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Sample records for cells direct evidence

  1. Direct evidence of specific localization of sesquiterpenes and marchantin A in oil body cells of Marchantia polymorpha L.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Esaki, T; Kenmoku, H; Koeduka, T; Kiyoyama, Y; Masujima, T; Asakawa, Y; Matsui, K

    2016-10-01

    Liverworts are a rich source of a diverse array of specialized metabolites, such as terpenoids and benzenoids, which are potentially useful for pharmaceutical or agrochemical applications, and also provide clues to elucidate the strategy by which liverworts adapt to the terrestrial environment. Liverworts, belonging to orders Marchantiales and Jungermanniales, possess oil bodies. In Marchantia polymorpha L., oil bodies are confined to scattered idioblastic oil body cells. It has been assumed that the specialized metabolites in M. polymorpha specifically accumulate in the oil bodies in oil body cells; however, no direct evidence was previously available for this specific accumulation. In this study, direct evidence was obtained using micromanipulation techniques coupled with MS analysis that demonstrated the specific accumulation of sesquiterpenoids and marchantin A in the oil body cells of M. polymorpha thalli. It was also observed that the number of oil body cells increased in thalli grown in low-mineral conditions. The amounts of sesquiterpenoids and marchantin A detected in crude extract prepared from the whole thallus were roughly proportional to the number of oil body cells found in a given volume of thallus, suggesting that oil body cell differentiation and sesquiterpenoid and marchantin A biosynthetic pathways are coordinated with each other. PMID:27406893

  2. Direct structural evidence of protein redox regulation obtained by in-cell NMR.

    PubMed

    Mercatelli, Eleonora; Barbieri, Letizia; Luchinat, Enrico; Banci, Lucia

    2016-02-01

    The redox properties of cellular environments are critical to many functional processes, and are strictly controlled in all living organisms. The glutathione-glutathione disulfide (GSH-GSSG) couple is the most abundant intracellular redox couple. A GSH redox potential can be calculated for each cellular compartment, which reflects the redox properties of that environment. This redox potential is often used to predict the redox state of a disulfide-containing protein, based on thermodynamic considerations. However, thiol-disulfide exchange reactions are often catalyzed by specific partners, and the distribution of the redox states of a protein may not correspond to the thermodynamic equilibrium with the GSH pool. Ideally, the protein redox state should be measured directly, bypassing the need to extrapolate from the GSH. Here, by in-cell NMR, we directly observe the redox state of three human proteins, Cox17, Mia40 and SOD1, in the cytoplasm of human and bacterial cells. We compare the observed distributions of redox states with those predicted by the GSH redox potential, and our results partially agree with the predictions. Discrepancies likely arise from the fact that the redox state of SOD1 is controlled by a specific partner, its copper chaperone (CCS), in a pathway which is not linked to the GSH redox potential. In principle, in-cell NMR allows determining whether redox proteins are at the equilibrium with GSH, or they are kinetically regulated. Such approach does not need assumptions on the redox potential of the environment, and provides a way to characterize each redox-regulating pathway separately. PMID:26589182

  3. Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Current Clinical Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Berman, Abigail T.; St. James, Sara; Rengan, Ramesh

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cancer cause of death in the United States. Radiotherapy is an essential component of the definitive treatment of early-stage and locally-advanced lung cancer, and the palliative treatment of metastatic lung cancer. Proton beam therapy (PBT), through its characteristic Bragg peak, has the potential to decrease the toxicity of radiotherapy, and, subsequently improve the therapeutic ratio. Herein, we provide a primer on the physics of proton beam therapy for lung cancer, present the existing data in early-stage and locally-advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), as well as in special situations such as re-irradiation and post-operative radiation therapy. We then present the technical challenges, such as anatomic changes and motion management, and future directions for PBT in lung cancer, including pencil beam scanning. PMID:26147335

  4. Novel evidence that pituitary gonadotropins directly stimulate human leukemic cells-studies of myeloid cell lines and primary patient AML and CML cells

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Borkowska, Sylwia; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Tonn, Torsten; Rodriguez, Cesar; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun, Lukasz; Koloczko, Janusz; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Kucia, Magda

    2016-01-01

    We recently reported that normal hematopoietic stem cells express functional pituitary sex hormone (SexH) receptors. Here we report for the first time that pituitary-secreted gonadotrophins stimulate migration, adhesion, and proliferation of several human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Similar effects were observed after stimulation of human leukemic cell lines by gonadal SexHs. This effect seems to be direct, as the SexH receptors expressed by leukemic cells responded to stimulation by phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKTser473. Furthermore, in parallel studies we confirmed that human primary patient-derived AML and CML blasts also express several functional SexH receptors. These results shed more light on the potential role of SexHs in leukemogenesis and, in addition, provide further evidence suggesting a developmental link between hematopoiesis and the germline. PMID:26701888

  5. Novel evidence that pituitary gonadotropins directly stimulate human leukemic cells-studies of myeloid cell lines and primary patient AML and CML cells.

    PubMed

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Borkowska, Sylwia; Janowska-Wieczorek, Anna; Tonn, Torsten; Rodriguez, Cesar; Moniuszko, Marcin; Bolkun, Lukasz; Koloczko, Janusz; Eljaszewicz, Andrzej; Ratajczak, Janina; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Kucia, Magda

    2016-01-19

    We recently reported that normal hematopoietic stem cells express functional pituitary sex hormone (SexH) receptors. Here we report for the first time that pituitary-secreted gonadotrophins stimulate migration, adhesion, and proliferation of several human myeloid and lymphoid leukemia cell lines. Similar effects were observed after stimulation of human leukemic cell lines by gonadal SexHs. This effect seems to be direct, as the SexH receptors expressed by leukemic cells responded to stimulation by phosphorylation of MAPKp42/44 and AKTser473. Furthermore, in parallel studies we confirmed that human primary patient-derived AML and CML blasts also express several functional SexH receptors. These results shed more light on the potential role of SexHs in leukemogenesis and, in addition, provide further evidence suggesting a developmental link between hematopoiesis and the germline. PMID:26701888

  6. Direct evidence that suspensor cells have embryogenic potential that is suppressed by the embryo proper during normal embryogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuan; Li, Xinbo; Zhao, Jing; Tang, Xingchun; Tian, Shujuan; Chen, Junyi; Shi, Ce; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Liyao; Feng, Xianzhong; Sun, Meng-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    The suspensor is a temporary supporting structure of proembryos. It has been proposed that suspensor cells also possess embryogenic potential, which is suppressed by the embryo as an effect of the embryo–suspensor interaction. However, data to support this hypothesis are not yet available. In this report, using an in vivo living cell laser ablation technique, we show that Arabidopsis suspensor cells can develop into embryos after removing the embryo proper. The embryo proper plays a critical role in maintaining suspensor cell identity. However, this depends on the developmental stage; after the globular embryo stage, the suspensors no longer possess the potential to develop into embryos. We also reveal that hypophysis formation may be essential for embryo differentiation. Furthermore, we show that, after removing the embryo, auxin gradually accumulates in the top suspensor cell where cell division occurs to produce an embryo. Auxin redistribution likely reprograms the fate of the suspensor cell and triggers embryogenesis in suspensor cells. Thus, we provide direct evidence that the embryo suppresses the embryogenic potential of suspensor cells. PMID:26396256

  7. Evidence from a carbohydrate incorporation assay for direct activation of bone marrow myelopoietic precursor cells by bacterial cell wall constitutents.

    PubMed Central

    Monner, D A; Gmeiner, J; Mühlradt, P F

    1981-01-01

    The stimulation of incorporation of [3H]galactose into membrane glycoconjugates, measured in a precipitation test, was used as a criterion for activation of bone marrow cells. In this assay, purified bacterial lipopolysaccharide, lipoprotein, and murein monomer and dimer fragments all activated rat bone marrow cells in vitro. The response was dose dependent, followed a defined time course, and was not serum dependent. O-Acetylated murein dimer fragments from Proteus mirabilis were much less active than their unsubstituted counterparts, indicating a structural specificity for murein activation. Removal of adherent and phagocytizing cells from the marrow suspensions did not alter these results. The labeled, activated cells constituted a distinct population of buoyant density 1.064 to 1.069 g/cm3 when centrifuged on a continuous gradient of Percoll. Enrichment of the target cell population was achieved by a combination of adherent cell removal and discontinuous density gradient centrifugation to remove granulocytes and erythropoietic cells. It was concluded that a population of myelopoietic precursors could be activated by direct contact with bacterial cell wall constituents. The stimulation of galactose incorporation was not coupled to active deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis in the marrow cells. Thus, the activation was interpreted as an induction of differentiation rather than a mitotic event. PMID:7014467

  8. Enantiopure titanocene complexes--direct evidence for paraptosis in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cini, Melchior; Williams, Huw; Fay, Mike W; Searle, Mark S; Woodward, Simon; Bradshaw, Tracey D

    2016-03-01

    Tolerated by normal tissues, anti-cancer therapies based on titanium compounds are limited by low efficacy/selectivity and lack of understanding of their mode(s) of action. In vitro antitumour activity and mode of cell death incurred by enantiopure TiCl2{η-C5H4CHEt(2-MeOPh)}2 (abbreviated Cp(R)2TiCl2) has been investigated. The in vitro anti-tumour activity of Cp(R)2TiCl2 is selective for cancer cells; in clonogenic assays, (S,S)-Cp(R)2TiCl2 was twice as effective at inhibiting colony formation than other stereoisomers after 24 h exposure. HPLC, MS and NMR techniques determined hydrolysis of Cp(R)2TiCl2; data strongly correlate with soluble [Cp(R)2Ti(OH)(OH2)](+) being the biological trigger. Treatment of cells with Cp(R)2TiCl2 provoked extensive cytoplasmic vacuolization, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) swelling and activation of MAPKinase signal transduction, consistent with ligand-induced paraptosis, type III cell death, which is morphologically distinct from, and independent of apoptosis. Indeed, distinct from cisplatin, Cp(R)2TiCl2 failed to perturb cell cycle dynamics, induce γH2AX foci or evoke apoptosis in MDA-MB-468 and HCT-116 cells. PMID:26806372

  9. Harnessing the PD-1 Pathway in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Abhishek; Drake, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) is a recognized immune checkpoint. It is frequently upregulated on the T cells that infiltrate tumors, providing an inhibitory signal, which may facilitate immune escape. Blocking antibodies have been developed to interrupt the interaction of PD-1 with its ligands PD-L1/PD-L2, with the goal of increasing the host antitumor immune response. Initial results have been encouraging, with durable responses in both treatment-naive and pretreated patients, along with an acceptable toxicity profile. This tolerability makes PD-1 blockade an excellent potential partner for combination strategies with the approved targeted agents, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) and anti-vascular endothelial growth factor (anti-VEGF) antibodies, as well as other investigational immune checkpoint inhibitors or agonist antibodies that may costimulate an immune response. PD-L1 expression on tumor cells and tumor-infiltrating immune cells is also being evaluated as a predictive biomarker of response to treatment. This review summarizes the biological basis, preclinical studies, ongoing trials, and future challenges associated with targeting the PD-1 pathway in renal cell carcinoma. PMID:25445176

  10. Long-Term Fructose Intake Increases Adipogenic Potential: Evidence of Direct Effects of Fructose on Adipocyte Precursor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zubiría, María Guillermina; Alzamendi, Ana; Moreno, Griselda; Rey, María Amanda; Spinedi, Eduardo; Giovambattista, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We have previously addressed that fructose rich diet (FRD) intake for three weeks increases the adipogenic potential of stromal vascular fraction cells from the retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT). We have now evaluated the effect of prolonged FRD intake (eight weeks) on metabolic parameters, number of adipocyte precursor cells (APCs) and in vitro adipogenic potential from control (CTR) and FRD adult male rats. Additionally, we have examined the direct fructose effects on the adipogenic capacity of normal APCs. FRD fed rats had increased plasma levels of insulin, triglyceride and leptin, and RPAT mass and adipocyte size. FACS studies showed higher APCs number and adipogenic potential in FRD RPAT pads; data is supported by high mRNA levels of competency markers: PPARγ2 and Zfp423. Complementary in vitro experiments indicate that fructose-exposed normal APCs displayed an overall increased adipogenic capacity. We conclude that the RPAT mass expansion observed in eight week-FRD fed rats depends on combined accelerated adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy, partially due to a direct effect of fructose on APCs. PMID:27049396

  11. Long-Term Fructose Intake Increases Adipogenic Potential: Evidence of Direct Effects of Fructose on Adipocyte Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Zubiría, María Guillermina; Alzamendi, Ana; Moreno, Griselda; Rey, María Amanda; Spinedi, Eduardo; Giovambattista, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    We have previously addressed that fructose rich diet (FRD) intake for three weeks increases the adipogenic potential of stromal vascular fraction cells from the retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT). We have now evaluated the effect of prolonged FRD intake (eight weeks) on metabolic parameters, number of adipocyte precursor cells (APCs) and in vitro adipogenic potential from control (CTR) and FRD adult male rats. Additionally, we have examined the direct fructose effects on the adipogenic capacity of normal APCs. FRD fed rats had increased plasma levels of insulin, triglyceride and leptin, and RPAT mass and adipocyte size. FACS studies showed higher APCs number and adipogenic potential in FRD RPAT pads; data is supported by high mRNA levels of competency markers: PPARγ2 and Zfp423. Complementary in vitro experiments indicate that fructose-exposed normal APCs displayed an overall increased adipogenic capacity. We conclude that the RPAT mass expansion observed in eight week-FRD fed rats depends on combined accelerated adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy, partially due to a direct effect of fructose on APCs. PMID:27049396

  12. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  13. Stereotactic body radiotherapy for the treatment of medically inoperable primary renal cell carcinoma: Current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Swaminath, Anand; Chu, William

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is steadily rising due to an aging population and more frequent imaging of the abdomen for other medical conditions. While surgery remains the standard of care treatment for localized disease, many patients are unfit due to their advanced age and medical comorbidities. In these patients, an active surveillance strategy or ablative therapies, including radiofrequency/microwave ablation or cryotherapy, can be offered. Such options have limitations particularly with fast growing, or larger tumors. A promising ablative therapy option to consider is stereo-tactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). SBRT refers to high dose, focally ablative radiation delivered in a short time (3–5 fractions), and is safe and effective in many other cancer sites, including lung, liver and spine. SBRT offers potential advantages in the primary kidney cancer setting due to its ablative dosing (overcoming the notion of “radio-resistance”), short treatment duration (important in an elderly population), low toxicity profile (enabling SBRT to treat larger RCCs than other ablative modalities), and non-invasiveness. To date, there is limited long-term prospective data on the outcomes of SBRT in primary RCC. However, early evidence is intriguing with respect to excellent local control and low toxicity; however, most studies vary in terms of technique and radiation dosing used. Well-designed prospective cohort studies with clearly defined and standardized techniques, dosing, follow-up, and integration of quality of life outcomes will be essential to further establish the role of SBRT in management of inoperable, localized RCC. PMID:26316914

  14. S14 protein in breast cancer cells: Direct evidence of regulation by SREBP-1c, superinduction with progestin, and effects on cell growth

    SciTech Connect

    Martel, Peter M.; Bingham, Chad M.; McGraw, Charles J.; Baker, Christina L.; Morganelli, Peter M.; Meng, Marie Louise; Armstrong, Jessica M.; Moncur, Joel T.; Kinlaw, William B. . E-mail: william.kinlaw@hitchcock.org

    2006-02-01

    Most breast cancers exhibit brisk lipogenesis, and require it for growth. S14 is a lipogenesis-related nuclear protein that is overexpressed in most breast cancers. Sterol response element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) is required for induction of lipogenesis-related genes, including S14 and fatty acid synthase (FAS), in hepatocytes, and correlation of SREBP-1c and FAS expression suggested that SREBP-1c drives lipogenesis in tumors as well. We directly tested the hypothesis that SREBP-1c drives S14 expression and mediates lipogenic effects of progestin in T47D breast cancer cells. Dominant-negative SREBP-1c inhibited induction of S14 and FAS mRNAs by progestin, while active SREBP-1c induced without hormone and superinduced in its presence. Changes in S14 mRNA were reflected in protein levels. A lag time and lack of progestin response elements indicated that S14 and FAS gene activation by progestin is indirect. Knockdown of S14 reduced, whereas overexpression stimulated, T47D cell growth, while nonlipogenic MCF10a mammary epithelial cells were not growth-inhibited. These data directly demonstrate that SREBP-1c drives S14 gene expression in breast cancer cells, and progestin magnifies that effect via an indirect mechanism. This supports the prediction, based on S14 gene amplification and overexpression in breast tumors, that S14 augments breast cancer cell growth and survival.

  15. Direct Evidence of Active and Rapid Nuclear Degradation Triggered by Vacuole Rupture during Programmed Cell Death in Zinnia1

    PubMed Central

    Obara, Keisuke; Kuriyama, Hideo; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2001-01-01

    Differentiation into a tracheary element (TE) is a typical example of programmed cell death (PCD) in the developmental processes of vascular plants. In the PCD process the TE degrades its cellular contents and becomes a hollow corpse that serves as a water conduct. Using a zinnia (Zinnia elegans) cell culture we obtained serial observations of single living cells undergoing TE PCD by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Vital staining was performed and the relative fluorescence intensity was measured, revealing that the tonoplast of the swollen vacuole in TEs loses selective permeability of fluorescein just before its physical rupture. After the vacuole ruptured the nucleus was degraded rapidly within 10 to 20 min. No prominent chromatin condensation or nuclear fragmentation occurred in this process. Nucleoids in chloroplasts were also degraded in a similar time course to that of the nucleus. Degradations did not occur in non-TEs forced to rupture the vacuole by probenecid treatment. These results demonstrate that TE differentiation involves a unique type of PCD in which active and rapid nuclear degradation is triggered by vacuole rupture. PMID:11161019

  16. Evidence for direct cellular protective effect of PL-10 substances (synthesized parts of body protection compound, BPC) and their specificity to gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Bódis, B; Karádi, O; Németh, P; Dohoczky, C; Kolega, M; Mózsik, G

    1997-01-01

    The direct gastric mucosal cellular effect of four PL-10 substances (a synthesized part of human body protection compound, BPC containing 14 or 15 amino acids) was studied on freshly isolated rat gastric mucosal cells and on a mouse myeloma cell line (Sp2/0-Ag14) in an ethanol-induced cell injury model. The examined substances were not toxic for the cells. Two of them proved to be significantly protective against the direct cellular damaging effect of ethanol (PL 10.1.15AK-3 in 5 microg/ml dose and PL 10.1.AK14-2 dose-dependently, ED50=50 ng/ml) on gastric mucosal cells. This cytoprotective effect was failured on mouse myeloma cells. Based on these results a part of the in vivo protection induced by BPC seems to be a direct cellular protective effect to gastric mucosal cells. PMID:9353174

  17. Geometric friction directs cell migration.

    PubMed

    Le Berre, M; Liu, Yan-Jun; Hu, J; Maiuri, Paolo; Bénichou, O; Voituriez, R; Chen, Y; Piel, M

    2013-11-01

    In the absence of environmental cues, a migrating cell performs an isotropic random motion. Recently, the breaking of this isotropy has been observed when cells move in the presence of asymmetric adhesive patterns. However, up to now the mechanisms at work to direct cell migration in such environments remain unknown. Here, we show that a nonadhesive surface with asymmetric microgeometry consisting of dense arrays of tilted micropillars can direct cell motion. Our analysis reveals that most features of cell trajectories, including the bias, can be reproduced by a simple model of active Brownian particle in a ratchet potential, which we suggest originates from a generic elastic interaction of the cell body with the environment. The observed guiding effect, independent of adhesion, is therefore robust and could be used to direct cell migration both in vitro and in vivo. PMID:24266490

  18. A cell's sense of direction.

    PubMed

    Parent, C A; Devreotes, P N

    1999-04-30

    In eukaryotic cells directional sensing is mediated by heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding protein (G protein)-linked signaling pathways. In Dictyostelium discoideum amoebae and mammalian leukocytes, the receptors and G-protein subunits are uniformly distributed around the cell perimeter. Chemoattractants induce the transient appearance of binding sites for several pleckstrin homology domain-containing proteins on the inner face of the membrane. In gradients of attractant these sites are persistently present on the side of the cell facing the higher concentration, even in the absence of a functional actin cytoskeleton or cell movement. Thus, the cell senses direction by spatially regulating the activity of the signal transduction pathway. PMID:10221901

  19. Evidence for Vitamin D Receptor Expression and Direct Effects of 1α,25(OH)2D3 in Human Skeletal Muscle Precursor Cells.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Karl; Saini, Amarjit; Strömberg, Anna; Alam, Seher; Lilja, Mats; Rullman, Eric; Gustafsson, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Presence of the vitamin D receptor and direct effects of vitamin D on the proliferation and differentiation of muscle precursor cells have been demonstrated in animal models. However, the effects and mechanisms of vitamin D actions in human skeletal muscle, and the presence of the vitamin D receptor in human adult skeletal muscle, remain to be established. Here, we investigated the role of vitamin D in human muscle cells at various stages of differentiation. We demonstrate that the components of the vitamin D-endocrine system are readily detected in human muscle precursor cells but are low to nondetectable in adult skeletal muscle and that human muscle cells lack the ability to convert the inactive vitamin D-metabolite 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 to the active 1α,25-dihydroxy-vitamin D3 (1α,25(OH)2D3). In addition, we show that 1α,25(OH)2D3 inhibits myoblast proliferation and differentiation by altering the expression of cell cycle regulators and myogenic regulatory factors, with associated changes in forkhead box O3 and Notch signaling pathways. The present data add novel information regarding the direct effects of vitamin D in human skeletal muscle and provide functional and mechanistic insight to the regulation of myoblast cell fate decisions by 1α,25(OH)2D3. PMID:26469137

  20. Cell-penetrating peptides do not cross mitochondrial membranes even when conjugated to a lipophilic cation: evidence against direct passage through phospholipid bilayers

    PubMed Central

    2004-01-01

    CPPs (cell-penetrating peptides) facilitate the cellular uptake of covalently attached oligonucleotides, proteins and other macromolecules, but the mechanism of their uptake is disputed. Two models are proposed: direct movement through the phospholipid bilayer and endocytic uptake. Mitochondria are a good model system to distinguish between these possibilities, since they have no vesicular transport systems. Furthermore, CPP-mediated delivery of macromolecules to the mitochondrial matrix would be a significant breakthrough in the study of mitochondrial function and dysfunction, and could also lead to new therapies for diseases caused by mitochondrial damage. Therefore we investigated whether two CPPs, penetratin and Tat, could act as mitochondrial delivery vectors. We also determined whether conjugation of the lipophilic cation TPP (triphenylphosphonium) to penetratin or Tat facilitated their uptake into mitochondria, since TPP leads to uptake of attached molecules into mitochondria driven by the membrane potential. Neither penetratin nor Tat, nor their TPP conjugates, are internalized by isolated mitochondria, indicating that these CPPs cannot cross mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers. Tat and TPP–Tat are taken up by cells, but they accumulate in endosomes and do not reach mitochondria. We conclude that CPPs cannot cross mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers, and therefore cannot deliver macromolecules directly to mitochondria. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of uptake of CPPs by cells. The lack of direct movement of CPPs through mitochondrial phospholipid bilayers, along with the observed endosomal accumulation of Tat and TPP–Tat in cells, makes it unlikely that CPPs enter cells by direct membrane passage, and instead favours cellular uptake via an endocytic pathway. PMID:15270716

  1. 19 CFR 10.174 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... of Preferences § 10.174 Evidence of direct shipment. (a) Documents constituting evidence of direct shipment. The port director may require that appropriate shipping papers, invoices, or other documents be... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.174 Section...

  2. 19 CFR 10.194 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.194 Section 10.194... Evidence of direct shipment. (a) Documents constituting evidence of direct shipment. The port director may require that appropriate shipping papers, invoices, or other documents be submitted within 60 days of...

  3. 19 CFR 10.194 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.194 Section 10.194 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Caribbean Basin Initiative § 10.194 Evidence of direct shipment....

  4. 19 CFR 10.194 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.194 Section 10.194 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Caribbean Basin Initiative § 10.194 Evidence of direct shipment....

  5. 19 CFR 10.194 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.194 Section 10.194 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Caribbean Basin Initiative § 10.194 Evidence of direct shipment....

  6. 19 CFR 10.194 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.194 Section 10.194 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. Caribbean Basin Initiative § 10.194 Evidence of direct shipment....

  7. The direct methanol fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Halpert, G.; Narayanan, S.R.; Frank, H.

    1995-08-01

    This presentation describes the approach and progress in the ARPA-sponsored effort to develop a Direct Methanol, Liquid-Feed Fuel Cell (DMLFFC) with a solid Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) for battery replacement in small portable applications. Using Membrane Electrode Assemblies (MEAs) developed by JPL and Giner, significant voltage was demonstrated at relatively high current densities. The DMLFFC utilizes a 3 percent aqueous solution of methanol that is oxidized directly in the anode (fuel) chamber and oxygen (air) in the cathode chamber to produce water and significant power. The only products are water and CO{sub 2}. The ARPA effort is aimed at replacing the battery in the BA 5590 military radio.

  8. Direct evidence of current blocking by ZnSe in Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Waetjen, Joern Timo; Engman, Jessica; Edoff, Marika; Platzer-Bjoerkman, Charlotte

    2012-04-23

    Thin films of polycrystalline Cu{sub 2}ZnSnSe{sub 4} were made by selenization of co-sputtered metallic precursors and processed to solar cells. Electron beam induced current (EBIC) in combination with microscopic scale IV characterization is used to investigate lateral inhomogeneities in electrical performance across the solar cell area. Transmission electron microscopy relates areas with low EBIC response to the formation of a ZnSe phase at the absorber surface resulting in a current blocking behavior and a reduced short-circuit current density for the solar cells. Areas without ZnSe have a high EBIC response and result in high quality diodes well suited for solar cells.

  9. 19 CFR 10.174 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.174 Section 10.174 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Generalized System of Preferences § 10.174 Evidence...

  10. 19 CFR 10.174 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.174 Section 10.174 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Generalized System of Preferences § 10.174 Evidence...

  11. 19 CFR 10.174 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.174 Section 10.174 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Generalized System of Preferences § 10.174 Evidence...

  12. 19 CFR 10.174 - Evidence of direct shipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Evidence of direct shipment. 10.174 Section 10.174 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ARTICLES CONDITIONALLY FREE, SUBJECT TO A REDUCED RATE, ETC. General Provisions Generalized System of Preferences § 10.174 Evidence...

  13. Caudal medullary pathways to lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups in the cat: evidence for direct projections possibly representing the final common pathway for lordosis.

    PubMed

    Vanderhorst, V G; Holstege, G

    1995-08-28

    The nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) projects to distinct brainstem and cervical and thoracic cord motoneuronal cell groups. The present paper describes NRA projections to distinct motoneuronal cell groups in the lumbar enlargement. Lumbosacral injections of wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) were made to localize and quantify the retrogradely labeled neurons in the caudal medullary lateral tegmentum. These injections were combined with spinal hemisections to distinguish between neurons having ipsi-or contralaterally descending axons. The NRA-lumbosacral fibers descend almost exclusively contralaterally, but neurons in areas surrounding the NRA project mainly ipsilaterally. In an anterograde tracing study, injections of WGA-HRP or tritiated leucine were made in the region of the NRA to determine the NRA targets in the lumbosarcral cord. Hemisections in C2 made it possible to distinguish between NRA projections and projections from neurons in the adjoining lateral tegmentum. The results show delicate NRA projections to distinct lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating specific hindlimb muscles (iliopsoas, adductors, and hamstrings) as well as axial muscles (medial longissimus and proximal tail muscles). The projection is bilateral, with a contralateral predominance. Ipsilaterally terminating fibers are derived from NRA neurons whose axons cross the midline at the level of the obex, descend through the contralateral spinal white matter, and recross at the level of termination. A conceptual description is presented in which the periaqueductal gray-NRA-lumbosacral projections form the final common pathway for lordosis in the cat. PMID:7499541

  14. Evidence-based medicine meets goal-directed health care.

    PubMed

    Mold, James W; Hamm, Robert; Scheid, Dewey

    2003-05-01

    Evidence-based medicine and goal-directed, patient-centered health care seem, at times, like parallel universes, though, at a conceptual level, they are perfectly compatible. Part of the problem is that many of the kinds of information required for decision making in primary care are often unavailable or difficult to find. Several case examples are used to illustrate this problem, and reasons and solutions are suggested. The goal-directed health care model could be helpful for directing the search for evidence that is relevant to the decisions that patients and their primary care physicians must make on a regular basis. PMID:12772939

  15. Direct evidence that decreased serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in sickle cell disease is related to antibody deficiency.

    PubMed Central

    Bjornson, A B; Lobel, J S

    1987-01-01

    Two approaches were used to demonstrate that reduction in serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in children with sickle cell disease is related to a deficiency of antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. First, opsonization of S. pneumoniae mediated by the alternative pathway in patients' sera was restored to normal by addition of the purified IgG or IgM fraction of goat antiserum to capsular polysaccharide of the homologous serotype. Secondly, IgG antibody titers to capsular polysaccharide in patients' sera correlated significantly with alternative pathway-mediated opsonization; the correlation between titers of IgM anticapsular antibodies and opsonization approached statistical significance. The sum of the IgG and IgM anticapsular antibody titers correlated most significantly with opsonization. Our results suggest that reduction in alternative pathway-mediated opsonization in sera from children with sickle cell disease is related to low levels of both IgG and IgM anticapsular antibodies. Images PMID:3805275

  16. Direct evidence that decreased serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in sickle cell disease is related to antibody deficiency.

    PubMed

    Bjornson, A B; Lobel, J S

    1987-02-01

    Two approaches were used to demonstrate that reduction in serum opsonization of Streptococcus pneumoniae via the alternative complement pathway in children with sickle cell disease is related to a deficiency of antibodies to pneumococcal capsular polysaccharide. First, opsonization of S. pneumoniae mediated by the alternative pathway in patients' sera was restored to normal by addition of the purified IgG or IgM fraction of goat antiserum to capsular polysaccharide of the homologous serotype. Secondly, IgG antibody titers to capsular polysaccharide in patients' sera correlated significantly with alternative pathway-mediated opsonization; the correlation between titers of IgM anticapsular antibodies and opsonization approached statistical significance. The sum of the IgG and IgM anticapsular antibody titers correlated most significantly with opsonization. Our results suggest that reduction in alternative pathway-mediated opsonization in sera from children with sickle cell disease is related to low levels of both IgG and IgM anticapsular antibodies. PMID:3805275

  17. Air Breathing Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren; Xiaoming

    2003-07-22

    A method for activating a membrane electrode assembly for a direct methanol fuel cell is disclosed. The method comprises operating the fuel cell with humidified hydrogen as the fuel followed by running the fuel cell with methanol as the fuel.

  18. Directional summation in non-direction selective retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Syed Y; Hamade, Khaldoun C; Yang, Ellen J; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G; Pettit, Diana L

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  19. Directional Summation in Non-direction Selective Retinal Ganglion Cells

    PubMed Central

    Abbas, Syed Y.; Hamade, Khaldoun C.; Yang, Ellen J.; Nawy, Scott; Smith, Robert G.; Pettit, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Retinal ganglion cells receive inputs from multiple bipolar cells which must be integrated before a decision to fire is made. Theoretical studies have provided clues about how this integration is accomplished but have not directly determined the rules regulating summation of closely timed inputs along single or multiple dendrites. Here we have examined dendritic summation of multiple inputs along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount rat retina. We activated inputs at targeted locations by uncaging glutamate sequentially to generate apparent motion along On ganglion cell dendrites in whole mount retina. Summation was directional and dependent13 on input sequence. Input moving away from the soma (centrifugal) resulted in supralinear summation, while activation sequences moving toward the soma (centripetal) were linear. Enhanced summation for centrifugal activation was robust as it was also observed in cultured retinal ganglion cells. This directional summation was dependent on hyperpolarization activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) channels as blockade with ZD7288 eliminated directionality. A computational model confirms that activation of HCN channels can override a preference for centripetal summation expected from cell anatomy. This type of direction selectivity could play a role in coding movement similar to the axial selectivity seen in locust ganglion cells which detect looming stimuli. More generally, these results suggest that non-directional retinal ganglion cells can discriminate between input sequences independent of the retina network. PMID:23516351

  20. Describing Directional Cell Migration with a Characteristic Directionality Time

    PubMed Central

    Loosley, Alex J.; O’Brien, Xian M.; Reichner, Jonathan S.; Tang, Jay X.

    2015-01-01

    Many cell types can bias their direction of locomotion by coupling to external cues. Characteristics such as how fast a cell migrates and the directedness of its migration path can be quantified to provide metrics that determine which biochemical and biomechanical factors affect directional cell migration, and by how much. To be useful, these metrics must be reproducible from one experimental setting to another. However, most are not reproducible because their numerical values depend on technical parameters like sampling interval and measurement error. To address the need for a reproducible metric, we analytically derive a metric called directionality time, the minimum observation time required to identify motion as directionally biased. We show that the corresponding fit function is applicable to a variety of ergodic, directionally biased motions. A motion is ergodic when the underlying dynamical properties such as speed or directional bias do not change over time. Measuring the directionality of nonergodic motion is less straightforward but we also show how this class of motion can be analyzed. Simulations are used to show the robustness of directionality time measurements and its decoupling from measurement errors. As a practical example, we demonstrate the measurement of directionality time, step-by-step, on noisy, nonergodic trajectories of chemotactic neutrophils. Because of its inherent generality, directionality time ought to be useful for characterizing a broad range of motions including intracellular transport, cell motility, and animal migration. PMID:25992908

  1. Children Mix Direct and Indirect Speech: Evidence from Pronoun Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Köder, Franziska; Maier, Emar

    2016-01-01

    This study investigates children's acquisition of the distinction between direct speech (Elephant said, "I get the football") and indirect speech ("Elephant said that he gets the football"), by measuring children's interpretation of first, second, and third person pronouns. Based on evidence from various linguistic sources, we…

  2. Early goal-directed resuscitation of patients with septic shock: current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Ravi G; Hartigan, Sarah M; Kashiouris, Markos G; Sessler, Curtis N; Bearman, Gonzalo M L

    2015-01-01

    Severe sepsis and septic shock are among the leading causes of mortality in the intensive care unit. Over a decade ago, early goal-directed therapy (EGDT) emerged as a novel approach for reducing sepsis mortality and was incorporated into guidelines published by the international Surviving Sepsis Campaign. In addition to requiring early detection of sepsis and prompt initiation of antibiotics, the EGDT protocol requires invasive patient monitoring to guide resuscitation with intravenous fluids, vasopressors, red cell transfusions, and inotropes. The effect of these measures on patient outcomes, however, remains controversial. Recently, three large randomized trials were undertaken to re-examine the effect of EGDT on morbidity and mortality: the ProCESS trial in the United States, the ARISE trial in Australia and New Zealand, and the ProMISe trial in England. These trials showed that EGDT did not significantly decrease mortality in patients with septic shock compared with usual care. In particular, whereas early administration of antibiotics appeared to increase survival, tailoring resuscitation to static measurements of central venous pressure and central venous oxygen saturation did not confer survival benefit to most patients. In the following review, we examine these findings as well as other evidence from recent randomized trials of goal-directed resuscitation. We also discuss future areas of research and emerging paradigms in sepsis trials. PMID:26316210

  3. Children mix direct and indirect speech: evidence from pronoun comprehension.

    PubMed

    Köder, Franziska; Maier, Emar

    2016-07-01

    This study investigates children's acquisition of the distinction between direct speech (Elephant said, "I get the football") and indirect speech (Elephant said that he gets the football), by measuring children's interpretation of first, second, and third person pronouns. Based on evidence from various linguistic sources, we hypothesize that the direct-indirect distinction is acquired relatively late. We also predict more mistakes for third person pronouns compared to first and second person pronouns. We tested 136 Dutch-speaking children between four and twelve in a referent selection task and found that children interpret pronouns in direct speech predominantly as in indirect speech, supporting our hypothesis about a late acquisition of the direct-indirect distinction. In addition, we found differences between I, you, and he that deviate from a simple first and second vs. third person split. We discuss our results in the light of cross-linguistic findings of direct-indirect mixing. PMID:26121990

  4. Direct evidence of hybodont shark predation on Late Jurassic ammonites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vullo, Romain

    2011-06-01

    Sharks are known to have been ammonoid predators, as indicated by analysis of bite marks or coprolite contents. However, body fossil associations attesting to this predator-prey relationship have never been described so far. Here, I report a unique finding from the Late Jurassic of western France: a complete specimen of the Kimmeridgian ammonite Orthaspidoceras bearing one tooth of the hybodont shark Planohybodus. Some possible tooth puncture marks are also observed. This is the first direct evidence of such a trophic link between these two major Mesozoic groups, allowing an accurate identification of both organisms. Although Planohybodus displays a tearing-type dentition generally assumed to have been especially adapted for large unshelled prey, our discovery clearly shows that this shark was also able to attack robust ammonites such as aspidoceratids. The direct evidence presented here provides new insights into the Mesozoic marine ecosystem food webs.

  5. Direct Geoelectrical Evidence of Mass Transfer at the Lab scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, R. D.; Singha, K.; Day-Lewis, F. D.; Keating, K.; Binley, A.; Clifford, J.; Haggerty, R.

    2011-12-01

    At many field sites, anomalous tailing behavior-- a long, slow decrease of solute concentration in time-- is observed yet cannot be explained with the advection-dispersion model. One explanation for this commonly observed behavior is the exchange of solute between mobile and immobile domains; however, direct experimental observations of this controlling process remain elusive. Circumstantial evidence for a less-mobile phase is typically inferred from tailing behavior observed in fluid samples of the mobile phase. Electrical methods provide a measure of the total solutes in both the immobile and mobile domain and therefore have been hypothesized to provide, in combination with fluid sampling, direct experimental evidence for a less-mobile and mobile model, yet experimental evidence is needed to support this claim. Here, we conduct column solute tracer tests and measure both electrical resistivity and fluid conductivity on unconsolidated, well-sorted sand in addition to fine and coarse fractions of the porous zeolite clinoptilolite. We examine nearly co-located time-lapse standard fluid conductivity and bulk apparent resistivity measurements to identify solute exchange between multiple domains at the lab scale. Our results show extensive tailing behavior in both fluid and bulk electrical conductivity measurements in the zeolite but not in sand, providing evidence for a mobile-immobile framework. Transport parameters are estimated by minimizing the root-mean-square error between the observed and simulated fluid conductivity in COMSOL Multiphysics. These best-fit parameters support our claims of mass transfer occurring in the zeolite columns and provide the first direct electrical evidence of dual-domain mass transport at the lab scale.

  6. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source. Water loss from the cell is minimized by making the conductive cathode assembly hydrophobic and the conductive anode assembly hydrophilic.

  7. Air breathing direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming

    2002-01-01

    An air breathing direct methanol fuel cell is provided with a membrane electrode assembly, a conductive anode assembly that is permeable to air and directly open to atmospheric air, and a conductive cathode assembly that is permeable to methanol and directly contacting a liquid methanol source.

  8. Nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Del Toro, Raquel; Chèvre, Raphael; Rodríguez, Cristina; Ordóñez, Antonio; Martínez-González, José; Andrés, Vicente; Méndez-Ferrer, Simón

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a leading death cause. Endothelial and smooth muscle cells participate in atherogenesis, but it is unclear whether other mesenchymal cells contribute to this process. Bone marrow (BM) nestin(+) cells cooperate with endothelial cells in directing monocyte egress to bloodstream in response to infections. However, it remains unknown whether nestin(+) cells regulate inflammatory cells in chronic inflammatory diseases, such as atherosclerosis. Here, we show that nestin(+) cells direct inflammatory cell migration during chronic inflammation. In Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) knockout mice fed with high-fat diet, BM nestin(+) cells regulate the egress of inflammatory monocytes and neutrophils. In the aorta, nestin(+) stromal cells increase ∼30 times and contribute to the atheroma plaque. Mcp1 deletion in nestin(+) cells-but not in endothelial cells only- increases circulating inflammatory cells, but decreases their aortic infiltration, delaying atheroma plaque formation and aortic valve calcification. Therefore, nestin expression marks cells that regulate inflammatory cell migration during atherosclerosis. PMID:27586429

  9. Shallow cells in directional solidification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merchant, G. J.; Davis, S. H.

    1989-01-01

    The existing theory on two-dimensional transitions (appropriate to thin parallel-plate geometries) is presented in such a way that it is possible to identify easily conditions for the onset of shallow cells. Conditions are given under which succinonitrile-acetone mixtures should undergo supercritical bifurcation in experimentally accessible ranges. These results suggest a means for the quantitative test of the Mullins and Sekerka (1964) model and its weakly nonlinear extensions.

  10. Directing the public to evidence-based online content.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Gelb, Cynthia A; Vaughn, Alexandra N; Smuland, Jenny; Hughes, Alexandra G; Hawkins, Nikki A

    2015-04-01

    To direct online users searching for gynecologic cancer information to accurate content, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's (CDC) 'Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer' campaign sponsored search engine advertisements in English and Spanish. From June 2012 to August 2013, advertisements appeared when US Google users entered search terms related to gynecologic cancer. Users who clicked on the advertisements were directed to relevant content on the CDC website. Compared with the 3 months before the initiative (March-May 2012), visits to the CDC web pages linked to the advertisements were 26 times higher after the initiative began (June-August 2012) (p<0.01), and 65 times higher when the search engine advertisements were supplemented with promotion on television and additional websites (September 2012-August 2013) (p<0.01). Search engine advertisements can direct users to evidence-based content at a highly teachable moment--when they are seeking relevant information. PMID:25053580

  11. Safety of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: Evidence Based Update 2016.

    PubMed

    Bikson, Marom; Grossman, Pnina; Thomas, Chris; Zannou, Adantchede Louis; Jiang, Jimmy; Adnan, Tatheer; Mourdoukoutas, Antonios P; Kronberg, Greg; Truong, Dennis; Boggio, Paulo; Brunoni, André R; Charvet, Leigh; Fregni, Felipe; Fritsch, Brita; Gillick, Bernadette; Hamilton, Roy H; Hampstead, Benjamin M; Jankord, Ryan; Kirton, Adam; Knotkova, Helena; Liebetanz, David; Liu, Anli; Loo, Colleen; Nitsche, Michael A; Reis, Janine; Richardson, Jessica D; Rotenberg, Alexander; Turkeltaub, Peter E; Woods, Adam J

    2016-01-01

    This review updates and consolidates evidence on the safety of transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). Safety is here operationally defined by, and limited to, the absence of evidence for a Serious Adverse Effect, the criteria for which are rigorously defined. This review adopts an evidence-based approach, based on an aggregation of experience from human trials, taking care not to confuse speculation on potential hazards or lack of data to refute such speculation with evidence for risk. Safety data from animal tests for tissue damage are reviewed with systematic consideration of translation to humans. Arbitrary safety considerations are avoided. Computational models are used to relate dose to brain exposure in humans and animals. We review relevant dose-response curves and dose metrics (e.g. current, duration, current density, charge, charge density) for meaningful safety standards. Special consideration is given to theoretically vulnerable populations including children and the elderly, subjects with mood disorders, epilepsy, stroke, implants, and home users. Evidence from relevant animal models indicates that brain injury by Direct Current Stimulation (DCS) occurs at predicted brain current densities (6.3-13 A/m(2)) that are over an order of magnitude above those produced by conventional tDCS. To date, the use of conventional tDCS protocols in human trials (≤40 min, ≤4 milliamperes, ≤7.2 Coulombs) has not produced any reports of a Serious Adverse Effect or irreversible injury across over 33,200 sessions and 1000 subjects with repeated sessions. This includes a wide variety of subjects, including persons from potentially vulnerable populations. PMID:27372845

  12. Direct evidence of milk consumption from ancient human dental calculus.

    PubMed

    Warinner, C; Hendy, J; Speller, C; Cappellini, E; Fischer, R; Trachsel, C; Arneborg, J; Lynnerup, N; Craig, O E; Swallow, D M; Fotakis, A; Christensen, R J; Olsen, J V; Liebert, A; Montalva, N; Fiddyment, S; Charlton, S; Mackie, M; Canci, A; Bouwman, A; Rühli, F; Gilbert, M T P; Collins, M J

    2014-01-01

    Milk is a major food of global economic importance, and its consumption is regarded as a classic example of gene-culture evolution. Humans have exploited animal milk as a food resource for at least 8500 years, but the origins, spread, and scale of dairying remain poorly understood. Indirect lines of evidence, such as lipid isotopic ratios of pottery residues, faunal mortality profiles, and lactase persistence allele frequencies, provide a partial picture of this process; however, in order to understand how, where, and when humans consumed milk products, it is necessary to link evidence of consumption directly to individuals and their dairy livestock. Here we report the first direct evidence of milk consumption, the whey protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG), preserved in human dental calculus from the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the present day. Using protein tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that BLG is a species-specific biomarker of dairy consumption, and we identify individuals consuming cattle, sheep, and goat milk products in the archaeological record. We then apply this method to human dental calculus from Greenland's medieval Norse colonies, and report a decline of this biomarker leading up to the abandonment of the Norse Greenland colonies in the 15(th) century CE. PMID:25429530

  13. Direct evidence of milk consumption from ancient human dental calculus

    PubMed Central

    Warinner, C.; Hendy, J.; Speller, C.; Cappellini, E.; Fischer, R.; Trachsel, C.; Arneborg, J.; Lynnerup, N.; Craig, O. E.; Swallow, D. M.; Fotakis, A.; Christensen, R. J.; Olsen, J. V.; Liebert, A.; Montalva, N.; Fiddyment, S.; Charlton, S.; Mackie, M.; Canci, A.; Bouwman, A.; Rühli, F.; Gilbert, M. T. P.; Collins, M. J.

    2014-01-01

    Milk is a major food of global economic importance, and its consumption is regarded as a classic example of gene-culture evolution. Humans have exploited animal milk as a food resource for at least 8500 years, but the origins, spread, and scale of dairying remain poorly understood. Indirect lines of evidence, such as lipid isotopic ratios of pottery residues, faunal mortality profiles, and lactase persistence allele frequencies, provide a partial picture of this process; however, in order to understand how, where, and when humans consumed milk products, it is necessary to link evidence of consumption directly to individuals and their dairy livestock. Here we report the first direct evidence of milk consumption, the whey protein β-lactoglobulin (BLG), preserved in human dental calculus from the Bronze Age (ca. 3000 BCE) to the present day. Using protein tandem mass spectrometry, we demonstrate that BLG is a species-specific biomarker of dairy consumption, and we identify individuals consuming cattle, sheep, and goat milk products in the archaeological record. We then apply this method to human dental calculus from Greenland's medieval Norse colonies, and report a decline of this biomarker leading up to the abandonment of the Norse Greenland colonies in the 15th century CE. PMID:25429530

  14. Methods of conditioning direct methanol fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Cynthia; Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2005-11-08

    Methods for conditioning the membrane electrode assembly of a direct methanol fuel cell ("DMFC") are disclosed. In a first method, an electrical current of polarity opposite to that used in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is passed through the anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly. In a second method, methanol is supplied to an anode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, allowed to cross over the polymer electrolyte membrane of the membrane electrode assembly to a cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly, and an electrical current of polarity opposite to that in a functioning direct methanol fuel cell is drawn through the membrane electrode assembly, wherein methanol is oxidized at the cathode surface of the membrane electrode assembly while the catalyst on the anode surface is reduced. Surface oxides on the direct methanol fuel cell anode catalyst of the membrane electrode assembly are thereby reduced.

  15. Direct chemical evidence for eumelanin pigment from the Jurassic period.

    PubMed

    Glass, Keely; Ito, Shosuke; Wilby, Philip R; Sota, Takayuki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Bowers, C Russell; Vinther, Jakob; Dutta, Suryendu; Summons, Roger; Briggs, Derek E G; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Simon, John D

    2012-06-26

    Melanin is a ubiquitous biological pigment found in bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. It has a diverse range of ecological and biochemical functions, including display, evasion, photoprotection, detoxification, and metal scavenging. To date, evidence of melanin in fossil organisms has relied entirely on indirect morphological and chemical analyses. Here, we apply direct chemical techniques to categorically demonstrate the preservation of eumelanin in two > 160 Ma Jurassic cephalopod ink sacs and to confirm its chemical similarity to the ink of the modern cephalopod, Sepia officinalis. Identification and characterization of degradation-resistant melanin may provide insights into its diverse roles in ancient organisms. PMID:22615359

  16. Direct chemical evidence for eumelanin pigment from the Jurassic period

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Keely; Ito, Shosuke; Wilby, Philip R.; Sota, Takayuki; Nakamura, Atsushi; Bowers, C. Russell; Vinther, Jakob; Dutta, Suryendu; Summons, Roger; Briggs, Derek E. G.; Wakamatsu, Kazumasa; Simon, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Melanin is a ubiquitous biological pigment found in bacteria, fungi, plants, and animals. It has a diverse range of ecological and biochemical functions, including display, evasion, photoprotection, detoxification, and metal scavenging. To date, evidence of melanin in fossil organisms has relied entirely on indirect morphological and chemical analyses. Here, we apply direct chemical techniques to categorically demonstrate the preservation of eumelanin in two > 160 Ma Jurassic cephalopod ink sacs and to confirm its chemical similarity to the ink of the modern cephalopod, Sepia officinalis. Identification and characterization of degradation-resistant melanin may provide insights into its diverse roles in ancient organisms. PMID:22615359

  17. Generation of diverse neural cell types through direct conversion

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Gayle F; Strappe, Padraig M

    2016-01-01

    A characteristic of neurological disorders is the loss of critical populations of cells that the body is unable to replace, thus there has been much interest in identifying methods of generating clinically relevant numbers of cells to replace those that have been damaged or lost. The process of neural direct conversion, in which cells of one lineage are converted into cells of a neural lineage without first inducing pluripotency, shows great potential, with evidence of the generation of a range of functional neural cell types both in vitro and in vivo, through viral and non-viral delivery of exogenous factors, as well as chemical induction methods. Induced neural cells have been proposed as an attractive alternative to neural cells derived from embryonic or induced pluripotent stem cells, with prospective roles in the investigation of neurological disorders, including neurodegenerative disease modelling, drug screening, and cellular replacement for regenerative medicine applications, however further investigations into improving the efficacy and safety of these methods need to be performed before neural direct conversion becomes a clinically viable option. In this review, we describe the generation of diverse neural cell types via direct conversion of somatic cells, with comparison against stem cell-based approaches, as well as discussion of their potential research and clinical applications. PMID:26981169

  18. Capnography during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: Current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Kodali, Bhavani Shankar; Urman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Capnography continues to be an important tool in measuring expired carbon dioxide (CO2). Most recent Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) guidelines now recommend using capnography to ascertain the effectiveness of chest compressions and duration of cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR). Based on an extensive review of available published literature, we selected all available peer-reviewed research investigations and case reports. Available evidence suggests that there is significant correlation between partial pressure of end-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) and cardiac output that can indicate the return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC). Additional evidence favoring the use of capnography during CPR includes definitive proof of correct placement of the endotracheal tube and possible prediction of patient survival following cardiac arrest, although the latter will require further investigations. There is emerging evidence that PETCO2 values can guide the initiation of extracorporeal life support (ECLS) in refractory cardiac arrest (RCA). There is also increasing recognition of the value of capnography in intensive care settings in intubated patients. Future directions include determining the outcomes based on capnography waveforms PETCO2 values and determining a reasonable duration of CPR. In the future, given increasing use of capnography during CPR large databases can be analyzed to predict outcomes. PMID:25400399

  19. Direct lineage reprogramming to neural cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Janghwan; Ambasudhan, Rajesh; Ding, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have witnessed an array of studies on direct reprogramming that describe induced inter conversion of mature cell types from higher organisms including human. While these studies reveal an unexpected level of plasticity of differentiated somatic cells, they also provide unprecedented opportunities to develop regenerative therapies for many debilitating disorders and model these ‘diseases-in-a-dish’ for studying their pathophysiology. Here we review the current state of the art in direct lineage reprogramming to neural cells, and discuss the challenges that need to be addressed toward achieving the full potential of this exciting new technology. PMID:22652035

  20. Lightweight Stacks of Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Valdez, Thomas

    2004-01-01

    An improved design concept for direct methanol fuel cells makes it possible to construct fuel-cell stacks that can weigh as little as one-third as much as do conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks of equal power. The structural-support components of the improved cells and stacks can be made of relatively inexpensive plastics. Moreover, in comparison with conventional bipolar fuel-cell stacks, the improved fuel-cell stacks can be assembled, disassembled, and diagnosed for malfunctions more easily. These improvements are expected to bring portable direct methanol fuel cells and stacks closer to commercialization. In a conventional bipolar fuel-cell stack, the cells are interspersed with bipolar plates (also called biplates), which are structural components that serve to interconnect the cells and distribute the reactants (methanol and air). The cells and biplates are sandwiched between metal end plates. Usually, the stack is held together under pressure by tie rods that clamp the end plates. The bipolar stack configuration offers the advantage of very low internal electrical resistance. However, when the power output of a stack is only a few watts, the very low internal resistance of a bipolar stack is not absolutely necessary for keeping the internal power loss acceptably low.

  1. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura; Barth, Heidi; Soulier, Eric; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Bukh, Jens; Patel, Arvind H; Zeisel, Mirjam B; Baumert, Thomas F

    2014-05-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs. PMID:24830295

  2. Hepatitis C Virus Cell-Cell Transmission and Resistance to Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents

    PubMed Central

    Heydmann, Laura; Barth, Heidi; Soulier, Eric; Habersetzer, François; Doffoël, Michel; Bukh, Jens; Patel, Arvind H.; Zeisel, Mirjam B.; Baumert, Thomas F.

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs. PMID:24830295

  3. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of stem cells - like most cells - is not just a membrane phenomenon. Most tissue cells need to adhere to a ``solid'' for viability, and over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that the physical ``elasticity'' of that solid is literally ``felt'' by cells. Here we show that Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) specify lineage and commit to phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to the elasticity typical of tissues [1]. In serum only media, soft matrices that mimic brain appear neurogenic, stiffer matrices that mimic muscle are myogenic, and comparatively rigid matrices that mimic collagenous bone prove osteogenic. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activity blocks all elasticity directed lineage specification, which indicates that the cytoskeleton pulls on matrix through adhesive attachments. Results have significant implications for `therapeutic' stem cells and have motivated development of a proteomic-scale method to identify mechano-responsive protein structures [2] as well as deeper physical studies of matrix physics [3] and growth factor pathways [4]. [4pt] [1] A. Engler, et al. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell (2006).[0pt] [2] C.P. Johnson, et al. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells. Science (2007).[0pt] [3] A.E.X. Brown, et al. Multiscale mechanics of fibrin polymer: Gel stretching with protein unfolding and loss of water. Science (2009).[0pt] [4] D.E. Discher, et al. Growth factors, matrices, and forces combine and control stem cells. Science (2009).

  4. Designing Biomaterials To Direct Stem Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Chaenyung; Liechty, William B.; Khademhosseini, Ali; Peppas, Nicholas A.

    2012-01-01

    As stem cells are a cornerstone of regenerative medicine, research efforts have been extensively focused on controlling their self-renewal and differentiation. It is well known that stem cells are tightly regulated by a combination of physical and chemical factors from their complex extracellular surroundings; thus, conventional cell culture approaches based purely on using soluble factors to direct stem cell fate have resulted in limited success. To account for the complexities of native stem-cell niches, biomaterials are actively investigated as artificial extracellular matrices in order to mimic the natural microenvironment. This Perspective highlights important areas related to the design of biomaterials to control stem cell behavior, such as cell-responsive ligands, mechanical signals, and delivery of soluble factors. PMID:23136849

  5. Designing biomaterials to direct stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Cha, Chaenyung; Liechty, William B; Khademhosseini, Ali; Peppas, Nicholas A

    2012-11-27

    As stem cells are a cornerstone of regenerative medicine, research efforts have been extensively focused on controlling their self-renewal and differentiation. It is well-known that stem cells are tightly regulated by a combination of physical and chemical factors from their complex extracellular surroundings; thus, conventional cell culture approaches based purely on using soluble factors to direct stem cell fate have resulted in limited success. To account for the complexities of native stem-cell niches, biomaterials are actively investigated as artificial extracellular matrices in order to mimic the natural microenvironment. This Perspective highlights important areas related to the design of biomaterials to control stem cell behavior, such as cell-responsive ligands, mechanical signals, and delivery of soluble factors. PMID:23136849

  6. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-10-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  7. Direct geoelectrical evidence of mass transfer at the laboratory scale

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swanson, Ryan D.; Singha, Kamini; Day-Lewis, Frederick D.; Binley, Andrew; Keating, Kristina; Haggerty, Roy

    2012-01-01

    Previous field-scale experimental data and numerical modeling suggest that the dual-domain mass transfer (DDMT) of electrolytic tracers has an observable geoelectrical signature. Here we present controlled laboratory experiments confirming the electrical signature of DDMT and demonstrate the use of time-lapse electrical measurements in conjunction with concentration measurements to estimate the parameters controlling DDMT, i.e., the mobile and immobile porosity and rate at which solute exchanges between mobile and immobile domains. We conducted column tracer tests on unconsolidated quartz sand and a material with a high secondary porosity: the zeolite clinoptilolite. During NaCl tracer tests we collected nearly colocated bulk direct-current electrical conductivity (σb) and fluid conductivity (σf) measurements. Our results for the zeolite show (1) extensive tailing and (2) a hysteretic relation between σf and σb, thus providing evidence of mass transfer not observed within the quartz sand. To identify best-fit parameters and evaluate parameter sensitivity, we performed over 2700 simulations of σf, varying the immobile and mobile domain and mass transfer rate. We emphasized the fit to late-time tailing by minimizing the Box-Cox power transformed root-mean square error between the observed and simulated σf. Low-field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements provide an independent quantification of the volumes of the mobile and immobile domains. The best-fit parameters based on σf match the NMR measurements of the immobile and mobile domain porosities and provide the first direct electrical evidence for DDMT. Our results underscore the potential of using electrical measurements for DDMT parameter inference.

  8. Direct Behavioral and Neurophysiological Evidence for Retronasal Olfaction in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Rebello, Michelle R.; Kandukuru, Padma; Verhagen, Justus V.

    2015-01-01

    The neuroscience of flavor perception is hence becoming increasingly important to understand food flavor perception that guides food selection, ingestion and appreciation. We recently provided evidence that rats can use the retronasal mode of olfaction, an essential element of human flavor perception. We showed that in rats, like humans, odors can acquire a taste. We and others also defined how the input of the olfactory bulb (OB) -not functionally imageable in humans- codes retronasal smell in anesthetized rat. The powerful awake transgenic mouse, however, would be a valuable additional model in the study of flavor neuroscience. We used a go/no-go behavioral task to test the mouse's ability to detect and discriminate the retronasal odor amyl acetate. In this paradigm a tasteless aqueous odor solution was licked by water-restricted head-fixed mice from a lick spout. Orthonasal contamination was avoided. The retronasal odor was successfully discriminated by mice against pure distilled water in a concentration-dependent manner. Bulbectomy removed the mice's ability to discriminate the retronasal odor but not tastants. The OB showed robust optical calcium responses to retronasal odorants in these awake mice. These results suggest that mice, like rats, are capable of smelling retronasally. This direct neuro-behavioral evidence establishes the mouse as a useful additional animal model for flavor research. PMID:25675095

  9. Direct Cytoskeleton Forces Cause Membrane Softening in Red Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-García, Ruddi; López-Montero, Iván; Mell, Michael; Egea, Gustavo; Gov, Nir S.; Monroy, Francisco

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes are flexible cells specialized in the systemic transport of oxygen in vertebrates. This physiological function is connected to their outstanding ability to deform in passing through narrow capillaries. In recent years, there has been an influx of experimental evidence of enhanced cell-shape fluctuations related to metabolically driven activity of the erythroid membrane skeleton. However, no direct observation of the active cytoskeleton forces has yet been reported to our knowledge. Here, we show experimental evidence of the presence of temporally correlated forces superposed over the thermal fluctuations of the erythrocyte membrane. These forces are ATP-dependent and drive enhanced flickering motions in human erythrocytes. Theoretical analyses provide support for a direct force exerted on the membrane by the cytoskeleton nodes as pulses of well-defined average duration. In addition, such metabolically regulated active forces cause global membrane softening, a mechanical attribute related to the functional erythroid deformability. PMID:26083919

  10. Mitogen-stimulated events in nuclei of Swiss 3T3 cells. Evidence for a direct link between changes of inositol lipids, protein kinase C requirement and the onset of DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Martelli, A M; Gilmour, R S; Neri, L M; Manzoli, L; Corps, A N; Cocco, L

    1991-06-01

    Two different clones of Swiss 3T3 cells belonging to the same original cell line have been obtained, one of which was unresponsive to mitogenic stimulation (e.g. insulin-like growth factor-I, bombesin, insulin-like growth factor-I + bombesin), while the other clone showed a very high rate of DNA synthesis under identical conditions as demonstrated by 5-bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Both types of cells expressed the IGF-I receptor and showed high contact inhibition. When highly purified nuclei from responsive cells, treated for a short time with bombesin and insulin-like growth factor-I or insulin-like growth factor-I alone, were incubated with [gamma-32P]adenosine triphosphate, the labelling of phosphatidylinositol-mono- and diphosphate decreased when compared to controls, while this transient effect did not appear in the nuclei from unresponsive cells. Similarly nuclear protein kinase C is activated only in responsive cells. Therefore, it seems that a direct link exists between polyphosphoinositide metabolism, protein kinase C activation and the early events leading to cell division, since the rapid changes in the labelling of both phosphatidylinositol mono- and di-phosphate occur only in nuclei from Swiss 3T3 cells, which respond to the mitogenic stimulus determined by insulin-like growth factor-I on its own, or in combination with bombesin. PMID:1646120

  11. Advances in direct oxidation methanol fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, S.; Narayanan, S. R.; Vamos, E.; Frank, H.; Halpert, G.; Laconti, Anthony B.; Kosek, J.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Olah, G. A.

    1993-01-01

    Fuel cells that can operate directly on fuels such as methanol are attractive for low to medium power applications in view of their low weight and volume relative to other power sources. A liquid feed direct methanol fuel cell has been developed based on a proton exchange membrane electrolyte and Pt/Ru and Pt catalyzed fuel and air/O2 electrodes, respectively. The cell has been shown to deliver significant power outputs at temperatures of 60 to 90 C. The cell voltage is near 0.5 V at 300 mA/cm(exp 2) current density and an operating temperature of 90 C. A deterrent to performance appears to be methanol crossover through the membrane to the oxygen electrode. Further improvements in performance appear possible by minimizing the methanol crossover rate.

  12. Direct formate fuel cells: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Chen, R.

    2016-07-01

    Direct formate fuel cells (DFFC), which convert the chemical energy stored in formate directly into electricity, are recently attracting more attention, primarily because of the use of the carbon-neutral fuel and the low-cost electrocatalytic and membrane materials. As an emerging energy technology, the DFFC has made a rapid progress in recent years (currently, the state-of-the-art power density is 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C). This article provides a review of past research on the development of this type of fuel cell, including the working principle, mechanisms and materials of the electrocatalytic oxidation of formate, singe-cell designs and performance, as well as innovative system designs. In addition, future perspectives with regard to the development of this fuel cell system are also highlighted.

  13. Direct Numerical Simulation of Cell Printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Rui; He, Ping

    2010-11-01

    Structural cell printing, i.e., printing three dimensional (3D) structures of cells held in a tissue matrix, is gaining significant attention in the biomedical community. The key idea is to use desktop printer or similar devices to print cells into 3D patterns with a resolution comparable to the size of mammalian cells, similar to that in living organs. Achieving such a resolution in vitro can lead to breakthroughs in areas such as organ transplantation and understanding of cell-cell interactions in truly 3D spaces. Although the feasibility of cell printing has been demonstrated in the recent years, the printing resolution and cell viability remain to be improved. In this work, we investigate one of the unit operations in cell printing, namely, the impact of a cell-laden droplet into a pool of highly viscous liquids using direct numerical simulations. The dynamics of droplet impact (e.g., crater formation and droplet spreading and penetration) and the evolution of cell shape and internal stress are quantified in details.

  14. Alignment of cell division axes in directed epithelial cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marel, Anna-Kristina; Podewitz, Nils; Zorn, Matthias; Oskar Rädler, Joachim; Elgeti, Jens

    2014-11-01

    Cell division is an essential dynamic event in tissue remodeling during wound healing, cancer and embryogenesis. In collective migration, tensile stresses affect cell shape and polarity, hence, the orientation of the cell division axis is expected to depend on cellular flow patterns. Here, we study the degree of orientation of cell division axes in migrating and resting epithelial cell sheets. We use microstructured channels to create a defined scenario of directed cell invasion and compare this situation to resting but proliferating cell monolayers. In experiments, we find a strong alignment of the axis due to directed flow while resting sheets show very weak global order, but local flow gradients still correlate strongly with the cell division axis. We compare experimental results with a previously published mesoscopic particle based simulation model. Most of the observed effects are reproduced by the simulations.

  15. Uterine stem cells: what is the evidence?

    PubMed

    Gargett, C E

    2007-01-01

    The mucosal lining (endometrium) of the human uterus undergoes cyclical processes of regeneration, differentiation and shedding as part of the menstrual cycle. Endometrial regeneration also follows parturition, almost complete resection and in post-menopausal women taking estrogen replacement therapy. In non-menstruating species, there are cycles of endometrial growth and apoptosis rather than physical shedding. The concept that endometrial stem/progenitor cells are responsible for the remarkable regenerative capacity of endometrium was proposed many years ago. However, attempts to isolate, characterize and locate endometrial stem cells have only been undertaken in the last few years as experimental approaches to identify adult stem/progenitor cells in other tissues have been developed. Adult stem cells are defined by their functional properties rather than by marker expression. Evidence for the existence of adult stem/progenitor cells in human and mouse endometrium is now emerging because functional stem cell assays are being applied to uterine cells and tissues. These fundamental studies on endometrial stem/progenitor cells will provide new insights into the pathophysiology of various gynaecological disorders associated with abnormal endometrial proliferation, including endometrial cancer, endometrial hyperplasia, endometriosis and adenomyosis. PMID:16960017

  16. Improved Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Stack

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.; Ramsey, John C.

    2005-03-08

    A stack of direct methanol fuel cells exhibiting a circular footprint. A cathode and anode manifold, tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are located within the circular footprint. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet cathode manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold, where the serpentine channels of the anode are orthogonal to the serpentine channels of the cathode. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  17. DIRECT FUEL/CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-05-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  18. Neuroanatomical Evidence That Kisspeptin Directly Regulates Isotocin and Vasotocin Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Kanda, Shinji; Akazome, Yasuhisa; Mitani, Yuta; Okubo, Kataaki; Oka, Yoshitaka

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide kisspeptin has been suggested to be an essential central regulator of reproduction in response to changes in serum gonadal steroid concentrations. However, in spite of wide kisspeptin receptor distribution in the brain, especially in the preoptic area and hypothalamus, the research focus has mostly been confined to the kisspeptin regulation on GnRH neurons. Here, by using medaka whose kisspeptin (kiss1) neurons have been clearly demonstrated to be regulated by sex steroids, we analyzed the anatomical distribution of kisspeptin receptors Gpr54-1 and Gpr54-2. Because the both receptors were shown to be activated by kisspeptins (Kiss1 and Kiss2), we analyzed the anatomical distribution of the both receptors by in situ hybridization. They were mainly expressed in the ventral telencephalon, preoptic area, and hypothalamus, which have been suggested to be involved in homeostatic functions including reproduction. First, we found gpr54-2 mRNA expression in nucleus preopticus pars magnocellularis and demonstrated that vasotocin and isotocin (Vasopressin and Oxytocin ortholog, respectively) neurons express gpr54-2 by dual in situ hybridization. Given that kisspeptin administration increases serum oxytocin and vasopressin concentration in mammals, the present finding are likely to be vertebrate-wide phenomenon, although direct regulation has not yet been demonstrated in mammals. We then analyzed co-expression of kisspeptin receptors in three types of GnRH neurons. It was clearly demonstrated that gpr54-expressing cells were located adjacent to GnRH1 neurons, although they were not GnRH1 neurons themselves. In contrast, there was no gpr54-expressing cell in the vicinities of neuromodulatory GnRH2 or GnRH3 neurons. From these results, we suggest that medaka kisspeptin neurons directly regulate some behavioral and neuroendocrine functions via vasotocin/isotocin neurons, whereas they do not regulate hypophysiotropic GnRH1 neurons at least in a direct manner. Thus

  19. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-01

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine{reg_sign} (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. The operation of sub-MW hybrid Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant test facility with a Capstone C60 microturbine was initiated in March 2003. The inclusion of the C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in previous tests using a 30kW microturbine. The design of multi-MW DFC/T hybrid systems, approaching 75% efficiency on natural gas, was initiated. A new concept was developed based on clusters of One-MW fuel cell modules as the building blocks. System analyses were performed, including systems for near-term deployment and power plants with long-term ultra high efficiency objectives. Preliminary assessment of the fuel cell cluster concept, including power plant layout for a 14MW power plant, was performed.

  20. FIRST DIRECT EVIDENCE THAT BARIUM DWARFS HAVE WHITE DWARF COMPANIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, R. O.; McGahee, C. E.; Griffin, R. E. M.; Corbally, C. J. E-mail: cmcgahe@g.clemson.edu E-mail: corbally@as.arizona.edu

    2011-05-15

    Barium II (Ba) stars are chemically peculiar F-, G-, and K-type objects that show enhanced abundances of s-process elements. Since s-process nucleosynthesis is unlikely to take place in stars prior to the advanced asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stage, the prevailing hypothesis is that each present Ba star was contaminated by an AGB companion which is now a white dwarf (WD). Unless the initial mass ratio of such a binary was fairly close to unity, the receiving star is thus at least as likely to be a dwarf as a giant. So although most known Ba stars appear to be giants, the hypothesis requires that Ba dwarfs be comparably plentiful and moreover that they should all have WD companions. However, despite dedicated searches with the IUE satellite, no WD companions have been directly detected to date among the classical Ba dwarfs, even though some 90% of those stars are spectroscopic binaries, so the contamination hypothesis is therefore presently in some jeopardy. In this paper, we analyze recent deep, near-UV and far-UV Galaxy Evolution Explorer (GALEX) exposures of four of the brightest of the class (HD 2454, 15360, 26367, and 221531), together with archived GALEX data for two newly recognized Ba dwarfs: HD 34654 and HD 114520 (which also prove to be spectroscopic binaries). The GALEX observations of the Ba dwarfs as a group show a significant far-UV excess compared to a control sample of normal F-type dwarfs. We suggest that this ensemble far-UV excess constitutes the first direct evidence that Ba dwarfs have WD companions.

  1. Direct fuel cell product design improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Maru, H.C.; Farooque, M.

    1996-12-31

    Significant milestones have been attained towards the technology development field testing and commercialization of direct fuel cell power plant since the 1994 Fuel Cell Seminar. Under a 5-year cooperative agreement with the Department of Energy signed in December 1994, Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has been developing the design for a MW-scale direct fuel cell power plant with input from previous technology efforts and the Santa Clara Demonstration Project. The effort encompasses product definition in consultation with the Fuel Cell Commercialization Group, potential customers, as well as extensive system design and packaging. Manufacturing process improvements, test facility construction, cell component scale up, performance and endurance improvements, stack engineering, and critical balance-of-plant development are also addressed. Major emphasis of this product design improvement project is on increased efficiency, compactness and cost reduction to establish a competitive place in the market. A 2.85 MW power plant with an efficiency of 58% and a footprint of 420 m{sup 2} has been designed. Component and subsystem testing is being conducted at various levels. Planning and preparation for verification of a full size prototype unit are in progress. This paper presents the results obtained since the last fuel cell seminar.

  2. Chrysler Pentastar direct hydrogen fuel cell program

    SciTech Connect

    Kimble, M.; Deloney, D.

    1995-08-01

    The Chrysler Pentastar Electronics, Inc. Direct Hydrogen Fueled PEM Fuel Cell Hybrid Vehicle Program (DPHV) was initiated 1 July, 1994 with the following mission, {open_quotes}Design, fabricate, and test a Direct Hydrogen Fueled Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) Fuel Cell System including onboard hydrogen storage, an efficient lightweight fuel cell, a gas management system, peak power augmentation and a complete system controls that can be economically mass produced and comply with all safety environmental and consumer requirements for vehicle applications for the 21st century.{close_quotes} The Conceptual Design for the entire system based upon the selection of an applicable vehicle and performance requirements that are consistent with the PNGV goals will be discussed. A Hydrogen Storage system that has been selected, packaged, and partially tested in accordance with perceived Hydrogen Safety and Infrastructure requirements will be discussed in addition to our Fuel Cell approach along with design of the {open_quotes}real{close_quotes} module. The Gas Management System and the Load Leveling System have been designed and the software programs have been developed and will be discussed along with a complete fuel cell test station that has the capability to test up to a 60 kW fuel cell system.

  3. Direct evidence of cognitive control without perceptual awareness.

    PubMed

    Ocampo, Brenda; Al-Janabi, Shahd; Finkbeiner, Matthew

    2015-08-01

    A central question within the domain of human cognition is whether or not the ability to replace a current action with a new one (i.e., cognitive control) depends on a conscious appreciation of the environmental change that necessitates the new behavior. Specifically, it is not yet known if non-consciously perceived stimuli can trigger the modification of a currently ongoing action. We show for the first time that individuals are able to use non-consciously perceived information to modify the course and outcome of an ongoing action. Participants were presented with a masked (i.e., subliminal) 'stop' or 'go-on' prime stimulus whilst performing a routine reach-to-touch action. Despite being invisible to participants, the stop primes produced more hesitations mid-flight and more movement reversals than the go-on primes. This new evidence directly establishes that cognitive control (i.e., the ability to modify a currently ongoing action) does not depend on a conscious appreciation of the environmental trigger. PMID:25404552

  4. Direct Behavioral Evidence for Retronasal Olfaction in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Shree Hari; Verhagen, Justus V.

    2012-01-01

    The neuroscience of flavor perception is becoming increasingly important to understand abnormal feeding behaviors and associated chronic diseases such as obesity. Yet, flavor research has mainly depended on human subjects due to the lack of an animal model. A crucial step towards establishing an animal model of flavor research is to determine whether the animal uses the retronasal mode of olfaction, an essential element of flavor perception. We designed a go- no go behavioral task to test the rat's ability to detect and discriminate retronasal odorants. In this paradigm, tasteless aqueous solutions of odorants were licked by water-restricted head-fixed rats from a lick spout. Orthonasal contamination was avoided by employing a combination of a vacuum around the lick-spout and blowing clean air toward the nose. Flow models support the effectiveness of both approaches. The licked odorants were successfully discriminated by rats. Moreover, the tasteless odorant amyl acetate was reliably discriminated against pure distilled water in a concentration-dependent manner. The results from this retronasal odor discrimination task suggest that rats are capable of smelling retronasally. This direct behavioral evidence establishes the rat as a useful animal model for flavor research. PMID:22970305

  5. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed. PMID:25628139

  6. Direct evidence for kinetic effects associated with solar wind reconnection

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaojun; Wang, Yi; Wei, Fengsi; Feng, Xueshang; Deng, Xiaohua; Ma, Yonghui; Zhou, Meng; Pang, Ye; Wong, Hon-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Kinetic effects resulting from the two-fluid physics play a crucial role in the fast collisionless reconnection, which is a process to explosively release massive energy stored in magnetic fields in space and astrophysical plasmas. In-situ observations in the Earth's magnetosphere provide solid consistence with theoretical models on the point that kinetic effects are required in the collisionless reconnection. However, all the observations associated with solar wind reconnection have been analyzed in the context of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) although a lot of solar wind reconnection exhausts have been reported. Because of the absence of kinetic effects and substantial heating, whether the reconnections are still ongoing when they are detected in the solar wind remains unknown. Here, by dual-spacecraft observations, we report a solar wind reconnection with clear Hall magnetic fields. Its corresponding Alfvenic electron outflow jet, derived from the decouple between ions and electrons, is identified, showing direct evidence for kinetic effects that dominate the collisionless reconnection. The turbulence associated with the exhaust is a kind of background solar wind turbulence, implying that the reconnection generated turbulence has not much developed. PMID:25628139

  7. Direct transesterification of fresh microalgal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiao; Liu, Yanan; Wang, Haitao; Xue, Song

    2015-01-01

    Transesterification of lipids is a vital step during the processes of both biodiesel production and fatty acid analysis. By comparing the yields and fatty acid profiles obtained from microalgal oil and dry microalgal cells, the reliability of method for the transesterification of micro-scale samples was tested. The minimum amount of microalgal cells needed for accurate analysis was found to be approximately 300μg dry cells. This direct transesterification method of fresh cells was applied to eight microalgal species, and the results indicate that the efficiency of the developed method is identical to that of conventional method, except for Spirulina whose lipid content is very low, which means the total lipid content should been considered. PMID:25467001

  8. Persistent neural activity in head direction cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taube, Jeffrey S.; Bassett, Joshua P.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    Many neurons throughout the rat limbic system discharge in relation to the animal's directional heading with respect to its environment. These so-called head direction (HD) cells exhibit characteristics of persistent neural activity. This article summarizes where HD cells are found, their major properties, and some of the important experiments that have been conducted to elucidate how this signal is generated. The number of HD and angular head velocity cells was estimated for several brain areas involved in the generation of the HD signal, including the postsubiculum, anterior dorsal thalamus, lateral mammillary nuclei and dorsal tegmental nucleus. The HD cell signal has many features in common with what is known about how neural integration is accomplished in the oculomotor system. The nature of the HD cell signal makes it an attractive candidate for using neural network models to elucidate the signal's underlying mechanisms. The conditions that any network model must satisfy in order to accurately represent how the nervous system generates this signal are highlighted and areas where key information is missing are discussed.

  9. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2004-11-19

    This report includes the progress in development of Direct Fuel Cell/Turbine. (DFC/T.) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T power system is based on an indirectly heated gas turbine to supplement fuel cell generated power. The DFC/T power generation concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, 60% on coal gas, minimal emissions, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed testing of the pre-alpha sub-MW DFC/T power plant. This power plant was constructed by integration of a 250kW fuel cell stack and a microturbine. Following these proof-of-concept tests, a stand-alone test of the microturbine verified the turbine power output expectations at an elevated (representative of the packaged unit condition) turbine inlet temperature. Preliminary design of the packaged sub-MW alpha DFC/T unit has been completed and procurement activity has been initiated. The preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed. A preliminary cost estimate for the 40 MW DFC/T plant has also been prepared. The tests of the cascaded fuel cell concept for achieving high fuel utilizations were completed. The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. Alternate stack flow geometries for increased power output/fuel utilization capabilities are also being evaluated.

  10. Direct volume rendering methods for cell structures.

    PubMed

    Martišek, Dalibor; Martišek, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The study of the complicated architecture of cell space structures is an important problem in biology and medical research. Optical cuts of cells produced by confocal microscopes enable two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions of observed cells. This paper discuses new possibilities for direct volume rendering of these data. We often encounter 16 or more bit images in confocal microscopy of cells. Most of the information contained in these images is unsubstantial for the human vision. Therefore, it is necessary to use mathematical algorithms for visualization of such images. Present software tools as OpenGL or DirectX run quickly in graphic station with special graphic cards, run very unsatisfactory on PC without these cards and outputs are usually poor for real data. These tools are black boxes for a common user and make it impossible to correct and improve them. With the method proposed, more parameters of the environment can be set, making it possible to apply 3D filters to set the output image sharpness in relation to the noise. The quality of the output is incomparable to the earlier described methods and is worth increasing the computing time. We would like to offer mathematical methods of 3D scalar data visualization describing new algorithms that run on standard PCs very well. PMID:22511504

  11. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-23

    In this reporting period, a milestone was achieved by commencement of testing and operation of the sub-scale hybrid direct fuel cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant. The operation was initiated subsequent to the completion of the construction of the balance-of-plant (BOP) and implementation of process and control tests of the BOP for the subscale DFC/T hybrid system. The construction efforts consisted of finishing the power plant insulation and completion of the plant instrumentation including the wiring and tubing required for process measurement and control. The preparation work also included the development of procedures for facility shake down, conditioning and load testing of the fuel cell, integration of the microturbine, and fuel cell/gas turbine load tests. At conclusion of the construction, the process and control (PAC) tests of BOP, including the microturbine, were initiated.

  12. Direct Evidence Linking Soil Organic Matter Development to Microbial Communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kallenbach, C.; Grandy, S.

    2013-12-01

    Despite increasing recognition of microbial contributions to soil organic matter (SOM) formation there is little experimental evidence linking microbial processes to SOM development and the mechanisms responsible remain unclear. Specifically, if stable SOM is largely comprised of microbial products, we need to better understand the soil conditions that influence microbial biomass production and ultimately its stability. Microbial physiology, such as microbial growth efficiency (MGE) and rate (MGR) have direct influences on microbial biomass production and are highly sensitive to resource quality. Therefore, the importance of resource quality on SOM is not necessarily a function of resistance to decay but the degree to which it optimizes microbial biomass production. While resource quality may have an indirect effect on SOM abundance via its influence on microbial physiology, SOM stabilization of labile microbial products may rely heavily on a soil's capacity to form organo-mineral interactions. To examine the relative importance of soil microbial community function, resource quality and mineralogy on direct microbial contributions to SOM formation and stability, an ongoing 15-mo incubation experiment was set up using artificial, initially C- and microbial-free soils. Soil microcosms were constructed by mixing sand with either kaolinite or montmorillonite clays followed with a natural soil microbial inoculum. For both soil mineral treatments, weekly additions of glucose, cellobiose, or syringol are carried out, with an additional treatment of plant leachate to serve as a reference. This simplified system allows us to determine if, in the absence of plant-derived C, microbial products using simple substrates can result in chemically complex SOM similar to natural soils. Over the course of the incubation, MGE, MGR, microbial activity, and SOM accumulation rates are monitored. Pyrolysis-gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (Py-GC/MS) is used to track the microbial

  13. Expression of H-ras correlates with metastatic potential: evidence for direct regulation of the metastatic phenotype in 10T1/2 and NIH 3T3 cells.

    PubMed Central

    Egan, S E; McClarty, G A; Jarolim, L; Wright, J A; Spiro, I; Hager, G; Greenberg, A H

    1987-01-01

    Using three independent approaches, we studied the effects of H-ras on metastasis formation. Analysis of five in vitro-ras-transfected 10T1/2 clones with either flat or refractile morphologies revealed a relationship between metastatic potential, H-ras expression, and anchorage-independent growth. Four metastatic variants derived from a poorly metastatic, low-H-ras-expressing line all expressed high levels of H-ras RNA and grew efficiently in soft agar. Activation of H-ras expression in the metastatic tumors had occurred through amplification and rearrangement of H-ras sequences. In addition, preinduction of p21 synthesis in NIH 3T3 line 433, which contains v-H-ras under transcriptional control of the glucocorticoid-sensitive mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat, significantly increased metastatic efficiency. Glucocorticoid treatment of normal or pEJ-transformed NIH 3T3 cells did not affect metastatic potential. These data reveal a direct relationship between ras expression and metastasis formation and suggest that metastatic and transformed phenotypes may be coregulated in ras-transformed 10T1/2 and NIH 3T3 cells. Images PMID:3102946

  14. Direct FuelCell/Turbine Power Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2008-09-30

    This report summarizes the progress made in development of Direct FuelCell/Turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plants for generation of clean power at very high efficiencies. The DFC/T system employs an indirectly heated Turbine Generator to supplement fuel cell generated power. The concept extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell by utilizing the fuel cell's byproduct heat in a Brayton cycle. Features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas, minimal emissions, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, simplicity in design, direct reforming internal to the fuel cell, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. Proof-of-concept tests using a sub-MW-class DFC/T power plant at FuelCell Energy's (FCE) Danbury facility were conducted to validate the feasibility of the concept and to measure its potential for electric power production. A 400 kW-class power plant test facility was designed and retrofitted to conduct the tests. The initial series of tests involved integration of a full-size (250 kW) Direct FuelCell stack with a 30 kW Capstone microturbine. The operational aspects of the hybrid system in relation to the integration of the microturbine with the fuel cell, process flow and thermal balances, and control strategies for power cycling of the system, were investigated. A subsequent series of tests included operation of the sub-MW Direct FuelCell/Turbine power plant with a Capstone C60 microturbine. The C60 microturbine extended the range of operation of the hybrid power plant to higher current densities (higher power) than achieved in initial tests using the 30kW microturbine. The proof-of-concept test results confirmed the stability and controllability of operating a fullsize (250 kW) fuel cell stack in combination with a microturbine. Thermal management of the system was confirmed and power plant operation, using the microturbine as the only source of fresh air supply to the

  15. Selectivity of Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aricò, Antonino S.; Sebastian, David; Schuster, Michael; Bauer, Bernd; D’Urso, Claudia; Lufrano, Francesco; Baglio, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Sulfonic acid-functionalized polymer electrolyte membranes alternative to Nafion® were developed. These were hydrocarbon systems, such as blend sulfonated polyetheretherketone (s-PEEK), new generation perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) systems, and composite zirconium phosphate–PFSA polymers. The membranes varied in terms of composition, equivalent weight, thickness, and filler and were investigated with regard to their methanol permeation characteristics and proton conductivity for application in direct methanol fuel cells. The behavior of the membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) was investigated in fuel cell with the aim to individuate a correlation between membrane characteristics and their performance in a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). The power density of the DMFC at 60 °C increased according to a square root-like function of the membrane selectivity. This was defined as the reciprocal of the product between area specific resistance and crossover. The power density achieved at 60 °C for the most promising s-PEEK-based membrane-electrode assembly (MEA) was higher than the benchmark Nafion® 115-based MEA (77 mW·cm−2 vs. 64 mW·cm−2). This result was due to a lower methanol crossover (47 mA·cm−2 equivalent current density for s-PEEK vs. 120 mA·cm−2 for Nafion® 115 at 60 °C as recorded at OCV with 2 M methanol) and a suitable area specific resistance (0.15 Ohm cm2 for s-PEEK vs. 0.22 Ohm cm2 for Nafion® 115). PMID:26610582

  16. Evidence for bystander signalling between human trophoblast cells and human embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, Anna J; Gokhale, Paul J; Allison, Thomas F; Sampson, Barry; Athwal, Sharan; Grant, Simon; Andrews, Peter W; Allen, Nicholas D; Case, C Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Maternal exposure during pregnancy to toxins can occasionally lead to miscarriage and malformation. It is currently thought that toxins pass through the placental barrier, albeit bi-layered in the first trimester, and damage the fetus directly, albeit at low concentration. Here we examined the responses of human embryonic stem (hES) cells in tissue culture to two metals at low concentration. We compared direct exposures with indirect exposures across a bi-layered model of the placenta cell barrier. Direct exposure caused increased DNA damage without apoptosis or a loss of cell number but with some evidence of altered differentiation. Indirect exposure caused increased DNA damage and apoptosis but without loss of pluripotency. This was not caused by metal ions passing through the barrier. Instead the hES cells responded to signalling molecules (including TNF-α) secreted by the barrier cells. This mechanism was dependent on connexin 43 mediated intercellular 'bystander signalling' both within and between the trophoblast barrier and the hES colonies. These results highlight key differences between direct and indirect exposure of hES cells across a trophoblast barrier to metal toxins. It offers a theoretical possibility that an indirectly mediated toxicity of hES cells might have biological relevance to fetal development. PMID:26170169

  17. Evidence for bystander signalling between human trophoblast cells and human embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Anna J; Gokhale, Paul J; Allison, Thomas F; Sampson, Barry; Athwal, Sharan; Grant, Simon; Andrews, Peter W; Allen, Nicholas D; Patrick Case, C

    2015-01-01

    Maternal exposure during pregnancy to toxins can occasionally lead to miscarriage and malformation. It is currently thought that toxins pass through the placental barrier, albeit bi-layered in the first trimester, and damage the fetus directly, albeit at low concentration. Here we examined the responses of human embryonic stem (hES) cells in tissue culture to two metals at low concentration. We compared direct exposures with indirect exposures across a bi-layered model of the placenta cell barrier. Direct exposure caused increased DNA damage without apoptosis or a loss of cell number but with some evidence of altered differentiation. Indirect exposure caused increased DNA damage and apoptosis but without loss of pluripotency. This was not caused by metal ions passing through the barrier. Instead the hES cells responded to signalling molecules (including TNF-α) secreted by the barrier cells. This mechanism was dependent on connexin 43 mediated intercellular ‘bystander signalling’ both within and between the trophoblast barrier and the hES colonies. These results highlight key differences between direct and indirect exposure of hES cells across a trophoblast barrier to metal toxins. It offers a theoretical possibility that an indirectly mediated toxicity of hES cells might have biological relevance to fetal development. PMID:26170169

  18. Mutual enhancement of differentiation of osteoblasts and osteocytes occurs through direct cell-cell contact

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Koji; Xing, Qian; Khosla, Sundeep; Monroe, David G.

    2014-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that osteocytes regulate multiple aspects of bone remodeling through bi-directional communication with osteoblasts. This is potentially mediated through cell-cell contact via osteocytic dendritic processes, through the activity of secreted factors, or both. To test whether cell-cell contact affects gene expression patterns in osteoblasts and osteocytes, we used a co-culture system where calvarial osteoblasts and IDG-SW3 osteocytes were allowed to touch through a porous membrane, while still being physically separated to allow for phenotypic characterization. Osteoblast/osteocyte cell-contact resulted in up-regulation of osteoblast differentiation genes in the osteoblasts, when compared to wells where no cell contact was allowed. Examination of osteocyte gene expression when in direct contact with osteoblasts also revealed increased expression of osteocyte-specific genes. These data suggest that physical contact mutually enhances both the osteoblastic and osteocytic character of each respective cell type. Interestingly, Gja1 (a gap junction protein) was increased in the osteoblasts only when in direct contact with the osteocytes, suggesting that Gja1 may mediate some of the effects of direct cell contact. To test this hypothesis, we treated the direct contact system with the gap junction inhibitor 18-alpha-glycyrrhetinic acid and found that Bglap expression was significantly inhibited. This suggests that osteocytes may regulate late osteoblast differentiation at least in part through Gja1. Identification of the specific factors involved in the enhancement of differentiation of both osteoblasts and osteocytes when in direct contact will uncover new biology concerning how these bone cells communicate. PMID:25043105

  19. Cost Sharing in Medicaid: Assumptions, Evidence, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Powell, Victoria; Saloner, Brendan; Sabik, Lindsay M

    2016-08-01

    Several states have received waivers to expand Medicaid to poor adults under the Affordable Care Act using more cost sharing than the program traditionally allows. We synthesize literature on the effects of cost sharing, focusing on studies of low-income U.S. populations from 1995 to 2014. Literature suggests that cost sharing has a deterrent effect on initiation of treatments, and can reduce utilization of ongoing treatments. Furthermore, cost sharing may be difficult for low-income populations to understand, patients often lack sufficient information to choose medical treatment, and cost sharing may be difficult to balance within the budgets of poor adults. Gaps in the literature include evidence of long-term effects of cost sharing on health and financial well-being, evidence related to effectiveness of cost sharing combined with patient education, and evidence related to targeted programs that use financial incentives for wellness. Literature underscores the need for evaluation of the effects of cost sharing on health status and spending, particularly among the poorest adults. PMID:26602175

  20. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-22

    Project activities were focused on the design and construction the sub-scale hybrid Direct Fuel Cell/turbine (DFC/T{reg_sign}) power plant and modification of a Capstone Simple Cycle Model 330 microturbine. The power plant design work included preparation of system flow sheet and performing computer simulations based on conservation of mass and energy. The results of the simulation analyses were utilized to prepare data sheets and specifications for balance-of-plant equipment. Process flow diagram (PFD) and piping and instrumentation diagrams (P&ID) were also completed. The steady state simulation results were used to develop design information for modifying the control functions, and for sizing the heat exchangers required for recuperating the waste heat from the power plant. Line and valve sizes for the interconnecting pipes between the microturbine and the heat recuperators were also identified.

  1. The Preferred Directions of Conjunctive Grid X Head Direction Cells in the Medial Entorhinal Cortex Are Periodically Organized

    PubMed Central

    Keinath, Alexander Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of speed-modulated grid, head direction, and conjunctive grid x head direction cells in the medial entorhinal cortex has led to the hypothesis that path integration, the updating of one’s spatial representation based on movement, may be carried out within this region. This hypothesis has been formalized by many computational models, including a class known as attractor network models. While many of these models propose specific mechanisms by which path integration might occur, predictions of these specific mechanisms have not been tested. Here I derive and test a key prediction of one attractor network path integration mechanism. Specifically, I first demonstrate that this mechanism predicts a periodic distribution of conjunctive cell preferred directions in order to minimize drift. Next, I test whether conjunctive cell preferred directions are in fact periodically organized. Results indicate that conjunctive cells are preferentially tuned to increments of 36°, consistent with drift minimization in this path integration mechanism. By contrast, no periodicity was observed in the preferred directions of either pure grid or pure head direction cells. These results provide the first neural evidence of a nonuniform structure in the directional preferences of any head direction representation found in the brain. PMID:27003407

  2. Transcriptionally Regulated Cell Adhesion Network Dictates Distal Tip Cell Directionality

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Ming-Ching; Kennedy, William P.; Schwarzbauer, Jean E.

    2015-01-01

    Background The mechanisms that govern directional changes in cell migration are poorly understood. The migratory paths of two distal tip cells (DTC) determine the U-shape of the C. elegans hermaphroditic gonad. The morphogenesis of this organ provides a model system to identify genes necessary for the DTCs to execute two stereotyped turns. Results Using candidate genes for RNAi knockdown in a DTC-specific strain, we identified two transcriptional regulators required for DTC turning: cbp-1, the CBP/p300 transcriptional coactivator homologue, and let-607, a CREBH transcription factor homologue. Further screening of potential target genes uncovered a network of integrin adhesion-related genes that have roles in turning and are dependent on cbp-1 and let-607 for expression. These genes include src-1/Src kinase, tln-1/talin, pat-2/α integrin and nmy-2, a nonmuscle myosin heavy chain. Conclusions Transcriptional regulation by means of cbp-1 and let-607 is crucial for determining directional changes during DTC migration. These regulators coordinate a gene network that is necessary for integrin-mediated adhesion. Overall, these results suggest that directional changes in cell migration rely on the precise gene regulation of adhesion. PMID:24811939

  3. Self Directed Support and People with Learning Disabilities: A Review of the Published Research Evidence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harkes, Mary Anne; Brown, Michael; Horsburgh, Dorothy

    2014-01-01

    A systematic literature review was undertaken to determine the evidence base underpinning the strategy of Self Directed Support and whether evidence demonstrates that this policy is accessible to everyone with a learning disability. It also sought to identify whether there were any barriers to Self Directed Support for people with severe or…

  4. Memory bias in anorexia nervosa: evidence from directed forgetting.

    PubMed

    Tekcan, Ali I; Cağlar Taş, A; Topçuoğlu, Volkan; Yücel, Başak

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine memory bias for disorder-relevant information in anorexia nervosa by using the directed forgetting paradigm. Normal controls and patients with anorexia nervosa were given a list consisting of neutral and disorder-relevant words, which they were either asked to remember (R) or forget (F). Memory performance was measured by a free recall and a Yes/No recognition task for all items. There was a directed forgetting effect for both groups; however, the magnitude of the effect (difference between R and F words) was smaller for the patient group due to higher recall of F items. Further analyses showed that this was true only for disorder-relevant but not for neutral items. Our findings support the existence of a strong memory bias for disorder-relevant information in patients with anorexia nervosa, who had difficulty in avoiding the processing of information that they were asked to forget. PMID:17996215

  5. Recognizing intentions in infant-directed speech: evidence for universals.

    PubMed

    Bryant, Gregory A; Barrett, H Clark

    2007-08-01

    In all languages studied to date, distinct prosodic contours characterize different intention categories of infant-directed (ID) speech. This vocal behavior likely exists universally as a species-typical trait, but little research has examined whether listeners can accurately recognize intentions in ID speech using only vocal cues, without access to semantic information. We recorded native-English-speaking mothers producing four intention categories of utterances (prohibition, approval, comfort, and attention) as both ID and adult-directed (AD) speech, and we then presented the utterances to Shuar adults (South American hunter-horticulturalists). Shuar subjects were able to reliably distinguish ID from AD speech and were able to reliably recognize the intention categories in both types of speech, although performance was significantly better with ID speech. This is the first demonstration that adult listeners in an indigenous, nonindustrialized, and nonliterate culture can accurately infer intentions from both ID speech and AD speech in a language they do not speak. PMID:17680948

  6. Neoadjuvant therapy for gastric cancer: current evidence and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Andrew D.; Datta, Jashodeep; Loaiza-Bonilla, Arturo; Karakousis, Giorgos C.

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection remains the only potentially curative treatment for gastric cancer (GC), poor long-term outcomes with resection alone compel a multimodality approach to this disease. Multimodality strategies vary widely; while adjuvant approaches are typically favored in Asia and the United States (USA), a growing body of evidence supports neoadjuvant and/or perioperative strategies in locally advanced tumors. Neoadjuvant approaches are particularly attractive given the morbidity associated with surgical management of GC and the substantial risk of omission of adjuvant therapy. The specific advantages of chemoradiotherapy (CRT) compared to chemotherapy have not been well defined, particularly in the preoperative setting and trials aimed at determining the optimal elements and sequencing of therapy are underway. Future studies will also define the role of targeted and biologic therapies. PMID:26487948

  7. Direct Evidence of Egestion and Salivation of Xylella fastidiosa Suggests Sharpshooters Can Be "Flying Syringes".

    PubMed

    Backus, Elaine A; Shugart, Holly J; Rogers, Elizabeth E; Morgan, J Kent; Shatters, Robert

    2015-05-01

    Xylella fastidiosa is unique among insect-transmitted plant pathogens because it is propagative but noncirculative, adhering to and multiplying on the cuticular lining of the anterior foregut. Any inoculation mechanism for X. fastidiosa must explain how bacterial cells exit the vector's stylets via the food canal and directly enter the plant. A combined egestion-salivation mechanism has been proposed to explain these unique features. Egestion is the putative outward flow of fluid from the foregut via hypothesized bidirectional pumping of the cibarium. The present study traced green fluorescent protein-expressing X. fastidiosa or fluorescent nanoparticles acquired from artificial diets by glassy-winged sharpshooters, Homalodisca vitripennis, as they were egested into simultaneously secreted saliva. X. fastidiosa or nanoparticles were shown to mix with gelling saliva to form fluorescent deposits and salivary sheaths on artificial diets, providing the first direct, conclusive evidence of egestion by any hemipteran insect. Therefore, the present results strongly support an egestion-salivation mechanism of X. fastidiosa inoculation. Results also support that a column of fluid is transiently held in the foregut without being swallowed. Evidence also supports (but does not definitively prove) that bacteria were suspended in the column of fluid during the vector's transit from diet to diet, and were egested with the held fluid. Thus, we hypothesize that sharpshooters could be true "flying syringes," especially when inoculation occurs very soon after uptake of bacteria, suggesting the new paradigm of a nonpersistent X. fastidiosa transmission mechanism. PMID:26020829

  8. Direct evidence of flagellar synchronization through hydrodynamic interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumley, Douglas; Polin, Marco; Wan, Kirsty; Goldstein, Raymond

    2013-11-01

    Eukaryotic cilia and flagella exhibit striking coordination, from the synchronous beating of two flagella in Chlamydomonas to the metachronal waves and large-scale flows displayed by carpets of cilia. However, the precise mechanisms responsible for flagellar synchronization remain unclear. We perform a series of experiments involving two individual flagella in a quiescent fluid. Cells are isolated from the colonial alga Volvox carteri, held in place at a fixed distance d, and oriented so that their flagellar beating planes coincide. In this fashion, we are able to explicitly assess the role of hydrodynamics in achieving synchronization. For closely separated cells, the flagella are capable of exhibiting a phase-locked state for thousands of beats at a time, despite significant differences in their intrinsic frequencies. For intermediate values of d, synchronous periods are interrupted by brief phase slips, while for d >> 1 the flagellar phase difference drifts almost linearly with time. The coupling strength extracted through analysis of the synchronization statistics exhibits excellent agreement with hydrodynamic predictions. This study unambiguously reveals that flagella coupled only through hydrodynamics are capable of exhibiting robust synchrony.

  9. Hepatic Safety of Atypical Antipsychotics: Current Evidence and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Slim, Mahmoud; Medina-Caliz, Inmaculada; Gonzalez-Jimenez, Andres; Cabello, M Rosario; Mayoral-Cleries, Fermin; Lucena, M Isabel; Andrade, Raul J

    2016-10-01

    The newer atypical antipsychotic agents (AAPs) represent an attractive therapeutic option for a wide range of psychotic disorders, including schizophrenia and bipolar mania, because of the reduced risk of disabling extrapyramidal symptoms. However, their growing use has raised questions about their tolerability over the endocrine, metabolic, and cardiovascular axes. Indeed, atypical antipsychotic drugs are associated, to differing extents, with mild elevation of aminotransferases related to weight gain, AAP-induced metabolic syndrome, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Although the hepatic safety of new AAPs seems improved over that of chlorpromazine, they can occasionally cause idiosyncratic liver injury with varying phenotypes and, rarely, lead to acute liver failure. However, AAPs are a group of heterogeneous, chemically unrelated compounds with distinct pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties and substantially different safety profiles, which precludes the notion of a class effect for hepatotoxicity risk and highlights the need for an individualized therapeutic approach. We discuss the current evidence on the hepatotoxicity potential of AAPs, the emerging underlying mechanisms, and the limitations inherent to this group of drugs for both establishing a proper causality assessment and developing strategies for risk management. PMID:27449495

  10. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport

    PubMed Central

    Knight, Michael J.; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na+/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  11. Direct evidence of the molecular basis for biological silicon transport.

    PubMed

    Knight, Michael J; Senior, Laura; Nancolas, Bethany; Ratcliffe, Sarah; Curnow, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Diatoms are an important group of eukaryotic algae with a curious evolutionary innovation: they sheath themselves in a cell wall made largely of silica. The cellular machinery responsible for silicification includes a family of membrane permeases that recognize and actively transport the soluble precursor of biosilica, silicic acid. However, the molecular basis of silicic acid transport remains obscure. Here, we identify experimentally tractable diatom silicic acid transporter (SIT) homologues and study their structure and function in vitro, enabled by the development of a new fluorescence method for studying substrate transport kinetics. We show that recombinant SITs are Na(+)/silicic acid symporters with a 1:1 protein: substrate stoichiometry and KM for silicic acid of 20 μM. Protein mutagenesis supports the long-standing hypothesis that four conserved GXQ amino acid motifs are important in SIT function. This marks a step towards a detailed understanding of silicon transport with implications for biogeochemistry and bioinspired materials. PMID:27305972

  12. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment. PMID:19074573

  13. Direct evidence of void passivation in Cu(InGa)(SSe){sub 2} absorber layers

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Dongho; Kim, Young-Su; Mo, Chan B.; Huh, Kwangsoo; Yang, JungYup E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr; Nam, Junggyu; Baek, Dohyun; Park, Sungchan; Kim, ByoungJune; Kim, Dongseop; Lee, Jaehan; Heo, Sung; Park, Jong-Bong; Kang, Yoonmook E-mail: ddang@korea.ac.kr

    2015-02-23

    We have investigated the charge collection condition around voids in copper indium gallium sulfur selenide (CIGSSe) solar cells fabricated by sputter and a sequential process of selenization/sulfurization. In this study, we found direct evidence of void passivation by using the junction electron beam induced current method, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The high sulfur concentration at the void surface plays an important role in the performance enhancement of the device. The recombination around voids is effectively suppressed by field-assisted void passivation. Hence, the generated carriers are easily collected by the electrodes. Therefore, when the S/(S + Se) ratio at the void surface is over 8% at room temperature, the device performance degradation caused by the recombination at the voids is negligible at the CIGSSe layer.

  14. Experimental evidence for direct sesquiterpene emission from soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    HorváTh, Eszter; Hoffer, AndráS.; SebőK, Flóra; Dobolyi, Csaba; Szoboszlay, SáNdor; Kriszt, BaláZs; GelencséR, AndráS.

    2012-08-01

    The biogenic organic precursors which are of relevance in secondary organic aerosol formation are primarily isoprene, monoterpenes, sesquiterpenes (SQTs) and their derivatives. Atmospheric volatile organic compound inventories consider plant emissions as the exclusive sources of natural secondary organic aerosol precursors. Very recently we have shown in pure culture experiments that abundant soil fungal strains are capable of producing significant emission fluxes of SQTs and have implied that soils might be globally important SQT emission sources. In the present follow-up study we determined sesquiterpene emission fluxes in the laboratory directly from unperturbed soil samples and from selected soil samples with the top litter layer removed. We also characterized basic soil parameters and native fungal strains in the samples, and quantified ergosterol as a proxy of bulk fungal biomass. The measured SQT emission fluxes (6-1980 ng m-2 h-1; median 109 ng m-2 h-1) were of the same magnitude as inferred from culture experiments confirming that soil biota can be an important sesquiterpene emission source that has to be included in future VOC inventories.

  15. Performance of 2-propanol in direct-oxidation fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhigang; Kaufman, Arthur

    A direct-oxidation fuel cell using 2-propanol as fuel has been evaluated. The cell performance, open circuit voltage (OCV), and alcohol crossover were measured at various alcohol concentration, cell temperature, and air/nitrogen flow rate. The cell shows much higher performance than a direct methanol fuel cell, especially at current densities less than ca. 200 mA/cm 2. This performance is the highest among any direct-liquid-oxidation fuel cells. The cell open circuit voltage can be as much as 0.27 V higher than that of a methanol cell, while the amount of 2-propanol crossing through the membrane can be as low as 1/7 of that of methanol. Therefore, a direct 2-propanol fuel cell can have much higher fuel and fuel cell efficiencies. One problem associated with using 2-propanol as fuel is the anode poisoning by reaction intermediates and a frequent cleaning of the electrode surface is needed.

  16. Direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in a honeycomb lattice iridate Na2IrO3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwan Chun, Sae; Kim, Jong-Woo; Kim, Jungho; Zheng, H.; Stoumpos, Constantinos C.; Malliakas, C. D.; Mitchell, J. F.; Mehlawat, Kavita; Singh, Yogesh; Choi, Y.; Gog, T.; Al-Zein, A.; Sala, M. Moretti; Krisch, M.; Chaloupka, J.; Jackeli, G.; Khaliullin, G.; Kim, B. J.

    2015-06-01

    Heisenberg interactions are ubiquitous in magnetic materials and play a central role in modelling and designing quantum magnets. Bond-directional interactions offer a novel alternative to Heisenberg exchange and provide the building blocks of the Kitaev model, which has a quantum spin liquid as its exact ground state. Honeycomb iridates, A2IrO3 (A = Na, Li), offer potential realizations of the Kitaev magnetic exchange coupling, and their reported magnetic behaviour may be interpreted within the Kitaev framework. However, the extent of their relevance to the Kitaev model remains unclear, as evidence for bond-directional interactions has so far been indirect. Here we present direct evidence for dominant bond-directional interactions in antiferromagnetic Na2IrO3 and show that they lead to strong magnetic frustration. Diffuse magnetic X-ray scattering reveals broken spin-rotational symmetry even above the Néel temperature, with the three spin components exhibiting short-range correlations along distinct crystallographic directions. This spin- and real-space entanglement directly uncovers the bond-directional nature of these interactions, thus providing a direct connection between honeycomb iridates and Kitaev physics.

  17. Laser-based direct-write techniques for cell printing

    PubMed Central

    Schiele, Nathan R; Corr, David T; Huang, Yong; Raof, Nurazhani Abdul; Xie, Yubing; Chrisey, Douglas B

    2016-01-01

    Fabrication of cellular constructs with spatial control of cell location (±5 μm) is essential to the advancement of a wide range of applications including tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research. Precise cell placement, especially of multiple cell types in co- or multi-cultures and in three dimensions, can enable research possibilities otherwise impossible, such as the cell-by-cell assembly of complex cellular constructs. Laser-based direct writing, a printing technique first utilized in electronics applications, has been adapted to transfer living cells and other biological materials (e.g., enzymes, proteins and bioceramics). Many different cell types have been printed using laser-based direct writing, and this technique offers significant improvements when compared to conventional cell patterning techniques. The predominance of work to date has not been in application of the technique, but rather focused on demonstrating the ability of direct writing to pattern living cells, in a spatially precise manner, while maintaining cellular viability. This paper reviews laser-based additive direct-write techniques for cell printing, and the various cell types successfully laser direct-written that have applications in tissue engineering, stem cell and cancer research are highlighted. A particular focus is paid to process dynamics modeling and process-induced cell injury during laser-based cell direct writing. PMID:20814088

  18. Direct evidence of host genome acquisition by the alphaherpesvirus Marek's disease virus.

    PubMed

    Niikura, M; Dodgson, J; Cheng, H

    2006-03-01

    Many herpesviruses including Marek's disease virus (MDV), a poultry alphaherpesvirus, carry homologous host genes presumably acquired during viral evolution. We have characterized one recent acquisition by MDV in considerable detail. The virulent MDV strain Md11 previously was isolated from a commercial chicken and initially propagated on duck cells. In the process of cloning the entire Md11 genome in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC), we obtained an infectious clone in which the entire terminal repeat short segment was replaced with a portion of the duck genome that corresponds to chicken chromosome 19. This sequence is not predicted to express any protein even though it contains one exon of the VAMP1 gene. The replacement did not affect MDV replication in vitro, despite the virus having only one copy of ICP4. Furthermore, we have shown that the variant MDV genome containing the duck genome substitution is present in the parental Md11 population and has been maintained through several subsequent propagations of the virus on chicken cells. This finding provides direct evidence that host genome acquisition by MDV actually occurs during virus replication, and that one or more such MDV genomes with host sequences may exist within MDV viral stocks which tend to be polyclonal, due to the cell-associated nature of its infection process. PMID:16155725

  19. Directing cell migration in continuous microchannels by topographical amplification of natural directional persistence

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Young-Gwang; Co, Carlos C.; Ho, Chia-Chi

    2013-01-01

    Discrete micropatterns on biomaterial surfaces can be used to guide the direction of mammalian cell movement by orienting cell morphology. However, guiding cell assembly in three-dimensional scaffolds remains a challenge. Here we demonstrate that the random motions of motile cells can be rectified within continuous microchannels without chemotactic gradients or fluid flow. Our results show that uniform width microchannels with an overhanging zigzag design can induce polarization of NIH3T3 fibroblasts and human umbilical vein endothelial cells by expanding the cell front at each turn. These continuous zigzag microchannels can guide the direction of cell movement even for cells with altered intracellular signals that promote random movement. This approach for directing cell migration within microchannels has important potential implications in the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering. PMID:23099064

  20. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous. The fuel cell system also comprises a fuel supplying part including a meter which meters an amount of fuel which is used by the fuel cell, and controls the supply of fuel based on said metering.

  1. Aerosol feed direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Improvements to fuel cells include introduction of the fuel as an aerosol of liquid fuel droplets suspended in a gas. The particle size of the liquid fuel droplets may be controlled for optimal fuel cell performance by selection of different aerosol generators or by separating droplets based upon size using a particle size conditioner.

  2. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  3. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  4. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Improvements to non-acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  5. Direct methanol feed fuel cell and system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Frank, Harvey A. (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Chun, William (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Kindler, Andrew (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    Improvements to non acid methanol fuel cells include new formulations for materials. The platinum and ruthenium are more exactly mixed together. Different materials are substituted for these materials. The backing material for the fuel cell electrode is specially treated to improve its characteristics. A special sputtered electrode is formed which is extremely porous.

  6. Direct evidence of chemical ordering in the FePt nanostructured alloy by HR-TEM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rekha; Medwal, Rohit; Annapoorni, S.

    2015-07-01

    The iron-platinum (FePt) alloy exhibits structural and magnetic phase transformation even at a low temperature of 300 °C with an insignificant grain growth. These transformation studies were understood nano-scopically using high resolution-transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The FePt grains show strain induced structural transformation and adopts polycrystalline behaviour. The chemical ordering of FePt grains is explained using Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) analysis of the TEM image. HR-TEM image shows the hexagonal arrangement of Pt atoms in the [0 0 1] direction in the FePt unit cell which gives the direct evidence of chemical ordering in FePt nanostructured alloy. The filtration and reconstruction method has been employed with the help of inverse Fast Fourier Transformation tool, confirming the formation of L10 FePt phase. The chemical ordering is also confirmed by structural and magnetic measurements revealing an order parameter of 0.875 and coercivity 3 kOe respectively at a low annealing temperature of 300 °C. The chemical ordering at low annealing temperature makes it suitable for media storage applications.

  7. Directional cell movement through tissues is controlled by exosome secretion

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bong Hwan; Ketova, Tatiana; Hoshino, Daisuke; Zijlstra, Andries; Weaver, Alissa M.

    2015-01-01

    Directional cell movement through tissues is critical for multiple biological processes and requires maintenance of polarity in the face of complex environmental cues. Here we use intravital imaging to demonstrate that secretion of exosomes from late endosomes is required for directionally persistent and efficient in vivo movement of cancer cells. Inhibiting exosome secretion or biogenesis leads to defective tumour cell migration associated with increased formation of unstable protrusions and excessive directional switching. In vitro rescue experiments with purified exosomes and matrix coating identify adhesion assembly as a critical exosome function that promotes efficient cell motility. Live-cell imaging reveals that exosome secretion directly precedes and promotes adhesion assembly. Fibronectin is found to be a critical motility-promoting cargo whose sorting into exosomes depends on binding to integrins. We propose that autocrine secretion of exosomes powerfully promotes directionally persistent and effective cell motility by reinforcing otherwise transient polarization states and promoting adhesion assembly. PMID:25968605

  8. Direction-Setting School Leadership Practices: A Meta-Analytical Review of Evidence about Their Influence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sun, Jingping; Leithwood, Kenneth

    2015-01-01

    This study reviews evidence about the overall influence of direction-setting leadership practices (DSLPs), 1 of 4 major categories of practices included in a widely known conception of effective leadership (e.g., Leithwood & Louis, 2011) and a focus of many other such conceptions, as well. This study also inquires about how direction-setting…

  9. Direct-Write Contacts for Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaydanova, T.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Miedaner, A.; Curtis, C. J.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Garnett, E.; Shaheen, S.; Ginley, D. S.; Smith, L.; Collins, R.; Hanoka, J. I.; Gabor, A. M.

    2005-01-01

    We report on our project to develop inkjet printable contacts for solar cells. Ag, Cu, and Ni metallizations were inkjet printed with near vacuum deposition quality. Thick, highly conducting lines of Ag and Cu demonstrating good adhesion to glass, Si, and PCB have been printed at 100-200 C in air and N2, respectively. Ag grids were inkjet-printed on Si solar cells and fired through silicon nitride AR layer at 850 C resulting in 8% cells. Next-generation multicomponent inks (including etching agents) have also been developed with improved fire-through contacts leading to higher cell efficiencies. The approach developed can be easily extended to other conductors such as Pt, Pd, and Au, etc. In addition, PEDOT-PSS polymer-based conductors were inkjet-printed with the conductivity as good or better than those of polymer-based conductors.

  10. Leader Cells Define Directionality of Trunk, but Not Cranial, Neural Crest Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Jo; Gauert, Anton; Briones Montecinos, Luis; Fanlo, Lucía; Alhashem, Zainalabdeen Mohmammed; Assar, Rodrigo; Marti, Elisa; Kabla, Alexandre; Härtel, Steffen; Linker, Claudia

    2016-05-31

    Collective cell migration is fundamental for life and a hallmark of cancer. Neural crest (NC) cells migrate collectively, but the mechanisms governing this process remain controversial. Previous analyses in Xenopus indicate that cranial NC (CNC) cells are a homogeneous population relying on cell-cell interactions for directional migration, while chick embryo analyses suggest a heterogeneous population with leader cells instructing directionality. Our data in chick and zebrafish embryos show that CNC cells do not require leader cells for migration and all cells present similar migratory capacities. In contrast, laser ablation of trunk NC (TNC) cells shows that leader cells direct movement and cell-cell contacts are required for migration. Moreover, leader and follower identities are acquired before the initiation of migration and remain fixed thereafter. Thus, two distinct mechanisms establish the directionality of CNC cells and TNC cells. This implies the existence of multiple molecular mechanisms for collective cell migration. PMID:27210753

  11. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  12. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  13. Direct Write Contacts for Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kaydanova, T.; van Hest, M.F.A.M.; Miedaner, A.; Curtis, C. J.; Alleman, J. L.; Dabney, M. S.; Garnett, E.; Shaheen, S.; Smith, L.; Collins, R.; Hanoka, J. I.; Gabor, A. M.; Ginley, D.S.

    2005-02-01

    Ag, Cu, and Ni metallizations were inkjet-printed with near-vacuum deposition quality. The approach developed can be easily extended to other conductors such as Pt, Pd, and Au. Thick, highly conducting lines of Ag and Cu demonstrating good adhesion to glass, Si, and PCB have been printed at 100-200 C in air and N2, respectively. Ag grids were inkjet-printed on Si solar cells and fired through the silicon nitride antireflective layer at 850 C resulting in 8%-efficient cells. Next-generation multicomponent inks (including etching agents) have also been developed with improved fire-through contacts leading to higher cell efficiencies. PEDOT-PSS polymer-based conductors were inkjet-printed with conductivity as good or better than that of spin-coated films.

  14. Wdpcp, a PCP Protein Required for Ciliogenesis, Regulates Directional Cell Migration and Cell Polarity by Direct Modulation of the Actin Cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Cheng; Chatterjee, Bishwanath; Lozito, Thomas P.; Zhang, Zhen; Francis, Richard J.; Yagi, Hisato; Swanhart, Lisa M.; Sanker, Subramaniam; Francis, Deanne; Yu, Qing; San Agustin, Jovenal T.; Puligilla, Chandrakala; Chatterjee, Tania; Tansey, Terry; Liu, Xiaoqin; Kelley, Matthew W.; Spiliotis, Elias T.; Kwiatkowski, Adam V.; Tuan, Rocky; Pazour, Gregory J.; Hukriede, Neil A.; Lo, Cecilia W.

    2013-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) regulates cell alignment required for collective cell movement during embryonic development. This requires PCP/PCP effector proteins, some of which also play essential roles in ciliogenesis, highlighting the long-standing question of the role of the cilium in PCP. Wdpcp, a PCP effector, was recently shown to regulate both ciliogenesis and collective cell movement, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Here we show Wdpcp can regulate PCP by direct modulation of the actin cytoskeleton. These studies were made possible by recovery of a Wdpcp mutant mouse model. Wdpcp-deficient mice exhibit phenotypes reminiscent of Bardet–Biedl/Meckel–Gruber ciliopathy syndromes, including cardiac outflow tract and cochlea defects associated with PCP perturbation. We observed Wdpcp is localized to the transition zone, and in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2, Nphp1, and Mks1 were lost from the transition zone, indicating Wdpcp is required for recruitment of proteins essential for ciliogenesis. Wdpcp is also found in the cytoplasm, where it is localized in the actin cytoskeleton and in focal adhesions. Wdpcp interacts with Sept2 and is colocalized with Sept2 in actin filaments, but in Wdpcp-deficient cells, Sept2 was lost from the actin cytoskeleton, suggesting Wdpcp is required for Sept2 recruitment to actin filaments. Significantly, organization of the actin filaments and focal contacts were markedly changed in Wdpcp-deficient cells. This was associated with decreased membrane ruffling, failure to establish cell polarity, and loss of directional cell migration. These results suggest the PCP defects in Wdpcp mutants are not caused by loss of cilia, but by direct disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Consistent with this, Wdpcp mutant cochlea has normal kinocilia and yet exhibits PCP defects. Together, these findings provide the first evidence, to our knowledge, that a PCP component required for ciliogenesis can directly modulate the actin cytoskeleton to

  15. Which type of fuel cell is more competitive for portable application: Direct methanol fuel cells or direct borohydride fuel cells?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wee, Jung-Ho

    The promise of fuel cell systems using liquid fuels, such as the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) and direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC), to complement or substitute for existing batteries is becoming recognized, along with their potential as a future technology for mobile and portable power supplies. The key issue is which type of fuel cell is more competitive for such power supplies: DMFC or DBFC? To answer this question, the present study analyzes and discusses the relative competitiveness of these two systems given the current status of the technologies and assuming some generally accepted conditions. The findings confirm that the DBFC system is superior to the DMFC system in terms of cell size and fuel (or fuel solution) consumption. Thus, the DBFC system is better suited to applications that require small operational space. On the other hand, the total operating costs of DBFC systems are higher than those of DMFC systems. According to the total cost formulae derived in the analysis, the DBFC system becomes relatively uneconomic at higher power outputs and longer operation times, but may be more favourable in specific portable applications such as miniaturized or micro power systems with short operational time spans.

  16. Gammaherpesviruses and canine lymphoma: no evidence for direct involvement in commonly occurring lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, Alice; McAulay, Karen A.; Henriques, Joaquim; Alves, Margarida; Bell, Adam J.; Morris, Joanna S.; Jarrett, Ruth F.

    2015-01-01

    Lymphoma is the most common haematopoietic malignancy in dogs, but little is known about the aetiology of this heterogeneous group of cancers. In humans, the Epstein–Barr virus (EBV) is associated with several lymphoma subtypes. Recently, it was suggested that EBV or an EBV-like virus is circulating in dogs. We therefore investigated whether EBV, or a novel herpesvirus, is associated with canine lymphoma using both serological and molecular techniques. In an assay designed to detect antibodies to EBV viral capsid antigens, 41 % of dogs were positive. Dogs with cancers, including lymphoma, were more frequently positive than controls, but no particular association with B-cell lymphoma was noted. EBV-specific RNA and DNA sequences were not detected in lymphoma tissue by in situ hybridization or PCR, and herpesvirus genomes were not detected using multiple degenerate PCR assays with the ability to detect novel herpesviruses. We therefore found no evidence that herpesviruses are directly involved in common types of canine lymphoma although cannot exclude the presence of an EBV-like virus in the canine population. PMID:25722346

  17. DIRECT FUEL CELL/TURBINE POWER PLANT

    SciTech Connect

    Hossein Ghezel-Ayagh

    2003-05-27

    The subMW hybrid DFC/T power plant facility was upgraded with a Capstone C60 microturbine and a state-of-the-art full size fuel cell stack. The integration of the larger microturbine extended the capability of the hybrid power plant to operate at high power ratings with a single gas turbine without the need for supplementary air. The objectives of this phase of subMW hybrid power plant tests are to support the development of process and control and to provide the insight for the design of the packaged subMW hybrid demonstration units. The development of the ultra high efficiency multi-MW power plants was focused on the design of 40 MW power plants with efficiencies approaching 75% (LHV of natural gas). The design efforts included thermodynamic cycle analysis of key gas turbine parameters such as compression ratio.

  18. Direct methanol fuel cell and system

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2004-10-26

    A fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and a polymer electrolyte membrane located between anode and cathode gas diffusion backings uses a methanol vapor fuel supply. A permeable polymer electrolyte membrane having a permeability effective to sustain a carbon dioxide flux equivalent to at least 10 mA/cm.sup.2 provides for removal of carbon dioxide produced at the anode by reaction of methanol with water. Another aspect of the present invention includes a superabsorpent polymer material placed in proximity to the anode gas diffusion backing to hold liquid methanol or liquid methanol solution without wetting the anode gas diffusion backing so that methanol vapor from the liquid methanol or liquid methanol-water solution is supplied to the membrane.

  19. The Mammary Gland Microenvironment Directs Progenitor Cell Fate In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Bussard, Karen M.; Smith, Gilbert H.

    2011-01-01

    The mammary gland is a unique organ that continually undergoes postnatal developmental changes. In mice, the mammary gland is formed via signals from terminal end buds, which direct ductal growth and elongation. Intriguingly, it is likely that the entire cellular repertoire of the mammary gland is formed from a single antecedent cell. Furthermore, in order to produce progeny of varied lineages (e.g., luminal and myoepithelial cells), signals from the local tissue microenvironment influence mammary stem/progenitor cell fate. Data have shown that cells from the mammary gland microenvironment reprogram adult somatic cells from other organs (testes, nerve) into cells that produce milk and express mammary epithelial cell proteins. Similar results were found for human tumorigenic epithelial carcinoma cells. Presently, it is unclear how the deterministic power of the mammary gland microenvironment controls epithelial cell fate. Regardless, signals generated by the microenvironment have a profound influence on progenitor cell differentiation in vivo. PMID:21647291

  20. DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS AT REDUCED CATALYST LOADINGS

    SciTech Connect

    P. ZELENAY; F. GUYON; SM. GOTTESFELD

    2001-05-01

    We focus in this paper on the reduction of catalyst loading in direct methanol fuel cells currently under development at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Based on single-cell DMFC testing, we discuss performance vs. catalyst loading trade-offs and demonstrate optimization of the anode performance. We also show test data for a short five-cell DMFC stack with the average total platinum loading of 0.53 mg cm{sup {minus}2} and compare performance of this stack with the performance of a single direct methanol fuel cell using similar total amount of precious metal.

  1. Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Directly from Isolated Cells of the Human Inner Cell Mass.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ge; von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Santos, Fatima; Chen, Yaoyao; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin; Nichols, Jennifer

    2016-04-12

    Conventional generation of stem cells from human blastocysts produces a developmentally advanced, or primed, stage of pluripotency. In vitro resetting to a more naive phenotype has been reported. However, whether the reset culture conditions of selective kinase inhibition can enable capture of naive epiblast cells directly from the embryo has not been determined. Here, we show that in these specific conditions individual inner cell mass cells grow into colonies that may then be expanded over multiple passages while retaining a diploid karyotype and naive properties. The cells express hallmark naive pluripotency factors and additionally display features of mitochondrial respiration, global gene expression, and genome-wide hypomethylation distinct from primed cells. They transition through primed pluripotency into somatic lineage differentiation. Collectively these attributes suggest classification as human naive embryonic stem cells. Human counterparts of canonical mouse embryonic stem cells would argue for conservation in the phased progression of pluripotency in mammals. PMID:26947977

  2. Naive Pluripotent Stem Cells Derived Directly from Isolated Cells of the Human Inner Cell Mass

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ge; von Meyenn, Ferdinand; Santos, Fatima; Chen, Yaoyao; Reik, Wolf; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin; Nichols, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Summary Conventional generation of stem cells from human blastocysts produces a developmentally advanced, or primed, stage of pluripotency. In vitro resetting to a more naive phenotype has been reported. However, whether the reset culture conditions of selective kinase inhibition can enable capture of naive epiblast cells directly from the embryo has not been determined. Here, we show that in these specific conditions individual inner cell mass cells grow into colonies that may then be expanded over multiple passages while retaining a diploid karyotype and naive properties. The cells express hallmark naive pluripotency factors and additionally display features of mitochondrial respiration, global gene expression, and genome-wide hypomethylation distinct from primed cells. They transition through primed pluripotency into somatic lineage differentiation. Collectively these attributes suggest classification as human naive embryonic stem cells. Human counterparts of canonical mouse embryonic stem cells would argue for conservation in the phased progression of pluripotency in mammals. PMID:26947977

  3. Direct deposit of catalyst on the membrane of direct feed fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chun, William (Inventor); Narayanan, Sekharipuram R. (Inventor); Jeffries-Nakamura, Barbara (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor); Linke, Juergen (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An improved direct liquid-feed fuel cell having a solid membrane electrolyte for electrochemical reactions of an organic fuel. Catalyst utilization and catalyst/membrane interface improvements are disclosed. Specifically, the catalyst layer is applied directly onto the membrane electrolyte.

  4. Tetrodotoxin-Resistant Sodium Channels Contribute to Directional Responses in Starburst Amacrine Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oesch, Nicholas W.; Taylor, W. Rowland

    2010-01-01

    The biophysical mechanisms that give rise to direction selectivity in the retina remain uncertain. Current evidence suggests that the directional signal first arises within the dendrites of starburst amacrine cells (SBACs). Two models have been proposed to explain this phenomenon, one based on mutual inhibitory interactions between SBACs, and the other positing an intrinsic dendritic mechanism requiring a voltage-gradient depolarizing towards the dendritic tips. We tested these models by recording current and voltage responses to visual stimuli in SBACs. In agreement with previous work, we found that the excitatory currents in the SBACs were directional, and remained directional when GABA receptors were blocked. Contrary to the mutual-inhibitory model, stimuli that produce strong directional signals in ganglion cells failed to reveal a significant inhibitory input to SBACs. Suppression of the tonic excitatory conductance, proposed to generate the dendritic voltage-gradient required for the dendrite autonomous model, failed to eliminate the directional signal in SBACs. However, selective block of tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels did reduce the strength of the directional excitatory signal in the SBACs. These results indicate that current models of direction-selectivity in the SBACs are inadequate, and suggest that voltage-gated excitatory channels, specifically tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels, are important elements in directional signaling. This is the first physiological evidence that tetrodotoxin-resistant sodium channels play a role in retinal information processing. PMID:20805982

  5. New directions in evidence-based policy research: a critical analysis of the literature.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kathryn; Lorenc, Theo; Innvær, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Despite 40 years of research into evidence-based policy (EBP) and a continued drive from both policymakers and researchers to increase research uptake in policy, barriers to the use of evidence are persistently identified in the literature. However, it is not clear what explains this persistence - whether they represent real factors, or if they are artefacts of approaches used to study EBP. Based on an updated review, this paper analyses this literature to explain persistent barriers and facilitators. We critically describe the literature in terms of its theoretical underpinnings, definitions of 'evidence', methods, and underlying assumptions of research in the field, and aim to illuminate the EBP discourse by comparison with approaches from other fields. Much of the research in this area is theoretically naive, focusing primarily on the uptake of research evidence as opposed to evidence defined more broadly, and privileging academics' research priorities over those of policymakers. Little empirical data analysing the processes or impact of evidence use in policy is available to inform researchers or decision-makers. EBP research often assumes that policymakers do not use evidence and that more evidence - meaning research evidence - use would benefit policymakers and populations. We argue that these assumptions are unsupported, biasing much of EBP research. The agenda of 'getting evidence into policy' has side-lined the empirical description and analysis of how research and policy actually interact in vivo. Rather than asking how research evidence can be made more influential, academics should aim to understand what influences and constitutes policy, and produce more critically and theoretically informed studies of decision-making. We question the main assumptions made by EBP researchers, explore the implications of doing so, and propose new directions for EBP research, and health policy. PMID:25023520

  6. Perceived azimuth direction is exaggerated: Converging evidence from explicit and implicit measures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhi; Durgin, Frank H.

    2016-01-01

    Recent observations suggest that perceived visual direction in the sagittal plane (angular direction in elevation, both upward and downward from eye level) is exaggerated. Foley, Ribeiro-Filho, and Da Silva's (2004) study of perceived size of exocentric ground extent implies that perceived angular direction in azimuth may also be exaggerated. In the present study, we directly examined whether perceived azimuth direction is overestimated. In Experiment 1, numeric estimates of azimuth direction (−48° to 48° relative to straight ahead) were obtained. The results showed a linear exaggeration in perceived azimuth direction with a gain of about 1.26. In Experiment 2, a perceptual extent-matching task served as an implicit measure of perceived azimuth direction. Participants matched an egocentric distance in one direction to a frontal extent in nearly the opposite direction. The angular biases implied by the matching data well replicated Foley et al.'s finding and were also fairly consistent with the azimuth bias function found in Experiment 1, although a slight overall shift was observed between the results of the two experiments. Experiment 3, in which half the observers were tilted sideways while making frontal/depth extent comparisons, suggested that the discrepancy between the results of Experiment 1 and 2 can partially be explained by a retinal horizontal vertical illusion affecting distance estimation tasks. Overall the present study provides converging evidence to suggest that the perception of azimuth direction is overestimated. PMID:26756174

  7. Ratchetaxis: Long-Range Directed Cell Migration by Local Cues.

    PubMed

    Caballero, David; Comelles, Jordi; Piel, Matthieu; Voituriez, Raphaël; Riveline, Daniel

    2015-12-01

    Directed cell migration is usually thought to depend on the presence of long-range gradients of either chemoattractants or physical properties such as stiffness or adhesion. However, in vivo, chemical or mechanical gradients have not systematically been observed. Here we review recent in vitro experiments, which show that other types of spatial guidance cues can bias cell motility. Introducing local geometrical or mechanical anisotropy in the cell environment, such as adhesive/topographical microratchets or tilted micropillars, show that local and periodic external cues can direct cell motion. Together with modeling, these experiments suggest that cell motility can be viewed as a stochastic phenomenon, which can be biased by various types of local cues, leading to directional migration. PMID:26615123

  8. Lattice-free models of directed cell motility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irons, Carolyn; Plank, Michael J.; Simpson, Matthew J.

    2016-01-01

    Directed cell migration often occurs when individual cells move in response to an external chemical stimulus. Cells can respond by moving in either the direction of increasing (chemoattraction) or decreasing (chemorepulsion) concentration. Many previous models of directed cell migration use a lattice-based framework where agents undergo a lattice-based random walk and the direction of nearest-neighbour motility events is biased in a preferred direction. Such lattice-based models can lead to unrealistic configurations of agents, since the agents always move on an artificial lattice structure which is never observed experimentally. We present a lattice-free model of directed cell migration that incorporates two key features. First, agents move on a continuous domain, with the possibility that there is some preferred direction of motion. Second, to be consistent with experimental observations, we enforce a crowding mechanism so that motility events that would lead to agent overlap are not permitted. We compare simulation data from the new lattice-free model with a more traditional lattice-based model. To provide additional insight into the lattice-free model, we construct an approximate conservation statement which corresponds to a nonlinear advection-diffusion equation in the continuum limit. The solution of this mean-field model compares well with averaged data from the individual-based model.

  9. A direct 2-propanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Dianxue; Bergens, Steven H.

    We report the performance of a polymer electrolyte membrane direct 2-propanol fuel cell (DPFC). The cell consisted of a Pt-Ru (atomic ratio of 1:1) black anode, a Pt black cathode, and a Nafion ®-117 membrane electrolyte. The cell was operated at 90 °C with aqueous 2-propanol as fuel and with oxygen as oxidant. The performance of the cell operating on 2-propanol is substantially higher than when it was operating on methanol at current densities lower than ˜200 mA/cm 2. The electrical efficiency of the direct 2-propanol fuel cell is nearly 1.5 times that of the direct methanol fuel cell at power densities below 128 mW/cm 2. Studies on the effects of electrocatalyst loading, of 2-propanol concentration, and of oxygen pressure on cell performance indicate that the cells operating on 2-propanol require lower anode and cathode loadings than cells operating on methanol. Cathode poisoning by 2-propanol is less severe than by methanol. Hydrogen gas evolution observed at the anode at low current densities indicated that catalytic dehydrogenation of 2-propanol occurred over the anode catalyst. A rapid voltage drop occurred at high current densities and after operating the cell for extended periods of time at constant current. The rapid voltage drop is an anode phenomenon.

  10. New directions in evidence-based policy research: a critical analysis of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Despite 40 years of research into evidence-based policy (EBP) and a continued drive from both policymakers and researchers to increase research uptake in policy, barriers to the use of evidence are persistently identified in the literature. However, it is not clear what explains this persistence – whether they represent real factors, or if they are artefacts of approaches used to study EBP. Based on an updated review, this paper analyses this literature to explain persistent barriers and facilitators. We critically describe the literature in terms of its theoretical underpinnings, definitions of ‘evidence’, methods, and underlying assumptions of research in the field, and aim to illuminate the EBP discourse by comparison with approaches from other fields. Much of the research in this area is theoretically naive, focusing primarily on the uptake of research evidence as opposed to evidence defined more broadly, and privileging academics’ research priorities over those of policymakers. Little empirical data analysing the processes or impact of evidence use in policy is available to inform researchers or decision-makers. EBP research often assumes that policymakers do not use evidence and that more evidence – meaning research evidence – use would benefit policymakers and populations. We argue that these assumptions are unsupported, biasing much of EBP research. The agenda of ‘getting evidence into policy’ has side-lined the empirical description and analysis of how research and policy actually interact in vivo. Rather than asking how research evidence can be made more influential, academics should aim to understand what influences and constitutes policy, and produce more critically and theoretically informed studies of decision-making. We question the main assumptions made by EBP researchers, explore the implications of doing so, and propose new directions for EBP research, and health policy. PMID:25023520

  11. Parametric Design Studies on a Direct Liquid Feed Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, H. A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Nakamura, B.; Surampudi, S.; Halpert, G.

    1995-01-01

    Parametric design studies were carried out on a direct methanol liquid feed fuel cell employing 1 M MeOH fuel, air and oxygen as oxidant in a 2 inch x 2 inch cell employing polymeric electrolyte membranes. Measurements include voltage-current output parameters, methanol crossover rate, and impedance as a function of several design and operational variables. Design variables are described.

  12. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  13. Direct cell-cell contact with the vascular niche maintains quiescent neural stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Ottone, Cristina; Krusche, Benjamin; Whitby, Ariadne; Clements, Melanie; Quadrato, Giorgia; Pitulescu, Mara E.; Adams, Ralf H.; Parrinello, Simona

    2014-01-01

    The vasculature is a prominent component of the subventricular zone neural stem cell niche. Although quiescent neural stem cells physically contact blood vessels at specialised endfeet, the significance of this interaction is not understood. In contrast, it is well established that vasculature-secreted soluble factors promote lineage progression of committed progenitors. Here we specifically investigated the role of cell-cell contact-dependent signalling in the vascular niche. Unexpectedly, we find that direct cell-cell interactions with endothelial cells enforces quiescence and promotes stem cell identity. Mechanistically, endothelial ephrinB2 and Jagged1 mediate these effects by suppressing cell-cycle entry downstream of mitogens and inducing stemness genes to jointly inhibit differentiation. In vivo, endothelial-specific ablation of either of the genes which encode these proteins, Efnb2 and Jag1 respectively, aberrantly activates quiescent stem cells, resulting in depletion. Thus, we identify the vasculature as a critical niche compartment for stem cell maintenance, furthering our understanding of how anchorage to the niche maintains stem cells within a pro-differentiative microenvironment. PMID:25283993

  14. Methanol crossover in direct methanol fuel cell systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Pivovar, B. S.; Bender, G.; Davey, J. R.; Zelenay, P.

    2003-01-01

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) are currently being investigated for a number of different applications from several milliwatts to near kilowatt size scales (cell phones, laptops, auxiliary power units, etc .). Because methanol has a very high energy density, over 6000 W hr/kg, a DMFC can possibly have greatly extended lifetimes compared to the batteries, doesn't present the storage problems associated with hydrogen fuel cells and can possibly operate more efficiently and cleanly than internal combustion engines.

  15. Skin-Directed Therapies in Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Cuong V; Bohjanen, Kimberly A

    2015-10-01

    Early stage mycosis fungoides represents the most common clinical presentation of cutaneous lymphoma, with skin-directed therapies long established in its treatment. These therapies continue to change as new treatment regimens emerge. Other skin-directed treatments include light and radiation therapy. Therapies with higher levels of evidence and less systemic toxicity are usually preferred as first-line treatment. However, even these established therapies, like topical corticosteroids and carmustine, lack randomized clinical trials to establish their efficacy. Research is also needed to further define the role of combination topical therapies and how skin-directed therapies can be used as adjuvants to systemic medications. PMID:26433841

  16. Direct and indirect evidence for earthquakes; an example from the Lake Tahoe Basin, California-Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloney, J. M.; Noble, P. J.; Driscoll, N. W.; Kent, G.; Schmauder, G. C.

    2012-12-01

    High-resolution seismic CHIRP data can image direct evidence of earthquakes (i.e., offset strata) beneath lakes and the ocean. Nevertheless, direct evidence often is not imaged due to conditions such as gas in the sediments, or steep basement topography. In these cases, indirect evidence for earthquakes (i.e., debris flows) may provide insight into the paleoseismic record. The four sub-basins of the tectonically active Lake Tahoe Basin provide an ideal opportunity to image direct evidence for earthquake deformation and compare it to indirect earthquake proxies. We present results from high-resolution seismic CHIRP surveys in Emerald Bay, Fallen Leaf Lake, and Cascade Lake to constrain the recurrence interval on the West Tahoe Dollar Point Fault (WTDPF), which was previously identified as potentially the most hazardous fault in the Lake Tahoe Basin. Recently collected CHIRP profiles beneath Fallen Leaf Lake image slide deposits that appear synchronous with slides in other sub-basins. The temporal correlation of slides between multiple basins suggests triggering by events on the WTDPF. If correct, we postulate a recurrence interval for the WTDPF of ~3-4 k.y., indicating that the WTDPF is near its seismic recurrence cycle. In addition, CHIRP data beneath Cascade Lake image strands of the WTDPF that offset the lakefloor as much as ~7 m. The Cascade Lake data combined with onshore LiDAR allowed us to map the geometry of the WTDPF continuously across the southern Lake Tahoe Basin and yielded an improved geohazard assessment.

  17. Extracellular matrix components direct porcine muscle stem cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Wilschut, Karlijn J.; Haagsman, Henk P.; Roelen, Bernard A.J.

    2010-02-01

    In muscle tissue, extracellular matrix proteins, together with the vasculature system, muscle-residence cells and muscle fibers, create the niche for muscle stem cells. The niche is important in controlling proliferation and directing differentiation of muscle stem cells to sustain muscle tissue. Mimicking the extracellular muscle environment improves tools exploring the behavior of primary muscle cells. Optimizing cell culture conditions to maintain muscle commitment is important in stem cell-based studies concerning toxicology screening, ex vivo skeletal muscle tissue engineering and in the enhancement of clinical efficiency. We used the muscle extracellular matrix proteins collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin, and also gelatin and Matrigel as surface coatings of tissue culture plastic to resemble the muscle extracellular matrix. Several important factors that determine myogenic commitment of the primary muscle cells were characterized by quantitative real-time RT-PCR and immunofluorescence. Adhesion of high PAX7 expressing satellite cells was improved if the cells were cultured on fibronectin or laminin coatings. Cells cultured on Matrigel and laminin coatings showed dominant integrin expression levels and exhibited an activated Wnt pathway. Under these conditions both stem cell proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity were superior if compared to cells cultured on collagen type I, fibronectin and gelatin. In conclusion, Matrigel and laminin are the preferred coatings to sustain the proliferation and myogenic differentiation capacity of the primary porcine muscle stem cells, when cells are removed from their natural environment for in vitro culture.

  18. Direct evidence of central European forest refugia during the last glacial period based on mollusc fossils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Juřičková, Lucie; Horáčková, Jitka; Ložek, Vojen

    2014-07-01

    Although there is evidence from molecular studies for the existence of central European last glacial refugia for temperate species, there is still a great lack of direct fossil records to confirm this theory. Here we bring such evidence in the form of fossil shells from twenty strictly forest land snail species, which were recorded in radiocarbon-dated late glacial or older mollusc assemblages of nine non-interrupted mollusc successions situated in the Western Carpathians, and one in the Bohemian Massif. We proposed that molluscs survived the last glacial period in central Europe in isolated small patches of broadleaf forest, which we unequivocally demonstrate for two sites of last glacial maximum age.

  19. Apoptosis by Direct Current Treatment in Tumor Cells and Tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hongbae; Sim, Sungbo; Ahn, Saeyoung

    2003-10-01

    Electric field induces cell fusion, electroporation on biological cells, including apoptosis. Apoptosis is expressed in a series of natural enzymatic reactions for the natural elimination of unhealthy, genetically damaged, or otherwise aberrant cells that are not needed or not advantageous to the well-being of the organism. Its markers involve cell shrinkage, activation of intracellular caspase proteases, externalization of phosphatidylserine at the plasma membrane, and fragmentation of DNA. Direct electric fields using direct current have been exploited recently to investigate its effects on tumor cells and tissues, but the mechanism of direct electric fields has not been exhibited clearly other than by electroosmosis or pH changes. Direct electric field induces apoptosis in tumor cells cultured and tumor tissues as indicated by cell shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and tumor suppression. In our experiment that direct electric field was applied to tumor tissues via two needle electrodes inserted into tumor tissue 5mm at distance in parallel, pH changes resulted from electrochemical reaction, exhibiting about pH 9.0, 1.83, 2.0 in the vicinity of cathodic and anodic electrode, and at their mid-point, respectively. DNA fragmentation of tumor tissues destructed by direct electric field was analyzed by Tunel assay by ApopTag technology. As a result of this analysis, it showed that apoptosis in tumor tissue destructed was increased up to 59.1normal(control) tissues, showing 41.1, 31.1cathodic tissues. In vitro cell survival was exhibited that it was decreased with enhancing electric current intensity in the same condition of electrical charge 5C having different time applied. We will show results of apoptosis analyzed by flow cytometry in vitro.

  20. Footprints reveal direct evidence of group behavior and locomotion in Homo erectus.

    PubMed

    Hatala, Kevin G; Roach, Neil T; Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Wunderlich, Roshna E; Dingwall, Heather L; Villmoare, Brian A; Green, David J; Harris, John W K; Braun, David R; Richmond, Brian G

    2016-01-01

    Bipedalism is a defining feature of the human lineage. Despite evidence that walking on two feet dates back 6-7 Ma, reconstructing hominin gait evolution is complicated by a sparse fossil record and challenges in inferring biomechanical patterns from isolated and fragmentary bones. Similarly, patterns of social behavior that distinguish modern humans from other living primates likely played significant roles in our evolution, but it is exceedingly difficult to understand the social behaviors of fossil hominins directly from fossil data. Footprints preserve direct records of gait biomechanics and behavior but they have been rare in the early human fossil record. Here we present analyses of an unprecedented discovery of 1.5-million-year-old footprint assemblages, produced by 20+ Homo erectus individuals. These footprints provide the oldest direct evidence for modern human-like weight transfer and confirm the presence of an energy-saving longitudinally arched foot in H. erectus. Further, print size analyses suggest that these H. erectus individuals lived and moved in cooperative multi-male groups, offering direct evidence consistent with human-like social behaviors in H. erectus. PMID:27403790

  1. Footprints reveal direct evidence of group behavior and locomotion in Homo erectus

    PubMed Central

    Hatala, Kevin G.; Roach, Neil T.; Ostrofsky, Kelly R.; Wunderlich, Roshna E.; Dingwall, Heather L.; Villmoare, Brian A.; Green, David J.; Harris, John W. K.; Braun, David R.; Richmond, Brian G.

    2016-01-01

    Bipedalism is a defining feature of the human lineage. Despite evidence that walking on two feet dates back 6–7 Ma, reconstructing hominin gait evolution is complicated by a sparse fossil record and challenges in inferring biomechanical patterns from isolated and fragmentary bones. Similarly, patterns of social behavior that distinguish modern humans from other living primates likely played significant roles in our evolution, but it is exceedingly difficult to understand the social behaviors of fossil hominins directly from fossil data. Footprints preserve direct records of gait biomechanics and behavior but they have been rare in the early human fossil record. Here we present analyses of an unprecedented discovery of 1.5-million-year-old footprint assemblages, produced by 20+ Homo erectus individuals. These footprints provide the oldest direct evidence for modern human-like weight transfer and confirm the presence of an energy-saving longitudinally arched foot in H. erectus. Further, print size analyses suggest that these H. erectus individuals lived and moved in cooperative multi-male groups, offering direct evidence consistent with human-like social behaviors in H. erectus. PMID:27403790

  2. Direct Evidence for Daily Plasticity of Electrical Coupling between Rod Photoreceptors in the Mammalian Retina

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Nan Ge

    2016-01-01

    Rod photoreceptors are electrically coupled through gap junctions. Coupling is a key determinant of their light response properties, but whether rod electrical coupling is dynamically regulated remains elusive and controversial. Here, we have obtained direct measurements of the conductance between adjacent rods in mouse retina and present evidence that rod electrical coupling strength is dependent on the time of day, the lighting conditions, and the mouse strain. Specifically, we show in CBA/Ca mice that under circadian conditions, the rod junctional conductance has a median value of 98 pS during the subjective day and of 493 pS during the subjective night. In C57BL/6 mice, the median junctional conductance between dark-adapted rods is ∼140 pS, regardless of the time in the circadian cycle. Adaptation to bright light decreases the rod junctional conductance to ∼0 pS, regardless of the time of day or the mouse strain. Together, these results establish the high degree of plasticity of rod electrical coupling over the course of the day. Estimates of the rod coupling strength will provide a foundation for further investigations of rod interactions and the role of rod coupling in the ability of the visual system to anticipate, assimilate, and respond to the daily changes in ambient light intensity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Many cells in the CNS communicate via gap junctions, or electrical synapses, the regulation of which remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the strength of electrical coupling between rod photoreceptors of the retina is regulated by the time of day and the lighting conditions. This mechanism may help us understand some key aspects of day and night vision as well as some visual malfunctions. PMID:26740659

  3. Paxillin controls directional cell motility in response to physical cues

    PubMed Central

    Sero, Julia E.; German, Alexandra E.; Mammoto, Akiko; Ingber, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Physical cues from the extracellular environment that influence cell shape and directional migration are transduced into changes in cytoskeletal organization and biochemistry through integrin-based cell adhesions to extracellular matrix (ECM). Paxillin is a focal adhesion (FA) scaffold protein that mediates integrin anchorage to the cytoskeleton, and has been implicated in regulation of FA assembly and cell migration. To determine whether paxillin is involved in coupling mechanical distortion with directional movement, cell shape was physically constrained by culturing cells on square-shaped fibronectin-coated adhesive islands surrounded by non-adhesive barrier regions that were created with a microcontact printing technique. Square-shaped cells preferentially formed FAs and extended lamellipodia from their corner regions when stimulated with PDGF, and loss of paxillin resulted in loss of this polarized response. Selective expression of the N- and C-terminal domains of paxillin produced opposite, but complementary, effects on suppressing or promoting lamellipodia formation in different regions of square cells, which corresponded to directional motility defects in vitro. Paxillin loss or mutation was also shown to affect the formation of circular dorsal ruffles, and this corresponded to changes in cell invasive behavior in 3D. This commentary addresses the implications of these findings in terms of how a multifunctional FA scaffold protein can link physical cues to cell adhesion, protrusion and membrane trafficking so as to control directional migration in 2D and 3D. We also discuss how microengineered ECM islands and in vivo model systems can be used to further elucidate the functions of paxillin in directional migration. PMID:23076140

  4. Lymphoma stem cells: enough evidence to support their existence?

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Climent, Jose A.; Fontan, Lorena; Gascoyne, Randy D.; Siebert, Reiner; Prosper, Felipe

    2010-01-01

    While leukemia-originating stem cells are critical in the initiation and maintenance of leukemias, the existence of similar cell populations that may generate B-cell lymphoma upon mutation remains uncertain. Here we propose that committed lymphoid progenitor/precursor cells with an active V-D-J recombination program are the initiating cells of follicular lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma when targeted by immunoglobulin (IG)- gene translocations in the bone marrow. However, these pre-malignant lymphoma-initiating cells cannot drive complete malignant transformation, requiring additional cooperating mutations in specific stem-cell programs to be converted into the lymphoma-originating cells able to generate and sustain lymphoma development. Conversely, diffuse large B-cell lymphoma and sporadic Burkitt’s lymphoma derive from B lymphocytes that acquire translocations through IG-hyper-mutation or class-switching errors within the germinal center. Although secondary reprogramming mutations are generally required, some cells such as centroblasts or memory B cells that have certain stem cell-like features, or lymphocytes with MYC rearrangements that deregulate self-renewal pathways, may bypass this need and directly function as the lymphoma-originating cells. An alternative model supports an aberrant epigenetic modification of gene sets as the first occurring hit, which either leads to retaining stem-cell features in hematopoietic stem or progenitor cells, or reprograms stemness into more committed lymphocytes, followed by secondary chromosomal translocations that eventually drive lymphoma development. Isolation and characterization of the cells that are at the origin of the different B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas will provide critical insights into the disease pathogenesis and will represent a step towards the development of more effective therapies. PMID:20139392

  5. Biomaterials Approach to Expand and Direct Differentiation of Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Chou; Leong, Kam W

    2008-01-01

    Stem cells play increasingly prominent roles in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells theoretically allow every cell type in the body to be regenerated. Adult stem cells have also been identified and isolated from every major tissue and organ, some possessing apparent pluripotency comparable to that of ES cells. However, a major limitation in the translation of stem cell technologies to clinical applications is the supply of cells. Advances in biomaterials engineering and scaffold fabrication enable the development of ex vivo cell expansion systems to address this limitation. Progress in biomaterial design has also allowed directed differentiation of stem cells into specific lineages. In addition to delivering biochemical cues, various technologies have been developed to introduce micro- and nano-scale features onto culture surfaces to enable the study of stem cell responses to topographical cues. Knowledge gained from these studies portends the alteration of stem cell fate in the absence of biological factors, which would be valuable in the engineering of complex organs comprising multiple cell types. Biomaterials may also play an immunoprotective role by minimizing host immunoreactivity toward transplanted cells or engineered grafts. PMID:17264853

  6. Direct Evidence for Vision-based Control of Flight Speed in Budgerigars

    PubMed Central

    Schiffner, Ingo; Srinivasan, Mandyam V.

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated whether, and, if so, how birds use vision to regulate the speed of their flight. Budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus, were filmed in 3-D using high-speed video cameras as they flew along a 25 m tunnel in which stationary or moving vertically oriented black and white stripes were projected on the side walls. We found that the birds increased their flight speed when the stripes were moved in the birds’ flight direction, but decreased it only marginally when the stripes were moved in the opposite direction. The results provide the first direct evidence that Budgerigars use cues based on optic flow, to regulate their flight speed. However, unlike the situation in flying insects, it appears that the control of flight speed in Budgerigars is direction-specific. It does not rely solely on cues derived from optic flow, but may also be determined by energy constraints. PMID:26046799

  7. Direct Evidence for Vision-based Control of Flight Speed in Budgerigars.

    PubMed

    Schiffner, Ingo; Srinivasan, Mandyam V

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated whether, and, if so, how birds use vision to regulate the speed of their flight. Budgerigars, Melopsittacus undulatus, were filmed in 3-D using high-speed video cameras as they flew along a 25 m tunnel in which stationary or moving vertically oriented black and white stripes were projected on the side walls. We found that the birds increased their flight speed when the stripes were moved in the birds' flight direction, but decreased it only marginally when the stripes were moved in the opposite direction. The results provide the first direct evidence that Budgerigars use cues based on optic flow, to regulate their flight speed. However, unlike the situation in flying insects, it appears that the control of flight speed in Budgerigars is direction-specific. It does not rely solely on cues derived from optic flow, but may also be determined by energy constraints. PMID:26046799

  8. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  9. When Cells Collide: A Model for Cell-Assisted Cell Growth based on Direct Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, Carl; Ip, Wui; Bae, Albert; Franck, Nathan; Bogart, Elijah; Thi Le, Thanhbinh

    2008-03-01

    Although intercellular communication is frequently viewed as involving the transport of small molecules through an intracellular fluid medium, biologists have proposed chemical signaling with chemical specificity due to chemical recognition through direct contacts. Considering the collective computation behind the decision of a cell to divide when it senses the presence of a sufficient number of like neighbors, we offer a model for the transition from slow to exponential growth in shaken suspension cell culture of the model eukaryote, Dictyostelium discoideum. Besides exploring an elegantly simple example of multicellular life, this discussion might well prove useful in considering the limits of cell culture on small spatial scales as required for contemporary massively parallel biotechnology.

  10. Direct evidence of mitochondrial G-quadruplex DNA by using fluorescent anti-cancer agents.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Chun; Tseng, Ting-Yuan; Chen, Ying-Ting; Chang, Cheng-Chung; Wang, Zi-Fu; Wang, Chiung-Lin; Hsu, Tsu-Ning; Li, Pei-Tzu; Chen, Chin-Tin; Lin, Jing-Jer; Lou, Pei-Jen; Chang, Ta-Chau

    2015-12-01

    G-quadruplex (G4) is a promising target for anti-cancer treatment. In this paper, we provide the first evidence supporting the presence of G4 in the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) of live cells. The molecular engineering of a fluorescent G4 ligand, 3,6-bis(1-methyl-4-vinylpyridinium) carbazole diiodide (BMVC), can change its major cellular localization from the nucleus to the mitochondria in cancer cells, while remaining primarily in the cytoplasm of normal cells. A number of BMVC derivatives with sufficient mitochondrial uptake can induce cancer cell death without damaging normal cells. Fluorescence studies of these anti-cancer agents in live cells and in isolated mitochondria from HeLa cells have demonstrated that their major target is mtDNA. In this study, we use fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy to verify the existence of mtDNA G4s in live cells. Bioactivity studies indicate that interactions between these anti-cancer agents and mtDNA G4 can suppress mitochondrial gene expression. This work underlines the importance of fluorescence in the monitoring of drug-target interactions in cells and illustrates the emerging development of drugs in which mtDNA G4 is the primary target. PMID:26487635

  11. Dengue Virus Directly Stimulates Polyclonal B Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Papa, Michelle Premazzi; de Morais, Ana Theresa Silveira; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2015-01-01

    Dengue infection is associated to vigorous inflammatory response, to a high frequency of activated B cells, and to increased levels of circulating cross-reactive antibodies. We investigated whether direct infection of B cells would promote activation by culturing primary human B lymphocytes from healthy donors with DENV in vitro. B cells were susceptible, but poorly permissive to infection. Even though, primary B cells cultured with DENV induced substantial IgM secretion, which is a hallmark of polyclonal B cell activation. Notably, DENV induced the activation of B cells obtained from either DENV immune or DENV naïve donors, suggesting that it was not dependent on DENV-specific secondary/memory response. B cell stimulation was dependent on activation of MAPK and CD81. B cells cultured with DENV also secreted IL-6 and presented increased expression of CD86 and HLA-DR, which might contribute to B lymphocyte co-stimulatory function. Indeed, PBMCs, but not isolated B cells, secreted high amounts of IgG upon DENV culture, suggesting that interaction with other cell types in vivo might promote Ig isotype switching and IgG secretion from different B cell clones. These findings suggest that activation signaling pathways triggered by DENV interaction with non-specific receptors on B cells might contribute to the exacerbated response observed in dengue patients. PMID:26656738

  12. Direct reprogramming of human neural stem cells by OCT4.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeong Beom; Greber, Boris; Araúzo-Bravo, Marcos J; Meyer, Johann; Park, Kook In; Zaehres, Holm; Schöler, Hans R

    2009-10-01

    Induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have been generated from mouse and human somatic cells by ectopic expression of four transcription factors (OCT4 (also called POU5F1), SOX2, c-Myc and KLF4). We previously reported that Oct4 alone is sufficient to reprogram directly adult mouse neural stem cells to iPS cells. Here we report the generation of one-factor human iPS cells from human fetal neural stem cells (one-factor (1F) human NiPS cells) by ectopic expression of OCT4 alone. One-factor human NiPS cells resemble human embryonic stem cells in global gene expression profiles, epigenetic status, as well as pluripotency in vitro and in vivo. These findings demonstrate that the transcription factor OCT4 is sufficient to reprogram human neural stem cells to pluripotency. One-factor iPS cell generation will advance the field further towards understanding reprogramming and generating patient-specific pluripotent stem cells. PMID:19718018

  13. Economics of Direct Hydrogen Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mahadevan, Kathyayani

    2011-10-04

    Battelle's Economic Analysis of PEM Fuel Cell Systems project was initiated in 2003 to evaluate the technology and markets that are near-term and potentially could support the transition to fuel cells in automotive markets. The objective of Battelle?s project was to assist the DOE in developing fuel cell systems for pre-automotive applications by analyzing the technical, economic, and market drivers of direct hydrogen PEM fuel cell adoption. The project was executed over a 6-year period (2003 to 2010) and a variety of analyses were completed in that period. The analyses presented in the final report include: Commercialization scenarios for stationary generation through 2015 (2004); Stakeholder feedback on technology status and performance status of fuel cell systems (2004); Development of manufacturing costs of stationary PEM fuel cell systems for backup power markets (2004); Identification of near-term and mid-term markets for PEM fuel cells (2006); Development of the value proposition and market opportunity of PEM fuel cells in near-term markets by assessing the lifecycle cost of PEM fuel cells as compared to conventional alternatives used in the marketplace and modeling market penetration (2006); Development of the value proposition of PEM fuel cells in government markets (2007); Development of the value proposition and opportunity for large fuel cell system application at data centers and wastewater treatment plants (2008); Update of the manufacturing costs of PEM fuel cells for backup power applications (2009).

  14. Astrophysical evidence shows no direct interaction between gravitation and electromagnetism in empty vacuum space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dowdye, Edward H., Jr.

    2009-08-01

    Findings show that important fundamental principles of mathematical Physics are consistently misapplied to concepts of gravitational lensing or just simply ignored. The thin plasma atmosphere of the sun represents an indirect interaction involving an interfering plasma medium between the gravitational field of the sun and the rays of light from the stars. There is convincing observational evidence that a direct interaction between light and gravitation in empty vacuum space is yet to be observed. Historically, the observed evidence of light bending occurred predominantly near the plasma rim of the sun, not in the vacuum space far above the rim. An intense search of the star filled sky will reveal a clear lack of lensing exists among the countless numbers of stars, where the lens and the source are by good chance co-linearly aligned with the earth based observer. With this condition at hand and assuming the validity of the light bending rule of General Relativity, the sky should be filled with images of Einstein rings. Moreover, the events taking place at the center of our galaxy under intense observations by the astrophysicists since 1992, presents convincing evidence that a direct interaction between light and gravitation simply does not take place. This highly studied region, known as Sagittarius A*, is thought to contain a super massive black hole, a most likely candidate for gravitational lensing. The evidence is clearly revealed in the time resolved images of the rapidly moving stellar objects orbiting about Sagittarius A*.

  15. Spatial coordination of cell orientation directed by nanoribbon sheets.

    PubMed

    Fujie, Toshinori; Shi, Xuetao; Ostrovidov, Serge; Liang, Xiaobin; Nakajima, Ken; Chen, Yin; Wu, Hongkai; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2015-06-01

    Spatial coordination of cell orientation is of central importance in tissue/organ construction. In this study, we developed microfabricated poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoribbon sheets with unique structures, using spin-coating and micropatterning techniques, in order to generate a hierarchically assembled cellular structure consisting of murine skeletal myoblasts (C2C12). The nanoribbon sheets were composed of aligned PLGA nanoribbons in the center, and strips on four sides which take a role as bridges to connect and immobilize the aligned nanoribbons. Such unique structures facilitated the alignment of C2C12 cells into bilayer cell sheets, and cellular alignment was directed by the aligned direction of nanoribbons. The nanoribbon sheets also facilitated the construction of multilayer cell sheets with anisotropic (orthogonal) and isotropic (parallel) orientations. The enhanced expression of myogenic genes of C2C12 cells on the bilayer cell sheets demonstrated that the nanoribbons induced C2C12 cell differentiation into mature myoblasts. The micropatterned nanoribbon sheets may be a useful tool for directing cellular organization with defined alignment for regenerative medicine and drug screening applications. PMID:25890709

  16. Loss of pluripotency in human embryonic stem cells directly correlates with an increase in nuclear zinc.

    SciTech Connect

    Finney, L.; Vogt, S.; Wolford, J. L.; Chishti, Y.; Jin, Q.; Ward, J.; Chen, L.

    2010-01-01

    The pluripotency of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) is important to investigations of early development and to cell replacement therapy, but the mechanism behind pluripotency is incompletely understood. Zinc has been shown to play a key role in differentiation of non-pluripotent cell types, but here its role in hESCs is directly examined. By mapping the distribution of metals in hESCs at high resolution by x-ray fluorescence microprobe (XFM) and by analyzing subcellular metal content, we have found evidence that loss of pluripotency is directly correlated with an increase in nuclear zinc. Zinc elevation not only redefines our understanding of the mechanisms that support pluripotency, but also may act as a biomarker and an intervention point for stem cell differentiation.

  17. Head direction cell activity in mice: robust directional signal depends on intact otolith organs.

    PubMed

    Yoder, Ryan M; Taube, Jeffrey S

    2009-01-28

    The head direction (HD) cell signal is a representation of an animal's perceived directional heading with respect to its environment. This signal appears to originate in the vestibular system, which includes the semicircular canals and otolith organs. Preliminary studies indicate the semicircular canals provide a necessary component of the HD signal, but involvement of otolithic information in the HD signal has not been tested. The present study was designed to determine the otolithic contribution to the HD signal, as well as to compare HD cell activity of mice with that of rats. HD cell activity in the anterodorsal thalamus was assessed in wild-type C57BL/6J and otoconia-deficient tilted mice during locomotion within a cylinder containing a prominent visual landmark. HD cell firing properties in C57BL/6J mice were generally similar to those in rats. However, in C57BL/6J mice, landmark rotation failed to demonstrate dominant control of the HD signal in 36% of the sessions. In darkness, directional firing became unstable during 42% of the sessions, but landmark control was not associated with HD signal stability in darkness. HD cells were identified in tilted mice, but directional firing properties were not as robust as those of C57BL/6J mice. Most HD cells in tilted mice were controlled by landmark rotation but showed substantial signal degradation across trials. These results support current models that suggest otolithic information is involved in the perception of directional heading. Furthermore, compared with rats, the HD signal in mice appears to be less reliably anchored to prominent environmental cues. PMID:19176815

  18. Dimethoxymethane: A Fuel For Direct-Oxidation Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olah, George A.; Prakash, Surya G.; Narayanan, Sekharipuram R.; Vamos, Eugene; Halpert, Gerald

    1995-01-01

    Dimethoxymethane (DMM) identified as one of several high-energy fuels for direct-oxidation fuel cells. Found to undergo facile electro-oxidation to carbon dioxide and water, with methanol as possible intermediate product. Fuel electro-oxidized at sustained high rates without poisoning electrodes. Performance superior to that of methanol at same temperature. Synthesized from natural gas (methane) and is thus viable alternative to methanol in direct-oxidation fuel cells. Better performance expected at higher temperature and by use of Pt/Sn catalyst. Alternatively, low boiling temperature of DMM also makes it candidate for gas-feed operation.

  19. Directional control of lamellipodia extension by constraining cell shape and orienting cell tractional forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Kevin Kit; Brock, Amy Lepre; Brangwynne, Cliff; Mannix, Robert J.; Wang, Ning; Ostuni, Emanuele; Geisse, Nicholas A.; Adams, Josephine C.; Whitesides, George M.; Ingber, Donald E.

    2002-01-01

    Directed cell migration is critical for tissue morphogenesis and wound healing, but the mechanism of directional control is poorly understood. Here we show that the direction in which cells extend their leading edge can be controlled by constraining cell shape using micrometer-sized extracellular matrix (ECM) islands. When cultured on square ECM islands in the presence of motility factors, cells preferentially extended lamellipodia, filopodia, and microspikes from their corners. Square cells reoriented their stress fibers and focal adhesions so that tractional forces were concentrated in these corner regions. When cell tension was dissipated, lamellipodia extension ceased. Mechanical interactions between cells and ECM that modulate cytoskeletal tension may therefore play a key role in the control of directional cell motility.

  20. Dynamic simulation of a direct carbonate fuel cell power plant

    SciTech Connect

    Ernest, J.B.; Ghezel-Ayagh, H.; Kush, A.K.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) is commercializing a 2.85 MW Direct carbonate Fuel Cell (DFC) power plant. The commercialization sequence has already progressed through construction and operation of the first commercial-scale DFC power plant on a U.S. electric utility, the 2 MW Santa Clara Demonstration Project (SCDP), and the completion of the early phases of a Commercial Plant design. A 400 kW fuel cell stack Test Facility is being built at Energy Research Corporation (ERC), FCE`s parent company, which will be capable of testing commercial-sized fuel cell stacks in an integrated plant configuration. Fluor Daniel, Inc. provided engineering, procurement, and construction services for SCDP and has jointly developed the Commercial Plant design with FCE, focusing on the balance-of-plant (BOP) equipment outside of the fuel cell modules. This paper provides a brief orientation to the dynamic simulation of a fuel cell power plant and the benefits offered.

  1. Power generation properties of Direct Flame Fuel Cell (DFFC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endo, S.; Nakamura, Y.

    2014-11-01

    This paper investigated the effect of cell temperature and product species concentration induced by small-jet flame on the power generation performance of Direct Flame Fuel Cell (DFFC). The cell is placed above the small flame and heated product gas is impinged toward it and this system is the simplest and smallest unit of the power generation device to be developed. Equivalence ratio (phi) and the distance between the cell and the burner surface (d) are considered as main experimental parameters. It turns out that open circuit voltage (OCV) increases linearly with the increase of temperature in wide range of equivalence ratios. However, it increases drastically at which the equivalence ratio became small (phi <= 2.0) showing inner flame clearly. This result suggests that OCV depends on not only cell temperature but also the species concentration exposed to the cell. It is suggested that Nernst equation might work satisfactory to predict OCV of DFFC.

  2. Enhanced methanol utilization in direct methanol fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Xiaoming; Gottesfeld, Shimshon

    2001-10-02

    The fuel utilization of a direct methanol fuel cell is enhanced for improved cell efficiency. Distribution plates at the anode and cathode of the fuel cell are configured to distribute reactants vertically and laterally uniformly over a catalyzed membrane surface of the fuel cell. A conductive sheet between the anode distribution plate and the anodic membrane surface forms a mass transport barrier to the methanol fuel that is large relative to a mass transport barrier for a gaseous hydrogen fuel cell. In a preferred embodiment, the distribution plate is a perforated corrugated sheet. The mass transport barrier may be conveniently increased by increasing the thickness of an anode conductive sheet adjacent the membrane surface of the fuel cell.

  3. Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an anion exchange membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuoka, Koji; Iriyama, Yasutoshi; Abe, Takeshi; Matsuoka, Masao; Ogumi, Zempachi

    Alkaline direct alcohol fuel cells using an OH-form anion exchange membrane and polyhydric alcohols were studied. A high open circuit voltage of ca. 800 mV was obtained for a cell using Pt-Ru/C (anode) and Pt/C (cathode) at 323 K, which was about 100-200 mV higher than that for a DMFC using Nafion ®. The maximum power densities were in the order of ethylene glycol > glycerol > methanol > erythritol > xylitol. Silver catalysts were used as a cathode catalyst to fabricate alkaline fuel cells, since silver catalyst is almost inactive in the oxidation of polyhydric alcohols. Alkaline direct ethylene glycol fuel cells using silver as a cathode catalyst gave excellent performance because higher concentrations of fuel could be supplied to the anode.

  4. T-cell-directed therapies in systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Nandkumar, P; Furie, R

    2016-09-01

    Drug development for the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) has largely focused on B-cell therapies. A greater understanding of the immunopathogenesis of SLE coupled with advanced bioengineering has allowed for clinical trials centered on other targets for SLE therapy. The authors discuss the benefits and shortcomings of focusing on T-cell-directed therapies in SLE and lupus nephritis clinical trials. PMID:27497252

  5. Cytochemical and cytofluorometric evidence for guard cell photosystems

    SciTech Connect

    Vaughn, K.C.; Outlaw, W.H. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Evidence for photosynthetic linear electron transport in guard cells was obtained with two sensitive methods of high spacial resolution. Light-dependent diaminobenzidine oxidation (an indicator of PSI) and DCMU-sensitive, light-dependent thiocarbamyl nitroblue tetrazolium reduction (an indicator of PSII) were observed in guard cell plastids of Hordeum vulgare L. cv Himalaya using electron microscopic cytochemical procedures. DCMU-sensitive Chl a fluorescence induction (an indicator of PSII) was detected in individual guard cell pairs of Vicia faba L. cv Longpod using an ultramicrofluorometer. At least for these species, we conclude these results are proof for the presence of PSII in guard cell chloroplasts, which until now has been somewhat controversial. 31 references, 2 figures.

  6. Direct evidence of strain transfer for InAs island growth on compliant Si substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Marçal, L. A. B.; Magalhães-Paniago, R.; Malachias, Angelo; Richard, M.-I.; Cavallo, F.; Lagally, M. G.; Schmidt, O. G.; Schülli, T. Ü.; Deneke, Ch.

    2015-04-13

    Semiconductor heteroepitaxy on top of thin compliant layers has been explored as a path to make inorganic electronics mechanically flexible as well as to integrate materials that cannot be grown directly on rigid substrates. Here, we show direct evidences of strain transfer for InAs islands on freestanding Si thin films (7 nm). Synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements using a beam size of 300 × 700 nm{sup 2} can directly probe the strain status of the compliant substrate underneath deposited islands. Using a recently developed diffraction mapping technique, three-dimensional reciprocal space maps were reconstructed around the Si (004) peak for specific illuminated positions of the sample. The strain retrieved was analyzed using continuous elasticity theory via Finite-element simulations. The comparison of experiment and simulations yields the amount of strain from the InAs islands, which is transferred to the compliant Si thin film.

  7. Direct patterning of mammalian cells in an ultrasonic heptagon stencil.

    PubMed

    Bernassau, A L; Gesellchen, F; Macpherson, P G A; Riehle, M; Cumming, D R S

    2012-06-01

    We describe the construction of a ultrasonic device suitable for micro patterning particles and cells for tissue engineering applications. The device is formed by seven transducers shaped into a heptagon cavity. By exciting two and three transducers simultaneously, lines or hexagonal shapes can be formed with beads and cells. Furthermore, phase control of the transducers allows shifting the standing waves and thus patterning at different positions on a surface in a controlled manner. The paper discusses direct patterning of mammalian cells by ultrasound "stencil". PMID:22327813

  8. A novel direct ethanol fuel cell with high power density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, L.; Zhao, T. S.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    2011-08-01

    A new type of direct ethanol fuel cell (DEFC) that is composed of an alkaline anode and an acid cathode separated with a charger conducting membrane is developed. Theoretically it is shown that the voltage of this novel fuel cell is 2.52 V, while, experimentally it has been demonstrated that this fuel cell can yield an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 1.60 V and a peak power density of 240 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which represent the highest performance of DEFCs that has so far been reported in the open literature.

  9. Neuropeptide Y directly affects ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Sirotkin, Alexander V; Kardošová, Diana; Alwasel, Saleh Hamad; Harrath, Abdel Halim

    2015-12-01

    The effects of neuropeptide Y (NPY; 0, 10, 100 and 1000 ng/mL) on the expression of PCNA, bax and p53 were examined by immunocytochemistry in porcine luteinized granulosa cells. NPY inhibited proliferation as well as promoted apoptosis and accumulation of p53 in the cells. This is the first report to demonstrate the direct action of NPY on ovarian cell proliferation and apoptosis. The results of the study suggest that the effect is mediated by transcription factor p53. PMID:26679167

  10. Direct evidence for the atovaquone action on the Plasmodium cytochrome bc1 complex.

    PubMed

    Siregar, Josephine E; Kurisu, Genji; Kobayashi, Tamaki; Matsuzaki, Motomichi; Sakamoto, Kimitoshi; Mi-ichi, Fumika; Watanabe, Yoh-ichi; Hirai, Makoto; Matsuoka, Hiroyuki; Syafruddin, Din; Marzuki, Sangkot; Kita, Kiyoshi

    2015-06-01

    Atovaquone, a coenzyme Q analogue has been indicated to specifically target the cytochrome bc1 complex of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in the malarial parasite and other protozoan. Various mutations in the quinone binding site of the cytochrome b gene of Plasmodium spp. such as M133I, L144S, L271V, K272R, Y268C, Y268S, Y268N, and V284F are suggesting to associate with resistance to atovaquone. There is no direct evidence of relation between the mutations and resistance to atovaquone in Plasmodium parasite that has been available. Technical difficulties in isolating active assayable mitochondria in the malarial parasite hinder us to obtain direct biochemical evidence to support the relation between the mutations and drug resistance. The establishment of a mitochondrial isolation method for the malaria parasite has allowed us to test the degree of resistance of Plasmodium berghei isolates to atovaquone directly. We have tested the activity of dihydroorotate (DHO)-cytochrome c reductase in various P. berghei atovaquone resistant clones in the presence of a wide concentration range of atovaquone. Our results show the IC(50) of P. berghei atovaquone resistant clones is much higher (1.5 up to 40 nM) in comparison to the atovaquone sensitive clones (0.132-0.465 nM). The highest IC(50) was revealed in clones carrying Y268C and Y268N mutations (which play an important role in atovaquone resistance in Plasmodium falciparum), with an approximately 100-fold increase. The findings indicate the importance of the mutation in the quinone binding site of the cytochrome b gene and that provide a direct evidence for the atovaquone inhibitory mechanism in the cytochrome bc1 complex of the parasite. PMID:25264100

  11. Beginning of a novel frontier: T-cell-directed immune manipulation in lymphomas.

    PubMed

    Kasenda, Benjamin; Kühnl, Andrea; Chau, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Checkpoint inhibitors with monoclonal antibodies targeting the CTLA-4 or PD-1 axis have revolutionized treatment in some solid tumors, especially melanoma and lung. The role of the CTLA-4 and PD-1 pathways and their inhibition in lymphoma may be different compared to solid tumors. In heavily pretreated Hodgkin lymphoma, PD-1-directed treatment has led to high remission rates. Several studies are now conducted also including diffuse large B-cell and follicular lymphoma. Besides antibody-based immunotherapy, treatment with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells has also come back to the focus of recent studies. Clinical evidence of CAR T-cell treatment in B-cell malignancies is limited to small series, because of the dedicated resources needed. However, impressive response rates have been observed, but toxicities associated with cytokine release can be very severe and fatal. We herein review the background, early clinical evidence, and future perspectives of T-cell-directed immune manipulation for lymphomas including checkpoint inhibitors and CAR T-cell therapies. PMID:26581237

  12. Directing neuronal cell growth on implant material surfaces by microstructuring.

    PubMed

    Reich, Uta; Fadeeva, Elena; Warnecke, Athanasia; Paasche, Gerrit; Müller, Peter; Chichkov, Boris; Stöver, Timo; Lenarz, Thomas; Reuter, Günter

    2012-05-01

    For best hearing sensation, electrodes of auditory prosthesis must have an optimal electrical contact to the respective neuronal cells. To improve the electrode-nerve interface, microstructuring of implant surfaces could guide neuronal cells toward the electrode contact. To this end, femtosecond laser ablation was used to generate linear microgrooves on the two currently relevant cochlear implant materials, silicone elastomer and platinum. Silicone surfaces were structured by two different methods, either directly, by laser ablation or indirectly, by imprinting using laser-microstructured molds. The influence of surface structuring on neurite outgrowth was investigated utilizing a neuronal-like cell line and primary auditory neurons. The pheochromocytoma cell line PC-12 and primary spiral ganglion cells were cultured on microstructured auditory implant materials. The orientation of neurite outgrowth relative to the microgrooves was determined. Both cell types showed a preferred orientation in parallel to the microstructures on both, platinum and on molded silicone elastomer. Interestingly, microstructures generated by direct laser ablation of silicone did not influence the orientation of either cell type. This shows that differences in the manufacturing procedures can affect the ability of microstructured implant surfaces to guide the growth of neurites. This is of particular importance for clinical applications, since the molding technique represents a reproducible, economic, and commercially feasible manufacturing procedure for the microstructured silicone surfaces of medical implants. PMID:22287482

  13. Metabolic evidence for PtdIns(4,5)P2-directed phospholipase C in permeabilized plant protoplasts.

    PubMed Central

    Brearley, C A; Parmar, P N; Hanke, D E

    1997-01-01

    Comparison of the sequences of the genes encoding phospholipase C (PLC) which have been cloned to date in plants with their mammalian counterparts suggests that plant PLC is similar to PLCdelta of mammalian cells. The physiological role and mechanism of activation of PLCdelta is unclear. It has recently been shown that Ins(1,4,5)P3 may not solely be the product of PtdIns(4,5)P2-directed PLC activity. Enzyme activities capable of producing Ins(1,4,5)P3 from endogenous inositol phosphates are present in Dictyostelium and also in rat liver. Significantly it has not been directly determined whether Ins(1,4,5)P3 present in higher plants is the product of a PtdIns(4, 5)P2-directed PLC activity. Therefore we have developed an experimental strategy for the identification of d-Ins(1,4,5)P3 in higher plants. By the use of a short-term non-equilibrium labelling strategy in permeabilized plant protoplasts, coupled to the use of a 'metabolic trap' to prevent degradation of [32P]Ins(1,4,5)P3, we were able to determine the distribution of 32P in individual phosphate esters of Ins(1,4,5)P3. The [32]Ins(1,4,5)P3 identified showed the same distribution of label in individual phosphate esters as that of [32P]PtdIns(4,5)P2 isolated from the same tissue. We thus provide in vivo evidence for the action of a PtdIns(4,5)P2-directed PLC activity in plant cells which is responsible for the production of Ins(1,4,5)P3 observed here. This observation does not, however, exclude the possibility that in other cells or under different conditions Ins(1,4,5)P3 can be generated by alternative routes. PMID:9164848

  14. Direct hydrogen fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahluwalia, Rajesh K.; Wang, X.

    Hybridizing a fuel cell system with an energy storage system offers an opportunity to improve the fuel economy of the vehicle through regenerative braking and possibly to increase the specific power and decrease the cost of the combined energy conversion and storage systems. Even in a hybrid configuration it is advantageous to operate the fuel cell system in a load-following mode and use the power from the energy storage system when the fuel cell alone cannot meet the power demand. This paper discusses an approach for designing load-following fuel cell systems for hybrid vehicles and illustrates it by applying it to pressurized, direct hydrogen, polymer-electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC) systems for a mid-size family sedan. The vehicle level requirements relative to traction power, response time, start-up time and energy conversion efficiency are used to select the important parameters for the PEFC stack, air management system, heat rejection system and the water management system.

  15. Cell carriers for oncolytic viruses: current challenges and future directions.

    PubMed

    Roy, Dominic G; Bell, John C

    2013-01-01

    The optimal route for clinical delivery of oncolytic viruses is thought to be systemic intravenous injection; however, the immune system is armed with several highly efficient mechanisms to remove pathogens from the circulatory system. To overcome the challenges faced in trying to delivery oncolytic viruses specifically to tumors via the bloodstream, carrier cells have been investigated to determine their suitability as delivery vehicles for systemic administration of oncolytic viruses. Cell carriers protect viruses from neutralization, one of the most limiting aspects of oncolytic virus interaction with the immune system. Cell carriers can also possess inherent tumor tropism, thus directing the delivery of the virus more specifically to a tumor. With preclinical studies already demonstrating the success and feasibility of this approach with multiple oncolytic viruses, clinical evaluation of cell-mediated delivery of viruses is on the horizon. Meanwhile, ongoing preclinical studies are aimed at identifying new cellular vehicles for oncolytic viruses and improving current promising cell carrier platforms. PMID:27512657

  16. Cell order in bacterial swarms arises from reversals of moving direction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yilin; Jiang, Yi; Kaiser, Dale; Alber, Mark

    2010-03-01

    Bacterial swarms are a beautiful example of the emergent behavior of systems of self-propelled rods. In swarming rod-shaped bacteria cells move smoothly even though they are packed together in high density. Experimental evidence shows that long-distance signaling is not required for bacterial swarming. It naturally raises the question how a swarm develops its order. Using a biomechanical model, we show here that regular periodic reversals of gliding direction in general systems of self-propelled rod shaped bacteria can lead to the extensive ordering of cells. We also show that an optimal reversal period and an optimal cell shape exist for producing such order. Given the observations of reversing behavior in several bacterial species,we suggest that the capacity to swarm depends less on the motility engine employed by individual cells, but more on the behavioral algorithm that enhances the flow of densely packed cells near the swarming edge.

  17. IL-12 directs further maturation of ex vivo differentiated NK cells with improved therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Sturtzel, Caterina; Tordoir, Marleen; Schlechta, Bernhard; Groenewegen, Dirk; Hofer, Erhard

    2014-01-01

    The possibility to modulate ex vivo human NK cell differentiation towards specific phenotypes will contribute to a better understanding of NK cell differentiation and facilitate tailored production of NK cells for immunotherapy. In this study, we show that addition of a specific low dose of IL-12 to an ex vivo NK cell differentiation system from cord blood CD34(+) stem cells will result in significantly increased proportions of cells with expression of CD62L as well as KIRs and CD16 which are preferentially expressed on mature CD56(dim) peripheral blood NK cells. In addition, the cells displayed decreased expression of receptors such as CCR6 and CXCR3, which are typically expressed to a lower extent by CD56(dim) than CD56(bright) peripheral blood NK cells. The increased number of CD62L and KIR positive cells prevailed in a population of CD33(+)NKG2A(+) NK cells, supporting that maturation occurs via this subtype. Among a series of transcription factors tested we found Gata3 and TOX to be significantly downregulated, whereas ID3 was upregulated in the IL-12-modulated ex vivo NK cells, implicating these factors in the observed changes. Importantly, the cells differentiated in the presence of IL-12 showed enhanced cytokine production and cytolytic activity against MHC class I negative and positive targets. Moreover, in line with the enhanced CD16 expression, these cells exhibited improved antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity for B-cell leukemia target cells in the presence of the clinically applied antibody rituximab. Altogether, these data provide evidence that IL-12 directs human ex vivo NK cell differentiation towards more mature NK cells with improved properties for potential cancer therapies. PMID:24498025

  18. An evidence summary of the management of patients taking direct oral anticoagulants (DOACs) undergoing dental surgery.

    PubMed

    Johnston, S

    2016-05-01

    Direct oral anticoagulant (DOAC) drugs (dabigatran, rivaroxaban, and apixaban) have emerged in the last decade to overcome some of the drawbacks of existing medications. To date, little is known about the dental management of patients taking these drugs. This study was undertaken to establish the evidence for the management of patients undergoing dental procedures while taking these medications. A rapid review approach was used to identify clinical and scientific research related to dental surgery performed in patients taking DOACs in order to produce an evidence summary. The rapid review did not identify any systematic reviews or original clinical trials and the overall quality of evidence found was poor. Most of the literature consisted of non-structured review articles and guidance documents based on assumptions from non-dental data and expert opinion, and recommendations on best practice varied throughout. The findings from the review of the literature varied considerably. Currently, recommendations are based on poor quality scientific data and clinical trials are required to establish best evidence-based practice guidance. PMID:26774397

  19. Body image disturbance in children and adolescents with eating disorders. Current evidence and future directions.

    PubMed

    Legenbauer, Tanja; Thiemann, Pia; Vocks, Silja

    2014-01-01

    Body image is multifaceted and incorporates perceptual, affective, and cognitive components as well as behavioral features. Only few studies have examined the character of body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders. It is unknown whether body-image disturbances in children/adolescent with eating disturbances are comparable to those of adult patients with eating disorders. Body-image disturbance might differ quantitatively and qualitatively according to the cognitive developmental status and the age of the individual. This paper provides an overview of the current evidence for body-image disturbance in children/adolescents with eating disorders, and how they compare with those adults with eating disorders. Current evidence indicates that older adolescent patients show similar deficits as adult patients with eating disorders, in particular for the attitudinal body-image component. However, evidence for a perceptual body-image disturbance in adolescent patients, in particular anorexia nervosa, is not conclusive. Reliable statements for childhood can hardly be made because clinical studies are not available. Investigations of body-image disturbance in children have focused on the predictive value for eating disorders. Limitations of the current evidence are discussed, and future directions for research and therapy are indicated. PMID:24365963

  20. Utilizing Chimeric Antigen Receptors to Direct Natural Killer Cell Activity

    PubMed Central

    Hermanson, David L.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells represent an attractive lymphocyte population for cancer immunotherapy due to their ability to lyse tumor targets without prior sensitization and without need for human leukocyte antigens-matching. Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) are able to enhance lymphocyte targeting and activation toward diverse malignancies. CARs consist of an external recognition domain (typically a small chain variable fragment) directed at a specific tumor antigen that is linked with one or more intracellular signaling domains that mediate lymphocyte activation. Most CAR studies have focused on their expression in T cells. However, use of CARs in NK cells is starting to gain traction because they provide a method to redirect these cells more specifically to target refractory cancers. CAR-mediated anti-tumor activity has been demonstrated using NK cell lines, as well as NK cells isolated from peripheral blood, and NK cells produced from human pluripotent stem cells. This review will outline the CAR constructs that have been reported in NK cells with a focus on comparing the use of different signaling domains in combination with other co-activating domains. PMID:25972867

  1. Compact direct methanol fuel cells for portable application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Icardi, U. A.; Specchia, S.; Fontana, G. J. R.; Saracco, G.; Specchia, V.

    Consumers' demand for portable audio/video/ICT products has driven the development of advanced power technologies in recent years. Fuel cells are a clean technology with low emissions levels, suitable for operation with renewable fuels and capable, in a next future, of replacing conventional power systems meeting the targets of the Kyoto Protocol for a society based on sustainable energy systems. Within such a perspective, the objective of the European project MOREPOWER (compact direct methanol fuel cells for portable applications) is the development of a low-cost, low temperature, portable direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC; nominal power 250 W) with compact construction and modular design for the potential market area of weather stations, medical devices, signal units, gas sensors and security cameras. This investigation is focused on a conceptual study of the DMFC system carried out in the Matlab/Simulink ® platform: the proposed scheme arrangements lead to a simple equipment architecture and a efficient process.

  2. Evidence of tricellulin expression by immune cells, particularly microglia.

    PubMed

    Mariano, Cibelle; Silva, Sandra Leitão; Pereira, Pedro; Fernandes, Adelaide; Brites, Dora; Brito, Maria A

    2011-06-17

    Tight junctions (TJs) are elaborate structures located on the apical region of epithelial cells that limit paracellular permeability. Tricellulin is a recently discovered TJ protein, which is concentrated at the structurally specialized tricellular TJs but also present at bicellular contacts between epithelial cells, namely in the stomach. Interestingly, several TJ proteins have been found in other than epithelial cells, as astrocytes, and tricellulin mRNA expression was reported in mature dendritic cells. These findings prompted us to look for tricellulin expression in both epithelial and immune cells in the stomach, as well as in microglia, the brain resident immunocompetent cells. Immunohistochemical analysis of human stomach tissue sections revealed peroxidase staining at three-corner contact sites, as well as at the contact between two adjacent epithelial cells, thus evidencing the expression of tricellulin not only at tricellullar but at bicellular junctions as well. Such analysis, further revealed tricellulin immunostaining in cells of the monocyte/macrophage lineage, scattered throughout the lamina propria. Cultured rat microglia exhibited a notorious tricellulin staining, consistent with an extensive expression of the protein along the cell, which was not absolutely coincident with the lysosomal marker CD68. Detection of mRNA expression by real-time PCR provided supportive evidence for the expression of the TJ protein in microglia. These data demonstrate for the first time that microglia express a TJ protein. Moreover, the expression of tricellulin both in microglia and in the stomach immune cells point to a possible role of this new TJ protein in the immune system. PMID:21624353

  3. Cognitive remediation therapy for mood disorders: rationale, early evidence, and future directions.

    PubMed

    Bowie, Christopher R; Gupta, Maya; Holshausen, Katherine

    2013-06-01

    People with mood disorders experience cognitive impairments that are predictive of functional disability. Cognitive remediation (CR) is an empirically validated intervention that is designed to remediate neurocognitive deficits and improve functioning. Although much of the focus of this treatment during the last decade has centred on attention deficit disorders, brain injury, and schizophrenia spectrum disorders, emerging evidence suggests that CR is an effective intervention for mood disorders and that these treatment effects translate into improvements in cognitive performance and possibly functioning. Our review aims to examine the profile and magnitude of cognitive impairments in mood disorders, review the evidence in support of CR for this population, and discuss future research directions in CR. PMID:23768259

  4. Manipulating directional cell motility using intracellular superparamagnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, Michael; Clemons, Tristan D.; Ho, Diwei; Gutiérrez, Lucía; Lázaro, Francisco J.; House, Michael J.; St. Pierre, Timothy G.; Fear, Mark W.; Wood, Fiona M.; Iyer, K. Swaminathan

    2015-03-01

    This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications.This study investigated the ability for magnetic nanoparticles to influence cellular migration in the presence of an external magnetic field. We found that the direction of migrating keratinocytes can be controlled and the migration speed of fibroblasts can be increased with the internalisation of these nanoparticles in the presence of a magnetic field. The possibility of shepherding cells towards a region of interest through the use of internalized nanoparticles is an attractive prospect for cell tracking, cell therapies, and tissue engineering applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Nanoparticle characterisation, supporting experimental data, video time course study of cellular uptake of the nanoparticles and complete experimental details are all provided in the ESI. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr06594h

  5. Recent advances in high-performance direct methanol fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Narayanan, S.R.; Chun, W.; Valdez, T.I.

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells for portable power applications have been advanced significantly under DARPA- and ARO-sponsored programs over the last five years. A liquid-feed direct methanol fuel cell developed under these programs, employs a proton exchange membrane as electrolyte and operates on aqueous solutions of methanol with air or oxygen as the oxidant. Power densities as high as 320 mW/cm{sup 2} have been demonstrated. Demonstration of five-cell stack based on the liquid-feed concept have been successfully performed by Giner Inc. and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Over 2000 hours of life-testing have been completed on these stacks. These fuel cells have been also been demonstrated by USC to operate on alternate fuels such as trimethoxymethane, dimethoxymethane and trioxane. Reduction in the parasitic loss of fuel across the fuel cell, a phenomenon termed as {open_quotes}fuel crossover{close_quotes} has been achieved using polymer membranes developed at USC. As a result efficiencies as high as 40% is considered attainable with this type of fuel cell. The state-of-development has reached a point where it is now been actively considered for stationary, portable and transportation applications. The research and development issues have been the subject of several previous articles and the present article is an attempt to summarize the key advances in this technology.

  6. Direct Visualization of De novo Lipogenesis in Single Living Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Junjie; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2014-10-01

    Increased de novo lipogenesis is being increasingly recognized as a hallmark of cancer. Despite recent advances in fluorescence microscopy, autoradiography and mass spectrometry, direct observation of de novo lipogenesis in living systems remains to be challenging. Here, by coupling stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy with isotope labeled glucose, we were able to trace the dynamic metabolism of glucose in single living cells with high spatial-temporal resolution. As the first direct visualization, we observed that glucose was largely utilized for lipid synthesis in pancreatic cancer cells, which occurs at a much lower rate in immortalized normal pancreatic epithelial cells. By inhibition of glycolysis and fatty acid synthase (FAS), the key enzyme for fatty acid synthesis, we confirmed the deuterium labeled lipids in cancer cells were from de novo lipid synthesis. Interestingly, we also found that prostate cancer cells exhibit relatively lower level of de novo lipogenesis, but higher fatty acid uptake compared to pancreatic cancer cells. Together, our results demonstrate a valuable tool to study dynamic lipid metabolism in cancer and other disorders.

  7. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Induce Directional Migration of Invasive Breast Cancer Cells through TGF-β

    PubMed Central

    McAndrews, Kathleen M.; McGrail, Daniel J.; Ravikumar, Nithin; Dawson, Michelle R.

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are recruited to the tumor microenvironment and influence tumor progression; however, how MSCs induce the invasion of cancer cells is not completely understood. Here, we used a 3D coculture model to determine how MSCs affect the migration of invasive breast cancer cells. Coculture with MSCs increases the elongation, directional migration, and traction generation of breast cancer cells. MSC-induced directional migration directly correlates with traction generation and is mediated by transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) and the migratory proteins rho-associated kinase, focal adhesion kinase, and matrix metalloproteinases. Treatment with MSC conditioned media or recombinant TGF-β1 elicits a similar migration response to coculture. Taken together, this work suggests TGF-β is secreted by MSCs, leading to force-dependent directional migration of invasive breast cancer cells. These pathways may be potential targets for blocking cancer cell invasion and subsequent metastasis. PMID:26585689

  8. Direct evidence for cytotoxicity associated with expression of hepatitis delta virus antigen.

    PubMed

    Cole, S M; Gowans, E J; Macnaughton, T B; Hall, P D; Burrell, C J

    1991-05-01

    It has been postulated that hepatocyte injury resulting from infection with hepatitis D virus may be caused by a direct virus cytotoxicity in contrast to immune-mediated injury associated with hepatitis B virus. We have transfected HeLa and HepG2 continuous cell lines with a recombinant plasmid containing the hepatitis D antigen gene under the inducible control of the human metallothionein promoter. The addition of zinc to the cell culture medium then led to the expression of hepatitis D antigen associated with, in the short term, a significant reduction in the rate of RNA but not DNA synthesis and, in the longer term, cell death. The necrotic cells had pyknotic nuclei and shrunken eosinophilic cytoplasm; these necrotic cells resembled the apoptotic bodies seen in hepatitis D virus-related hepatitis. The level of hepatitis D antigen in individual cells that produced these changes was similar to the level of hepatitis D antigen in hepatocytes from a chimpanzee with acute hepatitis D virus infection. We conclude that the expression of hepatitis D antigen resulted in significant cytotoxic changes in these cells, providing strong support for the view that hepatitis D antigen may be specifically cytotoxic to infected hepatocytes in vivo. PMID:1709411

  9. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells.

    PubMed

    Mellon, DeForest

    2016-01-01

    I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5-10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in parasol cells. PMID

  10. Electrophysiological Evidence for Intrinsic Pacemaker Currents in Crayfish Parasol Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mellon, DeForest

    2016-01-01

    I used sharp intracellular electrodes to record from parasol cells in the semi-isolated crayfish brain to investigate pacemaker currents. Evidence for the presence of the hyperpolarization-activated inward rectifier potassium current was obtained in about half of the parasol cells examined, where strong, prolonged hyperpolarizing currents generated a slowly-rising voltage sag, and a post-hyperpolarization rebound. The amplitudes of both the sag voltage and the depolarizing rebound were dependent upon the strength of the hyperpolarizing current. The voltage sag showed a definite threshold and was non-inactivating. The voltage sag and rebound depolarization evoked by hyperpolarization were blocked by the presence of 5–10 mM Cs2+ ions, 10 mM tetraethyl ammonium chloride, and 10 mM cobalt chloride in the bathing medium, but not by the drug ZD 7288. Cs+ ions in normal saline in some cells caused a slight increase in mean resting potential and a reduction in spontaneous burst frequency. Many of the neurons expressing the hyperpolarization-activated inward potassium current also provided evidence for the presence of the transient potassium current IA, which was inferred from experimental observations of an increased latency of post-hyperpolarization response to a depolarizing step, compared to the response latency to the depolarization alone. The latency increase was reduced in the presence of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP), a specific blocker of IA. The presence of 4-AP in normal saline also induced spontaneous bursting in parasol cells. It is conjectured that, under normal physiological conditions, these two potassium currents help to regulate burst generation in parasol cells, respectively, by helping to maintain the resting membrane potential near a threshold level for burst generation, and by regulating the rate of rise of membrane depolarizing events leading to burst generation. The presence of post-burst hyperpolarization may depend upon IA channels in parasol cells

  11. DIRECTED DIFFERENTIATION OF EMBRYONIC STEM CELLS INTO BLADDER TISSUE

    PubMed Central

    Oottamasathien, Siam; Wang, YongQing; Williams, Karin; Franco, Omar E.; Wills, Marcia L.; Thomas, John C.; Saba, Katrina; Sharif-Afshar, Ali-Reza; Makari, John H.; Bhowmick, Neil A; DeMarco, Romano T.; Hipkens, Susan; Magnuson, Mark; Brock, John W.; Hayward, Simon W.; Pope, John C.; Matusik, Robert J.

    2007-01-01

    Manipulatable models of bladder development which interrogate specific pathways are badly needed. Such models will allow a systematic investigation of the multitude of pathologies which result from developmental defects of the urinary bladder. In the present communication, we describe a model in which mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are directed to differentiate to form bladder tissue by specific interactions with fetal bladder mesenchyme. This model allows us to visualize the various stages in the differentiation of urothelium from ES cells, including the commitment to an endodermal cell lineage, with the temporal profile characterized by examining the induction of specific endodermal transcription factors (Foxa1 and Foxa2). In addition, final functional urothelial differentiation was characterized by examining uroplakin expression. It is well established that ES cells will spontaneously develop teratomas when grown within immunocompromised mouse hosts. We determined the specific mesenchymal to ES cell ratios necessary to dictate organ-specific differentiation while completely suppressing teratomatous growth. Embryonic mesenchyme is well established as an inductive tissue which dictates organ-specific programming of epithelial tissues. The present study demonstrates that embryonic bladder mesenchyme can also steer ES cells towards developing specific endodermal derived urothelium. These approaches allow us to capture specific stages of stem cell differentiation and to better define stem cell hierarchies. PMID:17289017

  12. Evidence of canonical somatic hypermutation in hairy cell leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Arons, Evgeny; Roth, Laura; Sapolsky, Jeffrey; Suntum, Tara; Stetler-Stevenson, Maryalice

    2011-01-01

    To compare hairy cell leukemia (HCL) with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and normal B cells with respect to their B-cell receptors, somatic hypermutation (SHM) features in HCL were examined in a series of 130 immunoglobulin gene heavy chain rearrangements, including 102 from 100 classic (HCLc) and 28 from 26 variant (HCLv) patients. The frequency of unmutated rearrangements in HCLc was much lower than that in HCLv (17% vs 54%, P < .001) or historically in CLL (17% vs 46%, P < .001), but HCLv and CLL were similar (P = .45). As previously reported for CLL, evidence of canonical SHM was observed in HCLc rearrangements, including: (1) a higher ratio of replacement to silent mutations in the complementarity determining regions than in the framework regions (2.83 vs 1.41, P < .001), (2) higher transition to transversion ratio than would be expected if mutations were random (1.49 vs 0.5, P < .001), and (3) higher than expected concentration of mutations within RGYW hot spots (13.92% vs 3.33%, P < .001). HCLv met these 3 criteria of canonical SHM to a lesser extent. These data suggest that, whereas HCLc cells may recognize antigen-like CLL and normal B cells before malignant transformation, HCLv cells from some patients may originate differently, possibly without undergoing antigen recognition. PMID:21368287

  13. Direct evidence for compressive elastic strain at ground surfaces of nanocomposite ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, B. K.; Wu, H. Z.; Roberts, S. G.

    2005-02-01

    High-resolution grazing incidence x-ray powder diffraction has been used to provide direct evidence for the existence of a uniform compressive strain close to the surface of ground alumina/SiC nanocomposites. No such strain is found in ground surfaces of single-phase alumina or polished surfaces of nanocomposite. The strain in the ground nanocomposite is found to be perpendicular to the grinding direction and disappears on annealing at 1250°C. Such a compressive stress provides a mechanism for enhancing the strength of the nanocomposite, by opposing any tensile loading tending to open surface flaws. The origin of the stresses probably lies in the enhanced grain boundary strength in the nanocomposite alumina-silicon carbide compared to alumina.

  14. Directional Bleb Formation in Spherical Cells under Temperature Gradient

    PubMed Central

    Oyama, Kotaro; Arai, Tomomi; Isaka, Akira; Sekiguchi, Taku; Itoh, Hideki; Seto, Yusuke; Miyazaki, Makito; Itabashi, Takeshi; Ohki, Takashi; Suzuki, Madoka; Ishiwata, Shin'ichi

    2015-01-01

    Living cells sense absolute temperature and temporal changes in temperature using biological thermosensors such as ion channels. Here, we reveal, to our knowledge, a novel mechanism of sensing spatial temperature gradients within single cells. Spherical mitotic cells form directional membrane extensions (polar blebs) under sharp temperature gradients (≥∼0.065°C μm−1; 1.3°C temperature difference within a cell), which are created by local heating with a focused 1455-nm laser beam under an optical microscope. On the other hand, multiple nondirectional blebs are formed under gradual temperature gradients or uniform heating. During heating, the distribution of actomyosin complexes becomes inhomogeneous due to a break in the symmetry of its contractile force, highlighting the role of the actomyosin complex as a sensor of local temperature gradients. PMID:26200871

  15. Does the vestibular system contribute to head direction cell activity in the rat?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. E.; Yates, B. J.; Taube, J. S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Head direction cells (HDC) located in several regions of the brain, including the anterior dorsal nucleus of the thalamus (ADN), postsubiculum (PoS), and lateral mammillary nuclei (LMN), provide the neural substrate for the determination of head direction. Although activity of HDC is influenced by various sensory signals and internally generated cues, lesion studies and some anatomical and physiological evidence suggest that vestibular inputs are critical for the maintenance of directional sensitivity of these cells. However, vestibular inputs must be transformed considerably in order to signal head direction, and the neuronal circuitry that accomplishes this signal processing has not been fully established. Furthermore, it is unclear why the removal of vestibular inputs abolishes the directional sensitivity of HDC, as visual and other sensory inputs and motor feedback signals strongly affect the firing of these neurons and would be expected to maintain their directional-related activity. Further physiological studies will be required to establish the role of vestibular system in producing HDC responses, and anatomical studies are needed to determine the neural circuitry that mediates vestibular influences on determination of head direction.

  16. 7 CFR 1412.34 - Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops. 1412.34 Section 1412.34 Agriculture Regulations of... ELECTION PROGRAM FOR THE 2008 AND SUBSEQUENT CROP YEARS Establishment of Yields for Direct and Counter-Cyclical Payments § 1412.34 Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields...

  17. Directed 3D cell alignment and elongation in microengineered hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Aubin, Hug; Nichol, Jason W; Hutson, Ché B; Bae, Hojae; Sieminski, Alisha L; Cropek, Donald M; Akhyari, Payam; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-09-01

    Organized cellular alignment is critical to controlling tissue microarchitecture and biological function. Although a multitude of techniques have been described to control cellular alignment in 2D, recapitulating the cellular alignment of highly organized native tissues in 3D engineered tissues remains a challenge. While cellular alignment in engineered tissues can be induced through the use of external physical stimuli, there are few simple techniques for microscale control of cell behavior that are largely cell-driven. In this study we present a simple and direct method to control the alignment and elongation of fibroblasts, myoblasts, endothelial cells and cardiac stem cells encapsulated in microengineered 3D gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels, demonstrating that cells with the intrinsic potential to form aligned tissues in vivo will self-organize into functional tissues in vitro if confined in the appropriate 3D microarchitecture. The presented system may be used as an in vitro model for investigating cell and tissue morphogenesis in 3D, as well as for creating tissue constructs with microscale control of 3D cellular alignment and elongation, that could have great potential for the engineering of functional tissues with aligned cells and anisotropic function. PMID:20638973

  18. Direct evidence for block-by-block growth in high-temperature superconductor ultrathin films.

    PubMed

    Varela, M; Grogger, W; Arias, D; Sefrioui, Z; León, C; Ballesteros, C; Krishnan, K M; Santamaría, J

    2001-05-28

    Charge neutrality and stoichiometry impose severe restrictions on the mechanisms of epitaxial growth of complex oxides. The fundamental question arises of what is the minimum growth unit when sample thickness is reduced beyond the size of the unit cell. We have investigated the growth mechanism of YBa2Cu3O7 cuprate superconductor, using a consistent approach based on the growth of noninteger numbers of YBa2Cu3O7 layers in YBa(2)Cu(3)O(7)/PrBa(2)Cu3O7 superlattices. Ex situ chemical and structural analysis evidence a 2D block-by-block mechanism in which the minimum growth units are complete unit cell blocks, growing coherently over large lateral distances. PMID:11384445

  19. Laetoli Footprints Preserve Earliest Direct Evidence of Human-Like Bipedal Biomechanics

    PubMed Central

    Raichlen, David A.; Gordon, Adam D.; Harcourt-Smith, William E. H.; Foster, Adam D.; Haas, Wm. Randall

    2010-01-01

    Background Debates over the evolution of hominin bipedalism, a defining human characteristic, revolve around whether early bipeds walked more like humans, with energetically efficient extended hind limbs, or more like apes with flexed hind limbs. The 3.6 million year old hominin footprints at Laetoli, Tanzania represent the earliest direct evidence of hominin bipedalism. Determining the kinematics of Laetoli hominins will allow us to understand whether selection acted to decrease energy costs of bipedalism by 3.6 Ma. Methodology/Principal Findings Using an experimental design, we show that the Laetoli hominins walked with weight transfer most similar to the economical extended limb bipedalism of humans. Humans walked through a sand trackway using both extended limb bipedalism, and more flexed limb bipedalism. Footprint morphology from extended limb trials matches weight distribution patterns found in the Laetoli footprints. Conclusions These results provide us with the earliest direct evidence of kinematically human-like bipedalism currently known, and show that extended limb bipedalism evolved long before the appearance of the genus Homo. Since extended-limb bipedalism is more energetically economical than ape-like bipedalism, energy expenditure was likely an important selection pressure on hominin bipeds by 3.6 Ma. PMID:20339543

  20. The first direct evidence of pre-columbian sources of palygorskite for Maya Blue

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arnold, Dean E.; Bohor, Bruce F.; Neff, Hector; Feinman, Gary M.; Williams, Patrick Ryan; Dussubieux, Laure; Bishop, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    Maya Blue, a nano-structured clay–organic complex of palygorskite and indigo, was used predominantly before the Spanish Conquest. It has fascinated chemists, material scientists, archaeologists and art historians for decades because it is resistant to the effect of acids, alkalis, and other reagents, and its rich color has persisted for centuries in the harsh tropical climate of southern Mesoamerica. One of its components, palygorskite, is part of modern Maya indigenous knowledge, and ethnohistoric and archaeological data suggest that its modern sources were probably utilized in Prehispanic times. Yet no direct evidence verifies that palygorskite was actually mined from these sources to make Maya Blue. Here we characterize these sources compositionally, and compare our analyses to those of Maya Blue from Chichén Itzá and Palenque. We demonstrate that the palygorskite in most of these samples came from modern mines, providing the first direct evidence for the use of these sources for making Maya Blue. These findings reveal that modern Maya indigenous knowledge about palygorskite, its mining, and its source locations, is at least seven centuries old.

  1. Direct Evidence of Solution-Mediated Superoxide Transport and Organic Radical Formation in Sodium-Oxygen Batteries.

    PubMed

    Xia, Chun; Fernandes, Russel; Cho, Franklin H; Sudhakar, Niranjan; Buonacorsi, Brandon; Walker, Sean; Xu, Meng; Baugh, Jonathan; Nazar, Linda F

    2016-09-01

    Advanced large-scale electrochemical energy storage requires cost-effective battery systems with high energy densities. Aprotic sodium-oxygen (Na-O2) batteries offer advantages, being comprised of low-cost elements and possessing much lower charge overpotential and higher reversibility compared to their lithium-oxygen battery cousins. Although such differences have been explained by solution-mediated superoxide transport, the underlying nature of this mechanism is not fully understood. Water has been suggested to solubilize superoxide via formation of hydroperoxyl (HO2), but direct evidence of these HO2 radical species in cells has proven elusive. Here, we use ESR spectroscopy at 210 K to identify and quantify soluble HO2 radicals in the electrolyte-cold-trapped in situ to prolong their lifetime-in a Na-O2 cell. These investigations are coupled to parallel SEM studies that image crystalline sodium superoxide (NaO2) on the carbon cathode. The superoxide radicals were spin-trapped via reaction with 5,5-dimethyl-pyrroline N-oxide at different electrochemical stages, allowing monitoring of their production and consumption during cycling. Our results conclusively demonstrate that transport of superoxide from cathode to electrolyte leads to the nucleation and growth of NaO2, which follows classical mechanisms based on the variation of superoxide content in the electrolyte and its correlation with the crystallization of cubic NaO2. The changes in superoxide content upon charge show that charge proceeds through the reverse solution process. Furthermore, we identify the carbon-centered/oxygen-centered alkyl radicals arising from attack of these solubilized HO2 species on the diglyme solvent. This is the first direct evidence of such species, which are likely responsible for electrolyte degradation. PMID:27498623

  2. Performance of direct formate-peroxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yinshi; Wu, Hao; He, Yaling; Liu, Yue; Jin, Lei

    2015-08-01

    We report the high-performance direct formate-peroxide fuel cells (DFPFCs) that consist of a cation-exchange membrane sandwiched between an alkaline formate anode and an acid peroxide cathode. Much attention has been paid to investigate the effects of different composite parameters and operating parameters, including catalyst loadings at both anode and cathode electrodes, operating temperatures, as well as the concentrations of both formate and electrolyte solutions. It is demonstrated that the optimization of both the electrode composition (anode 2.0 mgPd cm-2, cathode 2.0 mgPt cm-2) and the solution concentration (1.0 M HCOONa-3.0 M NaOH) enables the DFPFC to yield a peak power density as high as 591 mW cm-2 at 60 °C, which is about one times higher than that of state-of-the-art anion-exchange membrane direct formate fuel cells.

  3. GATA factors efficiently direct cardiac fate from embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Turbendian, Harma K; Gordillo, Miriam; Tsai, Su-Yi; Lu, Jia; Kang, Guoxin; Liu, Ting-Chun; Tang, Alice; Liu, Susanna; Fishman, Glenn I; Evans, Todd

    2013-04-01

    The GATA4 transcription factor is implicated in promoting cardiogenesis in combination with other factors, including TBX5, MEF2C and BAF60C. However, when expressed in embryonic stem cells (ESCs), GATA4 was shown to promote endoderm, not cardiac mesoderm. The capacity of related GATA factors to promote cardiogenesis is untested. We found that expression of the highly related gene, Gata5, very efficiently promotes cardiomyocyte fate from murine ESCs. Gata5 directs development of beating sheets of cells that express cardiac troponin T and show a full range of action potential morphologies that are responsive to pharmacological stimulation. We discovered that by removing serum from the culture conditions, GATA4 and GATA6 are each also able to efficiently promote cardiogenesis in ESC derivatives, with some distinctions. Thus, GATA factors can function in ESC derivatives upstream of other cardiac transcription factors to direct the efficient generation of cardiomyocytes. PMID:23487308

  4. Social network analysis shows direct evidence for social transmission of tool use in wild chimpanzees.

    PubMed

    Hobaiter, Catherine; Poisot, Timothée; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Hoppitt, William; Gruber, Thibaud

    2014-09-01

    Social network analysis methods have made it possible to test whether novel behaviors in animals spread through individual or social learning. To date, however, social network analysis of wild populations has been limited to static models that cannot precisely reflect the dynamics of learning, for instance, the impact of multiple observations across time. Here, we present a novel dynamic version of network analysis that is capable of capturing temporal aspects of acquisition--that is, how successive observations by an individual influence its acquisition of the novel behavior. We apply this model to studying the spread of two novel tool-use variants, "moss-sponging" and "leaf-sponge re-use," in the Sonso chimpanzee community of Budongo Forest, Uganda. Chimpanzees are widely considered the most "cultural" of all animal species, with 39 behaviors suspected as socially acquired, most of them in the domain of tool-use. The cultural hypothesis is supported by experimental data from captive chimpanzees and a range of observational data. However, for wild groups, there is still no direct experimental evidence for social learning, nor has there been any direct observation of social diffusion of behavioral innovations. Here, we tested both a static and a dynamic network model and found strong evidence that diffusion patterns of moss-sponging, but not leaf-sponge re-use, were significantly better explained by social than individual learning. The most conservative estimate of social transmission accounted for 85% of observed events, with an estimated 15-fold increase in learning rate for each time a novice observed an informed individual moss-sponging. We conclude that group-specific behavioral variants in wild chimpanzees can be socially learned, adding to the evidence that this prerequisite for culture originated in a common ancestor of great apes and humans, long before the advent of modern humans. PMID:25268798

  5. Experimental Design to Evaluate Directed Adaptive Mutation in Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chiaro, Christopher R; May, Tobias

    2014-01-01

    Background We describe the experimental design for a methodological approach to determine whether directed adaptive mutation occurs in mammalian cells. Identification of directed adaptive mutation would have profound practical significance for a wide variety of biomedical problems, including disease development and resistance to treatment. In adaptive mutation, the genetic or epigenetic change is not random; instead, the presence and type of selection influences the frequency and character of the mutation event. Adaptive mutation can contribute to the evolution of microbial pathogenesis, cancer, and drug resistance, and may become a focus of novel therapeutic interventions. Objective Our experimental approach was designed to distinguish between 3 types of mutation: (1) random mutations that are independent of selective pressure, (2) undirected adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces a general increase in the mutation rate, and (3) directed adaptive mutations that arise when selective pressure induces targeted mutations that specifically influence the adaptive response. The purpose of this report is to introduce an experimental design and describe limited pilot experiment data (not to describe a complete set of experiments); hence, it is an early report. Methods An experimental design based on immortalization of mouse embryonic fibroblast cells is presented that links clonal cell growth to reversal of an inactivating polyadenylation site mutation. Thus, cells exhibit growth only in the presence of both the countermutation and an inducing agent (doxycycline). The type and frequency of mutation in the presence or absence of doxycycline will be evaluated. Additional experimental approaches would determine whether the cells exhibit a generalized increase in mutation rate and/or whether the cells show altered expression of error-prone DNA polymerases or of mismatch repair proteins. Results We performed the initial stages of characterizing our system

  6. Angiotensin II directly impairs adipogenic differentiation of human preadipose cells.

    PubMed

    Palominos, Marisol M; Dünner, Natalia H; Wabitsch, Martin; Rojas, Cecilia V

    2015-10-01

    Angiotensin II reduces adipogenic differentiation of preadipose cells present in the stroma-vascular fraction of human adipose tissue, which also includes several cell types. Because of the ability of non-adipose lineage cells in the stroma-vascular fraction to respond to angiotensin II, it is not possible to unequivocally ascribe the anti-adipogenic response to a direct effect of this hormone on preadipose cells. Therefore, we used the human Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome (SGBS) preadipocyte cell strain to investigate the consequences of angiotensin II treatment on adipogenic differentiation under serum-free conditions, by assessing expression of typical adipocyte markers perilipin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), at the transcript and protein level. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction showed that perilipin and FABP4 transcripts were, respectively, reduced to 0.33 ± 0.07 (P < 0.05) and 0.41 ± 0.19-fold (P < 0.05) in SGBS cells induced to adipogenic differentiation in the presence of angiotensin II. Western Blot analysis corroborated reduction of the corresponding proteins to 0.23 ± 0.21 (P < 0.01) and 0.46 ± 0.30-fold (P < 0.01) the respective controls without angiotensin II. Angiotensin II also impaired morphological changes associated with early adipogenesis. Hence, we demonstrated that angiotensin II is able to directly reduce adipogenic differentiation of SGBS preadipose cells. PMID:26112903

  7. Direct methanol feed fuel cell with reduced catalyst loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kindler, Andrew (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Improvements to direct feed methanol fuel cells include new protocols for component formation. Catalyst-water repellent material is applied in formation of electrodes and sintered before application of ionomer. A membrane used in formation of an electrode assembly is specially pre-treated to improve bonding between catalyst and membrane. The improved electrode and the pre-treated membrane are assembled into a membrane electrode assembly.

  8. Cell-directed-assembly: Directing the formation of nano/bio interfaces and architectures with living cells

    PubMed Central

    Baca, Helen K.; Carnes, Eric C.; Ashley, Carlee E.; Lopez, DeAnna M.; Douthit, Cynthia; Karlin, Shelly; Brinker, C. Jeffrey

    2011-01-01

    Background The desire to immobilize, encapsulate, or entrap viable cells for use in a variety of applications has been explored for decades. Traditionally, the approach is to immobilize cells to utilize a specific functionality of the cell in the system. Scope of Review This review describes our recent discovery that living cells can organize extended nanostructures and nano-objects to create a highly biocompatible nano//bio interface [1]. Major Conclusions We find that short chain phospholipids direct the formation of thin film silica mesophases during evaporation-induced self-assembly (EISA) [2], and that the introduction of cells alter the self-assembly pathway. Cells organize an ordered lipid-membrane that forms a coherent interface with the silica mesophase that is unique in that it withstands drying - yet it maintains accessibility to molecules introduced into the 3D silica host. Cell viability is preserved in the absence of buffer, making these constructs useful as standalone cell-based sensors. In response to hyperosmotic stress, the cells release water, creating a pH gradient which is maintained within the nanostructured host and serves to localize lipids, proteins, plasmids, lipidized nanocrystals, and other components at the cellular surface. This active organization of the bio/nano interface can be accomplished during ink-jet printing or selective wetting - processes allowing patterning of cellular arrays - and even spatially-defined genetic modification. General Significance Recent advances in the understanding of nanotechnology and cell biology encourage the pursuit of more complex endeavors where the dynamic interactions of the cell and host material act symbiotically to obtain new, useful functions. PMID:20933574

  9. Novel mitochondrial extensions provide evidence for a link between microtubule-directed movement and mitochondrial fission

    SciTech Connect

    Bowes, Timothy; Gupta, Radhey S.

    2008-11-07

    Mitochondrial dynamics play an important role in a large number of cellular processes. Previously, we reported that treatment of mammalian cells with the cysteine-alkylators, N-ethylmaleimide and ethacrynic acid, induced rapid mitochondrial fusion forming a large reticulum approximately 30 min after treatment. Here, we further investigated this phenomenon using a number of techniques including live-cell confocal microscopy. In live cells, drug-induced fusion coincided with a cessation of fast mitochondrial movement which was dependent on microtubules. During this loss of movement, thin mitochondrial tubules extending from mitochondria were also observed, which we refer to as 'mitochondrial extensions'. The formation of these mitochondrial extensions, which were not observed in untreated cells, depended on microtubules and was abolished by pretreatment with nocodazole. In this study, we provide evidence that these extensions result from of a block in mitochondrial fission combined with continued application of motile force by microtubule-dependent motor complexes. Our observations strongly suggest the existence of a link between microtubule-based mitochondrial trafficking and mitochondrial fission.

  10. European Working Time Directive and doctors’ health: a systematic review of the available epidemiological evidence

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Jareño, Maria Cruz; Demou, Evangelia; Vargas-Prada, Sergio; Sanati, Kaveh A; Škerjanc, Alenka; Reis, Pedro G; Helimäki-Aro, Ritva; Macdonald, Ewan B; Serra, Consol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To summarise the available scientific evidence on the health effects of exposure to working beyond the limit number of hours established by the European Working Time Directive (EWTD) on physicians. Design A systematic literature search was conducted in PubMed and EMBASE. Study selection, quality appraisal and data extraction were carried out by independent pairs of researchers using pre-established criteria. Setting Physicians of any medical, surgical or community specialty, working in any possible setting (hospitals, primary healthcare, etc), as well as trainees, residents, junior house officers or postgraduate interns, were included. Participants The total number of participants was 14 338. Primary and secondary outcome measures Health effects classified under the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10). Results Over 3000 citations and 110 full articles were reviewed. From these, 11 studies of high or intermediate quality carried out in North America, Europe and Japan met the inclusion criteria. Six studies included medical residents, junior doctors or house officers and the five others included medical specialists or consultants, medical, dental, and general practitioners and hospital physicians. Evidence of an association was found between percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents with extended long working hours (LWH)/days or very LWH/weeks. The evidence was insufficient for mood disorders and general health. No studies on other health outcomes were identified. Conclusions LWH could increase the risk of percutaneous injuries and road traffic accidents, and possibly other incidents at work through the same pathway. While associations are clear, the existing evidence does not allow for an established causal or ‘dose–response’ relationship between LWH and incidents at work, or for a threshold number of extended hours above which there is a significantly higher risk and the hours physicians could work and remain safe and healthy

  11. Evidence for a direct involvement of hMSH5 in promoting ionizing radiation induced apoptosis

    SciTech Connect

    Tompkins, Joshua D.; Wu, Xiling; Chu, Yen-Lin; Her, Chengtao

    2009-08-15

    Although increasing evidence has suggested that the hMSH5 protein plays an important role in meiotic and mitotic DNA recombinational repair, its precise functions in recombination and DNA damage response are presently elusive. Here we show that the interaction between hMSH5 and c-Abl confers ionizing radiation (IR)-induced apoptotic response by promoting c-Abl activation and p73 accumulation, and these effects are greatly enhanced in cells expressing hMSH5{sup P29S} (i.e. the hMSH5 variant possessing a proline to serine change within the N-terminal (Px){sub 5} dipeptide repeat). Our current study provides the first evidence that the (Px){sub 5} dipeptide repeat plays an important role in modulating the interaction between hMSH5 and c-Abl and alteration of this dipeptide repeat in hMSH5{sup P29S} leads to increased IR sensitivity owing to enhanced caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. In addition, RNAi-mediated hMSH5 silencing leads to the reduction of apoptosis in IR-treated cells. In short, this study implicates a role for hMSH5 in DNA damage response involving c-Abl and p73, and suggests that mutations impairing this process could significantly affect normal cellular responses to anti-cancer treatments.

  12. Cell-Penetrating Peptide as a Means of Directing the Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaitsuka, Taku; Tomizawa, Kazuhito

    2015-01-01

    Protein transduction using cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) is useful for the delivery of large protein molecules, including some transcription factors. This method is safer than gene transfection methods with a viral vector because there is no risk of genomic integration of the exogenous DNA. Recently, this method was reported as a means for the induction of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells, directing the differentiation into specific cell types and supporting gene editing/correction. Furthermore, we developed a direct differentiation method to obtain a pancreatic lineage from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells via the protein transduction of three transcription factors, Pdx1, NeuroD, and MafA. Here, we discuss the possibility of using CPPs as a means of directing the differentiation of iPS cells and other stem cell technologies. PMID:26561805

  13. Rectified directional sensing in long-range cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Akihiko; Ishihara, Shuji; Imoto, Daisuke; Sawai, Satoshi

    2014-01-01

    How spatial and temporal information are integrated to determine the direction of cell migration remains poorly understood. Here, by precise microfluidics emulation of dynamic chemoattractant waves, we demonstrate that, in Dictyostelium, directional movement as well as activation of small guanosine triphosphatase Ras at the leading edge is suppressed when the chemoattractant concentration is decreasing over time. This ‘rectification’ of directional sensing occurs only at an intermediate range of wave speed and does not require phosphoinositide-3-kinase or F-actin. From modelling analysis, we show that rectification arises naturally in a single-layered incoherent feedforward circuit with zero-order ultrasensitivity. The required stimulus time-window predicts ~5 s transient for directional sensing response close to Ras activation and inhibitor diffusion typical for protein in the cytosol. We suggest that the ability of Dictyostelium cells to move only in the wavefront is closely associated with rectification of adaptive response combined with local activation and global inhibition. PMID:25373620

  14. Directed Ig class switch recombination in activated murine B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Winter, E; Krawinkel, U; Radbruch, A

    1987-01-01

    Immunoglobulin class switch recombination occurs at frequencies of up to 10%/cell/generation in activated murine B-lymphocytes. We analysed cH gene rearrangements and switch recombinations from active and inactive IgH loci of B-cells activated in various ways and immortalized by cell fusion. Although about half of the IgM+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes, the deletion of c mu is a rare event. Half of the IgG3+ and IgG1+ cells show rearrangement of c mu genes on the inactive IgH locus and the other half of the IgG+ cells have deleted c mu from both IgH loci by switch recombination. This recombination is directed to the same switch regions on both IgH loci in 60-80% of all cases. Interleukin 4 may play a critical role in programming murine B-lymphocytes for specific switch recombination. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. PMID:3038529

  15. Low contaminant formic acid fuel for direct liquid fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Masel, Richard I.; Zhu, Yimin; Kahn, Zakia; Man, Malcolm

    2009-11-17

    A low contaminant formic acid fuel is especially suited toward use in a direct organic liquid fuel cell. A fuel of the invention provides high power output that is maintained for a substantial time and the fuel is substantially non-flammable. Specific contaminants and contaminant levels have been identified as being deleterious to the performance of a formic acid fuel in a fuel cell, and embodiments of the invention provide low contaminant fuels that have improved performance compared to known commercial bulk grade and commercial purified grade formic acid fuels. Preferred embodiment fuels (and fuel cells containing such fuels) including low levels of a combination of key contaminants, including acetic acid, methyl formate, and methanol.

  16. Direct observation of nanoparticle-cancer cell nucleus interactions.

    PubMed

    Dam, Duncan Hieu M; Lee, Jung Heon; Sisco, Patrick N; Co, Dick T; Zhang, Ming; Wasielewski, Michael R; Odom, Teri W

    2012-04-24

    We report the direct visualization of interactions between drug-loaded nanoparticles and the cancer cell nucleus. Nanoconstructs composed of nucleolin-specific aptamers and gold nanostars were actively transported to the nucleus and induced major changes to the nuclear phenotype via nuclear envelope invaginations near the site of the construct. The number of local deformations could be increased by ultrafast, light-triggered release of the aptamers from the surface of the gold nanostars. Cancer cells with more nuclear envelope folding showed increased caspase 3 and 7 activity (apoptosis) as well as decreased cell viability. This newly revealed correlation between drug-induced changes in nuclear phenotype and increased therapeutic efficacy could provide new insight for nuclear-targeted cancer therapy. PMID:22424173

  17. Liquid Tin Anode Direct Coal Fuel Cell Final Program Report

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, Thomas

    2012-01-26

    This SBIR program will result in improved LTA cell technology which is the fundamental building block of the Direct Coal ECL concept. As described below, ECL can make enormous efficiency and cost contributions to utility scale coal power. This program will improve LTA cells for small scale power generation. As described in the Commercialization section, there are important intermediate military and commercial markets for LTA generators that will provide an important bridge to the coal power application. The specific technical information from this program relating to YSZ electrolyte durability will be broadly applicable SOFC developers working on coal based SOFC generally. This is an area about which very little is currently known and will be critical for successfully applying fuel cells to coal power generation.

  18. Catalytic polymeric electrodes for direct borohydride fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayatsarmadi, Bita; Peters, Alice; Talemi, Pejman

    2016-08-01

    The direct borohydride fuel cell (DBFC) is a new class of fuel cells that produces non-toxic by-products and has a potential for a high voltage and high energy density. A major challenge in developing efficient DBFCs is the development of an efficient, stable, and economic catalyst for the oxidation of borohydride. In this paper, we report the use of conducting polymer Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) as electrocatalysts in DBFC. PEDOT electrodes prepared by vacuum phase polymerization exhibited electrocatalytic behavior towards oxidation of borohydride and reduction of hydrogen peroxide. Spectroscopic analysis of samples showed that PEDOT can act as an interface for electron transfer from borohydride ions. Comparing the polarization curves of DBFCs with PEDOT coated on graphite electrodes and cells with bare graphite electrodes, demonstrated higher voltage, maximum power density, and stability.

  19. Evidence for a direct action of Tityus serrulatus scorpion venom on the cardiac muscle.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, A L; Fontoura, B F; Freire-Maia, L; Machado, C R; Camargos, E R; Teixeira, M M

    2001-05-01

    The ability of toxins to activate the cardiovascular system plays an important role in the morbidity and lethality of the Tityus serrulatus scorpion envenoming. Most of the actions of the scorpion toxins are indirect and due to the release of adrenergic and cholinergic neurotransmitters. Accordingly, treatment following envenoming is targeted towards inhibition of adrenergic and cholinergic receptors. Here, we have sought evidence for a direct action of T. serrulatus venom on the isolated rat heart (Langendorff's method). We show that the bradycardia induced by T. serrulatus venom was completely blocked by atropine, a muscarinic receptor antagonist. Similarly, the increase in heart rate that follows the venom-induced bradycardia was totally inhibited by a beta(1)-adrenoceptor antagonist or by chemical sympathetic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine. In contrast to these findings, the venom-induced increase in contractile force was not modified by beta(1)-adrenoceptor blockade or by chemical sympathetic denervation. The results clearly demonstrate that the chronotropic effects of T. serrulatus are dependent on neurotransmitter release, but the inotropic effects are not. The neurotransmitter-independent increase in contractility seems to be a direct action of the venom on cardiomyocytes. We suggest that this direct effect on cardiac fibers may play a role in the development of cardiac arrhythmias and contractility defects following envenoming with T. serrulatus scorpion. PMID:11072050

  20. Coordinated vigilance provides evidence for direct reciprocity in coral reef fishes

    PubMed Central

    Brandl, Simon J.; Bellwood, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Reciprocity is frequently assumed to require complex cognitive abilities. Therefore, it has been argued that reciprocity may be restricted to animals that can meet these demands. Here, we provide evidence for the potential presence of direct reciprocity in teleost fishes. We demonstrate that in pairs of coral reef rabbitfishes (f. Siganidae), one fish frequently assumes an upright vigilance position in the water column, while the partner forages in small crevices in the reef substratum. Both behaviours are strongly coordinated and partners regularly alternate their positions, resulting in a balanced distribution of foraging activity. Compared to solitary individuals, fishes in pairs exhibit longer vigilance bouts, suggesting that the help provided to the partner is costly. In turn, fishes in pairs take more consecutive bites and penetrate deeper into crevices than solitary individuals, suggesting that the safety provided by a vigilant partner may outweigh initial costs by increasing foraging efficiency. Thus, the described system appears to meet all of the requirements for direct reciprocity. We argue that the nature of rabbitfish pairs provides favourable conditions for the establishment of direct reciprocity, as continuous interaction with the same partner, simultaneous needs, interdependence, and communication relax the cognitive demands of reciprocal cooperation. PMID:26403250

  1. Monomeric C-reactive protein inhibits renal cell-directed complement activation mediated by properdin.

    PubMed

    O'Flynn, Joseph; van der Pol, Pieter; Dixon, Karen O; Prohászka, Zoltán; Daha, Mohamed R; van Kooten, Cees

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that complement activation on renal tubular cells is involved in the induction of interstitial fibrosis and cellular injury. Evidence suggests that the tubular cell damage is initiated by the alternative pathway (AP) of complement with properdin having an instrumental role. Properdin is a positive regulator of the AP, which can bind necrotic cells as well as viable proximal tubular epithelial cells (PTECs), inducing complement activation. Various studies have indicated that in the circulation there is an unidentified inhibitor of properdin. We investigated the ability of C-reactive protein (CRP), both in its monomeric (mCRP) and pentameric (pCRP) form, to inhibit AP activation and injury in vitro on renal tubular cells by fluorescent microscopy, ELISA, and flow cytometry. We demonstrated that preincubation of properdin with normal human serum inhibits properdin binding to viable PTECs. We identified mCRP as a factor able to bind to properdin in solution, thereby inhibiting its binding to PTECs. In contrast, pCRP exhibited no such binding and inhibitory effect. Furthermore, mCRP was able to inhibit properdin-directed C3 and C5b-9 deposition on viable PTECs. The inhibitory ability of mCRP was not unique for viable cells but also demonstrated for binding to necrotic Jurkat cells, a target for properdin binding and complement activation. In summary, mCRP is an inhibitor of properdin in both binding to necrotic cells and viable renal cells, regulating complement activation on the cell surface. We propose that mCRP limits amplification of tissue injury by controlling properdin-directed complement activation by damaged tissue and cells. PMID:26984957

  2. Heading off with the herd: How cancer cells might maneuver supernumerary centrosomes for directional migration

    PubMed Central

    Ogden, Angela; Rida, Padmashree CG; Aneja, Ritu

    2012-01-01

    The complicity of centrosomes in carcinogenesis is unmistakable. Mounting evidence clearly implicates a robust correlation between centrosome amplification (CA) and malignant transformation in diverse tissue types. Furthermore, CA has been suggested as a marker of cancer aggressiveness, in particular the invasive phenotype, in breast and prostate cancers. One means by which CA promotes malignancy is through induction of transient spindle multipolarity during mitosis, which predisposes the cell to karyotypic changes arising from low-grade chromosome mis-segregation. It is well recognized that during cell migration in interphase, centrosome-mediated nucleation of a radial microtubule array is crucial for establishing a polarized Golgi apparatus, without which directionality is precluded. The question of how cancer cells maneuver their supernumerary centrosomes to achieve directionality during cell migration is virtually uncharted territory. Given CA is a hallmark of cancers and has been correlated with cancer aggressiveness, malignant cells are presumably competent in managing their centrosome surfeit during directional migration, although the cellular logistics of this process remain unexplored. Thus, another key angle worth pondering is whether an overabundance of centrosomes confers some advantage on cancer cells in terms of their migratory and invasive capabilities. Recent studies have uncovered a remarkable strategy that cancer cells employ to deal with the problem of excess centrosomes and ensure bipolar mitoses, viz., centrosome clustering. This review aims to change the narrative by exploring how an increased centrosome complement may, via aneuploidy-independent modulation of the microtubule cytoskeleton, enhance directional migration and invasion of malignant cells. We postulate that CA imbues cancer cells with cytoskeletal advantages that enhance cell polarization, Golgi-dependent vesicular trafficking, stromal invasion and other aspects of metastatic

  3. The differentiation directions of the bone marrow stromal cells under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesterenko, Olga; Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Within experiments on rats simulating microgravity by base load remove from back limbs (duration of the experiment 1,5 months) on marrow stromal cells cultures (ex vivo, in vitro) comprising osteogenic cells-predecessors, extracted from femurs, studied their peculiarities of the colony formation ablity, the cell structure, some cytological and ultra-structural characteristics and differentiation direction. It was found that that under microgravity conditions there is a decline of the stromal cells colony formation intensity, decrease of the colonies size and cells mitotic activity that indicates decrease of their growth potential. Both in control and in experiment the colonies were presented by population of low-differentiated cells, differentiated cells and mature cells. The comparative cytological and morphometric analysis have shown that the studied stromal cells in colonies have the smaller sizes, more elongated shape, and higher nucleocytoplasmic ratio. Cells composition in the experiment colonies is reliably different by the ratio of the low-differentiating to being differentiated cells; a ratio of low-differentiated to already differentiated cells; ratio of differentiated cells to total number of all cells. In comparison with control group, amount of the cells passed trough a differentiation stage and mature cells in colonies is decreased by 3 to 4 times. Among the differentiated stromal cells in colonies increasing amount of adipocytes was revealed. The analysis of electron microscope microphotographs showed that in osteogenic cells differentiated under microgravity conditions, there is a reduction of the specific volume of a granular endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi's complex and quantity of nuclei reduction that indicates depression of the specific biosyntheses process intensity in cells. The increase of lysosomes and myelinic structures quantity is linked to organelles partial reduction. Consolidation of mitochondrias is an evidence of the cells’ energy

  4. Engineered microtopographies and surface chemistries direct cell attachment and function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Chelsea Marie

    topographically modified surface (R2=0.82). Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels significantly reduced attachment and attachment strength of Navicula and C. marina. These hydrogels also reduced attachment of zoospores of Ulva compared to PDMSe. Attachment of Ulva to microtopographies in PDMSe and PEGDMA-co-HEMA negatively correlated with ERIII*Re (R2 = 0.94 and R2 = 0.99, respectively). Incorporating a surface energy term into this equation created a correlation between the attachment densities of cells from two evolutionarily diverse groups on substrates of two surface chemistries with an equation that describes the various microtopographies and surface chemistries in terms of surface energy (R2 = 0.80). The current Attachment Model can now be used to design engineered antifouling surface microtopographies and chemistries that inhibit the attachment of organisms from three evoluntionarily diverse groups. Hydrogels based on PEGDMA were also chosen as a substratum material for mammalian cell culture. Capturing endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and inducing differentiation into the endothelial cell (EC) phenotype is the ideal way to re-endothelialize a small-diameter vascular graft. Substratum elasticity has been reported to direct stem cell differentiation into specific lineages. Functionalized PEGDMA hydrogels provided good compliance, high fidelity of topographic features and sites for surface modification with biomolecules. Fibronectin grafting and topography both increased EC attachment. This combination of adjustable elasticity, surface chemistry and topography has the potential to promote the capture and differentiation of EPCs into a confluent EC monolayer. Engineered microtopographies replicated in PDMSe directed elongation and alignment of human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) and human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMCs) compared to smooth surfaces. Engineered cellular micro-environments were created with specific surface energies defined by chemistry

  5. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V.

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells. PMID:27082860

  6. RNA Directed Modulation of Phenotypic Plasticity in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Trakman, Laura; Hewson, Chris; Burdach, Jon; Morris, Kevin V

    2016-01-01

    Natural selective processes have been known to drive phenotypic plasticity, which is the emergence of different phenotypes from one genome following environmental stimulation. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been observed to modulate transcriptional and epigenetic states of genes in human cells. We surmised that lncRNAs are governors of phenotypic plasticity and drive natural selective processes through epigenetic modulation of gene expression. Using heat shocked human cells as a model we find several differentially expressed transcripts with the top candidates being lncRNAs derived from retro-elements. One particular retro-element derived transcripts, Retro-EIF2S2, was found to be abundantly over-expressed in heat shocked cells. Over-expression of Retro-EIF2S2 significantly enhanced cell viability and modulated a predisposition for an adherent cellular phenotype upon heat shock. Mechanistically, we find that this retro-element derived transcript interacts directly with a network of proteins including 40S ribosomal protein S30 (FAU), Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 5A (EIF5A), and Ubiquitin-60S ribosomal protein L40 (UBA52) to affect protein modulated cell adhesion pathways. We find one motif in Retro-EIF2S2 that exhibits binding to FAU and modulates phenotypic cell transitions from adherent to suspension states. The observations presented here suggest that retroviral derived transcripts actively modulate phenotypic plasticity in human cells in response to environmental selective pressures and suggest that natural selection may play out through the action of retro-elements in human cells. PMID:27082860

  7. Left-right asymmetric cell intercalation drives directional collective cell movement in epithelial morphogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Emi; Isomura, Ayako; Shibata, Tatsuo; Kuranaga, Erina

    2015-12-01

    Morphogenetic epithelial movement occurs during embryogenesis and drives complex tissue formation. However, how epithelial cells coordinate their unidirectional movement while maintaining epithelial integrity is unclear. Here we propose a novel mechanism for collective epithelial cell movement based on Drosophila genitalia rotation, in which epithelial tissue rotates clockwise around the genitalia. We found that this cell movement occurs autonomously and requires myosin II. The moving cells exhibit repeated left-right-biased junction remodelling, while maintaining adhesion with their neighbours, in association with a polarized myosin II distribution. Reducing myosinID, known to cause counter-clockwise epithelial-tissue movement, reverses the myosin II distribution. Numerical simulations revealed that a left-right asymmetry in cell intercalation is sufficient to induce unidirectional cellular movement. The cellular movement direction is also associated with planar cell-shape chirality. These findings support a model in which left-right asymmetric cell intercalation within an epithelial sheet drives collective cellular movement in the same direction.

  8. Coordinated Switching of Bacterial Flagellar Motors: Evidence for Direct Motor-Motor Coupling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bo; Tu, Yuhai

    2013-04-01

    The swimming of Escherichia coli is powered by its multiple flagellar motors. Each motor spins either clockwise or counterclockwise, under the control of an intracellular regulator, CheY-P. There can be two mechanisms (extrinsic and intrinsic) to coordinate the switching of bacterial motors. The extrinsic one arises from the fact that different motors in the same cell sense a common input (CheY-P) which fluctuates near the motors’ response threshold. An alternative, intrinsic mechanism is direct motor-motor coupling which makes synchronized switching energetically favorable. Here, we develop simple models for both mechanisms and uncover their different hallmarks. A quantitative comparison to the recent experiments suggests that the direct coupling mechanism may be accountable for the observed sharp correlation between motors in a single Escherichia coli. Possible origins of this coupling (e.g., hydrodynamic interaction) are discussed.

  9. Direct Visualization of HIV-1 with Correlative Live-Cell Microscopy and Cryo-Electron Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Sangmi; Ke, Danxia; Debiec, Karl; Zhao, Gongpu; Meng, Xin; Ambrose, Zandrea; Gibson, Gregory A.; Watkins, Simon C.; Zhang, Peijun

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryo-electron tomography (cryoET) allows 3D visualization of cellular structures at molecular resolution in a close-to-native state, and therefore has the potential to help elucidate early events of HIV-1 infection in host cells. However, direct observation of structural details of infecting HIV-1 has not been realized due to technological challenges in working with rare and dynamic HIV-1 particles in human cells. Here, we report structural analysis of HIV-1 and host-cell interactions by developing a correlative high-speed 3D live-cell imaging and cryoET method. Using this methodology, we showed, for the first time under near-native conditions, that intact hyperstable mutant HIV-1 cores are released into the cytoplasm of host-cells. We further obtained direct evidence to suggest that a hyperstable mutant capsid, E45A, delayed capsid disassembly compared to the wild-type capsid. Together, these results demonstrate the advantage of our correlative live-cell and cryoET approach to image dynamic processes, such as viral infection. PMID:22078557

  10. Efficient direct ZnO/CIS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Larry C.; William Addis, F.; Lei, Wenhua; Li, Jun

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes investigations of CIS solar cells with ZnO window layers deposited by MOCVD. These studies have been conducted with graded absorber CIS substrates obtained from Siemens Solar. Cell fabrication involves surface preparation of the Siemens substrate, growth of 200 to 400 Å of undoped ZnO by MOCVD, deposition of a highly conducting ZnO top contact layer and deposition of a Ni/Ag collector grid. MOCVD growth of ZnO is accomplished in a SPIRE 500XT reactor by reacting a zinc adduct and tetrahydrofuran. Processing development has been conducted by forming test cells on ZnO/CIS structures by depositing thin, transparent Al contacts 2.8 mm in diameter on top of the ZnO window layer to serve as contacts. Several cells have been completed with a total area efficiency ≥11.0%, with the best result being 11.3%. The best active area efficiency is approximately 12%. Other topics discussed include current-voltage characteristics of direct ZnO/CIS cells.

  11. Low Crossover Polymer Electrolyte Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prakash, G. K. Surya; Smart, Marshall; Atti, Anthony R.; Olah, George A.; Narayanan, S. R.; Valdez, T.; Surampudi, S.

    1996-01-01

    Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC's) using polymer electrolyte membranes are promising power sources for portable and vehicular applications. State of the art technology using Nafion(R) 117 membranes (Dupont) are limited by high methanol permeability and cost, resulting in reduced fuel cell efficiencies and impractical commercialization. Therefore, much research in the fuel cell field is focused on the preparation and testing of low crossover and cost efficient polymer electrolyte membranes. The University of Southern California in cooperation with the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is focused on development of such materials. Interpenetrating polymer networks are an effective method used to blend polymer systems without forming chemical links. They provide the ability to modify physical and chemical properties of polymers by optimizing blend compositions. We have developed a novel interpenetrating polymer network based on poly (vinyl - difluoride)/cross-linked polystyrenesulfonic acid polymer composites (PVDF PSSA). Sulfonation of polystyrene accounts for protonic conductivity while the non-polar, PVDF backbone provides structural integrity in addition to methanol rejection. Precursor materials were prepared and analyzed to characterize membrane crystallinity, stability and degree of interpenetration. USC JPL PVDF-PSSA membranes were also characterized to determine methanol permeability, protonic conductivity and sulfur distribution. Membranes were fabricated into membrane electrode assemblies (MEA) and tested for single cell performance. Tests include cell performance over a wide range of temperatures (20 C - 90 C) and cathode conditions (ambient Air/O2). Methanol crossover values are measured in situ using an in-line CO2 analyzer.

  12. Minimal second language exposure, SES, and early word comprehension: New evidence from a direct assessment*

    PubMed Central

    Deanda, Stephanie; Arias-Trejo, Natalia; Poulin-Dubois, Diane; Zesiger, Pascal; Friend, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Although the extant literature provides robust evidence of the influence of language exposure and socioeconomic status (SES) on language acquisition, it is unknown how sensitive the early receptive vocabulary system is to these factors. The current study investigates effects of minimal second language exposure and SES on the comprehension vocabulary of 16-month-old children in the language in which they receive the greatest exposure. Study 1 revealed minimal second language exposure and SES exert significant and independent effects on a direct measure of vocabulary comprehension in English-dominant and English monolingual children (N = 72). In Study 2, we replicated the effect of minimal second language exposure in Spanish-dominant and Spanish monolingual children (N = 86), however no effect of SES on vocabulary was obtained. Our results emphasize the sensitivity of the language system to minimal changes in the environment in early development. PMID:26957947

  13. Direct behavioral and neural evidence for an offset-triggered conscious perception.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Yasuki; Kimijima, Shintaro; Kakigi, Ryusuke

    2015-04-01

    Many previous theories of perceptual awareness assume that a conscious representation of a stimulus is created from sensory information carried by an onset (appearance) of the stimulus. In contrast, here we provide behavioral and neural evidence for a new phenomenon in which conscious perception is directly triggered by an offset (disappearance) of a stimulus. When a stimulus made invisible by inter-ocular suppression physically disappeared from a screen, subjects reported an appearance (not disappearance) of that stimulus, correctly reporting a color of the disappeared stimulus. Measurements of brain activity further confirmed that the physical offset of an invisible stimulus evoked neural activity reflecting conscious perception of that stimulus. Those results indicate a new role of a stimulus offset to facilitate (rather than inhibit) an emergence of consciousness. PMID:25725188

  14. Evidence for production of single top quarks and first direct measurement of |Vtb|.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Boos, E E; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Bunichev, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J M; Kalk, J R; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Monk, J; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero Y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Vetterli, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, C; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-05-01

    The D0 Collaboration presents first evidence for the production of single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron pp[over ] collider. Using a 0.9 fb(-1) dataset, we apply a multivariate analysis to separate signal from background and measure sigma(pp[over ]-->tb+X,tqb+X)=4.9+/-1.4 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of a signal is 0.035%, corresponding to a 3.4 standard deviation significance. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element that describes the Wtb coupling and find 0.68<|V(tb)|

  15. First direct evidence of a vertebrate three-level trophic chain in the fossil record.

    PubMed

    Kriwet, Jürgen; Witzmann, Florian; Klug, Stefanie; Heidtke, Ulrich H J

    2008-01-22

    We describe the first known occurrence of a Permian shark specimen preserving two temnospondyl amphibians in its digestive tract as well as the remains of an acanthodian fish, which was ingested by one of the temnospondyls. This exceptional find provides for the first time direct evidence of a vertebrate three-level food chain in the fossil record with the simultaneous preservation of three trophic levels. Our analysis shows that small-sized Lower Permian xenacanthid sharks of the genus Triodus preyed on larval piscivorous amphibians. The recorded trophic interaction can be explained by the adaptation of certain xenacanthids to fully freshwater environments and the fact that in these same environments, large temnospondyls occupied the niche of modern crocodiles. This unique faunal association has not been documented after the Permian and Triassic. Therefore, this Palaeozoic three-level food chain provides strong and independent support for changes in aquatic trophic chain structures through time. PMID:17971323

  16. Learning through EC directive based SEA in spatial planning? Evidence from the Brunswick Region in Germany

    SciTech Connect

    Fischer, Thomas B.; Kidd, Sue; Jha-Thakur, Urmila; Gazzola, Paola; Peel, Deborah

    2009-11-15

    This paper presents results of an international comparative research project, funded by the UK Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) and the Academy for Sustainable Communities (ASC) on the 'learning potential of appraisal (strategic environmental assessment - SEA) in spatial planning'. In this context, aspects of 'single-loop' and 'double-loop' learning, as well as of individual, organisational and social learning are discussed for emerging post-EC Directive German practice in the planning region (Zweckverband) of Brunswick (Braunschweig), focusing on four spatial plan SEAs from various administrative levels in the region. It is found that whilst SEA is able to lead to plan SEA specific knowledge acquisition, comprehension, application and analysis ('single-loop learning'), it is currently resulting only occasionally in wider synthesis and evaluation ('double-loop learning'). Furthermore, whilst there is evidence that individual and occasionally organisational learning may be enhanced through SEA, most notably in small municipalities, social learning appears to be happening only sporadically.

  17. Scanning probe acoustic microscopy of extruded starch materials: direct visual evidence of starch crystal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhongdong; Liu, Boxiang; Li, Mengxing; Wei, Min; Li, Hua; Liu, Peng; Wan, Tuo

    2013-10-15

    Scanning probe acoustic microscopy (SPAM) has been successfully used to study inorganic and keratin biomaterials. However, few studies have attempted to apply SPAM to structural study of non-keratin organic materials such as starch based materials. This study investigated hardness and surface finish to establish sample preparation method suitable for SPAM imaging and acquired clear acoustic images of extruded starch materials. Acquired acoustic images directly exhibited certain structure of starch materials and provided visual evidence of starch material components and aggregates. In addition, through correlating acoustic images with X-ray diffraction data, crystal-structural information in nano-scale was obtained and acoustic image contrast showed a linear relationship with starch amylose content in extruded starch materials. PMID:23987357

  18. Evidence for production of single top quarks and first direct measurement of |Vtb|

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; Alkhazov, G.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Rio de Janeiro State U. /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U.

    2006-12-01

    The D0 Collaboration presents first evidence for the production of single top quarks at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} collider. Using a 0.9 fb{sup -1} dataset, we apply a multivariate analysis to separate signal from background and measure {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.9 {+-} 1.4 pb. The probability to measure a cross section at this value or higher in the absence of signal is 0.035%, corresponding to a 3.4 standard deviation significance. We use the cross section measurement to directly determine the CKM matrix element that describes the W tb coupling and find 0.68 < |V{sub tb}| {le} 1 at 95% C.L.

  19. Evidence for Directly Driven Auroral Signatures Resulting from Interplanetary Pressure Pulses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, J. F., Jr.; Brittnacher, M. J.; Parks, G. K.; Germany, G. A.

    1999-01-01

    It has been observed that the auroral signature of the arrival of an interplanetary pressure pulse at the bow shock causes an initial brightening near noon. Consequently, the bright region propagates to the night side via the dawn and dusk flanks. The delay time for subsequent auroral breakup is observed to vary significantly from seconds to hours. We have examined the 1998 and early 1999 interplanetary pressure pulse events recorded by WIND and ACE (over 35 in all) and correlated these with the Polar UVI data for the events that are imaged. Evidence for directly driven auroral activity resulting from an interplanetary pressure pulse will be discussed as well as the variation of the delay time for auroral breakup.

  20. The permeability of reconstituted nuclear pores provides direct evidence for the selective phase model.

    PubMed

    Hülsmann, Bastian B; Labokha, Aksana A; Görlich, Dirk

    2012-08-17

    Nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) maintain a permeability barrier between the nucleus and the cytoplasm through FG-repeat-containing nucleoporins (Nups). We previously proposed a "selective phase model" in which the FG repeats interact with one another to form a sieve-like barrier that can be locally disrupted by the binding of nuclear transport receptors (NTRs), but not by inert macromolecules, allowing selective passage of NTRs and associated cargo. Here, we provide direct evidence for this model in a physiological context. By using NPCs reconstituted from Xenopus laevis egg extracts, we show that Nup98 is essential for maintaining the permeability barrier. Specifically, the multivalent cohesion between FG repeats is required, including cohesive FG repeats close to the anchorage point to the NPC scaffold. Our data exclude alternative models that are based solely on an interaction between the FG repeats and NTRs and indicate that the barrier is formed by a sieve-like FG hydrogel. PMID:22901806

  1. A novel membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Qingfeng; Chen, Qinghua; Yang, Zheng

    2015-12-01

    Membrane-less fuel cell possesses such advantages as simplified design and lower cost. In this paper, a membrane-less direct alcohol fuel cell is constructed by using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) supported Pd and ternary PdSnNi composites as the anode catalysts and Fe/C-PANI composite, produced by direct pyrolysis of Fe-doped polyaniline precursor, as the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) catalyst. The alcohols investigated in the present study are methanol, ethanol, n-propanol, iso-propanol, n-butanol, iso-butanol and sec-butanol. The cathode catalyst Fe/C-PANI is electrochemically inactive to oxidation of the alcohols. The performance of the cell with various alcohols in 1 mol L-1 NaOH solution on either Pd/MWCNT or PdSnNi/MWCNT catalyst has been evaluated. In any case, the performance of the cell using the anode catalyst PdSnNi/MWCNT is considerably better than Pd/MWCNT. For the PdSnNi/MWCNT, the maximum power densities of the cell using methanol (0.5 mol L-1), ethanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), iso-propanol (0.5 mol L-1), n-butanol (0.2 mol L-1), iso-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) and sec-butanol (0.2 mol L-1) are 0.34, 1.03, 1.07, 0.44, 0.50, 0.31 and 0.15 mW cm-2, respectively.

  2. Direct and Indirect Evidence of Size-Selective Grazing on Pelagic Bacteria by Freshwater Nanoflagellates

    PubMed Central

    Šimek, Karel; Chrzanowski, Thomas H.

    1992-01-01

    Size-selective grazing of three heterotrophic nanoflagellates (with cell sizes of 21, 44, and 66 μm3) isolated from Lake Arlington, Texas was examined by using a natural mixture of fluorescence labelled lake bacteria. Sizes of ingested bacteria in food vacuoles were directly measured. Larger bacterial cells were ingested at a frequency much higher than that at which they occurred in the assemblage, indicating preferential flagellate grazing on the larger size classes within the lake bacterioplankton. Water samples were collected biweekly from June through September, 1989, fractionated by filtration, and incubated for 40 h at in situ temperatures. The average bacterial size was always larger in water which was passed through 1-μm-pore-size filters (1-μm-filtered water) (which was predator free) than in 5-μm-filtered water (which contained flagellates only) or in unfiltered water (in which all bacterivores were present). The increase of bacterial-cell size in 1-μm-filtered water was caused by a shift in the size structure of the bacterioplankton population. Larger cells became more abundant in the absence of flagellate grazing. PMID:16348811

  3. Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Carlstrom, Charles, M., Jr.

    2009-07-07

    This report is the final technical report for DOE Program DE-FC36-04GO14301 titled “Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Prototype Demonstration for Consumer Electronics Applications”. Due to the public nature of this report some of the content reported in confidential reports and meetings to the DOE is not covered in detail in this report and some of the content has been normalized to not show actual values. There is a comparison of the projects accomplishments with the objectives, an overview of some of the key subsystem work, and a review of the three levels of prototypes demonstrated during the program. There is also a description of the eventual commercial product and market this work is leading towards. The work completed under this program has significantly increased the understanding of how Direct Methanol Fuel Cells (DMFC) can be deployed successfully to power consumer electronic devices. The prototype testing has demonstrated the benefits a direct methanol fuel cell system has over batteries typically used for powering consumer electronic devices. Three generations of prototypes have been developed and tested for performance, robustness and life. The technologies researched and utilized in the fuel cell stack and related subsystems for these prototypes are leveraged from advances in other industries such as the hydrogen fueled PEM fuel cell industry. The work under this program advanced the state of the art of direct methanol fuel cells. The system developed by MTI micro fuel cells aided by this program differs significantly from conventional DMFC designs and offers compelling advantages in the areas of performance, life, size, and simplicity. The program has progressed as planned resulting in the completion of the scope of work and available funding in December 2008. All 18 of the final P3 prototypes builds have been tested and the results showed significant improvements over P2 prototypes in build yield, initial performance, and durability. The systems have

  4. NMDA Receptors Multiplicatively Scale Visual Signals and Enhance Directional Motion Discrimination in Retinal Ganglion Cells.

    PubMed

    Poleg-Polsky, Alon; Diamond, Jeffrey S

    2016-03-16

    Postsynaptic responses in many CNS neurons are typically small and variable, often making it difficult to distinguish physiologically relevant signals from background noise. To extract salient information, neurons are thought to integrate multiple synaptic inputs and/or selectively amplify specific synaptic activation patterns. Here, we present evidence for a third strategy: directionally selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) in the mouse retina multiplicatively scale visual signals via a mechanism that requires both nonlinear NMDA receptor (NMDAR) conductances in DSGC dendrites and directionally tuned inhibition provided by the upstream retinal circuitry. Postsynaptic multiplication enables DSGCs to discriminate visual motion more accurately in noisy visual conditions without compromising directional tuning. These findings demonstrate a novel role for NMDARs in synaptic processing and provide new insights into how synaptic and network features interact to accomplish physiologically relevant neural computations. PMID:26948896

  5. Coping strategies and immune neglect in affective forecasting: Direct evidence and key moderators

    PubMed Central

    Hoerger, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Affective forecasting skills have important implications for decision making. However, recent research suggests that immune neglect – the tendency to overlook coping strategies that reduce future distress – may lead to affective forecasting problems. Prior evidence for immune neglect has been indirect. More direct evidence and a deeper understanding of immune neglect are vital to informing the design of future decision-support interventions. In the current study, young adults (N = 325) supplied predicted, actual, and recollected reactions to an emotionally-evocative interpersonal event, Valentine’s Day. Based on participants’ qualitative descriptions of the holiday, a team of raters reliably coded the effectiveness of their coping strategies. Supporting the immune neglect hypothesis, participants overlooked the powerful role of coping strategies when predicting their emotional reactions. Immune neglect was present not only for those experiencing the holiday negatively (non-daters) but also for those experiencing it positively (daters), suggesting that the bias may be more robust than originally theorized. Immune neglect was greater for immediate emotional reactions than more enduring reactions. Further, immune neglect was conspicuously absent from recollected emotional reactions. Implications for decision-support interventions are discussed. PMID:22375161

  6. The direction of word stress processing in German: evidence from a working memory paradigm.

    PubMed

    Domahs, Frank; Grande, Marion; Huber, Walter; Domahs, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    There are contradicting assumptions and findings on the direction of word stress processing in German. To resolve this question, we asked participants to read tri-syllabic non-words and stress ambiguous words aloud. Additionally, they also performed a working memory (WM) task (2-back task). In non-word reading, participants' individual WM capacity was positively correlated with assignment of main stress to the antepenultimate syllable, which is most distant to the word's right edge, while a (complementary) negative correlation was observed with assignment of stress to the ultimate syllable. There was no significant correlation between WM capacity and stress assignment to the penultimate syllable, which has been claimed to be the default stress pattern in German. In reading stress ambiguous words, a similar but non-significant pattern was observed as in non-word reading. In sum, our results provide first psycholinguistic evidence supporting leftward stress processing in German. Our results do not lend support to the assumption of penultimate default stress in German. A specification of the lemma model is proposed which seems able to reconcile our findings and apparently contradicting assumptions and evidence. PMID:24966845

  7. Direct evidence and generation conditions of triggered slow slip event by teleseismic surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itaba, S.; Ando, R.; Takeda, N.

    2011-12-01

    In recent years slow slip events (SSE) have been observed to occur at regular intervals on the deep portions of subduction zone interfaces. There are many evidence of triggered tremor with only transient excitation by the passage of seismic waves from distant earthquakes, however SSEs, which are much larger in sizes and continue longer after the transient excitation, have been yet to be identified. Here we found, for the first time, robust and direct geodetic evidence of an interplate SSE with tremor activity in southwest Japan triggered by an earthquake in strain records from our highly sensitive strainmeter network. This SSE, in southwest Japan, which had an equivalent magnitude Mw 5.3 and duration of 1.5 days, was triggered by the surface waves of a Mw 7.6 earthquake in Tonga. The triggered SSE occurred on a place on the plate interface where the recurrence time for such events had almost expired, whereas other regions, at up to 90% of the recurrence time, were not triggered. Therefore, it is suggested that the overall segment of the triggered SSE had been necessarily very close to the critical stress level due to tectonic loading, and the seismic wave gave only the last push. Our results provide physical constraints to elucidate how earthquakes start and growth not only for the slow earthquakes but also for regular earthquakes.

  8. Direct evidence of quantum transport in photosynthetic light-harvesting complexes.

    PubMed

    Panitchayangkoon, Gitt; Voronine, Dmitri V; Abramavicius, Darius; Caram, Justin R; Lewis, Nicholas H C; Mukamel, Shaul; Engel, Gregory S

    2011-12-27

    The photosynthetic light-harvesting apparatus moves energy from absorbed photons to the reaction center with remarkable quantum efficiency. Recently, long-lived quantum coherence has been proposed to influence efficiency and robustness of photosynthetic energy transfer in light-harvesting antennae. The quantum aspect of these dynamics has generated great interest both because of the possibility for efficient long-range energy transfer and because biology is typically considered to operate entirely in the classical regime. Yet, experiments to date show only that coherence persists long enough that it can influence dynamics, but they have not directly shown that coherence does influence energy transfer. Here, we provide experimental evidence that interaction between the bacteriochlorophyll chromophores and the protein environment surrounding them not only prolongs quantum coherence, but also spawns reversible, oscillatory energy transfer among excited states. Using two-dimensional electronic spectroscopy, we observe oscillatory excited-state populations demonstrating that quantum transport of energy occurs in biological systems. The observed population oscillation suggests that these light-harvesting antennae trade energy reversibly between the protein and the chromophores. Resolving design principles evident in this biological antenna could provide inspiration for new solar energy applications. PMID:22167798

  9. The direction of word stress processing in German: evidence from a working memory paradigm

    PubMed Central

    Domahs, Frank; Grande, Marion; Huber, Walter; Domahs, Ulrike

    2014-01-01

    There are contradicting assumptions and findings on the direction of word stress processing in German. To resolve this question, we asked participants to read tri-syllabic non-words and stress ambiguous words aloud. Additionally, they also performed a working memory (WM) task (2-back task). In non-word reading, participants’ individual WM capacity was positively correlated with assignment of main stress to the antepenultimate syllable, which is most distant to the word’s right edge, while a (complementary) negative correlation was observed with assignment of stress to the ultimate syllable. There was no significant correlation between WM capacity and stress assignment to the penultimate syllable, which has been claimed to be the default stress pattern in German. In reading stress ambiguous words, a similar but non-significant pattern was observed as in non-word reading. In sum, our results provide first psycholinguistic evidence supporting leftward stress processing in German. Our results do not lend support to the assumption of penultimate default stress in German. A specification of the lemma model is proposed which seems able to reconcile our findings and apparently contradicting assumptions and evidence. PMID:24966845

  10. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W.; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R.; Basta, Lena P.; Kyburz, Kyle A.; Anseth, Kristi S.

    2016-01-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  11. Spatially patterned matrix elasticity directs stem cell fate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun; DelRio, Frank W; Ma, Hao; Killaars, Anouk R; Basta, Lena P; Kyburz, Kyle A; Anseth, Kristi S

    2016-08-01

    There is a growing appreciation for the functional role of matrix mechanics in regulating stem cell self-renewal and differentiation processes. However, it is largely unknown how subcellular, spatial mechanical variations in the local extracellular environment mediate intracellular signal transduction and direct cell fate. Here, the effect of spatial distribution, magnitude, and organization of subcellular matrix mechanical properties on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) function was investigated. Exploiting a photodegradation reaction, a hydrogel cell culture substrate was fabricated with regions of spatially varied and distinct mechanical properties, which were subsequently mapped and quantified by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The variations in the underlying matrix mechanics were found to regulate cellular adhesion and transcriptional events. Highly spread, elongated morphologies and higher Yes-associated protein (YAP) activation were observed in hMSCs seeded on hydrogels with higher concentrations of stiff regions in a dose-dependent manner. However, when the spatial organization of the mechanically stiff regions was altered from a regular to randomized pattern, lower levels of YAP activation with smaller and more rounded cell morphologies were induced in hMSCs. We infer from these results that irregular, disorganized variations in matrix mechanics, compared with regular patterns, appear to disrupt actin organization, and lead to different cell fates; this was verified by observations of lower alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and higher expression of CD105, a stem cell marker, in hMSCs in random versus regular patterns of mechanical properties. Collectively, this material platform has allowed innovative experiments to elucidate a novel spatial mechanical dosing mechanism that correlates to both the magnitude and organization of spatial stiffness. PMID:27436901

  12. Direct Measurement of Helical Cell Motion of the Spirochete Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Shuichi; Leshansky, Alexander; Magariyama, Yukio; Namba, Keiichi; Kudo, Seishi

    2014-01-01

    Leptospira are spirochete bacteria distinguished by a short-pitch coiled body and intracellular flagella. Leptospira cells swim in liquid with an asymmetric morphology of the cell body; the anterior end has a long-pitch spiral shape (S-end) and the posterior end is hook-shaped (H-end). Although the S-end and the coiled cell body called the protoplasmic cylinder are thought to be responsible for propulsion together, most observations on the motion mechanism have remained qualitative. In this study, we analyzed the swimming speed and rotation rate of the S-end, protoplasmic cylinder, and H-end of individual Leptospira cells by one-sided dark-field microscopy. At various viscosities of media containing different concentrations of Ficoll, the rotation rate of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed a clear correlation with the swimming speed, suggesting that these two helical parts play a central role in the motion of Leptospira. In contrast, the H-end rotation rate was unstable and showed much less correlation with the swimming speed. Forces produced by the rotation of the S-end and protoplasmic cylinder showed that these two helical parts contribute to propulsion at nearly equal magnitude. Torque generated by each part, also obtained from experimental motion parameters, indicated that the flagellar motor can generate torque >4000 pN nm, twice as large as that of Escherichia coli. Furthermore, the S-end torque was found to show a markedly larger fluctuation than the protoplasmic cylinder torque, suggesting that the unstable H-end rotation might be mechanically related to changes in the S-end rotation rate for torque balance of the entire cell. Variations in torque at the anterior and posterior ends of the Leptospira cell body could be transmitted from one end to the other through the cell body to coordinate the morphological transformations of the two ends for a rapid change in the swimming direction. PMID:24411236

  13. Thyroid tumor-initiating cells: Increasing evidence and opportunities for anticancer therapy (Review)

    PubMed Central

    GAO, YONG-JU; LI, BO; WU, XIN-YU; CUI, JING; HAN, JIAN-KUI

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence supports the notion that thyroid cancer is initiated by tumor-initiating cells (TICs) (commonly known as cancer stem cells), which are thought to play a crucial role in malignant progression, therapeutic resistance and recurrence. Thyroid TICs have been isolated and identified using specific biomarkers (such as CD133), the side population, sphere formation and aldehyde dehydrogenase activity assays. Although their characteristics remain largely unknown, TICs provide an attractive cellular mechanism to explain therapeutic refractoriness. Efforts are currently being directed toward the identification of therapeutic strategies that could target these cells. The present review discusses the cellular origins of TICs and the main approaches used to isolate and identify thyroid TICs, with a focus on the remaining challenges and opportunities for anticancer therapy. PMID:24424445

  14. Direct evidence of dust growth in L183 from mid-infrared light scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, J.; Pagani, L.; Bacmann, A.; Guieu, S.

    2010-02-01

    Context. Theoretical arguments suggest that dust grains should grow in the dense cold parts of molecular clouds. Evidence of larger grains has so far been gathered in near/mid infrared extinction and millimeter observations. Interpreting the data is, however, aggravated by the complex interplay of density and dust properties (as well as temperature for thermal emission). Aims: Direct evidence of larger particles can be derived from scattered mid-infrared (MIR) radiation from a molecular cloud observed in a spectral range where little or no emission from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is expected. Methods: We present new Spitzer data of L183 in bands that are sensitive and insensitive to PAHs. The visual extinction AV map derived in a former paper was fitted by a series of 3D Gaussian distributions. For different dust models, we calculate the scattered MIR radiation images of structures that agree with the AV map and compare them to the Spitzer data. Results: The Spitzer data of L183 show emission in the 3.6 and 4.5 μm bands, while the 5.8 μm band shows slight absorption. The emission layer of stochastically heated particles should coincide with the layer of strongest scattering of optical interstellar radiation, which is seen as an outer surface on I band images different from the emission region seen in the Spitzer images. Moreover, PAH emission is expected to strongly increase from 4.5 to 5.8 μm, which is not seen. Hence, we interpret this emission to be MIR scattered light from grains located further inside the core, and call it "coreshine". Scattered light modeling when assuming interstellar medium dust grains without growth does not reproduce flux measurable by Spitzer. In contrast, models with grains growing with density yield images with a flux and pattern comparable to the Spitzer images in the bands 3.6, 4.5, and 8.0 μm. Conclusions: There is direct evidence of dust grain growth in the inner part of L183 from the scattered light MIR images

  15. Nanotopography guides and directs cell migration in amoeboid and epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Rachel; Das, Satarupa; Hourwitz, Matthew; Sun, Xiaoyu; Parent, Carole; Fourkas, John; Losert, Wolfgang

    Cell migration plays a critical role in development, angiogenesis, immune response, wound healing, and cancer metastasis. In many cases, cells also move in the context of a matrix of collagen fibers, and the alignment of these fibers can both affect the migration phenotype and guide cells. Here we show that both fast and slow migrating cells - amoeboid HL-60 and epithelial MCF10A - are affected in similar ways by micro/nanostructures with dimensions similar to those of collagen fibers. Cell alignment enhances the efficiency of migration by increasing directional persistence.

  16. Direct Evidence of EMIC-Driven Electron Loss in Space: Evaluation of an Electron Dropout Event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, X.; Li, W.; Ma, Q.; Thorne, R. M.; Angelopoulos, V.

    2015-12-01

    Electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves have been proposed as a mechanism to cause efficient losses of highly relativistic (>MeV) electrons via gyroresonant interactions. However, simultaneous observations of EMIC waves and equatorial electron pitch angle distributions, which can be used to directly quantify the EMIC wave scattering effect, are still very limited. In the present study, we evaluate the effect of EMIC waves on the pitch angle scattering of relativistic and ultrarelativistic (0.5-5 MeV) electrons during the main phase of a geomagnetic storm, when intense EMIC wave activity was observed in situ (in the plasma plume region with high plasma density) on both the Van Allen Probes and one of the THEMIS probes. EMIC waves captured on the ground across the Canadian Array for Real-time Investigations of Magnetic Activity (CARISMA) and enhanced precipitation of >~0.7 MeV electrons captured by POES are used to infer the MLT coverage of EMIC waves. Based on the observed EMIC wave spectra, local fpe and fce, we estimate the wave diffusion rates and model the evolution of electron pitch angle distributions. By comparing the modeled results with local observations of pitch angle distributions, for the first time, we are able to show direct, quantitative evidence of EMIC wave-driven relativistic electron loss in the Earth's outer radiation belt.

  17. Direct Evidence of the Transition from Weak to Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien; Kiyani, Khurom H.

    2016-03-01

    One of the most important predictions in magnetohydrodynamics is that in the presence of a uniform magnetic field b0e^∥ a transition from weak to strong wave turbulence should occur when going from large to small perpendicular scales. This transition is believed to be a universal property of several anisotropic turbulent systems. We present, for the first time, direct evidence of such a transition using a decaying three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of incompressible balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a grid resolution of 30722×256 . From large to small scales, the change of regime is characterized by (i) a change of slope in the energy spectrum going from approximately -2 to -3 /2 , (ii) an increase of the ratio between the wave and nonlinear times, with a critical ratio of χc˜1 /3 , (iii) a modification of the isocontours of energy revealing a transition from a purely perpendicular cascade to a cascade compatible with the critical-balance-type phenomenology, and (iv) an absence followed by a dramatic increase of the communication between Alfvén modes. The changes happen at approximately the same transition scale and can be seen as manifest signatures of the transition from weak to strong wave turbulence. Furthermore, we observe a significant nonlocal three-wave coupling between strongly and weakly nonlinear modes resulting in an inverse transfer of energy from small to large scales.

  18. Evidence for direct geographic influences on linguistic sounds: the case of ejectives.

    PubMed

    Everett, Caleb

    2013-01-01

    We present evidence that the geographic context in which a language is spoken may directly impact its phonological form. We examined the geographic coordinates and elevations of 567 language locations represented in a worldwide phonetic database. Languages with phonemic ejective consonants were found to occur closer to inhabitable regions of high elevation, when contrasted to languages without this class of sounds. In addition, the mean and median elevations of the locations of languages with ejectives were found to be comparatively high. The patterns uncovered surface on all major world landmasses, and are not the result of the influence of particular language families. They reflect a significant and positive worldwide correlation between elevation and the likelihood that a language employs ejective phonemes. In addition to documenting this correlation in detail, we offer two plausible motivations for its existence. We suggest that ejective sounds might be facilitated at higher elevations due to the associated decrease in ambient air pressure, which reduces the physiological effort required for the compression of air in the pharyngeal cavity--a unique articulatory component of ejective sounds. In addition, we hypothesize that ejective sounds may help to mitigate rates of water vapor loss through exhaled air. These explications demonstrate how a reduction of ambient air density could promote the usage of ejective phonemes in a given language. Our results reveal the direct influence of a geographic factor on the basic sound inventories of human languages. PMID:23776463

  19. Direct evidence for impact winter following the Cretaceous-Paleogene bolide impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellekoop, J.; Sluijs, A.; Smit, J.; Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damsté, J. S.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-12-01

    The Cretaceous/Paleogene (K/Pg) boundary, ~65.5 Ma, marks a mass-extinction event related the impact of a large asteroid on the Yucatan peninsula, Mexico. Model scenarios predict that the explosive injection of dust and sulfate aerosols into the stratosphere blocked incoming solar radiation, resulting in a cooling pulse of months to several decades, a so-called 'impact winter', but thus far, proxy records lack sufficient resolution to evaluate this hypothesis. We report on a major, short-lived drop in sea surface temperatures (SSTs) recorded in an unusually well preserved and stratigraphically expanded K/Pg boundary site in Texas, USA, based on TEX86 paleothermometry. Critically, the cooling directly post-dates impact-related tsunami deposits, and coincides with the deposition of extraterrestrial iridium representing aerosol fall out, restricting the age of the cooling to the first months to decades after impact. We interpret this cooling to reflect the first direct evidence for the "impact winter" at the K/Pg boundary. The combination of darkness and cooling must have been a key contributory element in the extinctions of many biological clades, including the dinosaurs, flying reptiles and marine reptiles.

  20. Alarm system management: evidence-based guidance encouraging direct measurement of informativeness to improve alarm response.

    PubMed

    Rayo, Michael F; Moffatt-Bruce, Susan D

    2015-04-01

    Although there are powerful incentives for creating alarm management programmes to reduce 'alarm fatigue', they do not provide guidance on how to reduce the likelihood that clinicians will disregard critical alarms. The literature cites numerous phenomena that contribute to alarm fatigue, although many of these, including total rate of alarms, are not supported in the literature as factors that directly impact alarm response. The contributor that is most frequently associated with alarm response is informativeness, which is defined as the proportion of total alarms that successfully conveys a specific event, and the extent to which it is a hazard. Informativeness is low across all healthcare applications, consistently ranging from 1% to 20%. Because of its likelihood and strong evidential support, informativeness should be evaluated before other contributors are considered. Methods for measuring informativeness and alarm response are discussed. Design directions for potential interventions, as well as design alternatives to traditional alarms, are also discussed. With the increased attention and investment in alarm system management that alarm interventions are currently receiving, initiatives that focus on informativeness and the other evidence-based measures identified will allow us to more effectively, efficiently and reliably redirect clinician attention, ultimately improving alarm response. PMID:25734193

  1. Direct evidence of strong local ferroelectric ordering in a thermoelectric semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Aggarwal, Leena; Sekhon, Jagmeet S.; Arora, Ashima; Sheet, Goutam; Guin, Satya N.; Negi, Devendra S.; Datta, Ranjan; Biswas, Kanishka

    2014-09-15

    It is thought that the proposed new family of multi-functional materials, namely, the ferroelectric thermoelectrics may exhibit enhanced functionalities due to the coupling of the thermoelectric parameters with ferroelectric polarization in solids. Therefore, the ferroelectric thermoelectrics are expected to be of immense technological and fundamental significance. As a first step towards this direction, it is most important to identify the existing high performance thermoelectric materials exhibiting ferroelectricity. Herein, through the direct measurement of local polarization switching, we show that the recently discovered thermoelectric semiconductor AgSbSe{sub 2} has local ferroelectric ordering. Using piezo-response force microscopy, we demonstrate the existence of nanometer scale ferroelectric domains that can be switched by external electric field. These observations are intriguing as AgSbSe{sub 2} crystalizes in cubic rock-salt structure with centro-symmetric space group (Fm–3m), and therefore, no ferroelectricity is expected. However, from high resolution transmission electron microscopy measurement, we found the evidence of local superstructure formation which, we believe, leads to local distortion of the centro-symmetric arrangement in AgSbSe{sub 2} and gives rise to the observed ferroelectricity. Stereochemically active 5S{sup 2} lone-pair of Sb may also give rise to local structural distortion thereby creating ferroelectricity in AgSbSe{sub 2}.

  2. Direct Evidence of the Transition from Weak to Strong Magnetohydrodynamic Turbulence.

    PubMed

    Meyrand, Romain; Galtier, Sébastien; Kiyani, Khurom H

    2016-03-11

    One of the most important predictions in magnetohydrodynamics is that in the presence of a uniform magnetic field b_{0}e[over ^]_{∥} a transition from weak to strong wave turbulence should occur when going from large to small perpendicular scales. This transition is believed to be a universal property of several anisotropic turbulent systems. We present, for the first time, direct evidence of such a transition using a decaying three-dimensional direct numerical simulation of incompressible balanced magnetohydrodynamic turbulence with a grid resolution of 3072^{2}×256. From large to small scales, the change of regime is characterized by (i) a change of slope in the energy spectrum going from approximately -2 to -3/2, (ii) an increase of the ratio between the wave and nonlinear times, with a critical ratio of χ_{c}∼1/3, (iii) a modification of the isocontours of energy revealing a transition from a purely perpendicular cascade to a cascade compatible with the critical-balance-type phenomenology, and (iv) an absence followed by a dramatic increase of the communication between Alfvén modes. The changes happen at approximately the same transition scale and can be seen as manifest signatures of the transition from weak to strong wave turbulence. Furthermore, we observe a significant nonlocal three-wave coupling between strongly and weakly nonlinear modes resulting in an inverse transfer of energy from small to large scales. PMID:27015486

  3. Evidence of a Direct Evolutionary Selection for Strong Folding and Mutational Robustness Within HIV Coding Regions.

    PubMed

    Goz, Eli; Tuller, Tamir

    2016-08-01

    A large number of studies demonstrated the importance of different HIV RNA structural elements at all stages of the viral life cycle. Nevertheless, the significance of many of these structures is unknown, and plausibly new regions containing RNA structure-mediated regulatory signals remain to be identified. An important characteristic of genomic regions carrying functionally significant secondary structures is their mutational robustness, that is, the extent to which a sequence remains constant in spite of despite mutations in terms of its underlying secondary structure. Structural robustness to mutations is expected to be important in the case of functional RNA structures in viruses with high mutation rate; it may prevent fitness loss due to disruption of possibly functional conformations, pointing to the specific significance of the corresponding genomic region. In the current work, we perform a genome-wide computational analysis to detect signals of a direct evolutionary selection for strong folding and RNA structure-based mutational robustness within HIV coding sequences. We provide evidence that specific regions of HIV structural genes undergo an evolutionary selection for strong folding; in addition, we demonstrate that HIV Rev responsive element seems to undergo a direct evolutionary selection for increased secondary structure robustness to point mutations. We believe that our analysis may enable a better understanding of viral evolutionary dynamics at the RNA structural level and may benefit to practical efforts of engineering antiviral vaccines and novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27347769

  4. No evidence for directional evolution of body mass in herbivorous theropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Zanno, Lindsay E; Makovicky, Peter J

    2013-01-22

    The correlation between large body size and digestive efficiency has been hypothesized to have driven trends of increasing mass in herbivorous clades by means of directional selection. Yet, to date, few studies have investigated this relationship from a phylogenetic perspective, and none, to our knowledge, with regard to trophic shifts. Here, we reconstruct body mass in the three major subclades of non-avian theropod dinosaurs whose ecomorphology is correlated with extrinsic evidence of at least facultative herbivory in the fossil record--all of which also achieve relative gigantism (more than 3000 kg). Ordinary least-squares regressions on natural log-transformed mean mass recover significant correlations between increasing mass and geological time. However, tests for directional evolution in body mass find no support for a phylogenetic trend, instead favouring passive models of trait evolution. Cross-correlation of sympatric taxa from five localities in Asia reveals that environmental influences such as differential habitat sampling and/or taphonomic filtering affect the preserved record of dinosaurian body mass in the Cretaceous. Our results are congruent with studies documenting that behavioural and/or ecological factors may mitigate the benefit of increasing mass in extant taxa, and suggest that the hypothesis can be extrapolated to herbivorous lineages across geological time scales. PMID:23193135

  5. Direct evidence for distance measurement via flexible stride integration in the fiddler crab.

    PubMed

    Walls, Michael L; Layne, John E

    2009-01-13

    While on foraging excursions, fiddler crabs track their burrow location despite having no visual contact with it . They do this by path integration, a common navigational process in which motion vectors (the direction and distance of animals' movements) are summed to form a single "home vector" linking the current location with the point of origin. Here, we identify the mechanism by which the integrator measures distance, by decoupling motor output from both inertial and visual feedback. Fiddler crabs were passively translated to a position such that the home vector lay across an acetate sheet on the ground. After being frightened, crabs tried to escape but slipped as they did so. Detailed high-speed video analysis reveals that crabs measure distance by integrating strides, rather than linear acceleration or optic flow: the number of steps they took depended on both the length of the home vector and how large their steps were, whether they slipped and fell short or not. This is the most direct evidence to date of a stride integrator that is flexible enough to account for significant variation in stride length and frequency. PMID:19110426

  6. Novel Materials for High Efficiency Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Carson, Stephen; Mountz, David; He, Wensheng; Zhang, Tao

    2013-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cell membranes were developed using blends of different polyelectrolytes with PVDF. The membranes showed complex relationships between polyelectrolyte chemistry, morphology, and processing. Although the PVDF grade was found to have little effect on the membrane permselectivity, it does impact membrane conductivity and methanol permeation values. Other factors, such as varying the polyelectrolyte polarity, using varying crosslinking agents, and adjusting the equivalent weight of the membranes impacted methanol permeation, permselectivity, and areal resistance. We now understand, within the scope of the project work completed, how these inter-related performance properties can be tailored to achieve a balance of performance.

  7. A reusable mold in directional solidification for silicon solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, T.; Shimura, A.; Ichikawa, S.

    1983-12-01

    Directional solidification of silicon was achieved by using a SiC coated carbon mold together with Si3N4 powder mold releasing agent. Crack-free polycrystalline silicon ingots were able to be extracted easily out of the mold. The mold was easily able to withstand more than 12 utilizations. Silicon ingot impurity contents were less than 3 ppm and the average polycrystalline grain diameter was 0.8 mm. Solar cells made of this material gave an AM1 maximum conversion of 10.8 deg.

  8. Micro-crack formation in direct methanol fuel cell electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qing; Spernjak, Dusan; Zelenay, Piotr; Kim, Yu Seung

    2014-12-01

    This study focuses on the micro-crack formation of Nafion®-based membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) after extended direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) operation. All electrodes, both with metal-black and carbon-supported catalysts, contain some micro-cracks initially; the area covered by these cracks increases both in the anode and cathode after 100-hours of DMFC test. X-ray tomography shows an increase in the crack area in both anode and cathode that correlates with methanol feed concentration and methanol crossover. The MEAs with carbon-supported catalysts and thicker membrane are more resistant to the formation of micro-cracks compared to those with metal-black catalysts and thinner membrane, respectively. The impact of the micro-crack formation on cell performance and durability is limited over the 100-hour DMFC operation, with the long-term impact remaining unknown.

  9. Starting characteristics of direct current motors powered by solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singer, S.; Appelbaum, J.

    1989-01-01

    Direct current motors are used in photovoltaic systems. Important characteristics of electric motors are the starting to rated current and torque ratios. These ratios are dictated by the size of the solar cell array and are different for the various dc motor types. Discussed here is the calculation of the starting to rated current ratio and starting to rated torque ratio of the permanent magnet, and series and shunt excited motors when powered by solar cells for two cases: with and without a maximum-power-point-tracker (MPPT) included in the system. Comparing these two cases, one gets a torque magnification of about 3 for the permanent magnet motor and about 7 for other motor types. The calculation of the torques may assist the PV system designer to determine whether or not to include an MPPT in the system.

  10. Progress toward cell-directed therapy for phenylketonuria.

    PubMed

    Harding, Co

    2008-08-01

    Phenylketonuria (PKU) is one of the most common inborn errors of metabolism with an annual incidence of approximately 1:16,000 live births in North America. Contemporary therapy relies upon lifelong dietary protein restriction and supplementation with phenylalanine-free medical foods. This therapy is expensive and unpalatable; dietary compliance is difficult to maintain throughout life. Non-adherence to the diet is associated with learning disabilities, adult-onset neurodegenerative disease, and maternal PKU syndrome. The fervent dream of many individuals with PKU is a more permanent cure for this disease. This paper will review ongoing efforts to develop viable cell-directed therapies, in particular cell transplantation and gene therapy, for the treatment of PKU. PMID:18498375

  11. Direct determination of phosphatase activity from physiological substrates in cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Zhongyuan; Do, Le Duy; Bechkoff, Géraldine; Mebarek, Saida; Keloglu, Nermin; Ahamada, Saandia; Meena, Saurabh; Magne, David; Pikula, Slawomir; Wu, Yuqing; Buchet, René

    2015-01-01

    A direct and continuous approach to determine simultaneously protein and phosphate concentrations in cells and kinetics of phosphate release from physiological substrates by cells without any labeling has been developed. Among the enzymes having a phosphatase activity, tissue non-specific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) performs indispensable, multiple functions in humans. It is expressed in numerous tissues with high levels detected in bones, liver and neurons. It is absolutely required for bone mineralization and also necessary for neurotransmitter synthesis. We provided the proof of concept that infrared spectroscopy is a reliable assay to determine a phosphatase activity in the osteoblasts. For the first time, an overall specific phosphatase activity in cells was determined in a single step by measuring simultaneously protein and substrate concentrations. We found specific activities in osteoblast like cells amounting to 116 ± 13 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for PPi, to 56 ± 11 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for AMP, to 79 ± 23 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for beta-glycerophosphate and to 73 ± 15 nmol min(-1) mg(-1) for 1-alpha-D glucose phosphate. The assay was also effective to monitor phosphatase activity in primary osteoblasts and in matrix vesicles. The use of levamisole--a TNAP inhibitor--served to demonstrate that a part of the phosphatase activity originated from this enzyme. An IC50 value of 1.16 ± 0.03 mM was obtained for the inhibition of phosphatase activity of levamisole in osteoblast like cells. The infrared assay could be extended to determine any type of phosphatase activity in other cells. It may serve as a metabolomic tool to monitor an overall phosphatase activity including acid phosphatases or other related enzymes. PMID:25785438

  12. 7 CFR 1412.34 - Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 10 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops. 1412.34 Section 1412.34 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) COMMODITY CREDIT CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LOANS, PURCHASES, AND OTHER OPERATIONS DIRECT...

  13. Improved fullerene nanofiber electrodes used in direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Miyazawa, K.; Kato, R.; Hotta, K.; Wakahara, T.

    2009-04-01

    Platinum supported on fullerene nanofibers as possible electrodes for direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) were studied. Fullerene nanofiber with 20 wt% Pt loading was mixed with 5 wt% Nafion solution. The mixture paste was coated on Nafion 117 membrane and sandwiched with silicon plates. To increase the surface reaction area of catalyst, nanoimprint was used to fabricate micro-patterns in the Nafion proton exchange membrane. Nanoimprint pattern consisted of dots of 500 nm-in-diameter, 140 nm-in-depth and 1 μm-in-spacing. The nanoimprint of the treated proton exchange membrane (PEM) was carried out in a desktop thermal nanoimprint system (NI273, Nano Craft Tech. Corp., Japan) at the optimized conditions of 130 °C and pressure of 3 MPa for 6 min. Then the Pt-coated PEM was sandwiched with micro-channelled silicon plates to form a micro-DMFC. With passively feeding of 1 M methanol solution and air at room temperature, the as-prepared cell had the open circuit voltage of 0.34 V and the maximum power density of 0.30 mW/cm2. Compared with a fresh cell, the results shows that nanofibers used in nanoimprinted PEM have an improvement on the performance of micro fuel cells.

  14. Performance of direct methanol polymer electrolyte fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, Dong Ryul; Jung, Doo Hwan; Lee, Chang Hyeong; Chun, Young Gab

    1996-12-31

    Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) using polymer electrolyte membrane are promising candidate for application of portable power sources and transportation applications because they do not require any fuel processing equipment and can be operated at low temperature of 60{degrees}C - 130{degrees}C. Elimination of the fuel processor results in simpler design, higher operation reliability, lower weight volume, and lower capital and operating cost. However, methanol as a fuel is relatively electrochemical inert, so that kinetics of the methanol oxidation is too slow. Platinum and Pt-based binary alloy electrodes have been extensively studied for methanol electro-oxidation in acid electrolyte at ambient and elevated temperatures. Particularly, unsupported carbon Pt-Ru catalyst was found to be superior to the anode of DMFC using a proton exchange membrane electrolyte (Nafion). The objective of this study is to develop the high performance DNTC. This paper summarizes the results from half cell and single cell tests, which focus on the electrode manufacturing process, catalyst selection, and operating conditions of single cell such as methanol concentration, temperature and pressure.

  15. DNA methylation directs functional maturation of pancreatic β cells

    PubMed Central

    Dhawan, Sangeeta; Tschen, Shuen-Ing; Zeng, Chun; Guo, Tingxia; Hebrok, Matthias; Matveyenko, Aleksey; Bhushan, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic β cells secrete insulin in response to postprandial increases in glucose levels to prevent hyperglycemia and inhibit insulin secretion under fasting conditions to protect against hypoglycemia. β cells lack this functional capability at birth and acquire glucose-stimulated insulin secretion (GSIS) during neonatal life. Here, we have shown that during postnatal life, the de novo DNA methyltransferase DNMT3A initiates a metabolic program by repressing key genes, thereby enabling the coupling of insulin secretion to glucose levels. In a murine model, β cell–specific deletion of Dnmt3a prevented the metabolic switch, resulting in loss of GSIS. DNMT3A bound to the promoters of the genes encoding hexokinase 1 (HK1) and lactate dehydrogenase A (LDHA) — both of which regulate the metabolic switch — and knockdown of these two key DNMT3A targets restored the GSIS response in islets from animals with β cell–specific Dnmt3a deletion. Furthermore, DNA methylation–mediated repression of glucose-secretion decoupling genes to modulate GSIS was conserved in human β cells. Together, our results reveal a role for DNA methylation to direct the acquisition of pancreatic β cell function. PMID:26098213

  16. Tuning cell adhesion by direct nanostructuring silicon into cell repulsive/adhesive patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Premnath, Priyatha; Venkatakrishnan, Krishnan

    2015-09-10

    Developing platforms that allow tuning cell functionality through incorporating physical, chemical, or mechanical cues onto the material surfaces is one of the key challenges in research in the field of biomaterials. In this respect, various approaches have been proposed and numerous structures have been developed on a variety of materials. Most of these approaches, however, demand a multistep process or post-chemical treatment. Therefore, a simple approach would be desirable to develop bio-functionalized platforms for effectively modulating cell adhesion and consequently programming cell functionality without requiring any chemical or biological surface treatment. This study introduces a versatile yet simple laser approach to structure silicon (Si) chips into cytophobic/cytophilic patterns in order to modulate cell adhesion and proliferation. These patterns are fabricated on platforms through direct laser processing of Si substrates, which renders a desired computer-generated configuration into patterns. We investigate the morphology, chemistry, and wettability of the platform surfaces. Subsequently, we study the functionality of the fabricated platforms on modulating cervical cancer cells (HeLa) behaviour. The results from in vitro studies suggest that the nanostructures efficiently repel HeLa cells and drive them to migrate onto untreated sites. The study of the morphology of the cells reveals that cells evade the cytophobic area by bending and changing direction. Additionally, cell patterning, cell directionality, cell channelling, and cell trapping are achieved by developing different platforms with specific patterns. The flexibility and controllability of this approach to effectively structure Si substrates to cell-repulsive and cell-adhesive patterns offer perceptible outlook for developing bio-functionalized platforms for a variety of biomedical devices. Moreover, this approach could pave the way for developing anti-cancer platforms that selectively repel

  17. Improved Anode for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    A modified chemical composition has been devised to improve the performance of the anode of a direct methanol fuel cell. The main feature of the modified composition is the incorporation of hydrous ruthenium oxide into the anode structure. This modification can reduce the internal electrical resistance of the cell and increase the degree of utilization of the anode catalyst. As a result, a higher anode current density can be sustained with a smaller amount of anode catalyst. These improvements can translate into a smaller fuel-cell system and higher efficiency of conversion. Some background information is helpful for understanding the benefit afforded by the addition of hydrous ruthenium oxide. The anode of a direct methanol fuel cell sustains the electro-oxidation of methanol to carbon dioxide in the reaction CH3OH + H2O--->CO2 + 6H(+) + 6e(-). An electrocatalyst is needed to enable this reaction to occur. The catalyst that offers the highest activity is an alloy of approximately equal numbers of atoms of the noble metals platinum and ruthenium. The anode is made of a composite material that includes high-surface-area Pt/Ru alloy particles and a proton-conducting ionomeric material. This composite is usually deposited onto a polymer-electrolyte (proton-conducting) membrane and onto an anode gas-diffusion/current-collector sheet that is subsequently bonded to the proton-conducting membrane by hot pressing. Heretofore, the areal density of noble-metal catalyst typically needed for high performance has been about 8 mg/cm2. However, not all of the catalyst has been utilized in the catalyzed electro-oxidation reaction. Increasing the degree of utilization of the catalyst would make it possible to improve the performance of the cell for a given catalyst loading and/or reduce the catalyst loading (thereby reducing the cost of the cell). The use of carbon and possibly other electronic conductors in the catalyst layer has been proposed for increasing the utilization of the

  18. Direct coupling of a laser ablation cell to an AMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wacker, L.; Münsterer, C.; Hattendorf, B.; Christl, M.; Günther, D.; Synal, H.-A.

    2013-01-01

    In rare cases, cleaned samples can be directly inserted into a negative ion source of an AMS and still meet the requirements for long-term and stable measurements. We present the coupling of a laser ablation system to the gas ion source of an AMS system (MICADAS, ETH Zurich) for direct and continuous CO2 introduction. Solid carbonate samples like stalagmites or corals are suitable sample materials, which can be ablated and decomposed continuously using a pulsed laser focused onto the surface of a solid sample, which is placed in an airtight ablation cell. CO2 formed during the ablation of a CaCO3 sample is continually flushed with He into the gas ion source. The production rate of CO2 can be adjusted via the laser pulse repetition rate (1-20 Hz), the crater diameter (1-150 μm) and the energy density applied (0.2-3 mJ/pulse) of the laser (frequency quintupled Nd:YAG at 213 nm with 5 ns pulse duration). In our first test, measurements of one sample with known age were replicated within one sigma. Blanks showed 5% contamination of modern carbon of yet unknown origin. In order to develop LA-AMS into a routine sampling tool the ablation cell geometry and settings of the gas ion source have to be further optimized.

  19. Direct Carbon Fuel Cell System Utilizing Solid Carbonaceous Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Turgut Gur

    2010-04-30

    This 1-year project has achieved most of its objective and successfully demonstrated the viability of the fluidized bed direct carbon fuel cell (FB-DCFC) approach under development by Direct Carbon technologies, LLC, that utilizes solid carbonaceous fuels for power generation. This unique electrochemical technology offers high conversion efficiencies, produces proportionately less CO{sub 2} in capture-ready form, and does not consume or require water for gasification. FB-DCFC employs a specialized solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) arrangement coupled to a Boudouard gasifier where the solid fuel particles are fluidized and reacted by the anode recycle gas CO{sub 2}. The resulting CO is electrochemically oxidized at the anode. Anode supported SOFC structures employed a porous Ni cermet anode layer, a dense yttria stabilized zirconia membrane, and a mixed conducting porous perovskite cathode film. Several kinds of untreated solid fuels (carbon and coal) were tested in bench scale FBDCFC prototypes for electrochemical performance and stability testing. Single cells of tubular geometry with active areas up to 24 cm{sup 2} were fabricated. The cells achieved high power densities up to 450 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C using a low sulfur Alaska coal char. This represents the highest power density reported in the open literature for coal based DCFC. Similarly, power densities up to 175 mW/cm{sup 2} at 850 C were demonstrated with carbon. Electrical conversion efficiencies for coal char were experimentally determined to be 48%. Long-term stability of cell performance was measured under galvanostatic conditions for 375 hours in CO with no degradation whatsoever, indicating that carbon deposition (or coking) does not pose any problems. Similar cell stability results were obtained in coal char tested for 24 hours under galvanostatic conditions with no sign of sulfur poisoning. Moreover, a 50-cell planar stack targeted for 1 kW output was fabricated and tested in 95% CO (balance CO{sub 2

  20. Engineering the human pluripotent stem cell microenvironment to direct cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Hazeltine, Laurie B.; Selekman, Joshua A.; Palecek, Sean P.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs), including both embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells, offer a potential cell source for research, drug screening, and regenerative medicine applications due to their unique ability to self-renew or differentiate to any somatic cell type. Before the full potential of hPSCs can be realized, robust protocols must be developed to direct their fate. Cell fate decisions are based on components of the surrounding microenvironment, including soluble factors, substrate or extracellular matrix, cell-cell interactions, mechanical forces, and 2D or 3D architecture. Depending on their spatio-temporal context, these components can signal hPSCs to either self-renew or differentiate to cell types of the ectoderm, mesoderm, or endoderm. Researchers working at the interface of engineering and biology have identified various factors which can affect hPSC fate, often based on lessons from embryonic development, and they have utilized this information to design in vitro niches which can reproducibly direct hPSC fate. This review highlights culture systems that have been engineered to promote self-renewal or differentiation of hPSCs, with a focus on studies that have elucidated the contributions of specific microenvironmental cues in the context of those culture systems. We propose the use of microsystems technologies for high-throughput screening of spatial-temporal presentation of cues, as this has been demonstrated to be a powerful approach for differentiating hPSCs to desired cell types. PMID:23510904

  1. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-09-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells towards higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces.

  2. Experimental evidence of direct contact formation for the current transport in silver thick film metallized silicon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, Enrique; Olibet, Sara; Glatz-Reichenbach, Joachim; Kopecek, Radovan; Reinke, Daniel; Schubert, Gunnar

    2011-12-01

    Great advances have been achieved in the development of silver pastes. The use of smaller silver particles, higher silver content, and, thus, less glass frit allow modern silver pastes to contact high resistive emitters without the necessity of a selective emitter or subsequent plating. To identify the microscopic key reasons behind the improvement of silver paste, it is essential to understand the current transport mechanism from the silicon emitter into the bulk of the silver finger. Two current transport theories predominate: i) The current flows through the Ag crystallites grown into the Si emitter, which are separated by a thin glass layer or possibly in direct contact with the silver finger. ii) The current is transported by means of multistep tunneling into the silver finger across nano-Ag colloids in the glass layer, which are formed at optimal firing conditions; the formation of Ag crystallites into the Si surface is synonymous with over-firing. In this study, we contact Si solar cell emitters with different silver pastes on textured and flat silicon surfaces. A sequential selective silver-glass etching process is employed to expose and isolate the different contact components for current transport. The surface configurations after the etching sequences are observed with scanning electron microscopy. Liquid conductive silver is then applied to each sample and the contact resistivity is measured to determine the dominant microscopic conduction path system. We observe glass-free emitter areas at the tops of the pyramidal-textured Si that lead to the formation of direct contacts between the Ag crystallites grown into the Si emitter and the bulk of the silver finger. We present experimental evidence that the major current flow into the silver finger is through these direct contacts.

  3. Ultrasonic radiation to enable improvement of direct methanol fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chaoqun; Wu, Jiang; Luo, Hao; Wang, Sanwu; Chen, Tao

    2016-03-01

    To improve DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell) performance, a new method using ultrasonic radiation is proposed and a novel DMFC structure is designed and fabricated in the present paper. Three ultrasonic transducers (piezoelectric transducer, PZT) are integrated in the flow field plate to form the ultrasonic field in the liquid fuel. Ultrasonic frequency, acoustic power, and methanol concentration have been considered as variables in the experiments. With the help of ultrasonic radiation, the maximum output power and limiting current of cell can be independently increased by 30.73% and 40.54%, respectively. The best performance of DMFC is obtained at the condition of ultrasonic radiation (30 kHz and 4 W) fed with 2M methanol solution, because both its limiting current and output power reach their maximum value simultaneously (222 mA and 33.6 mW, respectively) under this condition. These results conclude that ultrasonic can be an alternative choice for improving the cell performance, and can facilitate a guideline for the optimization of DMFC. PMID:26585016

  4. Direct Imaging of Gene-Carrier Complexes in Animal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Slack, Nelle L.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Matsumoto, Brian; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1998-03-01

    Cationic lipids are promising gene carriers for DNA transfection. Establishing the correlations between structures of cationic lipid/DNA complexes (CL-DNA) and pathways of transfection will greatly aid us in achieving the optimal CL-DNA transfections. Our first step is to determine the uptake mechanism of DNA by studying the interactions and structures of DNA and cationic lipids. X-ray diffraction shows that the CL-DNA undergoes structural phase transitions from lamellar( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. R. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997).) to inverted hexagonal self-assemblies as we change the lipid composition. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy techniques are used to directly image the progress of the CL-DNA in mouse L-cells and unravel the complex structure in-situ. Fluorescence and confocal optical microscopy techniques allow us to monitor the interactions between the complexes and different organelles in the cell cytoplasm. Current results indicate that once inside cells, complexes containing DOPE follow a different pathway from those containing DOPC. This research is funded by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  5. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANOCATALYSTS FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELL APPLICATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Murph, S.

    2012-09-12

    While gold and platinum have long been recognized for their beauty and value, researchers at the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) are working on the nano-level to use these elements for creative solutions to our nation's energy and security needs. Multiinterdisciplinary teams consisting of chemists, materials scientists, physicists, computational scientists, and engineers are exploring unchartered territories with shape-selective nanocatalysts for the development of novel, cost effective and environmentally friendly energy solutions to meet global energy needs. This nanotechnology is vital, particularly as it relates to fuel cells.SRNL researchers have taken process, chemical, and materials discoveries and translated them for technological solution and deployment. The group has developed state-of-the art shape-selective core-shell-alloy-type gold-platinum nanostructures with outstanding catalytic capabilities that address many of the shortcomings of the Direct Methanol Fuel Cell (DMFC). The newly developed nanostructures not only busted the performance of the platinum catalyst, but also reduced the material cost and overall weight of the fuel cell.

  6. A microfluidic direct formate fuel cell on paper.

    PubMed

    Copenhaver, Thomas S; Purohit, Krutarth H; Domalaon, Kryls; Pham, Linda; Burgess, Brianna J; Manorothkul, Natalie; Galvan, Vicente; Sotez, Samantha; Gomez, Frank A; Haan, John L

    2015-08-01

    We describe the first direct formate fuel cell on a paper microfluidic platform. In traditional membrane-less microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs), external pumping consumes power produced by the fuel cell in order to maintain co-laminar flow of the anode stream and oxidant stream to prevent mixing. However, in paper microfluidics, capillary action drives flow while minimizing stream mixing. In this work, we demonstrate a paper MFC that uses formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. Using these materials we achieve a maximum power density of nearly 2.5 mW/mg Pd. In a series configuration, our MFC achieves an open circuit voltage just over 1 V, and in a parallel configuration, short circuit of 20 mA absolute current. We also demonstrate that the MFC does not require continuous flow of fuel and oxidant to produce power. We found that we can pre-saturate the materials on the paper, stop the electrolyte flow, and still produce approximately 0.5 V for 15 min. This type of paper MFC has potential applications in point-of-care diagnostic devices and other electrochemical sensors. PMID:25546700

  7. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S.; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P. G.; Ferguson, Lynnette R.

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols. PMID:27548217

  8. Evidence to Support the Anti-Cancer Effect of Olive Leaf Extract and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Boss, Anna; Bishop, Karen S; Marlow, Gareth; Barnett, Matthew P G; Ferguson, Lynnette R

    2016-01-01

    The traditional Mediterranean diet (MD) is associated with long life and lower prevalence of cardiovascular disease and cancers. The main components of this diet include high intake of fruit, vegetables, red wine, extra virgin olive oil (EVOO) and fish, low intake of dairy and red meat. Olive oil has gained support as a key effector of health benefits and there is evidence that this relates to the polyphenol content. Olive leaf extract (OLE) contains a higher quantity and variety of polyphenols than those found in EVOO. There are also important structural differences between polyphenols from olive leaf and those from olive fruit that may improve the capacity of OLE to enhance health outcomes. Olive polyphenols have been claimed to play an important protective role in cancer and other inflammation-related diseases. Both inflammatory and cancer cell models have shown that olive leaf polyphenols are anti-inflammatory and protect against DNA damage initiated by free radicals. The various bioactive properties of olive leaf polyphenols are a plausible explanation for the inhibition of progression and development of cancers. The pathways and signaling cascades manipulated include the NF-κB inflammatory response and the oxidative stress response, but the effects of these bioactive components may also result from their action as a phytoestrogen. Due to the similar structure of the olive polyphenols to oestrogens, these have been hypothesized to interact with oestrogen receptors, thereby reducing the prevalence and progression of hormone related cancers. Evidence for the protective effect of olive polyphenols for cancer in humans remains anecdotal and clinical trials are required to substantiate these claims idea. This review aims to amalgamate the current literature regarding bioavailability and mechanisms involved in the potential anti-cancer action of olive leaf polyphenols. PMID:27548217

  9. Novel Sex Cells and Evidence for Sex Pheromones in Diatoms

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Shinya; Beakes, Gordon; Idei, Masahiko; Nagumo, Tamotsu; Mann, David G.

    2011-01-01

    Background Diatoms belong to the stramenopiles, one of the largest groups of eukaryotes, which are primarily characterized by a presence of an anterior flagellum with tubular mastigonemes and usually a second, smooth flagellum. Based on cell wall morphology, diatoms have historically been divided into centrics and pennates, of which only the former have flagella and only on the sperm. Molecular phylogenies show the pennates to have evolved from among the centrics. However, the timing of flagellum loss – whether before the evolution of the pennate lineage or after – is unknown, because sexual reproduction has been so little studied in the ‘araphid’ basal pennate lineages, to which Pseudostaurosira belongs. Methods/Principal Finding Sexual reproduction of an araphid pennate, Pseudostaurosira trainorii, was studied with light microscopy (including time lapse observations and immunofluorescence staining observed under confocal scanning laser microscopy) and SEM. We show that the species produces motile male gametes. Motility is mostly associated with the extrusion and retrieval of microtubule-based ‘threads’, which are structures hitherto unknown in stramenopiles, their number varying from one to three per cell. We also report experimental evidence for sex pheromones that reciprocally stimulate sexualization of compatible clones and orientate motility of the male gametes after an initial ‘random walk’. Conclusions/Significance The threads superficially resemble flagella, in that both are produced by male gametes and contain microtubules. However, one striking difference is that threads cannot beat or undulate and have no motility of their own, and they do not bear mastigonemes. Threads are sticky and catch and draw objects, including eggs. The motility conferred by the threads is probably crucial for sexual reproduction of P. trainorii, because this diatom is non-motile in its vegetative stage but obligately outbreeding. Our pheromone experiments are

  10. Evidence of the direct adsorption of mercury in human hair during occupational exposure to mercury vapour.

    PubMed

    Queipo Abad, Silvia; Rodríguez-González, Pablo; García Alonso, J Ignacio

    2016-07-01

    We have found clear evidence of direct adsorption of mercury in human hair after the occupational exposure to mercury vapour. We have performed both longitudinal analysis of human hair by laser ablation ICP-MS and speciation analysis by gas chromatography ICP-MS in single hair strands of 5 individuals which were occupationally exposed to high levels of mercury vapour and showed acute mercury poisoning symptoms. Hair samples, between 3.5 and 11cm long depending on the individual, were taken ca. three months after exposure. Single point laser ablation samples of 50μm diameter were taken at 1mm intervals starting from the root of the hairs. Sulfur-34 was used as internal standard. The ratio (202)Hg/(34)S showed a distinct pattern of mercury concentration with much lower levels of mercury near the root of the hair and high levels of mercury near the end of the hair. In all cases a big jump in the concentration of mercury in hair occurred at a given distance from the root, between 32 and 42mm depending on the individual, with a high and almost constant concentration of mercury for longer distances to the root. When we took into account the rate of hair growth in humans, 9-15mm/month, the jump in mercury concentration agreed approximately with the dates when the contamination occurred with the new growing hair showing much lower mercury concentration. In some cases the concentration of mercury at the tip of the hair was ca. 1000 times higher than that near the root. Additionally, speciation studies confirmed that mercury in all hair samples was present as inorganic mercury. The only explanation for these results was the direct adsorption of mercury vapour in hair at the time of exposure. PMID:27259347

  11. Dissecting Complex Metabolic Integration Provides Direct Genetic Evidence for CodY Activation by Guanine Nucleotides▿

    PubMed Central

    Brinsmade, Shaun R.; Sonenshein, Abraham L.

    2011-01-01

    The global regulator CodY controls the expression of dozens of metabolic genes and genes mediating adaptation to nutrient availability in many low-G+C Gram-positive bacteria. Branched-chain amino acids l-isoleucine, l-leucine, and l-valine (ILV) activate CodY both in vivo and in vitro, and genes that direct their synthesis (ilv, ybgE, and ywaA) are highly repressed by CodY, creating a potential negative feedback loop. The nucleoside triphosphate GTP also activates CodY in vitro, but the evidence for activation by GTP in vivo is limited and indirect. We constructed a Bacillus subtilis strain (ybgE bcd ywaA) that is unable to convert branched-chain α-keto acids to ILV or to use ILV as a precursor for branched-chain fatty acid synthesis. Unexpectedly, the strain was not viable on rich medium. Supplementing rich medium with short, branched-chain fatty acids or derepressing expression of genes for de novo ILV synthesis bypassed the original lethality, restoring growth and showing that the lack of viability was due to insufficient intracellular production of the precursors of branched-chain fatty acids. Spontaneous extragenic suppressor mutants that arose in the triple mutant population proved to have additional mutations in guaA or guaB or codY. Expression of ILV biosynthetic genes in codY mutants was increased. The gua mutations caused guanine/guanosine auxotrophy and led to partial derepression of direct CodY-repressed targets, including ILV biosynthetic genes, under conditions similar to those that caused the original lethality. We conclude that a guanine derivative, most likely GTP, controls CodY activity in vivo. PMID:21856856

  12. Molecular Targeted Therapies for the Treatment of Leptomeningeal Carcinomatosis: Current Evidence and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dae-Won; Lee, Kyung-Hun; Kim, Jin Wook; Keam, Bhumsuk

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal carcinomatosis (LMC) is the multifocal seeding of cerebrospinal fluid and leptomeninges by malignant cells. The incidence of LMC is approximately 5% in patients with malignant tumors overall and the rate is increasing due to increasing survival time of cancer patients. Eradication of the disease is not yet possible, so the treatment goals of LMC are to improve neurologic symptoms and to prolong survival. A standard treatment for LMC has not been established due to low incidences of LMC, the rapidly progressing nature of the disease, heterogeneous populations with LMC, and a lack of randomized clinical trial results. Treatment options for LMC include intrathecal chemotherapy, systemic chemotherapy, and radiation therapy, but the prognoses remain poor with a median survival of <3 months. Recently, molecular targeted agents have been applied in the clinic and have shown groundbreaking results in specific patient groups epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-targeted therapy or an anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitor in lung cancer, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-directed therapy in breast cancer, and CD20-targeted therapy in B cell lymphoma). Moreover, there are results indicating that the use of these agents under proper dose and administration routes can be effective for managing LMC. In this article, we review molecular targeted agents for managing LMC. PMID:27399673

  13. Directional collective cell migration emerges as a property of cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Woods, Mae L; Carmona-Fontaine, Carlos; Barnes, Chris P; Couzin, Iain D; Mayor, Roberto; Page, Karen M

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell migration is a fundamental process, occurring during embryogenesis and cancer metastasis. Neural crest cells exhibit such coordinated migration, where aberrant motion can lead to fatality or dysfunction of the embryo. Migration involves at least two complementary mechanisms: contact inhibition of locomotion (a repulsive interaction corresponding to a directional change of migration upon contact with a reciprocating cell), and co-attraction (a mutual chemoattraction mechanism). Here, we develop and employ a parameterized discrete element model of neural crest cells, to investigate how these mechanisms contribute to long-range directional migration during development. Motion is characterized using a coherence parameter and the time taken to reach, collectively, a target location. The simulated cell group is shown to switch from a diffusive to a persistent state as the response-rate to co-attraction is increased. Furthermore, the model predicts that when co-attraction is inhibited, neural crest cells can migrate into restrictive regions. Indeed, inhibition of co-attraction in vivo and in vitro leads to cell invasion into restrictive areas, confirming the prediction of the model. This suggests that the interplay between the complementary mechanisms may contribute to guidance of the neural crest. We conclude that directional migration is a system property and does not require action of external chemoattractants. PMID:25181349

  14. Neurological disease associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. PCR evidence against a direct invasive mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Fink, C G; Sillis, M; Read, S J; Butler, L; Pike, M

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To investigate the pathology in patients presenting with sudden onset neurological illnesses associated with Mycoplasma pneumoniae infection. Methods—M pneumoniae infection was diagnosed by a highly rigorous interpretation of serological markers initially using complement fixation, agglutination and IgM antibodies. Confirmation of the serological diagnosis was achieved using indirect immunofluorescence for IgM, IgA, and IgG. Serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from these patients were examined using the polymerase chain reaction to look for evidence of M pneumoniae DNA. Results—No M pneumoniae DNA was found in any serum or CSF samples. Diagnosis of M pneumoniae infection by agglutination and complement fixation antibodies was not always confirmed by indirect immunofluorescence. Conclusion—The neurological lesions in these patients do not appear to be caused by the direct invasion of M pneumoniae into the nervous system. The lesions may be an immune response to infection. Serological diagnosis of M pneumoniae continues to be a laboratory problem. PMID:16695976

  15. Specific disgust processing in the left insula: New evidence from direct electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Papagno, Costanza; Pisoni, Alberto; Mattavelli, Giulia; Casarotti, Alessandra; Comi, Alessandro; Fumagalli, Francesca; Vernice, Mirta; Fava, Enrica; Riva, Marco; Bello, Lorenzo

    2016-04-01

    Neuropsychological and neuroimaging studies yielded controversial results concerning the specific role of the insula in recognizing the facial expression of disgust. To verify whether the insula has a selective role in facial disgust processing, emotion recognition was studied in thirteen patients during intraoperative stimulation of the insula in awake surgery performed for removal of a glioma close to this structure. Direct electrical stimulation of the left insula produced a general decrease in emotion recognition but only in the case of disgust there was a statistically significant detrimental effect (p=0.004). Happiness and anger were the best and the worst recognized emotion, respectively. The worst baseline performance with anger and, partly, fear could be explained with the involvement of the left temporal regions, striatum, and the connection between the striatum and the frontal lobe, as suggested in previous studies. Therefore, upon these intra-operative evidences, we argue for a selective role of the left insula in disgust recognition, although a (non significant) decrease in the recognition of other negative emotions was found. However, additional networks can develop, as demonstrated by the fact that disgust recognition was not impaired after surgery even in patients with insular resection in the current as in previous studies. PMID:26836143

  16. Direct evidence of octupole deformation in neutron-rich 144Ba

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Butler, P. A.; Campbell, C. M.; et al

    2016-03-17

    Here, the neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1/2 = 11.5 s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0–mg/cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, < 31–∥M(E3)∥01+ >= 0.65(+17–23) eb3/2, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probabilitymore » of 48(+25–34) W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.« less

  17. One size fits all? Direct evidence for the heterogeneity of genetic drift throughout the genome.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Mena, Belén; Tataru, Paula; Brøndum, Rasmus F; Sahana, Goutam; Guldbrandtsen, Bernt; Bataillon, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Effective population size (Ne) is a central parameter in population and conservation genetics. It measures the magnitude of genetic drift, rates of accumulation of inbreeding in a population, and it conditions the efficacy of selection. It is often assumed that a single Ne can account for the evolution of genomes. However, recent work provides indirect evidence for heterogeneity in Ne throughout the genome. We study this by examining genome-wide diversity in the Danish Holstein cattle breed. Using the differences in allele frequencies over a single generation, we directly estimated Ne among autosomes and smaller windows within autosomes. We found statistically significant variation in Ne at both scales. However, no correlation was found between the detected regional variability in Ne, and proxies for the intensity of linked selection (local recombination rate, gene density), or the presence of either past strong selection or current artificial selection on traits of economic value. Our findings call for further caution regarding the wide applicability of the Ne concept for understanding quantitatively processes such as genetic drift and accumulation of consanguinity in both natural and managed populations. PMID:27405384

  18. First Evidence of pep Solar Neutrinos by Direct Detection in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Chepurnov, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Quirk, J.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.

    2012-02-01

    We observed, for the first time, solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range. We determined the rate of pep solar neutrino interactions in Borexino to be 3.1±0.6stat±0.3systcounts/(day·100ton). Assuming the pep neutrino flux predicted by the standard solar model, we obtained a constraint on the CNO solar neutrino interaction rate of <7.9counts/(day·100ton) (95% C.L.). The absence of the solar neutrino signal is disfavored at 99.97% C.L., while the absence of the pep signal is disfavored at 98% C.L. The necessary sensitivity was achieved by adopting data analysis techniques for the rejection of cosmogenic C11, the dominant background in the 1-2 MeV region. Assuming the Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein large mixing angle solution to solar neutrino oscillations, these values correspond to solar neutrino fluxes of (1.6±0.3)×108cm-2s-1 and <7.7×108cm-2s-1 (95% C.L.), respectively, in agreement with both the high and low metallicity standard solar models. These results represent the first direct evidence of the pep neutrino signal and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux to date.

  19. Kodiak brown bears surf the salmon red wave: direct evidence from GPS collared individuals.

    PubMed

    Deacy, William; Leacock, William; Armstrong, Jonathan B; Stanford, Jack A

    2016-05-01

    A key constraint faced by consumers is achieving a positive energy balance in the face of temporal variation in foraging opportunities. Recent work has shown that spatial heterogeneity in resource phenology can buffer mobile consumers from this constraint by allowing them to track changes in resource availability across space. For example, salmon populations spawn asynchronously across watersheds, causing high-quality foraging opportunities to propagate across the landscape, prolonging the availability of salmon at the regional scale. However, we know little about how individual consumers integrate across phenological variation or the benefits they receive by doing so. Here, we present direct evidence that individual brown bears track spatial variation in salmon phenology. Data from 40 GPS collared brown bears show that bears visited multiple spawning sites in synchrony with the order of spawning phenology. The number of sites used was correlated with the number of days a bear exploited salmon, suggesting the phenological variation in the study area influenced bear access to salmon, a resource which strongly influences bear fitness. Fisheries managers attempting to maximize harvest while maintaining ecosystem function should strive to protect the population diversity that underlies the phenological variation used by wildlife consumers. PMID:27349087

  20. Direct evidence for the adaptive role of copy number variation on antifolate susceptibility in Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Heinberg, Adina; Siu, Edwin; Stern, Chaya; Lawrence, Elizabeth A; Ferdig, Michael T; Deitsch, Kirk W; Kirkman, Laura A

    2013-01-01

    Summary Resistance to antimalarials targeting the folate pathway is widespread. GTP-cyclohydrolase (gch1), the first enzyme in this pathway, exhibits extensive copy number variation (CNV) in parasite isolates from areas with a history of longstanding antifolate use. Increased CN of gch1 is associated with a greater number of point mutations in enzymes targeted by the antifolates, pyrimethamine and sulfadoxine. While these observations suggest that increases in gch1 CN are an adaptation to drug pressure, changes in CN have not been experimentally demonstrated to directly alter drug susceptibility. To determine if changes in gch1 expression alone modify pyrimethamine sensitivity, we manipulated gch1 CN in several parasite lines to test the effect on drug sensitivity. We report that increases in gch1 CN alter pyrimethamine resistance in most parasites lines. However we find evidence of a detrimental effect of very high levels of gch1 overexpression in parasite lines with high endogenous levels of gch1 expression, revealing the importance of maintaining balance in the folate pathway and implicating changes in gch1 expression in preserving proper metabolic flux. This work expands our understanding of parasite adaptation to drug pressure and provides a possible mechanism for how specific mutations become fixed within parasite populations. PMID:23347134

  1. Alcohol action on a neuronal membrane receptor: evidence for a direct interaction with the receptor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Peoples, R W; Weight, F F

    1994-01-01

    For almost a century, alcohols have been thought to produce their effects by actions on the membrane lipids of central nervous system neurons--the well known "lipid theory" of alcohol action. The rationale for this theory is the correlation of potency with oil/water or membrane/buffer partition coefficient. Although a number of recent studies have shown that alcohols can affect the function of certain neuronal neurotransmitter receptors, there is no evidence that the alcohols interact directly with these membrane proteins. In the present study, we report that inhibition of a neuronal neurotransmitter receptor, an ATP-gated ion channel, by a series of alcohols exhibits a distinct cutoff effect. For alcohols with a molecular volume of < or = 42.2 ml/mol, potency for inhibiting ATP-activated current was correlated with lipid solubility (order of potency: 1-propanol = trifluoroethanol > monochloroethanol > ethanol > methanol). However, despite increased lipid solubility, alcohols with a molecular volume of > or = 46.1 ml/mol (1-butanol, 1-pentanol, trichloroethanol, and dichloroethanol) were without effect on the ATP-activated current. The results suggest that alcohols inhibit the function of this neurotransmitter receptor by interacting with a small hydrophobic pocket on the receptor protein. PMID:8058780

  2. Direct Evidence of Octupole Deformation in Neutron-Rich 144Ba

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bucher, B.; Zhu, S.; Wu, C. Y.; Janssens, R. V. F.; Cline, D.; Hayes, A. B.; Albers, M.; Ayangeakaa, A. D.; Butler, P. A.; Campbell, C. M.; Carpenter, M. P.; Chiara, C. J.; Clark, J. A.; Crawford, H. L.; Cromaz, M.; David, H. M.; Dickerson, C.; Gregor, E. T.; Harker, J.; Hoffman, C. R.; Kay, B. P.; Kondev, F. G.; Korichi, A.; Lauritsen, T.; Macchiavelli, A. O.; Pardo, R. C.; Richard, A.; Riley, M. A.; Savard, G.; Scheck, M.; Seweryniak, D.; Smith, M. K.; Vondrasek, R.; Wiens, A.

    2016-03-01

    The neutron-rich nucleus 144Ba (t1 /2=11.5 s ) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E 1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV 144Ba beam on a 1.0 -mg /cm2 208Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, ⟨31 -∥M (E 3 )∥01 +⟩=0.65 (+17/-23) e b3 /2, corresponds to a reduced B (E 3 ) transition probability of 48 (+25/-34) W .u . This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation.

  3. First evidence of pep solar neutrinos by direct detection in Borexino

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galbiati, C.; Bellini, G.; Benziger, J.; Bick, D.; Bonetti, S.; Bonfini, G.; Bravo, D.; Buizza Avanzini, M.; Caccianiga, B.; Cadonati, L.; Calaprice, F.; Carraro, C.; Cavalcante, P.; Chavarria, A.; Dangelo, D.; Davini, S.; Derbin, A.; Etenko, A.; Fomenko, K.; Franco, D.; Galbiati, C.; Gazzana, S.; Ghiano, C.; Giammarchi, M.; Goeger-Neff, M.; Goretti, A.; Grandi, L.; Guardincerri, E.; Hardy, S.; Ianni, Aldo; Ianni, Andrea; Korablev, D.; Korga, G.; Koshio, Y.; Kryn, D.; Laubenstein, M.; Lewke, T.; Litvinovich, E.; Loer, B.; Lombardi, F.; Lombardi, P.; Ludhova, L.; Machulin, I.; Manecki, S.; Maneschg, W.; Manuzio, G.; Meindl, Q.; Meroni, E.; Miramonti, L.; Misiaszek, M.; Montanari, D.; Mosteiro, P.; Muratova, V.; Oberauer, L.; Obolensky, M.; Ortica, F.; Otis, K.; Pallavicini, M.; Papp, L.; Perasso, L.; Perasso, S.; Pocar, A.; Quirk, J.; Raghavan, R. S.; Ranucci, G.; Razeto, A.; Re, A.; Romani, A.; Sabelnikov, A.; Saldanha, R.; Salvo, C.; Schönert, S.; Simgen, H.; Skorokhvatov, M.; Smirnov, O.; Sotnikov, A.; Sukhotin, S.; Suvorov, Y.; Tartaglia, R.; Testera, G.; Vignaud, D.; Vogelaar, R. B.; von Feilitzsch, F.; Winter, J.; Wojcik, M.; Wright, A.; Wurm, M.; Xu, J.; Zaimidoroga, O.; Zavatarelli, S.; Zuzel, G.; Borexino Collaboration

    2012-07-01

    We observed, for the first time, solar neutrinos in the 1.0-1.5 MeV energy range. We determined the rate of pep solar neutrino interactions in Borexino to be 3.l±0.6stat±0.3syst counts/(day-100 ton). Assuming the pep neutrino flux predicted by the Standard Solar Model, we obtained a constraint on the CNO solar neutrino interaction rate of <7.9 counts/(day-100 ton) (95% C.L.). The absence of the solar neutrino signal is disfavored at 99.97% C.L., while the absence of the pep signal is disfavored at 98% C.L. The necessary sensitivity was achieved by adopting data analysis techniques for the rejection of cosmogenic 11C, the dominant background in the 1-2 MeV region. Assuming the MSW-LMA solution to solar neutrino oscillations, these values correspond to solar neutrino fluxes of (1.6±0.3)×l08cm-2s-1 and <7.7×l08 cm-2s-1 (95% C.L.), respectively, in agreement with both the High and Low Metallicity Standard Solar Models. These results represent the first direct evidence of the pep neutrino signal and the strongest constraint of the CNO solar neutrino flux to date.

  4. Molecular Evidence for a Natural Primary Triple Hybrid in Plants Revealed from Direct Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Zdenek; Fehrer, Judith

    2007-01-01

    Background and Aims Molecular evidence for natural primary hybrids composed of three different plant species is very rarely reported. An investigation was therefore carried out into the origin and a possible scenario for the rise of a sterile plant clone showing a combination of diagnostic morphological features of three separate, well-defined Potamogeton species. Methods The combination of sequences from maternally inherited cytoplasmic (rpl20-rps12) and biparentally inherited nuclear ribosomal DNA (ITS) was used to identify the exact identity of the putative triple hybrid. Key Results Direct sequencing showed ITS variants of three parental taxa, P. gramineus, P. lucens and P. perfoliatus, whereas chloroplast DNA identified P. perfoliatus as the female parent. A scenario for the rise of the triple hybrid through a fertile binary hybrid P. gramineus × P. lucens crossed with P. perfoliatus is described. Conclusions Even though the triple hybrid is sterile, it possesses an efficient strategy for its existence and became locally successful even in the parental environment, perhaps as a result of heterosis. The population investigated is the only one known of this hybrid, P. × torssanderi, worldwide. Isozyme analysis indicated the colony to be genetically uniform. The plants studied represented a single clone that seems to have persisted at this site for a long time. PMID:17478544

  5. Direct Evidence of Octupole Deformation in Neutron-Rich ^{144}Ba.

    PubMed

    Bucher, B; Zhu, S; Wu, C Y; Janssens, R V F; Cline, D; Hayes, A B; Albers, M; Ayangeakaa, A D; Butler, P A; Campbell, C M; Carpenter, M P; Chiara, C J; Clark, J A; Crawford, H L; Cromaz, M; David, H M; Dickerson, C; Gregor, E T; Harker, J; Hoffman, C R; Kay, B P; Kondev, F G; Korichi, A; Lauritsen, T; Macchiavelli, A O; Pardo, R C; Richard, A; Riley, M A; Savard, G; Scheck, M; Seweryniak, D; Smith, M K; Vondrasek, R; Wiens, A

    2016-03-18

    The neutron-rich nucleus ^{144}Ba (t_{1/2}=11.5  s) is expected to exhibit some of the strongest octupole correlations among nuclei with mass numbers A less than 200. Until now, indirect evidence for such strong correlations has been inferred from observations such as enhanced E1 transitions and interleaving positive- and negative-parity levels in the ground-state band. In this experiment, the octupole strength was measured directly by sub-barrier, multistep Coulomb excitation of a post-accelerated 650-MeV ^{144}Ba beam on a 1.0-mg/cm^{2} ^{208}Pb target. The measured value of the matrix element, ⟨3_{1}^{-}∥M(E3)∥0_{1}^{+}⟩=0.65(+17/-23) eb^{3/2}, corresponds to a reduced B(E3) transition probability of 48(+25/-34)  W.u. This result represents an unambiguous determination of the octupole collectivity, is larger than any available theoretical prediction, and is consistent with octupole deformation. PMID:27035298

  6. Directed Forgetting in Direct and Indirect Tests of Memory: Seeking Evidence of Retrieval Inhibition Using Electrophysiological Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Hooff, Johanna C.; Whitaker, T. Aisling; Ford, Ruth M.

    2009-01-01

    We investigated whether directed forgetting as elicited by the item-cueing method results solely from "differential rehearsal" of to-be-remembered vs. to-be-forgotten words or, additionally, from "inhibitory" processes that actively impair retrieval of to-be-forgotten words. During study, participants (N = 24) were instructed to remember half of a…

  7. GATA-1 directly regulates Nanog in mouse embryonic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wen-Zhong; Ai, Zhi-Ying; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Chen, Lin-Lin; Guo, Ze-Kun; Zhang, Yong

    2015-09-25

    Nanog safeguards pluripotency in mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Insight into the regulation of Nanog is important for a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms that control pluripotency of mESCs. In a silico analysis, we identify four GATA-1 putative binding sites in Nanog proximal promoter. The Nanog promoter activity can be significantly repressed by ectopic expression of GATA-1 evidenced by a promoter reporter assay. Mutation studies reveal that one of the four putative binding sites counts for GATA-1 repressing Nanog promoter activity. Direct binding of GATA-1 on Nanog proximal promoter is confirmed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Our data provide new insights into the expanded regulatory circuitry that coordinates Nanog expression. - Highlights: • The Nanog proximal promoter conceives functional element for GATA-1. • GATA-1 occupies the Nanog proximal promoter in vitro and in vivo. • GATA-1 transcriptionally suppresses Nanog.

  8. Thin Film Catalyst Layers for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witham, C. K.; Chun, W.; Ruiz, R.; Valdez, T. I.; Narayanan, S. R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary obstacles to the widespread use of the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is the high cost of the catalyst. Therefore, reducing the catalyst loading well below the current level of 8-12 mg/cm 2 would be important to commercialization. The current methods for preparation of catalyst layers consisting of catalyst, ionomer and sometimes a hydrophobic additive are applied by either painting, spraying, decal transfer or screen printing processes. Sputter deposition is a coating technique widely used in manufacturing and therefore particularly attractive. In this study we have begun to explore sputtering as a method for catalyst deposition. Present experiments focus on Pt-Ru catalyst layers for the anode.

  9. Direct Adaptive Aircraft Control Using Dynamic Cell Structure Neural Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, Charles C.

    1997-01-01

    A Dynamic Cell Structure (DCS) Neural Network was developed which learns topology representing networks (TRNS) of F-15 aircraft aerodynamic stability and control derivatives. The network is integrated into a direct adaptive tracking controller. The combination produces a robust adaptive architecture capable of handling multiple accident and off- nominal flight scenarios. This paper describes the DCS network and modifications to the parameter estimation procedure. The work represents one step towards an integrated real-time reconfiguration control architecture for rapid prototyping of new aircraft designs. Performance was evaluated using three off-line benchmarks and on-line nonlinear Virtual Reality simulation. Flight control was evaluated under scenarios including differential stabilator lock, soft sensor failure, control and stability derivative variations, and air turbulence.

  10. Evidence of dysregulation of dendritic cells in primary HIV infection

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; O'Brien, Meagan; Subedi, Abhignya; Qin, Li; Hu, Nan; Taylor, Elizabeth; Dibben, Oliver; Stacey, Andrea; Fellay, Jacques; Shianna, Kevin V.; Siegal, Frederick; Shodell, Michael; Shah, Kokila; Larsson, Marie; Lifson, Jeffrey; Nadas, Arthur; Marmor, Michael; Hutt, Richard; Margolis, David; Garmon, Donald; Markowitz, Martin; Valentine, Fred; Borrow, Persephone

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (DCs) are important mediators of both innate and adaptive immunity against pathogens such as HIV. During the course of HIV infection, blood DC numbers fall substantially. In the present study, we sought to determine how early in HIV infection the reduction occurs and whether the remaining DC subsets maintain functional capacity. We find that both myeloid DC and plasmacytoid DC levels decline very early during acute HIV in-fection. Despite the initial reduction in numbers, those DCs that remain in circulation retain their function and are able to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses, and up-regulate maturation markers plus produce cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists. Notably, DCs from HIV-infected subjects produced significantly higher levels of cytokines/chemokines in response to stimulation with TLR7/8 agonists than DCs from uninfected controls. Further examination of gene expression profiles indicated in vivo activation, either directly or indirectly, of DCs during HIV infection. Taken together, our data demonstrate that despite the reduction in circulating DC numbers, those that remain in the blood display hyperfunctionality and implicates a possible role for DCs in promoting chronic immune activation. PMID:20693428

  11. Infectious rotavirus enters cells by direct cell membrane penetration, not by endocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kaljot, K.T.; Shaw, R.D.; Greenberg, H.B. Palo Alto Veterans Administration Medical Center, CA ); Rubin, D.H. )

    1988-04-01

    Rotaviruses are icosahedral viruses with a segmented, double-stranded RNA genome. They are the major cause of severe infantile infectious diarrhea. Rotavirus growth in tissue culture is markedly enhanced by pretreatment of virus with trypsin. Trypsin activation is associated with cleavage of the viral hemagglutinin (viral protein 3 (VP3); 88 kilodaltons) into two fragments (60 and 28 kilodaltons). The mechanism by which proteolytic cleavage leads to enhanced growth is unknown. To determine whether trypsin treatment affected rotavirus internalization, the authors studied the kinetics of entry of infectious rhesus rotavirus (RRV) into MA104 cells. Trypsin-activated RRV was internalized with a half-time of 3 to 5 min, while nonactivated virus disappeared from the cell surface with a half-time of 30 to 50 min. In contrast to trypsin-activated RRV, loss of nonactivated RRV from the cell surface did not result in the appearance of infection, as measured by plaque formation. Purified trypsin-activated RRV added to cell monolayers at pH 7.4 mediated {sup 51}Cr, ({sup 14}C)choline, and ({sup 3}H)inositol released from prelabeled MA104 cells. This release could be specifically blocked by neutralizing antibodies to VP3. These results suggest that MA104 cell infection follows the rapid entry of trypsin-activated RRV by direct cell membrane penetration. Cell membrane penetration of infectious RRV is initiated by trypsin cleavage of VP3. Neutralizing antibodies can inhibit this direct membrane penetration.

  12. Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing

    SciTech Connect

    Fletcher, James H.; Cox, Philip; Harrington, William J; Campbell, Joseph L

    2013-09-03

    ABSTRACT Project Title: Recovery Act: Advanced Direct Methanol Fuel Cell for Mobile Computing PROJECT OBJECTIVE The objective of the project was to advance portable fuel cell system technology towards the commercial targets of power density, energy density and lifetime. These targets were laid out in the DOE’s R&D roadmap to develop an advanced direct methanol fuel cell power supply that meets commercial entry requirements. Such a power supply will enable mobile computers to operate non-stop, unplugged from the wall power outlet, by using the high energy density of methanol fuel contained in a replaceable fuel cartridge. Specifically this project focused on balance-of-plant component integration and miniaturization, as well as extensive component, subassembly and integrated system durability and validation testing. This design has resulted in a pre-production power supply design and a prototype that meet the rigorous demands of consumer electronic applications. PROJECT TASKS The proposed work plan was designed to meet the project objectives, which corresponded directly with the objectives outlined in the Funding Opportunity Announcement: To engineer the fuel cell balance-of-plant and packaging to meet the needs of consumer electronic systems, specifically at power levels required for mobile computing. UNF used existing balance-of-plant component technologies developed under its current US Army CERDEC project, as well as a previous DOE project completed by PolyFuel, to further refine them to both miniaturize and integrate their functionality to increase the system power density and energy density. Benefits of UNF’s novel passive water recycling MEA (membrane electrode assembly) and the simplified system architecture it enabled formed the foundation of the design approach. The package design was hardened to address orientation independence, shock, vibration, and environmental requirements. Fuel cartridge and fuel subsystems were improved to ensure effective fuel

  13. Low direct cytotoxicity of nabumetone on gastric mucosal cells.

    PubMed

    Arai, Yasuhiro; Tanaka, Ken-Ichiro; Ushijima, Hironori; Tomisato, Wataru; Tsutsumi, Shinji; Aburaya, Mayuko; Hoshino, Tatsuya; Yokomizo, Kazumi; Suzuki, Keitarou; Katsu, Takashi; Tsuchiya, Tomofusa; Mizushima, Tohru

    2005-09-01

    Prodrugs of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used for clinical purposes because they are not harmful to the gastrointestinal mucosa. We recently showed that NSAIDs have direct cytotoxicity in NSAID-induced gastric lesions. We show here that under conditions where the NSAIDs indomethacin and celecoxib clearly induce cell death, an NSAID prodrug, nabumetone, and its active metabolite 6-methoxy-2-naphthylacetic acid (6MNA), did not have such effects. Moreover, nabumetone and 6MNA exhibited much lower membrane permeabilizing activities than did indomethacin and celecoxib. We recently reported that when an orally administered NSAID was used in combination with a low dose of intravenously administered indomethacin, the severity of gastric lesions produced in rats depended on the cytotoxicity of the orally administered NSAID. Using a similar protocol, we show here that gastric lesions were produced when the orally administered NSAID was celecoxib, but not when nabumetone was used. We thus propose that the low direct cytotoxicity of nabumetone observed in vitro is maintained in vivo, and that the use of nabumetone does not harm the gastric mucosa. PMID:16133963

  14. Reactivity Descriptors for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Anode Catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrin, Peter; Nilekar, Anand U.; Greeley, Jeffrey P.; Mavrikakis, Manos; Rossmeisl, Jan

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the anode reaction in direct methanol fuel cells using a database of adsorption free energies for 16 intermediates on 12 close-packed transition metal surfaces calculated with periodic, selfconsistent, density functional theory (DFT–GGA). This database, combined with a simple electrokinetic model of the methanol electrooxidation reaction, yields mechanistic insights that are consistent with previous experimental and theoretical studies on Pt, and extends these insights to a broad spectrum of other transition metals. In addition, by using linear scaling relations between the adsorption free energies of various intermediates in the reaction network, we find that the results determined with the full database of adsorption energies can be estimated by knowing only two key descriptors for each metal surface: the free energies of OH and CO on the surface. Two mechanisms for methanol oxidation to CO₂ are investigated: an indirect mechanism that goes through a CO intermediate and a direct mechanism where methanol is oxidized to CO₂ without the formation of a CO intermediate. For the direct mechanism, we find that, because of CO poisoning, only a small current will result on all non-group 11 transition metals; of these metals, Pt is predicted to be the most active. For methanol decomposition via the indirect mechanism, we find that the onset potential is limited either by the ability to activate methanol, by the ability to activate water, or by surface poisoning by CO* or OH*/O*. Among pure metals, there is no obvious candidate for a good anode catalyst, and in order to design a better catalyst, one has to look for bi-functional surfaces such as the well-studied PtRu alloy.

  15. Investigating differential cell-matrix adhesion by directly comparative single-cell force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Dao, Lu; Gonnermann, Carina; Franz, Clemens M

    2013-11-01

    Tissue-embedded cells are often exposed to a complex mixture of extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules, to which they bind with different cell adhesion receptors and affinities. Differential cell adhesion to ECM components is believed to regulate many aspects of tissue function, such as the sorting of specific cell types into different tissue compartments or ECM niches. In turn, aberrant switches in cell adhesion preferences may contribute to cell misplacement, tissue invasion, and metastasis. Methods to determine differential adhesion profiles of single cells are therefore desirable, but established bulk assays usually only test cell population adhesion to a single type of ECM molecule. We have recently demonstrated that atomic force microscopy-based single-cell force spectroscopy (SCFS), performed on bifunctional, microstructured adhesion substrates, provides a useful tool for accurately quantitating differential matrix adhesion of single Chinese hamster ovary cells to laminin and collagen I. Here, we have extended this approach to include additional ECM substrates, such as bifunctional collagen I/collagen IV surfaces, as well as adhesion-passivated control surfaces. We investigate differential single cell adhesion to these substrates and analyze in detail suitable experimental conditions for comparative SCFS, including optimal cell-substrate contact times and the impact of force cycle repetitions on single cell adhesion force statistics. Insight gained through these experiments may help in adapting this technique to other ECM molecules and cell systems, making directly comparative SCFS a versatile tool for comparing receptor-mediated cell adhesion to different matrix molecules in a wide range of biological contexts. PMID:24089365

  16. Dkk-1 Inhibits Intestinal Epithelial Cell Migration by Attenuating Directional Polarization of Leading Edge Cells

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Stefan; Capaldo, Christopher T.; Samarin, Stanislav; Nava, Porfirio; Neumaier, Irmgard; Skerra, Arne; Sacks, David B.; Parkos, Charles A.

    2009-01-01

    Wnt signaling pathways regulate proliferation, motility, and survival in a variety of human cell types. Dickkopf-1 (Dkk-1) is a secreted Wnt antagonist that has been proposed to regulate tissue homeostasis in the intestine. In this report, we show that Dkk-1 is secreted by intestinal epithelial cells after wounding and that it inhibits cell migration by attenuating the directional orientation of migrating epithelial cells. Dkk-1 exposure induced mislocalized activation of Cdc42 in migrating cells, which coincided with a displacement of the polarity protein Par6 from the leading edge. Consequently, the relocation of the microtubule organizing center and the Golgi apparatus in the direction of migration was significantly and persistently inhibited in the presence of Dkk-1. Small interfering RNA-induced down-regulation of Dkk-1 confirmed that extracellular exposure to Dkk-1 was required for this effect. Together, these data demonstrate a novel role of Dkk-1 in the regulation of directional polarization of migrating intestinal epithelial cells, which contributes to the effect of Dkk-1 on wound closure in vivo. PMID:19776352

  17. A Direct Carbon Fuel Cell with a Molten Antimony Anode

    SciTech Connect

    Jayakumar, Abhimanyu; Kungas, Rainer; Roy, Sounak; Javadekar, Ashay; Buttrey, Douglas J.; Vohs, John M.; Gorte, Raymond J.

    2011-01-01

    The direct utilization of carbonaceous fuels is examined in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) with a molten Sb anode at 973 K. It is demonstrated that the anode operates by oxidation of metallic Sb at the electrolyte interface, with the resulting Sb₂O₃ being reduced by the fuel in a separate step. Although the Nernst Potential for the Sb-Sb₂O₃ mixture is only 0.75 V, the electrode resistance associated with molten Sb is very low, approximately 0.06 Ωcm², so that power densities greater than 350 mW cm⁻² were achieved with an electrolyte-supported cell made from Sc-stabilized zirconia (ScSZ). Temperature programmed reaction measurements of Sb₂O₃ with sugar char, rice starch, carbon black, and graphite showed that the Sb₂O₃ is readily reduced by a range of carbonaceous solids at typical SOFC operating conditions. Finally, stable operation with a power density of 300 mW cm⁻² at a potential of 0.5 V is demonstrated for operation on sugar char.

  18. Improved Flow-Field Structures for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Bogdan

    2013-05-31

    The direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is ideal if high energy-density liquid fuels are required. Liquid fuels have advantages over compressed hydrogen including higher energy density and ease of handling. Although state-of-the-art DMFCs exhibit manageable degradation rates, excessive fuel crossover diminishes system energy and power density. Although use of dilute methanol mitigates crossover, the concomitant lowering of the gross fuel energy density (GFED) demands a complex balance-of-plant (BOP) that includes higher flow rates, external exhaust recirculation, etc. An alternative approach is redesign of the fuel delivery system to accommodate concentrated methanol. NuVant Systems Inc. (NuVant) will maximize the GFED by design and assembly of a DMFC that uses near neat methanol. The approach is to tune the diffusion of highly concentrated methanol (to the anode catalytic layer) to the back-diffusion of water formed at the cathode (i.e. in situ generation of dilute methanol at the anode layer). Crossover will be minimized without compromising the GFED by innovative integration of the anode flow-field and the diffusion layer. The integrated flow-field-diffusion-layers (IFDLs) will widen the current and potential DMFC operating ranges and enable the use of cathodes optimized for hydrogen-air fuel cells.

  19. Direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cell design and performance evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Zuria, A.; Dector, A.; Cuevas-Muñiz, F. M.; Esquivel, J. P.; Sabaté, N.; Ledesma-García, J.; Arriaga, L. G.; Chávez-Ramírez, A. U.

    2014-12-01

    This work reports the evolution of design, fabrication and testing of direct formic acid microfluidic fuel cells (DFAμFFC), the architecture and channel dimensions are miniaturized from a thousand to few cents of micrometers. Three generations of DFAμFFCs are presented, from the initial Y-shape configuration made by a hot pressing technique; evolving into a novel miniaturized fuel cell based on microfabrication technology using SU-8 photoresist as core material; to the last air-breathing μFFC with enhanced performance and built with low cost materials and processes. The three devices were evaluated in acidic media in the presence of formic acid as fuel and oxygen/air as oxidant. Commercial Pt/C (30 wt. % E-TEK) and Pd/C XC-72 (20 wt. %, E-TEK) were used as cathode and anode electrodes respectively. The air-breathing μFFC generation, delivered up to 27.3 mW cm-2 for at least 30 min, which is a competitive power density value at the lowest fuel flow of 200 μL min-1 reported to date.

  20. Towards operating direct methanol fuel cells with highly concentrated fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T. S.; Yang, W. W.; Chen, R.; Wu, Q. X.

    A significant advantage of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) is the high specific energy of the liquid fuel, making it particularly suitable for portable and mobile applications. Nevertheless, conventional DMFCs have to be operated with excessively diluted methanol solutions to limit methanol crossover and the detrimental consequences. Operation with diluted methanol solutions significantly reduces the specific energy of the power pack and thereby prevents it from competing with advanced batteries. In view of this fact, there exists a need to improve conventional DMFC system designs, including membrane electrode assemblies and the subsystems for supplying/removing reactants/products, so that both the cell performance and the specific energy can be simultaneously maximized. This article provides a comprehensive review of past efforts on the optimization of DMFC systems that operate with concentrated methanol. Based on the discussion of the key issues associated with transport of the reactants/products, the strategies to manage the supply/removal of the reactants/products in DMFC operating with highly concentrated methanol are identified. With these strategies, the possible approaches to achieving the goal of concentrated fuel operation are then proposed. Past efforts in the management of the reactants/products for implementing each of the approaches are also summarized and reviewed.

  1. Direct fuel cell - A high proficiency power generator for biofuels

    SciTech Connect

    Patel, P.S.; Steinfeld, G.; Baker, B.S.

    1994-12-31

    Conversion of renewable bio-based resources into energy offers significant benefits for our environment and domestic economic activity. It also improves national security by displacing fossil fuels. However, in the current economic environment, it is difficult for biofuel systems to compete with other fossil fuels. The biomass-fired power plants are typically smaller than 50 MW, lower in electrical efficiencies (<25%) and experience greater costs for handling and transporting the biomass. When combined with fuel cells such as the Direct Fuel Cell (DFC), biofuels can produce power more efficiently with negligible environmental impact. Agricultural and other waste biomass can be converted to ethanol or methane-rich biofuels for power generation use in the DFC. These DFC power plants are modular and factory assembled. Due to their electrochemical (non-combustion) conversion process, these plants are environmentally friendly, highly efficient and potentially cost effective, even in sizes as small as a few meagawatts. They can be sited closer to the source of the biomass to minimize handling and transportation costs. The high-grade waste heat available from DFC power plants makes them attractive in cogeneration applications for farming and rural communities. The DFC potentially opens up new markets for biofuels derived from wood, grains and other biomass waste products.

  2. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  3. Turgor Regulation in Osmotically Stressed Arabidopsis Epidermal Root Cells. Direct Support for the Role of Inorganic Ion Uptake as Revealed by Concurrent Flux and Cell Turgor Measurements1

    PubMed Central

    Shabala, Sergey N.; Lew, Roger R.

    2002-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress is known to significantly enhance net uptake of inorganic ions into plant cells. Direct evidence for cell turgor recovery via such a mechanism, however, is still lacking. In the present study, we performed concurrent measurements of net ion fluxes (with the noninvasive microelectrode ion flux estimation technique) and cell turgor changes (with the pressure-probe technique) to provide direct evidence that inorganic ion uptake regulates turgor in osmotically stressed Arabidopsis epidermal root cells. Immediately after onset of hyperosmotic stress (100/100 mm mannitol/sorbitol treatment), the cell turgor dropped from 0.65 to about 0.25 MPa. Turgor recovery started within 2 to 10 min after the treatment and was accompanied by a significant (30–80 nmol m−2 s−1) increase in uptake of K+, Cl−, and Na+ by root cells. In most cells, almost complete (>90% of initial values) recovery of the cell turgor was observed within 40 to 50 min after stress onset. In another set of experiments, we combined the voltage-clamp and the microelectrode ion flux estimation techniques to show that this process is, in part, mediated by voltage-gated K+ transporters at the cell plasma membrane. The possible physiological significance of these findings is discussed. PMID:12011359

  4. Endothelial Cells Direct Mesenchymal Stem Cells Toward a Smooth Muscle Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Cho-Hao

    2014-01-01

    Under defined conditions, mesenchymal stem cells can differentiate into unique cell types, making them attractive candidates for cell-based disease therapies. Ischemic diseases would greatly benefit from treatments that include the formation of new blood vessels from mesenchymal stem cells. However, blood vessels are complex structures composed of endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells, and their assembly and function in a diseased environment is reliant upon joining with the pre-existing vasculature. Although endothelial cell/smooth muscle cell interactions are well known, how endothelial cells may influence mesenchymal stem cells and facilitate their differentiation has not been defined. Therefore, we sought to explore how endothelial cells might drive mesenchymal stem cells toward a smooth muscle fate. Our data show that cocultured endothelial cells induce smooth muscle cell differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. Endothelial cells can promote a contractile phenotype, reduce proliferation, and enhance collagen synthesis and secretion. Our data show that Notch signaling is essential for endothelial cell-dependent differentiation, and this differentiation pathway is largely independent of growth factor signaling mechanisms. PMID:24914692

  5. Gastric cancer stem cells: evidence, potential markers, and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Brungs, Daniel; Aghmesheh, Morteza; Vine, Kara L; Becker, Therese M; Carolan, Martin G; Ranson, Marie

    2016-04-01

    Gastric cancer is a significant global health problem. It is the fifth most common cancer and third leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide (Torre et al. in CA Cancer J Clin 65(2):87-108, 2015). Despite advances in treatment, overall prognosis remains poor, due to tumour relapse and metastasis. There is an urgent need for novel therapeutic approaches to improve clinical outcomes in gastric cancer. The cancer stem cell (CSC) model has been proposed to explain the high rate of relapse and subsequent resistance of cancer to current systemic treatments (Vermeulen et al. in Lancet Oncol 13(2):e83-e89, 2012). CSCs have been identified in many solid malignancies, including gastric cancer, and have significant clinical implications, as targeting the CSC population may be essential in preventing the recurrence and spread of a tumour (Dewi et al. in J Gastroenterol 46(10):1145-1157, 2011). This review seeks to summarise the current evidence for CSC in gastric cancer, with an emphasis on candidate CSC markers, clinical implications, and potential therapeutic approaches. PMID:26428661

  6. Evidences Suggesting Involvement of Viruses in Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kanupriya; Metgud, Rashmi

    2013-01-01

    Oral cancer is one of the most common cancers and it constitutes a major health problem particularly in developing countries. Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) represents the most frequent of all oral neoplasms. Several risk factors have been well characterized to be associated with OSCC with substantial evidences. The etiology of OSCC is complex and involves many factors. The most clearly defined potential factors are smoking and alcohol, which substantially increase the risk of OSCC. However, despite this clear association, a substantial proportion of patients develop OSCC without exposure to them, emphasizing the role of other risk factors such as genetic susceptibility and oncogenic viruses. Some viruses are strongly associated with OSCC while the association of others is less frequent and may depend on cofactors for their carcinogenic effects. Therefore, the exact role of viruses must be evaluated with care in order to improve the diagnosis and treatment of OSCC. Although a viral association within a subset of OSCC has been shown, the molecular and histopathological characteristics of these tumors have yet to be clearly defined. PMID:24455418

  7. Direct effects of music in non-auditory cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Lestard, Nathalia Dos Reis; Valente, Raphael C; Lopes, Anibal G; Capella, Márcia A M

    2013-01-01

    The biological effects of electromagnetic waves are widely studied, especially due to their harmful effects, such as radiation-induced cancer and to their application in diagnosis and therapy. However, the biological effects of sound, another physical agent to which we are frequently exposed have been considerably disregarded by the scientific community. Although a number of studies suggest that emotions evoked by music may be useful in medical care, alleviating stress and nociception in patients undergoing surgical procedures as well as in cancer and burned patients, little is known about the mechanisms by which these effects occur. It is generally accepted that the mechanosensory hair cells in the ear transduce the sound-induced mechanical vibrations into neural impulses, which are interpreted by the brain and evoke the emotional effects. In the last decade; however, several studies suggest that the response to music is even more complex. Moreover, recent evidence comes out that cell types other than auditory hair cells could response to audible sound. However, what is actually sensed by the hair cells, and possible by other cells in our organism, are physical differences in fluid pressure induced by the sound waves. Therefore, there is no reasonable impediment for any cell type of our body to respond to a pure sound or to music. Hence, the aim of the present study was to evaluate the response of a human breast cancer cell line, MCF7, to music. The results' obtained suggest that music can alter cellular morpho-functional parameters, such as cell size and granularity in cultured cells. Moreover, our results suggest for the 1 st time that music can directly interfere with hormone binding to their targets, suggesting that music or audible sounds could modulate physiological and pathophysiological processes. PMID:23955127

  8. Future treatment directions for HPV-associated head and neck cancer based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Marcu, Loredana G

    2016-07-01

    A relatively new entity of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma located in the oropharynx and associated to the human papillomavirus (HPV) is on the rise. This cancer represents a distinct entity from the non-HPV tumours, holds different biological characteristics and responds differently to treatment. An outcome analysis of locoregionally-advanced oropharyngeal versus non-oropharyngeal cancers treated with chemo-radiotherapy revealed a statistically significant improvement for oropharyngeal cancers, which are thought to be due to their HPV-association. Consequently, more attention is paid to HPV-related head and neck cancers, given that HPV status serves as prognostic marker in oropharyngeal cancer patients. Yet, HPV positivity is a simplistic approach for risk stratification, thus more robust biomarkers are needed to fulfil this task. Despite differences in clinical response, HPV-related oral cancers undergo similar therapy to their non-HPV counterparts. This review discusses future treatment directions for HPV-related oropharyngeal cancers based on radiobiological rationale and current clinical evidence. PMID:27221393

  9. Integrin-mediated cell surface recruitment of autotaxin promotes persistent directional cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Tao; Kooi, Craig Vander; Shah, Pritom; Charnigo, Richard; Huang, Cai; Smyth, Susan S.; Morris, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D (lysoPLD) that binds to integrin adhesion receptors. We dissected the roles of integrin binding and lysoPLD activity in stimulation of human breast cancer and mouse aortic vascular smooth muscle cell migration by ATX. We compared effects of wild-type human ATX, catalytically inactive ATX, an integrin binding-defective ATX variant with wild-type lysoPLD activity, the isolated ATX integrin binding N-terminal domain, and a potent ATX selective lysoPLD inhibitor on cell migration using transwell and single-cell tracking assays. Stimulation of transwell migration was reduced (18 or 27% of control, respectively) but not ablated by inactivation of integrin binding or inhibition of lysoPLD activity. The N-terminal domain increased transwell migration (30% of control). ATX lysoPLD activity and integrin binding were necessary for a 3.8-fold increase in the fraction of migrating breast cancer cell step velocities >0.7 μm/min. ATX increased the persistent directionality of single-cell migration 2-fold. This effect was lysoPLD activity independent and recapitulated by the integrin binding N-terminal domain. Integrin binding enables uptake and intracellular sequestration of ATX, which redistributes to the front of migrating cells. ATX binding to integrins and lysoPLD activity therefore cooperate to promote rapid persistent directional cell migration.—Wu, T., Kooi, C. V., Shah, P., Charnigo, R., Huang, C., Smyth, S. S., Morris, A. J. Integrin-mediated cell surface recruitment of autotaxin promotes persistent directional cell migration. PMID:24277575

  10. Evidence for Cryptic Speciation in Directly Transmitted Gyrodactylid Parasites of Trinidadian Guppies

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Raquel; Faria, Patricia J.; Paladini, Giuseppe; van Oosterhout, Cock; Johnson, Mireille; Cable, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Cryptic species complexes are common among parasites, which tend to have large populations and are subject to rapid evolution. Such complexes may arise through host-parasite co-evolution and/or host switching. For parasites that reproduce directly on their host, there might be increased opportunities for sympatric speciation, either by exploiting different hosts or different micro-habitats within the same host. The genus Gyrodactylus is a specious group of viviparous monogeneans. These ectoparasites transfer between teleosts during social contact and cause significant host mortality. Their impact on the guppy (Poecilia reticulata), an iconic evolutionary and ecological model species, is well established and yet the population genetics and phylogenetics of these parasites remains understudied. Using mtDNA sequencing of the host and its parasites, we provide evidence of cryptic speciation in Gyrodactylus bullatarudis, G. poeciliae and G. turnbulli. For the COII gene, genetic divergence of lineages within each parasite species ranged between 5.7 and 17.2%, which is typical of the divergence observed between described species in this genus. Different lineages of G. turnbulli and G. poeciliae appear geographically isolated, which could imply allopatric speciation. In addition, for G. poeciliae, co-evolution with a different host species cannot be discarded due to its host range. This parasite was originally described on P. caucana, but for the first time here it is also recorded on the guppy. The two cryptic lineages of G. bullatarudis showed considerable geographic overlap. G. bullatarudis has a known wide host range and it can also utilize a killifish (Anablepsoides hartii) as a temporary host. This killifish is capable of migrating overland and it could act as a transmission vector between otherwise isolated populations. Additional genetic markers are needed to confirm the presence of these cryptic Gyrodactylus species complexes, potentially leading to more in

  11. Direct phylogenetic evidence for lateral transfer of elongation factor-like gene

    PubMed Central

    Kamikawa, Ryoma; Inagaki, Yuji; Sako, Yoshihiko

    2008-01-01

    Genes encoding elongation factor-like (EFL) proteins, which show high similarity to elongation factor-1α (EF-1α), have been found in phylogenetically distantly related eukaryotes. The sporadic distribution of “EFL-containing” lineages within “EF-1α-containing” lineages indirectly, but strongly, suggests lateral gene transfer as the principal driving force in EFL evolution. However, one of the most critical aspects in the above hypothesis, the donor lineages in any putative cases of lateral EFL gene transfer, remained unclear. In this study, we provide direct evidence for lateral transfer of an EFL gene through the analyses of 10 diatom EFL genes. All diatom EFL homologues tightly clustered in phylogenetic analyses, suggesting acquisition of the exogenous EFL gene early in diatom evolution. Our survey additionally identified Thalassiosira pseudonana as a eukaryote bearing EF-1α and EFL genes and secondary EFL gene loss in Phaeodactylum tricornutum, the complete genome of which encodes only the EF-1α gene. Most importantly, the EFL phylogeny recovered a robust grouping of homologues from diatoms, the cercozoan Bigelowiella natans, and the foraminifer Planoglabratella opecularis, with the diatoms nested within the Bigelowiella plus Planoglabratella (Rhizaria) grouping. The particular relationships recovered are further consistent with two characteristic sequence motifs. The best explanation of our data analyses is an EFL gene transfer from a foraminifer to a diatom, the first case in which the donor–recipient relationship was clarified. Finally, based on a reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR assay and the genome information of Thalassiosira and Phaeodactylum, we propose the loss of elongation factor function in Thalassiosira EF-1α. PMID:18458344

  12. Direct Evidence for an Enhancement of Helium in Giant Stars in Omega Centauri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, A. K.; Strader, Jay; Smith, Graeme H.

    2011-02-01

    The double main sequence identified in the globular cluster Omega Centauri has been interpreted using isochrones to indicate a large variation in the abundance of helium. If true, a helium enhancement carries strong implications for the chemical and stellar evolutionary history of this cluster. However, only indirect measures currently support this conjecture. We report the discovery of a variation in the line strength of the near-infrared He I 10830 Å transition in 12 similar red giants in Omega Centauri observed with PHOENIX on Gemini-S. Abundances of these stars derived from Magellan/MIKE spectra taken at the Las Campanas Observatory show that the helium transition is not detected in the most metal-poor population ([Fe/H] < -1.8), yet is present in the majority of stars with [Fe/H] >= -1.8. These observations give the first direct evidence for an enhancement of helium in Omega Centauri. The appearance of helium appears better correlated with increased [Al/Fe] and [Na/Fe] abundances than as a function of [Fe/H], giving observational support to the presence of high-temperature H burning in a prior generation of stars. Data presented herein were obtained at the Gemini Observatory, which is operated by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., under a cooperative agreement with the NSF on behalf of the Gemini partnership: the National Science Foundation (United States), the Science and Technology Facilities Council (United Kingdom), the National Research Council (Canada), CONICYT (Chile), the Australian Research Council (Australia), Ministério da Ciência e Tecnologia (Brazil), and Ministerio de Ciencia, Tecnología e Innovación Productiva (Argentina). This paper also includes spectra gathered with the 6.5 m Magellan Telescope/CLAY located at Las Campanas Observatory, Chile.

  13. Direct evidence for Antarctic Ice-Sheet variability across the Eocene-Oligocene boundary climate transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeotti, S.; DeConto, R.; Florindo, F.; Lanci, L.; Naish, T.; Pagani, M.; Pollard, D.; Talarico, F.

    2011-12-01

    About ~34 million years ago, at the Eocene-Oligocene (E-O) boundary, Earth's climate underwent a substantial change from relatively ice-free "greenhouse" conditions to a glacial state marked by the establishment of a permanent ice sheet on Antarctica. Geochemical data and modeling suggests that decline of atmospheric pCO2 to a threshold level around 2.5X pre-industrial levels concomitant with an optimal orbital configuration for cold southern hemisphere summers provided the precursory conditions for extensive glaciation of Antarctica. Previous geological drill core records from the Antarctic margin indicate that the ice sheet reached continental extent and was calving at the coastline by the Earliest Oligocene. Notwithstanding these, our understanding of Antarctic cryospheric evolution across the E-O climate transition, relies almost entirely on marine geochemical proxies and reconstruction of sea-level changes from continental margin sequences. Hitherto it has not been possible to reconcile the pattern of inferred ice-sheet growth from these "far-field" proxy records with direct physical evidence of ice-volume changes from the Antarctic continental margin. Here we correlate cyclical changes recorded in sediment cores from western Ross Sea, which are related to oscillations in the volume of a growing East Antarctic Ice Sheet, with well-dated lower latitude records of orbital forcing and climate change across the E-O transition. We show that the EAIS was relatively small and unstable during the first ~200 thousands of years (kyr) of the E-O transition and that fully glaciated conditions did not occur until ~32.8 Ma, more than a million years after the glacial maximum of the climatic transition as recorded by geochemical proxies.

  14. DIRECT EVIDENCE OF COLD GAS IN DLA 0812+32B

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Carswell, Robert F.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Xavier Prochaska, J.

    2009-10-10

    We present the first direct evidence for cold gas in a high redshift DLA galaxy. We measured several multiplets of weak neutral carbon (C I) transitions in order to perform a curve of growth analysis. A DELTA chi{sup 2} test constrains the best-fit Doppler parameter, b = 0.33{sup +0.05}{sub -0.04} km s{sup -1} and log N(C I) = 13.30 +- 0.2 cm{sup -2}. This Doppler parameter constrains the kinetic temperature of the gas to T <= 78 K (T <= 115 K, 2sigma). We used the associated C I fine structure lines to constrain the volume density of the gas, n(H I) approx40-200 cm{sup -3} (2sigma), resulting in a lower limit on the cloud size of approximately 0.1-1 parsec. While it is difficult to determine the metallicity of the cold component, the absence of Cr II indicates that the cold cloud suffers a high level of dust depletion. Additionally, the large amount of Lyman and Werner-band molecular hydrogen absorption (log N(H{sub 2}){sub total} = 19.88 cm{sup -2}, f{sub H{sub 2}} >= 0.06) with an excitation temperature of T{sub ex} = 46 K as determined by the rotational J = 0 and J = 1 states, is consistent with the presence of cold gas. We propose that this cloud may be gravitationally confined and may represent a transition gas phase from primarily neutral atomic gas, to a colder, denser molecular phase that will eventually host star formation.

  15. Evidence for a retinal velocity memory underlying the direction of anticipatory smooth pursuit eye movements.

    PubMed

    Murdison, T Scott; Paré-Bingley, Chanel A; Blohm, Gunnar

    2013-08-01

    To compute spatially correct smooth pursuit eye movements, the brain uses both retinal motion and extraretinal signals about the eyes and head in space (Blohm and Lefèvre 2010). However, when smooth eye movements rely solely on memorized target velocity, such as during anticipatory pursuit, it is unknown if this velocity memory also accounts for extraretinal information, such as head roll and ocular torsion. To answer this question, we used a novel behavioral updating paradigm in which participants pursued a repetitive, spatially constant fixation-gap-ramp stimulus in series of five trials. During the first four trials, participants' heads were rolled toward one shoulder, inducing ocular counterroll (OCR). With each repetition, participants increased their anticipatory pursuit gain, indicating a robust encoding of velocity memory. On the fifth trial, they rolled their heads to the opposite shoulder before pursuit, also inducing changes in ocular torsion. Consequently, for spatially accurate anticipatory pursuit, the velocity memory had to be updated across changes in head roll and ocular torsion. We tested how the velocity memory accounted for head roll and OCR by observing the effects of changes to these signals on anticipatory trajectories of the memory decoding (fifth) trials. We found that anticipatory pursuit was updated for changes in head roll; however, we observed no evidence of compensation for OCR, representing the absence of ocular torsion signals within the velocity memory. This indicated that the directional component of the memory must be coded retinally and updated to account for changes in head roll, but not OCR. PMID:23678014

  16. Direct evidence for a Coulombic phase in monopole-suppressed SU(2) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grady, Michael

    2013-11-01

    Further evidence is presented for the existence of a non-confining phase at weak coupling in SU(2) lattice gauge theory. Using Monte Carlo simulations with the standard Wilson action, gauge-invariant SO(3)-Z2 monopoles, which are strong-coupling lattice artifacts, have been seen to undergo a percolation transition exactly at the phase transition previously seen using Coulomb gauge methods, with an infinite lattice critical point near β=3.2. The theory with both Z2 vortices and monopoles and SO(3)-Z2 monopoles eliminated is simulated in the strong-coupling (β=0) limit on lattices up to 604. Here, as in the high-β phase of the Wilson-action theory, finite size scaling shows it spontaneously breaks the remnant symmetry left over after Coulomb gauge fixing. Such a symmetry breaking precludes the potential from having a linear term. The monopole restriction appears to prevent the transition to a confining phase at any β. Direct measurement of the instantaneous Coulomb potential shows a Coulombic form with moderately running coupling possibly approaching an infrared fixed point of α˜1.4. The Coulomb potential is measured to 50 lattice spacings and 2 fm. A short-distance fit to the 2-loop perturbative potential is used to set the scale. High precision at such long distances is made possible through the use of open boundary conditions, which was previously found to cut random and systematic errors of the Coulomb gauge fixing procedure dramatically. The Coulomb potential agrees with the gauge-invariant interquark potential measured with smeared Wilson loops on periodic lattices as far as the latter can be practically measured with similar statistics data.

  17. Direct Evidence of Cold Gas in DLA 0812+32B

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jorgenson, Regina A.; Wolfe, Arthur M.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Carswell, Robert F.

    2009-10-01

    We present the first direct evidence for cold gas in a high redshift DLA galaxy. We measured several multiplets of weak neutral carbon (C I) transitions in order to perform a curve of growth analysis. A Δ χ2 test constrains the best-fit Doppler parameter, b = 0.33+0.05 -0.04 km s-1 and log N(C I) = 13.30 ± 0.2 cm-2. This Doppler parameter constrains the kinetic temperature of the gas to T <= 78 K (T <= 115 K, 2σ). We used the associated C I fine structure lines to constrain the volume density of the gas, n(H I) ~40-200 cm-3 (2σ), resulting in a lower limit on the cloud size of approximately 0.1-1 parsec. While it is difficult to determine the metallicity of the cold component, the absence of Cr II indicates that the cold cloud suffers a high level of dust depletion. Additionally, the large amount of Lyman and Werner-band molecular hydrogen absorption (log N(H2)total = 19.88 cm-2, f _H_2 ≥ 0.06) with an excitation temperature of T ex = 46 K as determined by the rotational J = 0 and J = 1 states, is consistent with the presence of cold gas. We propose that this cloud may be gravitationally confined and may represent a transition gas phase from primarily neutral atomic gas, to a colder, denser molecular phase that will eventually host star formation.

  18. PLASMA OXYTOCIN CONCENTRATION AND DEPRESSIVE SYMPTOMS: A REVIEW OF CURRENT EVIDENCE AND DIRECTIONS FOR FUTURE RESEARCH.

    PubMed

    Massey, Suena H; Backes, Katherine A; Schuette, Stephanie A

    2016-04-01

    There is substantial recent interest in the role of oxytocin in social and affiliative behaviors-animal models of depression have suggested a link between oxytocin and mood. We reviewed literature to date for evidence of a potential relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms in humans. Pubmed(®) and PsychINFO(®) were searched for biomedical and social sciences literature from 1960 to May 19, 2015 for empirical articles in English involving human subjects focused on the relationship between peripheral oxytocin concentration and depressive symptoms, excluding articles on the oxytocin receptor gene, or involving exogenous (i.e. intranasal) administration of oxytocin. Eight studies meeting criteria were identified and formally reviewed. Studies of pregnant women suggested an inverse relationship between oxytocin level and depressive symptom severity. Findings in nonpregnant women were broadly consistent with the role of oxytocin release in response to stress supported by animal studies. The relationship between oxytocin and depression in men appeared to be in the opposite direction, possibly reflecting the influence of gonadal hormones on oxytocinergic functioning found in other mammalian species. Overall, small sample sizes, heterogeneity in study designs, and other methodological limitations may account for inconsistent findings. Future research utilizing reliable oxytocin measurement protocols including measurements across time, larger sample sizes, and sample homogeneity with respect to multiple possible confounders (age, gender, race and ethnicity, ovarian status among women, and psychosocial context) are needed to elucidate the role of oxytocin in the pathogenesis of depression, and could guide the design of novel pharmacologic agents. PMID:26756305

  19. Left-right asymmetric cell intercalation drives directional collective cell movement in epithelial morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Emi; Isomura, Ayako; Shibata, Tatsuo; Kuranaga, Erina

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenetic epithelial movement occurs during embryogenesis and drives complex tissue formation. However, how epithelial cells coordinate their unidirectional movement while maintaining epithelial integrity is unclear. Here we propose a novel mechanism for collective epithelial cell movement based on Drosophila genitalia rotation, in which epithelial tissue rotates clockwise around the genitalia. We found that this cell movement occurs autonomously and requires myosin II. The moving cells exhibit repeated left-right-biased junction remodelling, while maintaining adhesion with their neighbours, in association with a polarized myosin II distribution. Reducing myosinID, known to cause counter-clockwise epithelial-tissue movement, reverses the myosin II distribution. Numerical simulations revealed that a left-right asymmetry in cell intercalation is sufficient to induce unidirectional cellular movement. The cellular movement direction is also associated with planar cell-shape chirality. These findings support a model in which left-right asymmetric cell intercalation within an epithelial sheet drives collective cellular movement in the same direction. PMID:26656655

  20. Left–right asymmetric cell intercalation drives directional collective cell movement in epithelial morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Katsuhiko; Hiraiwa, Tetsuya; Maekawa, Emi; Isomura, Ayako; Shibata, Tatsuo; Kuranaga, Erina

    2015-01-01

    Morphogenetic epithelial movement occurs during embryogenesis and drives complex tissue formation. However, how epithelial cells coordinate their unidirectional movement while maintaining epithelial integrity is unclear. Here we propose a novel mechanism for collective epithelial cell movement based on Drosophila genitalia rotation, in which epithelial tissue rotates clockwise around the genitalia. We found that this cell movement occurs autonomously and requires myosin II. The moving cells exhibit repeated left–right-biased junction remodelling, while maintaining adhesion with their neighbours, in association with a polarized myosin II distribution. Reducing myosinID, known to cause counter-clockwise epithelial-tissue movement, reverses the myosin II distribution. Numerical simulations revealed that a left–right asymmetry in cell intercalation is sufficient to induce unidirectional cellular movement. The cellular movement direction is also associated with planar cell-shape chirality. These findings support a model in which left–right asymmetric cell intercalation within an epithelial sheet drives collective cellular movement in the same direction. PMID:26656655

  1. Transplantation directs oocyte maturation from embryonic stem cells and provides a therapeutic strategy for female infertility

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Cory R.; Haston, Kelly M.; Grewall, Amarjeet K.; Longacre, Teri A.; Reijo Pera, Renee A.

    2009-01-01

    Ten to 15% of couples are infertile, with the most common causes being linked to the production of few or no oocytes or sperm. Yet, our understanding of human germ cell development is poor, at least in part due to the inaccessibility of early stages to genetic and developmental studies. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) provide an in vitro system to study oocyte development and potentially treat female infertility. However, most studies of ESC differentiation to oocytes have not documented fundamental properties of endogenous development, making it difficult to determine the physiologic relevance of differentiated germ cells. Here, we sought to establish fundamental parameters of oocyte development during ESC differentiation to explore suitability for basic developmental genetic applications using the mouse as a model prior to translating to the human system. We demonstrate a timeline of definitive germ cell differentiation from ESCs in vitro that initially parallels endogenous oocyte development in vivo by single-cell expression profiling and analysis of functional milestones including responsiveness to defined maturation media, shared genetic requirement of Dazl, and entry into meiosis. However, ESC-derived oocyte maturation ultimately fails in vitro. To overcome this obstacle, we transplant ESC-derived oocytes into an ovarian niche to direct their functional maturation and, thereby, present rigorous evidence of oocyte physiologic relevance and a potential therapeutic strategy for infertility. PMID:19696121

  2. Direct fuel cell power plants: the final steps to commercialization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glenn, Donald R.

    Since the last paper presented at the Second Grove Fuel Cell Symposium, the Energy Research Corporation (ERC) has established two commercial subsidiaries, become a publically-held firm, expanded its facilities and has moved the direct fuel cell (DFC) technology and systems significantly closer to commercial readiness. The subsidiaries, the Fuel Cell Engineering Corporation (FCE) and Fuel Cell Manufacturing Corporation (FCMC) are perfecting their respective roles in the company's strategy to commercialize its DFC technology. FCE is the prime contractor for the Santa Clara Demonstration and is establishing the needed marketing, sales, engineering, and servicing functions. FCMC in addition to producing the stacks and stack modules for the Santa Clara demonstration plant is now upgrading its production capability and product yields, and retooling for the final stack scale-up for the commercial unit. ERC has built and operated the tallest and largest capacities-to-date carbonate fuel cell stacks as well as numerous short stacks. While most of these units were tested at ERC's Danbury, Connecticut (USA) R&D Center, others have been evaluated at other domestic and overseas facilities using a variety of fuels. ERC has supplied stacks to Elkraft and MTU for tests with natural gas, and RWE in Germany where coal-derived gas were used. Additional stack test activities have been performed by MELCO and Sanyo in Japan. Information from some of these activities is protected by ERC's license arrangements with these firms. However, permission for limited data releases will be requested to provide the Grove Conference with up-to-date results. Arguably the most dramatic demonstration of carbonate fuel cells in the utility-scale, 2 MW power plant demonstration unit, located in the City of Santa Clara, California. Construction of the unit's balance-of-plant (BOP) has been completed and the installed equipment has been operationally checked. Two of the four DFC stack sub-modules, each

  3. MiR-200c promotes bladder cancer cell migration and invasion by directly targeting RECK

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yidong; Zhang, Xiaolei; Li, Peng; Yang, Chengdi; Tang, Jinyuan; Deng, Xiaheng; Yang, Xiao; Tao, Jun; Lu, Qiang; Li, Pengchao

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing evidence suggests that the dysregulation of certain microRNAs plays an important role in tumorigenesis and metastasis. MiR-200c exhibits a disordered expression in many tumors and presents dual roles in bladder cancer (BC). Therefore, the definite role of miR-200c in BC needs to be investigated further. Materials and methods Quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction was used to assess miR-200c expression. Cell invasion and migration were evaluated using wound healing and transwell assays. The luciferase reporter assay was used to identify the direct target of miR-200c. The expression of reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motifs (RECK) in BC tissues and adjacent nontumor tissues, as well as in BC cell lines, was detected through quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Western blot assay, and immunohistochemistry. Results The miR-200c expression was significantly upregulated in the BC tissues compared with the adjacent nontumor tissues. The downregulation of miR-200c significantly inhibited cell migration and invasion in the BC cell lines. The luciferase reporter assay showed that RECK was a direct target of miR-200c. The knockdown of RECK in the BC cell lines treated with anti-miR-200c elevated the previously attenuated cell migration and invasion. Conclusion Our findings indicated that miR-200c functions as oncogenes in BC and may provide a novel therapeutic strategy for the treatment of BC. PMID:27574450

  4. Polarized Dendritic Cells as Cancer Vaccines: Directing Effector-type T Cells to Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Kalinski, Pawel; Okada, Hideho

    2010-01-01

    Ex-vivo-generation and antigen loading of dendritic cells (DCs) from cancer patients helps to bypass the dysfunction of endogenous DCs. It also allows to control the process of DC maturation and to imprint in maturing DCs several functions essential for induction of effective forms of cancer immunity. Recent reports from several groups including ours demonstrate that distinct conditions of DC generation and maturation can prime DCs for preferential interaction with different (effector versus regulatory) subsets of immune cells. Moreover, differentially-generated DCs have been shown to imprint different effector mechanisms in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells (delivery of “signal three”) and to induce their different homing properties (delivery of “signal four”). These developments allow for selective induction of tumor-specific T cells with desirable effector functions and tumor-relevant homing properties and to direct the desirable types of immune cells to tumors. PMID:20409732

  5. Evidence for preserved direct pupillary light response in Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy.

    PubMed Central

    Wakakura, M; Yokoe, J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND--Pupillary light response is usually defective in all types of optic neuropathy. However, the authors have observed in patients with Leber's hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) relatively normal light response, with consequent misdiagnosis psychogenic visual loss in some cases. To confirm this clinical impression, afferent pupillary defect was assessed by measurement of adjusted constriction amplitude (CA) and escape rate (ER) by infrared videopupillography (Iriscorder-C 2515). METHODS--Thirteen consecutive patients (26 eyes) with LHON (average age 27.2 years) were examined; 12 had the mitochondrial DNA 11778 mutation and one the 14484 mutation. Seven of these patients had a positive family history. For comparison, the above rates were determined in 19 patients (23 eyes) with idiopathic optic neuritis (ON; average age 35.1 years), 18 patients (19 eyes) with anterior ischaemic optic neuropathy (AION; average age 58.1 years), and 25 volunteers (50 eyes) with healthy eyes (average age 39.6 years). RESULTS--The distribution of visual acuity was essentially the same in all optic neuropathy groups. Reduction in CA and increase in ER were significant in patients with ON and AION, but not in those with LHON. Only slight afferent pupillary defect was evident even 2 years after the onset of LHON. CA in AION and ER in ON were correlated statistically with visual acuity and Humphrey mean threshold deviation, while CA and ER in LHON were not. CONCLUSION--Pupillary light response in patients with LHON obviously differs from that in patients with other types of optic neuropathy. LHON appears to be pathophysiologically characterised by well preserved afferent fibres for pupillary light response (probably from W cells). Besides being of pathogenetic interest, the detection of clinical features should facilitate the diagnosis of LHON particularly when family history provides no indication. PMID:7612556

  6. Evidence-based Medicine in Facial Plastic Surgery: Current State and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Dedhia, Raj; Hsieh, Tsung-Yen; Tollefson, Travis T; Ishii, Lisa E

    2016-08-01

    Evidence-based medicine (EBM) encompasses the evaluation and application of best available evidence, incorporation of clinical experience, and emphasis on patient preference and values. Different scales are used to rate levels of evidence. Translating available data for interventions to clinical practice guidelines requires an assessment of both the quality of evidence and the strength of recommendation. Essential to the practice of EBM is evaluating the effectiveness of an intervention through outcome measures. This article discusses principles essential to EBM, resources commonly used in EBM practice, and the strengths and limitations of EBM in facial plastic and reconstructive surgery. PMID:27400841

  7. A Goal-Directed Spatial Navigation Model Using Forward Trajectory Planning Based on Grid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Erdem, Uğur Murat; Hasselmo, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    A goal-directed navigation model is proposed based on forward linear look-ahead probe of trajectories in a network of head direction cells, grid cells, place cells, and prefrontal cortex (PFC) cells. The model allows selection of new goal-directed trajectories. In a novel environment, the virtual rat incrementally creates a map composed of place cells and PFC cells by random exploration. After exploration, the rat retrieves memory of the goal location, picks its next movement direction by forward linear look-ahead probe of trajectories in several candidate directions while stationary in one location, and finds the one activating PFC cells with the highest reward signal. Each probe direction involves activation of a static pattern of head direction cells to drive an interference model of grid cells to update their phases in a specific direction. The updating of grid cell spiking drives place cells along the probed look-ahead trajectory similar to the forward replay during waking seen in place cell recordings. Directions are probed until the look-ahead trajectory activates the reward signal and the corresponding direction is used to guide goal-finding behavior. We report simulation results in several mazes with and without barriers. Navigation with barriers requires a PFC map topology based on the temporal vicinity of visited place cells and a reward signal diffusion process. The interaction of the forward linear look-ahead trajectory probes with the reward diffusion allows discovery of never before experienced shortcuts towards a goal location. PMID:22393918

  8. Hippocampal place cell instability after lesions of the head direction cell network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calton, Jeffrey L.; Stackman, Robert W.; Goodridge, Jeremy P.; Archey, William B.; Dudchenko, Paul A.; Taube, Jeffrey S.; Oman, C. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The occurrence of cells that encode spatial location (place cells) or head direction (HD cells) in the rat limbic system suggests that these cell types are important for spatial navigation. We sought to determine whether place fields of hippocampal CA1 place cells would be altered in animals receiving lesions of brain areas containing HD cells. Rats received bilateral lesions of anterodorsal thalamic nuclei (ADN), postsubiculum (PoS), or sham lesions, before place cell recording. Although place cells from lesioned animals did not differ from controls on many place-field characteristics, such as place-field size and infield firing rate, the signal was significantly degraded with respect to measures of outfield firing rate, spatial coherence, and information content. Surprisingly, place cells from lesioned animals were more likely modulated by the directional heading of the animal. Rotation of the landmark cue showed that place fields from PoS-lesioned animals were not controlled by the cue and shifted unpredictably between sessions. Although fields from ADN-lesioned animals tended to have less landmark control than fields from control animals, this impairment was mild compared with cells recorded from PoS-lesioned animals. Removal of the prominent visual cue also led to instability of place-field representations in PoS-lesioned, but not ADN-lesioned, animals. Together, these findings suggest that an intact HD system is not necessary for the maintenance of place fields, but lesions of brain areas that convey the HD signal can degrade this signal, and lesions of the PoS might lead to perceptual or mnemonic deficits, leading to place-field instability between sessions.

  9. TGF-β-Induced Regulatory T Cells Directly Suppress B Cell Responses through a Noncytotoxic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Xu, Anping; Liu, Ya; Chen, Weiqian; Wang, Julie; Xue, Youqiu; Huang, Feng; Rong, Liming; Lin, Jin; Liu, Dahai; Yan, Mei; Li, Quan-Zhen; Li, Bin; Song, Jianxun; Olsen, Nancy; Zheng, Song Guo

    2016-05-01

    Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) playing a crucial role in the maintenance of immune tolerance and prevention of autoimmune diseases consist of thymus-derived naturally occurring CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells (nTreg) and those that can be induced ex vivo with TGF-β (iTreg). Although both Treg subsets share similar phenotypes and functional characteristics, they also have potential biologic differences on their biology. The role of iTreg in regulating B cells remains unclear so far. The suppression assays of Treg subsets on activation, proliferation, and Abs production of B cells were measured using a Treg and B cell coculture system in vitro. Transwell and Ab blockade experiments were performed to assess the roles of cell contact and soluble cytokines. Treg were adoptively transferred to lupus mice to assess in vivo effects on B cells. Like nTreg, iTreg subset also directly suppressed activation and proliferation of B cells. nTreg subset suppressed B cell responses through cytotoxic manner related to expression of granzyme A, granzyme B, and perforin, whereas the role of iTreg subset on B cells did not involve in cytotoxic action but depending on TGF-β signaling. Furthermore, iTreg subset can significantly suppress Ab produced by lupus B cells in vitro. Comparison experiments using autoantibodies microarrays demonstrated that adoptive transfer of iTreg had a superior effect than nTreg subset on suppressing lupus B cell responses in vivo. Our data implicate a role and advantage of iTreg subset in treating B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases, boosting the translational potential of these findings. PMID:27001954

  10. Self-aligned Schwann cell monolayers demonstrate an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seggio, A. M.; Narayanaswamy, A.; Roysam, B.; Thompson, D. M.

    2010-08-01

    In vivo nerve guidance channel studies have identified Schwann cell (SC) presence as an integral factor in axonal number and extension in an injury site, and in vitro studies have provided evidence that oriented SCs can direct neurite outgrowth. However, traditional methods used to create oriented SC monolayers (e.g. micropatterns/microtopography) potentially introduce secondary guidance cues to the neurons that are difficult to de-couple. Although SCs expanded on uniform laminin-coated coverslips lack a global orientation, the monolayers contain naturally formed regions of locally oriented cells that can be used to investigate SC-mediated neurite guidance. In this work, novel image analysis techniques have been developed to quantitatively assess local neurite orientation with respect to the underlying regional orientation of the Schwann cell monolayer. Results confirm that, in the absence of any secondary guidance cues, a positive correlation exists between neurite outgrowth and regional orientation of the SC monolayer. Thus, SCs alone possess an inherent ability to direct neurite outgrowth, and expansion of the co-culture-based quantitative method described can be used to further deconstruct specific biomolecular mechanisms of neurite guidance.

  11. Evidence for extremely rapid directional changes during the Brunhes-Matuyama polarity transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sagnotti, L.; Scardia, G.; Giaccio, B.; Liddicoat, J. C.; Nomade, S.; Renne, P. R.; Sprain, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    A continuous high-resolution record of the Brunhes-Matuyama (B-M) geomagnetic reversal has been acquired from a lacustrine sequence from the Sulmona basin, in the Central Apennines, Italy. The sedimentary sequence consists of a continuous and homogeneous whitish, biogenic calcareous mud deposit which includes several tephra layers. The sequence has been sampled and analyzed at high resolution both in a 65 m long drill core (SC1 core) collected from the depocenter of the basin and in a 3 m-thick exposed section (termed Horseshoe section) cropping out in close proximity to the SC1 drill site. The paleomagnetic and rock magnetic properties of the analyzed sequences were measured at 1-cm spacing on u-channel samples collected from the SC1 core as well as on fully oriented paleomagnetic cubes collected in a continuous stratigraphic order from the Horseshoe section spanning the stratigraphic interval across the B-M polarity transition. The records of various rock magnetic and paleomagnetic parameters from the core and outcrop sections can be matched at high-resolution and reliably tied by using tephras. The duplication of the paleomagnetic record on two distinct sections strengthen the reliability of the signal for geomagnetic reconstructions. Therefore, we use the paleomagnetic data from the Horseshoe section to reconstruct the dynamics of geomagnetic field variation across the B-M polarity reversal in the detail. Highly precise 40Ar/39Ar dating of two tephras at c. 100 cm above and 130 cm below the B-M geomagnetic reversal yielded ages of c. 782×2 ka and 793.8×1.8 ka (2σ), respectively. These datings indicate a mean sedimentation rate of c. 0.2 mm/a for the sampled interval in the Horseshoe section and thus that a single cubic specimen of 2 cm side represents about a century. Two evident relative paleointensity (RPI) minima have been identified in the paleomagnetic record, which mark the reversal precursor and the final B-M polarity transition. In the Horseshoe

  12. Nano-Engineered Catalysts for Direct Methanol Fuel Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myung, Nosang; Narayanan, Sekharipuram; Wiberg, Dean

    2008-01-01

    Nano-engineered catalysts, and a method of fabricating them, have been developed in a continuing effort to improve the performances of direct methanol fuel cells as candidate power sources to supplant primary and secondary batteries in a variety of portable electronic products. In order to realize the potential for high energy densities (as much as 1.5 W h/g) of direct methanol fuel cells, it will be necessary to optimize the chemical compositions and geometric configurations of catalyst layers and electrode structures. High performance can be achieved when catalyst particles and electrode structures have the necessary small feature sizes (typically of the order of nanometers), large surface areas, optimal metal compositions, high porosity, and hydrophobicity. The present method involves electrodeposition of one or more catalytic metal(s) or a catalytic-metal/polytetrafluoroethylene nanocomposite on an alumina nanotemplate. The alumina nanotemplate is then dissolved, leaving the desired metal or metal/polytetrafluoroethylene-composite catalyst layer. Unlike some prior methods of making fine metal catalysts, this method does not involve processing at elevated temperature; all processing can be done at room temperature. In addition, this method involves fewer steps and is more amenable to scaling up for mass production. Alumina nanotemplates are porous alumina membranes that have been fabricated, variously, by anodizing either pure aluminum or aluminum that has been deposited on silicon by electronbeam evaporation. The diameters of the pores (7 to 300 nm), areal densities of pores (as much as 7 x 10(exp 10)sq cm), and lengths of pores (up to about 100 nm) can be tailored by selection of fabrication conditions. In a given case, the catalytic metal, catalytic metal alloy, or catalytic metal/ polytetrafluoroethylene composite is electrodeposited in the pores of the alumina nanotemplate. The dimensions of the pores, together with the electrodeposition conditions

  13. A Review of e-Learning in Canada: A Rough Sketch of the Evidence, Gaps and Promising Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrami, Philip C.; Bernard, Robert M.; Wade, Anne; Schmid, Richard F.; Borokhovski, Eugene; Tamim, Rana; Surkes, Michael; Lowerison, Gretchen; Zhang, Dai; Nicolaidou, Iolie; Newman, Sherry; Wozney, Lori; Peretiatkowicz, Anna

    2006-01-01

    This review provides a rough sketch of the evidence, gaps and promising directions in e-learning from 2000 onwards, with a particular focus on Canada. The authors searched a wide range of sources and document types to ensure that we represented, comprehensively, the arguments surrounding e-learning. Overall, there were 2,042 entries in their…

  14. 7 CFR 1412.34 - Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... oilseeds and pulse crops. (a)(1) Reports of production evidence must be submitted when the owner elects to... designated oilseeds for which a yield was not established by September 30, 2007, and for pulse crops must be... direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops. 1412.34 Section 1412.34 Agriculture Regulations...

  15. 7 CFR 1412.34 - Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... oilseeds and pulse crops. (a)(1) Reports of production evidence must be submitted when the owner elects to... designated oilseeds for which a yield was not established by September 30, 2007, and for pulse crops must be... direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops. 1412.34 Section 1412.34 Agriculture Regulations...

  16. 7 CFR 1412.34 - Submitting production evidence for establishing direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... oilseeds and pulse crops. (a)(1) Reports of production evidence must be submitted when the owner elects to... designated oilseeds for which a yield was not established by September 30, 2007, and for pulse crops must be... direct payment yields for oilseeds and pulse crops. 1412.34 Section 1412.34 Agriculture Regulations...

  17. Computational modeling of a direct propane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khakdaman, H.; Bourgault, Y.; Ternan, M.

    2011-03-01

    The first two dimensional mathematical model of a complete direct propane fuel cell (DPFC) is described. The governing equations were solved using FreeFem software that uses finite element methods. Robin boundary conditions were used to couple the anode, membrane, and cathode sub-domains successfully. The model showed that a polytetrafluoroethylene membrane having its pores filled with zirconium phosphate (ZrP-PTFE), in a DPFC at 150 °C performed much the same as other electrolytes; Nafion, aqueous H3PO4, and H2SO4 doped polybenzimidazole, when they were used in DPFCs. One advantage of a ZrP-PTFE at 150 °C is that it operates without liquid phase water. As a result corrosion will be much less severe and it may be possible for non-precious metal catalysts to be used. Computational results showed that the thickness of the catalyst layer could be increased sufficiently so that the pressure drop between the reactant and product channels of the interdigitated flow fields is small. By increasing the width of the land and therefore the reactant's contact time with the catalyst it was possible to approach 100% propane conversion. Therefore fuel cell operation with a minimum concentration of propane in the product stream should be possible. Finally computations of the electrical potential in the ZrP phase, the electron flux in the Pt/C phase, and the overpotential in both the anode and cathode catalyst layers showed that serious errors in the model occurred because proton diffusion, caused by the proton concentration gradient, was neglected in the equation for the conservation of protons.

  18. Matrix Stiffness and Nanoscale Spatial Organization of Cell-Adhesive Ligands Direct Stem Cell Fate.

    PubMed

    Ye, Kai; Wang, Xuan; Cao, Luping; Li, Shiyu; Li, Zhenhua; Yu, Lin; Ding, Jiandong

    2015-07-01

    One of the breakthroughs in biomaterials and regenerative medicine in the latest decade is the finding that matrix stiffness affords a crucial physical cue of stem cell differentiation. This statement was recently challenged by another understanding that protein tethering on material surfaces instead of matrix stiffness was the essential cue to regulate stem cells. Herein, we employed nonfouling poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels as the matrix to prevent nonspecific protein adsorption, and meanwhile covalently bound cell-adhesive arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) peptides onto the hydrogel surfaces in the form of well-defined nanoarrays to control specific cell adhesion. This approach enables the decoupling of the effects of matrix stiffness and surface chemistry. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were cultured on four substrates (two compressive moduli of the PEG hydrogels multiplied by two RGD nanospacings) and incubated in the mixed osteogenic and adipogenic medium. The results illustrate unambiguously that matrix stiffness is a potent regulator of stem cell differentiation. Moreover, we reveal that RGD nanospacing affects spreading area and differentiation of rat MSCs, regardless of the hydrogel stiffness. Therefore, both matrix stiffness and nanoscale spatial organization of cell-adhesive ligands direct stem cell fate. PMID:26027605

  19. Direct Monitoring of Nucleotide Turnover in Human Cell Extracts and Cells by Fluorogenic ATP Analogs.

    PubMed

    Hacker, Stephan M; Buntz, Annette; Zumbusch, Andreas; Marx, Andreas

    2015-11-20

    Nucleotides containing adenosine play pivotal roles in every living cell. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP), for example, is the universal energy currency, and ATP-consuming processes also contribute to posttranslational protein modifications. Nevertheless, detecting the turnover of adenosine nucleotides in the complex setting of a cell remains challenging. Here, we demonstrate the use of fluorogenic analogs of ATP and adenosine tetraphosphate to study nucleotide hydrolysis in lysates of human cell lines and in intact human cells. We found that the adenosine triphosphate analog is completely stable in lysates of human cell lines, whereas the adenosine tetraphosphate analog is rapidly turned over. The observed activity in human cell lysates can be assigned to a single enzyme, namely, the human diadenosine tetraphosphate hydrolase NudT2. Since NudT2 has been shown to be a prognostic factor for breast cancer, the adenosine tetraphosphate analog might contribute to a better understanding of its involvement in cancerogenesis and allow the straightforward screening for inhibitors. Studying hydrolysis of the analogs in intact cells, we found that electroporation is a suitable method to deliver nucleotide analogs into the cytoplasm and show that high FRET efficiencies can be detected directly after internalization. Time-dependent experiments reveal that adenosine triphosphate and tetraphosphate analogs are both processed in the cellular environment. This study demonstrates that these nucleotide analogs indeed bear the potential to be powerful tools for the exploration of nucleotide turnover in the context of whole cells. PMID:26274552

  20. Evaluation of composite membranes for direct methanol fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Roberts, E. P. L.; Holmes, S. M.

    The performance of direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can be significantly affected by the transport of methanol through the membrane, depolarising the cathode. In this paper, the literature on composite membranes that have been developed for reduction of methanol crossover in DMFCs is reviewed. While such membranes can be effective in reducing methanol permeability, this is usually combined with a reduction in proton conductivity. Measurements of methanol permeability and proton conductivity are relatively straightforward, and these parameters (or a membrane 'selectivity' based on the ratio between them) are often used to characterize DMFC membranes. However, we have carried out one-dimensional simulations of DMFC performance for a wide range of membrane properties, and the results indicate that DMFC performance is normally either limited by methanol permeability or proton conductivity. Thus use of a 'selectivity' is not appropriate for comparison of membrane materials, and results from the model can be used to compare different membranes. The results also show that Nafion ® 117 has an optimum thickness, where DMFC performance is equally limited by both methanol permeability and proton conductivity. The model also indicates that new composite membranes based on Nafion ® can only offer significant improvement in DMFC performance by enabling operation with increased methanol concentration in the fuel. A number of composite membrane materials that have been reported in the literature are shown to deliver significant reduction in DMFC performance due to reduced proton conductivity, although improved performance at high methanol concentration may be possible.

  1. An improved alkaline direct formate paper microfluidic fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Vicente; Domalaon, Kryls; Tang, Catherine; Sotez, Samantha; Mendez, Alex; Jalali-Heravi, Mehdi; Purohit, Krutarth; Pham, Linda; Haan, John; Gomez, Frank A

    2016-02-01

    Paper-based microfluidic fuel cells (MFCs) are a potential replacement for traditional FCs and batteries due to their low cost, portability, and simplicity to operate. In MFCs, separate solutions of fuel and oxidant migrate through paper due to capillary action and laminar flow and, upon contact with each other and catalyst, produce electricity. In the present work, we describe an improved microfluidic paper-based direct formate FC (DFFC) employing formate and hydrogen peroxide as the anode fuel and cathode oxidant, respectively. The dimensions of the lateral column, current collectors, and cathode were optimized. A maximum power density of 2.53 mW/cm(2) was achieved with a DFFC of surface area 3.0 cm(2) , steel mesh as current collector, 5% carbon to paint mass ratio for cathode electrode and, 30% hydrogen peroxide. The longevity of the MFC's detailed herein is greater than eight hours with continuous flow of streams. In a series configuration, the MFCs generate sufficient energy to power light-emitting diodes and a handheld calculator. PMID:26572774

  2. New Catalysts for Direct Methanol Oxidation Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Adzic, Radoslav

    1998-08-01

    A new class of efficient electrocatalytic materials based on platinum - metal oxide systems has been synthetized and characterized by several techniques. Best activity was found with NiWO{sub 4}-, CoWO{sub 4}-, and RuO{sub 2}- sr¡pported platinum catalysts. A very similar activity at room temperature was observed with the electrodes prepared with the catalyst obtained from International Fuel Cells Inc. for the same Pt loading. Surprisingly, the two tungstates per se show a small activity for methanol oxidation without any Pt loading. Synthesis of NiWO{sub 4} and CoWO{sub 4} were carried out by solid-state reactions. FTIR spectroscopy shows that the tungstates contain a certain amount of physically adsorbed water even after heating samples at 200{degrees}C. A direct relationship between the activity for methanol oxidation and the amount of adsorbed water on those oxides has been found. The Ru(0001) single crystal shows a very small activity for CO adsorption and oxidation, in contrast to the behavior of polycrystalline Ru. In situ extended x-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) and x-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES) showed that the OH adsorption on Ru in the Pt-Ru alloy appears to be the limiting step in methanol oxidation. This does not occur for Pt-RuO{SUB 2} electrocatalyst, which explains its advantages over the Pt-Ru alloys. The IFCC electrocatalyst has the properties of the Pt-Ru alloy.

  3. New bimetallic EMF cell shows promise in direct energy conversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesson, J. C.; Shimotake, H.

    1968-01-01

    Concentration cell, based upon a thermally regenerative cell principle, produces electrical energy from any large heat source. This experimental bimetallic EMF cell uses a sodium-bismuth alloy cathode and a pure liquid sodium anode. The cell exhibits reliability, corrosion resistance, and high current density performance.

  4. Reversal of Aberrant Cancer Methylome and Transcriptome upon Direct Reprogramming of Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahalingam, Dashayini; Kong, Chiou Mee; Lai, Jason; Tay, Ling Lee; Yang, Henry; Wang, Xueying

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports on direct reprogramming of cancer cells (iPCs) which results in reduced tumorigenic potential has attributed the importance of epigenetics in tumorigenesis, but lacked genome-wide analysis. Here we describe successful generation of iPCs from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines. Following reprogramming, they resembled embryonic stem and induced pluripotent stem cells in pluripotency markers expression, gene expression patterns and in vitro differentiation ability. Genome-wide methylation analysis revealed that aberrantly methylated promoters which were mostly developmental-associated genes and tumor suppressors; as well as commonly upregulated genes in NSCLC i.e. KRT19 and S100P were reversed in iPCs upon reprogramming. Also, the reversal of oncogenes and tumor suppressors status were partially explainable by DNA methylation. These findings suggest that DNA methylation patterns explain the downstream transcriptional effects, which potentially caused the reduced tumorigenicity in iPCs, thus providing evidence that reprogramming reverses the aberrantly dysregulated genes in NSCLC both epigenetically and transcriptionally. PMID:22912920

  5. Direct observation of mammalian cell growth and size regulation

    PubMed Central

    Son, Sungmin; Tzur, Amit; Weng, Yaochung; Jorgensen, Paul; Kim, Jisoo; Kirschner, Marc W.; Manalis, Scott R.

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a microfluidic system for simultaneously measuring single cell mass and cell cycle progression over multiple generations. We use this system to obtain over 1,000 hours of growth data from mouse lymphoblast and pro-B-cell lymphoid cell lines. Cell lineage analysis revealed a decrease in the growth rate variability at the G1/S phase transition, which suggests the presence of a growth rate threshold for maintaining size homeostasis. PMID:22863882

  6. Current issues and future directions in evidence-based child protection practices: a view from Romania.

    PubMed

    Iovu, Mihai-Bogdan

    2013-10-01

    The constantly changing nature of social care practice necessitates continuous development of educational programs to prepare current practitioners. Basing social work practice on methodologically sound research evidence is an appealing prospect for the child protection services. However, Romania, once considered an Eastern European model for child welfare policy and practice, is somehow lagging behind. In this article the author gives a short overview of where the Romanian Child Protection System currently stands in terms of evidence-based practice. PMID:24066629

  7. Directing cell migration and organization via nanocrater-patterned cell-repellent interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hojeong; Koo, Sangmo; Reese, Willie Mae; Loskill, Peter; Grigoropoulos, Costas P.; Healy, Kevin E.

    2015-01-01

    Although adhesive interactions between cells and nanostructured interfaces have been studied extensively1–6, there is a paucity of data on how nanostructured interfaces repel cells by directing cell migration and cell-colony organization. Here, by using multiphoton ablation lithography7 to pattern surfaces with nanoscale craters of various aspect ratios and pitches, we show that the surfaces altered the cells’ focal-adhesion size and distribution, thus affecting cell morphology, migration and ultimately localization. We also show that nanocrater pitch can disrupt the formation of mature focal adhesions to favour the migration of cells toward higher-pitched regions, which present increased planar area for the formation of stable focal adhesions. Moreover, by designing surfaces with variable pitch but constant nanocrater dimensions, we were able to create circular and striped cellular patterns. Our surface-patterning approach, which does not involve chemical treatments and can be applied to various materials, represents a simple method to control cell behaviour on surfaces. PMID:26213899

  8. A dedicated circuit linking direction selective retinal ganglion cells to primary visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; El-Danaf, Rana N.; Osakada, Fumitaka; Sriram, Balaji; Dhande, Onkar S.; Nguyen, Phong L.; Callaway, Edward M.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Huberman, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    How specific features in the environment are represented within the brain is an important unanswered question in neuroscience. A subset of retinal neurons, called direction selective ganglion cells (DSGCs) are specialized for detecting motion along specific axes of the visual field1. Despite extensive study of the retinal circuitry that endows DSGCs with their unique tuning properties2,3, their downstream circuitry in the brain and thus their contribution to visual processing has remained unclear. In mice, several different types of DSGCs connect to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN),4,5,6 the visual thalamic structure that harbors cortical relay neurons. Whether direction selective information computed at the level of the retina is routed to cortical circuits and integrated with other visual channels, however, is unknown. Here we show using viral trans-synaptic circuit mapping7,8 and functional imaging of visually-driven calcium signals in thalamocortical axons, that there is a di-synaptic circuit linking DSGCs with the superficial layers of primary visual cortex (V1). This circuit pools information from multiple types of DSGCs, converges in a specialized subdivision of the dLGN, and delivers direction-tuned and orientation-tuned signals to superficial V1. Notably, this circuit is anatomically segregated from the retino-geniculo-cortical pathway carrying non-direction-tuned visual information to deeper layers of V1, such as layer 4. Thus, the mouse harbors several functionally specialized, parallel retino-geniculo-cortical pathways, one of which originates with retinal DSGCs and delivers direction- and orientation-tuned information specifically to the superficial layers of primary visual cortex. These data provide evidence that direction and orientation selectivity of some V1 neurons may be influenced by the activation of DSGCs. PMID:24572358

  9. A dedicated circuit links direction-selective retinal ganglion cells to the primary visual cortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Martín, Alberto; El-Danaf, Rana N.; Osakada, Fumitaka; Sriram, Balaji; Dhande, Onkar S.; Nguyen, Phong L.; Callaway, Edward M.; Ghosh, Anirvan; Huberman, Andrew D.

    2014-03-01

    How specific features in the environment are represented within the brain is an important unanswered question in neuroscience. A subset of retinal neurons, called direction-selective ganglion cells (DSGCs), are specialized for detecting motion along specific axes of the visual field. Despite extensive study of the retinal circuitry that endows DSGCs with their unique tuning properties, their downstream circuitry in the brain and thus their contribution to visual processing has remained unclear. In mice, several different types of DSGCs connect to the dorsal lateral geniculate nucleus (dLGN), the visual thalamic structure that harbours cortical relay neurons. Whether direction-selective information computed at the level of the retina is routed to cortical circuits and integrated with other visual channels, however, is unknown. Here we show that there is a di-synaptic circuit linking DSGCs with the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex (V1) by using viral trans-synaptic circuit mapping and functional imaging of visually driven calcium signals in thalamocortical axons. This circuit pools information from several types of DSGCs, converges in a specialized subdivision of the dLGN, and delivers direction-tuned and orientation-tuned signals to superficial V1. Notably, this circuit is anatomically segregated from the retino-geniculo-cortical pathway carrying non-direction-tuned visual information to deeper layers of V1, such as layer 4. Thus, the mouse harbours several functionally specialized, parallel retino-geniculo-cortical pathways, one of which originates with retinal DSGCs and delivers direction- and orientation-tuned information specifically to the superficial layers of the primary visual cortex. These data provide evidence that direction and orientation selectivity of some V1 neurons may be influenced by the activation of DSGCs.

  10. Direct targeting of cancer cells: a multiparameter approach.

    PubMed

    Heinrich, Eileen L; Welty, Lily Anne Y; Banner, Lisa R; Oppenheimer, Steven B

    2005-01-01

    Lectins have been widely used in cell surface studies and in the development of potential anticancer drugs. Many past studies that have examined lectin toxicity have only evaluated the effects on cancer cells, not their non-cancer counterparts. In addition, few past studies have evaluated the relationship between lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity on both cell types. Here we examine these parameters in one study: lectin-cell binding and lectin toxicity with both cancer cells and their normal counterparts. We found that the human colon cancer cell line CCL-220/Colo320DM bound to agarose beads derivatized with Phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA-L) and wheat germ agglutinin (WGA), while the non-cancer human colon cell line CRL-1459/CCD-18Co did not. When these lectins were tested for their effects on cell viability in culture, both cell lines were affected by the lectins but at 6, 48 and 72 h incubation times, PHA-L was most toxic to the cancer cell line in a concentration dependent manner. At 48 h incubation, WGA was more toxic to the cancer cell line. The results suggest that it may be possible to develop lectin protocols that selectively target cancer cells for death. In any case, examination of both malignant cells and their non-malignant counterparts, analysis of their binding characteristics to immobilized lectins, and examination of the toxicity of free lectins in culture, provides a multiparameter model for obtaining more comprehensive information than from more limited approaches. PMID:16181664

  11. Injury induces direct lineage segregation of functionally distinct airway basal stem/progenitor cell subpopulations.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Law, Brandon M; Tata, Purushothama Rao; Villoria, Jorge; Saez, Borja; Mou, Hongmei; Zhao, Rui; Rajagopal, Jayaraj

    2015-02-01

    Following injury, stem cells restore normal tissue architecture by producing the proper number and proportions of differentiated cells. Current models of airway epithelial regeneration propose that distinct cytokeratin 8-expressing progenitor cells, arising from p63(+) basal stem cells, subsequently differentiate into secretory and ciliated cell lineages. We now show that immediately following injury, discrete subpopulations of p63(+) airway basal stem/progenitor cells themselves express Notch pathway components associated with either secretory or ciliated cell fate commitment. One basal cell population displays intracellular Notch2 activation and directly generates secretory cells; the other expresses c-myb and directly yields ciliated cells. Furthermore, disrupting Notch ligand activity within the basal cell population at large disrupts the normal pattern of lineage segregation. These non-cell-autonomous effects demonstrate that effective airway epithelial regeneration requires intercellular communication within the broader basal stem/progenitor cell population. These findings have broad implications for understanding epithelial regeneration and stem cell heterogeneity. PMID:25658372

  12. Evidence for Direct Electron Transfer by a Gram-Positive Bacterium Isolated from a Microbial Fuel Cell▿†

    PubMed Central

    Wrighton, K. C.; Thrash, J. C.; Melnyk, R. A.; Bigi, J. P.; Byrne-Bailey, K. G.; Remis, J. P.; Schichnes, D.; Auer, M.; Chang, C. J.; Coates, J. D.

    2011-01-01

    Despite their importance in iron redox cycles and bioenergy production, the underlying physiological, genetic, and biochemical mechanisms of extracellular electron transfer by Gram-positive bacteria remain insufficiently understood. In this work, we investigated respiration by Thermincola potens strain JR, a Gram-positive isolate obtained from the anode surface of a microbial fuel cell, using insoluble electron acceptors. We found no evidence that soluble redox-active components were secreted into the surrounding medium on the basis of physiological experiments and cyclic voltammetry measurements. Confocal microscopy revealed highly stratified biofilms in which cells contacting the electrode surface were disproportionately viable relative to the rest of the biofilm. Furthermore, there was no correlation between biofilm thickness and power production, suggesting that cells in contact with the electrode were primarily responsible for current generation. These data, along with cryo-electron microscopy experiments, support contact-dependent electron transfer by T. potens strain JR from the cell membrane across the 37-nm cell envelope to the cell surface. Furthermore, we present physiological and genomic evidence that c-type cytochromes play a role in charge transfer across the Gram-positive bacterial cell envelope during metal reduction. PMID:21908627

  13. Pluripotent Stem Cells: Current Understanding and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Romito, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells have the ability to undergo self-renewal and to give rise to all cells of the tissues of the body. However, this definition has been recently complicated by the existence of distinct cellular states that display these features. Here, we provide a detailed overview of the family of pluripotent cell lines derived from early mouse and human embryos and compare them with induced pluripotent stem cells. Shared and distinct features of these cells are reported as additional hallmark of pluripotency, offering a comprehensive scenario of pluripotent stem cells. PMID:26798367

  14. Engineering nanoscale stem cell niche: direct stem cell behavior at cell-matrix interface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Gordon, Andrew; Qian, Weiyi; Chen, Weiqiang

    2015-09-16

    Biophysical cues on the extracellular matrix (ECM) have proven to be significant regulators of stem cell behavior and evolution. Understanding the interplay of these cells and their extracellular microenvironment is critical to future tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, both of which require a means of controlled differentiation. Research suggests that nanotopography, which mimics the local, nanoscale, topographic cues within the stem cell niche, could be a way to achieve large-scale proliferation and control of stem cells in vitro. This Progress Report reviews the history and contemporary advancements of this technology, and pays special attention to nanotopographic fabrication methods and the effect of different nanoscale patterns on stem cell response. Finally, it outlines potential intracellular mechanisms behind this response. PMID:26222885

  15. Direct effect of croton oil on intestinal epithelial cells and colonic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xin; Lan, Mei; Wu, Han-Ping; Shi, Yong-Quan; Lu, Ju; Ding, Jie; Wu, Kai-Cun; Jin, Jian-Ping; Fan, Dai Ming

    2002-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the direct effect of croton oil (CO) on human intestinal epithelial cell (HIEC) and guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells in vitro. METHODS: Growth curves of HIEC were drawn by MTT colorimetry. The dynamics of cell proliferation was analyzed with flow cytometry, and morphological changes were observed under light and electron microscopy after long-term (6 weeks) treatment with CO.Expression of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) mRNA was detected by dot blot in HIEC treated with CO. Genes related to CO were screened by DD-PCR, and the direct effect of CO on the contractility of isolated guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells was observed. RESULTS: High concentration (20-40 mg·L-1) CO inhibited cell growth significantly (1, 3, 5, 7 d OD sequence: (20 mg·L-1 ) 0.040 ± 0.003, 0.081 ± 0.012, 0.147 ± 0.022,0.024 ± 0.016; (40 mg·L-1) 0.033 ± 0.044, 0.056 ± 0.012, 0.104 ± 0.010, 0.189 ± 0.006; OD control 0.031 ± 0.008, 0.096 ± 0.012, 0.173 ± 0.009, 0.300 ± 0.016, P < 0.01), which appeared to be related directly to the dosage. Compared with the control, the fraction number of cells in G1 phase decreased from 0.60 to 0.58, while that in S phase increased from 0.30 to 0.34 and DNA index also increased after 6 weeks of treatment with CO (the dosage was increased gradually from 4 to 40 mg·L-1). Light microscopic observation revealed that cells had karyomegaly, less plasma and karyoplasm lopsidedness. Electron microscopy also showed an increase in cell proliferation and in the quantity of abnormal nuclei with pathologic mitosis. Expression of COX-2 mRNA decreased significantly in HIEC treated with CO. Thirteen differential cDNA fragments were cloned from HIEC treated with CO, one of which was 100 percent homologous with human mitochondrial cytochrome C oxidase subunit II. The length of isolated guinea pig colonic smooth muscle cells was significantly shortened after treatment with CO (P < 0.05). CONCLUSION: At a high CO concentration ( > 20 mg·L-1

  16. Are Consumer-Directed Home Care Beneficiaries Satisfied? Evidence from Washington State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiener, Joshua M.; Anderson, Wayne L.; Khatutsky, Galina

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study analyzed the effect of consumer-directed versus agency-directed home care on satisfaction with paid personal assistance services among Medicaid beneficiaries in Washington State. Design and Methods: The study analyzed a survey of 513 Medicaid beneficiaries receiving home- and community-based services. As part of a larger study,…

  17. Item-Specific Encoding Produces an Additional Benefit of Directed Forgetting: Evidence from Intrusion Errors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sahakyan, Lili; Delaney, Peter F.

    2010-01-01

    List-method directed forgetting involves encoding 2 lists, between which half of the participants are told to forget List 1. When participants are free to study however they want, directed forgetting impairs List 1 recall and enhances List 2 recall in the forget group compared with a control remember group. In a large-scale experiment, the current…

  18. Neutralizing antibodies are unable to inhibit direct viral cell-to-cell spread of human cytomegalovirus.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Christian L; Lamorte, Louie; Sepulveda, Eliud; Lorenz, Ivo C; Gauthier, Annick; Franti, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Infection with human cytomegalovirus (CMV) during pregnancy is the most common cause of congenital disorders, and can lead to severe life-long disabilities with associated high cost of care. Since there is no vaccine or effective treatment, current efforts are focused on identifying potent neutralizing antibodies. A panel of CMV monoclonal antibodies identified from patent applications, was synthesized and expressed in order to reproduce data from the literature showing that anti-glycoprotein B antibodies neutralized virus entry into all cell types and that anti-pentameric complex antibodies are highly potent in preventing virus entry into epithelial cells. It had not been established whether antibodies could prevent subsequent rounds of infection that are mediated primarily by direct cell-to-cell transmission. A thorough validation of a plaque reduction assay to monitor cell-to-cell spread led to the conclusion that neutralizing antibodies do not significantly inhibit plaque formation or reduce plaque size when they are added post-infection. PMID:23849792

  19. Gene marking and gene therapy directed at primary hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, C E; Young, N S

    1996-11-01

    The past year has been a very active one in the field of gene transfer to hematopoietic targets, specifically stem cells and T cells. A number of clinical trials were published that both demonstrated progress as well as identified problems that investigators will face in trying to make the technology therapeutically applicable. Important laboratory and animal experiments focused on predictive models for human stem cell behavior, methods for culturing and expanding primitive cells ex vivo, immune responses against transgenes, in vitro and in vivo selection of transduced cells, and alternatives to standard retroviral vectors. PMID:9372114

  20. Designing materials to direct stem-cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Lutolf, Matthias P.; Gilbert, Penney M.; Blau, Helen M.

    2010-01-01

    Proper tissue function and regeneration rely on robust spatial and temporal control of biophysical and biochemical microenvironmental cues through mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Biomaterials are rapidly being developed to display and deliver stem-cell-regulatory signals in a precise and near-physiological fashion, and serve as powerful artificial microenvironments in which to study and instruct stem-cell fate both in culture and in vivo. Further synergism of cell biological and biomaterials technologies promises to have a profound impact on stem-cell biology and provide insights that will advance stem-cell-based clinical approaches to tissue regeneration. PMID:19940913

  1. LHRH-Conjugated Lytic Peptides Directly Target Prostate Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Clayton; Sharp, Starlette; Jones, Jacqueline; Topps, Daphne; Coleman, Mathew; Aneja, Ritu; Jaynes, Jesse; Turner, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths among men. For patients with hormone-refractory disease, few treatments are available once the tumor has metastasized beyond the prostate. In the present study, two conjugated lytic peptide sequences (named JCHLHRH and JC21LHRH) were designed to target luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone receptors (LHRH-R). Our results indicate that human prostate cancer cell lines were sensitive to both LHRH-conjugated and non-conjugated lytic peptides, with IC50 concentrations for LNCaP cells, 4.4 and 9.1 µM; for DU-145 cells, 4.8 and 5.7 µM; and for PC-3 cells, 4.4 and 8.2 µM, respectively. JCHLHRH and JC21LHRH were nontoxic to normal primary human prostate epithelial cells or to bone marrow stromal cells in co-culture. There were morphological changes in PC-3 cells after 3 hr of exposure to either peptide; after 6 hr, there were significant reductions in cell numbers. Exposure of PC-3 cells for 24 hr to either JCHLHRH or JC21LHRH blocked their growth over 3 days. Since JCHLHRH and JC21LHRH have specificity for and anti-proliferative activity against tumor cells, and low toxicity for normal prostate cells, these peptides could serve as a new type of therapy for prostate cancer. PMID:20869347

  2. Nocturnal migratory songbirds adjust their travelling direction aloft: evidence from a radiotelemetry and radar study.

    PubMed

    Sjöberg, Sissel; Nilsson, Cecilia

    2015-06-01

    In order to fully understand the orientation behaviour of migrating birds, it is important to understand when birds set their travel direction. Departure directions of migratory passerines leaving stopover sites are often assumed to reflect the birds' intended travel directions, but this assumption has not been critically tested. We used data from an automated radiotelemetry system and a tracking radar at Falsterbo peninsula, Sweden, to compare the initial orientation of departing songbirds (recorded by radiotelemetry) with the orientation of songbird migrants in climbing and level flight (recorded by radar). We found that the track directions of birds at high altitudes and in level flight were more concentrated than the directions of departing birds and birds in climbing flight, which indicates that the birds adjust their travelling direction once aloft. This was further supported by a wide scatter of vanishing bearings in a subsample of radio-tracked birds that later passed an offshore radio receiver station 50 km southeast of Falsterbo. Track directions seemed to be more affected by winds in climbing compared with level flights, which may be explained by birds not starting to partially compensate for wind drift until they have reached cruising altitudes. PMID:26085501

  3. In vivo evidence for the fibrillar structures of Sup35 prions in yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Kawai-Noma, Shigeko; Pack, Chan-Gi; Kojidani, Tomoko; Asakawa, Haruhiko; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Kinjo, Masataka; Haraguchi, Tokuko; Hirata, Aiko

    2010-01-01

    Yeast prion [PSI+] is caused by aggregated structures of the Sup35 protein. Although Sup35 forms typical amyloid fibrils in vitro, there is no direct evidence for the fibrillar structures of Sup35 in vivo. We analyzed [PSI+] cells in which Sup35 fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) formed aggregates visible by fluorescence microscopy using thin-section electron microscopy (EM). Rapid-freeze EM combined with an immunogold-labeling technique as well as correlative light EM, which allows high-resolution imaging by EM of the same structure observed by light (fluorescence) microscopy, shows that the aggregates contain bundled fibrillar structures of Sup35-GFP. Additional biochemical and fluorescent correlation spectroscopy results suggest that the Sup35 oligomers diffused in the [PSI+] lysates adopt fibril-like shapes. Our findings demonstrate that [PSI+] cells contain Sup35 fibrillar structures closely related to those formed in vitro and provide insight into the molecular mechanism by which Sup35 aggregates are assembled and remodeled in [PSI+] cells. PMID:20643880

  4. Evidence for direct CP violation from Dalitz-plot analysis of B±→K±π∓π±

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Bona, M.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Poireau, V.; Prencipe, E.; Prudent, X.; Tisserand, V.; Garra Tico, J.; Grauges, E.; Lopez, L.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Eigen, G.; Stugu, B.; Sun, L.; Abrams, G. S.; Battaglia, M.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadyk, J. A.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kukartsev, G.; Lynch, G.; Osipenkov, I. L.; Ronan, M. T.; Tackmann, K.; Tanabe, T.; Wenzel, W. A.; Hawkes, C. M.; Soni, N.; Watson, A. T.; Koch, H.; Schroeder, T.; Walker, D.; Asgeirsson, D. J.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Fulsom, B. G.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Barrett, M.; Khan, A.; Saleem, M.; Teodorescu, L.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Druzhinin, V. P.; Golubev, V. B.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Todyshev, K. Yu.; Bondioli, M.; Curry, S.; Eschrich, I.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Lund, P.; Mandelkern, M.; Martin, E. C.; Stoker, D. P.; Abachi, S.; Buchanan, C.; Gary, J. W.; Liu, F.; Long, O.; Shen, B. C.; Vitug, G. M.; Yasin, Z.; Zhang, L.; Sharma, V.; Campagnari, C.; Hong, T. M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Beck, T. W.; Eisner, A. M.; Flacco, C. J.; Heusch, C. A.; Kroseberg, J.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Wang, L.; Wilson, M. G.; Winstrom, L. O.; Cheng, C. H.; Doll, D. A.; Echenard, B.; Fang, F.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Piatenko, T.; Porter, F. C.; Andreassen, R.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Mishra, K.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P. C.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Hirschauer, J. F.; Kreisel, A.; Nagel, M.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Smith, J. G.; Ulmer, K. A.; Wagner, S. R.; Ayad, R.; Gabareen, A. M.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Altenburg, D. D.; Feltresi, E.; Hauke, A.; Jasper, H.; Karbach, M.; Merkel, J.; Petzold, A.; Spaan, B.; Wacker, K.; Klose, V.; Kobel, M. J.; Lacker, H. M.; Mader, W. F.; Nogowski, R.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Sundermann, J. E.; Volk, A.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Latour, E.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Verderi, M.; Clark, P. J.; Gradl, W.; Playfer, S.; Watson, J. E.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cecchi, A.; Cibinetto, G.; Franchini, P.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Petrella, A.; Piemontese, L.; Santoro, V.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Finocchiaro, G.; Pacetti, S.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Rama, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M. M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Chaisanguanthum, K. S.; Morii, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Marks, J.; Schenk, S.; Uwer, U.; Bard, D. J.; Dauncey, P. D.; Nash, J. A.; Panduro Vazquez, W.; Tibbetts, M.; Behera, P. K.; Chai, X.; Charles, M. J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Dong, L.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rubin, A. E.; Gao, Y. Y.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Lae, C. K.; Denig, A. G.; Fritsch, M.; Schott, G.; Arnaud, N.; Béquilleux, J.; D'Orazio, A.; Davier, M.; Firmino da Costa, J.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Lepeltier, V.; Le Diberder, F.; Lutz, A. M.; Pruvot, S.; Roudeau, P.; Schune, M. H.; Serrano, J.; Sordini, V.; Stocchi, A.; Wang, W. F.; Wormser, G.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bingham, I.; Burke, J. P.; Chavez, C. A.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Hutchcroft, D. E.; Payne, D. J.; Touramanis, C.; Bevan, A. J.; George, K. A.; di Lodovico, F.; Sacco, R.; Sigamani, M.; Cowan, G.; Flaecher, H. U.; Hopkins, D. A.; Paramesvaran, S.; Salvatore, F.; Wren, A. C.; Brown, D. N.; Davis, C. L.; Alwyn, K. E.; Barlow, N. R.; Barlow, R. J.; Chia, Y. M.; Edgar, C. L.; Lafferty, G. D.; West, T. J.; Yi, J. I.; Anderson, J.; Chen, C.; Jawahery, A.; Roberts, D. A.; Simi, G.; Tuggle, J. M.; Dallapiccola, C.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Li, X.; Salvati, E.; Saremi, S.; Cowan, R.; Dujmic, D.; Fisher, P. H.; Koeneke, K.; Sciolla, G.; Spitznagel, M.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Zhao, M.; McLachlin, S. E.; Patel, P. M.; Robertson, S. H.; Lazzaro, A.; Lombardo, V.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Brunet, S.; Côté, D.; Simard, M.; Taras, P.; Viaud, F. B.; Nicholson, H.; de Nardo, G.; Lista, L.; Monorchio, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Snoek, H. L.; Jessop, C. P.; Knoepfel, K. J.; Losecco, J. M.; Benelli, G.; Corwin, L. A.; Honscheid, K.; Kagan, H.; Kass, R.; Morris, J. P.; Rahimi, A. M.; Regensburger, J. J.; Sekula, S. J.; Wong, Q. K.; Blount, N. L.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Igonkina, O.; Kolb, J. A.; Lu, M.; Rahmat, R.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Strube, J.; Torrence, E.; Castelli, G.; Gagliardi, N.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Voci, C.; Del Amo Sanchez, P.; Ben-Haim, E.; Briand, H.; Calderini, G.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; Del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Perez, A.; Prendki, J.; Gladney, L.; Biasini, M.; Covarelli, R.; Manoni, E.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Carpinelli, M.; Cervelli, A.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rizzo, G.; Walsh, J. J.; Biesiada, J.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lu, C.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J. S.; Telnov, A. V.; Baracchini, E.; Cavoto, G.; Del Re, D.; di Marco, E.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Jackson, P. D.; Gioi, L. Li; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Piredda, G.; Polci, F.; Renga, F.; Voena, C.; Ebert, M.; Hartmann, T.; Schröder, H.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; Franek, B.; Olaiya, E. O.; Roethel, W.; Wilson, F. F.; Emery, S.; Escalier, M.; Esteve, L.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Kozanecki, W.; Vasseur, G.; Yèche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Chen, X. R.; Liu, H.; Park, W.; Purohit, M. V.; White, R. M.; Wilson, J. R.; Allen, M. T.; Aston, D.; Bartoldus, R.; Bechtle, P.; Benitez, J. F.; Cenci, R.; Coleman, J. P.; Convery, M. R.; Dingfelder, J. C.; Dorfan, J.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Gowdy, S. J.; Graham, M. T.; Grenier, P.; Hast, C.; Innes, W. R.; Kaminski, J.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Li, S.; Lindquist, B.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Marsiske, H.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; Neal, H.; Nelson, S.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ofte, I.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Snyder, A.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S. K.; Thompson, J. M.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, A. P.; Weaver, M.; West, C. A.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wittgen, M.; Wright, D. H.; Wulsin, H. W.; Yarritu, A. K.; Yi, K.; Young, C. C.; Ziegler, V.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Majewski, S. A.; Miyashita, T. S.; Petersen, B. A.; Wilden, L.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Bula, R.; Ernst, J. A.; Pan, B.; Saeed, M. A.; Zain, S. B.; Spanier, S. M.; Wogsland, B. J.; Eckmann, R.; Ritchie, J. L.; Ruland, A. M.; Schilling, C. J.; Schwitters, R. F.; Drummond, B. W.; Izen, J. M.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Gamba, D.; Pelliccioni, M.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cartaro, C.; Della Ricca, G.; Lanceri, L.; Vitale, L.; Azzolini, V.; Lopez-March, N.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Milanes, D. A.; Oyanguren, A.; Albert, J.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bhuyan, B.; Choi, H. H. F.; Hamano, K.; Kowalewski, R.; Lewczuk, M. J.; Nugent, I. M.; Roney, J. M.; Sobie, R. J.; Gershon, T. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Ilic, J.; Latham, T. E.; Mohanty, G. B.; Band, H. R.; Chen, X.; Dasu, S.; Flood, K. T.; Pan, Y.; Pierini, M.; Prepost, R.; Vuosalo, C. O.; Wu, S. L.

    2008-07-01

    We report a Dalitz-plot analysis of the charmless hadronic decays of charged B mesons to the final state K±π∓π±. Using a sample of (383.2±4.2)×106 B Bmacr pairs collected by the BABAR detector, we measure CP-averaged branching fractions and direct CP asymmetries for intermediate resonant and nonresonant contributions. We find evidence for direct CP violation in the decay B±→ρ0(770)K±, with a CP-violation parameter ACP=(+44±10±4-13+5)%.

  5. Calpain-Mediated positional information directs cell wall orientation to sustain plant stem cell ativity, growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic development and stem cell control depend on the integration of cell positional sensing with cell cycle control and cell wall positioning, yet few factors that directly link these events are known. The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) gene encoding the unique plant calpain protein is fundamental f...

  6. Calpain-Mediated positional information directs cell wall orientation to sustain plant stem cell activity, growth and development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Eukaryotic development and stem cell control depend on the integration of cell positional sensing with cell cycle control and cell wall positioning, yet few factors that directly link these events are known. The DEFECTIVE KERNEL1 (DEK1) gene encoding the unique plant calpain protein is fundamental f...

  7. Burnout and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease: Evidence, Possible Causal Paths, and Promising Research Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melamed, Samuel; Shirom, Arie; Toker, Sharon; Berliner, Shlomo; Shapira, Itzhak

    2006-01-01

    Burnout is characterized by emotional exhaustion, physical fatigue, and cognitive weariness, resulting from prolonged exposure to work-related stress. The authors review the accumulated evidence suggesting that burnout and the related concept of vital exhaustion are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and…

  8. Management of Child and Adolescent Eating Disorders: The Current Evidence Base and Future Directions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gowers, Simon; Bryant-Waugh, Rachel

    2004-01-01

    Although eating disorders in children and adolescents remain a serious cause of morbidity and mortality, the evidence base for effective interventions is surprisingly weak. The adult literature is growing steadily, but this is mainly with regard to psychological therapies for bulimia nervosa and to some extent in the field of pharmacotherapy. This…

  9. HIV-1 Infection of DC: Evidence for the Acquisition of Virus Particles from Infected T Cells by Antigen Uptake Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Venkatachari, Narasimhan J.; Alber, Sean; Watkins, Simon C.; Ayyavoo, Velpandi

    2009-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) play a pivotal role in transmission and dissemination of HIV-1. Earlier studies reported that DC present at the site of infection trap virus particles via DC-SIGN and transfer the virus to the interacting naïve T cells. This prompted us to ask the question whether DC could acquire virus from infected T cells during DC-T cell interaction. To address this, we investigated the likely transfer of virus from HIV-1 infected T cells to DC and the underlying mechanisms involved. Results indicate that DC acquire virus from infected T cells via antigen uptake mechanism and this results in infection of DC with expression of proteins directed by viral DNA. Further studies with HIV-1 lacking the Env protein also resulted in infection of DC. The use of antibodies against DC-SIGN and DC-SIGN-R ruled out a role for receptor in the infection of DC. Additional data show that DC infection is directly correlated with the ability of DC to take up antigen from infected T cells. Overall, these studies provide evidence to suggest that HIV-1, besides infecting immune cells, also utilizes immunological mechanism(s) to acquire and disseminate virus. PMID:19829715

  10. NK cell biology: An update and future directions

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Kerry S.; Hasegawa, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute a minor subset of normal lymphocytes that initiate innate immune responses toward tumor and virus-infected cells. They can mediate spontaneous cytotoxicity toward these abnormal cells and rapidly secrete numerous cytokines and chemokines to promote subsequent adaptive immune responses. Significant progress has been made in the past two decades to improve our understanding of NK cell biology. Here we review recent discoveries, including a better comprehension of the “education” of NK cells to achieve functional competence during their maturation and the discovery of “memory” responses by NK cells suggesting that they may also contribute to adaptive immunity. The improved understanding of NK cell biology has forged greater awareness that these cells play integral early roles in immune responses. In addition, several promising clinical therapies have been used to exploit NK cell functions in treating cancer patients. As our molecular understanding improves, these and future immunotherapies should continue to provide promising strategies to exploit the unique functions of NK cells to treat cancer, infections, and other pathological conditions. PMID:23906377

  11. Evidence for Resident Memory T Cells in Rasmussen Encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Owens, Geoffrey C; Chang, Julia W; Huynh, My N; Chirwa, Thabiso; Vinters, Harry V; Mathern, Gary W

    2016-01-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare pediatric neuroinflammatory disease of unknown etiology characterized by intractable seizures, and progressive atrophy usually confined to one cerebral hemisphere. Surgical removal or disconnection of the affected cerebral hemisphere is currently the only intervention that effectively stops the seizures. Histopathological evaluation of resected brain tissue has shown that activated brain resident macrophages (microglia) and infiltrating T cells are involved in the inflammatory reaction. Here, we report that T cells isolated from seven RE brain surgery specimens express the resident memory T cell (TRM) marker CD103. CD103 was expressed by >50% of CD8(+) αβ T cells and γδ T cells irrespective of the length of time from seizure onset to surgery, which ranged from 0.3 to 8.4 years. Only ~10% of CD4(+) αβ were CD103(+), which was consistent with the observation that few CD4(+) T cells are found in RE brain parenchyma. Clusters of T cells in brain parenchyma, which are a characteristic of RE histopathology, stained for CD103. Less than 10% of T cells isolated from brain specimens from eight surgical cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a condition that is also characterized by intractable seizures, were CD103(+). In contrast to the RE cases, the percent of CD103(+) T cells increased with the length of time from seizure onset to surgery. In sections of brain tissue from the FCD cases, T cells were predominantly found around blood vessels, and did not stain for CD103. The presence of significant numbers of TRM cells in RE brain irrespective of the length of time between clinical presentation and surgical intervention supports the conclusion that a cellular immune response to an as yet unidentified antigen(s) occurs at an early stage of the disease. Reactivated TRM cells may contribute to disease progression. PMID:26941743

  12. Evidence for Resident Memory T Cells in Rasmussen Encephalitis

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Geoffrey C.; Chang, Julia W.; Huynh, My N.; Chirwa, Thabiso; Vinters, Harry V.; Mathern, Gary W.

    2016-01-01

    Rasmussen encephalitis (RE) is a rare pediatric neuroinflammatory disease of unknown etiology characterized by intractable seizures, and progressive atrophy usually confined to one cerebral hemisphere. Surgical removal or disconnection of the affected cerebral hemisphere is currently the only intervention that effectively stops the seizures. Histopathological evaluation of resected brain tissue has shown that activated brain resident macrophages (microglia) and infiltrating T cells are involved in the inflammatory reaction. Here, we report that T cells isolated from seven RE brain surgery specimens express the resident memory T cell (TRM) marker CD103. CD103 was expressed by >50% of CD8+ αβ T cells and γδ T cells irrespective of the length of time from seizure onset to surgery, which ranged from 0.3 to 8.4 years. Only ~10% of CD4+ αβ were CD103+, which was consistent with the observation that few CD4+ T cells are found in RE brain parenchyma. Clusters of T cells in brain parenchyma, which are a characteristic of RE histopathology, stained for CD103. Less than 10% of T cells isolated from brain specimens from eight surgical cases of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD), a condition that is also characterized by intractable seizures, were CD103+. In contrast to the RE cases, the percent of CD103+ T cells increased with the length of time from seizure onset to surgery. In sections of brain tissue from the FCD cases, T cells were predominantly found around blood vessels, and did not stain for CD103. The presence of significant numbers of TRM cells in RE brain irrespective of the length of time between clinical presentation and surgical intervention supports the conclusion that a cellular immune response to an as yet unidentified antigen(s) occurs at an early stage of the disease. Reactivated TRM cells may contribute to disease progression. PMID:26941743

  13. An adenylyl cyclase signaling pathway predicts direct dopaminergic input to vestibular hair cells.

    PubMed

    Drescher, M J; Cho, W J; Folbe, A J; Selvakumar, D; Kewson, D T; Abu-Hamdan, M D; Oh, C K; Ramakrishnan, N A; Hatfield, J S; Khan, K M; Anne, S; Harpool, E C; Drescher, D G

    2010-12-29

    Adenylyl cyclase (AC) signaling pathways have been identified in a model hair cell preparation from the trout saccule, for which the hair cell is the only intact cell type. The use of degenerate primers targeting cDNA sequence conserved across AC isoforms, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with cloning of amplification products, indicated expression of AC9, AC7 and AC5/6, with cloning efficiencies of 11:5:2. AC9 and AC5/6 are inhibited by Ca(2+), the former in conjunction with calcineurin, and message for calcineurin has also been identified in the trout saccular hair cell layer. AC7 is independent of Ca(2+). Given the lack of detection of calcium/calmodulin-activated isoforms previously suggested to mediate AC activation in the absence of Gαs in mammalian cochlear hair cells, the issue of hair-cell Gαs mRNA expression was re-examined in the teleost vestibular hair cell model. Two full-length coding sequences were obtained for Gαs/olf in the vestibular type II-like hair cells of the trout saccule. Two messages for Gαi have also been detected in the hair cell layer, one with homology to Gαi1 and the second with homology to Gαi3 of higher vertebrates. Both Gαs/olf protein and Gαi1/Gαi3 protein were immunolocalized to stereocilia and to the base of the hair cell, the latter consistent with sites of efferent input. Although a signaling event coupling to Gαs/olf and Gαi1/Gαi3 in the stereocilia is currently unknown, signaling with Gαs/olf, Gαi3, and AC5/6 at the base of the hair cell would be consistent with transduction pathways activated by dopaminergic efferent input. mRNA for dopamine receptors D1A4 and five forms of dopamine D2 were found to be expressed in the teleost saccular hair cell layer, representing information on vestibular hair cell expression not directly available for higher vertebrates. Dopamine D1A receptor would couple to Gαolf and activation of AC5/6. Co-expression with dopamine D2 receptor, which

  14. Direct Exposure to Ethanol Disrupts Junctional Cell-Cell Contact and Hippo-YAP Signaling in HL-1 Murine Atrial Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Noritake, Kanako; Aki, Toshihiko; Funakoshi, Takeshi; Unuma, Kana; Uemura, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Direct exposure of cardiomyocytes to ethanol causes cardiac damage such as cardiac arrythmias and apoptotic cell death. Cardiomyocytes are connected to each other through intercalated disks (ID), which are composed of a gap junction (GJ), adherens junction, and desmosome. Changes in the content as well as the subcellular localization of connexin43 (Cx43), the main component of the cardiac GJ, are reportedly involved in cardiac arrythmias and subsequent damage. Recently, the hippo-YAP signaling pathway, which links cellular physical status to cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, has been implicated in cardiac homeostasis under physiological as well as pathological conditions. This study was conducted to explore the possible involvement of junctional intercellular communication, mechanotransduction through cytoskeletal organization, and the hippo-YAP pathway in cardiac damage caused by direct exposure to ethanol. HL-1 murine atrial cardiac cells were used since these cells retain cardiac phenotypes through ID formation and subsequent synchronous contraction. Cells were exposed to 0.5–2% ethanol; significant apoptotic cell death was observed after exposure to 2% ethanol for 48 hours. A decrease in Cx43 levels was already observed after 3 hours exposure to 2% ethanol, suggesting a rapid degradation of this protein. Upon exposure to ethanol, Cx43 translocated into lysosomes. Cellular cytoskeletal organization was also dysregulated by ethanol, as demonstrated by the disruption of myofibrils and intermediate filaments. Coinciding with the loss of cell-cell adherence, decreased phosphorylation of YAP, a hippo pathway effector, was also observed in ethanol-treated cells. Taken together, the results provide evidence that cells exposed directly to ethanol show 1) impaired cell-cell adherence/communication, 2) decreased cellular mechanotransduction by the cytoskeleton, and 3) a suppressed hippo-YAP pathway. Suppression of hippo-YAP pathway signaling should be

  15. Amorphous silicon materials and solar cells - Progress and directions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sabisky, E.; Mahan, H.; McMahon, T.

    In 1978, the U.S. Department of Energy initiated government sponsored research in amorphous materials and thin film solar cells. The program was subsequently transferred to the Solar Energy Research Institute for program management. The program grew into a major program for the development of high efficiency (greater than 10 percent), cost effective (15-40 cents per peak watt) thin film amorphous solar cells. The present international interest, the substantial progress made in the device area (2 percent PIN cell in 1976 to 10 percent PIN cell in 1982), and the marketing of the first consumer products using thin film solar cells are to a large ducts using thin film solar cells are to a large extent a consequence of this goal-oriented program.

  16. Directional cell migration, but not proliferation, drives hair placode morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ahtiainen, Laura; Lefebvre, Sylvie; Lindfors, Päivi H; Renvoisé, Elodie; Shirokova, Vera; Vartiainen, Maria K; Thesleff, Irma; Mikkola, Marja L

    2014-03-10

    Epithelial reorganization involves coordinated changes in cell shapes and movements. This restructuring occurs during formation of placodes, ectodermal thickenings that initiate the morphogenesis of epithelial organs including hair, mammary gland, and tooth. Signaling pathways in ectodermal placode formation are well known, but the cellular mechanisms have remained ill defined. We established imaging methodology for live visualization of embryonic skin explants during the first wave of hair placode formation. We found that the vast majority of placodal cells were nonproliferative throughout morphogenesis. We show that cell compaction and centripetal migration are the main cellular mechanisms associated with hair placode morphogenesis and that inhibition of actin remodeling suppresses placode formation. Stimulation of both ectodysplasin/NF-κB and Wnt/β-catenin signaling increased cell motility and the number of cells committed to placodal fate. Thus, cell fate choices and morphogenetic events are controlled by the same molecular pathways, providing the framework for coordination of these two processes. PMID:24636260

  17. Quantifying the weight of fingerprint evidence through the spatial relationship, directions and types of minutiae observed on fingermarks.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Cedric; Champod, Christophe; Yoo, Mina; Genessay, Thibault; Langenburg, Glenn

    2015-03-01

    This paper presents a statistical model for the quantification of the weight of fingerprint evidence. Contrarily to previous models (generative and score-based models), our model proposes to estimate the probability distributions of spatial relationships, directions and types of minutiae observed on fingerprints for any given fingermark. Our model is relying on an AFIS algorithm provided by 3M Cogent and on a dataset of more than 4,000,000 fingerprints to represent a sample from a relevant population of potential sources. The performance of our model was tested using several hundreds of minutiae configurations observed on a set of 565 fingermarks. In particular, the effects of various sub-populations of fingers (i.e., finger number, finger general pattern) on the expected evidential value of our test configurations were investigated. The performance of our model indicates that the spatial relationship between minutiae carries more evidential weight than their type or direction. Our results also indicate that the AFIS component of our model directly enables us to assign weight to fingerprint evidence without the need for the additional layer of complex statistical modeling involved by the estimation of the probability distributions of fingerprint features. In fact, it seems that the AFIS component is more sensitive to the sub-population effects than the other components of the model. Overall, the data generated during this research project contributes to support the idea that fingerprint evidence is a valuable forensic tool for the identification of individuals. PMID:25637956

  18. Dysfunctional endothelial cells directly stimulate cancer inflammation and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Franses, Joseph W.; Drosu, Natalia C.; Gibson, William J.; Chitalia, Vipul C.; Edelman, Elazer R.

    2013-01-01

    Although the influence of context-dependent endothelial cell regulation of vascular disease and repair is well-established, the privileged roles endothelial cells play as paracrine regulators of tumor progression has only recently become appreciated. We hypothesized that if the same endothelial physiology governs vascular and cancer biology then endothelial cell control in cancer should follow endothelial regulation of vascular health. Healthy endothelial cells promote vascular repair and inhibit tumor invasiveness and metastasis; dysfunctional endothelial cells have the opposite effects. We now ask if dysfunctionally activated endothelial cells will promote cancer cell inflammatory signaling and aggressive properties. Indeed, while factors released from quiescent ECs induce balanced inflammatory signaling, correlating with decreased proliferation and invasiveness, factors released from dysfunctional ECs robustly activated NF-κB and STAT3 signaling within cancer cells, correlating with increased in vitro invasiveness and decreased proliferation and survival. Furthermore, matrix-embedded dysfunctional endothelial cells stimulated intratumoral pro-inflammatory signaling and spontaneous metastasis, while simultaneously slowing net primary tumor growth, when implanted adjacent to Lewis lung carcinoma tumors. These studies may broaden our realization of the roles of endothelial function and dysfunction, increase understanding and control of the tumor microenvironment, and facilitate optimization of anti-angiogenic and vascular-modifying therapies in cancer and related diseases. PMID:23463345

  19. Direct-to-Consumer Stem Cell Marketing and Regulatory Responses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Summary There is a large, poorly regulated international market of putative stem cell products, including transplants of processed autologous stem cells from various tissues, cell processing devices, cosmetics, and nutritional supplements. Despite the absence of rigorous scientific research in the form of randomized clinical trials to support the routine use of such products, the market appears to be growing and diversifying. Very few stem cell biologics have passed regulatory scrutiny, and authorities in many countries, including the United States, have begun to step up their enforcement activities to protect patients and the integrity of health care markets. PMID:23934911

  20. Direct-to-consumer stem cell marketing and regulatory responses.

    PubMed

    Sipp, Douglas

    2013-09-01

    There is a large, poorly regulated international market of putative stem cell products, including transplants of processed autologous stem cells from various tissues, cell processing devices, cosmetics, and nutritional supplements. Despite the absence of rigorous scientific research in the form of randomized clinical trials to support the routine use of such products, the market appears to be growing and diversifying. Very few stem cell biologics have passed regulatory scrutiny, and authorities in many countries, including the United States, have begun to step up their enforcement activities to protect patients and the integrity of health care markets. PMID:23934911

  1. Efficient Generation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Corneal Endothelial Cells by Directed Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, Kathryn L.; Kunzevitzky, Noelia J.; Chiswell, Brian P.; Xia, Xin; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Lanza, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Aim To generate human embryonic stem cell derived corneal endothelial cells (hESC-CECs) for transplantation in patients with corneal endothelial dystrophies. Materials and Methods Feeder-free hESC-CECs were generated by a directed differentiation protocol. hESC-CECs were characterized by morphology, expression of corneal endothelial markers, and microarray analysis of gene expression. Results hESC-CECs were nearly identical morphologically to primary human corneal endothelial cells, expressed Zona Occludens 1 (ZO-1) and Na+/K+ATPaseα1 (ATPA1) on the apical surface in monolayer culture, and produced the key proteins of Descemet’s membrane, Collagen VIIIα1 and VIIIα2 (COL8A1 and 8A2). Quantitative PCR analysis revealed expression of all corneal endothelial pump transcripts. hESC-CECs were 96% similar to primary human adult CECs by microarray analysis. Conclusion hESC-CECs are morphologically similar, express corneal endothelial cell markers and express a nearly identical complement of genes compared to human adult corneal endothelial cells. hESC-CECs may be a suitable alternative to donor-derived corneal endothelium. PMID:26689688

  2. Glioma-associated endothelial cells show evidence of replicative senescence

    SciTech Connect

    Charalambous, Christiana; Virrey, Jenilyn; Kardosh, Adel; Jabbour, Mark N.; Qazi-Abdullah, Lubna; Pen, Ligaya; Zidovetzki, Raphael; Schoenthal, Axel H.; Chen, Thomas C.; Hofman, Florence M. . E-mail: hofman@usc.edu

    2007-04-01

    The innately programmed process of replicative senescence has been studied extensively with respect to cancer, but primarily from the perspective of tumor cells overcoming this stringent innate barrier and acquiring the capacity for unlimited proliferation. In this study, we focus on the potential role of replicative senescence affecting the non-transformed endothelial cells of the blood vessels within the tumor microenvironment. Based on the well-documented aberrant structural and functional features of blood vessels within solid tumors, we hypothesized that tumor-derived factors may lead to premature replicative senescence in tumor-associated brain endothelial cells (TuBEC). We show here that glioma tissue, but not normal brain tissue, contains cells that express the signature of replicative senescence, senescence-associated {beta}-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal), on CD31-positive endothelial cells. Primary cultures of human TuBEC stain for SA-{beta}-gal and exhibit characteristics of replicative senescence, including increased levels of the cell cycle inhibitors p21 and p27, increased resistance to cytotoxic drugs, increased growth factor production, and inability to proliferate. These data provide the first demonstration that tumor-derived brain endothelial cells may have reached an end-stage of differentiation known as replicative senescence and underscore the need for anti-angiogenic therapies to target this unique tumor-associated endothelial cell population.

  3. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schwab, Angela; Meyering, Shabana S.; Lepene, Ben; Iordanskiy, Sergey; van Hoek, Monique L.; Hakami, Ramin M.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs) that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical toll-like receptor and NFκB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of many

  4. Extracellular vesicles from infected cells: potential for direct pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Angela; Meyering, Shabana S; Lepene, Ben; Iordanskiy, Sergey; van Hoek, Monique L; Hakami, Ramin M; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    Infections that result in natural or manmade spread of lethal biological agents are a concern and require national and focused preparedness. In this manuscript, as part of an early diagnostics and pathogen treatment strategy, we have focused on extracellular vesicles (EVs) that arise following infections. Although the field of biodefense does not currently have a rich resource in EVs literature, none the less, similar pathogens belonging to the more classical emerging and non-emerging diseases have been studied in their EV/exosomal contents and function. These exosomes are formed in late endosomes and released from the cell membrane in almost every cell type in vivo. These vesicles contain proteins, RNA, and lipids from the cells they originate from and function in development, signal transduction, cell survival, and transfer of infectious material. The current review focuses on how different forms of infection exploit the exosomal pathway and how exosomes can be exploited artificially to treat infection and disease and potentially also be used as a source of vaccine. Virally-infected cells can secrete viral as well as cellular proteins and RNA in exosomes, allowing viruses to cause latent infection and spread of miRNA to nearby cells prior to a subsequent infection. In addition to virally-infected host cells, bacteria, protozoa, and fungi can all release small vesicles that contain pathogen-associated molecular patterns, regulating the neighboring uninfected cells. Examples of exosomes from both virally and bacterially infected cells point toward a re-programming network of pathways in the recipient cells. Finally, many of these exosomes contain cytokines and miRNAs that in turn can effect gene expression in the recipient cells through the classical toll-like receptor and NFκB pathway. Therefore, although exosomes do not replicate as an independent entity, they however facilitate movement of infectious material through tissues and may be the cause of many

  5. Egocentric search for disappearing objects in domestic dogs: evidence for a geometric hypothesis of direction.

    PubMed

    Fiset, Sylvain; Landry, France; Ouellette, Manon

    2006-01-01

    In several species, the ability to locate a disappearing object is an adaptive component of predatory and social behaviour. In domestic dogs, spatial memory for hidden objects is primarily based on an egocentric frame of reference. We investigated the geometric components of egocentric spatial information used by domestic dogs to locate an object they saw move and disappear. In experiment 1, the distance and the direction between the position of the animal and the hiding location were put in conflict. Results showed that the dogs primarily used the directional information between their own spatial coordinates and the target position. In experiment 2, the accuracy of the dogs in finding a hidden object by using directional information was estimated by manipulating the angular deviation between adjacent hiding locations and the position of the animal. Four angular deviations were tested: 5, 7.5, 10 and 15 degrees . Results showed that the performance of the dogs decreased as a function of the angular deviations but it clearly remained well above chance, revealing that the representation of the dogs for direction is precise. In the discussion, we examine how and why domestic dogs determine the direction in which they saw an object disappear. PMID:15750805

  6. Angular velocity and head direction signals recorded from the dorsal tegmental nucleus of gudden in the rat: implications for path integration in the head direction cell circuit.

    PubMed

    Sharp, P E; Tinkelman, A; Cho, J

    2001-06-01

    When a rat navigates through space, head direction (HD) cells provide an ongoing signal of the rat's directional heading. It is thought that these cells rely, in part, on angular path integration of the rat's head movements. This integration requires that the HD cell system receive information about angular head movements and that this information be combined with the current directional signal, to generate the next "predicted" direction. Recent data suggest that the dorsal tegmental nucleus (DTN) may play a critical role in helping to generate the HD cell signal. To test this, recordings were made from cells in the DTN in freely moving rats. The following cell types were found: (a) "classic" HD cells, (b) angular velocity cells, and (c) cells that fired as a function of both head direction and angular velocity. Thus, DTN cells exhibit firing characteristics that are critical to the neural circuit hypothesized for generation of the HD cell signal. PMID:11439447

  7. Hysteresis in the perception of motion direction as evidence for neural cooperativity.

    PubMed

    Williams, D; Phillips, G; Sekuler, R

    When elements of a parallel network, such as the human brain, are extensively interconnected, the network can exhibit 'cooperative behaviour'. Such behaviour, which is characterized by order-disorder transitions, multi-stable states, and a form of memory called 'hysteresis', has been observed in human stereopsis and has motivated models of stereopsis that incorporate cooperative networks. More recently, cooperative phenomena have also been observed in human visual motion perception. This report strongly supports a cooperative interpretation of motion perception by demonstrating hysteresis in the perception of motion direction. The results agree quantitatively with a mathematical model incorporating nonlinear excitatory and inhibitory interactions among direction-selective elements. PMID:3785395

  8. Mechanism of Cationic Nanoparticles and Cell-Penetrating Peptides Direct Translocate Across Cell Membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Alexander-Katz, Alfredo

    2014-03-01

    Cationic Nanoparticles (NPs) and cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) are known effective intracellular delivery agents. These positively charged particles can bypass traditional endocytosis route to enter the cytosol, which is known as direct translocation. However, mechanism of direct translocation of both NPs and CPPs is not well understood. Using Coarse-grained (CG) molecular dynamics simulation, we found that gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) as well as HIV-1 Tat peptides can translocate across model biological membranes through nanoscale holes under a transmembrane (TM) potential. After the translocation, the TM is strongly weakened and the holes gradually reseal themselves, while the NPs/CPPs roam freely in the ``intracellular region.'' Both size and shape of the NPs/ CPPs are found to be a determine factor of their translocation behaviour, and the relationship between direct translocation and endocytosis is also discussed. The results provided here establish fundamental rules of direct translocation entry of NPs/CPPs, which may guide the rational design of cationic intracellular nanocarriers.

  9. Microfluidic application-specific integrated device for monitoring direct cell-cell communication via gap junctions between individual cell pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Philip J.; Hung, Paul J.; Shaw, Robin; Jan, Lily; Lee, Luke P.

    2005-05-01

    Direct cell-cell communication between adjacent cells is vital for the development and regulation of functional tissues. However, current biological techniques are difficult to scale up for high-throughput screening of cell-cell communication in an array format. In order to provide an effective biophysical tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of gap junctions that underlie intercellular communication, we have developed a microfluidic device for selective trapping of cell-pairs and simultaneous optical characterizations. Two different cell populations can be brought into membrane contact using an array of trapping channels with a 2μm by 2μm cross section. Device operation was verified by observation of dye transfer between mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) placed in membrane contact. Integration with lab-on-a-chip technologies offers promising applications for cell-based analytical tools such as drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and soft-state biophysical devices for the study of gap junction protein channels in cellular communications. Understanding electrical transport mechanisms via gap junctions in soft membranes will impact quantitative biomedical sciences as well as clinical applications.

  10. V{delta}1 T cell receptor binds specifically to MHC I chain related A: Molecular and biochemical evidences

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Jianqing; Huang Jie; Chen Hui; Cui Lianxian; He Wei . E-mail: heweiimu@public.bta.net.cn

    2006-01-06

    Human MHC class I chain-related A (MICA) is a tumor-associated antigen that can be recognized by V{delta}1 subset of tumor-infiltrating {gamma}{delta} T cells. We previously reported that immobilized recombinant MICA protein could induce the proliferation of tumor-infiltrating V{delta}1 {gamma}{delta} T cells in vitro. But there has been no direct evidence showing the engagement of {gamma}{delta} T cell receptors (TCR) of the induced cells with MICA. In the current investigation, we show that MICA induces specific cytolytic activity of the expanded {gamma}{delta} T cells. We expressed the coupled V domains from the MICA-induced T cells as a single polypeptide chain V{delta}V{gamma} TCR ({gamma}{delta} scTCR). Such scTCR can specifically bind MICA of HeLa cells. Direct interaction of {gamma}{delta} scTCRs with in vitro expressed MICA was monitored using an IAsys biosensor. We found that the V{delta}1 scTCR can specifically bind to immobilized MICA molecule and MICA{alpha}1{alpha}2 domains are responsible for the binding reaction.

  11. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-10-09

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  12. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2012-01-24

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  13. Carbon Fuel Particles Used in Direct Carbon Conversion Fuel Cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2008-10-21

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  14. Carbon fuel particles used in direct carbon conversion fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Cooper, John F.; Cherepy, Nerine

    2011-08-16

    A system for preparing particulate carbon fuel and using the particulate carbon fuel in a fuel cell. Carbon particles are finely divided. The finely dividing carbon particles are introduced into the fuel cell. A gas containing oxygen is introduced into the fuel cell. The finely divided carbon particles are exposed to carbonate salts, or to molten NaOH or KOH or LiOH or mixtures of NaOH or KOH or LiOH, or to mixed hydroxides, or to alkali and alkaline earth nitrates.

  15. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in media containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8x10-4-3x10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  16. Direct Gene Transfer into Human Cultured Cells Facilitated by Laser Micropuncture of the Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wen; Wilkinson, Joyce; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 × 10-4-3 × 10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  17. Intentional Forgetting Reduces Color-Naming Interference: Evidence from Item-Method Directed Forgetting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Yuh-shiow; Lee, Huang-mou; Fawcett, Jonathan M.

    2013-01-01

    In an item-method-directed forgetting task, Chinese words were presented individually, each followed by an instruction to remember or forget. Colored probe items were presented following each memory instruction requiring a speeded color-naming response. Half of the probe items were novel and unrelated to the preceding study item, whereas the…

  18. Direct evidence for the spin cycloid in strained nanoscale bismuth ferrite thin films.

    PubMed

    Bertinshaw, Joel; Maran, Ronald; Callori, Sara J; Ramesh, Vidya; Cheung, Jeffery; Danilkin, Sergey A; Lee, Wai Tung; Hu, Songbai; Seidel, Jan; Valanoor, Nagarajan; Ulrich, Clemens

    2016-01-01

    Magnonic devices that utilize electric control of spin waves mediated by complex spin textures are an emerging direction in spintronics research. Room-temperature multiferroic materials, such as bismuth ferrite (BiFeO3), would be ideal candidates for this purpose. To realize magnonic devices, a robust long-range spin cycloid with well-known direction is desired, since it is a prerequisite for the magnetoelectric coupling. Despite extensive investigation, the stabilization of a large-scale uniform spin cycloid in nanoscale (100 nm) thin BiFeO3 films has not been accomplished. Here, we demonstrate cycloidal spin order in 100 nm BiFeO3 thin films through the careful choice of crystallographic orientation, and control of the electrostatic and strain boundary conditions. Neutron diffraction, in conjunction with X-ray diffraction, reveals an incommensurate spin cycloid with a unique [11] propagation direction. While this direction is different from bulk BiFeO3, the cycloid length and Néel temperature remain equivalent to bulk at room temperature. PMID:27585637

  19. Phonetic Category Cues in Adult-Directed Speech: Evidence from Three Languages with Distinct Vowel Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pons, Ferran; Biesanz, Jeremy C.; Kajikawa, Sachiyo; Fais, Laurel; Narayan, Chandan R.; Amano, Shigeaki; Werker, Janet F.

    2012-01-01

    Using an artificial language learning manipulation, Maye, Werker, and Gerken (2002) demonstrated that infants' speech sound categories change as a function of the distributional properties of the input. In a recent study, Werker et al. (2007) showed that Infant-directed Speech (IDS) input contains reliable acoustic cues that support distributional…

  20. Changing the Legacy of Divorce: Evidence from Prevention Programs and Future Directions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haine, Rachel A.; Sandler, Irwin N.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Dawson-McClure, Spring R.

    2003-01-01

    Assesses efforts to prevent mental health problems in children of divorce by highlighting the importance of using theory in the design and evaluation of prevention programs and by reviewing the empirical research on the efficacy of programs to improve outcomes for children of divorce. Also proposes two future directions for advancing theory-based…

  1. Anxiety and Reading Difficulties in Early Elementary School: Evidence for Unidirectional- or Bi-Directional Relations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grills-Taquechel, Amie E.; Fletcher, Jack M.; Vaughn, Sharon R.; Stuebing, Karla K.

    2012-01-01

    The present study examined competing models of the bi-directional influences of anxiety and reading achievement. Participants were 153 ethnically-diverse children (84 male, 69 female) from general education classes evaluated in the winter and spring of their first-grade academic year. Children completed standardized measures of reading achievement…

  2. Comprehension of Linguistic Dependencies: Speed-Accuracy Tradeoff Evidence for Direct-Access Retrieval From Memory

    PubMed Central

    Foraker, Stephani; McElree, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Comprehenders can rapidly and efficiently interpret expressions with various types of non-adjacent dependencies. In the sentence The boy that the teacher warned fell, boy is readily interpreted as the subject of the verb fall despite the fact that a relative clause, that the teacher warned, intervenes between the two dependent elements. We review research investigating three memory operations proposed for resolving this and other types of non-adjacent dependencies: serial search retrieval, in which the dependent constituent is recovered by a search process through representations in memory, direct-access retrieval in which the dependent constituent is recovered directly by retrieval cue operations without search, and active maintenance of the dependent constituent in focal attention. Studies using speed-accuracy tradeoff methodology to examine the full timecourse of interpreting a wide range of non-adjacent dependencies indicate that comprehenders retrieve dependent constituents with a direct-access operation, consistent with the claim that representations formed during comprehension are accessed with a cue-driven, content-addressable retrieval process. The observed timecourse profiles are inconsistent with a broad class of models based on several search operations for retrieval. The profiles are also inconsistent with active maintenance of a constituent while concurrently processing subsequent material, and suggest that, with few exceptions, direct-access retrieval is required to process non-adjacent dependencies. PMID:22448181

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Transmigrate Between and Directly Through TNF-α-activated Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Teo, Grace S.L.; Ankrum, James A.; Martinelli, Roberta; Boetto, Sarah E.; Simms, Kayla; Sciuto, Tracey E.; Dvorak, Ann M.; Karp, Jeffrey M.; Carman, Christopher V.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Systemically administered adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSC), which are being explored in clinical trials to treat inflammatory disease, exhibit the critical ability to extravasate at sites of inflammation. We aimed to characterize the basic cellular processes mediating this extravasation and compare them to those involved in leukocyte transmigration. Using high-resolution confocal and dynamic microscopy, we show that, like leukocytes, human bone marrow-derived MSC preferentially adhere to and migrate across TNF-α-activated endothelium in a vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) signaling-dependent manner. As several studies have suggested, we observed that a fraction of MSC integrated into endothelium. In addition, we observed two modes of transmigration not previously observed for MSC: Para (between endothelial cells)- and trans (directly through individual endothelial cells)-cellular diapedesis through discrete pores and gaps in the endothelial monolayer, in association with VCAM-1-enriched ‘transmigratory cups’. Contrasting leukocytes, MSC transmigration was not preceded by significant lateral migration and occurred on the time scale of hours rather than minutes. Interestingly, rather than lamellipodia and invadosomes, MSC exhibited non-apoptotic membrane blebbing activity, that was similar to activities previously described for metastatic tumor and embryonic germ cells. Our studies suggest that low avidity binding between endothelium and MSC may grant a permissive environment for MSC blebbing. MSC blebbing was associated with early stages of transmigration, in which blebs could exert forces on underlying endothelial cells indicating potential functioning in breaching the endothelium. Collectively, our data suggest that MSC transmigrate actively into inflamed tissues via both leukocyte-like and novel mechanisms. PMID:22887987

  4. DIRECT EVIDENCE FOR TERMINATION OF OBSCURED STAR FORMATION BY RADIATIVELY DRIVEN OUTFLOWS IN REDDENED QSOs

    SciTech Connect

    Farrah, Duncan; Urrutia, Tanya; Lacy, Mark; Lonsdale, Carol; Efstathiou, Andreas; Afonso, Jose; Coppin, Kristen; Hall, Patrick B.; Jarrett, Tom; Borys, Colin; Bridge, Carrie; Petty, Sara

    2012-02-01

    We present optical to far-infrared photometry of 31 reddened QSOs that show evidence for radiatively driven outflows originating from active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in their rest-frame UV spectra. We use these data to study the relationships between the AGN-driven outflows, and the AGN and starburst infrared luminosities. We find that FeLoBAL QSOs are invariably IR-luminous, with IR luminosities exceeding 10{sup 12} L{sub Sun} in all cases. The AGN supplies 76% of the total IR emission, on average, but with a range from 20% to 100%. We find no evidence that the absolute luminosity of obscured star formation is affected by the AGN-driven outflows. Conversely, we find an anticorrelation between the strength of AGN-driven outflows, as measured from the range of outflow velocities over which absorption exceeds a minimal threshold, and the contribution from star formation to the total IR luminosity, with a much higher chance of seeing a starburst contribution in excess of 25% in systems with weak outflows than in systems with strong outflows. Moreover, we find no convincing evidence that this effect is driven by the IR luminosity of the AGN. We conclude that radiatively driven outflows from AGNs can have a dramatic, negative impact on luminous star formation in their host galaxies. We find that such outflows act to curtail star formation such that star formation contributes less than {approx}25% of the total IR luminosity. We also propose that the degree to which termination of star formation takes place is not deducible from the IR luminosity of the AGN.

  5. Direct conversion of human amniotic cells into endothelial cells without transitioning through a pluripotent state.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Michael; Schachterle, William; Shido, Koji; Rafii, Shahin

    2015-12-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) have essential roles in organ development and regeneration, and therefore they could be used for regenerative therapies. However, generation of abundant functional endothelium from pluripotent stem cells has been difficult because ECs generated by many existing strategies have limited proliferative potential and display vascular instability. The latter difficulty is of particular importance because cells that lose their identity over time could be unsuitable for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a 3-week platform for directly converting human mid-gestation lineage-committed amniotic fluid-derived cells (ACs) into a stable and expandable population of vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) without using pluripotency factors. By transient expression of the ETS transcription factor ETV2 for 2 weeks and constitutive expression the ETS transcription factors FLI1 and ERG1, concomitant with TGF-β inhibition for 3 weeks, epithelial and mesenchymal ACs are converted, with high efficiency, into functional rAC-VECs. These rAC-VECs maintain their vascular repertoire and morphology over numerous passages in vitro, and they form functional vessels when implanted in vivo. rAC-VECs can be detected in recipient mice months after implantation. Thus, rAC-VECs can be used to establish a cellular platform to uncover the molecular determinants of vascular development and heterogeneity and potentially represent ideal ECs for the treatment of regenerative disorders. PMID:26540589

  6. Direct conversion of human amniotic cells into endothelial cells without transitioning through a pluripotent state

    PubMed Central

    Ginsberg, Michael; Schachterle, William; Shido, Koji; Rafii, Shahin

    2016-01-01

    Endothelial cells (ECs) have essential roles in organ development and regeneration, and therefore they could be used for regenerative therapies. However, generation of abundant functional endothelium from pluripotent stem cells has been difficult because ECs generated by many existing strategies have limited proliferative potential and display vascular instability. The latter difficulty is of particular importance because cells that lose their identity over time could be unsuitable for therapeutic use. Here, we describe a 3-week platform for directly converting human mid-gestation lineage-committed amniotic fluid–derived cells (ACs) into a stable and expandable population of vascular ECs (rAC-VECs) without using pluripotency factors. By transient expression of the ETS transcription factor ETV2 for 2 weeks and constitutive expression the ETS transcription factors FLI1 and ERG1, concomitant with TGF-β inhibition for 3 weeks, epithelial and mesenchymal ACs are converted, with high efficiency, into functional rAC-VECs. These rAC-VECs maintain their vascular repertoire and morphology over numerous passages in vitro, and they form functional vessels when implanted in vivo. rAC-VECs can be detected in recipient mice months after implantation. Thus, rAC-VECs can be used to establish a cellular platform to uncover the molecular determinants of vascular development and heterogeneity and potentially represent ideal ECs for the treatment of regenerative disorders. PMID:26540589

  7. Advantages of RGD peptides for directing cell association with biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Bellis, Susan L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite many years of in vitro research confirming the effectiveness of RGD in promoting cell attachment to a wide variety of biomaterials, animal studies evaluating tissue responses to implanted RGD-functionalized substrates have yielded more variable results The goals of this report are to present some of the reasons why cell culture studies may not always reliably predict in vivo responses, and more importantly, to highlight potential applications that may benefit from the use of RGD peptides. PMID:21515168

  8. Compact bipolar plate-free direct methanol fuel cell stacks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Takahashi, Motohiro; Nagao, Masahiro; Hibino, Takashi

    2011-05-14

    Fuel cells with a PtAu/C anode and a Pr-doped Mn(2)O(3)/C cathode were stacked without using a bipolar plate, and their discharge properties were investigated in a methanol aqueous solution bubbled with air. A three-cell stack exhibited a stack voltage of 2330 mV and a power output of 21 mW. PMID:21451850

  9. The TRPM8 protein is a testosterone receptor: I. Biochemical evidence for direct TRPM8-testosterone interactions.

    PubMed

    Asuthkar, Swapna; Elustondo, Pia A; Demirkhanyan, Lusine; Sun, Xiaohui; Baskaran, Padmamalini; Velpula, Kiran Kumar; Thyagarajan, Baskaran; Pavlov, Evgeny V; Zakharian, Eleonora

    2015-01-30

    The transient receptor potential ion channel of the melastatin subfamily, TRPM8, is a major cold receptor in the peripheral nervous system. Along with the sensory neurons, the TRPM8 protein is highly expressed in the prostate epithelial cells, and this expression is regulated by androgens. Here we investigated the expression and intracellular localization of the TRPM8 channel in relationship to androgens. We performed experiments using human prostate tissues obtained from healthy individuals and patients with prostate cancer at various stages of the disease as well as in cultured cells. Using an immunohistochemistry approach, we detected an intensive colocalization pattern of the TRPM8 protein with endogenous androgens in all tissues tested, suggesting possible interactions. Co-immunoprecipitation experiments performed using cultured prostate epithelial cells, prostate cancer cells, and HEK-293 cells stably expressing TRPM8 further confirmed direct binding of the steroid hormone, testosterone, to the TRPM8 protein. Applications of picomolar concentrations of testosterone to the primary human prostate cells, endogenously expressing TRPM8, elicited Ca(2+) responses and channel currents, and those were inhibited in the presence of TRPM8 antagonist, N-(2-aminoethyl)-N-(4-(benzyloxy)-3-methoxybenzyl)thiophene-2-carboxamide hydrochloride. These results indicate that the TRPM8 channel is physically associated with testosterone and suggest that, in addition to a genomic role, testosterone plays a role in direct regulation of the TRPM8 channel function. PMID:25480783

  10. PD-1 as an emerging therapeutic target in renal cell carcinoma: current evidence

    PubMed Central

    Tykodi, Scott S

    2014-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common primary malignant tumor of the kidney in adults, representing approximately 4% of all adult cancers in the United States. Metastatic RCC is poorly responsive to conventional cytotoxic chemotherapies but can be sensitive to T-cell-directed immunotherapies such as interferon-α or interleukin-2. Despite recent progress in the application of antiangiogenic “targeted therapies” for metastatic RCC, high-dose interleukin-2 remains an appropriate first-line therapy for select patients and is associated with durable complete remissions in a small fraction of treated patients. Thus, advanced RCC provides a unique opportunity to investigate the requirements for effective antitumor immunotherapy. Accumulating evidence suggests that resistance mechanisms exploited by RCC and other tumor types may play a dominant role in limiting the effectiveness of tumor-reactive adaptive immune responses. Expression of the inhibitory coreceptor programmed cell death-1 (PD-1) on tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes within RCC tumors, as well as the expression of the PD-1 ligand (PD-L1) on RCC tumor cells, are strong negative prognostic markers for disease-specific death in RCC patients. Monoclonal antibodies targeting either PD-1 or PD-L1 have now entered clinic trials and have demonstrated promising antitumor effects for refractory metastatic RCC. This review summarizes the results of published and reported studies of PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted therapies enrolling patients with advanced RCC, focusing on key safety, toxicity, and efficacy end points. Prospects for advanced phase clinical testing and novel therapy combinations with PD-1- and PD-L1-targeted agents are discussed. PMID:25114573

  11. Epigenetics of Posttraumatic Stress Disorder: Current Evidence, Challenges, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Zannas, Anthony S; Provençal, Nadine; Binder, Elisabeth B

    2015-09-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a stress-related psychiatric disorder that is thought to emerge from complex interactions among traumatic events and multiple genetic factors. Epigenetic regulation lies at the heart of these interactions and mediates the lasting effects of the environment on gene regulation. An increasing body of evidence in human subjects with PTSD supports a role for epigenetic regulation of distinct genes and pathways in the pathogenesis of PTSD. The role of epigenetic regulation is further supported by studies examining fear conditioning in rodent models. Although this line of research offers an exciting outlook for future epigenetic research in PTSD, important limitations include the tissue specificity of epigenetic modifications, the phenomenologic definition of the disorder, and the challenge of translating molecular evidence across species. These limitations call for studies that combine data from postmortem human brain tissue and animal models, assess longitudinal epigenetic changes in living subjects, and examine dimensional phenotypes in addition to diagnoses. Moreover, examining the environmental, genetic, and epigenetic factors that promote resilience to trauma may lead to important advances in the field. PMID:25979620

  12. The Role of Massage in Sports Performance and Rehabilitation: Current Evidence and Future Direction

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Background Massage is a popular treatment choice of athletes, coaches, and sports physical therapists. Despite its purported benefits and frequent use, evidence demonstrating its efficacy is scarce. Purpose To identify current literature relating to sports massage and its role in effecting an athlete's psychological readiness, in enhancing sports performance, in recovery from exercise and competition, and in the treatment of sports related musculoskeletal injuries. Methods Electronic databases were used to identify papers relevant to this review. The following keywords were searched: massage, sports injuries, athletic injuries, physical therapy, rehabilitation, delayed onset muscle soreness, sports psychology, sports performance, sports massage, sports recovery, soft tissue mobilization, deep transverse friction massage, pre-event, and post exercise. Results Research studies pertaining to the following general categories were identified and reviewed: pre-event (physiological and psychological variables), sports performance, recovery, and rehabilitation. Discussion Despite the fact clinical research has been performed, a poor appreciation exists for the appropriate clinical use of sports massage. Conclusion Additional studies examining the physiological and psychological effects of sports massage are necessary in order to assist the sports physical therapist in developing and implementing clinically significant evidence based programs or treatments. PMID:21509135

  13. Mantle cell lymphoma cell lines show no evident immunoglobulin heavy chain stereotypy but frequent light chain stereotypy.

    PubMed

    Pighi, Chiara; Barbi, Stefano; Bertolaso, Anna; Zamò, Alberto

    2013-08-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma shows a peculiar immunogenetic profile, but the functional consequences of this fact are unknown. We have determined the precise sequences of rearranged heavy and light chain genes in several mantle cell lymphoma cell lines and investigated the presence of heavy and light chain stereotypy. These cell lines use IGHV and IGLV genes that are known to be preferentially rearranged in mantle cell lymphoma, but we found no evidence of heavy chain stereotypy. In contrast, one cell line (Mino) showed a nearly identical light chain complementarity-determining region 3 when compared to the only published light chain cluster. Two cell line couples (Jeko-1/UPN-2 and JVM-2/JVM-13) showed a highly similar light chain that satisfied the criteria for stereotypy. Our data show that mantle cell lymphoma cell lines resemble the IGHV and IGLV usage of mantle cell lymphoma, and foster the hypothesis that light chain stereotypy might be under-recognized. PMID:23245212

  14. Evidence of DMSO-Induced Protein Aggregation in Cells.

    PubMed

    Giugliarelli, A; Urbanelli, L; Ricci, M; Paolantoni, M; Emiliani, C; Saccardi, R; Mazzanti, B; Lombardini, L; Morresi, A; Sassi, P

    2016-07-14

    We report on a study of protein aggregation induced on different cell samples by dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) addition. DMSO is the most commonly used cryoprotectant because it is supposed to readily diffuse across lipid bilayers, thus reducing water activity within cells; despite its large use, the mechanism of penetration and even the main interaction features with cell components are far from being understood. In the present work, infrared absorption spectroscopy is successfully applied to real time detection of chemical and structural changes occurring in cells during dehydration from water and water/DMSO suspensions. As a most interesting result, DMSO is observed to favor protein aggregation both in cellular model systems, as cultured lymphocytes and fibroblasts, and in human samples for clinic use, as hematopoietic stem cells from cord blood. This effect is evidenced at low water content, analogously to what is observed for protein solutions. Such tendency is not specific of the type of protein and suggests one possible origin of DMSO toxicity. PMID:26859100

  15. Direct In Vivo Inflammatory Cell-Induced Corrosion of CoCrMo Alloy Orthopedic Implant Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Gilbert, Jeremy L.; Sivan, Shiril; Liu, Yangping; Kocagöz, Sevi; Arnholt, Christina; Kurtz, Steven M.

    2014-01-01

    Cobalt-chromium-molybdenum alloy, used for over four decades in orthopedic implants, may corrode and release wear debris into the body during use. These degradation products may stimulate immune and inflammatory responses in vivo. We report here on evidence of direct inflammatory cell-induced corrosion of human implanted and retrieved CoCrMo implant surfaces. Corrosion morphology on CoCrMo implant surfaces, in unique and characteristic patterns, and the presence of cellular remnants and biological materials intimately entwined with the corrosion indicates direct cellular attack under the cell membrane region of adhered and/or migrating inflammatory cells. Evidence supports a Fenton-like reaction mechanism driving corrosion in which reactive oxygen species are the major driver of corrosion. Using in vitro tests, large increases in corrosion susceptibility of CoCrMo were seen (40 to 100 fold) when immersed in phosphate buffered saline solutions modified with hydrogen peroxide and HCl to represent the chemistry under inflammatory cells. This discovery raises significant new questions about the clinical consequences of such corrosion interactions, the role of patient inflammatory reactions, and the detailed mechanisms at play. PMID:24619511

  16. Evidence for a Direct Effect of the NAD+ Precursor Acipimox on Muscle Mitochondrial Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    van de Weijer, Tineke; Phielix, Esther; Bilet, Lena; Williams, Evan G.; Ropelle, Eduardo R.; Bierwagen, Alessandra; Livingstone, Roshan; Nowotny, Peter; Sparks, Lauren M.; Paglialunga, Sabina; Szendroedi, Julia; Havekes, Bas; Moullan, Norman; Pirinen, Eija; Hwang, Jong-Hee; Schrauwen-Hinderling, Vera B.; Hesselink, Matthijs K.C.; Auwerx, Johan

    2015-01-01

    Recent preclinical studies showed the potential of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) precursors to increase oxidative phosphorylation and improve metabolic health, but human data are lacking. We hypothesize that the nicotinic acid derivative acipimox, an NAD+ precursor, would directly affect mitochondrial function independent of reductions in nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) concentrations. In a multicenter randomized crossover trial, 21 patients with type 2 diabetes (age 57.7 ± 1.1 years, BMI 33.4 ± 0.8 kg/m2) received either placebo or acipimox 250 mg three times daily dosage for 2 weeks. Acipimox treatment increased plasma NEFA levels (759 ± 44 vs. 1,135 ± 97 μmol/L for placebo vs. acipimox, P < 0.01) owing to a previously described rebound effect. As a result, skeletal muscle lipid content increased and insulin sensitivity decreased. Despite the elevated plasma NEFA levels, ex vivo mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle increased. Subsequently, we showed that acipimox treatment resulted in a robust elevation in expression of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial gene sets and a mitonuclear protein imbalance, which may indicate activation of the mitochondrial unfolded protein response. Further studies in C2C12 myotubes confirmed a direct effect of acipimox on NAD+ levels, mitonuclear protein imbalance, and mitochondrial oxidative capacity. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate that NAD+ boosters can also directly affect skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in humans. PMID:25352640

  17. Inhibition of Human Colon Cancer Growth by Antibody-Directed Human LAK Cells in SCID Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Hiroshi; Nakada, Tetsuya; Puisieux, Isabelle

    1993-03-01

    Advanced human colon cancer does not respond to lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells. In order to direct cytotoxic cells to the tumor, human LAK cells linked with antibodies to a tumor cell surface antigen were tested with established hepatic metastases in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These cells had increased uptake into the tumor and suppression of tumor growth as compared with LAK cells alone, thereby improving the survival of tumor-bearing mice. Thus, tumor growth can be inhibited by targeted LAK cells, and SCID mice can be used to test the antitumor properties of human effector cells.

  18. Directed Myogenic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Emi; Woltjen, Knut; Sakurai, Hidetoshi

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have opened the door to recreating pathological conditions in vitro using differentiation into diseased cells corresponding to each target tissue. Yet for muscular diseases, a method for reproducible and efficient myogenic differentiation from human iPSCs is required for in vitro modeling. Here, we introduce a myogenic differentiation protocol mediated by inducible transcription factor expression that reproducibly and efficiently drives human iPSCs into myocytes. Delivering a tetracycline-inducible, myogenic differentiation 1 (MYOD1) piggyBac (PB) vector to human iPSCs enables the derivation of iPSCs that undergo uniform myogenic differentiation in a short period of time. This differentiation protocol yields a homogenous skeletal muscle cell population, reproducibly reaching efficiencies as high as 70-90 %. MYOD1-induced myocytes demonstrate characteristics of mature myocytes such as cell fusion and cell twitching in response to electric stimulation within 14 days of differentiation. This differentiation protocol can be applied widely in various types of patient-derived human iPSCs and has great prospects in disease modeling particularly with inherited diseases that require studies of early pathogenesis and drug screening. PMID:25971915

  19. Interface Directed Self Assembly of Cell-Laden Microgels

    PubMed Central

    Zamanian, Behnam; Masaeli, Mahdokht; Nichol, Jason W.; Khabiry, Masoud; Hancock, Matthew J.; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2010-01-01

    Cell-laden hydrogels show great promise for creating engineered tissues. However, a major shortcoming with these systems has been the inability to fabricate structures with controlled microscale features on a biologically relevant length scale. Here we demonstrate a rapid method for creating centimeter-scale, cell-laden hydrogels through the assembly of shape-controlled microgels. This was achieved by using an approach that uses the liquid-air interface of a hydrophobic solution to drive the assembly of microgels. Cell-laden microgels of specific shapes were randomly placed on the surface of a high density, hydrophobic solution and induced to aggregate and were subsequently crosslinked into macroscale tissue-like structures. The resultant assemblies were cell-laden hydrogel sheets consisting of tightly-packed ordered microgel units. In addition, a hierarchical approach created complex multi-gel building blocks which were then assembled into tissues with precise spatial control over the cell distribution. These data demonstrate that forces at an air-liquid interface can be used to self-assemble spatially controllable, co-cultured tissue-like structures. PMID:20358531

  20. Directional cell elongation through filopodia-steered lamellipodial extension on patterned silk fibroin films.

    PubMed

    You, Renchuan; Li, Xiufang; Luo, Zuwei; Qu, Jing; Li, Mingzhong

    2015-01-01

    Micropatterned biomaterials have been used to direct cell alignment for specific tissue engineering applications. However, the understanding of how cells respond to guidance cues remains limited. Plasticity in protrusion formation has been proposed to enable cells to adapt their motility mode to microenvironment. In this study, the authors investigated the key role of protrusion response in cell guidance on patterned silk fibroin films. The results revealed that the ability to transform between filopodia and small lamellipodia played important roles in directional cell guidance. Filopodia did not show directional extension on patterned substrates prior to spreading, but they transduced topographical cues to the cell to trigger the formation of small lamellipodia along the direction of a microgrooved or parallel nanofiber pattern. The polar lamellipodia formation provided not only a path with directionality, but a driving force for directional cell elongation. Moreover, aligned nanofibers coating provided better mechanical support for the traction of filopodia and lamellipodia, promoting cell attachment, spreading, and migration. This study provides new insight into how cells respond to guidance cues and how filopodia and lamellipodia control cell contact guidance on micropatterned biomaterial surfaces. PMID:25743615

  1. Direct Utilization of Coal Syngas in High Temperature Fuel Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Celik, Ismail B.

    2014-10-30

    This EPSCoR project had two primary goals: (i) to build infrastructure and work force at WVU to support long-term research in the area of fuel cells and related sciences; (ii) study effects of various impurities found in coal-syngas on performance of Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFC). As detailed in this report the WVU research team has made significant accomplishments in both of these areas. What follows is a brief summary of these accomplishments: State-of-the-art test facilities and diagnostic tools have been built and put into use. These include cell manufacturing, half-cell and full-cell test benches, XPS, XRD, TEM, Raman, EDAX, SEM, EIS, and ESEM equipment, unique in-situ measurement techniques and test benches (Environmental EM, Transient Mass-Spectrometer-MS, and IR Optical Temperature measurements). In addition, computational capabilities have been developed culminating in a multi-scale multi-physics fuel cell simulation code, DREAM-SOFC, as well as a Beowulf cluster with 64 CPU units. We have trained 16 graduate students, 10 postdoctoral fellows, and recruited 4 new young faculty members who have actively participated in the EPSCoR project. All four of these faculty members have already been promoted to the tenured associate professor level. With the help of these faculty and students, we were able to secure 14 research awards/contracts amounting to a total of circa $5.0 Million external funding in closely related areas of research. Using the facilities mentioned above, the effects of PH3, HCl, Cl2, and H2S on cell performance have been studied in detail, mechanisms have been identified, and also remedies have been proposed and demonstrated in the laboratory. For example, it has been determined that PH3 reacts rapidly with Ni to from secondary compounds which may become softer or even melt at high temperature and then induce Ni migration to the surface of the cell changing the material and micro-structural properties of the cell drastically. It is found that

  2. State of direct fuel cell/turbine systems development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Walzak, Jim; Patel, Dilip; Daly, Joseph; Maru, Hans; Sanderson, Robert; Livingood, William

    FuelCell Energy Inc. (FCE) is actively developing fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid systems, DFC/T ®, for generation of clean electric power with very high efficiencies. The gas turbine extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell without the need for supplementary fuel. Key features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas (60% on coal gas), minimal emissions, simple design, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed sub-MW scale proof-of-concept tests (pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant). The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. A small packaged natural gas fueled sub-MW unit is being developed for demonstrations (alpha and beta units). Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  3. Directing cell migration using micropatterned and dynamically adhesive polymer brushes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Patricia; Gautrot, Julien E; Connelly, John T

    2014-06-01

    Micropatterning techniques, such as photolithography and microcontact printing, provide robust tools for controlling the adhesive interactions between cells and their extracellular environment. However, the ability to modify these interactions in real time and examine dynamic cellular responses remains a significant challenge. Here we describe a novel strategy to create dynamically adhesive, micropatterned substrates, which afford precise control of cell adhesion and migration over both space and time. Specific functionalization of micropatterned poly(ethylene glycol methacrylate) (POEGMA) brushes with synthetic peptides, containing the integrin-binding arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) motif, was achieved using thiol-yne coupling reactions. RGD activation of POEGMA brushes promoted fibroblast adhesion, spreading and migration into previously non-adhesive areas, and migration speed could be tuned by adjusting the surface ligand density. We propose that this technique is a robust strategy for creating dynamically adhesive biomaterial surfaces and a useful assay for studying cell migration. PMID:24508539

  4. An indirect electric field-induced control in directional migration of rat mesenchymal stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hyoun-Hyang; Jo, Sungkwon; Hoon Seo, Cheong; Jeong, Je Hoon; Yoo, Yeong-Eun; Lee, Dae Hoon

    2014-12-01

    We present the efficacy of an indirect E-field on the directional migration of rat mesenchymal stem cell (MSC). To avoid current flow through culture media and cell, E-fields were generated without exposing electrodes directly to the cell media. MSC migration was observed during wound closure in presence of indirect E-field. MSC migration depended on the E-field strength and occurs predominantly in the anodal direction. Indirect E-field therapy proved as tentative tool for controlled cell movement and healing.

  5. Further evidence against a direct genotoxic mode of action for arsenic-induced cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, Catherine B.; Leszczynska, Joanna; Hickey, Christina; Rossman, Toby G.

    2007-08-01

    Arsenic in drinking water, a mixture of arsenite and arsenate, is associated with increased skin and other cancers in Asia and Latin America, but not the United States. Arsenite alone in drinking water does not cause skin cancers in experimental animals; therefore, it is not a complete carcinogen in skin. We recently showed that low concentrations of arsenite enhanced the tumorigenicity of solar UV irradiation in hairless mice, suggesting arsenic cocarcinogenesis with sunlight in skin cancer and perhaps with different carcinogenic partners for lung and bladder tumors. Cocarcinogenic mechanisms could include blocking DNA repair, stimulating angiogenesis, altering DNA methylation patterns, dysregulating cell cycle control, induction of aneuploidy and blocking apoptosis. Arsenicals are documented clastogens but not strong mutagens, with weak mutagenic activity reported at highly toxic concentrations of inorganic arsenic. Previously, we showed that arsenite, but not monomethylarsonous acid (MMA[III]), induced delayed mutagenesis in HOS cells. Here, we report new data on the mutagenicity of the trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites MMA(III) and dimethylarsinous acid [DMA(III)] at the gpt locus in Chinese hamster G12 cells. Both methylated arsenicals seemed mutagenic with apparent sublinear dose responses. However, significant mutagenesis occurred only at highly toxic concentrations of MMA(III). Most mutants induced by MMA(III) and DMA(III) exhibited transgene deletions. Some non-deletion mutants exhibited altered DNA methylation. A critical discussion of cell survival leads us to conclude that clastogenesis occurs primarily at highly cytotoxic arsenic concentrations, casting further doubt as to whether a genotoxic mode of action (MOA) for arsenicals is supportable.

  6. First evidence of direct CP violation in charmless two-body decays of Bs0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Arrabito, L; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chiapolini, N; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Lorenzi, F; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harji, R; Harnew, N; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Holubyev, K; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Miglioranzi, S; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, K B; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Paterson, S K; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urquijo, P; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-05-18

    Using a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 0.35  fb-1 collected by LHCb in 2011, we report the first evidence of CP violation in the decays of Bs0} mesons to K±π∓ pairs, ACP(Bs0→Kπ)=0.27±0.08(stat)±0.02(syst), with a significance of 3.3σ. Furthermore, we report the most precise measurement of CP violation in the decays of B0 mesons to K±π∓ pairs, ACP(B0→Kπ)=-0.088±0.011(stat)±0.008(syst), with a significance exceeding 6σ. PMID:23003138

  7. Have we found conclusive evidence for dark matter through direct detection experiments?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jun

    2014-04-01

    A WIMP-model-independent method is used to examine the existing evidence for low mass dark matter. Using XENON100's recent result of 224.6 live days × 34 kg exposure and PICASSO's result that was published in 2012, we have obtained constraints on the couplings |an| < 0.4 and |ap| < 0.3, corresponding to spin-dependent cross-sections of σn<2.5×10-38 cm and σp<1.4×10-38 cm2 for a WIMP mass of 10 GeV/c2. It is shown that the spin-independent isospin-violating dark matter model also fails to reconcile the recent result from XENON100 with the positive results from DAMA, CoGeNT and CDMS-II.

  8. OBSERVATIONAL EVIDENCE OF A CORONAL MASS EJECTION DISTORTION DIRECTLY ATTRIBUTABLE TO A STRUCTURED SOLAR WIND

    SciTech Connect

    Savani, N. P.; Owens, M. J.; Forsyth, R. J.; Rouillard, A. P.; Davies, J. A.

    2010-05-01

    We present the first observational evidence of the near-Sun distortion of the leading edge of a coronal mass ejection (CME) by the ambient solar wind into a concave structure. On 2007 November 14, a CME was observed by coronagraphs onboard the STEREO-B spacecraft, possessing a circular cross section. Subsequently the CME passed through the field of view of the STEREO-B Heliospheric Imagers where the leading edge was observed to distort into an increasingly concave structure. The CME observations are compared to an analytical flux rope model constrained by a magnetohydrodynamic solar wind solution. The resultant bimodal speed profile is used to kinematically distort a circular structure that replicates the initial shape of the CME. The CME morphology is found to change rapidly over a relatively short distance. This indicates an approximate radial distance in the heliosphere where the solar wind forces begin to dominate over the magnetic forces of the CME influencing the shape of the CME.

  9. Direct electrochemistry of Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase: evidence for interactions across the dimeric interface

    PubMed Central

    Judd, Evan T.; Youngblut, Matthew; Pacheco, A. Andrew; Elliott, Sean J.

    2013-01-01

    Shewanella oneidensis cytochrome c nitrite reductase (soNrfA), a dimeric enzyme that houses five c-type hemes per protomer, carries out the six-electron reduction of nitrite and the two-electron reduction of hydroxylamine. Protein film voltammetry (PFV) has been used to study the cytochrome c nitrite reductase from Escherichia coli (ecNrfA) previously, revealing catalytic reduction of both nitrite and hydroxylamine substrates by ecNrfA adsorbed to a graphite electrode that is characterized by ‘boosts’ and attenuations in activity depending on the applied potential. Here, we use PFV to investigate the catalytic properties of soNrfA during both nitrite and hydroxylamine turnover and compare those properties to ecNrfA. Distinct differences in both the electrochemical and kinetic characteristics of soNrfA are observed, e.g., all detected electron transfer steps are one-electron in nature, contrary to what has been observed in ecNrfA (Angove, H. C., Cole, J. A., Richardson, D. J., and Butt, J. N. (2002) Protein film voltammetry reveals distinctive fingerprints of nitrite and hydroxylamine reduction by a cytochrome C nitrite reductase, J Biol Chem 277, 23374-23381). Additionally, we find evidence of substrate inhibition during nitrite turnover and negative cooperativity during hydroxylamine turnover, neither of which have previously been observed in any cytochrome c nitrite reductase. Collectively these data provide evidence that during catalysis, potential pathways of communication exist between the individual soNrfA monomers comprising the native homodimer. PMID:23210513

  10. Direct Measurement of Acetylesterase in Living Protist Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Medzon, Edward L.; Brady, Marilyn L.

    1969-01-01

    The fluorogenic acetylesterase (acetic ester hydrolase EC 3.1.1.6.) substrate, fluorescein diacetate, was used to measure enzyme activity in living protist cells. The visual enzyme assay was done by monitoring fluorochromasia by fluorescent microscopy. Quantitative fluorogenic assays were done by measuring the evolved fluorescein in a fluorometer. Of 59 strains of bacteria, 35 were fluorochromatically positive. Eight of the fluorochromatically negative strains were fluorogenically positive. Of 22 strains of slime molds and fungi, all were fluorochromatically positive. Three out of 12 different algae were fluorochromatically positive. Several unidentified protozoa were also fluorochromatically positive. Four out of six protozoa were fluorochromatically positive. Structures of special interest showing acetylesterase activity were: the growing hyphal tips of fungi, the vacuolated areas of yeast and protozoa, newly formed bacterial spores or immature fungal spores, “mesosome-like” bodies in Bacillus megaterium, and the cell membrane and nuclear region of green algae. Yeast protoplasts and bacterial protoplasts and spheroplasts were fluorochromatically positive when derived from positive cells and negative when derived from negative cells. There was no correlation between the possession of a capsule and acetylesterase activity. There was no effect on the viability of bacterial cells incubated in the presence of fluorescein diacetate. Paraoxon inhibited bacterial and yeast enzyme at 10−5m. Eserine (10−5m) and Paraoxon (10−7m) inhibited B. megaterium enzyme. Sodium acetate at 10−2m did not inhibit bacterial enzyme. The implications of these findings on the location and expression of esterase activity in living cells are discussed. Images PMID:4974398

  11. Directing dendritic cell immunotherapy towards successful cancer treatment

    PubMed Central

    Sabado, Rachel Lubong; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2010-01-01

    The use of dendritic cells (DCs) for tumor immunotherapy represents a powerful approach for harnessing the patient's own immune system to eliminate tumor cells. However, suboptimal conditions for generating potent immunostimulatory DCs, as well as the induction of tolerance and suppression mediated by the tumors and its microenvironment have contributed to limited success. Combining DC vaccines with new approaches that enhance immunogenicity and overcome the regulatory mechanisms underlying peripheral tolerance may be the key to achieving effective and durable anti-tumor immune responses that translate to better clinical outcomes. PMID:20473346

  12. Novel anode structure for the direct methanol fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, R. G.; Lim, Chan; Yang, L. X.; Scott, K.; Roy, S.

    Pt-Ru catalysts have been made by a thermal decomposition and electrodeposition method onto a titanium mesh for the electrooxidation of methanol. Galvanostatic polarisations were used to assess and compare the relative activities of the electrodes. SEM and XRD are employed to study the morphology and structure of the catalyst layers. The performance of the anodes in fuel cell assemblies is also discussed. We can see that the mesh perform well in half and full cell tests despite significant apparent physical differences, which are yet to be explored.

  13. Intermediate band solar cells: Recent progress and future directions

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Y. Tamaki, R.; Farrell, D. J.; Yoshida, K.; Ahsan, N.; Shoji, Y.; Sogabe, T.; Ekins-Daukes, N. J. Yoshida, M.; Pusch, A.; Hess, O.; Phillips, C. C.; Kita, T.; Guillemoles, J.-F.

    2015-06-15

    Extensive literature and publications on intermediate band solar cells (IBSCs) are reviewed. A detailed discussion is given on the thermodynamics of solar energy conversion in IBSCs, the device physics, and the carrier dynamics processes with a particular emphasis on the two-step inter-subband absorption/recombination processes that are of paramount importance in a successful implementation high-efficiency IBSC. The experimental solar cell performance is further discussed, which has been recently demonstrated by using highly mismatched alloys and high-density quantum dot arrays and superlattice. IBSCs having widely different structures, materials, and spectral responses are also covered, as is the optimization of device parameters to achieve maximum performance.

  14. Myosin-II-Mediated Directional Migration of Dictyostelium Cells in Response to Cyclic Stretching of Substratum

    PubMed Central

    Iwadate, Yoshiaki; Okimura, Chika; Sato, Katsuya; Nakashima, Yuta; Tsujioka, Masatsune; Minami, Kazuyuki

    2013-01-01

    Living cells are constantly subjected to various mechanical stimulations, such as shear flow, osmotic pressure, and hardness of substratum. They must sense the mechanical aspects of their environment and respond appropriately for proper cell function. Cells adhering to substrata must receive and respond to mechanical stimuli from the substrata to decide their shape and/or migrating direction. In response to cyclic stretching of the elastic substratum, intracellular stress fibers in fibroblasts and endothelial, osteosarcoma, and smooth muscle cells are rearranged perpendicular to the stretching direction, and the shape of those cells becomes extended in this new direction. In the case of migrating Dictyostelium cells, cyclic stretching regulates the direction of migration, and not the shape, of the cell. The cells migrate in a direction perpendicular to that of the stretching. However, the molecular mechanisms that induce the directional migration remain unknown. Here, using a microstretching device, we recorded green fluorescent protein (GFP)-myosin-II dynamics in Dictyostelium cells on an elastic substratum under cyclic stretching. Repeated stretching induced myosin II localization equally on both stretching sides in the cells. Although myosin-II-null cells migrated randomly, myosin-II-null cells expressing a variant of myosin II that cannot hydrolyze ATP migrated perpendicular to the stretching. These results indicate that Dictyostelium cells accumulate myosin II at the portion of the cell where a large strain is received and migrate in a direction other than that of the portion where myosin II accumulated. This polarity generation for migration does not require the contraction of actomyosin. PMID:23442953

  15. A model for cell density effect on stress fiber alignment and collective directional migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeddoust, Mohammad; Shamloo, Amir

    2015-12-01

    In this study, numerical simulation of collective cell migration is presented in order to mimic the group migration of endothelial cells subjected to the concentration gradients of a biochemical factor. The developed 2D model incorporates basic elements of the cell, including both the cell membrane and the cell cytoskeleton, based on a viscoelastic cell mechanic model. Various cell processes—including cell random walk, cell-cell interactions, cell chemotaxis, and cellular cytoskeleton rearrangements—are considered and analyzed in our developed model. After validating the model by using available experimental data, the model is used to investigate various important parameters during collective cell chemotaxis, such as cell density, cytoskeleton organization, stress fiber reorientations, and intracellular forces. The results suggest that increasing the cell density causes the cell-cell interactions to affect the orientation of stress fibers throughout the cytoskeleton and makes the stress fibers more aligned in the direction of the imposed concentration gradient. This improved alignment of the stress fibers correlates with the intensification of the intracellular forces transferred in the gradient direction; this improves the cell group migration. Comparison of the obtained results with available experimental observations of collective chemotaxis of endothelial cells shows an interesting agreement.

  16. Intercellular signaling through secreted proteins induces free-energy gradient-directed cell movement.

    PubMed

    Kravchenko-Balasha, Nataly; Shin, Young Shik; Sutherland, Alex; Levine, R D; Heath, James R

    2016-05-17

    Controlling cell migration is important in tissue engineering and medicine. Cell motility depends on factors such as nutrient concentration gradients and soluble factor signaling. In particular, cell-cell signaling can depend on cell-cell separation distance and can influence cellular arrangements in bulk cultures. Here, we seek a physical-based approach, which identifies a potential governed by cell-cell signaling that induces a directed cell-cell motion. A single-cell barcode chip (SCBC) was used to experimentally interrogate secreted proteins in hundreds of isolated glioblastoma brain cancer cell pairs and to monitor their relative motions over time. We used these trajectories to identify a range of cell-cell separation distances where the signaling was most stable. We then used a thermodynamics-motivated analysis of secreted protein levels to characterize free-energy changes for different cell-cell distances. We show that glioblastoma cell-cell movement can be described as Brownian motion biased by cell-cell potential. To demonstrate that the free-energy potential as determined by the signaling is the driver of motion, we inhibited two proteins most involved in maintaining the free-energy gradient. Following inhibition, cell pairs showed an essentially random Brownian motion, similar to the case for untreated, isolated single cells. PMID:27140641

  17. Preventing malaria in pregnancy through community-directed interventions: evidence from Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite massive anti-malaria campaigns across the subcontinent, effective access to intermittent preventive treatment (IPTp) and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) among pregnant women remain low in large parts of sub-Saharan Africa. The slow uptake of malaria prevention products appears to reflect lack of knowledge and resistance to behavioural change, as well as poor access to resources, and limited support of programmes by local communities and authorities. Methods A recent community-based programme in Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria, is analysed to determine the degree to which community-directed interventions can improve access to malaria prevention in pregnancy. Six local government areas in Southern Nigeria were selected for a malaria in pregnancy prevention intervention. Three of these local government areas were selected for a complementary community-directed intervention (CDI) programme. Under the CDI programme, volunteer community-directed distributors (CDDs) were appointed by each village and kindred in the treatment areas and trained to deliver ITNs and IPTp drugs as well as basic counseling services to pregnant women. Findings Relative to women in the control area, an additional 7.4 percent of women slept under a net during pregnancy in the treatment areas (95% CI [0.035, 0.115], p-value < 0.01), and an additional 8.5 percent of women slept under an ITN after delivery and prior to the interview (95% CI [0.045, 0.122], p-value < 0.001). The effects of the CDI programme were largest for IPTp adherence, increasing the fraction of pregnant women taking at least two SP doses during pregnancy by 35.3 percentage points [95% CI: 0.280, 0.425], p-value < 0.001) relative to the control group. No effects on antenatal care attendance were found. Conclusion The presented results suggest that the inclusion of community-based programmes can substantially increase effective access to malaria prevention, and also increase access to formal health care access in

  18. Direct evidence of acute, massive striatal dopamine release in gerbils with unilateral strokes.

    PubMed

    Brannan, T; Weinberger, J; Knott, P; Taff, I; Kaufmann, H; Togasaki, D; Nieves-Rosa, J; Maker, H

    1987-01-01

    Dopamine release into the extracellular space was measured with in vivo electrochemical detection in the ipsilateral and contralateral striata in Mongolian gerbils that suffered a stroke after acute unilateral carotid artery ligations. A sevenfold increase in the dopamine signal occurred within 15 minutes of carotid ligation in the ischemic side, while the unlesioned side had no significant change. Increased extracellular levels of dopamine persisted throughout the 3-hour recording period. Pretreatment with alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine 6 hours prior to recording significantly attenuated the signal increase. This study is the first direct demonstration of the marked, continuous dopamine release that occurs during acute cerebral ischemia. PMID:3810742

  19. Evidence base and future research directions in the management of low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Allan

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a prevalent and costly condition. Awareness of valid and reliable patient history taking, physical examination and clinical testing is important for diagnostic accuracy. Stratified care which targets treatment to patient subgroups based on key characteristics is reliant upon accurate diagnostics. Models of stratified care that can potentially improve treatment effects include prognostic risk profiling for persistent LBP, likely response to specific treatment based on clinical prediction models or suspected underlying causal mechanisms. The focus of this editorial is to highlight current research status and future directions for LBP diagnostics and stratified care. PMID:27004162

  20. Confirmatory evidence for a direct parasympathetic pathway to internal eye structures.

    PubMed Central

    Parelman, J J; Fay, M T; Burde, R M

    1984-01-01

    The hypothesis that a direct neural pathway exists between the midbrain and the intrinsic musculature was investigated. Wheat germ agglutinin labeled with HRP and WG-HRP were injected intraocularly into the ciliary muscle of rabbits and cynomolgus monkeys, and their retrograde movement was monitored. Sparse, but definite labeling was found in the AM nuclei, the EW nuclei, and Perlia's nucleus of the monkey, confirming the existence of a nonsynapsing pathway between intraocular structures and the midbrain in the primate. Images FIGURE 1 A FIGURE 1 B FIGURE 1 C PMID:6549517

  1. Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation mediated by vascular cell adhesion molecule-1: evidence for involvement of cell adhesion molecules in HTLV-1 biology.

    PubMed Central

    Hildreth, J E; Subramanium, A; Hampton, R A

    1997-01-01

    While studying the potential role of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) in infection of endothelial cells by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), we found that VCAM-1 can mediate human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1)-induced syncytium formation. Both expression-vector-encoded and endogenously expressed VCAM-1 supported fusion of uninfected cells with HTLV-1-infected cells. Fusion was obtained with cell lines carrying the HTLV-1 genome and expressing viral proteins but not with an HTLV-1-transformed cell line that does not express viral proteins. In clones of VCAM-1-transfected cells, the degree of syncytium formation observed directly reflected the level of VCAM-1 expression. Syncytium formation between HTLV-1-expressing cells and VCAM-1+ cells could be blocked with antiserum against HTLV-1 gp46 and with a monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VCAM-1. Fusion was not blocked by antiserum against HIV or a MAb against VLA-4, the physiological counter-receptor for VCAM-1. The results indicate that VCAM-1 can serve as an accessory molecule or potential coreceptor for HTLV-1-induced cell fusion and provide direct evidence of a role for cell adhesion molecules in the biology of HTLV-1. PMID:8995639

  2. Engineering microbial fuels cells: recent patents and new directions.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental research into how microbes generate electricity within microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has far outweighed the practical application and large scale development of microbial energy harvesting devices. MFCs are considered alternatives to standard commercial polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology because the fuel supply does not need to be purified, ambient operating temperatures are maintained with biologically compatible materials, and the biological catalyst is self-regenerating. The generation of electricity during wastewater treatment using MFCs may profoundly affect the approach to anaerobic treatment technologies used in wastewater treatment as a result of developing this energy harvesting technology. However, the materials and engineering designs for MFCs were identical to commercial fuel cells until 2003. Compared to commercial fuel cells, MFCs will remain underdeveloped as long as low power densities are generated from the best systems. The variety of designs for MFCs has expanded rapidly in the last five years in the literature, but the patent protection has lagged behind. This review will cover recent and important patents relating to MFC designs and progress. PMID:19075862

  3. Directed endothelial cell morphogenesis in micropatterned gelatin methacrylate hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Nikkhah, Mehdi; Eshak, Nouran; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Annabi, Nasim; Castello, Marco; Kim, Keekyoung; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Edalat, Faramarz; Bae, Hojae; Yang, Yunzhi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2012-12-01

    Engineering of organized vasculature is a crucial step in the development of functional and clinically relevant tissue constructs. A number of previous techniques have been proposed to spatially regulate the distribution of angiogenic biomolecules and vascular cells within biomaterial matrices to promote vascularization. Most of these approaches have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned features or have resulted in formation of random vasculature within three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. In this study, we investigate 3D endothelial cord formation within micropatterned gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels with varying geometrical features (50-150 μm height). We demonstrated the significant dependence of endothelial cells proliferation, alignment and cord formation on geometrical dimensions of the patterned features. The cells were able to align and organize within the micropatterned constructs and assemble to form cord structures with organized actin fibers and circular/elliptical cross-sections. The inner layer of the cord structure was filled with gel showing that the micropatterned hydrogel constructs guided the assembly of endothelial cells into cord structures. Notably, the endothelial cords were retained within the hydrogel microconstructs for all geometries after two weeks of culture; however, only the 100 μm-high constructs provided the optimal microenvironment for the formation of circular and stable cord structures. Our findings suggest that endothelial cord formation is a preceding step to tubulogenesis and the proposed system can be used to develop organized vasculature for engineered tissue constructs. PMID:23018132

  4. Directed Endothelial Cell Morphogenesis in Micropatterned Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Nikkhah, Mehdi; Eshak, Nouran; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Annabi, Nasim; Castello, Marco; Kim, Keekyoung; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, Alireza; Edalat, Faramarz; Bae, Hojae; Yang, Yunzhi; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Engineering of organized vasculature is a crucial step in the development of functional and clinically relevant tissue constructs. A number of previous techniques have been proposed to spatially regulate the distribution of angiogenic biomolecules and vascular cells within biomaterial matrices to promote vascularization. Most of these approaches have been limited to two-dimensional (2D) micropatterned features or have resulted in formation of random vasculature within three-dimensional (3D) microenvironments. In this study, we investigate 3D endothelial cord formation within micropatterned gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels with varying geometrical features (50–150 µm height). We demonstrated the significance dependence of endothelial cells proliferation, alignment and cord formation on geometrical dimensions of the patterned features. The cells were able to align and organize within the micropatterned constructs and assemble to form cord structures with organized actin fibers and circular/elliptical cross-sections. The inner layer of the cord structure was filled with gel showing that the micropatterned hydrogel constructs guided the assembly of endothelial cells into cord structures. Notably, the endothelial cords were retained within the hydrogel microconstructs for all geometries after two weeks of culture; however, only the 100 µm-high constructs provided the optimal microenvironment for the formation of circular and stable cord structures. Our findings suggest that endothelial cord formation is a preceding step to tubulogenesis and the proposed system can be used to develop organized vasculature for engineered tissue constructs. PMID:23018132

  5. Opioid receptors mediate direct predictive fear learning: Evidence from one-trial blocking

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Sindy; McNally, Gavan P.

    2007-01-01

    Pavlovian fear learning depends on predictive error, so that fear learning occurs when the actual outcome of a conditioning trial exceeds the expected outcome. Previous research has shown that opioid receptors, including μ-opioid receptors in the ventrolateral quadrant of the midbrain periaqueductal gray (vlPAG), mediate such predictive fear learning. Four experiments reported here used a within-subject one-trial blocking design to study whether opioid receptors mediate a direct or indirect action of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. In Stage I, rats were trained to fear conditioned stimulus (CS) A by pairing it with shock. In Stage II, CSA and CSB were co-presented once and co-terminated with shock. Two novel stimuli, CSC and CSD, were also co-presented once and co-terminated with shock in Stage II. The results showed one-trial blocking of fear learning (Experiment 1) as well as one-trial unblocking of fear learning when Stage II training employed a higher intensity footshock than was used in Stage I (Experiment 2). Systemic administrations of the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone (Experiment 3) or intra-vlPAG administrations of the selective μ-opioid receptor antagonist CTAP (Experiment 4) prior to Stage II training prevented one-trial blocking. These results show that opioid receptors mediate the direct actions of predictive error on Pavlovian association formation. PMID:17404385

  6. Characterization of Polyethylene-Graft-Sulfonated Polyarylsulfone Proton Exchange Membranes for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Applications

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Kyu; Zhang, Gang; Nam, Changwoo; Chung, T.C. Mike

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines polymer film morphology and several important properties of polyethylene-graft-sulfonated polyarylene ether sulfone (PE-g-s-PAES) proton exchange membranes (PEMs) for direct methanol fuel cell applications. Due to the extreme surface energy differences between a semi-crystalline and hydrophobic PE backbone and several amorphous and hydrophilic s-PAES side chains, the PE-g-s-PAES membrane self-assembles into a unique morphology, with many proton conductive s-PAES channels embedded in the stable and tough PE matrix and a thin hydrophobic PE layer spontaneously formed on the membrane surfaces. In the bulk, these membranes show good mechanical properties (tensile strength >30 MPa, Young’s modulus >1400 MPa) and low water swelling (λ < 15) even with high IEC >3 mmol/g in the s-PAES domains. On the surface, the thin hydrophobic and semi-crystalline PE layer shows some unusual barrier (protective) properties. In addition to exhibiting higher through-plane conductivity (up to 160 mS/cm) than in-plane conductivity, the PE surface layer minimizes methanol cross-over from anode to cathode with reduced fuel loss, and stops the HO• and HO2• radicals, originally formed at the anode, entering into PEM matrix. Evidently, the thin PE surface layer provides a highly desirable protecting layer for PEMs to reduce fuel loss and increase chemical stability. Overall, the newly developed PE-g-s-PAES membranes offer a desirable set of PEM properties, including conductivity, selectivity, mechanical strength, stability, and cost-effectiveness for direct methanol fuel cell applications. PMID:26690232

  7. Let-7a inhibits tumor cell growth and metastasis by directly targeting RTKN in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Chen, Peng; Chang, Yanxiang; Qi, Jingpeng; Fu, Hui; Guo, Huifang

    2016-09-16

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the third most common cancer worldwide, with high morbidity. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous small RNAs that play important roles in regulating multiple biological and pathologic processes. The differential expression of miRNAs in CRC was first reported in 2003. Accumulated evidence indicates that lethal-7a (let-7a, miRNA) generally functions as a tumor suppressor in several human cancers. However, the role of let-7a in human colon cancer remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the biological functions of let-7a and its potential role in colon cancer. We first discovered that let-7a level was significantly decreased in colon cancer tissues and cell lines (HT-29, HCT-116, LoVo, SW480, and SW620). To explore the effects of let-7a on colon cancer, let-7a over-expressed HCT-116 and SW620 cells were constructed. Further studies demonstrated that over-expressed let-7a could remarkably inhibit HCT-116 and SW620 cell growth and metastasis by directly down-regulating Rhotekin (RTKN). When RTKN was reintroduced into let-7a mimic transfected HCT-116 or SW620 cells, the inhibition effects of let-7a on colon cancer cell growth and metastasis were markedly reversed. In conclusion, our research shows that let-7a can inhibit tumor cell growth and metastasis by directly targeting RTKN in human colon cancer. PMID:27498032

  8. Actions, Action Sequences and Habits: Evidence That Goal-Directed and Habitual Action Control Are Hierarchically Organized

    PubMed Central

    Dezfouli, Amir; Balleine, Bernard W.

    2013-01-01

    Behavioral evidence suggests that instrumental conditioning is governed by two forms of action control: a goal-directed and a habit learning process. Model-based reinforcement learning (RL) has been argued to underlie the goal-directed process; however, the way in which it interacts with habits and the structure of the habitual process has remained unclear. According to a flat architecture, the habitual process corresponds to model-free RL, and its interaction with the goal-directed process is coordinated by an external arbitration mechanism. Alternatively, the interaction between these systems has recently been argued to be hierarchical, such that the formation of action sequences underlies habit learning and a goal-directed process selects between goal-directed actions and habitual sequences of actions to reach the goal. Here we used a two-stage decision-making task to test predictions from these accounts. The hierarchical account predicts that, because they are tied to each other as an action sequence, selecting a habitual action in the first stage will be followed by a habitual action in the second stage, whereas the flat account predicts that the statuses of the first and second stage actions are independent of each other. We found, based on subjects' choices and reaction times, that human subjects combined single actions to build action sequences and that the formation of such action sequences was sufficient to explain habitual actions. Furthermore, based on Bayesian model comparison, a family of hierarchical RL models, assuming a hierarchical interaction between habit and goal-directed processes, provided a better fit of the subjects' behavior than a family of flat models. Although these findings do not rule out all possible model-free accounts of instrumental conditioning, they do show such accounts are not necessary to explain habitual actions and provide a new basis for understanding how goal-directed and habitual action control interact. PMID:24339762

  9. Direct evidence for negative grain boundary potential in Ca-doped and undoped YBa2Cu3O7-x.

    PubMed

    Schofield, Marvin A; Beleggia, Marco; Zhu, Yimei; Guth, Karsten; Jooss, Christian

    2004-05-14

    Using electron holography in a transmission electron microscope, we obtained direct evidence for the reduction of negative charge at grain boundary dislocations in Ca-doped YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) when compared to undoped YBCO. Because of the finite width of the valence band in the superconducting CuO2 planes, the negative grain boundary charge can lead to a depletion of electron holes available for superconductivity. A significant reduction in the size of the perturbed region in the Ca-doped samples appears to be the principal mechanism for the improved interfacial superconductivity. PMID:15169414

  10. Liquid-feed direct oxidation fuel cells using neat 2-propanol as fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Zhigang; Kaufman, Arthur

    Neat 2-propanol was used as the fuel in liquid-feed direct oxidation fuel cells. The fuel that was intentionally not mixed with any amount of water was oxidized directly at the fuel cell anode. The fuel cell showed very good performance. For example, at a cell temperature of 60 °C and an air flow rate of 970 ml/min, the cell output voltage was as high as 0.485 V at a current density of 200 mA/cm 2. This performance was among the highest numbers ever reported for liquid-feed direct oxidation fuel cells. The energy density of a fuel cell using a neat fuel is expected to be much higher than that of one using dilute fuel solutions because the latter needs to carry between 10 and 30 parts by weight of water for each part of alcohol.

  11. First direct evidence of sedimentary carbonate recycling in subduction-related xenoliths

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yongsheng; He, Detao; Gao, Changgui; Foley, Stephen; Gao, Shan; Hu, Zhaochu; Zong, Keqing; Chen, Haihong

    2015-01-01

    Carbon in rocks and its rate of exchange with the exosphere is the least understood part of the carbon cycle. The amount of carbonate subducted as sediments and ocean crust is poorly known,