... cells. T cells are responsible for cell-mediated immunity. This type of immunity becomes deficient in persons with HIV, the virus ... blood. B lymphocytes provide the body with humoral immunity as they circulate in the fluids in search ...

  15. Effects of inoculum size on cell-mediated and humoral immune responses of foals experimentally infected with Rhodococcus equi: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Jacks, Stephanie; Giguère, Steeve

    2010-02-15

    The objective of this pilot study was to compare the cytokine profile as well as cell-mediated and antibody responses of foals infected with a low inoculum of virulent Rhodococcus equi resulting in subclinical pneumonia to that of foals infected with a high inoculum resulting in severe clinical pneumonia. The mean (+/-SD) ratio of post-infection to pre-infection anti-R. equi IgG(T) concentration was significantly (P=0.002) higher in foals infected with the high inoculum (195+/-145; range 62-328) compared to foals infected with the low inoculum (3.9+/-4.5; range 0.5-11). Similarly, mean (+/-SD) ratio of post-infection to pre-infection IgM concentration was significantly (P=0.002) higher in foals infected with the high inoculum (12+/-4.0; range 7.4-14) compared to foals infected with the low inoculum (2.5+/-1.5; range 1.2-4.7). Proliferative responses to R. equi antigens as well as expression of mRNA for IL-2, IL-4, IL-10, and IFN-gamma in BLN were not significantly different between the two groups. There was a tendency (P=0.073) towards a higher IFN-gamma/IL-4 ratio in the low inoculum group. This study demonstrates that the size of inoculum modulates the IgG subisotype response and possibly the cytokine profile of foals. PMID:19720402

  16. Cell-mediated immunity to pancreatic islet cells in the non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse: in vitro characterization and time course study.

    PubMed Central

    Timsit, J; Debray-Sachs, M; Boitard, C; Bach, J F

    1988-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is an animal model of insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM), in which 80% of the females become diabetic after the age of 12 weeks. Using an in vitro assay we investigated the capacity of spleen lymphocytes from NOD mice to inhibit the insulin secretion of normal islet cells after stimulation by theophylline plus arginine. Spleen cells from diabetic NOD mice inhibited the insulin release of DBA/2 islet cells. Depletion experiments using monoclonal antibodies demonstrated that inhibitory cells belonged to the Lyt2 positive T lymphocyte subset. The phenomenon was not restricted by the MHC class I K region, shared by NOD and DBA/2 mice, since lymphocytes from diabetic NOD mice also inhibited the insulin secretion of normal Wistar rat islet cells. Inhibitory T cells were detected in overtly diabetic mice but also in non-diabetic females aged 5-11 weeks indicating that they are not secondary to metabolic disturbances and might contribute to their onset. Conversely they were not found in male NOD mice although some of these mice show insulitis. The presence of these inhibitory T cells might thus represent an early and sensitive marker of anti-islet cell-mediated autoimmunity. PMID:3052943

  17. Cell-mediated immune responses and protective efficacy against infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis induced by Hsp65 and hIL-2 fusion protein in mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, C; Yuan, S; Zhang, H; Zhang, T; Wang, L; Xu, Z

    2009-02-01

    Heat shock protein 65 (Hsp65) is an important immunodominant antigen against tuberculosis (TB), and interleukin-2 (IL-2) plays an important role in the regulation of antimycobacteria immune responses. In order to further increase the immunogenicity of Hsp65 against infection caused by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB), we expressed MTB Hsp65 and human IL-2 fusion protein, Hsp65-hIL-2, in Escherichia coli. The expression of Hsp65-hIL-2 was confirmed by Western blotting using anti-Hsp65 MoAb and anti-hIL-2 MoAb, respectively. Hsp65-IL-2 and Hsp65 were then purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. Mice were immunized with purified Hsp65-hIL-2 or Hsp65 emulsified in the adjuvant combination dimethyl dioctadecylammonium bromide and monophosphoryl lipid A. Eight weeks after immunization, there was significant proliferation of spleen lymphocytes in response to both Hsp65 and Hsp65-hIL-2 proteins. Interestingly, Hsp65-hIL-2 fusion protein elicited significantly higher levels of IFN-gamma and IL-2 in the lymphocytes culture supernatant than that of the BCG (Denmark strain) immunized group and Hsp65 group (P < 0.05). After challenging the immunized mice with MTB, the bacteria loads in the spleens and lungs of mice immunized with the fusion protein were significantly lower than Hsp65 alone group, reaching an equivalent level as BCG immunization group. Our results suggest that the Hsp65 and hIL-2 fusion protein may serve as an alternative vaccine candidate against MTB infection. PMID:19144078

  18. An Oral Salmonella-Based Vaccine Inhibits Liver Metastases by Promoting Tumor-Specific T-Cell-Mediated Immunity in Celiac and Portal Lymph Nodes: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Vendrell, Alejandrina; Mongini, Claudia; Gravisaco, María José; Canellada, Andrea; Tesone, Agustina Inés; Goin, Juan Carlos; Waldner, Claudia Inés

    2016-01-01

    Primary tumor excision is one of the most widely used therapies of cancer. However, the risk of metastases development still exists following tumor resection. The liver is a common site of metastatic disease for numerous cancers. Breast cancer is one of the most frequent sources of metastases to the liver. The aim of this work was to evaluate the efficacy of the orally administered Salmonella Typhi vaccine strain CVD 915 on the development of liver metastases in a mouse model of breast cancer. To this end, one group of BALB/c mice was orogastrically immunized with CVD 915, while another received PBS as a control. After 24 h, mice were injected with LM3 mammary adenocarcinoma cells into the spleen and subjected to splenectomy. This oral Salmonella-based vaccine produced an antitumor effect, leading to a decrease in the number and volume of liver metastases. Immunization with Salmonella induced an early cellular immune response in mice. This innate stimulation rendered a large production of IFN-γ by intrahepatic immune cells (IHIC) detected within 24 h. An antitumor adaptive immunity was found in the liver and celiac and portal lymph nodes (LDLN) 21 days after oral bacterial inoculation. The antitumor immune response inside the liver was associated with increased CD4+ and dendritic cell populations as well as with an inflammatory infiltrate located around liver metastatic nodules. Enlarged levels of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and TNF) were also detected in IHIC. Furthermore, a tumor-specific production of IFN-γ and TNF as well as tumor-specific IFN-γ-producing CD8 T cells (CD8+IFN-γ+) were found in the celiac and portal lymph nodes of Salmonella-treated mice. This study provides first evidence for the involvement of LDLN in the development of an efficient cellular immune response against hepatic tumors, which resulted in the elimination of liver metastases after oral Salmonella-based vaccination. PMID:26973649

  19. Design considerations for liposomal vaccines: Influence of formulation parameters on antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to liposome associated antigens

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Douglas S.; Endsley, Aaron N.; Huang, Leaf

    2012-01-01

    Liposomes (phospholipid bilayer vesicles) are versatile and robust delivery systems for induction of antibody and T lymphocyte responses to associated subunit antigens. In the last 15 years, liposome vaccine technology has matured and now several vaccines containing liposome-based adjuvants have been approved for human use or have reached late stages of clinical evaluation. Given the intensifying interest in liposome-based vaccines, it is important to understand precisely how liposomes interact with the immune system and stimulate immunity. It has become clear that the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines – method of antigen attachment, lipid composition, bilayer fluidity, particle charge, and other properties – exert dramatic effects on the resulting immune response. Here, we present a comprehensive review of the physicochemical properties of liposomal vaccines and how they influence immune responses. A discussion of novel and emerging immunomodulators that are suitable for inclusion in liposomal vaccines is also presented. Through a comprehensive analysis of the body of liposomal vaccine literature, we enumerate a series of principles that can guide the rational design of liposomal vaccines to elicit immune responses of a desired magnitude and quality. We also identify major unanswered questions in the field, pointing the direction for future study. PMID:22306376

  20. An investigation of the effect of anti-inflammatory and anti-rheumatoid drugs in cell-mediated immune arthritis in guinea-pigs by microfocal radiography.

    PubMed Central

    Cashin, C. H.; Doherty, N. S.; Jeffries, B. L.; Buckland-Wright, J. C.

    1980-01-01

    Guinea-pigs were sensitized by intra-articular injection of M. tuberculosis (2.0 mg) into one knee joint and arthritis induced in the opposite knee 21 days later by intra-articular injection of antigen (0.2 mg). The time course off the arthritic changes was followed for 25 days by assessment of knee swelling and hind-limb flexion. Twenty-eight days after challenge the experiment was terminated and radiographic changes evaluated by means of a microfocal X-ray unit. The effect of treatment with the anti-rheumatic drugs, D-penicillamine (100 mg/kg by mouth), dexamethasone (0.1 mg/kg i.p.), aspirin (100 mg/kg by mouth), chloroquine phosphate (30 mg/kg by mouth) and sodium aurothiomalate (2 mg/kg i.m.) given daily from 10 days after sensitization until 28 days after challenge was assessed. Changes in joint swelling and hind-limb flexion were maximal 1-3 days after challenge. None of the drug treatments influenced these parameters. Microfocal radiography showed marked changes in arthritis animals of all X-ray parameters measured. It was possible readily to identify joint erosion, trabecular loss and associated osteoporosis, the latter occurring proximal to and relatively remote from the affected joint. None of the treatments prevented the radiographic changes but exacerbation of trabecular number in the area of the epiphysis was seen with aspirin and D-penicillamine and of trabecular density further up the shaft of the femur was seen with D-penicillamine. The changes with D-penicillamine may reflect the potentiation of cell-mediated hypersensitivity with this drug reported by other workers. It was concluded that the model is not suitable for the detection of clinically active anti-rheumatic drugs but that microfocal radiography provides a sensitive index for the assessment of joint damage in small animals. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6775665

  1. Anti-CD40 antibody and toll-like receptor 3 ligand restore dendritic cell-mediated anti-tumor immunity suppressed by morphine

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Cheng; Chen, Yu-Li; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Cheng, Ya-Jung; Jen, Yu-Wei; Chen, Chi-An; Cheng, Wen-Fang; Sun, Wei-Zen

    2016-01-01

    The influence of morphine on host immunity and the underlying mechanism are still unclear. In the current study, we investigated the influence of morphine on dendritic cells (DCs), its possible mechanism of action, and the molecules that could reverse these effects. Morphine suppressed DC maturation, antigen presenting abilities, and the ability to activate antigen-specific CD8+ T cells. Morphine-treated DCs also secreted higher concentrations of IL-10, but lower IL-6 and TNF-α. Morphine-treated DCs showed decreased ERK1/2 phosphorylation and reduced p38 dephosphorylation. The in vivo administration of immuno-modulators, anti-CD40 Ab and TLR3 ligand-poly(I:C), enhanced antigen-specific immunity, promoted the anti-tumor effects, and prolonged the survival of morphine-treated, tumor-bearing mice by promoting the maturation and function of BMM-derived DCs by enhancing ERK1/2 phosphorylation and p38 dephosphorylation. We concluded that morphine can inhibit DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity by suppressing DC maturation and function. Immuno-modulators, such as anti-CD40 Abs and TLR agonists, can restore the DC-mediated anti-tumor immunity. Use of immuno-modulators could serve as a useful approach to overcome the immunocompromised state generated by morphine. PMID:27186393

  2. Cell mediated innate responses of cattle and swine are diverse during foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection: A unique landscape of innate immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogens in general and pathogenic viruses in particular have evolved a myriad of mechanisms to escape the immune response of mammalian species. Viruses that cause acute disease and are rapidly cleared tend to bear characteristics that make them very contagious, as survival does not derive from chr...

  3. Antigen/IgG immune complex-primed mucosal mast cells mediate antigen-specific activation of co-cultured T cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jie; Fang, Yu; Xiang, Zou

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are proposed to be one of the targets for mucosal vaccine adjuvants. We previously demonstrated that mucosal adjuvants containing IgG immune complexes could activate connective tissue mast cells enhancing immune responses. Here we suggest that mucosal mast cells (MMC) may also contribute to augmentation of antigen-specific immune responses following treatment with antigens complexed with IgG. We demonstrated that both bone marrow-derived cultured MMC and tissue resident MMC incorporated ovalbumin (OVA) at a greater level in the presence of anti-OVA IgG. Co-culture of OVA/IgG-pulsed bone marrow-derived MMC with splenocytes from OT-II mice promoted OVA-specific activation and proliferation of T cells, a process known as cross-presentation. Furthermore, bone marrow-derived cultured MMC underwent apoptosis following treatment with IgG immune complexes, a feature that has been described as favouring phagocytosis of mast cells by professional antigen-presenting cells. PMID:25196548

  4. Role of lymphocyte activation products (LAP) in cell-mediated immunity. II. Effects of lymphocyte activation products on lymph node architecture and evidence for peripheral release of LAP following antigenic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, R. H.; Wolstencroft, R. A.; Dumonde, D. C.; Balfour, Brigid M.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported here were concerned with determining the effects of lymphocyte activation products (LAP) on lymph node architecture, and with assaying afferent lymph for evidence of the peripheral release of LAP during the induction of an immune response. Intralymphatic inoculation of purified homologous LAP into guinea-pigs resulted in increased weight and cellular content of the draining node. Histologically these nodes showed paracortical distension and dense aggregations of lymphoid cells or `cellular plugs' in the paracortical sinuses. It was suggested that one effect of LAP may be to cause cellular retention in the paracortex of lymph nodes by regulating the rate of cell exit via the sinuses of the node. The peripheral lymph of rabbits was assayed for its ability to inhibit macrophage migration and to accelerate lymphocyte DNA synthesis after stimulation with three different antigens. The antigens were chosen to give a spectrum which ranged from a primarily humoral response (erythrocyte stimulation) through a mixed humoral and cell-mediated response (diphtheria toxoid stimulation) to a predominantly cell-mediated type of response (skin contact sensitization to fluorodinitrobenzene–FDNB). Paracortical distension with lymphoid cell sinus plugging, similar to that observed in the guinea-pig nodes following intralymphatic injection of LAP, were common features of both the diphtheria toxoid and FDNB responses. It was concluded that the development of this type of sinus plugging and paracortical distension might be related to multiple activities of LAP generated and released either at the peripheral antigen depot or within the draining node. ImagesFig. 5Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4 PMID:4111695

  5. The role of ISCOMATRIX bilayer composition to induce a cell mediated immunity and protection against leishmaniasis in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Mehravaran, Ahmad; Jaafari, Mahmoud Reza; Jalali, Seyed Amir; Khamesipour, Ali; Ranjbar, Reza; Hojatizade, Mansure; Badiee, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): Development of new generation of vaccines against leishmaniasis is possible because long-term protection is usually seen after recovery from cutaneous leishmaniasis. ISCOMATRIX is particulate antigen delivery system composed of antigen, cholesterol, phospholipid and saponin. In this study, the role of ISCOMATRIX bilayer composition made by different phase transition temperature (Tc) to induce a type of immune response and protection against leishmaniasis was assessed. Materials and Methods: ISCOMATRIX formulations with different bilayer compositions consisting of EPC (Tc <0 °C), DMPC (Tc 23 °C) and DSPC (Tc 54 °C) were prepared. Different ISCOMATRIX formulations were mixed with soluble Leishmania antigens (SLA). BALB/c mice were immunized subcutaneously, three times with 2-week intervals. As criteria for protection, footpads swelling, parasite burden, determination of IgG isotypes and the level of IFN-γ and IL-4 were assessed. Results: Although the groups of mice immunized with ISCOMATRIX DMPC or ISCOMATRIX DSPC showed the smallest footpad swelling and least parasite burden compared with the buffer group, the difference was not significant. Moreover, the highest level of IFN- γ and IL-4 was observed in the splenocytes of mice immunized with ISCOMATRIX DMPC or ISCOMATRIX DSPC, respectively. After challenge, the mice immunized with ISCOMATRIX DSPC showed the highest elevation of IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a antibodies (P<0.01) compared with control group. However, our results indicated that ISCOMATRIX EPC, DMPC or DSPC generated a mixed Th1/Th2 response that was not protective. Conclusion: Our results showed that the adjuvanticity of prepared ISCOMATRIX doesn’t influence with different phospholipids at least in our mice model. PMID:27081463

  6. Enhanced early innate and T cell-mediated responses in subjects immunized with Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed Plus CPG 7909 (AV7909).

    PubMed

    Minang, Jacob T; Inglefield, Jon R; Harris, Andrea M; Lathey, Janet L; Alleva, David G; Sweeney, Diane L; Hopkins, Robert J; Lacy, Michael J; Bernton, Edward W

    2014-11-28

    NuThrax™ (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed with CPG 7909 Adjuvant) (AV7909) is in development. Samples obtained in a phase Ib clinical trial were tested to confirm biomarkers of innate immunity and evaluate effects of CPG 7909 (PF-03512676) on adaptive immunity. Subjects received two intramuscular doses of commercial BioThrax(®) (Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed, AVA), or two intramuscular doses of one of four formulations of AV7909. IP-10, IL-6, and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels were elevated 24-48 h after administration of AV7909 formulations, returning to baseline by Day 7. AVA (no CPG 7909) resulted in elevated IL-6 and CRP, but not IP-10. Another marker of CpG, transiently decreased absolute lymphocyte counts (ALCs), correlated with transiently increased IP-10. Cellular recall responses to anthrax protective antigen (PA) or PA peptides were assessed by IFN-γ ELISpot assay performed on cryopreserved PBMCs obtained from subjects prior to immunization and 7 days following the second immunization (study day 21). One-half of subjects that received AV7909 with low-dose (0.25mg/dose) CPG 7909 possessed positive Day 21 T cell responses to PA. In contrast, positive T cell responses occurred at an 11% average rate (1/9) for AVA-treated subjects. Differences in cellular responses due to dose level of CPG 7909 were not associated with differences in humoral anti-PA IgG responses, which were elevated for recipients of AV7909 compared to recipients of AVA. Serum markers at 24 or 48 h (i.e. % ALC decrease, or increase in IL-6, IP-10, or CRP) correlated with the humoral (antibody) responses 1 month later, but did not correlate with cellular ELISpot responses. In summary, biomarkers of early responses to CPG 7909 were confirmed, and adding a CpG adjuvant to a vaccine administered twice resulted in increased T cell effects relative to vaccine alone. Changes in early biomarkers correlated with subsequent adaptive humoral immunity but not cellular immunity. PMID:24530403

  7. The Co-Operonic PE25/PPE41 Protein Complex of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Elicits Increased Humoral and Cell Mediated Immune Response

    PubMed Central

    Tundup, Smanla; Pathak, Niteen; Ramanadham, M.; Mukhopadhyay, Sangita; Murthy, K. J. R.; Ehtesham, Nasreen Z.; Hasnain, Seyed E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Many of the PE/PPE proteins are either surface localized or secreted outside and are thought to be a source of antigenic variation in the host. The exact role of these proteins are still elusive. We previously reported that the PPE41 protein induces high B cell response in TB patients. The PE/PPE genes are not randomly distributed in the genome but are organized as operons and the operon containing PE25 and PPE41 genes co-transcribe and their products interact with each other. Methodology/Principal Finding We now describe the antigenic properties of the PE25, PPE41 and PE25/PPE41 protein complex coded by a single operon. The PPE41 and PE25/PPE41 protein complex induces significant (p<0.0001) B cell response in sera derived from TB patients and in mouse model as compared to the PE25 protein. Further, mice immunized with the PE25/PPE41 complex and PPE41 proteins showed significant (p<0.00001) proliferation of splenocyte as compared to the mice immunized with the PE25 protein and saline. Flow cytometric analysis showed 15–22% enhancement of CD8+ and CD4+ T cell populations when immunized with the PPE41 or PE25/PPE41 complex as compared to a marginal increase (8–10%) in the mice immunized with the PE25 protein. The PPE41 and PE25/PPE41 complex can also induce higher levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-2 cytokines. Conclusion While this study documents the differential immunological response to the complex of PE and PPE vis-à-vis the individual proteins, it also highlights their potential as a candidate vaccine against tuberculosis. PMID:18974870

  8. Differential effects of NOX4 and NOX1 on immune cell-mediated inflammation in the aortic sinus of diabetic ApoE-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Di Marco, Elyse; Gray, Stephen P; Chew, Phyllis; Kennedy, Kit; Cooper, Mark E; Schmidt, Harald H H W; Jandeleit-Dahm, Karin A M

    2016-08-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are central mediators of atherosclerosis particularly in the context of diabetes. The potential interactions between the major producers of vascular reactive oxygen species (ROS), NADPH oxidase (NOX) enzymes and immune-inflammatory processes remain to be fully elucidated. In the present study we investigated the roles of the NADPH oxidase subunit isoforms, NOX4 and NOX1, in immune cell activation and recruitment to the aortic sinus atherosclerotic plaque in diabetic ApoE(-/-) mice. Plaque area analysis showed that NOX4- and NOX1-derived ROS contribute to atherosclerosis in the aortic sinus following 10 weeks of diabetes. Immunohistochemical staining of the plaques revealed that NOX4-derived ROS regulate T-cell recruitment. In addition, NOX4-deficient mice showed a reduction in activated CD4(+) T-cells in the draining lymph nodes of the aortic sinus coupled with reduced pro-inflammatory gene expression in the aortic sinus. Conversely, NOX1-derived ROS appeared to play a more important role in macrophage accumulation. These findings demonstrate distinct roles for NOX4 and NOX1 in immune-inflammatory responses that drive atherosclerosis in the aortic sinus of diabetic mice. PMID:27190136

  9. Protein vaccination with HPV16 E7/Pep-1 nanoparticles elicits a protective T-helper cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Mardani, Golnaz; Bolhassani, Azam; Agi, Elnaz; Shahbazi, Sepideh; Mehdi Sadat, Seyed

    2016-06-01

    Two human papillomavirus (HPV) viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7 represent ideal targets for development of a therapeutic HPV vaccine. It is important to reduce the rate of HPV-associated malignancies through improvement of vaccine modalities. In this study, we used a short amphipathic peptide carrier, Pep-1, for delivery of the full-length HPV16 E7 protein into mammalian cells and evaluated immune responses and protective effects of different formulations in C57BL/6 tumor mice model. Our results showed that the complexes of E7/Pep-1 protein form stable nanoparticles through noncovalent binding with an average size of 120 to 250 nm. The efficient delivery of E7 protein by Pep-1 at molar ratio of 1:20 was detected in HEK-293T cell line for 1 h and 3 h post-transfection. Immunization with E7/Pep-1 nanoparticles at a ratio of 1:20 induced a higher Th1 cellular immune response with the predominant IgG2a and IFN-γ levels than those induced by E7 protein in a murine tumor model. These data suggest that Pep-1 peptide would indicate promising applications for improvement of HPV therapeutic vaccines. © 2016 IUBMB Life, 68(6):459-467, 2016. PMID:27094221

  10. Development of cell-mediated immunity to porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) in caesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets.

    PubMed

    Fort, Maria; Fernandes, Lana T; Nofrarias, Miquel; Díaz, Ivan; Sibila, Marina; Pujols, Joan; Mateu, Enric; Segalés, Joaquim

    2009-05-15

    The interaction between porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) and the pig immune system has been suggested to be a determinant event for the pathogenesis of postweaning multisystemic wasting syndrome (PMWS). To gain insight into the host immune mechanisms developed upon PCV2 infection, early innate and adaptive immune responses were examined in 1-week-old, caesarean-derived, colostrum-deprived piglets using a subclinical infection model of PCV2 in combination with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) as a potential immunostimulation factor. The use of LPS did not show any significant effect on the course of PCV2 infection, nor did in the evolution of the immunological parameters evaluated. Ex vivo responses were detected as early as 1 day post-infection (PI) and consisted of an elevation of the plasmatic levels of interleukin (IL)-8 in PCV2-inoculated pigs followed by an increase on plasmatic IFN-alpha at day 5 PI. Regarding IL-10, only one PCV2-inoculated pig was positive (day 7 PI); this pig was the only one in which viremia persisted until the end of the study. In vitro cytokine determination showed that, regardless of the treatment administrated to the pigs, an IL-10 release was observed when peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) cultures were stimulated with PCV2. Seroconvertion to PCV2 measured by an immunoperoxidase monolayer assay (IPMA) occurred between 7 and 14 days PI, whereas neutralizing antibodies (NA) did not appear until day 29 PI. PCV2 DNA was first detected in serum at day 7 PI, reaching the peak of viremia between days 14 and 21 PI, followed by a drop in viral load that was found coincident with the appearance of PCV2-specific IFN-gamma-secreting cells (PCV2-IFN-gamma-SC) and NA. Results from the present work suggest that viral clearance might be mediated by the development of PCV2-IFN-gamma-SC in contribution to the PCV2-specific NA. PMID:19167096

  11. Co-delivery of PLGA encapsulated invariant NKT cell agonist with antigenic protein induce strong T cell-mediated antitumor immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Dölen, Yusuf; Kreutz, Martin; Gileadi, Uzi; Tel, Jurjen; Vasaturo, Angela; van Dinther, Eric A. W.; van Hout-Kuijer, Maaike A.; Cerundolo, Vincenzo; Figdor, Carl G.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antitumor immunity can be enhanced by the coordinated release and delivery of antigens and immune-stimulating agents to antigen-presenting cells via biodegradable vaccine carriers. So far, encapsulation of TLR ligands and tumor-associated antigens augmented cytotoxic T cell (CTLs) responses. Here, we compared the efficacy of the invariant NKT (iNKT) cell agonist α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer) and TLR ligands (R848 and poly I:C) as an adjuvant for the full length ovalbumin (OVA) in PLGA nanoparticles. We observed that OVA+α-GalCer nanoparticles (NP) are superior over OVA+TLR-L NP in generating and stimulating antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes without the need for CD4+ T cell help. Not only a 4-fold higher induction of antigen-specific T cells was observed, but also a more profound IFN-γ secretion was obtained by the addition α-GalCer. Surprisingly, we observed that mixtures of OVA containing NP with α-GalCer were ineffective, demonstrating that co-encapsulation of both α-GalCer and antigen within the same nanoparticle is essential for the observed T cell responses. Moreover, a single immunization with OVA+α-GalCer NP provided substantial protection from tumor formation and even delayed the growth of already established tumors, which coincided with a prominent and enhanced antigen-specific CD8+ T cell infiltration. The provided evidence on the advantage of antigen and α-GalCer coencapsulation should be considered in the design of future nanoparticle vaccines for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26942088

  12. HIV-1 Adenoviral Vector Vaccines Expressing Multi-Trimeric BAFF and 4-1BBL Enhance T Cell Mediated Anti-Viral Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sachin; Raffa, Francesca N.; Fuller, Katherine A.; Rivas, Yaelis; Philip, Sakhi; Kornbluth, Richard S.; Stone, Geoffrey W.

    2014-01-01

    Adenoviral vectored vaccines have shown considerable promise but could be improved by molecular adjuvants. Ligands in the TNF superfamily (TNFSF) are potential adjuvants for adenoviral vector (Ad5) vaccines based on their central role in adaptive immunity. Many TNFSF ligands require aggregation beyond the trimeric state (multi-trimerization) for optimal biological function. Here we describe Ad5 vaccines for HIV-1 Gag antigen (Ad5-Gag) adjuvanted with the TNFSF ligands 4-1BBL, BAFF, GITRL and CD27L constructed as soluble multi-trimeric proteins via fusion to Surfactant Protein D (SP-D) as a multimerization scaffold. Mice were vaccinated with Ad5-Gag combined with Ad5 expressing one of the SP-D-TNFSF constructs or single-chain IL-12p70 as adjuvant. To evaluate vaccine-induced protection, mice were challenged with vaccinia virus expressing Gag (vaccinia-Gag) which is known to target the female genital tract, a major route of sexually acquired HIV-1 infection. In this system, SP-D-4-1BBL or SP-D-BAFF led to significantly reduced vaccinia-Gag replication when compared to Ad5-Gag alone. In contrast, IL-12p70, SP-D-CD27L and SP-D-GITRL were not protective. Histological examination following vaccinia-Gag challenge showed a dramatic lymphocytic infiltration into the uterus and ovaries of SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF-treated animals. By day 5 post challenge, proinflammatory cytokines in the tissue were reduced, consistent with the enhanced control over viral replication. Splenocytes had no specific immune markers that correlated with protection induced by SP-D-4-1BBL and SP-D-BAFF versus other groups. IL-12p70, despite lack of anti-viral efficacy, increased the total numbers of splenic dextramer positive CD8+ T cells, effector memory T cells, and effector Gag-specific CD8+ T cells, suggesting that these markers are poor predictors of anti-viral immunity in this model. In conclusion, soluble multi-trimeric 4-1BBL and BAFF adjuvants led to strong protection from vaccinia

  13. Efficacy of a modified live porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine in pigs naturally exposed to a heterologous European (Italian cluster) field strain: Clinical protection and cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Paolo; Gozio, Stefano; Ferrari, Luca; Rosina, Stefano; De Angelis, Elena; Quintavalla, Cecilia; Bottarelli, Ezio; Borghetti, Paolo

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess clinical protection in pigs vaccinated with a commercially available attenuated porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) vaccine (Porcilis) PRRS) and then naturally exposed under field conditions to a heterologous (Italian cluster) strain of virulent PRRSV. A total of 30, 4-week-old pigs seronegative for PRRSV were allocated to 1 of 3 groups (IM, ID, and C groups). At 5 weeks of age, pigs of groups IM (n=10 pigs) and ID (n=10 pigs) were vaccinated intramuscularly and intradermally, respectively, with modified live PRRSV-1 vaccine (Porcilis) PRRS). Pigs of group C (n=10 pigs) were kept as non-vaccinated controls. At post-vaccination (PV) days 0, 7, 14, 28, and 45, blood samples were collected for detection of vaccine virus (PCR) and antibody response (ELISA), identification of changes in lymphocyte subpopulations by cytometry, and IFN-gamma PRRSV-specific secreting cells (SC) by ELISpot. At PV day 45, pigs of A, B, and C groups were moved to a site 3 conventional finishing herd with a history of respiratory disease caused by PRRSV and the most common bacteria to be exposed to a natural challenge. The PRRSV field strain, belonging to the Italian cluster of the PRRSV-1, demonstrated a 84% identity with the vaccine virus (DV strain) at ORF5 sequencing. At 0 (exposure day=45 days PV), 4, 7, 11, 14, 19, 21, 28, and 34 days post-exposure (PE) blood samples were collected for detection and titration of PRRSV and antibody, as well as for lymphocyte and IFN-gamma measurement as described above. Throughout the post-exposure period, all pigs were observed daily for clinical signs. The overall clinical signs were reduced by 68 and 72%, respectively in the intramuscularly and intradermally vaccinated pigs compared to controls. Respiratory signs were reduced by 72 and 80%, respectively in the IM and ID groups. Clinical protection was associated with marked activation of cell-mediated immune response. The highest levels of

  14. Acute Morphine Administration Reduces Cell-Mediated Immunity and Induces Reactivation of Latent Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 in BALB/c Mice

    PubMed Central

    Mojadadi, Shafi; Jamali, Abbas; Khansarinejad, Behzad; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Bamdad, Taravat

    2009-01-01

    Acute morphine administration is known to alter the course of herpes simplex virus infection. In this study, the effect of acute morphine administration on the reactivation of latent herpes was investigated in a mouse model. Because of the important role of cytolytic T lymphocyte (CTL) activity in the inhibition of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) reactivation, the effect of acute morphine administration on CTL responses was also evaluated. Furthermore, lymphocyte proliferation and IFN-γ production were evaluated for their roles in the induction of the CTL response. The findings showed that acute morphine administration significantly reduced CTL responses, lymphocyte proliferation, and IFN-γ production. Furthermore, acute morphine administration has been shown to reactivate latent HSV-1. Previous studies have shown that cellular immune responses have important roles in the inhibition of HSV reactivation. These findings suggest that suppression of a portion of the cellular immune response after acute morphine administration may constitute one part of the mechanism that induces HSV reactivation. PMID:19403060

  15. Peptide vaccination of mice immune to LCMV or vaccinia virus causes serious CD8+ T cell-mediated, TNF-dependent immunopathology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Feuer, Ralph; Hassett, Daniel E.; Whitton, J. Lindsay

    2006-01-01

    CD8+ T cells play a key role in clearing primary virus infections and in protecting against subsequent challenge. The potent antiviral effects of these cells make them important components of vaccine-induced immunity and, because of this, peptide vaccines often contain epitopes designed to induce strong CD8+ T cell responses. However, the same effector functions that protect the host also can be harmful if they are not tightly regulated, and virus-specific CD8+ T cells are a frequent cause of immunopathology. Here, we report that the administration of peptide to virus-immune recipient mice can lead to the synchronous activation of preexisting virus-specific CD8+ T cells with serious, and even lethal, consequences. Mice infected with LCMV or vaccinia virus developed rapid and profound hypothermia following injection of cognate synthetic peptides, and LCMV-infected mice frequently died within hours. Detailed analyses of the LCMV infected mice revealed enterocyte apoptosis and implicated TNF produced by peptide-specific CD8+ T cells as the major mediator of disease. The caspase inhibitor zVADfmk had no demonstrable effect on the development of hypothermia, but diminished enterocyte apoptosis and greatly reduced the number of deaths. These findings, if similarly observed in patients, counsel caution when administering powerful immunogens such as peptide vaccines to individuals who may have a large preexisting pool of epitope-specific CD8+ T cells. PMID:16424939

  16. Cell-mediated immunity to schistosomes. Evaluation of mechanisms operating against lung-stage parasites which might be exploited in a vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pemberton, R M; Malaquias, L C; Falcao, P L; Silveira, A M; Rabello, A L; Katz, N; Amorim, M; Mountford, A P; Coffman, R L; Correa-Oliveira, R

    1994-01-01

    This report describes parallel studies examining T cell and cytokine responses to Schistosoma mansoni in mice and man. The prevalence of IFNg production amongst murine (C57BL/6) T cell lines and clones, plus good DTH reactivity by IFNg-secreting clones, highlights the predominance of the Th1 response in the pulmonary immunity characteristics of the murine irradiated vaccine model. In human studies, effects of anti-cytokine antibodies on the proliferation of PBMC from human patients to various soluble schistosome antigen preparations have been examined. Data suggest that both Th1 (against early antigens) and Th2 (against late antigens) responses are present. A role for IL-10 is highlighted in chronic intestinal, but not acute or chronic hepatosplenic patients, as a downregulator of responses which are associated with morbidity and are against late stage antigens. PMID:7825229

  17. Equine Neonates Have Attenuated Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses to a Killed Adjuvanted Vaccine Compared to Adult Horses ▿

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Clare; Giguère, Steeve

    2010-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare relative vaccine-specific serum immunoglobulin concentrations, vaccine-specific lymphoproliferative responses, and cytokine profiles of proliferating lymphocytes between 3-day-old foals, 3-month-old foals, and adult horses after vaccination with a killed adjuvanted vaccine. Horses were vaccinated intramuscularly twice at 3-week intervals with a vaccine containing antigens from bovine viral respiratory pathogens to avoid interference from maternal antibody. Both groups of foals and adult horses responded to the vaccine with a significant increase in vaccine-specific IgGa and IgG(T) concentrations. In contrast, only adult horses and 3-month-old foals mounted significant vaccine-specific total IgG, IgGb, and IgM responses. Vaccine-specific concentrations of IgM and IgG(T) were significantly different between all groups, with the highest concentrations occurring in adult horses, followed by 3-month-old foals and, finally, 3-day-old foals. Only the adult horses mounted significant vaccine-specific lymphoproliferative responses. Baseline gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and interleukin-4 (IL-4) concentrations were significantly lower in 3-day-old foals than in adult horses. Vaccination resulted in a significant decrease in IFN-γ concentrations in adult horses and a significant decrease in IL-4 concentrations in 3-day-old foals. After vaccination, the ratio of IFN-γ/IL-4 in both groups of foals was significantly higher than that in adult horses. The results of this study indicate that the humoral and lymphoproliferative immune responses to this killed adjuvanted vaccine are modest in newborn foals. Although immune responses improve with age, 3-month-old foals do not respond with the same magnitude as adult horses. PMID:20943883

  18. Radiation-induced matrix metalloproteinases limit natural killer cell-mediated anticancer immunity in NCI-H23 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Heo, Woong; Lee, Young Shin; Son, Cheol Hun; Yang, Kwangmo; Park, You Soo; Bae, Jaeho

    2015-03-01

    Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer for >100 years and is required by numerous patients with cancer. Ionizing radiation effectively inhibits the growth of cancer cells by inducing cell death and increasing anticancer immunity, through the induction of natural killer group 2 member D ligands (NKG2DLs); however, adverse effects have also been reported, including the promotion of metastasis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are induced by ionizing radiation and have an important role in the invasion and metastasis of cancer cells. Previously, MMPs were demonstrated to increase the shedding of NKG2DLs, which may reduce the surface expression of NKG2DLs on cancer cells. As a consequence, the cancer cells may escape natural killer (NK)‑mediated anticancer immunity. In the present study, NCI‑H23 human non‑small cell lung cancer cells were used to investigate the combined effects of ionizing radiation and MMP inhibitors on the expression levels of NKG2DLs. Ionizing radiation increased the expression of MMP2 and ADAM metalloproteinase domain 10 protease, as well as NKG2DLs. The combined treatment of ionizing radiation and MMP inhibitors increased the surface expression levels of NKG2DLs and resulted in the increased susceptibility of the cancer cells to NK‑92 natural killer cells. Furthermore, soluble NKG2DLs were increased in the media by ionizing radiation and blocked by MMP inhibitors. The present study suggests that radiotherapy may result in the shedding of soluble NKG2DLs, through the induction of MMP2, and combined treatment with MMP inhibitors may minimize the adverse effects of radiotherapy. PMID:25385045

  19. Mycobacterium-Specific γ9δ2 T Cells Mediate Both Pathogen-Inhibitory and CD40 Ligand-Dependent Antigen Presentation Effects Important for Tuberculosis Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles T.; Hamzabegovic, Fahreta; Blazevic, Azra; Xia, Mei

    2015-01-01

    Numerous pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, can activate human γ9δ2 T cells to proliferate and express effector mechanisms. γ9δ2 T cells can directly inhibit the growth of intracellular mycobacteria and may also act as antigen-presenting cells (APC). Despite evidence for γδ T cells having the capacity to function as APC, the mechanisms involved and importance of these effects on overall tuberculosis (TB) immunity are unknown. We prepared M. tuberculosis-specific γ9δ2 T cell lines to study their direct protective effects and APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells. The direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria were measured, and the enhancing effects on proliferative and effector responses of αβ T cells assessed. Furthermore, the importance of cell-to-cell contact and soluble products for γ9δ2 T cell effector responses and APC functions were investigated. We demonstrate, in addition to direct inhibitory effects on intracellular mycobacteria, the following: (i) γ9δ2 T cells enhance the expansion of M. tuberculosis-specific αβ T cells and increase the ability of αβ T cells to inhibit intracellular mycobacteria; (ii) although soluble mediators are critical for the direct inhibitory effects of γ9δ2 T cells, their APC functions do not require soluble mediators; (iii) the APC functions of γ9δ2 T cells involve cell-to-cell contact that is dependent on CD40-CD40 ligand (CD40L) interactions; and (iv) fully activated CD4+ αβ T cells and γ9δ2 T cells provide similar immune enhancing/APC functions for M. tuberculosis-specific T cells. These effector and helper effects of γ9δ2 T cells further indicate that these T cells should be considered important new targets for new TB vaccines. PMID:26644385

  20. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: the next generation of gene-engineered immune cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, L J; Moeller, M; Darcy, P K

    2009-10-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy involving transfer of tumor-reactive T cells has shown some notable antitumor responses in a minority of cancer patients. In particular, transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes has resulted in long-term objective responses in patients with advanced melanoma. However, the inability to isolate sufficient numbers of tumor-specific T cells from most malignancies has restricted the broad utility of this approach. An emerging approach to circumvent this limitation involves the genetic modification of effector cells with T cell receptor (TCR) transgenes or chimeric single-chain variable fragment (scFv) receptors that can specifically redirect T cells to tumor. There has been much progress in the design of TCR and scFv receptors to enhance the antigen-specific activation of effector cells and their trafficking and persistence in vivo. Considerable effort has been directed toward improving the safety of this approach and reducing the immunogenicity of the receptor. This review discusses the latest developments in the field of adoptive immunotherapy using genetically modified immune cells that have been transduced with either TCR or scFv receptor transgenes and used in preclinical and clinical settings as anticancer agents. PMID:19775368

  1. Alleviation of collagen-induced arthritis by the benzoxathiole derivative BOT-4-one in mice: Implication of the Th1- and Th17-cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byung-Hak; Yoon, Bo Ruem; Kim, Eun Kyoung; Noh, Kum Hee; Kwon, Sun-Ho; Yi, Eun Hee; Lee, Hyun Gyu; Choi, Jung Sook; Kang, Seong Wook; Park, In-Chul; Lee, Won-Woo; Ye, Sang-Kyu

    2016-06-15

    Autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis is characterized by chronic inflammation and hyperplasia in the synovial joints. Although the cause of rheumatoid arthritis is largely unknown, substantial evidence has supported the importance of immune cells and inflammatory cytokines in the initiation and progression of this disease. Herein, we demonstrated that the benzoxathiole derivative 2-cyclohexylimino-6-methyl-6,7-dihydro-5H-benzo[1,3]oxathiol-4-one (BOT-4-one) alleviated type II collagen-induced arthritis in a mouse model. The levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines are elevated in both human patients with rheumatoid arthritis and mice with collagen-induced arthritis. BOT-4-one treatment reduced the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines in mice and endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. BOT-4-one treatment suppressed the polarization of Th1- and Th17-cell subsets by inhibiting the expression and production of their lineage-specific master transcription factors and cytokines, as well as activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription proteins. In addition, BOT-4-one inhibited mitogen-activated protein kinase and NF-kappaB signaling as well as the transcriptional activities and DNA-binding of transcription factors, including activator protein-1, cAMP response element-binding protein and NF-kappaB. Our results suggest that BOT-4-one may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of chronic inflammation associated with autoimmune rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:27005941

  2. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R; Williams, Richard O; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B; Venables, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  3. Induction of Humoral and Cell-Mediated Immune Responses by Hepatitis B Virus Epitope Displayed on the Virus-Like Particles of Prawn Nodavirus

    PubMed Central

    Yong, Chean Yeah; Yeap, Swee Keong; Goh, Zee Hong; Ho, Kok Lian; Omar, Abdul Rahman

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a deadly pathogen that has killed countless people worldwide. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived HBV vaccines based upon hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly effective. However, the emergence of vaccine escape mutants due to mutations on the HBsAg and polymerase genes has produced a continuous need for the development of new HBV vaccines. In this study, the “a” determinant within HBsAg was displayed on the recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV), which can be purified easily in a single step through immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The purified protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) when observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric protein induced specific antibodies against the “a” determinant. In addition, it induced significantly more natural killer and cytotoxic T cells, as well as an increase in interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secretion, which are vital for virus clearance. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that the MrNV capsid protein is a potential carrier for the HBV “a” determinant, which can be further extended to display other foreign epitopes. This paper is the first to report the application of MrNV VLPs as a novel platform to display foreign epitopes. PMID:25416760

  4. Oral administration of Aloe vera gel, anti-microbial and anti-inflammatory herbal remedy, stimulates cell-mediated immunity and antibody production in a mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Bałan, Barbara Joanna; Niemcewicz, Marcin; Kocik, Janusz; Jung, Leszek; Skopiński, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Aloe vera (L.) Burm. f. (Aloe barbadensis Mill) Liliaceae, succulent plant native to northern Africa, is presently cultivated in many regions of the world. Traditionally, its inner part of parenchyma, which contains aloe gel, was used for the treatment of minor wounds, inflammatory skin disorders, thermal and radiation burns and to alleviate chronic osteoarthritis pain. It also possesses some antimicrobial activity. Now, aloe gel is also increasingly consumed as a dietary supplement. Some data suggest its immunomodulatory properties. The aim of the study The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of orally administered aloe gel on some parameters of cellular and humoral immunity viz. mitogen-induced proliferation of splenic lymphocytes and their chemokinetic activity, and anti-sheep red blood cells (SRBC) antibody production in Balb/c mice. Results Daily treatment of mice for 14 and 21 days with 50 µl or 150 µl of aloe gel dose resulted in enhanced chemokinetic activity and stronger response of their splenic lymphocytes to mitogen PHA and enhancement of anti-SRBC antibody production. PMID:26155113

  5. Induction of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses by hepatitis B virus epitope displayed on the virus-like particles of prawn nodavirus.

    PubMed

    Yong, Chean Yeah; Yeap, Swee Keong; Goh, Zee Hong; Ho, Kok Lian; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Tan, Wen Siang

    2015-02-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is a deadly pathogen that has killed countless people worldwide. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-derived HBV vaccines based upon hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) is highly effective. However, the emergence of vaccine escape mutants due to mutations on the HBsAg and polymerase genes has produced a continuous need for the development of new HBV vaccines. In this study, the "a" determinant within HBsAg was displayed on the recombinant capsid protein of Macrobrachium rosenbergii nodavirus (MrNV), which can be purified easily in a single step through immobilized metal affinity chromatography (IMAC). The purified protein self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs) when observed under a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Immunization of BALB/c mice with this chimeric protein induced specific antibodies against the "a" determinant. In addition, it induced significantly more natural killer and cytotoxic T cells, as well as an increase in interferon gamma (IFN-γ) secretion, which are vital for virus clearance. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that the MrNV capsid protein is a potential carrier for the HBV "a" determinant, which can be further extended to display other foreign epitopes. This paper is the first to report the application of MrNV VLPs as a novel platform to display foreign epitopes. PMID:25416760

  6. Abrogation of collagen-induced arthritis by a peptidyl arginine deiminase inhibitor is associated with modulation of T cell-mediated immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Kawalkowska, Joanna; Quirke, Anne-Marie; Ghari, Fatemeh; Davis, Simon; Subramanian, Venkataraman; Thompson, Paul R.; Williams, Richard O.; Fischer, Roman; La Thangue, Nicholas B.; Venables, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Proteins containing citrulline, a post-translational modification of arginine, are generated by peptidyl arginine deiminases (PAD). Citrullinated proteins have pro-inflammatory effects in both innate and adaptive immune responses. Here, we examine the therapeutic effects in collagen-induced arthritis of the second generation PAD inhibitor, BB-Cl-amidine. Treatment after disease onset resulted in the reversal of clinical and histological changes of arthritis, associated with a marked reduction in citrullinated proteins in lymph nodes. There was little overall change in antibodies to collagen or antibodies to citrullinated peptides, but a shift from pro-inflammatory Th1 and Th17-type responses to pro-resolution Th2-type responses was demonstrated by serum cytokines and antibody subtypes. In lymph node cells from the arthritic mice treated with BB-Cl-amidine, there was a decrease in total cell numbers but an increase in the proportion of Th2 cells. BB-Cl-amidine had a pro-apoptotic effect on all Th subsets in vitro with Th17 cells appearing to be the most sensitive. We suggest that these immunoregulatory effects of PAD inhibition in CIA are complex, but primarily mediated by transcriptional regulation. We suggest that targeting PADs is a promising strategy for the treatment of chronic inflammatory disease. PMID:27210478

  7. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIV{sub KU2} infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    SciTech Connect

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Hill, Lori; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Feng Lei; Simmons, Johnny; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2008-01-05

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-{gamma}-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIV{sub KU2}. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-{gamma} production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-{gamma} producing CD4{sup +} cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies.

  8. Successful Therapy of Murine Visceral Leishmaniasis with Astrakurkurone, a Triterpene Isolated from the Mushroom Astraeus hygrometricus, Involves the Induction of Protective Cell-Mediated Immunity and TLR9.

    PubMed

    Mallick, Suvadip; Dutta, Aritri; Chaudhuri, Ankur; Mukherjee, Debasri; Dey, Somaditya; Halder, Subhadra; Ghosh, Joydip; Mukherjee, Debarati; Sultana, Sirin Salma; Biswas, Gunjan; Lai, Tapan Kumar; Patra, Pradyumna; Sarkar, Indranil; Chakraborty, Sibani; Saha, Bhaskar; Acharya, Krishnendu; Pal, Chiranjib

    2016-05-01

    In our previous report, we showed that astrakurkurone, a triterpene isolated from the Indian mushroom Astraeus hygrometricus (Pers.) Morgan, induced reactive oxygen species, leading to apoptosis in Leishmania donovani promastigotes, and also was effective in inhibiting intracellular amastigotes at the 50% inhibitory concentration of 2.5 μg/ml. The aim of the present study is to characterize the associated immunomodulatory potentials and cellular activation provided by astrakurkurone, leading to effective antileishmanial activity in vitro and in vivo Astrakurkurone-mediated antileishmanial activity was evaluated by real-time PCR and flow cytometry. The involvement of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) was studied by in vitro assay in the presence of a TLR9 agonist and antagonist and by in silico modeling of a three-dimensional structure of the ectodomain of TLR9 and its interaction with astrakurkurone. Astrakurkurone caused a significant increase in TLR9 expression of L. donovani-infected macrophages along with the activation of proinflammatory responses. The involvement of TLR9 in astrakurkurone-mediated amastigote killing has been evidenced from the fact that a TLR9 agonist (CpG, ODN 1826) in combination with astrakurkurone enhanced the amastigote killing, while a TLR9 antagonist (bafilomycin A1) alone or in combination with astrakurkurone curbed the amastigote killing, which could be further justified by in silico evidence of docking between mouse TLR9 and astrakurkurone. Astrakurkurone was found to reduce the parasite burden in vivo by inducing protective cytokines, gamma interferon and interleukin 17. Moreover, astrakurkurone was nontoxic toward peripheral blood mononuclear cells of immunocompromised patients with visceral leishmaniasis. Astrakurkurone, a nontoxic antileishmanial, enhances the immune efficiency of host cells, leading to parasite clearance in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26883702

  9. One dose of a porcine circovirus 2 subunit vaccine induces humoral and cell-mediated immunity and protects against porcine circovirus-associated disease under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Martelli, Paolo; Ferrari, Luca; Morganti, Marina; De Angelis, Elena; Bonilauri, Paolo; Guazzetti, Stefano; Caleffi, Antonio; Borghetti, Paolo

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a one-dose porcine circovirus 2 (PCV2) subunit vaccine based on the PCV2 Cap protein expressed in a baculovirus system on two different farms at which a history of porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVD) was present. Morbidity, mortality, average daily weight gain, carcass weight, PCV2 load in serum and vaccine immunogenicity were assessed. Serology to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) and Mycoplasma hyopneumoniae was performed. A double-blind, randomised, and controlled field trial was performed distributing 818 piglets between two treatment groups. At inclusion (weaning at 21 ± 3 days of age), 408 animals (group B) received a 2-mL intramuscular dose of Porcilis PCV(®) (vaccinated group). Controls (group A, 410 pigs) received 2 mL of the adjuvant Diluvac Forte(®) intramuscularly. Weights were recorded at inclusion and at 12 and 26 weeks of age, and the average daily weight gain (ADWG) was calculated. The carcass weights of the pigs from farm 2 were recorded at slaughter (274 days old). All dead animals (died or culled) underwent autopsy to classify them as PMWS-affected or not. At each farm, blood samples were taken from 22 pigs/group for serologic studies. A beneficial effect was found after vaccination with a single dose of a PCV2 Cap vaccine against PCVD. The vaccination reduced the mortality rate and morbidity, reduced PCV2 viremia and viral load, improved productive performances (e.g. ADWG: +70 g/day between 12 and 26 weeks of age when viremia and the specific disease occurred) as well as carcass weight at slaughter age (+4.5 kg). These effects were associated with virologic and clinical protection from the immunogenicity of the vaccine measured as activation of both a humoral and a cellular immune response. PMID:21216540

  10. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Sestak, Karol; Thwin, Hazel; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P.; Liu, David X.; Moehs, Charles P.

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten) barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS) and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading—by co-administration of additional treatments. PMID:25756783

  11. Heme oxygenase-1 exerts a protective role in ovalbumin-induced neutrophilic airway inflammation by inhibiting Th17 cell-mediated immune response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjie; Zhang, Liya; Wu, Jinhong; Di, Caixia; Xia, Zhenwei

    2013-11-29

    Allergic asthma is conventionally considered as a Th2 immune response characterized by eosinophilic inflammation. Recent investigations revealed that Th17 cells play an important role in the pathogenesis of non-eosinophilic asthma (NEA), resulting in steroid-resistant neutrophilic airway inflammation. Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has anti-inflammation, anti-oxidation, and anti-apoptosis functions. However, its role in NEA is still unclear. Here, we explore the role of HO-1 in a mouse model of NEA. HO-1 inducer hemin or HO-1 inhibitor tin protoporphyrin IX was injected intraperitoneally into ovalbumin-challenged DO11.10 mice. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) was delivered into mice to knock down HO-1 expression. The results show that induction of HO-1 by hemin attenuated airway inflammation and decreased neutrophil infiltration in bronchial alveolar lavage fluid and was accompanied by a lower proportion of Th17 cells in mediastinal lymph nodes and spleen. More importantly, induction of HO-1 down-regulated Th17-related transcription factor retinoic acid-related orphan receptor γt (RORγt) expression and decreased IL-17A levels, all of which correlated with a decrease in phosphorylated STAT3 (p-STAT3) level and inhibition of Th17 cell differentiation. Consistently, the above events could be reversed by tin protoporphyrin IX. Also, HO-1 siRNA transfection abolished the effect of hemin induced HO-1 in vivo. Meanwhile, the hemin treatment promoted the level of Foxp3 expression and enhanced the proportion of regulatory T cells (Tregs). Collectively, our findings indicate that HO-1 exhibits anti-inflammatory activity in the mouse model of NEA via inhibition of the p-STAT3-RORγt pathway, regulating kinetics of RORγt and Foxp3 expression, thus providing a possible novel therapeutic target in asthmatic patients. PMID:24097973

  12. Safety, Humoral and Cell Mediated Immune Responses to Two Formulations of an Inactivated, Split-Virion Influenza A/H5N1 Vaccine in Children

    PubMed Central

    Chotpitayasunondh, Tawee; Thisyakorn, Usa; Pancharoen, Chitsanu; Pepin, Stephanie; Nougarede, Nolwenn

    2008-01-01

    Background Highly pathogenic influenza A/H5N1 has caused outbreaks in wild birds and poultry in Asia, Africa and Europe. It has also infected people, especially children, causing severe illness and death. Although the virus shows limited ability to transmit between humans, A/H5N1 represents a potential source of the next influenza pandemic. This study assesses the safety and immunogenicity of aluminium hydroxide adjuvanted (Al) and non adjuvanted influenza A/Vietnam/1194/2004 NIBRG-14 (H5N1) vaccine in children. Methods and Findings In a Phase II, open, randomised, multicentre trial 180 children aged 6 months to 17 years received two injections, 21 days apart, of vaccine containing either: 30 µg haemagglutinin (HA) with adjuvant (30 µg+Al) or 7.5 µg HA without adjuvant. An additional 60 children aged 6–35 months received two “half dose” injections (ie 15 µg+Al or 3.8 µg). Safety was followed for 21 days after vaccination. Antibody responses were assessed 21 days after each injection and cellular immune responses were explored. Vaccination appeared well tolerated in all age groups. The 30 µg+Al formulation was more immunogenic than 7.5 µg in all age groups: in these two groups 79% and 46% had haemagglutinination inhibition antibody titres ≥32 (1/dil). Among 6–35 month-olds, the full doses were more immunogenic than their half dose equivalents. Vaccination induced a predominantly Th2 response against H5 HA. Conclusions This influenza A(H5N1) vaccine was well tolerated and immunogenic in children and infants, with Al adjuvant providing a clear immunogenic advantage. These results demonstrate that an H5N1 Al-adjuvanted vaccine, previously shown to be immunogenic and safe in adults, can also be used in children, the group most at risk for pandemic influenza. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00491985 PMID:19112513

  13. Co-incubation with IL-18 potentiates antigen-specific IFN-γ response in a whole-blood stimulation assay for measurement of cell-mediated immune responses in pigs experimentally infected with Lawsonia intracellularis.

    PubMed

    Riber, Ulla; Boesen, Henriette Toft; Jakobsen, Jeanne T; Nguyen, Lien T M; Jungersen, Gregers

    2011-02-15

    The whole-blood interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) assay is a quantitative in vitro assay for a direct read-out of Ag-specific cell-mediated immune (CMI) responses to infectious diseases. The IFN-γ assay is robust in severe intracellular infections like Brucella or mycobacteria, but more difficult to evaluate for less severe or immunocompromising infections. Here we investigated the performance of the assay when recombinant co-stimulatory cytokines IL-12 and/or IL-18 were added along with Ag or PBS to cultures of whole-blood from pigs infected with Lawsonia intracellularis. In pigs recovering from a natural infection, addition of rIL-12 or rIL-18 alone increased the Ag-specific IFN-γ release while addition of both cytokines resulted in increased IFN-γ release also in PBS cultures. In analyses after experimental infections with L. intracellularis, significant increased levels of Ag-specific IFN-γ production were measured in Ag+rIL-18 cultures from infected pigs compared to the background response in PBS+rIL-18 control samples (p<0.01) or to Ag+rIL-18 cultures from non-inoculated control pigs (p<0.05). Flow cytometry identified two lymphocyte subsets as the Ag-specific IFN-γ producers. The highest IFN-γ production was by CD4(+)CD8(+) cells while a more numerous population of CD4(-)CD8(+) cells produced lower amounts of IFN-γ in response to rIL-18 and L. intracellularis Ag. PMID:20889217

  14. Echinococcus multilocularis proliferation in mice and respective parasite 14-3-3 gene expression is mainly controlled by an αβ+ CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune response

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Wen Juan; Waldvogel, Andreas; Siles-Lucas, Mar; Gottstein, Bruno

    2004-01-01

    The role of specific B lymphocytes and T-cell populations in the control of experimental Echinococus multilocularis infection was studied in µMT, nude, T-cell receptor (TCR)-β–/–, major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-I–/– and MHC-II–/– mice. At 2 months postinfection, the parasite mass was more than 10 times higher in nude, TCR-β–/– and MHC-II–/– mice than in infected C57BL/6 wild-type (WT) mice, and these T-cell-deficient mice started to die of the high parasite load at this time-point. In contrast, MHC-I–/– and µMT mice exhibited parasite growth rates similar to those found in WT controls. These findings clearly point to the major role that CD4+ αβ+ T cells play in limiting the E. multilocularis proliferation, while CD8+ T and B cells appeared to play a minor role in the control of parasite growth. In the absence of T cells, especially CD4+ or αβ+ T cells, the cellular immune response to infection was impaired, as documented by the lack of hepatic granuloma formation around the parasite and by a decreased splenocyte responsiveness to concanavalin A (Con A) and parasite antigen stimulation. Surprisingly, in T-cell-deficient mice, the ex vivo expression of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and other inflammatory cytokines (except for interleukin-6) were increased in association with a high parasite load. Thus, the relative protection mediated by CD4+ αβ+ T cells against E. multilocularis infection seemed not be IFN-γ dependent, but rather to rely on the effector's function of CD4+ αβ+ T cells. The local restriction of parasite germinal cell proliferation was reflected by a regulatory effect on the expression of 14-3-3 protein within the parasite tissue in T-cell-deficient mice. These results provide a strong indication that the CD4+ αβ+ T-cell-mediated immune response contributes to the control of the parasite growth and to the regulation of production of the parasite 14-3-3 protein in metacestode tissues. PMID:15196217

  15. Mast Cell-Mediated Mechanisms of Nociception

    PubMed Central

    Aich, Anupam; Afrin, Lawrence B.; Gupta, Kalpna

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells are tissue-resident immune cells that release immuno-modulators, chemo-attractants, vasoactive compounds, neuropeptides and growth factors in response to allergens and pathogens constituting a first line of host defense. The neuroimmune interface of immune cells modulating synaptic responses has been of increasing interest, and mast cells have been proposed as key players in orchestrating inflammation-associated pain pathobiology due to their proximity to both vasculature and nerve fibers. Molecular underpinnings of mast cell-mediated pain can be disease-specific. Understanding such mechanisms is critical for developing disease-specific targeted therapeutics to improve analgesic outcomes. We review molecular mechanisms that may contribute to nociception in a disease-specific manner. PMID:26690128

  16. Passive adoptive transfer of antitumor immunity induced by laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment in a rat metastatic breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    The ideal cancer treatment modalities should not only cause tumor regression and eradication but also induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity. This is essential for control of metastatic tumors and for long-term tumor resistance. Laser immunotherapy using a laser, a laser-absorbing dye and an immunoadjuvant has induced such a long-term immunity in treatment of a mammary metastatic tumor. The successfully treated rats established total resistance to multiple subsequent tumor challenges. For further mechanistic studies of the antitumor immunity induced by this novel treatment modality, passive adoptive transfer was performed using splenocytes as immune cells. The spleen cells harvested from successfully treated tumor-bearing rats provided 100% immunity in the naive recipients. The passively protected first cohort rats were immune to tumor challenge with an increased tumor dose; their splenocytes also prevented the establishment of tumor in the second cohort of naive recipient rats. This immunity transfer was accomplished without the usually required T-cell suppression in recipients.

  17. The other way around: probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restrict progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice via activiation of CD8 alpha+ immune cell-mediated immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine the immune-modulating effects of feeding a novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD) in rumi...

  18. Effects of injectable trace minerals on humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to Bovine viral diarrhea virus, Bovine herpes virus 1 and Bovine respiratory syncytial virus following administration of a modified-live virus vaccine in dairy calves.

    PubMed

    Palomares, R A; Hurley, D J; Bittar, J H J; Saliki, J T; Woolums, A R; Moliere, F; Havenga, L J; Norton, N A; Clifton, S J; Sigmund, A B; Barber, C E; Berger, M L; Clark, M J; Fratto, M A

    2016-10-01

    Our objective was to evaluate the effect of an injectable trace mineral (ITM) supplement containing zinc, manganese, selenium, and copper on the humoral and cell mediated immune (CMI) responses to vaccine antigens in dairy calves receiving a modified-live viral (MLV) vaccine containing BVDV, BHV1, PI3V and BRSV. A total of 30 dairy calves (3.5 months of age) were administered a priming dose of the MLV vaccine containing BHV1, BVDV1 & 2, BRSV, PI3V, and an attenuated-live Mannheimia-Pasteurella bacterin subcutaneously (SQ). Calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 groups: (1) administration of ITM SQ (ITM, n=15) or (2) injection of sterile saline SQ (Control; n=15). Three weeks later, calves received a booster of the same vaccine combination SQ, and a second administration of ITM, or sterile saline, according to the treatment group. Blood samples were collected on days 0, 7, 14, 21, 28, 42, 56, and 90 post-vaccination for determination of antibody titer, viral recall antigen-induced IFN-γ production, and viral antigen-induced proliferation by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Administration of ITM concurrently with MLV vaccination resulted in higher antibody titers to BVDV1 on day 28 after priming vaccination compared to the control group (P=0.03). Calves treated with ITM showed an earlier enhancement in PBMC proliferation to BVDV1 following vaccination compared to the control group. Proliferation of PBMC after BVDV stimulation tended to be higher on day 14 after priming vaccination in calves treated with ITM than in the control group (P=0.08). Calves that received ITM showed higher PBMC proliferation to BRSV stimulation on day 7 after priming vaccination compared to the control group (P=0.01). Moreover, calves in the ITM group also had an enhanced production IFN-γ by PBMC after stimulation with BRSV on day 21 after priming vaccination compared to day 0 (P<0.01). In conclusion, administration of ITM concurrently with MLV vaccination in dairy calves

  19. Adoptive transfer of immune subsets prior to MCAO does not exacerbate stroke outcome in splenectomized mice

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jianming; Dotson, Abby L.; Murphy, Stephanie J.; Offner, Halina; Saugstad, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    The peripheral immune response contributes to neurologic impairment after stroke and the extent of initial damage is greater in males than females. We have previously shown that spleen cells directly contribute to ischemic damage in males, as splenectomy prior to experimental stroke eliminates the sex differences in infarct volume. This study aims to determine which specific subset of immune cells exert pathogenic effects when injected 24 hours before MCAO induction into splenectomized male and female WT mice. The results demonstrate that CD4/CD8/CD11b treated mice had no significant effect on infarct volumes vs. vehicle-treated control mice after MCAO. However, there were significant alterations to the resident peripheral immune composition. These results suggest that there are regulatory factors resulting from splenectomy or other possible influences that inhibit peripheral immune cell contribution to neuroinflammation and thus contributing to differential effects of the spleen on stroke outcome in males and female mice. PMID:26634148

  20. Improving clinical outcomes using adoptively transferred immune cells from umbilical cord blood.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Cruz, Conrad Russell; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Bollard, Catherine M

    2010-10-01

    Because of the necessary immunodepletion prior to cord blood transplantation as well as the immaturity of cord blood immune cells, recipients experience a high incidence of viral infection in addition to complications observed after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, such as relapse and graft-versus-host disease. We describe current immunotherapeutic approaches to treating these complications, including the generation of antigen-specific T cells from cord blood, redirecting cord blood T cells using chimeric antigen receptors, and generating cord blood-derived natural killer cells and regulatory T cells. PMID:20818913

  1. Extending the lifespan and efficacies of immune cells used in adoptive transfer for cancer immunotherapies–A review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Prokar; Galustian, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Cells used in adoptive cell-transfer immunotherapies against cancer include dendritic cells (DCs), natural-killer cells, and CD8+ T-cells. These cells may have limited efficacy due to their lifespan, activity, and immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells. Therefore, increasing longevity and activity of these cells may boost their efficacy. Four cytokines that can extend immune effector-cell longevity are IL-2, IL-7, IL-21, and IL-15. This review will discuss current knowledge on effector-cell lifespans and the mechanisms by which IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 can extend effector-cell longevity. We will also discuss how lifespan and efficacy of these cells can be regulated to allow optimal clinical benefits. PMID:26155387

  2. Study of interspouse communication and adoption of family planning and immunization services in a rural block of Varanasi District.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V M; Jain, R; Sen, P

    2001-01-01

    Interspouse communication was studied in some pertinent areas which have an important bearing on day to day transactions. The level of such communication measured on a three-point scale was studied for its role on acceptance of family planning and immunization services. 200 currently married females residing with their husbands in a rural block of Varanasi, in the reproductive age group, with at least one child aged 1-3 years were selected and interviewed. Scores were ascribed for 12 selected items of conversation according to frequency of conversation on a three point scale based on which high, medium and low communicators were delineated. In this study high, medium and low communicators were found to be 14%, 40% and 45% respectively. Topics of importance which never featured in interspouse communication were menstrual problems (44%), when to have first child (82.5%) and birth spacing (48.5%). Interspouse communication was better in upper castes and joint families. Literacy status of both husband and wife and per capita income of the family revealed positive relationship with inter-spouse communication. Adoption and practice of family planning methods as well as full immunization coverage of the child in the family were observed to be higher among high and medium communicators as compared to low degree of communcators (p < 0.001). PMID:11917331

  3. Adoptive transfer of activated marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes induces measurable antitumor immunity in the bone marrow in multiple myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Noonan, Kimberly A.; Huff, Carol A.; Davis, Janice; Lemas, M. Victor; Fiorino, Susan; Bitzan, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Anna; Emerling, Amy; Luznik, Leo; Matsui, William; Powell, Jonathan; Fuchs, Ephraim; Rosner, Gary L.; Epstein, Caroline; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Ambinder, Richard F.; Jones, Richard J.; Pardoll, Drew; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Successful adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) requires the ability to activate tumor-specific T cells with the ability to traffic to the tumor site and effectively kill their target as well as persist over time. We hypothesized that ACT using marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs) in multiple myeloma (MM) could impart greater antitumor immunity in that they were obtained from the tumor microenvironment. We describe the results from the first clinical trial using MILs in MM. Twenty-five patients with either newly diagnosed or relapsed disease had their MILs harvested, activated and expanded, and subsequently infused on the third day after myeloablative therapy. Cells were obtained and adequately expanded in all patients with anti-CD3/CD28 beads plus interleukin-2, and a median of 9.5 × 108 MILs were infused. Factors indicative of response to MIL ACT included (i) the presence of measurable myeloma-specific activity of the ex vivo expanded product, (ii) low endogenous bone marrow T cell interferon-γ production at baseline, (iii) a CD8+ central memory phenotype at baseline, and (iv) the generation and persistence of myeloma-specific immunity in the bone marrow at 1 year after ACT. Achieving at least a 90% reduction in disease burden significantly increased the progression-free survival (25.1 months versus 11.8 months; P = 0.01). This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of MILs as a form of ACT with applicability across many hematologic malignancies and possibly solid tumors infiltrating the bone marrow. PMID:25995224

  4. Adoptive transfer of activated marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes induces measurable antitumor immunity in the bone marrow in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Noonan, Kimberly A; Huff, Carol A; Davis, Janice; Lemas, M Victor; Fiorino, Susan; Bitzan, Jeffrey; Ferguson, Anna; Emerling, Amy; Luznik, Leo; Matsui, William; Powell, Jonathan; Fuchs, Ephraim; Rosner, Gary L; Epstein, Caroline; Rudraraju, Lakshmi; Ambinder, Richard F; Jones, Richard J; Pardoll, Drew; Borrello, Ivan

    2015-05-20

    Successful adoptive T cell therapy (ACT) requires the ability to activate tumor-specific T cells with the ability to traffic to the tumor site and effectively kill their target as well as persist over time. We hypothesized that ACT using marrow-infiltrating lymphocytes (MILs) in multiple myeloma (MM) could impart greater antitumor immunity in that they were obtained from the tumor microenvironment. We describe the results from the first clinical trial using MILs in MM. Twenty-five patients with either newly diagnosed or relapsed disease had their MILs harvested, activated and expanded, and subsequently infused on the third day after myeloablative therapy. Cells were obtained and adequately expanded in all patients with anti-CD3/CD28 beads plus interleukin-2, and a median of 9.5 × 10(8) MILs were infused. Factors indicative of response to MIL ACT included (i) the presence of measurable myeloma-specific activity of the ex vivo expanded product, (ii) low endogenous bone marrow T cell interferon-γ production at baseline, (iii) a CD8(+) central memory phenotype at baseline, and (iv) the generation and persistence of myeloma-specific immunity in the bone marrow at 1 year after ACT. Achieving at least a 90% reduction in disease burden significantly increased the progression-free survival (25.1 months versus 11.8 months; P = 0.01). This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of MILs as a form of ACT with applicability across many hematologic malignancies and possibly solid tumors infiltrating the bone marrow. PMID:25995224

  5. Mucosal priming of newborn mice with S. Typhi Ty21a expressing anthrax protective antigen (PA) followed by parenteral PA-boost induces B and T cell-mediated immunity that protects against infection bypassing maternal antibodies.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Karina; Ditamo, Yanina; Galen, James E; Baillie, Les W J; Pasetti, Marcela F

    2010-08-23

    The currently licensed anthrax vaccine has several limitations and its efficacy has been proven only in adults. Effective immunization of newborns and infants requires adequate stimulation of their immune system, which is competent but not fully activated. We explored the use of the licensed live attenuated S. Typhi vaccine strain Ty21a expressing Bacillus anthracis protective antigen [Ty21a(PA)] followed PA-alum as a strategy for immunizing the pediatric population. Newborn mice primed with a single dose of Ty21a(PA) exhibited high frequencies of mucosal IgA-secreting B cells and IFN-gamma-secreting T cells during the neonatal period, none of which was detected in newborns immunized with a single dose of PA-alum. Priming with Ty21a(PA) followed by PA-boost resulted in high levels of PA-specific IgG, toxin neutralizing and opsonophagocytic antibodies and increased frequency of bone marrow IgG plasma cells and memory B cells compared with repeated immunization with PA-alum alone. Robust B and T cell responses developed even in the presence of maternal antibodies. The prime-boost protected against systemic and respiratory infection. Mucosal priming with a safe and effective S. Typhi-based anthrax vaccine followed by PA-boost could serve as a practical and effective prophylactic approach to prevent anthrax early in life. PMID:20619377

  6. Montanide™ ISA 71 VG adjuvant enhances antibody and cell-mediated immune responses to profilin subunit antigen vaccination and promotes protection against Eimeria acervulina and Eimeria tenella. Experimental Parasitology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study was conducted to investigate the immunoenhancing effects of MontanideTM ISA 71 VG adjuvant on profilin subunit antigen vaccination. Broiler chickens were immunized subcutaneously with a purified Eimeria acervulina recombinant profilin protein, either alone or mixed with ISA 71 VG, ...

  7. The other way around: Probiotic lactobacillus acidophilus NP51 restricts progression of Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP) infection in Balb/c mice through activation of CD8+ T cell-mediated immunity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to examine immune effects of feeding novel probiotic Lactobacillus acidophilus strain NP51 to specific pathogen-free Balb/c mice challenged with Mycobacterium avium subspecies paratuberculosis (MAP), the causative agent of Johne’s disease (JD). We hypothesized that fe...

  8. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  9. The interplay between Epstein-Barr virus and the immune system: a rationale for adoptive cell therapy of EBV-related disorders

    PubMed Central

    Merlo, Anna; Turrini, Riccardo; Dolcetti, Riccardo; Martorelli, Debora; Muraro, Elena; Comoli, Patrizia; Rosato, Antonio

    2010-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus has evolved a plethora of strategies to evade immune system recognition and to establish latent infection in memory B cells, where the virus resides lifelong without any consequence in the majority of individuals. However, some imbalances in the equilibrium between the inherent virus transforming properties and the host immune system can lead to the development of different tumors, such as lymphoproliferative disorders, Hodgkin’s lymphoma, Burkitt’s lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. The expression of viral antigens in malignant cells makes them suitable targets for immunotherapeutic approaches, which are mainly based on the ex vivo expansion of EBV-specific T cells. Indeed, the infusion of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has proved not only to be safe and effective, but also capable of restoring or inducing a protective anti-virus immunity, which is lacking, albeit to a different extent, in every EBV-driven malignancy. The purpose of this review is to summarize the results of adoptive immunotherapy approaches for EBV-related malignancies, with particular emphasis on the immunological and virological aspects linked to the clinical responses obtained. Data collected confirm the clinical relevance of the use of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes in the field of adoptive immunotherapy and suggest the increasing importance of this approach also against other tumors, concurrent with the increasing knowledge of the intimate and continuous interplay between the virus and the host immune system. PMID:20421267

  10. Memory T cells specific for murine cytomegalovirus re-emerge after multiple challenges and recapitulate immunity in various adoptive transfer scenarios.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Michael; Turula, Holly; Tandon, Mayank; Deslouches, Berthony; Moghbeli, Toktam; Snyder, Christopher M

    2015-02-15

    Reconstitution of CMV-specific immunity after transplant remains a primary clinical objective to prevent CMV disease, and adoptive immunotherapy of CMV-specific T cells can be an effective therapeutic approach. Because of viral persistence, most CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells become terminally differentiated effector phenotype CD8(+) T cells (TEFF). A minor subset retains a memory-like phenotype (memory phenotype CD8(+) T cells [TM]), but it is unknown whether these cells retain memory function or persist over time. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells with different phenotypes have different abilities to reconstitute sustained immunity after transfer. The immunology of human CMV infections is reflected in the murine CMV (MCMV) model. We found that human CMV- and MCMV-specific T cells displayed shared genetic programs, validating the MCMV model for studies of CMV-specific T cells in vivo. The MCMV-specific TM population was stable over time and retained a proliferative capacity that was vastly superior to TEFF. Strikingly, after transfer, TM established sustained and diverse T cell populations even after multiple challenges. Although both TEFF and TM could protect Rag(-/-) mice, only TM persisted after transfer into immune replete, latently infected recipients and responded if recipient immunity was lost. Interestingly, transferred TM did not expand until recipient immunity was lost, supporting that competition limits the Ag stimulation of TM. Ultimately, these data show that CMV-specific TM retain memory function during MCMV infection and can re-establish CMV immunity when necessary. Thus, TM may be a critical component for consistent, long-term adoptive immunotherapy success. PMID:25595792

  11. Identification of GLA/SE as an effective adjuvant for the induction of robust humoral and cell-mediated immune responses to EBV-gp350 in mice and rabbits.

    PubMed

    Heeke, Darren S; Lin, Rui; Rao, Eileen; Woo, Jennifer C; McCarthy, Michael P; Marshall, Jason D

    2016-05-17

    Childhood infection with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is often asymptomatic and may result in mild flu-like symptoms, but exposure during adolescence and young adulthood can lead to acute infectious mononucleosis (AIM) with a pathology characterized by swollen lymph nodes, sore throat, and severe fatigue lasting weeks or months. A vaccine targeting the envelope glycoprotein gp350 adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide complexed with the TLR4 agonist monophosphoryl lipid A (MPLA) achieved a 78% reduction in AIM incidence in a small phase II trial of college-age individuals, but development of this vaccine was halted by the manufacturer. Here, we report the evaluation in mice and rabbits of an EBV-gp350 vaccine combined with an adjuvant composed of the synthetic TLR4 agonist glucopyranosyl lipid A (GLA) integrated into stable emulsion (SE). In mice, GLA/SE-adjuvanted gp350 generated high IgG titers (both IgG1 and IgG2a/c subtypes), elevated EBV-neutralizing antibody titers, and robust poly-functional anti-gp350 CD4(+) T cell responses. In addition, GLA/SE routinely demonstrated superior performance over aluminum hydroxide in all immunological readouts, including induction of durable neutralizing antibody titers out to at least 1 year post-vaccination. Both components of the GLA/SE adjuvant were found to be required to get optimal responses in both arms of the immune response: specifically, SE for neutralizing antibodies and GLA for induction of T cell responses. Furthermore, this vaccine also elicited high neutralizing antibody titers in a second species, rabbit. These promising results suggest that clinical development of a vaccine comprised of EBV-gp350 plus GLA/SE has the potential to prevent AIM in post-adolescents. PMID:27085175

  12. Genetic diversity predicts pathogen resistance and cell-mediated immunocompetence in house finches

    PubMed Central

    Hawley, Dana M; Sydenstricker, Keila V; Kollias, George V; Dhondt, André A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that genetic variation within individual hosts can influence their susceptibility to pathogens. However, there have been few opportunities to experimentally test this relationship, particularly within outbred populations of non-domestic vertebrates. We performed a standardized pathogen challenge in house finches (Carpodacus mexicanus) to test whether multilocus heterozygosity across 12 microsatellite loci predicts resistance to a recently emerged strain of the bacterial pathogen, Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). We simultaneously tested whether the relationship between heterozygosity and pathogen susceptibility is mediated by differences in cell-mediated or humoral immunocompetence. We inoculated 40 house finches with MG under identical conditions and assayed both humoral and cell-mediated components of the immune response. Heterozygous house finches developed less severe disease when infected with MG, and they mounted stronger cell-mediated immune responses to phytohaemagglutinin. Differences in cell-mediated immunocompetence may, therefore, partly explain why more heterozygous house finches show greater resistance to MG. Overall, our results underscore the importance of multilocus heterozygosity for individual pathogen resistance and immunity. PMID:17148199

  13. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against things like measles, ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  14. Immunizations

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immunizations KidsHealth > For Teens > Immunizations Print A A A ... That Shot? en español Las vacunas Why Are Vaccinations Important? Measles, mumps, and whooping cough may seem ...

  15. Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... a lot worse. Some are even life-threatening. Immunization shots, or vaccinations, are essential. They protect against ... B, polio, tetanus, diphtheria, and pertussis (whooping cough). Immunizations are important for adults as well as children. ...

  16. Adenovirus Improves the Efficacy of Adoptive T-cell Therapy by Recruiting Immune Cells to and Promoting Their Activity at the Tumor.

    PubMed

    Tähtinen, Siri; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Lumen, Dave; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Siurala, Mikko; Airaksinen, Anu J; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-08-01

    Despite the rapid progress in the development of novel adoptive T-cell therapies, the clinical benefits in treatment of established tumors have remained modest. Several immune evasion mechanisms hinder T-cell entry into tumors and their activity within the tumor. Of note, oncolytic adenoviruses are intrinsically immunogenic due to inherent pathogen-associated molecular patterns. Here, we studied the capacity of adenovirus to overcome resistance of chicken ovalbumin-expressing B16.OVA murine melanoma tumors to adoptive ovalbumin-specific CD8(+) T-cell (OT-I) therapy. Following intraperitoneal transfer of polyclonally activated OT-I lymphocytes, control of tumor growth was superior in mice given intratumoral adenovirus compared with control mice, even in the absence of oncolytic virus replication. Preexisting antiviral immunity against serotype 5 did not hinder the therapeutic efficacy of the combination treatment. Intratumoral adenovirus injection was associated with an increase in proinflammatory cytokines, CD45(+) leukocytes, CD8(+) lymphocytes, and F4/80(+) macrophages, suggesting enhanced tumor immunogenicity. The proinflammatory effects of adenovirus on the tumor microenvironment led to expression of costimulatory signals on CD11c(+) antigen-presenting cells and subsequent activation of T cells, thus breaking the tumor-induced peripheral tolerance. An increased number of CD8(+) T cells specific for endogenous tumor antigens TRP-2 and gp100 was detected in combination-treated mice, indicating epitope spreading. Moreover, the majority of virus/T-cell-treated mice rejected the challenge of parental B16.F10 tumors, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. In summary, we provide proof-of-mechanism data on combining adoptive T-cell therapy and adenovirotherapy for the treatment of cancer. PMID:25977260

  17. Adoptive precursor cell therapy to enhance immune reconstitution after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in mouse and man

    PubMed Central

    Holland, Amanda M.; Zakrzewski, Johannes L.; Goldberg, Gabrielle L.; Ghosh, Arnab

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a curative therapy for hematological malignancies. T cell deficiency following transplantation is a major cause of morbidity and mortality. In this review, we discuss adoptive transfer of committed precursor cells to enhance T cell reconstitution and improve overall prognosis after transplantation. PMID:19015856

  18. Immunizations.

    PubMed

    Sanford, Christopher A; Jong, Elaine C

    2016-03-01

    Vaccinations are a cornerstone of the pretravel consultation. The pretravel provider should assess a traveler's past medical history, planned itinerary, activities, mode of travel, and duration of stay and make appropriate vaccine recommendations. Given that domestic vaccine-preventable illnesses are more common in international travelers than are exotic or low-income nation-associated vaccine-preventable illnesses, clinicians should first ensure that travelers are current regarding routine immunizations. Additional immunizations may be indicated in some travelers. Familiarity with geographic distribution and seasonality of infectious diseases is essential. Clinicians should be cognizant of which vaccines are live, as there exist contraindications for live vaccines. PMID:26900111

  19. Immunization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guerin, Nicole; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this double journal issue concern immunization and primary health care of children. The issue decribes vaccine storage and sterilization techniques, giving particular emphasis to the role of the cold chain, i.e., the maintenance of a specific temperature range to assure potency of vaccines as they are moved from a national storage…

  20. Near-Infrared Imaging of Adoptive Immune Cell Therapy in Breast Cancer Model Using Cell Membrane Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Youniss, Fatma M.; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Graham, Laura J.; Wang, Li; Berry, Collin R.; Dewkar, Gajanan K.; Jose, Purnima; Bear, Harry D.; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to non-invasively image and assess tumor targeting and retention of directly labeled T-lymphocytes following their adoptive transfer in mice. T-lymphocytes obtained from draining lymph nodes of 4T1 (murine breast cancer cell) sensitized BALB/C mice were activated in-vitro with Bryostatin/Ionomycin for 18 hours, and were grown in the presence of Interleukin-2 for 6 days. T-lymphocytes were then directly labeled with 1,1-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbocyanine Iodide (DiR), a lipophilic near infrared fluorescent dye that labels the cell membrane. Assays for viability, proliferation, and function of labeled T-lymphocytes showed that they were unaffected by DiR labeling. The DiR labeled cells were injected via tail vein in mice bearing 4T1 tumors in the flank. In some cases labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes were injected a week before 4T1 tumor cell implantation. Multi-spectral in vivo fluorescence imaging was done to subtract the autofluorescence and isolate the near infrared signal carried by the T-lymphocytes. In recipient mice with established 4T1 tumors, labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes showed marked tumor retention, which peaked 6 days post infusion and persisted at the tumor site for up to 3 weeks. When 4T1 tumor cells were implanted 1-week post-infusion of labeled T-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes responded to the immunologic challenge and accumulated at the site of 4T1 cell implantation within two hours and the signal persisted for 2 more weeks. Tumor accumulation of labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes was absent in mice bearing Meth A sarcoma tumors. When lysate of 4T1 specific labeled T-lymphocytes was injected into 4T1 tumor bearing mice the near infrared signal was not detected at the tumor site. In conclusion, our validated results confirm that the near infrared signal detected at the tumor site represents the DiR labeled 4T1 specific viable T-lymphocytes and their response to immunologic challenge can be imaged in

  1. Skewed B cell differentiation affects lymphoid organogenesis but not T cell-mediated autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Colombo, E; Tentorio, P; Musio, S; Rajewsky, K; Pedotti, R; Casola, S; Farina, C

    2014-04-01

    B cell receptor (BCR) signalling determines B cell differentiation and may potentially alter T cell-mediated immune responses. In this study we used two transgenic strains of BCR-deficient mice expressing Epstein-Barr virus latent membrane protein (LMP)2A in B cells, where either follicular and marginal zone differentiation (D(H)LMP2A mice) or B-1 cell development (V(H)LMP2A mice) were supported, and evaluated the effects of skewed B lymphocyte differentiation on lymphoid organogenesis and T cell responses in vivo. Compared to wild-type animals, both transgenic strains displayed alterations in the composition of lymphoid organs and in the dynamics of distinct immune cell subsets following immunization with the self-antigen PLP₁₈₅₋₂₀₆. However, ex-vivo T cell proliferation to PLP₁₈₅₋₂₀₆ peptide measured in immunized D(H)LMP2A and V(H)LMP2A mice was similar to that detected in immunized control mice. Further, clinical expression of experimental autoimmune encephalitis in both LMP2A strains was identical to that of wild-type mice. In conclusion, mice with skewed B cell differentiation driven by LMP2A expression in BCR-negative B cells do not show changes in the development of a T cell mediated disease model of autoimmunity, suggesting that compensatory mechanisms support the generation of T cell responses. PMID:24325711

  2. Loss of PTEN promotes resistance to T cell-mediated immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Weiyi; Chen, Jie Qing; Liu, Chengwen; Malu, Shruti; Creasy, Caitlin; Tetzlaff, Michael T; Xu, Chunyu; McKenzie, Jodi A; Zhang, Chunlei; Liang, Xiaoxuan; Williams, Leila J; Deng, Wanleng; Chen, Guo; Mbofung, Rina; Lazar, Alexander J; Torres-Cabala, Carlos A; Cooper, Zachary A; Chen, Pei-Ling; Tieu, Trang N; Spranger, Stefani; Yu, Xiaoxing; Bernatchez, Chantale; Forget, Marie-Andree; Haymaker, Cara; Amaria, Rodabe; McQuade, Jennifer L; Glitza, Isabella C; Cascone, Tina; Li, Haiyan S; Kwong, Lawrence N; Heffernan, Timothy P; Hu, Jianhua; Bassett, Roland L; Bosenberg, Marcus W; Woodman, Scott E; Overwijk, Willem W; Lizée, Gregory; Roszik, Jason; Gajewski, Thomas F; Wargo, Jennifer A; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E; Radvanyi, Laszlo; Davies, Michael A; Hwu, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    T cell-mediated immunotherapies are promising cancer treatments. However, most patients still fail to respond to these therapies. The molecular determinants of immune resistance are poorly understood. We show that loss of PTEN in tumor cells in preclinical models of melanoma inhibits T cell-mediated tumor killing and decreases T cell trafficking into tumors. In patients, PTEN loss correlates with decreased T cell infiltration at tumor sites, reduced likelihood of successful T cell expansion from resected tumors, and inferior outcomes with PD-1 inhibitor therapy. PTEN loss in tumor cells increased the expression of immunosuppressive cytokines, resulting in decreased T cell infiltration in tumors, and inhibited autophagy, which decreased T cell-mediated cell death. Treatment with a selective PI3Kβ inhibitor improved the efficacy of both anti-PD-1 and anti-CTLA4 antibodies in murine models. Together these findings demonstrate that PTEN loss promotes immune resistance and support the rationale to explore combinations of immunotherapies and PI3K-AKT pathway inhibitors. PMID:26645196

  3. Carbonic anhydrase enzymes regulate mast cell-mediated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Henry, Everett K; Sy, Chandler B; Inclan-Rico, Juan M; Espinosa, Vanessa; Ghanny, Saleena S; Dwyer, Daniel F; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C

    2016-08-22

    Type 2 cytokine responses are necessary for the development of protective immunity to helminth parasites but also cause the inflammation associated with allergies and asthma. Recent studies have found that peripheral hematopoietic progenitor cells contribute to type 2 cytokine-mediated inflammation through their enhanced ability to develop into mast cells. In this study, we show that carbonic anhydrase (Car) enzymes are up-regulated in type 2-associated progenitor cells and demonstrate that Car enzyme inhibition is sufficient to prevent mouse mast cell responses and inflammation after Trichinella spiralis infection or the induction of food allergy-like disease. Further, we used CRISPR/Cas9 technology and illustrate that genetically editing Car1 is sufficient to selectively reduce mast cell development. Finally, we demonstrate that Car enzymes can be targeted to prevent human mast cell development. Collectively, these experiments identify a previously unrecognized role for Car enzymes in regulating mast cell lineage commitment and suggest that Car enzyme inhibitors may possess therapeutic potential that can be used to treat mast cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27526715

  4. Natural killer cell mediated cytotoxic responses in the Tasmanian devil.

    PubMed

    Brown, Gabriella K; Kreiss, Alexandre; Lyons, A Bruce; Woods, Gregory M

    2011-01-01

    The Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii), the world's largest marsupial carnivore, is under threat of extinction following the emergence of an infectious cancer. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) is spread between Tasmanian devils during biting. The disease is consistently fatal and devils succumb without developing a protective immune response. The aim of this study was to determine if Tasmanian devils were capable of forming cytotoxic antitumour responses and develop antibodies against DFTD cells and foreign tumour cells. The two Tasmanian devils immunised with irradiated DFTD cells did not form cytotoxic or humoral responses against DFTD cells, even after multiple immunisations. However, following immunisation with xenogenic K562 cells, devils did produce cytotoxic responses and antibodies against this foreign tumour cell line. The cytotoxicity appeared to occur through the activity of natural killer (NK) cells in an antibody dependent manner. Classical NK cell responses, such as innate killing of DFTD and foreign cancer cells, were not observed. Cells with an NK-like phenotype comprised approximately 4 percent of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The results of this study suggest that Tasmanian devils have NK cells with functional cytotoxic pathways. Although devil NK cells do not directly recognise DFTD cancer cells, the development of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity presents a potential pathway to induce cytotoxic responses against the disease. These findings have positive implications for future DFTD vaccine research. PMID:21957452

  5. Immune-surveillance through exhausted effector T-cells.

    PubMed

    Zehn, Dietmar; Utzschneider, Daniel T; Thimme, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Pathogens such as the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the hepatitis B and C virus (HBV, HCV) and certain strains of the rodent lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) establish a state of persisting viral replication. This occurs besides strong adoptive immune responses and the induction of large numbers of activated pathogen-specific T-cells. The failure of the immune system to clear these viruses is typically attributed to a loss of effector T-cell function-a phenomenon referred to as T-cell exhaustion. Though largely accepted, this loss of function concept is being more and more challenged by comprehensive clinical and experimental observations which highlight that T-cells in chronic infections are more functional than previously considered. Here, we highlight examples that demonstrate that such T-cells mediate a profound form of immune-surveillance. We also briefly discuss the opportunities and limitations of employing 'exhausted' T-cells for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26826950

  6. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy. PMID:26543091

  7. B-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Fight Chronic Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Dalloul, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Solid organs have been transplanted for decades. Since the improvement in graft selection and in medical and surgical procedures, the likelihood of graft function after 1 year is now close to 90%. Nonetheless even well-matched recipients continue to need medications for the rest of their lives hence adverse side effects and enhanced morbidity. Understanding Immune rejection mechanisms, is of increasing importance since the greater use of living-unrelated donors and genetically unmatched individuals. Chronic rejection is devoted to T-cells, however the role of B-cells in rejection has been appreciated recently by the observation that B-cell depletion improve graft survival. By contrast however, B-cells can be beneficial to the grafted tissue. This protective effect is secondary to either the secretion of protective antibodies or the induction of B-cells that restrain excessive inflammatory responses, chiefly by local provision of IL-10, or inhibit effector T-cells by direct cellular interactions. As a proof of concept B-cell-mediated infectious transplantation tolerance could be achieved in animal models, and evidence emerged that the presence of such B-cells in transplanted patients correlate with a favorable outcome. Among these populations, regulatory B-cells constitute a recently described population. These cells may develop as a feedback mechanism to prevent uncontrolled reactivity to antigens and inflammatory stimuli. The difficult task for the clinician, is to quantify the respective ratios and functions of “tolerant” vs. effector B-cells within a transplanted organ, at a given time point in order to modulate B-cell-directed therapy. Several receptors at the B-cell membrane as well as signaling molecules, can now be targeted for this purpose. Understanding the temporal expansion of regulatory B-cells in grafted patients and the stimuli that activate them will help in the future to implement specific strategies aimed at fighting chronic allograft

  8. Cell-mediated response at the muscle phase of Trichinella pseudospiralis and Trichinella spiralis infections.

    PubMed

    Lee, K M; Ko, R C

    2006-06-01

    The cell-mediated response in BALB/c mice infected either by Trichinella pseudospiralis or Trichinella spiralis was compared at days 30-50 post-infection (muscle phase). The former species is non-encapsulated, whereas the latter is encapsulated in host muscles. The pattern of response against the two species was similar. Both species elicited T(H)0 or T(H)1/T(H)2 response, with the last one being dominant. Productions of interferon gamma (IFN-gamma), interleukin (IL)-4 and IL-5 were observed after antigenic restimulation of splenocytes from infected mice. No significant difference was observed between the levels of response to concanavalin A (Con-A) by the splenocytes from both infected and non-infected animals. There was a significant increase in serum IgG(1) and IgG(2a). Flow cytometric analysis revealed a marked proliferative response of splenocytes from infected mice to worm antigens, dominated by B (CD19) lymphoblasts. Only a few helper (CD4+) and cytotoxic (CD8+) T lymphoblasts were present. This was confirmed by an up-regulation of CD69, with a dominant expression on B lymphoblasts. In conclusion, the minimal or lack of intense cellular response against T. pseudospiralis in muscles is likely not due to depression of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:16489472

  9. Neoplasia in adoptively immunosuppressed rats. A possible model for tumorigenesis in transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Dorsch, S.E.; Cook, E.P.

    1983-07-01

    An extremely high incidence of malignant tumors was observed in groups of rats that had previously been exposed to whole body irradiation, grafted with allogeneic tissue, and injected with lymphocytes capable of specifically suppressing the rejection of the grafted tissue. Neoplasia in these adoptively immunosuppressed rats had features in common with that in therapeutically immunosuppressed transplant recipients. Increased tumor incidence could not be accounted for on the basis of the effects of whole body irradiation or failure of immune surveillance, nor could it be a direct effect of lymphoid tissue stimulation. It is suggested that cell mediated suppressor responses play a critical role in tumorigenesis. The mechanism of this is not simply direct stimulation of lymphoid tissue proliferation.

  10. Origins of adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Liongue, Clifford; John, Liza B; Ward, Alister

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive immunity, involving distinctive antibody- and cell-mediated responses to specific antigens based on "memory" of previous exposure, is a hallmark of higher vertebrates. It has been argued that adaptive immunity arose rapidly, as articulated in the "big bang theory" surrounding its origins, which stresses the importance of coincident whole-genome duplications. Through a close examination of the key molecules and molecular processes underpinning adaptive immunity, this review suggests a less-extreme model, in which adaptive immunity emerged as part of longer evolutionary journey. Clearly, whole-genome duplications provided additional raw genetic materials that were vital to the emergence of adaptive immunity, but a variety of other genetic events were also required to generate some of the key molecules, whereas others were preexisting and simply co-opted into adaptive immunity. PMID:21395512

  11. NUTRITION AND THE AGING IMMUNE RESPONSE

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The incidence of neoplastic and infectious diseases is increased in the elderly, as is the resulting morbidity and mortality. The age-related changes of the immune response have mainly been reported for cell-mediated immune functions such as DTH skin response, antibody response to T cell-dependent a...

  12. Kupffer cell-mediated exacerbation of methimazole-induced acute liver injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Akai, Sho; Uematsu, Yasuaki; Tsuneyama, Koichi; Oda, Shingo; Yokoi, Tsuyoshi

    2016-05-01

    Methimazole (MTZ), an anti-thyroid drug, is known to cause liver injury in humans. It has been demonstrated that MTZ-induced liver injury in Balb/c mice is accompanied by T helper (Th) 2 cytokine-mediated immune responses; however, there is little evidence for immune responses associated with MTZ-induced liver injury in rats. To investigate species differences in MTZ-induced liver injury, we administered MTZ with a glutathione biosynthesis inhibitor, L-buthionine-S,R-sulfoximine (BSO), to F344 rats and subsequently observed an increase in plasma alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which are associated with hepatic lesions. The hepatic mRNA expression of innate immune-related genes significantly increased in BSO- and MTZ-treated rats, but the change in Th2-related genes was not much greater than the change observed in the previous mouse study. Moreover, an increase in Kupffer cells and an induction of the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)/c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) proteins were accompanied by an increase in Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression, indicating that Kupffer cell activation occurs through HMGB1-TLR4 signaling. To elucidate the mechanism of liver injury in rats, gadolinium chloride, which inactivates the function of Kupffer cells, was administered before BSO and MTZ administration. The gadolinium chloride treatment significantly suppressed the increased ALT, which was accompanied by decreased hepatic mRNA expression related to innate immune responses and ERK/JNK phosphorylation. In conclusion, Kupffer cell-mediated immune responses are crucial factors for the exacerbation of MTZ-induced liver injury in rats, indicating apparent species differences in the immune-mediated exacerbation of liver injury between mice and rats. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26177832

  13. miR-23a blockade enhances adoptive T cell transfer therapy by preserving immune-competence in the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Regina; Sampson, John H; Li, Qi-Jing; Zhu, Bo

    2015-01-01

    In adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT), the antitumor efficacy of cytotoxic CD8+ T lymphocytes (CTLs) has been limited by tumor-induced immunosuppression. We have demonstrated that miR-23a blockade in tumor-specific CTLs conferred resilience to TGFβ-mediated immunosuppression, resulting in superior tumor control. Our studies highlight miR-23a in tumor-specific CTLs as a clinically relevant target to enhance ACT. PMID:25949909

  14. Chimeric NK-receptor–bearing T cells mediate antitumor immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tong; Lemoi, Bethany A.; Sentman, Charles L.

    2005-01-01

    NKG2D is an activating cell-surface receptor expressed on natural killer (NK) cells and some T-cell subsets. Its ligands are primarily expressed on tumor cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether chimeric NK-receptor—bearing T cells would directly kill tumor cells and lead to induction of host immunity against tumors. Chimeric NK receptors were produced by linking NKG2D or DNAX activating protein of 10 kDa (Dap10) to the cytoplasmic portion of the CD3ζ chain. Our results showed that chimeric (ch) NKG2D-bearing T cells responded to NKG2D-ligand–bearing tumor cells (RMA/Rae-1β, EG7) but not to wild-type tumor cells (RMA). This response was dependent upon ligand expression on the target cells but not on expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules, and the response could be blocked by anti-NKG2D antibodies. These T cells produced large amounts of T-helper 1 (Th1) cytokines and proinflammatory chemokines and killed ligand–expressing tumor cells. Adoptive transfer of chNKG2D-bearing T cells inhibited RMA/Rae-1β tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, mice that had remained tumor-free were resistant to subsequent challenge with the wild-type RMA tumor cells, suggesting the generation of immunity against other tumor antigens. Taken together, our findings indicate that modification of T cells with chimeric NKG2D receptors represents a promising approach for immunotherapy against cancer. PMID:15890688

  15. Multiphoton high-resolution 3D imaging of Langerhans cells and keratinocytes in the mouse skin model adopted for epidermal powdered immunization.

    PubMed

    Mulholland, William J; Arbuthnott, Edward A H; Bellhouse, Brian J; Cornhill, J Frederick; Austyn, Jonathan M; Kendall, Mark A F; Cui, Zhanfeng; Tirlapur, Uday K

    2006-07-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) can be targeted with DNA-coated gold micro-projectiles ("Gene Gun") to induce potent cellular and humoral immune responses. It is likely that the relative volumetric distribution of LCs and keratinocytes within the epidermis impacts on the efficacy of Gene Gun immunization protocols. This study quantified the three-dimensional (3D) distribution of LCs and keratinocytes in the mouse skin model with a near-infrared multiphoton laser-scanning microscope (NIR-MPLSM). Stratum corneum (SC) and viable epidermal thickness measured with MPLSM was found in close agreement with conventional histology. LCs were located in the vertical plane at a mean depth of 14.9 microm, less than 3 mum above the dermo-epidermal boundary and with a normal histogram distribution. This likely corresponds to the fact that LCs reside in the suprabasal layer (stratum germinativum). The nuclear volume of keratinocytes was found to be approximately 1.4 times larger than that of resident LCs (88.6 microm3). Importantly, the ratio of LCs to keratinocytes in mouse ear skin (1:15) is more than three times higher than that reported for human breast skin (1:53). Accordingly, cross-presentation may be more significant in clinical Gene Gun applications than in pre-clinical mouse studies. These interspecies differences should be considered in pre-clinical trials using mouse models. PMID:16645596

  16. Immune responses to infectious laryngotracheitis virus.

    PubMed

    Coppo, Mauricio J C; Hartley, Carol A; Devlin, Joanne M

    2013-11-01

    Infectious laryngotracheitis (ILT) is an upper respiratory tract disease in chickens caused by infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV), an alphaherpesvirus. Despite the extensive use of attenuated, and more recently recombinant, vaccines for the control of this disease, ILT continues to affect the intensive poultry industries worldwide. Innate and cell-mediated, rather than humoral immune responses, have been identified as responsible for protection against disease. This review examines the current understandings in innate and adaptive immune responses towards ILTV, as well as the role of ILTV glycoprotein G in modulating the host immune response towards infection. Protective immunity induced by ILT vaccines is also examined. The increasing availability of tools and reagents for the characterisation of avian innate and cell-mediated immune responses are expected to further our understanding of immunity against ILTV and drive the development of new generation vaccines towards enhanced control of this disease. PMID:23567343

  17. Cord blood T cells mediate enhanced antitumor effects compared with adult peripheral blood T cells.

    PubMed

    Hiwarkar, Prashant; Qasim, Waseem; Ricciardelli, Ida; Gilmour, Kimberly; Quezada, Sergio; Saudemont, Aurore; Amrolia, Persis; Veys, Paul

    2015-12-24

    Unrelated cord blood transplantation (CBT) without in vivo T-cell depletion is increasingly used to treat high-risk hematologic malignancies. Following T-replete CBT, naïve CB T cells undergo rapid peripheral expansion with memory-effector differentiation. Emerging data suggest that unrelated CBT, particularly in the context of HLA mismatch and a T-replete graft, may reduce leukemic relapse. To study the role of CB T cells in mediating graft-versus-tumor responses and dissect the underlying immune mechanisms for this, we compared the ability of HLA-mismatched CB and adult peripheral blood (PB) T cells to eliminate Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-driven human B-cell lymphoma in a xenogeneic NOD/SCID/IL2rg(null) mouse model. CB T cells mediated enhanced tumor rejection compared with equal numbers of PB T cells, leading to improved survival in the CB group (P < .0003). Comparison of CB T cells that were autologous vs allogeneic to the lymphoma demonstrated that this antitumor effect was mediated by alloreactive rather than EBV-specific T cells. Analysis of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes demonstrated that CB T cells mediated this enhanced antitumor effect by rapid infiltration of the tumor with CCR7(+)CD8(+) T cells and prompt induction of cytotoxic CD8(+) and CD4(+) T-helper (Th1) T cells in the tumor microenvironment. In contrast, in the PB group, this antilymphoma effect is impaired because of delayed tumoral infiltration of PB T cells and a relative bias toward suppressive Th2 and T-regulatory cells. Our data suggest that, despite being naturally programmed toward tolerance, reconstituting T cells after unrelated T-replete CBT may provide superior Tc1-Th1 antitumor effects against high-risk hematologic malignancies. PMID:26450984

  18. Recombinant lentivector as a genetic immunization vehicle for antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    He, Yukai; Munn, David; Falo, Louis D

    2011-01-01

    Summary Encouraged by remarkable successes in preventing infectious diseases and by the well established potential of immune system for controlling tumor growth, active therapeutic immunization approaches hold great promise for treating malignant tumors. In recent years, engineered recombinant viral vectors have been carefully examined as genetic immunization vehicles and have been demonstrated to induce potent T cell mediated immune responses that can control tumor growth. Very recent efforts suggest that lentivectors possess important advantages over other candidate recombinant viral vectors for genetic immunization. Here we review the development of recombinant lentivectors and the characteristics of T cell immune responses elicited by lentivector immunization, including the mechanism of T cell priming with a focus on the role of skin dendritic cells (DC) and potential applications for tumor immunotherapy. PMID:18377355

  19. T cell-mediated modulation of mast cell function: heterotypic adhesion-induced stimulatory or inhibitory effects.

    PubMed

    Mekori, Yoseph A; Hershko, Alon Y

    2012-01-01

    Close physical proximity between mast cells and T cells has been demonstrated in several T cell mediated inflammatory processes such as rheumatoid arthritis and sarcoidosis. However, the way by which mast cells are activated in these T cell-mediated immune responses has not been fully elucidated. We have identified and characterized a novel mast cell activation pathway initiated by physical contact with activated T cells, and showed that this pathway is associated with degranulation and cytokine release. The signaling events associated with this pathway of mast cell activation have also been elucidated confirming the activation of the Ras mitogen-activated protein kinase systems. More recently, we hypothesized and demonstrated that mast cells may also be activated by microparticles released from activated T cells that are considered as miniature version of a cell. By extension, microparticles might affect the activity of mast cells, which are usually not in direct contact with T cells at the inflammatory site. Recent works have also focused on the effects of regulatory T cells (Treg) on mast cells. These reports highlighted the importance of the cytokines IL-2 and IL-9, produced by mast cells and T cells, respectively, in obtaining optimal immune suppression. Finally, physical contact, associated by OX40-OX40L engagement has been found to underlie the down-regulatory effects exerted by Treg on mast cell function. PMID:22566892

  20. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells to C57BL/6J mice during acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii down modulates the exacerbated Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Jonadab E; Fernández, Jacquelina; Salinas, Nohemí; Juárez, Imelda; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Campuzano, Jaime; Castellanos, Carlos; Saavedra, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Infection of C57BL/6J mice with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii triggers a powerful Th1 immune response that is detrimental to the host. During acute infection, a reduction in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) has been reported. We studied the role of Treg during T. gondii infection by adoptive transfer of cells purified from transgenic Foxp3(EGFP) mice to infected wild type animals. We found a less severe weight loss, a significant delayed mortality in infected Treg-transferred mice, and reduced pathology of the small intestine that were associated with lower IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Nevertheless, higher cyst number and parasite load in brain were observed in these mice. Treg-transferred infected mice showed reduced levels of both IFN-γ and TNF-α in sera. A reduced number of CD4(+) T cells producing IFN-γ was detected in these mice, while IL-2 producing CD4(+) T cells were restored to levels nearly similar to uninfected mice. CD25 and CD69 expression of CD4(+) T cells were also down modulated. Our data show that the low Treg cell number are insufficient to modulate the activation of CD4(+) T cells and the production of high levels of IFN-γ. Thus, a delicate balance between an optimal immune response and its modulation by Treg cells must exist. PMID:25899946

  1. T cell-mediated hepatitis in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. Liver cell destruction by H-2 class I-restricted virus-specific cytotoxic T cells as a physiological correlate of the /sup 51/Cr-release assay

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.; Haenseler, E.; Leist, T.; Cerny, A.; Hengartner, H.; Althage, A.

    1986-10-01

    A model for immunologically T cell-mediated hepatitis was established in mice infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of hepatitis was monitored histologically and by determination of changes in serum levels of the enzymes alanine aminotransferase (ALT), aspartate aminotransferase (AST), glutamate dehydrogenase (GLDH), and alkaline phosphatase (AP). Kinetics of histological disease manifestations, increases of liver enzyme levels in the serum, and cytotoxic T cell activities in livers and spleens all correlated and were dependent upon several parameters: LCMV-isolate; LCMV-WE caused extensive hepatitis, LCMV-Armstrong virtually none. Virus dose. Route of infection; i.v. or i.p. infection caused hepatitis, whereas infection into the footpad did not. The general genetic background of the murine host; of the strains tested, Swiss mice and A-strain mice were more susceptible than C57BL or CBA mice; BALB/c and DBA/2 mice were least susceptible. The degree of immunocompetence of the murine host; T cell deficient nu/nu mice never developed hepatitis, whereas nu/+ or +/+ mice always did. B cell-depleted anti-IgM-treated mice developed immune-mediated hepatitis comparably or even more extensively than control mice. Local cytotoxic T cell activity; mononuclear cells isolated from livers during the period of overt hepatitis were two to five times more active than equal numbers of spleen cells. Adoptive transfer of nylon wool-nonadherent anti-Thy-1.2 and anti-Lyt-2 plus C-sensitive, anti-L3T4 plus C-resistant lymphocytes into irradiated mice preinfected with LCMV-WE caused a rapid time- and dose-dependent linear increase of serum enzyme levels. This increase was caused by adoptive transfer of lymphocytes if immune cell donors and recipient mice shared class I, but not when they shared class II histocompatibility antigens.

  2. Narcolepsy-Associated HLA Class I Alleles Implicate Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Tafti, Mehdi; Lammers, Gert J.; Dauvilliers, Yves; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Mayer, Geert; Nowak, Jacek; Pfister, Corinne; Dubois, Valérie; Eliaou, Jean-François; Eberhard, Hans-Peter; Liblau, Roland; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Geisler, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.; Mathis, Johannes; Lecendreux, Michel; Khatami, Ramin; Heinzer, Raphaël; Haba-Rubio, José; Feketeova, Eva; Baumann, Christian R.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Tiercy, Jean-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy with cataplexy is tightly associated with the HLA class II allele DQB1*06:02. Evidence indicates a complex contribution of HLA class II genes to narcolepsy susceptibility with a recent independent association with HLA-DPB1. The cause of narcolepsy is supposed be an autoimmune attack against hypocretin-producing neurons. Despite the strong association with HLA class II, there is no evidence for CD4+ T-cell-mediated mechanism in narcolepsy. Since neurons express class I and not class II molecules, the final effector immune cells involved might include class I-restricted CD8+ T-cells. Methods: HLA class I (A, B, and C) and II (DQB1) genotypes were analyzed in 944 European narcolepsy with cataplexy patients and in 4,043 control subjects matched by country of origin. All patients and controls were DQB1*06:02 positive and class I associations were conditioned on DQB1 alleles. Results: HLA-A*11:01 (OR = 1.49 [1.18–1.87] P = 7.0*10−4), C*04:01 (OR = 1.34 [1.10–1.63] P = 3.23*10−3), and B*35:01 (OR = 1.46 [1.13–1.89] P = 3.64*10−3) were associated with susceptibility to narcolepsy. Analysis of polymorphic class I amino-acids revealed even stronger associations with key antigen-binding residues HLA-A-Tyr9 (OR = 1.32 [1.15–1.52] P = 6.95*10−5) and HLA-C-Ser11 (OR = 1.34 [1.15–1.57] P = 2.43*10−4). Conclusions: Our findings provide a genetic basis for increased susceptibility to infectious factors or an immune cytotoxic mechanism in narcolepsy, potentially targeting hypocretin neurons. Citation: Tafti M, Lammers GJ, Dauvilliers Y, Overeem S, Mayer G, Nowak J, Pfister C, Dubois V, Eliaou JF, Eberhard HP, Liblau R, Wierzbicka A, Geisler P, Bassetti CL, Mathis J, Lecendreux M, Khatami R, Heinzer R, Haba-Rubio J, Feketeova E, Baumann CR, Kutalik Z, Tiercy JM. Narcolepsy-associated HLA class I alleles implicate cell-mediated cytotoxicity. SLEEP 2016;39(3):581–587. PMID:26518595

  3. Immune modulation following immunization with polyvalent vaccines in dogs.

    PubMed

    Strasser, Alois; May, Bettina; Teltscher, Andrea; Wistrela, Eva; Niedermüller, Hans

    2003-08-15

    A decline in T-cell-mediated immunity and transient state of immunosuppression after immunization has been reported in dogs. Nevertheless, dogs are still routinely vaccinated with polyvalent live vaccines and severe disease does not generally occur. In order to investigate these effects on the canine immune system and to elucidate possible mechanisms we determined the following immune parameters in the blood of 33 clinically sound German shepherd dogs before and after standard vaccination with a polyvalent vaccine against distemper, parvovirus, viral hepatitis, leptospirosis, kennel cough and rabies: white and differential blood cell count, the serum concentrations and/or activities of IL-1, IL-2, IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha, neopterin and IgG, natural killer (NK) cell activity, bactericidal activity and complement hemolytic activity, lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT) and nitroblue tetrazolium test (NBT). Our major findings were that significant postvaccinal decreases in T-cell mitogenic response to PHA and in neutrophil function and neopterin serum concentration were accompanied by simultaneous increase in plasma IgG and hemolytic complement activity. This suggests a transient shift in the balance between cell-mediated and humoral (T(H)1/T(H)2) immunity rather than immunosuppression. These results do not imply that dogs should not receive live vaccines, as the response to vaccines just seems to create a state of altered homeostasis when immunization elicits protection by humoral and cell-mediated immunity. However, these recognized compromises of immune function should be considered and vaccines still be applied only in healthy animals and strictly according to the rules and regulations given by the manufacturer. PMID:12909408

  4. Electric Pulse Stimulation of Myotubes as an In Vitro Exercise Model: Cell-Mediated and Non-Cell-Mediated Effects

    PubMed Central

    Evers-van Gogh, Inkie J.A.; Alex, Sheril; Stienstra, Rinke; Brenkman, Arjan B.; Kersten, Sander; Kalkhoven, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Regular exercise has emerged as one of the best therapeutic strategies to prevent and treat type-2-diabetes. Exercise-induced changes in the muscle secretome, consisting of myokines and metabolites, may underlie the inter-organ communication between muscle and other organs. To investigate this crosstalk, we developed an in vitro system in which mouse C2C12 myotubes underwent electric pulse stimulation (EPS) to induce contraction. Subsequently the effects of EPS-conditioned media (EPS-CM) on hepatocytes were investigated. Here, we demonstrate that EPS-CM induces Metallothionein 1/2 and Slc30a2 gene expression and reduces Cyp2a3 gene expression in rat hepatocytes. When testing EPS-CM that was generated in the absence of C2C12 myotubes (non-cell EPS-CM) no decrease in Cyp2a3 expression was detected. However, similar inductions in hepatic Mt1/2 and Slc30a2 expression were observed. Non-cell EPS-CM were also applied to C2C12 myotubes and compared to C2C12 myotubes that underwent EPS: here changes in AMPK phosphorylation and myokine secretion largely depended on EPS-induced contraction. Taken together, these findings indicate that EPS can alter C2C12 myotube function and thereby affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM (Cyp2a3). However, EPS can also generate non-cell-mediated changes in cell culture media, which can affect gene expression in cells subjected to EPS-CM too. While EPS clearly represents a valuable tool in exercise research, care should be taken in experimental design to control for non-cell-mediated effects. PMID:26091097

  5. Effects of irradiating adult mdx mice before full-length dystrophin cDNA transfer on host anti-dystrophin immunity.

    PubMed

    Eghtesad, S; Zheng, H; Nakai, H; Epperly, M W; Clemens, P R

    2010-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal, genetic disorder in which dystrophin-deficient muscle progressively degenerates, for which dystrophin gene transfer could provide effective treatment. The host immune response to dystrophin, however, is an obstacle to therapeutic gene expression. Understanding the dystrophin-induced host immune response will facilitate the discovery of strategies to prolong expression of recombinant dystrophin in dystrophic muscle. Using whole-body irradiation of the dystrophic mdx mouse before gene transfer, we temporally removed the immune system; a 600 rad dose removed peripheral immune cells, which were restored by self-reconstitution, and a 900 rad dose removed central and peripheral immune cells, which were restored by adoptive transfer of bone marrow from a syngeneic, dystrophin-normal donor. The anti-dystrophin humoral response was delayed and dystrophin expression was partially preserved in irradiated, vector-treated mice. Nonirradiated, vector-treated control mice lost muscle dystrophin expression completely, had an earlier anti-dystrophin humoral response and demonstrated muscle fibers focally surrounded with T cells. We conclude that dystrophin gene transfer induced anti-dystrophin humoral immunity and cell-mediated responses that were significantly diminished and delayed by temporal removal of the host central or peripheral immune cells. Furthermore, manipulation of central immunity altered the pattern of regulatory T cells in muscle. PMID:20827278

  6. Enhancement of antibody-dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity: a new era in cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Rajasekaran, Narendiran; Chester, Cariad; Yonezawa, Atsushi; Zhao, Xing; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of some anti-tumor monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) depends on the capacity of the mAb to recognize the tumor-associated antigen and induce cytotoxicity via a network of immune effector cells. This process of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against tumor cells is triggered by the interaction of the fragment crystallizable (Fc) portion of the mAb with the Fc receptors on effector cells like natural killer cells, macrophages, γδ T cells, and dendritic cells. By augmenting ADCC, the antitumor activity of mAbs can be significantly increased. Currently, identifying and developing therapeutic agents that enhance ADCC is a growing area of research. Combining existing tumor-targeting mAbs and ADCC-promoting agents that stimulate effector cells will translate to greater clinical responses. In this review, we discuss strategies for enhancing ADCC and emphasize the potential of combination treatments that include US Food and Drug Administration-approved mAbs and immunostimulatory therapeutics.

  7. CD8+ T Cell-Mediated Neuronal Dysfunction and Degeneration in Limbic Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Ehling, Petra; Melzer, Nico; Budde, Thomas; Meuth, Sven G.

    2015-01-01

    Autoimmune inflammation of the limbic gray matter structures of the human brain has recently been identified as major cause of mesial temporal lobe epilepsy with interictal temporal epileptiform activity and slowing of the electroencephalogram, progressive memory disturbances, as well as a variety of other behavioral, emotional, and cognitive changes. Magnetic resonance imaging exhibits volume and signal changes of the amygdala and hippocampus, and specific anti-neuronal antibodies binding to either intracellular or plasma membrane neuronal antigens can be detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid. While effects of plasma cell-derived antibodies on neuronal function and integrity are increasingly becoming characterized, potentially contributing effects of T cell-mediated immune mechanisms remain poorly understood. CD8+ T cells are known to directly interact with major histocompatibility complex class I-expressing neurons in an antigen-specific manner. Here, we summarize current knowledge on how such direct CD8+ T cell–neuron interactions may impact neuronal excitability, plasticity, and integrity on a single cell and network level and provide an overview on methods to further corroborate the in vivo relevance of these mechanisms mainly obtained from in vitro studies. PMID:26236280

  8. First Line of Defense: Innate Cell-Mediated Control of Pulmonary Aspergillosis

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa, Vanessa; Rivera, Amariliz

    2016-01-01

    Mycotic infections and their effect on the human condition have been widely overlooked and poorly surveilled by many health organizations even though mortality rates have increased in recent years. The increased usage of immunosuppressive and myeloablative therapies for the treatment of malignant as well as non-malignant diseases has contributed significantly to the increased incidence of fungal infections. Invasive fungal infections have been found to be responsible for at least 1.5 million deaths worldwide. About 90% of these deaths can be attributed to Cryptococcus, Candida, Aspergillus, and Pneumocystis. A better understanding of how the host immune system contains fungal infection is likely to facilitate the development of much needed novel antifungal therapies. Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition and containment of fungal infections and have been found to play essential roles in defense against multiple fungal pathogens. In this review we summarize our current understanding of host-fungi interactions with a focus on mechanisms of innate cell-mediated recognition and control of pulmonary aspergillosis. PMID:26973640

  9. Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells: modification of the IgG1 Fc 'spacer' domain in the extracellular moiety of chimeric antigen receptors avoids 'off-target' activation and unintended initiation of an innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Hombach, A; Hombach, A A; Abken, H

    2010-10-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, immunoreceptors) are frequently used to redirect T cells with pre-defined specificity, in particular towards tumour cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy of malignant diseases. Specific targeting is mediated by an extracellularly located antibody-derived binding domain, which is joined to the transmembrane and intracellular CD3ζ moiety for T-cell activation. Stable CAR expression in T cells, however, requires a spacer domain interposed between the binding and the transmembrane domain and which is commonly the constant IgG1 Fc domain. We here revealed that CARs with Fc spacer domain bind to IgG Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), thereby unintentionally activating innate immune cells, including monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, which consequently secrete high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Engineered T cells, on the other hand, are likewise activated by FcγR binding resulting in cytokine secretion and lysis of monocytes and NK cells independently of the redirected specificity. To reduce FcγR binding, we modified the spacer domain without affecting CAR expression and antigen binding. Engineered with the modified CAR, T cells are not activated in presence of FcγR(+) cells, thereby minimizing the risk of off-target activation while preserving their redirected targeting specificity. PMID:20555360

  10. MicroRNA-155 drives TH17 immune response and tissue injury in experimental crescentic GN.

    PubMed

    Krebs, Christian F; Kapffer, Sonja; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schmidt, Tilman; Bennstein, Sabrina B; Peters, Anett; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke R; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Turner, Jan-Eric; Steinmetz, Oliver M; Wolf, Gunter; Stahl, Rolf A K; Panzer, Ulf

    2013-12-01

    CD4(+) T cells play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, including human and experimental crescentic GN. Micro-RNAs (miRs) have emerged as important regulators of immune cell development, but the impact of miRs on the regulation of the CD4(+) T cell immune response remains to be fully clarified. Here, we report that miR-155 expression is upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN and a murine model of crescentic GN (nephrotoxic nephritis). To elucidate the potential role of miR-155 in T cell-mediated inflammation, nephritis was induced in miR-155(-/-) and wild-type mice. The systemic and renal nephritogenic TH17 immune response decreased markedly in nephritic miR-155(-/-) mice. Consistent with this finding, miR-155-deficient mice developed less severe nephritis, with reduced histologic and functional injury. Adoptive transfer of miR-155(-/-) and wild-type CD4(+) T cells into nephritic recombination activating gene 1-deficient (Rag-1(-/-)) mice showed the T cell-intrinsic importance of miR-155 for the stability of pathogenic TH17 immunity. These findings indicate that miR-155 drives the TH17 immune response and tissue injury in experimental crescentic GN and show that miR-155 is a potential therapeutic target in TH17-mediated diseases. PMID:23949802

  11. MicroRNA-155 Drives TH17 Immune Response and Tissue Injury in Experimental Crescentic GN

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Christian F.; Kapffer, Sonja; Paust, Hans-Joachim; Schmidt, Tilman; Bennstein, Sabrina B.; Peters, Anett; Stege, Gesa; Brix, Silke R.; Meyer-Schwesinger, Catherine; Müller, Roman-Ulrich; Turner, Jan-Eric; Steinmetz, Oliver M.; Wolf, Gunter; Stahl, Rolf A. K.

    2013-01-01

    CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease, including human and experimental crescentic GN. Micro-RNAs (miRs) have emerged as important regulators of immune cell development, but the impact of miRs on the regulation of the CD4+ T cell immune response remains to be fully clarified. Here, we report that miR-155 expression is upregulated in the kidneys of patients with ANCA-associated crescentic GN and a murine model of crescentic GN (nephrotoxic nephritis). To elucidate the potential role of miR-155 in T cell-mediated inflammation, nephritis was induced in miR-155−/− and wild-type mice. The systemic and renal nephritogenic TH17 immune response decreased markedly in nephritic miR-155−/− mice. Consistent with this finding, miR-155–deficient mice developed less severe nephritis, with reduced histologic and functional injury. Adoptive transfer of miR-155−/− and wild-type CD4+ T cells into nephritic recombination activating gene 1-deficient (Rag-1−/−) mice showed the T cell-intrinsic importance of miR-155 for the stability of pathogenic TH17 immunity. These findings indicate that miR-155 drives the TH17 immune response and tissue injury in experimental crescentic GN and show that miR-155 is a potential therapeutic target in TH17-mediated diseases. PMID:23949802

  12. Deletion of Plasmodium berghei-Specific CD4+ T Cells Adoptively Transferred into Recipient Mice after Challenge with Homologous Parasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit; Good, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    The immune response to malaria parasites includes T cell responses that reduce parasites by effector T cell responses and by providing help for antibody responses. Some parasites are more sensitive to antibody and others are more sensitive to cell-mediated immunity. We demonstrate that cultured CD4+ T cells that produce interferon CD4+ and interleukin 2, but not interleukin 4, in response to stimulation with the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei can reduce but not eliminate parasites in vivo after adoptive transfer. Although cells can persist in vivo for up to 9 months in uninfected mice, infection results in elimination of up to 99% of specific T cells in different tissues, as judged by tracking T cells labeled with the fluorescent dye 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. T cells specific for ovalbumin are unaffected. In vivo activation and division of transferred T cells per se are not responsible for deletion because T cells positive for 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester divide up to six times within 7 days in uninfected mice and are not deleted. Understanding the factors responsible for parasite-mediated specific deletion of T cells would enhance our knowledge of parasite immunity.

  13. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  14. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  15. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti; Spencer, Chris C A; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A; Moutsianas, Loukas; Dilthey, Alexander; Su, Zhan; Freeman, Colin; Hunt, Sarah E; Edkins, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Booth, David R; Potter, Simon C; Goris, An; Band, Gavin; Oturai, Annette Bang; Strange, Amy; Saarela, Janna; Bellenguez, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Gillman, Matthew; Hemmer, Bernhard; Gwilliam, Rhian; Zipp, Frauke; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Martin, Roland; Leslie, Stephen; Hawkins, Stanley; Giannoulatou, Eleni; D'alfonso, Sandra; Blackburn, Hannah; Martinelli Boneschi, Filippo; Liddle, Jennifer; Harbo, Hanne F; Perez, Marc L; Spurkland, Anne; Waller, Matthew J; Mycko, Marcin P; Ricketts, Michelle; Comabella, Manuel; Hammond, Naomi; Kockum, Ingrid; McCann, Owen T; Ban, Maria; Whittaker, Pamela; Kemppinen, Anu; Weston, Paul; Hawkins, Clive; Widaa, Sara; Zajicek, John; Dronov, Serge; Robertson, Neil; Bumpstead, Suzannah J; Barcellos, Lisa F; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Abraham, Roby; Alfredsson, Lars; Ardlie, Kristin; Aubin, Cristin; Baker, Amie; Baker, Katharine; Baranzini, Sergio E; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Bernstein, Allan; Berthele, Achim; Boggild, Mike; Bradfield, Jonathan P; Brassat, David; Broadley, Simon A; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Capra, Ruggero; Carroll, William M; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G; Cepok, Sabine; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Clysters, Katleen; Comi, Giancarlo; Cossburn, Mark; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cox, Mathew B; Cozen, Wendy; Cree, Bruce A C; Cross, Anne H; Cusi, Daniele; Daly, Mark J; Davis, Emma; de Bakker, Paul I W; Debouverie, Marc; D'hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Dixon, Katherine; Dobosi, Rita; Dubois, Bénédicte; Ellinghaus, David; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Fontenille, Claire; Foote, Simon; Franke, Andre; Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Glessner, Joseph; Gomez, Refujia; Gout, Olivier; Graham, Colin; Grant, Struan F A; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Heard, Rob N; Heath, Simon; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muna; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Ingram, Gillian; Ingram, Wendy; Islam, Talat; Jagodic, Maja; Kabesch, Michael; Kermode, Allan G; Kilpatrick, Trevor J; Kim, Cecilia; Klopp, Norman; Koivisto, Keijo; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette S; Leone, Maurizio A; Leppä, Virpi; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Lincoln, Robin R; Link, Jenny; Liu, Jianjun; Lorentzen, Aslaug R; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Mack, Thomas; Marriott, Mark; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; McCauley, Jacob L; Mentch, Frank; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mihalova, Tania; Montalban, Xavier; Mottershead, John; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Naldi, Paola; Ollier, William; Page, Alison; Palotie, Aarno; Pelletier, Jean; Piccio, Laura; Pickersgill, Trevor; Piehl, Fredrik; Pobywajlo, Susan; Quach, Hong L; Ramsay, Patricia P; Reunanen, Mauri; Reynolds, Richard; Rioux, John D; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Roesner, Sabine; Rubio, Justin P; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Salvetti, Marco; Salvi, Erika; Santaniello, Adam; Schaefer, Catherine A; Schreiber, Stefan; Schulze, Christian; Scott, Rodney J; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selmaj, Krzysztof W; Sexton, David; Shen, Ling; Simms-Acuna, Brigid; Skidmore, Sheila; Sleiman, Patrick M A; Smestad, Cathrine; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Stankovich, Jim; Strange, Richard C; Sulonen, Anna-Maija; Sundqvist, Emilie; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Taddeo, Francesca; Taylor, Bruce; Blackwell, Jenefer M; Tienari, Pentti; Bramon, Elvira; Tourbah, Ayman; Brown, Matthew A; Tronczynska, Ewa; Casas, Juan P; Tubridy, Niall; Corvin, Aiden; Vickery, Jane; Jankowski, Janusz; Villoslada, Pablo; Markus, Hugh S; Wang, Kai; Mathew, Christopher G; Wason, James; Palmer, Colin N A; Wichmann, H-Erich; Plomin, Robert; Willoughby, Ernest; Rautanen, Anna; Winkelmann, Juliane; Wittig, Michael; Trembath, Richard C; Yaouanq, Jacqueline; Viswanathan, Ananth C; Zhang, Haitao; Wood, Nicholas W; Zuvich, Rebecca; Deloukas, Panos; Langford, Cordelia; Duncanson, Audrey; Oksenberg, Jorge R; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Haines, Jonathan L; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Ivinson, Adrian J; De Jager, Philip L; Peltonen, Leena; Stewart, Graeme J; Hafler, David A; Hauser, Stephen L; McVean, Gil; Donnelly, Peter; Compston, Alastair

    2011-08-11

    Multiple sclerosis is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability. Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals, and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk. Modestly powered genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects have a key role in disease susceptibility. Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9,772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the HLA-DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly overrepresented among those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T-helper-cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:21833088

  16. In vitro assessment of the cell-mediated immune response to herpes simplex virus in man

    SciTech Connect

    Clouse, K.A.B.

    1986-01-01

    These studies demonstrated that human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from individuals sensitized to herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) were capable of producing interleukin 2 (IL 2) following in vitro stimulation with HSV antigen. IL 2 activity was detected by the direct addition of the murine IL 2-dependent cell line, CTLL-20, to ..gamma..-irradiated cultures of HSV-1 antigen-stimulated PBMC. It was found that PBMC from sensitized individuals produced IL 2 in a dose-dependent manner after in vitro stimulation with HSV antigen. Furthermore, IL 2 production in response to viral antigen correlated with viral antigen-induced proliferation of PBMC. It was also shown that contact with HSV-1 antigen induced the expression of IL 2 receptors on a small percentage of human PBMC. While this suggested that IL 2 receptor expression was associated with viral antigen-induced proliferation responses, the level of induced IL 2 receptor expression remained close to the lower limit of detectability for cytofluorographic analysis. Experiments to elucidate the role of the macrophage (MO) in the response to viral antigen revealed that HSV antigen-induced IL 2 production by sensitized T lymphocytes was dependent on the presence of an accessory MO. To investigate the signals provided to T lymphocytes by accessory cells, MOs were pulsed with HSV antigen and treated with paraformaldehyde. This allowed HSV antigen display, but prevented monokine (IL 1) secretion. The treated MOs could no longer induce sensitized lymphocytes to produce IL 2.

  17. Cell-mediated immune functions and immunoregulatory cells in Behçet's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Victorino, R M; Ryan, P; Hughes, G R; Hodgson, H J

    1982-01-01

    Lymphocyte responsiveness to mitogens (phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), concanavalin A (Con A), and pokeweed mitogen (PWM)), T-cell subsets (T mu and T gamma) and short-lived suppressor cell activity were investigated in the peripheral blood of seven patients with Behçet's syndrome and compared to normal individuals and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). Amongst patients with Behçet's syndrome, responses to mitogens PHA and Con A were normal or slightly reduced; numbers of circulating T gamma cells were unaltered whereas T mu cells were reduced (P less than 0 . 05) compared with normal individuals. This was in contrast to SLE where a marked reduction in responses to PHA and Con A was found with reduced T gamma cell but normal T mu cell numbers. Although the mean suppressor cell activity in the Behçet's group was significantly reduced, all patients had values within the normal range, in contrast with SLE where the reduction was much more marked and most patients had values below the normal range. In conclusion, the pattern of alteration in T mu and T gamma cells in Behçet's syndrome is distinct from that in SLE, and the reduction of short-lived suppressor cell activity is only mild in Behçet's syndrome but marked in SLE. PMID:6211313

  18. HUMORAL AND CELL MEDIATED IMMUNE FUNCTION IN MICE EXPOSED TO PERFLUOROOCTANOIC ACID AS ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is used in the manufacture of fluoropolymers, and may be formed by metabolism or degradation of other perfluoroalkyl acids and fluorotelomers. Safety concerns lead the U.S. EPA to conduct a risk assessment of PFOA and related compounds due to their ...

  19. Genetic risk and a primary role for cell-mediated immune mechanisms in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Sawcer, Stephen; Hellenthal, Garrett; Pirinen, Matti; Spencer, Chris C.A.; Patsopoulos, Nikolaos A.; Moutsianas, Loukas; Dilthey, Alexander; Su, Zhan; Freeman, Colin; Hunt, Sarah E.; Edkins, Sarah; Gray, Emma; Booth, David R.; Potter, Simon C.; Goris, An; Band, Gavin; Oturai, Annette Bang; Strange, Amy; Saarela, Janna; Bellenguez, Céline; Fontaine, Bertrand; Gillman, Matthew; Hemmer, Bernhard; Gwilliam, Rhian; Zipp, Frauke; Jayakumar, Alagurevathi; Martin, Roland; Leslie, Stephen; Hawkins, Stanley; Giannoulatou, Eleni; D’alfonso, Sandra; Blackburn, Hannah; Boneschi, Filippo Martinelli; Liddle, Jennifer; Harbo, Hanne F.; Perez, Marc L.; Spurkland, Anne; Waller, Matthew J; Mycko, Marcin P.; Ricketts, Michelle; Comabella, Manuel; Hammond, Naomi; Kockum, Ingrid; McCann, Owen T.; Ban, Maria; Whittaker, Pamela; Kemppinen, Anu; Weston, Paul; Hawkins, Clive; Widaa, Sara; Zajicek, John; Dronov, Serge; Robertson, Neil; Bumpstead, Suzannah J.; Barcellos, Lisa F.; Ravindrarajah, Rathi; Abraham, Roby; Alfredsson, Lars; Ardlie, Kristin; Aubin, Cristin; Baker, Amie; Baker, Katharine; Baranzini, Sergio E.; Bergamaschi, Laura; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Bernstein, Allan; Berthele, Achim; Boggild, Mike; Bradfield, Jonathan P.; Brassat, David; Broadley, Simon A.; Buck, Dorothea; Butzkueven, Helmut; Capra, Ruggero; Carroll, William M.; Cavalla, Paola; Celius, Elisabeth G.; Cepok, Sabine; Chiavacci, Rosetta; Clerget-Darpoux, Françoise; Clysters, Katleen; Comi, Giancarlo; Cossburn, Mark; Cournu-Rebeix, Isabelle; Cox, Mathew B.; Cozen, Wendy; Cree, Bruce A.C.; Cross, Anne H.; Cusi, Daniele; Daly, Mark J.; Davis, Emma; de Bakker, Paul I.W.; Debouverie, Marc; D’hooghe, Marie Beatrice; Dixon, Katherine; Dobosi, Rita; Dubois, Bénédicte; Ellinghaus, David; Elovaara, Irina; Esposito, Federica; Fontenille, Claire; Foote, Simon; Franke, Andre; Galimberti, Daniela; Ghezzi, Angelo; Glessner, Joseph; Gomez, Refujia; Gout, Olivier; Graham, Colin; Grant, Struan F.A.; Guerini, Franca Rosa; Hakonarson, Hakon; Hall, Per; Hamsten, Anders; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Heard, Rob N.; Heath, Simon; Hobart, Jeremy; Hoshi, Muna; Infante-Duarte, Carmen; Ingram, Gillian; Ingram, Wendy; Islam, Talat; Jagodic, Maja; Kabesch, Michael; Kermode, Allan G.; Kilpatrick, Trevor J.; Kim, Cecilia; Klopp, Norman; Koivisto, Keijo; Larsson, Malin; Lathrop, Mark; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette S.; Leone, Maurizio A.; Leppä, Virpi; Liljedahl, Ulrika; Bomfim, Izaura Lima; Lincoln, Robin R.; Link, Jenny; Liu, Jianjun; Lorentzen, Åslaug R.; Lupoli, Sara; Macciardi, Fabio; Mack, Thomas; Marriott, Mark; Martinelli, Vittorio; Mason, Deborah; McCauley, Jacob L.; Mentch, Frank; Mero, Inger-Lise; Mihalova, Tania; Montalban, Xavier; Mottershead, John; Myhr, Kjell-Morten; Naldi, Paola; Ollier, William; Page, Alison; Palotie, Aarno; Pelletier, Jean; Piccio, Laura; Pickersgill, Trevor; Piehl, Fredrik; Pobywajlo, Susan; Quach, Hong L.; Ramsay, Patricia P.; Reunanen, Mauri; Reynolds, Richard; Rioux, John D.; Rodegher, Mariaemma; Roesner, Sabine; Rubio, Justin P.; Rückert, Ina-Maria; Salvetti, Marco; Salvi, Erika; Santaniello, Adam; Schaefer, Catherine A.; Schreiber, Stefan; Schulze, Christian; Scott, Rodney J.; Sellebjerg, Finn; Selmaj, Krzysztof W.; Sexton, David; Shen, Ling; Simms-Acuna, Brigid; Skidmore, Sheila; Sleiman, Patrick M.A.; Smestad, Cathrine; Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Stankovich, Jim; Strange, Richard C.; Sulonen, Anna-Maija; Sundqvist, Emilie; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Taddeo, Francesca; Taylor, Bruce; Blackwell, Jenefer M.; Tienari, Pentti; Bramon, Elvira; Tourbah, Ayman; Brown, Matthew A.; Tronczynska, Ewa; Casas, Juan P.; Tubridy, Niall; Corvin, Aiden; Vickery, Jane; Jankowski, Janusz; Villoslada, Pablo; Markus, Hugh S.; Wang, Kai; Mathew, Christopher G.; Wason, James; Palmer, Colin N.A.; Wichmann, H-Erich; Plomin, Robert; Willoughby, Ernest; Rautanen, Anna; Winkelmann, Juliane; Wittig, Michael; Trembath, Richard C.; Yaouanq, Jacqueline; Viswanathan, Ananth C.; Zhang, Haitao; Wood, Nicholas W.; Zuvich, Rebecca; Deloukas, Panos; Langford, Cordelia; Duncanson, Audrey; Oksenberg, Jorge R.; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Haines, Jonathan L.; Olsson, Tomas; Hillert, Jan; Ivinson, Adrian J.; De Jager, Philip L.; Peltonen, Leena; Stewart, Graeme J.; Hafler, David A.; Hauser, Stephen L.; McVean, Gil; Donnelly, Peter; Compston, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (OMIM 126200) is a common disease of the central nervous system in which the interplay between inflammatory and neurodegenerative processes typically results in intermittent neurological disturbance followed by progressive accumulation of disability.1 Epidemiological studies have shown that genetic factors are primarily responsible for the substantially increased frequency of the disease seen in the relatives of affected individuals;2,3 and systematic attempts to identify linkage in multiplex families have confirmed that variation within the Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) exerts the greatest individual effect on risk.4 Modestly powered Genome-Wide Association Studies (GWAS)5-10 have enabled more than 20 additional risk loci to be identified and have shown that multiple variants exerting modest individual effects play a key role in disease susceptibility.11 Most of the genetic architecture underlying susceptibility to the disease remains to be defined and is anticipated to require the analysis of sample sizes that are beyond the numbers currently available to individual research groups. In a collaborative GWAS involving 9772 cases of European descent collected by 23 research groups working in 15 different countries, we have replicated almost all of the previously suggested associations and identified at least a further 29 novel susceptibility loci. Within the MHC we have refined the identity of the DRB1 risk alleles and confirmed that variation in the HLA-A gene underlies the independent protective effect attributable to the Class I region. Immunologically relevant genes are significantly over-represented amongst those mapping close to the identified loci and particularly implicate T helper cell differentiation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. PMID:21833088

  20. Purification and characterization of a fish granzymeA involved in cell-mediated immunity.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Yuta; Yabu, Takeshi; Shiba, Hajime; Moritomo, Tadaaki; Nakanishi, Teruyuki

    2016-07-01

    Granzymes are serine proteases involved in the induction of cell death against non-self cells. The enzymes differ in their primary substrate specificity and have one of four hydrolysis activities: tryptase, Asp-ase, Met-ase and chymase. Although granzyme genes have been isolated from several fishes, evidence for their involvement in cytotoxicity has not yet been reported. In the present study, we attempted to purify and characterize a fish granzyme involved in cytotoxicity using ginbuna crucian carp. The cytotoxicity of leukocytes was significantly inhibited by the serine protease inhibitor ''3, 4-dichloroisocoumarin''. In addition, we found that granzymeA-like activity (hydrolysis of Z-GPR-MCA) was inhibited by the same inhibitor and significantly enhanced by allo-antigen stimulation in vivo. Proteins from leukocyte extracts were subjected to two steps of chromatographic purification using benzamidine-Sepharose and SP-Sepharose. The molecular weight of the purified enzyme was estimated to be 26,900 Da by SDS-PAGE analysis. The purified enzyme displayed a Km of 220 μM, a Kcat of 21.7 sec(-1) and a Kcat/Km of 98,796 sec(-1) M(-1) with an optimal pH of 9.5 for the Z-GPR-MCA substrate. The protease was totally inhibited by serine protease inhibitors and showed granzymeA-like substrate specificity. Therefore, we conclude that the purified enzyme belongs to the mammalian granzymeA (EC 3.4.21.78) and appears to be involved in cytotoxicity in fish. PMID:26872543

  1. Airway Memory CD4(+) T Cells Mediate Protective Immunity against Emerging Respiratory Coronaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jincun; Zhao, Jingxian; Mangalam, Ashutosh K; Channappanavar, Rudragouda; Fett, Craig; Meyerholz, David K; Agnihothram, Sudhakar; Baric, Ralph S; David, Chella S; Perlman, Stanley

    2016-06-21

    Two zoonotic coronaviruses (CoVs)-SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV-have crossed species to cause severe human respiratory disease. Here, we showed that induction of airway memory CD4(+) T cells specific for a conserved epitope shared by SARS-CoV and MERS-CoV is a potential strategy for developing pan-coronavirus vaccines. Airway memory CD4(+) T cells differed phenotypically and functionally from lung-derived cells and were crucial for protection against both CoVs in mice. Protection was dependent on interferon-γ and required early induction of robust innate and virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses. The conserved epitope was also recognized in SARS-CoV- and MERS-CoV-infected human leukocyte antigen DR2 and DR3 transgenic mice, indicating potential relevance in human populations. Additionally, this epitope was cross-protective between human and bat CoVs, the progenitors for many human CoVs. Vaccine strategies that induce airway memory CD4(+) T cells targeting conserved epitopes might have broad applicability in the context of new CoVs and other respiratory virus outbreaks. PMID:27287409

  2. Histopathology of cell mediated immune reaction in mouse colon--allograft rejection.

    PubMed Central

    Holden, R J; Ferguson, A

    1976-01-01

    Grafts of mouse fetal colon, implanted beneath the renal capsule of adult hosts, have been used to study the growth and development of colonic isografts and the rejection of colonic allografts. Isografts grew normally and maintained a structure similar to normal colon. Grafts between strains with H2 histocompatibility differences were rejected by 13 days after transplantation. Early progressive infiltration of the grafts by lymphoid cells was followed by increasing damage to, and subsequent loss of, the epithelial cell layer and destruction of the underlying muscle, changes which parallel those seen in rejection of skin and small bowel. The increase in survival time which is seen in allografts between strains with H2 identity was longer in the colon than has been seen in the skin or small bowel; none of the allografts of colon were completely rejected before 30 days, and some remained viable at 50 days. Comparison of the appearances of rejection in the colon with those of ulcerative colitis and colonic Crohn's disease does not show the striking similarity which is seen between small bowel rejection and coeliac disease. Many of the individual features of these diseases are, however, present in the course of colonic rejection. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:976806

  3. Role of dendritic cell-mediated abnormal immune response in visceral hypersensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Meng; Zhang, Lu; Lu, Bin; Chen, Zhe; Chu, Li; Meng, Lina; Fan, Yihong

    2015-01-01

    The role of dendritic cells (DCs) in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is unclear. This study tested the hypothesis that intestinal DCs induced visceral hypersensitivity in IBS rats through mast cell (MC) activation. The IBS rat model was established by combining colorectal distension with restraint stress. The number of CD103-positive cells in colon was higher in the IBS group. Expression of PAR-2, IL-4 and IL-9 in the colonic mucosa was higher in the IBS group. Mesenteric lymph node DCs (MLNDCs) and splenic CD4+/CD8+ T cells were isolated and purified by a magnetic labeling-based technique; they were cultured alone or co-cultured (T4+DC/T8+DC). The coculture of MLNDCs and CD4+ T cells had the highest IL-4 secretion in the IBS group, while IL-9 expression was higher in the cultures containing CD8+ T cells. Our findings indicate that an increased number of DCs in the colon stimulated CD4+ T cells to secrete high levels of IL-4, which led to the activation of MCs and subsequently resulted in visceral hypersensitivity. PMID:26550249

  4. MANGANESE CHLORIDE ENHANCES NATURAL CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE EFFECTOR CELL FUNCTION: EFFECTS ON MACROPHAGES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A single intramuscular injection of MnCl2 in mice caused an increase in macrophage functional activity. Spleen cell antibody-dependent cellmediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) against both chicken erythrocytes and P815 tumor cell targets was enhanced 24 hours following a single injection...

  5. The role of cytokines and chemokines in the T-cell-mediated autoimmune process in alopecia areata.

    PubMed

    Ito, Taisuke; Tokura, Yoshiki

    2014-11-01

    The aetiology of alopecia areata (AA) is still not fully understood. However, recent clinical and experimental studies have provided insights into the pathomechanisms of AA and revealed that it is an organ-specific and cell-mediated autoimmune disease. Some triggers, such as viral infections, trauma, hormones and emotional/physical stressors, may cause activation of autoreactive T cells that target hair follicle (HF) autoantigens. In these immunological responses, cytokines and chemokines are regarded as key players that mediate the autoimmune inflammation. This results in the collapse of HF immune privilege, which is central to the pathogenesis of AA. This essay will focus on how cytokines and chemokines contribute to the immunological aspects of AA. The management of AA often remains difficult in a number of cases. Our review suggests that novel therapies for AA may involve targeting cytokines and chemokines. PMID:25040075

  6. Acquired and innate immunity to polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Yusuf, Nabiha Timares, Laura; Seibert, Megan D.; Xu Hui; Elmets, Craig A.

    2007-11-01

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that are potent mutagens and carcinogens. Researchers have taken advantage of these properties to investigate the mechanisms by which chemicals cause cancer of the skin and other organs. When applied to the skin of mice, several carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons have also been shown to interact with the immune system, stimulating immune responses and resulting in the development of antigen-specific T-cell-mediated immunity. Development of cell-mediated immunity is strain-specific and is governed by Ah receptor genes and by genes located within the major histocompatibility complex. CD8{sup +} T cells are effector cells in the response, whereas CD4{sup +} T cells down-regulate immunity. Development of an immune response appears to have a protective effect since strains of mice that develop a cell-mediated immune response to carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons are less likely to develop tumors when subjected to a polyaromatic hydrocarbon skin carcinogenesis protocol than mice that fail to develop an immune response. With respect to innate immunity, TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice are more susceptible to polyaromatic hydrogen skin tumorigenesis than C3H/HeN mice in which TLR4 is normal. These findings support the hypothesis that immune responses, through their interactions with chemical carcinogens, play an active role in the prevention of chemical skin carcinogenesis during the earliest stages. Efforts to augment immune responses to the chemicals that cause tumors may be a productive approach to the prevention of tumors caused by these agents.

  7. Immune response

    MedlinePlus

    Innate immunity; Humoral immunity; Cellular immunity; Immunity; Inflammatory response; Acquired (adaptive) immunity ... and usually does not react against them. INNATE IMMUNITY Innate, or nonspecific, immunity is the defense system ...

  8. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  9. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Brynn B; Highfill, Steven L; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L; Bachovchin, William W; Fry, Terry J

    2013-10-01

    Multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and result in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologs) enzymes can mediate tumor regression by immune-mediated mechanisms. Herein, we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b) cells, particularly myeloid DCs, to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11bLy6-CLy6-G) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared with either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies, particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT. PMID:23994886

  10. A pan-inhibitor of DASH family enzymes induces immune-mediated regression of murine sarcoma and is a potent adjuvant to dendritic cell vaccination and adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Brynn B.; Highfill, Steven L.; Qin, Haiying; Bouchkouj, Najat; Larabee, Shannon; Zhao, Peng; Woznica, Iwona; Liu, Yuxin; Li, Youhua; Wu, Wengen; Lai, Jack H.; Jones, Barry; Mackall, Crystal L.; Bachovchin, William W.; Fry, Terry J.

    2013-01-01

    Current multimodality therapy consisting of surgery, chemotherapy and radiation will fail in approximately 40% of patients with pediatric sarcomas and results in substantial long-term morbidity in those who are cured. Immunotherapeutic regimens for the treatment of solid tumors typically generate antigen-specific responses too weak to overcome considerable tumor burden and tumor suppressive mechanisms and are in need of adjuvant assistance. Previous work suggests that inhibitors of DASH (Dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity and/or structural homologues) enzymes can mediate tumor regression via immune-mediated mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that the DASH inhibitor, ARI-4175, can induce regression and eradication of well-established solid tumors, both as a single agent and as an adjuvant to a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine and adoptive cell therapy (ACT) in mice implanted with the M3-9-M rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell line. Treatment with effective doses of ARI-4175 correlated with recruitment of myeloid (CD11b+) cells, particularly myeloid dendritic cells (DCs), to secondary lymphoid tissues and with reduced frequency of intratumoral monocytic (CD11b+Ly6-ChiLy6-Glo) myeloid-derived suppressor cells. In immunocompetent mice, combining ARI-4175 with a DC vaccine or ACT with tumor-primed T cells produced significant improvements in tumor responses against well-established M3-9-M tumors. In M3-9-M-bearing immunodeficient (Rag1-/-) mice, ACT combined with ARI-4175 produced greater tumor responses and significantly improved survival compared to either treatment alone. These studies warrant the clinical investigation of ARI-4175 for treatment of sarcomas and other malignancies particularly as an adjuvant to tumor vaccines and ACT. PMID:23994886

  11. Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells: Common Traits in Immune Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaev, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    To protect host against immune-mediated damage, immune responses are tightly regulated. The regulation of immune responses is mediated by various populations of mature immune cells, such as T regulatory cells and B regulatory cells, but also by immature cells of different origins. In this review, we discuss regulatory properties and mechanisms whereby two distinct populations of immature cells, mesenchymal stem cells, and myeloid derived suppressor cells mediate immune regulation, focusing on their similarities, discrepancies, and potential clinical applications. PMID:27529074

  12. Protection in antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases by antiinflammatory IgG Fcs requires type II FcRs.

    PubMed

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M; Maamary, Jad; Pincetic, Andrew; Ravetch, Jeffrey V

    2015-05-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is dependent on the presence of sialic acid in the core IgG fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) glycan, resulting in increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain with corresponding modulation of Fc receptor (FcR) binding specificity from type I to type II receptors. Sialylated IgG Fc (sFc) increases the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the up-regulation of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. We have found that the structural alterations induced by sialylation can be mimicked by specific amino acid modifications to the CH2 domain. An IgG Fc variant with a point mutation at position 241 (F→A) exhibits antiinflammatory activity even in the absence of sialylation. F241A and sFc protect mice from arthritis in the K/BxN-induced model and, in the T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, suppress disease by specifically activating regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Protection by these antiinflammatory Fcs in both antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases required type II FcRs and the induction of IL-33. These results further clarify the mechanism of action of IVIG in both antibody- and T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and demonstrate that Fc variants that mimic the structural alterations induced by sialylation, such as F241A, can be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of various autoimmune disorders. PMID:25870292

  13. Protection in antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases by antiinflammatory IgG Fcs requires type II FcRs

    PubMed Central

    Fiebiger, Benjamin M.; Maamary, Jad; Pincetic, Andrew; Ravetch, Jeffrey V.

    2015-01-01

    The antiinflammatory activity of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is dependent on the presence of sialic acid in the core IgG fragment crystallizable domain (Fc) glycan, resulting in increased conformational flexibility of the CH2 domain with corresponding modulation of Fc receptor (FcR) binding specificity from type I to type II receptors. Sialylated IgG Fc (sFc) increases the activation threshold of innate effector cells to immune complexes by stimulating the up-regulation of the inhibitory receptor FcγRIIB. We have found that the structural alterations induced by sialylation can be mimicked by specific amino acid modifications to the CH2 domain. An IgG Fc variant with a point mutation at position 241 (F→A) exhibits antiinflammatory activity even in the absence of sialylation. F241A and sFc protect mice from arthritis in the K/BxN-induced model and, in the T cell-mediated experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) mouse model, suppress disease by specifically activating regulatory T cells (Treg cells). Protection by these antiinflammatory Fcs in both antibody- and T cell-mediated autoimmune diseases required type II FcRs and the induction of IL-33. These results further clarify the mechanism of action of IVIG in both antibody- and T cell-mediated inflammatory diseases and demonstrate that Fc variants that mimic the structural alterations induced by sialylation, such as F241A, can be promising therapeutic candidates for the treatment of various autoimmune disorders. PMID:25870292

  14. Community Immunity (Herd Immunity)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content Marketing Share this: Main Content Area ​Community Immunity ("Herd" Immunity) Vaccines can prevent outbreaks of disease and save ... disease is contained. This is known as "community immunity." In the illustration below, the top box depicts ...

  15. Synergistic innate and adaptive immune response to combination immunotherapy with anti-tumor antigen antibodies and extended serum half-life IL-2.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Eric F; Gai, Shuning A; Opel, Cary F; Kwan, Byron H; Surana, Rishi; Mihm, Martin C; Kauke, Monique J; Moynihan, Kelly D; Angelini, Alessandro; Williams, Robert T; Stephan, Matthias T; Kim, Jacob S; Yaffe, Michael B; Irvine, Darrell J; Weiner, Louis M; Dranoff, Glenn; Wittrup, K Dane

    2015-04-13

    Cancer immunotherapies under development have generally focused on either stimulating T cell immunity or driving antibody-directed effector functions of the innate immune system such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We find that a combination of an anti-tumor antigen antibody and an untargeted IL-2 fusion protein with delayed systemic clearance induces significant tumor control in aggressive isogenic tumor models via a concerted innate and adaptive response involving neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and CD8(+) T cells. This combination therapy induces an intratumoral "cytokine storm" and extensive lymphocyte infiltration. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T cells together with this combination therapy leads to robust cures of established tumors and development of immunological memory. PMID:25873172

  16. Synergistic innate and adaptive immune response to combination immunotherapy with anti-tumor antigen antibodies and extended serum half-life IL-2

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Eric F.; Gai, Shuning A.; Opel, Cary F.; Kwan, Byron H.; Surana, Rishi; Mihm, Martin C.; Kauke, Monique J.; Moynihan, Kelly D.; Angelini, Alessandro; Williams, Robert T.; Stephan, Matthias T.; Kim, Jacob S.; Yaffe, Michael B.; Irvine, Darrell J.; Weiner, Louis M.; Dranoff, Glenn

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cancer immunotherapies under development have generally focused on either stimulating T-cell immunity or driving antibody-directed effector functions of the innate immune system such as antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC). We find that a combination of an anti-tumor antigen antibody and an untargeted IL-2 fusion protein with delayed systemic clearance induces significant tumor control in aggressive isogenic tumor models via a concerted innate and adaptive response involving neutrophils, NK cells, macrophages, and CD8+ T-cells. This combination therapy induces an intratumoral “cytokine storm” and extensive lymphocyte infiltration. Adoptive transfer of anti-tumor T-cells together with this combination therapy leads to robust cures of established tumors and establishment of immunological memory. PMID:25873172

  17. Medical Issues in Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Medical Issues in Adoption KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Issues in Adoption Print ... or emotional abuse of the child continue Agency Adoptions If you adopt through an agency, you might ...

  18. T cell-mediated immunoregulation in the gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Saurer, L; Mueller, C

    2009-04-01

    In the intestinal tract, only a single layer of epithelial cells separates innate and adaptive immune effector cells from a vast amount of antigens. Here, the immune system faces a considerable challenge in tolerating commensal flora and dietary antigens while preventing the dissemination of potential pathogens. Failure to tightly control immune reactions may result in detrimental inflammation. In this respect, 'conventional' regulatory CD4(+) T cells, including naturally occurring and adaptive CD4(+) CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T cells, Th3 and Tr1 cells, have recently been the focus of considerable attention. However, regulatory mechanisms in the intestinal mucosa are highly complex, including adaptations of nonhaematopoietic cells and innate immune cells as well as the presence of unconventional T cells with regulatory properties such as resident TCRgammadelta or TCRalphabeta CD8(+) intraepithelial lymphocytes. This review aims to summarize the currently available knowledge on conventional and unconventional regulatory T cell subsets (Tregs), with special emphasis on clinical data and the potential role or malfunctioning of Tregs in four major human gastrointestinal diseases, i.e. inflammatory bowel diseases, coeliac disease, food allergy and colorectal cancer. We conclude that the clinical data confirms some but not all of the findings derived from experimental animal models. PMID:19210347

  19. Prophylactic immunization against experimental leishmaniasis. III. Protection against fatal Leishmania tropica infection induced by irradiated promastigotes involves Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that do not mediate cutaneous DTH

    SciTech Connect

    Liew, F.Y.; Howard, J.G.; Hale, C.

    1984-01-01

    Protective immunity against fatal L. tropica infection in genetically vulnerable BALB/c mice can be induced by prophylactic immunization with irradiated promastigotes even when heat-killed. Such immunity is adoptively transferable transiently into intact or durably into sub-lethally irradiated (200 or 550 rad) syngeneic recipients by splenic T but not B cells. The effector T cells are of the Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ phenotype, devoid of demonstrable cytotoxic activity. The immune splenic T cell population expresses specific helper activity for antibody synthesis. A causal role for helper T cells in this capacity, however, seems unlikely, because it was shown that antibody does not determine the protective immunity against L. tropica. The immunized donors show no detectable cutaneous DTH or its early memory recall in response to live or killed promastigotes or a soluble L. tropica antigen preparation. Spleen, lymph node, and peritoneal exudate cells from protectively immunized donors similarly fail to transfer DTH locally or systemically. These cells also lack demonstrable suppressive activity against the expression or induction of DTH to L. tropica. Thus, protection against L. tropica induced by prophylactic i.v. immunization with irradiated promastigotes appears to be conferred by Lyt-1/sup +/2/sup -/ T cells that are distinguishable from T cells mediating either both DTH and T help, or cytotoxicity.

  20. Cdk5 disruption attenuates tumor PD-L1 expression and promotes antitumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Dorand, R Dixon; Nthale, Joseph; Myers, Jay T; Barkauskas, Deborah S; Avril, Stefanie; Chirieleison, Steven M; Pareek, Tej K; Abbott, Derek W; Stearns, Duncan S; Letterio, John J; Huang, Alex Y; Petrosiute, Agne

    2016-07-22

    Cancers often evade immune surveillance by adopting peripheral tissue- tolerance mechanisms, such as the expression of programmed cell death ligand 1 (PD-L1), the inhibition of which results in potent antitumor immunity. Here, we show that cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), a serine-threonine kinase that is highly active in postmitotic neurons and in many cancers, allows medulloblastoma (MB) to evade immune elimination. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-induced PD-L1 up-regulation on MB requires Cdk5, and disruption of Cdk5 expression in a mouse model of MB results in potent CD4(+) T cell-mediated tumor rejection. Loss of Cdk5 results in persistent expression of the PD-L1 transcriptional repressors, the interferon regulatory factors IRF2 and IRF2BP2, which likely leads to reduced PD-L1 expression on tumors. Our finding highlights a central role for Cdk5 in immune checkpoint regulation by tumor cells. PMID:27463676

  1. NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Erbe, Amy K.; Hank, Jacquelyn A.; Morris, Zachary S.; Sondel, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a major role in cancer immunotherapies that involve tumor-antigen targeting by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). NK cells express a variety of activating and inhibitory receptors that serve to regulate the function and activity of the cells. In the context of targeting cells, NK cells can be “specifically activated” through certain Fc receptors that are expressed on their cell surface. NK cells can express FcγRIIIA and/or FcγRIIC, which can bind to the Fc portion of immunoglobulins, transmitting activating signals within NK cells. Once activated through Fc receptors by antibodies bound to target cells, NK cells are able to lyse target cells without priming, and secrete cytokines like interferon gamma to recruit adaptive immune cells. This antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) of tumor cells is utilized in the treatment of various cancers overexpressing unique antigens, such as neuroblastoma, breast cancer, B cell lymphoma, and others. NK cells also express a family of receptors called killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs), which regulate the function and response of NK cells toward target cells through their interaction with their cognate ligands that are expressed on tumor cells. Genetic polymorphisms in KIR and KIR-ligands, as well as FcγRs may influence NK cell responsiveness in conjunction with mAb immunotherapies. This review focuses on current therapeutic mAbs, different strategies to augment the anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and genotypic factors that may influence patient responses to antibody-dependent immunotherapies. PMID:26284063

  2. Shared signaling systems in myeloid cell-mediated muscle regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Tidball, James G.; Dorshkind, Kenneth; Wehling-Henricks, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Much of the focus in muscle regeneration has been placed on the identification and delivery of stem cells to promote regenerative capacity. As those efforts have advanced, we have learned that complex features of the microenvironment in which regeneration occurs can determine success or failure. The immune system is an important contributor to that complexity and can determine the extent to which muscle regeneration succeeds. Immune cells of the myeloid lineage play major regulatory roles in tissue regeneration through two general, inductive mechanisms: instructive mechanisms that act directly on muscle cells; and permissive mechanisms that act indirectly to influence regeneration by modulating angiogenesis and fibrosis. In this article, recent discoveries that identify inductive actions of specific populations of myeloid cells on muscle regeneration are presented, with an emphasis on how processes in muscle and myeloid cells are co-regulated. PMID:24595286

  3. Innate immunity in vertebrates: an overview.

    PubMed

    Riera Romo, Mario; Pérez-Martínez, Dayana; Castillo Ferrer, Camila

    2016-06-01

    Innate immunity is a semi-specific and widely distributed form of immunity, which represents the first line of defence against pathogens. This type of immunity is critical to maintain homeostasis and prevent microbe invasion, eliminating a great variety of pathogens and contributing with the activation of the adaptive immune response. The components of innate immunity include physical and chemical barriers, humoral and cell-mediated components, which are present in all jawed vertebrates. The understanding of innate defence mechanisms in non-mammalian vertebrates is the key to comprehend the general picture of vertebrate innate immunity and its evolutionary history. This is also essential for the identification of new molecules with applications in immunopharmacology and immunotherapy. In this review, we describe and discuss the main elements of vertebrate innate immunity, presenting core findings in this field and identifying areas that need further investigation. PMID:26878338

  4. Cell-Mediated Delivery of Nanoparticles: Taking Advantage of Circulatory Cells to Target Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Anselmo, Aaron C.; Mitragotri, Samir

    2014-01-01

    Cellular hitchhiking leverages the use of circulatory cells to enhance the biological outcome of nanoparticle drug delivery systems, which often suffer from poor circulation time and limited targeting. Cellular hitchhiking utilizes the natural abilities of circulatory cells to: (i) navigate the vasculature while avoiding immune system clearance, (ii) remain relatively inert until needed and (iii) perform specific functions, including nutrient delivery to tissues, clearance of pathogens, and immune system surveillance. A variety of synthetic nanoparticles attempt to mimic these functional attributes of circulatory cells for drug delivery purposes. By combining the advantages of circulatory cells and synthetic nanoparticles, many advanced drug delivery systems have been developed that adopt the concept of cellular hitchhiking. Here, we review the development and specific applications of cellular hitchhiking-based drug delivery systems. PMID:24747161

  5. Epirubicin pretreatment enhances NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against breast cancer cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hui; Dong, Ying; Wu, Jing; Qiao, Yuan; Zhu, Ge; Jin, Haofan; Cui, Jiuwei; Li, Wei; Liu, Yong-Jun; Chen, Jingtao; Song, Yanqiu

    2016-01-01

    Anthracycline-based chemotherapy is a conventional treatment for breast cancer. However, it can negatively affect host immune function and thereby impair patients’ quality of life. Boosting the host immune system and reducing the adverse effect of chemotherapy are important for effective cancer treatment. Natural killer (NK) cells stimulate immune responses against cancer; autologous immune enhancement therapy with NK cells prolongs patient survival without significant adverse effects. This study investigated the effects of combined treatment with the anthracycline agent epirubicin (EPI) and NK cells on human breast cancer cells. NK cells were obtained by autologous adoptive cell transfer from breast cancer patients and amplified for 14 days in vitro. The cytotoxicity of NK cells against breast cancer cells was higher following EPI (5.0 μg/ml) pretreatment than without EPI pretreatment or application of EPI alone. The expression of NKG2D ligands [unique long 16-binding protein (ULBP) 1, ULBP2, and major histocompatibility complex class I-related chain A] in breast cancer cells was upregulated by pretreatment with EPI, which also increased the secretion of interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α and expression of perforin and granzyme B in NK cells. These results indicate that EPI-NK cell treatment has synergistic cytotoxic effects against breast cancer cells, and suggest that anthracycline-based chemotherapy and NK cell-based immunotherapy can be combined for more effective breast cancer treatment. PMID:27158340

  6. Induction of mucosal immunity through systemic immunization: Phantom or reality?

    PubMed

    Su, Fei; Patel, Girishchandra B; Hu, Songhua; Chen, Wangxue

    2016-04-01

    Generation of protective immunity at mucosal surfaces can greatly assist the host defense against pathogens which either cause disease at the mucosal epithelial barriers or enter the host through these surfaces. Although mucosal routes of immunization, such as intranasal and oral, are being intensely explored and appear promising for eliciting protective mucosal immunity in mammals, their application in clinical practice has been limited due to technical and safety related challenges. Most of the currently approved human vaccines are administered via systemic (such as intramuscular and subcutaneous) routes. Whereas these routes are acknowledged as being capable to elicit antigen-specific systemic humoral and cell-mediated immune responses, they are generally perceived as incapable of generating IgA responses or protective mucosal immunity. Nevertheless, currently licensed systemic vaccines do provide effective protection against mucosal pathogens such as influenza viruses and Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, whether systemic immunization induces protective mucosal immunity remains a controversial topic. Here we reviewed the current literature and discussed the potential of systemic routes of immunization for the induction of mucosal immunity. PMID:26752023

  7. Immunity to fish rhabdoviruses

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non-virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals.

  8. Immunity to Fish Rhabdoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Laing, Kerry J.; Winton, James R.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the family Rhabdoviridae are single-stranded RNA viruses and globally important pathogens of wild and cultured fish and thus relatively well studied in their respective hosts or other model systems. Here, we review the protective immune mechanisms that fish mount in response to rhabdovirus infections. Teleost fish possess the principal components of innate and adaptive immunity found in other vertebrates. Neutralizing antibodies are critical for long-term protection from fish rhabdoviruses, but several studies also indicate a role for cell-mediated immunity. Survival of acute rhabdoviral infection is also dependent on innate immunity, particularly the interferon (IFN) system that is rapidly induced in response to infection. Paradoxically, rhabdoviruses are sensitive to the effects of IFN but virulent rhabdoviruses can continue to replicate owing to the abilities of the matrix (M) protein to mediate host-cell shutoff and the non‑virion (NV) protein to subvert programmed cell death and suppress functional IFN. While many basic features of the fish immune response to rhabdovirus infections are becoming better understood, much less is known about how factors in the environment affect the ecology of rhabdovirus infections in natural populations of aquatic animals. PMID:22355456

  9. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  10. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Aaron E.; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  11. The immune system in space and microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2002-01-01

    Space flight and models that created conditions similar to those that occur during space flight have been shown to affect a variety of immunological responses. These have primarily been cell-mediated immune responses including leukocyte proliferation, cytokine production, and leukocyte subset distribution. The mechanisms and biomedical consequences of these changes remain to be established. Among the possible causes of space flight-induced alterations in immune responses are exposure to microgravity, exposure to stress, exposure to radiation, and many more as yet undetermined causes. This review chronicles the known effects of space flight on the immune system and explores the possible role of stress in contributing to these changes.

  12. New approaches for predicting T cell-mediated drug reactions: A role for inducible and potentially preventable autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Michels, Aaron W; Ostrov, David A

    2015-08-01

    Adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are commonplace and occur when a drug binds to its intended pharmacologic target (type A ADR) or an unintended target (type B ADR). Immunologically mediated type B ADRs, such as drug hypersensitivity syndrome, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms syndrome, and Stevens-Johnson syndrome/toxic epidermal necrolysis, can be severe and result in a diverse set of clinical manifestations that include fever and rash, as well as multiple organ failure (liver, kidney, lungs, and/or heart) in the case of drug hypersensitivity syndrome. There is increasing evidence that specific HLA alleles influence the risk of drug reactions. Several features of T cell-mediated ADRs are strikingly similar to those displayed by patients with autoimmune diseases like type I diabetes, such as strong HLA association, organ-specific adaptive immune responses, viral involvement, and activation of innate immunity. There is a need to better predict patient populations at risk for immunologically mediated type B ADRs. Because methods to predict type 1 diabetes by using genetic and immunologic biomarkers have been developed to a high level of accuracy (predicting 100% of subjects likely to progress), new research strategies based on these methods might also improve the ability to predict drug hypersensitivity. PMID:26254052

  13. Role of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) in Sm-p80-mediated protection against Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Torben, Workineh; Ahmad, Gul; Zhang, Weidong; Nash, Stewart; Le, Loc; Karmakar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Afzal A.

    2012-01-01

    Schistosomiasis is a major health problem in the developing world and for international travelers to the endemic countries. Existing strategies to control schistosomiasis have had limited successes so far. The addition of an effective vaccine in existing control measures would be greatly beneficial in reducing the impact of the disease. In this regard, Sm-p80 mediated protection against intestinal schistosomiasis caused by Schistosoma mansoni has been observed to be promising in two animal models of infection and disease. In this study, the role of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxcity (ADCC) was deciphered in Sm-p80-mediated protection especially in the elimination of lung stage schistosomula. This was achieved using lung lavage cells and lung cells that were isolated from mice immunized with and without Sm-p80 formulated in a recombinant vaccine formulation. Significant differences were observed in cytotoxicity assays using immune sera with the lung lavage cells which showed 51% more killing of schistosomula and elevated levels of nitric oxide in the supernatants were detected compared to controls. PMID:23000221

  14. Antibody-Dependent Cell-Mediated Cytotoxicity to Hemagglutinin of Influenza A Viruses After Influenza Vaccination in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Weimin; Liu, Feng; Wilson, Jason R.; Holiday, Crystal; Li, Zhu-Nan; Bai, Yaohui; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.; Levine, Min Z.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Detection of neutralizing antibodies (nAbs) to influenza A virus hemagglutinin (HA) antigens by conventional serological assays is currently the main immune correlate of protection for influenza vaccines However, current prepandemic avian influenza vaccines are poorly immunogenic in inducing nAbs despite considerable protection conferred. Recent studies show that Ab-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) to HA antigens are readily detectable in the sera of healthy individuals and patients with influenza infection. Methods. Virus neutralization and ADCC activities of serum samples from individuals who received either seasonal or a stock-piled H5N1 avian influenza vaccine were evaluated by hemagglutination inhibition assay, microneutralization assay, and an improved ADCC natural killer (NK) cell activation assay. Results. Immunization with inactivated seasonal influenza vaccine led to strong expansion of both nAbs and ADCC-mediating antibodies (adccAbs) to H3 antigen of the vaccine virus in 24 postvaccination human sera. In sharp contrast, 18 individuals vaccinated with the adjuvanted H5N1 avian influenza vaccine mounted H5-specific antibodies with strong ADCC activities despite moderate virus neutralization capacity. Strength of HA-specific ADCC activities is largely associated with the titers of HA-binding antibodies and not with the fine antigenic specificity of anti-HA nAbs. Conclusions. Detection of both nAbs and adccAbs may better reflect protective capacity of HA-specific antibodies induced by avian influenza vaccines.

  15. Adoption and Korea.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chun, Byung Hoon

    1989-01-01

    Because of Korean attitudes towards adoption and other reasons, attempts to promote intracountry adoption have met with limited success, and intercountry adoption is used as an alternative way of meeting children's needs. (RJC)

  16. Adopted Children and Discipline

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media ... Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen ...

  17. Adoption & Foster Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care Adoption & Foster Care Article Body ​Each year, many children join families through adoption and foster care. These families may face unique ...

  18. The role of T-cell-mediated mechanisms in virus infections of the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Dörries, R

    2001-01-01

    during or shortly after exerting their effector functions. The clinical consequences and the influence of the effector phase on the further course of the infection depends on the balance and fine-tuning of the contributing lymphoid cell populations. Generally, any delay in the recruitment of effector lymphocytes to the tissue or an unbalanced combination of lymphocyte subsets allows the virus to spread in the CNS, which in turn will cause severe immune-mediated tissue effects as well as disease. If either too late or partially deficient, the immune system response may contribute to a lethal outcome or cause autosensitization to brain-specific antigens by epitope spreading to the antigen-presenting system in peripheral lymphoid tissue. This could form the basis for subsequent booster reactions of autosensitized CD4+ T cells--a process that finally will end in an inflammatory autoimmune reaction, which in humans we call multiple sclerosis. In contrast, a rapid and specific local response in the brain tissue will result in efficient limitation of viral spread and thereby a subclinical immune system-mediated termination of the infection. After clearance of virus-infected cells, downsizing of the local response probably occurs via self-elimination of the contributing T cell populations and/or by so far unidentified signal pathways. However, much of this is highly speculative, and more data have to be collected to make decisive conclusions regarding this matter. Several strategies have been developed by viruses to escape T cell-mediated eradication, including interference with the MHC class I presentation pathway of the host cell or "hiding" in cells which lack MHC class I expression. This may result in life-long persistence of the virus in the brain, a state which probably is actively controlled by T lymphocytes. Under severe immunosuppression, however, reactivation of viral replication can occur, which is a lethal threat to the host. PMID:11417137

  19. [The role of serotonin in the immune system development and functioning during ontogenesis].

    PubMed

    Mel'nikova, V I; Izvol'skaia, M S; Voronova, S N; Zakharova, L A

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of serotonin on the development and functioning of T- and B-cell-mediated immunity during ontogenesis using the pharmacological model of serotonin depletion in rat fetuses. It has been demonstrated that prenatal serotonin deficiency resulted in a decrease in thymus and spleen weights, changes in their cellular composition, and long-lasting disturbances in cell-mediated and humoral immunity in postnatal ontogenesis. The data obtained suggest that serotonin may be considered a morphogenic factor in development of the immune system. PMID:22834312

  20. Deciphering and Reversing Tumor Immune Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Motz, Greg T.; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Generating an anti-tumor immune response is a multi-step process that is executed by effector T cells that can recognize and kill tumor targets. However, tumors employ multiple strategies to attenuate the effectiveness of T cell-mediated attack. This is achieved by interfering with nearly every step required for effective immunity, from deregulation of antigen-presenting cells, to establishment of a physical barrier at the vasculature that prevents homing of effector tumor-rejecting cells, and through the suppression of effector lymphocytes through the recruitment and activation of immunosuppressive cells like myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), tolerogenic monocytes and T regulatory cells (Tregs). Here, we review the ways in which tumors exert immune suppression and highlight the new therapies that seek to reverse this phenomenon and promote anti-tumor immunity. Understanding anti-tumor immunity, and how it becomes disabled by tumors, will ultimately lead to improved immune therapies and prolonged survival of patients. PMID:23890064

  1. Effect of blueberries on the immune response of obese mice induced by high fat diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Both high fat diet and obesity have been linked to impaired cell-mediated immune response. Blueberry, rich in antioxidant phytochemicals, has been shown to impact biologic functions in several tissues. However, no information is available on immune cells. We investigated whether blueberry consumptio...

  2. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  3. Immunotoxicity of aflatoxin B1: Impairment of the cell-mediated response to vaccine antigen and modulation of cytokine expression

    SciTech Connect

    Meissonnier, Guylaine M.; Pinton, Philippe; Laffitte, Joelle; Cossalter, Anne-Marie; Gong, Yun Yun; Wild, Christopher P.; Bertin, Gerard; Galtier, Pierre; Oswald, Isabelle P.

    2008-09-01

    Aflatoxin B1 (AFB1), a mycotoxin produced by Aspergillus flavus or A. parasiticus, is a frequent contaminant of food and feed. This toxin is hepatotoxic and immunotoxic. The present study analyzed in pigs the influence of AFB1 on humoral and cellular responses, and investigated whether the immunomodulation observed is produced through interference with cytokine expression. For 28 days, pigs were fed a control diet or a diet contaminated with 385, 867 or 1807 {mu}g pure AFB1/kg feed. At days 4 and 15, pigs were vaccinated with ovalbumin. AFB1 exposure, confirmed by an observed dose-response in blood aflatoxin-albumin adduct, had no major effect on humoral immunity as measured by plasma concentrations of total IgA, IgG and IgM and of anti-ovalbumin IgG. Toxin exposure did not impair the mitogenic response of lymphocytes but delayed and decreased their specific proliferation in response to the vaccine antigen, suggesting impaired lymphocyte activation in pigs exposed to AFB1. The expression level of pro-inflammatory (TNF-{alpha}, IL-1{beta}, IL-6, IFN-{gamma}) and regulatory (IL-10) cytokines was assessed by real-time PCR in spleen. A significant up-regulation of all 5 cytokines was observed in spleen from pigs exposed to the highest dose of AFB1. In pigs exposed to the medium dose, IL-6 expression was increased and a trend towards increased IFN-{gamma} and IL-10 was observed. In addition we demonstrate that IL-6 impaired in vitro the antigenic- but not the mitogenic-induced proliferation of lymphocytes from control pigs vaccinated with ovalbumin. These results indicate that AFB1 dietary exposure decreases cell-mediated immunity while inducing an inflammatory response. These impairments in the immune response could participate in failure of vaccination protocols and increased susceptibility to infections described in pigs exposed to AFB1.

  4. Nizatidine, a small molecular compound, enhances killed H5N1 vaccine cell-mediated responses and protects mice from lethal viral challenge.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Wu, Bing; Xue, Jia; Wang, Ming; Chen, Ruiai; Wang, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Nizatidine (NIZ), closely related to Cimetidine, is a histamine H2 receptor inverse agonist used primarily as an anti-acid drug. Recent studies showed that this class of compounds may also modulate immune responses. To evaluate adjuvant effects of NIZ on vaccine immune modulation, we formulated NIZ with a H5N1 killed viral antigen and tested in vitro and in vivo. NIZ activated DC maturation and stimulated Th1 and Th2 immune responses to H5N1 vaccine. As a result, it enhanced both antibody and T cell-mediated immune responses. We also observed that a single immunization into C57BL/6 mice blocked IL-10 upregulation and potentiated Th1/Th2 dual polarization. Importantly, the inoculation of H5N1 vaccine with NIZ significantly improved protection of animals from death after challenge and reduced virus loads in the lung tissues. Considering its water-soluble nature, compared with Cimetidine, Nizatidine may be a better choice to use as a vaccine adjuvant. PMID:24253609

  5. Psychological stress may induce increased humoral and decreased cellular immunity.

    PubMed

    Paik, I H; Toh, K Y; Lee, C; Kim, J J; Lee, S J

    2000-01-01

    Stress alters immune function and affects different immune cell populations in different ways. The authors examined whether psychological stress has different effects on the production of macrophage, T-helper 1(Th1) cell, and T-helper 2(Th2) cell-derived cytokines. Forty-two college students were recruited and their blood was sampled on the day they were to take a stressful academic examination and again 4 weeks after the examination. The stress from the academic examination significantly increased IL-1 beta, IL-6, and IL-10 and decreased IFN-gamma production. These findings suggest that examination stress may increase Th2 cell-mediated humoral immunity and macrophage activities and may decrease Th1 cell-mediated cellular immunity. PMID:11209594

  6. Monocytic suppressive cells mediate cardiovascular transplantation tolerance in mice

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Mercedes Rodriguez; Ledgerwood, Levi; Yang, Yu; Xu, Jiangnan; Lal, Girdhari; Burrell, Bryna; Ma, Ge; Hashimoto, Daigo; Li, Yansui; Boros, Peter; Grisotto, Marcos; van Rooijen, Nico; Matesanz, Rafael; Tacke, Frank; Ginhoux, Florent; Ding, Yaozhong; Chen, Shu-Hsia; Randolph, Gwendalyn; Merad, Miriam; Bromberg, Jonathan S.; Ochando, Jordi C.

    2010-01-01

    One of the main unresolved questions in solid organ transplantation is how to establish indefinite graft survival that is free from long-term treatment with immunosuppressive drugs and chronic rejection (i.e., the establishment of tolerance). The failure to achieve this goal may be related to the difficulty in identifying the phenotype and function of the cell subsets that participate in the induction of tolerance. To address this issue, we investigated the suppressive roles of recipient myeloid cells that may be manipulated to induce tolerance to transplanted hearts in mice. Using depleting mAbs, clodronate-loaded liposomes, and transgenic mice specific for depletion of CD11c+, CD11b+, or CD115+ cells, we identified a tolerogenic role for CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes during the induction of tolerance by costimulatory blockade with CD40L-specific mAb. Early after transplantation, Gr1+ monocytes migrated from the bone marrow into the transplanted organ, where they prevented the initiation of adaptive immune responses that lead to allograft rejection and participated in the development of Tregs. Our results suggest that mobilization of bone marrow CD11b+CD115+Gr1+ monocytes under sterile inflammatory conditions mediates the induction of indefinite allograft survival. We propose that manipulating the common bone marrow monocyte progenitor could be a useful clinical therapeutic approach for inducing transplantation tolerance. PMID:20551515

  7. Interleukin-22 Promotes Intestinal Stem Cell-Mediated Epithelial Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Dudakov, Jarrod A.; Jenq, Robert R.; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F.; Smith, Odette M.; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A.; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L.; O'Rourke, Kevin P.; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E.; Shroyer, Noah F.; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch, and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5+ crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance1,2. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Utilizing ex vivo organoid cultures, we provide evidence that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of Interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury3,4, increased the growth of murine small intestine (SI) organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both murine and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation, and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced Stat3 phosphorylation in Lgr5+ ISCs, and Stat3 was critical for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after murine allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) enhanced recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration, and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft vs. host disease (GVHD). Atoh1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independent of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration. PMID:26649819

  8. Interleukin-22 promotes intestinal-stem-cell-mediated epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Lindemans, Caroline A; Calafiore, Marco; Mertelsmann, Anna M; O'Connor, Margaret H; Dudakov, Jarrod A; Jenq, Robert R; Velardi, Enrico; Young, Lauren F; Smith, Odette M; Lawrence, Gillian; Ivanov, Juliet A; Fu, Ya-Yuan; Takashima, Shuichiro; Hua, Guoqiang; Martin, Maria L; O'Rourke, Kevin P; Lo, Yuan-Hung; Mokry, Michal; Romera-Hernandez, Monica; Cupedo, Tom; Dow, Lukas E; Nieuwenhuis, Edward E; Shroyer, Noah F; Liu, Chen; Kolesnick, Richard; van den Brink, Marcel R M; Hanash, Alan M

    2015-12-24

    Epithelial regeneration is critical for barrier maintenance and organ function after intestinal injury. The intestinal stem cell (ISC) niche provides Wnt, Notch and epidermal growth factor (EGF) signals supporting Lgr5(+) crypt base columnar ISCs for normal epithelial maintenance. However, little is known about the regulation of the ISC compartment after tissue damage. Using ex vivo organoid cultures, here we show that innate lymphoid cells (ILCs), potent producers of interleukin-22 (IL-22) after intestinal injury, increase the growth of mouse small intestine organoids in an IL-22-dependent fashion. Recombinant IL-22 directly targeted ISCs, augmenting the growth of both mouse and human intestinal organoids, increasing proliferation and promoting ISC expansion. IL-22 induced STAT3 phosphorylation in Lgr5(+) ISCs, and STAT3 was crucial for both organoid formation and IL-22-mediated regeneration. Treatment with IL-22 in vivo after mouse allogeneic bone marrow transplantation enhanced the recovery of ISCs, increased epithelial regeneration and reduced intestinal pathology and mortality from graft-versus-host disease. ATOH1-deficient organoid culture demonstrated that IL-22 induced epithelial regeneration independently of the Paneth cell niche. Our findings reveal a fundamental mechanism by which the immune system is able to support the intestinal epithelium, activating ISCs to promote regeneration. PMID:26649819

  9. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  10. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy occurring with the acquired immune deficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    England, J D; Hsu, C Y; Garen, P D; Goust, J M; Biggs, P J

    1984-08-01

    A 33-year-old homosexual man with symptoms and signs of a focal brain process was subsequently found to have an acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) with biopsy-proven progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy. This report reemphasizes the association of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy with AIDS and probably is best viewed as another example of an opportunistic CNS infection complicating deficient cell-mediated immunity. PMID:6540476

  11. Adoptive immunotherapy against ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Mittica, Gloria; Capellero, Sonia; Genta, Sofia; Cagnazzo, Celeste; Aglietta, Massimo; Sangiolo, Dario; Valabrega, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    The standard front-line therapy for epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) is combination of debulking surgery and platinum-based chemotherapy. Nevertheless, the majority of patients experience disease recurrence. Although extensive efforts to find new therapeutic options, cancer cells invariably develop drug resistance and disease progression. New therapeutic strategies are needed to improve prognosis of patients with advanced EOC.Recently, several preclinical and clinical studies investigated feasibility and activity of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC. Our aim is to highlight prospective of adoptive immunotherapy in EOC, focusing on HLA-restricted Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs), and MHC-independent immune effectors such as natural killer (NK), and cytokine-induced killer (CIK). Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) has shown activity in several pre-clinical models. Available preclinical and clinical data suggest that adoptive cell therapy may provide the best benefit in settings of low tumor burden, minimal residual disease, or maintenance therapy. Further studies are needed to better define the optimal clinical setting. PMID:27188274

  12. KERATINOCYTE CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS ASSAY: CORRELATION WITH IN VIVO TUMOR STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    A murine keratinocyte cell-mediated mutagenesis assay was characterized and examined as an in vitro model system for studying the biotransformation of promutagens/procarcinogens by mouse skin. The assay used living cultured newborn SENCAR keratinocytes for the metabolic activatio...

  13. Questions about Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Español Text Size Email Print Share Questions About Adoption Page Content Article Body What's the best way to handle my child's questions about her adoption? Many parents want to know when is the ...

  14. What's Happening in Adoption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Ursula M.

    1975-01-01

    Reviews current issues in adoption: termination of parental rights, rights of unwed fathers, subsidized adoption, the recent influx of Vietnamese children, black market babies, agency accountability in placing children, the right of the adoptee to know his biological parents. (ED)

  15. Single Parent Adoptive Homes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shireman, Joan F.

    1996-01-01

    Reviews research and reports on a longitudinal study of 15 single-parent adoptive homes over a 14-year period that demonstrated that these homes have the capacity to be successful adoptive placements. Identifies unique characteristics of single-parent adoptive homes, and notes the need for additional research to identify children for whom these…

  16. Adoption and Identity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, E. James

    1998-01-01

    Discusses how adoption responds to ancient questions about origins. Maintains that one's identity hinges on actual relationships more than on pedigree and genes. Discusses reasons for informing a child about his or her adoption. Suggests that adoption is a constructive process involving too many worrisome warnings and anxiety-raising advice by the…

  17. Immune System

    MedlinePlus

    ... How Can I Help a Friend Who Cuts? Immune System KidsHealth > For Teens > Immune System Print A A ... could put us out of commission. What the Immune System Does The immune (pronounced: ih-MYOON) system, which ...

  18. Oxaliplatin regulates expression of stress ligands in ovarian cancer cells and modulates their susceptibility to natural killer cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Siew, Yin-Yin; Neo, Soek-Ying; Yew, Hui-Chuing; Lim, Shun-Wei; Ng, Yi-Cheng; Lew, Si-Min; Seetoh, Wei-Guang; Seow, See-Voon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2015-12-01

    Selected cytotoxic chemicals can provoke the immune system to recognize and destroy malignant tumors. Most of the studies on immunogenic cell death are focused on the signals that operate on a series of receptors expressed by dendritic cells to induce tumor antigen-specific T-cell responses. Here, we explored the effects of oxaliplatin, an immunogenic cell death inducer, on the induction of stress ligands and promotion of natural killer (NK) cell-mediated cytotoxicity in human ovarian cancer cells. The results indicated that treatment of tumor cells with oxaliplatin induced the production of type I interferons and chemokines and enhanced the expression of major histocompatibility complex class I-related chains (MIC) A/B, UL16-binding protein (ULBP)-3, CD155 and TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL)-R1/R2. Furthermore, oxaliplatin but not cisplatin treatment enhanced susceptibility of ovarian cancer cells to NK cell-mediated cytolysis. In addition, activated NK cells completely abrogated the growth of cancer cells that were pretreated with oxaliplatin. However, cancer cells pretreated with the same concentration of oxaliplatin alone were capable of potentiating regrowth over a period of time. These results suggest an advantage in combining oxaliplatin and NK cell-based therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer. Further investigation on such potential combination therapy is warranted. PMID:26138671

  19. The requirement for DNAM-1, NKG2D, and NKp46 in the natural killer cell-mediated killing of myeloma cells.

    PubMed

    El-Sherbiny, Yasser M; Meade, Josephine L; Holmes, Tim D; McGonagle, Dennis; Mackie, Sarah L; Morgan, Ann W; Cook, Gordon; Feyler, Sylvia; Richards, Stephen J; Davies, Faith E; Morgan, Gareth J; Cook, Graham P

    2007-09-15

    Recent evidence suggests a role for natural killer (NK) cells in the control of multiple myeloma. We show that expression of the NK cell receptor DNAM-1 (CD226) is reduced on CD56(dim) NK cells from myeloma patients with active disease compared with patients in remission and healthy controls. This suggested that this receptor might play a role in NK-myeloma interactions. The DNAM-1 ligands Nectin-2 (CD112) and the poliovirus receptor (PVR; CD155) were expressed by most patient myeloma samples analyzed. NK killing of patient-derived myelomas expressing PVR and/or Nectin-2 was DNAM-1 dependent, revealing a functional role for DNAM-1 in myeloma cell killing. In myeloma cell lines, cell surface expression of PVR was associated with low levels of NKG2D ligands, whereas cells expressing high levels of NKG2D ligands did not express PVR protein or mRNA. Furthermore, NK cell-mediated killing of myeloma cell lines was dependent on either DNAM-1 or NKG2D but not both molecules. In contrast, the natural cytotoxicity receptor NKp46 was required for the killing of all myeloma cell lines analyzed. Thus, DNAM-1 is important in the NK cell-mediated killing of myeloma cells expressing the cognate ligands. The importance of NKp46, NKG2D, and DNAM-1 in myeloma killing mirrors the differential expression of NK cell ligands by myeloma cells, reflecting immune selection during myeloma disease progression. PMID:17875681

  20. Vaccines and immunization against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic immunization strategies are an effective method to control human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases and cancers. Current protective virus-like particle and capsid-based vaccines are highly protective against vaccine-matched HPV types, and continued improvements in second-generation vaccines will lead to broader protection and cross-protection against the cancer-associated types. Increasing the effectiveness of broadly cross-protective L2-based immunogens will require adjuvants that activate innate immunity to thus enhance adaptive immunity. Therapeutic immunization strategies are needed to control and cure clinical disease and HPV-associated cancers. Significant advances in strategies to improve induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV early (and capsid) proteins have been pretested in preclinical animal papillomavirus models. Several of these effective protocols have translated into successful therapeutic immune-mediated clearance of clinical lesions. Nevertheless, there are significant challenges in activating immunity to cancer-associated lesions due to various immune downregulatory events that are triggered by persistent HPV infections. A better understanding of immune responses to HPV lesions in situ is needed to optimize immune effector T cells that efficiently locate to sites of infection and which should lead to an effective immunotherapeutic management of this important human viral pathogen. The most effective immunization strategy may well require combination antiviral and immunotherapeutic treatments to achieve complete clearance of HPV infections and associated cancers. PMID:24643192

  1. The Transracial Adoption Paradox

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Richard M.

    2008-01-01

    The number of transracial adoptions in the United States, particularly international adoptions, is increasing annually. Counseling psychology as a profession, however, is a relatively silent voice in the research on and practice of transracial adoption. This article presents an overview of the history and research on transracial adoption to inform counseling psychologists of the set of racial and ethnic challenges and opportunities that transracial adoptive families face in everyday living. Particular attention is given to emergent theory and research on the cultural socialization process within these families. PMID:18458794

  2. [The use of Chinese traditional medicines to improve impaired immune functions in scald mice].

    PubMed

    Luo, Z H

    1993-01-01

    For the purpose of searching for immunomodulators, this experiment studied the effects of 6 kinds of Chinese traditional herbs on the restoration of the suppressed immune functions in scald mice, including cell-mediated, humoral and non-specific immunity. All control non-treated scald mice showed definite depression of immune functions in various degrees. Polygonum cuspidatum, Taraxacum officinale and Oidenlandia diffusa (wild) roxb showed immunomodulating effects as measured with 3 immunological parameters. But the effects varied according to the dosage of drugs. Rehmannia glutinosa gave definite improving effects on cell-mediated and non-specific immunity, but no significant effect on humoral immunity, while Gui Ling Gao only showed some effect on humoral immunity. PMID:8330249

  3. Allogeneic cell-mediated immunotherapy for breast cancer after autologous stem cell transplantation: a clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Or, R; Ackerstein, A; Nagler, A; Kapelushnik, J; Naparstek, E; Samuel, S; Amar, A; Bruatbar, C; Slavin, S

    1998-03-01

    Allogeneic cell therapy (allo-CT) is emerging as an effective treatment for patients relapsing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), indicating that tumor cells resisting chemoradiotherapy may still respond to immunocompetent allogeneic lymphocytes. We investigated possible graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects in six patients with metastatic breast cancer that would be comparable to the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) phenomenon occurring after allogeneic BMT in hematologic malignancies. The patients were cytoreduced with high-dose chemotherapy and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT), and were treated ambulatory with allo-CT consisting of adoptive transfer of HLA-matched donor peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) activated in vivo with human recombinant interleukin-2 (rIL-2). If no graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) developed, allo-CT was augmented with infusion of donor PBL, preactivated in vitro with rIL-2. Treatment was well tolerated, with low therapy-related toxicity in all patients. Two patients developed signs and symptoms compatible with GVHD grade I-II, one of whom shows no evidence of disease at more than 34 months out. In the remaining patients, progression-free survival following allo-CT ranged between 7 and 13 months. Allogeneic cell-mediated, cytokine-activated immunotherapy might be utilized for induction of GVT in metastatic breast cancer. A search for techniques to boost chimerism without severe GVHD is indicated. PMID:9557210

  4. Adjuvant effects of saponins on animal immune responses*

    PubMed Central

    Rajput, Zahid Iqbal; Hu, Song-hua; Xiao, Chen-wen; Arijo, Abdullah G.

    2007-01-01

    Vaccines require optimal adjuvants including immunopotentiator and delivery systems to offer long term protection from infectious diseases in animals and man. Initially it was believed that adjuvants are responsible for promoting strong and sustainable antibody responses. Now it has been shown that adjuvants influence the isotype and avidity of antibody and also affect the properties of cell-mediated immunity. Mostly oil emulsions, lipopolysaccharides, polymers, saponins, liposomes, cytokines, ISCOMs (immunostimulating complexes), Freund’s complete adjuvant, Freund’s incomplete adjuvant, alums, bacterial toxins etc., are common adjuvants under investigation. Saponin based adjuvants have the ability to stimulate the cell mediated immune system as well as to enhance antibody production and have the advantage that only a low dose is needed for adjuvant activity. In the present study the importance of adjuvants, their role and the effect of saponin in immune system is reviewed. PMID:17323426

  5. Companion animal adoption study.

    PubMed

    Neidhart, Laura; Boyd, Renee

    2002-01-01

    To better understand the outcomes of companion animal adoptions, Bardsley & Neidhart Inc. conducted a series of 3 surveys over a 1-year period with dog and cat owners who had adopted their pet through either a (a) Luv-A-Pet location, (b) Adopt-a-thon, or (c) traditional shelter. This article suggests opportunities to improve owners' perceptions of their pets and the adoption process through (a) providing more information before adoption about pet health and behaviors, (b) providing counseling to potential adopters to place pets appropriately, and (c) educating adopters to promote companion animal health and retention. Results demonstrate that the pet's relationship to the family unit, such as where the pet sleeps and how much time is spent with the pet, is related to the amount of veterinary care the companion animal receives, and to long-term retention. Satisfaction and retention are attributed to the pet's personality, compatibility, and behavior, rather than demographic differences among adopters or between adoption settings. The age of the companion animal at adoption, the intended recipient, and presence of children in the home also play a role. Health problems were an issue initially for half of all adopted pets, but most were resolved within 12 months. Roughly one fourth of adopters who no longer have their companion animal said their pet died. Characteristics of pets that died support the contention that spaying and neutering profoundly affects a companion animal's life span. Although retention is similar for dogs and cats, mortality is higher among cats in the first year after adoption. PMID:12578739

  6. Antigen-specific immune-suppressor factor in herpes simplex virus type 2 infections of UV B-irradiated mice

    SciTech Connect

    Aurelian, L.; Yasumoto, S.; Smith, C.C.

    1988-07-01

    UV B-irradiation (280 to 320 nm) of mice at the site of cutaneous infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) induced suppressor T-cell circuits that decreased HSV-2-induced proliferative responses of HSV-2-immune lymph node cells. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that splenocytes from UV B-irradiated HSV-2-infected animals contain L3T4+ cells that suppress proliferative responses in vivo, consistent with suppressor inducer cells. However, following in vitro culture of the splenocytes with HSV-2 antigen, the proliferation of immune lymph node cells was inhibited by Lyt2+ suppressor T cells, consistent with antigen-induced suppressor effector cells. Antigen-specific and nonspecific suppressor factors were fractionated from supernatants of HSV-2-stimulated spleen cells by molecular-sieve chromatography. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of the Sephadex fraction that contained the antigen-specific suppressor factor, in the presence or absence of 2-mercaptoethanol, defined a 115-kilodalton protein consisting of two disulfide-bound components with molecular sizes of 70 and 52 kilodaltons. The implications of these results with respect to the regulation of HSV-induced cell-mediated immunity following UV B-irradiation are discussed.

  7. Challenges and Opportunities for T-Cell-Mediated Strategies to Eliminate HIV Reservoirs

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, Mark A.; Jones, R. Brad; Brumme, Zabrina L.

    2015-01-01

    HIV’s ability to establish latent reservoirs of reactivation-competent virus is the major barrier to cure. “Shock and kill” methods consisting of latency-reversing agents (LRAs) followed by elimination of reactivating cells through cytopathic effects are under active development. However, the clinical efficacy of LRAs remains to be established. Moreover, recent studies indicate that reservoirs may not be reduced efficiently by either viral cytopathic or CD8+ T-cell-mediated mechanisms. In this perspective, we highlight challenges to T-cell-mediated elimination of HIV reservoirs, including characteristics of responding T cells, aspects of the cellular reservoirs, and properties of the latent virus itself. We also discuss potential strategies to overcome these challenges by targeting the antiviral activity of T cells toward appropriate viral antigens following latency. PMID:26483795

  8. Effect of disodium cromoglycate on mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reactions.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hye-Young; Kim, Jung-Sook; An, Nyeon-Hyoung; Park, Rae-Kil; Kim, Hyung-Min

    2004-04-23

    We investigated the effect of disodium cromoglycate (DSCG) on mast cell-mediated immediate-type hypersensitivity. DSCG inhibited systemic allergic reaction induced by compound 48/80 dose-dependently. Passive cutaneous anaphylaxis was inhibited by 71.6% by oral administration of DSCG (1 g/kg). When DSCG was pretreated at concentration rang from 0.01-1000 g/kg, the serum histamine levels were reduced in a dose dependent manner. DSCG also significantly inhibited histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cell (RPMC) by compound 48/80. We confirmed that DSCG inhibited compound 48/80-induced degranulation of RPMC by alcian blue/nuclear fast red staining. In addition, DSCG showed a significant inhibitory effect on anti-dinitrophenyl IgE-mediated tumor necrosis factor-alpha production. These results indicate that DSCG inhibits mast cell-mediated immediate-type allergic reaction. PMID:15050425

  9. Innate immune cells in the pathogenesis of primary systemic vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Agarwal, Vikas

    2016-02-01

    Innate immune system forms the first line of defense against foreign substances. Neutrophils, eosinophils, erythrocytes, platelets, monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, γδ T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells comprise the innate immune system. Genetic polymorphisms influencing the activation of innate immune cells predispose to development of vasculitis and influence its severity. Abnormally activated innate immune cells cross-talk with other cells of the innate immune system, present antigens more efficiently and activate T and B lymphocytes and cause tissue destruction via cell-mediated cytotoxicity and release of pro-inflammatory cytokines. These secreted cytokines further recruit other cells to the sites of vascular injury. They are involved in both the initiation as well as the perpetuation of vasculitis. Evidences suggest reversal of aberrant activation of immune cells in response to therapy. Understanding the role of innate immune cells in vasculitis helps understand the potential of therapeutic modulation of their activation to treat vasculitis. PMID:26403285

  10. The Exonuclease Domain of Lassa Virus Nucleoprotein Is Involved in Antigen-Presenting-Cell-Mediated NK Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Russier, Marion; Reynard, Stéphanie; Carnec, Xavier

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lassa virus is an Old World Arenavirus which causes Lassa hemorrhagic fever in humans, mostly in West Africa. Lassa fever is an important public health problem, and a safe and effective vaccine is urgently needed. The infection causes immunosuppression, probably due to the absence of activation of antigen-presenting cells (dendritic cells and macrophages), low type I interferon (IFN) production, and deficient NK cell function. However, a recombinant Lassa virus carrying D389A and G392A substitutions in the nucleoprotein that abolish the exonuclease activity and IFN activation loses its inhibitory activity and induces strong type I IFN production by dendritic cells and macrophages. We show here that during infection by this mutant Lassa virus, antigen-presenting cells trigger efficient human NK cell responses in vitro, including production of IFN-γ and cytotoxicity. NK cell activation involves close contact with both antigen-presenting cells and soluble factors. We report that infected dendritic cells and macrophages express the NKG2D ligands major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-related chains A and B and that they may produce interleukin-12 (IL-12), IL-15, and IL-18, all involved in NK cell functions. NK cell degranulation is significantly increased in cocultures, suggesting that NK cells seem to kill infected dendritic cells and macrophages. This work confirms the inhibitory function of Lassa virus nucleoprotein. Importantly, we demonstrate for the first time that Lassa virus nucleoprotein is involved in the inhibition of antigen-presenting cell-mediated NK cell responses. IMPORTANCE The pathogenesis and immune responses induced by Lassa virus are poorly known. Recently, an exonuclease domain contained in the viral nucleoprotein has been shown to be able to inhibit the type I IFN response by avoiding the recognition of viral RNA by cell sensors. Here, we studied the responses of NK cells to dendritic cells and macrophages infected with a

  11. Single Parent Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration for Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC.

    Presenting two views of the single-parent family, this pamphlet includes an article by two researchers (William Feigelman and Arnold R. Silverman) and a short statement by a single adoptive parent (Amanda Richards). The first paper summarizes earlier research on single-parent adoptions and discusses the results of a nationwide survey of 713…

  12. Proteomic comparison of 3D and 2D glioma models reveals increased HLA-E expression in 3D models is associated with resistance to NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    He, Weiqi; Kuang, Yongqin; Xing, Xuemin; Simpson, Richard J; Huang, Haidong; Yang, Tao; Chen, Jingmin; Yang, Libin; Liu, Enyu; He, Weifeng; Gu, Jianwen

    2014-05-01

    Three-dimensional cell culture techniques can better reflect the in vivo characteristics of tumor cells compared with traditional monolayer cultures. Compared with their 2D counterparts, 3D-cultured tumor cells showed enhanced resistance to the cytotoxic T cell-mediated immune response. However, it remains unclear whether 3D-cultured tumor cells have an enhanced resistance to NK cell cytotoxicity. In this study, a total of 363 differentially expressed proteins were identified between the 2D- and 3D-cultured U251 cells by comparative proteomics, and an immune-associated protein-protein interaction (PPI) network based on these differential proteins was constructed by bioinformatics. Within the network, HLA-E, as a molecule for inhibiting NK cell activation, was significantly up-regulated in the 3D-cultured tumor cells. Then, we found that the 3D-cultured U251 cells exhibited potent resistance to NK cell cytotoxicity in vitro and were prone to tumor formation in vivo. The resistance of the 3D-cultured tumor cells to NK cell lysis was mediated by the HLA-E/NKG2A interaction because the administration of antibodies that block either HLA-E or NKG2A completely eliminated this resistance and significantly decreased tumor formation. Taken together, our findings indicate that HLA-E up-regulation in 3D-cultured cells may result in enhanced tumor resistance to NK cell-mediated immune response. PMID:24742303

  13. Adoptive T-cell therapy for B-cell malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Anderson, Larry D; Nishida, Tetsuya; Riddell, Stanley R

    2011-01-01

    The success of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for B-cell malignancies is evidence that these tumors can be eliminated by T lymphocytes. This has encouraged the development of specific adoptive T-cell therapy, both for augmenting the anti-tumor effect of HCT and for patients not undergoing HCT. T cells that are capable of recognizing antigens expressed on malignant B cells may be recruited from the endogenous repertoire or engineered to express tumor-targeting receptors. Critical insights into the qualities of T cells that enable their persistence and function in vivo have been derived, and obstacles to effective T-cell-mediated tumor eradication are being elucidated. These advances provide the tools to translate adoptive T-cell transfer into reliable clinical therapies. PMID:21083018

  14. Immune Restoration

    MedlinePlus

    ... marrow cells immune to HIV infection. Letting the immune system repair itself: CD4 counts have increased for many ... have taken ART. Some scientists believe that the immune system might be able to heal and repair itself ...

  15. Immune changes during short-duration missions.

    PubMed

    Taylor, G R

    1993-09-01

    Spaceflight materially influences the immune mechanism of humans and animals. Effects resulting from missions of less than 1 month are examined. Effects from longer missions are discussed in the companion paper by Konstantinova et al. Most immunology studies have involved analyses of subjects and samples from subjects obtained after flight, with the data being compared with similar data obtained before flight. These studies have demonstrated that short-duration missions can result in a postflight depression in blast cell transformation, major changes in cytokine function, and alterations in the relative numbers of immune cell populations. In addition to these post- vs. preflight studies, some data have been produced in flight. However, these in vitro analyses have been less than satisfactory because of differences between in-flight and ground-control conditions. Recently, both the U.S. and Russian space programs have started collecting in-flight, in vivo, cell-mediated immunity data. These studies have confirmed that the human cell-mediated immune system is blunted during spaceflight. PMID:8371049

  16. Immune changes during short-duration missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Spaceflight materially influences the immune mechanism of humans and animals. Effects resulting from missions of less than 1 month are examined. Effects from longer missions are discussed in the companion paper by Konstantinova et al. Most immunology studies have involved analyses of subjects and samples from subjects obtained after flight, with the data being compared with similar data obtained before flight. These studies have demonstrated that short-duration missions can result in a postflight depression in blast cell transformation, major changes in cytokine function, and alterations in the relative numbers of immune cell populations. In addition to these post- vs. preflight studies, some data have been produced in flight. However, these in vitro analyses have been less than satisfactory because of differences between in-flight and ground-control conditions. Recently, both the U.S. and Russian space programs have started collecting in-flight, in vivo, cell-mediated immunity data. These studies have confirmed that the human cell-mediated immune system is blunted during spaceflight.

  17. Interleukin-1-induced promotion of T-cell differentiation in mice immunized with killed Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Igarashi, K; Mitsuyama, M; Muramori, K; Tsukada, H; Nomoto, K

    1990-01-01

    We studied the effects of administration of recombinant interleukin-1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) to mice after immunization with killed Listeria monocytogenes cells on the promotion of the functional differentiation of T cells in vivo. Mice immunized with killed L. monocytogenes were unable to express cell-mediated immunity to specific antigen in vivo, as determined by delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) and acquired cellular resistance (ACR), and splenic T cells obtained from such mice were unable to respond to rIL-2 and specific antigen and to produce IL-2 after antigenic restimulation in vitro. When rIL-1 alpha was given to mice after immunization with killed bacteria. T cells became capable of responding to rIL-2 and specific antigen in vitro. These functions of T cells were similar to those from mice immunized with viable listeriae. Moreover, using a local passive transfer system, it was found that effector T cells mediating DTH but not ACR to L. monocytogenes were generated in mice treated with rIL-1 alpha after immunization with killed bacteria. These T cells were able to produce macrophage chemotactic factor but not macrophage-activating factor or gamma interferon in vitro in response to stimulation with specific antigen. These results suggest that in vivo administration of rIL-1 alpha facilitates the maturation of antigen-specific T cells mediating DTH and that different effector T cells mediating DTH or ACR are involved in cell-mediated immunity to L. monocytogenes. PMID:2123829

  18. Mechanisms of long and short term immunity to plague.

    PubMed Central

    Wake, A; Morita, H; Wake, M

    1978-01-01

    Long and short term immunity to plague was produced in normal mice by using, respectively, an antibiotic resistant Yersinia pestis and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Both immunogens were used live. Passive serum transfer experiments, together with assays for the bactericidal activity of macrophages and delayed hypersensitivity tests, showed that the short term immunity was of a humoral nature and the long term immunity was cell mediated. The plague virulence markers of the two immunogens were: Y. pestis VW- F1+ P1+ P+; Y. pseudotuberculosis VW+ F1- P1- P-. The challenge organism was Y. pestis VW+ F1+ P1+ P+. Images Figure 3 PMID:680791

  19. GENE EXPRESSION AND CELLULAR IMMUNE RESPONSE OF RAINBOW TROUT (ONCORHYNCHUS MYKISS) EXPOSED TO YERSINIA RUCKERI: A MODEL SYSTEM FOR UNDERSTANDING MECHANISMS OF TELEOST PROTECTIVE IMMUNITY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The formalin-killed enteric redmouth bacterin is one of the most successful aquaculture vaccines developed, and millions of rainbow trout have been vaccinated each year since the 1950s. Cell-mediated immunity is important for vaccine efficacy; however, the molecular mechanisms of protection are poo...

  20. Immunometabolism: Cellular Metabolism Turns Immune Regulator.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Róisín M; Finlay, David K

    2016-01-01

    Immune cells are highly dynamic in terms of their growth, proliferation, and effector functions as they respond to immunological challenges. Different immune cells can adopt distinct metabolic configurations that allow the cell to balance its requirements for energy, molecular biosynthesis, and longevity. However, in addition to facilitating immune cell responses, it is now becoming clear that cellular metabolism has direct roles in regulating immune cell function. This review article describes the distinct metabolic signatures of key immune cells, explains how these metabolic setups facilitate immune function, and discusses the emerging evidence that intracellular metabolism has an integral role in controlling immune responses. PMID:26534957

  1. The effect of nutritional status on immune capacity and immune responses in preschool children in a rural community in India*

    PubMed Central

    Kielmann, A. A.; Uberoi, I. S.; Chandra, R. K.; Mehra, V. L.

    1976-01-01

    Cell-mediated immune response (CMI) and several aspects of humoral immune status and response were measured and related to nutritional status in preschool children in north India. CMI was measured by means of postvaccinal (BCG) tuberculin sensitivity and leucocytic blast cell transformation. Humoral immune response was measured by means of tetanus antibody production following vaccination with diphtheria—pertussis—tetanus vaccine. Immunoglobulins A, G, and M and complement (C3) were also determined. CMI, serum IgA, and C3 were found to be directly correlated with weight-for-age status. PMID:1088398

  2. Chronically Elevated Levels of Short-Chain Fatty Acids Induce T Cell-Mediated Ureteritis and Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeongho; Goergen, Craig J; HogenEsch, Harm; Kim, Chang H

    2016-03-01

    Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) are major products of gut microbial fermentation and profoundly affect host health and disease. SCFAs generate IL-10(+) regulatory T cells, which may promote immune tolerance. However, SCFAs can also induce Th1 and Th17 cells upon immunological challenges and, therefore, also have the potential to induce inflammatory responses. Because of the seemingly paradoxical SCFA activities in regulating T cells, we investigated, in depth, the impact of elevated SCFA levels on T cells and tissue inflammation in mice. Orally administered SCFAs induced effector (Th1 and Th17) and regulatory T cells in ureter and kidney tissues, and they induced T cell-mediated ureteritis, leading to kidney hydronephrosis (hereafter called acetate-induced renal disease, or C2RD). Kidney hydronephrosis in C2RD was caused by ureteral obstruction, which was, in turn, induced by SCFA-induced inflammation in the ureteropelvic junction and proximal ureter. Oral administration of all major SCFAs, such as acetate, propionate, and butyrate, induced the disease. We found that C2RD development is dependent on mammalian target of rapamycin activation, T cell-derived inflammatory cytokines such as IFN-γ and IL-17, and gut microbiota. Young or male animals were more susceptible than old or female animals, respectively. However, SCFA receptor (GPR41 or GPR43) deficiency did not affect C2RD development. Thus, SCFAs, when systemically administered at levels higher than physiological levels, cause dysregulated T cell responses and tissue inflammation in the renal system. The results provide insights into the immunological and pathological effects of chronically elevated SCFAs. PMID:26819206

  3. Role of donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone repair: differentiation vs. paracrine effects

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueqin; Usas, Arvydas; Proto, Jonathan D.; Lu, Aiping; Cummins, James H.; Proctor, Alexander; Chen, Chien-Wen; Huard, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    Murine muscle-derived stem cells (MDSCs) have been shown capable of regenerating bone in a critical size calvarial defect model when transduced with BMP 2 or 4; however, the contribution of the donor cells and their interactions with the host cells during the bone healing process have not been fully elucidated. To address this question, C57/BL/6J mice were divided into MDSC/BMP4/GFP, MDSC/GFP, and scaffold groups. After transplanting MDSCs into the critical-size calvarial defects created in normal mice, we found that mice transplanted with BMP4GFP-transduced MDSCs healed the bone defect in 4 wk, while the control groups (MDSC-GFP and scaffold) demonstrated no bone healing. The newly formed trabecular bone displayed similar biomechanical properties as the native bone, and the donor cells directly participated in endochondral bone formation via their differentiation into chondrocytes, osteoblasts, and osteocytes via the BMP4-pSMAD5 and COX-2-PGE2 signaling pathways. In contrast to the scaffold group, the MDSC groups attracted more inflammatory cells initially and incurred faster inflammation resolution, enhanced angiogenesis, and suppressed initial immune responses in the host mice. MDSCs were shown to attract macrophages via the secretion of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 and promote endothelial cell proliferation by secreting multiple growth factors. Our findings indicated that BMP4GFP-transduced MDSCs not only regenerated bone by direct differentiation, but also positively influenced the host cells to coordinate and promote bone tissue repair through paracrine effects.—Gao, X., Usas, A., Proto, J. D., Lu, A., Cummins, J. H., Proctor, A., Chen, C.-W., Huard, J. Role of donor and host cells in muscle-derived stem cell-mediated bone repair: differentiation vs. paracrine effects. PMID:24843069

  4. Immune markers and correlates of protection for vaccine induced immune responses.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Aneesh; Pedersen, Lasse E; Jungersen, Gregers

    2012-07-13

    Vaccines have been a major innovation in the history of mankind and still have the potential to address the challenges posed by chronic intracellular infections including tuberculosis, HIV and malaria which are leading causes of high morbidity and mortality across the world. Markers of an appropriate humoral response currently remain the best validated correlates of protective immunity after vaccination. Despite advancements in the field of immunology over the past few decades currently there are, however, no sufficiently validated immune correlates of vaccine induced protection against chronic infections in neither human nor veterinary medicine. Technological and conceptual advancements within cell-mediated immunology have led to a number of new immunological read-outs with the potential to emerge as correlates of vaccine induced protection. For T(H)1 type responses, antigen-specific production of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) has been promoted as a quantitative marker of protective cell-mediated immune responses over the past couple of decades. More recently, however, evidence from several infections has pointed towards the quality of the immune response, measured through increased levels of antigen-specific polyfunctional T cells capable of producing a triad of relevant cytokines, as a better correlate of sustained protective immunity against this type of infections. Also the possibilities to measure antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells (CTL) during infection or in response to vaccination, through recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers loaded with relevant peptides, has opened a new vista to include CTL responses in the evaluation of protective immune responses. Here, we review different immune markers and new candidates for correlates of a protective vaccine induced immune response against chronic infections and how successful they have been in defining the protective immunity in human and veterinary medicine. PMID:22658928

  5. T-cell-mediated clearance of mouse hepatitis virus strain JHM from the central nervous system.

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, M A; Shubin, R A; Kyuwa, S; Stohlman, S A

    1989-01-01

    Clearance of the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus from the central nervous system was examined by the transfer of spleen cells from immunized donors. A T cell with the surface phenotype of Thy1.2+ CD4+ CD8- asialo-GM1+ Mac-1- was found to be necessary for viral clearance. The surface phenotype and adherence to nylon wool suggest that these cells are activated helper-inducer T cells. Adoptive transfer to congenic histocompatibility strains demonstrated the necessity for compatibility at the D locus of the major histocompatibility complex. The expression of the CD4 surface marker and the requirement for major histocompatibility complex class I were further studied by the transfer of cells to recipients treated with anti-CD4 or anti-CD8 monoclonal antibodies. Treatment of recipients with either the anti-CD8 or the anti-CD4 antibodies inhibited virus clearance from the central nervous system. This suggests that the CD4+ cell acts as a helper and that virus is cleared from the central nervous system. This suggests that the CD4+ cell acts as a helper and that virus is cleared from the central nervous system by CD8+ cells that recognize viral antigen in the context of the H-2Db gene product. PMID:2542613

  6. Parenting Your Adopted Teenager

    MedlinePlus

    ... https: / / www. childwelfare. gov/ pubs/ f- openadopt/ .) The Internet and the explosion of social media sites (e. ... 4 Howard, J. (2012). Untangling the web: The Internet’s transformative impact on adoption . New York, NY: Evan ...

  7. Adoption and Sibling Rivalry

    MedlinePlus

    ... child in your family should understand her own origins, and those of her brothers and sisters. But ... children can seem exaggerated because of their different origins. For instance, i f your adoptive child does ...

  8. Travelers' Health: International Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... preadoption living standards, varying disease epidemiology in the countries of origin, the presence of previously unidentified medical problems, and ... know the disease risks in the adopted child’s country of origin and the medical and social histories of the ...

  9. Protective immunity to Brucella ovis in BALB/c mice following recovery from primary infection or immunization with subcellular vaccines.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Elzer, P H; Blasco, J M; Marín, C M; Gamazo, C; Winter, A J

    1994-01-01

    Experiments were performed with BALB/c mice to elucidate the roles of humoral and cell-mediated immune responses in the acquisition of protective immunity to Brucella ovis and to compare infection immunity with immunity developed through vaccination with a hot saline extract (HS) of B. ovis. Mice convalescing from a primary infection with B. ovis displayed a high level of resistance to reinfection, as evidenced by splenic bacterial counts decreased over 10,000-fold from control groups at 2 weeks after challenge. Passive transfer assays revealed that protection was mediated by both T lymphocytes and antibodies but that antibodies had a substantially greater role on the basis of log units of protection that were transferred. Antibodies specific for HS proteins in sera from convalescent mice were predominantly of the immunoglobulin G 2a and 3 isotypes. Vaccination with HS conferred good protection against B. ovis, but protection was greatly enhanced by the incorporation of QS-21 or other adjuvants. Protection provided by the HS vaccine resulted largely from immune responses to its protein moieties. A critical evaluation of the protective efficacy of the rough lipopolysaccharide component of HS was precluded by its poor immunogenicity in BALB/c mice. HS-QS-21 afforded protection against challenge infection with B. ovis as good as that which developed after a primary infection and as good as or better than that provided by attenuated Brucella melitensis vaccine strain Rev 1. Passive transfer experiments confirmed that the magnitudes of both humoral and cell-mediated forms of protective immunity were equivalent in mice vaccinated with HS-QS-21 and those recovering from a primary infection. Protective immunity to B. ovis in mice therefore resembled that to Brucella abortus, except that the relative roles of humoral and cell-mediated immunity, rather than being equivalent, were shifted toward a greater role for antibodies. PMID:8300219

  10. Immune Mechanism: A ‘Double-Edged Sword’

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Mustaffa

    2013-01-01

    Immunology has now developed into an independent discipline in medicine which covers not only germ infection which is related to immunity solely but also covers a lot of non-infectious diseases such as autoimmune disease, allergies, and others. Therefore, “The Immune Mechanism: “A Double-Edged Sword” means that the immune mechanism (consisted of antibody mediated mechanism and T cell mediated mechanism), just like one edge playing the role of giving benefit (immunity) as it destroys the agent of infection, and another one can be detrimental as it will cause tissue/cell damages and then give rise to immune diseases (immunopathology). Now, the prevalence of these immune diseases is on the rise and has become a new challenge to our country towards developed country in 2020. Therefore, we have to make ample preparation (laboratory facilities/services, main power, and research) from now on in order to face the problems and challenges. PMID:23966827

  11. Immunity to Cryptococcus neoformans and C. gattii during cryptococcosis

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Josie F.; Johnston, Simon A.

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of infection with cryptococcal species occurs with Cryptococcus neoformans in the severely immunocompromised. A significant exception to this is the infections of those with apparently normal immune systems by Cryptococcus gattii. Susceptibility to cryptococcosis can be broadly categorised as a defect in adaptive immune responses, especially in T cell immunity. However, innate immune cells such as macrophages play a key role and are likely the primary effector cell in the killing and ultimate clearance of cryptococcal infection. In this review we discuss the current state of our understanding of how the immune system responds to cryptococcal infection in health and disease, with reference to the work communicated at the 9th International Conference on Cryptococcus and Cryptococcosis (ICCC9). We have focussed on cell mediated responses, particularly early in infection, but with the aim of presenting a broad overview of our understanding of immunity to cryptococcal infection, highlighting some recent advances and offering some perspectives on future directions. PMID:25498576

  12. Innate immune cell response upon Candida albicans infection.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yulin; Zhang, Lulu; Xu, Zheng; Zhang, Jinyu; Jiang, Yuan-Ying; Cao, Yongbing; Yan, Tianhua

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus which is the predominant cause of superficial and deep tissue fungal infections. This microorganism has developed efficient strategies to invade the host and evade host defense systems. However, the host immune system will be prepared for defense against the microbe by recognition of receptors, activation of signal transduction pathways and cooperation of immune cells. As a consequence, C. albicans could either be eliminated by immune cells rapidly or disseminate hematogenously, leading to life-threatening systemic infections. The interplay between Candida albicans and the host is complex, requiring recognition of the invaded pathogens, activation of intricate pathways and collaboration of various immune cells. In this review, we will focus on the effects of innate immunity that emphasize the first line protection of host defense against invaded C. albicans including the basis of receptor-mediated recognition and the mechanisms of cell-mediated immunity. PMID:27078171

  13. [The protective role of postvaccinal immunity in mumps in children].

    PubMed

    Zheleznikova, G F; Ivanova, V V; Bekhtereva, M K; Gnilevskaia, Z U; Monakhova, N E; Novozhilova, E V; Goleva, O V; Sizemov, A N

    2000-01-01

    The immunological study of children with infectious parotitis (IP) without complications and with such complications as pancreatitis, meningitis or orchitis in the glandular form was carried out. In accordance with the previously proposed principle, 4 types of immune response (IR) were established on the basis of differences in initial resistance and the IR profile: cell-mediated immunity (types I and III) and humoral immunity (types II and IV). The patients included nonvaccinated children, as well as children vaccinated on epidemic indications, 3-6, 7-9, 10 and more years before infection. The comparative analysis of the number of IP cases with and without complications in the groups of children, divided according to their immunization history and the type of IR, revealed that postvaccinal immunity in children vaccinated on epidemic indications (less than a month ago) or 3-6 years before infection had protective potential, sufficient for the prevention of complicated forms of IP. Immunity obtained 7-9 years ago was effective for the protection from IP complications only in cell-mediated, but not humoral IR. Postvaccinal immunity obtained more than 10 years ago did not ensure the decrease in the occurrence of complicated forms of IP (in comparison with that in nonvaccinated patients) in children with any type of IR. PMID:10925873

  14. Immune cells in term and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Lopez, Nardhy; StLouis, Derek; Lehr, Marcus A; Sanchez-Rodriguez, Elly N; Arenas-Hernandez, Marcia

    2014-11-01

    Labor resembles an inflammatory response that includes secretion of cytokines/chemokines by resident and infiltrating immune cells into reproductive tissues and the maternal/fetal interface. Untimely activation of these inflammatory pathways leads to preterm labor, which can result in preterm birth. Preterm birth is a major determinant of neonatal mortality and morbidity; therefore, the elucidation of the process of labor at a cellular and molecular level is essential for understanding the pathophysiology of preterm labor. Here, we summarize the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the physiological or pathological activation of labor. We review published literature regarding the role of innate and adaptive immune cells in the cervix, myometrium, fetal membranes, decidua and the fetus in late pregnancy and labor at term and preterm. Accumulating evidence suggests that innate immune cells (neutrophils, macrophages and mast cells) mediate the process of labor by releasing pro-inflammatory factors such as cytokines, chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases. Adaptive immune cells (T-cell subsets and B cells) participate in the maintenance of fetomaternal tolerance during pregnancy, and an alteration in their function or abundance may lead to labor at term or preterm. Also, immune cells that bridge the innate and adaptive immune systems (natural killer T (NKT) cells and dendritic cells (DCs)) seem to participate in the pathophysiology of preterm labor. In conclusion, a balance between innate and adaptive immune cells is required in order to sustain pregnancy; an alteration of this balance will lead to labor at term or preterm. PMID:24954221

  15. Oral treatment of chickens with lactobacilli influences elicitation of immune responses.

    PubMed

    Brisbin, Jennifer T; Gong, Joshua; Orouji, Shahriar; Esufali, Jessica; Mallick, Amirul I; Parvizi, Payvand; Shewen, Patricia E; Sharif, Shayan

    2011-09-01

    Commensal microbes in the intestine are in constant interaction with host cells and play a role in shaping the immune system. Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus reuteri, and Lactobacillus salivarius are members of the chicken intestinal microbiota and have been shown to induce different cytokine profiles in mononuclear cells in vitro. The objective of the present study was to examine the effects of these bacteria individually or in combination on the induction of antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. The birds received lactobacilli weekly via oral gavage starting on day of hatch and subsequently, at 14 and 21 days, were immunized with sheep red blood cells (SRBC), keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH), Newcastle disease virus vaccine, and infectious bursal disease virus vaccine. Antibody responses in serum were measured weekly for 4 weeks beginning on the day of primary immunization. The cell-mediated immune response was evaluated at 21 days postimmunization by measurement of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production in splenocytes stimulated with inactivated vaccine antigens. L. salivarius-treated birds had significantly more serum antibody to SRBC and KLH than birds that were not treated with probiotics. L. salivarius-treated birds also had decreased cell-mediated immune responses to recall antigen stimulation. L. reuteri treatment did not significantly affect the systemic immune response, while L. acidophilus treatment increased the antibody response to KLH. These results indicate that systemic antibody- and cell-mediated immune responses can be modulated by oral treatment with lactobacilli but that these bacteria may vary in their ability to modulate the immune response. PMID:21734067

  16. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. - Highlights: • Dehydroeffusol markedly inhibits gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry. • Dehydroeffusol suppresses the expression of vasculogenic mimicry key gene VE-cadherin. • Dehydroeffusol decreases the MMP2 expression and activity in gastric cancer cells. • Dehydroeffusol is a potential anti-cancer drug candidate with very low toxicity.

  17. Integrated Immune

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian; Mehta, Satish; Stowe, Raymond; Uchakin, Peter; Quiriarte, Heather; Pierson, Duane; Sams, Clarnece

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the program to replace several recent studies about astronaut immune systems with one comprehensive study that will include in-flight sampling. The study will address lack of in-flight data to determine the inflight status of immune systems, physiological stress, viral immunity, to determine the clinical risk related to immune dysregulation for exploration class spaceflight, and to determine the appropriate monitoring strategy for spaceflight-associated immune dysfunction, that could be used for the evaluation of countermeasures.

  18. Immunopotentiating Effect of a Fomitella fraxinea Derived Lectin on Chicken Immunity and Resistance to Coccidiosis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study reports a novel immunopotentiating effect of a lectin (FFrL) extracted from the mushroom Fomitella fraxinea on poultry cell mediated immunity and poultry coccidiosis. We describe the extraction of FFrL, its in vitro mitogenic activity and in vivo protection against an oral challenge infe...

  19. KINETIC CHANGES IN IMMUNE-RELATED GENE EXPRESSION AND INTESTINAL LYMPHOCYTE SUBPOPULATIONS FOLLOWING E. MAXIMA INFECTION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis, a major intestinal parasitic disease of poultry, induces a cell-mediated immune response against the etiologic agent of the disease, Eimeria. In the current study, the expression levels of gene transcripts encoding pro-inflammatory, Th1, and Th2 cytokines, as well as chemokines and int...

  20. The new numerology of immunity mediated by virus-specific CD8(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Doherty, P C

    1998-08-01

    Our understanding of virus-specific CD8(+) T cell responses is currently being revolutionized by peptide-based assay systems that allow flow cytometric analysis of effector and memory cytotoxic T lymphocyte populations. These techniques are, for the first time, putting the analysis of T-cell-mediated immunity on a quantitative basis. PMID:10066507

  1. HUMORAL AND CELL-MEDIATED IMMUNE STATUS OF MICE EXPOSED TO TRANS-1,2-DICHLORO ETHYLENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The study assessed possible adverse immunological effects of trans-1,2-dichloroethylene (DCE) on random-bred CD-1 mice following 14 and 90 days of exposure. A 14-day range-finding study was performed on male mice by gavage at doses 1/10 and 1/100 the LD50 (210 and 21 mg/kg). No a...

  2. Only a Subset of Phosphoantigen-responsive γ9δ2 T cells Mediate Protective TB Immunity1

    PubMed Central

    Spencer, Charles Thomas; Abate, Getahun; Blazevic, Azra; Hoft, Daniel F.

    2009-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis and M. bovis-BCG induce potent expansions of human memory Vγ9+Vδ2+ T cells capable of IFN-γ production, cytolytic activity and mycobacterial growth inhibition. Certain phosphoantigens expressed by mycobacteria can stimulate γ9δ2 T cell expansions, suggesting that purified or synthetic forms of these phosphoantigens may be useful alone or as components of new vaccines or immunotherapeutics. However, we show that while mycobacteria-activated γ9δ2 T cells potently inhibit intracellular mycobacterial growth, phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells fail to inhibit mycobacteria, although both develop similar effector cytokine and cytolytic functional capacities. γ9δ2 T cells receiving TLR-mediated co-stimulation during phosphoantigen activation also failed to inhibit mycobacterial growth. We hypothesized that mycobacteria express antigens, other than the previously identified phosphoantigens, that induce protective subsets of γ9δ2 T cells. Testing this hypothesis, we compared the TCR sequence diversity of γ9δ2 T cells expanded with BCG-infected versus phosphoantigen-treated DC. BCG-stimulated γ9δ2 T cells displayed a more restricted TCR diversity than phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells. In addition, only a subset of phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells functionally responded to mycobacteria-infected DC. Furthermore, differential inhibitory functions of BCG- and phosphoantigen-activated γ9δ2 T cells were confirmed at the clonal level and were not due to differences in TCR avidity. Our results demonstrate that BCG infection can activate and expand protective subsets of phosphoantigen responsive γ9δ2 T cells, and provide the first indication that γ9δ2 T cells can develop pathogen specificity similar to αβ T cells. Specific targeting of protective γ9δ2 T cell subsets will be important for future tuberculosis vaccines. PMID:18802050

  3. Surgical Stress Abrogates Pre-Existing Protective T Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Immunity Leading to Postoperative Cancer Recurrence

    PubMed Central

    Lansdell, Casey; Alkayyal, Almohanad A.; Baxter, Katherine E.; Angka, Leonard; Zhang, Jiqing; Tanese de Souza, Christiano; Stephenson, Kyle B.; Parato, Kelley; Bramson, Jonathan L.; Bell, John C.; Lichty, Brian D.; Auer, Rebecca C.

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells are a key determinant for overall survival in patients following surgical resection for solid malignancies. Using a mouse model of cancer vaccination (adenovirus expressing melanoma tumor-associated antigen (TAA)—dopachrome tautomerase (AdDCT) and resection resulting in major surgical stress (abdominal nephrectomy), we demonstrate that surgical stress results in a reduction in the number of CD8+ T cell that produce cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, Granzyme B) in response to TAA. This effect is secondary to both reduced proliferation and impaired T cell function following antigen binding. In a prophylactic model, surgical stress completely abrogates tumor protection conferred by vaccination in the immediate postoperative period. In a clinically relevant surgical resection model, vaccinated mice undergoing a positive margin resection with surgical stress had decreased survival compared to mice with positive margin resection alone. Preoperative immunotherapy with IFNα significantly extends survival in surgically stressed mice. Importantly, myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) population numbers and functional impairment of TAA-specific CD8+ T cell were altered in surgically stressed mice. Our observations suggest that cancer progression may result from surgery-induced suppression of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. Preoperative immunotherapies aimed at targeting the prometastatic effects of cancer surgery will reduce recurrence and improve survival in cancer surgery patients. PMID:27196057

  4. Surgical Stress Abrogates Pre-Existing Protective T Cell Mediated Anti-Tumor Immunity Leading to Postoperative Cancer Recurrence.

    PubMed

    Ananth, Abhirami A; Tai, Lee-Hwa; Lansdell, Casey; Alkayyal, Almohanad A; Baxter, Katherine E; Angka, Leonard; Zhang, Jiqing; Tanese de Souza, Christiano; Stephenson, Kyle B; Parato, Kelley; Bramson, Jonathan L; Bell, John C; Lichty, Brian D; Auer, Rebecca C

    2016-01-01

    Anti-tumor CD8+ T cells are a key determinant for overall survival in patients following surgical resection for solid malignancies. Using a mouse model of cancer vaccination (adenovirus expressing melanoma tumor-associated antigen (TAA)-dopachrome tautomerase (AdDCT) and resection resulting in major surgical stress (abdominal nephrectomy), we demonstrate that surgical stress results in a reduction in the number of CD8+ T cell that produce cytokines (IFNγ, TNFα, Granzyme B) in response to TAA. This effect is secondary to both reduced proliferation and impaired T cell function following antigen binding. In a prophylactic model, surgical stress completely abrogates tumor protection conferred by vaccination in the immediate postoperative period. In a clinically relevant surgical resection model, vaccinated mice undergoing a positive margin resection with surgical stress had decreased survival compared to mice with positive margin resection alone. Preoperative immunotherapy with IFNα significantly extends survival in surgically stressed mice. Importantly, myeloid derived suppressor cell (MDSC) population numbers and functional impairment of TAA-specific CD8+ T cell were altered in surgically stressed mice. Our observations suggest that cancer progression may result from surgery-induced suppression of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells. Preoperative immunotherapies aimed at targeting the prometastatic effects of cancer surgery will reduce recurrence and improve survival in cancer surgery patients. PMID:27196057

  5. HLA Associations and Clinical Implications in T-Cell Mediated Drug Hypersensitivity Reactions: An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Chen, Chi-Hua; Chen, Wei-Li; Deng, Shin-Tarng; Chung, Wen-Hung

    2014-01-01

    T-cell mediated drug hypersensitivity reactions may range from mild rash to severe fatal reactions. Among them, drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS) or drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS), Stevens-Johnson syndrome/ toxic epidermal necrolysis (SJS/TEN), are some of the most life-threatening severe cutaneous adverse reactions (SCARs). Recent advances in pharmacogenetic studies show strong genetic associations between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles and susceptibility to drug hypersensitivity. This review summarizes the literature on recent progresses in pharmacogenetic studies and clinical application of pharmacogenetic screening based on associations between SCARs and specific HLA alleles to avoid serious conditions associated with drug hypersensitivity. PMID:24901010

  6. Vitamin E, immune response, and disease resistance.

    PubMed

    Tengerdy, R P

    1989-01-01

    Vitamin E as a dietary supplement or as part of an adjuvant vaccine formulation increases humoral and cell-mediated immunity and disease resistance in laboratory animals, farm animals, and humans. Adjuvant administration has far greater effect than dietary supplementation. Vitamin E as an antioxidant protects the cells of the immune response from peroxidative damage; possibly through a modulation of lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid, vitamin E alters cell membrane functions and cell-cell interactions. The most pronounced effect of vitamin E is on immune phagocytosis. Dietary supplementation is beneficial to animals, especially under stress, in decreasing susceptibility to infections. Vitamin E adjuvant vaccines have provided greater immunoprotection against enterotoxemia and epididymitis in sheep than conventional vaccines. PMID:2698109

  7. Adolescents' Feelings about Openness in Adoption: Implications for Adoption Agencies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berge, Jerica M.; Mendenhall, Tai J.; Wrobel, Gretchen M.; Grotevant, Harold D.; McRoy, Ruth G.

    2006-01-01

    Adoption research commonly uses parents' reports of satisfaction when examining openness in adoption arrangements. This qualitative study aimed to fill a gap in the adoption research by using adolescents' voices to gain a better understanding of their adoption experiences. Adopted adolescents (n = 152) were interviewed concerning their…

  8. Toddler Adoption: The Weaver's Craft.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins-Best, Mary

    Based on concern about the lack of information on adopting toddlers, this book examines the special needs of adopted toddlers and their adoptive parents. Chapter 1, "Why Write a Book on Toddler Adoption?" details the lack of information on the difficulties of adopted toddlers in forming attachments and parents' child rearing difficulties. Chapter…

  9. Design strategies and applications of circulating cell-mediated drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Gloria B.; Dong, Cheng; Yang, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Drug delivery systems, particularly nanomaterial-based drug delivery systems, possess a tremendous amount of potential to improve diagnostic and therapeutic effects of drugs. Controlled drug delivery targeted to a specific disease is designed to significantly improve the pharmaceutical effects of drugs and reduce their side effects. Unfortunately, only a few targeted drug delivery systems can achieve high targeting efficiency after intravenous injection, even with the development of numerous surface markers and targeting modalities. Thus, alternative drug and nanomedicine targeting approaches are desired. Circulating cells, such as erythrocytes, leukocytes, and stem cells, present innate disease sensing and homing properties. Hence, using living cells as drug delivery carriers has gained increasing interest in recent years. This review highlights the recent advances in the design of cell-mediated drug delivery systems and targeting mechanisms. The approaches of drug encapsulation/conjugation to cell-carriers, cell-mediated targeting mechanisms, and the methods of controlled drug release are elaborated here. Cell-based “live” targeting and delivery could be used to facilitate a more specific, robust, and smart payload distribution for the next-generation drug delivery systems. PMID:25984572

  10. Ripe fruit of Rubus coreanus inhibits mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hui-Hun; Choi, Phil Hyung; Yoo, Jin-Su; Jeon, Hoon; Chae, Byeong-Suk; Park, Jeong-Suk; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Shin, Tae-Yong

    2012-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the effect of a water extract of the ripe fruits of Rubus coreanus Miq. (Rosaceae) (RFRC) on mast cell-mediated allergic inflammation and studied the possible mechanism of action. Mast cell-mediated allergic disease is involved in many diseases such as anaphylaxis, rhinitis, asthma and atopic dermatitis. RFRC dose-dependently inhibited compound 48/80-induced systemic anaphylaxis and serum histamine release in mice. RFRC reduced the immunoglobulin E (IgE)-mediated local allergic reaction, passive cutaneous anaphylaxis. RFRC attenuated histamine release from rat peritoneal mast cells and human mast cells by the reduction of intracellular calcium. RFRC decreased the phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and the calcium ionophore A23187 (PMACI)-stimulated expression and secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines in human mast cells. The inhibitory effect of RFRC on cytokine production was nuclear factor (NF)-κB- and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-dependent. In addition, RFRC suppressed the activation of caspase-1. Our findings provide evidence that RFRC inhibits mast cell-derived allergic inflammatory reactions, and for the involvement of calcium, NF-κB, MAPKs and caspase-1 in these effects. Furthermore, in vivo and in vitro anti-allergic inflammatory effects of RFRC provide affirmative proof of a possible therapeutic application of this agent in allergic inflammatory diseases. PMID:22075758

  11. Compromised NK Cell-Mediated Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity in Chronic SIV/SHIV Infection

    PubMed Central

    He, Xuan; Li, Dan; Luo, Zhenwu; Liang, Hua; Peng, Hong; Zhao, Yangyang; Wang, Nidan; Liu, Donghua; Qin, Chuan; Wei, Qiang; Yan, Huimin; Shao, Yiming

    2013-01-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributes to the control of HIV/SIV infection. However, little is known about the ADCC function of natural killer (NK) cells in non-human primate model. Here we demonstrated that ADCC function of NK cells was significantly compromised in chronic SIV/SHIV infection, correlating closely with the expression of FcγRIIIa receptor (CD16) on NK cells. CD32, another class of IgG Fc receptors, was identified on NK cells with higher expression in the infected macaques and the blockade of CD32 impacted the ability of NK cells to respond to antibody-coated target cells. The inhibition of matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a group of enzymes normally involved in tissue/receptor remodeling, could restore NK cell-mediated ADCC with increased CD16 expression on macaque NK cells. These data offer a clearer understanding of NK cell-mediated ADCC in rhesus macaques, which will allow us to evaluate the ADCC repertoire arising from preclinical vaccination studies in non-human primates and inform us in the future design of effective HIV vaccination strategies. PMID:23424655

  12. Cutting edge: membrane lymphotoxin regulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated intestinal allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Guo, Z; Wang, J; Meng, L; Wu, Q; Kim, O; Hart, J; He, G; Zhou, P; Thistlethwaite, J R; Alegre, M L; Fu, Y X; Newell, K A

    2001-11-01

    Blocking the CD28/B7 and/or CD154/CD40 costimulatory pathways promotes long-term allograft survival in many transplant models where CD4(+) T cells are necessary for rejection. When CD8(+) T cells are sufficient to mediate rejection, these approaches fail, resulting in costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. To address this problem we examined the role of lymphotoxin-related molecules in CD8(+) T cell-mediated rejection of murine intestinal allografts. Targeting membrane lymphotoxin by means of a fusion protein, mAb, or genetic mutation inhibited rejection of intestinal allografts by CD8(+) T cells. This effect was associated with decreased monokine induced by IFN-gamma (Mig) and secondary lymphoid chemokine (SLC) gene expression within allografts and spleens respectively. Blocking membrane lymphotoxin did not inhibit rejection mediated by CD4(+) T cells. Combining disruption of membrane lymphotoxin and treatment with CTLA4-Ig inhibited rejection in wild-type mice. These data demonstrate that membrane lymphotoxin is an important regulatory molecule for CD8(+) T cells mediating rejection and suggest a strategy to avoid costimulation blockade-resistant rejection. PMID:11673481

  13. Controlling Stem Cell-mediated Bone Regeneration through Tailored Mechanical Properties of Collagen Scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Hongli; Zhu, Feng; Hu, Qingang; Krebsbach, Paul H.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM) play an essential role in cell fate determination. To study the role of mechanical properties of ECM in stem cell-mediated bone regeneration, we used a 3D in vivo ossicle model that recapitulates endochondral bone formation. Three-dimensional gelatin scaffolds with distinct stiffness were developed using 1-Ethyl-3-[3-dimethylaminopropyl] carbodiimide hydrochloride (EDC) mediated zero-length crosslinking. The mechanical strength of the scaffolds was significantly increased by EDC treatment, while the microstructure of the scaffold was preserved. Cell behavior on the scaffolds with different mechanical properties was evaluated in vitro and in vivo. EDC-treated scaffolds promoted early chondrogenic differentiation, while it promoted both chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation at later time points. Both micro-computed tomography and histologic data demonstrated that EDC-treatment significantly increased trabecular bone formation by transplanted cells transduced with AdBMP. Moreover, significantly increased chondrogenesis was observed in the EDC-treated scaffolds. Based on both in vitro and in vivo data, we conclude that the high mechanical strength of 3D scaffolds promoted stem cell mediated bone regeneration by promoting endochondral ossification. These data suggest a new method for harnessing stem cells for bone regeneration in vivo by tailoring the mechanical properties of 3D scaffolds. PMID:24211076

  14. Dehydroeffusol effectively inhibits human gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with low toxicity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenming; Meng, Mei; Zhang, Bin; Du, Longsheng; Pan, Yanyan; Yang, Ping; Gu, Zhenlun; Zhou, Quansheng; Cao, Zhifei

    2015-09-01

    Accumulated data has shown that various vasculogenic tumor cells, including gastric cancer cells, are able to directly form tumor blood vessels via vasculogenic mimicry, supplying oxygen and nutrients to tumors, and facilitating progression and metastasis of malignant tumors. Therefore, tumor vasculogenic mimicry is a rational target for developing novel anticancer therapeutics. However, effective antitumor vasculogenic mimicry-targeting drugs are not clinically available. In this study, we purified 2,7-dihydroxyl-1-methyl-5-vinyl-phenanthrene, termed dehydroeffusol, from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Juncus effusus L., and found that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry in vitro and in vivo with very low toxicity. Dehydroeffusol significantly suppressed gastric cancer cell adhesion, migration, and invasion. Molecular mechanistic studies revealed that dehydroeffusol markedly inhibited the expression of a vasculogenic mimicry master gene VE-cadherin and reduced adherent protein exposure on the cell surface by inhibiting gene promoter activity. In addition, dehydroeffusol significantly decreased the expression of a key vasculogenic gene matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) in gastric cancer cells, and diminished MMP2 protease activity. Together, our results showed that dehydroeffusol effectively inhibited gastric cancer cell-mediated vasculogenic mimicry with very low toxicity, suggesting that dehydroeffusol is a potential drug candidate for anti-gastric cancer neovascularization and anti-gastric cancer therapy. PMID:25982451

  15. CD47 Blockade Triggers T cell-mediated Destruction of Immunogenic Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaojuan; Pu, Yang; Cron, Kyle; Deng, Liufu; Kline, Justin; Frazier, William A.; Xu, Hairong; Peng, Hua; Fu, Yang-Xin; Xu, Meng Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells mediated by CD47-specific blocking antibodies has been proposed to be the major effector mechanism in xenograft models. Using syngeneic immunocompetent tumor models, we reveal that in the therapeutic effects of CD47 blockade depend on dendritic cell (DC) but not macrophage cross-priming of T cell responses in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic effects of anti-CD47 antibody therapy were abrogated in T cell-deficient mice. In addition, the anti-tumor effects of CD47 blockade required expression of the cytosolic DNA sensor STING, but neither MyD88 nor TRIF, in CD11c+ cells, suggesting that cytosolic sensing of DNA from tumor cells is enhanced by anti-CD47 treatment, further bridging the innate and adaptive responses. Notably, the timing of administration of standard chemotherapy markedly impacted the induction of anti-tumor T cell responses by CD47 blockade. Together, our findings indicate that CD47 blockade drives T cell-mediated elimination of immunogenic tumors. PMID:26322579

  16. Ubiquitin-like Molecule ISG15 Acts as an Immune Adjuvant to Enhance Antigen-specific CD8 T-cell Tumor Immunity.

    PubMed

    Villarreal, Daniel O; Wise, Megan C; Siefert, Rebekah J; Yan, Jian; Wood, Laurence M; Weiner, David B

    2015-10-01

    ISG15 is an ubiquitin-like protein induced by type I interferon associated with antiviral activity. ISG15 is also secreted and known to function as an immunomodulatory molecule. However, ISG15's role in influencing the adaptive CD8 T-cell responses has not been studied. Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of ISG15 as a vaccine adjuvant, inducing human papilloma virus (HPV) E7-specific IFNγ responses as well as the percentage of polyfunctional, cytolytic, and effector CD8 T-cell responses. Vaccination with ISG15 conferred remarkable control and/or regression of established HPV-associated tumor-bearing mice. T-cell depletion coupled with adoptive transfer experiments revealed that ISG15 protective efficacy was CD8 T-cell mediated. Importantly, we demonstrate that ISG15 vaccine-induced responses could be generated independent of ISGylation, suggesting that responses were mostly influenced by free ISG15. Our results provide more insight into the immunomodulatory properties of ISG15 and its potential to serve as an effective immune adjuvant in a therapeutic tumor or infectious disease setting. PMID:26122932

  17. NK Cell-Mediated Regulation of Protective Memory Responses against Intracellular Ehrlichial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Samar; El Andaloussi, Abdeljabar; Hisham, Ahmed; Ismail, Nahed

    2016-01-01

    Ehrlichiae are gram-negative obligate intracellular bacteria that cause potentially fatal human monocytic ehrlichiosis. We previously showed that natural killer (NK) cells play a critical role in host defense against Ehrlichia during primary infection. However, the contribution of NK cells to the memory response against Ehrlichia remains elusive. Primary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Ehrlichia muris provides long-term protection against a second challenge with the highly virulent Ixodes ovatus Ehrlichia (IOE), which ordinarily causes fatal disease in naïve mice. Here, we show that the depletion of NK cells in E. muris-primed mice abrogates the protective memory response against IOE. Approximately, 80% of NK cell-depleted E. muris-primed mice succumbed to lethal IOE infection on days 8–10 after IOE infection, similar to naïve mice infected with the same dose of IOE. The lack of a recall response in NK cell-depleted mice correlated with an increased bacterial burden, extensive liver injury, decreased frequency of Ehrlichia-specific IFN-γ-producing memory CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells, and a low titer of Ehrlichia-specific antibodies. Intraperitoneal infection of mice with E. muris resulted in the production of IL-15, IL-12, and IFN-γ as well as an expansion of activated NKG2D+ NK cells. The adoptive transfer of purified E. muris-primed hepatic and splenic NK cells into Rag2-/-Il2rg-/- recipient mice provided protective immunity against challenge with E. muris. Together, these data suggest that E. muris-induced memory-like NK cells, which contribute to the protective, recall response against Ehrlichia. PMID:27092553

  18. CERTS customer adoption model

    SciTech Connect

    Rubio, F. Javier; Siddiqui, Afzal S.; Marnay, Chris; Hamachi,Kristina S.

    2000-03-01

    This effort represents a contribution to the wider distributed energy resources (DER) research of the Consortium for Electric Reliability Technology Solutions (CERTS, http://certs.lbl.gov) that is intended to attack and, hopefully, resolve the technical barriers to DER adoption, particularly those that are unlikely to be of high priority to individual equipment vendors. The longer term goal of the Berkeley Lab effort is to guide the wider technical research towards the key technical problems by forecasting some likely patterns of DER adoption. In sharp contrast to traditional electricity utility planning, this work takes a customer-centric approach and focuses on DER adoption decision making at, what we currently think of as, the customer level. This study reports on Berkeley Lab's second year effort (completed in Federal fiscal year 2000, FY00) of a project aimed to anticipate patterns of customer adoption of distributed energy resources (DER). Marnay, et al., 2000 describes the earlier FY99 Berkeley Lab work. The results presented herein are not intended to represent definitive economic analyses of possible DER projects by any means. The paucity of data available and the importance of excluded factors, such as environmental implications, are simply too important to make such an analysis possible at this time. Rather, the work presented represents a demonstration of the current model and an indicator of the potential to conduct more relevant studies in the future.

  19. Obstacles to Interstate Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Roberta

    A documentation of the obstacles in law, policy and administrative procedure that interfere with effecting adoptions across State lines is presented. Major problems include: (1) Nonjudicial termination or relinquishment proceedings, although legal in many States, do not satisfy the courts in other states on the issue of the child's freedom for…

  20. Studies of Immune Responses in Candida vaginitis.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Norelli, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of vaginal candidiasis and the development of resistance against anti-fungal agents has stimulated interest in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of our work was to characterize, in an animal model of vaginal candidiasis, the mechanisms that play a role in the induction of mucosal immunity against C. albicans and the interaction between innate and adaptive immunity. Our studies evidenced the elicitation of cell-mediated immunity (CMIs) and antibody (Abs)-mediated immunity with a Th1 protective immunity. An immune response of this magnitude in the vagina was very encouraging to identify the proper targets for new strategies for vaccination or immunotherapy of vaginal candidiasis. Overall, our data provide clear evidence that it is possible to prevent C. albicans vaginal infection by active intravaginal immunization with aspartyl proteinase expressed as recombinant protein. This opens the way to a modality for anti-Candida protection at the mucosa. The recombinant protein Sap2 was assembled with virosomes, and a vaccine PEVION7 (PEV7) was obtained. The results have given evidence that the vaccine, constituted of virosomes and Secretory aspartyl proteinase 2 (Sap2) (PEV7), has an encouraging therapeutic potential for the treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:26473934

  1. Studies of Immune Responses in Candida vaginitis

    PubMed Central

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Graziani, Sofia; Norelli, Sandro

    2015-01-01

    The widespread occurrence of vaginal candidiasis and the development of resistance against anti-fungal agents has stimulated interest in understanding the pathogenesis of this disease. The aim of our work was to characterize, in an animal model of vaginal candidiasis, the mechanisms that play a role in the induction of mucosal immunity against C. albicans and the interaction between innate and adaptive immunity. Our studies evidenced the elicitation of cell-mediated immunity (CMIs) and antibody (Abs)-mediated immunity with a Th1 protective immunity. An immune response of this magnitude in the vagina was very encouraging to identify the proper targets for new strategies for vaccination or immunotherapy of vaginal candidiasis. Overall, our data provide clear evidence that it is possible to prevent C. albicans vaginal infection by active intravaginal immunization with aspartyl proteinase expressed as recombinant protein. This opens the way to a modality for anti-Candida protection at the mucosa. The recombinant protein Sap2 was assembled with virosomes, and a vaccine PEVION7 (PEV7) was obtained. The results have given evidence that the vaccine, constituted of virosomes and Secretory aspartyl proteinase 2 (Sap2) (PEV7), has an encouraging therapeutic potential for the treatment of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. PMID:26473934

  2. Functional Immune Anatomy of the Liver-As an Allograft.

    PubMed

    Demetris, A J; Bellamy, C O C; Gandhi, C R; Prost, S; Nakanuma, Y; Stolz, D B

    2016-06-01

    The liver is an immunoregulatory organ in which a tolerogenic microenvironment mitigates the relative "strength" of local immune responses. Paradoxically, necro-inflammatory diseases create the need for most liver transplants. Treatment of hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, and acute T cell-mediated rejection have redirected focus on long-term allograft structural integrity. Understanding of insults should enable decades of morbidity-free survival after liver replacement because of these tolerogenic properties. Studies of long-term survivors show low-grade chronic inflammatory, fibrotic, and microvascular lesions, likely related to some combination of environment insults (i.e. abnormal physiology), donor-specific antibodies, and T cell-mediated immunity. The resultant conundrum is familiar in transplantation: adequate immunosuppression produces chronic toxicities, while lightened immunosuppression leads to sensitization, immunological injury, and structural deterioration. The "balance" is more favorable for liver than other solid organ allografts. This occurs because of unique hepatic immune physiology and provides unintended benefits for allografts by modulating various afferent and efferent limbs of allogenic immune responses. This review is intended to provide a better understanding of liver immune microanatomy and physiology and thereby (a) the potential structural consequences of low-level, including allo-antibody-mediated injury; and (b) how liver allografts modulate immune reactions. Special attention is given to the microvasculature and hepatic mononuclear phagocytic system. PMID:26848550

  3. Childhood Immunization

    MedlinePlus

    ... lowest levels in history, thanks to years of immunization. Children must get at least some vaccines before ... child provide protection for many years, adults need immunizations too. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

  4. Immunizations - diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000331.htm Immunizations - diabetes To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Immunizations (vaccines or vaccinations) help protect you from some ...

  5. The precaution adoption process.

    PubMed

    Weinstein, N D

    1988-01-01

    This article presents a critique of current models of preventive behavior. It discusses a variety of factors that are usually overlooked-including the appearance of costs and benefits over time, the role of cues to action, the problem of competing life demands, and the ways that actual decision behavior differs from the rational ideal implicit in expectancy-value and utility theories. Such considerations suggest that the adoption of new precautions should be viewed as a dynamic process with many determinants. The framework of a model that is able to accommodate these additional factors is described. This alternative model portrays the precaution adoption process as an orderly sequence of qualitatively different cognitive stages. Data illustrating a few of the suggestions made in the article are presented, and implications for prevention programs are discussed. PMID:3049068

  6. Open Adoption: Adoptive Parents' Reactions Two Decades Later

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah H.

    2013-01-01

    Unlike in the past, most adoption agencies today offer birth parents and adoptive parents the opportunity to share identifying information and have contact with each other. To understand the impacts of different open adoption arrangements, a qualitative descriptive study using a snowball sample of 44 adoptive parents throughout New England began…

  7. Hospitious Adoption: How Hospitality Empowers Children and Transforms Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gritter, James L.

    2009-01-01

    Building on previous books by the author, "Hospitious Adoption: How Hospitality Empowers Children and Transforms Adoption" examines the next step after open adoption. Gritter takes the approach that practicing goodwill, respect, and courage within the realm of adoption makes the process move smoother and enriches children's lives. Following a…

  8. HER2-specific immunoligands engaging NKp30 or NKp80 trigger NK-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells and enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Peipp, Matthias; Derer, Stefanie; Lohse, Stefan; Staudinger, Matthias; Klausz, Katja; Valerius, Thomas; Gramatzki, Martin; Kellner, Christian

    2015-10-13

    NK cells detect tumors through activating surface receptors, which bind self-antigens that are frequently expressed upon malignant transformation. To increase the recognition of tumor cells, the extracellular domains of ligands of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30, NKp80 and DNAM-1 (i.e. B7-H6, AICL and PVR, respectively) were fused to a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is displayed by various solid tumors. The resulting immunoligands, designated B7-H6:HER2-scFv, AICL:HER2-scFv, and PVR:HER2-scFv, respectively, bound HER2 and the addressed NK cell receptor. However, whereas B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv triggered NK cells to kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, PVR:HER2-scFv was not efficacious. Moreover, NK cell cytotoxicity was enhanced synergistically when B7-H6:HER2-scFv or AICL:HER2-scFv were applied in combination with another HER2-specific immunoligand engaging the stimulatory receptor NKG2D. In contrast, no improvements were achieved by combining B7-H6:HER2-scFv with AICL:HER2-scFv. Additionally, B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by the therapeutic antibodies trastuzumab and cetuximab synergistically, with B7-H6:HER2-scFv exhibiting a higher efficacy. In summary, antibody-derived proteins engaging NKp30 or NKp80 may represent attractive biologics to further enhance anti-tumor NK cell responses and may provide an innovative approach to sensitize tumor cells for antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26392331

  9. HER2-specific immunoligands engaging NKp30 or NKp80 trigger NK-cell-mediated lysis of tumor cells and enhance antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Peipp, Matthias; Derer, Stefanie; Lohse, Stefan; Staudinger, Matthias; Klausz, Katja; Valerius, Thomas; Gramatzki, Martin; Kellner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    NK cells detect tumors through activating surface receptors, which bind self-antigens that are frequently expressed upon malignant transformation. To increase the recognition of tumor cells, the extracellular domains of ligands of the activating NK cell receptors NKp30, NKp80 and DNAM-1 (i.e. B7-H6, AICL and PVR, respectively) were fused to a single-chain fragment variable (scFv) targeting the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), which is displayed by various solid tumors. The resulting immunoligands, designated B7-H6:HER2-scFv, AICL:HER2-scFv, and PVR:HER2-scFv, respectively, bound HER2 and the addressed NK cell receptor. However, whereas B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv triggered NK cells to kill HER2-positive breast cancer cells at nanomolar concentrations, PVR:HER2-scFv was not efficacious. Moreover, NK cell cytotoxicity was enhanced synergistically when B7-H6:HER2-scFv or AICL:HER2-scFv were applied in combination with another HER2-specific immunoligand engaging the stimulatory receptor NKG2D. In contrast, no improvements were achieved by combining B7-H6:HER2-scFv with AICL:HER2-scFv. Additionally, B7-H6:HER2-scFv and AICL:HER2-scFv enhanced antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) by the therapeutic antibodies trastuzumab and cetuximab synergistically, with B7-H6:HER2-scFv exhibiting a higher efficacy. In summary, antibody-derived proteins engaging NKp30 or NKp80 may represent attractive biologics to further enhance anti-tumor NK cell responses and may provide an innovative approach to sensitize tumor cells for antibody-based immunotherapy. PMID:26392331

  10. Pseudorabies Virus US3 Protein Kinase Protects Infected Cells from NK Cell-Mediated Lysis via Increased Binding of the Inhibitory NK Cell Receptor CD300a

    PubMed Central

    Grauwet, K.; Vitale, M.; De Pelsmaeker, S.; Jacob, T.; Laval, K.; Moretta, L.; Parodi, M.; Parolini, S.; Cantoni, C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Several reports have indicated that natural killer (NK) cells are of particular importance in the innate response against herpesvirus infections. As a consequence, herpesviruses have developed diverse mechanisms for evading NK cells, although few such mechanisms have been identified for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. The antiviral activity of NK cells is regulated by a complex array of interactions between activating/inhibitory receptors on the NK cell surface and the corresponding ligands on the surfaces of virus-infected cells. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus (PRV) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties: it triggers the binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a to the surface of the infected cell, thereby providing increased CD300a-mediated protection of infected cells against NK cell-mediated lysis. US3-mediated CD300a binding was found to depend on aminophospholipid ligands of CD300a and on group I p21-activated kinases. These data identify a novel alphaherpesvirus strategy for evading NK cells and demonstrate, for the first time, a role for CD300a in regulating NK cell activity upon contact with virus-infected target cells. IMPORTANCE Herpesviruses have developed fascinating mechanisms to evade elimination by key elements of the host immune system, contributing to their ability to cause lifelong infections with recurrent reactivation events. Natural killer (NK) cells are central in the innate antiviral response. Here we report that the US3 protein kinase of the alphaherpesvirus pseudorabies virus displays a previously uncharacterized capacity for evasion of NK cells. Expression of US3 protects infected cells from NK cell-mediated lysis via increased binding of the inhibitory NK cell receptor CD300a. We show that this US3-mediated increase in CD300a binding depends on aminophospholipids and on cellular p21-activated kinases (PAKs). The

  11. Enteric Immunization of Mice Against Influenza with Recombinant Vaccinia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meitin, Catherine A.; Bender, Bradley S.; Small, Parker A., Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Intrajejunal administration to mice of a recombinant vaccinia virus containing the influenza virus hemagglutinin gene induced IgA antibody in nasal, gut, and vaginal secretions. It also induced IgG antibody in serum and cell-mediated immunity. The immunization provided significant protection against an influenza virus challenge. This work suggests that enteric-coated recombinant vaccinia could be an orally administered, inexpensive, multivalent, temperature-stable, safe, and effective vaccine for children that could be particularly useful in developing nations, where multiple injections are not easily administered. Oral administration of vaccines should also reduce children's fear of shots at the doctor's office.

  12. Evaluation of antigen specific recognition and cell mediated cytotoxicity by a modified lysispot assay in a rat colon carcinoma model

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes represent potent effector cells of the adaptive immune response against viruses as well as tumours. Therefore assays capable at exploring the generation and function of cytotoxic T lymphocytes represent an important objective for both clinical and experimental settings. Methods Here we show a simple and reproducible assay for the evaluation of antigen-specific CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes based on a LysiSpot technique for the simultaneous determination of antigen-specific IFN-γ production and assessment of tumor cytolysis. The assay was developed within an experimental model of colorectal carcinoma, induced by the colorectal tumor cell line DHD-K12 that induces tumors in BDIX rats and, in turn, elicits a tumor- specific immune response. Results Using DHD-K12 cells transfected to express Escherichia coli β-galactosidase as target cells, and by the fine setting of spot colours detection, we have developed an in vitro assay that allows the recognition of cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced in BDIX rats as well as the assessment of anti-tumour cytotoxicity. The method highlighted that in the present experimental model the tumour antigen-specific immune response was bound to killing target cells in the proportion of 55%, while 45% of activated cells were not cytotoxic but released IFN-γ. Moreover in this model by an ELISPOT assay we demonstrated the specific recognition of a nonapeptide epitope called CSH-275 constitutionally express in DHD-K12 cells. Conclusions The assay proved to be highly sensitive and specific, detecting even low frequencies of cytotoxic/activated cells and providing the evaluation of cytokine-expressing T cells as well as the extent of cytotoxicity against the target cells as independent functions. This assay may represent an important tool to be adopted in experimental settings including the development of vaccines or immune therapeutic strategies PMID:22296726

  13. Echinoderm immunity.

    PubMed

    Smith, L Courtney; Ghosh, Julie; Buckley, Katherine M; Clow, Lori A; Dheilly, Nolwenn M; Haug, Tor; Henson, John H; Li, Chun; Lun, Cheng Man; Majeske, Audrey J; Matranga, Valeria; Nair, Sham V; Rast, Jonathan P; Raftos, David A; Roth, Mattias; Sacchi, Sandro; Schrankel, Catherine S; Stensvåg, Klara

    2010-01-01

    A survey for immune genes in the genome for the purple sea urchin has shown that the immune system is complex and sophisticated. By inference, immune responses of all echinoderms maybe similar. The immune system is mediated by several types of coelomocytes that are also useful as sensors of environmental stresses. There are a number of large gene families in the purple sea urchin genome that function in immunity and of which at least one appears to employ novel approaches for sequence diversification. Echinoderms have a simpler complement system, a large set of lectin genes and a number of antimicrobial peptides. Profiling the immune genes expressed by coelomocytes and the proteins in the coelomic fluid provide detailed information about immune functions in the sea urchin. The importance of echinoderms in maintaining marine ecosystem stability and the disastrous effects of their removal due to disease will require future collaborations between ecologists and immunologists working towards understanding and preserving marine habitats. PMID:21528703

  14. Cell-mediated fibre recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-12-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices, we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibres, and bulk contraction of the material. Increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation; however, increasing fibre stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation for certain network architectures. Lower fibre stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibres, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signalling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fibre recruitment as a previously undescribed mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices.

  15. Cell-mediated fiber recruitment drives extracellular matrix mechanosensing in engineered fibrillar microenvironments

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Trappmann, Britta; Wang, William Y.; Sakar, Mahmut S.; Kim, Iris L.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Burdick, Jason A.; Chen, Christopher S.

    2015-01-01

    To investigate how cells sense stiffness in settings structurally similar to native extracellular matrices (ECM), we designed a synthetic fibrous material with tunable mechanics and user-defined architecture. In contrast to flat hydrogel surfaces, these fibrous materials recapitulated cell-matrix interactions observed with collagen matrices including stellate cell morphologies, cell-mediated realignment of fibers, and bulk contraction of the material. While increasing the stiffness of flat hydrogel surfaces induced mesenchymal stem cell spreading and proliferation, increasing fiber stiffness instead suppressed spreading and proliferation depending on network architecture. Lower fiber stiffness permitted active cellular forces to recruit nearby fibers, dynamically increasing ligand density at the cell surface and promoting the formation of focal adhesions and related signaling. These studies demonstrate a departure from the well-described relationship between material stiffness and spreading established with hydrogel surfaces, and introduce fiber recruitment as a novel mechanism by which cells probe and respond to mechanics in fibrillar matrices. PMID:26461445

  16. Biomimetic and cell-mediated mineralization of hydroxyapatite by carrageenan functionalized graphene oxide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongyan; Cheng, Ju; Chen, Fengjuan; Hou, Fengping; Bai, Decheng; Xi, Pinxian; Zeng, Zhengzhi

    2014-03-12

    In bone tissue engineering, it is imperative to design multifunctional biomaterials that can induce and assemble bonelike apatite that is close to natural bone. In this study, graphene oxide (GO) was functionalized by carrageenan. The resulting GO-carrageenan (GO-Car) composite was further used as a substrate for biomimetic and cell-mediated mineralization of hydroxyapatite (HA). It was confirmed that carrageenan on the GO surface facilitated the nucleation of HA. The observation of the effect of the GO-Car on the adhesion, morphology, and proliferation of MC3T3-E1 cells was investigated. In vitro studies clearly show the effectiveness of GO-Car in promoting HA mineralization and cell differentiation. The results of this study suggested that the GO-Car hybrid will be a promising material for bone regeneration and implantation. PMID:24527702

  17. Molecular, genetic and stem cell-mediated therapeutic strategies for spinal muscular atrophy (SMA)

    PubMed Central

    Zanetta, Chiara; Riboldi, Giulietta; Nizzardo, Monica; Simone, Chiara; Faravelli, Irene; Bresolin, Nereo; Comi, Giacomo P; Corti, Stefania

    2014-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease. It is the first genetic cause of infant mortality. It is caused by mutations in the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, leading to the reduction of SMN protein. The most striking component is the loss of alpha motor neurons in the ventral horn of the spinal cord, resulting in progressive paralysis and eventually premature death. There is no current treatment other than supportive care, although the past decade has seen a striking advancement in understanding of both SMA genetics and molecular mechanisms. A variety of disease modifying interventions are rapidly bridging the translational gap from the laboratory to clinical trials. In this review, we would like to outline the most interesting therapeutic strategies that are currently developing, which are represented by molecular, gene and stem cell-mediated approaches for the treatment of SMA. PMID:24400925

  18. Role of histamine in natural killer cell-mediated resistance against tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Hellstrand, K; Asea, A; Hermodsson, S

    1990-12-15

    The formation of lung metastases by i.v.-injected B16 melanoma (F1 and F10 strain) cells in Swiss albino, C57BL/6, and BALB/c mice was reduced by a single dose of histamine given 24 h before tumor cell inoculation. The antimetastatic effect of histamine was specifically mediated by histamine H2-receptors (H2R): it was blocked by the H2R antagonist ranitidine and mimicked by dimaprit, a specific H2R agonist but not by an H2R-inactive structural analog of this compound, nor-dimaprit, or the H1R agonist 2-thiazolyl-ethylamide. A single dose of any of the H2R antagonists ranitidine, tiotidine, famotidine, or cimetidine drastically augmented metastasis. Effects of H2R-interactive compounds on B16 metastasis required intact NK cells, as judged by the inability of histamine or ranitidine to affect B16 metastasis after NK cell depletion in vivo using antibodies to asialo-GM1. NK-cell-mediated lysis of YAC-1 lymphoma cells in vivo was enhanced by histamine and reduced by ranitidine within 4 h after inoculation of tumor cells. The antimetastatic effect of IL-2 was potentiated by histamine; in some experiments, combined treatment with a low dose of IL-2 (6000 U/kg) and histamine completely eliminated metastasis, whereas concomitant treatment with ranitidine abrogated antimetastatic effects of IL-2; animals treated with ranitidine and IL-2 displayed the same level of enhanced metastasis as those treated with ranitidine alone. The presented data are suggestive of an earlier unrecognized role for histamine in NK cell-mediated resistance against metastatic tumor cells. PMID:2147942

  19. Adoption Research: Trends, Topics, Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palacios, Jesus; Brodzinsky, David

    2010-01-01

    The current article provides a review of adoption research since its inception as a field of study. Three historical trends in adoption research are identified: the first focusing on risk in adoption and identifying adoptee-nonadoptee differences in adjustment; the second examining the capacity of adopted children to recover from early adversity;…

  20. The Development of Adoption Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bussiere, Alice

    1998-01-01

    Reviews the evolution of U.S. adoption law since 1851. Recounts changes in the perceived "best interests" of all members of the adoption triad over time, and growing recognition of links between adoption and child welfare policy. Discusses current controversies including open adoption, birth parents' rights, unmarried fathers, and the role of…

  1. Vaccination Strategies for Mucosal Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Ogra, Pearay L.; Faden, Howard; Welliver, Robert C.

    2001-01-01

    Mucosal administration of vaccines is an important approach to the induction of appropriate immune responses to microbial and other environmental antigens in systemic sites and peripheral blood as well as in most external mucosal surfaces. The development of specific antibody- or T-cell-mediated immunologic responses and the induction of mucosally induced systemic immunologic hyporesponsiveness (oral or mucosal tolerance) depend on complex sets of immunologic events, including the nature of the antigenic stimulation of specialized lymphoid structures in the host, antigen-induced activation of different populations of regulatory T cells (Th1 versus Th2), and the expression of proinflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines. Availability of mucosal vaccines will provide a painless approach to deliver large numbers of vaccine antigens for human immunization. Currently, an average infant will receive 20 to 25 percutaneous injections for vaccination against different childhood infections by 18 months of age. It should be possible to develop for human use effective, nonliving, recombinant, replicating, transgenic, and microbial vector- or plant-based mucosal vaccines to prevent infections. Based on the experience with many dietary antigens, it is also possible to manipulate the mucosal immune system to induce systemic tolerance against environmental, dietary, and possibly other autoantigens associated with allergic and autoimmune disorders. Mucosal immunity offers new strategies to induce protective immune responses against a variety of infectious agents. Such immunization may also provide new prophylactic or therapeutic avenues in the control of autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:11292646

  2. [Immune response in experimental animals immunized with Burkholderia pseudomallei surface antigens].

    PubMed

    Avrorova, I V; Piven', N N; Zhukova, S I; Viktorov, D V; Khrapova, N P; Popov, S F

    2004-01-01

    The influence of the chromatographic fractions of B. pseudomallei surface antigenic complex (C, C1, D, H) on immune response in white rats and white mice was under study. These antigenic complexes were noted to produce perceptible stimulating effect on the immune system of white rats, in contrast to that of white mice. The immunization of the mice the above-mentioned fractions suppressed the phagocytic activity of peritoneal macrophages (PM) and slightly enhanced cell-mediated immunity. In experiments on white rats, fraction C induced the growth of specific antibody titers and stimulated the phagocytic activity of PM, as well as the indices of delayed hypersensitivity (DH). Fraction D showed a lower level of the induction of the phagocytic activity of PM and was inactive in the manifestation of cell-mediated immunity, but induced a high level of humoral immunity. Antigenic complexes C1 and H increased the phagocytic activity of PM and DH characteristics with a low level of antibody production. The studied fractions of the causative agent of melioidosis decreased the content of bactericidal cationic proteins (BCP) in rat blood neutrophils, and in mice a decreased content of BCP in phagocytes was registered. The fractions increased the activity of myeloperoxidase in blood neutrophils in mice and rats. As revealed with the use of immunoelectrophoresis, SDS PAAG electrophoresis and immunoblotting, the surface antigenic complex contained proteins of 18, 22, 39 kD and glycoproteins 42, 55, 90 kD. The latter glycoprotein was found in all the fractions under study, having protective properties. PMID:15554321

  3. Effect of centchroman on cellular and humoral immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Licto; Asad, Mohammad; Hrishikeshavan, Heremaglur Jagannath; Chandrakala, Gowda Kallenahalli

    2007-01-01

    Centchroman (Ormeloxifene) is a nonsteroidal selective estrogen receptor modulator that is used as once a week oral contraceptive agent. The effect of centchroman on the immune system was evaluated by using different experimental models such as carbon clearance test, cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia, neutrophil adhesion test, effect on serum immunoglobulins, mice lethality test and indirect haemagglutination test. The first three models namely carbon clearance test, cyclophosphamide induced neutropenia and neutrophil adhesion test were used to study cell mediated immunity while the latter three models were used to see the effect on humoral immunity. Centchroman was administered orally at a dose of 5 mg/kg and levamisole (2.5 mg/kg/ p.o) was used as standard drug. Centchroman significantly increased the levels of serum immunoglobulins and also prevented the mortality induced by bovine Pasteurella multocida in mice. It also increased significantly the circulating antibody litre in indirect haemagglunation test. However, it did not show any significant effect on phagocytic index in carbon clearance assay and nor did influence the adhesion of neutrophils in the neutrophil adhesion test. Centchroman was also not effective in preventing the cyclophosphamde induced neutropenia. Hence, it was concluded that centchroman increases humoral immunity with no significant effect on cell mediated immunity. PMID:18476393

  4. Becoming Lesbian Adoptive Parents: An Exploratory Study of Lesbian Adoptive, Lesbian Birth, and Heterosexual Adoptive Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shelley-Sireci, Lynn M.; Ciano-Boyce, Claudia

    2002-01-01

    Surveyed lesbian adoptive parents, heterosexual adoptive parents, and lesbian parents who had used assisted fertilization, regarding the adoption process. Found that the process was similar for both heterosexual and lesbian parents, but lesbian adoptive parents perceived more discrimination and were more inclined to omit information during the…

  5. EHR adopters vs. non-adopters: Impacts of, barriers to, and federal initiatives for EHR adoption

    PubMed Central

    Jamoom, Eric W.; Patel, Vaishali; Furukawa, Michael F.; King, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    While adoption of electronic health record (EHR) systems has grown rapidly, little is known about physicians’ perspectives on its adoption and use. Nationally representative survey data from 2011 are used to compare the perspectives of physicians who have adopted EHRs with those that have yet to do so across three key areas: the impact of EHRs on clinical care, practice efficiency and operations; barriers to EHR adoption; and factors that influence physicians to adopt EHRs. Despite significant differences in perspectives between adopters and non-adopters, the majority of physicians perceive that EHR use yields overall clinical benefits, more efficient practices and financial benefits. Purchase cost and productivity loss are the greatest barriers to EHR adoption among both adopters and non-adopters; although non-adopters have significantly higher rates of reporting these as barriers. Financial incentives and penalties, technical assistance, and the capability for electronic health information exchange are factors with the greatest influence on EHR adoption among all physicians. However, a substantially higher proportion of non-adopters regard various national health IT policies, and in particular, financial incentives or penalties as a major influence in their decision to adopt an EHR system. Contrasting these perspectives provides a window into how national policies have shaped adoption thus far; and how these policies may shape adoption in the near future. PMID:26250087

  6. Early Immune Markers Associated with Experimental Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) Infection in a Neonatal Calf Model

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this study was to observe early markers of cell-mediated immunity in naïve calves infected with Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis (MAP) and how expression of these markers evolved over the 12-month period of infection. Methods of experimental infection included: Control (n...

  7. Modified live virus vaccine induces a distinct immune response profile compared to inactivated influenza A virus vaccines in swine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genetic and antigenic diversity within H1 influenza A virus (IAV) subtypes circulating in swine is increasing. The need for cross-protective influenza vaccines in swine is necessary as the virus becomes more diverse. This study compared the humoral and cell-mediated immune response of modified live ...

  8. The effect of IL-2 expression by recombinant Newcastle disease virus on host immune response, viral replication and pathogenesis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Interleukin 2 (IL-2) is a soluble cytokine that stimulates the cell-mediated immune response. Virus constructs, such as recombinant vaccinia virus, expressing chicken IL-2 have been shown to improve viral clearance by natural killer cells in mice. We have inserted the open-reading frame of the chi...

  9. Changes in Immune-Related Gene Expression and Intestinal Lymphocyte Subpopulations Following Eimeria maxima Infection of Chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis, a major intestinal parasitic disease of poultry, induces a cell-mediated immune response against the etiologic agent of the disease, Eimeria. In the current study, the expression levels of gene transcripts encoding pro-inflammatory, Th1, and Th2 cytokines, as well as chemokines were me...

  10. DNA Immunization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2013-01-01

    DNA immunization was discovered in early 1990s and its use has been expanded from vaccine studies to a broader range of biomedical research, such as the generation of high quality polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies as research reagents. In this unit, three common DNA immunization methods are described: needle injection, electroporation and gene gun. In addition, several common considerations related to DNA immunization are discussed. PMID:24510291

  11. RAT BLADDER CELL-MEDIATED MUTAGENESIS OF CHINESE HAMSTER V79 CELLS AND METABOLISM OF BENZO(A)PYRENE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Primary rat bladder epithelial cells were coculivated with Chinese hamster V79 cells in the presence of carcinogens, and the induction of 6-thioguanine resistance in the V79 cells was used as a marker of cell-mediated mutagenesis. The carcinogens dimethylnitrosamine, 7, 12-dimeth...

  12. Special topics in international adoption.

    PubMed

    Jenista, Jerri Ann

    2005-10-01

    As international adoption has become more "mainstream," the issues recently addressed in domestic adoption have become more important in adoptions involving children originating in other countries. Certain groups of prospective adoptive parents, such as gay or lesbian couples, single parents, and parents with disabilities, have begun to apply to adopt in ever increasing numbers. Children who may have been considered unadoptable in the past are now routinely being offered to prospective adoptive parents. The numbers and ages of the children placed and the spacing between adoptions have come under scrutiny. The rates of adoption dissolutions and disruptions are being examined carefully by the receiving and sending countries. There is a pressing need for research into numerous social aspects of adoption. PMID:16154473

  13. Dendritic cells in irradiated mice trigger the functional plasticity and antitumor activity of adoptively transferred Tc17 cells via IL-12 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Bowers, Jacob S.; Nelson, Michelle H.; Kundimi, Sreenath; Bailey, Stefanie R.; Huff, Logan W.; Schwartz, Kristina M.; Cole, David J.; Rubinstein, Mark P.; Paulos, Chrystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of CD8+ T cells is a promising treatment for advanced malignancies. Lymphodepletion prior to ACT enhances IFN-γ+CD8+ T cell (Tc0) mediated tumor regression. Yet, how lymphodepletion regulates the function and antitumor activity of IL-17A+CD8+ T cells (Tc17) is unknown. Experimental Design To address this question, pmel-1 CD8+ T cells were polarized to secrete either IL-17A or IFN-γ. These subsets were then infused into mice with B16F10 melanoma that were lymphoreplete (no TBI), or lymphodepleted with non-myeloablative (5 Gy) or myeloablative (9 Gy requiring hematopoietic stem cell transplantation) TBI. The activation of innate immune cells and function of donor T cell subsets was monitored in these preconditioned mice. Results Tc17 cells regress melanoma in myeloablated mice to a greater extent than in lymphoreplete or non-myeloablated mice. TBI induced functional plasticity in Tc17 cells causing conversion from IL-17A to IFN-γ producers. Additional investigation revealed that Tc17 plasticity and antitumor activity was mediated by IL-12 secreted by irradiated host dendritic cells. Neutralization of endogenous IL-12 reduced the antitumor activity of Tc17 cells in myeloablated mice, while ex vivo priming with IL-12 enhanced their capacity to regress melanoma in non-myeloablated animals. This, coupled with exogenous administration of low dose IL-12, obviated the need for host preconditioning creating curative responses in non-irradiated mice, Conclusions Our findings indicate that TBI-induced IL-12 augments Tc17 cell-mediated tumor immunity and underline the substantial implications of in vitro preparation of antitumor Tc17 cells with IL-12 in the design of T cell immunotherapies. PMID:25904754

  14. Identification of Neospora antigens recognized by CD4+ T cells and immune sera from experimentally infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Marks, J; Lundén, A; Harkins, D; Innes, E

    1998-07-01

    Neospora caninum is recognized as a major cause of infectious abortion in cattle. Very little is known about immunity to Neospora. Cell mediated responses have previously been shown to be important in the development of protective immunity to the closely related parasite Toxoplasma gondii, and may therefore be an important component in the immune response to Neospora. In this paper we report that a group of low molecular weight NCI strain tachyzoite antigens (< or = 30 kDa) separated by SDS PAGE and bound to nitrocellulose membrane stimulated proliferation in vitro of CD4+ T cells from calves experimentally infected with N. caninum. Proliferation was accompanied by production of high concentrations of IFN-gamma. Several of these antigens were also recognized by antibody produced in these animals. As the most effective vaccines require the stimulation of both humoral and cell mediated immune responses, these antigens may be important in the development of a vaccine against neosporosis. PMID:9717191

  15. Modulation of CD112 by the alphaherpesvirus gD protein suppresses DNAM-1–dependent NK cell-mediated lysis of infected cells

    PubMed Central

    Grauwet, Korneel; Cantoni, Claudia; Parodi, Monica; De Maria, Andrea; Devriendt, Bert; Pende, Daniela; Moretta, Lorenzo; Vitale, Massimo; Favoreel, Herman W.

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are key players in the innate response to viruses, including herpesviruses. In particular, the variety of viral strategies to modulate the recognition of certain herpesviruses witnesses the importance of NK cells in the control of this group of viruses. Still, NK evasion strategies have remained largely elusive for the largest herpesvirus subfamily, the alphaherpesviruses. Here, we report that the gD glycoprotein of the alphaherpesviruses pseudorabies virus (PRV) and herpes simplex virus 2 (HSV-2) displays previously uncharacterized immune evasion properties toward NK cells. Expression of gD during infection or transfection led to degradation and consequent down-regulation of CD112, a ligand for the activating NK receptor DNAX accessory molecule 1 (DNAM-1). CD112 downregulation resulted in a reduced ability of DNAM-1 to bind to the surface of both virus-infected and gD-transfected cells. Consequently, expression of gD suppressed NK cell degranulation and NK cell-mediated lysis of PRV- or HSV-2–infected cells. These data identify an alphaherpesvirus evasion strategy from NK cells and point out that interactions between viral envelope proteins and host cell receptors can have biological consequences that stretch beyond virus entry. PMID:25352670

  16. C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1)-targeted TRAIL augments the tumoricidal activity of granulocytes and potentiates therapeutic antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Wiersma, Valerie R; de Bruyn, Marco; Shi, Ce; Gooden, Marloes JM; Wouters, Maartje CA; Samplonius, Douwe F; Hendriks, Djoke; Nijman, Hans W; Wei, Yunwei; Zhou, Jin; Helfrich, Wijnand; Bremer, Edwin

    2015-01-01

    The therapeutic effect of anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies stems from their capacity to opsonize targeted cancer cells with subsequent phagocytic removal, induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) or induction of complement-mediated cytotoxicity (CDC). The major immune effector cells involved in these processes are natural killer (NK) cells and granulocytes. The latter and most prevalent blood cell population contributes to phagocytosis, but is not effective in inducing ADCC. Here, we report that targeted delivery of the tumoricidal protein tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) to granulocyte marker C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL1), using fusion protein CLL1:TRAIL, equips granulocytes with high levels of TRAIL. Upon CLL1-selective binding of this fusion protein, granulocytes acquire additional TRAIL-mediated cytotoxic activity that, importantly, potentiates antibody-mediated cytotoxicity of clinically used therapeutic antibodies (e.g., rituximab, cetuximab). Thus, CLL1:TRAIL could be used as an adjuvant to optimize the clinical potential of anticancer antibody therapy by augmenting tumoricidal activity of granulocytes. PMID:25760768

  17. Disruption of Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptor-Associated Factor 5 Exacerbates Murine Experimental Colitis via Regulating T Helper Cell-Mediated Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Shang, Jian; Li, Lixia; Wang, Xiaobing; Pan, Huaqin; Liu, Shi; He, Ruohang; Li, Jin; Zhao, Qiu

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) receptor-associated factor 5 (TRAF5) is a key mediator of TNF receptor superfamily members and is important in both T helper (Th) cell immunity and the regulation of multiple signaling pathways. To clarify TRAF5's influence on inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs), we investigated TRAF5 deficiency's effect on dextran sulfate sodium- (DSS-) induced colitis. Colitis was induced in TRAF5 knockout (KO) mice and their wild-type (WT) littermates by administering 3% DSS orally for 7 days. The mice were then sacrificed, and their colons were removed. Our data suggested that KO mice were more susceptible to DSS-induced colitis. TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced IFN-γ, IL-4, and IL-17a mRNA and protein levels in the colons of DSS-fed mice, and the mRNA expression of T-bet and GATA-3 was also markedly elevated. However, ROR-α and ROR-γt mRNA levels did not differ between DSS-induced KO and WT mice. Flow cytometry showed increased frequencies of Th2 and IFN-γ/IL-17a-coproducing CD4+ T cells in the colons of DSS-induced KO mice. Additionally, TRAF5 deficiency significantly enhanced the activation of NF-κB in CD4+ T cells after DSS administration. These results indicated that TRAF5 deficiency significantly aggravated DSS-induced colitis, most likely by regulating Th cell-mediated inflammation. PMID:27110068

  18. The emotional aftermath of adoption.

    PubMed

    Nadelson, C C

    1976-09-01

    Adopted children are emotionally vulnerable. Adoptive parents must cope with more complex problems than biologic parents. The family physician can provide valuable counseling. Preadoption counseling focuses on motivation and ambivalence. After adoption, however, serious, sometimes predictable, issues arise, such as: how and when to tell the child he is adopted; the child's search for knowledge; the problem of subsequent divorce; the birth of a natural sibling, and the involvement of other family members. New concepts include "open adoption" and "single parent adoption." PMID:961560

  19. Adoptions Without Agencies: A Study of Independent Adoptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meezan, William; And Others

    The purposes of this national study of independent, nonagency adoptions were: (1) to determine the experience of the parties involved (biological parents, adoptive parents, agencies, intermediaries, and law enforcement agents); (2) to identify agency policies, procedures and resources that deter agency adoptions and thus encourage independent…

  20. Parents' Feelings towards Their Adoptive and Non-Adoptive Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glover, Marshaun B.; Mullineaux, Paula Y.; Deater-Deckard, Kirby; Petrill, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we examined parent gender differences in feelings (negativity and positivity) and perceptions of child behavioural and emotional problems in adoptive and biological parent-child dyads. In a sample of 85 families, we used a novel within-family adoption design in which one child was adopted and one child was a biological child…

  1. Platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia. Understanding the mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Bakchoul, Tamam; Sachs, Ulrich J

    2016-08-01

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune bleeding disorder characterized by isolated thrombocytopenia. A dysfunctional proliferation of autoreactive T cells is suggested to be responsible for the loss of tolerance to self-platelet antigens in ITP patients. Autoreactive T cells induce uncontrolled proliferation of autoantibody producing B cells leading to persistent anti-platelet autoimmunity in some ITP patients. The autoimmune response causes an increased destruction of platelets by antibody-mediated phagocytosis, complement activation but also by T cell mediated cytotoxicity. In addition, abnormalities in thrombopoiesis and insufficient platelet production due to antibody or T cell mediated megakaryocyte inhibition and destruction contribute to the pathophysiology of ITP. These various effector cell responses may account for the heterogeneity in the clinical manifestation of ITP and also, to success or failure of different treatment strategies. A better understanding of the mechanisms behind ITP will hopefully allow for better diagnostic and, particularly, therapeutic strategies in the future. PMID:25982994

  2. Aging and immune function: a possible role for growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Gelato, M C

    1996-01-01

    Elderly individuals have four to five times the case rate of cancer, tuberculosis and herpes zoster and six to seven times the fatality rate from pneumonia compared to young adults. This may be causally related to two changes that occur with aging, i.e. decreased growth hormone (GH)/insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) production and decreased immune function. Data from our laboratory as well as others have shown that, based on either GH secretory dynamics or IGF-1 levels, approximately 40% of adults aged 60 and older are GH deficient. In the same population of subjects, immune function decreases such that there is a decline in cell-mediated and humoral immune responsiveness. Some of these immune deficits have been shown to be reversed in humans and primates by GH and/or IGF-1 treatment. This paper will review some of these data. PMID:8742118

  3. Immune System

    EPA Science Inventory

    A properly functioning immune system is essential to good health. It defends the body against infectious agents and in some cases tumor cells. Individuals with immune deficiencies resulting from genetic defects, diseases (e.g., AIDS, leukemia), or drug therapies are more suscepti...

  4. [Progress of study on antitumor effects of antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity--review].

    PubMed

    Qu, Yu-Hua; Li, Yang

    2010-10-01

    In recent years, as increasing of monoclonal antibody application in clinic, the antitumor effect of antibody dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) get increasing attention. The natural killer (NK) cells are the most important effector cells mediating specific antitumor of ADCC; the phagocytes, T-cells and granulocytes have the definite effect on antitumor of ADCC. ADCC is confirmed as the important mechanism and means for clinically treating the cancers with monoclonal antibodies. The IgG antibody firstly combines with target cells (tumor cells) through antigen-binding sites, and then FcγR on effector cells identifies its Fc fragment and mediates ADCC. Today many kinds of monoclonal antibodies have been put into clinical application such as rituximab and other new anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies including trastuzumab, erbitux, cetuximab, edrecolomab, nimotuzumab, gemtuzumab ozogamicin and so on, which all can mediate ADCC. The antitumor effects of ADCC mediated by monoclonal antibody can be influenced by IgG Fc receptor gene polymorphism, tumor cell antigen, serum antibody levels, cytokines and drugs etc. As to peripheral blood mononuclear cells, ADCC efficacies of FcγRIIIa-158V/V and FcγRIIa-131H/H are higher than that of other genotypes, while increasing the level of tumor antigen and decreasing the level of serum antibody or adding some cytokines (IL-2, IL-21, IL-15, etc) may elevate the ADCC effect mediated by monoclonal antibodies. Avoiding use of certain drugs (dexamethasone, TNF antagonist) or appropriately using of ondansetron and clemastine also can enhance the anti-tumor effect of ADCC mediated by monoclonal antibodies. In short, ADCC is very important in clinical application for anti-tumor treatment, but its efficacy may be impacted by multiple factors.In this article, the killing mechanisms of ADCC, the clinical use of monoclonal antibodies with antitumor effect of ADCC, the factors influencing anti-tumor efficacy of ADCC, and the antitumor

  5. Maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    Moniz, Michelle H; Beigi, Richard H

    2014-01-01

    Maternal immunization holds tremendous promise to improve maternal and neonatal health for a number of infectious conditions. The unique susceptibilities of pregnant women to infectious conditions, as well as the ability of maternally-derived antibody to offer vital neonatal protection (via placental transfer), together have produced the recent increased attention on maternal immunization. The Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) currently recommends 2 immunizations for all pregnant women lacking contraindication, inactivated Influenza and tetanus toxoid, reduced diphtheria toxoid, and acellular pertussis (Tdap). Given ongoing research the number of vaccines recommended during pregnancy is likely to increase. Thus, achieving high vaccination coverage of pregnant women for all recommended immunizations is a key public health enterprise. This review will focus on the present state of vaccine acceptance in pregnancy, with attention to currently identified barriers and determinants of vaccine acceptance. Additionally, opportunities for improvement will be considered. PMID:25483490

  6. Virus infection, antiviral immunity, and autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Getts, Daniel R.; Chastain, Emily M. L.; Terry, Rachael L.; Miller, Stephen D.

    2014-01-01

    Summary As a group of disorders, autoimmunity ranks as the third most prevalent cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western World. However, the etiology of most autoimmune diseases remains unknown. Although genetic linkage studies support a critical underlying role for genetics, the geographic distribution of these disorders as well as the low concordance rates in monozygotic twins suggest that a combination of other factors including environmental ones are involved. Virus infection is a primary factor that has been implicated in the initiation of autoimmune disease. Infection triggers a robust and usually well-coordinated immune response that is critical for viral clearance. However, in some instances, immune regulatory mechanisms may falter, culminating in the breakdown of self-tolerance, resulting in immune-mediated attack directed against both viral and self-antigens. Traditionally, cross-reactive T-cell recognition, known as molecular mimicry, as well as bystander T-cell activation, culminating in epitope spreading, have been the predominant mechanisms elucidated through which infection may culminate in an T-cell-mediated autoimmune response. However, other hypotheses including virus-induced decoy of the immune system also warrant discussion in regard to their potential for triggering autoimmunity. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which virus infection and antiviral immunity contribute to the development of autoimmunity. PMID:23947356

  7. MUC1 upregulation promotes immune resistance in tumor cells undergoing brachyury-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    David, Justin M.; Hamilton, Duane H.; Palena, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a molecular and cellular program in which epithelial cells lose their well-differentiated phenotype and adopt mesenchymal characteristics. This process, which occurs naturally during embryogenesis, has also been shown to be associated with cancer progression and with tumor recurrence following conventional therapies. Brachyury is a transcription factor that mediates EMT during development, and is aberrantly expressed in various human cancers where it promotes tumor cell EMT, metastatic dissemination, and resistance to conventional therapies. We have recently shown that very high expression of brachyury can protect tumor cells against immune cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In seeking to elucidate mechanisms of immunotherapy resistance, we have discovered a novel positive association between brachyury and mucin-1 (MUC1). MUC1 is overexpressed in the majority of carcinomas, and it has been shown to mediate oncogenic signaling and confer resistance to genotoxic agents. We found that MUC1 is concomitantly upregulated in tumor cell lines that highly express brachyury due to an enhancement of MUC1 mRNA stability. Analysis of patient lung tumor tissues also identified a positive association between these two proteins in the majority of samples. Inhibition of MUC1 by siRNA-based gene silencing markedly enhanced the susceptibility of brachyury-expressing cancer cells to killing by tumor necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and to perforin/granzyme-dependent lysis by immune cytotoxic cells. These studies confirm a protective role for MUC1 in brachyury-expressing cancer cells, and suggest that inhibition of MUC1 can restore the susceptibility of mesenchymal-like cancer cells to immune attack. PMID:27141403

  8. Trastuzumab mediates antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity and phagocytosis to the same extent in both adjuvant and metastatic HER2/neu breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Monoclonal antibodies (mAb), such as trastuzumab are a valuable addition to breast cancer therapy. Data obtained from neoadjuvant settings revealed that antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) is a major mechanism of action for the mAb trastuzumab. Conflicting results still call into question whether disease progression, prolonged treatment or concomitant chemotherapy influences ADCC and related immunological phenomena. Methods We analyzed the activity of ADCC and antibody-dependent cell-mediated phagocytosis (ADCP) of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/neu) positive breast cancer patients receiving trastuzumab therapy either in an adjuvant (n = 13) or metastatic (n = 15) setting as well as from trastuzumab treatment-naive (t-naive) HER2/neu negative patients (n = 15). PBMCs from healthy volunteers (n = 24) were used as controls. ADCC and ADCP activity was correlated with the expression of antibody binding Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)I (CD64), FcγRII (CD32) and FcγRIII (CD16) on CD14+ (monocytes) and CD56+ (NK) cells, as well as the expression of CD107a+ (LAMP-1) on CD56+ cells and the total amount of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ (Treg) cells. In metastatic patients, markers were correlated with progression-free survival (PFS). Results ADCC activity was significantly down regulated in metastatic, adjuvant and t-naive patient cohorts as compared to healthy controls. Reduced ADCC activity was inversely correlated with the expression of CD107a on CD56+ cells in adjuvant patients. ADCC and ADCP activity of the patient cohorts were similar, regardless of treatment duration or additional chemotherapy. PFS in metastatic patients inversely correlated with the number of peripheral Treg cells. Conclusion The reduction of ADCC in patients as compared to healthy controls calls for adjuvant strategies, such as immune-enhancing agents, to improve the activity of trastuzumab. However, efficacy of trastuzumab

  9. A Phenomenological Exploration of Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baltimore, Diana L.; Crase, Sedahlia Jasper

    2009-01-01

    This qualitative analysis explored children's and adults' experiences with adoption. We used phenomenological methodology and individually interviewed 25 participants and included adoptive mothers and fathers, and their children, each adopted before 18 months of age. Two research questions guided the data analysis: (a) What are children's and…

  10. Dogmatism and Attitudes Toward Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dembroski, Betty G.; Johnson Dale L.

    1969-01-01

    Using Rokeach's Dogmatism Scale and an Adoption Attitude Scale administered to 113 college students study supports hypothesis that among males dogmatism and intolerance toward areas relating to adoption would be positively correlated. Negative correlation for females suggests that emphasis on maternal role makes adoption attitudes exception to…

  11. Adoption Resources for Black Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gallagher, Ursula M.

    1971-01-01

    The growing number of adoptions in this country, including racially mixed adoptions, attest to the general acceptance of adoption as a way of bringing love to children in need of families of their own and the satisfactions of parenthood to childless couples, single men and women, and families who have room for one more. (Author/AJ)

  12. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  13. Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell-Mediated Treatment for Periodontitis in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yi; Zheng, Ying; Ding, Gang; Fang, Dianji; Zhang, Chunmei; Bartold, Peter Mark; Gronthos, Stan; Shi, Songtao; Wang, Songlin

    2009-01-01

    Periodontitis is a periodontal tissue infectious disease and the most common cause for tooth loss in adults. It has been linked to many systemic disorders, such as coronary artery disease, stroke, and diabetes. At present, there is no ideal therapeutic approach to cure periodontitis and achieve optimal periodontal tissue regeneration. In this study, we explored the potential of using autologous periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) to treat periodontal defects in a porcine model of periodontitis. The periodontal lesion was generated in the first molars area of miniature pigs by the surgical removal of bone and subsequent silk ligament suture around the cervical portion of the tooth. Autol