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Sample records for cell-penetrating peptides decreases

  1. Cell Penetrating Peptides and Cationic Antibacterial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez Plaza, Jonathan G.; Morales-Nava, Rosmarbel; Diener, Christian; Schreiber, Gabriele; Gonzalez, Zyanya D.; Lara Ortiz, Maria Teresa; Ortega Blake, Ivan; Pantoja, Omar; Volkmer, Rudolf; Klipp, Edda; Herrmann, Andreas; Del Rio, Gabriel

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) and cationic antibacterial peptides (CAP) have similar physicochemical properties and yet it is not understood how such similar peptides display different activities. To address this question, we used Iztli peptide 1 (IP-1) because it has both CPP and CAP activities. Combining experimental and computational modeling of the internalization of IP-1, we show it is not internalized by receptor-mediated endocytosis, yet it permeates into many different cell types, including fungi and human cells. We also show that IP-1 makes pores in the presence of high electrical potential at the membrane, such as those found in bacteria and mitochondria. These results provide the basis to understand the functional redundancy of CPPs and CAPs. PMID:24706763

  2. Membranotropic Cell Penetrating Peptides: The Outstanding Journey

    PubMed Central

    Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Galdiero, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    The membrane bilayer delimits the interior of individual cells and provides them with the ability to survive and function properly. However, the crossing of cellular membranes constitutes the principal impediment to gaining entry into cells, and the potential therapeutic application of many drugs is predominantly dependent on the development of delivery tools that should take the drug to target cells selectively and efficiently with only minimal toxicity. Cell-penetrating peptides are short and basic peptides are widely used due to their ability to deliver a cargo across the membrane both in vitro and in vivo. It is widely accepted that their uptake mechanism involves mainly the endocytic pathway, the drug is catched inside endosomes and lysosomes, and only a small quantity is able to reach the intracellular target. In this wide-ranging scenario, a fascinating novel hypothesis is that membranotropic peptides that efficiently cross biological membranes, promote lipid-membrane reorganizing processes and cause a local and temporary destabilization and reorganization of the membrane bilayer, may also be able to enter cells circumventing the endosomal entrapment; in particular, by either favoring the escape from the endosome or by direct translocation. This review summarizes current data on membranotropic peptides for drug delivery. PMID:26512649

  3. Cell-penetrating peptides transport therapeutics into cells.

    PubMed

    Ramsey, Joshua D; Flynn, Nicholas H

    2015-10-01

    Nearly 30years ago, certain small, relatively nontoxic peptides were discovered to be capable of traversing the cell membrane. These cell-penetrating peptides, as they are now called, have been shown to not only be capable of crossing the cell membrane themselves but can also carry many different therapeutic agents into cells, including small molecules, plasmid DNA, siRNA, therapeutic proteins, viruses, imaging agents, and other various nanoparticles. Many cell-penetrating peptides have been derived from natural proteins, but several other cell-penetrating peptides have been developed that are either chimeric or completely synthetic. How cell-penetrating peptides are internalized into cells has been a topic of debate, with some peptides seemingly entering cells through an endocytic mechanism and others by directly penetrating the cell membrane. Although the entry mechanism is still not entirely understood, it seems to be dependent on the peptide type, the peptide concentration, the cargo the peptide transports, and the cell type tested. With new intracellular disease targets being discovered, cell-penetrating peptides offer an exciting approach for delivering drugs to these intracellular targets. There are hundreds of cell-penetrating peptides being studied for drug delivery, and ongoing studies are demonstrating their success both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26210404

  4. Prediction of cell-penetrating peptides with feature selection techniques.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hua; Su, Zhen-Dong; Wei, Huan-Huan; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-08-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides are a group of peptides which can transport different types of cargo molecules such as drugs across plasma membrane and have been applied in the treatment of various diseases. Thus, the accurate prediction of cell-penetrating peptides with bioinformatics methods will accelerate the development of drug delivery systems. The study aims to develop a powerful model to accurately identify cell-penetrating peptides. At first, the peptides were translated into a set of vectors with the same dimension by using dipeptide compositions. Secondly, the Analysis of Variance-based technique was used to reduce the dimension of the vector and explore the optimized features. Finally, the support vector machine was utilized to discriminate cell-penetrating peptides from non-cell-penetrating peptides. The five-fold cross-validated results showed that our proposed method could achieve an overall prediction accuracy of 83.6%. Based on the proposed model, we constructed a free webserver called C2Pred (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/C2Pred). PMID:27291150

  5. Synthesis and studies on cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Jean-Remi; Malvy, Claude; Auguste, Tiphanie; Tóth, Gábor K; Kiss-Ivánkovits, Orsolya; Illyés, Eszter; Hollósi, Miklós; Bottka, Sándor; Laczkó, Ilona

    2009-07-01

    The ability of different synthetic cell penetrating peptides, as Antennapedia (wild and Phe(6) mutated penetratins), flock house virus, and integrin peptides to form complexes with a 25mer antisense oligonucleotide was compared and their conformation was determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The efficiency for oligonucleotide delivery into cells was measured using peptides labeled with a coumarin derivative showing blue fluorescence and the fluorescein-labeled antisense oligonucleotide showing green fluorescence. Fluorescence due to the excitation energy transfer confirmed the interaction of the antisense oligonucleotide and cell-penetrating peptides. The most efficient oligonucleotide delivery was found for penetratins. Comparison of the two types of penetratins shows that the wild-type penetratin proved to be more efficient than mutated penetratin. The paper also emphasizes that the attachment of a fluorescent label may have an effect on the conformation and flexibility of cell-penetrating peptides that must be taken into consideration when evaluating biological experiments. PMID:19552459

  6. Strategies to stabilize cell penetrating peptides for in vivo applications.

    PubMed

    Fominaya, Jesús; Bravo, Jerónimo; Rebollo, Angelita

    2015-10-01

    In the era of biomedicines and engineered carrier systems, cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been established as a promising tool for therapeutic application. Likewise, other therapeutic peptides, successful in vivo application of CPPs will strongly depend on peptide stability, the bottleneck for this type of biodegradable molecules. In this review, the authors describe the current knowledge of the in vivo degradation for known CPPs and the different strategies available to provide a higher resistance to metabolic degradation while preserving cell penetration efficiency. Peptide stability can be improved by different means, either modifying the structure to make it unrecognizable to proteases, or preventing access of proteolytic enzymes by applying conformation restriction or shielding strategies. PMID:26448473

  7. Chemical-Functional Diversity in Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Stalmans, Sofie; Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Gevaert, Bert; D’Hondt, Matthias; Peremans, Kathelijne; Burvenich, Christian; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a promising tool to overcome cell membrane barriers. They have already been successfully applied as carriers for several problematic cargoes, like e.g. plasmid DNA and (si)RNA, opening doors for new therapeutics. Although several hundreds of CPPs are already described in the literature, only a few commercial applications of CPPs are currently available. Cellular uptake studies of these peptides suffer from inconsistencies in used techniques and other experimental conditions, leading to uncertainties about their uptake mechanisms and structural properties. To clarify the structural characteristics influencing the cell-penetrating properties of peptides, the chemical-functional space of peptides, already investigated for cellular uptake, was explored. For 186 peptides, a new cell-penetrating (CP)-response was proposed, based upon the scattered quantitative results for cellular influx available in the literature. Principal component analysis (PCA) and a quantitative structure-property relationship study (QSPR), using chemo-molecular descriptors and our newly defined CP-response, learned that besides typical well-known properties of CPPs, i.e. positive charge and amphipathicity, the shape, structure complexity and the 3D-pattern of constituting atoms influence the cellular uptake capacity of peptides. PMID:23951237

  8. Prediction of cell penetrating peptides by support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Sanders, William S; Johnston, C Ian; Bridges, Susan M; Burgess, Shane C; Willeford, Kenneth O

    2011-07-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are those peptides that can transverse cell membranes to enter cells. Once inside the cell, different CPPs can localize to different cellular components and perform different roles. Some generate pore-forming complexes resulting in the destruction of cells while others localize to various organelles. Use of machine learning methods to predict potential new CPPs will enable more rapid screening for applications such as drug delivery. We have investigated the influence of the composition of training datasets on the ability to classify peptides as cell penetrating using support vector machines (SVMs). We identified 111 known CPPs and 34 known non-penetrating peptides from the literature and commercial vendors and used several approaches to build training data sets for the classifiers. Features were calculated from the datasets using a set of basic biochemical properties combined with features from the literature determined to be relevant in the prediction of CPPs. Our results using different training datasets confirm the importance of a balanced training set with approximately equal number of positive and negative examples. The SVM based classifiers have greater classification accuracy than previously reported methods for the prediction of CPPs, and because they use primary biochemical properties of the peptides as features, these classifiers provide insight into the properties needed for cell-penetration. To confirm our SVM classifications, a subset of peptides classified as either penetrating or non-penetrating was selected for synthesis and experimental validation. Of the synthesized peptides predicted to be CPPs, 100% of these peptides were shown to be penetrating. PMID:21779156

  9. Applications of Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Tumor Targeting and Future Cancer Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Regberg, Jakob; Srimanee, Artita; Langel, Ülo

    2012-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides provide a highly promising strategy for intracellular drug delivery. One relevant clinical application of cell-penetrating peptides is cancer therapeutics. Peptide based delivery could increase the uptake of drugs in tumor cells and thereby increase the efficacy of the treatment, either of conventional small molecular drugs or oligonucleotide based therapeutics. This review is focused on the cancer applications of cell penetrating peptides as delivery systems; different aspects of drug loading, cargoes and delivery are discussed together with methods for targeted delivery, activatable cell-penetrating peptides and transducible agents coupled to cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:24280701

  10. Cell-penetrating peptides: Possible transduction mechanisms and therapeutic applications

    PubMed Central

    GUO, ZHENGRONG; PENG, HUANYAN; KANG, JIWEN; SUN, DIANXING

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also known as protein transduction domains, are a class of diverse peptides with 5–30 amino acids. CPPs are divided into cationic, amphipathic and hydrophobic CPPs. They are able to carry small molecules, plasmid DNA, small interfering RNA, proteins, viruses, imaging agents and other various nanoparticles across the cellular membrane, resulting in internalization of the intact cargos. However, the mechanisms of CPP internalization remain to be elucidated. Recently, CPPs have received considerable attention due to their high transduction efficiency and low cytotoxicity. These peptides have a significant potential for diagnostic and therapeutic applications, such as delivery of fluorescent or radioactive compounds for imaging, delivery of peptides and proteins for therapeutic application, and delivery of molecules into induced pluripotent stem cells for directing differentiation. The present study reviews the classifications and transduction mechanisms of CPPs, as well as their potential applications. PMID:27123243

  11. Cell Penetrating Elastin-like Polypeptides for Therapeutic Peptide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Bidwell, Gene L.; Raucher, Drazen

    2010-01-01

    Current treatment of solid tumors is limited by side effects that result from the nonspecific delivery of drugs to the tumor site. Alternative targeted therapeutic approaches for localized tumors would significantly reduce systemic toxicity. Peptide therapeutics are a promising new strategy for targeted cancer therapy because of the ease of peptide design and the specificity of peptides for their intracellular molecular targets. However, the utility of peptides is limited by their poor pharmacokinetic parameters and poor tissue and cellular membrane permeability in vivo. This review article summarizes the development of elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) as a potential carrier for thermally targeted delivery of therapeutic peptides (TP), and the use of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to enhance the intracellular delivery of the ELP-fused TPs. CPP-fused ELPs have been used to deliver a peptide inhibitor of c-Myc function and a peptide mimetic of p21 in several cancer models in vitro, and both polypeptides are currently yielding promising results in in vivo models of breast and brain cancer. PMID:20478348

  12. Translocation and Endocytosis for Cell-penetrating Peptide Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Chen-Yu; Delaroche, Diane; Burlina, Fabienne; Alves, Isabel D.; Chassaing, Gérard; Sagan, Sandrine

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) share the property of cellular internalization. The question of how these peptides reach the cytoplasm of cells is still widely debated. Herein, we have used a mass spectrometry-based method that enables quantification of internalized and membrane-bound peptides. Internalization of the most used CPP was studied at 37 °C (endocytosis and translocation) and 4 °C (translocation) in wild type and proteoglycan-deficient Chinese hamster ovary cells. Both translocation and endocytosis are internalization pathways used by CPP. The choice of one pathway versus the other depends on the peptide sequence (not the number of positive changes), the extracellular peptide concentration, and the membrane components. There is no relationship between the high affinity of these peptides for the cell membrane and their internalization efficacy. Translocation occurs at low extracellular peptide concentration, whereas endocytosis, a saturable and cooperative phenomenon, is activated at higher concentrations. Translocation operates in a narrow time window, which implies a specific lipid/peptide co-import in cells. PMID:19833724

  13. Identification and characterization of a new family of cell-penetrating peptides: cyclic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Cascales, Laura; Henriques, Sónia T; Kerr, Markus C; Huang, Yen-Hua; Sweet, Matthew J; Daly, Norelle L; Craik, David J

    2011-10-21

    Cell-penetrating peptides can translocate across the plasma membrane of living cells and thus are potentially useful agents in drug delivery applications. Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides also have promise in drug design because of their exceptional stability, but to date only one cyclic peptide has been reported to penetrate cells, the Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor II (MCoTI-II). MCoTI-II belongs to the cyclotide family of plant-derived cyclic peptides that are characterized by a cyclic cystine knot motif. Previous studies in fixed cells showed that MCoTI-II could penetrate cells but kalata B1, a prototypic cyclotide from a separate subfamily of cyclotides, was bound to the plasma membrane and did not translocate into cells. Here, we show by live cell imaging that both MCoTI-II and kalata B1 can enter cells. Kalata B1 has the same cyclic cystine knot structural motif as MCoTI-II but differs significantly in sequence, and the mechanism by which these two peptides enter cells also differs. MCoTI-II appears to enter via macropinocytosis, presumably mediated by interaction of positively charged residues with phosphoinositides in the cell membrane, whereas kalata B1 interacts directly with the membrane by targeting phosphatidylethanolamine phospholipids, probably leading to membrane bending and vesicle formation. We also show that another plant-derived cyclic peptide, SFTI-1, can penetrate cells. SFTI-1 includes just 14 amino acids and, with the exception of its cyclic backbone, is structurally very different from the cyclotides, which are twice the size. Intriguingly, SFTI-1 does not interact with any of the phospholipids tested, and its mechanism of penetration appears to be distinct from MCoTI-II and kalata B1. The ability of diverse disulfide-rich cyclic peptides to penetrate cells enhances their potential in drug design, and we propose a new classification for them, i.e. cyclic cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:21873420

  14. Quality control of cationic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Stalmans, Sofie; Gevaert, Bert; Verbeke, Frederick; D'Hondt, Matthias; Bracke, Nathalie; Wynendaele, Evelien; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2016-01-01

    During fundamental research, it is recommended to evaluate the test compound identity and purity in order to obtain reliable study outcomes. For peptides, quality control (QC) analyses are routinely performed using reversed-phase liquid chromatography coupled to an ultraviolet (UV) detector system. These traditional QC methods, using a C18 column and a linear gradient with formic acid (FA) as acidic modifier in the mobile phase, might not result in optimal chromatographic performance for basic peptides due to their cationic nature and hence may lead to erroneous results. Therefore, the influence of the used chromatographic system on the final QC results of basic peptides was evaluated using five cationic cell-penetrating peptides and five C18-chromatographic systems, differing in the column particle size (high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) versus ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC)), the acidic modifier (FA versus trifluoroacetic acid (TFA)), and the column temperature (30 °C versus 60 °C). Our results indicate that a UHPLC system with the C18 column thermostated at 30 °C and a mobile phase containing TFA, provides the most suitable routine QC analysis method for cationic peptides, outperforming in sensitivity and resolution compared to the other systems. We also demonstrate the use of a single quad mass spectrometry (MS) detector system during QC analysis of (cationic) peptides, allowing identification of the peptide and its impurities, as well as the evaluation of the peak purity. PMID:26397208

  15. Bioportide: an emergent concept of bioactive cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Howl, John; Matou-Nasri, Sabine; West, David C; Farquhar, Michelle; Slaninová, Jiřina; Ostenson, Claes-Göran; Zorko, Matjaz; Ostlund, Pernilla; Kumar, Shant; Langel, Ulo; McKeating, Jane; Jones, Sarah

    2012-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven utility for the highly efficient intracellular delivery of bioactive cargoes that include peptides, proteins, and oligonucleotides. The many strategies developed to utilize CPPs solely as pharmacokinetic modifiers necessarily requires them to be relatively inert. Moreover, it is feasible to combine one or multiple CPPs with bioactive cargoes either by direct chemical conjugation or, more rarely, as non-covalent complexes. In terms of the message-address hypothesis, this combination of cargo (message) linked to a CPP (address) as a tandem construct conforms to the sychnological organization. More recently, we have introduced the term bioportide to describe monomeric CPPs that are intrinsically bioactive. Herein, we describe the design and biochemical properties of two rhegnylogically organized monometic CPPs that collectively modulate a variety of biological and pathophysiological phenomena. Thus, camptide, a cell-penetrant sequence located within the first intracellular loop of a human calcitonin receptor, regulates cAMP-dependent processes to modulate insulin secretion and viral infectivity. Nosangiotide, a bioportide derived from endothelial nitric oxide synthase, potently inhibits many aspects of the endothelial cell morphology and movement and displays potent anti-angiogenic activity in vivo. We conclude that, due to their capacity to translocate and target intracellular signaling events, bioportides represent an innovative generic class of bioactive agents. PMID:22527714

  16. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess lowmore » cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.« less

  17. Reinventing Cell Penetrating Peptides Using Glycosylated Methionine Sulfonium Ion Sequences

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs. PMID:27162954

  18. Cell-penetrating Peptides as Versatile Vehicles for Oligonucleotide Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Margus, Helerin; Padari, Kärt; Pooga, Margus

    2012-01-01

    Short regulatory oligonucleotides (ONs) have a great therapeutic potential for the modulation of gene expression due to their high specificity and low toxicity. The major obstacles for in vivo clinical applications of ONs are the poor permeability of plasma membrane to nucleic acids and the sensitivity of ONs to enzymatic degradation. Hence, various delivery vehicles have been developed to ensure the transduction of ONs into cells. Among these, the cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have gained quickly broadening popularity as promising nonviral transmembrane delivery vectors. For coupling of nucleic acids to CPPs, two distinct strategies may be applied—covalent and noncovalent. The majority of earlier studies have used covalent coupling of CPPs to ONs. However, the number of studies demonstrating very high therapeutic potential of noncovalent complexes of ONs with novel CPP-based delivery vehicles is explosively increasing. In this review, the recent developments in the application of CPP-mediated oligonucleotide delivery by noncovalent strategy will be discussed. PMID:22233581

  19. Reinventing cell penetrating peptides using glycosylated methionine sulfonium ion sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, Jessica R.; Schmidt, Nathan W.; Mayle, Kristine M.; Kamei, Daniel T.; Wong, Gerard C.L.; Deming, Timothy J.

    2015-04-15

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are intriguing molecules that have received much attention, both in terms of mechanistic analysis and as transporters for intracellular therapeutic delivery. Most CPPs contain an abundance of cationic charged residues, typically arginine, where the amino acid compositions, rather than specific sequences, tend to determine their ability to enter cells. Hydrophobic residues are often added to cationic sequences to create efficient CPPs, but typically at the penalty of increased cytotoxicity. Here, we examined polypeptides containing glycosylated, cationic derivatives of methionine, where we found these hydrophilic polypeptides to be surprisingly effective as CPPs and to also possess low cytotoxicity. X-ray analysis of how these new polypeptides interact with lipid membranes revealed that the incorporation of sterically demanding hydrophilic cationic groups in polypeptides is an unprecedented new concept for design of potent CPPs.

  20. Cell Penetrating Peptides: How Do They Do It?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Angel E.

    2008-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides consist of short sequences of amino acids containing a large net positive charge that are able to penetrate almost any cell, carrying with them relatively large cargoes such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and drugs. During the 10 years since their discovery, the question of how they manage to translocate across the membrane has remained unanswered. The main discussion has been centered on whether they follow an energy-independent or an energy-dependent pathway. Recently, we have discovered the possibility of an energy-independent pathway that challenges fundamental concepts associated with protein-membrane interactions (Herce and Garcia, PNAS, 104: 20805 (2007) [1]). It involves the translocation of charged residues across the hydrophobic core of the membrane and the passive diffusion of these highly charged peptides across the membrane through the formation of aqueous toroidal pores. The aim of this review is to discuss the details of the mechanism and interpret some experimental results consistent with this view. PMID:19669523

  1. Cell penetrating peptides: how do they do it?

    PubMed

    Herce, Henry D; Garcia, Angel E

    2007-12-01

    Cell penetrating peptides consist of short sequences of amino acids containing a large net positive charge that are able to penetrate almost any cell, carrying with them relatively large cargoes such as proteins, oligonucleotides, and drugs. During the 10 years since their discovery, the question of how they manage to translocate across the membrane has remained unanswered. The main discussion has been centered on whether they follow an energy-independent or an energy-dependent pathway. Recently, we have discovered the possibility of an energy-independent pathway that challenges fundamental concepts associated with protein-membrane interactions (Herce and Garcia, PNAS, 104: 20805 (2007) [1]). It involves the translocation of charged residues across the hydrophobic core of the membrane and the passive diffusion of these highly charged peptides across the membrane through the formation of aqueous toroidal pores. The aim of this review is to discuss the details of the mechanism and interpret some experimental results consistent with this view. PMID:19669523

  2. Inhibition of regulated cell death by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Krautwald, Stefan; Dewitz, Christin; Fändrich, Fred; Kunzendorf, Ulrich

    2016-06-01

    Development of the means to efficiently and continuously renew missing and non-functional proteins in diseased cells remains a major goal in modern molecular medicine. While gene therapy has the potential to achieve this, substantial obstacles must be overcome before clinical application can be considered. A promising alternative approach is the direct delivery of non-permeant active biomolecules, such as oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins, to the affected cells with the purpose of ameliorating an advanced disease process. In addition to receptor-mediated endocytosis, cell-penetrating peptides are widely used as vectors for rapid translocation of conjugated molecules across cell membranes into intracellular compartments and the delivery of these therapeutic molecules is generally referred to as novel prospective protein therapy. As a broad coverage of the enormous amount of published data in this field is unrewarding, this review will provide a brief, focused overview of the technology and a summary of recent studies of the most commonly used protein transduction domains and their potential as therapeutic agents for the treatment of cellular damage and the prevention of regulated cell death. PMID:27048815

  3. Translocation of Cell Penetrating Peptide Engrafted Nanoparticles Across Skin Layers

    PubMed Central

    Patlolla, Ram R; Desai, Pinaki; Belay, Kalayu; Singh, Mandip

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the current study was to evaluate the ability of cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to translocate the lipid payload into the skin layers. Fluorescent dye (DID-oil) encapsulated nano lipid crystal nanoparticles (FNLCN) were prepared using Compritol, Miglyol and DOGS-NTA-Ni lipids by hot melt homogenization technique. The FNLCN surface was coated with TAT peptide (FNLCNT) or control YKA peptide (FNLCNY) and in vitro rat skin permeation studies were performed using Franz diffusion cells. Observation of lateral skin sections obtained using cryotome with a confocal microscope demonstrated that skin permeation of FNLCNT was time dependent and after 24 h, fluorescence was observed upto a depth of 120 µm which was localized in the hair follicles and epidermis. In case of FNLCN and FNLCNY formulations fluorescence was mainly observed in the hair follicles. This observation was further supported by confocal Raman spectroscopy where higher fluorescence signal intensity was observed at 80 and 120 µm depth with FNLCNT treated skin and intensity of fluorescence peaks was in the ratio of 2:1:1 and 5:3:1 for FNLCNT, FNLCN, and FNLCNY treated skin sections, respectively. Furthermore, replacement of DID-oil with celecoxib (Cxb), a model lipophilic drug showed similar results and after 24 h, the CXBNT formulation increased the Cxb concentration in SC by 3 and 6 fold and in epidermis by 2 and 3 fold as compared to CXBN and CXBNY formulations respectively. Our results strongly suggest that CPP can translocate nanoparticles with their payloads into deeper skin layers. PMID:20413152

  4. Methods to follow intracellular trafficking of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Pärnaste, Ly; Arukuusk, Piret; Zagato, Elisa; Braeckmans, Kevin; Langel, Ülo

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are efficient vehicles to transport bioactive molecules into the cells. Despite numerous studies the exact mechanism by which CPPs facilitate delivery of cargo to its intracellular target is still debated. The current work presents methods that can be used for tracking CPP/pDNA complexes through endosomal transport and show the role of endosomal transport in the delivery of cargo. Separation of endosomal vesicles by differential centrifugation enables to pinpoint the localization of delivered cargo without labeling it and gives important quantitative information about pDNA trafficing in certain endosomal compartments. Single particle tracking (SPT) allows following individual CPP/cargo complex through endosomal path in live cells, using fluoresently labled cargo and green fluoresent protein expressing cells. These two different methods show similar results about tested NickFect/pDNA complexes intracellular trafficing. NF51 facilitates rapid internalization of complexes into the cells, prolongs their stay in early endosomes and promotes release to cytosol. NF1 is less capable to induce endosomal release and higher amount of complexes are routed to lysosomes for degradation. Our findings offer potential delivery vector for in vivo applications, NF51, where endosomal entrapment has been allayed. Furthermore, these methods are valuable tools to study other CPP-based delivery systems. PMID:26460120

  5. Effects of the properties of short peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides on their internalization into cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Okochi, Mina; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kanie, Kei; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Peptides, especially intracellular functional peptides that can play a particular role inside a cell, have attracted attention as promising materials to control cell fate. However, hydrophilic materials like peptides are difficult for cells to internalize. Therefore, the screening and design of intracellular functional peptides are more difficult than that of extracellular ones. An effective high-throughput screening system for intracellular functional peptides has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate a novel peptide array system for screening intracellular functional peptides, in which both cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) domain and photo-cleavable linkers are used. By using this screening system, we determined how the cellular uptake properties of CPP-conjugated peptides varied depending on the properties of the conjugated peptides. We found that the internalization ability of CPP-conjugated peptides varied greatly depending on the property of the conjugated peptides, and anionic peptides drastically decreased the uptake ability. We summarized our data in a scatter diagram that plots hydrophobicity versus isoelectric point (pI) of conjugated peptides. These results define a peptide library suitable for screening of intracellular functional peptides. Thus, our system, including the diagram, is a promising tool for searching biological active molecules such as peptide-based drugs. PMID:26256261

  6. Effects of the properties of short peptides conjugated with cell-penetrating peptides on their internalization into cells

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Ryo; Okochi, Mina; Shimizu, Kazunori; Kanie, Kei; Kato, Ryuji; Honda, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Peptides, especially intracellular functional peptides that can play a particular role inside a cell, have attracted attention as promising materials to control cell fate. However, hydrophilic materials like peptides are difficult for cells to internalize. Therefore, the screening and design of intracellular functional peptides are more difficult than that of extracellular ones. An effective high-throughput screening system for intracellular functional peptides has not been reported. Here, we demonstrate a novel peptide array system for screening intracellular functional peptides, in which both cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) domain and photo-cleavable linkers are used. By using this screening system, we determined how the cellular uptake properties of CPP-conjugated peptides varied depending on the properties of the conjugated peptides. We found that the internalization ability of CPP-conjugated peptides varied greatly depending on the property of the conjugated peptides, and anionic peptides drastically decreased the uptake ability. We summarized our data in a scatter diagram that plots hydrophobicity versus isoelectric point (pI) of conjugated peptides. These results define a peptide library suitable for screening of intracellular functional peptides. Thus, our system, including the diagram, is a promising tool for searching biological active molecules such as peptide-based drugs. PMID:26256261

  7. pH-responsive PepFect cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Regberg, Jakob; Vasconcelos, Luis; Madani, Fatemeh; Langel, Ülo; Hällbrink, Mattias

    2016-03-30

    A series of cell-penetrating PepFect peptide analogues was developed by substitutions of the galanin-derived N-terminal sequence. Histidine modifications were incorporated in order to make the peptides pH-responsive. The peptides were all able to form non-covalent complexes with an oligonucleotide cargo by co-incubation in buffer. The complexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering and circular dichroism, and an assay to evaluate the peptide-cargo affinity was developed. Cellular bioactivity was studied in HeLa cells using a luciferase-based splice correction assay. In addition, the membrane interactions of the peptides in large unilammelar vesicles was studied using a calcein leakage assay. The effects of substitutions were found to be dependent of the non-modified, C-terminal sequence of the peptides; for analogues of PepFect 3 we observed an increase in membrane activity and bioactivity for histidine-containing analogues, whereas the same modifications introduced to PepFect 14 lead to a decreased bioactivity. Peptides modified with a leucine/histidine sequence were found to be pH responsive, complexes formed from these peptides were small at pH 7 and grew under acidic conditions. The most promising of the novel PepFect 3 analogues, PepFect 132 has a significantly higher bioactivity and membrane activity than the parent peptide PepFect 3. PMID:26821060

  8. Sensing lymphoma cells based on a cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptide probe.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Kazuharu; Shinohara, Hiroki; Kadoya, Toshihiko; Kuramitz, Hideki

    2016-06-14

    To electrochemically sense lymphoma cells (U937), we fabricated a multifunctional peptide probe that consists of cell-penetrating/apoptosis-inducing/electron-transfer peptides. Electron-transfer peptides derive from cysteine residue combined with the C-terminals of four tyrosine residues (Y4). A peptide whereby Y4C is bound to the C-terminals of protegrin 1 (RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH2) is known to be an apoptosis-inducing agent against U937 cells, and is referred to as a peptide-1 probe. An oxidation response of the peptide-1 probe has been observed due to a phenolic hydroxyl group, and this response is decreased by the uptake of the peptide probe into the cells. To improve the cell membrane permeability against U937 cells, the RGGR at the N-terminals of the peptide-1 probe was replaced by RRRR (peptide-2 probe). In contrast, RNRCKGTDVQAWY4C (peptide-3 probe), which recognizes ovalbumin, was constructed as a control. Compared with the other probes, the change in the peak current of the peptide-2 probe was the greatest at low concentrations and occurred in a short amount of time. Therefore, the cell membrane permeability of the peptide-2 probe was increased based on the arginine residues and the apoptosis-inducing peptides. The peak current was linear and ranged from 100 to 1000 cells/ml. The relative standard deviation of 600 cells/ml was 5.0% (n = 5). Furthermore, the membrane permeability of the peptide probes was confirmed using fluorescent dye. PMID:27181650

  9. Rational design of a series of novel amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Regberg, Jakob; Srimanee, Artita; Erlandsson, Mikael; Sillard, Rannar; Dobchev, Dimitar A; Karelson, Mati; Langel, Ulo

    2014-04-10

    A series of novel, amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides was developed based on a combination of the model amphipathic peptide sequence and modifications based on the strategies developed for PepFect and NickFect peptides. The aim was to study the role of amphipathicity for peptide uptake and to investigate if the modifications developed for PepFect peptides could be used to improve the uptake of another class of cell-penetrating peptides. The peptides were synthesized by solid phase peptide synthesis and characterized by circular dichroism spectroscopy. Non-covalent peptide-plasmid complexes were formed by co-incubation of the peptides and plasmids in water solution. The complexes were characterized by dynamic light scattering and cellular uptake of the complexes was studied in a luciferase-based plasmid transfection assay. A quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) model of cellular uptake was developed using descriptors including hydrogen bonding, peptide charge and positions of nitrogen atoms. The peptides were found to be non-toxic and could efficiently transfect cells with plasmid DNA. Cellular uptake data was correlated to QSAR predictions and the predicted biological effects obtained from the model correlated well with experimental data. The QSAR model could improve the understanding of structural requirements for cell penetration, or could potentially be used to predict more efficient cell-penetrating peptides. PMID:24463071

  10. Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted delivery of anti-inflammatory cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartlett, Rush Lloyd, II

    Inflammatory diseases such as osteoarthritis and rheumatoid arthritis cause $127.8 billion in US healthcare expenditures each year and are the cause of disability for 27% of disabled persons in the United States. Current treatment options rarely halt disease progression and often result in significant unwanted and debilitating side effects. Our laboratory has previously developed a family of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) which inhibit the activity of mitogen activated protein kinase activate protein kinase 2 (MK2). MK2 mediates the inflammatory response by activating Tristetraprline (TTP). Once activated, TTP rapidly stabilizes AU rich regions of pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA which allows translation of pro-inflammatory cytokines to occur. Blocking MK2 with our labs CPPs yields a decrease in inflammatory activity but CPPs by are highly non specific and prone to rapid enzymatic degradation in vivo.. In order to increase the potency of MK2 inhibiting CPPs we have developed a novel nanoparticle drug carrier composed of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid). This drug carrier has been shown to have preliminary efficacy in vitro and ex vivo for suppressing pro-inflammatory cytokine production when releasing CPPs. This thesis will present progress made on three aims: Specific Aim 1) Create and validate a NIPAm based drug delivery system that mimics the binding and release previously observed between cell penetrating peptides and glycosaminoglycans. Specific Aim 2) Engineer degradability into poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles to enable more drug to be released and qualify that system in vitro. Specific Aim 3) Validate poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles for targeted drug delivery in an ex vivo inflammatory model. Overall we have developed a novel anionic nanoparticle system that is biocompatible and efficient at loading and releasing cell penetrating peptides to inflamed tissue. Once loaded with a CPP the nanoparticle drug complex is

  11. Cell-penetrating recombinant peptides for potential use in agricultural pest control applications

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes ...

  12. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:26814673

  13. A Cell-Penetrating Peptide with a Guanidinylethyl Amine Structure Directed to Gene Delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Makoto; Kato, Takuma; Furukawa, Kaori; Tanaka, Masakazu

    2016-01-01

    A peptide composed of lysine with a guanidinylethyl (GEt) amine structure in the side chain [Lys(GEt)] was developed as a cell-penetrating peptide directed to plasmid DNA (pDNA) delivery. The GEt amine adopted a diprotonated form at neutral pH, which may have led to the more efficient cellular uptake of a Lys(GEt)-peptide than an arginine-peptide at a low concentration. Lys(GEt)-peptide/pDNA complexes showed the highest transfection efficiency due to efficient endosomal escape without any cytotoxicity. Lys(GEt)-peptide may be a promising candidate as a gene delivery carrier.

  14. Glycosylated cell-penetrating peptides and their conjugates to a proapoptotic peptide: preparation by click chemistry and cell viability studies

    PubMed Central

    Dutot, Laurence; Lécorché, Pascaline; Burlina, Fabienne; Marquant, Rodrigue; Point, Vanessa; Sagan, Sandrine; Chassaing, Gérard; Mallet, Jean-Maurice

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), which are usually short basic peptides, are able to cross cell membranes and convey bioactive cargoes inside cells. CPPs have been widely used to deliver inside cells peptides, proteins, and oligonucleotides; however, their entry mechanisms still remain controversial. A major problem concerning CPPs remains their lack of selectivity to target a specific type of cell and/or an intracellular component. We have previously shown that myristoylation of one of these CPPs affected the intracellular distribution of the cargo. We report here on the synthesis of glycosylated analogs of the cell-penetrating peptide (R6/W3): Ac-RRWWRRWRR-NH2. One, two, or three galactose(s), with or without a spacer, were introduced into the sequence of this nonapeptide via a triazole link, the Huisgen reaction being achieved on a solid support. Four of these glycosylated CPPs were coupled via a disulfide bridge to the proapoptotic KLAK peptide, (KLAKLAKKLAKLAK), which alone does not enter into cells. The effect on cell viability and the uptake efficiency of different glycosylated conjugates were studied on CHO cells and were compared to those of the nonglycosylated conjugates: (R6/W3)S-S-KLAK and penetratinS-S-KLAK. We show that glycosylation significantly increases the cell viability of CHO cells compared to the nonglycosylated conjugates and concomitantly decreases the internalization of the KLAK cargo. These results suggest that glycosylation of CPP may be a key point in targeting specific cells. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s12154-009-0031-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:19899012

  15. An unusual cell penetrating peptide identified using a plasmid display-based functional selection platform

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Shan; Simon, Melissa J.; Hue, Christopher D.; Morrison, Barclay; Banta, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have tremendous potential for use in gene and drug delivery applications. The selection of new CPPs with desired capabilities from randomized peptide libraries is challenging, since the CPP phenotype is a complex selection target. Here we report the discovery of an unusual new CPP from a randomized peptide library using a functional selection system based on plasmid display (PD). After four rounds of screening of a 14-mer peptide library over PC12 cells, several peptides were identified and tested for their ability to deliver the green fluorescent protein (GFP). One peptide (SG3) exhibited a cell penetrating phenotype, however unlike other well-known CPPs such as TAT or Penetratin, the newly identified peptide was not highly cationic. The PD protocol necessitated the addition of a cationic lipid (Lipofectamine2000), and in the presence of this compound, the SG3 peptide significantly outperformed the well-known TAT CPP in the delivery of GFP to PC12 cells and primary astrocytes. When the SG3 peptide was fused to the pro-apoptotic BH3 peptide from the Bak protein, significant cell death was induced in cultured primary astrocytes, indicating relevant, intracellular delivery of a functional cargo. The PD platform is a useful method for identifying functional new CPPs from randomized libraries with unique delivery capabilities. PMID:21291271

  16. Nucleolar localization signals of LIM kinase 2 function as a cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Nahoko; Niwa, Mikio; Hao, Yang; Yoshida, Tetsuhiko

    2010-12-01

    LIM Kinase 2 (LIMK2) is a LIM domain-containing protein kinase which regulates actin polymerization thorough phosphorylation of the actin depolymerizing factor cofilin. It is also known to function as a shuttle between the cytoplasm and nucleus in endothelial cells. A basic amino acid-rich motif in LIMK2 was previously identified to be responsible for this shuttling function, as a nucleolar localization signal (NoLS). Here it is shown that this nucleolar localization signal sequence also has the characteristic function of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). We synthesized LIMK2 NoLS-conjugated peptides and a protein and analyzed their cell-penetrating abilities in various types of cells. The BC-box motif of the Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) protein was used for the peptide. This motif previously has been reported to be involved in the neural differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells and skin-derived precursor cells. Green fluorescence protein (GFP) was used as a large biologically active biomolecule for the protein. The LIMK2 NoLS-conjugated peptides and protein translocated across the cell membranes of fibroblast cells, neural stem cells, and even iPS cells. These results suggest that LIMK2 NoLS acts as a cell-penetrating peptide and its cell-penetrating ability is not restricted by cell type. Moreover, from an in vivo assay using a mouse brain, it was confirmed that NoLS has potential for transporting biomolecules across the blood-brain barrier. PMID:20937035

  17. Effect of poly-glutamate on uptake efficiency and cytotoxicity of cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Shirani, Ali; Mohammadi, Samaneh; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Shahbazi Mojarrad, Javid; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2016-04-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were developed as vehicles for efficient delivery of various molecules. An ideal CPP-peptide should not display any toxicity against cancer cells as well as healthy cells and efficiently enter into the cell. Because of the cationic nature and the intrinsic vector capabilities, these peptides can cause cytotoxicity. One of the possible reasons for toxicity of CPPs is direct translocation and consequently, pore formation on the plasma membrane. In this study it was demonstrated that interaction of poly-glutamate with CPP considerably reduced their cytotoxicity in A549 cell. This strategy could be useful for efficient drug delivery mediated by CPP. PMID:27074859

  18. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S.; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K.; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  19. Topical Delivery of Protein and Peptide Using Novel Cell Penetrating Peptide IMT-P8.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ankur; Nanda, Jagpreet Singh; Samuel, Jesse S; Kumari, Manisha; Priyanka, Priyanka; Bedi, Gursimran; Nath, Samir K; Mittal, Garima; Khatri, Neeraj; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2016-01-01

    Skin, being the largest organ of the body, is an important site for drug administration. However, most of the drugs have poor permeability and thus drug delivery through the skin is very challenging. In this study, we examined the transdermal delivery capability of IMT-P8, a novel cell-penetrating peptide. We generated IMT-P8-GFP and IMT-P8-KLA fusion constructs and evaluated their internalization into mouse skin after topical application. Our results demonstrate that IMT-P8 is capable of transporting green fluorescent protein (GFP) and proapoptotic peptide, KLA into the skin and also in different cell lines. Interestingly, uptake of IMT-P8-GFP was considerably higher than TAT-GFP in HeLa cells. After internalization, IMT-P8-KLA got localized to the mitochondria and caused significant cell death in HeLa cells signifying an intact biological activity. Further in vivo skin penetration experiments revealed that after topical application, IMT-P8 penetrated the stratum corneum, entered into the viable epidermis and accumulated inside the hair follicles. In addition, both IMT-P8-KLA and IMT-P8-GFP internalized into the hair follicles and dermal tissue of the skin following topical application. These results suggested that IMT-P8 could be a potential candidate to be used as a topical delivery vehicle for various cosmetic and skin disease applications. PMID:27189051

  20. Transduction of peptides and proteins into live cells by cell penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Mussbach, Franziska; Franke, Martin; Zoch, Ansgar; Schaefer, Buerk; Reissmann, Siegmund

    2011-12-01

    Internalization of peptides and proteins into live cells is an essential prerequisite for studies on intracellular signal pathways, for treatment of certain microbial diseases and for signal transduction therapy, especially for cancer treatment. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) facilitate the transport of cargo-proteins through the cell membrane into live cells. CPPs which allow formation of non-covalent complexes with the cargo are used primarily in this study due to the relatively easy handling procedure. Efficiency of the protein uptake is estimated qualitatively by fluorescence microscopy and quantitatively by SDS-PAGE. Using the CPP cocktail JBS-Proteoducin, the intracellular concentrations of a secondary antibody and bovine serum albumin can reach the micromolar range. Internalization of antibodies allows mediation of intracellular pathways including knock down of signal transduction. The high specificity and affinity of antibodies makes them potentially more powerful than siRNA. Thus, CPPs represent a significant new possibility to study signal transduction processes in competition or in comparison to the commonly used other techniques. To estimate the highest attainable intracellular concentrations of cargo proteins, the CPPs are tested for cytotoxicity. Cell viability and membrane integrity relative to concentration of CPPs are investigated. Viability as estimated by the reductive activity of mitochondria (MTT-test) is more sensitive to higher concentrations of CPPs versus membrane integrity, as measured by the release of dead cell protease. Distinct differences in uptake efficiency and cytotoxic effects are found using six different CPPs and six different adhesion and suspension cell lines. PMID:21826709

  1. Mechanism of the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 Permeation of Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Florén, Anders; Knoelke, Kristina; Langel, Ülo; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanism of the interaction between the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10) and phospholipid membranes was investigated. Tp10 induces graded release of the contents of phospholipid vesicles. The kinetics of peptide association with vesicles and peptide-induced dye efflux from the vesicle lumen were examined experimentally by stopped-flow fluorescence. The experimental kinetics were analyzed by directly fitting to the data the numerical solution of mathematical kinetic models. A very good global fit was obtained using a model in which tp10 binds to the membrane surface and perturbs it because of the mass imbalance thus created across the bilayer. The perturbed bilayer state allows peptide monomers to insert transiently into its hydrophobic core and cross the membrane, until the peptide mass imbalance is dissipated. In that transient state tp10 “catalyzes” dye efflux from the vesicle lumen. These conclusions are consistent with recent reports that used molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between peptide antimicrobials and phospholipid bilayers. A thermodynamic analysis of tp10 binding and insertion in the bilayer using water-membrane transfer hydrophobicity scales is entirely consistent with the model proposed. A small bilayer perturbation is both necessary and sufficient to achieve very good agreement with the model, indicating that the role of the lipids must be included to understand the mechanism of cell-penetrating and antimicrobial peptides. PMID:17218466

  2. Photodamage of Lipid Bilayers by Irradiation of a Fluorescently Labeled Cell-Penetrating Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Meerovich, Igor; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Johnson, Gregory A.; Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Background Fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptides can translocate into cells by endocytosis and upon light irradiation, lyse the endocytic vesicles. This photo-inducible endosomolytic activity of Fl-CPPs can be used to efficiently deliver macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids and other small organic molecules into the cytosol of live cells. The requirement of a light trigger to induce photolysis provides a more spatial and temporal control to the intracellular delivery process. Methods In this report, we examine the molecular level mechanisms by which cell-penetrating peptides such as TAT when labeled with small organic fluorophore molecules acquire a photo-induced lytic activity using a simplified model of lipid vesicles. Results The peptide TAT labeled with 5(6)-carboxy-tetramethylrhodamine binds to negatively charged phospholipids, thereby bringing the fluorophore in close proximity to the membrane of liposomes. Upon light irradiation, the excited fluorophore produces reactive oxygen species at the lipid bilayer and oxidation of the membrane is achieved. In addition, the fluorescent peptide causes aggregation of photo-oxidized lipids, an activity that requires the presence of arginine residues in the peptide sequence. Conclusions These results suggest that the cell penetrating peptide plays a dual role. On one hand, TAT targets a conjugated fluorophore to membranes. On the other hand, TAT participates directly in the destabilization of photosensitized membranes. Peptide and fluorophore therefore appear to act in synergy to destroy membranes efficiently. General Significance Understanding the mechanism behind Fl-CPP mediated membrane photodamage will help to design optimally photo-endosomolytic compounds. PMID:24135456

  3. Backbone rigidity and static presentation of guanidinium groups increases cellular uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Prinz, Manuel; Hoffmann, Daniel; Behlke, Joachim; Palm-Apergi, Caroline; Morano, Ingo; Herce, Henry D; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2011-01-01

    In addition to endocytosis-mediated cellular uptake, hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptides are able to traverse biological membranes in a non-endocytic mode termed transduction, resulting in immediate bioavailability. Here we analysed structural requirements for the non-endocytic uptake mode of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, by a combination of live-cell microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate that the transduction efficiency of arginine-rich peptides increases with higher peptide structural rigidity. Consequently, cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides showed enhanced cellular uptake kinetics relative to their linear and more flexible counterpart. We propose that guanidinium groups are forced into maximally distant positions by cyclization. This orientation increases membrane contacts leading to enhanced cell penetration. PMID:21878907

  4. Backbone rigidity and static presentation of guanidinium groups increases cellular uptake of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Lättig-Tünnemann, Gisela; Prinz, Manuel; Hoffmann, Daniel; Behlke, Joachim; Palm-Apergi, Caroline; Morano, Ingo; Herce, Henry D.; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2011-01-01

    In addition to endocytosis-mediated cellular uptake, hydrophilic cell-penetrating peptides are able to traverse biological membranes in a non-endocytic mode termed transduction, resulting in immediate bioavailability. Here we analysed structural requirements for the non-endocytic uptake mode of arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides, by a combination of live-cell microscopy, molecular dynamics simulations and analytical ultracentrifugation. We demonstrate that the transduction efficiency of arginine-rich peptides increases with higher peptide structural rigidity. Consequently, cyclic arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides showed enhanced cellular uptake kinetics relative to their linear and more flexible counterpart. We propose that guanidinium groups are forced into maximally distant positions by cyclization. This orientation increases membrane contacts leading to enhanced cell penetration. PMID:21878907

  5. Effect of cell-penetrating peptides on the nasal absorption of insulin.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Morishita, Mariko; Isowa, Koichi; Imai, Jun; Takayama, Kozo

    2009-01-19

    The goal of this study was to evaluate whether cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) affect the nasal absorption of insulin. L- or D-forms of penetratin, or the L- or D-forms of octaarginine (L- or D-R8), was used as first time for nasal insulin delivery. Furthermore, the concentration of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in nasal lavage fluid was determined and a histopathological study of nasal respiratory epithelium was conducted. CPPs dramatically increased nasal insulin absorption, and it was more pronounced for L- and D-penetratin than L- or D-R8. L-penetratin was the most effective promoter of insulin absorption compared with others CPPs. A dose-dependent relationship of L-penetratin and insulin bioavailability was statically significant. The pharmacological availability and bioavailability of nasally administered insulin was up to 76.7% and 50.7% relative to the subcutaneous route, respectively. In contrast, increasing the D-penetratin concentration decreased the efficiency of nasal insulin absorption. There was no significant difference in the release of LDH in nasal lavage fluid and the integrity of nasal respiratory epithelium when L-penetratin was present. In conclusion, these data demonstrate that L-penetratin markedly increased the permeability of insulin across the nasal membrane without causing detectable damage to the integrity of cells in the nasal respiratory mucosa. PMID:18930084

  6. Biodistribution, Stability, and Blood Distribution of the Cell Penetrating Peptide Maurocalcine in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perret, Pascale; Ahmadi, Mitra; Riou, Laurent; Bacot, Sandrine; Pecher, Julien; Poillot, Cathy; Broisat, Alexis; Ghezzi, Catherine; De Waard, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Maurocalcine (MCa) is the first natural cell penetrating peptide to be discovered in animal venom. In addition to the fact that it represents a potent vector for the cell penetration of structurally diverse therapeutic compounds, MCa also displays several distinguishing features that make it a potential peptide of choice for clinical and biotechnological applications. The aim of the present study was to gain new information about the properties of MCa in vivo in order to delineate the future potential applications of this vector. For this purpose, two analogues of this peptide with (Tyr-MCa) and without (Lin-Tyr-MCa) disulfide bridges were synthesized, radiolabeled with 125I, and their in vitro stabilities were first evaluated in mouse blood. The results indicated that 125I-Tyr-MCa was stable in vitro and that the disulfide bridges conferred a competitive advantage for the stability of peptide. Following in vivo injection in mice, 125I-Tyr-MCa targeted peripheral organs with interesting quantitative differences and the main route of peptide elimination was renal. PMID:26610471

  7. A Novel Cell-Penetrating Peptide Derived from Human Eosinophil Cationic Protein

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Shun-lung; Fan, Tan-chi; Fu, Hua-Wen; Chen, Chien-Jung; Hwang, Chi-Shin; Hung, Ta-Jen; Lin, Lih-Yuan; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short peptides which can carry various types of molecules into cells; however, although most CPPs rapidly penetrate cells in vitro, their in vivo tissue-targeting specificities are low. Herein, we describe cell-binding, internalization, and targeting characteristics of a newly identified 10-residue CPP, denoted ECP32–41, derived from the core heparin-binding motif of human eosinophil cationic protein (ECP). Besides traditional emphasis on positively charged residues, the presence of cysteine and tryptophan residues was demonstrated to be essential for internalization. ECP32–41 entered Beas-2B and wild-type CHO-K1 cells, but not CHO cells lacking of cell-surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), indicating that binding of ECP32–41 to cell-surface GAGs was required for internalization. When cells were cultured with GAGs or pre-treated with GAG-digesting enzymes, significant decreases in ECP32–41 internalization were observed, suggesting that cell-surface GAGs, especially heparan sulfate proteoglycans were necessary for ECP32–41 attachment and penetration. Furthermore, treatment with pharmacological agents identified two forms of energy-dependent endocytosis, lipid-raft endocytosis and macropinocytosis, as the major ECP32–41 internalization routes. ECP32–41 was demonstrated to transport various cargoes including fluorescent chemical, fluorescent protein, and peptidomimetic drug into cultured Beas-2B cells in vitro, and targeted broncho-epithelial and intestinal villi tissues in vivo. Hence this CPP has the potential to serve as a novel vehicle for intracellular delivery of biomolecules or medicines, especially for the treatment of pulmonary or gastrointestinal diseases. PMID:23469189

  8. A cell penetrating peptide-integrated and enediyne-energized fusion protein shows potent antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Ru, Qin; Shang, Bo-Yang; Miao, Qing-Fang; Li, Liang; Wu, Shu-Ying; Gao, Rui-Juan; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2012-11-20

    Arginine-rich peptides belong to a subclass of cell penetrating peptides that are taken up by living cells and can be detected freely diffusing inside the cytoplasm and nucleoplasm. This phenomenon has been attributed to either an endocytotic mode of uptake and a subsequent release from vesicles or a direct membrane penetration. Lidamycin is an antitumor antibiotic, which consists of an active enediyne chromophore (AE) and a noncovalently bound apoprotein (LDP). In the present study, a fusion protein (Arg)(9)-LDP composed of cell penetrating peptide (Arg)(9) and LDP was prepared by DNA recombination, and the enediyne-energized fusion protein (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE was prepared by molecular reconstitution. The data in fixed cells demonstrated that (Arg)(9)-LDP could rapidly enter cells, and the results based on fluorescence activated cell sorting indicated that the major route for (Arg)(9)-mediated cellular uptake of protein molecules was endocytosis. (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE demonstrated more potent cytotoxicity against different carcinoma cell lines than lidamycin in vitro. In the mouse hepatoma 22 model, (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE (0.3mg/kg) suppressed the tumor growth by 89.2%, whereas lidamycin (0.05 mg/kg) by 74.6%. Furthermore, in the glioma U87 xenograft model in nude mice, (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE at 0.2mg/kg suppressed tumor growth by 88.8%, compared with that of lidamycin by 62.9% at 0.05 mg/kg. No obvious toxic effects were observed in all groups during treatments. The results showed that energized fusion protein (Arg)(9)-LDP-AE was more effective than lidamycin and would be a promising candidate for glioma therapy. In addition, this approach to manufacturing fusion proteins might serve as a technology platform for the development of new cell penetrating peptides-based drugs. PMID:22982402

  9. Enhancing cellular uptake of activable cell-penetrating peptide-doxorubicin conjugate by enzymatic cleavage.

    PubMed

    Shi, Nian-Qiu; Gao, Wei; Xiang, Bai; Qi, Xian-Rong

    2012-01-01

    The use of activable cell-penetrating peptides (ACPPs) as molecular imaging probes is a promising new approach for the visualization of enzymes. The cell-penetrating function of a polycationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) is efficiently blocked by intramolecular electrostatic interactions with a polyanionic peptide. Proteolysis of a proteinase-sensitive substrate present between the CPP and polyanionic peptide affords dissociation of both domains and enables the activated CPP to enter cells. This ACPP strategy could also be used to modify antitumor agents for tumor-targeting therapy. Here, we aimed to develop a conjugate of ACPP with antitumor drug doxorubicin (DOX) sensitive to matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2/9) for tumor-targeting therapy purposes. The ACPP-DOX conjugate was successfully synthesized. Enzymatic cleavage of ACPP-DOX conjugate by matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2/9 indicated that the activation of ACPP-DOX occurred in an enzyme concentration-dependent manner. Flow cytometry and laser confocal microscope studies revealed that the cellular uptake of ACPP-DOX was enhanced after enzymatic-triggered activation and was higher in HT-1080 cells (overexpressed MMPs) than in MCF-7 cells (under-expressed MMPs). The antiproliferative assay showed that ACPP had little toxicity and that ACPP-DOX effectively inhibited HT-1080 cell proliferation. These experiments revealed that the ACPP-DOX conjugate could be triggered by MMP-2/9, which enabled the activated CPP-DOX to enter cells. ACPP-DOX conjugate may be a potential prodrug delivery system used to carry antitumor drugs for MMP-related tumor therapy. PMID:22619516

  10. Oligonucleotide delivery with cell surface binding and cell penetrating Peptide amphiphile nanospheres.

    PubMed

    Mumcuoglu, Didem; Sardan, Melis; Tekinay, Turgay; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2015-05-01

    A drug delivery system designed specifically for oligonucleotide therapeutics can ameliorate the problems associated with the in vivo delivery of these molecules. The internalization of free oligonucleotides is challenging, and cytotoxicity is the main obstacle for current transfection vehicles. To develop nontoxic delivery vehicles for efficient transfection of oligonucleotides, we designed a self-assembling peptide amphiphile (PA) nanosphere delivery system decorated with cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) containing multiple arginine residues (R4 and R8), and a cell surface binding peptide (KRSR), and report the efficiency of this system in delivering G-3129, a Bcl-2 antisense oligonucleotide (AON). PA/AON (peptide amphiphile/antisense oligonucleotide) complexes were characterized with regards to their size and secondary structure, and their cellular internalization efficiencies were evaluated. The effect of the number of arginine residues on the cellular internalization was investigated by both flow cytometry and confocal imaging, and the results revealed that uptake efficiency improved as the number of arginines in the sequence increased. The combined effect of cell penetration and surface binding property on the cellular internalization and its uptake mechanism was also evaluated by mixing R8-PA and KRSR-PA. R8 and R8/KRSR decorated PAs were found to drastically increase the internalization of AONs compared to nonbioactive PA control. Overall, the KRSR-decorated self-assembled PA nanospheres were demonstrated to be noncytotoxic delivery vectors with high transfection rates and may serve as a promising delivery system for AONs. PMID:25828697

  11. Nonhemolytic Cell-Penetrating Peptides: Site Specific Introduction of Glutamine and Lysine Residues into the α-Helical Peptide Causes Deletion of Its Direct Membrane Disrupting Ability but Retention of Its Cell Penetrating Ability.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seoyeon; Hyun, Soonsil; Lee, Yuri; Lee, Yan; Yu, Jaehoon

    2016-09-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) often have cationic and amphipathic characteristics that are commonly associated with α-helical peptides. These features give CPPs both membrane demolishing and penetrating abilities. To make CPPs safe for biomedical applications, their toxicities resulting from their membrane demolishing abilities must be removed while their cell penetrating abilities must be retained. In this study, we systematically constructed mutants of the amphipathic α-helical model peptide (LKKLLKLLKKLLKLAG, LK peptide). The hydrophobic amino acid leucine in the LK peptide was replaced with hydrophilic amino acids to reduce hemolytic or cell toxicity. Most of the mutants were found to have weakened membrane disrupting abilities, but their cell penetrating abilities were also weakened. However, the L8Q and L8K mutants were found to have low micromolar range cell penetrating ability and almost no membrane disrupting ability. These selected mutants utilize energy-dependent endocytosis mechanisms instead of an energy-independent direct cell penetrating mechanism to enter cells. In addition, the mutants can be used to deliver the anticancer drug methotrexate (MTX) to cells, thereby overcoming resistance to this drug. To determine if the effect of these mutations on the membrane disrupting and cell penetrating abilities is general, Q and K mutations of the natural amphipathic α-helical antimicrobial peptide (AMP), LL37, were introduced. Specific positional Q and K mutants of LL37 were found to have lower hemolytic toxicities and preserved the ability to penetrate eukaryotic cells such as MDA-MB-231 cells. Taken together, observations made in this work suggest that interrupting the global hydrophobicity of amphipathic α-helical CPPs and AMPs, by replacing hydrophobic residues with mildly hydrophilic amino acids such as Q and K, might be an ideal strategy for constructing peptides that have strong cell penetrating abilities and weak cell membrane disrupting

  12. Mechanisms of antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides: from kinetics to thermodynamics†

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Paulo F.; Pokorny, Antje

    2009-01-01

    The mechanisms of six different antimicrobial, cytolytic, and cell-penetrating peptides, including some of their variants, are discussed and compared. The specificity of these polypeptides varies, but they all form amphipathic α-helices when bound to membranes, and there are no striking differences in their sequences. We have examined the thermodynamics and kinetics of their interaction with phospholipid vesicles, namely binding and peptide-induced dye efflux. The thermodynamics of binding calculated using the Wimley-White interfacial hydrophobicity scale are in good agreement with the values derived from experiment. The generally accepted view that binding affinity determines functional specificity is also supported by experiment in model membranes. We now propose the hypothesis that it is the thermodynamics of peptide insertion into the membrane, from a surface-bound state, that determines the mechanism. PMID:19655791

  13. Cell Penetrating Peptide Adsorption on Magnetite and Silica Surfaces: A Computational Investigation.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Gianvito; Deriu, Marco A; Prat, Maria; Rimondini, Lia; Vernè, Enrica; Follenzi, Antonia; Danani, Andrea

    2015-07-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent one of the most promising materials as they can act as a versatile platform in the field of bionanotechnology for enhanced imaging, diagnosis, and treatment of various diseases. Silica is the most common compound for preparing coated iron oxide NPs since it improves colloidal stability and the binding affinity for various organic molecules. Biomolecules such as cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) might be employed to decorate MNPs, combining their promising physicochemical properties with a cell penetrating ability. In this work, a computational investigation on adsorption of Antennapedia homeodomain-derived penetrating peptide (pAntp) on silica and magnetite (MAG) surfaces is presented. By employing umbrella sampling molecular dynamics, we provided a quantitative estimation of the pAntp-surface adsorption free energy to highlight the influence of surface hydroxylation state on the adsorption mechanism. The interaction between peptide and surface has shown to be mainly driven by electrostatics. In case of MAG surface, also an important contribution of van der Waals (VdW) attraction was observed. Our data suggest that a competitive mechanism between MNPs and cell membrane might partially inhibit the CPP to carry out its membrane penetrating function. PMID:26042722

  14. Computer-Aided Virtual Screening and Designing of Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Ankur; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Kumar, Rahul; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven their potential as versatile drug delivery vehicles. Last decade has witnessed an unprecedented growth in CPP-based research, demonstrating the potential of CPPs as therapeutic candidates. In the past, many in silico algorithms have been developed for the prediction and screening of CPPs, which expedites the CPP-based research. In silico screening/prediction of CPPs followed by experimental validation seems to be a reliable, less time-consuming, and cost-effective approach. This chapter describes the prediction, screening, and designing of novel efficient CPPs using "CellPPD," an in silico tool. PMID:26202262

  15. Cell-Penetrating HIV1 TAT Peptides Can Generate Pores in Model Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Ciobanasu, Corina; Siebrasse, Jan Peter; Kubitscheck, Ulrich

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Cell-penetrating peptides like the cationic human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-acting activator of transcription (TAT) peptide have the capability to traverse cell membranes and to deliver large molecular cargoes into the cellular interior. We used optical sectioning and state-of-the-art single-molecule microscopy to examine the passive membrane permeation of fluorescently labeled TAT peptides across the membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs). In GUVs formed by phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol only, no translocation of TAT up to a concentration of 2 μM into the GUVs could be observed. At the same peptide concentration, but with 40 mol % of anionic phosphatidylserine in the membrane, rapid translocation of TAT peptides across the bilayers was detected. Efficient translocation of TAT peptides was observed across GUVs containing 20 mol % of phosphatidylethanolamine, which is known to induce a negative curvature into membranes. We discovered that TAT peptides are not only capable of penetrating membranes directly in a passive manner, but they were also able to form physical pores with sizes in the nanometer range, which could be passed by small dye tracer molecules. Lipid topology and anionic charge of the lipid bilayer are decisive parameters for pore formation. PMID:20655843

  16. Cell-Penetrating Peptide Penetratin as a Potential Tool for Developing Effective Nasal Vaccination Systems.

    PubMed

    Muto, Keiya; Kamei, Noriyasu; Yoshida, Mia; Takayama, Kozo; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-06-01

    Nasal vaccination is considered an attractive strategy to prevent the infection and spread of viruses. However, the vaccine formulations available on the market remain imperfect on account of their limited effectiveness. In the present study, we hypothesized that the nasal coadministration of antigens with cell-penetrating peptides promotes antigen delivery immune response in the nasal mucosa, thereby enhancing the production of mucosal IgA and systemic IgG. The levels of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific IgG and IgA in plasma and nasal perfusate, respectively, increased after 2 or 4 weeks on nasal coadministration of OVA with l- or d-penetratin, suggesting that OVA antigen was effectively delivered by penetratin to the nasal epithelium. An additional study demonstrated that the production of systemic IgG and nasal mucosal IgA against influenza A virus was specifically promoted by nasal coadministration of influenza A virus with d-penetratin. The results of this study suggested that cell-penetrating peptides are a promising tool for the delivery of vaccines to the nasal mucosa and for the subsequent dual stimulation of systemic and mucosal immune responses. PMID:27155764

  17. Cell penetrating peptide delivery of splice directing oligonucleotides as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Betts, Corinne A; Wood, Matthew J A

    2013-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a severe, X-linked muscle wasting disorder caused by the absence of an integral structural protein called dystrophin. This is caused by mutations or deletions in the dystrophin gene which disrupt the reading frame, thereby halting the production of a functional protein. A number of potential therapies have been investigated for the treatment of this disease including utrophin upregulation, 'stop-codon read through' aminoglycosides and adeno-associated virus gene replacement as well as stem cell therapy. However, the most promising treatment to date is the use of antisense oligonucleotides which cause exon skipping by binding to a specific mRNA sequence, skipping the desired exon, thereby restoring the reading frame and producing a truncated yet functional protein. The results from recent 2'OMePS and morpholino clinical trials have renewed hope for Duchenne patients; however in vivo studies in a mouse model, mdx, have revealed low systemic distribution and poor delivery of oligonucleotides to affected tissues such as the brain and heart. However a variety of cell penetrating peptides directly conjugated to antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to enhance delivery in Duchenne model systems with improved systemic distribution and greater efficacy compared to 'naked' antisense oligonucleotides. These cell penetrating peptides, combined with an optimised dose and dosing regimen, as well as thorough toxicity profile have the potential to be developed into a promising treatment which may be progressed to clinical trial. PMID:23140454

  18. Improving the Endosomal Escape of Cell-Penetrating Peptides and Their Cargos: Strategies and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Erazo-Oliveras, Alfredo; Muthukrishnan, Nandhini; Baker, Ryan; Wang, Ting-Yi; Pellois, Jean-Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) can deliver cell-impermeable therapeutic cargos into cells. In particular, CPP-cargo conjugates tend to accumulate inside cells by endocytosis. However, they often remain trapped inside endocytic organelles and fail to reach the cytosolic space of cells efficiently. In this review, the evidence for CPP-mediated endosomal escape is discussed. In addition, several strategies that have been utilized to enhance the endosomal escape of CPP-cargos are described. The recent development of branched systems that display multiple copies of a CPP is presented. The use of viral or synthetic peptides that can disrupt the endosomal membrane upon activation by the low pH of endosomes is also discussed. Finally, we survey how CPPs labeled with chromophores can be used in combination with light to stimulate endosomal lysis. The mechanisms and challenges associated with these intracellular delivery methodologies are discussed. PMID:24223492

  19. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease.

    PubMed

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  20. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Functionized Quantum Dots for Intracellular Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Betty R.; Huang, Yue-Wern; Chiang, Huey-Jenn; Lee, Han-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) are luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals that are widely used as fluorescent probes in biomedical applications, including cellular imaging and tumor tracking. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), also called protein transduction domains (PTDs), are short basic peptides that permeate cell membranes and are able to deliver a variety of macromolecule cargoes, such as DNAs, RNAs, proteins, and nanomaterials. Here we review strategies to couple QDs to CPPs, by either covalent linkages or noncovalent interactions, to provide a tool to study intracellular delivery. This facilitated transport of QDs by CPPs into cells is both simple and efficient. Accordingly, CPP-QD nanoparticles are likely to be of broad utility in biological research and advance the development of medical and pharmaceutical therapeutics. PMID:21121277

  1. Xentry, a new class of cell-penetrating peptide uniquely equipped for delivery of drugs

    PubMed Central

    Montrose, Kristopher; Yang, Yi; Sun, Xueying; Wiles, Siouxsie; Krissansen, Geoffrey W.

    2013-01-01

    Here we describe an entirely new class of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) represented by the short peptide Xentry (LCLRPVG) derived from an N-terminal region of the X-protein of the hepatitis B virus. Xentry permeates adherent cells using syndecan-4 as a portal for entry, and is uniquely restricted from entering syndecan-deficient, non-adherent cells, such as resting blood cells. Intravenous injection of Xentry alone or conjugated to β-galactosidase led to its delivery to most tissues in mice, except circulating blood cells. There was a predilection for uptake by epithelia. Anti-B-raf antibodies and siRNAs linked to Xentry were capable of killing B-raf-dependent melanoma cells. Xentry represents a new class of CPP with properties that are potentially advantageous for life science and therapeutic applications. PMID:23588666

  2. Intracellular Delivery of Proteins with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Therapeutic Uses in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dinca, Ana; Chien, Wei-Ming; Chin, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    Protein therapy exhibits several advantages over small molecule drugs and is increasingly being developed for the treatment of disorders ranging from single enzyme deficiencies to cancer. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), a group of small peptides capable of promoting transport of molecular cargo across the plasma membrane, have become important tools in promoting the cellular uptake of exogenously delivered proteins. Although the molecular mechanisms of uptake are not firmly established, CPPs have been empirically shown to promote uptake of various molecules, including large proteins over 100 kiloDaltons (kDa). Recombinant proteins that include a CPP tag to promote intracellular delivery show promise as therapeutic agents with encouraging success rates in both animal and human trials. This review highlights recent advances in protein-CPP therapy and discusses optimization strategies and potential detrimental effects. PMID:26907261

  3. The cell-type specificity and endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Tang, Liling

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have become a great potential non-invasive carrier candidate for the delivery of various cell-impermeable therapeutic cargoes such as proteins, polypeptides and nucleic acid. However, the lack of tissue specificity and entrapment in the endocytic vesicles is the primary limitation to the application of these peptides in cargo delivery. Emphasis should be placed on developing novel methods to overcome these barriers. In this review, several current strategies to promote tissue specificity and endosomal escape of CPPs will be described, as well as the comparison of different approaches in efficacy and security. Finally, this review will be attributed to new ideas to improve the tissue specificity and cytosolic availability of CPP-cargoes. PMID:25341672

  4. Cell penetrating peptide-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide to improve stability and gene transfection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenyu; Liu, Yajie; Du, Jianwei; Ren, Kefeng; Wang, Youxiang

    2015-04-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid-labile imine bonds (Az-I-Dex). The supramolecular polymer CDR/Az-I-Dex with high a C/A molar ratio (molar ratio of CD on CDR to Az on Az-I-Dex) was unfavorable for DNA condensation. The dextran shell of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes improved the stability under physiological conditions. However, once treated with acetate buffer (pH 5.4) for 3 h, large aggregates formed rapidly due to the cleavage of the dextran shell. As expected, the vector had cell viability of 80% even when the CDR concentration increased to 100 μg mL-1. Moreover, due to the effective cellular uptake efficiency, CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes had 6-300 times higher transfection efficiency than CDR/DNA polyplexes. It was even higher than high molecular weight PLL-based polyplexes of HEK293 T cells. Importantly, chloroquine as an endosomal escape agent could not improve the transfection of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes, which indicated that the CDR/Az-I-Dex supramolecular polymer had its own ability for endosomal escape. These results suggested that the CPP-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide can be promising non-viral gene delivery carriers.Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid

  5. Wasp Mastoparans Follow the Same Mechanism as the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10†

    PubMed Central

    Yandek, Lindsay E.; Pokorny, Antje; Almeida, Paulo F. F.

    2009-01-01

    We have been examining the mechanism and kinetics of the interactions of a selected set of peptides with phospholipid membranes, in a quantitative manner. This set was chosen to cover a broad range of physical-chemical properties and cell specificities. Mastoparan (masL) and mastoparan X (masX) are two similar peptides from the venoms of the wasps Vespula lewisii and Vespa xanthoptera, respectively, and were chosen to complete the set. The rate constants for masX association with, and dissociation from membranes are reported here for the first time. The kinetics of dye efflux induced by both mastoparans from phospholipid vesicles were also examined and quantitatively analyzed. We find that masL and masX follow the same graded kinetic model that we previously proposed for the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (tp10), but with different parameters. This comparison is relevant because tp10 is derived from masL by addition of a mostly nonpolar segment of 7 residues at the N-terminus. Tp10 is more active than the mastoparans toward phosphatidylcholine vesicles, but the mastoparans are more sensitive to the effect of anionic lipids. Furthermore, the Gibbs free energies of binding and insertion of the peptides calculated using the Wimley-White transfer scales are in good agreement with the values derived from our experimental data, and are useful for understanding peptide behavior. PMID:19594111

  6. A Cell-penetrating Peptide Suppresses Inflammation by Inhibiting NF-κB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu Fu; Xu, Xiang; Fan, Xia; Zhang, Chun; Wei, Qiang; Wang, Xi; Guo, Wei; Xing, Wei; Yu, Jian; Yan, Jing-Long; Liang, Hua-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) is a central regulator of immune response and a potential target for developing anti-inflammatory agents. Mechanistic studies suggest that compounds that directly inhibit NF-κB DNA binding may block inflammation and the associated tissue damage. Thus, we attempted to discover peptides that could interfere with NF-κB signaling based on a highly conserved DNA-binding domain found in all NF-κB members. One such small peptide, designated as anti-inflammatory peptide-6 (AIP6), was characterized in the current study. AIP6 directly interacted with p65 and displayed an intrinsic cell-penetrating property. This peptide demonstrated significant anti-inflammatory effects in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, AIP6 inhibited the DNA-binding and transcriptional activities of the p65 NF-κB subunit as well as the production of inflammatory mediators in macrophages upon stimulation. Local administration of AIP6 significantly inhibited inflammation induced by zymosan in mice. Collectively, our results suggest that AIP6 is a promising lead peptide for the development of specific NF-κB inhibitors as potential anti-inflammatory agents. PMID:21556052

  7. Antibacterial Effects of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide Isolated from Kefir.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jianyin; Guo, Haoxian; Chen, Feilong; Zhao, Lichao; He, Liping; Ou, Yangwen; Huang, Manman; Zhang, Yi; Guo, Baoyan; Cao, Yong; Huang, Qingrong

    2016-04-27

    Kefir is a traditional fermented milk beverage used throughout the world for centuries. A cell-penetrating peptide, F3, was isolated from kefir by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration, DEAE-52 ion exchange, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. F3 was determined to be a low molecular weight peptide containing one leucine and one tyrosine with two phosphate radicals. This peptide displayed antimicrobial activity across a broad spectrum of organisms including several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as fungi, with minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 125 to 500 μg/mL. Cellular penetration and accumulation of F3 were determined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. The peptide was able to penetrate the cellular membrane of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. Changes in cell morphology were observed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results indicate that peptide F3 may be a good candidate for use as an effective biological preservative in agriculture and the food industry. PMID:27003578

  8. Cell penetrating peptide-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide to improve stability and gene transfection.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyu; Liu, Yajie; Du, Jianwei; Ren, Kefeng; Wang, Youxiang

    2015-05-14

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) have been widely developed as a strategy to enhance cell penetrating ability and transfection. In this work, octa-arginine modified dextran gene vector with pH-sensitivity was developed via host-guest interactions. α-Cyclodextrin was modified with octa-arginine (CDR), which had excellent cell penetrating ability. Dextran was selected as a backbone and modified with azobenzene as guest units by acid-labile imine bonds (Az-I-Dex). The supramolecular polymer CDR/Az-I-Dex with high a C/A molar ratio (molar ratio of CD on CDR to Az on Az-I-Dex) was unfavorable for DNA condensation. The dextran shell of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes improved the stability under physiological conditions. However, once treated with acetate buffer (pH 5.4) for 3 h, large aggregates formed rapidly due to the cleavage of the dextran shell. As expected, the vector had cell viability of 80% even when the CDR concentration increased to 100 μg mL(-1). Moreover, due to the effective cellular uptake efficiency, CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes had 6-300 times higher transfection efficiency than CDR/DNA polyplexes. It was even higher than high molecular weight PLL-based polyplexes of HEK293 T cells. Importantly, chloroquine as an endosomal escape agent could not improve the transfection of CDR/Az-I-Dex/DNA polyplexes, which indicated that the CDR/Az-I-Dex supramolecular polymer had its own ability for endosomal escape. These results suggested that the CPP-based polyplexes shelled with polysaccharide can be promising non-viral gene delivery carriers. PMID:25893559

  9. Inhibiting bladder tumor growth with a cell penetrating R11 peptide derived from the p53 C-terminus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tingting; Wu, Kaijie; Ding, Chen; Sun, Kangwei; Guan, Zhenfeng; Wang, Xinyang; Hsieh, Jer-Tsong; He, Dalin; Fan, Jinhai

    2015-11-10

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder (UCB) is the most common malignancy of the urinary tract, nearly half of which contains a mutation in TP53 gene. Hence, therapeutic approach by restoring functional p53 protein in cancer cells will be beneficial. Recent studies have demonstrated the inhibition of cancer cell growth by p53 reactivation using a peptide derived from the p53 C-terminus (p53C). However, the outcome of reactivating p53 in controlling bladder cancer development is limited by its efficiency and specificity of peptide delivery, especially in metastatic animal models. Herein, we report that the cell penetrating peptide (polyarginine, R11)-conjugated p53C can exhibit a preferential uptake and growth inhibit of UCB cells expressing either mutant or wild-type TP53 by the activation of p53-dependent pathway. R11-p53C peptide treatment of preclinical orthotopic and metastatic bladder cancer models significantly decreased the tumor burden and increased the lifespan without a significant cytotoxicity. Based on these results, we believe that R11-p53C peptide has therapeutic potential for primary and metastatic bladder cancer, and R11-mediated transduction may be a useful strategy for the therapeutic delivery of large tumor suppressor molecules to tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26462022

  10. Cell-penetrating recombinant peptides for potential use in agricultural pest control applications.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Dowd, Patrick F; Johnson, Eric T

    2012-01-01

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes these peptides attractive candidates for delivery of therapeutic compounds, especially to the interior of cells. Compounds with characteristics similar to CPPs and that, in addition, have antimicrobial properties are being investigated as antibiotics with a reduced risk of causing resistance. These CPP-like membrane-acting antimicrobial peptides (MAMPs) are α-helical amphipathic peptides that interact with and perturb cell membranes to produce their antimicrobial effects. One source of MAMPs is spider venom. Because these compounds are toxic to insects, they also show promise for development as biological agents for control of insecticide-resistant agricultural pests. Spider venom is a potential source of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. One example is the small amphipathic α-helical peptide lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1 or LCTX) from the wolf spider (Lycosa carolinensis). One side of the α-helix has mostly hydrophilic and the other mainly hydrophobic amino acid residues. The positive charge of the hydrophilic side interacts with negatively charged prokaryotic membranes and the hydrophobic side associates with the membrane lipid bilayer to permeabilize it. Because the surface of the exoskeleton, or cuticle, of an insect is highly hydrophobic, to repel water and dirt, it would be expected that amphipathic compounds could permeabilize it. Mutagenized lycotoxin 1 peptides were produced and expressed in yeast cultures that were fed to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larvae to identify the most lethal mutants. Transgenic expression of spider venom toxins such as lycotoxin-1 in plants could provide durable insect resistance. PMID:24281256

  11. Cell-Penetrating Recombinant Peptides for Potential Use in Agricultural Pest Control Applications

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Stephen R.; Dowd, Patrick F.; Johnson, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    Several important areas of interest intersect in a class of peptides characterized by their highly cationic and partly hydrophobic structure. These molecules have been called cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) because they possess the ability to translocate across cell membranes. This ability makes these peptides attractive candidates for delivery of therapeutic compounds, especially to the interior of cells. Compounds with characteristics similar to CPPs and that, in addition, have antimicrobial properties are being investigated as antibiotics with a reduced risk of causing resistance. These CPP-like membrane-acting antimicrobial peptides (MAMPs) are α-helical amphipathic peptides that interact with and perturb cell membranes to produce their antimicrobial effects. One source of MAMPs is spider venom. Because these compounds are toxic to insects, they also show promise for development as biological agents for control of insecticide-resistant agricultural pests. Spider venom is a potential source of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. One example is the small amphipathic α-helical peptide lycotoxin-1 (Lyt-1 or LCTX) from the wolf spider (Lycosa carolinensis). One side of the α-helix has mostly hydrophilic and the other mainly hydrophobic amino acid residues. The positive charge of the hydrophilic side interacts with negatively charged prokaryotic membranes and the hydrophobic side associates with the membrane lipid bilayer to permeabilize it. Because the surface of the exoskeleton, or cuticle, of an insect is highly hydrophobic, to repel water and dirt, it would be expected that amphipathic compounds could permeabilize it. Mutagenized lycotoxin 1 peptides were produced and expressed in yeast cultures that were fed to fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda) larvae to identify the most lethal mutants. Transgenic expression of spider venom toxins such as lycotoxin-1 in plants could provide durable insect resistance. PMID:24281256

  12. CPPsite 2.0: a repository of experimentally validated cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Piyush; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Raghava, Gajendra P. S.; Gautam, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    CPPsite 2.0 (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cppsite/) is an updated version of manually curated database (CPPsite) of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The current version holds around 1850 peptide entries, which is nearly two times than the entries in the previous version. The updated data were curated from research papers and patents published in last three years. It was observed that most of the CPPs discovered/ tested, in last three years, have diverse chemical modifications (e.g. non-natural residues, linkers, lipid moieties, etc.). We have compiled this information on chemical modifications systematically in the updated version of the database. In order to understand the structure-function relationship of these peptides, we predicted tertiary structure of CPPs, possessing both modified and natural residues, using state-of-the-art techniques. CPPsite 2.0 also maintains information about model systems (in vitro/in vivo) used for CPP evaluation and different type of cargoes (e.g. nucleic acid, protein, nanoparticles, etc.) delivered by these peptides. In order to assist a wide range of users, we developed a user-friendly responsive website, with various tools, suitable for smartphone, tablet and desktop users. In conclusion, CPPsite 2.0 provides significant improvements over the previous version in terms of data content. PMID:26586798

  13. Cell-Penetrating Peptide Induces Leaky Fusion of Liposomes Containing Late Endosome-Specific Anionic Lipid

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sung-Tae; Zaitseva, Elena; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Melikov, Kamran

    2010-01-01

    Cationic cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a promising vehicle for the delivery of macromolecular drugs. Although many studies have indicated that CPPs enter cells by endocytosis, the mechanisms by which they cross endosomal membranes remain elusive. On the basis of experiments with liposomes, we propose that CPP escape into the cytosol is based on leaky fusion (i.e., fusion associated with the permeabilization of membranes) of the bis(monoacylglycero)phosphate (BMP)-enriched membranes of late endosomes. In our experiments, prototypic CPP HIV-1 TAT peptide did not interact with liposomes mimicking the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane, but it did induce lipid mixing and membrane leakage as it translocated into liposomes mimicking the lipid composition of late endosome. Both membrane leakage and lipid mixing depended on the BMP content and were promoted at acidic pH, which is characteristic of late endosomes. Substitution of BMP with its structural isomer, phosphatidylglycerol (PG), significantly reduced both leakage of the aqueous probe from liposomes and lipid mixing between liposomes. Although affinity of binding to TAT was similar for BMP and PG, BMP exhibited a higher tendency to support the inverted hexagonal phase than PG. Finally, membrane leakage and peptide translocation were both inhibited by inhibitors of lipid mixing, further substantiating the hypothesis that cationic peptides cross BMP-enriched membranes by inducing leaky fusion between them. PMID:20959093

  14. CPPsite 2.0: a repository of experimentally validated cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Piyush; Bhalla, Sherry; Usmani, Salman Sadullah; Singh, Sandeep; Chaudhary, Kumardeep; Raghava, Gajendra P S; Gautam, Ankur

    2016-01-01

    CPPsite 2.0 (http://crdd.osdd.net/raghava/cppsite/) is an updated version of manually curated database (CPPsite) of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The current version holds around 1850 peptide entries, which is nearly two times than the entries in the previous version. The updated data were curated from research papers and patents published in last three years. It was observed that most of the CPPs discovered/ tested, in last three years, have diverse chemical modifications (e.g. non-natural residues, linkers, lipid moieties, etc.). We have compiled this information on chemical modifications systematically in the updated version of the database. In order to understand the structure-function relationship of these peptides, we predicted tertiary structure of CPPs, possessing both modified and natural residues, using state-of-the-art techniques. CPPsite 2.0 also maintains information about model systems (in vitro/in vivo) used for CPP evaluation and different type of cargoes (e.g. nucleic acid, protein, nanoparticles, etc.) delivered by these peptides. In order to assist a wide range of users, we developed a user-friendly responsive website, with various tools, suitable for smartphone, tablet and desktop users. In conclusion, CPPsite 2.0 provides significant improvements over the previous version in terms of data content. PMID:26586798

  15. Visualization of the Nucleolus in Living Cells with Cell-Penetrating Fluorescent Peptides.

    PubMed

    Martin, Robert M; Herce, Henry D; Ludwig, Anne K; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The nucleolus is the hallmark of nuclear compartmentalization and has been shown to exert multiple roles in cellular metabolism besides its main function as the place of ribosomal RNA synthesis and assembly of ribosomes. The nucleolus plays also a major role in nuclear organization as the largest compartment within the nucleus. The prominent structure of the nucleolus can be detected using contrast light microscopy providing an approximate localization of the nucleolus, but this approach does not allow to determine accurately the three-dimensional structure of the nucleolus in cells and tissues. Immunofluorescence staining with antibodies specific to nucleolar proteins albeit very useful is time consuming, normally antibodies recognize their epitopes only within a small range of species and is applicable only in fixed cells. Here, we present a simple method to selectively and accurately label this ubiquitous subnuclear compartment in living cells of a large range of species using a fluorescently labeled cell-penetrating peptide. PMID:27576711

  16. Interaction of nanoparticles and cell-penetrating peptides with skin for transdermal drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Pinaki; Patlolla, Ram R.; Singh, Mandip

    2011-01-01

    Topical or transdermal drug delivery is challenging because the skin acts as a natural and protective barrier. Therefore, several methods have been examined to increase the permeation of therapeutic molecules into and through the skin. One approach is to use the nanoparticulate delivery system. Starting with liposomes and other vesicular systems, several other types of nanosized drug carriers have been developed such as solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid carriers, polymer-based nanoparticles and magnetic nanoparticles for dermatological applications. This review article discusses how different particulate systems can interact and penetrate into the skin barrier. In this review, the effectiveness of nanoparticles, as well as possible mode of actions of nanoparticles, is presented. In addition to nanoparticles, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated drug delivery into the skin and the possible mechanism of CPP-derived delivery into the skin is discussed. Lastly, the effectiveness and possible mechanism of CPP-modified nanocarriers into the skin are addressed. PMID:21028936

  17. Plasmid DNA delivery by arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides containing unnatural amino acids.

    PubMed

    Kato, Takuma; Yamashita, Hiroko; Misawa, Takashi; Nishida, Koyo; Kurihara, Masaaki; Tanaka, Masakazu; Demizu, Yosuke; Oba, Makoto

    2016-06-15

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been developed as drug, protein, and gene delivery tools. In the present study, arginine (Arg)-rich CPPs containing unnatural amino acids were designed to deliver plasmid DNA (pDNA). The transfection ability of one of the Arg-rich CPPs examined here was more effective than that of the Arg nonapeptide, which is the most frequently used CPP. The transfection efficiencies of Arg-rich CPPs increased with longer post-incubation times and were significantly higher at 48-h and 72-h post-incubation than that of the commercially available transfection reagent TurboFect. These Arg-rich CPPs were complexed with pDNA for a long time in cells and effectively escaped from the late endosomes/lysosomes into the cytoplasm. These results will be helpful for designing novel CPPs for pDNA delivery. PMID:27132868

  18. Cell-Penetrating Peptide as a Means of Directing the Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaitsuka, Taku; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Protein transduction using cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is useful for the delivery of large protein molecules, including some transcription factors. This method is safer than gene transfection methods with a viral vector because there is no risk of genomic integration of the exogenous DNA. Recently, this method was reported as a means for the induction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, directing the differentiation into specific cell types and supporting gene editing/correction. Furthermore, we developed a direct differentiation method to obtain a pancreatic lineage from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells via the protein transduction of three transcription factors, Pdx1, NeuroD, and MafA. Here, we discuss the possibility of using CPPs as a means of directing the differentiation of iPS cells and other stem cell technologies. PMID:26561805

  19. In vivo delivery of morpholino oligos by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Moulton, Hong M

    2013-01-01

    Morpholino oligos (Morpholinos) are widely used tools for knocking down gene expression and are currently in a clinical trial for treatment of Duchene muscular dystrophy. A Morpholino analog has been in a clinical trial as a potential anti-bioterrorism agent for inhibiting replication of deadly Marburg viral infection. The cellular uptake of Morpholinos can been greatly increased by conjugation with cell-penetrating peptides (CPP). The use of the CPP-Morpholino conjugates (PPMOs) in vivo has been broadly demonstrated in viral, bacterial, genetic and other diseases. The following aspects of PPMOs will be discussed in this paper including chemistry, stability, antisense specificity, mechanism of cellular uptake, in vivo efficacy, tissue distribution, pharmacokinetics, toxicity and the human clinical trials. PPMOs are powerful research tools for studying gene function in animals and their properties are being improved as potential human therapeutic agents. PMID:23140456

  20. Macropinocytosis: searching for an endocytic identity and role in the uptake of cell penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Arwyn Tomos

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Macropinocytosis defines a series of events initiated by extensive plasma membrane reorganization or ruffling to form an external macropinocytic structure that is then enclosed and internalized. The process is constitutive in some organisms and cell types but in others it is only pronounced after growth factor stimulation. Internalized macropinosomes share many features with phagosomes and both are distinguished from other forms of pinocytic vesicles by their large size, morphological heterogeneity and lack of coat structures. A paucity of information is available on other distinguishing features for macropinocytosis such as specific marker proteins and drugs that interfere with its mechanism over other endocytic processes. This has hampered efforts to characterize the dynamics of this pathway and to identify regulatory proteins that are expressed in order to allow it to proceed. Upon internalization, macropinosomes acquire regulatory proteins common to other endocytic pathways, suggesting that their identities as unique structures are short-lived. There is however less consensus regarding the overall fate of the macropinosome cargo or its limiting membrane and processes such as fusion, tubulation, recycling and regulated exocytosis have all been implicated in shaping the macropinosome and directing cargo traffic. Macropinocytosis has also been implicated in the internalization of cell penetrating peptides that are of significant interest to researchers aiming to utilize their translocation abilities to deliver therapeutic entities such as genes and proteins into cells. This review focuses on recent findings on the regulation of macropinocytosis, the intracellular fate of the macropinosome and discusses evidence for the role of this pathway as a mechanism of entry for cell penetrating peptides. PMID:17760832

  1. Alternative Mechanisms for the Interaction of the Cell-Penetrating Peptides Penetratin and the TAT Peptide with Lipid Bilayers

    PubMed Central

    Yesylevskyy, Semen; Marrink, Siewert-Jan; Mark, Alan E.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have recently attracted much interest due to their apparent ability to penetrate cell membranes in an energy-independent manner. Here molecular-dynamics simulation techniques were used to study the interaction of two CPPs: penetratin and the TAT peptide with 1,2-Dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) phospolipid bilayers shed light on alternative mechanisms by which these peptides might cross biological membranes. In contrast to previous simulation studies of charged peptides interacting with lipid bilayers, no spontaneous formation of transmembrane pores was observed. Instead, the simulations suggest that the peptides may enter the cell by micropinocytosis, whereby the peptides induce curvature in the membrane, ultimately leading to the formation of small vesicles within the cell that encapsulate the peptides. Specifically, multiple peptides were observed to induce large deformations in the lipid bilayer that persisted throughout the timescale of the simulations (hundreds of nanoseconds). Pore formation could be induced in simulations in which an external potential was used to pull a single penetratin or TAT peptide into the membrane. With the use of umbrella-sampling techniques, the free energy of inserting a single penetratin peptide into a DPPC bilayer was estimated to be ∼75 kJmol−1, which suggests that the spontaneous penetration of single peptides would require a timescale of at least seconds to minutes. This work also illustrates the extent to which the results of such simulations can depend on the initial conditions, the extent of equilibration, the size of the system, and the conditions under which the simulations are performed. The implications of this with respect to the current systems and to simulations of membrane-peptide interactions in general are discussed. PMID:19580742

  2. Cellular Internalization of Quantum Dots Noncovalently Conjugated with Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Betty R.; Li, Jheng-Fong; Lu, Shu-Wan; Lee, Han-Jung; Huang, Yue-Wern; Shannon, Katie B.; Aronstam, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    Protein transduction domains comprised of basic amino acid-rich peptides, can efficiently deliver covalently fused macromolecules into cells. Quantum dots (QDs) are luminescent semiconductor nanocrystals that are finding increasing application in biological imaging. Previous studies showed that protein transduction domains mediate the internalization of covalently attached QDs. In this study, we demonstrate that arginine-rich intracellular delivery peptides (cell-penetrating peptides; CPPs), analogs of naturally-occuring protein transduction domains, deliver noncovalently associated QDs into living cells; CPPs dramatically increase the rate and efficiency of cellular uptake of QD probes. The optimal molecular ratio between arginine-rich CPPs and QD cargoes for cellular internalization is approximately 60:1. Upon entry into cells, the QDs are concentrated in the perinuclear region. There is no cytotoxicity following transport of QDs present at concentrations up to 200 nM. The mechanism for arginine-rich CPP/QD complexes to traverse cell membrane appears to involve a combination of internalization pathways. These results provide insight into the mechanism of arginine-rich CPP delivery of noncovalently attached cargoes, and may provide a powerful tool for imaging in vivo. PMID:21137758

  3. A Heparan Sulfate-Binding Cell Penetrating Peptide for Tumor Targeting and Migration Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Ping-Hsueh; Chang, Pei-Lin; Wang, Wen-Ching; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chang, Margaret Dah-Tsyr

    2015-01-01

    As heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) are known as co-receptors to interact with numerous growth factors and then modulate downstream biological activities, overexpression of HS/HSPG on cell surface acts as an increasingly reliable prognostic factor in tumor progression. Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short-chain peptides developed as functionalized vectors for delivery approaches of impermeable agents. On cell surface negatively charged HS provides the initial attachment of basic CPPs by electrostatic interaction, leading to multiple cellular effects. Here a functional peptide (CPPecp) has been identified from critical HS binding region in hRNase3, a unique RNase family member with in vitro antitumor activity. In this study we analyze a set of HS-binding CPPs derived from natural proteins including CPPecp. In addition to cellular binding and internalization, CPPecp demonstrated multiple functions including strong binding activity to tumor cell surface with higher HS expression, significant inhibitory effects on cancer cell migration, and suppression of angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, different from conventional highly basic CPPs, CPPecp facilitated magnetic nanoparticle to selectively target tumor site in vivo. Therefore, CPPecp could engage its capacity to be developed as biomaterials for diagnostic imaging agent, therapeutic supplement, or functionalized vector for drug delivery. PMID:26064887

  4. Brain delivery of insulin boosted by intranasal coadministration with cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-01-10

    Intranasal administration is considered as an alternative route to enable effective drug delivery to the central nervous system (CNS) by bypassing the blood-brain barrier. Several reports have proved that macromolecules can be transferred directly from the nasal cavity to the brain. However, strategies to enhance the delivery of macromolecules from the nasal cavity to CNS are needed because of their low delivery efficiencies via this route in general. We hypothesized that the delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain parenchyma can be facilitated by increasing the uptake of drugs by the nasal epithelium including supporting and neuronal cells to maximize the potentiality of the intranasal pathway. To test this hypothesis, the CNS-related model peptide insulin was intranasally coadministered with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin to mice. As a result, insulin coadministered with l- or d-penetratin reached the distal regions of the brain from the nasal cavity, including the cerebral cortex, cerebellum, and brain stem. In particular, d-penetratin could intranasally deliver insulin to the brain with a reduced risk of systemic insulin exposure. Thus, the results obtained in this study suggested that CPPs are potential tools for the brain delivery of peptide- and protein-based pharmaceuticals via intranasal administration. PMID:25445695

  5. Glycosaminoglycans are required for translocation of amphipathic cell-penetrating peptides across membranes.

    PubMed

    Pae, Janely; Liivamägi, Laura; Lubenets, Dmitri; Arukuusk, Piret; Langel, Ülo; Pooga, Margus

    2016-08-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are considered as one of the most promising tools to mediate the cellular delivery of various biologically active compounds that are otherwise cell impermeable. CPPs can internalize into cells via two different pathways - endocytosis and direct translocation across the plasma membrane. In both cases, the initial step of internalization requires interactions between CPPs and different plasma membrane components. Despite the extensive research, it is not yet fully understood, which of these cell surface molecules mediate the direct translocation of CPPs across the plasma- and endosomal membrane. In the present study we used giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) as a model membrane system to elucidate the specific molecular mechanisms behind the internalization and the role of cell surface glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in the translocation of four well-known CPPs, classified as cationic (nona-arginine, Tat peptide) and amphipathic (transportan and TP10). We demonstrate here that GAGs facilitate the translocation of amphipathic CPPs, but not the internalization of cationic CPPs; and that the uptake is not mediated by a specific GAG class, but rather the overall amount of these polysaccharides is crucial for the internalization of amphipathic peptides. PMID:27117133

  6. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  7. Applications and Challenges for Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Delivery Vectors for Peptide and Protein Cargos.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mie; Birch, Ditlev; Mørck Nielsen, Hanne

    2016-01-01

    The hydrophilic nature of peptides and proteins renders them impermeable to cell membranes. Thus, in order to successfully deliver peptide and protein-based therapeutics across the plasma membrane or epithelial and endothelial barriers, a permeation enhancing strategy must be employed. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) constitute a promising tool and have shown applications for peptide and protein delivery into cells as well as across various epithelia and the blood-brain barrier (BBB). CPP-mediated delivery of peptides and proteins may be pursued via covalent conjugation of the CPP to the cargo peptide or protein or via physical complexation obtained by simple bulk-mixing of the CPP with its cargo. Both approaches have their pros and cons, and which is the better choice likely relates to the physicochemical properties of the CPP and its cargo as well as the route of administration, the specific barrier and the target cell. Besides the physical barrier, a metabolic barrier must be taken into consideration when applying peptide-based delivery vectors, such as the CPPs, and stability-enhancing strategies are commonly employed to prolong the CPP half-life. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate cell membranes are believed to involve both endocytosis and direct translocation, but are still widely investigated and discussed. The fact that multiple factors influence the mechanisms responsible for cellular CPP internalization and the lack of sensitive methods for detection of the CPP, and in some cases the cargo, further complicates the design and conduction of conclusive mechanistic studies. PMID:26840305

  8. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Delivery of TALEN Proteins via Bioconjugation for Genome Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jia; Gaj, Thomas; Patterson, James T.; Sirk, Shannon J.; Barbas III, Carlos F.

    2014-01-01

    Transcription activator-like (TAL) effector nucleases (TALENs) have enabled the introduction of targeted genetic alterations into a broad range of cell lines and organisms. These customizable nucleases are comprised of programmable sequence-specific DNA-binding modules derived from TAL effector proteins fused to the non-specific FokI cleavage domain. Delivery of these nucleases into cells has proven challenging as the large size and highly repetitive nature of the TAL effector DNA-binding domain precludes their incorporation into many types of viral vectors. Furthermore, viral and non-viral gene delivery methods carry the risk of insertional mutagenesis and have been shown to increase the off-target activity of site-specific nucleases. We previously demonstrated that direct delivery of zinc-finger nuclease proteins enables highly efficient gene knockout in a variety of mammalian cell types with reduced off-target effects. Here we show that conjugation of cell-penetrating poly-Arg peptides to a surface-exposed Cys residue present on each TAL effector repeat imparted cell-penetrating activity to purified TALEN proteins. These modifications are reversible under reducing conditions and enabled TALEN-mediated gene knockout of the human CCR5 and BMPR1A genes at rates comparable to those achieved with transient transfection of TALEN expression vectors. These findings demonstrate that direct protein delivery, facilitated by conjugation of chemical functionalities onto the TALEN protein surface, is a promising alternative to current non-viral and viral-based methods for TALEN delivery into mammalian cells. PMID:24465685

  9. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Min; Guo Youmin . E-mail: mikie0763@126.com; Wu Qifei; Yang Junle; Wang Peng; Wang Sicen; Guo Xiaojuan; Qiang Yongqian; Duan Xiaoyi

    2006-08-18

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate on 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance was 5.7311 {+-} 0.0122 mmol{sup -1} s{sup -1}, higher than that of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (p < 0.05). Fluorescein imaging confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Gadolinium was efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time- or concentration-dependent fashion, resulting in intercellular T1 relaxation enhancement, which was obviously detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability and membrane potential gradient. The research in vitro suggests that the newly constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking mesenchymal stem cells.

  10. Generation of GFP Native Protein for Detection of Its Intracellular Uptake by Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kadkhodayan, S; Sadat, S M; Irani, S; Fotouhi, F; Bolhassani, A

    2016-01-01

    Different types of lipid- and polymer-based vectors have been developed to deliver proteins into cells, but these methods showed relatively poor efficiency. Recently, a group of short, highly basic peptides known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) were used to carry polypeptides and proteins into cells. In this study, expression and purification of GFP protein was performed using the prokaryotic pET expression system. We used two amphipathic CPPs (Pep-1 and CADY-2) as a novel delivery system to transfer the GFP protein into cells. The morphological features of the CPP/GFP complexes were studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Zetasizer, and SDS-PAGE. The efficiency of GFP transfection using Pep-1 and CADY-2 peptides and TurboFect reagent was compared with FITC-antibody protein control delivered by these transfection vehicles in the HEK-293T cell line. SEM data confirmed formation of discrete nanoparticles with a diameter of below 300 nm. Moreover, formation of the complexes was detected using SDS-PAGE as two individual bands, indicating non-covalent interaction. The size and homogeneity of Pep-1/GFP and CADY-2/GFP complexes were dependent on the ratio of peptide/cargo formulations, and responsible for their biological efficiency. The cells transfected by Pep-1/GFP and CADY-2/GFP complexes at a molar ratio of 20 : 1 demonstrated spreading green regions using fluorescent microscopy. Flow cytometry results showed that the transfection efficiency of Pep-based nanoparticles was similar to CADY-based nanoparticles and comparable with TurboFect-protein complexes. These data open an efficient way for future therapeutic purposes. PMID:27516189

  11. Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Carriers for Oral Delivery of Biopharmaceuticals.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Mie; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck

    2016-02-01

    Oral delivery of biopharmaceuticals, for example peptides and proteins, constitutes a great challenge in drug delivery due to their low chemical stability and poor permeation across the intestinal mucosa, to a large extent limiting the mode of administration to injections, which is not favouring patient compliance. Nevertheless, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have shown promising potential as carriers to overcome the epithelium, and this minireview highlights recent knowledge gained within the field of CPP-mediated transepithelial delivery of therapeutic peptides and proteins from the intestine. Two approaches may be pursued: co-administration of the carrier and therapeutic peptide in the form of complexes obtained by simple bulk mixing, or administration of covalent conjugates demanding more advanced production methodologies. These formulation approaches have their pros and cons, and which is to be preferred depends on the physicochemical properties of both the specific CPP and the specific cargo. In addition to the physical epithelial barrier, a metabolic barrier must be overcome in order to obtain CPP-mediated delivery of a cargo drug from the intestine, and a number of strategies have been employed to delay enzymatic degradation of the CPP. The mechanisms by which CPPs translocate across membranes are not fully understood, but possibly involve endocytosis as well as direct translocation, and the CPP-mediated transepithelial delivery of cargo drugs thus likely involves similar mechanisms for the initial membrane interaction and translocation. However, the mechanisms responsible for transcytosis of the cargo drug, if taken up by an endocytic mechanism, or direct translocation across the epithelium are so far not known. PMID:26525297

  12. Cell Penetrating Peptide POD Mediates Delivery of Recombinant Proteins to Retina, Cornea and Skin

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Leslie N.; Cashman, Siobhan M.; Read, Sarah Parker; Kumar-Singh, Rajendra

    2009-01-01

    Recently we described a novel cell penetrating peptide, POD (peptide for ocular delivery) that could deliver small molecules including fluorescent dyes into retinal cells. The objective of the current study was to examine whether biologically relevant macromolecules such as proteins, genetically fused with POD could also be delivered into retinal tissues in vivo. We generated a POD-GFP fusion protein and examined its cell and tissue penetrating properties. We found that endogenously expressed POD-GFP fusion protein localized to the nucleus, suggesting that POD acts as a nuclear localization signal. Adenovirus (Ad) vectors expressing POD-GFP fusion protein were constructed and the recombinant protein was purified from Ad-infected human embryonic retinoblasts (HER). Exogenously supplied POD-GFP fusion protein rapidly transduced A549 and HER cells and colocalized in part with markers of late endosomes, from which it could escape. Following subretinal delivery, POD-GFP localized to the retinal pigment epithelium and the photoreceptor cell bodies. When injected into the vitreous, POD-GFP localized to the ganglion cells and the inner nuclear layer of the retina as well as the lens capsule. Topical application of POD-GFP to ocular surfaces resulted in uptake by the corneal epithelium. POD-GFP also transduced non-ocular tissues, including the epidermis of the skin following topical application. PMID:19733192

  13. Functionalization of gold nanoparticles and CdS quantum dots with cell penetrating peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berry, Catherine C.; de la Fuente, Jesus M.

    2009-02-01

    During the last decade, there has been great deal of interest in the self-assembly fabrication of hybrid materials from inorganic nanoparticles and biomolecules. Nanoparticles are similar in size range to many common biomolecules, thus, nanoparticles appear to be natural companions in hybrid systems. At present, it is straightforward to control and modify properties of nanostructures to better suit their integration with biological systems; for example, controlling their size, modifying their surface layer for enhanced aqueous solubility, biocompatibility, or biorecognition. A particularly desirable target for therapeutic uses is the cell nucleus, because the genetic information is there. We review in this article the synthesis developed by our research group of water-soluble gold nanoparticles and CdS nanocrystals functionalized with a Tat protein-derived peptide sequence by straightforward and economical methodologies. The particles were subsequently tested in vitro with a human fibroblast cell line using optical and transmission electron microscopy to determine the biocompatibility of these nanoparticles and whether the functionalization with the cell penetrating peptide allowed particles to transfer across the cell membrane and locate into the nucleus.

  14. Cell-penetrating peptides: achievements and challenges in application for cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Meong Cheol; Zhang, Jian; Min, Kyoung Ah; Lee, Kyuri; Byun, Youngro; David, Allan E.; He, Huining; Yang, Victor C.

    2014-01-01

    One of the major hurdles to cure cancer lies in the low potency of currently available drugs, which could eventually be solved by using more potent therapeutic macromolecules, such as proteins or genes. However, although these macromolecules possess greater potency inside the cancer cells, the barely permeable cell membrane remains a formidable barrier to exert their efficacy. A widely used strategy is to use cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) to improve their intracellular uptake. Since the discovery of the first CPP, numerous CPPs have been derived from natural or synthesized products. Both in vitro and in vivo studies have demonstrated that those CPPs are highly efficient in transducing cargoes into almost all cell types. Therefore, to date, CPPs have been widely used for intracellular delivery of various cargoes, including peptides, proteins, genes, and even nanoparticles. In addition, recently, based on the successes of CPPs in cellular studies, their applications in vivo have been actively pursued. This review will focus on the advanced applications of CPP-based in vivo delivery of therapeutics (e.g., small molecule drugs, proteins, and genes). In addition, we will highlight certain updated applications of CPPs for intracellular delivery of nanoparticulate drug carriers, as well as several ‘smart’ strategies for tumor targeted delivery of CPP-cargoes. PMID:23852939

  15. Impact of different cell penetrating peptides on the efficacy of antisense therapeutics for targeting intracellular pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Abushahba, Mostafa F. N.; Mohammad, Haroon; Thangamani, Shankar; Hussein, Asmaa A. A.; Seleem, Mohamed N.

    2016-01-01

    There is a pressing need for novel and innovative therapeutic strategies to address infections caused by intracellular pathogens. Peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) present a novel method to target intracellular pathogens due to their unique mechanism of action and their ability to be conjugated to cell penetrating peptides (CPP) to overcome challenging delivery barriers. In this study, we targeted the RNA polymerase α subunit (rpoA) using a PNA that was covalently conjugated to five different CPPs. Changing the conjugated CPP resulted in a pronounced improvement in the antibacterial activity observed against Listeria monocytogenes in vitro, in cell culture, and in a Caenorhabditis elegans (C. elegans) infection model. Additionally, a time-kill assay revealed three conjugated CPPs rapidly kill Listeria within 20 minutes without disrupting the bacterial cell membrane. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of other critical virulence genes (Listeriolysin O, and two phospholipases plcA and plcB) in a concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, PNA-inhibition of bacterial protein synthesis was selective and did not adversely affect mitochondrial protein synthesis. This study provides a foundation for improving and developing PNAs conjugated to CPPs to better target intracellular pathogens. PMID:26860980

  16. Use of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Dendritic Cell-Based Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sangho; Koo, Ja-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short amino acids that have been widely used to deliver macromolecules such as proteins, peptides, DNA, or RNA, to control cellular behavior for therapeutic purposes. CPPs have been used to treat immunological diseases through the delivery of immune modulatory molecules in vivo. Their intracellular delivery efficiency is highly synergistic with the cellular characteristics of the dendritic cells (DCs), which actively uptake foreign antigens. DC-based vaccines are primarily generated by pulsing DCs ex vivo with various immunomodulatory antigens. CPP conjugation to antigens would increase DC uptake as well as antigen processing and presentation on both MHC class II and MHC class I molecules, leading to antigen specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. CPP-antigen based DC vaccination is considered a promising tool for cancer immunotherapy due to the enhanced CTL response. In this review, we discuss the various applications of CPPs in immune modulation and DC vaccination, and highlight the advantages and limitations of the current CPP-based DC vaccination. PMID:26937230

  17. The many futures for cell-penetrating peptides: how soon is now?

    PubMed

    Howl, J; Nicholl, I D; Jones, S

    2007-08-01

    Studies of CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides), sequences that are also commonly designated as protein transduction domains, now extend to a second decade of exciting and far-reaching discoveries. CPPs are proven vehicles for the intracellular delivery of macromolecules that include oligonucleotides, peptides and proteins, low-molecular-mass drugs, nanoparticles and liposomes. The biochemical properties of different classes of CPP, including various sequences derived from the HIV-1 Tat (transactivator of transcription) [e.g. Tat-(48-60), GRKKRRQRRRPPQ], and the homeodomain of the Drosophila homeoprotein Antennapaedia (residues 43-58, commonly named penetratin, RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), also provide novel insights into the fundamental mechanisms of translocation across biological membranes. Thus the efficacy of CPP-mediated cargo delivery continues to provide valuable tools for biomedical research and, as witnessed in 2007, candidate and emerging therapeutics. Thus it is anticipated that the further refinement of CPP technologies will provide drug-delivery vectors, cellular imaging tools, nanoparticulate devices and molecular therapeutics that will have a positive impact on the healthcare arena. The intention of this article is to provide both a succinct overview of current developments and applications of CPP technologies, and to illustrate key developments that the concerted efforts of the many researchers contributing to the Biochemical Society's Focused Meeting in Telford predict for the future. The accompanying papers in this issue of Biochemical Society Transactions provide additional details and appropriate references. Hopefully, the important and eagerly anticipated biomedical and clinical developments within the CPP field will occur sooner rather than later. PMID:17635144

  18. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B.

    PubMed

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  19. Therapeutic Potential of Cell Penetrating Peptides (CPPs) and Cationic Polymers for Chronic Hepatitis B

    PubMed Central

    Ndeboko, Bénédicte; Lemamy, Guy Joseph; Nielsen, Peter. E; Cova, Lucyna

    2015-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection remains a major health problem worldwide. Because current anti-HBV treatments are only virostatic, there is an urgent need for development of alternative antiviral approaches. In this context, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and cationic polymers, such as chitosan (CS), appear of particular interest as nonviral vectors due to their capacity to facilitate cellular delivery of bioactive cargoes including peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) or DNA vaccines. We have investigated the ability of a PNA conjugated to different CPPs to inhibit the replication of duck hepatitis B virus (DHBV), a reference model for human HBV infection. The in vivo administration of PNA-CPP conjugates to neonatal ducklings showed that they reached the liver and inhibited DHBV replication. Interestingly, our results indicated also that a modified CPP (CatLip) alone, in the absence of its PNA cargo, was able to drastically inhibit late stages of DHBV replication. In the mouse model, conjugation of HBV DNA vaccine to modified CS (Man-CS-Phe) improved cellular and humoral responses to plasmid-encoded antigen. Moreover, other systems for gene delivery were investigated including CPP-modified CS and cationic nanoparticles. The results showed that these nonviral vectors considerably increased plasmid DNA uptake and expression. Collectively promising results obtained in preclinical studies suggest the usefulness of these safe delivery systems for the development of novel therapeutics against chronic hepatitis B. PMID:26633356

  20. Mechanism of Cationic Nanoparticles and Cell-Penetrating Peptides Direct Translocate Across Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Cationic Nanoparticles (NPs) and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are known effective intracellular delivery agents. These positively charged particles can bypass traditional endocytosis route to enter the cytosol, which is known as direct translocation. However, mechanism of direct translocation of both NPs and CPPs is not well understood. Using Coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulation, we found that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as well as HIV-1 Tat peptides can translocate across model biological membranes through nanoscale holes under a transmembrane (TM) potential. After the translocation, the TM is strongly weakened and the holes gradually reseal themselves, while the NPs/CPPs roam freely in the ``intracellular region.'' Both size and shape of the NPs/ CPPs are found to be a determine factor of their translocation behaviour, and the relationship between direct translocation and endocytosis is also discussed. The results provided here establish fundamental rules of direct translocation entry of NPs/CPPs, which may guide the rational design of cationic intracellular nanocarriers.

  1. Nanocarriers Conjugated with Cell Penetrating Peptides: New Trojan Horses by Modern Ulysses.

    PubMed

    Zappavigna, Silvia; Misso, Gabriella; Falanga, Annarita; Perillo, Emiliana; Novellino, Ettore; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Grieco, Paolo; Caraglia, Michele; Galdiero, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Nanomedicine has opened the way to the design of more efficient diagnostics and therapeutics. Moreover, recent literature has illustrated the use of short cationic and/or amphipathic peptides, known as cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), for mediating advanced drug delivery. CPPs exploit their ability to enter cells and enhance the uptake of many cargoes ranging from small molecules to proteins. The distinctive properties of nanocarriers (NC) based systems provide unforeseen benefits over pure drugs for biomedical applications and constitute a challenging research field particularly focused on imaging and delivery; nonetheless, several problems have to be overcome to make them a viable option in clinic. The use of CPPs improves significantly their delivery to specific intracellular targets and thus readily contributes to their use both for effective tumor therapy and gene therapy. A key issue is related to their mechanism of uptake, because although classical CPPs enhance NCs' uptake, the entry mechanism involves the endocytic pathway, which means that the delivered material is sequestered within vesicles and only a small amount will escape from this environment and reach the desired target. In this review, we will summarize recent advances in the use of CPP for enhanced delivery of nanocarriers, nucleic acids, and drugs, we will discuss their uptake mechanisms and we will describe novel approaches to improve endosomal escape of internalized nanosystems. PMID:27087493

  2. Efficient Cargo Delivery into Adult Brain Tissue Using Short Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Alvin Kuriakose; Bhattarai, Prabesh; Zhang, Yixin; Brand, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Zebrafish brains can regenerate lost neurons upon neurogenic activity of the radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) that reside at the ventricular region. Understanding the molecular events underlying this ability is of great interest for translational studies of regenerative medicine. Therefore, functional analyses of gene function in RGCs and neurons are essential. Using cerebroventricular microinjection (CVMI), RGCs can be targeted efficiently but the penetration capacity of the injected molecules reduces dramatically in deeper parts of the brain tissue, such as the parenchymal regions that contain the neurons. In this report, we tested the penetration efficiency of five known cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) and identified two– polyR and Trans – that efficiently penetrate the brain tissue without overt toxicity in a dose-dependent manner as determined by TUNEL staining and L-Plastin immunohistochemistry. We also found that polyR peptide can help carry plasmid DNA several cell diameters into the brain tissue after a series of coupling reactions using DBCO-PEG4-maleimide-based Michael’s addition and azide-mediated copper-free click reaction. Combined with the advantages of CVMI, such as rapidness, reproducibility, and ability to be used in adult animals, CPPs improve the applicability of the CVMI technique to deeper parts of the central nervous system tissues. PMID:25894337

  3. Cell penetration and cell-selective drug delivery using α-helix peptides conjugated with gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyejin; Tsutsumi, Hiroshi; Mihara, Hisakazu

    2013-07-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been developed as vectors for molecular delivery into various cells for use in drug delivery, gene therapy and cancer treatment by their property transporting various molecules into cytoplasm. CPPs with high internalization, cell specificity, and low cytotoxicity have been considered to increase the applicability for cell engineering. Gold nanospheres (GNSs) are a useful tool for molecular imaging, because they are non-cytotoxic and have high solubility, ease of synthesis and excellent light scattering property. Here, we investigated the cell penetrability using α-helix peptides of 17-amino acids conjugated to gold nanospheres (P-GNS). Depending on the peptide sequence had the different cell penetrating (CP) activity for three kinds of cell lines. P-GNS showed low cytotoxicity and high selectivity against three cell types, despite just one amino acid difference between the peptide. We studied the cytotoxic activity of an anti-cancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) conjugated to the P-GNS. They showed different cytotoxicity against the three cell lines, depending on the peptide sequence, with a higher efficiency than free DOX at the same concentration. The cytotoxicity by DOX was correlated with the CP activity of the peptides against the three cell lines. These results demonstrated that P-GNS would be a useful tool for the development of a new cell-selective drug delivery system. PMID:23545289

  4. Development of a Cell-penetrating Peptide that Exhibits Responsive Changes in its Secondary Structure in the Cellular Environment.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Kato, Takuma; Oba, Makoto; Misawa, Takashi; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are received a lot of attention as an intracellular delivery tool for hydrophilic molecules such as drugs, proteins, and DNAs. We designed and synthesized nona-arginine analogues 1-5 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro(NH2))3-(Gly)3-NH2 (2), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro(Gu))3-(Gly)3-NH2 (3), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)2-(l-Pro(Gu))2-(l-Arg)4-l-Pro(Gu)-(Gly)3-NH2 (4), and FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)6-(l-Pro(Gu))3-(Gly)3-NH2 (5)] containing l-proline (l-Pro) or cationic proline derivatives (l-Pro(NH2) and l-Pro(Gu)), and investigated their cell-penetrating abilities. Interestingly, only peptide 3 having the side-chain guanidinyl l-Pro(Gu) exhibited a secondary structural change in cellular environment. Specifically, peptide 3 formed a random structure in hydrophilic conditions, whereas it formed a helical structure under amphipathic conditions. Furthermore, during cellular permeability tests, peptide 3 demonstrated greater cell-penetrating activity than other peptides and effectively transported plasmid DNA into HeLa cells. Thus, l-Pro(Gu)-containing peptide 3 may be a useful candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:27609319

  5. Development of a Cell-penetrating Peptide that Exhibits Responsive Changes in its Secondary Structure in the Cellular Environment

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Hiroko; Kato, Takuma; Oba, Makoto; Misawa, Takashi; Hattori, Takayuki; Ohoka, Nobumichi; Tanaka, Masakazu; Naito, Mikihiko; Kurihara, Masaaki; Demizu, Yosuke

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are received a lot of attention as an intracellular delivery tool for hydrophilic molecules such as drugs, proteins, and DNAs. We designed and synthesized nona-arginine analogues 1–5 [FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-Pro)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (1), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProNH2)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (2), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg-l-Arg-l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (3), FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)2-(l-ProGu)2-(l-Arg)4-l-ProGu-(Gly)3-NH2 (4), and FAM-β-Ala-(l-Arg)6-(l-ProGu)3-(Gly)3-NH2 (5)] containing l-proline (l-Pro) or cationic proline derivatives (l-ProNH2 and l-ProGu), and investigated their cell-penetrating abilities. Interestingly, only peptide 3 having the side-chain guanidinyl l-ProGu exhibited a secondary structural change in cellular environment. Specifically, peptide 3 formed a random structure in hydrophilic conditions, whereas it formed a helical structure under amphipathic conditions. Furthermore, during cellular permeability tests, peptide 3 demonstrated greater cell-penetrating activity than other peptides and effectively transported plasmid DNA into HeLa cells. Thus, l-ProGu-containing peptide 3 may be a useful candidate as a gene delivery carrier. PMID:27609319

  6. Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Caveolae-Dependent Activation of Lung Endothelial Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Tarun E; Hu, Hanbo; Patel, Jawaharlal M

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides can be used as therapeutic agents via modulation of selective cell functions. Nitric oxide (NO) generated by vascular endothelial NO synthase (eNOS) plays a critical role in the NO/ cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (cGMP)-mediated pulmonary vascular function. Here we examined whether internalization of a fifteen amino acid (KRFNSISCSSWRRKR) synthetic peptide (P3) enhances the catalytic activity of eNOS via caveolae/eNOS dissociation leading to NO release and increased cGMP production in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (EC). ECs were treated with varying concentrations of P3 and used to monitor internalization, isolation of caveolae-enriched fraction, the catalytic activity of eNOS, NO/cGMP production, and intracellular Ca(2+) release. Confocal images show timedependent internalization of P3 in EC. Treatment of EC with P3, but not scrambled P3, increased the catalytic activity of eNOS in a dose-dependent manner without change in eNOS expression or phosphorylation. Treatment of EC with P3 stimulated intracellular Ca(2+) release, increased the catalytic activity of phospatidylinsositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and resulted in eNOS/caveolae-1 (Cav-1) dissociation leading to translocation of eNOS to intracellular compartment in EC. P3- mediated activation of eNOS was abolished by intracellular Ca(2+) chelator 1,2-bis(2-aminophenooxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'- tertraacetic acid-AM (BAPTA-AM), PI3K inhibition, or by siRNA-mediated Cav-1 suppression. These results demonstrate that exogenous peptide consisting of cationic amino acids can internalize and enhance the catalytic activity of eNOS via modulation of caveolar signaling and intracellular Ca(2+) release in EC. PMID:26655728

  7. Enhancing tumor-specific intracellular delivering efficiency of cell-penetrating peptide by fusion with a peptide targeting to EGFR.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Long The; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Du, Xuan; Wang, Jia-Wei; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun; Dong, Yang; Li, Peng-Fei

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are well known as intracellular delivery vectors. However, unsatisfactory delivery efficiency and poor specificity are challenging barriers to CPP applications at the clinical trial stage. Here, we showed that S3, an EGFR-binding domain derived from vaccinia virus growth factor, when fused to a CPP such as HBD or TAT can substantially enhance its internalization efficiency and tumor selectivity. The uptake of S3-HBD (S3H) recombinant molecule by tumor cells was nearly 80 folds increased compared to HBD alone. By contrast, the uptake of S3H by non-neoplastic cells still remained at a low level. The specific recognition between S3 and its receptor, EGFR, as well as between HBD and heparan sulfate proteoglycans on the cell surface was essential for these improvements, suggesting a syngeneic effect between the two functional domains in conjugation. This syngeneic effect is likely similar to that of the heparin-binding epidermal growth factor, which is highly abundant particularly in metastatic tumors. The process that S3H entered cells was dependent on time, dosage, and energy, via macropinocytosis pathway. With excellent cell-penetrating efficacy and a novel tumor-targeting ability, S3H appears as a promising candidate vector for targeted anti-cancer drug delivery. PMID:25655386

  8. Transferrin and cell-penetrating peptide dual-functioned liposome for targeted drug delivery to glioma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Chuanyi; Ma, Chunyang; Bai, Enqi; Yang, Kun; Xu, Ruxiang

    2015-01-01

    A brain drug delivery system for glioma chemotherapy based on transferrin and cell-penetrating peptide dual-functioned liposome, Tf/TAT-lip, was made and evaluated with doxorubicin (DOX) as a model drug. TAT conjugated liposome (TAT-lip) loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) were prepared by the thin film hydration methods (lip-DOX) and then conjugated with transferrin (Tf) to yield Tf/TAT-lip-DOX which was characterized for their various physicochemical and pharmaceutical properties. Cellular uptakes were explored in both brain capillary endothelial cells (BCECs) of rats and U87 cells. The blood brain barrier model in vitro was established to evaluate the trans-endothelial ability crossing the BBB. The biodistribution of each formulation was further identified. The Tf/TAT-lip-DOX presents the best anti-proliferative activity against U87 cells. The orthotropic glioma model was established for the evaluation of anti-glioma effect. In conclusion, the experimental data in vitro and in vivo indicated that the Tf/TAT-lip was a promising brain drug delivery system due to its high delivery efficiency across the BBB. PMID:25932094

  9. The Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptide and Transferrin on Enhanced Delivery of Drug to Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gitanjali; Lakkadwala, Sushant; Modgil, Amit; Singh, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to brain has led to an entire field of active research devoted to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver drugs to brain. This review focusses on exploring the facets of a novel platform designed for the delivery of drugs to brain. The platform was constructed based on the hypothesis that a combination of receptor-targeting agent, like transferrin protein, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB. The combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle has shown significantly improved (p < 0.05) translocation of small molecules and genes into brain as compared to the vehicle with only receptor-targeting agents. The comprehensive details of the uptake mechanisms and properties of various CPPs are illustrated here. The application of this technology, in conjunction with nanotechnology, can potentially open new horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27231900

  10. Cholesterol prevents interaction of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan with model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Arsov, Zoran; Nemec, Marjana; Schara, Milan; Johansson, Henrik; Langel, Ulo; Zorko, Matjaz

    2008-12-01

    Interaction of the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) cysteine-transportan (Cys-TP) with model lipid membranes was examined by spin-label electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR). Membranes were labeled with lipophilic spin probes and the influence of Cys-TP on membrane structure was studied. The influence of Cys-TP on membrane permeability was monitored by the reduction of a liposome-trapped water-soluble spin probe. Cys-TP caused lipid ordering in membranes prepared from pure dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and in DMPC membranes with moderate cholesterol concentration. In addition, Cys-TP caused a large increase in permeation of DMPC membranes. In contrast, with high cholesterol content, at which model lipid membranes are in the so-called liquid-ordered phase, no effect of Cys-TP was observed, either on the membrane structure or on the membrane permeability. The interaction between Cys-TP and the lipid membrane therefore depends on the lipid phase. This could be of great importance for understanding of the CPP-lipid interaction in laterally heterogeneous membranes, while it implies that the CPP-lipid interaction can be different at different points along the membrane. PMID:18683276

  11. The Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptide and Transferrin on Enhanced Delivery of Drug to Brain.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Gitanjali; Lakkadwala, Sushant; Modgil, Amit; Singh, Jagdish

    2016-01-01

    The challenge of effectively delivering therapeutic agents to brain has led to an entire field of active research devoted to overcome the blood brain barrier (BBB) and efficiently deliver drugs to brain. This review focusses on exploring the facets of a novel platform designed for the delivery of drugs to brain. The platform was constructed based on the hypothesis that a combination of receptor-targeting agent, like transferrin protein, and a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) will enhance the delivery of associated therapeutic cargo across the BBB. The combination of these two agents in a delivery vehicle has shown significantly improved (p < 0.05) translocation of small molecules and genes into brain as compared to the vehicle with only receptor-targeting agents. The comprehensive details of the uptake mechanisms and properties of various CPPs are illustrated here. The application of this technology, in conjunction with nanotechnology, can potentially open new horizons for the treatment of central nervous system disorders. PMID:27231900

  12. Cell Penetrating Peptide Conjugated Chitosan for Enhanced Delivery of Nucleic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Layek, Buddhadev; Lipp, Lindsey; Singh, Jagdish

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy is an emerging therapeutic strategy for the cure or treatment of a spectrum of genetic disorders. Nevertheless, advances in gene therapy are immensely reliant upon design of an efficient gene carrier that can deliver genetic cargoes into the desired cell populations. Among various nonviral gene delivery systems, chitosan-based carriers have gained increasing attention because of their high cationic charge density, excellent biocompatibility, nearly nonexistent cytotoxicity, negligible immune response, and ideal ability to undergo chemical conjugation. However, a major shortcoming of chitosan-based carriers is their poor cellular uptake, leading to inadequate transfection efficiency. The intrinsic feature of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) for transporting diverse cargoes into multiple cell and tissue types in a safe manner suggests that they can be conjugated to chitosan for improving its transfection efficiency. In this review, we briefly discuss CPPs and their classification, and also the major mechanisms contributing to the cellular uptake of CPPs and cargo conjugates. We also discuss immense improvements for the delivery of nucleic acids using CPP-conjugated chitosan-based carriers with special emphasis on plasmid DNA and small interfering RNA. PMID:26690119

  13. Novel Efficient Cell-Penetrating, Peptide-Mediated Strategy for Enhancing Telomerase Inhibitor Oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Alarcón, Andrés; Eriksson, Jonas; Langel, Ülo

    2015-12-01

    At present, there are several therapeutic approaches for targeting telomerase in tumors. One in particular, currently undergoing clinical trials, is based on synthetic lipid-modified oligonucleotide antagonists aimed at inhibiting the ribonucleoprotein subunit of human telomerase. However, while enabling efficient uptake, the lipid modifications reduce the potency of the therapeutic oligonucleotides compared to nonmodified oligonucleotides. Moreover, lipid modification may increase oligonucleotide accumulation in the liver causing undesirable hepatotoxicity. Noncovalent complexation strategies for cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-mediated delivery present an option to circumvent the need for potency-reducing modifications, while allowing for a highly efficient uptake, and could significantly improve the efficiency of telomerase-targeting cancer therapeutics. Delivery of a nonlipidated locked nucleic acid/2'-O-methyl mixmer significantly inhibits the telomerase activity in treated HeLa cells. The inhibitory effect was further improved through addition of a CPP. Furthermore, calculated IC50-values for the oligonucleotide delivered by CPPs into HeLa cells are more than 20 times lower than telomerase inhibitor Imetelstat, currently undergoing clinical trials. These results emphasize the potential of CPP-mediated delivery of future pharmaceuticals and provide means by which to enhance an already promising therapeutic strategy for cancer treatment. PMID:26479411

  14. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Therapeutic Molecule Delivery into the Central Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Li-Li; Ma, Jie-Lan; Wang, Tao; Yang, Tang-Bin; Liu, Chang-Bai

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB), a dynamic and complex barrier formed by endothelial cells, can impede the entry of unwanted substances – pathogens and therapeutic molecules alike – into the central nervous system (CNS) from the blood circulation. Taking into account the fact that CNS-related diseases are the largest and fastest growing unmet medical concern, many potential protein- and nucleic acid-based medicines have been developed for therapeutic purposes. However, due to their poor ability to cross the BBB and the plasma membrane, the above-mentioned bio-macromolecules have limited use in treating neurological diseases. Finding effective, safe, and convenient ways to deliver therapeutic molecules into the CNS is thus urgently required. In recent decades, much effort has been expended in the development of drug delivery technologies, of which cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have the most promising potential. The present review covers the latest advances in CPP delivery technology, and provides an update on their use in CNS-targeted drug delivery. PMID:23997754

  15. The molecular mechanism of photochemical internalization of cell penetrating peptide-cargo-photosensitizer conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Miki, Shunya; Kobayashi, Shouhei; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Nakata, Eiji; Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Sumita, Kensuke; Watanabe, Kazunori; Okazaki, Shigetoshi

    2015-01-01

    In many drug delivery strategies, an inefficient transfer of macromolecules such as proteins and nucleic acids to the cytosol often occurs because of their endosomal entrapment. One of the methods to overcome this problem is photochemical internalization, which is achieved using a photosensitizer and light to facilitate the endosomal escape of the macromolecule. In this study, we examined the molecular mechanism of photochemical internalization of cell penetrating peptide-cargo (macromolecule)-photosensitizer conjugates. We measured the photophysical properties of eight dyes (photosensitizer candidates) and determined the respective endosomal escape efficiencies using these dyes. Correlation plots between these factors indicated that the photogenerated 1O2 molecules from photosensitizers were highly related to the endosomal escape efficiencies. The contribution of 1O2 was confirmed using 1O2 quenchers. In addition, time-lapse fluorescence imaging showed that the photoinduced endosomal escape occurred at a few seconds to a few minutes after irradiation (much longer than 1O2 lifetime), and that the pH increased in the endosome prior to the endosomal escape of the macromolecule. PMID:26686907

  16. Concatemerization increases the inhibitory activity of short, cell-penetrating, cationic and tryptophan-rich antifungal peptides.

    PubMed

    López-García, Belén; Harries, Eleonora; Carmona, Lourdes; Campos-Soriano, Lidia; López, José Javier; Manzanares, Paloma; Gandía, Mónica; Coca, María; Marcos, Jose F

    2015-10-01

    There are short cationic and tryptophan-rich antifungal peptides such as the hexapeptide PAF26 (RKKWFW) that have selective toxicity and cell penetration properties against fungal cells. This study demonstrates that concatemeric peptides with tandem repeats of the heptapeptide PAF54 (which is an elongated PAF26 sequence) show increased fungistatic and bacteriostatic activities while maintaining the absence of hemolytic activity of the monomer. The increase in antimicrobial activity of the double-repeated PAF sequences (diPAFs), compared to the nonrepeated PAF, was higher (4-8-fold) than that seen for the triple-repeated sequences (triPAFs) versus the diPAFs (2-fold). However, concatemerization diminished the fungicidal activity against quiescent spores of the filamentous fungus Penicillium digitatum. Peptide solubility and sensitivity to proteolytic degradation were affected by the design of the concatemers: incorporation of the AGPA sequence hinge to separate PAF54 repeats increased solubility while the C-terminal addition of the KDEL sequence decreased in vitro stability. These results led to the design of the triPAF sequence PAF102 of 30 amino acid residues, with increased antimicrobial activity and minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1-5 μM depending on the fungus. Further characterization of the mode-of-action of PAF102 demonstrated that it colocalizes first with the fungal cell wall, it is thereafter internalized in an energy dependent manner into hyphal cells of the filamentous fungus Fusarium proliferatum, and finally kills hyphal cells intracellularly. Therefore, PAF102 showed mechanistic properties against fungi similar to the parental PAF26. These observations are of high interest in the future development of PAF-based antimicrobial molecules optimized for their production in biofactories. PMID:25846331

  17. Activation of Cell-Penetrating Peptides with Ionpair-π Interactions and Fluorophiles.

    PubMed

    Chuard, Nicolas; Fujisawa, Kaori; Morelli, Paola; Saarbach, Jacques; Winssinger, Nicolas; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Resnati, Giuseppe; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-09-01

    In this report, we elaborate on two new concepts to activate arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). Early on, we have argued that repulsion-driven ion-pairing interactions with anionic lipids account for their ability to move across hydrophobic cell membranes and that hydrophobic anions such as pyrenebutyrate can accelerate this process to kinetically outcompete endosomal capture. The original explanation that the high activity of pyrenebutyrate might originate from ionpair-π interactions between CPP and activator implied that replacement of the π-basic pyrene with polarized push-pull aromatics should afford more powerful CPP activators. To elaborate on this hypothesis, we prepared a small collection of anionic amphiphiles that could recognize cations by ionpair-π interactions. Consistent with theoretical predictions, we find that parallel but not antiparallel ionpair-π interactions afford operational CPP activators in model membranes and cells. The alternative suggestion that the high activity of pyrenebutyrate might originate from self-assembly in membranes was explored with perfluorinated fatty acids. Their fluorophilicity was expected to promote self-assembly in membranes, while their high acidity should prevent charge neutralization in response to self-assembly, i.e., generate repulsion-driven ion-pairing interactions. Consistent with these expectations, we find that perfluorinated fatty acids are powerful CPP activators in HeLa cells but not in model membranes. These findings support parallel ionpair-π interactions and repulsion-driven ion pairing with self-assembled fluorophiles as innovative concepts to activate CPPs. These results also add much corroborative support for counterion-mediated uptake as the productive mode of action of arginine-rich CPPs. PMID:27568814

  18. Free Energy of Translocating an Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide across a Lipid Bilayer Suggests Pore Formation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E.

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism and energetics of the translocation of arginine-rich, cell-penetrating peptides through membranes are still under debate. One possible mechanism involves the formation of a water pore in the membrane such that the hydrophilic residues of the peptide are solvated throughout the translocating process. In this work, employing two different order parameters, we calculate the free energies of translocating a cyclic Arg9 peptide into a lipid bilayer along one path that involves a water-pore formation and another path that does not form a separate pore. The free-energy barrier of translocating the peptide along a pore path is 80 kJ/mol lower than along a pore-free path. This suggests that the peptide translocation is more likely associated with a water-pore formation. PMID:23442863

  19. Cell-Penetrating Peptide-Modified Gold Nanoparticles for the Delivery of Doxorubicin to Brain Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Morshed, Ramin A; Muroski, Megan E; Dai, Qing; Wegscheid, Michelle L; Auffinger, Brenda; Yu, Dou; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Cheng, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2016-06-01

    As therapies continue to increase the lifespan of patients with breast cancer, the incidence of brain metastases has steadily increased, affecting a significant number of patients with metastatic disease. However, a major barrier toward treating these lesions is the inability of therapeutics to penetrate into the central nervous system and accumulate within intracranial tumor sites. In this study, we designed a cell-penetrating gold nanoparticle platform to increase drug delivery to brain metastatic breast cancer cells. TAT peptide-modified gold nanoparticles carrying doxorubicin led to improved cytotoxicity toward two brain metastatic breast cancer cell lines with a decrease in the IC50 of at least 80% compared to free drug. Intravenous administration of these particles led to extensive accumulation of particles throughout diffuse intracranial metastatic microsatellites with cleaved caspase-3 activity corresponding to tumor foci. Furthermore, intratumoral administration of these particles improved survival in an intracranial MDA-MB-231-Br xenograft mouse model. Our results demonstrate the promising application of gold nanoparticles for improving drug delivery in the context of brain metastatic breast cancer. PMID:27169484

  20. PepFect15, a novel endosomolytic cell-penetrating peptide for oligonucleotide delivery via scavenger receptors.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Staffan; Muñoz-Alarcón, Andrés; Helmfors, Henrik; Mosqueira, Diogo; Gyllborg, Daniel; Tudoran, Oana; Langel, Ulo

    2013-01-30

    Gene-regulatory biomolecules such as splice-correcting oligonucleotides and anti-microRNA oligonucleotides are important tools in the struggle to understand and treat genetic disorders caused by defective gene expression or aberrant splicing. However, oligonucleotides generally suffer from low bioavailability, hence requiring efficient and non-toxic delivery vectors to reach their targets. Cell-penetrating peptides constitute a promising category of carrier molecules for intracellular delivery of bioactive cargo. In this study we present a novel cell-penetrating peptide, PepFect15, comprising the previously reported PepFect14 peptide modified with endosomolytic trifluoromethylquinoline moieties to facilitate endosomal escape. Pepfect15 efficiently delivers both splice-correcting oligonucleotides and anti-microRNA oligonucleotides into cells through a non-covalent complexation strategy. To our knowledge this is the first work that describes peptide-mediated anti-microRNA delivery. The peptide and its cargo form stable, negatively charged nanoparticles that are taken up by cells largely through scavenger receptor type A mediated endocytosis. PMID:23200958

  1. Effects of Lipid Composition on the Entry of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Oligoarginine into Single Vesicles.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Sabrina; Islam, Md Zahidul; Karal, Mohammad Abu Sayem; Alam Shibly, Sayed Ul; Dohra, Hideo; Yamazaki, Masahito

    2016-08-01

    The cell-penetrating peptide R9, an oligoarginine comprising nine arginines, has been used to transport biological cargos into cells. However, the mechanisms underlying its translocation across membranes remain unclear. In this report, we investigated the entry of carboxyfluorescein (CF)-labeled R9 (CF-R9) into single giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) of various lipid compositions and the CF-R9-induced leakage of a fluorescent probe, Alexa Fluor 647 hydrazide (AF647), using a method developed recently by us. First, we investigated the interaction of CF-R9 with dioleoylphosphatidylglycerol (DOPG)/dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) GUVs containing AF647 and small DOPG/DOPC vesicles. The fluorescence intensity of the GUV membrane due to CF-R9 (i.e., the rim intensity) increased with time to a steady-state value, and then the fluorescence intensity of the membranes of the small vesicles in the GUV lumen increased without leakage of AF647. This result indicates that CF-R9 entered the GUV lumen from the outside by translocating across the lipid membrane without forming pores through which AF647 could leak. The fraction of entry of CF-R9 at 6 min in the absence of pore formation, Pentry (6 min), increased with an increase in CF-R9 concentration, but the CF-R9 concentration in the lumen was low. We obtained similar results for dilauroyl-PG (DLPG)/ditridecanoyl-PC (DTPC) (2/8) GUVs. The values of Pentry (6 min) of CF-R9 for DLPG/DTPC (2/8) GUVs were larger than those obtained with DOPG/DOPC (2/8) GUVs at the same CF-R9 concentrations. In contrast, a high concentration of CF-R9 induced pores in DLPG/DTPC (4/6) GUVs through which CF-R9 entered the GUV lumen, so the CF-R9 concentration in the lumen was higher. However, CF-R9 could not enter DOPG/DOPC/cholesterol (2/6/4) GUVs. Analysis of the rim intensity showed that CF-R9 was located only in the outer monolayer of the DOPG/DOPC/cholesterol (2/6/4) GUVs. On the basis of analyses of these results, we discuss the elementary

  2. Cyclization of a cell-penetrating peptide via click-chemistry increases proteolytic resistance and improves drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Reichart, Florian; Horn, Mareike; Neundorf, Ines

    2016-06-01

    In this work we report synthesis and biological evaluation of a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), that is partly cyclized via a triazole bridge. Recently, beneficious properties have been reported for cyclized peptides concerning their metabolic stability and intracellular uptake. A CPP based on human calcitonin was used in this study, and side chain cyclization was achieved via copper catalyzed alkyne-azide click reaction. Cell viability studies in several cell-lines revealed no cytotoxic effects. Furthermore, efficient uptake in breast cancer MCF-7 cells could be determined. Moreover, preliminary studies using this novel peptide as drug transporter for daunorubicin were performed. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27197760

  3. Stearylated antimicrobial peptide [D]-K6L9 with cell penetrating property for efficient gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Song, Jingjing; Liang, Ranran; Zheng, Xin; Chen, Jianbo; Li, Guolin; Zhang, Bangzhi; Wang, Kairong; Yan, Xiang; Wang, Rui

    2013-08-01

    Stearyl-cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been proved to be efficient nonviral gene vectors. Due to the similarities between antimicrobial peptides and CPPs, we constructed a novel type of gene vectors by introducing stearyl moiety to the N-terminus of antimicrobial peptide [D]-K6L9. In this study, stearyl-[D]-K6L9 delivered plasmids into cells by clathrin- and caveolin-mediated endocytosis. Gratifyingly, stearyl-[D]-K6L9 exhibited high transfection efficiency and almost reached the level of Lipofectamine 2000. Taken together, the combination of the stearyl moiety with [D]-K6L9 provides a novel framework for the development of excellent nonviral gene vectors. PMID:23727033

  4. Effect of crotamine, a cell-penetrating peptide, on blastocyst production and gene expression of in vitro fertilized bovine embryos.

    PubMed

    Campelo, Iana S; Pereira, Alexsandra F; Alcântara-Neto, Agostinho S; Canel, Natalia G; Souza-Fabjan, Joanna M G; Teixeira, Dárcio I A; Camargo, Luiz S A; Melo, Luciana M; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Salamone, Daniel F; Freitas, Vicente J F

    2016-02-01

    The present study investigated the effects of crotamine, a cell-penetrating peptide from rattlesnake venom, at different exposure times and concentrations, on both developmental competence and gene expression (ATP1A1, AQP3, GLUT1 and GLUT3) of in vitro fertilized (IVF) bovine embryos. In Experiment 1, presumptive zygotes were exposed to 0.1 μM crotamine for 6, 12 or 24 h and control groups (vehicle and IVF) were included. In Experiment 2, presumptive zygotes were exposed to 0 (vehicle), 0.1, 1 and 10 μM crotamine for 24 h. Additionally, to visualize crotamine uptake, embryos were exposed to rhodamine B-labelled crotamine and subjected to confocal microscopy. In Experiment 1, no difference (P > 0.05) was observed among different exposure times and control groups for cleavage and blastocyst rates and total cells number per blastocyst. Within each exposure time, mRNA levels were similar (P > 0.05) in embryos cultured with or without crotamine. In Experiment 2, concentrations as high as 10 μM crotamine did not affect (P > 0.05) the blastocyst rate. Crotamine at 0.1 and 10 μM did not alter mRNA levels when compared with the control (P > 0.05). Remarkably, only 1 μM crotamine decreased both ATP1A1 and AQP3 expression levels relative to the control group (P < 0.05). Also, it was possible to visualize the intracellular localization of crotamine. These results indicate that crotamine can translocate intact IVF bovine embryos and its application in the culture medium is possible at concentrations from 0.1-10 μM for 6-24 h. PMID:25532535

  5. Effect of arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides on membrane pore formation and life-times: a molecular simulation study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Delin; Forsman, Jan; Lund, Mikael; Woodward, Clifford E

    2014-10-14

    The molecular basis for the effectiveness of arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides (ARCPPs) traversing a cell membrane barrier is not well established. The fact that a threshold concentration of ARCPPs is required for efficient translocation in model membranes suggests cooperative action by ARCPPs. We used umbrella sampling simulations to calculate the free energies for membrane pore formation. Membrane-bound octaarginine (ARG8) peptides showed little cooperativity in lowering the free energy barrier to generate membrane pores by direct peptide translocation or by lipid flip-flop. Instead, high concentrations of ARG8 peptides were found to expand the surface area of the lipid bilayer due to the deep partitioning of guanidinium ions into the lipid glycerol regions. Surface-bound ARG8 peptides can also insert an arginine side chain into one existing transient membrane pore, and the lifetime of the transient membrane pore is significantly extended by arginine. This suggests a cooperative kinetic mechanism may act above a threshold adsorption concentration to facilitate the rapid uptake of these peptides. PMID:25166723

  6. Full membrane spanning self-assembled monolayers as model systems for UHV-based studies of cell-penetrating peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, Johannes; Graham, Daniel J.; Baio, Joe E.; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Müllen, Klaus; Castner, David G.; Weidner, Tobias

    2015-03-01

    Biophysical studies of the interaction of peptides with model membranes provide a simple yet effective approach to understand the transport of peptides and peptide based drug carriers across the cell membrane. Therein, the authors discuss the use of self-assembled monolayers fabricated from the full membrane-spanning thiol (FMST) 3-((14-((4'-((5-methyl-1-phenyl-35-(phytanyl)oxy-6,9,12,15,18,21,24,27,30,33,37-undecaoxa-2,3-dithiahenpentacontan-51-yl)oxy)-[1,1'-biphenyl]-4-yl)oxy)tetradecyl)oxy)-2-(phytanyl)oxy glycerol for ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) based experiments. UHV-based methods such as electron spectroscopy and mass spectrometry can provide important information about how peptides bind and interact with membranes, especially with the hydrophobic core of a lipid bilayer. Moreover, near-edge x-ray absorption fine structure spectra and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) data showed that FMST forms UHV-stable and ordered films on gold. XPS and time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry depth profiles indicated that a proline-rich amphipathic cell-penetrating peptide, known as sweet arrow peptide is located at the outer perimeter of the model membrane.

  7. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-11-01

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes.Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of

  8. Syndecan-4 Is a Receptor for Clathrin-Mediated Endocytosis of Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptides.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Yoshimasa; Takeuchi, Toshihide; Kuwata, Keiko; Chiba, Junya; Hatanaka, Yasumaru; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh

    2016-04-20

    Arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) such as Tat and oligoarginine peptides have been widely used as carriers for intracellular delivery of bioactive molecules. Despite accumulating evidence for involvement of endocytosis in the cellular uptake of arginine-rich CPPs, the primary cell-surface receptors for these peptide carriers that would initiate endocytic processes leading to intracellular delivery of bioactive cargoes have remained poorly understood. Our previous attempt to identify membrane receptors for octa-arginine (R8) peptide, one of the representative arginine-rich CPPs, using the photo-cross-linking probe bearing a photoreactive diazirine was not successful due to considerable amounts of cellular proteins nonspecifically bound to the affinity beads. To address this issue, here we developed a photo-cross-linking probe in which a cleavable linker of a diazobenzene moiety was employed to allow selective elution of cross-linked proteins by reducing agent-mediated cleavage. We demonstrated that introduction of the diazobenzene moiety into the photoaffinity probe enables efficient purification of cross-linked proteins with significant reduction of nonspecific binding proteins, leading to successful identification of 17 membrane-associated proteins that would interact with R8 peptide. RNAi-mediated knockdown experiments in combination with the pharmacological inhibitors revealed that, among the proteins identified, syndecan-4, one of the heparan sulfate proteoglycans, is an endogenous membrane-associated receptor for the cellular uptake of R8 peptide via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. This syndecan-4-dependent pathway was also involved in the intracellular delivery of bioactive proteins mediated by R8 peptide. These results reveal that syndecan-4 is a primary cell-surface target for R8 peptide that allows intracellular delivery of bioactive cargo molecules via clathrin-mediated endocytosis. PMID:27019270

  9. Functionalization with C-terminal cysteine enhances transfection efficiency of cell-penetrating peptides through dimer formation

    SciTech Connect

    Amand, Helene L.

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversible CPP dimerisation is a simple yet efficient strategy to improve delivery. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Dimer formation enhances peptiplex stability, resulting in increased transfection. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By dimerisation, the CPP EB1 even gain endosomal escape properties while lowering cytotoxicity. -- Abstract: Cell-penetrating peptides have the ability to stimulate uptake of macromolecular cargo in mammalian cells in a non-toxic manner and therefore hold promise as efficient and well tolerated gene delivery vectors. Non-covalent peptide-DNA complexes ('peptiplexes') enter cells via endocytosis, but poor peptiplex stability and endosomal entrapment are considered as main barriers to peptide-mediated delivery. We explore a simple, yet highly efficient, strategy to improve the function of peptide-based vectors, by adding one terminal cysteine residue. This allows the peptide to dimerize by disulfide bond formation, increasing its affinity for nucleic acids by the 'chelate effect' and, when the bond is reduced intracellularly, letting the complex dissociate to deliver the nucleic acid. By introducing a single C-terminal cysteine in the classical CPP penetratin and the penetratin analogs PenArg and EB1, we show that this minor modification greatly enhances the transfection capacity for plasmid DNA in HEK293T cells. We conclude that this effect is mainly due to enhanced thermodynamic stability of the peptiplexes as endosome-disruptive chloroquine is still required for transfection and the effect is more pronounced for peptides with lower inherent DNA condensation capacity. Interestingly, for EB1, addition of one cysteine makes the peptide able to mediate transfection in absence of chloroquine, indicating that dimerisation can also improve endosomal escape properties. Further, the cytotoxicity of EB1 peptiplexes is considerably reduced, possibly due to lower concentration of free peptide dimer resulting from

  10. State of the Art in the Studies on Crotamine, a Cell Penetrating Peptide from South American Rattlesnake

    PubMed Central

    Kerkis, Irina; Hayashi, Mirian A. F.; Prieto da Silva, Alvaro R. B.; Pereira, Alexandre; De Sá Júnior, Paulo Luiz; Zaharenko, Andre J.; Rádis-Baptista, Gandhi; Kerkis, Alexandre; Yamane, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    Animal venoms comprise a naturally selected cocktail of bioactive peptides/proteins and other molecules, each of which playing a defined role thanks to the highly specific interactions with diverse molecular targets found in the prey. Research focused on isolation, structural, and functional characterizations of novel natural biologics (bioactive peptides/proteins from natural sources) has a long way to go through from the basic science to clinical applications. Herein, we overview the structural and functional characteristics of the myoneurotoxin crotamine, firstly isolated from the South American rattlesnake venom. Crotamine is the first venom peptide classified as a natural cell penetrating and antimicrobial peptide (CPP and AMP) with a more pronounced antifungal activity. In contrast to other known natural CPPs and AMPs, crotamine demonstrates a wide spectrum of biological activities with potential biotechnological and therapeutic values. More recent studies have demonstrated the selective in vitro anticancer activity of crotamine. In vivo, using a murine melanoma model, it was shown that crotamine delays tumor implantation, inhibits tumor cells proliferation, and also increases the survival of mice engrafted with subcutaneous melanoma. The structural and functional properties and also the possible biotechnological applications of minimized molecules derived from crotamine are also discussed. PMID:24551848

  11. Neuropilin-1 and heparan sulfate proteoglycans cooperate in cellular uptake of nanoparticles functionalized by cationic cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Hong-Bo; Braun, Gary B.; Ruoslahti, Erkki

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been widely used to deliver nanomaterials and other types of macromolecules into mammalian cells for therapeutic and diagnostic use. Cationic CPPs that bind to heparan sulfate (HS) proteoglycans on the cell surface induce potent endocytosis; however, the role of other surface receptors in this process is unclear. We describe the convergence of an HS-dependent pathway with the C-end rule (CendR) mechanism that enables peptide ligation with neuropilin-1 (NRP1), a cell surface receptor known to be involved in angiogenesis and vascular permeability. NRP1 binds peptides carrying a positive residue at the carboxyl terminus, a feature that is compatible with cationic CPPs, either intact or after proteolytic processing. We used CPP and CendR peptides, as well as HS- and NRP1-binding motifs from semaphorins, to explore the commonalities and differences of the HS and NRP1 pathways. We show that the CendR-NRP1 interaction determines the ability of CPPs to induce vascular permeability. We also show at the ultrastructural level, using a novel cell entry synchronization method, that both the HS and NRP1 pathways can initiate a macropinocytosis-like process and visualize these CPP-cargo complexes going through various endosomal compartments. Our results provide new insights into how CPPs exploit multiple surface receptor pathways for intracellular delivery. PMID:26601141

  12. The spacer arm length in cell-penetrating peptides influences chitosan/siRNA nanoparticle delivery for pulmonary inflammation treatment.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Eun Ju; Choi, Moonhwan; Lee, Jangwook; Rhim, Taiyoun; Lee, Kuen Yong

    2015-12-21

    Although chitosan and its derivatives have been frequently utilized as delivery vehicles for small interfering RNA (siRNA), it is challenging to improve the gene silencing efficiency of chitosan-based nanoparticles. In this study, we hypothesized that controlling the spacer arm length between a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and a nanoparticle could be critical to enhancing the cellular uptake as well as the gene silencing efficiency of conventional chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles. A peptide consisting of nine arginine units (R9) was used as a CPP, and the spacer arm length was controlled by varying the number of glycine units between the peptide (R9Gn) and the nanoparticle (n = 0, 4, and 10). Various physicochemical characteristics of R9Gn-chitosan/siRNA nanoparticles were investigated in vitro. Increasing the spacing arm length did not significantly affect the complex formation between R9Gn-chitosan and siRNA. However, R9G10-chitosan was much more effective in delivering genes both in vitro and in vivo compared with non-modified chitosan (without the peptide) and R9-chitosan (without the spacer arm). Chitosan derivatives modified with oligoarginine containing a spacer arm can be considered as potential delivery vehicles for various genes. PMID:26568525

  13. Massive glycosaminoglycan-dependent entry of Trp-containing cell-penetrating peptides induced by exogenous sphingomyelinase or cholesterol depletion.

    PubMed

    Bechara, Chérine; Pallerla, Manjula; Burlina, Fabienne; Illien, Françoise; Cribier, Sophie; Sagan, Sandrine

    2015-02-01

    Among non-invasive cell delivery strategies, cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) vectors represent interesting new tools. To get fundamental knowledge about the still debated internalisation mechanisms of these peptides, we modified the membrane content of cells, typically by hydrolysis of sphingomyelin or depletion of cholesterol from the membrane outer leaflet. We quantified and visualised the effect of these viable cell surface treatments on the internalisation efficiency of different CPPs, among which the most studied Tat, R9, penetratin and analogues, that all carry the N-terminal biotin-Gly4 tag cargo. Under these cell membrane treatments, only penetratin and R6W3 underwent a massive glycosaminoglycan (GAG)-dependent entry in cells. Internalisation of the other peptides was only slightly increased, similarly in the absence or the presence of GAGs for R9, and only in the presence of GAGs for Tat and R6L3. Ceramide formation (or cholesterol depletion) is known to lead to the reorganisation of membrane lipid domains into larger platforms, which can serve as a trap and cluster receptors. These results show that GAG clustering, enhanced by formation of ceramide, is efficiently exploited by penetratin and R6W3, which contains Trp residues in their sequence but not Tat, R9 and R6L3. Hence, these data shed new lights on the differences in the internalisation mechanism and pathway of these peptides that are widely used in delivery of cargo molecules. PMID:25112713

  14. Cell-penetrating peptides as noninvasive transmembrane vectors for the development of novel multifunctional drug-delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dongdong; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang

    2016-05-10

    Unique characteristics, such as nontoxicity and rapid cellular internalization, allow the cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) to transport hydrophilic macromolecules into cells, thus, enabling them to execute biological functions. However, some CPPs have limitations due to nonspecificity and easy proteolysis. To overcome such defects, the CPP amino acid sequence can be modified, replaced, and reconstructed for optimization. CPPs can also be used in combination with other drug vectors, fused with their preponderances to create novel multifunctional drug-delivery systems that increase the stability during blood circulation, and also develop novel preparations capable of targeted delivery, along with sustainable and controllable release. Further improvements in CPP structure can facilitate the penetration of macromolecules into diverse biomembrane structures, such as the blood brain barrier, gastroenteric mucosa, and skin dermis. The ability of CPP to act as transmembrane vectors improves the clinical application of some biomolecules to treat central nervous system diseases, increase oral bioavailability, and develop percutaneous-delivery dosage form. PMID:26993425

  15. Cell penetrating peptides released from thermosensitive nanoparticles suppress proinflammatory cytokine response by specifically targeting inflamed cartilage explants

    PubMed Central

    Panitch, Alyssa

    2014-01-01

    Cell penetrating anti-inflammatory peptide KAFAKLAARLYRKALARQLGVAA (KAFAK) has the ability to suppress pro-inflammatory cytokines TNF-α and IL-6 when released from degradable and non-degradable Poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles. In vitro human macrophage model with THP1 human monocytes and ex vivo bovine knee cartilage tissue both showed a dose dependent suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines when treated with KAFAK loaded poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles. When bovine knee cartilage explants were treated with KAFAK loaded poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles, rapid and highly selective targeting of only damaged tissue occurred. This study has demonstrated selective targeting and therapeutic efficacy of KAFAK when released from both degradable and non degradable poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles in in vitro and ex vivo models. As a result, poly(NIPAm-AMPS) nanoparticles loaded with KAFAK could a very effective tool to treat osteoarthritis. PMID:23041412

  16. Real-time In Vivo Molecular Detection of Primary Tumors and Metastases with Ratiometric Activatable Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Felsen, Csilla N.; Nashi, Nadia; Jiang, Tao; Ellies, Lesley G.; Steinbach, Paul; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2013-01-01

    Management of metastatic disease is integral to cancer treatment. Evaluation of metastases often requires surgical removal of all anatomically susceptible lymph nodes for ex vivo pathologic examination. We report a family of novel ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptides, which contain Cy5 as far red fluorescent donor and Cy7 as near-infrared fluorescent acceptor. Cy5 is quenched in favor of Cy7 reemission until the intervening linker is cut by tumor-associated matrix metalloproteinases-2 and 9 (MMP2,9) or elastases. Such cleavage increases the Cy5:Cy7 emission ratio 40-fold and triggers tissue retention of the Cy5-containing fragment. This ratiometric increase provides an accelerated and quantifiable metric to identify primary tumors and metastases to liver and lymph nodes with increased sensitivity and specificity. This technique represents a significant advance over existing nonratiometric protease sensors and sentinel lymph node detection methods, which give no information about cancer invasion. PMID:23188503

  17. Cell-Penetrating Peptide as a Means of Directing the Differentiation of Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Kaitsuka, Taku; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Protein transduction using cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is useful for the delivery of large protein molecules, including some transcription factors. This method is safer than gene transfection methods with a viral vector because there is no risk of genomic integration of the exogenous DNA. Recently, this method was reported as a means for the induction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, directing the differentiation into specific cell types and supporting gene editing/correction. Furthermore, we developed a direct differentiation method to obtain a pancreatic lineage from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells via the protein transduction of three transcription factors, Pdx1, NeuroD, and MafA. Here, we discuss the possibility of using CPPs as a means of directing the differentiation of iPS cells and other stem cell technologies. PMID:26561805

  18. The influence of cell penetrating peptide branching on cellular uptake of QDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breger, Joyce; Delehanty, James; Susumu, Kimihiro; Anderson, George; Muttenhaler, Markus; Dawson, Philip; Medintz, Igor

    2016-03-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) serve as a valuable platform for understating the intricacies of nanoparticle cellular uptake and fate for the development of theranostics. Developing novel internalization peptides that maximize cellular uptake while minimizing the amount of peptide is important to allow space on the nanoparticle for other cargo (e.g. drugs). We have designed a range of branched, dendritic internalization peptides composed of polyarginine (Arg9) branches (1 to 16 repeats) attached a dendritic wedge based on the sequence WP9G2H6. By attaching these branched dendritic peptides to QD's, we can study the influence of branching on cellular uptake as a function of time, ratio, and degree of branching.

  19. Cationic Cell-Penetrating Peptide Binds to Planar Lipid Bilayers Containing Negatively Charged Lipids but does not Induce Conductive Pores

    PubMed Central

    Gurnev, Philip A.; Yang, Sung-Tae; Melikov, Kamran C.; Chernomordik, Leonid V.; Bezrukov, Sergey M.

    2013-01-01

    Using a cation-selective gramicidin A channel as a sensor of the membrane surface charge, we studied interactions of oligoarginine peptide R9C, a prototype cationic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), with planar lipid membranes. We have found that R9C sorption to the membrane depends strongly on its lipid composition from virtually nonexistent for membranes made of uncharged lipids to very pronounced for membranes containing negatively charged lipids, with charge overcompensation at R9C concentrations exceeding 1 μM. The sorption was reversible as it was removed by addition of polyanionic dextran sulfate to the membrane bathing solution. No membrane poration activity of R9C (as would be manifested by increased bilayer conductance) was detected in the charged or neutral membranes, including those with asymmetric negative/neutral and negative/positive lipid leaflets. We conclude that interaction of R9C with planar lipid bilayers does not involve pore formation in all studied lipid combinations up to 20 μM peptide concentration. However, R9C induces leakage of negatively charged but not neutral liposomes in a process that involves lipid mixing between liposomes. Our findings suggest that direct traversing of CPPs through the uncharged outer leaflet of the plasma membrane bilayer is unlikely and that permeabilization necessarily involves both anionic lipids and CPP-dependent fusion between opposing membranes. PMID:23663836

  20. Heat shock protein-mediated cell penetration and cytosolic delivery of macromolecules by a telomerase-derived peptide vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung-Ae; Kim, Bo-Ram; Kim, Bu-Kyung; Kim, Dong-Won; Shon, Won-Jun; Lee, Na-Rae; Inn, Kyung-Soo; Kim, Bum-Joon

    2013-10-01

    A reverse-transcriptase-subunit of telomerase (hTERT) derived peptide, GV1001, has been developed as a vaccine against various cancers. Here, we report an unexpected function of GV1001 as a cell-penetrating peptide (CPP). GV1001 was delivered into a variety of cells including various cancer cell lines and primary blood cells. Moreover, the delivered GV1001 was predominantly located in the cytoplasm of the cells, while a significantly higher proportion of TAT peptide was localized in the nucleus. Macromolecules such as proteins, DNA and siRNA, which were linked to GV1001 by direct covalent conjugation or non-covalent complexation through poly-lysine, were successfully delivered into cells, indicating that GV1001 can be used as a carrier for macromolecules. Expression of the delivered DNA, and lowered expression of the target gene by the delivered siRNA, suggest the potential therapeutic use of GV1001. Pull-down analysis identified Heat Shock Protein 90 (HSP90) and 70 (HSP70) as GV1001 interacting proteins. Treatment of Anti-HSP90 and HSP70 antibodies lowered the internalization of GV1001, indicating that the interaction is critical for the efficient internalization of GV1001. Collectively, the results of this study suggest the pharmaceutical potential of GV1001, already proven safe in clinical trials, as a carrier for the delivery of macromolecular therapeutics into cells, in addition to its own anti-cancer activity. PMID:23827187

  1. Anti-HIV screening for cell-penetrating peptides using chloroquine and identification of anti-HIV peptides derived from matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Takaaki; Ohashi, Nami; Nomura, Wataru; Komoriya, Mao; Hashimoto, Chie; Yamamoto, Naoki; Murakami, Tsutomu; Tamamura, Hirokazu

    2015-08-01

    Previously, compounds which inhibit the HIV-1 replication cycle were found in overlapping peptide libraries covering the whole sequence of an HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein constructed with the addition of an octa-arginyl group. The two top lead compounds are sequential fragments MA-8L and MA-9L. In the present study, the addition of chloroquine in cell-based anti-HIV assays was proven to be an efficient method with which to find anti-HIV compounds among several peptides conjugated by cell-penetrating signals such as an octa-arginyl group: the conjugation of an octa-arginyl group to individual peptides contained in whole proteins in combination with the addition of chloroquine in cells is a useful assay method to search active peptides. To find more potent fragment peptides, individual peptides between MA-8L and MA-9L, having the same peptide chain length but with sequences shifted by one amino acid residue, were synthesized in this paper and their anti-HIV activity was evaluated with an anti-HIV assay using chloroquine. As a result, the peptides in the C-terminal side of the series, which are relatively close to MA-9L, showed more potent inhibitory activity against both X4-HIV-1 and R5-HIV-1 than the peptides in the N-terminal side. PMID:26094944

  2. H(II) mesophase and peptide cell-penetrating enhancers for improved transdermal delivery of sodium diclofenac.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Avrahami, Marganit; Aserin, Abraham; Garti, Nissim

    2010-06-01

    This study develops a novel transdermal delivery vehicle for the enhanced delivery of sodium diclofenac (Na-DFC). The system utilizes the advantages of reversed hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystals (H(II)LC), combined with a peptide cell penetration enhancer (CPE), creating together an adaptable system that provides versatile options in the field of transdermal delivery. This enhancer peptide is based on a family of amphipatic peptides that exhibit improved membrane permeability. Franz permeation cell experiments revealed that the peptide enhancer (RALA) improved Na-DFC skin penetration of the liquid crystal 2.2-fold. We studied the structural effects of RALA solubilization on the H(II) mesophase. RALA acts as a chaotropic agent, interfering in the structure of the water, and causes a measurable swelling of the aqueous cylinders by 5A. Small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) measurements reveal enhanced hydration of the glycerol monooleate (GMO) headgroups and a 6.5% increase in the fraction of non-freezable water resulting from RALA incorporation. RALA caused a gradual increase in the GMO effective headgroup area due to the hydration, leading eventually to a transform of the hexagonal structure towards a lamellar one. Circular dichroism and ATR-FTIR measurements showed a conservation of the peptide structure when incorporated into the H(II) mesophase. The combined H(II)LC-CPE systems can serve as high potential vehicles for a variety of drugs, as they can easily be modified by varying the composition and temperature, according to the required dose and delivery features. PMID:20189781

  3. Relationships between Membrane Binding, Affinity and Cell Internalization Efficacy of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide: Penetratin as a Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Isabel D.; Bechara, Cherine; Walrant, Astrid; Zaltsman, Yefim; Jiao, Chen-Yu; Sagan, Sandrine

    2011-01-01

    Background Penetratin is a positively charged cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that has the ability to bind negatively charged membrane components, such as glycosaminoglycans and anionic lipids. Whether this primary interaction of penetratin with these cell surface components implies that the peptide will be further internalized is not clear. Methodology Using mass spectrometry, the amount of internalized and membrane bound penetratin remaining after washings, were quantified in three different cell lines: wild type (WT), glycosaminoglycans- (GAGneg) and sialic acid-deficient (SAneg) cells. Additionally, the affinity and kinetics of the interaction of penetratin to membrane models composed of pure lipids and membrane fragments from the referred cell lines was investigated, as well as the thermodynamics of such interactions using plasmon resonance and calorimetry. Principal Findings Penetratin internalized with the same efficacy in the three cell lines at 1 µM, but was better internalized at 10 µM in SAneg>WT>GAGneg. The heat released by the interaction of penetratin with these cells followed the ranking order of internalization efficiency. Penetratin had an affinity of 10 nM for WT cells and µM for SAneg and GAGneg cells and model membrane of phospholipids. The remaining membrane-bound penetratin after cells washings was similar in WT and GAGneg cells, which suggested that these binding sites relied on membrane phospholipids. The interaction of penetratin with carbohydrates was more superficial and reversible while it was stronger with phospholipids, likely because the peptide can intercalate between the fatty acid chains. Conclusion/Significance These results show that accumulation and high-affinity binding of penetratin at the cell-surface do not reflect the internalization efficacy of the peptide. Altogether, these data further support translocation (membrane phospholipids interaction) as being the internalization pathway used by penetratin at low

  4. Thermodynamics of cell-penetrating HIV1 TAT peptide insertion into PC/PS/CHOL model bilayers through transmembrane pores: the roles of cholesterol and anionic lipids.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuan; Patel, Sandeep

    2016-08-10

    Efficient delivery of pharmaceutically active molecules across cellular membranes using cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), such as the cationic human immunodeficiency virus-1 trans-acting activator of transcription peptide (HIV-1 TAT), continues to attract scientific attention in drug design and disease treatment. Experimental results show that the TAT peptide is not only capable of directly penetrating the biological membrane in a passive manner, but also forming physical, membrane-spanning pores that may facilitate transport. Experiments further show that anionic lipids accelerate peptide permeation within a range of mole percentage composition. In this work, we explored the structures and translocation thermodynamics of the cationic TAT peptide across a series of DPPC/DPPS model membranes with the presence of 0-30 mol% cholesterol. We computed the potentials of the mean force by using umbrella sampling molecular dynamics simulations coupled to the Martini coarse-grained force field. We systematically investigated the roles of cholesterol and anionic lipids (membrane surface charge) in TAT peptide translocation. In qualitative agreement with experimental findings, the barrier heights were significantly reduced in the presence of anionic lipids. A toroidal hydrophilic pore was strongly suggested by membrane structure analysis. Cholesterol stabilizes the liquid-ordered (Lo) phase of membranes and increases the elastic stiffness of bilayers. Consequently, it hinders transmembrane pore formation and thus modulates solute permeability, since the liquid-ordered phase suppresses reorientation of the lipid molecules on simulation time scales. Though cholesterol contributes marginally to the total free energy associated with peptide permeation, the coordination of cholesterol to the peptide weakens more favorable peptide-lipid interactions. The addition of the anionic lipid DPPS to the neutral DPPC bilayer leads to the emergence and further enhancement of an interfacially

  5. The acceleration of boron neutron capture therapy using multi-linked mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate (BSH) fused cell-penetrating peptide.

    PubMed

    Michiue, Hiroyuki; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kondo, Natsuko; Kitamatsu, Mizuki; Bin, Feng; Nakajima, Kiichiro; Hirota, Yuki; Kawabata, Shinji; Nishiki, Tei-ichi; Ohmori, Iori; Tomizawa, Kazuhito; Miyatake, Shin-ichi; Ono, Koji; Matsui, Hideki

    2014-03-01

    New anti-cancer therapy with boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is based on the nuclear reaction of boron-10 with neutron irradiation. The median survival of BNCT patients with glioblastoma was almost twice as long as those receiving standard therapy in a Japanese BNCT clinical trial. In this clinical trial, two boron compounds, BPA (boronophenylalanine) and BSH (sodium borocaptate), were used for BNCT. BPA is taken up into cells through amino acid transporters that are expressed highly in almost all malignant cells, but BSH cannot pass through the cell membrane and remains outside the cell. We simulated the energy transfer against the nucleus at different locations of boron from outside the cell to the nuclear region with neutron irradiation and concluded that there was a marked difference between inside and outside the cell in boron localization. To overcome this disadvantage of BSH in BNCT, we used a cell-penetrating peptide system for transduction of BSH. CPP (cell-membrane penetrating peptide) is very common peptide domains that transduce many physiologically active substances into cells in vitro and in vivo. BSH-fused CPPs can penetrate the cell membrane and localize inside a cell. To increase the boron ratio in one BSH-peptide molecule, 8BSH fused to 11R with a dendritic lysine structure was synthesized and administrated to malignant glioma cells and a brain tumor mouse model. 8BSH-11R localized at the cell nucleus and showed a very high boron value in ICP results. With neutron irradiation, the 8BSH-11R administrated group showed a significant cancer killing effect compared to the 100 times higher concentration of BSH-administrated group. We concluded that BSH-fused CPPs were one of the most improved and potential boron compounds in the next-stage BNCT trial and 8BSH-11R may be applied in the clinical setting. PMID:24452095

  6. Endocytic Trafficking of Nanoparticles Delivered by Cell-penetrating Peptides Comprised of Nona-arginine and a Penetration Accelerating Sequence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Betty R.; Lo, Shih-Yen; Liu, Chia-Chin; Chyan, Chia-Lin; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S.; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) can traverse cellular membranes and deliver biologically active molecules into cells. In this study, we demonstrate that CPPs comprised of nona-arginine (R9) and a penetration accelerating peptide sequence (Pas) that facilitates escape from endocytic lysosomes, denoted as PR9, greatly enhance the delivery of noncovalently associated quantum dots (QDs) into human A549 cells. Mechanistic studies, intracellular trafficking analysis and a functional gene assay reveal that endocytosis is the main route for intracellular delivery of PR9/QD complexes. Endocytic trafficking of PR9/QD complexes was monitored using both confocal and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Zeta-potential and size analyses indicate the importance of electrostatic forces in the interaction of PR9/QD complexes with plasma membranes. Circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy reveals that the secondary structural elements of PR9 have similar conformations in aqueous buffer at pH 7 and 5. This study of nontoxic PR9 provides a basis for the design of optimized cargo delivery that allows escape from endocytic vesicles. PMID:23840594

  7. Cell penetrating peptides as a therapeutic strategy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Arrouss, Issam; Decaudin, Didier; Choquet, Sylvain; Azar, Nabih; Parizot, Christophe; Zini, Jean M; Nemati, Fariba; Rebollo, Angelita

    2015-01-01

    PP2A is a serine/threonine phosphatase critical to a number of physiological and developmental processes. In this manuscript, we show that a peptide, specifically blocking the caspase- 9/PP2A interaction, DPT-C9h, induces apoptosis in primary tumour B cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells or bone marrow of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, but not on B cells obtained from healthy donors (HD). Moreover, in both CLL patients and HD, DPT-C9h does not induce apoptosis on T- and NKcells and monocytes. Our results strongly suggest that DPT-C9h peptide has tumour specificity and that caspase-9/PP2Ac interaction constitutes a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment in CLL patients. PMID:25687226

  8. Human antimicrobial peptide histatin 5 is a cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondrial ATP synthesis in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Luque-Ortega, Juan Román; van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Saugar, José M; Rivas, Luis

    2008-06-01

    Histatin 5 (Hst5) is a human salivary antimicrobial peptide that targets fungal mitochondria. In the human parasitic protozoa Leishmania, the mitochondrial ATP production is essential, as it lacks the bioenergetic switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation described in some yeasts. On these premises, Hst5 activity was assayed on both stages of its life cycle, promastigotes and amastigotes (LC(50)=7.3 and 14.4 microM, respectively). In a further step, its lethal mechanism was studied. The main conclusions drawn were as follows: 1) Hst5 causes limited and temporary damage to the plasma membrane of the parasites, as assessed by electron microscopy, depolarization, and entrance of the vital dye SYTOX Green; 2) Hst5 translocates into the cytoplasm of Leishmania in an achiral receptor-independent manner with accumulation into the mitochondrion, as shown by confocal microscopy; and 3) Hst5 produces a bioenergetic collapse of the parasite, caused essentially by the decrease of mitochondrial ATP synthesis through inhibition of F(1)F(0)-ATPase, with subsequent fast ATP exhaustion. By using the Hst5 enantiomer, it was found that the key steps of its lethal mechanism involved no chiral recognition. Hst5 thus constitutes the first leishmanicidal peptide with a defined nonstereospecific intracellular target. The prospects of its development, by its own or as a carrier molecule for other leishmanicidal molecules, into a novel anti-Leishmania drug with a preferential subcellular accumulation are discussed. PMID:18230684

  9. The impact of cell-penetrating peptides on membrane bilayer structure during binding and insertion.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Daniel J; Lee, Tzong-Hsien; Kulkarni, Ketav; Wilce, Jacqueline A; Aguilar, Marie-Isabel

    2016-08-01

    We have studied the effect of penetratin and a truncated analogue on the bilayer structure using dual polarisation interferometry, to simultaneously measure changes in mass per unit area and birefringence (an optical parameter representing bilayer order) with high sensitivity during the binding and dissociation from the membrane. Specifically, we studied penetratin (RQIKIWFQNRRMKWKK), along with a shortened and biotinylated version known as R8K-biotin (RRMKWKKK(Biotin)-NH2). Overall both peptides bound only weakly to the neutral DMPC and POPC bilayers, while much higher binding was observed for the anionic DMPC/DMPG and POPC/POPG. The binding of penetratin to gel-phase DMPC/DMPG was adequately represented by a two-state model, whereas on the fluid-phase POPC/POPG it exhibited a distinctly different binding pattern, best represented by a three-state kinetic model. However, R8K-biotin did not bind well to DMPC/DMPG and showed a more transitory and superficial binding to POPC/POPG. Comparing the modelling results for both peptides binding to POPC/POPG suggests an important role for a securely bound intermediate prior to penetratin insertion and translocation. Overall these results further elucidate the mechanism of penetratin, and provide another example of the significance of the ability of DPI to measure structural changes and the use of kinetic analysis to investigate the stages of peptide-membrane interactions. PMID:27163492

  10. Mechanism of antifungal activity of antimicrobial peptide APP, a cell-penetrating peptide derivative, against Candida albicans: intracellular DNA binding and cell cycle arrest.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Sun, Jin; Xia, Shufang; Tian, Xu; Cheserek, Maureen Jepkorir; Le, Guowei

    2016-04-01

    We investigated the antifungal properties and anti-candidal mechanism of antimicrobial peptide APP. The minimum inhibitory concentration of APP was 8 μM against Candida albicans and Aspeogillus flavus, the concentration against Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Cryptococcus neoformans was 16 μM, while 32 μM inhibited Aspergilla niger and Trichopyton rubrum. APP caused slight depolarization (12.32 ± 0.87%) of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells when it exerted its anti-candidal activity and only caused 21.52 ± 0.48% C. albicans cell membrane damage. APP interacted with cell wall membrane, caused potassium efflux and nucleotide leakage. However, confocal fluorescence microscopy experiment and flow cytometry confirmed that FITC-labeled APP penetrated C. albicans cell membrane with 52.31 ± 1.88% cell-penetrating efficiency and accumulated in the cytoplasm. Then, APP interact with C. albicans genomic DNA and completely suppressed DNA migration above weight ratio (peptide/DNA) of 2, and significantly arrested cell cycles during the S-phase (S-phase cell population was 27.09 ± 0.73%, p < 0.05) after penetrating the cell membrane. Results indicated that APP kills C. albicans for efficient cell-penetrating efficiency, strong DNA-binding affinity and significant physiological changes inducing S-phase arrest in intracellular environment. PMID:26743655

  11. Early endosomal escape of a cyclic cell-penetrating peptide allows effective cytosolic cargo delivery.

    PubMed

    Qian, Ziqing; LaRochelle, Jonathan R; Jiang, Bisheng; Lian, Wenlong; Hard, Ryan L; Selner, Nicholas G; Luechapanichkul, Rinrada; Barrios, Amy M; Pei, Dehua

    2014-06-24

    Cyclic heptapeptide cyclo(FΦRRRRQ) (cFΦR4, where Φ is l-2-naphthylalanine) was recently found to be efficiently internalized by mammalian cells. In this study, its mechanism of internalization was investigated by perturbing various endocytic events through the introduction of pharmacologic agents and genetic mutations. The results show that cFΦR4 binds directly to membrane phospholipids, is internalized into human cancer cells through endocytosis, and escapes from early endosomes into the cytoplasm. Its cargo capacity was examined with a wide variety of molecules, including small-molecule dyes, linear and cyclic peptides of various charged states, and proteins. Depending on the nature of the cargos, they may be delivered by endocyclic (insertion of cargo into the cFΦR4 ring), exocyclic (attachment of cargo to the Gln side chain), or bicyclic approaches (fusion of cFΦR4 and cyclic cargo rings). The overall delivery efficiency (i.e., delivery of cargo into the cytoplasm and nucleus) of cFΦR4 was 4-12-fold higher than those of nonaarginine, HIV Tat-derived peptide, or penetratin. The higher delivery efficiency, coupled with superior serum stability, minimal toxicity, and synthetic accessibility, renders cFΦR4 a useful transporter for intracellular cargo delivery and a suitable system for investigating the mechanism of endosomal escape. PMID:24896852

  12. Dual Receptor Recognizing Cell Penetrating Peptide for Selective Targeting, Efficient Intratumoral Diffusion and Synthesized Anti-Glioma Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yayuan; Mei, Ling; Xu, Chaoqun; Yu, Qianwen; Shi, Kairong; Zhang, Li; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Qianyu; Gao, Huile; Zhang, Zhirong; He, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) were widely used for drug delivery to tumor. However, the nonselective in vivo penetration greatly limited the application of CPPs-mediated drug delivery systems. And the treatment of malignant tumors is usually followed by poor prognosis and relapse due to the existence of extravascular core regions of tumor. Thus it is important to endue selective targeting and stronger intratumoral diffusion abilities to CPPs. In this study, an RGD reverse sequence dGR was conjugated to a CPP octa-arginine to form a CendR (R/KXXR/K) motif contained tandem peptide R8-dGR (RRRRRRRRdGR) which could bind to both integrin αvβ3 and neuropilin-1 receptors. The dual receptor recognizing peptide R8-dGR displayed increased cellular uptake and efficient penetration ability into glioma spheroids in vitro. The following in vivo studies indicated the active targeting and intratumoral diffusion capabilities of R8-dGR modified liposomes. When paclitaxel was loaded in the liposomes, PTX-R8-dGR-Lip induced the strongest anti-proliferation effect on both tumor cells and cancer stem cells, and inhibited the formation of vasculogenic mimicry channels in vitro. Finally, the R8-dGR liposomal drug delivery system prolonged the medium survival time of intracranial C6 bearing mice by 2.1-fold compared to the untreated group, and achieved an exhaustive anti-glioma therapy including anti-tumor cells, anti-vasculogenic mimicry and anti-brain cancer stem cells. To sum up, all the results demonstrated that R8-dGR was an ideal dual receptor recognizing CPP with selective glioma targeting and efficient intratumoral diffusion, which could be further used to equip drug delivery system for effective glioma therapy. PMID:26877777

  13. Design and Screening of a Glial Cell-Specific, Cell Penetrating Peptide for Therapeutic Applications in Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Corey; Sumer, Huseyin; Guillemin, Gilles J.; Manuelpillai, Ursula; Verma, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    Multiple Sclerosis (MS) is an autoimmune, neurodegenerative disease of the central nervous system (CNS) characterized by demyelination through glial cell loss. Current and proposed therapeutic strategies to arrest demyelination and/or promote further remyelination include: (i) modulation of the host immune system; and/or (ii) transplantation of myelinating/stem or progenitor cells to the circulation or sites of injury. However, significant drawbacks are inherent with both approaches. Cell penetrating peptides (CPP) are short amino acid sequences with an intrinsic ability to translocate across plasma membranes, and theoretically represent an attractive vector for delivery of therapeutic peptides or nanoparticles to glia to promote cell survival or remyelination. The CPPs described to date are commonly non-selective in the cell types they transduce, limiting their therapeutic application in vivo. Here, we describe a theoretical framework for design of a novel CPP sequence that selectively transduces human glial cells (excluding non-glial cell types), and conduct preliminary screens of purified, recombinant CPPs with immature and matured human oligodendrocytes and astrocytes, and two non-glial cell types. A candidate peptide, termed TD2.2, consistently transduced glial cells, was significantly more effective at transducing immature oligodendrocytes than matured progeny, and was virtually incapable of transducing two non-glial cell types: (i) human neural cells and (ii) human dermal fibroblasts. Time-lapse confocal microscopy confirms trafficking of TD2.2 (fused to EGFP) to mature oligodendrocytes 3–6 hours after protein application in vitro. We propose selectivity of TD2.2 for glial cells represents a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of glial-related disease, such as MS. PMID:23049807

  14. Structure Analysis and Conformational Transitions of the Cell Penetrating Peptide Transportan 10 in the Membrane-Bound State

    PubMed Central

    Strandberg, Erik; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Bürck, Jochen; Ehni, Sebastian; Mykhailiuk, Pavel K.; Afonin, Sergii; Gerthsen, Dagmar; Komarov, Igor V.; Brock, Roland; Ulrich, Anne S.

    2014-01-01

    Structure analysis of the cell-penetrating peptide transportan 10 (TP10) revealed an exemplary range of different conformations in the membrane-bound state. The bipartite peptide (derived N-terminally from galanin and C-terminally from mastoparan) was found to exhibit prominent characteristics of (i) amphiphilic α-helices, (ii) intrinsically disordered peptides, as well as (iii) β-pleated amyloid fibrils, and these conformational states become interconverted as a function of concentration. We used a complementary approach of solid-state 19F-NMR and circular dichroism in oriented membrane samples to characterize the structural and dynamical behaviour of TP10 in its monomeric and aggregated forms. Nine different positions in the peptide were selectively substituted with either the L- or D-enantiomer of 3-(trifluoromethyl)-bicyclopent-[1.1.1]-1-ylglycine (CF3-Bpg) as a reporter group for 19F-NMR. Using the L-epimeric analogs, a comprehensive three-dimensional structure analysis was carried out in lipid bilayers at low peptide concentration, where TP10 is monomeric. While the N-terminal region is flexible and intrinsically unstructured within the plane of the lipid bilayer, the C-terminal α-helix is embedded in the membrane with an oblique tilt angle of ∼55° and in accordance with its amphiphilic profile. Incorporation of the sterically obstructive D-CF3-Bpg reporter group into the helical region leads to a local unfolding of the membrane-bound peptide. At high concentration, these helix-destabilizing C-terminal substitutions promote aggregation into immobile β-sheets, which resemble amyloid fibrils. On the other hand, the obstructive D-CF3-Bpg substitutions can be accommodated in the flexible N-terminus of TP10 where they do not promote aggregation at high concentration. The cross-talk between the two regions of TP10 thus exerts a delicate balance on its conformational switch, as the presence of the α-helix counteracts the tendency of the unfolded N

  15. Arginine-Rich Peptides Destabilize the Plasma Membrane, Consistent with a Pore Formation Translocation Mechanism of Cell-Penetrating Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Herce, H.D.; Garcia, A.E.; Litt, J.; Kane, R.S.; Martin, P.; Enrique, N.; Rebolledo, A.; Milesi, V.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Recent molecular-dynamics simulations have suggested that the arginine-rich HIV Tat peptides translocate by destabilizing and inducing transient pores in phospholipid bilayers. In this pathway for peptide translocation, Arg residues play a fundamental role not only in the binding of the peptide to the surface of the membrane, but also in the destabilization and nucleation of transient pores across the bilayer. Here we present a molecular-dynamics simulation of a peptide composed of nine Args (Arg-9) that shows that this peptide follows the same translocation pathway previously found for the Tat peptide. We test experimentally the hypothesis that transient pores open by measuring ionic currents across phospholipid bilayers and cell membranes through the pores induced by Arg-9 peptides. We find that Arg-9 peptides, in the presence of an electrostatic potential gradient, induce ionic currents across planar phospholipid bilayers, as well as in cultured osteosarcoma cells and human smooth muscle cells. Our results suggest that the mechanism of action of Arg-9 peptides involves the creation of transient pores in lipid bilayers and cell membranes. PMID:19804722

  16. Arginine-rich peptides destabilize the plasma membrane, consistent with a pore formation translocation mechanism of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Herce, H D; Garcia, A E; Litt, J; Kane, R S; Martin, P; Enrique, N; Rebolledo, A; Milesi, V

    2009-10-01

    Recent molecular-dynamics simulations have suggested that the arginine-rich HIV Tat peptides translocate by destabilizing and inducing transient pores in phospholipid bilayers. In this pathway for peptide translocation, Arg residues play a fundamental role not only in the binding of the peptide to the surface of the membrane, but also in the destabilization and nucleation of transient pores across the bilayer. Here we present a molecular-dynamics simulation of a peptide composed of nine Args (Arg-9) that shows that this peptide follows the same translocation pathway previously found for the Tat peptide. We test experimentally the hypothesis that transient pores open by measuring ionic currents across phospholipid bilayers and cell membranes through the pores induced by Arg-9 peptides. We find that Arg-9 peptides, in the presence of an electrostatic potential gradient, induce ionic currents across planar phospholipid bilayers, as well as in cultured osteosarcoma cells and human smooth muscle cells. Our results suggest that the mechanism of action of Arg-9 peptides involves the creation of transient pores in lipid bilayers and cell membranes. PMID:19804722

  17. Recombinant expression and purification of a MAP30-cell penetrating peptide fusion protein with higher anti-tumor bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Lv, Qiang; Yang, Xu-Zhong; Fu, Long-Yun; Lu, Yv-Ting; Lu, Yan-Hua; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2015-07-01

    MAP30 (Momordica Antiviral Protein 30 Kd), a single-stranded type-I ribosome inactivating protein, possesses versatile biological activities including anti-tumor abilities. However, the low efficiency penetrating into tumor cells hampers the tumoricidal effect of MAP30. This paper describes MAP30 fused with a human-derived cell penetrating peptide HBD which overcome the low uptake efficiency by tumor cells and exhibits higher anti-tumor bioactivity. MAP30 gene was cloned from the genomic DNA of Momordica charantia and the recombinant plasmid pET28b-MAP30-HBD was established and transferred into Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). The recombinant MAP30-HBD protein (rMAP30-HBD) was expressed in a soluble form after being induced by 0.5mM IPTG for 14h at 15°C. The recombinant protein was purified to greater than 95% purity with Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The rMAP30-HBD protein not only has topological inactivation and protein translation inhibition activity but also showed significant improvements in cytotoxic activity compared to that of the rMAP30 protein without HBD in the tested tumor cell lines, and induced higher apoptosis rates in HeLa cells analyzed by Annexin V-FITC with FACS. This paper demonstrated a new method for improving MAP30 protein anti-tumor activity and might have potential applications in cancer therapy area. PMID:25797209

  18. Surgical molecular navigation with a Ratiometric Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide improves intraoperative identification and resection of small salivary gland cancers

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Timon; Savariar, Elamprakash N.; Diaz-Perez, Julio A.; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Background We evaluated the use of intraoperative fluorescence guidance by enzymatically cleavable ratiometric activatable cell-penetrating peptide (RACPPPLGC(Me)AG) containing Cy5 as a fluorescent donor and Cy7 as a fluorescent acceptor for salivary gland cancer surgery in a mouse model. Methods Surgical resection of small parotid gland cancers in mice was performed with fluorescence guidance or white light (WL) imaging alone. Tumor identification accuracy, operating time and tumor free survival were compared. Results RACPP guidance aided tumor detection (positive histology in 90% (27/30) vs. 48% (15/31) for WL, p<0.001). A ~25% ratiometric signal increase as the threshold to distinguish between tumor and adjacent tissue, yielded >90% detection sensitivity and specificity. Operating time was reduced by 54% (p<0.001), tumor free survival was increased with RACPP guidance (p=0.025). Conclusions RACPP provides real-time intraoperative guidance leading to improved survival. Ratiometric signal thresholds can be set according to desired detection accuracy levels for future RACPP applications. PMID:25521629

  19. Gene disruption by cell-penetrating peptide-mediated delivery of Cas9 protein and guide RNA.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Suresh; Kwaku Dad, Abu-Bonsrah; Beloor, Jagadish; Gopalappa, Ramu; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Kim, Hyongbum

    2014-06-01

    RNA-guided endonucleases (RGENs) derived from the CRISPR/Cas system represent an efficient tool for genome editing. RGENs consist of two components: Cas9 protein and guide RNA. Plasmid-mediated delivery of these components into cells can result in uncontrolled integration of the plasmid sequence into the host genome, and unwanted immune responses and potential safety problems that can be caused by the bacterial sequences. Furthermore, this delivery method requires transfection tools. Here we show that simple treatment with cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-conjugated recombinant Cas9 protein and CPP-complexed guide RNAs leads to endogenous gene disruptions in human cell lines. The Cas9 protein was conjugated to CPP via a thioether bond, whereas the guide RNA was complexed with CPP, forming condensed, positively charged nanoparticles. Simultaneous and sequential treatment of human cells, including embryonic stem cells, dermal fibroblasts, HEK293T cells, HeLa cells, and embryonic carcinoma cells, with the modified Cas9 and guide RNA, leads to efficient gene disruptions with reduced off-target mutations relative to plasmid transfections, resulting in the generation of clones containing RGEN-induced mutations. Our CPP-mediated RGEN delivery process provides a plasmid-free and additional transfection reagent-free method to use this tool with reduced off-target effects. We envision that our method will facilitate RGEN-directed genome editing. PMID:24696462

  20. A specific aptamer-cell penetrating peptides complex delivered siRNA efficiently and suppressed prostate tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Diao, Yanjun; Liu, Jiayun; Ma, Yueyun; Su, Mingquan; Zhang, Hongyi; Hao, Xiaoke

    2016-05-01

    Specific and efficient delivery of siRNA into intended tumor cells remains as a challenge, even though RNAi has been exploited as a new strategy for prostate cancer therapy. This work aims to address both specificity and efficiency of SURVIVIN-siRNA delivery by constructing a therapeutic complex using combinatorial strategies. A fusion protein STD was first expressed to serve as a backbone, consisting of streptavidin, a cell-penetrating peptide called Trans-Activator of Transcription (TAT) and a double-stranded RNA binding domain. A biotinylated Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen (PSMA) specific aptamer A10 and SURVIVIN-siRNA were then linked to STD protein to form the therapeutic complex. This complex could specifically targeted PSMA(+) tumor cells. Compared to lipofectamine and A10-siRNA chimera, it demonstrated higher efficiency in delivering siRNA into target cells by 19.2% and 59.9%, and increased apoptosis by 16.8% and 26.1% respectively. Upon systemic administration, this complex also showed significant efficacy in suppressing tumor growth in athymic mice (p <0.001). We conclude that this therapeutic complex could specifically and efficiently deliver SURVIVIN-siRNA to target cells and suppressed tumor growth in vivo, which indicates its potential to be used as a new strategy in prostate cancer therapy. PMID:26954374

  1. The next generation cell-penetrating peptide and carbon dot conjugated nano-liposome for transdermal delivery of curcumin.

    PubMed

    Patra, Santanu; Roy, Ekta; Madhuri, Rashmi; Sharma, Prashant K

    2016-03-01

    To overcome the problems associated with conventional liposomes in transdermal drug delivery like limited penetration ability and poor stability, in this article we report a new generation of cell penetrating peptide polyarginine containing nano-liposomes conjugated with carbon dots. The newly synthesized, cost-effective liposomic precursors were used for the fabrication of liposomes. The resulting liposomes have a bilayer structure like that of conventional liposomes with much smaller size, higher stability, and high penetration ability. The nano-liposomes show high stability at room temperature for three months without any change in size or encapsulation efficiency. The incorporation of carbon dots also opens up their application in fluorescence cell imaging studies, which is very well supported by the fluorescence microscopic analysis of the liposome skin penetration. The as-prepared nano-liposomes do not show any cytotoxicity for MCF-7 cells, even at high concentrations; however, when drug loaded liposomes are applied, they can kill the cancer cells with a high rate. The synthesized nano-liposomes have the potential to be used as an efficient, stable, biocompatible nanocarrier for transdermal drug delivery. PMID:26631310

  2. Integrating Display and Delivery Functionality with a Cell Penetrating Peptide Mimic as a Scaffold for Intracellular Multivalent Multitargeting.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yugang; Nguyen, Lien; Song, Ziyuan; Peng, Shaohong; Lee, JuYeon; Zheng, Nan; Kapoor, Iti; Hagler, Lauren D; Cai, Kaimin; Cheng, Jianjun; Chan, H Y Edwin; Zimmerman, Steven C

    2016-08-01

    The construction of a multivalent ligand is an effective way to increase affinity and selectivity toward biomolecular targets with multiple-ligand binding sites. Adopting this strategy, we used a known cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) mimic as a scaffold to develop a series of multivalent ligand constructs that bind to the expanded dCTG (CTG(exp)) and rCUG nucleotide repeats (CUG(exp)) known to cause myotonic dystrophy type I (DM1), an incurable neuromuscular disease. By assembling this polyvalent construct, the hydrophobic ligands are solubilized and delivered into cell nuclei, and their enhanced binding affinity leads to the inhibition of ribonuclear foci formation and a reversal of splicing defects, all at low concentrations. Some of the multivalent ligands are shown to inhibit selectively the in vitro transcription of (CTG·CAG)74, to reduce the concentration of the toxic CUG RNA in DM1 model cells, and to show phenotypic improvement in vivo in a Drosophila model of DM1. This strategy may be useful in drug design for other trinucleotide repeat disorders and more broadly for intracellular multivalent targeting. PMID:27355522

  3. Guanidine-Containing Methacrylamide (Co)polymers via aRAFT: Toward a Cell Penetrating Peptide Mimica

    PubMed Central

    Treat, Nicolas J.; Smith, DeeDee; Teng, Chengwen; Flores, Joel D.; Abel, Brooks A.; York, Adam W.; Huang, Faqing; McCormick, Charles L.

    2011-01-01

    We report the synthesis and controlled radical homo- and block copolymerization of 3-guanidinopropyl methacrylamide (GPMA) utilizing aqueous reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (aRAFT) polymerization. The resulting homopolymer and block copolymer with N-(2-hydroxypropyl) methacrylamide (HPMA) were prepared to mimic the behavior of cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) and poly(arginine) (> 6 units) which have been shown to cross cell membranes. The homopolymerization mediated by 4-cyano-4-(ethylsulfanylthiocarbonylsulfanyl)pentanoic acid (CEP) in aqueous buffer exhibited pseudo-first-order kinetics and linear growth of molecular weight with conversion. Retention of the “living” thiocarbonylthio ω-end-group was demonstrated through successful chain extension of the GPMA macroCTA yielding GPMA37-b-GPMA61 (Mw/Mn =1.05). Block copolymers of GPMA with the non-immunogenic, biocompatible HPMA were synthesized yielding HPMA271-b-GPMA13 (Mw/Mn = 1.15). Notably, intracellular uptake was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy, confocal laser scanning microscopy, and flow cytometry experiments after 2.5 h incubation with KB cells at 4 °C and at 37 °C utilizing FITC-labeled, GPMA-containing copolymers. The observed facility of cellular uptake and the structural control afforded by aRAFT polymerization suggest significant potential for these synthetic (co)polymers as drug delivery vehicles in targeted therapies. PMID:22639734

  4. Precise quantification of cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides using fluorescence-activated cell sorting and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rezgui, Rachid; Blumer, Katy; Yeoh-Tan, Gilbert; Trexler, Adam J; Magzoub, Mazin

    2016-07-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as a potentially powerful tool for drug delivery due to their ability to efficiently transport a whole host of biologically active cargoes into cells. Although concerted efforts have shed some light on the cellular internalization pathways of CPPs, quantification of CPP uptake has proved problematic. Here we describe an experimental approach that combines two powerful biophysical techniques, fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), to directly, accurately and precisely measure the cellular uptake of fluorescently-labeled molecules. This rapid and technically simple approach is highly versatile and can readily be applied to characterize all major CPP properties that normally require multiple assays, including amount taken up by cells (in moles/cell), uptake efficiency, internalization pathways, intracellular distribution, intracellular degradation and toxicity threshold. The FACS-FCS approach provides a means for quantifying any intracellular biochemical entity, whether expressed in the cell or introduced exogenously and transported across the plasma membrane. PMID:27033412

  5. Sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the cell-penetrating antifungal peptide PAF26 correlates with endogenous nitric oxide (NO) production.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Lourdes; Gandía, Mónica; López-García, Belén; Marcos, Jose F

    2012-01-01

    PAF26 is a synthetic fungicidal hexapeptide with cell-penetration properties and non-lytic mode of action. We demonstrate herein the endogenous accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated with PAF26. However, the S. cerevisiae deletion mutant of YAP1 - the major inductor of defense to oxidative stress - did not show high sensitivity to PAF26 but rather increased resistance, and its ROS accumulation did not differ from that of the parental strain. Cross-protection experiments suggest that the oxidant H(2)O(2) and PAF26 kill yeast through different pathways. Overall, the data indicate that ROS are not the primary antifungal mechanism of the peptide. On the contrary, the PAF26-induced intracellular production of NO was blocked in two distinct resistant mutants: the above mentioned Δyap1, which had the induction of NO disrupted, and the previously reported Δarg1 from the biosynthetic pathway of arginine, which has reduced basal NO levels. The NO synthase inhibitor l-NAME partially restored yeast growth in the presence of PAF26. These findings correlate antifungal activity of PAF26 with NO production and provide a plausible explanation for the resistance phenotype of Δarg1 through its involvement in NO biosynthesis. PMID:22120633

  6. A novel cell penetrating peptide carrier for the delivery of nematocidal proteins drug

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jea Hyun

    Nematodes have recently become a primary source of harmful diseases to the environment that inflict harsh damages to pine trees and marine species. However, nematodes cannot be killed by normal pesticides or chemicals due to their thick outer protective layer mainly composed of collagen and cuticles. Thus, a novel approach to trigger intracellular delivery of chemicals through the layers of nematodes is required. In this study, the selection of the novel CPP was carefully progressed through protein database and serial digested fragmentation, internalization of each amino sequence was analyzed through flow cytometry and confocal microscope. As one of the most effective CPP material, JH 1.6 was compared with other major CPPs and its cellular toxicity was investigated. Furthermore, JH 1.6 was attached to various RNA, DNA, and proteins and internalization efficiency was evaluated for mammalian cells. To examine its effects on nematodes in vivo, JH 1.6 was conjugated with nematocidal protein - botulinum neurotoxin (BnT) and treated in C.elegans as a model animal. The results showed that JH 1.6 had high relative internalization rate and low cellular toxicity compared to other major CPP such as TAT and GV1001 peptides.

  7. Cell-penetrating peptides mediated protein cross-membrane delivery and its use in bacterial vector vaccine.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jimei; Xu, Jinmei; Guan, Lingyu; Hu, Tianjian; Liu, Qin; Xiao, Jingfan; Zhang, Yuanxing

    2014-07-01

    It is an attractive strategy to develop a recombinant bacterial vector vaccine by expressing exogenous protective antigen to induce the immune response, and the main concern is how to enhance the cellular internalization of antigen produced by bacterial vector. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short cationic/amphipathic peptides which facilitate cellular uptake of various molecular cargoes and therefore have great potentials in vector vaccine design. In this work, eleven different CPPs were fused to the C-terminus of EGFP respectively, and the resultant EGFP-CPP fusion proteins were expressed and purified to assay their cross-membrane transport in macrophage J774 A.1 cells. Among the tested CPPs, TAT showed an excellent capability to deliver the cargo protein EGFP into cytoplasm. In order to establish an efficient antigen delivery system in Escherichia coli, the EGFP-TAT synthesis circuit was combined with an in vivo inducible lysis circuit PviuA-E in E. coli to form an integrated antigen delivery system, the resultant E. coli was proved to be able to lyse upon the induction of a mimic in vivo signal and thus release intracellular EGFP-TAT intensively, which were assumed to undergo a more efficient intracellular delivery by CPP to evoke protective immune responses. Based on the established antigen delivery system, the protective antigen gene flgD from an invasive intracellular fish pathogen Edwardsiella tarda EIB202, was applied to establish an E. coli recombinant vector vaccine. This E. coli vector vaccine presented superior immune protection (RPS = 63%) under the challenge with E. tarda EIB202, suggesting that the novel antigen delivery system had great potential in bacterial vector vaccine applications. PMID:24746937

  8. Enzyme-triggered delivery of chlorambucil from conjugates based on the cell-penetrating peptide BP16.

    PubMed

    Soler, Marta; González-Bártulos, Marta; Figueras, Eduard; Ribas, Xavi; Costas, Miquel; Massaguer, Anna; Planas, Marta; Feliu, Lidia

    2015-02-01

    The undecapeptide KKLFKKILKKL-NH2 (BP16) is a non-toxic cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that is mainly internalized into cancer cells through a clathrin dependent endocytic mechanism and localizes in late endosomes. Moreover, this CPP is able to enhance the cellular uptake of chlorambucil (CLB) improving its cytotoxicity. In this work, we further explored the cell-penetrating properties of BP16 and those of its arginine analogue BP308. We investigated the influence on the cytotoxicity and on the cellular uptake of conjugating CLB at the N- or the C-terminal end of these undecapeptides. The effect of incorporating the cathepsin B-cleavable sequence Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly in CLB-BP16 and CLB-BP308 conjugates was also evaluated. The activity of CLB was significantly improved when conjugated at the N- or the C-terminus of BP16, or at the N-terminus of BP308. While CLB alone was not active (IC50 of 73.7 to >100 μM), the resulting conjugates displayed cytotoxic activity against CAPAN-1, MCF-7, PC-3, 1BR3G and SKMEL-28 cell lines with IC50 values ranging from 8.7 to 25.5 μM. These results were consistent with the internalization properties observed for the corresponding 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein-labeled conjugates. The presence of the tetrapeptide Gly-Phe-Leu-Gly at either the N- or the C-terminus of CLB-BP16 conjugates further increased the efficacy of CLB (IC50 of 3.6 to 16.2 μM), which could be attributed to its selective release in the lysosomal compartment. Enzymatic assays with cathepsin B showed the release of CLB-Gly-OH from these sequences within a short time. Therefore, the combination of BP16 with an enzymatic cleavable sequence can be used as a drug delivery system for the effective uptake and release of drugs in cancer cells. PMID:25474438

  9. A Cancer Specific Cell-Penetrating Peptide, BR2, for the Efficient Delivery of an scFv into Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ki Jung; Sung, Bong Hyun; Shin, Ju Ri; Lee, Young Woong; Kim, Da Jung; Yang, Kyung Seok; Kim, Sun Chang

    2013-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have proven very effective as intracellular delivery vehicles for various therapeutics. However, there are some concerns about non-specific penetration and cytotoxicity of CPPs for effective cancer treatments. Herein, based on the cell-penetrating motif of an anticancer peptide, buforin IIb, we designed several CPP derivatives with cancer cell specificity. Among the derivatives, a 17-amino acid peptide (BR2) was found to have cancer-specificity without toxicity to normal cells. After specifically targeting cancer cells through interaction with gangliosides, BR2 entered cells via lipid-mediated macropinocytosis. Moreover, BR2 showed higher membrane translocation efficiency than the well-known CPP Tat (49–57). The capability of BR2 as a cancer-specific drug carrier was demonstrated by fusion of BR2 to a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) directed toward a mutated K-ras (G12V). BR2-fused scFv induced a higher degree of apoptosis than Tat-fused scFv in K-ras mutated HCT116 cells. These results suggest that the novel cell-penetrating peptide BR2 has great potential as a useful drug delivery carrier with cancer cell specificity. PMID:23776609

  10. Enhanced oral bioavailability of insulin using PLGA nanoparticles co-modified with cell-penetrating peptides and Engrailed secretion peptide (Sec).

    PubMed

    Zhu, Siqi; Chen, Shuangxi; Gao, Yuan; Guo, Feng; Li, Fengying; Xie, Baogang; Zhou, Jianliang; Zhong, Haijun

    2016-07-01

    Biodegradable polymer nanoparticle drug carriers are an attractive strategy for oral delivery of peptide and protein drugs. However, their ability to cross the intestinal epithelium membrane is largely limited. Therefore, in the present study, cell-penetrating peptides (R8, Tat, penetratin) and a secretion peptide (Sec) with N-terminal stearylation were introduced to modify nanoparticles (NPs) on the surface to improve oral bioavailability of peptide and protein drugs. In vitro studies conducted in Caco-2 cells showed the value of the apparent permeability coefficient (Papp) of the nanoparticles co-modified with Sec and penetratin (Sec-Pen-NPs) was about two-times greater than that of the nanoparticles modified with only penetratin (Pen-NPs), while the increase of transcellular transport of nanoparticles modified together with Sec and R8 (Sec-R8-NPs), or Sec and Tat (Sec-Tat-NPs), was not significant compared with nanoparticles modified with only R8 (R8-NPs) or Tat (Tat-NPs). Using insulin as the model drug, in vivo studies performed on rats indicated that compared to Pen-NPs, the relative bioavailability of insulin for Sec-Pen-NPs was 1.71-times increased after ileal segments administration, and stronger hypoglycemic effects was also observed. Therefore, the nanoparticles co-modified with penetratin and Sec could act as attractive carriers for oral delivery of insulin. PMID:26181841

  11. Targeting Multidrug-resistant Staphylococci with an anti-rpoA Peptide Nucleic Acid Conjugated to the HIV-1 TAT Cell Penetrating Peptide.

    PubMed

    Abushahba, Mostafa Fn; Mohammad, Haroon; Seleem, Mohamed N

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus infections present a serious challenge to healthcare practitioners due to the emergence of resistance to numerous conventional antibiotics. Due to their unique mode of action, peptide nucleic acids are novel alternatives to traditional antibiotics to tackle the issue of bacterial multidrug resistance. In this study, we designed a peptide nucleic acid covalently conjugated to the HIV-TAT cell penetrating peptide (GRKKKRRQRRRYK) in order to target the RNA polymerase α subunit gene (rpoA) required for bacterial genes transcription. We explored the antimicrobial activity of the anti-rpoA construct (peptide nucleic acid-TAT) against methicillin-resistant S. aureus, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus, vancomycin-resistant S. aureus, linezolid-resistant S. aureus, and methicillin-resistant S. epidermidis in pure culture, infected mammalian cell culture, and in an in vivo Caenorhabditis elegans infection model. The anti-rpoA construct led to a concentration-dependent inhibition of bacterial growth (at micromolar concentrations) in vitro and in both infected cell culture and in vivo in C. elegans. Moreover, rpoA gene silencing resulted in suppression of its message as well as reduced expression of two important methicillin-resistant S. aureus USA300 toxins (α-hemolysin and Panton-Valentine leukocidin). This study confirms that rpoA gene is a potential target for development of novel antisense therapeutics to treat infections caused by methicillin-resistant S. aureus. PMID:27434684

  12. Effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers on the oral absorption of tripterine

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yan; Yuan, Ling; Zhou, Lei; Zhang, Zhen-hai; Cao, Wei; Wu, Qingqing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose To develop nanostructured-lipid carriers (NLCs) coated with cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) for improving the oral bioavailability of tripterine. Methods We prepared CPP-coated tripterine-loaded NLCs (CT-NLCs) by using a solvent evaporation method, and determined their physical properties. In vitro drug release was determined by using a dialysis bag diffusion technique, and intestinal toxicity was evaluated by performing MTT assay using Caco-2 cells. In vivo absorption was studied in an in situ rat intestinal perfusion model, and oral bioavailability was examined in beagles. Results The average particle size, zeta potential, and encapsulation efficiency of the optimized CT-NLCs were 126.7 ± 9.2 nm, 28.7 ± 3.4 mV, and 72.64% ± 1.37%, respectively. The CT-NLCs showed a controlled release profile in vitro and had significantly lower intestinal cytotoxicity than the tripterine solution (P < 0.05). The absorption levels of tripterine from the CT-NLCs in the rat duodenum and jejunum were markedly higher than with tripterine-loaded NLCs without the CPP coating (T-NLCs), and with tripterine solution. Pharmacokinetic study showed that the maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs was greater than that of the T-NLCs and tripterine suspension, and that the time to maximum concentration of the CT-NLCs as well as the T-NLCs, was longer than that of the tripterine suspension. The relative oral bioavailability of the CT-NLCs compared to that of tripterine suspension and T-NLCs were 484.75% and 149.91% respectively. Conclusion The oral bioavailability of tripterine is dramatically increased by CT-NLCs. Therefore, CT-NLCs seem to be a promising carrier for oral delivery of tripterine. PMID:22942642

  13. Region-Dependent Role of Cell-Penetrating Peptides in Insulin Absorption Across the Rat Small Intestinal Membrane.

    PubMed

    Khafagy, El-Sayed; Iwamae, Ruisha; Kamei, Noriyasu; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-11-01

    We have reported that the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin acts as a potential absorption enhancer in oral insulin delivery systems and that this action occurs through noncovalent intermolecular interactions. However, the region-dependent role of CPPs in intestinal insulin absorption has not been clarified. To identify the intestinal region where CPPs have the most effect in increasing insulin absorption, the region-dependent action of penetratin was investigated using in situ closed intestinal loops in rats. The order of the insulin area under the insulin concentration-time curve (AUC) increase effect by L-penetratin was ileum > jejunum > duodenum > colon. By contrast, the AUC order after coadministration of insulin with D-penetratin was colon > duodenum ≥ jejunum and ileum. We also compared the effects of the L- and D-forms of penetratin, R8, and PenetraMax on ileal insulin absorption. Along with the CPPs used in this study, L- and D-PenetraMax produced the largest insulin AUCs. An absorption study using ilea pretreated with CPPs showed that PenetraMax had no irreversible effect on the intestinal epithelial membrane. The degradation of insulin in the presence of CPPs was assessed in rat intestinal enzymatic fluid. The half-life (t 1/2) of insulin increased from 14.5 to 23.7 and 184.7 min in the presence of L- and D-PenetraMax, respectively. These enzymatic degradation-resistant effects might contribute partly to the increased ileal absorption of insulin induced by D-PenetraMax. In conclusion, this study demonstrated that the ability of the L- and D-forms of penetratin to increase intestinal insulin absorption was maximal in the ileum and the colon, respectively, and that D-PenetraMax is a powerful but transient enhancer of oral insulin absorption. PMID:26216471

  14. Enhanced anti-tumor activity of trichosanthin after combination with a human-derived cell-penetrating peptide, and a possible mechanism of activity.

    PubMed

    Lu, Ye-Zhou; Li, Peng-Fei; Li, Yan-Zhong; Luo, Fan; Guo, Chao; Lin, Bin; Cao, Xue-Wei; Zhao, Jian; Wang, Fu-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Trichosanthin (TCS), a type I ribosome-inactivating protein (RIP-I) and renowned Chinese traditional medicine, displays a broad spectrum of biological and pharmacological properties. Particularly, its anti-tumor activity has received a great deal of attention. However, the cellular mechanism for TCS uptake varies with different tumor cell lines, leading to discrepancies in its reported ability to penetrate cells. In this study, HBD, a human derived cell-penetrating peptide (CPP), was used to improve the delivery of TCS into several types of tumor cells, including HeLa cells. Recombinant TCS (rTCS) with or without the fused HBD peptide was expressed in Escherichia coli cells and successfully purified by Ni-NTA affinity chromatography. The cellular uptake efficiency of FITC-labelled-rTCS-HBD was observed in HeLa cells and compared with the uptake efficiency of non-HBD conjugated rTCS under the same conditions using laser confocal microscopy. Moreover, the IC50 value of rTCS-HBD in the tested tumor cells was much lower than that of rTCS, indicating that HBD could efficiently deliver the rTCS into tumor cells. When compared with rTCS, rTCS-HBD induced higher rates of apoptosis in HeLa cells as analyzed by flow cytometry. Furthermore, the apoptotic events observed in HeLa cells incubated with HBD-fused rTCS included activation of Caspase-9, decrease in the Bcl-2/Bax ratio, and cleavage of PARP. These results strongly suggest the participation of mitochondria in apoptosis. This report illustrates one possible method for achieving the efficient transport of TCS into cells using a CPP as a vector, and increases the likelihood that TCS can be used in the clinic. PMID:27050721

  15. Effect of different intestinal conditions on the intermolecular interaction between insulin and cell-penetrating peptide penetratin and on its contribution to stimulation of permeation through intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Aoyama, Yukina; Khafagy, El-Sayed; Henmi, Mao; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2015-08-01

    Our recent studies have shown that the coadministration of cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is a potential strategy for oral delivery of peptide- and protein-based biopharmaceuticals. The intermolecular interaction between drug and CPP is an essential factor in the effective delivery of these drugs, but the characteristics of the interaction under the conditions of the intestinal lumen remain unknown. In this study, therefore, we examined the characteristics of binding of the amphipathic CPP penetratin to insulin and the efficiency of its enhancement of epithelial insulin transport at different pH and in simulated intestinal fluids (SIFs). The binding between insulin and penetratin was pH dependent and particularly decreased at pH 5.0. In addition, we clarified that the sodium taurocholate (NaTC) present in two types of SIF (fasted-state SIF [FaSSIF] and fed-state SIF [FeSSIF]) affected binding efficiency. However, the permeation of insulin through a Caco-2 cell monolayer was significantly facilitated by coincubation with l- or d-penetratin at various pH values. Moreover, the permeation-stimulating effect of l-penetratin was observed in FaSSIF containing NaTC and lecithin, but not in 3mM NaTC solution, suggesting that the presence of lecithin was the key factor in maintaining the ability of penetratin to enhance the intestinal absorption of biopharmaceuticals. This report describes the essential considerations for in vivo use and clinical application of a CPP-based oral delivery strategy. PMID:25960330

  16. Design and mechanism of action of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide from the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, W.L.; Lan Hongliang; Park, Il-Seon; Kim, Jae Il; Jin, H.Z.; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Shin, S.Y. . E-mail: syshin@chosun.ac.kr

    2006-10-20

    Here, we report the successful design of a novel bacteria-selective antimicrobial peptide, Pep-1-K (KKTWWKTWWTKWSQPKKKRKV). Pep-1-K was designed by replacing Glu-2, Glu-6, and Glu-11 in the cell-penetrating peptide Pep-1 with Lys. Pep-1-K showed strong antibacterial activity against reference strains (MIC = 1-2 {mu}M) of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as against clinical isolates (MIC = 1-8 {mu}M) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In contrast, Pep-1-K did not cause hemolysis of human erythrocytes even at 200 {mu}M. These results indicate that Pep-1-K may be a good candidate for antimicrobial drug development, especially as a topical agent against antibiotic-resistant microorganisms. Tryptophan fluorescence studies indicated that the lack of hemolytic activity of Pep-1-K correlated with its weak ability to penetrate zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (10:1, w/w) vesicles, which mimic eukaryotic membranes. Furthermore, Pep-1-K caused little or no dye leakage from negatively charged phosphatidylethanolamine/phosphatidylglycerol (7:3, w/w) vesicles, which mimic bacterial membranes but had a potent ability to cause depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane potential of intact S. aureus cells. These results suggested that Pep-1-K kills microorganisms by not the membrane-disrupting mode but the formation of small channels that permit transit of ions or protons but not molecules as large as calcein.

  17. Antitumor activity of tripterine via cell-penetrating peptide-coated nanostructured lipid carriers in a prostate cancer model

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ling; Liu, Congyan; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Zhenhai; Zhou, Lei; Qu, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antitumor effect of cell-penetrating peptide-coated tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (CT-NLC) on prostate tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. Methods CT-NLC were developed to improve the hydrophilicity of tripterine. The antiproliferative effects of CT-NLC, tripterine-loaded nanostructured lipid carriers (T-NLC), and free tripterine in a human prostatic carcinoma cell line (PC-3) and a mouse prostate carcinoma cell line (RM-1) were evaluated using an MTT assay. The advantage of CT-NLC over T-NLC and free tripterine with regard to antitumor activity in vivo was evaluated in a prostate tumor-bearing mouse model. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content was investigated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to determine the effect of CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine on immune responses. Histologic and TUNEL assays were carried out to investigate the mechanisms of tumor necrosis and apoptosis. Results CT-NLC, T-NLC, and free tripterine showed high antiproliferative activity in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 0.60, 0.81, and 1.02 μg/mL in the PC-3 cell line and 0.41, 0.54, and 0.89 μg/mL in the RM-1 cell line after 36 hours. In vivo, the tumor inhibition rates for cyclophosphamide, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) tripterine, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) T-NLC, high-dose (4 mg/kg) and low-dose (2 mg/kg) CT-NLC were 76.51%, 37.07%, 29.53%, 63.56%, 48.25%, 72.68%, and 54.50%, respectively, showing a dose-dependent pattern. The induced tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 cytokine content after treatment with CT-NLC and T-NLC was significantly higher than that of high-dose tripterine. Moreover, CT-NLC showed the expected advantage of inducing necrosis and apoptosis in prostate tumor cells. Conclusion CT-NLC noticeably enhanced antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo and showed dramatically improved cytotoxicity in normal cells

  18. Folic Acid-Targeted and Cell Penetrating Peptide-Mediated Theranostic Nanoplatform for High-Efficiency Tri-Modal Imaging-Guided Synergistic Anticancer Phototherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Tingting; Liu, Chen; Ye, Shiyi; Liang, Jiangong; Han, Heyou

    2016-05-01

    A novel nanomaterial with precisely-defined size and shape, biocompatible composition, and excellent stability, which can integrate multi modal targeted imaging and therapy into a single system for visualized therapeutics, has recently attracted significant research interest. Here, we developed a multifunctional nanoplatform based on silica-coated 4-mercaptobenzoic acid-modified gold nanorods (Au NRs) decorated with gold nanoclusters rich in the photosensitizer Ce6 (Au-Ce6 NCs). The nanoparticles also comprised folic acid and cell penetrating peptide molecules anchored on the surface, obtaining the Au@SiO2@Au-cell penetrating peptide nanocomposite. The Au-Ce6 NCs enhanced the photophysical stability, provided numerous bonding sites and offered a large surface-area and interior space to achieve a high drug loading efficiency (up to 55%). The anchored folic acid and cell penetrating peptide synergistically enhanced the efficiency of uptake of nanocomposites by HeLa cells (up to 70.7%) and improved therapeutic efficacy. The nanocomposite also has good water-solubility, excellent biocompatibility, and long-term stability against illumination and exposure to pH 3-12, thus facilitating their bioapplications in cancer theranostics. Here, the nanocomposite was established for high-resolution and noninvasive tri-modal surface-enhanced Raman spectrum/dark-field/fluorescence imaging-guided high-efficiency synergistic photodynamic/photothermal therapy of cancer. Our studies demonstrate that the multifunctional nanocomposite has the potential as a novel and sensitive contrast agent for complementary and synergistic theranostics in the clinic. PMID:27305812

  19. Structural parameters modulating the cellular uptake of disulfide-rich cyclic cell-penetrating peptides: MCoTI-II and SFTI-1.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Charlotte; Henriques, Sónia Troeira; Wang, Conan K; Craik, David J

    2014-12-17

    Peptides are emerging as a new class of therapeutics due to their high potency and specificity for a range of targets, including the inhibition of protein-protein interactions. Disulfide-rich cyclic peptides, in particular, have attracted much attention in drug design due to their ultra-stable structure. Moreover, some of them have been shown to internalize into cells, which makes them potential scaffolds to deliver pharmaceutically bioactive sequences to intracellular targets. Here we examined the effects of structural modifications on the cell-penetrating properties of two disulfide-rich cyclic cell-penetrating peptides, Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor II (MCoTI-II) and sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1 (SFTI-1). We found that the cellular uptake of MCoTI-II can be improved by increasing the overall positive charge of the native sequence. On the other hand, mutations to SFTI-1 did not significantly influence its cellular uptake, suggesting a non-specific endocytosis-dependent mechanism of cellular uptake. This study provides an understanding of the structural features affecting the internalization of MCoTI-II and SFTI-1, and hence provides a guide for the development of these disulfide-rich cyclic scaffolds into potential drug leads. PMID:24985034

  20. Enhanced cellular internalization of CdTe quantum dots mediated by arginine- and tryptophan-rich cell-penetrating peptides as efficient carriers.

    PubMed

    Farkhani, Samad Mussa; Johari-Ahar, Mohammad; Zakeri-Milani, Parvin; Shahbazi Mojarrad, Javid; Valizadeh, Hadi

    2016-09-01

    Quantum dots (QDs), as a new class of fluorescent tags, have been widely used for biomedical applications. Despite their various advantages, QDs do not efficiently enter cells on their own, and aggregation often occurs following internalization. In the present study, we have designed three QD-cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) complexes to increase the uptake of QD into cells. The results demonstrated that R9 and R5W3R4 form relatively stable noncovalent complexes with QDs, considerably increasing the rate and efficiency of QD uptake by A549 cells. These data suggest that cationic CPPs could efficiently transfer QDs into cells in a non-toxic manner. PMID:25884240

  1. Co-operative Membrane Disruption Between Cell-penetrating Peptide and Cargo: Implications for the Therapeutic Use of the Bcl-2 Converter Peptide D-NuBCP-9-r8

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Catherine L; Sayers, Edward J; Allender, Chris; Barrow, David; Fegan, Christopher; Brennan, Paul; Jones, Arwyn T

    2011-01-01

    Delivering apoptosis inducing peptides to cells is an emerging area in cancer and molecular therapeutics. Here, we have identified an alternative mechanism of action for the proapoptotic chimeric peptide D-NuBCP-9-r8. Integral to D-NuBCP-9-r8 is the Nur-77-derived D-isoform sequence fsrslhsll that targets Bcl-2, and the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) octaarginine (r8) that is required for intracellular delivery. We find that the N-terminal phenylalanine of fsrslhsll acts in synergy with the cell-penetrating moiety to enhance peptide uptake at low nontoxic levels and cause rapid membrane blebbing and cell necrosis at higher (IC50) concentrations. These effects were not observed when a single phenylalanine–alanine mutation was introduced at the N-terminus of D-NuBCP-9-r8. Using primary samples from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients and cancer cell lines, we show that NuBCP-9-r8 induced toxicity, via membrane disruption, is independent of Bcl-2 expression. Overall, this study demonstrates a new mechanism of action for this peptide and cautions its use as a highly specific entity for targeting Bcl-2. For delivery of therapeutic peptides the work emphasizes that key amino acids in cargo, located several residues away from the cell-penetrating sequence, can significantly influence their cellular uptake and mode of action. PMID:21934653

  2. Interference with RUNX1/ETO Leukemogenic Function by Cell-Penetrating Peptides Targeting the NHR2 Oligomerization Domain

    PubMed Central

    Bartel, Yvonne; Grez, Manuel; Wichmann, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The leukemia-associated fusion protein RUNX1/ETO is generated by the chromosomal translocation t(8;21) which appears in about 12% of all de novo acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs). Essential for the oncogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO is the oligomerization of the chimeric fusion protein through the nervy homology region 2 (NHR2) within ETO. In previous studies, we have shown that the intracellular expression of peptides containing the NHR2 domain inhibits RUNX1/ETO oligomerization, thereby preventing cell proliferation and inducing differentiation of RUNX1/ETO transformed cells. Here, we show that introduction of a recombinant TAT-NHR2 fusion polypeptide into the RUNX1/ETO growth-dependent myeloid cell line Kasumi-1 results in decreased cell proliferation and increased numbers of apoptotic cells. This effect was highly specific and mediated by binding the TAT-NHR2 peptide to ETO sequences, as TAT-polypeptides containing the oligomerization domain of BCR did not affect cell proliferation or apoptosis in Kasumi-1 cells. Thus, the selective interference with NHR2-mediated oligomerization by peptides represents a challenging but promising strategy for the inhibition of the leukemogenic potential of RUNX1/ETO in t(8;21)-positive leukemia. PMID:23865046

  3. The potent antimicrobial properties of cell penetrating peptide-conjugated silver nanoparticles with excellent selectivity for Gram-positive bacteria over erythrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lihong; Yang, Jun; Xie, Jianping; Luo, Zhentao; Jiang, Jiang; Yang, Yi Yan; Liu, Shaomin

    2013-04-01

    Silver nanoparticles are of great interest for use as antimicrobial agents. Studies aimed at producing potent nano-silver biocides have focused on manipulation of particle size, shape, composition and surface charge. Here, we report the cell penetrating peptide catalyzed formation of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide. The novel nano-composite demonstrated a distinctly enhanced biocidal effect toward bacteria (Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli) and pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans), as compared to triangular and extremely small silver nanoparticles. In addition, a satisfactory biocompatibility was verified by a haemolysis test. Our results provide a paradigm in developing strategies that can maximize the silver nanoparticle application potentials while minimizing the toxic effects.Silver nanoparticles are of great interest for use as antimicrobial agents. Studies aimed at producing potent nano-silver biocides have focused on manipulation of particle size, shape, composition and surface charge. Here, we report the cell penetrating peptide catalyzed formation of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles in N,N-dimethylformamide. The novel nano-composite demonstrated a distinctly enhanced biocidal effect toward bacteria (Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, Gram-negative Escherichia coli) and pathogenic yeast (Candida albicans), as compared to triangular and extremely small silver nanoparticles. In addition, a satisfactory biocompatibility was verified by a haemolysis test. Our results provide a paradigm in developing strategies that can maximize the silver nanoparticle application potentials while minimizing the toxic effects. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c3nr34254a

  4. Discovery of a non-cationic cell penetrating peptide derived from membrane-interacting human proteins and its potential as a protein delivery carrier.

    PubMed

    Young Kim, Hyo; Young Yum, Soo; Jang, Goo; Ahn, Dae-Ro

    2015-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) are peptides that can be translocated into cells and used as a carrier platform for the intracellular uptake of cargo molecules. Subject to the source of CPP sequences and their positively charged nature, the cytotoxicity and immunogenicity of conventional CPPs needs to be optimized to expand their utility for biomedical applications. In addition to these safety issues, the stability of CPPs needs to be addressed since their positively charged residues are prone to interact with the biological milieu. As an effort to overcome these limitations of the current CPP technology, we isolated CPP candidate sequences and synthesized peptides from twelve isoforms of annexin, a family of membrane-interacting human proteins. The candidate screen returned a CPP rich in hydrophobic residues that showed more efficient cellular uptake than TAT-CPP. We then investigated the uptake mechanism, subcellular localization, and biophysical properties of the newly found CPP, verifying low cytotoxicity, long-term serum stability, and non-immunogenicity. Finally, model proteins conjugated to this peptide were successfully delivered into mammalian cells both in vitro and in vivo, indicating a potential use of the peptide as a carrier for the delivery of macromolecular cargos. PMID:26114640

  5. The cell-penetrating peptide domain from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) has anti-inflammatory activity in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jue-Yeon; Seo, Yoo-Na; Park, Hyun-Jung; Park, Yoon-Jeong; Chung, Chong-Pyoung

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP sequence identified from HB-EGF has cell penetration activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits the NF-{kappa}B dependent inflammatory responses. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP directly blocks phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer HBP inhibits nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B p65 subunit. -- Abstract: A heparin-binding peptide (HBP) sequence from human heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor (HB-EGF) was identified and was shown to exhibit cell penetration activity. This cell penetration induced an anti-inflammatory reaction in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. HBP penetrated the cell membrane during the 10 min treatment and reduced the LPS-induced production of nitric oxide (NO), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and cytokines (TNF-{alpha} and IL-6) in a concentration-dependent manner. Additionally, HBP inhibited the LPS-induced upregulation of cytokines, including TNF-{alpha} and IL-6, and decreased the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. HBP inhibited NF-{kappa}B-dependent inflammatory responses by directly blocking the phosphorylation and degradation of I{kappa}B{alpha} and by subsequently inhibiting the nuclear translocation of the p65 subunit of NF-{kappa}B. Taken together, this novel HBP may be potentially useful candidate for anti-inflammatory treatments and can be combined with other drugs of interest to transport attached molecules into cells.

  6. Synthesis, cellular uptake and HIV-1 Tat-dependent trans-activation inhibition activity of oligonucleotide analogues disulphide-conjugated to cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Turner, John J.; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Gait, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    Oligonucleotides composed of 2′-O-methyl and locked nucleic acid residues complementary to HIV-1 trans-activation responsive element TAR block Tat-dependent trans-activation in a HeLa cell assay when delivered by cationic lipids. We describe an improved procedure for synthesis and purification under highly denaturing conditions of 5′-disulphide-linked conjugates of 3′-fluorescein labelled oligonucleotides with a range of cell-penetrating peptides and investigate their abilities to enter HeLa cells and block trans-activation. Free uptake of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide conjugates to Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9F2 was observed in cytosolic compartments of HeLa cells. Uptake of the Tat conjugate was enhanced by N-terminal addition of four Lys or Arg residues or a second Tat peptide. None of the conjugates entered the nucleus or inhibited trans-activation when freely delivered, but inhibition was obtained in the presence of cationic lipids. Nuclear exclusion was seen for free delivery of Tat (48–58), Penetratin and R9 conjugates of 16mer phosphorothioate OMe oligonucleotide. Uptake into human fibroblast cytosolic compartments was seen for Tat, Penetratin, R9F2 and Transportan conjugates. Large enhancements of HeLa cell uptake into cytosolic compartments were seen when free Tat peptide was added to Tat conjugate of 12mer OMe/LNA oligonucleotide or Penetratin peptide to Penetratin conjugate of the same oligonucleotide. PMID:15640444

  7. Membrane-Bound Dynamic Structure of an Arginine-Rich Cell-Penetrating Peptide, the Protein Transduction Domain of HIV TAT, from Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Hong, Mei

    2010-01-01

    The protein transduction domain of HIV-1 TAT, TAT(48-60), is an efficient cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) that diffuses across the lipid membranes of cells despite eight cationic Arg and Lys residues. To understand its mechanism of membrane translocation against the free energy barrier, we have conducted solid-state NMR experiments to determine the site-specific conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of the TAT peptide in anionic lipid bilayers. We found that TAT(48-60) is a highly dynamic and nearly random-coil peptide in the lipid bilayer, and inserts into the membrane-water interface near the glycerol backbone region. Arg-phosphate salt bridge interaction was revealed by short guanidinium-phosphate distances and restricted dynamics of the guanidinium. Together with the observation of strong peptide-water cross peaks in 1H spin diffusion spectra, these results indicate that TAT binding to the membrane-water interface is stabilized not only by electrostatic attraction to the anionic lipids, but also by intermolecular hydrogen bonding with the lipid phosphates and water, which may take the role of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in canonical secondary structures. The random-coil structure of TAT and another CPP, penetratin, suggests that the lack of amphipathic structure is essential for rapid translocation of these Arg-rich CPPs across the lipid membrane without causing permanent damages to the membrane integrity. PMID:20550193

  8. A+-Helix of Protein C Inhibitor (PCI) Is a Cell-penetrating Peptide That Mediates Cell Membrane Permeation of PCI*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hanjiang; Wahlmüller, Felix Christof; Sarg, Bettina; Furtmüller, Margareta; Geiger, Margarethe

    2015-01-01

    Protein C inhibitor (PCI) is a serpin with broad protease reactivity. It binds glycosaminoglycans and certain phospholipids that can modulate its inhibitory activity. PCI can penetrate through cellular membranes via binding to phosphatidylethanolamine. The exact mechanism of PCI internalization and the intracellular role of the serpin are not well understood. Here we showed that testisin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored serine protease, cleaved human PCI and mouse PCI (mPCI) at their reactive sites as well as at sites close to their N terminus. This cleavage was observed not only with testisin in solution but also with cell membrane-anchored testisin on U937 cells. The cleavage close to the N terminus released peptides rich in basic amino acids. Synthetic peptides corresponding to the released peptides of human PCI (His1–Arg11) and mPCI (Arg1–Ala18) functioned as cell-penetrating peptides. Because intact mPCI but not testisin-cleaved mPCI was internalized by Jurkat T cells, a truncated mPCI mimicking testisin-cleaved mPCI was created. The truncated mPCI lacking 18 amino acids at the N terminus was not taken up by Jurkat T cells. Therefore our model suggests that testisin or other proteases could regulate the internalization of PCI by removing its N terminus. This may represent one of the mechanisms regulating the intracellular functions of PCI. PMID:25488662

  9. Enhanced Cellular Uptake of Albumin-Based Lyophilisomes when Functionalized with Cell-Penetrating Peptide TAT in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    van Bracht, Etienne; Versteegden, Luuk R. M.; Stolle, Sarah; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Woestenenk, Rob; Raavé, René; Hafmans, Theo; Oosterwijk, Egbert; Brock, Roland; van Kuppevelt, Toin H.; Daamen, Willeke F.

    2014-01-01

    Lyophilisomes are a novel class of biodegradable proteinaceous nano/micrometer capsules with potential use as drug delivery carrier. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) including the TAT peptide have been successfully implemented for intracellular delivery of a broad variety of cargos including various nanoparticulate pharmaceutical carriers. In the present study, lyophilisomes were modified using CPPs in order to achieve enhanced cellular uptake. Lyophilisomes were prepared by a freezing, annealing, and lyophilization method and a cystein-elongated TAT peptide was conjugated to the lyophilisomes using a heterobifunctional linker. Fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS) was utilized to acquire a lyophilisome population with a particle diameter smaller than 1000 nm. Cultured HeLa, OVCAR-3, Caco-2 and SKOV-3 cells were exposed to unmodified lyophilisomes and TAT-conjugated lyophilisomes and examined with FACS. HeLa cells were investigated in more detail using a trypan blue quenching assay, confocal microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. TAT-conjugation strongly increased binding and cellular uptake of lyophilisomes in a time-dependent manner in vitro, as assessed by FACS. These results were confirmed by confocal microscopy. Transmission electron microscopy indicated rapid cellular uptake of TAT-conjugated lyophilisomes via phagocytosis and/or macropinocytosis. In conclusion, TAT-peptides conjugated to albumin-based lyophilisomes are able to enhance cellular uptake of lyophilisomes in HeLa cells. PMID:25369131

  10. Reversible Sheet–Turn Conformational Change of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide in Lipid Bilayers Studied by Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Mani, Rajeswari; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound conformation of a cell-penetrating peptide, penetratin, is investigated using solid-state NMR spectroscopy. The 13C chemical shifts of 13C, 15N-labeled residues in the peptide indicate a reversible conformational change from β-sheet at low temperature to coil-like at high temperature. This conformational change occurs for all residues examined between positions 3 and 13, at peptide/lipid molar ratios of 1:15 and 1:30, in membranes with 25–50% anionic lipids, and in both saturated DMPC/DMPG (1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylchloline/1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) membranes and unsaturated POPC/POPG (1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine/1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylglycerol) membranes. Thus, it is an intrinsic property of penetratin. The coil state of the peptide has C– H order parameters of 0.23–0.52 for Cα and Cβ sites, indicating that the peptide backbone is unstructured. Moreover, chemical shift anisotropy lineshapes are uniaxially averaged, suggesting that the peptide backbone undergoes uniaxial rotation around the bilayer normal. These observations suggest that the dynamic state of penetratin at high temperature is a structured turn instead of an isotropic random coil. The thermodynamic parameters of this sheet–turn transition are extracted and compared to other membrane peptides reported to exhibit conformational changes. We suggest that the function of this turn conformation may be to reduce hydrophobic interactions with the lipid chains and facilitate penetratin translocation across the bilayer without causing permanent membrane damage. PMID:18656895

  11. Mechanisms of cell penetration and cytotoxicity of ultrasmall Au nanoparticles conjugated to doxorubicin and/or targeting peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeau, Jay; Poon, Wilson; Zhang, Xuan

    2015-03-01

    The goals of this work were to determine whether conjugation of any of four selected peptides to Au nanoparticles improved their delivery to B16 melanoma in vitro and in vivo. In in vitro cytotoxicity assays, peptides and conjugates were endocytosed but did not escape from endosomes. None of the peptides showed any cytotoxicity, with or without conjugation to the nanoparticles. The combination of peptides and doxorubicin did not improve upon the cytotoxicity of gold-doxorubicin alone. We then tested targeting in vivo using inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry to quantify the concentration of Au in the organs of B16 tumor-bearing mice 4, 24, and 72 h after intravenous Au nanoparticle injection. These experiments showed that in some cases, peptide conjugation improved upon the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. A peptide based upon the myxoma virus and the cyclic RGD peptide were both effective at tumor targeting; myxoma was more effective with un-PEGylated particles, and cRGD with PEGylated particles. The FREG and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) peptides did not improve targeting. These results suggest that these peptides may improve delivery of Au particles to tumors, but also may prevent entry of particles into cell nuclei.

  12. Parallel Synthesis of Cell-Penetrating Peptide Conjugates of PMO Toward Exon Skipping Enhancement in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    O'Donovan, Liz; Okamoto, Itaru; Arzumanov, Andrey A.; Williams, Donna L.; Deuss, Peter

    2015-01-01

    We describe two new methods of parallel chemical synthesis of libraries of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) cargoes on a scale suitable for cell screening prior to in vivo analysis for therapeutic development. The methods represent an extension of the SELection of PEPtide CONjugates (SELPEPCON) approach previously developed for parallel peptide-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) synthesis. However, these new methods allow for the utilization of commercial PMO as cargo with both C- and N-termini unfunctionalized. The synthetic methods involve conjugation in solution phase, followed by rapid purification via biotin-streptavidin immobilization and subsequent reductive release into solution, avoiding the need for painstaking high-performance liquid chromatography purifications. The synthesis methods were applied for screening of PMO conjugates of a 16-member library of variants of a 10-residue ApoE peptide, which was suggested for blood-brain barrier crossing. In this work the conjugate library was tested in an exon skipping assay using skeletal mouse mdx cells, a model of Duchene's muscular dystrophy where higher activity peptide-PMO conjugates were identified compared with the starting peptide-PMO. The results demonstrate the power of the parallel synthesis methods for increasing the speed of optimization of peptide sequences in conjugates of PMO for therapeutic screening. PMID:25412073

  13. Parallel synthesis of cell-penetrating peptide conjugates of PMO toward exon skipping enhancement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    O'Donovan, Liz; Okamoto, Itaru; Arzumanov, Andrey A; Williams, Donna L; Deuss, Peter; Gait, Michael J

    2015-02-01

    We describe two new methods of parallel chemical synthesis of libraries of peptide conjugates of phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligonucleotide (PMO) cargoes on a scale suitable for cell screening prior to in vivo analysis for therapeutic development. The methods represent an extension of the SELection of PEPtide CONjugates (SELPEPCON) approach previously developed for parallel peptide-peptide nucleic acid (PNA) synthesis. However, these new methods allow for the utilization of commercial PMO as cargo with both C- and N-termini unfunctionalized. The synthetic methods involve conjugation in solution phase, followed by rapid purification via biotin-streptavidin immobilization and subsequent reductive release into solution, avoiding the need for painstaking high-performance liquid chromatography purifications. The synthesis methods were applied for screening of PMO conjugates of a 16-member library of variants of a 10-residue ApoE peptide, which was suggested for blood-brain barrier crossing. In this work the conjugate library was tested in an exon skipping assay using skeletal mouse mdx cells, a model of Duchene's muscular dystrophy where higher activity peptide-PMO conjugates were identified compared with the starting peptide-PMO. The results demonstrate the power of the parallel synthesis methods for increasing the speed of optimization of peptide sequences in conjugates of PMO for therapeutic screening. PMID:25412073

  14. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  15. An efficient PEGylated liposomal nanocarrier containing cell-penetrating peptide and pH-sensitive hydrazone bond for enhancing tumor-targeted drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yuan; Sun, Dan; Wang, Gui-Ling; Yang, Hong-Ge; Xu, Hai-Feng; Chen, Jian-Hua; Xie, Ying; Wang, Zhi-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) as small molecular transporters with abilities of cell penetrating, internalization, and endosomal escape have potential prospect in drug delivery systems. However, a bottleneck hampering their application is the poor specificity for cells. By utilizing the function of hydration shell of polyethylene glycol (PEG) and acid sensitivity of hydrazone bond, we constructed a kind of CPP-modified pH-sensitive PEGylated liposomes (CPPL) to improve the selectivity of these peptides for tumor targeting. In CPPL, CPP was directly attached to liposome surfaces via coupling with stearate (STR) to avoid the hindrance of PEG as a linker on the penetrating efficiency of CPP. A PEG derivative by conjugating PEG with STR via acid-degradable hydrazone bond (PEG2000-Hz-STR, PHS) was synthesized. High-performance liquid chromatography and flow cytometry demonstrated that PHS was stable at normal neutral conditions and PEG could be completely cleaved from liposome surface to expose CPP under acidic environments in tumor. An optimal CPP density on liposomes was screened to guaranty a maximum targeting efficiency on tumor cells as well as not being captured by normal cells that consequently lead to a long circulation in blood. In vitro and in vivo studies indicated, in 4 mol% CPP of lipid modified system, that CPP exerted higher efficiency on internalizing the liposomes into targeted subcellular compartments while remaining inactive and free from opsonins at a maximum extent in systemic circulation. The 4% CPPL as a drug delivery system will have great potential in the clinical application of anticancer drugs in future. PMID:26491292

  16. Synthesis of Glycopolymer Containing Cell-Penetrating Peptides as Inducers of Recombinant Protein Expression under the Control of Lactose Operator/Repressor Systems.

    PubMed

    Katagiri, Kei; Takasu, Akinori; Higuchi, Masahiro

    2016-05-01

    We recently reported on newly synthesized S-galactosyl oligo(Arg) conjugates to overcome the serious problem of the passage through the E. coli cell membrane. Following in vivo expression of green fluorescent protein (GFP) induced by each of the S-galactosyl (Arg)n constructs (n = 5, 6, 8) at the T5 promoter in E. coli for 18 h, we visually observed that the cultures fluoresced green light when excited with UV light. The fluorescence intensities for these cultures were greater than that found for a control culture, indicating that the peptides had induced GFP expression. In order to accomplish higher expression efficiency, we investigated the cluster effect and structural fine-tuning of new poly(2-oxazoline) containing CysArgArg as the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) and S-galactosides when acting as inducers of recombinant protein expression under the control of lac operator/repressor systems in this article. Quantitative fluorescence intensities (calculated per molecule) also supported the observations that the cell-penetrating glyco poly(2-oxazoline)s were better inducers of GFP expression than glyco poly(2-oxazoline) containing no CPP or isopropyl β-d-thiogalactoside. Because the level of GFP expression was directly related to the number of sugar residues in each glyco poly(2-oxazoline), we propose that a cluster effect of the S-galactosides attached to the cell-penetrating poly(2-oxazoline) is responsible for how well the galactosides inhibited the lac repressor to activate the protein expression under the control of the lac operator/repressor system. A similar tendency was observed when the T7 promoter was placed upstream of the gene for an artificial extracellular matrix protein and glyco poly(2-oxazoline)s-CPP conjugates were used as inducers. To assess how the glyco poly(2-oxazoline) penetrate the cell membrane, we labeled the glyco poly(2-oxazoline) using 1-amino pyrene and directly observed the penetration process. Furthermore, we could visualize protein

  17. Inhibition of malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum development by crotamine, a cell penetrating peptide from the snake venom.

    PubMed

    El Chamy Maluf, S; Dal Mas, C; Oliveira, E B; Melo, P M; Carmona, A K; Gazarini, M L; Hayashi, M A F

    2016-04-01

    We show here that crotamine, a polypeptide from the South American rattlesnake venom with cell penetrating and selective anti-fungal and anti-tumoral properties, presents a potent anti-plasmodial activity in culture. Crotamine inhibits the development of the Plasmodium falciparum parasites in a dose-dependent manner [IC50 value of 1.87 μM], and confocal microscopy analysis showed a selective internalization of fluorescent-labeled crotamine into P. falciparum infected erythrocytes, with no detectable fluorescence in uninfected healthy erythrocytes. In addition, similarly to the crotamine cytotoxic effects, the mechanism underlying the anti-plasmodial activity may involve the disruption of parasite acidic compartments H(+) homeostasis. In fact, crotamine promoted a reduction of parasites organelle fluorescence loaded with the lysosomotropic fluorochrome acridine orange, in the same way as previously observed mammalian tumoral cells. Taken together, we show for the first time crotamine not only compromised the metabolism of the P. falciparum, but this toxin also inhibited the parasite growth. Therefore, we suggest this snake polypeptide as a promising lead molecule for the development of potential new molecules, namely peptidomimetics, with selectivity for infected erythrocytes and ability to inhibit the malaria infection by its natural affinity for acid vesicles. PMID:26806200

  18. Efficient entry of cell-penetrating peptide nona-arginine into adherent cells involves a transient increase in intracellular calcium

    PubMed Central

    Melikov, Kamran; Hara, Ann; Yamoah, Kwabena; Zaitseva, Elena; Zaitsev, Eugene; Chernomordik, Leonid V.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the mechanism of entry of cationic peptides such as nona-arginine (R9) into cells remains an important challenge to their use as efficient drug-delivery vehicles. At nanomolar to low micromolar R9 concentrations and at physiological temperature, peptide entry involves endocytosis. In contrast, at a concentration ≥10 μM, R9 induces a very effective non-endocytic entry pathway specific for cationic peptides. We found that a similar entry pathway is induced at 1–2 μM concentrations of R9 if peptide application is accompanied by a rapid temperature drop to 15°C. Both at physiological and at sub-physiological temperatures, this entry mechanism was inhibited by depletion of the intracellular ATP pool. Intriguingly, we found that R9 at 10–20 μM and 37°C induces repetitive spikes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This Ca2+ signalling correlated with the efficiency of the peptide entry. Pre-loading cells with the Ca2+ chelator BAPTA (1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N′,N′-tetraacetic acid) inhibited both Ca2+ spikes and peptide entry, suggesting that an increase in intracellular Ca2+ precedes and is required for peptide entry. One of the hallmarks of Ca2+ signalling is a transient cell-surface exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), a lipid normally residing only in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. Blocking the accessible PS with the PS-binding domain of lactadherin strongly inhibited non-endocytic R9 entry, suggesting the importance of PS externalization in this process. To conclude, we uncovered a novel mechanistic link between calcium signalling and entry of cationic peptides. This finding will enhance our understanding of the properties of plasma membrane and guide development of future drug-delivery vehicles. PMID:26272944

  19. The Antimicrobial Domains of Wheat Puroindolines Are Cell-Penetrating Peptides with Possible Intracellular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Alfred, Rebecca L.; Palombo, Enzo A.; Panozzo, Joseph F.; Bhave, Mrinal

    2013-01-01

    The puroindoline proteins (PINA and PINB) of wheat display lipid-binding properties which affect the grain texture, a critical parameter for wheat quality. Interestingly, the same proteins also display antibacterial and antifungal properties, attributed mainly to their Tryptophan-rich domain (TRD). Synthetic peptides based on this domain also display selectivity towards bacterial and fungal cells and do not cause haemolysis of mammalian cells. However, the mechanisms of these activities are unclear, thus limiting our understanding of the in vivo roles of PINs and development of novel applications. This study investigated the mechanisms of antimicrobial activities of synthetic peptides based on the TRD of the PINA and PINB proteins. Calcein dye leakage tests and transmission electron microscopy showed that the peptides PuroA, Pina-M and Pina-W→F selectively permeabilised the large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) made with negatively charged phospholipids mimicking bacterial membranes, but were ineffective against LUVs made with zwitterionic phospholipids mimicking eukaryotic membranes. Propidium iodide fluorescence tests of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells showed the peptides were able to cause loss of membrane integrity, PuroA and Pina-M being more efficient. Scanning electron micrographs of PINA-based peptide treated yeast cells showed the formation of pits or pores in cell membranes and release of cellular contents. Gel retardation assays indicated the peptides were able to bind to DNA in vitro, and the induction of filamental growth of E. coli cells indicated in vivo inhibition of DNA synthesis. Together, the results strongly suggest that the PIN-based peptides exert their antimicrobial effects by pore formation in the cell membrane, likely by a carpet-like mechanism, followed by intracellular mechanisms of activity. PMID:24098387

  20. Roles of Arginine and Lysine Residues in the Translocation of a Cell-Penetrating Peptide from 13C, 31P and 19F Solid-State NMR

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yongchao; Doherty, Tim; Waring, Alan J.; Ruchala, Piotr; Hong, Mei

    2009-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are small cationic peptides that cross the cell membrane while carrying macromolecular cargoes. We use solid-state NMR to investigate the structure and lipid interaction of two cationic residues, Arg10 and Lys13, in the CPP penetratin. 13C chemical shifts indicate that Arg10 adopts a rigid β-strand conformation in the liquid-crystalline state of anionic lipid membranes. This behavior contrasts with all other residues observed so far in this peptide, which adopt a dynamic β-turn conformation with coil-like chemical shifts at physiological temperature. Low-temperature 13C-31P distances between the peptide and the lipid phosphates indicate that both the Arg10 guanidinium Cζ and the Lys13 Cε lie in close proximity to the lipid 31P (4.0 - 4.2 Å), proving the existence of charge-charge interaction for both Arg10 and Lys13 in the gel-phase membrane. However, since lysine substitution in CPPs are known to reduce their translocation ability, we propose that low temperature stabilizes both lysine and arginine interactions with the phosphates, whereas at high temperature the lysine-phosphate interaction is much weaker than the arginine-phosphate interaction. This is supported by the unusually high rigidity of the Arg10 sidechain and its β-strand conformation at high temperature. The latter is proposed to be important for ion pair formation by allowing close approach of the lipid headgroups to guanidinium sidechains. 19F and 13C spin diffusion experiments indicate that penetratin is oligomerized into β-sheets in gel-phase membranes. These solid-state NMR data indicate that guanidinium-phosphate interactions exist in penetratin, and guanidinium groups play a stronger structural role than ammonium groups in the lipid-assisted translocation of CPPs across liquid-crystalline cell membranes. PMID:19364134

  1. Identification of a Short Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Bovine Lactoferricin for Intracellular Delivery of DNA in Human A549 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Betty R.; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S.; Lee, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to deliver cargos, including protein, DNA, RNA, and nanomaterials, in fully active forms into live cells. Most of the CPP sequences in use today are based on non-native proteins that may be immunogenic. Here we demonstrate that the L5a CPP (RRWQW) from bovine lactoferricin (LFcin), stably and noncovalently complexed with plasmid DNA and prepared at an optimal nitrogen/phosphate ratio of 12, is able to efficiently enter into human lung cancer A549 cells. The L5a CPP delivered a plasmid containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence that was subsequently expressed in cells, as revealed by real-time PCR and fluorescent microscopy at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Treatment with calcium chloride increased the level of gene expression, without affecting CPP-mediated transfection efficiency. Zeta-potential analysis revealed that positively electrostatic interactions of CPP/DNA complexes correlated with CPP-mediated transport. The L5a and L5a/DNA complexes were not cytotoxic. This biomimetic LFcin L5a represents one of the shortest effective CPPs and could be a promising lead peptide with less immunogenic for DNA delivery in gene therapy. PMID:26942714

  2. Visualization and Quantitative Assessment of the Brain Distribution of Insulin through Nose-to-Brain Delivery Based on the Cell-Penetrating Peptide Noncovalent Strategy.

    PubMed

    Kamei, Noriyasu; Shingaki, Tomotaka; Kanayama, Yousuke; Tanaka, Misa; Zochi, Riyo; Hasegawa, Koki; Watanabe, Yasuyoshi; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2016-03-01

    Our recent work suggested that intranasal coadministration with the cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) penetratin increased the brain distribution of the peptide drug insulin. The present study aimed to distinctly certify the ability of penetratin to facilitate the nose-to-brain delivery of insulin by quantitatively evaluating the distribution characteristics in brain using radioactive (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin. Autoradiography and analysis using a gamma counter of brain areas demonstrated that the accumulation of radioactivity was greatest in the olfactory bulb, the anterior part of the brain closest to the administration site, at 15 min after intranasal administration of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with l- or d-penetratin. The brain accumulation of (64)Cu-NODAGA-insulin with penetratin was confirmed by ELISA using unlabeled insulin in which intact insulin was delivered to the brain after intranasal coadministration with l- or d-penetratin. By contrast, quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples showed increased insulin concentration in only the anterior portion of the CSF at 15 min after intranasal coadministration with l-penetratin. This study gives the first concrete proof that penetratin can accelerate the direct transport of insulin from the nasal cavity to the brain parenchyma. Further optimization of intranasal administration with CPP may increase the efficacy of delivery of biopharmaceuticals to the brain while reducing the risk of systemic drug exposure. PMID:26795701

  3. Synthesis, characterization and applications of carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolated bifunctionalized InP/ZnS quantum dots in cellular internalization mediated by cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Winiarz, Jeffrey G; Moon, Jong-Sik; Lo, Shih-Yen; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2013-11-01

    Semiconductor nanoparticles, also known as quantum dots (QDs), are widely used in biomedical imaging studies and pharmaceutical research. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are a group of small peptides that are able to traverse cell membrane and deliver a variety of cargoes into living cells. CPPs deliver QDs into cells with minimal nonspecific absorption and toxic effect. In this study, water-soluble, monodisperse, carboxyl-functionalized indium phosphide (InP)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) QDs coated with polyethylene glycol lipids (designated QInP) were synthesized for the first time. The physicochemical properties (optical absorption, fluorescence and charging state) and cellular internalization of QInP and CPP/QInP complexes were characterized. CPPs noncovalently interact with QInP in vitro to form stable CPP/QInP complexes, which can then efficiently deliver QInP into human A549 cells. The introduction of 500nM of CPP/QInP complexes and QInP at concentrations of less than 1μM did not reduce cell viability. These results indicate that carboxylated and polyethylene-glycolylated (PEGylated) bifunctionalized QInP are biocompatible nanoparticles with potential for use in biomedical imaging studies and drug delivery applications. PMID:23792556

  4. Identification of a Short Cell-Penetrating Peptide from Bovine Lactoferricin for Intracellular Delivery of DNA in Human A549 Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Betty R; Huang, Yue-Wern; Aronstam, Robert S; Lee, Han-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been shown to deliver cargos, including protein, DNA, RNA, and nanomaterials, in fully active forms into live cells. Most of the CPP sequences in use today are based on non-native proteins that may be immunogenic. Here we demonstrate that the L5a CPP (RRWQW) from bovine lactoferricin (LFcin), stably and noncovalently complexed with plasmid DNA and prepared at an optimal nitrogen/phosphate ratio of 12, is able to efficiently enter into human lung cancer A549 cells. The L5a CPP delivered a plasmid containing the enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequence that was subsequently expressed in cells, as revealed by real-time PCR and fluorescent microscopy at the mRNA and protein levels, respectively. Treatment with calcium chloride increased the level of gene expression, without affecting CPP-mediated transfection efficiency. Zeta-potential analysis revealed that positively electrostatic interactions of CPP/DNA complexes correlated with CPP-mediated transport. The L5a and L5a/DNA complexes were not cytotoxic. This biomimetic LFcin L5a represents one of the shortest effective CPPs and could be a promising lead peptide with less immunogenic for DNA delivery in gene therapy. PMID:26942714

  5. Cell-penetration by Co(III)cyclen-based peptide-cleaving catalysts selective for pathogenic proteins of amyloidoses.

    PubMed

    Chei, Woo Suk; Lee, Joo-Won; Kim, Jae Bum; Suh, Junghun

    2010-07-15

    Derivatives of the Co(III) complex of 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane (cyclen) with various organic pendants have been reported as target-selective peptide-cleaving catalysts, which can be exploited as catalytic drugs. In order to provide a firm basis for the catalytic drugs based on Co(III)cyclen, the ability of the Co(III)cyclen-containing peptide-cleaving catalysts to penetrate animal cells such as mouse fibroblast NIH-3T 3 or human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells is demonstrated in the present study. Since the catalysts destroy pathogenic proteins for amyloidoses, results of the present study are expected to initiate extensive efforts to obtain therapeutically safe catalytic drugs for amyloidoses such as Alzheimer's disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, mad cow disease, and so on. PMID:20542701

  6. The cell-penetrating peptide, Pep-1, has activity against intracellular chlamydial growth but not extracellular forms of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Narae; Yamanaka, Kinrin; Tran, Dat; Chandrangsu, Pete; Akers, Johnny C.; de Leon, Jessica C.; Morrissette, Naomi S.; Selsted, Michael E.; Tan, Ming

    2009-01-01

    Objectives In the course of studies to identify novel treatment strategies against the pathogenic bacterium, Chlamydia, we tested the carrier peptide, Pep-1, for activity against an intracellular infection. Methods Using a cell culture model of Chlamydia trachomatis infection, the effect of Pep-1 was measured by incubating the peptide with extracellular chlamydiae prior to infection, or by adding Pep-1 to the medium at varying times after infection, and assaying for inhibition of inclusion formation. Results Pep-1 had a concentration-dependent effect on chlamydial growth with 100% inhibition of inclusion formation at 8 mg/L peptide. There was a window of susceptibility during the chlamydial developmental cycle with a maximal effect when treatment was begun within 12 h of infection. Pep-1 treatment caused a severe reduction in the production of infectious progeny even when started later, when the effect on inclusion formation was minimal. Furthermore, electron micrographs showed a paucity of progeny elementary bodies (EBs) in the inclusion. In contrast, pre-incubation of EBs with Pep-1 prior to infection did not affect inclusion formation. Taken together, these findings indicate that the antichlamydial effect was specific for the intracellular stage of chlamydial infection. By comparison, Pep-1 had no antimicrobial activity against Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus or the obligate intracellular parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Conclusions Pep-1 has antichlamydial activity by preventing intracellular chlamydial growth and replication but has no effect on extracellular chlamydiae. PMID:18957395

  7. Cell-penetrating conjugates of coproporphyrins with oligoarginine peptides: rational design and application for sensing intracellular O2.

    PubMed

    Dmitriev, Ruslan I; Ropiak, Honorata M; Ponomarev, Gelii V; Yashunsky, Dmitri V; Papkovsky, Dmitri B

    2011-12-21

    A panel of phosphorescent oligoarginine conjugates of tetracarboxylic Pt(II)-coproporphyrin I dye (PtCP), monosubstituted with long peptides or tetra-substituted with short peptides and having different linkers and peripheral groups, is described. Their photophysical properties, cell loading efficiency, and mechanisms of transport into the cell were investigated and compared. The conjugates were seen to rely on endocytotic mechanisms of cell entry, which are different from that of the unconjugated oligoarginine peptide, and show diverse patterns of intracellular distribution. On the basis of this study, the tetra-substituted PtCP conjugate displaying whole cell distribution was selected for the sensing of intracellular O(2). This probe has been tested in biological experiments on a fluorescence plate reader, including the monitoring of in situ oxygenation of respiring cells and their responses to metabolic stimulation. Similar conjugates of the phosphorescent Pd(II)-coprorphyrin and fluorescent coproporphyrin-ketone were also synthesized and assessed for the sensing of low levels intracellular O(2) and ratiometric pH-sensing, respectively. The results produced and the structure-activity relationships determined can facilitate the rational design of new bioconjugates of porphyrin dyes tailored to specific applications. PMID:22035070

  8. Cell-penetrating peptide-siRNA conjugate loaded YSA-modified nanobubbles for ultrasound triggered siRNA delivery.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiangyang; Yang, Yanfang; Lin, Wen; Liu, Hui; Liu, Hong; Yang, Yang; Chen, Ying; Fu, Xudong; Deng, Jianping

    2015-12-01

    Due to the absence of effective in vivo delivery systems, the employment of small interference RNA (siRNA) in the clinic has been hindered. In this paper, a new siRNA targeting system for EphA2-positive tumors was developed, based on ultrasound-sensitive nanobubbles (NBs) and cell-permeable peptides (CPPs). Here, a CPP-siRNA conjugate (CPP-siRNA) was entrapped in an ephrin mimetic peptide (YSA peptide)-modified NB (CPP-siRNA/YSA-NB) and the penetration of the CPP-siRNA was temporally masked; local ultrasound stimulation triggered the release of CPP-siRNA from the NBs and activated its penetration. Subsequent research demonstrated that the CPP-siRNA/YSA-NBs had particle sizes of approximately 200 nm and a siRNA entrapment efficiency of more than 85%. The in vitro release results showed that over 90% of the encapsulated CPP-siRNA released from the NBs in the presence of ultrasound, while less than 1.5% of that (30 min) released without ultrasound. Cell experiments showed a the higher CPP-siRNA cellular uptake of CPP-siRNA/YSA-NB among the various formulations in human breast adenocarcinoma cells (MCF-7, EphA2 positive cells). Additionally, after systemic administration in mice, CPP-siRNA/YSA-NB accumulated in the tumor, augmented c-Myc silencing and delayed tumor progression. In conclusion, the application of CPP-siRNA/YSA-NB with ultrasound may provide a strategy for the selective and efficient delivery of siRNA. PMID:26492155

  9. Cell-penetrating peptide-doxorubicin conjugate loaded NGR-modified nanobubbles for ultrasound triggered drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Wen; Xie, Xiangyang; Deng, Jianping; Liu, Hui; Chen, Ying; Fu, Xudong; Liu, Hong; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A new drug-targeting system for CD13(+) tumors has been developed, based on ultrasound-sensitive nanobubbles (NBs) and cell-permeable peptides (CPPs). Here, the CPP-doxorubicin conjugate (CPP-DOX) was entrapped in the asparagine-glycine-arginine (NGR) peptide modified NB (CPP-DOX/NGR-NB) and the penetration of CPP-DOX was temporally masked; local ultrasound stimulation could trigger the CPP-DOX release from NB and activate its penetration. The CPP-DOX/NGR-NBs had particle sizes of about 200 nm and drug entrapment efficiency larger than 90%. In vitro release results showed that over 85% of the encapsulated DOX or CPP-DOX would release from NBs in the presence of ultrasound, while less than 1.5% of that (30 min) without ultrasound. Cell experiments showed the higher cellular CPP-DOX uptake of CPP-DOX/NGR-NB among the various NB formulations in Human fibrosarcoma cells (HT-1080, CD13(+)). The CPP-DOX/NGR-NB with ultrasound treatment exhibited an increased cytotoxic activity than the one without ultrasound. In nude mice xenograft of HT-1080 cells, CPP-DOX/NGR-NB with ultrasound showed a higher tumor inhibition effect (3.1% of T/C%, day 24), longer median survival time (50 days) and excellent body safety compared with the normal DOX injection group. These results indicate that the constructed vesicle would be a promising drug delivery system for specific cancer treatment. PMID:26176270

  10. Modified nanoparticles with cell-penetrating peptide and amphipathic chitosan derivative for enhanced oral colon absorption of insulin: preparation and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Guo, Feng; Zhang, Mengyuan; Gao, Yuan; Zhu, Siqi; Chen, Shuangxi; Liu, Wenyu; Zhong, Haijun; Liu, Jianping

    2016-07-01

    Colon is an ideal absorptive site for oral protein and peptide drug (insulin), and yet it poses multiple barriers against the drug absorption, such as the barriers against the drug diffusion from colon lumen toward the absorptive mucosa and permeation across colon epithelium. In this study, modified nanoparticles (Tat-CS-NPs) with cell-penetrating peptide (Tat) and amphipathic chitosan derivative (a-CS) were used as carriers to improve colonic absorption of the drug. With a-CS as emulsifier and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) as matrix material, Tat-CS-NPs were prepared and evaluated in vitro/vivo. Using Caco-2 cell monolayers to imitate the colonic epithelial cells, it was found that the cellular uptake amount and transcellular transportation performance of Tat-CS-NPs were much enhanced compared with those of CS-NPs and PVA-NPs. The efficacy evaluation on diabetic rat models demonstrated that the hypoglycemic effect of Tat-CS-NPs loaded with insulin was 6.89 times higher than that of PVA-NPs, and 1.79 times higher than that of CS-NPs. By gavage of [(99m)Tc] isotope labeled Tat-CS-NPs in mini-pigs and single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) on pigs' gastrointestinal tract, it was further proved that the nanoparticles could reach colon and produce pharmacological effect. In conclusion, Tat-CS-NPs as vehicles for colon-specific drug delivery may be an efficient approach to improve oral bioavailability of protein and peptide drugs. PMID:26181840

  11. Novel cell-penetrating peptide-loaded nanobubbles synergized with ultrasound irradiation enhance EGFR siRNA delivery for triple negative Breast cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Jing, Hui; Cheng, Wen; Li, Shouqiang; Wu, Bolin; Leng, Xiaoping; Xu, Shouping; Tian, Jiawei

    2016-10-01

    The lack of safe and effective gene delivery strategies remains a bottleneck for cancer gene therapy. Here, we describe the synthesis, characterization, and application of cell-penetrating peptide (CPP)-loaded nanobubbles (NBs), which are characterized by their safety, strong penetrating power and high gene loading capability for gene delivery. An epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted small interfering RNA (siEGFR) was transfected into triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) cells via prepared CPP-NBs synergized with ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) technology. Fluorescence microscopy showed that siEGFR and CPP were loaded on the shells of the NBs. The transfection efficiency and cell proliferation levels were evaluated by FACS and MTT assays, respectively. In addition, in vivo experiments showed that the expression of EGFR mRNA and protein could be efficiently downregulated and that the growth of a xenograft tumor derived from TNBC cells could be inhibited. Our results indicate that CPP-NBs carrying siEGFR could potentially be used as a promising non-viral gene vector that can be synergized with UTMD technology for efficient TNBC therapy. PMID:27388967

  12. Attachment of cell-binding ligands to arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptides enables cytosolic translocation of complexed siRNA.

    PubMed

    Zeller, Skye; Choi, Chang Seon; Uchil, Pradeep D; Ban, Hong-Seok; Siefert, Alyssa; Fahmy, Tarek M; Mothes, Walther; Lee, Sang-Kyung; Kumar, Priti

    2015-01-22

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs), such as nona-arginine (9R), poorly translocate siRNA into cells. Our studies demonstrate that attaching 9R to ligands that bind cell surface receptors quantitatively increases siRNA uptake and importantly, allows functional delivery of complexed siRNA. The mechanism involved accumulation of ligand-9R:siRNA microparticles on the cell membrane, which induced transient membrane inversion at the site of ligand-9R binding and rapid siRNA translocation into the cytoplasm. siRNA release also occurred late after endocytosis when the ligand was attached to the L isoform of 9R, but not the protease-resistant 9DR, prolonging mRNA knockdown. This critically depended on endosomal proteolytic activity, implying that partial CPP degradation is required for endosome-to-cytosol translocation. The data demonstrate that ligand attachment renders simple polycationic CPPs effective for siRNA delivery by restoring their intrinsic property of translocation. PMID:25544044

  13. Attachment of cell-binding ligands to arginine-rich cell penetrating peptides enables cytosolic translocation of complexed siRNA

    PubMed Central

    Zeller, Skye; Choi, Changseon; Uchil, Pradeep D.; Ban, Hongseok; Siefert, Alyssa; Fahmy, Tarek M.; Mothes, Walther; Lee, Sang Kyung; Kumar, Priti

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) like nona-arginine (9R) poorly translocate siRNA into cells. Our studies demonstrate that attaching 9R to ligands that bind cell-surface receptors quantitatively increases siRNA uptake and importantly, allows functional delivery of complexed siRNA. The mechanism involved accumulation of ligand-9R:siRNA microparticles on the cell membrane, which induced transient membrane inversion at the site of ligand-9R binding and rapid siRNA translocation into the cytoplasm. siRNA release also occurred late after endocytosis when the ligand was attached to the L isoform of 9R, but not the protease-resistant 9DR, prolonging mRNA knockdown. This critically depended on endosomal proteolytic activity implying partial CPP degradation is required for endosome to cytosol translocation. The data demonstrate that ligand attachment renders simple polycationic CPPs effective for siRNA delivery by restoring their intrinsic property of translocation. PMID:25544044

  14. Targeting the EGFR/PCNA Signaling Suppresses Tumor Growth of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells with Cell-Penetrating PCNA Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yung-Luen; Chou, Ruey-Hwang; Liang, Jia-Hong; Chang, Wei-Jung; Su, Kuo-Jung; Tseng, Yen-Ju; Huang, Wei-Chien; Wang, Shao-Chun; Hung, Mien-Chie

    2013-01-01

    Tyrosine 211 (Y211) phosphorylation of proliferation cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) coincides with pronounced cancer cell proliferation and correlates with poor survival of breast cancer patients. In epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-resistant cells, both nuclear EGFR (nEGFR) expression and PCNA Y211 phosphorylation are increased. Moreover, the resistance to EGFR TKI is a major clinical problem in treating EGFR-overexpressing triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). Thus, effective treatment to combat resistance is urgently needed. Here, we show that treatment of cell-penetrating PCNA peptide (CPPP) inhibits growth and induces apoptosis of human TNBC cells. The Y211F CPPP specifically targets EGFR and competes directly for PCNA tyrosine Y211 phosphorylation and prevents nEGFR from binding PCNA in vivo; it also suppresses tumor growth by sensitizing EGFR TKI resistant cells, which have enhanced nEGFR function and abrogated classical EGFR membrane signaling. Furthermore, we identify an active motif of CPPP, RFLNFF (RF6 CPPP), which is necessary and sufficient to inhibit TKI-resistant TNBC cell growth of orthotopic implanted tumor in mice. Finally, the activity of its synthetic retro-inverted derivative, D-RF6 CPPP, on an equimolar basis, is more potent than RF6 CPPP. Our study reveals a drug candidate with translational potential for the future development of safe and effective therapeutic for EGFR TKI resistance in TNBC. PMID:23593472

  15. A novel cell-penetrating peptide suppresses breast tumorigenesis by inhibiting β-catenin/LEF-1 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Tsung-Hua; Hsu, Chia-Yi; Tsai, Cheng-Fang; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Liang, Shih-Shin; Wang, Tsu-Nai; Kuo, Po-Lin; Long, Cheng-Yu; Tsai, Eing-Mei

    2016-01-01

    The inhibition of β-catenin/LEF-1 signaling is an emerging strategy in cancer therapy. However, clinical targeted treatment of the β-catenin/LEF-1 complex remains relatively ineffective. Therefore, development of specific molecular targets is a key approach for identifying new cancer therapeutics. Thus, we attempted to synthesize a peptide (TAT-NLS-BLBD-6) that could interfere with the interaction of β-catenin and LEF-1 at nuclei in human breast cancer cells. TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 directly interacted with β-catenin and inhibited breast cancer cell growth, invasion, migration, and colony formation as well as increased arrest of sub-G1 phase and apoptosis; it also suppressed breast tumor growth in nude mouse and zebrafish xenotransplantation models, showed no signs of toxicity, and did not affect body weight. Furthermore, the human global gene expression profiles and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software showed that the TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 downstream target genes were associated with the HER-2 and IL-9 signaling pathways. TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 commonly down-regulated 27 candidate genes in MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, which are concurrent with Wnt downstream target genes in human breast cancer. Our study suggests that TAT-NLS-BLBD-6 is a promising drug candidate for the development of effective therapeutics specific for Wnt/β-catenin signaling inhibition. PMID:26750754

  16. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Dixon, James E; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M

    2016-01-19

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  17. Highly efficient delivery of functional cargoes by the synergistic effect of GAG binding motifs and cell-penetrating peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dixon, James E.; Osman, Gizem; Morris, Gavin E.; Markides, Hareklea; Rotherham, Michael; Bayoussef, Zahia; El Haj, Alicia J.; Denning, Chris; Shakesheff, Kevin M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein transduction domains (PTDs) are powerful nongenetic tools that allow intracellular delivery of conjugated cargoes to modify cell behavior. Their use in biomedicine has been hampered by inefficient delivery to nuclear and cytoplasmic targets. Here we overcame this deficiency by developing a series of novel fusion proteins that couple a membrane-docking peptide to heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) with a PTD. We showed that this GET (GAG-binding enhanced transduction) system could deliver enzymes (Cre, neomycin phosphotransferase), transcription factors (NANOG, MYOD), antibodies, native proteins (cytochrome C), magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), and nucleic acids [plasmid (p)DNA, modified (mod)RNA, and small inhibitory RNA] at efficiencies of up to two orders of magnitude higher than previously reported in cell types considered hard to transduce, such as mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs), human ESCs (hESCs), and induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). This technology represents an efficient strategy for controlling cell labeling and directing cell fate or behavior that has broad applicability for basic research, disease modeling, and clinical application. PMID:26733682

  18. Efficient siRNA Delivery Using Novel Cell-Penetrating Peptide-siRNA Conjugate-Loaded Nanobubbles and Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Xie, Xiangyang; Lin, Wen; Li, Mingyuan; Yang, Yang; Deng, Jianping; Liu, Hui; Chen, Ying; Fu, Xudong; Liu, Hong; Yang, Yanfang

    2016-06-01

    Because of the absence of tolerable and effective carriers for in vivo delivery, the applications of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in the clinic for therapeutic purposes have been limited. In this study, development of a novel siRNA delivery system based on ultrasound-sensitive nanobubbles (NBs, nano-sized echogenic liposomes) and cell-permeable peptides (CPPs) is described. A CPP-siRNA conjugate was entrapped in an NB, (CPP-siRNA)-NB, and the penetration of CPP-siRNA was temporally masked; local ultrasound stimulation triggered the release of CPP-siRNA from the NBs and activated its penetration. Subsequent research revealed that the (CPP-siRNA)-NBs had a mean particle size of 201 ± 2.05 nm and a siRNA entrapment efficiency >85%. In vitro release results indicated that >90% of the encapsulated CPP-siRNA was released from NBs in the presence of ultrasound, whereas <1.5% (30 min) was released in the absence of ultrasound. Cell experiments indicated higher cellular CPP-siRNA uptake of (CPP-siRNA)-NBs with ultrasound among the various formulations in human breast adenocarcinoma cells (HT-1080). Additionally, after systemic administration in mice, (CPP-siRNA)-NBs accumulated in the tumor, augmented c-myc silencing and delayed tumor progression. In conclusion, the application of (CPP-siRNA)-NBs with ultrasound may constitute an approach to selective targeted delivery of siRNA. PMID:27012462

  19. In vivo proof of concept of oral insulin delivery based on a co-administration strategy with the cell-penetrating peptide penetratin.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Ebbe Juel Bech; Yoshida, Shinya; Kamei, Noriyasu; Iwamae, Ruisha; Khafagy, El-Sayed; Olsen, Jørgen; Rahbek, Ulrik Lytt; Pedersen, Betty Lomstein; Takayama, Kozo; Takeda-Morishita, Mariko

    2014-09-10

    Oral delivery of insulin is blocked by low intestinal absorption caused by the poor permeability of insulin across cellular membranes and the susceptibility to enzymatic degradation in the gastrointestinal tract. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have been investigated for a number of years as oral absorption enhancers for hydrophilic macromolecules. Penetratin, a cationic and amphipathic CPP, effectively enhances insulin absorption and we were able to alleviate the enzymatic barrier by using the enzymatic resistant D-form of penetratin. In this study, mice were dosed orally with a physical mixture of insulin and penetratin. Blood glucose concentrations were measured and a pharmacological availability (PA) of 18.2% was achieved in mice dosed with insulin and D-penetratin. Following the promising data, we investigated the degradation parameters of insulin and penetratin in rat intestinal fluid. As expected, L-penetratin was degraded rapidly whereas D-penetratin had a halflife of 67±7min in 10-fold diluted gastrointestinal fluid. Insulin degradation was slowed by the presence of penetratin in intestinal fluid. The half-life of insulin increased from 24.9±4.5min to 55.6±14min and 90.5±11.8min in the presence of L- and D-penetratin respectively. In conclusion, both Land D-penetratin acted as oral absorption enhancers at select CPP concentrations for insulin and the current study is the first solid evidence of pharmacological activity of oral insulin delivery systems based on non-covalent intermolecular interactions with penetratin. PMID:24973720

  20. Cell-penetrating peptide and antibiotic combination therapy: a potential alternative to combat drug resistance in methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Randhawa, Harmandeep Kaur; Gautam, Ankur; Sharma, Minakshi; Bhatia, Rakesh; Varshney, Grish C; Raghava, Gajendra Pal Singh; Nandanwar, Hemraj

    2016-05-01

    The diverse pattern of resistance by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is the major obstacle in the treatment of its infections. The key reason of resistance is the poor membrane permeability of drug molecules. Over the last decade, cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have emerged as efficient drug delivery vehicles and have been exploited to improve the intracellular delivery of numerous therapeutic molecules in preclinical studies. Therefore, to overcome the drug resistance, we have investigated for the first time the effects of two CPPs (P3 and P8) in combination with four antibiotics (viz. oxacillin, erythromycin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin) against MRSA strains. We found that both CPPs internalized into the MRSA efficiently at very low concentration (<10 μM) which was non-toxic to bacteria as well as mammalian cells and showed no significant hemolytic activity. However, the combinations of CPPs (≤10 μM) and antibiotics showed high toxicity against MRSA as compared to antibiotics alone. The significant finding is that P3 and P8 could lower the MICs against oxacillin, norfloxacin, and vancomycin to susceptible levels (generally <1 μg/mL) for almost all five clinical isolates. Further, the bacterial cell death was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy as well as propidium iodide uptake assay. Simultaneously, time-kill kinetics revealed the increased uptake of antibiotics. In summary, CPPs assist to restore the effectiveness of antibiotics at much lower concentration, eliminate the antibiotic toxicity, and represent the CPP-antibiotic combination therapy as a potential novel weapon to combat MRSA infections. PMID:26837216

  1. Cell-penetrating peptides do not cross mitochondrial membranes even when conjugated to a lipophilic cation: evidence against direct passage through phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides) facilitate the cellular uptake of covalently attached oligonucleotides, proteins and other macromolecules, but the mechanism of their uptake is disputed. Two models are proposed: direct movement through the phospholipid bilayer and endocytic uptake. Mitochondria are a good model system to distinguish between these possibilities, since they have no vesicular transport systems. Furthermore, CPP-mediated delivery of macromolecules to the mitochondrial matrix would be a significant breakthrough in the study of mitochondrial function and dysfunction, and could also lead to new therapies for diseases caused by mitochondrial damage. Therefore we investigated whether two CPPs, penetratin and Tat, could act as mitochondrial delivery vectors. We also determined whether conjugation of the lipophilic cation TPP (triphenylphosphonium) to penetratin or Tat facilitated their uptake into mitochondria, since TPP leads to uptake of attached molecules into mitochondria driven by the membrane potential. Neither penetratin nor Tat, nor their TPP conjugates, are internalized by isolated mitochondria, indicating that these CPPs cannot cross mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers. Tat and TPP–Tat are taken up by cells, but they accumulate in endosomes and do not reach mitochondria. We conclude that CPPs cannot cross mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers, and therefore cannot deliver macromolecules directly to mitochondria. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of uptake of CPPs by cells. The lack of direct movement of CPPs through mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers, along with the observed endosomal accumulation of Tat and TPP–Tat in cells, makes it unlikely that CPPs enter cells by direct membrane passage, and instead favours cellular uptake via an endocytic pathway. PMID:15270716

  2. A cell-penetrating peptide based on the interaction between c-Src and connexin43 reverses glioma stem cell phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Gangoso, E; Thirant, C; Chneiweiss, H; Medina, J M; Tabernero, A

    2014-01-01

    Connexin43 (Cx43), the main gap junction channel-forming protein in astrocytes, is downregulated in malignant gliomas. These tumors are composed of a heterogeneous population of cells that include many with stem-cell-like properties, called glioma stem cells (GSCs), which are highly tumorigenic and lack Cx43 expression. Interestingly, restoring Cx43 reverses GSC phenotype and consequently reduces their tumorigenicity. In this study, we investigated the mechanism by which Cx43 exerts its antitumorigenic effects on GSCs. We have focused on the tyrosine kinase c-Src, which interacts with the intracellular carboxy tail of Cx43. We found that Cx43 regulates c-Src activity and proliferation in human GSCs expanded in adherent culture. Thus, restoring Cx43 in GSCs inhibited c-Src activity, which in turn promoted the downregulation of the inhibitor of differentiation Id1. Id1 sustains stem cell phenotype as it controls the expression of Sox2, responsible for stem cell self-renewal, and promotes cadherin switching, which has been associated to epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Our results show that both the ectopic expression of Cx43 and the inhibition of c-Src reduced Id1, Sox2 expression and promoted the switch from N- to E-cadherin, suggesting that Cx43, by inhibiting c-Src, downregulates Id1 with the subsequent changes in stem cell phenotype. On the basis of this mechanism, we found that a cell-penetrating peptide, containing the region of Cx43 that interacts with c-Src, mimics the effect of Cx43 on GSC phenotype, confirming the relevance of the interaction between Cx43 and c-Src in the regulation of the malignant phenotype and pinpointing this interaction as a promising therapeutic target. PMID:24457967

  3. Selective Intracellular Delivery of Recombinant Arginine Deiminase (ADI) Using pH-Sensitive Cell Penetrating Peptides To Overcome ADI Resistance in Hypoxic Breast Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yeh, Tzyy-Harn; Chen, Yun-Ru; Chen, Szu-Ying; Shen, Wei-Chiang; Ann, David K; Zaro, Jennica L; Shen, Li-Jiuan

    2016-01-01

    Arginine depletion strategies, such as pegylated recombinant arginine deiminase (ADI-PEG20), offer a promising anticancer treatment. Many tumor cells have suppressed expression of a key enzyme, argininosuccinate synthetase 1 (ASS1), which converts citrulline to arginine. These tumor cells become arginine auxotrophic, as they can no longer synthesize endogenous arginine intracellularly from citrulline, and are therefore sensitive to arginine depletion therapy. However, since ADI-PEG20 only depletes extracellular arginine due to low internalization, ASS1-expressing cells are not susceptible to treatment since they can synthesize arginine intracellularly. Recent studies have found that several factors influence ASS1 expression. In this study, we evaluated the effect of hypoxia, frequently encountered in many solid tumors, on ASS1 expression and its relationship to ADI-resistance in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. It was found that MDA-MB-231 cells developed ADI resistance in hypoxic conditions with increased ASS1 expression. To restore ADI sensitivity as well as achieve tumor-selective delivery under hypoxia, we constructed a pH-sensitive cell penetrating peptide (CPP)-based delivery system to carry ADI inside cells to deplete both intra- and extracellular arginine. The delivery system was designed to activate the CPP-mediated internalization only at the mildly acidic pH (6.5-7) associated with the microenvironment of hypoxic tumors, thus achieving better selectivity toward tumor cells. The pH sensitivity of the CPP HBHAc was controlled by recombinant fusion to a histidine-glutamine (HE) oligopeptide, generating HBHAc-HE-ADI. The tumor distribution of HBHAc-HE-ADI was comparable to ADI-PEG20 in a mouse xenograft model of human breast cancer cells in vivo. In addition, HBHAc-HE-ADI showed increased in vitro cellular uptake in cells incubated in a mildly acidic pH (hypoxic conditions) compared to normal pH (normoxic conditions), which correlated with p

  4. Development of a novel nanoparticle by dual modification with the pluripotential cell-penetrating peptide PepFect6 for cellular uptake, endosomal escape, and decondensation of an siRNA core complex.

    PubMed

    Mitsueda, Asako; Shimatani, Yuri; Ito, Masahiro; Ohgita, Takashi; Yamada, Asako; Hama, Susumu; Gräslund, Astrid; Lindberg, Staffan; Langel, Ülo; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Nakase, Ikuhiko; Futaki, Shiroh; Kogure, Kentaro

    2013-11-01

    Development of novel devices for effective nucleotide release from nanoparticles is required to improve the functionality of nonviral delivery systems, because decondensation of nucleotide/polycation complexes is considered as a key step for cytoplasmic delivery of nucleotides. Previously, PepFect6 (PF6) comprised chloroquine analog moieties and a stearylated cell-penetrating peptide to facilitate endosomal escape and cellular uptake, respectively, was developed as a device for efficient siRNA delivery. As PF6 contains bulky chloroquine analog moieties, the polyplexes are expected to be loose structure, which facilitates decondensation. In the present study, siRNA was electrostatically condensed by PF6, and the PF6/siRNA complexes were coated with lipid membranes. The surface of the nanoparticles encapsulating the PF6/siRNA core (PF6-NP) was modified with PF6 for endosomal escape (PF6/PF6-NP). The RNAi effect of PF6/PF6-NP was compared with those of stearylated cell-penetrating peptide octaarginine (R8)-modified PF6-NP, R8-modified nanoparticles encapsulating the R8/siRNA core (R8-NP) and PF6-modified R8-NP. Nanoparticles encapsulating the PF6 polyplex, especially PF/PF-NP, showed a significant knockdown effect on luciferase activity of B16-F1 cells stably expressing luciferase. siRNA was widely distributed within the cytoplasm after transfection of the nanoparticles encapsulating the PF6 polyplex, while siRNA encapsulated in the R8-presenting nanoparticles was localized within the nuclei. Thus, the siRNA distribution was dependent on the manner of peptide-modification. In conclusion, we have successfully developed PF6/PF6-NP exhibiting a potent RNAi effect resulting from high cellular uptake, efficient endosomal escape and decondensation of the polyplexes based on the multifunctional cell penetrating peptide PF6. PF6 is therefore a useful pluripotential device for siRNA delivery. PMID:23893316

  5. Tumor Detection at 3 Tesla with an Activatable Cell Penetrating Peptide Dendrimer (ACPPD-Gd), a T1 Magnetic Resonance (MR) Molecular Imaging Agent

    PubMed Central

    Malone, Christopher D.; Olson, Emilia S.; Mattrey, Robert F.; Jiang, Tao; Tsien, Roger Y.; Nguyen, Quyen T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The ability to detect small malignant lesions with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is limited by inadequate accumulations of Gd with standard chelate agents. To date, no T1-targeted agents have proven superiority to Gd chelates in their ability to detect small tumors at clinically relevant field strengths. Activatable cell-penetrating peptides and their Gd-loaded dendrimeric form (ACPPD-Gd) have been shown to selectively accumulate in tumors. In this study we compared the performance of ACPPD-Gd vs. untargeted Gd chelates to detect small tumors in rodent models using a clinical 3T-MR system. Materials and Methods This study was approved by the Institutional-Animal Care-and-Use Committee. 2 of 4 inguinal breast fat pads of 16 albino-C57BL/6 mice were inoculated with tumor Py8119 cells and the other 2 with saline at random. MRI at 3T was performed at 4, 9, and 14 days after inoculation on 8 mice 24-hours after injection of 0.036mmol Gd/kg (ACPPD-Gd), and before and 2–3 minutes after 0.1 mmol/kg gadobutrol on the other 8 mice. T1-weighted (T1w) tumor signal normalized to muscle, was compared among the non-contrast, gadobutrol, and ACPPD-Gd groups using ANOVA. Experienced and trainee readers blinded to experimental conditions assessed for the presence of tumor in each of the 4 breast regions. Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curves and area-under-curve (AUC) values were constructed and analyzed. Results Tumors ≥1mm3 were iso-intense to muscle without contrast on T1w sequences. They enhanced diffusely and homogeneously by 57±20% (p<0.001) 24 hours after ACPPD-Gd and by 25±13% (p<0.001) immediately after gadobutrol. The nearly 2-fold difference was similar for small tumors (1-5mm3) (45±19% vs. 19±18%, p = 0.03). ACPPD-Gd tended to improve tumor detection by an experienced reader (AUC 0.98 vs 0.91) and significantly more for a trainee (0.93 vs. 0.82, p = 0.02) compared to gadobutrol. This improvement was more pronounced when obvious tumors (>5mm3

  6. Membrane damage as first and DNA as the secondary target for anti-candidal activity of antimicrobial peptide P7 derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20 against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Li, Lirong; Song, Fengxia; Sun, Jin; Tian, Xu; Xia, Shufang; Le, Guowei

    2016-06-01

    P7, a peptide analogue derived from cell-penetrating peptide ppTG20, possesses antibacterial and antitumor activities without significant hemolytic activity. In this study, we investigated the antifungal effect of P7 and its anti-Candida acting mode in Candida albicans. P7 displayed antifungal activity against the reference C. albicans (MIC = 4 μM), Aspergilla niger (MIC = 32 μM), Aspergillus flavus (MIC = 8 μM), and Trichopyton rubrum (MIC = 16 μM). The effect of P7 on the C. albicans cell membrane was examined by investigating the calcein leakage from fungal membrane models made of egg yolk l-phosphatidylcholine/ergosterol (10 : 1, w/w) liposomes. P7 showed potent leakage effects against fungal liposomes similar to Melittin-treated cells. C. albicans protoplast regeneration assay demonstrated that P7 interacted with the C. albicans plasma membrane. Flow cytometry of the plasma membrane potential and integrity of C. albicans showed that P7 caused 60.9 ± 1.8% depolarization of the membrane potential of intact C. albicans cells and caused 58.1 ± 3.2% C. albicans cell membrane damage. Confocal laser scanning microscopy demonstrated that part of FITC-P7 accumulated in the cytoplasm. DNA retardation analysis was also performed, which showed that P7 interacted with C. albicans genomic DNA after penetrating the cell membrane, completely inhibiting the migration of genomic DNA above the weight ratio (peptide : DNA) of 6. Our results indicated that the plasma membrane was the primary target, and DNA was the secondary intracellular target of the mode of action of P7 against C. albicans. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27197902

  7. Delivery of siRNA Complexed with Palmitoylated α-Peptide/β-Peptoid Cell-Penetrating Peptidomimetics: Membrane Interaction and Structural Characterization of a Lipid-Based Nanocarrier System.

    PubMed

    Jing, Xiaona; Foged, Camilla; Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Yaghmur, Anan; Knapp, Kolja M; Malmsten, Martin; Franzyk, Henrik; Nielsen, Hanne M

    2016-06-01

    Proteolytically stable α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics constitute promising cell-penetrating carrier candidates exhibiting superior cellular uptake as compared to commonly used cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs). The aim of the present study was to explore the potential of these peptidomimetics for delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) to the cytosol by incorporation of a palmitoylated peptidomimetic construct into a cationic lipid-based nanocarrier system. The optimal construct was selected on the basis of the effect of palmitoylation and the influence of the length of the peptidomimetic on the interaction with model membranes and the cellular uptake. Palmitoylation enhanced the peptidomimetic adsorption to supported lipid bilayers as studied by ellipsometry. However, both palmitoylation and increased peptidomimetic chain length were found to be beneficial in the cellular uptake studies using fluorophore-labeled analogues. Thus, the longer palmitoylated peptidomimetic was chosen for further formulation of siRNA in a dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine/cholesteryl hemisuccinate (DOPE/CHEMS) nanocarrier system, and the resulting nanoparticles were found to mediate efficient gene silencing in vitro. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM) revealed multilamellar, onion-like spherical vesicles, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analysis confirmed that the majority of the lipids in the nanocarriers were organized in lamellar structures, yet coexisted with a hexagonal phase, which is important for efficient nanocarrier-mediated endosomal escape of siRNA ensuring cytosolic delivery. The present work is a proof-of-concept for the use of α-peptides/β-peptoid peptidomimetics in an efficient delivery system that may be more generally exploited for the intracellular delivery of biomacromolecular drugs. PMID:26654841

  8. Conjugation of cell-penetrating peptides with poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid)-polyethylene glycol nanoparticles improves ocular drug delivery

    PubMed Central

    Vasconcelos, Aimee; Vega, Estefania; Pérez, Yolanda; Gómara, María J; García, María Luisa; Haro, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a peptide for ocular delivery (POD) and human immunodeficiency virus transactivator were conjugated with biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PGLA)–polyethylene glycol (PEG)-nanoparticles (NPs) in an attempt to improve ocular drug bioavailability. The NPs were prepared by the solvent displacement method following two different pathways. One involved preparation of PLGA NPs followed by PEG and peptide conjugation (PLGA-NPs-PEG-peptide); the other involved self-assembly of PLGA-PEG and the PLGA-PEG-peptide copolymer followed by NP formulation. The conjugation of the PEG and the peptide was confirmed by a colorimetric test and proton nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Flurbiprofen was used as an example of an anti-inflammatory drug. The physicochemical properties of the resulting NPs (morphology, in vitro release, cell viability, and ocular tolerance) were studied. In vivo anti-inflammatory efficacy was assessed in rabbit eyes after topical instillation of sodium arachidonate. Of the formulations developed, the PLGA-PEG-POD NPs were the smaller particles and exhibited greater entrapment efficiency and more sustained release. The positive charge on the surface of these NPs, due to the conjugation with the positively charged peptide, facilitated penetration into the corneal epithelium, resulting in more effective prevention of ocular inflammation. The in vitro toxicity of the NPs developed was very low; no ocular irritation in vitro (hen’s egg test–chorioallantoic membrane assay) or in vivo (Draize test) was detected. Taken together, these data demonstrate that PLGA-PEG-POD NPs are promising vehicles for ocular drug delivery. PMID:25670897

  9. Identification of a cell-penetrating peptide domain from human beta-defensin 3 and characterization of its anti-inflammatory activity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jue Yeon; Suh, Jin Sook; Kim, Jung Min; Kim, Jeong Hwa; Park, Hyun Jung; Park, Yoon Jeong; Chung, Chong Pyoung

    2015-01-01

    Human beta-defensins (hBDs) are crucial factors of intrinsic immunity that function in the immunologic response to a variety of invading enveloped viruses, bacteria, and fungi. hBDs can cause membrane depolarization and cell lysis due to their highly cationic nature. These molecules participate in antimicrobial defenses and the control of adaptive and innate immunity in every mammalian species and are produced by various cell types. The C-terminal 15-mer peptide within hBD3, designated as hBD3-3, was selected for study due to its cell- and skin-penetrating activity, which can induce anti-inflammatory activity in lipopolysaccharide-treated RAW 264.7 macrophages. hBD3-3 penetrated both the outer membrane of the cells and mouse skin within a short treatment period. Two other peptide fragments showed poorer penetration activity compared to hBD3-3. hBD3-3 inhibited the lipopolysaccharide-induced production of inducible nitric oxide synthase, nitric oxide, and secretory cytokines, such as interleukin-6 and tumor necrosis factor in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, hBD3-3 reduced the interstitial infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in a lung inflammation model. Further investigation also revealed that hBD3-3 downregulated nuclear factor kappa B-dependent inflammation by directly suppressing the degradation of phosphorylated-IκBα and by downregulating active nuclear factor kappa B p65. Our findings indicate that hBD3-3 may be conjugated with drugs of interest to ensure their proper translocation to sites, such as the cytoplasm or nucleus, as hBD3-3 has the ability to be used as a carrier, and suggest a potential approach to effectively treat inflammatory diseases. PMID:26347021

  10. Dual Myostatin and Dystrophin Exon Skipping by Morpholino Nucleic Acid Oligomers Conjugated to a Cell-penetrating Peptide Is a Promising Therapeutic Strategy for the Treatment of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Malerba, Alberto; Kang, Jagjeet K; McClorey, Graham; Saleh, Amer F; Popplewell, Linda; Gait, Michael J; Wood, Matthew JA; Dickson, George

    2012-01-01

    The knockdown of myostatin, a negative regulator of skeletal muscle mass may have important implications in disease conditions accompanied by muscle mass loss like cancer, HIV/AIDS, sarcopenia, muscle atrophy, and Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). In DMD patients, where major muscle loss has occurred due to a lack of dystrophin, the therapeutic restoration of dystrophin expression alone in older patients may not be sufficient to restore the functionality of the muscles. We recently demonstrated that phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs) can be used to re-direct myostatin splicing and promote the expression of an out-of-frame transcript so reducing the amount of the synthesized myostatin protein. Furthermore, the systemic administration of the same PMO conjugated to an octaguanidine moiety (Vivo-PMO) led to a significant increase in the mass of soleus muscle of treated mice. Here, we have further optimized the use of Vivo-PMO in normal mice and also tested the efficacy of the same PMO conjugated to an arginine-rich cell-penetrating peptide (B-PMO). Similar experiments conducted in mdx dystrophic mice showed that B-PMO targeting myostatin is able to significantly increase the tibialis anterior (TA) muscle weight and when coadministered with a B-PMO targeting the dystrophin exon 23, it does not have a detrimental interaction. This study confirms that myostatin knockdown by exon skipping is a potential therapeutic strategy to counteract muscle wasting conditions and dual myostatin and dystrophin skipping has potential as a therapy for DMD. PMID:23250360

  11. Thermal and magnetic dual-responsive liposomes with a cell-penetrating peptide-siRNA conjugate for enhanced and targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yanfang; Xie, Xiangyang; Xu, Xueqing; Xia, Xuejun; Wang, Hongliang; Li, Lin; Dong, Wujun; Ma, Panpan; Yang, Yang; Liu, Yuling; Mei, Xingguo

    2016-10-01

    Due to the absence of effective in vivo delivery systems, the employment of small interfering RNA (siRNA) in the clinic has been hindered. Here, we describe a novel siRNA targeting system that combines features of biological (cell-permeable peptides, CPPs) and physical (magnetic) siRNA targeting for use in magnetic hyperthermia-triggered release. A siRNA-CPPs conjugate (siRNA-CPPs) was loaded into thermal and magnetic dual-responsive liposomes (TML) (siRNA-CPPs/TML), and in vitro siRNA-CPPs thermosensitive release activity, targeted cellular uptake, gene silencing efficiency, in vivo targeted delivery and in vivo antitumor activity were determined. The results demonstrated that siRNA-CPPs/TML exhibited good physicochemical properties, effective cellular uptake, endosomal escape and a significant gene silencing efficiency in MCF-7 cells in vitro. Additionally, in the in vivo study, siRNA-CPPs/TML under an alternating current (AC) magnetic field displayed a superior in vivo targeted delivery efficacy, antitumor efficacy and gene silencing efficiency in a MCF-7 xenograft murine model. In conclusion, the application of siRNA-CPPs/TML under an AC magnetic field represents a new strategy for the selective and efficient delivery of siRNA. PMID:27429294

  12. Optimization of the cyclotide framework to improve cell penetration properties

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yen-Hua; Chaousis, Stephanie; Cheneval, Olivier; Craik, David J.; Henriques, Sónia T.

    2015-01-01

    Cell penetrating peptides have been regarded as promising vectors to deliver hydrophilic molecules inside cells. Although they are great tools for research and have high potential as drug delivery systems, their application as drugs is impaired by their low stability in serum. Cyclotides, cyclic disulfide-rich peptides from plants, are ultra-stable molecules that have inspired applications in drug design as they can be used as scaffolds to stabilize linear bioactive sequences. Recently, they have also been shown to possess cell-penetrating properties. The combination of their remarkable stability and cell-penetrating properties opens new avenues for the application of peptides to bind to and inhibit intracellular proteins. Nevertheless, for a broader application of these molecules as vectors is of utmost importance to improve their cellular internalization efficiency. In this study we successfully modified MCoTI-II, one of the most widely studied cyclotide scaffolds in drug design, and improved its internalization properties. The internalization of the newly designed MCoTI-II is as efficient as the gold standard cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) TAT and maintains all the required features as a template to graft desired bioactivities. PMID:25709580

  13. Peptides Interfering 3A Protein Dimerization Decrease FMDV Multiplication

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Beatriz G.; Valle, Javier; Andreu, David; Sobrino, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Nonstructural protein 3A is involved in relevant functions in foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) replication. FMDV 3A can form homodimers and preservation of the two hydrophobic α-helices (α1 and α2) that stabilize the dimer interface is essential for virus replication. In this work, small peptides mimicking residues involved in the dimer interface were used to interfere with dimerization and thus gain insight on its biological function. The dimer interface peptides α1, α2 and that spanning the two hydrophobic α-helices, α12, impaired in vitro dimer formation of a peptide containing the two α-helices, this effect being higher with peptide α12. To assess the effect of dimer inhibition in cultured cells, the interfering peptides were N-terminally fused to a heptaarginine (R7) sequence to favor their intracellular translocation. Thus, when fused to R7, interference peptides (100 μM) were able to inhibit dimerization of transiently expressed 3A, the higher inhibitions being found with peptides α1 and α12. The 3A dimerization impairment exerted by the peptides correlated with significant, specific reductions in the viral yield recovered from peptide-treated FMDV infected cells. In this case, α2 was the only peptide producing significant reductions at concentrations lower than 100 μM. Thus, dimer interface peptides constitute a tool to understand the structure-function relationship of this viral protein and point to 3A dimerization as a potential antiviral target. PMID:26505190

  14. Liquid Crystalline Nanodispersions Functionalized with Cell-Penetrating Peptides for Topical Delivery of Short-Interfering RNAs: A Proposal for Silencing a Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine in Cutaneous Diseases.

    PubMed

    Petrilli, R; Eloy, J O; Praça, F S G; Del Ciampo, J O; Fantini, M A C; Fonseca, M J V; Bentley, M V L B

    2016-05-01

    Short-interfering RNAs (siRNAs) are a potential strategy for the treatment of cutaneous diseases. In this context, liquid crystalline nanoparticles functionalized with specific proteins and peptide-transduction domains (PTDs), which act as penetration enhancers, are a promising carrier for siRNA delivery through the skin. Herein, hexagonal phase liquid crystal nanoparticles based on monoolein (MO) and/or oleic acid (OA) containing (or lacking) the cationic polymer polyethylenimine (PEI) and the cationic lipid oleylamine (OAM) were functionalized with the membrane transduction peptides transcriptional activator (TAT) or penetratin (PNT). These nanoparticles were complexed with siRNA and characterized by particle size, polydispersity, zeta potential, complexation efficiency and siRNA release. The formulations containing cationic agents presented positive zeta potentials, sizes on the nanometer scale, and complexed siRNAs at concentrations of 10 μM; these agents were successfully released in a heparin competition assay. Cell culture studies demonstrated that nanoparticles composed of MO:OA:PEI functionalized with TAT were the most efficient at transfecting L929 cells, and the uptake efficiency was enhanced by TAT peptide functionalization. Thereafter, the selected formulations were evaluated for in vivo skin irritation, penetration and in vivo efficacy using a chemically induced inflammatory animal model. These nanoparticles did not irritate the skin and provided higher siRNA penetration and delivery into the skin than control formulations. Additionally, efficacy studies in the animal model showed that the association of TAT with the nanodispersion provided higher suppression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α. Thus, the development of liquid crystalline nanodispersions containing TAT may lead to improved topical siRNA delivery for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases. PMID:27305826

  15. Decreased outer membrane permeability protects mycobacteria from killing by ubiquitin-derived peptides.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Georgiana E; Niederweis, Michael; Russell, David G

    2009-09-01

    Ubiquitin-derived peptides are bactericidal in vitro and contribute to the mycobactericidal activity of the lysosome. To further define interactions of ubiquitin-derived peptides with mycobacteria, we screened for mutants with increased resistance to the bactericidal activity of the synthetic ubiquitin-derived peptide Ub2. The four Ub2-resistant Mycobacterium smegmatis mutants were also resistant to the bactericidal action of other antimicrobial peptides and macrophages. Two mutants were in the mspA gene encoding the main M. smegmatis porin. Using a translocation-deficient MspA point mutant, we showed that susceptibility of M. smegmatis to Ub2 was independent of MspA channel activity. Instead, the M. smegmatis Ub2-resistant mutants shared a common phenotype of decreased cell wall permeability compared with wild-type bacteria. Expression of mspA rendered Mycobacterium tuberculosis CDC1551 more susceptible both to ubiquitin-derived peptides in vitro and to lysosomal killing in macrophages. Finally, biochemical assays designed to assess membrane integrity indicated that Ub2 treatment impairs membrane function of M. smegmatis and M. tuberculosis cells. The M. smegmatis Ub2-resistant mutants were more resistant than wild-type M. smegmatis to this damage. We conclude that Ub2 targets mycobacterial membranes and that reduced membrane permeability provides mycobacteria intrinsic resistance against antimicrobial compounds including bactericidal ubiquitin-derived peptides. PMID:19682257

  16. Cell-penetrating conjugates of pentaglutamylated methotrexate as potential anticancer drugs against resistant tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Ildikó; Orbán, Erika; Schlosser, Gitta; Hudecz, Ferenc; Bánóczi, Zoltán

    2016-06-10

    The emerging resistance of tumor cells against methotrexate (MTX) is one of the major limitations of the MTX treatment of tumorous diseases. The disturbance in the polyglutamation which is a main step in the mechanism of methotrexate action is often the reason of the resistance. Delivery of polyglutamylated MTX into cells may evade the mechanisms that are responsible for drug resistance. In this study conjugates of methotrexate and its pentaglutamylated derivatives with cell-penetrating peptides - penetratin and octaarginine - were investigated. The cellular-uptake and in vitro cytostatic activity of conjugates were examined on breast cancer cell cultures (MDA-MB-231 as resistant and MCF-7 as sensitive cell culture). These cell cultures showed very different behaviour towards the conjugates. Although the presence of pentaglutamyl moiety significantly decreased the internalisation of conjugates, some of them were significantly active in vitro. All of the conjugates were able to penetrate in some extent into both cell types, but only the conjugates of penetratin showed in vitro cytostatic activity. The most effective conjugates were the MTX-Glu5-Penetratin(desMet) and MTX-Glu5-GFLG-Penetratin(desMet). The latter was effective on both cell cultures while the former was active only on the resistant tumor cells. Our results suggest that the translocation of polyglutamylated MTX may be a new way to treat sensitive and more importantly resistant tumors. While both penetratin and octaarginine peptides were successfully used to deliver several kinds of cargos earlier in our case the activity of penetratin conjugates was more pronounced. PMID:27031212

  17. Human neutrophil peptide-1 decreases during ageing in selected Mexican population.

    PubMed

    Rivas-Santiago, Bruno; Castañeda-Delgado, Julio E; de Haro-Acosta, Jeny; Torres-Juarez, Flor; Frausto-Lujan, Isabel; Marin-Luevano, Paulina; González-Amaro, Roberto; Enciso-Moreno, Jose A

    2016-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptide innate immunity plays a central role in the susceptibility to infectious diseases, as has been described extensively in different settings. However, the role that these molecules play in the immunity mediated by polymorphonuclear phagocytes as part of the innate immunity of ageing individuals has not been described. In the present study, we addressed the question whether antimicrobial activity in polymorphonuclear cells from elderly individuals was altered in comparison with young adults. We compared phagocytosis index, bacterial killing efficiency, myeloperoxidase activity and cathelicidin expression. Results showed that there were no statistical differences among groups. However, human neutrophil peptide-1 (HNP-1) was decreased in the elderly individuals group. Results suggest that the decreased HNP-1 production in the polymorphonuclear phagocytes form elderly individuals might have an important participation in the increased susceptibility to infectious diseases. PMID:26323500

  18. Enthalpy-driven interactions with sulfated glycosaminoglycans promote cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides.

    PubMed

    Takechi-Haraya, Yuki; Nadai, Ryo; Kimura, Hitoshi; Nishitsuji, Kazuchika; Uchimura, Kenji; Sakai-Kato, Kumiko; Kawakami, Kohsaku; Shigenaga, Akira; Kawakami, Toru; Otaka, Akira; Hojo, Hironobu; Sakashita, Naomi; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The first step of cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides is thought to occur via electrostatic interactions between positive charges of arginine residues and negative charges of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) on the cell surface. However, the molecular interaction of arginine peptides with GAG still remains unclear. Here, we compared the interactions of several arginine peptides of Tat, R8, and Rev and their analogues with heparin in relation to the cell membrane penetration efficiency. The high-affinity binding of arginine peptides to heparin was shown to be driven by large favorable enthalpy contributions, possibly reflecting multidentate hydrogen bondings of arginine residues with sulfate groups of heparin. Interestingly, the lysine peptides in which all arginine residues are substituted with lysine residues exhibited negligible binding enthalpy despite of their considerable binding to heparin. In CHO-K1 cells, arginine peptides exhibited a great cell-penetrating ability whereas their corresponding lysine peptides did not penetrate into cells. The degree of cell penetration of arginine peptides markedly decreased by the chlorate treatment of cells which prevents the sulfation of GAG chains. Significantly, the cell penetration efficiency of arginine peptides was found to be correlated with the favorable enthalpy of binding to heparin. These results suggest that the enthalpy-driven strong interaction with sulfated GAGs such as heparan sulfate plays a critical role in the efficient cell membrane penetration of arginine peptides. PMID:27003128

  19. Atrial natriuretic peptide decreases blood volume in intact and anephric rats

    SciTech Connect

    Trippodo, N.C.; Chien, Y.W.; Pegram, B.L.; Cole, F.E.; MacPhee, A.A.; Kardon, M.B.

    1986-03-05

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) reportedly lowers atrial pressure and increases hematocrit, suggesting venodilation and/or decreased blood volume (BV). To examine these possibilities, rat ANP (99-126) was administered to Inactinanesthetized rats (313 +/- 9 g, +/- SE) at 0.5 ..mu..g/kg/min for 30 minutes. Urine flow increased by 0.05 ml/min (p < 0.001) during the last 15 minutes of infusion. Mean arterial pressure (MAP) and thoracic central venous pressure (CVP) decreased (p < 0.001) by 12 and 0.5 mmHg, respectively; hematocrit increased by 4.1 units (p < 0.001) and BV (/sup 51/Cr-RBC) decreased by 3.4 ml/kg (p < 0.001). Mean circulatory filling pressure, measured by inflating an intracardiac balloon to briefly stop the circulation, did not change. Distribution of BV between the thoracic and spanchnic organs (whole-animal freezing in liquid nitrogen) was not measurably altered. The results suggest that the decrease in CVP was related more to decreased BV than to venodilation. To investigate possible mechanisms for the decreased BV, the same dose of ANP was administered to anephric rats. MAP decreased by 8 mmHg (p < 0.001); hematocrit increased by 2.4 units (p < 0.001) and BV decreased by 1.7 ml/kg (p < 0.05). The results indicate that short-term administration of ANP decreases blood volume by causing intravascular fluid to shift into the interstitium as well as by inducing diuresis.

  20. A single cell penetration system by ultrasonic driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaoying; Xiao, Mingfei; Yang, Xing; Wu, Ting

    2008-12-01

    The researches of single cell's control and operation are the hotspots in whole world. Among the various technologies, the transmission of ectogenic genetic materials between cell membrane is very significant. Imitating the Chinese traditional acupuncture therapy, a new ultrasonic resonance driving method, is imported to drive a cell's penetration probe. A set of the single cell penetration system was established to perform this function. This system includes four subsystems: driving part, micromanipulation part, observation and measurement part, and actuation part. Some fish egg experiments indicate that this system is workable and effective.

  1. SAP(E) - A cell-penetrating polyproline helix at lipid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Franz, Johannes; Lelle, Marco; Peneva, Kalina; Bonn, Mischa; Weidner, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are short membrane-permeating amino acid sequences that can be used to deliver cargoes, e.g. drugs, into cells. The mechanism for CPP internalization is still subject of ongoing research. An interesting family of CPPs is the sweet arrow peptides - SAP(E) - which are known to adopt a polyproline II helical secondary structure. SAP(E) peptides stand out among CPPs because they carry a net negative charge while most CPPs are positively charged, the latter being conducive to electrostatic interaction with generally negatively charged membranes. For SAP(E)s, an internalization mechanism has been proposed, based on polypeptide aggregation on the cell surface, followed by an endocytic uptake. However, this process has not yet been observed directly - since peptide-membrane interactions are inherently difficult to monitor on a molecular scale. Here, we use sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy to investigate molecular interactions of SAP(E) with differently charged model membranes, in both mono- and bi-layer configurations. The data suggest that the initial binding mechanism is accompanied by structural changes of the peptide. Also, the peptide-model membrane interaction depends on the charge of the lipid headgroup with phosphocholine being a favorable binding site. Moreover, while direct penetration has also been observed for some CPPs, the spectroscopy reveals that for SAP(E), its interaction with model membranes remains limited to the headgroup region, and insertion into the hydrophobic core of the lipid layer does not occur. PMID:27237727

  2. Interaction of β(3) /β(2) -peptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu segments, with POPC giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and white blood cancer cells (U937)--a new type of cell-penetrating peptides, and a surprising chain-length dependence of their vesicle- and cell-lysing activity.

    PubMed

    Kolesinska, Beata; Eyer, Klaus; Robinson, Tom; Dittrich, Petra S; Beck, Albert K; Seebach, Dieter; Walde, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Many years ago, β(2) /β(3) -peptides, consisting of alternatively arranged β(2) - and β(3) h-amino-acid residues, have been found to undergo folding to a unique type of helix, the 10/12-helix, and to exhibit non-polar, lipophilic properties (Helv. Chim. Acta 1997, 80, 2033). We have now synthesized such 'mixed' hexa-, nona-, dodeca-, and octadecapeptides, consisting of Val-Ala-Leu triads, with N-terminal fluorescein (FAM) labels, i.e., 1-4, and studied their interactions with POPC (=1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) and with human white blood cancer cells U937. The methods used were microfluidic technology, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), a flow-cytometry assay, a membrane-toxicity assay with the dehydrogenase G6PDH as enzymatic reporter, and visual microscopy observations. All β(3) /β(2) -peptide derivatives penetrate the GUVs and/or the cells. As shown with the isomeric β(3) /β(2) -, β(3) -, and β(2) -nonamers, 2, 5, and 6, respectively, the derivatives 5 and 6 consisting exclusively of β(3) - or β(2) -amino-acid residues, respectively, interact neither with the vesicles nor with the cells. Depending on the method of investigation and on the pretreatment of the cells, the β(3) /β(2) -nonamer and/or the β(3) /β(2) -dodecamer derivative, 2 and/or 3, respectively, cause a surprising disintegration or lysis of the GUVs and cells, comparable with the action of tensides, viral fusion peptides, and host-defense antimicrobial peptides. Possible sources of the chain-length-dependent destructive potential of the β(3) /β(2) -nona- and β(3) /β(2) -dodecapeptide derivatives, and a possible relationship with the phosphate-to-phosphate and hydrocarbon thicknesses of GUVs, and eukaryotic cells are discussed. Further investigations with other types of GUVs and of eukaryotic or prokaryotic cells will be necessary to elucidate the mechanism(s) of interaction of 'mixed' β(3) /β(2) -peptides with

  3. Mitofusin-2 knockdown increases ER-mitochondria contact and decreases amyloid β-peptide production.

    PubMed

    Leal, Nuno Santos; Schreiner, Bernadette; Pinho, Catarina Moreira; Filadi, Riccardo; Wiehager, Birgitta; Karlström, Helena; Pizzo, Paola; Ankarcrona, Maria

    2016-09-01

    Mitochondria are physically and biochemically in contact with other organelles including the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Such contacts are formed between mitochondria-associated ER membranes (MAM), specialized subregions of ER, and the outer mitochondrial membrane (OMM). We have previously shown increased expression of MAM-associated proteins and enhanced ER to mitochondria Ca(2+) transfer from ER to mitochondria in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and amyloid β-peptide (Aβ)-related neuronal models. Here, we report that siRNA knockdown of mitofusin-2 (Mfn2), a protein that is involved in the tethering of ER and mitochondria, leads to increased contact between the two organelles. Cells depleted in Mfn2 showed increased Ca(2+) transfer from ER to mitchondria and longer stretches of ER forming contacts with OMM. Interestingly, increased contact resulted in decreased concentrations of intra- and extracellular Aβ40 and Aβ42 . Analysis of γ-secretase protein expression, maturation and activity revealed that the low Aβ concentrations were a result of impaired γ-secretase complex function. Amyloid-β precursor protein (APP), β-site APP-cleaving enzyme 1 and neprilysin expression as well as neprilysin activity were not affected by Mfn2 siRNA treatment. In summary, our data shows that modulation of ER-mitochondria contact affects γ-secretase activity and Aβ generation. Increased ER-mitochondria contact results in lower γ-secretase activity suggesting a new mechanism by which Aβ generation can be controlled. PMID:27203684

  4. Culture on electrospun polyurethane scaffolds decreases atrial natriuretic peptide expression by cardiomyocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Rockwood, Danielle N; Akins, Robert E; Parrag, Ian C; Woodhouse, Kimberly A; Rabolt, John F

    2008-12-01

    The function of the mammalian heart depends on the functional alignment of cardiomyocytes, and controlling cell alignment is an important consideration in biomaterial design for cardiac tissue engineering and research. The physical cues that guide functional cell alignment in vitro and the impact of substrate-imposed alignment on cell phenotype, however, are only partially understood. In this report, primary cardiac ventricular cells were grown on electrospun, biodegradable polyurethane (ES-PU) with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU scaffolds supported high-density cultures and cell subpopulations remained intact over two weeks in culture. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled cardiomyocytes with connexin-43 localized to points of cell:cell contact. Multi-cellular organization correlated with microfiber orientation and aligned materials yielded highly oriented cardiomyocyte groupings. Atrial natriuretic peptide, a molecular marker that shows decreasing expression during ventricular cell maturation, was significantly lower in cultures grown on ES-PU scaffolds than in those grown on tissue culture polystyrene. Cells grown on aligned ES-PU had significantly lower steady state levels of ANP and constitutively released less ANP over time indicating that scaffold-imposed cell organization resulted in a shift in cell phenotype to a more mature state. We conclude that the physical organization of microfibers in ES-PU scaffolds impacts both multi-cellular architecture and cardiac cell phenotype in vitro. PMID:18823659

  5. Decreased susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus small-colony variants toward human antimicrobial peptides.

    PubMed

    Gläser, Regine; Becker, Karsten; von Eiff, Christof; Meyer-Hoffert, Ulf; Harder, Jürgen

    2014-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a frequent resident of human nose and skin in many individuals, but it is also able to cause a variety of serious infections including those of the skin and soft tissue. There is increasing evidence that particularly persistent, relapsing, and difficult-to-treat infections caused by S. aureus are associated with the formation of the small-colony variant (SCV) phenotype. The aim of this study was to investigate the hypothesis that (i) skin-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) exhibit a reduced activity against SCVs and (ii) that switching into the SCV phenotype may endow S. aureus with a decreased susceptibility toward the killing activity of human stratum corneum. Here, we show that clinically derived S. aureus SCVs are less susceptible to the bactericidal activity of different human skin-derived AMPs as compared with their isogenic corresponding wild-type strains. Similarly, a S. aureus hemB mutant displaying the SCV phenotype was less susceptible to the antimicrobial activity of AMPs than its hemB-complemented mutant. These findings were accompanied by a higher resistance of SCVs to the killing activity of human stratum corneum. Switching into the SCV phenotype may help S. aureus to subvert cutaneous innate defense, thus contributing to the establishment and persistence of infection. PMID:24717245

  6. A cell-penetrating foldamer with a bioreducible linkage for intracellular delivery of DNA.

    PubMed

    Douat, Céline; Aisenbrey, Christopher; Antunes, Stéphanie; Decossas, Marion; Lambert, Olivier; Bechinger, Burkhard; Kichler, Antoine; Guichard, Gilles

    2015-09-14

    Despite significant advances in foldamer chemistry, tailored delivery systems based on foldamer architectures, which provide a high level of control over secondary structure, are curiously rare among non-viral technologies for transporting nucleic acids into cells. A potent pH-responsive, bioreducible cell-penetrating foldamer (CPF) was developed through covalent dimerization of a short (8-mer) amphipathic oligourea sequence bearing histidine-type units. This CPF exhibits a high capacity to assemble with pDNA and mediates efficient delivery of nucleic acids into the cell. Furthermore, it does not adversely affect cellular viability and was shown to compare favorably with a cognate peptide transfection agent based on His-rich sequences. PMID:26246005

  7. Glucagon-like peptide 1 decreases lipotoxicity in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Matthew J.; Hull, Diana; Guo, Kathy; Barton, Darren; Hazlehurst, Jonathan M.; Gathercole, Laura L.; Nasiri, Maryam; Yu, Jinglei; Gough, Stephen C.; Newsome, Philip N.; Tomlinson, Jeremy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Insulin resistance and lipotoxicity are pathognomonic in non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) analogues are licensed for type 2 diabetes, but no prospective experimental data exists in NASH. This study determined the effect of a long-acting GLP-1 analogue, liraglutide, on organ-specific insulin sensitivity, hepatic lipid handling and adipose dysfunction in biopsy-proven NASH. Methods Fourteen patients were randomised to 1.8 mg liraglutide or placebo for 12-weeks of the mechanistic component of a double-blind, randomised, placebo-controlled trial (ClinicalTrials.gov-NCT01237119). Patients underwent paired hyperinsulinaemic euglycaemic clamps, stable isotope tracers, adipose microdialysis and serum adipocytokine/metabolic profiling. In vitro isotope experiments on lipid flux were performed on primary human hepatocytes. Results Liraglutide reduced BMI (−1.9 vs. +0.04 kg/m2; p <0.001), HbA1c (−0.3 vs. +0.3%; p <0.01), cholesterol-LDL (−0.7 vs. +0.05 mmol/L; p <0.01), ALT (−54 vs. −4.0 IU/L; p <0.01) and serum leptin, adiponectin, and CCL-2 (all p <0.05). Liraglutide increased hepatic insulin sensitivity (−9.36 vs. −2.54% suppression of hepatic endogenous glucose production with low-dose insulin; p <0.05). Liraglutide increased adipose tissue insulin sensitivity enhancing the ability of insulin to suppress lipolysis both globally (−24.9 vs. +54.8 pmol/L insulin required to ½ maximally suppress serum non-esterified fatty acids; p <0.05), and specifically within subcutaneous adipose tissue (p <0.05). In addition, liraglutide decreased hepatic de novo lipogenesis in vivo (−1.26 vs. +1.30%; p <0.05); a finding endorsed by the effect of GLP-1 receptor agonist on primary human hepatocytes (24.6% decrease in lipogenesis vs. untreated controls; p <0.01). Conclusions Liraglutide reduces metabolic dysfunction, insulin resistance and lipotoxicity in the key metabolic organs in the pathogenesis of

  8. Endosomolytic Nano-Polyplex Platform Technology for Cytosolic Peptide Delivery To Inhibit Pathological Vasoconstriction

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A platform technology has been developed and tested for delivery of intracellular-acting peptides through electrostatically complexed nanoparticles, or nano-polyplexes, formulated from an anionic endosomolytic polymer and cationic therapeutic peptides. This delivery platform has been initially tested and optimized for delivery of two unique vasoactive peptides, a phosphomimetic of heat shock protein 20 and an inhibitor of MAPKAP kinase II, to prevent pathological vasoconstriction (i.e., vasospasm) in human vascular tissue. These peptides inhibit vasoconstriction and promote vasorelaxation by modulating actin dynamics in vascular smooth muscle cells. Formulating these peptides into nano-polyplexes significantly enhances peptide uptake and retention, facilitates cytosolic delivery through a pH-dependent endosomal escape mechanism, and enhances peptide bioactivity in vitro as measured by inhibition of F-actin stress fiber formation. In comparison to treatment with the free peptides, which were endowed with cell-penetrating sequences, the nano-polyplexes significantly increased vasorelaxation, inhibited vasoconstriction, and decreased F-actin formation in the human saphenous vein ex vivo. These results suggest that these formulations have significant potential for treatment of conditions such as cerebral vasospasm following subarachnoid hemorrhage. Furthermore, because many therapeutic peptides include cationic cell-penetrating segments, this simple and modular platform technology may have broad applicability as a cost-effective approach for enhancing the efficacy of cytosolically active peptides. PMID:26004140

  9. DECREASED S-NITROSATION OF PEPTIDE THIOLS IN THE MEMBRANE INTERIOR

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Andrekopoulos, Christopher; Xu, Yingkai; Joseph, Joy; Hogg, Neil; Feix, Jimmy; Kalyanaraman, B.

    2009-01-01

    It has been proposed that autoxidation of nitric oxide (·NO) stimulates S-nitrosation of thiols located in the hydrophobic milieu. We tested whether thiols located in hydrophobic membranes undergo enhanced S-nitrosation in the presence of ·NO/O2. Transmembrane cysteinyl peptides, C4 (AcNH-KKACALA(LA)6KK-CONH2); C8 (AcNH-KKALALACALA(LA)3KK-CONH2), were incorporated into dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) bilayers; their location in the membrane was determined by EPR spin labeling. The peptides, C8 and C4, and GSH (300 μM) were treated with a ·NO donor, DEA-NONOate, and nitrosothiol formation determined under different O2 levels. Surprisingly, the more hydrophobic cysteinyl peptide, C8, did not yield any S-nitrosated product compared to GSH in the aqueous phase or C4 peptide in the liposomes in the presence of ·NO/O2. This data suggests that thiols located deeply in the hydrophobic core of the membrane may be less likely to undergo S-nitrosation in the presence of ·NO/O2. PMID:19573593

  10. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.