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Sample records for cells reproduces gene

  1. Magnetofection: a reproducible method for gene delivery to melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Prosen, Lara; Prijic, Sara; Music, Branka; Lavrencak, Jaka; Cemazar, Maja; Sersa, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Magnetofection is a nanoparticle-mediated approach for transfection of cells, tissues, and tumors. Specific interest is in using superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) as delivery system of therapeutic genes. Magnetofection has already been described in some proof-of-principle studies; however, fine tuning of the synthesis of SPIONs is necessary for its broader application. Physicochemical properties of SPIONs, synthesized by the co-precipitation in an alkaline aqueous medium, were tested after varying different parameters of the synthesis procedure. The storage time of iron(II) sulfate salt, the type of purified water, and the synthesis temperature did not affect physicochemical properties of SPIONs. Also, varying the parameters of the synthesis procedure did not influence magnetofection efficacy. However, for the pronounced gene expression encoded by plasmid DNA it was crucial to functionalize poly(acrylic) acid-stabilized SPIONs (SPIONs-PAA) with polyethyleneimine (PEI) without the adjustment of its elementary alkaline pH water solution to the physiological pH. In conclusion, the co-precipitation of iron(II) and iron(III) sulfate salts with subsequent PAA stabilization, PEI functionalization, and plasmid DNA binding is a robust method resulting in a reproducible and efficient magnetofection. To achieve high gene expression is important, however, the pH of PEI water solution for SPIONs-PAA functionalization, which should be in the alkaline range. PMID:23862136

  2. Identification of reproducible drug-resistance-related dysregulated genes in small-scale cancer cell line experiments

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Lu; Yan, Haidan; Zheng, Tingting; Wang, Hongwei; Tong, Mengsha; Guan, Qingzhou; Li, Xiangyu; Cai, Hao; Li, Mengyao; Guo, Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Researchers usually measure only a few technical replicates of two types of cell line, resistant or sensitive to a drug, and use a fold-change (FC) cut-off value to detect differentially expressed (DE) genes. However, the FC cut-off lacks statistical control and is biased towards the identification of genes with low expression levels in both cell lines. Here, viewing every pair of resistant-sensitive technical replicates as an experiment, we proposed an algorithm to identify DE genes by evaluating the reproducibility of the expression difference or FC between every two independent experiments without overlapping samples. Using four small datasets of cancer cell line resistant or sensitive to a drug, we demonstrated that this algorithm could efficiently capture reproducible DE genes significantly enriched in biological pathways relevant to the corresponding drugs, whereas many of them could not be found by the FC and other commonly used methods. Therefore, the proposed algorithm is an effective complement to current approaches for analysing small cancer cell line data. PMID:26173481

  3. Quartz-Seq: a highly reproducible and sensitive single-cell RNA sequencing method, reveals non-genetic gene-expression heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Development of a highly reproducible and sensitive single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) method would facilitate the understanding of the biological roles and underlying mechanisms of non-genetic cellular heterogeneity. In this study, we report a novel single-cell RNA-seq method called Quartz-Seq that has a simpler protocol and higher reproducibility and sensitivity than existing methods. We show that single-cell Quartz-Seq can quantitatively detect various kinds of non-genetic cellular heterogeneity, and can detect different cell types and different cell-cycle phases of a single cell type. Moreover, this method can comprehensively reveal gene-expression heterogeneity between single cells of the same cell type in the same cell-cycle phase. PMID:23594475

  4. Intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility and accuracy of the LuSens assay: A reporter gene-cell line to detect keratinocyte activation by skin sensitizers.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, Tzutzuy; Stein, Nadine; Aumann, Alexandra; Remus, Tina; Edwards, Amber; Norman, Kimberly G; Ryan, Cindy; Bader, Jackie E; Fehr, Markus; Burleson, Florence; Foertsch, Leslie; Wang, Xiaohong; Gerberick, Frank; Beilstein, Paul; Hoffmann, Sebastian; Mehling, Annette; van Ravenzwaay, Bennard; Landsiedel, Robert

    2016-04-01

    Several non-animal methods are now available to address the key events leading to skin sensitization as defined by the adverse outcome pathway. The KeratinoSens assay addresses the cellular event of keratinocyte activation and is a method accepted under OECD TG 442D. In this study, the results of an inter-laboratory evaluation of the "me-too" LuSens assay, a bioassay that uses a human keratinocyte cell line harboring a reporter gene construct composed of the rat antioxidant response element (ARE) of the NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase 1 gene and the luciferase gene, are described. Earlier in-house validation with 74 substances showed an accuracy of 82% in comparison to human data. When used in a battery of non-animal methods, even higher predictivity is achieved. To meet European validation criteria, a multicenter study was conducted in 5 laboratories. The study was divided into two phases, to assess 1) transferability of the method, and 2) reproducibility and accuracy. Phase I was performed by testing 8 non-coded test substances; the results showed a good transferability to naïve laboratories even without on-site training. Phase II was performed with 20 coded test substances (performance standards recommended by OECD, 2015). In this phase, the intra- and inter-laboratory reproducibility as well as accuracy of the method was evaluated. The data demonstrate a remarkable reproducibility of 100% and an accuracy of over 80% in identifying skin sensitizers, indicating a good concordance with in vivo data. These results demonstrate good transferability, reliability and accuracy of the method thereby achieving the standards necessary for use in a regulatory setting to detect skin sensitizers. PMID:26796489

  5. Reproducible, Scalable Fusion Gene Detection from RNA-Seq.

    PubMed

    Arsenijevic, Vladan; Davis-Dusenbery, Brandi N

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements resulting in the creation of novel gene products, termed fusion genes, have been identified as driving events in the development of multiple types of cancer. As these gene products typically do not exist in normal cells, they represent valuable prognostic and therapeutic targets. Advances in next-generation sequencing and computational approaches have greatly improved our ability to detect and identify fusion genes. Nevertheless, these approaches require significant computational resources. Here we describe an approach which leverages cloud computing technologies to perform fusion gene detection from RNA sequencing data at any scale. We additionally highlight methods to enhance reproducibility of bioinformatics analyses which may be applied to any next-generation sequencing experiment. PMID:26667464

  6. Single Cell Quantification of Reporter Gene Expression in Live Adult Caenorhabditis elegans Reveals Reproducible Cell-Specific Expression Patterns and Underlying Biological Variation

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Alexander R.; Tedesco, Patricia M.; Sands, Bryan; Johnson, Thomas E.; Brent, Roger

    2015-01-01

    In multicellular organisms such as Caenorhabditis elegans, differences in complex phenotypes such as lifespan correlate with the level of expression of particular engineered reporter genes. In single celled organisms, quantitative understanding of responses to extracellular signals and of cell-to-cell variation in responses has depended on precise measurement of reporter gene expression. Here, we developed microscope-based methods to quantify reporter gene expression in cells of Caenorhabditis elegans with low measurement error. We then quantified expression in strains that carried different configurations of Phsp-16.2-fluorescent-protein reporters, in whole animals, and in all 20 cells of the intestine tissue, which is responsible for most of the fluorescent signal. Some animals bore more recently developed single copy Phsp-16.2 reporters integrated at defined chromosomal sites, others, “classical” multicopy reporter gene arrays integrated at random sites. At the level of whole animals, variation in gene expression was similar: strains with single copy reporters showed the same amount of animal-to-animal variation as strains with multicopy reporters. At the level of cells, in animals with single copy reporters, the pattern of expression in cells within the tissue was highly stereotyped. In animals with multicopy reporters, the cell-specific expression pattern was also stereotyped, but distinct, and somewhat more variable. Our methods are rapid and gentle enough to allow quantification of expression in the same cells of an animal at different times during adult life. They should allow investigators to use changes in reporter expression in single cells in tissues as quantitative phenotypes, and link those to molecular differences. Moreover, by diminishing measurement error, they should make possible dissection of the causes of the remaining, real, variation in expression. Understanding such variation should help reveal its contribution to differences in complex

  7. Analytic performance studies and clinical reproducibility of a real-time PCR assay for the detection of epidermal growth factor receptor gene mutations in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue specimens of non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene mutations identify patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) who have a high likelihood of benefiting from treatment with anti-EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Sanger sequencing is widely used for mutation detection but can be technically challenging, resulting in longer turn-around-time, with limited sensitivity for low levels of mutations. This manuscript details the technical performance verification studies and external clinical reproducibility studies of the cobas EGFR Mutation Test, a rapid multiplex real-time PCR assay designed to detect 41 mutations in exons 18, 19, 20 and 21. Methods The assay’s limit of detection was determined using 25 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue (FFPET)-derived and plasmid DNA blends. Assay performance for a panel of 201 specimens was compared against Sanger sequencing with resolution of discordant specimens by quantitative massively parallel pyrosequencing (MPP). Internal and external reproducibility was assessed using specimens tested in duplicate by different operators, using different reagent lots, instruments and at different sites. The effects on the performance of the cobas EGFR test of endogenous substances and nine therapeutic drugs were evaluated in ten FFPET specimens. Other tests included an evaluation of the effects of necrosis, micro-organisms and homologous DNA sequences on assay performance, and the inclusivity of the assay for less frequent mutations. Results A >95% hit rate was obtained in blends with >5% mutant alleles, as determined by MPP analysis, at a total DNA input of 150 ng. The overall percent agreement between Sanger sequencing and the cobas test was 96.7% (negative percent agreement 97.5%; positive percent agreement 95.8%). Assay repeatability was 98% when tested with two operators, instruments, and reagent lots. In the external reproducibility study, the agreement was > 99% across all sites, all operators and all reagent lots

  8. ROTS: reproducible RNA-seq biomarker detector—prognostic markers for clear cell renal cell cancer

    PubMed Central

    Seyednasrollah, Fatemeh; Rantanen, Krista; Jaakkola, Panu; Elo, Laura L.

    2016-01-01

    Recent comprehensive assessments of RNA-seq technology support its utility in quantifying gene expression in various samples. The next step of rigorously quantifying differences between sample groups, however, still lacks well-defined best practices. Although a number of advanced statistical methods have been developed, several studies demonstrate that their performance depends strongly on the data under analysis, which compromises practical utility in real biomedical studies. As a solution, we propose to use a data-adaptive procedure that selects an optimal statistic capable of maximizing reproducibility of detections. After demonstrating its improved sensitivity and specificity in a controlled spike-in study, the utility of the procedure is confirmed in a real biomedical study by identifying prognostic markers for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In addition to identifying several genes previously associated with ccRCC prognosis, several potential new biomarkers among genes regulating cell growth, metabolism and solute transport were detected. PMID:26264667

  9. ROTS: reproducible RNA-seq biomarker detector-prognostic markers for clear cell renal cell cancer.

    PubMed

    Seyednasrollah, Fatemeh; Rantanen, Krista; Jaakkola, Panu; Elo, Laura L

    2016-01-01

    Recent comprehensive assessments of RNA-seq technology support its utility in quantifying gene expression in various samples. The next step of rigorously quantifying differences between sample groups, however, still lacks well-defined best practices. Although a number of advanced statistical methods have been developed, several studies demonstrate that their performance depends strongly on the data under analysis, which compromises practical utility in real biomedical studies. As a solution, we propose to use a data-adaptive procedure that selects an optimal statistic capable of maximizing reproducibility of detections. After demonstrating its improved sensitivity and specificity in a controlled spike-in study, the utility of the procedure is confirmed in a real biomedical study by identifying prognostic markers for clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). In addition to identifying several genes previously associated with ccRCC prognosis, several potential new biomarkers among genes regulating cell growth, metabolism and solute transport were detected. PMID:26264667

  10. Morphological Profiles of RNAi-Induced Gene Knockdown Are Highly Reproducible but Dominated by Seed Effects

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shantanu; Wu, Xiaoyun; Ljosa, Vebjorn; Bray, Mark-Anthony; Piccioni, Federica; Root, David E.; Doench, John G.; Boehm, Jesse S.; Carpenter, Anne E.

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference and morphological profiling—the measurement of thousands of phenotypes from individual cells by microscopy and image analysis—are a potentially powerful combination. We show that morphological profiles of RNAi-induced knockdown using the Cell Painting assay are in fact highly sensitive and reproducible. However, we find that the magnitude and prevalence of off-target effects via the RNAi seed-based mechanism make morphological profiles of RNAi reagents targeting the same gene look no more similar than reagents targeting different genes. Pairs of RNAi reagents that share the same seed sequence produce image-based profiles that are much more similar to each other than profiles from pairs designed to target the same gene, a phenomenon previously observed in small-scale gene-expression profiling experiments. Various strategies have been used to enrich on-target versus off-target effects in the context of RNAi screening where a narrow set of phenotypes are measured, mostly based on comparing multiple sequences targeting the same gene; however, new approaches will be needed to make RNAi morphological profiling (that is, comparing multi-dimensional phenotypes) viable. We have shared our raw data and computational pipelines to facilitate research. PMID:26197079

  11. Planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells with superior reproducibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Sehyun; Kang, Rira; Kim, Jueng-Eun; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Soon; Yun, Jin-Mun; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2014-11-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PeSCs) have been considered one of the competitive next generation power sources. To date, light-to-electric conversion efficiencies have rapidly increased to over 10%, and further improvements are expected. However, the poor device reproducibility of PeSCs ascribed to their inhomogeneously covered film morphology has hindered their practical application. Here, we demonstrate high-performance PeSCs with superior reproducibility by introducing small amounts of N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone (CHP) as a morphology controller into N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). As a result, highly homogeneous film morphology, similar to that achieved by vacuum-deposition methods, as well as a high PCE of 10% and an extremely small performance deviation within 0.14% were achieved. This study represents a method for realizing efficient and reproducible planar heterojunction (PHJ) PeSCs through morphology control, taking a major step forward in the low-cost and rapid production of PeSCs by solving one of the biggest problems of PHJ perovskite photovoltaic technology through a facile method.

  12. Planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells with superior reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Ye-Jin; Lee, Sehyun; Kang, Rira; Kim, Jueng-Eun; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seok-Soon; Yun, Jin-Mun; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2014-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PeSCs) have been considered one of the competitive next generation power sources. To date, light-to-electric conversion efficiencies have rapidly increased to over 10%, and further improvements are expected. However, the poor device reproducibility of PeSCs ascribed to their inhomogeneously covered film morphology has hindered their practical application. Here, we demonstrate high-performance PeSCs with superior reproducibility by introducing small amounts of N-cyclohexyl-2-pyrrolidone (CHP) as a morphology controller into N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF). As a result, highly homogeneous film morphology, similar to that achieved by vacuum-deposition methods, as well as a high PCE of 10% and an extremely small performance deviation within 0.14% were achieved. This study represents a method for realizing efficient and reproducible planar heterojunction (PHJ) PeSCs through morphology control, taking a major step forward in the low-cost and rapid production of PeSCs by solving one of the biggest problems of PHJ perovskite photovoltaic technology through a facile method. PMID:25377945

  13. Evolutionary adaptation after crippling cell polarization follows reproducible trajectories

    PubMed Central

    Laan, Liedewij; Koschwanez, John H; Murray, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Cells are organized by functional modules, which typically contain components whose removal severely compromises the module's function. Despite their importance, these components are not absolutely conserved between parts of the tree of life, suggesting that cells can evolve to perform the same biological functions with different proteins. We evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae for 1000 generations without the important polarity gene BEM1. Initially the bem1∆ lineages rapidly increase in fitness and then slowly reach >90% of the fitness of their BEM1 ancestors at the end of the evolution. Sequencing their genomes and monitoring polarization reveals a common evolutionary trajectory, with a fixed sequence of adaptive mutations, each improving cell polarization by inactivating proteins. Our results show that organisms can be evolutionarily robust to physiologically destructive perturbations and suggest that recovery by gene inactivation can lead to rapid divergence in the parts list for cell biologically important functions. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09638.001 PMID:26426479

  14. Factors Affecting Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cells Performance and Reproducibility

    SciTech Connect

    Moller-Holst S.

    1998-11-01

    Development of fuel cells is often based on small-scale laboratory studies. Due to limited time and budgets, a minimum number of cells are usually prepared and tested, thus, conclusions about improved performance are often drawn from studies of a few cells. Generally, statistics showing the significance of an effect are seldom reported. In this work a simple PEM fuel cell electrode optimization experiment is used as an example to illustrate the importance of statistical evaluation of factors affecting cell performance. The use of fractional factorial design of experiments to reduce the number of cells that have to be studied is also addressed.

  15. Reproducibility, Fidelity, and Discriminant Validity of mRNA Amplification for Microarray Analysis from Primary Hematopoietic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Roden, Joe; Shapiro, Bruce E.; Wold, Barbara J.; Bhatia, Smita; Forman, Stephen J.; Bhatia, Ravi

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression in clinical samples poses special challenges, including limited RNA availability and poor RNA quality. Quantitative information regarding reliability of RNA amplification methodologies applied to primary cells and representativeness of resulting gene expression profiles is limited. We evaluated four protocols for RNA amplification from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results obtained with 100 ng or 10 ng of RNA amplified using two rounds of cDNA synthesis and in vitro transcription were compared with control 2.5-μg RNA samples processed using a single round of in vitro transcription. Samples were hybridized to Affymetrix HG-U133A arrays. Considerable differences in results were obtained with different protocols. The optimal protocol resulted in highly reproducible gene expression profiles from amplified samples (r = 0.98) and good correlation between amplified and control samples (r = 0.94). Using the optimal protocol dissimilarities of gene expression between mononuclear cells from a normal individual and a patient with myelodysplastic syndrome were primarily maintained after amplification compared with controls. We conclude that small variations in methodology introduce considerable distortion of gene expression profiles obtained after RNA amplification from clinical samples and too strong a focus on a very small number of genes picked from an array analysis could be unduly influenced by seemingly acceptable methodologies. However, it is possible to obtain reproducible and representative results using optimized protocols. PMID:15681474

  16. RECLU: a pipeline to discover reproducible transcriptional start sites and their alternative regulation using capped analysis of gene expression (CAGE)

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Next generation sequencing based technologies are being extensively used to study transcriptomes. Among these, cap analysis of gene expression (CAGE) is specialized in detecting the most 5’ ends of RNA molecules. After mapping the sequenced reads back to a reference genome CAGE data highlights the transcriptional start sites (TSSs) and their usage at a single nucleotide resolution. Results We propose a pipeline to group the single nucleotide TSS into larger reproducible peaks and compare their usage across biological states. Importantly, our pipeline discovers broad peaks as well as the fine structure of individual transcriptional start sites embedded within them. We assess the performance of our approach on a large CAGE datasets including 156 primary cell types and two cell lines with biological replicas. We demonstrate that genes have complicated structures of transcription initiation events. In particular, we discover that narrow peaks embedded in broader regions of transcriptional activity can be differentially used even if the larger region is not. Conclusions By examining the reproducible fine scaled organization of TSS we can detect many differentially regulated peaks undetected by previous approaches. PMID:24779366

  17. Reproducible culture and differentiation of mouse embryonic stem cells using an automated microwell platform☆

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Waqar; Moens, Nathalie; Veraitch, Farlan S.; Hernandez, Diana; Mason, Chris; Lye, Gary J.

    2013-01-01

    The use of embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and their progeny in high throughput drug discovery and regenerative medicine will require production at scale of well characterized cells at an appropriate level of purity. The adoption of automated bioprocessing techniques offers the possibility to overcome the lack of consistency and high failure rates seen with current manual protocols. To build the case for increased use of automation this work addresses the key question: “can an automated system match the quality of a highly skilled and experienced person working manually?” To answer this we first describe an integrated automation platform designed for the ‘hands-free’ culture and differentiation of ESCs in microwell formats. Next we outline a framework for the systematic investigation and optimization of key bioprocess variables for the rapid establishment of validatable Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). Finally the experimental comparison between manual and automated bioprocessing is exemplified by expansion of the murine Oct-4-GiP ESC line over eight sequential passages with their subsequent directed differentiation into neural precursors. Our results show that ESCs can be effectively maintained and differentiated in a highly reproducible manner by the automated system described. Statistical analysis of the results for cell growth over single and multiple passages shows up to a 3-fold improvement in the consistency of cell growth kinetics with automated passaging. The quality of the cells produced was evaluated using a panel of biological markers including cell growth rate and viability, nutrient and metabolite profiles, changes in gene expression and immunocytochemistry. Automated processing of the ESCs had no measurable negative effect on either their pluripotency or their ability to differentiate into the three embryonic germ layers. Equally important is that over a 6-month period of culture without antibiotics in the medium, we have not had any cases

  18. Tumorigenic WAP-T Mouse Mammary Carcinoma Cells: A Model for a Self-Reproducing Homeostatic Cancer Cell System

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Benjamin; Gruner, Katharina; Heinlein, Christina; Kühl, Marion; Warnecke, Gabriele; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang; Tolstonog, Genrich V.

    2010-01-01

    Background In analogy to normal stem cell differentiation, the current cancer stem cell (CSC) model presumes a hierarchical organization and an irreversible differentiation in tumor tissue. Accordingly, CSCs should comprise only a small subset of the tumor cells, which feeds tumor growth. However, some recent findings raised doubts on the general applicability of the CSC model and asked for its refinement. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study we analyzed the CSC properties of mammary carcinoma cells derived from transgenic (WAP-T) mice. We established a highly tumorigenic WAP-T cell line (G-2 cells) that displays stem-like traits. G-2 cells, as well as their clonal derivates, are closely related to primary tumors regarding histology and gene expression profiles, and reflect heterogeneity regarding their differentiation states. G-2 cultures comprise cell populations in distinct differentiation states identified by co-expression of cytoskeletal proteins (cytokeratins and vimentin), a combination of cell surface markers and a set of transcription factors. Cellular subsets sorted according to expression of CD24a, CD49f, CD61, Epcam, Sca1, and Thy1 cell surface proteins, or metabolic markers (e.g. ALDH activity) are competent to reconstitute the initial cellular composition. Repopulation efficiency greatly varies between individual subsets and is influenced by interactions with the respective complementary G-2 cellular subset. The balance between differentiation states is regulated in part by the transcription factor Sox10, as depletion of Sox10 led to up-regulation of Twist2 and increased the proportion of Thy1-expressing cells representing cells in a self-renewable, reversible, quasi-mesenchymal differentiation state. Conclusions/Significance G-2 cells constitute a self-reproducing cancer cell system, maintained by bi- and unidirectional conversion of complementary cellular subsets. Our work contributes to the current controversial discussion on the existence

  19. Confronting the missing epistasis problem: on the reproducibility of gene-gene interactions.

    PubMed

    Murk, William; Bracken, Michael B; DeWan, Andrew T

    2015-08-01

    Epistasis (gene-gene interaction) is thought to play an integral role in the genetic basis of complex traits, and a significant amount of research has been invested into identifying this phenomenon in human disease. However, the overall success of empirical studies of epistasis in humans is unclear, as such studies are rarely systematically evaluated. Here, we have selected asthma as an example of a well-studied, complex human disease, and provide a critical analysis and replication attempt of nearly all prior reports of epistasis for this disease. Of 191 previously reported interactions, we find that 39.8% were not originally identified using an explicit test for interaction and thus may not have been true epistatic effects to begin with. Moreover, directions of effect were not described for 46.1% of the interactions, which prevents their rigorous replication. In the original studies, attempts at replication were made for 15.2% of the interactions, and 7.3% were actually replicated. In the current study, we were able to evaluate 85.9% of the interactions using a large asthma dataset from the GABRIEL Consortium. None of these interactions could be replicated based on strict criteria. However, we found nominally significant (p < 0.05) evidence in support of 23.8% of the evaluated interactions. Although many reports of epistasis are not robustly supported in the published literature, our results suggest that at least some of these reports may have been true-positive examples of epistasis. In general, improvements in empirical studies of epistasis are called for, in order to better understand the importance of this phenomenon in human disease. PMID:25998948

  20. Fly wing vein patterns have spatial reproducibility of a single cell

    PubMed Central

    Abouchar, Laurent; Petkova, Mariela D.; Steinhardt, Cynthia R.; Gregor, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Developmental processes in multicellular organisms occur in fluctuating environments and are prone to noise, yet they produce complex patterns with astonishing reproducibility. We measure the left–right and inter-individual precision of bilaterally symmetric fly wings across the natural range of genetic and environmental conditions and find that wing vein patterns are specified with identical spatial precision and are reproducible to within a single-cell width. The early fly embryo operates at a similar degree of reproducibility, suggesting that the overall spatial precision of morphogenesis in Drosophila performs at the single-cell level. Could development be operating at the physical limit of what a biological system can achieve? PMID:24942847

  1. A rat tail temporary static compression model reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration with decreased notochordal cell phenotype.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Hiroaki; Yurube, Takashi; Kakutani, Kenichiro; Maeno, Koichiro; Takada, Toru; Yamamoto, Junya; Kurakawa, Takuto; Akisue, Toshihiro; Kuroda, Ryosuke; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Nishida, Kotaro

    2014-03-01

    The intervertebral disc nucleus pulposus (NP) has two phenotypically distinct cell types-notochordal cells (NCs) and non-notochordal chondrocyte-like cells. In human discs, NCs are lost during adolescence, which is also when discs begin to show degenerative signs. However, little evidence exists regarding the link between NC disappearance and the pathogenesis of disc degeneration. To clarify this, a rat tail disc degeneration model induced by static compression at 1.3 MPa for 0, 1, or 7 days was designed and assessed for up to 56 postoperative days. Radiography, MRI, and histomorphology showed degenerative disc findings in response to the compression period. Immunofluorescence displayed that the number of DAPI-positive NP cells decreased with compression; particularly, the decrease was notable in larger, vacuolated, cytokeratin-8- and galectin-3-co-positive cells, identified as NCs. The proportion of TUNEL-positive cells, which predominantly comprised non-NCs, increased with compression. Quantitative PCR demonstrated isolated mRNA up-regulation of ADAMTS-5 in the 1-day loaded group and MMP-3 in the 7-day loaded group. Aggrecan-1 and collagen type 2α-1 mRNA levels were down-regulated in both groups. This rat tail temporary static compression model, which exhibits decreased NC phenotype, increased apoptotic cell death, and imbalanced catabolic and anabolic gene expression, reproduces different stages of intervertebral disc degeneration. PMID:24285589

  2. Question 8: From a Set of Chemical Reactions to Reproducing Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneko, Kunihiko

    2007-10-01

    As a prerequisite for a reproducing cell, we first discuss how non-equilibrium states are sustained endogenously in a catalytic reaction network. Negative correlation between abundances of resource chemicals and of catalysts for their consumption is shown to lead to hindrance of relaxation to equilibrium. Mutual reinforcement among such sustainment of non-equilibrium state, spatial structure formation, and reproduction of a compartment is discussed as a mechanism to further suppress the relaxation to equilibrium. As a next step to protocell, consistency between cell reproduction and replication of constituent molecules is theoretically studied, which leads to a power-law on abundance of molecules as well as log-normal distribution over cells, which are shown to be universal, and also confirmed experimentally in the present cells.

  3. Improved reproducibility of unit-cell parameters in macromolecular cryocrystallography by limiting dehydration during crystal mounting

    PubMed Central

    Farley, Christopher; Burks, Geoffry; Siegert, Thomas; Juers, Douglas H.

    2014-01-01

    In macromolecular cryocrystallography unit-cell parameters can have low reproducibility, limiting the effectiveness of combining data sets from multiple crystals and inhibiting the development of defined repeatable cooling protocols. Here, potential sources of unit-cell variation are investigated and crystal dehydration during loop-mounting is found to be an important factor. The amount of water lost by the unit cell depends on the crystal size, the loop size, the ambient relative humidity and the transfer distance to the cooling medium. To limit water loss during crystal mounting, a threefold strategy has been implemented. Firstly, crystal manipulations are performed in a humid environment similar to the humidity of the crystal-growth or soaking solution. Secondly, the looped crystal is transferred to a vial containing a small amount of the crystal soaking solution. Upon loop transfer, the vial is sealed, which allows transport of the crystal at its equilibrated humidity. Thirdly, the crystal loop is directly mounted from the vial into the cold gas stream. This strategy minimizes the exposure of the crystal to relatively low humidity ambient air, improves the reproducibility of low-temperature unit-cell parameters and offers some new approaches to crystal handling and cryoprotection. PMID:25084331

  4. Efficient and reproducible generation of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes for renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Baldan, V; Griffiths, R; Hawkins, R E; Gilham, D E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tumour-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) therapy is showing great promise in the treatment of patients with advanced malignant melanoma. However, the translation of TIL therapy to non-melanoma tumours such as renal cell carcinoma has been less successful with a major constraint being the inability to reproducibly generate TILs from primary and metastatic tumour tissue. Methods: Primary and metastatic renal cell carcinoma biopsies were subjected to differential tumour disaggregation methods and procedures that stimulate the specific expansion of TILs tested to determine which reliably generated TIL maintained antitumour specificity. Results: Enzymatic or combined enzymatic/mechanical disaggregation resulted in equivalent numbers of TILs being liberated from renal cell carcinoma biopsies. Following mitogenic activation of the isolated TILs with anti-CD3/anti-CD28-coated paramagnetic beads, successful TIL expansion was achieved in 90% of initiated cultures. The frequency of T-cell recognition of autologous tumours was enhanced when tumours were disaggregated using the GentleMACS enzymatic/mechanical system. Conclusion: TILs can be consistently produced from renal cell carcinoma biopsies maintaining autologous tumour recognition after expansion in vitro. While the method of disaggregation has little impact on the success of TIL growth, methods that preserve the cell surface architecture facilitate TIL recognition of an autologous tumour, which is important in terms of characterising the functionality of the expanded TIL population. PMID:25867267

  5. Reproducibility of Detecting Silent Cerebral Infarcts in Pediatric Sickle Cell Anemia

    PubMed Central

    Liem, Robert I.; Liu, Jingxia; Gordon, Mae O.; Vendt, Bruce A.; McKinstry, Robert C.; Kraut, Michael A.; Strouse, John J.; Ball, William S.; DeBaun, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    Detecting silent cerebral infarcts (SCI) on MRI in children with sickle cell anemia (SCA) is challenging, yet reproducibility of readings has not been examined in this population. We evaluated consensus rating, inter- and intra-grader agreement associated with detecting SCI on screening MRI in the Silent Infarct Transfusion (SIT) Trial. Three neuroradiologists provided consensus decisions for 1,073 MRIs. A random sample of 53 scans was re-analyzed in blinded fashion. Agreement between first and second consensus ratings was substantial (κ = 0.70, p < 0.0001), as was overall inter-grader agreement (κ = 0.76, p < 0.0001). In the test-retest sample, intra-grader agreement ranged from κ of 0.57 to 0.76. Consensus decisions were more concordant when MRIs contained more than one lesion and lesions were larger. We conclude that the routine use of MRI to screen for SCI in the research setting is reproducible in SCA and agreement among neuroradiologists is sufficient. PMID:24309240

  6. Variable Cell Growth Yields Reproducible OrganDevelopment through Spatiotemporal Averaging.

    PubMed

    Hong, Lilan; Dumond, Mathilde; Tsugawa, Satoru; Sapala, Aleksandra; Routier-Kierzkowska, Anne-Lise; Zhou, Yong; Chen, Catherine; Kiss, Annamaria; Zhu, Mingyuan; Hamant, Olivier; Smith, Richard S; Komatsuzaki, Tamiki; Li, Chun-Biu; Boudaoud, Arezki; Roeder, Adrienne H K

    2016-07-11

    Organ sizes and shapes are strikingly reproducible, despite the variable growth and division of individual cells within them. To reveal which mechanisms enable this precision, we designed a screen for disrupted sepal size and shape uniformity in Arabidopsis and identified mutations in the mitochondrial i-AAA protease FtsH4. Counterintuitively, through live imaging we observed that variability of neighboring cell growth was reduced in ftsh4 sepals. We found that regular organ shape results from spatiotemporal averaging of the cellular variability in wild-type sepals, which is disrupted in the less-variable cells of ftsh4 mutants. We also found that abnormal, increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in ftsh4 mutants disrupts organ size consistency. In wild-type sepals, ROS accumulate in maturing cells and limit organ growth, suggesting that ROS are endogenous signals promoting termination of growth. Our results demonstrate that spatiotemporal averaging of cellular variability is required for precision in organ size. PMID:27404356

  7. Delineation of HER2 Gene Status in Breast Carcinoma by Silver in Situ Hybridization is Reproducible among Laboratories and Pathologists

    PubMed Central

    Carbone, Antonino; Botti, Gerardo; Gloghini, Annunziata; Simone, Gianni; Truini, Mauro; Curcio, Maria Pia; Gasparini, Patrizia; Mangia, Anita; Perin, Tiziana; Salvi, Sandra; Testi, Adele; Verderio, Paolo

    2008-01-01

    An automated enzyme metallographic silver in situ hybridization method (SISH) has been reported to successfully determine human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) gene amplification. We evaluated the staining and interpretative reproducibility of the HER2 SISH assay at five laboratories and compared SISH results with other in situ hybridization (ISH) methods. The HER2 gene status of 89 breast carcinomas was analyzed in parallel using manual dual-color fluorescence ISH, manual chromogenic ISH, and bright-field automated SISH. A total of 1098 SISH-stained slides were evaluated. For comparison, all specimens were stained by 4B5 immunohistochemistry for HER2 protein expression. Interpretation was performed by pathologists at five different laboratories using the algorithms provided by the manufacturers and the guidelines of American Society of Clinical Oncology/College of American Pathologists. Staining and interpretative reproducibility were measured through the computation of weighted kappa statistics. Following the optimization of SISH staining, 1077/1098 (98%) of slides were evaluable. Excellent reproducibility and efficacy of HER2 SISH staining, and interobserver interpretation (Kw = 0.91), were observed among five sites. For the 89 invasive breast cancer cases, the overall rate of concordance between consensus 4B5 and consensus SISH, fluorescence ISH, and chromogenic ISH was 96.6% (86/89), 97.8% (87/89), and 96.6% (86/89), respectively. Overall concordance between positive and negative SISH and fluorescence ISH results, as well as between individual and consensus positive and negative SISH results, was excellent (P < 0.001). PMID:18832456

  8. Reproducible selection of high avidity CD8+ T-cell clones following secondary acute virus infection

    PubMed Central

    Cukalac, Tania; Chadderton, Jesseka; Handel, Andreas; Doherty, Peter C.; Turner, Stephen J.; Thomas, Paul G.; La Gruta, Nicole L.

    2014-01-01

    The recall of memory CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), elicited by prior virus infection or vaccination, is critical for immune protection. The extent to which this arises as a consequence of stochastic clonal expansion vs. active selection of particular clones remains unclear. Using a parallel adoptive transfer protocol in combination with single cell analysis to define the complementarity determining region (CDR) 3α and CDR3β regions of individual T-cell receptor (TCR) heterodimers, we characterized the antigen-driven recall of the same memory CTL population in three individual recipients. This high-resolution analysis showed reproducible enrichment (or diminution) of particular TCR clonotypes across all challenged animals. These changes in clonal composition were TCRα− and β chain–dependent and were directly related to the avidity of the TCR for the virus-derived peptide (p) + major histocompatibility complex class I molecule. Despite this shift in clonotype representation indicative of differential selection, there was no evidence of overall repertoire narrowing, suggesting a strategy to optimize CTL responses while safeguarding TCR diversity. PMID:24474775

  9. Reproducible selection of high avidity CD8+ T-cell clones following secondary acute virus infection.

    PubMed

    Cukalac, Tania; Chadderton, Jesseka; Handel, Andreas; Doherty, Peter C; Turner, Stephen J; Thomas, Paul G; La Gruta, Nicole L

    2014-01-28

    The recall of memory CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), elicited by prior virus infection or vaccination, is critical for immune protection. The extent to which this arises as a consequence of stochastic clonal expansion vs. active selection of particular clones remains unclear. Using a parallel adoptive transfer protocol in combination with single cell analysis to define the complementarity determining region (CDR) 3α and CDR3β regions of individual T-cell receptor (TCR) heterodimers, we characterized the antigen-driven recall of the same memory CTL population in three individual recipients. This high-resolution analysis showed reproducible enrichment (or diminution) of particular TCR clonotypes across all challenged animals. These changes in clonal composition were TCRα- and β chain-dependent and were directly related to the avidity of the TCR for the virus-derived peptide (p) + major histocompatibility complex class I molecule. Despite this shift in clonotype representation indicative of differential selection, there was no evidence of overall repertoire narrowing, suggesting a strategy to optimize CTL responses while safeguarding TCR diversity. PMID:24474775

  10. Anchor cell signaling and vulval precursor cell positioning establish a reproducible spatial context during C. elegans vulval induction.

    PubMed

    Grimbert, Stéphanie; Tietze, Kyria; Barkoulas, Michalis; Sternberg, Paul W; Félix, Marie-Anne; Braendle, Christian

    2016-08-01

    How cells coordinate their spatial positioning through intercellular signaling events is poorly understood. Here we address this topic using Caenorhabditis elegans vulval patterning during which hypodermal vulval precursor cells (VPCs) adopt distinct cell fates determined by their relative positions to the gonadal anchor cell (AC). LIN-3/EGF signaling by the AC induces the central VPC, P6.p, to adopt a 1° vulval fate. Exact alignment of AC and VPCs is thus critical for correct fate patterning, yet, as we show here, the initial AC-VPC positioning is both highly variable and asymmetric among individuals, with AC and P6.p only becoming aligned at the early L3 stage. Cell ablations and mutant analysis indicate that VPCs, most prominently 1° cells, move towards the AC. We identify AC-released LIN-3/EGF as a major attractive signal, which therefore plays a dual role in vulval patterning (cell alignment and fate induction). Additionally, compromising Wnt pathway components also induces AC-VPC alignment errors, with loss of posterior Wnt signaling increasing stochastic vulval centering on P5.p. Our results illustrate how intercellular signaling reduces initial spatial variability in cell positioning to generate reproducible interactions across tissues. PMID:27288708

  11. Reproducible Science▿

    PubMed Central

    Casadevall, Arturo; Fang, Ferric C.

    2010-01-01

    The reproducibility of an experimental result is a fundamental assumption in science. Yet, results that are merely confirmatory of previous findings are given low priority and can be difficult to publish. Furthermore, the complex and chaotic nature of biological systems imposes limitations on the replicability of scientific experiments. This essay explores the importance and limits of reproducibility in scientific manuscripts. PMID:20876290

  12. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hai-yi; Su, Zi-hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-peng; Duan, Fei-xue; Song, Yuan-yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan–rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K trans & Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  13. Dynamic Contrast-enhanced MR Imaging in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Reproducibility of Histogram Analysis on Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Yi; Su, Zi-Hua; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhi-Peng; Duan, Fei-Xue; Song, Yuan-Yuan; Li, Lu; Wang, Ying-Wei; Ma, Xin; Guo, Ai-Tao; Ma, Lin; Ye, Hui-Yi

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic parameters derived from dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) have been increasingly used to evaluate the permeability of tumor vessel. Histogram metrics are a recognized promising method of quantitative MR imaging that has been recently introduced in analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters in oncology due to tumor heterogeneity. In this study, 21 patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC) underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system. Extended Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters of RCC tumors. Mean value and histogram metrics (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) of each pharmacokinetic parameter were generated automatically using ImageJ software. Intra- and inter-observer reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) and coefficient of variation (CoV). Our results demonstrated that the histogram method (Mode, Skewness and Kurtosis) was not superior to the conventional Mean value method in reproducibility evaluation on DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters (K( trans) &Ve) in renal cell carcinoma, especially for Skewness and Kurtosis which showed lower intra-, inter-observer and scan-rescan reproducibility than Mean value. Our findings suggest that additional studies are necessary before wide incorporation of histogram metrics in quantitative analysis of DCE-MRI pharmacokinetic parameters. PMID:27380733

  14. Molecular Interactions of the Min Protein System Reproduce Spatiotemporal Patterning in Growing and Dividing Escherichia coli Cells

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, James C.; Angstmann, Christopher N.; Duggin, Iain G.; Curmi, Paul M. G.

    2015-01-01

    Oscillations of the Min protein system are involved in the correct midcell placement of the divisome during Escherichia coli cell division. Based on molecular interactions of the Min system, we formulated a mathematical model that reproduces Min patterning during cell growth and division. Specifically, the increase in the residence time of MinD attached to the membrane as its own concentration increases, is accounted for by dimerisation of membrane-bound MinD and its interaction with MinE. Simulation of this system generates unparalleled correlation between the waveshape of experimental and theoretical MinD distributions, suggesting that the dominant interactions of the physical system have been successfully incorporated into the model. For cells where MinD is fully-labelled with GFP, the model reproduces the stationary localization of MinD-GFP for short cells, followed by oscillations from pole to pole in larger cells, and the transition to the symmetric distribution during cell filamentation. Cells containing a secondary, GFP-labelled MinD display a contrasting pattern. The model is able to account for these differences, including temporary midcell localization just prior to division, by increasing the rate constant controlling MinD ATPase and heterotetramer dissociation. For both experimental conditions, the model can explain how cell division results in an equal distribution of MinD and MinE in the two daughter cells, and accounts for the temperature dependence of the period of Min oscillations. Thus, we show that while other interactions may be present, they are not needed to reproduce the main characteristics of the Min system in vivo. PMID:26018614

  15. Lung squamous cell carcinoma mRNA expression subtypes are reproducible, clinically important and correspond to different normal cell types

    PubMed Central

    Wilkerson, Matthew D.; Yin, Xiaoying; Hoadley, Katherine A.; Liu, Yufeng; Hayward, Michele C.; Cabanski, Christopher R.; Muldrew, Kenneth; Miller, C. Ryan; Randell, Scott H.; Socinski, Mark A.; Parsons, Alden M.; Funkhouser, William K.; Lee, Carrie B.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Thorne, Leigh; Bernard, Philip S.; Perou, Charles M.; Hayes, D. Neil

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) is clinically and genetically heterogeneous and current diagnostic practices do not adequately substratify this heterogeneity. A robust, biologically-based SCC subclassification may describe this variability and lead to more precise patient prognosis and management. We sought to determine if SCC mRNA expression subtypes exist, are reproducible across multiple patient cohorts, and are clinically relevant. Experimental Design Subtypes were detected by unsupervised consensus clustering in five published discovery cohorts of mRNA microarrays, totaling 382 SCC patients. An independent validation cohort of 56 SCC patients was collected and assayed by microarrays. A nearest-centroid subtype predictor was built using discovery cohorts. Validation cohort subtypes were predicted and evaluated for confirmation. Subtype survival outcome, clinical covariates, and biological processes were compared by statistical and bioinformatic methods. Results Four lung SCC mRNA expression subtypes, named primitive, classical, secretory, and basal, were detected and independently validated (P < 0.001). The primitive subtype had the worst survival outcome (P < 0.05) and is an independent predictor of survival (P < 0.05). Tumor differentiation and patient sex were associated with subtype. The subtypes’ expression profiles contained distinct biological processes (primitive – proliferation, classical – xeniobiotics metabolism, secretory – immune response, basal – cell adhesion) and suggested distinct pharmacologic interventions. Comparison to lung model systems revealed distinct subtype to cell type correspondence. Conclusions Lung SCC consists of four mRNA expression subtypes that have different survival outcomes, patient populations, and biological processes. The subtypes stratify patients for more precise prognosis and targeted research. PMID:20643781

  16. Elusive reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Gori, Gio Batta

    2014-08-01

    Reproducibility remains a mirage for many biomedical studies because inherent experimental uncertainties generate idiosyncratic outcomes. The authentication and error rates of primary empirical data are often elusive, while multifactorial confounders beset experimental setups. Substantive methodological remedies are difficult to conceive, signifying that many biomedical studies yield more or less plausible results, depending on the attending uncertainties. Real life applications of those results remain problematic, with important exceptions for counterfactual field validations of strong experimental signals, notably for some vaccines and drugs, and for certain safety and occupational measures. It is argued that industrial, commercial and public policies and regulations could not ethically rely on unreliable biomedical results; rather, they should be rationally grounded on transparent cost-benefit tradeoffs. PMID:24882687

  17. Control of 3-dimensional collagen matrix polymerization for reproducible human mammary fibroblast cell culture in microfluidic devices.

    PubMed

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Su, Gui; Pehlke, Carolyn; Trier, Steven M; Eliceiri, Kevin W; Keely, Patricia J; Friedl, Andreas; Beebe, David J

    2009-09-01

    Interest in constructing a reliable 3-dimensional (3D) collagen culture platform in microfabricated systems is increasing as researchers strive to investigate reciprocal interaction between extracellular matrix (ECM) and cells under various conditions. However, in comparison to conventional 2-dimensional (2D) cell culture research, relatively little work has been reported about the polymerization of collagen type I matrix in microsystems. We, thus, present a study of 3D collagen polymerization to achieve reproducible 3D cell culture in microfluidic devices. Array-based microchannels are employed to efficiently examine various polymerization conditions, providing more replicates with less sample volume than conventional means. Collagen fibers assembled in microchannels were almost two-times thinner than those in conventional gels prepared under similar conditions, and the fiber thickness difference influenced viability and morphology of embedded human mammary fibroblast (HMF) cells. HMF cells contained more actin stress fibers and showed increased viability in 3D collagen matrix composed of thicker collagen fibers. Relatively low pH of the collagen solution within a physiological pH range (6.5-8.5) and pre-incubation at low temperature (approximately 4 degrees C) before polymerization at 37 degrees C allow sufficient time for molecular assembly, generating thicker collagen fibers and enhancing HMF cell viability. The results provide the basis for improved process control and reproducibility of 3D collagen matrix culture in microchannels, allowing predictable modifications to provide optimum conditions for specific cell types. In addition, the presented method lays the foundation for high throughput 3D cellular screening. PMID:19540580

  18. Prognostic Value and Reproducibility of Pretreatment CT Texture Features in Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Fried, David V.; Tucker, Susan L.; Zhou, Shouhao; Liao, Zhongxing; Mawlawi, Osama; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: To determine whether pretreatment CT texture features can improve patient risk stratification beyond conventional prognostic factors (CPFs) in stage III non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We retrospectively reviewed 91 cases with stage III NSCLC treated with definitive chemoradiation therapy. All patients underwent pretreatment diagnostic contrast enhanced computed tomography (CE-CT) followed by 4-dimensional CT (4D-CT) for treatment simulation. We used the average-CT and expiratory (T50-CT) images from the 4D-CT along with the CE-CT for texture extraction. Histogram, gradient, co-occurrence, gray tone difference, and filtration-based techniques were used for texture feature extraction. Penalized Cox regression implementing cross-validation was used for covariate selection and modeling. Models incorporating texture features from the 33 image types and CPFs were compared to those with models incorporating CPFs alone for overall survival (OS), local-regional control (LRC), and freedom from distant metastases (FFDM). Predictive Kaplan-Meier curves were generated using leave-one-out cross-validation. Patients were stratified based on whether their predicted outcome was above or below the median. Reproducibility of texture features was evaluated using test-retest scans from independent patients and quantified using concordance correlation coefficients (CCC). We compared models incorporating the reproducibility seen on test-retest scans to our original models and determined the classification reproducibility. Results: Models incorporating both texture features and CPFs demonstrated a significant improvement in risk stratification compared to models using CPFs alone for OS (P=.046), LRC (P=.01), and FFDM (P=.005). The average CCCs were 0.89, 0.91, and 0.67 for texture features extracted from the average-CT, T50-CT, and CE-CT, respectively. Incorporating reproducibility within our models yielded 80.4% (±3.7% SD), 78.3% (±4.0% SD), and 78

  19. A reproducible and versatile system for the dynamic expansion of human pluripotent stem cells in suspension.

    PubMed

    Elanzew, Andreas; Sommer, Annika; Pusch-Klein, Annette; Brüstle, Oliver; Haupt, Simone

    2015-10-01

    Reprogramming of patient cells to human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) has facilitated in vitro disease modeling studies aiming at deciphering the molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to disease pathogenesis and progression. To fully exploit the potential of hiPSC for biomedical applications, technologies that enable the standardized generation and expansion of hiPSC from large numbers of donors are required. Paralleled automated processes for the expansion of hiPSC could provide an opportunity to maximize the generation of hiPSC collections from patient cohorts while minimizing hands-on time and costs. In order to develop a simple method for the parallel expansion of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC) we established a protocol for their cultivation as undifferentiated aggregates in a bench-top bioreactor system (BioLevitator™). We show that long-term expansion (10 passages) of hPSCs either in mTeSR or E8 medium preserved a normal karyotype, three-germ-layer differentiation potential and high expression of pluripotency-associated markers. The system enables the expansion from low inoculation densities (0.3 × 10(5) cells/mL) and provides a simplified, cost-efficient and time-saving method for the provision of hiPSC at midi-scale. Implementation of this protocol in cell production schemes has the potential to advance cell manufacturing in many areas of hiPSC-based medical research. PMID:26110829

  20. Continuous Flow Polymer Synthesis toward Reproducible Large-Scale Production for Efficient Bulk Heterojunction Organic Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Pirotte, Geert; Kesters, Jurgen; Verstappen, Pieter; Govaerts, Sanne; Manca, Jean; Lutsen, Laurence; Vanderzande, Dirk; Maes, Wouter

    2015-10-12

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) have attracted great interest as a solar cell technology with appealing mechanical, aesthetical, and economies-of-scale features. To drive OPV toward economic viability, low-cost, large-scale module production has to be realized in combination with increased top-quality material availability and minimal batch-to-batch variation. To this extent, continuous flow chemistry can serve as a powerful tool. In this contribution, a flow protocol is optimized for the high performance benzodithiophene-thienopyrroledione copolymer PBDTTPD and the material quality is probed through systematic solar-cell evaluation. A stepwise approach is adopted to turn the batch process into a reproducible and scalable continuous flow procedure. Solar cell devices fabricated using the obtained polymer batches deliver an average power conversion efficiency of 7.2 %. Upon incorporation of an ionic polythiophene-based cathodic interlayer, the photovoltaic performance could be enhanced to a maximum efficiency of 9.1 %. PMID:26388210

  1. Instrumental improvements and sample preparations that enable reproducible, reliable acquisition of mass spectra from whole bacterial cells

    PubMed Central

    Alusta, Pierre; Buzatu, Dan; Williams, Anna; Cooper, Willie-Mae; Tarasenko, Olga; Dorey, R Cameron; Hall, Reggie; Parker, W Ryan; Wilkes, Jon G

    2015-01-01

    Rationale Rapid sub-species characterization of pathogens is required for timely responses in outbreak situations. Pyrolysis mass spectrometry (PyMS) has the potential to be used for this purpose. Methods However, in order to make PyMS practical for traceback applications, certain improvements related to spectrum reproducibility and data acquisition speed were required. The main objectives of this study were to facilitate fast detection (<30 min to analyze 6 samples, including preparation) and sub-species-level bacterial characterization based on pattern recognition of mass spectral fingerprints acquired from whole cells volatilized and ionized at atmospheric pressure. An AccuTOF DART mass spectrometer was re-engineered to permit ionization of low-volatility bacteria by means of Plasma Jet Ionization (PJI), in which an electric discharge, and, by extension, a plasma beam, impinges on sample cells. Results Instrumental improvements and spectral acquisition methodology are described. Performance of the re-engineered system was assessed using a small challenge set comprised of assorted bacterial isolates differing in identity by varying amounts. In general, the spectral patterns obtained allowed differentiation of all samples tested, including those of the same genus and species but different serotypes. Conclusions Fluctuations of ±15% in bacterial cell concentrations did not substantially compromise replicate spectra reproducibility. © 2015 National Center for Toxicological Research. Rapid Communications in Mass Spectrometry published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26443394

  2. Overloading human aortic smooth muscle cells with low density lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters reproduces features of atherosclerosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Anderson, R G; Buja, L M; Basu, S K; Brown, M S

    1977-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells accumulate only small amounts of cholesteryl esters in tissue culture, even when incubated for prolonged periods with high levels of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). This failure to overaccumulate LDL-cholesteryl esters is due to an LDL-mediated feedback suppression of the activity of the cell surface LDL receptor, a regulatory action that limits the rate at which the cells take up LDL. This regulatory system can be bypassed by incubating smooth muscle cells with LDL that has been given a strong positive charge by covalent linkage with N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPA-LDL). The unregulated uptake of DMPA-LDL produces a massive deposition of cholesteryl esters in the form of inclusions within the cell. These inclusions take up lipid stains and exhibit positive birefringence with formée crosses that are typical of liquid crystals of cholesteryl esters. By electron microscopy, the cholesteryl ester inclusions appear as homogeneous gray cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The current studies demonstrate that the unregulated uptake of LDL-cholesteryl esters by human aortic smooth muscle cells can reproduce in vitro the major biochemical and morphological alterations that occur within smooth muscle cells in vivo during the process of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:193874

  3. Improvement of Charge Collection and Performance Reproducibility in Inverted Organic Solar Cells by Suppression of ZnO Subgap States.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Wu, Zhenghui; Yang, Qingyi; Zhu, Furong; Ng, Tsz-Wai; Lee, Chun-Sing; Cheung, Sin-Hang; So, Shu-Kong

    2016-06-15

    Organic solar cells (OSCs) with inverted structure usually exhibit higher power conversion efficiency (PCE) and are more stable than corresponding devices with regular configuration. Indium tin oxide (ITO) surface is often modified with solution-processed low work function metal oxides, such as ZnO, serving as the transparent cathode. However, the defect-induced subgap states in the ZnO interlayer hamper the efficient charge collection and the performance reproducibility of the OSCs. In this work, we demonstrate that suppression of the ZnO subgap states by modification of its surface with an ultrathin Al layer significantly improves the charge extraction and performance reproducibility, achieving PCE of 8.0%, which is ∼15% higher than that of a structurally identical control cell made with a pristine ZnO interlayer. Light intensity-dependent current density-voltage characteristic, photothermal deflection spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy measurements point out the enhancement of charge collection efficiency at the organic/cathode interface, due to the suppression of the subgap states in the ZnO interlayer. PMID:27224960

  4. Cell assemblies for reproducible multi-anvil experiments (the COMPRES assemblies)

    SciTech Connect

    Leinenweber, Kurt D.; Tyburczy, James A.; Sharp, Thomas G.; Soignard, Emmanuel; Diedrich, Tamara; Petuskey, William B.; Wang, Yanbin; Mosenfelder, Jed L.

    2012-01-31

    The multi-anvil high-pressure technique is an important tool in high-pressure mineralogy and petrology, as well as in chemical synthesis, allowing the treatment of large (millimeter-size) samples of minerals, rocks, and other materials at pressures of a few GPa to over 25 GPa and simultaneous uniform temperatures up to 2500 C and higher. A series of cell assemblies specially designed and implemented for interlaboratory use are described here. In terms of the size of the pressure medium and the anvil truncation size, the five sizes of assemblies developed here are an 8/3, 10/5, 14/8, 18/12, and 25/15 assembly. As of this writing, these assemblies are in widespread use at many laboratories. The details of design, construction, and materials developed or used for the assemblies are presented here.

  5. An on-chip microfluidic pressure regulator that facilitates reproducible loading of cells and hydrogels into microphysiological system platforms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolin; Phan, Duc T T; Zhao, Da; George, Steven C; Hughes, Christopher C W; Lee, Abraham P

    2016-03-01

    Coculturing multiple cell types together in 3-dimensional (3D) cultures better mimics the in vivo microphysiological environment, and has become widely adopted in recent years with the development of organ-on-chip systems. However, a bottleneck in set-up of these devices arises as a result of the delivery of the gel into the microfluidic chip being sensitive to pressure fluctuations, making gel confinement at a specific region challenging, especially when manual operation is performed. In this paper, we present a novel design of an on-chip regulator module with pressure-releasing safety microvalves that can facilitate stable gel delivery into designated microchannel regions while maintaining well-controlled, non-bursting gel interfaces. This pressure regulator design can be integrated into different microfluidic chip designs and is compatible with a wide variety of gel injection apparatuses operated automatically or manually at different flow rates. The sensitivity and working range of this pressure regulator can be adjusted by changing the width of its pressure releasing safety microvalve design. The effectiveness of the design is validated by its incorporation into a microfluidic platform we have developed for generating 3D vascularized micro-organs (VMOs). Reproducible gel loading is demonstrated for both an automatic syringe pump and a manually-operated micropipettor. This design allows for rapid and reproducible loading of hydrogels into microfluidic devices without the risk of bursting gel-air interfaces. PMID:26879519

  6. Can radiomics features be reproducibly measured from CBCT images for patients with non-small cell lung cancer?

    SciTech Connect

    Fave, Xenia Fried, David; Mackin, Dennis; Yang, Jinzhong; Zhang, Joy; Balter, Peter; Followill, David; Gomez, Daniel; Kyle Jones, A.; Stingo, Francesco; Fontenot, Jonas; Court, Laurence

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: Increasing evidence suggests radiomics features extracted from computed tomography (CT) images may be useful in prognostic models for patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). This study was designed to determine whether such features can be reproducibly obtained from cone-beam CT (CBCT) images taken using medical Linac onboard-imaging systems in order to track them through treatment. Methods: Test-retest CBCT images of ten patients previously enrolled in a clinical trial were retrospectively obtained and used to determine the concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) for 68 different texture features. The volume dependence of each feature was also measured using the Spearman rank correlation coefficient. Features with a high reproducibility (CCC > 0.9) that were not due to volume dependence in the patient test-retest set were further examined for their sensitivity to differences in imaging protocol, level of scatter, and amount of motion by using two phantoms. The first phantom was a texture phantom composed of rectangular cartridges to represent different textures. Features were measured from two cartridges, shredded rubber and dense cork, in this study. The texture phantom was scanned with 19 different CBCT imagers to establish the features’ interscanner variability. The effect of scatter on these features was studied by surrounding the same texture phantom with scattering material (rice and solid water). The effect of respiratory motion on these features was studied using a dynamic-motion thoracic phantom and a specially designed tumor texture insert of the shredded rubber material. The differences between scans acquired with different Linacs and protocols, varying amounts of scatter, and with different levels of motion were compared to the mean intrapatient difference from the test-retest image set. Results: Of the original 68 features, 37 had a CCC >0.9 that was not due to volume dependence. When the Linac manufacturer and imaging protocol

  7. Laser-Based Propagation of Human iPS and ES Cells Generates Reproducible Cultures with Enhanced Differentiation Potential

    PubMed Central

    Hohenstein Elliott, Kristi A.; Peterson, Cory; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Kan, Natalia; Nelson, Brandon; Spiering, Sean; Mercola, Mark; Bright, Gary R.

    2012-01-01

    Proper maintenance of stem cells is essential for successful utilization of ESCs/iPSCs as tools in developmental and drug discovery studies and in regenerative medicine. Standardization is critical for all future applications of stem cells and necessary to fully understand their potential. This study reports a novel approach for the efficient, consistent expansion of human ESCs and iPSCs using laser sectioning, instead of mechanical devices or enzymes, to divide cultures into defined size clumps for propagation. Laser-mediated propagation maintained the pluripotency, quality, and genetic stability of ESCs/iPSCs and led to enhanced differentiation potential. This approach removes the variability associated with ESC/iPSC propagation, significantly reduces the expertise, labor, and time associated with manual passaging techniques and provides the basis for scalable delivery of standardized ESC/iPSC lines. Adoption of standardized protocols would allow researchers to understand the role of genetics, environment, and/or procedural effects on stem cells and would ensure reproducible production of stem cell cultures for use in clinical/therapeutic applications. PMID:22701128

  8. Laser-Based Propagation of Human iPS and ES Cells Generates Reproducible Cultures with Enhanced Differentiation Potential.

    PubMed

    Hohenstein Elliott, Kristi A; Peterson, Cory; Soundararajan, Anuradha; Kan, Natalia; Nelson, Brandon; Spiering, Sean; Mercola, Mark; Bright, Gary R

    2012-01-01

    Proper maintenance of stem cells is essential for successful utilization of ESCs/iPSCs as tools in developmental and drug discovery studies and in regenerative medicine. Standardization is critical for all future applications of stem cells and necessary to fully understand their potential. This study reports a novel approach for the efficient, consistent expansion of human ESCs and iPSCs using laser sectioning, instead of mechanical devices or enzymes, to divide cultures into defined size clumps for propagation. Laser-mediated propagation maintained the pluripotency, quality, and genetic stability of ESCs/iPSCs and led to enhanced differentiation potential. This approach removes the variability associated with ESC/iPSC propagation, significantly reduces the expertise, labor, and time associated with manual passaging techniques and provides the basis for scalable delivery of standardized ESC/iPSC lines. Adoption of standardized protocols would allow researchers to understand the role of genetics, environment, and/or procedural effects on stem cells and would ensure reproducible production of stem cell cultures for use in clinical/therapeutic applications. PMID:22701128

  9. The MicroArray Quality Control (MAQC) project shows inter- and intraplatform reproducibility of gene expression measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the last decade, the introduction of microarray technology has had a profound impact on gene expression research. The publication of studies with dissimilar or altogether contradictory results, obtained using different microarray platforms to analyze identical RNA samples, ...

  10. Minimum information about tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (MITAP): a first step towards reproducibility and standardisation of cellular therapies

    PubMed Central

    Spiering, Rachel; Aguillon, Juan C.; Anderson, Amy E.; Appel, Silke; Benitez-Ribas, Daniel; ten Brinke, Anja; Broere, Femke; Cools, Nathalie; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Diboll, Julie; Geissler, Edward K.; Giannoukakis, Nick; Gregori, Silvia; van Ham, S. Marieke; Lattimer, Staci; Marshall, Lindsay; Harry, Rachel A.; Hutchinson, James A.; Isaacs, John D.; Joosten, Irma; van Kooten, Cees; Lopez Diaz de Cerio, Ascension; Nikolic, Tatjana; Oral, Haluk Barbaros; Sofronic-Milosavljevic, Ljiljana; Ritter, Thomas; Riquelme, Paloma; Thomson, Angus W.; Trucco, Massimo; Vives-Pi, Marta; Martinez-Caceres, Eva M.

    2016-01-01

    Cellular therapies with tolerogenic antigen-presenting cells (tolAPC) show great promise for the treatment of autoimmune diseases and for the prevention of destructive immune responses after transplantation. The methodologies for generating tolAPC vary greatly between different laboratories, making it difficult to compare data from different studies; thus constituting a major hurdle for the development of standardised tolAPC therapeutic products. Here we describe an initiative by members of the tolAPC field to generate a minimum information model for tolAPC (MITAP), providing a reporting framework that will make differences and similarities between tolAPC products transparent. In this way, MITAP constitutes a first but important step towards the production of standardised and reproducible tolAPC for clinical application.

  11. From single-cell to cell-pool transcriptomes: stochasticity in gene expression and RNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Marinov, Georgi K; Williams, Brian A; McCue, Ken; Schroth, Gary P; Gertz, Jason; Myers, Richard M; Wold, Barbara J

    2014-03-01

    Single-cell RNA-seq mammalian transcriptome studies are at an early stage in uncovering cell-to-cell variation in gene expression, transcript processing and editing, and regulatory module activity. Despite great progress recently, substantial challenges remain, including discriminating biological variation from technical noise. Here we apply the SMART-seq single-cell RNA-seq protocol to study the reference lymphoblastoid cell line GM12878. By using spike-in quantification standards, we estimate the absolute number of RNA molecules per cell for each gene and find significant variation in total mRNA content: between 50,000 and 300,000 transcripts per cell. We directly measure technical stochasticity by a pool/split design and find that there are significant differences in expression between individual cells, over and above technical variation. Specific gene coexpression modules were preferentially expressed in subsets of individual cells, including one enriched for mRNA processing and splicing factors. We assess cell-to-cell variation in alternative splicing and allelic bias and report evidence of significant differences in splice site usage that exceed splice variation in the pool/split comparison. Finally, we show that transcriptomes from small pools of 30-100 cells approach the information content and reproducibility of contemporary RNA-seq from large amounts of input material. Together, our results define an experimental and computational path forward for analyzing gene expression in rare cell types and cell states. PMID:24299736

  12. Convergence of gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bersenev, Alexey; Levine, Bruce L

    2012-11-01

    Gene therapy and cell therapy have followed similar roller coaster paths of rising public expectations and disappointment over the past two decades. There is now reason to believe that momentum in the field has reached the point where the successes will be more frequent. The use of gene-modified cells has opened new avenues for engineering desired cell properties, for the use of cells as vehicles for gene delivery, and for tracking cells and controlling cell persistence after transplantation. Some notable recent clinical developments in cellular engineering by gene transfer offer lessons on how the field has emerged, and hint at additional future clinical applications. PMID:23210811

  13. Interlaboratory reproducibility of semiautomated cell cycle analysis of flow cytometry DNA-histograms obtained from fresh material of 1,295 breast cancer cases.

    PubMed

    Bergers, E; Montironi, R; van Diest, P J; Prete, E; Baak, J P

    1996-06-01

    Conflicting prognostic results have been published as to the DNA variables, such as DNA ploidy, DNA index, and % S-phase cells for breast cancer patients. These variables can be obtained by interpreting DNA histograms by cell cycle analysis. Explanations for these conflicting results might be found on the level of the interpretation of the DNA histograms. In a previous study, the semi automated cell cycle analysis computer program MultiCycle (Phoenix Flow Systems, San Diego, CA) showed high intralaboratory reproducibility. However, what types of DNA histograms may cause disagreements was still unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the interlaboratory reproducibility of MultiCycle-based cell cycle analysis of 1,295 flow cytometric DNA histograms derived from fresh frozen breast cancer material and to clarify potential sources of interobserver variation when analyzing DNA histograms. DNA ploidy classification into diploid, hyperdiploid, tetraploid, hypertetraploid, and multiploid showed an interlaboratory agreement of 94% (kappa value = 0.92). The 6% discrepancies (n = 74) were caused by tetraploid peaks, as established in one laboratory, which shifted outside the tetraploid region on reanalysis by the other laboratory (37%), shoulders sometimes interpreted as peaks (24%), small peaks not always recognized as such (24%), fitting failures (10%), and overlooking of tetraploid peaks (5%). Furthermore, the cell cycle analysis variables showed variable reproducibility. The % S-phase cells of the first, second, and third cell cycle showed overall a moderate reproducibility (0.62 < or = R < or = 0.79), but the average % S-phase cells and the average aneuploid % S-phase cells were more reproducible with correlation coefficients of 0.89 and 0.81, respectively. The coefficient of variation of the G0/G1 peak of the first cell cycle, the DNA indices and the % diploid cells were highly reproducible (R > or = 0.94), and the % G2/M-phase cells of the first, second, and

  14. Gene modified cell transplantation for vascular regeneration.

    PubMed

    Murasawa, Satoshi; Asahara, Takayuki

    2007-02-01

    Cell Transplantation is one of the powerful tools to ameliorate the capillary flow in ischemic condition. EPC (Endothelial Progenitor Cell) was identified in adult peripheral blood and thought to be a suitable candidate for cell transplantation. Also, gene therapy is already promising choice for enhancing angiogenic property. The combination of cell transplantation and gene therapy should be more effective way to regenerate vasculature in ischemic region. Recently, several research reports have come out regarding gene modified cell transplantation. We will mainly focus on the background of EPC, and then gene modified EPC findings in this review. PMID:17305524

  15. Validation and Reproducibility of a Microarray-Based Gene Expression Test for Tumor Identification in Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Pillai, Raji; Deeter, Rebecca; Rigl, C. Ted; Nystrom, J. Scott; Miller, Meredith Halks; Buturovic, Ljubomir; Henner, W. David

    2011-01-01

    Tumors whose primary site is challenging to diagnose represent a considerable proportion of new cancer cases. We present validation study results for a gene expression-based diagnostic test (the Pathwork Tissue of Origin Test) that aids in determining the tissue of origin using formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) specimens. Microarray data files were generated for 462 metastatic, poorly differentiated, or undifferentiated FFPE tumor specimens, all of which had a reference diagnosis. The reference diagnoses were masked, and the microarray data files were analyzed using a 2000-gene classification model. The algorithm quantifies the similarity between RNA expression patterns of the study specimens and the 15 tissues on the test panel. Among the 462 specimens, overall agreement with the reference diagnosis was 89% (95% CI, 85% to 91%). In addition to the positive test results (ie, rule-ins), an average of 12 tissues for each specimen could be ruled out with >99% probability. The large size of this study increases confidence in the test results. A multisite reproducibility study showed 89.3% concordance between laboratories. The Tissue of Origin Test makes the benefits of microarray-based gene expression tests for tumor diagnosis available for use with the most common type of histology specimen (ie, FFPE). PMID:21227394

  16. Hand1-Luc embryonic stem cell test (Hand1-Luc EST): a novel rapid and highly reproducible in vitro test for embryotoxicity by measuring cytotoxicity and differentiation toxicity using engineered mouse ES cells.

    PubMed

    Le Coz, Florian; Suzuki, Noriyuki; Nagahori, Hirohisa; Omori, Takashi; Saito, Koichi

    2015-04-01

    The embryonic stem cell test (EST) is a promising alternative method for evaluating embryotoxicity of test chemicals by measuring cytotoxicity and differentiation toxicity using mouse ES cells. Differentiation toxicity is analyzed by microscopically counting the beating of embryonic bodies after 10 days of culture. However, improvements are necessary to reduce the laborious manipulations involved and the time required to obtain results. We have previously reported the successful stable transfection of ES cells (ES-D3) with the heart and neural crest derivatives expressed transcript 1 (Hand1) gene and the establishment of a 96-well multi-plate-based new EST with luciferase reporter assay 6 days after treatment with test chemicals. Now, we propose an even more rapid and easier EST, named Hand1-Luc EST. We established another cell line to monitor the Hand1 gene expression via a luciferase reporter gene. By mRNA analysis and luciferase assay, we examined in detail the luciferase activity during cell differentiation, which allowed us to reduce the time of measurement from day 6 to day 5 (120 hr). Furthermore, the protocol was improved, with, among others, the measurement of cytotoxicity and differentiation toxicity taking place in the same 96-well round bottom plate instead of two different plates. With the positive control, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and 9 test chemicals, data with high reproducibility and very low variation (CV < 50%) in the relevant endpoints were obtained. This study shows that the Hand1-Luc EST could provide an accurate and sensitive short-term test for prediction of embryotoxicants by measuring cytotoxicity and differentiation toxicity from the same sample. PMID:25786529

  17. Gene copy number and cell cycle arrest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Bhaswar; Bose, Indrani

    2006-03-01

    The cell cycle is an orderly sequence of events which ultimately lead to the division of a single cell into two daughter cells. In the case of DNA damage by radiation or chemicals, the damage checkpoints in the G1 and G2 phases of the cell cycle are activated. This results in an arrest of the cell cycle so that the DNA damage can be repaired. Once this is done, the cell continues with its usual cycle of activity. We study a mathematical model of the DNA damage checkpoint in the G2 phase which arrests the transition from the G2 to the M (mitotic) phase of the cell cycle. The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays a key role in activating the pathways leading to cell cycle arrest in mammalian systems. If the DNA damage is severe, the p53 proteins activate other pathways which bring about apoptosis, i.e., programmed cell death. Loss of the p53 gene results in the proliferation of cells containing damaged DNA, i.e., in the growth of tumors which may ultimately become cancerous. There is some recent experimental evidence which suggests that the mutation of a single copy of the p53 gene (in the normal cell each gene has two identical copies) is sufficient to trigger the formation of tumors. We study the effect of reducing the gene copy number of the p53 and two other genes on cell cycle arrest and obtain results consistent with experimental observations.

  18. Reproducibility of 18F-FDG PET uptake measurements in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma on both PET/CT and PET/MR

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, B M; Aznar, M C; Hansen, A E; Vogelius, I R; Löfgren, J; Andersen, F L; Loft, A; Kjaer, A; Højgaard, L; Specht, L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate reproducibility of fluorine-18 fludeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) uptake on 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET)/CT and 18F-FDG PET/MR scans in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods: 30 patients with HNSCC were included in this prospective study. The patients were scanned twice before radiotherapy treatment with both PET/CT and PET/MR. Patients were scanned on the same scanners, 3 days apart and according to the same protocol. Metabolic tumour activity was measured by the maximum and peak standardized uptake value (SUVmax and SUVpeak, respectively), and total lesion glycolysis from the metabolic tumour volume defined from ≥50% SUVmax. Bland–Altman analysis with limits of agreement, coefficient of variation (CV) from the two modalities were performed in order to test the reproducibility. Furthermore, CVs from SUVmax and SUVpeak were compared. The area under the curve from cumulative SUV–volume histograms were measured and tested for reproducibility of the distribution of 18F-FDG uptake. Results: 24 patients had two pre-treatment PET/CT scans and 21 patients had two pre-treatment PET/MR scans available for further analyses. Mean difference for SUVmax, peak and mean was approximately 4% for PET/CT and 3% for PET/MR, with 95% limits of agreement less than ±20%. CV was small (5–7%) for both modalities. There was no significant difference in CVs between PET/CT and PET/MR (p = 0.31). SUVmax was not more reproducible than SUVpeak (p = 0.09). Conclusion: 18F-FDG uptake in PET/CT and PET/MR is highly reproducible and we found no difference in reproducibility between PET/CT and PET/MR. Advances in knowledge: This is the first report to test reproducibility of PET/CT and PET/MR. PMID:25634069

  19. Gene marking and gene therapy directed at primary hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, C E; Young, N S

    1996-11-01

    The past year has been a very active one in the field of gene transfer to hematopoietic targets, specifically stem cells and T cells. A number of clinical trials were published that both demonstrated progress as well as identified problems that investigators will face in trying to make the technology therapeutically applicable. Important laboratory and animal experiments focused on predictive models for human stem cell behavior, methods for culturing and expanding primitive cells ex vivo, immune responses against transgenes, in vitro and in vivo selection of transduced cells, and alternatives to standard retroviral vectors. PMID:9372114

  20. Gene sensitizes cancer cells to chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NCI scientists have found that a gene, Schlafen-11 (SLFN11), sensitizes cells to substances known to cause irreparable damage to DNA.  As part of their study, the researchers used a repository of 60 cell types to identify predictors of cancer cell respons

  1. Expression of bacterial genes in plant cells.

    PubMed Central

    Fraley, R T; Rogers, S G; Horsch, R B; Sanders, P R; Flick, J S; Adams, S P; Bittner, M L; Brand, L A; Fink, C L; Fry, J S; Galluppi, G R; Goldberg, S B; Hoffmann, N L; Woo, S C

    1983-01-01

    Chimeric bacterial genes conferring resistance to aminoglycoside antibiotics have been inserted into the Agrobacterium tumefaciens tumor-inducing (Ti) plasmid and introduced into plant cells by in vitro transformation techniques. The chimeric genes contain the nopaline synthase 5' and 3' regulatory regions joined to the genes for neomycin phosphotransferase type I or type II. The chimeric genes were cloned into an intermediate vector, pMON120, and inserted into pTiB6S3 by recombination and then introduced into petunia and tobacco cells by cocultivating A. tumefaciens cells with protoplast-derived cells. Southern hybridization was used to confirm the presence of the chimeric genes in the transformed plant tissues. Expression of the chimeric genes was determined by the ability of the transformed cells to proliferate on medium containing normally inhibitory levels of kanamycin (50 micrograms/ml) or other aminoglycoside antibiotics. Plant cells transformed by wild-type pTiB6S3 or derivatives carrying the bacterial neomycin phosphotransferase genes with their own promoters failed to grow under these conditions. The significance of these results for plant genetic engineering is discussed. Images PMID:6308651

  2. Pluripotent Stem Cells and Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Simara, Pavel; Motl, Jason A.; Kaufman, Dan S.

    2013-01-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells represent an accessible cell source for novel cell-based clinical research and therapies. With the realization of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), it is possible to produce almost any desired cell type from any patient's cells. Current developments in gene modification methods have opened the possibility for creating genetically corrected human iPSCs for certain genetic diseases that could be used later in autologous transplantation. Promising preclinical studies have demonstrated correction of disease-causing mutations in a number of hematological, neuronal and muscular disorders. This review aims to summarize these recent advances with a focus on iPSC generation techniques, as well as gene modification methods. We will then further discuss some of the main obstacles remaining to be overcome before successful application of human pluripotent stem cell-based therapy arrives in the clinic and what the future of stem cell research may look like. PMID:23353080

  3. Imaging gene expression in single living cells

    PubMed Central

    Shav-Tal, Yaron; Singer, Robert H.; Darzacq, Xavier

    2016-01-01

    Technical advances in the field of live-cell imaging have introduced the cell biologist to a new, dynamic, subcellular world. The static world of molecules in fixed cells has now been extended to the time dimension. This allows the visualization and quantification of gene expression and intracellular trafficking events of the studied molecules and the associated enzymatic processes in individual cells, in real time. PMID:15459666

  4. Deterministic mechanical model of T-killer cell polarization reproduces the wandering of aim between simultaneously engaged targets.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mun Ju; Maly, Ivan V

    2009-01-01

    T-killer cells of the immune system eliminate virus-infected and tumorous cells through direct cell-cell interactions. Reorientation of the killing apparatus inside the T cell to the T-cell interface with the target cell ensures specificity of the immune response. The killing apparatus can also oscillate next to the cell-cell interface. When two target cells are engaged by the T cell simultaneously, the killing apparatus can oscillate between the two interface areas. This oscillation is one of the most striking examples of cell movements that give the microscopist an unmechanistic impression of the cell's fidgety indecision. We have constructed a three-dimensional, numerical biomechanical model of the molecular-motor-driven microtubule cytoskeleton that positions the killing apparatus. The model demonstrates that the cortical pulling mechanism is indeed capable of orienting the killing apparatus into the functional position under a range of conditions. The model also predicts experimentally testable limitations of this commonly hypothesized mechanism of T-cell polarization. After the reorientation, the numerical solution exhibits complex, multidirectional, multiperiodic, and sustained oscillations in the absence of any external guidance or stochasticity. These computational results demonstrate that the strikingly animate wandering of aim in T-killer cells has a purely mechanical and deterministic explanation. PMID:19132078

  5. Introduction of genes into living cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimura, E.; Nagai, A.; Tomimasu, T.; Kina, T.; Fujimoto, S.; Katsura, Y.

    1998-02-01

    One of our main subjects is an application of the FEL to gene therapy of genetic diseases, immunodeficiency syndromes and cancer. In this study, using the FEL, we tried to establish a model system for introducing genes into the stem cells from which all blood cells are derived. Our aim is to specifically mark the stem cells with monoclonal antibodies which are conjugated with efficient FEL absorbers. Cells are then irradiated with FEL at a wavelength corresponding to the absorption energy of the absorber. We speculate that the gap formation of cell membrane will occur, caused by the thermal shock due to the absorption of the FEL energy. As an animal model for gene therapy, we tried to transfer the RAG-2 genes into hematopoietic stem cells from RAG-2 deficient mice, which have severe immunodeficiency because of the lack of RAG-2 gene required for lymphocyte development. As the results by this construct, the infant lymphocytes (T and B cells) could be observed in the thymus of the RAG-2 deficient mice 2 weeks post-operative.

  6. Heat induces gene amplification in cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Bin; Ouyang, Ruoyun; Huang, Chenghui; Liu, Franklin; Neill, Daniel; Li, Chuanyuan; Dewhirst, Mark

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study discovered that heat exposure (hyperthermia) results in gene amplification in cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hyperthermia induces DNA double strand breaks. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA double strand breaks are considered to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The underlying mechanism of heat-induced gene amplification is generation of DNA double strand breaks. -- Abstract: Background: Hyperthermia plays an important role in cancer therapy. However, as with radiation, it can cause DNA damage and therefore genetic instability. We studied whether hyperthermia can induce gene amplification in cancer cells and explored potential underlying molecular mechanisms. Materials and methods: (1) Hyperthermia: HCT116 colon cancer cells received water-submerged heating treatment at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min; (2) gene amplification assay using N-(phosphoacetyl)-L-aspartate (PALA) selection of cabamyl-P-synthetase, aspartate transcarbarmylase, dihydro-orotase (cad) gene amplified cells; (3) southern blotting for confirmation of increased cad gene copies in PALA-resistant cells; (4) {gamma}H2AX immunostaining to detect {gamma}H2AX foci as an indication for DNA double strand breaks. Results: (1) Heat exposure at 42 or 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces gene amplification. The frequency of cad gene amplification increased by 2.8 and 6.5 folds respectively; (2) heat exposure at both 42 and 44 Degree-Sign C for 30 min induces DNA double strand breaks in HCT116 cells as shown by {gamma}H2AX immunostaining. Conclusion: This study shows that heat exposure can induce gene amplification in cancer cells, likely through the generation of DNA double strand breaks, which are believed to be required for the initiation of gene amplification. This process may be promoted by heat when cellular proteins that are responsible for checkpoints, DNA replication, DNA repair and

  7. Improved Gene Targeting through Cell Cycle Synchronization

    PubMed Central

    Tsakraklides, Vasiliki; Brevnova, Elena; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Shaw, A. Joe

    2015-01-01

    Gene targeting is a challenge in organisms where non-homologous end-joining is the predominant form of recombination. We show that cell division cycle synchronization can be applied to significantly increase the rate of homologous recombination during transformation. Using hydroxyurea-mediated cell cycle arrest, we obtained improved gene targeting rates in Yarrowia lipolytica, Arxula adeninivorans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces lactis and Pichia pastoris demonstrating the broad applicability of the method. Hydroxyurea treatment enriches for S-phase cells that are active in homologous recombination and enables previously unattainable genomic modifications. PMID:26192309

  8. Sequence-matched probes produce increased cross-platform consistency and more reproducible biological results in microarray-based gene expression measurements

    PubMed Central

    Mecham, Brigham H.; Klus, Gregory T.; Strovel, Jeffrey; Augustus, Meena; Byrne, David; Bozso, Peter; Wetmore, Daniel Z.; Mariani, Thomas J.; Kohane, Isaac S.; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2004-01-01

    Cancer derived microarray data sets are routinely produced by various platforms that are either commercially available or manufactured by academic groups. The fundamental difference in their probe selection strategies holds the promise that identical observations produced by more than one platform prove to be more robust when validated by biology. However, cross-platform comparison requires matching corresponding probe sets. We are introducing here sequence-based matching of probes instead of gene identifier-based matching. We analyzed breast cancer cell line derived RNA aliquots using Agilent cDNA and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms to assess the advantage of this method. We show, that at different levels of the analysis, including gene expression ratios and difference calls, cross-platform consistency is significantly improved by sequence- based matching. We also present evidence that sequence-based probe matching produces more consistent results when comparing similar biological data sets obtained by different microarray platforms. This strategy allowed a more efficient transfer of classification of breast cancer samples between data sets produced by cDNA microarray and Affymetrix gene-chip platforms. PMID:15161944

  9. Sequence-matched probes produce increased cross-platform consistency and more reproducible biological results in microarray-based gene expression measurements.

    PubMed

    Mecham, Brigham H; Klus, Gregory T; Strovel, Jeffrey; Augustus, Meena; Byrne, David; Bozso, Peter; Wetmore, Daniel Z; Mariani, Thomas J; Kohane, Isaac S; Szallasi, Zoltan

    2004-01-01

    Cancer derived microarray data sets are routinely produced by various platforms that are either commercially available or manufactured by academic groups. The fundamental difference in their probe selection strategies holds the promise that identical observations produced by more than one platform prove to be more robust when validated by biology. However, cross-platform comparison requires matching corresponding probe sets. We are introducing here sequence-based matching of probes instead of gene identifier-based matching. We analyzed breast cancer cell line derived RNA aliquots using Agilent cDNA and Affymetrix oligonucleotide microarray platforms to assess the advantage of this method. We show, that at different levels of the analysis, including gene expression ratios and difference calls, cross-platform consistency is significantly improved by sequence- based matching. We also present evidence that sequence-based probe matching produces more consistent results when comparing similar biological data sets obtained by different microarray platforms. This strategy allowed a more efficient transfer of classification of breast cancer samples between data sets produced by cDNA microarray and Affymetrix gene-chip platforms. PMID:15161944

  10. Gene and stem cell therapy for diabetes.

    PubMed

    Calne, Roy Y; Ghoneim, Mohamed A; Lee, K O; Uin, Gan Shu

    2013-01-01

    Gene and stem cell therapy has been on the scientific agenda in many laboratories for more than 20 years. The literature is enormous, but practical applications have been few. Recently advances in stem cell biology and gene therapy are clarifying some of the issues. I have made a few observations concerning our own studies on bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells cultured to produce a small percentage of insulin-producing cells and human insulin gene engineered into Lenti and AA viruses. The aim of clinical application would still seem to be several years away, if all goes well. The first step will be to produce enough insulin-secreting cells to be of potential value to patients. The next crucial question will be how to persuade the cells to respond to blood glucose levels swiftly and appropriately. With both stem cell and gene therapy, another important factor will be to ensure that any positive results will continue long enough to be preferable to insulin injections. PMID:25095498

  11. Introduction of the six major genomic deletions of modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) into the parental vaccinia virus is not sufficient to reproduce an MVA-like phenotype in cell culture and in mice.

    PubMed

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-10-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduced the six major MVA deletions into the cloned CVA genome. Reconstituted mutant CVA viruses containing up to six major MVA deletions showed no detectable replication restriction in 12 of 14 mammalian cell lines tested; the exceptions were rabbit cell lines RK13 and SIRC. In mice, CVA mutants with up to three deletions showed slightly enhanced virulence, suggesting that gene deletion in replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) can result in gain of fitness in vivo. CVA mutants containing five or all six deletions were still pathogenic, with a moderate degree of attenuation. Deletion V was mainly responsible for the attenuated phenotype of these mutants. In conclusion, loss or truncation of all 31 open reading frames in the six major deletions is not sufficient to reproduce the specific MVA phenotype of strong attenuation and highly restricted host range. Mutations in viral genes outside or in association with the six major deletions appear to contribute significantly to this phenotype. Host range restriction and avirulence of MVA are most likely a cooperative effect of gene deletions and mutations involving the major deletions. PMID:20668072

  12. Introduction of the Six Major Genomic Deletions of Modified Vaccinia Virus Ankara (MVA) into the Parental Vaccinia Virus Is Not Sufficient To Reproduce an MVA-Like Phenotype in Cell Culture and in Mice▿

    PubMed Central

    Meisinger-Henschel, Christine; Späth, Michaela; Lukassen, Susanne; Wolferstätter, Michael; Kachelriess, Heike; Baur, Karen; Dirmeier, Ulrike; Wagner, Markus; Chaplin, Paul; Suter, Mark; Hausmann, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) has a highly restricted host range in cell culture and is apathogenic in vivo. MVA was derived from the parental chorioallantois vaccinia virus Ankara (CVA) by more than 570 passages in chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells. During CEF cell passaging, six major deletions comprising 24,668 nucleotides occurred in the CVA genome. We have cloned both the MVA and the parental CVA genome as bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs) and have sequentially introduced the six major MVA deletions into the cloned CVA genome. Reconstituted mutant CVA viruses containing up to six major MVA deletions showed no detectable replication restriction in 12 of 14 mammalian cell lines tested; the exceptions were rabbit cell lines RK13 and SIRC. In mice, CVA mutants with up to three deletions showed slightly enhanced virulence, suggesting that gene deletion in replicating vaccinia virus (VACV) can result in gain of fitness in vivo. CVA mutants containing five or all six deletions were still pathogenic, with a moderate degree of attenuation. Deletion V was mainly responsible for the attenuated phenotype of these mutants. In conclusion, loss or truncation of all 31 open reading frames in the six major deletions is not sufficient to reproduce the specific MVA phenotype of strong attenuation and highly restricted host range. Mutations in viral genes outside or in association with the six major deletions appear to contribute significantly to this phenotype. Host range restriction and avirulence of MVA are most likely a cooperative effect of gene deletions and mutations involving the major deletions. PMID:20668072

  13. Gene transfer into hematopoietic progenitor and stem cells: progress and problems.

    PubMed

    Dunbar, C E; Emmons, R V

    1994-11-01

    Gene transfer to hematopoietic cells for the purpose of "gene therapy" is a new and rapidly developing field with clinical trials in progress. A fundamental goal of research in this field is the incorporation of exogenous genes into the chromosomes of the most primitive hematopoietic progenitor cells--stem cells. Recombinantly engineered retroviral vectors are the best characterized and are currently the only vector type in clinical trials directed at the hematopoietic system. High efficiency gene transfer and expression in murine stem cells and their progeny is now routine, but in larger animal models such as dogs or primates and preliminary clinical trials, gene transfer has been less successful. Problems such as retroviral efficiency, gene expression, insertional mutagenesis and helper virus contamination are being addressed. A promising new vector, the adeno-associated virus (AAV), has shown promise and may allow production of high titer, stable, recombinant virions without helper contamination and with potentially better safety parameters. However, the technology for AAV gene transfer is currently underdeveloped, and issues related to the reproducible production of vectors must be addressed. Other non-viral vector systems are being explored, but little data are available on applications to hematopoietic cells. Better preclinical models are needed to study gene targeting and expression in human cells. An overview of recombinant retroviral and adeno-associated viral vector production, preclinical data and preliminary clinical data will be given, and problems needing to be addressed at all stages of development before broad clinical utility can be achieved will be discussed. PMID:7881358

  14. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  15. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  16. Within-person reproducibility of red blood cell mercury over a 10- to 15-year period among women in the Nurses' Health Study II.

    PubMed

    Kioumourtzoglou, Marianthi-Anna; Roberts, Andrea L; Nielsen, Flemming; Tworoger, Shelley S; Grandjean, Philippe; Weisskopf, Marc G

    2016-01-01

    Most epidemiologic studies of methylmercury (MeHg) health effects rely on a single measurement of a MeHg biomarker to assess long-term exposures. Long-term reproducibility data are, therefore, needed to assess the reliability of a single measure to reflect long-term exposures. In this study, we assessed within-person reproducibility of red blood cell (RBC) mercury (Hg), a marker of methyl-mercury, over 10-15 years in a sample of 57 women. Fifty-seven women from the Nurses' Health Study II provided two blood samples 10-15-years apart (median: 12 years), which were analyzed for mercury levels in the red blood cells (B-Hg*). To characterize within-person reproducibility, we estimated correlation and intraclass correlation coefficients (r and ICC) across the two samples. Further, we compared different prediction models, including variables on fish and seafood consumption, for B-Hg* at the first sample, using leave-one-out cross-validation to assess predictive ability. Overall, we observed strong correlations over 10-15 years (r=0.69), as well as a high ICC (0.67; 95% CI: 0.49, 0.79). Fish and seafood consumption reported concurrently with the first B-Hg* sample accounted for 26.8% of the variability in that B-Hg*, giving a correlation of r=0.52. Despite decreasing B-Hg* levels over time, we observed strong correlations and high ICC estimates across B-Hg* measured 10-15 years apart, suggesting good relative within-person stability over time. Our results indicate that a single measurement of B-Hg* likely is adequate to represent long-term exposures. PMID:25492240

  17. Reproducible expansion and characterization of mouse neural stem/progenitor cells in adherent cultures derived from the adult subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Theus, Michelle H.; Ricard, Jerome; Liebl, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) residing in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the adult mouse forebrain have been shown to enhance their neurogenic potential in response to CNS injury. Mechanisms involved in regulating adult neurogenesis under naïve or stressed conditions can be studied using a monolayer cell-culture system of the nestin-expressing NSPC lineage to analyze proliferation, survival and differentiation. Here, we describe a protocol for the expansion of NSPCs for studies aimed at understanding the functional role of NSPCs in maintaining adult neurogenic processes. In this unit, we outline in detail the procedures for: (1) isolation, maintenance and culture of the NSPC component of the SVZ niche from the lateral wall of the lateral ventricle; (2) characterization of NSPC functions by examining proliferation, survival and differentiation; and (3) efficient siRNA transfection methods in 96-well format. PMID:22415840

  18. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-01

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  19. Gene expression profiles in irradiated cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minafra, L.; Bravatà, V.; Russo, G.; Ripamonti, M.; Gilardi, M. C.

    2013-07-26

    Knowledge of the molecular and genetic mechanisms underlying cellular response to radiation may provide new avenues to develop innovative predictive tests of radiosensitivity of tumours and normal tissues and to improve individual therapy. Nowadays very few studies describe molecular changes induced by hadrontherapy treatments, therefore this field has to be explored and clarified. High-throughput methodologies, such as DNA microarray, allow us to analyse mRNA expression of thousands of genes simultaneously in order to discover new genes and pathways as targets of response to hadrontherapy. Our aim is to elucidate the molecular networks involved in the sensitivity/resistance of cancer cell lines subjected to hadrontherapy treatments with a genomewide approach by using cDNA microarray technology to identify gene expression profiles and candidate genes responsible of differential cellular responses.

  20. A robust and reproducible animal serum-free culture method for clinical-grade bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Laitinen, Anita; Oja, Sofia; Kilpinen, Lotta; Kaartinen, Tanja; Möller, Johanna; Laitinen, Saara; Korhonen, Matti; Nystedt, Johanna

    2016-08-01

    Efficient xenofree expansion methods to replace fetal bovine serum (FBS)-based culture methods are strongly encouraged by the regulators and are needed to facilitate the adoption of mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC)-based therapies. In the current study we established a clinically-compliant and reproducible animal serum-free culture protocol for bone marrow-(BM-) MSCs based on an optimized platelet-derived supplement. Our study compared two different platelet-derived supplements, platelet lysate PL1 versus PL2, produced by two different methods and lysed with different amounts of freeze-thaw cycles. Our study also explored the effect of a low oxygen concentration on BM-MSCs. FBS-supplemented BM-MSC culture served as control. Growth kinetics, differentiation and immunomodulatory potential, morphology, karyotype and immunophenotype was analysed. Growth kinetics in long-term culture was also studied. Based on the initial results, we chose to further process develop the PL1-supplemented culture protocol at 20 % oxygen. The results from 11 individual BM-MSC batches expanded in the chosen condition were consistent, yielding 6.60 × 10(9) ± 4.74 × 10(9) cells from only 20 ml of bone marrow. The cells suppressed T-cell proliferation, displayed normal karyotype and typical MSC differentiation potential and phenotype. The BM-MSCs were, however, consistently HLA-DR positive when cultured in platelet lysate (7.5-66.1 %). We additionally show that culture media antibiotics and sterile filtration of the platelet lysate can be successfully omitted. We present a robust and reproducible clinically-compliant culture method for BM-MSCs based on platelet lysate, which enables high quantities of HLA-DR positive MSCs at a low passage number (p2) and suitable for clinical use. PMID:25777046

  1. Gene regulation in hepatic stellate cell.

    PubMed

    Lang, A; Brenner, D A

    1999-03-01

    Hepatic stellate cells are now recognized as the major source of extracellular matrix in hepatic fibrosis. Following liver injury the hepatic stellate cell changes from a quiescent to an activated cell. The activation process includes an increased proliferation rate, a phenotypic change to a myofibroblast-like cell, loss of vitamin A stores, increased extra-cellular matrix protein synthesis and contractility. Furthermore, hepatic stellate cells have been implicated in hepatic inflammation through their ability to secrete cytokines and chemokines. Here, we review the literature on the molecular pathogenesis of hepatic stellate cells activation with emphasis on the most recent findings. The reviewed topics include transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of the genes encoding type I collagen in hepatic stellate cells; the role of the transcription factor nuclear factor Kappa B in the hepatic stellate cell activation; focal adhesion kinase and integrin-mediated signal transduction in hepatic stellate cell, and apoptosis in hepatic stellate cells. New insight into hepatic stellate cell activation and death may lead to the development of novel therapies for hepatic fibrosis. PMID:10363203

  2. Cell cycle gene expression under clinorotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Artemenko, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) are main regulators of the cell cycle of eukaryotes. It's assumes a significant change of their level in cells under microgravity conditions and by other physical factors actions. The clinorotation use enables to determine the influence of gravity on simulated events in the cell during the cell cycle - exit from the state of quiet stage and promotion presynthetic phase (G1) and DNA synthesis phase (S) of the cell cycle. For the clinorotation effect study on cell proliferation activity is the necessary studies of molecular mechanisms of cell cycle regulation and development of plants under altered gravity condition. The activity of cyclin D, which is responsible for the events of the cell cycle in presynthetic phase can be controlled by the action of endogenous as well as exogenous factors, but clinorotation is one of the factors that influence on genes expression that regulate the cell cycle.These data can be used as a model for further research of cyclin - CDK complex for study of molecular mechanisms regulation of growth and proliferation. In this investigation we tried to summarize and analyze known literature and own data we obtained relatively the main regulators of the cell cycle in altered gravity condition.

  3. Correlation of immunohistochemical staining p63 and TTF-1 with EGFR and K-ras mutational spectrum and diagnostic reproducibility in non small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Thunnissen, Erik; Boers, Evan; Heideman, Daniëlle A M; Grünberg, Katrien; Kuik, Dirk J; Noorduin, Arnold; van Oosterhout, Matthijs; Pronk, Divera; Seldenrijk, Cees; Sietsma, Hannie; Smit, Egbert F; van Suylen, Robertjan; von der Thusen, Jan; Vrugt, Bart; Wiersma, Anne; Witte, Birgit I; den Bakker, Michael

    2012-12-01

    For treatment purposes, distinction between squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma is important. The aim of this study is to examine the diagnostic accuracy on lung cancer small biopsies for the distinction between adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma and relate these to immunohistochemical and KRAS and EGFR mutation analysis. An interobserver study was performed on 110 prospectively collected biopsies obtained by bronchoscopy or transthoracic needle biopsy of patients with non-small cell lung cancer. The diagnosis was correlated with immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis for markers of adeno- (TTF1 and/or mucin positivity) and squamous cell differentiation (P63 and CK5/6) as well as KRAS and EGFR mutation analysis. Eleven observers independently read H&E-stained slides of 110 cases, resulting in a kappa value of 0.55 ± 0.10. The diagnosis non-small cell lung cancer not otherwise specified was given on average on 29.5 % of the biopsies. A high concordance was observed between hematoxylin-eosin-based consensus diagnosis (≥8/11 readings concordant) and IHC markers. In all cases with EGFR (n = 1) and KRAS (n = 20) mutations, adenodifferentiation as determined by IHC was present and p63 staining was absent. In 2 of 25 cases with a consensus diagnosis of squamous cell carcinoma, additional stainings favored adenodifferentation, and a KRAS mutation was present. P63 is most useful for distinction between EGFR/KRAS mutation positive and negative patients. In the diagnostic work-up of non-small cell lung carcinoma the limited reproducibility on small biopsies is optimized with immunohistochemical analysis, resulting in reliable delineation for predictive analysis. PMID:23064619

  4. Reproducibility of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced MRI in Renal Cell Carcinoma: A Prospective Analysis on Intra- and Interobserver and Scan-Rescan Performance of Pharmacokinetic Parameters.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haiyi; Su, Zihua; Ye, Huiyi; Xu, Xiao; Sun, Zhipeng; Li, Lu; Duan, Feixue; Song, Yuanyuan; Lambrou, Tryphon; Ma, Lin

    2015-09-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the intra- and interobserver as well as scan-rescan reproducibility of quantitative parameters of renal cell carcinomas (RCCs) with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI). A total of 21 patients with clear cell RCCs (17 men, 4 woman; age 37-69 years, mean age 54.6 years, mean size, 5.0 ± 2.2 cm) were prospectively recruited from September 2012 to November 2012. Patients underwent paired DCE-MRI studies on a 3.0 T MR system with an interval of 48 to 72 hours. The extended-Tofts model and population-based arterial input function were used to calculate kinetic parameters. Three observers defined the 2-dimensional whole-tumor region of interest at the slice with the maximum diameter of the RCC. Intraobserver and scan-rescan differences were assessed using paired t tests, whereas interobserver differences using two-way analysis of variance. Intra- and interobserver reproducibility and scan-rescan reproducibility were evaluated using within-subject coefficient of variation (wCoV) and intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). There were no significant intra-, interobserver, or scan-rescan differences in parameters (all P > 0.05). All ICCs for intra- and interobserver agreements were >0.75 (P < 0.05), whereas the scan-rescan agreement was moderate to good; V(e) (0.764, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.378-0.925) and K(ep) (0.906, 95% CI: 0.710-0.972) had higher ICC than K(trans) (0.686; 95% CI: 0.212-0.898) and V(p) (0.657; 95% CI: 0.164-0.888). In intra- and interobserver variability analyses, all parameters except V(p) had low wCoV values. K(trans) and V(e) had slightly lower intraobserver wCoV (1.2% and 0.9%) compared with K(ep) (3.7%), whereas all 3 of these parameters had similar interobserver wCoV values (2.5%, 3.1%, and 2.9%, respectively). Regarding scan-rescan variability, K(trans) and K(ep) showed slightly higher variation (15.6% and 15.4%) than V(e) (10.1%). V(p) had the largest

  5. Optimizing autologous cell grafts to improve stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Psatha, Nikoletta; Karponi, Garyfalia; Yannaki, Evangelia

    2016-07-01

    Over the past decade, stem cell gene therapy has achieved unprecedented curative outcomes for several genetic disorders. Despite the unequivocal success, clinical gene therapy still faces challenges. Genetically engineered hematopoietic stem cells are particularly vulnerable to attenuation of their repopulating capacity once exposed to culture conditions, ultimately leading to low engraftment levels posttransplant. This becomes of particular importance when transduction rates are low or/and competitive transplant conditions are generated by reduced-intensity conditioning in the absence of a selective advantage of the transduced over the unmodified cells. These limitations could partially be overcome by introducing megadoses of genetically modified CD34(+) cells into conditioned patients or by transplanting hematopoietic stem cells hematopoietic stem cells with high engrafting and repopulating potential. On the basis of the lessons gained from cord blood transplantation, we summarize the most promising approaches to date of increasing either the numbers of hematopoietic stem cells for transplantation or/and their engraftability, as a platform toward the optimization of engineered stem cell grafts. PMID:27106799

  6. Ankylosing Spondylitis: From Cells to Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano-Zaragoza, José Francisco; Agraz-Cibrian, Juan Manuel; González-Reyes, Christian; Durán-Avelar, Ma. de Jesús; Vibanco-Pérez, Norberto

    2013-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of unknown etiology, though it is considered an autoimmune disease. HLA-B27 is the risk factor most often associated with AS, and although the mechanism of involvement is unclear, the subtypes and other features of the relationship between HLA-B27 and AS have been studied for years. Additionally, the key role of IL-17 and Th17 cells in autoimmunity and inflammation suggests that the latter and the cytokines involved in their generation could play a role in the pathogenesis of this disease. Recent studies have described the sources of IL-17 and IL-23, as well as the characterization of Th17 cells in autoimmune diseases. Other cells, such as NK and regulatory T cells, have been implicated in autoimmunity and have been evaluated to ascertain their possible role in AS. Moreover, several polymorphisms, mutations and deletions in the regulatory proteins, protein-coding regions, and promoter regions of different genes involved in immune responses have been discovered and evaluated for possible genetic linkages to AS. In this review, we analyze the features of HLA-B27 and the suggested mechanisms of its involvement in AS while also focusing on the characterization of the immune response and the identification of genes associated with AS. PMID:23970995

  7. Epigenetic Landscapes Explain Partially Reprogrammed Cells and Identify Key Reprogramming Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Alex H.; Li, Hu; Collins, James J.; Mehta, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    A common metaphor for describing development is a rugged “epigenetic landscape” where cell fates are represented as attracting valleys resulting from a complex regulatory network. Here, we introduce a framework for explicitly constructing epigenetic landscapes that combines genomic data with techniques from spin-glass physics. Each cell fate is a dynamic attractor, yet cells can change fate in response to external signals. Our model suggests that partially reprogrammed cells are a natural consequence of high-dimensional landscapes, and predicts that partially reprogrammed cells should be hybrids that co-express genes from multiple cell fates. We verify this prediction by reanalyzing existing datasets. Our model reproduces known reprogramming protocols and identifies candidate transcription factors for reprogramming to novel cell fates, suggesting epigenetic landscapes are a powerful paradigm for understanding cellular identity. PMID:25122086

  8. Roles of imprinted genes in neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Anke; Daniel, Guillaume; Schmidt-Edelkraut, Udo; Spengler, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Imprinted genes and neural stem cells (NSC) play an important role in the developing and mature brain. A central theme of imprinted gene function in NSCs is cell survival and G1 arrest to control cell division, cell-cycle exit, migration and differentiation. Moreover, genomic imprinting can be epigenetically switched off at some genes to ensure stem cell quiescence and differentiation. At the genome scale, imprinted genes are organized in dynamic networks formed by interchromosomal interactions and transcriptional coregulation of imprinted and nonimprinted genes. Such multilayered networks may synchronize NSC activity with the demand from the niche resembling their roles in adjusting fetal size. PMID:25431944

  9. Reproducibility of 'Intelligent' Contouring of Gross Tumor Volume in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer on PET/CT Images Using a Standardized Visual Method

    SciTech Connect

    Bayne, Michael; Hicks, Rodney J.; Everitt, Sarah; Fimmell, Natalie

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is increasingly used for delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The methodology for contouring tumor margins remains controversial. We developed a rigorous visual protocol for contouring GTV that uses all available clinical information and studied its reproducibility in patients from a prospective PET/CT planning trial. Methods and Materials: Planning PET/CT scans from 6 consecutive patients were selected. Six 'observers' (two radiation oncologists, two nuclear medicine physicians, and two radiologists) contoured GTVs for each patient using a predefined protocol and subsequently recontoured 2 patients. For the estimated GTVs and axial distances, least-squares means for each observer and for each case were calculated and compared, using the F test and pairwise t-tests. In five cases, tumor margins were also autocontoured using standardized uptake value (SUV) cutoffs of 2.5 and 3.5 and 40% SUV{sub max}. Results: The magnitude of variation between observers was small relative to the mean (coefficient of variation [CV] = 3%), and the total variation (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 3%). For estimation of superior/inferior (SI), left/right (LR), and anterior/posterior (AP) borders of the GTV, differences between observers were also small (AP, CV = 2%, ICC = 0.4%; LR, CV = 6%, ICC = 2%; SI, CV 4%, ICC = 2%). GTVs autocontoured generated using SUV 2.5, 3.5, and 40% SUV{sub max} differed widely in each case. An SUV contour of 2.5 was most closely correlated with the mean GTV defined by the human observers. Conclusions: Observer variation contributed little to total variation in the GTV and axial distances. A visual contouring protocol gave reproducible results for contouring GTV in NSCLC.

  10. Ex vivo generated natural killer cells acquire typical natural killer receptors and display a cytotoxic gene expression profile similar to peripheral blood natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Lehmann, Dorit; Spanholtz, Jan; Osl, Markus; Tordoir, Marleen; Lipnik, Karoline; Bilban, Martin; Schlechta, Bernhard; Dolstra, Harry; Hofer, Erhard

    2012-11-01

    Ex vivo differentiation systems of natural killer (NK) cells from CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells are of potential importance for adjuvant immunotherapy of cancer. Here, we analyzed ex vivo differentiation of NK cells from cord blood-derived CD34+ stem cells by gene expression profiling, real-time RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and functional analysis. Additionally, we compared the identified characteristics to peripheral blood (PB) CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells. The data show sequential expression of CD56 and the CD94 and NKG2 receptor chains during ex vivo NK cell development, resulting finally in the expression of a range of genes with partial characteristics of CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells from PB. Expression of characteristic NK cell receptors and cytotoxic genes was mainly found within the predominant ex vivo generated population of NKG2A+ NK cells, indicating the importance of NKG2A expression during NK cell differentiation and maturation. Furthermore, despite distinct phenotypic characteristics, the detailed analysis of cytolytic genes expressed within the ex vivo differentiated NK cells revealed a pattern close to CD56(dim) NK cells. In line with this finding, ex vivo generated NK cells displayed potent cytotoxicity. This supports that the ex vivo differentiation system faithfully reproduces major steps of the differentiation of NK cells from their progenitors, constitutes an excellent model to study NK cell differentiation, and is valuable to generate large-scale NK cells appropriate for immunotherapy. PMID:22571679

  11. Gene Expression by Mouse Inner Ear Hair Cells during Development

    PubMed Central

    Scheffer, Déborah I.; Shen, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Hair cells of the inner ear are essential for hearing and balance. As a consequence, pathogenic variants in genes specifically expressed in hair cells often cause hereditary deafness. Hair cells are few in number and not easily isolated from the adjacent supporting cells, so the biochemistry and molecular biology of hair cells can be difficult to study. To study gene expression in hair cells, we developed a protocol for hair cell isolation by FACS. With nearly pure hair cells and surrounding cells, from cochlea and utricle and from E16 to P7, we performed a comprehensive cell type-specific RNA-Seq study of gene expression during mouse inner ear development. Expression profiling revealed new hair cell genes with distinct expression patterns: some are specific for vestibular hair cells, others for cochlear hair cells, and some are expressed just before or after maturation of mechanosensitivity. We found that many of the known hereditary deafness genes are much more highly expressed in hair cells than surrounding cells, suggesting that genes preferentially expressed in hair cells are good candidates for unknown deafness genes. PMID:25904789

  12. Highly Efficient, Reproducible, Uniform (CH3 NH3 )PbI3 Layer by Processing Additive Dripping for Solution-Processed Planar Heterojunction Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hansol; Jeong, Hanbin; Lee, Jae Kwan

    2016-09-01

    A processing additive dripping (PAD) approach to forming highly efficient (CH3 NH3 )PbI3 (MAPbI3 ) perovskite layers was investigated. A MAPbI3 (CB/DIO) perovskite film fabricated by this approach, which included briefly dripping chlorobenzene incorporating a small amount of diiodooctane (DIO) during casting of a MAPbI3 perovskite precursor dissolved in dimethylformamide, exhibited superior smooth, uniform morphologies with high crystallinity and large grains and revealed completely homogeneous surface coverage. The surface coverage and morphology of the substrate significantly affected the photovoltaic performance of planar heterojunction (PHJ) perovskite solar cells (PrSCs), resulting in a power conversion efficiency of 11.45 % with high open-circuit voltage of 0.91 V and the highest fill factor of 80.87 %. Moreover, the PAD approach could effectively provide efficient MAPbI3 (CB/DIO) perovskite layers for highly efficient, reproducible, uniform PHJ PrSC devices without performance loss or variation even over larger active areas. PMID:27414840

  13. Identification of C/EBPβ Target Genes in ALK+ Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma (ALCL) by Gene Expression Profiling and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation

    PubMed Central

    Bonzheim, Irina; Irmler, Martin; Klier-Richter, Margit; Steinhilber, Julia; Anastasov, Nataša; Schäfer, Sabine; Adam, Patrick; Beckers, Johannes; Raffeld, Mark; Fend, Falko; Quintanilla-Martinez, Leticia

    2013-01-01

    C/EBPβ (CCAAT enhancer binding protein) is a transcription factor that plays a crucial role in survival and transformation of ALK+ anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL). The aim of this study was to identify the downstream targets of C/EBPβ responsible for ALK-mediated oncogenesis. C/EBPβ was knocked down in ALK+ ALCL cell lines with a C/EBPβ-shRNA, followed by gene expression profiling (GEP). GEP analysis revealed a reproducible signature of genes that were significantly regulated by C/EBPβ. Classification into biological categories revealed overrepresentation of genes involved in the immune response, apoptosis and cell proliferation. Transcriptional regulation by C/EBPβ was found in 6 of 11 (BCL2A1, G0S2, TRIB1, S100A9, DDX21 and DDIT4) genes investigated by chromatin immunoprecipitation. We demonstrated that BCL2A1, G0S2 and DDX21 play a crucial role in survival and proliferation of ALK+ ALCL cells. DDX21, a gene involved in rRNA biogenesis, was found differentially overexpressed in primary ALK+ ALCL cases. All three candidate genes were validated in primary ALCL cases by either immunohistochemistry or RT-qPCR. In conclusion, we identified and validated several key C/EBPβ-regulated genes with major impact on survival and cell growth in ALK+ ALCL, supporting the central role of C/EBPβ in ALK-mediated oncogenesis. PMID:23741337

  14. Gene Transfer between Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium inside Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ferguson, Gayle C.; Heinemann, Jack A.; Kennedy, Martin A.

    2002-01-01

    Virulence and antibiotic resistance genes transfer between bacteria by bacterial conjugation. Conjugation also mediates gene transfer from bacteria to eukaryotic organisms, including yeast and human cells. Predicting when and where genes transfer by conjugation could enhance our understanding of the risks involved in the release of genetically modified organisms, including those being developed for use as vaccines. We report here that Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium conjugated inside cultured human cells. The DNA transfer from donor to recipient bacteria was proportional to the probability that the two types of bacteria occupied the same cell, which was dependent on viable and invasive bacteria and on plasmid tra genes. Based on the high frequencies of gene transfer between bacteria inside human cells, we suggest that such gene transfers occur in situ. The implications of gene transfer between bacteria inside human cells, particularly in the context of antibiotic resistance, are discussed. PMID:11914355

  15. Reproducible research in palaeomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lurcock, Pontus; Florindo, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    The reproducibility of research findings is attracting increasing attention across all scientific disciplines. In palaeomagnetism as elsewhere, computer-based analysis techniques are becoming more commonplace, complex, and diverse. Analyses can often be difficult to reproduce from scratch, both for the original researchers and for others seeking to build on the work. We present a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program designed to make reproducibility easier. Part of the problem is the divide between interactive and scripted (batch) analysis programs. An interactive desktop program with a graphical interface is a powerful tool for exploring data and iteratively refining analyses, but usually cannot operate without human interaction. This makes it impossible to re-run an analysis automatically, or to integrate it into a larger automated scientific workflow - for example, a script to generate figures and tables for a paper. In some cases the parameters of the analysis process itself are not saved explicitly, making it hard to repeat or improve the analysis even with human interaction. Conversely, non-interactive batch tools can be controlled by pre-written scripts and configuration files, allowing an analysis to be 'replayed' automatically from the raw data. However, this advantage comes at the expense of exploratory capability: iteratively improving an analysis entails a time-consuming cycle of editing scripts, running them, and viewing the output. Batch tools also tend to require more computer expertise from their users. PuffinPlot is a palaeomagnetic plotting and analysis program which aims to bridge this gap. First released in 2012, it offers both an interactive, user-friendly desktop interface and a batch scripting interface, both making use of the same core library of palaeomagnetic functions. We present new improvements to the program that help to integrate the interactive and batch approaches, allowing an analysis to be interactively explored and refined

  16. Magnetogastrography (MGG) Reproducibility Assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Roca-Chiapas, J. M.; Córdova, T.; Hernández, E.; Solorio, S.; Solís Ortiz, S.; Sosa, M.

    2006-09-01

    Seven healthy subjects underwent a magnetic pulse of 32 mT for 17 ms, seven times in 90 minutes. The procedure was repeated one and two weeks later. Assessments of the gastric emptying were carried out for each one of the measurements and a statistical analysis of ANOVA was performed for every group of data. The gastric emptying time was 19.22 ± 5 min. Reproducibility estimation was above 85%. Therefore, magnetogastrography seems to be an excellent technique to be implemented in routine clinical trials.

  17. Opening Reproducible Research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nüst, Daniel; Konkol, Markus; Pebesma, Edzer; Kray, Christian; Klötgen, Stephanie; Schutzeichel, Marc; Lorenz, Jörg; Przibytzin, Holger; Kussmann, Dirk

    2016-04-01

    Open access is not only a form of publishing such that research papers become available to the large public free of charge, it also refers to a trend in science that the act of doing research becomes more open and transparent. When science transforms to open access we not only mean access to papers, research data being collected, or data being generated, but also access to the data used and the procedures carried out in the research paper. Increasingly, scientific results are generated by numerical manipulation of data that were already collected, and may involve simulation experiments that are completely carried out computationally. Reproducibility of research findings, the ability to repeat experimental procedures and confirm previously found results, is at the heart of the scientific method (Pebesma, Nüst and Bivand, 2012). As opposed to the collection of experimental data in labs or nature, computational experiments lend themselves very well for reproduction. Some of the reasons why scientists do not publish data and computational procedures that allow reproduction will be hard to change, e.g. privacy concerns in the data, fear for embarrassment or of losing a competitive advantage. Others reasons however involve technical aspects, and include the lack of standard procedures to publish such information and the lack of benefits after publishing them. We aim to resolve these two technical aspects. We propose a system that supports the evolution of scientific publications from static papers into dynamic, executable research documents. The DFG-funded experimental project Opening Reproducible Research (ORR) aims for the main aspects of open access, by improving the exchange of, by facilitating productive access to, and by simplifying reuse of research results that are published over the Internet. Central to the project is a new form for creating and providing research results, the executable research compendium (ERC), which not only enables third parties to

  18. Highly reproducible, efficient hysteresis-less CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x) planar hybrid solar cells without requiring heat-treatment.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2016-02-01

    CH3NH3PbI(3-x)Cl(x)(MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x)) mixed halide perovskite powder with uniform composition was synthesized via simple solution chemistry, which demonstrates highly reproducible, efficient planar type MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite solar cells. Pure MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite powder was synthesized by reacting a 3 : 1 molar ratio of MAI : PbCl2 powder mixture in isopropanol (IPA) solution for 30 min at 60 °C with subsequent repeated centrifugation and washing in IPA. IPA functions as both the reaction medium for the formation of MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide and a selective remover of unreacted MAI and MACl byproducts. Accordingly, we could deposit a pinhole-free dense MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite film on a TiO2/FTO substrate through a simple one step spin-coating of pure MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite powder in DMF solution with HI additive, without further long heat-treatment processes. The deposited MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite film revealed uniform composition throughout the entire area, and the ratio of Cl to I + Cl and I + Cl to Pb was constant at ∼0.03 and ∼1/3, respectively. On the other hand, the conventional MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite film prepared by the long heat-treatment process had non-uniform composition because the ratio of Cl to I + Cl fluctuated greatly from 0 to 7.2. The average efficiency of planar type MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite solar cells was 18.65% ± 0.30% and the champion cell had 1.11 V V(oc), 22.1 mA cm(-2) J(sc), 77% F.F., and 18.9% η for forward scan conditions and 1.11 V V(oc), 22.1 mA cm(-2) J(sc), 78% F.F., and 19.1% η for reverse scan conditions. Although the thickness of the MAPbI(3-x)Cl(x) mixed halide perovskite layer varied from ∼500 nm to ∼900 nm, the efficiency was within the range of 18.3%-19.0%. PMID:26781644

  19. Gene and Stem Cell Therapy: Alone or in Combination?

    PubMed Central

    Rafi, Mohammad A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Both gene and stem cell therapies hold great promise in the treatment of many genetic diseases and are currently focus of interest for many investigators. While both approaches are offering great and valuable treatment options for devastating and life-threatening diseases, they hold much greater promise in combination. Methods As there are multiple options in selecting gene transfer vehicles among the non-viral and viral vectors, there are also many options among the different transplantable cell types ranging from lineage-restricted progenitor cells to multipotent and pluripotent stem cells. Here, combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy is discussed. Results Several suc-cessful gene and stem cell therapies have been reported both in animal and human trials. Combination of the gene therapy and stem cell therapy can be carried out sequentially where the cell transplantation and the in vivo gene therapy are accomplished one after the other; or, as it is more commonly practiced, they can be carried out as ex vivo gene therapy where the transplantable cells are genetically modified outside the body before being transplanted into the body. Conclusion The combination of the stem-cell technology with gene therapy has the potential of providing both regenerative tissue and therapeutic material simultaneously; therefore, having the benefits of both technologies. PMID:23678430

  20. A reproducible and quantifiable model of choroidal neovascularization induced by VEGF A165 after subretinal adenoviral gene transfer in the rabbit

    PubMed Central

    Kreppel, Florian; Beck, Susanne; Heiduschka, Peter; Brito, Veronica; Schnichels, Sven; Kochanek, Stefan; Schraermeyer, Ulrich

    2008-01-01

    Purpose To determine the effects of the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-A165 delivered using a high capacity adenoviral vector (HC Ad.VEGF-A) on vascular growth and pathological changes in the rabbit eye. To combine different detection methods of VEGF-A165 overexpression-induced neovascularization in the rabbit. Methods HC Ad.VEGF-A165 was constructed and injected at 5x106 infectious units (iu) into the subretinal space of rabbit eyes. Two and four weeks postinjection, the development of neovascularization and the expression of HC Ad-transduced VEGF-A165 protein were followed up in vivo by scanning laser ophthalmoscopy, fluorescein and indocyanine green angiographies and ex vivo by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry Results We observed a choroidal neovascularization (CNV) with leakage in 83% of the rabbit eyes. Our findings present clear indications that there is a significant effect on the endothelial cells of the choriocapillaris after subretinal transduction of the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) with VEGF-A165 vector. The choroidal endothelial cells were activated, adherent junctions opened, and the fenestration was minimized, while the extracellular matrix localized between the RPE and the endothelium of the choriocapillaris was enlarged toward the lumen of the vessels, inducing a deep invagination of the endothelial cells into the vessel lumen. They also proliferated and formed pathological vessels in the subretinal space. Moreover,there was an increased expression of basic fibroblast growth factor and VEGF-A accompanied by macrophage stimulation, retinal edema, and photoreceptor loss. Conclusions This is the first model of VEGF-induced CNV in the rabbit in which the pathological events following overexpression of VEGF by RPE cells have been described in detail. Many of the features of our experimental CNV resemble those observed clinically in patients having wet age-related macular degeneration. PMID:18682809

  1. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Wagatsuma, Hiroki; Yokoya, Fumihiko; Zhang, Qing-Wei; Yamaguchi, Mutsuyo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylni-trosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis. METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells), and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells. RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSC-specific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis, suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocyte-specific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis. CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis. PMID:17072980

  2. Cell dynamics and gene expression control in tissue homeostasis and development

    PubMed Central

    Rué, Pau; Martinez Arias, Alfonso

    2015-01-01

    During tissue and organ development and maintenance, the dynamic regulation of cellular proliferation and differentiation allows cells to build highly elaborate structures. The development of the vertebrate retina or the maintenance of adult intestinal crypts, for instance, involves the arrangement of newly created cells with different phenotypes, the proportions of which need to be tightly controlled. While some of the basic principles underlying these processes developing and maintaining these organs are known, much remains to be learnt from how cells encode the necessary information and use it to attain those complex but reproducible arrangements. Here, we review the current knowledge on the principles underlying cell population dynamics during tissue development and homeostasis. In particular, we discuss how stochastic fate assignment, cell division, feedback control and cellular transition states interact during organ and tissue development and maintenance in multicellular organisms. We propose a framework, involving the existence of a transition state in which cells are more susceptible to signals that can affect their gene expression state and influence their cell fate decisions. This framework, which also applies to systems much more amenable to quantitative analysis like differentiating embryonic stem cells, links gene expression programmes with cell population dynamics. PMID:25716053

  3. Reproducing in cities.

    PubMed

    Mace, Ruth

    2008-02-01

    Reproducing in cities has always been costly, leading to lower fertility (that is, lower birth rates) in urban than in rural areas. Historically, although cities provided job opportunities, initially residents incurred the penalty of higher infant mortality, but as mortality rates fell at the end of the 19th century, European birth rates began to plummet. Fertility decline in Africa only started recently and has been dramatic in some cities. Here it is argued that both historical and evolutionary demographers are interpreting fertility declines across the globe in terms of the relative costs of child rearing, which increase to allow children to outcompete their peers. Now largely free from the fear of early death, postindustrial societies may create an environment that generates runaway parental investment, which will continue to drive fertility ever lower. PMID:18258904

  4. Screening of genes involved in cell migration in Dictyostelium.

    PubMed

    Nagasaki, Akira; Uyeda, Taro Q P

    2008-03-10

    A single cell of wild-type Dictyostelium discoideum forms a visible colony on a plastic dish in several days, but due to enhanced cell migration, amiB-null mutant cells scatter over a large area and do not form noticeable colonies. Here, with an aim to identify genes involved in cell migration, we isolated suppresser mutants of amiB-null mutants that restore the ability to form colonies. From REMI (restriction enzyme-mediated integration)-mutagenized pool of double-mutants, we identified 18 responsible genes from them. These genes can be categorized into several biological processes. One cell line, Sab16 (Suppressor of amiB) was chosen for further analysis, which had a disrupted phospholipase D pldB gene. To confirm the role of pldB gene in cell migration, we knocked out the pldB gene and over-expressed gfp-pldB in wild-type cells. GFP-PLDB localized to plasma membrane and on vesicles, and in migrating cells, at the protruding regions of pseudopodia. Migration speed of vegetative pldB-null cells was reduced to 73% of that of the wild-type. These results suggest that PLDB plays an important role in migration in Dictyostelium cells, and that our screening system is useful for the identification of genes involved in cell migration. PMID:18164290

  5. Differential gene expression in tumorigenic and nontumorigenic HeLa x normal human fibroblast hybrid cells.

    PubMed

    Tsujimoto, H; Nishizuka, S; Redpath, J L; Stanbridge, E J

    1999-12-01

    Fusion of tumorigenic HeLa cells with human skin fibroblasts results in chromosomally stable hybrids that are nontumorigenic and no longer express the HeLa tumor-associated marker intestinal alkaline phosphatase (IAP). Previous studies of spontaneous tumorigenic segregants from the nontumorigenic hybrids implicated the loss of one copy of human fibroblast chromosome 11 in the concomitant reexpression of tumorigenicity. In an attempt to identify genes involved in the control of tumorigenic expression, we performed differential display screening of nontumorigenic hybrid cells and tumorigenic segregants. Subsequent northern blot analyses reproducibly showed 17 differentially expressed genes, eight of which were expressed differentially in the nontumorigenic hybrids and nine of which were expressed differentially in the tumorigenic hybrids. The former were genes for 80K-L protein (a substrate of protein kinase C), AXL/UFO (a receptor tyrosine kinase), insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, apolipoprotein AI regulatory protein, collagen type I alpha-2 chain, transforming growth factor-beta-induced gene product 3 (BIGH3), pregnancy-specific beta-1-glycoprotein, and fibroblast activation protein alpha. The latter nine genes were genes for serum/glucocorticoid-regulated kinase (SGK; a serine/threonine protein kinase), PTPCAAX1 (a tyrosine phosphatase), CXCR-4 (a G-protein-coupled membrane receptor), L-kynurenine hydrolase, beta-1, 4-galactosyltransferase, keratin 8, keratin 17, and H19 and a novel gene. The differential expression of these genes provided several interesting candidates for regulation of tumorigenic expression, including those involved in signal transduction and the extracellular matrix, cytoskeletal proteins, cell-surface enzyme, and the H19 gene. PMID:10569806

  6. The Lupus Susceptibility Gene Pbx1 Regulates the Balance between Follicular Helper T Cell and Regulatory T Cell Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seung-Chul; Hutchinson, Tarun E; Titov, Anton A; Seay, Howard R; Li, Shiwu; Brusko, Todd M; Croker, Byron P; Salek-Ardakani, Shahram; Morel, Laurence

    2016-07-15

    Pbx1 controls chromatin accessibility to a large number of genes and is entirely conserved between mice and humans. The Pbx1-d dominant-negative isoform is more frequent in CD4(+) T cells from lupus patients than from healthy controls. Pbx1-d is associated with the production of autoreactive T cells in mice carrying the Sle1a1 lupus-susceptibility locus. Transgenic (Tg) expression of Pbx1-d in CD4(+) T cells reproduced the phenotypes of Sle1a1 mice, with increased inflammatory functions of CD4(+) T cells and impaired Foxp3(+) regulatory T cell (Treg) homeostasis. Pbx1-d-Tg expression also expanded the number of follicular helper T cells (TFHs) in a cell-intrinsic and Ag-specific manner, which was enhanced in recall responses and resulted in Th1-biased Abs. Moreover, Pbx1-d-Tg CD4(+) T cells upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-21, and miR-155, which were implicated in Treg and follicular helper T cell homeostasis. Our results suggest that Pbx1-d impacts lupus development by regulating effector T cell differentiation and promoting TFHs at the expense of Tregs. In addition, our results identify Pbx1 as a novel regulator of CD4(+) T cell effector function. PMID:27296664

  7. Highly reproducible, efficient hysteresis-less CH3NH3PbI3-xClx planar hybrid solar cells without requiring heat-treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Jin Hyuck; Im, Sang Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    CH3NH3PbI3-xClx(MAPbI3-xClx) mixed halide perovskite powder with uniform composition was synthesized via simple solution chemistry, which demonstrates highly reproducible, efficient planar type MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite solar cells. Pure MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite powder was synthesized by reacting a 3 : 1 molar ratio of MAI : PbCl2 powder mixture in isopropanol (IPA) solution for 30 min at 60 °C with subsequent repeated centrifugation and washing in IPA. IPA functions as both the reaction medium for the formation of MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide and a selective remover of unreacted MAI and MACl byproducts. Accordingly, we could deposit a pinhole-free dense MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite film on a TiO2/FTO substrate through a simple one step spin-coating of pure MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite powder in DMF solution with HI additive, without further long heat-treatment processes. The deposited MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite film revealed uniform composition throughout the entire area, and the ratio of Cl to I + Cl and I + Cl to Pb was constant at ~0.03 and ~1/3, respectively. On the other hand, the conventional MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite film prepared by the long heat-treatment process had non-uniform composition because the ratio of Cl to I + Cl fluctuated greatly from 0 to 7.2. The average efficiency of planar type MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite solar cells was 18.65% +/- 0.30% and the champion cell had 1.11 V Voc, 22.1 mA cm-2Jsc, 77% F.F., and 18.9% η for forward scan conditions and 1.11 V Voc, 22.1 mA cm-2Jsc, 78% F.F., and 19.1% η for reverse scan conditions. Although the thickness of the MAPbI3-xClx mixed halide perovskite layer varied from ~500 nm to ~900 nm, the efficiency was within the range of 18.3%-19.0%.CH3NH3PbI3-xClx(MAPbI3-xClx) mixed halide perovskite powder with uniform composition was synthesized via simple solution chemistry, which demonstrates highly reproducible, efficient planar type MAPbI3-x

  8. Morphological restriction of human coronary artery endothelial cells substantially impacts global gene expression patterns

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Jessica M; Pham, Robert; Rowntree, Rebecca K; Amaya, Clarissa; Battiste, James; Boucheron, Laura E; Mitchell, Dianne C; Bryan, Brad A

    2013-01-01

    Alterations in cell shape have been shown to modulate chromatin condensation and cell lineage specification; however, the mechanisms controlling these processes are largely unknown. Because endothelial cells experience cyclic mechanical changes from blood flow during normal physiological processes and disrupted mechanical changes as a result of abnormal blood flow, cell shape deformation and loss of polarization during coronary artery disease, we aimed to determine how morphological restriction affects global gene expression patterns. Human coronary artery endothelial cells (HCAECs) were cultured on spatially defined adhesive micropatterns, forcing them to conform to unique cellular morphologies differing in cellular polarization and angularity. We utilized pattern recognition algorithms and statistical analysis to validate the cytoskeletal pattern reproducibility and uniqueness of each micropattern, and performed microarray analysis on normal-shaped and micropatterned HCAECs to determine how constrained cellular morphology affects gene expression patterns. Analysis of the data revealed that forcing HCAECs to conform to geometrically-defined shapes significantly affects their global transcription patterns compared to nonrestricted shapes. Interestingly, gene expression patterns were altered in response to morphological restriction in general, although they were consistent regardless of the particular shape the cells conformed to. These data suggest that the ability of HCAECs to spread, although not necessarily their particular morphology, dictates their genomics patterns. PMID:23802622

  9. Baculoviruses deficient in ie1 gene function abrogate viral gene expression in transduced mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    Efrose, Rodica; Swevers, Luc; Iatrou, Kostas

    2010-10-25

    One of the newest niches for baculoviruses-based technologies is their use as vectors for mammalian cell transduction and gene therapy applications. However, an outstanding safety issue related to such use is the residual expression of viral genes in infected mammalian cells. Here we show that infectious baculoviruses lacking the major transcriptional regulator, IE1, can be produced in insect host cells stably transformed with IE1 expression constructs lacking targets of homologous recombination that could promote the generation of wt-like revertants. Such ie1-deficient baculoviruses are unable to direct viral gene transcription to any appreciable degree and do not replicate in normal insect host cells. Most importantly, the residual viral gene expression, which occurs in mammalian cells infected with wt baculoviruses is reduced 10 to 100 fold in cells infected with ie1-deficient baculoviruses. Thus, ie1-deficient baculoviruses offer enhanced safety features to baculovirus-based vector systems destined for use in gene therapy applications.

  10. Cell Targeting in Anti-Cancer Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lila, Mohd Azmi Mohd; Siew, John Shia Kwong; Zakaria, Hayati; Saad, Suria Mohd; Ni, Lim Shen; Abdullah, Jafri Malin

    2004-01-01

    Gene therapy is a promising approach towards cancer treatment. The main aim of the therapy is to destroy cancer cells, usually by apoptotic mechanisms, and preserving others. However, its application has been hindered by many factors including poor cellular uptake, non-specific cell targeting and undesirable interferences with other genes or gene products. A variety of strategies exist to improve cellular uptake efficiency of gene-based therapies. This paper highlights advancements in gene therapy research and its application in relation to anti-cancer treatment. PMID:22977356

  11. Genes that Confer the Identity of the Renin Cell

    PubMed Central

    Brunskill, Eric W.; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S.; Pentz, Ellen S.; Lin, Eugene; Yu, Jing; Aronow, Bruce J.; Potter, S. Steven

    2011-01-01

    Renin-expressing cells modulate BP, fluid-electrolyte homeostasis, and kidney development, but remarkably little is known regarding the genetic regulatory network that governs the identity of these cells. Here we compared the gene expression profiles of renin cells with most cells in the kidney at various stages of development as well as after a physiologic challenge known to induce the transformation of arteriolar smooth muscle cells into renin-expressing cells. At all stages, renin cells expressed a distinct set of genes characteristic of the renin phenotype, which was vastly different from other cell types in the kidney. For example, cells programmed to exhibit the renin phenotype expressed Akr1b7, and maturing cells expressed angiogenic factors necessary for the development of the kidney vasculature and RGS (regulator of G-protein signaling) genes, suggesting a potential relationship between renin cells and pericytes. Contrary to the plasticity of arteriolar smooth muscle cells upstream from the glomerulus, which can transiently acquire the embryonic phenotype in the adult under physiologic stress, the adult juxtaglomerular cell always possessed characteristics of both smooth muscle and renin cells. Taken together, these results identify the gene expression profile of renin-expressing cells at various stages of maturity, and suggest that juxtaglomerular cells maintain properties of both smooth muscle and renin-expressing cells, likely to allow the rapid control of body fluids and BP through both contractile and endocrine functions. PMID:22034642

  12. Genes that confer the identity of the renin cell.

    PubMed

    Brunskill, Eric W; Sequeira-Lopez, Maria Luisa S; Pentz, Ellen S; Lin, Eugene; Yu, Jing; Aronow, Bruce J; Potter, S Steven; Gomez, R Ariel

    2011-12-01

    Renin-expressing cells modulate BP, fluid-electrolyte homeostasis, and kidney development, but remarkably little is known regarding the genetic regulatory network that governs the identity of these cells. Here we compared the gene expression profiles of renin cells with most cells in the kidney at various stages of development as well as after a physiologic challenge known to induce the transformation of arteriolar smooth muscle cells into renin-expressing cells. At all stages, renin cells expressed a distinct set of genes characteristic of the renin phenotype, which was vastly different from other cell types in the kidney. For example, cells programmed to exhibit the renin phenotype expressed Akr1b7, and maturing cells expressed angiogenic factors necessary for the development of the kidney vasculature and RGS (regulator of G-protein signaling) genes, suggesting a potential relationship between renin cells and pericytes. Contrary to the plasticity of arteriolar smooth muscle cells upstream from the glomerulus, which can transiently acquire the embryonic phenotype in the adult under physiologic stress, the adult juxtaglomerular cell always possessed characteristics of both smooth muscle and renin cells. Taken together, these results identify the gene expression profile of renin-expressing cells at various stages of maturity, and suggest that juxtaglomerular cells maintain properties of both smooth muscle and renin-expressing cells, likely to allow the rapid control of body fluids and BP through both contractile and endocrine functions. PMID:22034642

  13. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  14. Glial cell derived neurotrophic factor induces spermatogonial stem cell marker genes in chicken mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Boozarpour, Sohrab; Matin, Maryam M; Momeni-Moghaddam, Madjid; Dehghani, Hesam; Mahdavi-Shahri, Naser; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad; Heirani-Tabasi, Asieh; Irfan-Maqsood, Muhammad; Bahrami, Ahmad Reza

    2016-06-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known with the potential of multi-lineage differentiation. Advances in differentiation technology have also resulted in the conversion of MSCs to other kinds of stem cells. MSCs are considered as a suitable source of cells for biotechnology purposes because they are abundant, easily accessible and well characterized cells. Nowadays small molecules are introduced as novel and efficient factors to differentiate stem cells. In this work, we examined the potential of glial cell derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) for differentiating chicken MSCs toward spermatogonial stem cells. MSCs were isolated and characterized from chicken and cultured under treatment with all-trans retinoic acid (RA) or glial cell derived neurotrophic factor. Expression analysis of specific genes after 7days of RA treatment, as examined by RT-PCR, proved positive for some germ cell markers such as CVH, STRA8, PLZF and some genes involved in spermatogonial stem cell maintenance like BCL6b and c-KIT. On the other hand, GDNF could additionally induce expression of POU5F1, and NANOG as well as other genes which were induced after RA treatment. These data illustrated that GDNF is relatively more effective in diverting chicken MSCs towards Spermatogonial stem cell -like cells in chickens and suggests GDNF as a new agent to obtain transgenic poultry, nevertheless, exploitability of these cells should be verified by more experiments. PMID:27026484

  15. Diverse Gene Expression in Human Regulatory T Cell Subsets Uncovers Connection between Regulatory T Cell Genes and Suppressive Function.

    PubMed

    Hua, Jing; Davis, Scott P; Hill, Jonathan A; Yamagata, Tetsuya

    2015-10-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells have a critical role in the control of immunity, and their diverse subpopulations may allow adaptation to different types of immune responses. In this study, we analyzed human Treg cell subpopulations in the peripheral blood by performing genome-wide expression profiling of 40 Treg cell subsets from healthy donors. We found that the human peripheral blood Treg cell population is comprised of five major genomic subgroups, represented by 16 tractable subsets with a particular cell surface phenotype. These subsets possess a range of suppressive function and cytokine secretion and can exert a genomic footprint on target effector T (Teff) cells. Correlation analysis of variability in gene expression in the subsets identified several cell surface molecules associated with Treg suppressive function, and pharmacological interrogation revealed a set of genes having causative effect. The five genomic subgroups of Treg cells imposed a preserved pattern of gene expression on Teff cells, with a varying degree of genes being suppressed or induced. Notably, there was a cluster of genes induced by Treg cells that bolstered an autoinhibitory effect in Teff cells, and this induction appears to be governed by a different set of genes than ones involved in counteracting Teff activation. Our work shows an example of exploiting the diversity within human Treg cell subpopulations to dissect Treg cell biology. PMID:26371251

  16. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells for gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhihong; Nör, Jacques E.

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that angiogenesis plays a critical role in the pathobiology of tumors. Recent clinical trials have shown that inhibition of angiogenesis can be an effective therapeutic strategy for patients with cancer. However, one of the outstanding issues in anti-angiogenic treatment for cancer is the development of toxicities related to off-target effects of drugs. Transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells involves the use of specific promoters for selective expression of therapeutic genes in the endothelial cells lining the blood vessels of tumors. Recently, several genes that are expressed specifically in tumor-associated endothelial cells have been identified and characterized. These discoveries have enhanced the prospectus of transcriptionaly targeting tumor endothelial cells for cancer gene therapy. In this manuscript, we review the promoters, vectors, and therapeutic genes that have been used for transcriptional targeting of tumor endothelial cells, and discuss the prospects of such approaches for cancer gene therapy. PMID:19393703

  17. Reproducible Experiment Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Likhomanenko, Tatiana; Rogozhnikov, Alex; Baranov, Alexander; Khairullin, Egor; Ustyuzhanin, Andrey

    2015-12-01

    Data analysis in fundamental sciences nowadays is an essential process that pushes frontiers of our knowledge and leads to new discoveries. At the same time we can see that complexity of those analyses increases fast due to a) enormous volumes of datasets being analyzed, b) variety of techniques and algorithms one have to check inside a single analysis, c) distributed nature of research teams that requires special communication media for knowledge and information exchange between individual researchers. There is a lot of resemblance between techniques and problems arising in the areas of industrial information retrieval and particle physics. To address those problems we propose Reproducible Experiment Platform (REP), a software infrastructure to support collaborative ecosystem for computational science. It is a Python based solution for research teams that allows running computational experiments on shared datasets, obtaining repeatable results, and consistent comparisons of the obtained results. We present some key features of REP based on case studies which include trigger optimization and physics analysis studies at the LHCb experiment.

  18. ccmGDB: a database for cancer cell metabolism genes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pora; Cheng, Feixiong; Zhao, Junfei; Zhao, Zhongming

    2016-01-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that rewiring of metabolism in cells is an important hallmark of cancer. The percentage of patients killed by metabolic disorder has been estimated to be 30% of the advanced-stage cancer patients. Thus, a systematic annotation of cancer cell metabolism genes is imperative. Here, we present ccmGDB (Cancer Cell Metabolism Gene DataBase), a comprehensive annotation database for cell metabolism genes in cancer, available at http://bioinfo.mc.vanderbilt.edu/ccmGDB. We assembled, curated, and integrated genetic, genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic, biological network and functional information for over 2000 cell metabolism genes in more than 30 cancer types. In total, we integrated over 260 000 somatic alterations including non-synonymous mutations, copy number variants and structural variants. We also integrated RNA-Seq data in various primary tumors, gene expression microarray data in over 1000 cancer cell lines and protein expression data. Furthermore, we constructed cancer or tissue type-specific, gene co-expression based protein interaction networks and drug-target interaction networks. Using these systematic annotations, the ccmGDB portal site provides 6 categories: gene summary, phenotypic information, somatic mutations, gene and protein expression, gene co-expression network and drug pharmacological information with a user-friendly interface for browsing and searching. ccmGDB is developed and maintained as a useful resource for the cancer research community. PMID:26519468

  19. T cells stimulate catabolic gene expression by the stromal cells from giant cell tumor of bone

    SciTech Connect

    Cowan, Robert W.; Ghert, Michelle; Singh, Gurmit

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two T cell lines stimulate PTHrP, RANKL, MMP13 gene expression in GCT cell cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer CD40 expressed by stromal cells; CD40L detected in whole tumor but not cultures. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of CD40L treatment on GCT cells increased PTHrP and MMP13 gene expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTHrP treatment increased MMP13 expression, while inhibition decreased expression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer T cells may stimulate GCT stromal cells and promote the osteolysis of the tumor. -- Abstract: The factors that promote the localized bone resorption by giant cell tumor of bone (GCT) are not fully understood. We investigated whether T cells could contribute to bone resorption by stimulating expression of genes for parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, and the receptor activator of nuclear-factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Two cell lines, Jurkat clone E6-1 and D1.1, were co-cultured with isolated GCT stromal cells. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated a significant increase of all three genes following 48 h incubation, and PTHrP and MMP-13 gene expression was also increased at 24 h. Further, we examined the expression of CD40 ligand (CD40L), a protein expressed by activated T cells, and its receptor, CD40, in GCT. Immunohistochemistry results revealed expression of the CD40 receptor in both the stromal cells and giant cells of the tumor. RNA collected from whole GCT tissues showed expression of CD40LG, which was absent in cultured stromal cells, and suggests that CD40L is expressed within GCT. Stimulation of GCT stromal cells with CD40L significantly increased expression of the PTHrP and MMP-13 genes. Moreover, we show that inhibition of PTHrP with neutralizing antibodies significantly decreased MMP13 expression by the stromal cells compared to IgG-matched controls, whereas stimulation with PTHrP (1-34) increased MMP-13 gene expression. These

  20. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  1. CFTR gene transfer to lung epithelium--on the trail of a target cell.

    PubMed

    O'Dea, S; Harrison, D J

    2002-05-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a lethal inherited disease that afflicts up to 1 in 2,500 people in the western world. Since 1989, when mutations in the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene were identified as responsible for the disease, intense effort has been applied to the development of replacement gene therapy strategies to cure CF. Problems with basic gene delivery techniques along with limited knowledge of the pathogenesis of CF have hindered progress so far. However, recent insights into the expression patterns and functions of CFTR in developing and adult lungs are now advancing our understanding of this disease. It is becoming apparent that progress in gene delivery to cure CF may be best served by identification of a target cell(s) around which gene transfer strategies can be specifically tailored to most closely reproduce the effects of normal CFTR expression. In fact, accurate restoration of endogenous expression patterns may be crucial, not only for disease reversal, but also to avoid potentially deleterious effects of inappropriate expression. This approach is in turn confounded however, by ill-defined stem and progenitor cell pathways within the lung epithelium. Nonetheless, studies to date suggest that these pathways are relatively plastic and may respond differently during homeostasis compared with repair following injury. It may therefore be feasible to target the lung epithelium in a non-cell specific manner and allow endogenous differentiation pathways to subsequently establish correct CFTR distribution patterns. In this review, emerging information on CFTR expression and function in developing and adult lungs is discussed in the context of putative stem cell populations and their potential for current gene delivery approaches. PMID:12109214

  2. Quantitative single-cell gene expression measurements of multiple genes in response to hypoxia treatment.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jia; Wang, Jiangxin; Gao, Weimin; Mohammadreza, Aida; Kelbauskas, Laimonas; Zhang, Weiwen; Johnson, Roger H; Meldrum, Deirdre R

    2011-07-01

    Cell-to-cell heterogeneity in gene transcription plays a central role in a variety of vital cell processes. To quantify gene expression heterogeneity patterns among cells and to determine their biological significance, methods to measure gene expression levels at the single-cell level are highly needed. We report an experimental technique based on the DNA-intercalating fluorescent dye SYBR green for quantitative expression level analysis of up to ten selected genes in single mammalian cells. The method features a two-step procedure consisting of a step to isolate RNA from a single mammalian cell, synthesize cDNA from it, and a qPCR step. We applied the method to cell populations exposed to hypoxia, quantifying expression levels of seven different genes spanning a wide dynamic range of expression in randomly picked single cells. In the experiment, 72 single Barrett's esophageal epithelial (CP-A) cells, 36 grown under normal physiological conditions (controls) and 36 exposed to hypoxia for 30 min, were randomly collected and used for measuring the expression levels of 28S rRNA, PRKAA1, GAPDH, Angptl4, MT3, PTGES, and VEGFA genes. The results demonstrate that the method is sensitive enough to measure alterations in gene expression at the single-cell level, clearly showing heterogeneity within a cell population. We present technical details of the method development and implementation, and experimental results obtained by use of the procedure. We expect the advantages of this technique will facilitate further developments and advances in the field of single-cell gene expression profiling on a nanotechnological scale, and eventually as a tool for future point-of-care medical applications. PMID:21614642

  3. Anthracycline-induced cardiac injury using a cardiac cell line: potential for gene therapy studies.

    PubMed

    L'Ecuyer, T; Horenstein, M S; Thomas, R; Vander Heide, R

    2001-11-01

    Anthracyclines are effective antitumor agents whose chief limitation has been cardiotoxicity directly related to free radical production. Therefore, strategies designed to selectively overexpress antioxidant proteins in the heart could protect against drug-induced toxicity and allow higher doses of chemotherapy. However, to date an adequate cardiac model system that is susceptible to anthracycline injury and can express foreign genes in a controlled fashion has been lacking. Developing a cardiac model system would permit examination of the relationship between the expression level of a potentially protective foreign gene and the degree of protection from injury. In this study we have examined the potential of the H9C2 rat cardiac myocyte cell line in this regard. H9C2 cells differentiate in a reproducible fashion, as shown by progressive increases in muscle tropomyosin-expressing cells, the organization of this thin filament protein, and the percentage of muscle cells contained within myotubes. Exposure of this cell line to the anthracycline doxorubicin produces cell injury as indicated by release of the intracellular enzyme lactate dehydrogenase into the culture medium. This injury is preceded by generation of reactive oxygen species, indicated by fluorescence after loading with carboxy-dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Stable transfection of H9C2 cells with a plasmid producing a tetracycline transactivator protein allows foreign genes to be expressed at a level tightly controlled by the concentration of tetracycline in the culture medium. Since H9C2 cells differentiate, can be injured by anthracycline exposure, and can express foreign genes at controllable levels, this is a suitable system in which to design genetic approaches to prevent this important clinical problem. PMID:11708868

  4. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells

    PubMed Central

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E.; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-01-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  5. Geometry of the Gene Expression Space of Individual Cells.

    PubMed

    Korem, Yael; Szekely, Pablo; Hart, Yuval; Sheftel, Hila; Hausser, Jean; Mayo, Avi; Rothenberg, Michael E; Kalisky, Tomer; Alon, Uri

    2015-07-01

    There is a revolution in the ability to analyze gene expression of single cells in a tissue. To understand this data we must comprehend how cells are distributed in a high-dimensional gene expression space. One open question is whether cell types form discrete clusters or whether gene expression forms a continuum of states. If such a continuum exists, what is its geometry? Recent theory on evolutionary trade-offs suggests that cells that need to perform multiple tasks are arranged in a polygon or polyhedron (line, triangle, tetrahedron and so on, generally called polytopes) in gene expression space, whose vertices are the expression profiles optimal for each task. Here, we analyze single-cell data from human and mouse tissues profiled using a variety of single-cell technologies. We fit the data to shapes with different numbers of vertices, compute their statistical significance, and infer their tasks. We find cases in which single cells fill out a continuum of expression states within a polyhedron. This occurs in intestinal progenitor cells, which fill out a tetrahedron in gene expression space. The four vertices of this tetrahedron are each enriched with genes for a specific task related to stemness and early differentiation. A polyhedral continuum of states is also found in spleen dendritic cells, known to perform multiple immune tasks: cells fill out a tetrahedron whose vertices correspond to key tasks related to maturation, pathogen sensing and communication with lymphocytes. A mixture of continuum-like distributions and discrete clusters is found in other cell types, including bone marrow and differentiated intestinal crypt cells. This approach can be used to understand the geometry and biological tasks of a wide range of single-cell datasets. The present results suggest that the concept of cell type may be expanded. In addition to discreet clusters in gene-expression space, we suggest a new possibility: a continuum of states within a polyhedron, in which the

  6. Analysis of variation of amplitudes in cell cycle gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Delong; Gaido, Kevin W; Wolfinger, Russ

    2005-01-01

    Background Variation in gene expression among cells in a population is often considered as noise produced from gene transcription and post-transcription processes and experimental artifacts. Most studies on noise in gene expression have emphasized a few well-characterized genes and proteins. We investigated whether different cell-arresting methods have impacts on the maximum expression levels (amplitudes) of a cell cycle related gene. Results By introducing random noise, modeled by a von Mises distribution, to the phase angle in a sinusoidal model in a cell population, we derived a relationship between amplitude and the distribution of noise in maximum transcription time (phase). We applied our analysis to Whitfield's HeLa cell cycle data. Our analysis suggests that among 47 cell cycle related genes common to the 2nd experiment (thymidine-thymidine method) and the 4th experiment (thymidine-nocodazole method): (i) the amplitudes of CDC6 and PCNA, which are expressed during G1/S phase, are smaller in the 2nd experiment than in the 4th, while the amplitude of CDC20, which is expressed during G2/M phase, is smaller in the 4th experiment; and (ii) the two cell-arresting methods had little impact on the amplitudes of the other 43 genes in the 2nd and 4th experiments. Conclusion Our analysis suggests that procedures that arrest cells in different stages of the cell cycle differentially affect expression of some cell cycle related genes once the cells are released from arrest. The impact of the cell-arresting method on expression of a cell cycle related gene can be quantitatively estimated from the ratio of two estimated amplitudes in two experiments. The ratio can be used to gauge the variation in the phase/peak expression time distribution involved in stochastic transcription and post-transcriptional processes for the gene. Further investigations are needed using normal, unperturbed and synchronized HeLa cells as a reference to compare how many cell cycle related genes

  7. Magnetic field-controlled gene expression in encapsulated cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortner, Viktoria; Kaspar, Cornelius; Halter, Christian; Töllner, Lars; Mykhaylyk, Olga; Walzer, Johann; Günzburg, Walter H.; Dangerfield, John A.; Hohenadl, Christine; Czerny, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Cell and gene therapies have an enormous range of potential applications, but as for most other therapies, dosing is a critical issue, which makes regulated gene expression a prerequisite for advanced strategies. Several inducible expression systems have been established, which mainly rely on small molecules as inducers, such as hormones or antibiotics. The application of these inducers is difficult to control and the effects on gene regulation are slow. Here we describe a novel system for induction of gene expression in encapsulated cells. This involves the modification of cells to express potential therapeutic genes under the control of a heat inducible promoter and the co-encapsulation of these cells with magnetic nanoparticles. These nanoparticles produce heat when subjected to an alternating magnetic field; the elevated temperatures in the capsules then induce gene expression. In the present study we define the parameters of such systems and provide proof-of-principle using reporter gene constructs. The fine-tuned heating of nanoparticles in the magnetic field allows regulation of gene expression from the outside over a broad range and within short time. Such a system has great potential for advancement of cell and gene therapy approaches. PMID:22197778

  8. Programmed cell death and the gene behind spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A

    1995-01-01

    A gene involved in the development of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) has been found on human chromosome 5 after a 4-year search. Named the neuronal apoptosis inhibitor protein (NAIP) gene, it is believed to inhibit the normal process of apoptosis--the disintegration of single cells that results from programmed cell death--in motor neurons. The researchers who found the NAIP gene also discovered that healthy people carry one complete copy of the gene along with many other partial copies. Many children with SMA have the partial copies but not the complete gene. This discovery facilitates the accurate genetic diagnosis of SMA. But gene therapy for SMA will not be possible until researchers find a suitable vector to stably introduce activated and intact copies of the gene into the motor neurons of children with SMA in time to stop motor neuron loss. Images p1460-a PMID:7585374

  9. Single-cell PCR profiling of gene expression in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Teles, José; Enver, Tariq; Pina, Cristina

    2014-01-01

    Single-cell analysis of gene expression offers the possibility of exploring cellular and molecular heterogeneity in stem and developmental cell systems, including cancer, to infer routes of cellular specification and their respective gene regulatory modules. PCR-based technologies, although limited to the analysis of a predefined set of genes, afford a cost-effective balance of throughput and biological information and have become a method of choice in stem cell laboratories. Here we describe an experimental and analytical protocol based on the Fluidigm microfluidics platform for the simultaneous expression analysis of 48 or 96 genes in multiples of 48 or 96 cells. We detail wet laboratory procedures and describe clustering, principal component analysis, correlation, and classification tools for the inference of cellular pathways and gene networks. PMID:25062620

  10. Identifying the genes regulated by IDH1 via gene-chip in glioma cell U87

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Jie; Lou, Meiqing; Shi, Jinlong; Xue, Yajun; Cui, Daming

    2015-01-01

    Glioma is the most common form of primary brain tumor. Increasing evidence show that IDH1 gene mutation is implicated in glioma. However, the mechanism involved in the progression of glioma remains unclear until now. In the study reported here, we used gene chip to identifying the genes regulated with IDH mutanted at R132. The results showed that IDH1-mutant leads to 1255 up-regulated genes and 1862 down-regulated genes in U87 cell lines. Meanwhile, GO and gene-network was performed and shown IDH1-mutant mainly affect small molecule metabolic process, mitotic cell cycle and apoptosis. This result will lay a foundation for further study of IDH1 gene function in the future. PMID:26770405

  11. Cell Pluripotency Levels Associated with Imprinted Genes in Human

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Liyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Binyan; Ding, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are exhibited similarly in the morphology, gene expression, growth properties, and epigenetic modification with embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, it is still controversial that the pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is much inferior to ESC, and the differentiation capacity of iPSC and ESC can also be separated by transcriptome and epigenetics. miRNAs, which act in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in many basic cellular processes, may reveal the answer. In this paper, we focused on identifying the hidden relationship between miRNAs and imprinted genes in cell pluripotency. Total miRNA expression patterns in iPSC and ES cells were comprehensively analysed and linked with human imprinted genes, which show a global picture of their potential function in pluripotent level. A new CPA4-KLF14 region which locates in chromosomal homologous segments (CHSs) within mammals and include both imprinted genes and significantly expressed miRNAs was first identified. Molecular network analysis showed genes interacted with imprinted genes closely and enriched in modules such as cancer, cell death and survival, and tumor morphology. This imprinted region may provide a new look for those who are interested in cell pluripotency of hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26504487

  12. Cell Pluripotency Levels Associated with Imprinted Genes in Human.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Liyun; Tang, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Binyan; Ding, Guohui

    2015-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells are exhibited similarly in the morphology, gene expression, growth properties, and epigenetic modification with embryonic stem cells (ESCs). However, it is still controversial that the pluripotency of induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) is much inferior to ESC, and the differentiation capacity of iPSC and ESC can also be separated by transcriptome and epigenetics. miRNAs, which act in posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression and are involved in many basic cellular processes, may reveal the answer. In this paper, we focused on identifying the hidden relationship between miRNAs and imprinted genes in cell pluripotency. Total miRNA expression patterns in iPSC and ES cells were comprehensively analysed and linked with human imprinted genes, which show a global picture of their potential function in pluripotent level. A new CPA4-KLF14 region which locates in chromosomal homologous segments (CHSs) within mammals and include both imprinted genes and significantly expressed miRNAs was first identified. Molecular network analysis showed genes interacted with imprinted genes closely and enriched in modules such as cancer, cell death and survival, and tumor morphology. This imprinted region may provide a new look for those who are interested in cell pluripotency of hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26504487

  13. Gene Expression in Mammalian Cells After Exposure to 95 MeV Argon Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arenz, A.; Hellweg, C. E.; Baumstark-Khan, C.

    Cell response to genotoxic agents is complex and involves the participation of different classes of genes (DNA repair, cell cycle control, signal transduction, apoptosis and oncogenesis). The unique feature of the space radiation environment is the dominance of high-energy charged particles (HZE or high LET radiation) which present a significant hazard to space flight crews, and accelerator-based experiments are underway to quantify the health risks due to unavoidable radiation exposure. High linear energy transfer (LET) radiation has an increased relative biological effectiveness (RBE) as compared to X-rays for cell death induction, gene mutation, genomic instability, and carcinogenesis. The tumour suppressor gene p53 plays a crucial role in maintaining the integrity of the genome. The p53 protein acts as a transcription factor that mediates cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by binding to DNA and activating transcription of specific genes. It is also though to be involved in damage repair by transcriptional activation of the newly identified p53 dependent ribonuclease subunit R2 (p53R2) that is directly involved in the p53 cell cycle checkpoint for repair of damaged DNA. In that case it is responsible for nucleotide delivery for DNA repair synthesis. DNA damages of cultured human cells (e.g. MCF-7, AGS, A549) exposed to accelerated argon ions at the French heavy ion facility GANIL were analysed for expression levels of certain damage- and apoptosis-relevant genes. RNA was extracted from cells exposed to different particle fluences after various recovery times. A real-time QRT-PCR assay was applied, which employs both relative and absolute quantification of a candidate mRNA biomarker. The expressions of different DNA damage inducible genes (e.g. p53R2, GADD45, p21) were analysed. A reproducible up-regulation representing a twofold to fourfold change in p53R2 gene expression level was confirmed for X-irradiated and Ar-ion exposed cells dependent on dose. Kinetics of p

  14. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-12-22

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the "germ-line multipotency program" and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells. PMID:26644562

  15. The ancestral gene repertoire of animal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Alié, Alexandre; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Sugimura, Itsuro; Manuel, Michaël; Sugano, Wakana; Mano, Akira; Satoh, Nori; Agata, Kiyokazu; Funayama, Noriko

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are pivotal for development and tissue homeostasis of multicellular animals, and the quest for a gene toolkit associated with the emergence of stem cells in a common ancestor of all metazoans remains a major challenge for evolutionary biology. We reconstructed the conserved gene repertoire of animal stem cells by transcriptomic profiling of totipotent archeocytes in the demosponge Ephydatia fluviatilis and by tracing shared molecular signatures with flatworm and Hydra stem cells. Phylostratigraphy analyses indicated that most of these stem-cell genes predate animal origin, with only few metazoan innovations, notably including several partners of the Piwi machinery known to promote genome stability. The ancestral stem-cell transcriptome is strikingly poor in transcription factors. Instead, it is rich in RNA regulatory actors, including components of the “germ-line multipotency program” and many RNA-binding proteins known as critical regulators of mammalian embryonic stem cells. PMID:26644562

  16. An Arabidopsis Gene Regulatory Network for Secondary Cell Wall Synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Taylor-Teeples, M; Lin, L; de Lucas, M; Turco, G; Toal, TW; Gaudinier, A; Young, NF; Trabucco, GM; Veling, MT; Lamothe, R; Handakumbura, PP; Xiong, G; Wang, C; Corwin, J; Tsoukalas, A; Zhang, L; Ware, D; Pauly, M; Kliebenstein, DJ; Dehesh, K; Tagkopoulos, I; Breton, G; Pruneda-Paz, JL; Ahnert, SE; Kay, SA; Hazen, SP; Brady, SM

    2014-01-01

    Summary The plant cell wall is an important factor for determining cell shape, function and response to the environment. Secondary cell walls, such as those found in xylem, are composed of cellulose, hemicelluloses and lignin and account for the bulk of plant biomass. The coordination between transcriptional regulation of synthesis for each polymer is complex and vital to cell function. A regulatory hierarchy of developmental switches has been proposed, although the full complement of regulators remains unknown. Here, we present a protein-DNA network between Arabidopsis transcription factors and secondary cell wall metabolic genes with gene expression regulated by a series of feed-forward loops. This model allowed us to develop and validate new hypotheses about secondary wall gene regulation under abiotic stress. Distinct stresses are able to perturb targeted genes to potentially promote functional adaptation. These interactions will serve as a foundation for understanding the regulation of a complex, integral plant component. PMID:25533953

  17. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data.

    PubMed

    Ezer, Daphne; Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-08-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  18. Determining Physical Mechanisms of Gene Expression Regulation from Single Cell Gene Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Moignard, Victoria; Göttgens, Berthold; Adryan, Boris

    2016-01-01

    Many genes are expressed in bursts, which can contribute to cell-to-cell heterogeneity. It is now possible to measure this heterogeneity with high throughput single cell gene expression assays (single cell qPCR and RNA-seq). These experimental approaches generate gene expression distributions which can be used to estimate the kinetic parameters of gene expression bursting, namely the rate that genes turn on, the rate that genes turn off, and the rate of transcription. We construct a complete pipeline for the analysis of single cell qPCR data that uses the mathematics behind bursty expression to develop more accurate and robust algorithms for analyzing the origin of heterogeneity in experimental samples, specifically an algorithm for clustering cells by their bursting behavior (Simulated Annealing for Bursty Expression Clustering, SABEC) and a statistical tool for comparing the kinetic parameters of bursty expression across populations of cells (Estimation of Parameter changes in Kinetics, EPiK). We applied these methods to hematopoiesis, including a new single cell dataset in which transcription factors (TFs) involved in the earliest branchpoint of blood differentiation were individually up- and down-regulated. We could identify two unique sub-populations within a seemingly homogenous group of hematopoietic stem cells. In addition, we could predict regulatory mechanisms controlling the expression levels of eighteen key hematopoietic transcription factors throughout differentiation. Detailed information about gene regulatory mechanisms can therefore be obtained simply from high throughput single cell gene expression data, which should be widely applicable given the rapid expansion of single cell genomics. PMID:27551778

  19. Cell-by-Cell Dissection of Gene Expression and Chromosomal Interactions Reveals Consequences of Nuclear Reorganization

    PubMed Central

    2005-01-01

    The functional consequences of long-range nuclear reorganization were studied in a cell-by-cell analysis of gene expression and long-range chromosomal interactions in the Drosophila eye and eye imaginal disk. Position-effect variegation was used to stochastically perturb gene expression and probe nuclear reorganization. Variegating genes on rearrangements of Chromosomes X, 2, and 3 were probed for long-range interactions with heterochromatin. Studies were conducted only in tissues known to express the variegating genes. Nuclear structure was revealed by fluorescence in situ hybridization with probes to the variegating gene and heterochromatin. Gene expression was determined alternately by immunofluorescence against specific proteins and by eye pigment autofluorescence. This allowed cell-by-cell comparisons of nuclear architecture between cells in which the variegating gene was either expressed or silenced. Very strong correlations between heterochromatic association and silencing were found. Expressing cells showed a broad distribution of distances between variegating genes and their own centromeric heterochromatin, while silenced cells showed a very tight distribution centered around very short distances, consistent with interaction between the silenced genes and heterochromatin. Spatial and temporal analysis of interactions with heterochromatin indicated that variegating genes primarily associate with heterochromatin in cells that have exited the cell cycle. Differentiation was not a requirement for association, and no differences in association were observed between cell types. Thus, long-range interactions between distal chromosome regions and their own heterochromatin have functional consequences for the organism. PMID:15737020

  20. Gene-modified hematopoietic stem cells for cancer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Sarah; De Oliveira, Satiro N

    2014-01-01

    The rapid expansion of available cancer immunotherapies has resulted in favorable early outcomes. Specifically the use of gene therapy to introduce chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) and T cell receptors (TCRs) in T cells creates new immunotherapy options for patients. While showing early success with these approaches, limitations remain that can be overcome by the use of modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) to express CARs and TCRs. With modern gene therapy technologies, increased safety and control of the modification of the HSCs can be achieved through the use of a suicide gene. PMID:24398603

  1. ALDH isozymes downregulation affects cell growth, cell motility and gene expression in lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Moreb, Jan S; Baker, Henry V; Chang, Lung-Ji; Amaya, Maria; Lopez, M Cecilia; Ostmark, Blanca; Chou, Wayne

    2008-01-01

    Background Aldehyde dehydrogenase isozymes ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 are highly expressed in non small cell lung cancer. Neither the mechanisms nor the biologic significance for such over expression have been studied. Methods We have employed oligonucleotide microarrays to analyze changes in gene profiles in A549 lung cancer cell line in which ALDH activity was reduced by up to 95% using lentiviral mediated expression of siRNA against both isozymes (Lenti 1+3). Stringent analysis methods were used to identify gene expression patterns that are specific to the knock down of ALDH activity and significantly different in comparison to wild type A549 cells (WT) or cells similarly transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP) siRNA. Results We confirmed significant and specific down regulation of ALDH1A1 and ALDH3A1 in Lenti 1+3 cells and in comparison to 12 other ALDH genes detected. The results of the microarray analysis were validated by real time RT-PCR on RNA obtained from Lenti 1+3 or WT cells treated with ALDH activity inhibitors. Detailed functional analysis was performed on 101 genes that were significantly different (P < 0.001) and their expression changed by ≥ 2 folds in the Lenti 1+3 group versus the control groups. There were 75 down regulated and 26 up regulated genes. Protein binding, organ development, signal transduction, transcription, lipid metabolism, and cell migration and adhesion were among the most affected pathways. Conclusion These molecular effects of the ALDH knock-down are associated with in vitro functional changes in the proliferation and motility of these cells and demonstrate the significance of ALDH enzymes in cell homeostasis with a potentially significant impact on the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:19025616

  2. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-03-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically `leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs.

  3. Role of Hox genes in stem cell differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Seifert, Anne; Werheid, David F; Knapp, Silvana M; Tobiasch, Edda

    2015-01-01

    Hox genes are an evolutionary highly conserved gene family. They determine the anterior-posterior body axis in bilateral organisms and influence the developmental fate of cells. Embryonic stem cells are usually devoid of any Hox gene expression, but these transcription factors are activated in varying spatial and temporal patterns defining the development of various body regions. In the adult body, Hox genes are among others responsible for driving the differentiation of tissue stem cells towards their respective lineages in order to repair and maintain the correct function of tissues and organs. Due to their involvement in the embryonic and adult body, they have been suggested to be useable for improving stem cell differentiations in vitro and in vivo. In many studies Hox genes have been found as driving factors in stem cell differentiation towards adipogenesis, in lineages involved in bone and joint formation, mainly chondrogenesis and osteogenesis, in cardiovascular lineages including endothelial and smooth muscle cell differentiations, and in neurogenesis. As life expectancy is rising, the demand for tissue reconstruction continues to increase. Stem cells have become an increasingly popular choice for creating therapies in regenerative medicine due to their self-renewal and differentiation potential. Especially mesenchymal stem cells are used more and more frequently due to their easy handling and accessibility, combined with a low tumorgenicity and little ethical concerns. This review therefore intends to summarize to date known correlations between natural Hox gene expression patterns in body tissues and during the differentiation of various stem cells towards their respective lineages with a major focus on mesenchymal stem cell differentiations. This overview shall help to understand the complex interactions of Hox genes and differentiation processes all over the body as well as in vitro for further improvement of stem cell treatments in future regenerative

  4. Crucial Genes and Pathways in Chicken Germ Stem Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhentao; Elsayed, Ahmed Kamel; Shi, Qingqing; Zhang, Yani; Zuo, Qisheng; Li, Dong; Lian, Chao; Tang, Beibei; Xiao, Tianrong; Xu, Qi; Chang, Guobin; Chen, Guohong; Zhang, Lei; Wang, Kehua; Wang, Yingjie; Jin, Kai; Wang, Yilin; Song, Jiuzhou; Cui, Hengmi; Li, Bichun

    2015-01-01

    Male germ cell differentiation is a subtle and complex regulatory process. Currently, its regulatory mechanism is still not fully understood. In our experiment, we performed the first comprehensive genome and transcriptome-wide analyses of the crucial genes and signaling pathways in three kinds of crucial cells (embryonic stem cells, primordial germ cell, and spermatogonial stem cells) that are associated with the male germ cell differentiation. We identified thousands of differentially expressed genes in this process, and from these we chose 173 candidate genes, of which 98 genes were involved in cell differentiation, 19 were involved in the metabolic process, and 56 were involved in the differentiation and metabolic processes, like GAL9, AMH, PLK1, and PSMD7 and so on. In addition, we found that 18 key signaling pathways were involved mainly in cell proliferation, differentiation, and signal transduction processes like TGF-β, Notch, and Jak-STAT. Further exploration found that the candidate gene expression patterns were the same between in vitro induction experiments and transcriptome results. Our results yield clues to the mechanistic basis of male germ cell differentiation and provide an important reference for further studies. PMID:25847247

  5. Pancreatic beta cells express a diverse set of homeobox genes.

    PubMed Central

    Rudnick, A; Ling, T Y; Odagiri, H; Rutter, W J; German, M S

    1994-01-01

    Homeobox genes, which are found in all eukaryotic organisms, encode transcriptional regulators involved in cell-type differentiation and development. Several homeobox genes encoding homeodomain proteins that bind and activate the insulin gene promoter have been described. In an attempt to identify additional beta-cell homeodomain proteins, we designed primers based on the sequences of beta-cell homeobox genes cdx3 and lmx1 and the Drosophila homeodomain protein Antennapedia and used these primers to amplify inserts by PCR from an insulinoma cDNA library. The resulting amplification products include sequences encoding 10 distinct homeodomain proteins; 3 of these proteins have not been described previously. In addition, an insert was obtained encoding a splice variant of engrailed-2, a homeodomain protein previously identified in the central nervous system. Northern analysis revealed a distinct pattern of expression for each homeobox gene. Interestingly, the PCR-derived clones do not represent a complete sampling of the beta-cell library because no inserts encoding cdx3 or lmx1 protein were obtained. Beta cells probably express additional homeobox genes. The abundance and diversity of homeodomain proteins found in beta cells illustrate the remarkable complexity and redundancy of the machinery controlling beta-cell development and differentiation. Images PMID:7991607

  6. Using injectoporation to deliver genes to mechanosensory hair cells

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Wei; Wagner, Thomas; Yan, Linxuan; Grillet, Nicolas; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Mechanosensation, the transduction of mechanical force into electrochemical signals, allows organisms to detect touch and sound, to register movement and gravity, and to sense changes in cell volume and shape. the hair cells of the mammalian inner ear are the mechanosensors for the detection of sound and head movement. the analysis of gene function in hair cells has been hampered by the lack of an efficient gene transfer method. Here we describe a method termed injectoporation that combines tissue microinjection with electroporation to express cDNAs and shRNAs in mouse cochlear hair cells. Injectoporation allows for gene transfer into dozens of hair cells, and it is compatible with the analysis of hair cell function using imaging approaches and electrophysiology. Tissue dissection and injectoporation can be carried out within a few hours, and the tissue can be cultured for days for subsequent functional analyses. PMID:25232939

  7. An Exercise to Estimate Differential Gene Expression in Human Cells

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chaudhry, M. Ahmad

    2006-01-01

    The expression of genes in cells of various tissue types varies considerably and is correlated with the function of a particular organ. The pattern of gene expression changes in diseased tissues, in response to therapy or infection and exposure to environmental mutagens, chemicals, ultraviolet light, and ionizing radiation. To better understand…

  8. Reproducibility in a multiprocessor system

    DOEpatents

    Bellofatto, Ralph A; Chen, Dong; Coteus, Paul W; Eisley, Noel A; Gara, Alan; Gooding, Thomas M; Haring, Rudolf A; Heidelberger, Philip; Kopcsay, Gerard V; Liebsch, Thomas A; Ohmacht, Martin; Reed, Don D; Senger, Robert M; Steinmacher-Burow, Burkhard; Sugawara, Yutaka

    2013-11-26

    Fixing a problem is usually greatly aided if the problem is reproducible. To ensure reproducibility of a multiprocessor system, the following aspects are proposed; a deterministic system start state, a single system clock, phase alignment of clocks in the system, system-wide synchronization events, reproducible execution of system components, deterministic chip interfaces, zero-impact communication with the system, precise stop of the system and a scan of the system state.

  9. Cesium-containing triple cation perovskite solar cells: improved stability, reproducibility and high efficiency† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5ee03874j Click here for additional data file.

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Taisuke; Seo, Ji-Youn; Domanski, Konrad; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Zakeeruddin, Shaik M.; Tress, Wolfgang; Abate, Antonio; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Today's best perovskite solar cells use a mixture of formamidinium and methylammonium as the monovalent cations. With the addition of inorganic cesium, the resulting triple cation perovskite compositions are thermally more stable, contain less phase impurities and are less sensitive to processing conditions. This enables more reproducible device performances to reach a stabilized power output of 21.1% and ∼18% after 250 hours under operational conditions. These properties are key for the industrialization of perovskite photovoltaics. PMID:27478500

  10. All-optical regulation of gene expression in targeted cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yisen; He, Hao; Li, Shiyang; Liu, Dayong; Lan, Bei; Hu, Minglie; Cao, Youjia; Wang, Chingyue

    2014-06-01

    Controllable gene expression is always a challenge and of great significance to biomedical research and clinical applications. Recently, various approaches based on extra-engineered light-sensitive proteins have been developed to provide optogenetic actuators for gene expression. Complicated biomedical techniques including exogenous genes engineering, transfection, and material delivery are needed. Here we present an all-optical method to regulate gene expression in targeted cells. Intrinsic or exogenous genes can be activated by a Ca2+-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) driven by a short flash of femtosecond-laser irradiation. When applied to mesenchymal stem cells, expression of a differentiation regulator Osterix can be activated by this method to potentially induce differentiation of them. A laser-induced ``Ca2+-comb'' (LiCCo) by multi-time laser exposure is further developed to enhance gene expression efficiency. This noninvasive method hence provides an encouraging advance of gene expression regulation, with promising potential of applying in cell biology and stem-cell science.

  11. Killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor gene association with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Pydi, Satya Sudheer; Sunder, Sharada Ramaseri; Venkatasubramanian, Sambasivan; Kovvali, Srinivas; Jonnalagada, Subbanna; Valluri, Vijaya Lakshmi

    2013-01-01

    NK cells are vital components of innate immune system and are the first cells which come into picture mediating resistance against intracellular pathogens. NK cell cytotoxicity is modulated by a wide variety of cell surface receptors that recognize and respond towards infected cells. Activation of NK cells are controlled by both inhibitory and activating receptors, encoded by KIR genes and bind to HLA ligands. Not much is known about KIR genes and their influence on the pathogenesis with M. tuberculosis infection. Our study aimed at detecting the presence of 14 KIR genes, their distribution and their association with tuberculosis. Total 77 different genotype combinations were observed which belonged to B-haplotype. Fifteen genotypes were similar to those reported in other world populations while remaining 62 were unique to this study group. Inhibitory genes KIR3DL1, KIR2DL3 and activating genes KIR2DS1, KIR2DS5 conferred susceptibility towards TB either individually or in haplotype combinations. The complimentary MHC ligands need to be tested for the functional relevance of the associated genes. PMID:23073291

  12. Cloned Hemoglobin Genes Enhance Growth Of Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khosla, Chaitan; Bailey, James E.

    1991-01-01

    Experiments show that portable deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) sequences incorporated into host cells make them produce hemoglobins - oxygen-binding proteins essential to function of red blood cells. Method useful in several biotechnological applications. One, enhancement of growth of cells at higher densities. Another, production of hemoglobin to enhance supplies of oxygen in cells, for use in chemical reactions requiring oxygen, as additive to serum to increase transport of oxygen, and for binding and separating oxygen from mixtures of gases.

  13. Analytical validation and interobserver reproducibility of EnzMet GenePro: a second-generation bright-field metallography assay for concomitant detection of HER2 gene status and protein expression in invasive carcinoma of the breast.

    PubMed

    Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Pettay, James; Hicks, David; Skacel, Marek; Yoder, Brian; Rybicki, Lisa; Myles, Jonathan; Sreenan, Joseph; Roche, Patrick; Powell, Richard; Hainfeld, James; Grogan, Thomas; Tubbs, Raymond

    2005-11-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) has both excellent sensitivity and specificity in detecting HER2 gene amplification in invasive breast carcinoma. FISH has not been widely implemented in clinical practice because of reagent costs and the special instrumentation and expertise required to perform and integrate the assay. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) for HER2 protein is widely used, but false-positive and false-negative results are problematic. We developed a bright-field assay to visualize HER2 gene amplification and concomitant HER2 protein expression (EnzMet GenePro). This assay detects HER2 gene amplification via deposition of metallic silver by enzyme metallographytrade mark (EnzMettrade mark, Nanoprobes, Yaphank, NY) combined with HER2 protein detection by IHC using alkaline phosphatase and fast red K substrate visualization (CB11;Ventana, Tucson, AZ). The assay was performed on 94 invasive breast carcinomas, for which FISH (PathVysiontrade mark, Vysis, Downer's Grove, IL), conventional IHC (CB11), and enzyme metallography (EnzMettrade mark) results were known. The EnzMettrade mark component of the assay was scored as either HER2 gene amplified, polysomic, or nonamplified. The IHC component was scored using the conventional FDA scale of 0 to 3+. Concordance of the EnzMet component of the assay versus FISH was assessed and showed an excellent correlation (Pearson coefficient of 0.95; P < 0.001). The combination of gene and protein detection (EnzMet GenePro) displayed a specificity of 100% and an accuracy of 92.6% (95% confidence interval 85.3-97.0), facilitated recognition of gene/protein discordances, and allowed for efficient interpretation of the slide by conventional light microscopy. The interobserver kappa for each component was excellent (IHC, kappa = 0.94; and EnzMettrade mark, kappa = 0.96). EnzMet is the first bright-field ISH assay in our experience that routinely and nonambiguously detects endogenous HER2 signals, essential for a reliable

  14. Regulation of Cell and Gene Therapy Medicinal Products in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Chu; Wang, Po-Yu; Tsai, Shih-Chih; Lin, Chien-Liang; Tai, Hsuen-Yung; Lo, Chi-Fang; Wu, Shiow-Ing; Chiang, Yu-Mei; Liu, Li-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the rapid and mature development of emerging biotechnology in the fields of cell culture, cell preservation, and recombinant DNA technology, more and more cell or gene medicinal therapy products have been approved for marketing, to treat serious diseases which have been challenging to treat with current medical practice or medicine. This chapter will briefly introduce the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) and elaborate regulation of cell and gene therapy medicinal products in Taiwan, including regulatory history evolution, current regulatory framework, application and review procedures, and relevant jurisdictional issues. Under the promise of quality, safety, and efficacy of medicinal products, it is expected the regulation and environment will be more flexible, streamlining the process of the marketing approval of new emerging cell or gene therapy medicinal products and providing diverse treatment options for physicians and patients. PMID:26374219

  15. Cell and gene therapy in Australia.

    PubMed

    Martiniello-Wilks, R; Rasko, J E J

    2007-01-01

    The expansion of human cells to produce cell therapeutic products for the treatment of disease is, with few exceptions, an experimental therapy. Because cell therapies involve a biological product, often with some genetic or other modification, they require extensive pre-clinical research and development. Cell therapy production processes and premises require licensing by the Therapeutic Goods Administration. In this review, timed to coincide with the international meetings of the ISCT and ISSCR in Australia, we describe some promising cell therapies currently under development. PMID:17464751

  16. Engineering Synthetic Gene Circuits in Living Cells with CRISPR Technology.

    PubMed

    Jusiak, Barbara; Cleto, Sara; Perez-Piñera, Pablo; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-01

    One of the goals of synthetic biology is to build regulatory circuits that control cell behavior, for both basic research purposes and biomedical applications. The ability to build transcriptional regulatory devices depends on the availability of programmable, sequence-specific, and effective synthetic transcription factors (TFs). The prokaryotic clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system, recently harnessed for transcriptional regulation in various heterologous host cells, offers unprecedented ease in designing synthetic TFs. We review how CRISPR can be used to build synthetic gene circuits and discuss recent advances in CRISPR-mediated gene regulation that offer the potential to build increasingly complex, programmable, and efficient gene circuits in the future. PMID:26809780

  17. Screening for the Most Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Equine Milk Somatic Cells.

    PubMed

    Cieslak, Jakub; Mackowski, Mariusz; Czyzak-Runowska, Grazyna; Wojtowski, Jacek; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Pawlak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the well-known role of somatic cell count as a parameter reflecting the inflammatory status of the mammary gland, the composition of cells isolated from milk is considered as a valuable material for gene expression studies in mammals. Due to its unique composition, in recent years an increasing interest in mare's milk consumption has been observed. Thus, investigating the genetic background of horse's milk variability presents and interesting study model. Relying on 39 milk samples collected from mares representing three breeds (Polish Primitive Horse, Polish Cold-blooded Horse, Polish Warmblood Horse) we aimed to investigate the utility of equine milk somatic cells as a source of mRNA and to screen the best reference genes for RT-qPCR using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The results showed that despite relatively low somatic cell counts in mare's milk, the amount and the quality of the extracted RNA are sufficient for gene expression studies. The analysis of the utility of 7 potential reference genes for RT-qPCR experiments for the normalization of equine milk somatic cells revealed some differences between the outcomes of the applied algorithms, although in both cases the KRT8 and TOP2B genes were pointed as the most stable. Analysis by geNorm showed that the combination of 4 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, TOP2B and KRT8) is required for apropriate RT-qPCR experiments normalization, whereas NormFinder algorithm pointed the combination of KRT8 and RPS9 genes as the most suitable. The trial study of the relative transcript abundance of the beta-casein gene with the use of various types and numbers of internal control genes confirmed once again that the selection of proper reference gene combinations is crucial for the final results of each real-time PCR experiment. PMID:26437076

  18. Screening for the Most Suitable Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies in Equine Milk Somatic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cieslak, Jakub; Mackowski, Mariusz; Czyzak-Runowska, Grazyna; Wojtowski, Jacek; Puppel, Kamila; Kuczynska, Beata; Pawlak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Apart from the well-known role of somatic cell count as a parameter reflecting the inflammatory status of the mammary gland, the composition of cells isolated from milk is considered as a valuable material for gene expression studies in mammals. Due to its unique composition, in recent years an increasing interest in mare's milk consumption has been observed. Thus, investigating the genetic background of horse’s milk variability presents and interesting study model. Relying on 39 milk samples collected from mares representing three breeds (Polish Primitive Horse, Polish Cold-blooded Horse, Polish Warmblood Horse) we aimed to investigate the utility of equine milk somatic cells as a source of mRNA and to screen the best reference genes for RT-qPCR using geNorm and NormFinder algorithms. The results showed that despite relatively low somatic cell counts in mare's milk, the amount and the quality of the extracted RNA are sufficient for gene expression studies. The analysis of the utility of 7 potential reference genes for RT-qPCR experiments for the normalization of equine milk somatic cells revealed some differences between the outcomes of the applied algorithms, although in both cases the KRT8 and TOP2B genes were pointed as the most stable. Analysis by geNorm showed that the combination of 4 reference genes (ACTB, GAPDH, TOP2B and KRT8) is required for apropriate RT-qPCR experiments normalization, whereas NormFinder algorithm pointed the combination of KRT8 and RPS9 genes as the most suitable. The trial study of the relative transcript abundance of the beta-casein gene with the use of various types and numbers of internal control genes confirmed once again that the selection of proper reference gene combinations is crucial for the final results of each real-time PCR experiment. PMID:26437076

  19. Stem Cell Based Gene Therapy in Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hong Jun; Song, Yun Seob

    2014-01-01

    Current prostate cancer treatment, especially hormone refractory cancer, may create profound iatrogenic outcomes because of the adverse effects of cytotoxic agents. Suicide gene therapy has been investigated for the substitute modality for current chemotherapy because it enables the treatment targeting the cancer cells. However the classic suicide gene therapy has several profound side effects, including immune-compromised due to viral vector. Recently, stem cells have been regarded as a new upgraded cellular vehicle or vector because of its homing effects. Suicide gene therapy using genetically engineered mesenchymal stem cells or neural stem cells has the advantage of being safe, because prodrug administration not only eliminates tumor cells but consequently kills the more resistant therapeutic stem cells as well. The attractiveness of prodrug cancer gene therapy by stem cells targeted to tumors lies in activating the prodrug directly within the tumor mass, thus avoiding systemic toxicity. Therapeutic achievements using stem cells in prostate cancer include the cytosine deaminase/5-fluorocytosine prodrug system, herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase/ganciclovir, carboxyl esterase/CPT11, and interferon-beta. The aim of this study is to review the stem cell therapy in prostate cancer including its proven mechanisms and also limitations. PMID:25121103

  20. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer's disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  1. Regulation of global gene expression and cell proliferation by APP

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yili; Zhang, Si; Xu, Qin; Zou, Haiyan; Zhou, Weihui; Cai, Fang; Li, Tingyu; Song, Weihong

    2016-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS), caused by trisomy of chromosome 21, is one of the most common genetic disorders. Patients with DS display growth retardation and inevitably develop characteristic Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology, including neurofibrillary tangles and neuritic plaques. The expression of amyloid precursor protein (APP) is increased in both DS and AD patients. To reveal the function of APP and elucidate the pathogenic role of increased APP expression in DS and AD, we performed gene expression profiling using microarray method in human cells overexpressing APP. A set of genes are significantly altered, which are involved in cell cycle, cell proliferation and p53 signaling. We found that overexpression of APP inhibits cell proliferation. Furthermore, we confirmed that the downregulation of two validated genes, PSMA5 and PSMB7, inhibits cell proliferation, suggesting that the downregulation of PSMA5 and PSMB7 is involved in APP-induced cell proliferation impairment. Taken together, this study suggests that APP regulates global gene expression and increased APP expression inhibits cell proliferation. Our study provides a novel insight that APP overexpression may contribute to the growth impairment in DS patients and promote AD pathogenesis by inhibiting cell proliferation including neural stem cell proliferation and neurogenesis. PMID:26936520

  2. Mouse T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    All mouse T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} variable (Tcra/d-, b-, and g-V) gene segments were aligned to compare the sequences with one another, to group them into subfamilies, and to derive a name which complies with the standard nomenclature. it was necessary to change the names of some V gene segments because they conflicted with those of other segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was re-evaluated using a much larger pool of sequences. In the mouse, most V gene segments can be grouped into subfamilies of closely related genes with significantly less similarity between different subfamilies. 118 refs., 11 figs., 4 tabs.

  3. Neural Stem Cell Gene Therapy Ameliorates Pathology and Function in a Mouse Model of Globoid Cell Leukodystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Neri, Margherita; Ricca, Alessandra; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Alcala'-Franco, Beatriz; Cavazzin, Chiara; Orlacchio, Aldo; Martino, Sabata; Naldini, Luigi; Gritti, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Murine neural stem cells (mNSCs), either naive or genetically modified to express supranormal levels of β-galactocerebrosidase (GALC), were transplanted into the brain of Twitcher mice, a murine model of globoid cell leukodystrophy, a severe sphingolipidosis. Cells engrafted long-term into the host cytoarchitecture, producing functional GALC. Levels of enzyme activity in brain and spinal cord tissues were enhanced when GALC-overexpressing NSC were used. Enzymatic correction correlated with reduced tissue storage, decreased activation of astroglia and microglia, delayed onset of symptoms, and longer lifespan. Mechanisms underlying the therapeutic effect of mNSC included widespread enzyme distribution, cross-correction of host cells, anti-inflammatory activity, and neuroprotection. Similar cell engraftment and metabolic correction were reproduced using human NSC. Thus, NSC gene therapy rapidly reconstitutes sustained and long-lasting enzyme activity in central nervous system tissues. Combining this approach with treatments targeting the systemic disease associated with leukodystrophies may provide significant therapeutic benefit. Stem Cells 2011;29:1559–1571 PMID:21809420

  4. Probing cell-free gene expression noise in femtoliter volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Karig, David K; Jung, Seung-Yong; Srijanto, Bernadeta R; Collier, Pat; Simpson, Michael L

    2013-01-01

    Cell-free systems offer a simplified and flexible context that enables important biological reactions while removing complicating factors such as fitness, division, and mutation that are associated with living cells. However, cell-free expression in unconfined spaces is missing important elements of expression in living cells. In particular, the small volume of living cells can give rise to significant stochastic effects, which are negligible in bulk cell-free reactions. Here, we confine cell-free gene expression reactions to cell relevant 20 fL volumes (between the volumes of E. coli and S. cerevisiae), in polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) containers. We demonstrate that expression efficiency varies widely at this volume, and we analyze gene expression noise. Noise analysis reveals signatures of translational bursting while noise dynamics suggest that overall cell-free expression is limited by a diminishing translation rate. In addition to offering a unique approach to understanding noise in gene circuits, our work contributes to a deeper understanding of the biophysical properties of cell-free expression systems, thus aiding efforts to harness cell-free systems for synthetic biology applications.

  5. Novel approaches and mechanisms in hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bigger, Brian W; Wynn, Robert F

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy is one of the most exciting clinical tools to emerge from the gene therapy stable. This technology combines the expansion capability of hematopoietic stem cells, capable of replacing the entire blood and immune system of an individual, with the capacity for long-term replacement of one or more gene copies using integrating gene therapy vectors. Hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits significantly from the pre-existing experience of standard blood and marrow transplantation, whilst at the same time having the capacity to deliver a safer and more effective therapy to a wider range of diseases. In this review we summarize the potential of hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy to expand the scope of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, including the evolution of vector delivery systems and the success and failures of current clinical experience with this treatment. In particular we deal with the incidence of vector mediated transformation in patients and the steps that have been taken to minimize this risk. Finally we discuss the innovations in preclinical development that are likely to drive the future of this field, including the expansion to many more genetic diseases, particularly those affecting the brain. PMID:24759625

  6. Stem cell and neurogenic gene-expression profiles link prostate basal cells to aggressive prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dingxiao; Park, Daechan; Zhong, Yi; Lu, Yue; Rycaj, Kiera; Gong, Shuai; Chen, Xin; Liu, Xin; Chao, Hsueh-Ping; Whitney, Pamela; Calhoun-Davis, Tammy; Takata, Yoko; Shen, Jianjun; Iyer, Vishwanath R.; Tang, Dean G.

    2016-01-01

    The prostate gland mainly contains basal and luminal cells constructed as a pseudostratified epithelium. Annotation of prostate epithelial transcriptomes provides a foundation for discoveries that can impact disease understanding and treatment. Here we describe a genome-wide transcriptome analysis of human benign prostatic basal and luminal epithelial populations using deep RNA sequencing. Through molecular and biological characterizations, we show that the differential gene-expression profiles account for their distinct functional properties. Strikingly, basal cells preferentially express gene categories associated with stem cells, neurogenesis and ribosomal RNA (rRNA) biogenesis. Consistent with this profile, basal cells functionally exhibit intrinsic stem-like and neurogenic properties with enhanced rRNA transcription activity. Of clinical relevance, the basal cell gene-expression profile is enriched in advanced, anaplastic, castration-resistant and metastatic prostate cancers. Therefore, we link the cell-type-specific gene signatures to aggressive subtypes of prostate cancer and identify gene signatures associated with adverse clinical features. PMID:26924072

  7. A simple plasmid-based transient gene expression method using High Five cells.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao; Pitol, Ana K; Bachmann, Virginie; Hacker, David L; Baldi, Lucia; Wurm, Florian M

    2015-12-20

    The High Five (H5) cell line, derived from the lepidopteran Trichoplusia ni, is one of the major insect cell hosts for the production of recombinant proteins using the baculovirus expression vector system (BEVS). Here, we describe a simple polyethylenimine (PEI)-based transient gene expression (TGE) process for the rapid production of recombinant proteins from suspension-adapted H5 cells. The method was optimized using two model proteins, enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) and human tumor necrosis factor receptor-Fc fusion protein (TNFR-Fc). After screening several promoter and enhancer combinations for high levels of TNFR:Fc production, an expression vector containing the Autographa californica multicapsid nucleopolyhedrovirus immediate early 1 (ie1) promoter and homologous region 5 (hr5) enhancer was selected. Cells were transfected at a density of 2×10(6) cells/mL by direct addition of DNA and PEI. Under optimized conditions, a 90% transfection efficiency (percentage of EGFP-positive cells) was obtained. In addition, we observed volumetric TNFR-Fc yields over 150μg/mL within 4 days of transfection. The method was found to be reproducible and scalable to 300mL. This plasmid-based transient transfection process is a simple and efficient alternative to the BEVS for recombinant protein production in H5 cells. PMID:26476358

  8. Isolating human DNA repair genes using rodent-cell mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, L.H.; Weber, C.A.; Brookman, K.W.; Salazar, E.P.; Stewart, S.A.; Mitchell, D.L.

    1987-03-23

    The DNA repair systems of rodent and human cells appear to be at least as complex genetically as those in lower eukaryotes and bacteria. The use of mutant lines of rodent cells as a means of identifying human repair genes by functional complementation offers a new approach toward studying the role of repair in mutagenesis and carcinogenesis. In each of six cases examined using hybrid cells, specific human chromosomes have been identified that correct CHO cell mutations affecting repair of damage from uv or ionizing radiations. This finding suggests that both the repair genes and proteins may be virtually interchangeable between rodent and human cells. Using cosmid vectors, human repair genes that map to chromosome 19 have cloned as functional sequences: ERCC2 and XRCC1. ERCC1 was found to have homology with the yeast excision repair gene RAD10. Transformants of repair-deficient cell lines carrying the corresponding human gene show efficient correction of repair capacity by all criteria examined. 39 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Cell cycle regulation of the human cdc2 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, S

    1992-01-01

    Transcription of the human cdc2 gene is cell cycle regulated and restricted to proliferating cells. Nuclear run-on assays show that cdc2 transcription is high in S and G2 phases of the cell cycle but low in G1. To investigate transcriptional control further, genomic clones of the human cdc2 gene containing 5' flanking sequences were isolated and shown to function as a growth regulated promoter in vivo when fused to a CAT reporter gene. In primary human fibroblasts, the human cdc2 promoter is negatively regulated by arrest of cell growth in a similar fashion to the endogenous gene. This requires specific 5' flanking upstream negative control (UNC) sequences which mediate repression. The retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product (Rb) specifically represses cdc2 transcription in cycling cells via 136 bp of 5' flanking sequence located between -245 and -109 within the UNC region. E2F binding sites in this region were shown to be essential for optimal repression. A model is proposed where Rb negatively regulates the cdc2 promoter in non-cycling and cycling G1 cells. Images PMID:1582409

  10. Experiments on gene transferring to primary hematopoietic cells by liposome.

    PubMed

    Hu, L; Zhang, B

    2000-01-01

    Liposomes have showed many advantages in mediating exogenous gene into many cell types in vitro and in vivo. But few data are available concerning gene transfer into hematopoietic cells. In this report, we described two-marker genes (Neo R and Lac Z) co-transferred into hematopoietic cells of human and mouse by using liposome in vitro. The efficiency of gene transfer was tested by X-gal staining and observation of colony formation. The X-gal blue staining rate of transduced cells was about (13.33 +/- 2.68)% in human and about (16.28 +/- 2.95)% in mouse without G418 selection. After G418 selection, the blue cell rate was (46.06 +/- 3.47)% in human and (43.45 +/- 4.1)% in mouse, which were markedly higher than those before selection, suggesting that high-efficiency gene transfer and expression could be attained in primary hematopoietic cells using this easy and harmless transduction protocol. At the same time, this protocol provided experimental data for clinicians to investigate the biology of marrow reconstitution and trace the origin of relapse after autologous bone marrow transplantation for the patients with leukemia. PMID:12840913

  11. Single-Cell Isolation and Gene Analysis: Pitfalls and Possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Hodne, Kjetil; Weltzien, Finn-Arne

    2015-01-01

    During the last two decades single-cell analysis (SCA) has revealed extensive phenotypic differences within homogenous cell populations. These phenotypic differences are reflected in the stochastic nature of gene regulation, which is often masked by qualitatively and quantitatively averaging in whole tissue analyses. The ability to isolate transcripts and investigate how genes are regulated at the single cell level requires highly sensitive and refined methods. This paper reviews different strategies currently used for SCA, including harvesting, reverse transcription, and amplification of the RNA, followed by methods for transcript quantification. The review provides the historical background to SCA, discusses limitations, and current and future possibilities in this exciting field of research. PMID:26569222

  12. Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction Measurement of HLA-DRA Gene Expression in Whole Blood Is Highly Reproducible and Shows Changes That Reflect Dynamic Shifts in Monocyte Surface HLA-DR Expression during the Course of Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Tina, Elisabet; Bäckman, Anders; Magnuson, Anders; Strålin, Kristoffer; Söderquist, Bo; Källman, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A decrease in the expression of monocyte surface protein HLA-DR (mHLA-DR), measured by flow cytometry (FCM), has been suggested as a marker of immunosuppression and negative outcome in severe sepsis. However, FCM is not always available due to sample preparation that limits its use to laboratory operational hours. In this prospective study we evaluated dynamic changes in mHLA-DR expression during sepsis in relation to changes in HLA-DRA gene expression and Class II transactivator (CIITA), measured by quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). Aims The aims of this study were: 1. to validate the robustness of qRT-PCR measurement of HLA-DRA- and CIITA–mRNA expression, in terms of reproducibility; and 2. to see if changes in expression of these genes reflect changes in mHLA-DR expression during the course of severe and non-severe bacteraemic sepsis. Methods and Findings Blood samples were collected from 60 patients with bacteraemic sepsis on up to five occasions during Days 1–28 after hospital admission. We found the reproducibility of the qRT-PCR method to be high by demonstrating low threshold variations (<0.11 standard deviation (SD)) of the qRT-PCR system, low intra-assay variation of Ct-values within triplicates (≤0.15 SD) and low inter-assay variations (12%) of the calculated target gene ratios. Our results also revealed dynamic HLA-DRA expression patterns during the course of sepsis that reflected those of mHLA-DR measured by FCM. Furthermore, HLA-DRA and mHLA-DR recovery slopes in patients with non-severe sepsis differed from those in patients with severe sepsis, shown by mixed model for repeated measurements (p<0.05). However, during the first seven days of sepsis, PCR-measurements showed a higher magnitude of difference between the two sepsis groups. Mean differences (95% CI) between severe sepsis (n = 20) and non-severe sepsis (n = 40) were; on day 1–2, HLA-DRA 0.40 (0.28–0.59) p<0.001, CIITA 0.48 (0.32–0.72) p = 0

  13. Salivary epithelial cells: an unassuming target site for gene therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Paola; Rowzee, Anne M.; Zheng, Changyu; Adriaansen, Janik; Baum, Bruce J.

    2010-01-01

    Salivary glands are classical exocrine glands whose external secretions result in the production of saliva. However, in addition to the secretion of exocrine proteins, salivary epithelial cells are also capable of secreting proteins internally, into the bloodstream. This brief review examines the potential for using salivary epithelial cells as a target site for in situ gene transfer, with an ultimate goal of producing therapeutic proteins for treating both systemic and upper gastrointestinal tract disorders. The review discusses the protein secretory pathways reported to be present in salivary epithelial cells, the viral gene transfer vectors shown useful for transducing these cells, model transgenic secretory proteins examined, and some clinical conditions that might benefit from such salivary gland gene transfer. PMID:20219693

  14. Gene expression profiling of cancer stem cell in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Dong-Cheol; Sung, Ji-Min; Cho, Hee-Jung; Yi, Hee; Seo, Kun-Ho; Choi, In-Soo; Kim, Dong-Ku; Kim, Jin-Suk; El-Aty AM, Abd; Shin, Ho-Chul

    2007-01-01

    Background The studies on cancer-stem-cells (CSCs) have attracted so much attention in recent years as possible therapeutic implications. This study was carried out to investigate the gene expression profile of CSCs in human lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells. Results We isolated CSCs from A549 cell line of which side population (SP) phenotype revealed several stem cell properties. After staining the cell line with Hoechst 33342 dye, the SP and non-side population (non-SP) cells were sorted using flow cytometric analysis. The mRNA expression profiles were measured using an Affymetrix GeneChip® oligonucleotide array. Among the sixty one differentially expressed genes, the twelve genes inclusive three poor prognostic genes; Aldo-keto reductase family 1, member C1/C2 (AKR1C1/C2), Transmembrane 4 L six family member 1 nuclear receptor (TM4SF1), and Nuclear receptor subfamily 0, group B, member 1 (NR0B1) were significantly up-regulated in SP compared to non-SP cells. Conclusion This is the first report indicating the differences of gene expression pattern between SP and non-SP cells in A549 cells. We suggest that the up-regulations of the genes AKR1C1/C2, TM4SF1 and NR0B1 in SP of human adenocarcinoma A549 cells could be a target of poor prognosis in anti-cancer therapy. PMID:18034892

  15. Contextual sensitivity in scientific reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Van Bavel, Jay J; Mende-Siedlecki, Peter; Brady, William J; Reinero, Diego A

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, scientists have paid increasing attention to reproducibility. For example, the Reproducibility Project, a large-scale replication attempt of 100 studies published in top psychology journals found that only 39% could be unambiguously reproduced. There is a growing consensus among scientists that the lack of reproducibility in psychology and other fields stems from various methodological factors, including low statistical power, researcher's degrees of freedom, and an emphasis on publishing surprising positive results. However, there is a contentious debate about the extent to which failures to reproduce certain results might also reflect contextual differences (often termed "hidden moderators") between the original research and the replication attempt. Although psychologists have found extensive evidence that contextual factors alter behavior, some have argued that context is unlikely to influence the results of direct replications precisely because these studies use the same methods as those used in the original research. To help resolve this debate, we recoded the 100 original studies from the Reproducibility Project on the extent to which the research topic of each study was contextually sensitive. Results suggested that the contextual sensitivity of the research topic was associated with replication success, even after statistically adjusting for several methodological characteristics (e.g., statistical power, effect size). The association between contextual sensitivity and replication success did not differ across psychological subdisciplines. These results suggest that researchers, replicators, and consumers should be mindful of contextual factors that might influence a psychological process. We offer several guidelines for dealing with contextual sensitivity in reproducibility. PMID:27217556

  16. AAV-mediated gene targeting methods for human cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Iram F; Hirata, Roli K; Russell, David W

    2013-01-01

    Gene targeting with adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors has been demonstrated in multiple human cell types, with targeting frequencies ranging from 10−5 to 10−2 per infected cell. these targeting frequencies are 1–4 logs higher than those obtained by conventional transfection or electroporation approaches. a wide variety of different types of mutations can be introduced into chromosomal loci with high fidelity and without genotoxicity. Here we provide a detailed protocol for gene targeting in human cells with AAV vectors. We describe methods for vector design, stock preparation and titration. optimized transduction protocols are provided for human pluripotent stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts and transformed cell lines, as well as a method for identifying targeted clones by southern blots. this protocol (from vector design through a single round of targeting and screening) can be completed in ~10 weeks; each subsequent round of targeting and screening should take an additional 7 weeks. PMID:21455185

  17. Dissection of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis for testing gene expression directly ex vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, M.; Hexel, K.; Bucur, M.; Schirrmacher, V.; Umansky, V.

    1996-01-01

    We report on a new methodology which allows the direct analysis ex vivo of tumour cells and host cells (lymphocytes, macrophages, endothelial cells) from a metastasised organ (liver or spleen) at any time point during the metastatic process and without any further in vitro culture. First, we used a tumour cell line transduced with the bacterial gene lacZ, which permits the detection of the procaryotic enzyme beta-galactosidase in eukaryotic cells at the single cell level thus allowing flow adhesion cell sorting (FACS) analysis of tumour cells from metastasised target organs. Second, we established a method for the separation and enrichment of tumour and host cells from target organs of metastasis with a high viability and reproducibility. As exemplified with the murine lymphoma ESb, this new methodology permits the study of molecules of importance for metastasis or anti-tumour immunity (adhesion, costimulatory and cytotoxic molecules, cytokines, etc.) at the RNA or protein level in tumour and host cells during the whole process of metastasis. This novel approach may open new possibilities of developing strategies for intervention in tumour progression, since it allows the determination of the optimal window in time for successful treatments. The possibility of direct analysis of tumour and host cell properties also provides a new method for the evaluation of the effects of immunisation with tumour vaccines or of gene therapy. Images Figure 3 PMID:8883407

  18. Deregulation of lipid metabolism pathway genes in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Daker, Maelinda; Bhuvanendran, Saatheeyavaane; Ahmad, Munirah; Takada, Kenzo; Khoo, Alan Soo-Beng

    2013-03-01

    Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a unique tumour of epithelial origin with a distinct geographical distribution, closely associated with the Epstein‑Barr virus (EBV). EBV‑encoded RNAs (EBERs) are small non‑polyadenylated RNAs that are abundantly expressed in latent EBV‑infected NPC cells. To study the role of EBERs in NPC, we established stable expression of EBERs in HK1, an EBV‑negative NPC cell line. Cells expressing EBERs consistently exhibited an increased growth rate. However, EBERs did not confer resistance towards cisplatin‑induced apoptosis or promote migration or invasion ability in the cells tested. Using microarray gene expression profiling, we identified potential candidate genes that were deregulated in NPC cells expressing EBERs. Gene Ontology analysis of the data set revealed that EBERs upregulate the cellular lipid metabolic process. Upregulation of low‑density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) and fatty acid synthase (FASN) was observed in EBER‑expressing cells. NPC cells exhibited LDL‑dependent cell proliferation. In addition, a polyphenolic flavonoid compound, quercetin, known to inhibit FASN, was found to inhibit proliferation of NPC cells. PMID:23292678

  19. Differential sensitivities of transcription factor target genes underlie cell type-specific gene expression profiles

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kim, Shin-Il; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2006-01-01

    Changes in transcription factor levels and activities dictate developmental fate. Such a change might affect the full ensemble of target genes for a factor or only uniquely sensitive targets. We investigated the relationship among activity of the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA-1, chromatin occupancy, and target gene sensitivity. Graded activation of GATA-1 in GATA-1-null cells revealed high-, intermediate-, and low-sensitivity targets. GATA-1 activity requirements for occupancy and transcription often correlated. A GATA-1 amino-terminal deletion mutant severely deregulated the low-sensitivity gene Tac-2. Thus, cells expressing different levels of a cell type-specific activator can have qualitatively distinct target gene expression patterns, and factor mutations preferentially deregulate low-sensitivity genes. Unlike other target genes, GATA-1-mediated Tac-2 regulation was bimodal, with activation followed by repression, and the coregulator Friend of GATA-1 (FOG-1) selectively mediated repression. A GATA-1 mutant defective in FOG-1 binding occupied a Tac-2 regulatory region at levels higher than wild-type GATA-1, whereas FOG-1 facilitated chromatin occupancy at a distinct target site. These results indicate that FOG-1 is a determinant of GATA factor target gene sensitivity by either facilitating or opposing chromatin occupancy. PMID:17043224

  20. Harnessing autophagy for cell fate control gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Felizardo, Tania C; Foley, Jason; Steed, Kevin; Dropulic, Boro; Amarnath, Shoba; Medin, Jeffrey A; Fowler, Daniel H

    2013-07-01

    We hypothesized that rapamycin, through induction of autophagy and promotion of an antiapoptotic phenotype, would permit lentiviral (LV)-based transgene delivery to human T-Rapa cells, which are being tested in phase II clinical trials in the setting of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation. Manufactured T-Rapa cells were exposed to supernatant enriched for a LV vector encoding a fusion protein consisting of truncated CD19 (for cell surface marking) and DTYMK/TMPKΔ, which provides "cell-fate control" due to its ability to phosphorylate (activate) AZT prodrug. LV-transduction in rapamycin-treated T-Rapa cells: (1) resulted in mitochondrial autophagy and a resultant antiapoptotic phenotype, which was reversed by the autophagy inhibitor 3-MA; (2) yielded changes in MAP1LC3B and SQSTM1 expression, which were reversed by 3-MA; and (3) increased T-Rapa cell expression of the CD19-DTYMKΔ fusion protein, despite their reduced proliferative status. Importantly, although the transgene-expressing T-Rapa cells expressed an antiapoptotic phenotype, they were highly susceptible to cell death via AZT exposure both in vitro and in vivo (in a human-into-mouse xenogeneic transplantation model). Therefore, rapamycin induction of T cell autophagy can be used for gene therapy applications, including the CD19-DTYMKΔ cell-fate control axis to improve the safety of T cell immuno-gene therapy. PMID:23633667

  1. Identification of somatic gene mutations in penile squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrándiz-Pulido, Carla; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Masferrer, Emili; Vivancos, Ana; Somoza, Rosa; Marés, Roso; Valverde, Claudia; Salvador, Carlos; Placer, Jose; Morote, Juan; Pujol, Ramon M; Ramon y Cajal, Santiago; de Torres, Ines; Toll, Agusti; García-Patos, Vicente

    2015-10-01

    There is a lack of studies on somatic gene mutations and cell signaling driving penile carcinogenesis. Our objective was to analyze somatic mutations in genes downstream of EGFR in penile squamous cell carcinomas, especially the mTOR and RAS/MAPK pathways. We retrospectively analyzed somatic mutations in 10 in situ and 65 invasive penile squamous cell carcinomas by using Sequenom's Mass Spectrometry iPlex Technology and Oncocarta v1.0 Panel. The DNA was extracted from FFPE blocks and we identified somatic missense mutations in three in situ tumors and in 19 invasive tumors, mostly in PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, NRAS, and PDGFA genes. Somatic mutations in the PIK3CA gene or RAS family genes were neither associated with tumor grade, stage or outcome, and were equally often identified in hrHPV positive and in hrHPV negative tumors that showed no p53 expression. Mutations in PIK3CA, KRAS, and HRAS are frequent in penile squamous cell carcinoma and likely play a role in the development of p53-negative tumors. Although the presence of these mutations does not seem to correlate with tumoral behavior or outcome, they could be biomarkers of treatment failure with anti-EGFR mAb in patients with penile squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:26216163

  2. Gene profiling of growth factor independence 1B gene (Gfi-1B) in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Koldehoff, Michael; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Klein-Hitpass, Ludger; Beelen, Dietrich W; Elmaagacli, Ahmet H

    2008-01-01

    To investigate the molecular effects of growth factor independence 1B (Gfi-1B), a transcription factor essential for the development of hematopoietic cells and differentiation of erythroid and megakaryocytic lineages, the naturally Gfi-1B overexpressing cell line K562 was cultured in the presence of Gfi-1B target-specific small interfering RNA (siRNA). SiRNA treatment significantly knocked down Gfi-1B expression with an efficiency of nearly 90%. Analysis of the siRNA silencing protocol by colony-forming units ensured that it was not cytotoxic. Samples from Gfi-1B overexpressing cells and cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B were analyzed by oligonucleotide microarray technology and based upon rigorous statistical analysis of the data; relevant genes were chosen for confirmation by reserve transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction, including MYC/MYCBP and CDKN1A. Interestingly, transcripts within components of the signalling cascade of immune cells (PLD1, LAMP1, HSP90, IL6ST), of the tyrosine kinase pathway (TPR, RAC3) and of the transcription factors (RAC3, CEP290, JEM-1, ATR, MYC, SMC3, RARA, RBBP6) were found to be differentially expressed in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells compared to controls. Individual genes such as ZDHHC17, DMXL1, ZNF292 were found to be upregulated in Gfi-1B overexpressing cells. In addition, down-regulated transcripts showed cell signaling transcripts for several chemokine gene members including GNAL, CXCL5, GNL3L, GPR65, TMEM30, BCL11B and transcription factors (GTF2H3, ATXN3). In conclusion, several essential cell signalling factors, as well as transcriptional and post-translational regulation genes were differentially expressed in cells that overexpressed Gfi-1B compared to control cells with knocked-down Gfi-1B. Our data indicate that Gfi-1B signalling is important for commitment and maturation of hematopoietic cell populations. PMID:18224412

  3. Topoisomerase inhibitors modulate gene expression of B-cell translocation gene 2 and prostate specific antigen in prostate carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Kun-Chun; Tsui, Ke-Hung; Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) have been demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor activity. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms of CPT and DOX on cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2 and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma cells. Our results indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP cells and apoptosis at higher dosage. Immunoblot and transient gene expression assay indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced p53 and BTG2 gene expression, with the later effect dependent on the p53 response element within BTG2 promoter area since mutation of the p53 response element from GGGAAAGTCC to GGAGTCC or from GGCAGAGCCC to GGCACC by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of CPT or DOX on the BTG2 promoter activity, which is also supported by our results that cotreatments of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 dependent transcriptional activation, blocked the induction of CPT or DOX on BTG2 gene expression. CPT or DOX also downregulated the protein expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and PSA. Transient gene expression assays suggested that CPT or DOX's attenuation of PSA promoter activity is dependent on both the androgen and p53 response elements within of the PSA promoter. Our results indicated that CPT and DOX attenuate cell proliferation via upregulation of BTG2 gene expression through the p53-dependent pathway. The CPT and DOX block the PSA gene expression by upregulation of p53 activity and downregulation of androgen receptor activity. PMID:24586533

  4. Topoisomerase Inhibitors Modulate Gene Expression of B-Cell Translocation Gene 2 and Prostate Specific Antigen in Prostate Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Li-Chuan; Yeh, Chun-Nan; Chang, Phei-Lang; Chen, Wen-Tsung; Juang, Horng-Heng

    2014-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and doxorubicin (DOX) have been demonstrated to have potent anti-tumor activity. The B-cell translocation gene 2 (BTG2) is involved in the regulation of cell cycle progression. We evaluated the molecular mechanisms of CPT and DOX on cell proliferation and the expressions of BTG2 and prostate specific antigen (PSA) in prostate carcinoma cells. Our results indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced Go/G1 cell cycle arrest in LNCaP cells and apoptosis at higher dosage. Immunoblot and transient gene expression assay indicated that CPT or DOX treatments induced p53 and BTG2 gene expression, with the later effect dependent on the p53 response element within BTG2 promoter area since mutation of the p53 response element from GGGAAAGTCC to GGAGTCC or from GGCAGAGCCC to GGCACC by site-directed mutagenesis abolished the stimulation of CPT or DOX on the BTG2 promoter activity, which is also supported by our results that cotreatments of pifithrin-α, an inhibitor of p53 dependent transcriptional activation, blocked the induction of CPT or DOX on BTG2 gene expression. CPT or DOX also downregulated the protein expressions of androgen receptor (AR) and PSA. Transient gene expression assays suggested that CPT or DOX’s attenuation of PSA promoter activity is dependent on both the androgen and p53 response elements within of the PSA promoter. Our results indicated that CPT and DOX attenuate cell proliferation via upregulation of BTG2 gene expression through the p53-dependent pathway. The CPT and DOX block the PSA gene expression by upregulation of p53 activity and downregulation of androgen receptor activity. PMID:24586533

  5. Investigation of Radiosensitivity Gene Signatures in Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Hall, John S.; Iype, Rohan; Senra, Joana; Taylor, Janet; Armenoult, Lucile; Oguejiofor, Kenneth; Li, Yaoyong; Stratford, Ian; Stern, Peter L.; O’Connor, Mark J.; Miller, Crispin J.; West, Catharine M. L.

    2014-01-01

    Intrinsic radiosensitivity is an important factor underlying radiotherapy response, but there is no method for its routine assessment in human tumours. Gene signatures are currently being derived and some were previously generated by expression profiling the NCI-60 cell line panel. It was hypothesised that focusing on more homogeneous tumour types would be a better approach. Two cell line cohorts were used derived from cervix [n = 16] and head and neck [n = 11] cancers. Radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction following irradiation with 2 Gy (SF2) by clonogenic assay. Differential gene expression between radiosensitive and radioresistant cell lines (SF2 median) was investigated using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0ST (cervix) or U133A Plus2 (head and neck) arrays. There were differences within cell line cohorts relating to tissue of origin reflected by expression of the stratified epithelial marker p63. Of 138 genes identified as being associated with SF2, only 2 (1.4%) were congruent between the cervix and head and neck carcinoma cell lines (MGST1 and TFPI), and these did not partition the published NCI-60 cell lines based on SF2. There was variable success in applying three published radiosensitivity signatures to our cohorts. One gene signature, originally trained on the NCI-60 cell lines, did partially separate sensitive and resistant cell lines in all three cell line datasets. The findings do not confirm our hypothesis but suggest that a common transcriptional signature can reflect the radiosensitivity of tumours of heterogeneous origins. PMID:24466029

  6. Open Science and Research Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Munafò, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Many scientists, journals and funders are concerned about the low reproducibility of many scientific findings. One approach that may serve to improve the reliability and robustness of research is open science. Here I argue that the process of pre-registering study protocols, sharing study materials and data, and posting preprints of manuscripts may serve to improve quality control procedures at every stage of the research pipeline, and in turn improve the reproducibility of published work. PMID:27350794

  7. Open Science and Research Reproducibility

    PubMed Central

    Munafò, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    Many scientists, journals and funders are concerned about the low reproducibility of many scientific findings. One approach that may serve to improve the reliability and robustness of research is open science. Here I argue that the process of pre-registering study protocols, sharing study materials and data, and posting preprints of manuscripts may serve to improve quality control procedures at every stage of the research pipeline, and in turn improve the reproducibility of published work. PMID:27350794

  8. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sidjanin, D.; Grdina, D.; Woloschak, G.E.

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  9. The evolutionary emergence of cell type-specific genes inferred from the gene expression analysis of Hydra

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jung Shan; Ohyanagi, Hajime; Hayakawa, Shiho; Osato, Naoki; Nishimiya-Fujisawa, Chiemi; Ikeo, Kazuho; David, Charles N.; Fujisawa, Toshitaka; Gojobori, Takashi

    2007-01-01

    Cell lineages of cnidarians including Hydra represent the fundamental cell types of metazoans and provides us a unique opportunity to study the evolutionary diversification of cell type in the animal kingdom. Hydra contains epithelial cells as well as a multipotent interstitial cell (I-cell) that gives rise to nematocytes, nerve cells, gland cells, and germ-line cells. We used cDNA microarrays to identify cell type-specific genes by comparing gene expression in normal Hydra with animals lacking the I-cell lineage, so-called epithelial Hydra. We then performed in situ hybridization to localize expression to specific cell types. Eighty-six genes were shown to be expressed in specific cell types of the I-cell lineage. An additional 29 genes were expressed in epithelial cells and were down-regulated in epithelial animals lacking I-cells. Based on the above information, we constructed a database (http://hydra.lab.nig.ac.jp/hydra/), which describes the expression patterns of cell type-specific genes in Hydra. Most genes expressed specifically in either I-cells or epithelial cells have homologues in higher metazoans. By comparison, most nematocyte-specific genes and approximately half of the gland cell- and nerve cell-specific genes are unique to the cnidarian lineage. Because nematocytes, gland cells, and nerve cells appeared along with the emergence of cnidarians, this suggests that lineage-specific genes arose in cnidarians in conjunction with the evolution of new cell types required by the cnidarians. PMID:17766437

  10. Serial analysis of gene expression in a microglial cell line.

    PubMed

    Inoue, H; Sawada, M; Ryo, A; Tanahashi, H; Wakatsuki, T; Hada, A; Kondoh, N; Nakagaki, K; Takahashi, K; Suzumura, A; Yamamoto, M; Tabira, T

    1999-12-01

    We used the serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE) method to systematically analyze transcripts present in a microglial cell line. Over 10,000 SAGE tags were sequenced, and shown to represent 6,013 unique transcripts. Among the diverse transcripts that had not been previously detected in microglia were those for cytokines such as endothelial monocyte-activating polypeptide I (EMAP I), and for cell surface antigens, including adhesion molecules such as CD9, CD53, CD107a, CD147, CD162 and mast cell high affinity IgE receptor. In addition, we detected transcripts that were characteristic of hematopoietic cells or mesodermal structures, such as E3 protein, A1, EN-7, B94, and ufo. Furthermore, the profile contained a transcript, Hn1, that is important in hematopoietic cells and neurological development (Tang et al. Mamm Genome 8:695-696, 1997), suggesting the probable neural differentiation of microglia from the hematopoietic system in development. Messenger RNA expression of these genes was confirmed by RT-PCR in primary cultures of microglia. Significantly, this is the first systematic profiling of the genes expressed in a microglial cell line. The identification and further characterization of the genes described here should provide potential new targets for the study of microglial biology. PMID:10559785

  11. Stochasticity in gene expression in a cell-sized compartment.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Kazuya; Tsuru, Saburo; Suzuki, Hiroaki; Yomo, Tetsuya

    2015-05-15

    The gene expression in a clonal cell population fluctuates significantly, and its relevance to various cellular functions is under intensive debate. A fundamental question is whether the fluctuation is a consequence of the complexity and redundancy in living cells or an inevitable attribute of the minute microreactor nature of cells. To answer this question, we constructed an artificial cell, which consists of only necessary components for the gene expression (in vitro transcription and translation system) and its boundary as a microreactor (cell-sized lipid vesicle), and investigated the gene expression noise. The variation in the expression of two fluorescent proteins was decomposed into the components that were correlated and uncorrelated between the two proteins using a method similar to the one used by Elowitz and co-workers to analyze the expression noise in E. coli. The observed fluctuation was compared with a theoretical model that expresses the amplitude of noise as a function of the average number of intermediate molecules and products. With the assumption that the transcripts are partly active, the theoretical model was able to well describe the noise in the artificial system. Furthermore, the same measurement for E. coli cells harboring an identical plasmid revealed that the E. coli exhibited a similar level of expression noise. Our results demonstrated that the level of fluctuation found in bacterial cells is mostly an intrinsic property that arises even in a primitive form of the cell. PMID:25280237

  12. Impact of the cell division cycle on gene circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bierbaum, Veronika; Klumpp, Stefan

    2015-12-01

    In growing cells, protein synthesis and cell growth are typically not synchronous, and, thus, protein concentrations vary over the cell division cycle. We have developed a theoretical description of genetic regulatory systems in bacteria that explicitly considers the cell division cycle to investigate its impact on gene expression. We calculate the cell-to-cell variations arising from cells being at different stages in the division cycle for unregulated genes and for basic regulatory mechanisms. These variations contribute to the extrinsic noise observed in single-cell experiments, and are most significant for proteins with short lifetimes. Negative autoregulation buffers against variation of protein concentration over the division cycle, but the effect is found to be relatively weak. Stronger buffering is achieved by an increased protein lifetime. Positive autoregulation can strongly amplify such variation if the parameters are set to values that lead to resonance-like behaviour. For cooperative positive autoregulation, the concentration variation over the division cycle diminishes the parameter region of bistability and modulates the switching times between the two stable states. The same effects are seen for a two-gene mutual-repression toggle switch. By contrast, an oscillatory circuit, the repressilator, is only weakly affected by the division cycle.

  13. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-03-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  14. Genome-editing Technologies for Gene and Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Maeder, Morgan L; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy has historically been defined as the addition of new genes to human cells. However, the recent advent of genome-editing technologies has enabled a new paradigm in which the sequence of the human genome can be precisely manipulated to achieve a therapeutic effect. This includes the correction of mutations that cause disease, the addition of therapeutic genes to specific sites in the genome, and the removal of deleterious genes or genome sequences. This review presents the mechanisms of different genome-editing strategies and describes each of the common nuclease-based platforms, including zinc finger nucleases, transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs), meganucleases, and the CRISPR/Cas9 system. We then summarize the progress made in applying genome editing to various areas of gene and cell therapy, including antiviral strategies, immunotherapies, and the treatment of monogenic hereditary disorders. The current challenges and future prospects for genome editing as a transformative technology for gene and cell therapy are also discussed. PMID:26755333

  15. Gene Silencing in Insect Cells Using RNAi.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hsuan-Chen; March, John C; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    A technique is described for synthesizing and transfecting double stranded RNA (dsRNA) for RNA interference (RNAi) in Sf-21 cell culture. Transfection with dsRNA only requires an hour and the cells usually recover within 12 h. Suggestions for designing dsRNA are included in the methods. Furthermore, websites are provided for rapid and effective dsRNA design. Three kits are essential for using the described methods: RNAqueous®-4PCR, Megascript™ T7 kit, and the Superscript™ III kit from Life Technologies, Inc. PMID:26820874

  16. Large-Scale Production of Cardiomyocytes from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Using a Highly Reproducible Small Molecule-Based Differentiation Protocol.

    PubMed

    Fonoudi, Hananeh; Ansari, Hassan; Abbasalizadeh, Saeed; Blue, Gillian M; Aghdami, Nasser; Winlaw, David S; Harvey, Richard P; Bosman, Alexis; Baharvand, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Maximizing the benefit of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) for research, disease modeling, pharmaceutical and clinical applications requires robust methods for the large-scale production of functional cell types, including cardiomyocytes. Here we demonstrate that the temporal manipulation of WNT, TGF-β, and SHH signaling pathways leads to highly efficient cardiomyocyte differentiation of single-cell passaged hPSC lines in both static suspension and stirred suspension bioreactor systems. Employing this strategy resulted in ~ 100% beating spheroids, consistently containing > 80% cardiac troponin T-positive cells after 15 days of culture, validated in multiple hPSC lines. We also report on a variation of this protocol for use with cell lines not currently adapted to single-cell passaging, the success of which has been verified in 42 hPSC lines. Cardiomyocytes generated using these protocols express lineage-specific markers and show expected electrophysiological functionalities. Our protocol presents a simple, efficient and robust platform for the large-scale production of human cardiomyocytes. PMID:27500408

  17. Use of bacterial and firefly luciferases as reporter genes in DEAE-dextran-mediated transfection of mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pazzagli, M; Devine, J H; Peterson, D O; Baldwin, T O

    1992-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare three different luciferase genes by placing them in a single reporter vector and expressing them in the same mammalian cell type. The luciferase genes investigated were the luc genes from the fireflies Photinus pyralis (PP) and Luciola mingrelica (LM) and the lux AB5 gene, a translational fusion of the two subunits of the bacterial luciferase from Vibrio harveyi (VH). The chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene was also included in this study for comparison. The performances of the assay methods of the corresponding enzymes were evaluated using reference materials and the results of the expressed enzymes following transfection were calculated using calibration curves. All of the bioluminescent assays possess high reproducibility both within and between the batches (less than 15%). The comparison of the assay methods shows that firefly luciferases have the highest detection sensitivity (0.05 and 0.08 amol for PP and LM, respectively) whereas the VH bacterial luciferase has 5 amol and CAT 100 amol. On the other hand, the transfection of the various plasmids shows that the content of the expressed enzyme within the cells is much higher for CAT than for the other luciferase genes. VH luciferase is expressed at very low levels in mammalian cells due to the relatively high temperature of growing of the mammalian cells that seems to impair the correct folding of the active enzyme. PP and LM luciferases are both expressed at picomolar level but usually 10 to 70 times less in content with respect to CAT within the transfected cells. On the basis of these results the overall improvement in sensitivity related to the use of firefly luciferases as reporter genes in mammalian cells is about 30 to 50 times with respect to that of CAT. PMID:1443530

  18. Highly parallel identification of essential genes in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Cheung, Hiu Wing; Subramanian, Aravind; Sharifnia, Tanaz; Okamoto, Michael; Yang, Xiaoping; Hinkle, Greg; Boehm, Jesse S; Beroukhim, Rameen; Weir, Barbara A; Mermel, Craig; Barbie, David A; Awad, Tarif; Zhou, Xiaochuan; Nguyen, Tuyen; Piqani, Bruno; Li, Cheng; Golub, Todd R; Meyerson, Matthew; Hacohen, Nir; Hahn, William C; Lander, Eric S; Sabatini, David M; Root, David E

    2008-12-23

    More complete knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer will improve prevention, diagnosis and treatment. Efforts such as The Cancer Genome Atlas are systematically characterizing the structural basis of cancer, by identifying the genomic mutations associated with each cancer type. A powerful complementary approach is to systematically characterize the functional basis of cancer, by identifying the genes essential for growth and related phenotypes in different cancer cells. Such information would be particularly valuable for identifying potential drug targets. Here, we report the development of an efficient, robust approach to perform genome-scale pooled shRNA screens for both positive and negative selection and its application to systematically identify cell essential genes in 12 cancer cell lines. By integrating these functional data with comprehensive genetic analyses of primary human tumors, we identified known and putative oncogenes such as EGFR, KRAS, MYC, BCR-ABL, MYB, CRKL, and CDK4 that are essential for cancer cell proliferation and also altered in human cancers. We further used this approach to identify genes involved in the response of cancer cells to tumoricidal agents and found 4 genes required for the response of CML cells to imatinib treatment: PTPN1, NF1, SMARCB1, and SMARCE1, and 5 regulators of the response to FAS activation, FAS, FADD, CASP8, ARID1A and CBX1. Broad application of this highly parallel genetic screening strategy will not only facilitate the rapid identification of genes that drive the malignant state and its response to therapeutics but will also enable the discovery of genes that participate in any biological process. PMID:19091943

  19. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway.

    PubMed

    Stansfield, Brian K; Bessler, Waylan K; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N; DiStasi, Matthew R; Conway, Simon J; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A

    2013-03-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1(+/-)) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1(+/-) neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1(+/-) mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1(+/-) mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1(+/-) neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease. PMID:23197650

  20. Gene Profiling Technique to Accelerate Stem Cell Therapies for Eye Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... to accelerate stem cell therapies for eye diseases Gene profiling technique to accelerate stem cell therapies for ... The method simultaneously measures the expression of multiple genes, allowing scientists to quickly characterize cells according to ...

  1. Structural alterations of the ribosomal RNA genes in leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Smirnova, I A

    1992-01-01

    Cloned 6.7 kb EcoR1 fragment of mice rDNA was used as a hybridization probe for rDNA structure analysis in mice, rat and calf haemopoietic tumor and normal cells. EcoR1, BglII and Pst1 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was found in neoplastic rDNA and was not revealed in normal ones. The rRNA gene rearrangements were observed not only in spacer region but in coding sequences of the genes. Leukemic cells reveal also rDNA amplification. A role of genetic rearrangements of rDNA for mechanisms of carcinogenesis is suggested. PMID:1342066

  2. Development of gene and stem cell therapy for ocular neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Xue; Wang, Ning-Li; Lu, Qing-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Retinal degenerative diseases pose a serious threat to eye health, but there is currently no effective treatment available. Recent years have witnessed rapid development of several cutting-edge technologies, such as gene therapy, stem cell therapy, and tissue engineering. Due to the special features of ocular structure, some of these technologies have been translated into ophthalmological clinic practice with fruitful achievements, setting a good example for other fields. This paper reviews the development of the gene and stem cell therapies in ophthalmology. PMID:26086019

  3. RNA-seq analysis of impact of PNN on gene expression and alternative splicing in corneal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akin, Debra; Newman, Jeremy R.B.; McIntyre, Lauren M.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The specialized corneal epithelium requires differentiated properties, specific for its role at the anterior surface of the eye. Thus, tight maintenance of the differentiated qualities of the corneal epithelial is essential. Pinin (PNN) is an exon junction component (EJC) that has dramatic implications for corneal epithelial cell differentiation and may act as a stabilizer of the corneal epithelial cell phenotype. Our studies revealed that PNN is involved in transcriptional repression complexes and spliceosomal complexes, placing PNN at the fulcrum between chromatin and mRNA splicing. Transcriptome analysis of PNN-knockdown cells revealed clear and reproducible alterations in transcript profiles and splicing patterns of a subset of genes that would significantly impact the epithelial cell phenotype. We further investigated PNN’s role in the regulation of gene expression and alternative splicing (AS) in a corneal epithelial context. Methods Human corneal epithelial (HCET) cells that carry the doxycycline-inducible PNN-knockdown shRNA vector were used to perform RNA-seq to determine differential gene expression and differential AS events. Results Multiple genes and AS events were identified as differentially expressed between PNN-knockdown and control cells. Genes upregulated by PNN knockdown included a large proportion of genes that are associated with enhanced cell migration and ECM remodeling processes, such as MMPs, ADAMs, HAS2, LAMA3, CXCRs, and UNC5C. Genes downregulated in response to PNN depletion included IGFBP5, FGD3, FGFR2, PAX6, RARG, and SOX10. AS events in PNN-knockdown cells compared to control cells were also more likely to be detected, and upregulated. In particular, 60% of exon-skipping events, detected in only one condition, were detected in PNN-knockdown cells and of the shared exon-skipping events, 92% of those differentially expressed were more frequent in the PNN knockdown. Conclusions These data suggest that lowering of PNN levels in

  4. Safeguarding Nonhuman Primate iPS Cells With Suicide Genes

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Bonan; Watts, Korashon L; Gori, Jennifer L; Wohlfahrt, Martin E; Enssle, Joerg; Adair, Jennifer E; Kiem, Hans-Peter

    2011-01-01

    The development of technology to generate induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells constitutes one of the most exciting scientific breakthroughs because of the enormous potential for regenerative medicine. However, the safety of iPS cell-related products is a major concern for clinical translation. Insertional mutagenesis, possible oncogenic transformation of iPS cells or their derivatives, or the contamination of differentiated iPS cells with undifferentiated cells, resulting in the formation of teratomas, have remained considerable obstacles. Here, we demonstrate the utility of suicide genes to safeguard iPS cells and their derivatives. We found suicide genes can control the cell fate of iPS cells in vitro and in vivo without interfering with their pluripotency and self-renewal capacity. This study will be useful to evaluate the safety of iPS cell technology in a clinically highly relevant, large animal model and further benefit the clinical use of human iPS cells. PMID:21587213

  5. Molecular Evolution of Drosophila Germline Stem Cell and Neural Stem Cell Regulating Genes

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jae Young; Aquadro, Charles F.

    2015-01-01

    Here, we study the molecular evolution of a near complete set of genes that had functional evidence in the regulation of the Drosophila germline and neural stem cell. Some of these genes have previously been shown to be rapidly evolving by positive selection raising the possibility that stem cell genes as a group have elevated signatures of positive selection. Using recent Drosophila comparative genome sequences and population genomic sequences of Drosophila melanogaster, we have investigated both long- and short-term evolution occurring across these two different stem cell systems, and compared them with a carefully chosen random set of genes to represent the background rate of evolution. Our results showed an excess of genes with evidence of a recent selective sweep in both germline and neural stem cells in D. melanogaster. However compared with their control genes, both stem cell systems had no significant excess of genes with long-term recurrent positive selection in D. melanogaster, or across orthologous sequences from the melanogaster group. The evidence of long-term positive selection was limited to a subset of genes with specific functions in both the germline and neural stem cell system. PMID:26507797

  6. Towards Reproducibility in Computational Hydrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutton, Christopher; Wagener, Thorsten; Freer, Jim; Han, Dawei

    2016-04-01

    The ability to reproduce published scientific findings is a foundational principle of scientific research. Independent observation helps to verify the legitimacy of individual findings; build upon sound observations so that we can evolve hypotheses (and models) of how catchments function; and move them from specific circumstances to more general theory. The rise of computational research has brought increased focus on the issue of reproducibility across the broader scientific literature. This is because publications based on computational research typically do not contain sufficient information to enable the results to be reproduced, and therefore verified. Given the rise of computational analysis in hydrology over the past 30 years, to what extent is reproducibility, or a lack thereof, a problem in hydrology? Whilst much hydrological code is accessible, the actual code and workflow that produced and therefore documents the provenance of published scientific findings, is rarely available. We argue that in order to advance and make more robust the process of hypothesis testing and knowledge creation within the computational hydrological community, we need to build on from existing open data initiatives and adopt common standards and infrastructures to: first make code re-useable and easy to find through consistent use of metadata; second, publish well documented workflows that combine re-useable code together with data to enable published scientific findings to be reproduced; finally, use unique persistent identifiers (e.g. DOIs) to reference re-useable and reproducible code, thereby clearly showing the provenance of published scientific findings. Whilst extra effort is require to make work reproducible, there are benefits to both the individual and the broader community in doing so, which will improve the credibility of the science in the face of the need for societies to adapt to changing hydrological environments.

  7. QSSPN: dynamic simulation of molecular interaction networks describing gene regulation, signalling and whole-cell metabolism in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Ciarán P.; Plant, Nicholas J.; Moore, J. Bernadette; Kierzek, Andrzej M.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: Dynamic simulation of genome-scale molecular interaction networks will enable the mechanistic prediction of genotype–phenotype relationships. Despite advances in quantitative biology, full parameterization of whole-cell models is not yet possible. Simulation methods capable of using available qualitative data are required to develop dynamic whole-cell models through an iterative process of modelling and experimental validation. Results: We formulate quasi-steady state Petri nets (QSSPN), a novel method integrating Petri nets and constraint-based analysis to predict the feasibility of qualitative dynamic behaviours in qualitative models of gene regulation, signalling and whole-cell metabolism. We present the first dynamic simulations including regulatory mechanisms and a genome-scale metabolic network in human cell, using bile acid homeostasis in human hepatocytes as a case study. QSSPN simulations reproduce experimentally determined qualitative dynamic behaviours and permit mechanistic analysis of genotype–phenotype relationships. Availability and implementation: The model and simulation software implemented in C++ are available in supplementary material and at http://sysbio3.fhms.surrey.ac.uk/qsspn/. Contact: a.kierzek@surrey.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24064420

  8. Prediction of epigenetically regulated genes in breast cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Loss, Leandro A; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Durinck, Steffen; Nautiyal, Shivani; Flaucher, Diane; Carlton, Victoria EH; Moorhead, Martin; Lu, Yontao; Gray, Joe W; Faham, Malek; Spellman, Paul; Parvin, Bahram

    2010-05-04

    Methylation of CpG islands within the DNA promoter regions is one mechanism that leads to aberrant gene expression in cancer. In particular, the abnormal methylation of CpG islands may silence associated genes. Therefore, using high-throughput microarrays to measure CpG island methylation will lead to better understanding of tumor pathobiology and progression, while revealing potentially new biomarkers. We have examined a recently developed high-throughput technology for measuring genome-wide methylation patterns called mTACL. Here, we propose a computational pipeline for integrating gene expression and CpG island methylation profles to identify epigenetically regulated genes for a panel of 45 breast cancer cell lines, which is widely used in the Integrative Cancer Biology Program (ICBP). The pipeline (i) reduces the dimensionality of the methylation data, (ii) associates the reduced methylation data with gene expression data, and (iii) ranks methylation-expression associations according to their epigenetic regulation. Dimensionality reduction is performed in two steps: (i) methylation sites are grouped across the genome to identify regions of interest, and (ii) methylation profles are clustered within each region. Associations between the clustered methylation and the gene expression data sets generate candidate matches within a fxed neighborhood around each gene. Finally, the methylation-expression associations are ranked through a logistic regression, and their significance is quantified through permutation analysis. Our two-step dimensionality reduction compressed 90% of the original data, reducing 137,688 methylation sites to 14,505 clusters. Methylation-expression associations produced 18,312 correspondences, which were used to further analyze epigenetic regulation. Logistic regression was used to identify 58 genes from these correspondences that showed a statistically signifcant negative correlation between methylation profles and gene expression in the

  9. Carbon nanoparticles for gene transfection in eukaryotic cell lines.

    PubMed

    Zanin, H; Hollanda, L M; Ceragioli, H J; Ferreira, M S; Machado, D; Lancellotti, M; Catharino, R R; Baranauskas, V; Lobo, A O

    2014-06-01

    For the first time, oxygen terminated cellulose carbon nanoparticles (CCN) was synthesised and applied in gene transfection of pIRES plasmid. The CCN was prepared from catalytic of polyaniline by chemical vapour deposition techniques. This plasmid contains one gene that encodes the green fluorescent protein (GFP) in eukaryotic cells, making them fluorescent. This new nanomaterial and pIRES plasmid formed π-stacking when dispersed in water by magnetic stirring. The frequencies shift in zeta potential confirmed the plasmid strongly connects to the nanomaterial. In vitro tests found that this conjugation was phagocytised by NG97, NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines making them fluorescent, which was visualised by fluorescent microscopy. Before the transfection test, we studied CCN in cell viability. Both MTT and Neutral Red uptake tests were carried out using NG97, NIH-3T3 and A549 cell lines. Further, we use metabolomics to verify if small amounts of nanomaterial would be enough to cause some cellular damage in NG97 cells. We showed two mechanisms of action by CCN-DNA complex, producing an exogenous protein by the transfected cell and metabolomic changes that contributed by better understanding of glioblastoma, being the major finding of this work. Our results suggested that this nanomaterial has great potential as a gene carrier agent in non-viral based therapy, with low cytotoxicity, good transfection efficiency, and low cell damage in small amounts of nanomaterials in metabolomic tests. PMID:24863237

  10. Tackling centrosome biology through gene targeting in chicken B cells.

    PubMed

    Chavali, Pavithra L; Gergely, Fanni

    2015-01-01

    The centrosome proteome comprises hundreds of proteins whose function at the organelle and in the cellular context is unknown. Loss-of-function studies present a powerful tool to probe the roles of these individual constituents and hence improve our insight into key questions of centrosome biology such as how centrosomes are built, how they duplicate, and which cellular processes they partake in. In cultured cells ribonucleic acid (RNA) interference remains the most widely used method to achieve protein depletion, but due to the remarkable stability of many centrosome components depletion is often incomplete. In such instances genome editing provides a viable alternative. The exceptionally high homologous recombination rate of chicken DT40 cells makes this lymphocytic cell line ideal for genetic manipulation. Here we describe methods for the design and generation of knockouts and in situ tagging of genes in these cells. Furthermore, we report an optimized technique that allows isolation of centrosomes from DT40 cells for use in in vitro functional assays and proteomic analysis. Gene editing by CRISPR-Cas9 technology is fast replacing RNA interference as a method of choice for loss-of-function studies, but the combination of the fast cell cycle, the robustness in culture and ease of gene targeting, will continue to make DT40 cells a useful model system for studies of vertebrate protein function. PMID:26175435

  11. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX), aracytin (ara-C) or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV) towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy. PMID:21970612

  12. FHIT gene alterations in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, L; Shuster, M; Gollin, S M; Veronese, M L; Ohta, M; Huebner, K; Croce, C M

    1996-01-01

    To determine whether the FHIT gene at 3p14.2 is altered in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC), we examined 26 HNSCC cell lines for deletions within the FHIT locus by Southern analysis, for allelic losses of specific exons FHIT by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and for integrity of FHIT transcripts. Three cell lines exhibited homozygous deletions within the FHIT gene, 55% (15/25) showed the presence of aberrant transcripts, and 65% (13/20) showed the presence of multiple cell populations with losses of different portions of FHIT alleles by FISH of FHIT genomic clones to interphase nuclei. When the data obtained by FISH and by reverse transcriptase-PCR analyses are combined, 22 of 26 cell lines showed alterations of at least one allele of the FHIT gene. Our data indicate that the FHIT gene is disrupted in HNSCCs and hence, loss of FHIT function may be important in the development and/or progression of head and neck cancers. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8790406

  13. New insights on human T cell development by quantitative T cell receptor gene rearrangement studies and gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Dik, Willem A.; Pike-Overzet, Karin; Weerkamp, Floor; de Ridder, Dick; de Haas, Edwin F.E.; Baert, Miranda R.M.; van der Spek, Peter; Koster, Esther E.L.; Reinders, Marcel J.T.; van Dongen, Jacques J.M.; Langerak, Anton W.; Staal, Frank J.T.

    2005-01-01

    To gain more insight into initiation and regulation of T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangement during human T cell development, we analyzed TCR gene rearrangements by quantitative PCR analysis in nine consecutive T cell developmental stages, including CD34+ lin− cord blood cells as a reference. The same stages were used for gene expression profiling using DNA microarrays. We show that TCR loci rearrange in a highly ordered way (TCRD-TCRG-TCRB-TCRA) and that the initiating Dδ2-Dδ3 rearrangement occurs at the most immature CD34+CD38−CD1a− stage. TCRB rearrangement starts at the CD34+CD38+CD1a− stage and complete in-frame TCRB rearrangements were first detected in the immature single positive stage. TCRB rearrangement data together with the PTCRA (pTα) expression pattern show that human TCRβ-selection occurs at the CD34+CD38+CD1a+ stage. By combining the TCR rearrangement data with gene expression data, we identified candidate factors for the initiation/regulation of TCR recombination. Our data demonstrate that a number of key events occur earlier than assumed previously; therefore, human T cell development is much more similar to murine T cell development than reported before. PMID:15928199

  14. Reproducible Volume Restoration and Efficient Long-term Volume Retention after Point-of-care Standardized Cell-enhanced Fat Grafting in Breast Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dos Anjos, Severiano; Matas-Palau, Aina; Mercader, Josep; Katz, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lipoaspirated fat grafts are used to reconstruct volume defects in breast surgery. Although intraoperative treatment decisions are influenced by volume changes observed immediately after grafting, clinical effect and patient satisfaction are dependent on volume retention over time. The study objectives were to determine how immediate breast volume changes correlate to implanted graft volumes, to understand long-term adipose graft volume changes, and to study the “dose” effect of adding autologous stromal vascular fraction (SVF) cells to fat grafts on long-term volume retention. Methods: A total of 74 patients underwent 77 cell-enhanced fat grafting procedures to restore breast volume deficits associated with cosmetic and reconstructive indications. Although all procedures used standardized fat grafts, 21 of the fat grafts were enriched with a low dose of SVF cells and 56 were enriched with a high SVF cell dose. Three-dimensional imaging was used to quantify volume retention over time Results: For each milliliter of injected fat graft, immediate changes in breast volume were shown to be lower than the actual volume implanted for all methods and clinical indications treated. Long-term breast volume changes stabilize by 90–120 days after grafting. Final volume retention in the long-term was higher with high cell-enhanced fat grafts. Conclusions: Intraoperative immediate breast volume changes do not correspond with implanted fat graft volumes. In the early postoperative period (7–21 days), breast volume increases more than the implanted volume and then rapidly decreases in the subsequent 30–60 days. High-dose cell-enhanced fat grafts decrease early postsurgical breast edema and significantly improve long-term volume retention. PMID:26579353

  15. Identification of Predictive Gene Markers for Multipotent Stromal Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Bellayr, Ian H; Marklein, Ross A; Lo Surdo, Jessica L; Bauer, Steven R; Puri, Raj K

    2016-06-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) are known for their distinctive ability to differentiate into different cell lineages, such as adipocytes, chondrocytes, and osteocytes. They can be isolated from numerous tissue sources, including bone marrow, adipose tissue, skeletal muscle, and others. Because of their differentiation potential and secretion of growth factors, MSCs are believed to have an inherent quality of regeneration and immune suppression. Cellular expansion is necessary to obtain sufficient numbers for use; however, MSCs exhibit a reduced capacity for proliferation and differentiation after several rounds of passaging. In this study, gene markers of MSC proliferation were identified and evaluated for their ability to predict proliferative quality. Microarray data of human bone marrow-derived MSCs were correlated with two proliferation assays. A collection of 24 genes were observed to significantly correlate with both proliferation assays (|r| >0.70) for eight MSC lines at multiple passages. These 24 identified genes were then confirmed using an additional set of MSCs from eight new donors using reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). The proliferative potential of the second set of MSCs was measured for each donor/passage for confluency fraction, fraction of EdU+ cells, and population doubling time. The second set of MSCs exhibited a greater proliferative potential at passage 4 in comparison to passage 8, which was distinguishable by 15 genes; however, only seven of the genes (BIRC5, CCNA2, CDC20, CDK1, PBK, PLK1, and SPC25) demonstrated significant correlation with MSC proliferation regardless of passage. Our analyses revealed that correlation between gene expression and proliferation was consistently reduced with the inclusion of non-MSC cell lines; therefore, this set of seven genes may be more strongly associated with MSC proliferative quality. Our results pave the way to determine the quality of an MSC population for a

  16. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Jacob L.; O'Connor, Deirdre M.; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  17. Gene and cell survival: lessons from prokaryotic plasmid R1.

    PubMed

    de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo; Pimentel, Belén

    2007-05-01

    Plasmids are units of extrachromosomal genetic inheritance found in all kingdoms of life. They replicate autonomously and undergo stable propagation in their hosts. Despite their small size, plasmid replication and gene expression constitute a metabolic burden that compromises their stable maintenance in host cells. This pressure has driven the evolution of strategies to increase plasmid stability--a process accelerated by the ability of plasmids to transfer horizontally between cells and to exchange genetic material with their host and other resident episomal DNAs. These abilities drive the adaptability and diversity of plasmids and their host cells. Indeed, survival functions found in plasmids have chromosomal homologues that have an essential role in cellular responses to stress. An analysis of these functions in the prokaryotic plasmid R1, and of their intricate interrelationships, reveals remarkable overall similarities with other gene- and cell-survival strategies found within and beyond the prokaryotic world. PMID:17471262

  18. Gene essentiality and synthetic lethality in haploid human cells.

    PubMed

    Blomen, Vincent A; Májek, Peter; Jae, Lucas T; Bigenzahn, Johannes W; Nieuwenhuis, Joppe; Staring, Jacqueline; Sacco, Roberto; van Diemen, Ferdy R; Olk, Nadine; Stukalov, Alexey; Marceau, Caleb; Janssen, Hans; Carette, Jan E; Bennett, Keiryn L; Colinge, Jacques; Superti-Furga, Giulio; Brummelkamp, Thijn R

    2015-11-27

    Although the genes essential for life have been identified in less complex model organisms, their elucidation in human cells has been hindered by technical barriers. We used extensive mutagenesis in haploid human cells to identify approximately 2000 genes required for optimal fitness under culture conditions. To study the principles of genetic interactions in human cells, we created a synthetic lethality network focused on the secretory pathway based exclusively on mutations. This revealed a genetic cross-talk governing Golgi homeostasis, an additional subunit of the human oligosaccharyltransferase complex, and a phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase β adaptor hijacked by viruses. The synthetic lethality map parallels observations made in yeast and projects a route forward to reveal genetic networks in diverse aspects of human cell biology. PMID:26472760

  19. Gene, Stem Cell, and Alternative Therapies for SCA 1.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Jacob L; O'Connor, Deirdre M; Donsante, Anthony; Boulis, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia 1 is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by neurodegeneration and motor dysfunction. In disease pathogenesis, polyglutamine expansion within Ataxin-1, a gene involved in transcriptional repression, causes protein nuclear inclusions to form. Most notably, neuronal dysfunction presents in Purkinje cells. However, the effect of mutant Ataxin-1 is not entirely understood. Two mouse models are employed to represent spinocerebellar ataxia 1, a B05 transgenic model that specifically expresses mutant Ataxin-1 in Purkinje cells, and a Sca1 154Q/2Q model that inserts the polyglutamine expansion into the mouse Ataxin-1 locus so that the mutant Ataxin-1 is expressed in all cells that express Ataxin-1. This review aims to summarize and evaluate the wide variety of therapies proposed for spinocerebellar ataxia 1, specifically gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:27570504

  20. Invitations to Cells: Life's Building Blocks. Teacher-Friendly Science Activities with Reproducible Handouts in English and Spanish. Grades 3-5. Living Things Science Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Camp, Carole Ann, Ed.

    This booklet, one of six in the Living Things Science series, presents activities about cells which address basic "Benchmarks" suggested by the American Association for the Advancement of Science for the Living Environment for grades 3-5. Contents include background information, vocabulary (in English and Spanish), materials, procedures, extension…

  1. T-cell intracellular antigens function as tumor suppressor genes

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez-Jiménez, C; Ludeña, M D; Izquierdo, J M

    2015-01-01

    Knockdown of T-cell intracellular antigens TIA1 and TIAR in transformed cells triggers cell proliferation and tumor growth. Using a tetracycline-inducible system, we report here that an increased expression of TIA1 or TIAR in 293 cells results in reduced rates of cell proliferation. Ectopic expression of these proteins abolish endogenous TIA1 and TIAR levels via the regulation of splicing of their pre-mRNAs, and partially represses global translation in a phospho-eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha-dependent manner. This is accompanied by cell cycle arrest at G1/S and cell death through caspase-dependent apoptosis and autophagy. Genome-wide profiling illustrates a selective upregulation of p53 signaling pathway-related genes. Nude mice injected with doxycycline-inducible cells expressing TIA1 or TIAR retard, or even inhibit, growth of xenotumors. Remarkably, low expressions of TIA1 and TIAR correlate with poor prognosis in patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma. These findings strongly support the concept that TIA proteins act as tumor suppressor genes. PMID:25741594

  2. Identification of novel Notch target genes in T cell leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Chadwick, Nicholas; Zeef, Leo; Portillo, Virginia; Fennessy, Carl; Warrander, Fiona; Hoyle, Sarah; Buckle, Anne-Marie

    2009-01-01

    Background Dysregulated Notch signalling is believed to play an important role in the development and maintenance of T cell leukaemia. At a cellular level, Notch signalling promotes proliferation and inhibits apoptosis of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL) cells. In this study we aimed to identify novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling in the T-ALL cell line, Jurkat. Results RNA was prepared from Jurkat cells retrovirally transduced with an empty vector (GFP-alone) or vectors containing constitutively active forms of Notch (N1ΔE or N3ΔE), and used for Affymetrix microarray analysis. A subset of genes found to be regulated by Notch was chosen for real-time PCR validation and in some cases, validation at the protein level, using several Notch-transduced T-ALL and non-T-ALL leukaemic cell lines. As expected, several known transcriptional target of Notch, such as HES1 and Deltex, were found to be overexpressed in Notch-transduced cells, however, many novel transcriptional targets of Notch signalling were identified using this approach. These included the T cell costimulatory molecule CD28, the anti-apoptotic protein GIMAP5, and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (1D1). Conclusion The identification of such downstream Notch target genes provides insights into the mechanisms of Notch function in T cell leukaemia, and may help identify novel therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:19508709

  3. Identification and Validation of Housekeeping Genes for Gene Expression Analysis of Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lemma, Silvia; Avnet, Sofia; Salerno, Manuela; Chano, Tokuhiro; Baldini, Nicola

    2016-01-01

    The characterization of cancer stem cell (CSC) subpopulation, through the comparison of the gene expression signature in respect to the native cancer cells, is particularly important for the identification of novel and more effective anticancer strategies. However, CSC have peculiar characteristics in terms of adhesion, growth, and metabolism that possibly implies a different modulation of the expression of the most commonly used housekeeping genes (HKG), like b-actin (ACTB). Although it is crucial to identify which are the most stable HKG genes to normalize the data derived from quantitative Real-Time PCR analysis to obtain robust and consistent results, an exhaustive validation of reference genes in CSC is still missing. Here, we isolated CSC spheres from different musculoskeletal sarcomas and carcinomas as a model to investigate on the stability of the mRNA expression of 15 commonly used HKG, in respect to the native cells. The selected genes were analysed for the variation coefficient and compared using the popular algorithms NormFinder and geNorm to evaluate stability ranking. As a result, we found that: 1) Tata Binding Protein (TBP), Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ), Peptidylprolyl isomerase A (PPIA), and Hydroxymethylbilane synthase (HMBS) are the most stable HKG for the comparison between CSC and native cells; 2) at least four reference genes should be considered for robust results; 3) the use of ACTB should not be recommended, 4) specific HKG should be considered for studies that are focused only on a specific tumor type, like sarcoma or carcinoma. Our results should be taken in consideration for all the studies of gene expression analysis of CSC, and will substantially contribute for future investigations aimed to identify novel anticancer therapy based on CSC targeting. PMID:26894994

  4. Distinguishing human cell types based on housekeeping gene signatures.

    PubMed

    Oyolu, Chuba; Zakharia, Fouad; Baker, Julie

    2012-03-01

    'In this report, we use single cell gene expression to identify transcriptional patterns emerging during the differentiation of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) into the endodermal lineage. Endoderm-specific transcripts are highly variable between individual CXCR4(+) endodermal cells, suggesting that either the cells generated from in vitro differentiation are distinct or that these embryonic cells tolerate a high degree of transcript variability. Housekeeping transcripts, on the other hand, are far more consistently expressed within the same cellular population. However, when we compare the levels of housekeeping transcripts between hESCs and derived endoderm, patterns emerge that can be used to clearly separate the two embryonic cell types. We further compared four additional human cell types, including 293T, induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC), HepG2, and endoderm-derived iPSC. In each case, the relative levels of housekeeping transcripts defined a particular cell fate. Interestingly, we find that three transcripts, LDHA, NONO, and ACTB, contribute the most to this diversity and together serve to segregate all six cell types. Overall, this suggests that levels of housekeeping transcripts, which are expressed within all cells, can be leveraged to distinguish between human cell types and thus may serve as important biomarkers for stem cell biology and other disciplines. PMID:22162332

  5. Dendrimers as synthetic gene vectors: Cell membrane attachment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voulgarakis, N. K.; Rasmussen, K. Ø.; Welch, P. M.

    2009-04-01

    We present molecular-level simulations of dendrimer/DNA complexes in the presence of a model cell membrane. We determine the required conditions for the complex to arrive intact at the membrane, and the lifetime of the complex as it resides attached to the membrane. Our simulations directly pertain to critical issues arising in emerging gene delivery therapeutic applications, where a molecular carrier is required to deliver DNA segments to the interior of living cells.

  6. The Effect of Adenovirus-Mediated Gene Expression of FHIT in Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zandi, Roza; Xu, Kai; Poulsen, Hans S.; Roth, Jack A.; Ji, Lin

    2012-01-01

    The candidate tumor suppressor fragile histidine traid (FHIT) is frequently inactivated in small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Mutations in the p53 gene also occur in the majority of SCLC leading to the accumulation of the mutant protein. Here we evaluated the effect of FHIT gene therapy alone or in combination with the mutant p53-reactivating molecule, PRIMA-1Met/APR-246, in SCLC. Overexpression of FHIT by recombinant adenoviral vector (Ad-FHIT)-mediated gene transfer in SCLC cells inhibited their growth by inducing apoptosis and when combined with PRIMA-1Met/APR-246, a synergistic cell growth inhibition was achieved. PMID:22085272

  7. A Review of Gene Delivery and Stem Cell Based Therapies for Regenerating Inner Ear Hair Cells

    PubMed Central

    Devarajan, Keerthana; Staecker, Hinrich; Detamore, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Sensory neural hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction have become the most common forms of sensory defects, affecting millions of people worldwide. Developing effective therapies to restore hearing loss is challenging, owing to the limited regenerative capacity of the inner ear hair cells. With recent advances in understanding the developmental biology of mammalian and non-mammalian hair cells a variety of strategies have emerged to restore lost hair cells are being developed. Two predominant strategies have developed to restore hair cells: transfer of genes responsible for hair cell genesis and replacement of missing cells via transfer of stem cells. In this review article, we evaluate the use of several genes involved in hair cell regeneration, the advantages and disadvantages of the different viral vectors employed in inner ear gene delivery and the insights gained from the use of embryonic, adult and induced pluripotent stem cells in generating inner ear hair cells. Understanding the role of genes, vectors and stem cells in therapeutic strategies led us to explore potential solutions to overcome the limitations associated with their use in hair cell regeneration. PMID:24956306

  8. Toward a stem cell gene therapy for breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, ZongYi; Liu, Ying; Tuve, Sebastian; Xun, Ye; Fan, Xiaolong; Min, Liang; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Disis, Mary Leonora

    2009-01-01

    Current approaches for treatment of late-stage breast cancer rarely result in a long-term cure. In part this is due to tumor stroma that prevents access of systemically or intratumorally applied therapeutics. We propose a stem cell gene therapy approach for controlled tumor stroma degradation that uses the pathophysiologic process of recruitment of inflammatory cells into the tumor. This approach involves genetic modification of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and their subsequent transplantation into tumor-bearing mice. We show that inducible, intratumoral expression of relaxin (Rlx) either by transplanting tumor cells that contained the Rlx gene or by transplantation of mouse HSCs transduced with an Rlx-expressing lentivirus vector delays tumor growth in a mouse model of breast cancer. The antitumor effect of Rlx was mediated through degradation of tumor stroma, which provided increased access of infiltrating antitumor immune cells to their target tumor cells. Furthermore, we have shown in a human/mouse chimeric model that genetically modified HSCs expressing a transgene can access the tumor site. Our findings are relevant for cancer gene therapy and immunotherapy. PMID:19329780

  9. Rotary head type reproducing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Takayama, Nobutoshi; Edakubo, Hiroo; Kozuki, Susumu; Takei, Masahiro; Nagasawa, Kenichi

    1986-01-01

    In an apparatus of the kind arranged to reproduce, with a plurality of rotary heads, an information signal from a record bearing medium having many recording tracks which are parallel to each other with the information signal recorded therein and with a plurality of different pilot signals of different frequencies also recorded one by one, one in each of the recording tracks, a plurality of different reference signals of different frequencies are simultaneously generated. A tracking error is detected by using the different reference signals together with the pilot signals which are included in signals reproduced from the plurality of rotary heads.

  10. Autophagy protects human brain microvascular endothelial cells against methylglyoxal-induced injuries, reproducible in a cerebral ischemic model in diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Fang, Lili; Li, Xue; Zhong, Yinbo; Yu, Jing; Yu, Lina; Dai, Haibin; Yan, Min

    2015-10-01

    Cerebral microvascular endothelial cells (ECs) are crucial for brain vascular repair and maintenance, but their physiological function may be impaired during ischemic stroke and diabetes. Methylglyoxal (MGO), a reactive dicarbonyl produced during glucose metabolism, could exacerbate ischemia-induced EC injury and dysfunction. We investigated the protective effect of autophagy on cultured human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) that underwent MGO treatment. A further study was conducted to explore the underlying mechanisms of the protective effect. Autophagic activity was assessed by evaluating protein levels, using western blot. 3-methyladenine (3-MA), bafilomycin A1, ammonium chloride (AC), Beclin 1 siRNA, and chloroquine (CQ) were used to cause autophagy inhibition. Alarmar blue assay and lactate dehydrogenase release assay were used to evaluate cell viability. Streptozotocin was administered to induce type I diabetes in rats and post-permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion was performed to elicit cerebral ischemia. Blood-brain barrier permeability was also assessed. Our study found that MGO reduced HBMEC cell viability in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, and triggered the responsive autophagy activation. Autophagy inhibitors bafilomycin A1, AC, 3-MA, and BECN1 siRNA exacerbated MGO-induced HBMEC injury. FAK phosphorylation inhibitor PF573228 inhibited MGO-triggered autophagy and enhanced lactate dehydrogenase release. Meanwhile, similar autophagy activation in brain vascular ECs was observed during permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced cerebral ischemia in diabetic rats, while chloroquine-induced autophagy inhibition enhanced blood-brain barrier permeability. Taken together, our study indicates that autophagy triggered by MGO defends HBMEC against injuries. PMID:26251121

  11. MAMMALIAN CELL GENE MUTATION ASSAYS WORKING GROUP REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mammalian cell gene mutation assays have been used for many years and the diversity of the available systems attests to the varied methods found to grow mammalian dells and detect mutations. s part of the International Workshop on Standardization of Genotoxicity Test Procedures, ...

  12. Gene targeting in embryonic stem cells, II: conditional technologies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genome modification via transgenesis has allowed researchers to link genotype and phenotype as an alternative approach to the characterization of random mutations through evolution. The synergy of technologies from the fields of embryonic stem (ES) cells, gene knockouts, and protein-mediated recombi...

  13. Tolerance Associated Gene Expression following Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Pidala, Joseph; Bloom, Gregory C.; Eschrich, Steven; Sarwal, Minnie; Enkemann, Steve; Betts, Brian C.; Beato, Francisca; Yoder, Sean; Anasetti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Biologic markers of immune tolerance may facilitate tailoring of immune suppression duration after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). In a cross-sectional study, peripheral blood samples were obtained from tolerant (n = 15, median 38.5 months post-HCT) and non-tolerant (n = 17, median 39.5 post-HCT) HCT recipients and healthy control subjects (n = 10) for analysis of immune cell subsets and differential gene expression. There were no significant differences in immune subsets across groups. We identified 281 probe sets unique to the tolerant (TOL) group and 122 for non-tolerant (non-TOL). These were enriched for process networks including NK cell cytotoxicity, antigen presentation, lymphocyte proliferation, and cell cycle and apoptosis. Differential gene expression was enriched for CD56, CD66, and CD14 human lineage-specific gene expression. Differential expression of 20 probe sets between groups was sufficient to develop a classifier with > 90% accuracy, correctly classifying 14/15 TOL cases and 15/17 non-TOL cases. These data suggest that differential gene expression can be utilized to accurately classify tolerant patients following HCT. Prospective investigation of immune tolerance biologic markers is warranted. PMID:25774806

  14. Lentiviral Hematopoietic Stem Cell Gene Therapy in Inherited Metabolic Disorders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Abstract After more than 20 years of development, lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy has entered the stage of initial clinical implementation for immune deficiencies and storage disorders. This brief review summarizes the development and applications, focusing on the lysosomal enzyme deficiencies, especially Pompe disease. PMID:25184354

  15. Cell targeted gene delivery system based on modified pectin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus pectin modified with various amine groups have been studied for its potential as a novel non-viral gene delivery carrier. The modified cationic pectin was able to condense DNA and mediate transfection in a cell type specific manner. The modified pectin seems to be a promising carrier, attra...

  16. A Gene Expression Signature for Chemoradiosensitivity of Colorectal Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Spitzner, Melanie; Emons, Georg; Kramer, Frank; Gaedcke, Jochen; Rave-Fraenk, Margret; Scharf, Jens-Gerd; Burfeind, Peter; Becker, Heinz; Beissbarth, Tim; Ghadimi, B. Michael; Ried, Thomas; Grade, Marian

    2010-11-15

    Purpose: The standard treatment of patients with locally advanced rectal cancers comprises preoperative 5-fluorouracil-based chemoradiotherapy followed by standardized surgery. However, tumor response to multimodal treatment has varied greatly, ranging from complete resistance to complete pathologic regression. The prediction of the response is, therefore, an important clinical need. Methods and Materials: To establish in vitro models for studying the molecular basis of this heterogeneous tumor response, we exposed 12 colorectal cancer cell lines to 3 {mu}M of 5-fluorouracil and 2 Gy of radiation. The differences in treatment sensitivity were then correlated with the pretherapeutic gene expression profiles of these cell lines. Results: We observed a heterogeneous response, with surviving fractions ranging from 0.28 to 0.81, closely recapitulating clinical reality. Using a linear model analysis, we identified 4,796 features whose expression levels correlated significantly with the sensitivity to chemoradiotherapy (Q <.05), including many genes involved in the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway or cell cycle genes. These data have suggested a potential relevance of the insulin and Wnt signaling pathways for treatment response, and we identified STAT3, RASSF1, DOK3, and ERBB2 as potential therapeutic targets. The microarray measurements were independently validated for a subset of these genes using real-time polymerase chain reactions. Conclusion: We are the first to report a gene expression signature for the in vitro chemoradiosensitivity of colorectal cancer cells. We anticipate that this analysis will unveil molecular biomarkers predictive of the response of rectal cancers to chemoradiotherapy and enable the identification of genes that could serve as targets to sensitize a priori resistant primary tumors.

  17. Expression of the somatostatin gene in human astrocytoma cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Mercure, L; Tannenbaum, G S; Schipper, H M; Phaneuf, D; Wainberg, M A

    1996-01-01

    Somatostatin (somatotropin release-inhibiting hormone; SRIH) has been demonstrated in neurons of the central nervous system (CNS) as well as in endocrine cells of the pancreas and gastrointestinal tract and can suppress various immune functions including lymphocyte proliferation, immunoglobulin synthesis, and cytokine production. Since astrocytes possess antigen-presenting activity and can secrete a wide array of immunoregulatory and inflammatory cytokines, we studied SRIH gene expression in both astrocyte cell lines and mitogen-stimulated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes from healthy donors. We now report by means of a complementary DNA-based reverse transcription PCR that differential levels of SRIH mRNA were expressed in 9 of 11 human astrocytoma cell lines tested but were undetectable in activated peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes as well as in a variety of human lymphocyte and monocyte cell lines. The synthesis and secretion of SRIH protein by astrocytoma cells that expressed SRIH transcripts were confirmed by specific radioimmunoassay of cell culture fluids. These findings support the notion that SRIH gene expression occurs in human astrocytoma cells but not in mature lymphoid cells of the immune system. PMID:8991628

  18. Isolation of genes predominantly expressed in guard cells and epidermal cells of Nicotiana glauca.

    PubMed

    Smart, L B; Cameron, K D; Bennett, A B

    2000-04-01

    Guard cells are specialized and metabolically active cells which arise during the differentiation of the epidermis. Using Nicotiana glauca epidermal peels as a source of purified guard cells, we have constructed a cDNA library from guard cell RNA. In order to isolate genes that are predominantly expressed in guard cells, we performed a differential screen of this library, comparing the hybridization of a radiolabeled cDNA probe synthesized from guard cell RNA to that from a mesophyll cell cDNA probe. Sixteen clones were isolated based on their greater level of hybridization with the guard cell probe. Of these, eight had high homology to lipid transfer protein (LTP), two were similar to glycine-rich protein (GRP), and one displayed high homology to proline-rich proteins from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtPRP2, AtPRP4) and from potato guard cells (GPP). Northern analysis confirmed that one or more NgLTP genes, NgGRP1, and NgGPP1 are all differentially expressed, with highest levels in guard cells, and low or undetectable levels in mesophyll cells and in roots. In addition, all are induced to some degree in drought-stressed guard cells. NgLTP and NgGRP1 expression was localized by in situ hybridization to the guard cells and pavement cells in the epidermis. NgGRP1 expression was also detected in cells of the vasculature. Genomic Southern analysis indicated that LTP is encoded by a family of highly similar genes in N. glauca. This work has identified members of a subset of epidermis- and guard cell-predominant genes, whose protein products are likely to contribute to the unique properties acquired by guard cells and pavement cells during differentiation. PMID:10890533

  19. Reproducible Bioinformatics Research for Biologists

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This book chapter describes the current Big Data problem in Bioinformatics and the resulting issues with performing reproducible computational research. The core of the chapter provides guidelines and summaries of current tools/techniques that a noncomputational researcher would need to learn to pe...

  20. Cell Cycle Gene Networks Are Associated with Melanoma Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Watkins, Wendy; Araki, Hiromitsu; Tamada, Yoshinori; Muthukaruppan, Anita; Ranjard, Louis; Derkac, Eliane; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru; Crampin, Edmund J.; Print, Cristin G.

    2012-01-01

    Background Our understanding of the molecular pathways that underlie melanoma remains incomplete. Although several published microarray studies of clinical melanomas have provided valuable information, we found only limited concordance between these studies. Therefore, we took an in vitro functional genomics approach to understand melanoma molecular pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings Affymetrix microarray data were generated from A375 melanoma cells treated in vitro with siRNAs against 45 transcription factors and signaling molecules. Analysis of this data using unsupervised hierarchical clustering and Bayesian gene networks identified proliferation-association RNA clusters, which were co-ordinately expressed across the A375 cells and also across melanomas from patients. The abundance in metastatic melanomas of these cellular proliferation clusters and their putative upstream regulators was significantly associated with patient prognosis. An 8-gene classifier derived from gene network hub genes correctly classified the prognosis of 23/26 metastatic melanoma patients in a cross-validation study. Unlike the RNA clusters associated with cellular proliferation described above, co-ordinately expressed RNA clusters associated with immune response were clearly identified across melanoma tumours from patients but not across the siRNA-treated A375 cells, in which immune responses are not active. Three uncharacterised genes, which the gene networks predicted to be upstream of apoptosis- or cellular proliferation-associated RNAs, were found to significantly alter apoptosis and cell number when over-expressed in vitro. Conclusions/Significance This analysis identified co-expression of RNAs that encode functionally-related proteins, in particular, proliferation-associated RNA clusters that are linked to melanoma patient prognosis. Our analysis suggests that A375 cells in vitro may be valid models in which to study the gene expression modules that underlie some melanoma

  1. Regulation of cell-to-cell variability in divergent gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Chao; Wu, Shuyang; Pocetti, Christopher; Bai, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Cell-to-cell variability (noise) is an important feature of gene expression that impacts cell fitness and development. The regulatory mechanism of this variability is not fully understood. Here we investigate the effect on gene expression noise in divergent gene pairs (DGPs). We generated reporters driven by divergent promoters, rearranged their gene order, and probed their expressions using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and single-molecule fluorescence in situ hybridization (smFISH). We show that two genes in a co-regulated DGP have higher expression covariance compared with the separate, tandem and convergent configurations, and this higher covariance is caused by more synchronized firing of the divergent transcriptions. For differentially regulated DGPs, the regulatory signal of one gene can stochastically ‘leak' to the other, causing increased gene expression noise. We propose that the DGPs' function in limiting or promoting gene expression noise may enhance or compromise cell fitness, providing an explanation for the conservation pattern of DGPs. PMID:27010670

  2. Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound Gene Transfer into Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Kota; Kaneko, Yukio; Tei, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2007-05-01

    Ultrasound finds many applications in the medical field, including ultrasound imaging, non-invasive treatment of tumors and lithotripsy. Ultrasound also has a potential to deliver some therapeutic materials, such as genes, drugs or proteins into cells. It is known that microbubbles can improve the delivery efficiency. It is believed that therapeutic materials can pass through the cell membrane whose permeability is increased by microbubble destruction or the ultrasound pressure. In this study, we investigated the delivery of GFP plasmid gene into the fibroblast cells. Ultrasound (frequency = 2.1 MHz, duty cycle = 10%) was used to irradiate the cultured cells through a medium that contains microbubbles and GFP plasmid. GFP plasmid transfection could be easily observed by fluorescence microscopy. Ultrasound irradiation under a variety of conditions resulted in successful GFP plasmid delivery. Microbubbles enhanced GFP transfection, and conclusions were drawn as to the relationship between gene transfection and various ultrasound exposure parameters. We also investigated the effect of ultrasound intensity on cell viability.

  3. Performance reproducibility index for classification

    PubMed Central

    Yousefi, Mohammadmahdi R.; Dougherty, Edward R.

    2012-01-01

    Motivation: A common practice in biomarker discovery is to decide whether a large laboratory experiment should be carried out based on the results of a preliminary study on a small set of specimens. Consideration of the efficacy of this approach motivates the introduction of a probabilistic measure, for whether a classifier showing promising results in a small-sample preliminary study will perform similarly on a large independent sample. Given the error estimate from the preliminary study, if the probability of reproducible error is low, then there is really no purpose in substantially allocating more resources to a large follow-on study. Indeed, if the probability of the preliminary study providing likely reproducible results is small, then why even perform the preliminary study? Results: This article introduces a reproducibility index for classification, measuring the probability that a sufficiently small error estimate on a small sample will motivate a large follow-on study. We provide a simulation study based on synthetic distribution models that possess known intrinsic classification difficulties and emulate real-world scenarios. We also set up similar simulations on four real datasets to show the consistency of results. The reproducibility indices for different distributional models, real datasets and classification schemes are empirically calculated. The effects of reporting and multiple-rule biases on the reproducibility index are also analyzed. Availability: We have implemented in C code the synthetic data distribution model, classification rules, feature selection routine and error estimation methods. The source code is available at http://gsp.tamu.edu/Publications/supplementary/yousefi12a/. Supplementary simulation results are also included. Contact: edward@ece.tamu.edu Supplementary Information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:22954625

  4. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-06-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  5. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is facilitated by mutations in genes repressing meristematic cell divisions.

    PubMed Central

    Mordhorst, A P; Voerman, K J; Hartog, M V; Meijer, E A; van Went, J; Koornneef, M; de Vries, S C

    1998-01-01

    Embryogenesis in plants can commence from cells other than the fertilized egg cell. Embryogenesis initiated from somatic cells in vitro is an attractive system for studying early embryonic stages when they are accessible to experimental manipulation. Somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis offers the additional advantage that many zygotic embryo mutants can be studied under in vitro conditions. Two systems are available. The first employs immature zygotic embryos as starting material, yielding continuously growing embryogenic cultures in liquid medium. This is possible in at least 11 ecotypes. A second, more efficient and reproducible system, employing the primordia timing mutant (pt allelic to hpt, cop2, and amp1), was established. A significant advantage of the pt mutant is that intact seeds, germinated in 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2, 4-D) containing liquid medium, give rise to stable embryonic cell cultures, circumventing tedious hand dissection of immature zygotic embryos. pt zygotic embryos are first distinguishable from wild type at early heart stage by a broader embryonic shoot apical meristem (SAM). In culture, embryogenic clusters originate from the enlarged SAMs. pt somatic embryos had all characteristic embryo pattern elements seen in zygotic embryos, but with higher and more variable numbers of cells. Embryogenic cell cultures were also established from seedling, of other mutants with enlarged SAMs, such as clavata (clv). pt clv double mutants showed additive effects on SAM size and an even higher frequency of seedlings producing embryogenic cell lines. pt clv double mutant plants had very short fasciated inflorescence stems and additive effects on the number of rosette leaves. This suggests that the PT and CLV genes act in independent pathways that control SAM size. An increased population of noncommitted SAM cells may be responsible for facilitated establishment of somatic embryogenesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:9611173

  6. [Strategies for regulating multiple genes in microbial cell factories].

    PubMed

    Jiang, Tianyi; Li, Lixiang; Ma, Cuiqing; Xu, Ping

    2010-10-01

    Microbial metabolic engineering and synthetic biology are important disciplines of microbial technology nowadays. Microbial cells are fast growing, easy to be cultivated in large scale, clear in genetic background and convenient in genetic modification. They play an important role in many domains. Microbial cell factory means an artificial microbial metabolic system that can be used in chemical production. The construction of a microbial cell factory needs transferring of multiple genes or a whole metabolic pathway, which may cause some problems such as metabolism imbalance and accumulation of mesostates. This review focuses on the regulation strategies of different levels involving simultaneous engagement of multiple genes. Future perspectives on the development of this domain were also discussed. PMID:21218630

  7. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  8. Single-cell gene expression profiling reveals functional heterogeneity of undifferentiated human epidermal cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, David W. M.; Jensen, Kim B.; Trotter, Matthew W. B.; Connelly, John T.; Broad, Simon; Watt, Fiona M.

    2013-01-01

    Human epidermal stem cells express high levels of β1 integrins, delta-like 1 (DLL1) and the EGFR antagonist LRIG1. However, there is cell-to-cell variation in the relative abundance of DLL1 and LRIG1 mRNA transcripts. Single-cell global gene expression profiling showed that undifferentiated cells fell into two clusters delineated by expression of DLL1 and its binding partner syntenin. The DLL1+ cluster had elevated expression of genes associated with endocytosis, integrin-mediated adhesion and receptor tyrosine kinase signalling. Differentially expressed genes were not independently regulated, as overexpression of DLL1 alone or together with LRIG1 led to the upregulation of other genes in the DLL1+ cluster. Overexpression of DLL1 and LRIG1 resulted in enhanced extracellular matrix adhesion and increased caveolin-dependent EGFR endocytosis. Further characterisation of CD46, one of the genes upregulated in the DLL1+ cluster, revealed it to be a novel cell surface marker of human epidermal stem cells. Cells with high endogenous levels of CD46 expressed high levels of β1 integrin and DLL1 and were highly adhesive and clonogenic. Knockdown of CD46 decreased proliferative potential and β1 integrin-mediated adhesion. Thus, the previously unknown heterogeneity revealed by our studies results in differences in the interaction of undifferentiated basal keratinocytes with their environment. PMID:23482486

  9. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death

    PubMed Central

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  10. DNA methylation and differential gene regulation in photoreceptor cell death.

    PubMed

    Farinelli, P; Perera, A; Arango-Gonzalez, B; Trifunovic, D; Wagner, M; Carell, T; Biel, M; Zrenner, E; Michalakis, S; Paquet-Durand, F; Ekström, P A R

    2014-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) defines a group of inherited degenerative retinal diseases causing progressive loss of photoreceptors. To this day, RP is still untreatable and rational treatment development will require a thorough understanding of the underlying cell death mechanisms. Methylation of the DNA base cytosine by DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs) is an important epigenetic factor regulating gene expression, cell differentiation, cell death, and survival. Previous studies suggested an involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in RP, and in this study, increased cytosine methylation was detected in dying photoreceptors in the rd1, rd2, P23H, and S334ter rodent models for RP. Ultrastructural analysis of photoreceptor nuclear morphology in the rd1 mouse model for RP revealed a severely altered chromatin structure during retinal degeneration that coincided with an increased expression of the DNMT isozyme DNMT3a. To identify disease-specific differentially methylated DNA regions (DMRs) on a genomic level, we immunoprecipitated methylated DNA fragments and subsequently analyzed them with a targeted microarray. Genome-wide comparison of DMRs between rd1 and wild-type retina revealed hypermethylation of genes involved in cell death and survival as well as cell morphology and nervous system development. When correlating DMRs with gene expression data, we found that hypermethylation occurred alongside transcriptional repression. Consistently, motif analysis showed that binding sites of several important transcription factors for retinal physiology were hypermethylated in the mutant model, which also correlated with transcriptional silencing of their respective target genes. Finally, inhibition of DNMTs in rd1 organotypic retinal explants using decitabine resulted in a substantial reduction of photoreceptor cell death, suggesting inhibition of DNA methylation as a potential novel treatment in RP. PMID:25476906

  11. Identifying genes that mediate anthracyline toxicity in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Frick, Amber; Suzuki, Oscar T.; Benton, Cristina; Parks, Bethany; Fedoriw, Yuri; Richards, Kristy L.; Thomas, Russell S.; Wiltshire, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The role of the immune system in response to chemotherapeutic agents remains elusive. The interpatient variability observed in immune and chemotherapeutic cytotoxic responses is likely, at least in part, due to complex genetic differences. Through the use of a panel of genetically diverse mouse inbred strains, we developed a drug screening platform aimed at identifying genes underlying these chemotherapeutic cytotoxic effects on immune cells. Using genome-wide association studies (GWAS), we identified four genome-wide significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that contributed to the sensitivity of doxorubicin and idarubicin in immune cells. Of particular interest, a locus on chromosome 16 was significantly associated with cell viability following idarubicin administration (p = 5.01 × 10−8). Within this QTL lies App, which encodes amyloid beta precursor protein. Comparison of dose-response curves verified that T-cells in App knockout mice were more sensitive to idarubicin than those of C57BL/6J control mice (p < 0.05). In conclusion, the cellular screening approach coupled with GWAS led to the identification and subsequent validation of a gene involved in T-cell viability after idarubicin treatment. Previous studies have suggested a role for App in in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to anticancer agents; the overexpression of App enhances resistance, while the knockdown of this gene is deleterious to cell viability. Further investigations should include performing mechanistic studies, validating additional genes from the GWAS, including Ppfia1 and Ppfibp1, and ultimately translating the findings to in vivo and human studies. PMID:25926793

  12. Optimizing T-cell receptor gene therapy for hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Morris, Emma C; Stauss, Hans J

    2016-06-30

    Recent advances in genetic engineering have enabled the delivery of clinical trials using patient T cells redirected to recognize tumor-associated antigens. The most dramatic results have been seen with T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19, a differentiation antigen expressed in B cells and B lineage malignancies. We propose that antigen expression in nonmalignant cells may contribute to the efficacy of T-cell therapy by maintaining effector function and promoting memory. Although CAR recognition is limited to cell surface structures, T-cell receptors (TCRs) can recognize intracellular proteins. This not only expands the range of tumor-associated self-antigens that are amenable for T-cell therapy, but also allows TCR targeting of the cancer mutagenome. We will highlight biological bottlenecks that potentially limit mutation-specific T-cell therapy and may require high-avidity TCRs that are capable of activating effector function when the concentrations of mutant peptides are low. Unexpectedly, modified TCRs with artificially high affinities function poorly in response to low concentration of cognate peptide but pose an increased safety risk as they may respond optimally to cross-reactive peptides. Recent gene-editing tools, such as transcription activator-like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, provide a platform to delete endogenous TCR and HLA genes, which removes alloreactivity and decreases immunogenicity of third-party T cells. This represents an important step toward generic off-the-shelf T-cell products that may be used in the future for the treatment of large numbers of patients. PMID:27207802

  13. Arginine-Rich Polyplexes for Gene Delivery to Neuronal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Viola B.; Labhasetwar, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal gene therapy potentially offers an effective therapeutic intervention to cure or slow the progression of neurological diseases. However, neuronal cells are difficult to transfect with nonviral vectors, and in vivo their transport across the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is inefficient. We synthesized a series of arginine-rich oligopeptides, grafted with polyethyleneimine (PEI) and modified with a short-chain polyethylene glycol (PEG). We hypothesized that the arginine would enhance cellular uptake and transport of these polyplexes across the BBB, with PEG imparting biocompatibility and “stealth” properties and PEI facilitating DNA condensation and gene transfection. The optimized composition of the polyplexes demonstrated hemocompatibility with red blood cells, causing no lysis or aggregation, and showed significantly better cytocompatibility than PEI in vitro. Polyplexes formulated with luciferase-expressing plasmid DNA could transfect rat primary astrocytes and neurons in vitro. Confocal imaging data showed efficient cellular uptake of DNA and its sustained intracellular retention and nuclear localization with polyplexes. Intravenous administration of the optimized polyplexes in mice led to gene expression in the brain, which upon further immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated gene expression in neurons. In conclusion, we have successfully designed a nonviral vector for in vitro and in vivo neuronal gene delivery. PMID:26000961

  14. Firefly luciferase gene: structure and expression in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    de Wet, J R; Wood, K V; DeLuca, M; Helinski, D R; Subramani, S

    1987-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the luciferase gene from the firefly Photinus pyralis was determined from the analysis of cDNA and genomic clones. The gene contains six introns, all less than 60 bases in length. The 5' end of the luciferase mRNA was determined by both S1 nuclease analysis and primer extension. Although the luciferase cDNA clone lacked the six N-terminal codons of the open reading frame, we were able to reconstruct the equivalent of a full-length cDNA using the genomic clone as a source of the missing 5' sequence. The full-length, intronless luciferase gene was inserted into mammalian expression vectors and introduced into monkey (CV-1) cells in which enzymatically active firefly luciferase was transiently expressed. In addition, cell lines stably expressing firefly luciferase were isolated. Deleting a portion of the 5'-untranslated region of the luciferase gene removed an upstream initiation (AUG) codon and resulted in a twofold increase in the level of luciferase expression. The ability of the full-length luciferase gene to activate cryptic or enhancerless promoters was also greatly reduced or eliminated by this 5' deletion. Assaying the expression of luciferase provides a rapid and inexpensive method for monitoring promoter activity. Depending on the instrumentation employed to detect luciferase activity, we estimate this assay to be from 30- to 1,000-fold more sensitive than assaying chloramphenicol acetyltransferase expression. Images PMID:3821727

  15. All-in-one processing of heterogeneous human cell grafts for gene and cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Yvon, Eric S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2016-01-01

    Current cell processing technologies for gene and cell therapies are often slow, expensive, labor intensive and are compromised by high cell losses and poor selectivity thus limiting the efficacy and availability of clinical cell therapies. We employ cell-specific on-demand mechanical intracellular impact from laser pulse-activated plasmonic nanobubbles (PNB) to process heterogeneous human cell grafts ex vivo with dual simultaneous functionality, the high cell type specificity, efficacy and processing rate for transfection of target CD3+ cells and elimination of subsets of unwanted CD25+ cells. The developed bulk flow PNB system selectively processed human cells at a rate of up to 100 million cell/minute, providing simultaneous transfection of CD3+ cells with the therapeutic gene (FKBP12(V36)-p30Caspase9) with the efficacy of 77% and viability 95% (versus 12 and 60%, respectively, for standard electroporation) and elimination of CD25+ cells with 99% efficacy. PNB flow technology can unite and replace several methodologies in an all-in-one universal ex vivo simultaneous procedure to precisely and rapidly prepare a cell graft for therapy. PNB's can process various cell systems including cord blood, stem cells, and bone marrow. PMID:27006970

  16. Stem cells and germ cells: microRNA and gene expression signatures.

    PubMed

    Dyce, Paul William; Toms, Derek; Li, Julang

    2010-04-01

    The study of primordial germ cell development in vivo is hampered by their low numbers and inaccessibility. Recent research has shown the ability of embryonic and adult stem cells to differentiate into primordial germ cells and more mature gametes and this generation of germ cells in vitro may be an attractive model for their study. One of the biggest challenges facing in vitro differentiation of stem cells into primordial germ cells is the lack of markers to clearly distinguish the two. As both cell types originate early in embryonic development they share many pluripotent markers such as OCT4, VASA, FRAGILIS, and NANOG. Genome wide microarray profiling has been used to identify transcriptome patterns unique to primordial germ cells. A more thorough analysis of the temporal and quantitative expression of a panel of genes may be more robust in distinguishing these two cell populations. MicroRNAs, short RNA molecules that have been shown to regulate translation through interactions with mRNA transcripts, have also recently come under investigation for the role they may play in pluripotency. Attempts to elucidate key microRNAs responsible for both stem cell and primordial germ cell characteristics have recently been undertaken. Unique microRNAs, either individually or as global profiles, may also help to distinguish differentiated primordial germ cells from stem cells in vitro. This review will examine gene expression and microRNA signatures in stem cells and germ cells as ways to distinguish these closely related cell types. PMID:20183803

  17. All-in-one processing of heterogeneous human cell grafts for gene and cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Yvon, Eric S; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2016-01-01

    Current cell processing technologies for gene and cell therapies are often slow, expensive, labor intensive and are compromised by high cell losses and poor selectivity thus limiting the efficacy and availability of clinical cell therapies. We employ cell-specific on-demand mechanical intracellular impact from laser pulse-activated plasmonic nanobubbles (PNB) to process heterogeneous human cell grafts ex vivo with dual simultaneous functionality, the high cell type specificity, efficacy and processing rate for transfection of target CD3+ cells and elimination of subsets of unwanted CD25+ cells. The developed bulk flow PNB system selectively processed human cells at a rate of up to 100 million cell/minute, providing simultaneous transfection of CD3+ cells with the therapeutic gene (FKBP12(V36)-p30Caspase9) with the efficacy of 77% and viability 95% (versus 12 and 60%, respectively, for standard electroporation) and elimination of CD25+ cells with 99% efficacy. PNB flow technology can unite and replace several methodologies in an all-in-one universal ex vivo simultaneous procedure to precisely and rapidly prepare a cell graft for therapy. PNB’s can process various cell systems including cord blood, stem cells, and bone marrow. PMID:27006970

  18. Regulation of histone gene expression during the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Meshi, T; Taoka, K I; Iwabuchi, M

    2000-08-01

    The steady-state level of histone mRNAs fluctuates coordinately with chromosomal DNA synthesis during the cell cycle. Such an S phase-specific expression pattern results from transcriptional activation of histone genes coupled with the onset of replication and from transcriptional repression of the genes as well as specific destabilization of histone mRNAs around the end of the S phase. Proliferation-coupled and S phase-specific expression of histone genes is primarily achieved by the activities of the proximal promoter regions, where several conserved cis-acting elements have been identified. Among them, three kinds of Oct-containing composite elements (OCEs) play a pivotal role in S phase-specific transcriptional activation. Other ones, such as Nona, solo-Oct, and CCGTC motifs, appear to modulate the functions of OCEs to enhance or repress the transcriptional level, possibly depending on the state of the cells. Here, we review the growing evidence concerning the regulatory mechanisms by which plant histone genes are expressed S phase-specifically in proliferating cells. PMID:11089867

  19. Live-Cell, Temporal Gene Expression Analysis of Osteogenic Differentiation in Adipose-Derived Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Hetal V.; Voruganti, Indu S.; Jayasuriya, Chathuraka; Chen, Qian

    2014-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are a widely investigated type of mesenchymal stem cells with great potential for musculoskeletal regeneration. However, the use of ASCs is complicated by their cellular heterogeneity, which exists at both the population and single-cell levels. This study demonstrates a live-cell assay to investigate gene expression in ASCs undergoing osteogenesis using fluorescently tagged DNA hybridization probes called molecular beacons. A molecular beacon was designed to target the mRNA sequence for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), a gene characteristically expressed during early osteogenesis. The percentage of cells expressing this gene in a population was monitored daily to quantify the uniformity of the differentiation process. Differentiating ASC populations were repeatedly measured in a nondestructive fashion over a 10-day period to obtain temporal gene expression data. Results showed consistent expression patterns for the investigated osteogenic genes in response to induction medium. Peak signal level, indicating when the most cells expressed ALPL at once, was observed on days 3–5. The differentiation response of sample populations was generally uniform when assessed on a well-by-well basis over time. The expression of alkaline phosphatase is consistent with previous studies of osteogenic differentiation, suggesting that molecular beacons are a viable means of monitoring the spatiotemporal gene expression of live, differentiating ASCs. PMID:24367991

  20. Identification of genes associated with renal cell carcinoma using gene expression profiling analysis

    PubMed Central

    YAO, TING; WANG, QINFU; ZHANG, WENYONG; BIAN, AIHONG; ZHANG, JINPING

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is the most common type of kidney cancer in adults and accounts for ~80% of all kidney cancer cases. However, the pathogenesis of RCC has not yet been fully elucidated. To interpret the pathogenesis of RCC at the molecular level, gene expression data and bio-informatics methods were used to identify RCC associated genes. Gene expression data was downloaded from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and identified differentially coexpressed genes (DCGs) and dysfunctional pathways in RCC patients compared with controls. In addition, a regulatory network was constructed using the known regulatory data between transcription factors (TFs) and target genes in the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC) Genome Browser (http://genome.ucsc.edu) and the regulatory impact factor of each TF was calculated. A total of 258,0427 pairs of DCGs were identified. The regulatory network contained 1,525 pairs of regulatory associations between 126 TFs and 1,259 target genes and these genes were mainly enriched in cancer pathways, ErbB and MAPK. In the regulatory network, the 10 most strongly associated TFs were FOXC1, GATA3, ESR1, FOXL1, PATZ1, MYB, STAT5A, EGR2, EGR3 and PELP1. GATA3, ERG and MYB serve important roles in RCC while FOXC1, ESR1, FOXL1, PATZ1, STAT5A and PELP1 may be potential genes associated with RCC. In conclusion, the present study constructed a regulatory network and screened out several TFs that may be used as molecular biomarkers of RCC. However, future studies are needed to confirm the findings of the present study. PMID:27347102

  1. Human clusterin gene expression is confined to surviving cells during in vitro programmed cell death.

    PubMed Central

    French, L E; Wohlwend, A; Sappino, A P; Tschopp, J; Schifferli, J A

    1994-01-01

    Clusterin is a serum glycoprotein endowed with cell aggregating, complement inhibitory, and lipid binding properties, and is also considered as a specific marker of dying cells, its expression being increased in various tissues undergoing programmed cell death (PCD). However, no study has so far directly shown that cells expressing clusterin in these tissues are actually apoptotic as defined by morphological and biochemical criteria. We have studied cellular clusterin gene expression in vitro using three different models of PCD: (a) ultraviolet B (UV-B) irradiation of human U937, HeLa, and A431 cell lines, (b) in vitro aging of human peripheral blood neutrophils (PMNs), and (c) dexamethasone-induced cell death of the human lymphoblastoid cell line CEM-C7. In all three models, the classical morphological and biochemical features of PCD observed did not correlate with an increase, but with either a marked decrease or an absence of clusterin gene expression as assessed by Northern blot analysis. In situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells after UV-B irradiation revealed, in addition, that only morphologically normal cells that are surviving continue to express the clusterin gene. Our results demonstrate that in the human myeloid, lymphoid, and epithelial cell types studied, clusterin gene expression is not a prerequisite to their death by apoptosis. In addition, and most interestingly, in situ hybridization of U937 and A431 cells revealed that only surviving cells express the clusterin gene after the induction of PCD, thus providing novel evidence suggesting that clusterin may be associated with cell survival within tissues regressing as a consequence of PCD. Images PMID:8113419

  2. Polony analysis of gene expression in ES cells and blastocysts

    PubMed Central

    Rieger, C.; Poppino, R.; Sheridan, R.; Moley, K.; Mitra, R.; Gottlieb, D.

    2007-01-01

    Expression profiling of stem cells is challenging due to their small numbers and heterogeneity. The PCR colony (polony) approach has theoretical advantages as an assay for stem cells but has not been applied to small numbers of cells. An assay has been developed that is sensitive enough to detect mRNAs from small numbers of ES cells and from fractions of a single mouse blastocyst. Genes assayed include Oct3, Rex1, Nanog, Cdx2 and GLUT-1. The assay is highly sensitive so that multiple mRNAs from a single blastocyst were easily detected in the same assay. In its present version, the assay is an attractive alternative to conventional RT–PCR for profiling small populations of stem cells. The assay is also amenable to improvements that will increase its sensitivity and ability to analyze many cDNAs simultaneously. PMID:18073198

  3. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, L.O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, B.E.

    1998-10-13

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol. 13 figs.

  4. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous gene

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2007-03-20

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  5. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  6. Recombinant cells that highly express chromosomally-integrated heterologous genes

    DOEpatents

    Ingram, Lonnie O.; Ohta, Kazuyoshi; Wood, Brent E.

    2000-08-22

    Recombinant host cells are obtained that comprise (A) a heterologous, polypeptide-encoding polynucleotide segment, stably integrated into a chromosome, which is under transcriptional control of an endogenous promoter and (B) a mutation that effects increased expression of the heterologous segment, resulting in enhanced production by the host cells of each polypeptide encoded by that segment, relative to production of each polypeptide by the host cells in the absence of the mutation. The increased expression thus achieved is retained in the absence of conditions that select for cells displaying such increased expression. When the integrated segment comprises, for example, ethanol-production genes from an efficient ethanol producer like Zymomonas mobilis, recombinant Escherichia coli and other enteric bacterial cells within the present invention are capable of converting a wide range of biomass-derived sugars efficiently to ethanol.

  7. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons

    PubMed Central

    Gnerer, Joshua P.; Venken, Koen J. T.; Dierick, Herman A.

    2015-01-01

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family. PMID:25712101

  8. Targeted gene therapy and cell reprogramming in Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Rio, Paula; Baños, Rocio; Lombardo, Angelo; Quintana-Bustamante, Oscar; Alvarez, Lara; Garate, Zita; Genovese, Pietro; Almarza, Elena; Valeri, Antonio; Díez, Begoña; Navarro, Susana; Torres, Yaima; Trujillo, Juan P; Murillas, Rodolfo; Segovia, Jose C; Samper, Enrique; Surralles, Jordi; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Naldini, Luigi; Bueren, Juan A

    2014-01-01

    Gene targeting is progressively becoming a realistic therapeutic alternative in clinics. It is unknown, however, whether this technology will be suitable for the treatment of DNA repair deficiency syndromes such as Fanconi anemia (FA), with defects in homology-directed DNA repair. In this study, we used zinc finger nucleases and integrase-defective lentiviral vectors to demonstrate for the first time that FANCA can be efficiently and specifically targeted into the AAVS1 safe harbor locus in fibroblasts from FA-A patients. Strikingly, up to 40% of FA fibroblasts showed gene targeting 42 days after gene editing. Given the low number of hematopoietic precursors in the bone marrow of FA patients, gene-edited FA fibroblasts were then reprogrammed and re-differentiated toward the hematopoietic lineage. Analyses of gene-edited FA-iPSCs confirmed the specific integration of FANCA in the AAVS1 locus in all tested clones. Moreover, the hematopoietic differentiation of these iPSCs efficiently generated disease-free hematopoietic progenitors. Taken together, our results demonstrate for the first time the feasibility of correcting the phenotype of a DNA repair deficiency syndrome using gene-targeting and cell reprogramming strategies. PMID:24859981

  9. Effects of space flight exposure on cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression in cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Cheng; Li, Yuehui; Zhang, Zhijie; Luo, Chen; Tong, Yongqing; Zhou, Guohua; Xie, Pingli; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Guancheng

    2008-12-01

    It is well recognized that harsh outer space environment, consisting of microgravity and radiation, poses significant health risks for human cells. To investigate potential effects of the space environment exposure on cancer cells we examined the biological changes in Caski cells carried by the "Shen Zhou IV" spaceship. After exposure for 7 days in spaceflight, 1440 survival subclonal cell lines were established and 4 cell lines were screened. 44F10 and 17E3 were selected because of their increased cell proliferation and tumorigenesis, while 48A9 and 31F2 had slower cytological events. Experiments with cell proliferation assay, flow cytometry, soft agar assay, tumorigenesis assay and DNA microarray analysis have shown that selected cell lines presented multiple biological changes in cell morphology, cell growth, tumorigenicity and gene expression. These results suggest that space environment exposure can make significant biological impact on cancer cells and provide an entry point to find the immunological target of tumorigenesis.

  10. Isolation and characterization of a novel B cell activation gene

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, J.X.; Wilson, G.L.; Fox, C.H.; Kehrl, J.H. )

    1993-05-01

    Using subtractive cDNA cloning, the authors have isolated a series of cDNA clones that are differentially expressed between B and T lymphocytes. Whereas some of the isolated cDNA are from known B cell-specific genes, many of them represent previously uncharacterized genes. One of these unknown genes was denoted as BL34. Northern blot analysis performed with the BL34 cDNA revealed a 1.6-kb mRNA transcript that was present at low levels in RNA extracted from resting B lymphocytes, but whose expression was markedly increased in RNA prepared from mitogen-activated B cells. Similarly, RNA prepared from several B cell lines treated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) contained high levels of BL34 mRNA. In contrast, RNA from purified T cells treated with phytohemagglutinin and PMA had undetectable amounts of BL34 mRNA. In addition, high levels of BL34 mRNA were detected in RNA purified from PBMC of a patient with B cell acute lymphocytic leukemia. Southern blot analysis of human DNA from various tissues and cells lines demonstrated that BL34 is a single-copy gene without evidence of rearrangement. Two full length BL34 cDNA were sequenced, and an open reading frame of 588 bp was identified that was predicted to encode for a 196 amino acid protein. Searches of several protein data bases failed to find any homologous proteins. To directly analyze the expression of BL34 mRNA in lymphoid tissues in situ, hybridization studies with human tonsil tissue sections were performed. BL34 mRNA was detected in a portion of the cells in the germinal center region and adjacent to the mantle region. Further characterization of the BL34 gene and its protein should lead to insights to its role in B cell function and the consequences of its over-expression in acute lymphocytic leukemia. 26 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  11. T Cells and Gene Regulation: The Switching On and Turning Up of Genes after T Cell Receptor Stimulation in CD8 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Conley, James M.; Gallagher, Michael P.; Berg, Leslie J.

    2016-01-01

    Signaling downstream of the T cell receptor (TCR) is directly regulated by the dose and affinity of peptide antigen. The strength of TCR signaling drives a multitude of T cell functions from development to differentiation. CD8 T cells differentiate into a diverse pool of effector and memory cells after activation, a process that is critical for pathogen clearance and is highly regulated by TCR signal strength. T cells rapidly alter their gene expression upon activation. Multiple signaling pathways downstream of the TCR activate transcription factors, which are critical for this process. The dynamics between proximal TCR signaling, transcription factor activation and CD8 T cell function are discussed here. We propose that inducible T cell kinase (ITK) acts as a rheostat for gene expression. This unique regulation of TCR signaling by ITK provides a possible signaling mechanism for the promotion of a diverse T cell repertoire in response to pathogen. PMID:26973653

  12. Identifying Francisella tularensis Genes Required for Growth in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brunton, J.; Steele, S.; Miller, C.; Lovullo, E.; Taft-Benz, S.

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent Gram-negative intracellular pathogen capable of infecting a vast diversity of hosts, ranging from amoebae to humans. A hallmark of F. tularensis virulence is its ability to quickly grow to high densities within a diverse set of host cells, including, but not limited to, macrophages and epithelial cells. We developed a luminescence reporter system to facilitate a large-scale transposon mutagenesis screen to identify genes required for growth in macrophage and epithelial cell lines. We screened 7,454 individual mutants, 269 of which exhibited reduced intracellular growth. Transposon insertions in the 269 growth-defective strains mapped to 68 different genes. FTT_0924, a gene of unknown function but highly conserved among Francisella species, was identified in this screen to be defective for intracellular growth within both macrophage and epithelial cell lines. FTT_0924 was required for full Schu S4 virulence in a murine pulmonary infection model. The ΔFTT_0924 mutant bacterial membrane is permeable when replicating in hypotonic solution and within macrophages, resulting in strongly reduced viability. The permeability and reduced viability were rescued when the mutant was grown in a hypertonic solution, indicating that FTT_0924 is required for resisting osmotic stress. The ΔFTT_0924 mutant was also significantly more sensitive to β-lactam antibiotics than Schu S4. Taken together, the data strongly suggest that FTT_0924 is required for maintaining peptidoglycan integrity and virulence. PMID:25987704

  13. Repression of the albumin gene in Novikoff hepatoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Capetanaki, Y G; Flytzanis, C N; Alonso, A

    1982-01-01

    Novikoff hepatoma cells have lost their capacity to synthesize albumin. As a first approach to study the mechanisms underlying this event, in vitro translation in a reticulocyte system was performed using total polyadenylated mRNA from rat liver and Novikoff hepatoma cells. Immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products with albumin-specific antibody revealed a total lack of albumin synthesis in Novikoff hepatoma, suggesting the absence of functional albumin mRNA in these cells. Titration experiments using as probe albumin cDNA cloned in pBR322 plasmid demonstrated the absence of albumin-specific sequences in both polysomal and nuclear polyadenylated and total RNA from Novikoff cells. This albumin recombinant plasmid was obtained by screening a rat liver cDNA library with albumin [32P]cDNA reverse transcribed from immuno-precipitated mRNA. The presence of an albumin-specific gene insert was documented with translation assays as well as by restriction mapping. Repression of the albumin gene at the transcriptional level was further demonstrated by RNA blotting experiments using the cloned albumin cDNA probe. Genomic DNA blots using the cloned albumin cDNA as probe did not reveal any large-scale deletions, insertions, or rearrangements in the albumin gene, suggesting that the processes involved in the suppression of albumin mRNA synthesis do not involve extensive genomic rearrangements. Images PMID:6180302

  14. Epigenetic Gene Regulation in Stem Cells and Correlation to Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mathews, Lesley A.; Crea, Francesco; Farrar, W. L.

    2009-01-01

    Through the classic study of genetics, much has been learned about the regulation and progression of human disease. Specifically, cancer has been defined as a disease driven by genetic alterations, including mutations in tumor-suppressor genes and oncogenes, as well as chromosomal abnormalities. However, the study of normal human development has identified that in addition to classical genetics, regulation of gene expression is also modified by ‘epigenetic’ alterations including chromatin remodeling and histone variants, DNA methylation, the regulation of polycomb group proteins and the epigenetic function of non-coding RNA. These changes are modifications inherited both during meiosis and mitosis, yet they do not result in alterations of the actual DNA sequence. A number of biological questions are directly influenced by epigenetics, such as how does a cell know when to divide, differentiate or remain quiescent, and more importantly, what happens when these pathways become altered? Do these alterations lead to the development and/or progression of cancer? This review will focus on summarizing the limited current literature involving epigenetic alterations in the context of human cancer stems cells (CSCs). The extent to which epigenetic changes define cell fate, identity, and phenotype are still under intense investigation, and many questions remain largely unanswered. Before discussing epigenetic gene silencing in CSCs, the different classifications of stem cells and their properties will be introduced. This will be followed by an introduction to the different epigenetic mechanisms Finally, there will be a discussion of the current knowledge of epigenetic modifications in stem cells, specifically what is known from rodent systems and established cancer cell lines, and how they are leading us to understand human stem cells. PMID:19443100

  15. Tissue transglutaminase-dependent posttranslational modification of the retinoblastoma gene product in promonocytic cells undergoing apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Oliverio, S; Amendola, A; Di Sano, F; Farrace, M G; Fesus, L; Nemes, Z; Piredda, L; Spinedi, A; Piacentini, M

    1997-01-01

    The retinoblastoma gene product (pRB) plays an important role in controlling both cell release from the G1 phase and apoptosis. We show here that in the early phases of apoptosis, pRB is posttranslationally modified by a tissue transglutaminase (tTG)-catalyzed reaction. In fact, by employing a novel haptenized lysis synthetic substrate which allows the isolation of glutaminyl-tTG substrates in vivo, we identified pRB as a potential tTG substrate in U937 cells undergoing apoptosis. In keeping with this finding, we showed that apoptosis of U937 cells is characterized by the rapid disappearance of the 105,000- to 110,000-molecular-weight pRB forms concomitantly with the appearance of a smear of immunoreactive products with a molecular weight of greater than 250,000. The shift in pRB molecular weight was reproduced by adding exogenous purified tTG to extracts obtained from viable U937 cells and was prevented by dansylcadaverine, a potent enzyme inhibitor. The effect of the pRB posttranslational modification during apoptosis was investigated by determining the E2F-1 levels and by isolating and characterizing pRB-null clones from U937 cells. Notably, the lack of pRB in these U937-derived clones renders these p53-null cells highly resistant to apoptosis induced by serum withdrawal, calphostin C, and ceramide. Taken together, these data suggest that tTG, acting on the pRB protein, might play an important role in the cell progression through the death program. PMID:9315663

  16. Global gene expression response to telomerase in bovine adrenocortical cells

    SciTech Connect

    Perrault, Steven D.; Hornsby, Peter J.; Betts, Dean H. . E-mail: bettsd@uoguelph.ca

    2005-09-30

    The infinite proliferative capability of most immortalized cells is dependent upon the presence of the enzyme telomerase and its ability to maintain telomere length and structure. However, telomerase may be involved in a greater system than telomere length regulation, as recent evidence has shown it capable of increasing wound healing in vivo, and improving cellular proliferation rate and survival from apoptosis in vitro. Here, we describe the global gene expression response to ectopic telomerase expression in an in vitro bovine adrenocortical cell model. Telomerase-immortalized cells showed an increased ability for proliferation and survival in minimal essential medium above cells transgenic for GFP. cDNA microarray analyses revealed an altered cell state indicative of increased adrenocortical cell proliferation regulated by the IGF2 pathway and alterations in members of the TGF-B family. As well, we identified alterations in genes associated with development and wound healing that support a model that high telomerase expression induces a highly adaptable, progenitor-like state.

  17. Programmable cells: Interfacing natural and engineered gene networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Hideki; Kærn, Mads; Araki, Michihiro; Chung, Kristy; Gardner, Timothy S.; Cantor, Charles R.; Collins, James J.

    2004-06-01

    Novel cellular behaviors and characteristics can be obtained by coupling engineered gene networks to the cell's natural regulatory circuitry through appropriately designed input and output interfaces. Here, we demonstrate how an engineered genetic circuit can be used to construct cells that respond to biological signals in a predetermined and programmable fashion. We employ a modular design strategy to create Escherichia coli strains where a genetic toggle switch is interfaced with: (i) the SOS signaling pathway responding to DNA damage, and (ii) a transgenic quorum sensing signaling pathway from Vibrio fischeri. The genetic toggle switch endows these strains with binary response dynamics and an epigenetic inheritance that supports a persistent phenotypic alteration in response to transient signals. These features are exploited to engineer cells that form biofilms in response to DNA-damaging agents and cells that activate protein synthesis when the cell population reaches a critical density. Our work represents a step toward the development of "plug-and-play" genetic circuitry that can be used to create cells with programmable behaviors. heterologous gene expression | synthetic biology | Escherichia coli

  18. Reproducibility of NIF hohlraum measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moody, J. D.; Ralph, J. E.; Turnbull, D. P.; Casey, D. T.; Albert, F.; Bachmann, B. L.; Doeppner, T.; Divol, L.; Grim, G. P.; Hoover, M.; Landen, O. L.; MacGowan, B. J.; Michel, P. A.; Moore, A. S.; Pino, J. E.; Schneider, M. B.; Tipton, R. E.; Smalyuk, V. A.; Strozzi, D. J.; Widmann, K.; Hohenberger, M.

    2015-11-01

    The strategy of experimentally ``tuning'' the implosion in a NIF hohlraum ignition target towards increasing hot-spot pressure, areal density of compressed fuel, and neutron yield relies on a level of experimental reproducibility. We examine the reproducibility of experimental measurements for a collection of 15 identical NIF hohlraum experiments. The measurements include incident laser power, backscattered optical power, x-ray measurements, hot-electron fraction and energy, and target characteristics. We use exact statistics to set 1-sigma confidence levels on the variations in each of the measurements. Of particular interest is the backscatter and laser-induced hot-spot locations on the hohlraum wall. Hohlraum implosion designs typically include variability specifications [S. W. Haan et al., Phys. Plasmas 18, 051001 (2011)]. We describe our findings and compare with the specifications. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by University of California, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  19. Regulators of gene expression in Enteric Neural Crest Cells are putative Hirschsprung disease genes.

    PubMed

    Schriemer, Duco; Sribudiani, Yunia; IJpma, Arne; Natarajan, Dipa; MacKenzie, Katherine C; Metzger, Marco; Binder, Ellen; Burns, Alan J; Thapar, Nikhil; Hofstra, Robert M W; Eggen, Bart J L

    2016-08-01

    The enteric nervous system (ENS) is required for peristalsis of the gut and is derived from Enteric Neural Crest Cells (ENCCs). During ENS development, the RET receptor tyrosine kinase plays a critical role in the proliferation and survival of ENCCs, their migration along the developing gut, and differentiation into enteric neurons. Mutations in RET and its ligand GDNF cause Hirschsprung disease (HSCR), a complex genetic disorder in which ENCCs fail to colonize variable lengths of the distal bowel. To identify key regulators of ENCCs and the pathways underlying RET signaling, gene expression profiles of untreated and GDNF-treated ENCCs from E14.5 mouse embryos were generated. ENCCs express genes that are involved in both early and late neuronal development, whereas GDNF treatment induced neuronal maturation. Predicted regulators of gene expression in ENCCs include the known HSCR genes Ret and Sox10, as well as Bdnf, App and Mapk10. The regulatory overlap and functional interactions between these genes were used to construct a regulatory network that is underlying ENS development and connects to known HSCR genes. In addition, the adenosine receptor A2a (Adora2a) and neuropeptide Y receptor Y2 (Npy2r) were identified as possible regulators of terminal neuronal differentiation in GDNF-treated ENCCs. The human orthologue of Npy2r maps to the HSCR susceptibility locus 4q31.3-q32.3, suggesting a role for NPY2R both in ENS development and in HSCR. PMID:27266404

  20. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  1. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in media containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8x10-4-3x10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  2. Direct Gene Transfer into Human Cultured Cells Facilitated by Laser Micropuncture of the Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wen; Wilkinson, Joyce; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 × 10-4-3 × 10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  3. Human Haploid Cell Genetics Reveals Roles for Lipid Metabolism Genes in Nonapoptotic Cell Death

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the regulation of nonapoptotic cell death. Using massive insertional mutagenesis of haploid KBM7 cells we identified nine genes involved in small-molecule-induced nonapoptotic cell death, including mediators of fatty acid metabolism (ACSL4) and lipid remodeling (LPCAT3) in ferroptosis. One novel compound, CIL56, triggered cell death dependent upon the rate-limiting de novo lipid synthetic enzyme ACC1. These results provide insight into the genetic regulation of cell death and highlight the central role of lipid metabolism in nonapoptotic cell death. PMID:25965523

  4. Chagas’ disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V.; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-01-01

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas’ disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas’ disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas’ disease patients. PMID:18502403

  5. Chagas' disease parasite-derived neurotrophic factor activates cholinergic gene expression in neuronal PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Akpan, Nsikan; Caradonna, Kacey; Chuenkova, Marina V; PereiraPerrin, Mercio

    2008-06-27

    A parasite-derived neurotrophic factor (PDNF) produced by the Chagas' disease parasite Trypanosoma cruzi binds nerve growth factor (NGF) receptor TrkA, increasing receptor autophosphorylation, and activating phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK/Erk) pathways, and transcription factor CREB. The end-result is enhanced survival and neuritogenesis of various types of neurons. PDNF also enhances the expression and activity of tyrosine hydroxylase, a rate limiting enzyme in the synthesis of dopamine and other catecholamine neurotransmitters. It remains unknown, however, if PDNF alters expression and metabolism of acetylcholine (ACh), a neurotransmitter thought to play a role in Chagas' disease progression. Here we demonstrate that PDNF stimulates mRNA and protein expression of choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), which are critical for synthesis and storage of ACh. Stimulation requires functional TrkA because it did not occur in cell mutants that lack the receptor and in TrkA-expressing wild-type cells treated with K252a, an inhibitor of TrkA kinase activity. It also requires TrkA-dependent PI3K and MAPK/Erk signaling pathways because PDNF stimulation of cholinergic transcripts is abolished by specific pharmacological inhibitors. Furthermore, the cholinergic actions of PDNF were reproduced by PDNF-expressing extracellular T. cruzi trypomastigotes at the start of host cell invasion. In contrast, host cells bearing intracellular T. cruzi showed decreased, rather than increased, cholinergic gene expression. These results suggest that T. cruzi invasion of the nervous system alters cholinergic gene expression and that could play a role in neuropathology, and/or lack thereof, in Chagas' disease patients. PMID:18502403

  6. The FRIABLE1 Gene Product Affects Cell Adhesion in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Neumetzler, Lutz; Humphrey, Tania; Lumba, Shelley; Snyder, Stephen; Yeats, Trevor H.; Usadel, Björn; Vasilevski, Aleksandar; Patel, Jignasha; Rose, Jocelyn K. C.; Persson, Staffan; Bonetta, Dario

    2012-01-01

    Cell adhesion in plants is mediated predominantly by pectins, a group of complex cell wall associated polysaccharides. An Arabidopsis mutant, friable1 (frb1), was identified through a screen of T-DNA insertion lines that exhibited defective cell adhesion. Interestingly, the frb1 plants displayed both cell and organ dissociations and also ectopic defects in organ separation. The FRB1 gene encodes a Golgi-localized, plant specific protein with only weak sequence similarities to known proteins (DUF246). Unlike other cell adhesion deficient mutants, frb1 mutants do not have reduced levels of adhesion related cell wall polymers, such as pectins. Instead, FRB1 affects the abundance of galactose- and arabinose-containing oligosaccharides in the Golgi. Furthermore, frb1 mutants displayed alteration in pectin methylesterification, cell wall associated extensins and xyloglucan microstructure. We propose that abnormal FRB1 action has pleiotropic consequences on wall architecture, affecting both the extensin and pectin matrices, with consequent changes to the biomechanical properties of the wall and middle lamella, thereby influencing cell-cell adhesion. PMID:22916179

  7. A proteomic chronology of gene expression through the cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Tony; Ahmad, Yasmeen; Shlien, Adam; Soroka, Dominique; Mills, Allie; Emanuele, Michael J; Stratton, Michael R; Lamond, Angus I

    2014-01-01

    Technological advances have enabled the analysis of cellular protein and RNA levels with unprecedented depth and sensitivity, allowing for an unbiased re-evaluation of gene regulation during fundamental biological processes. Here, we have chronicled the dynamics of protein and mRNA expression levels across a minimally perturbed cell cycle in human myeloid leukemia cells using centrifugal elutriation combined with mass spectrometry-based proteomics and RNA-Seq, avoiding artificial synchronization procedures. We identify myeloid-specific gene expression and variations in protein abundance, isoform expression and phosphorylation at different cell cycle stages. We dissect the relationship between protein and mRNA levels for both bulk gene expression and for over ∼6000 genes individually across the cell cycle, revealing complex, gene-specific patterns. This data set, one of the deepest surveys to date of gene expression in human cells, is presented in an online, searchable database, the Encyclopedia of Proteome Dynamics (http://www.peptracker.com/epd/). DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01630.001 PMID:24596151

  8. Human Cpr (Cell Cycle Progression Restoration) Genes Impart a Far(-) Phenotype on Yeast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, M. C.; Liegeois, N.; Horecka, J.; DePinho, R. A.; Sprague-Jr., G. F.; Tyers, M.; Elledge, S. J.

    1997-01-01

    Regulated cell cycle progression depends on the proper integration of growth control pathways with the basic cell cycle machinery. While many of the central molecules such as cyclins, CDKs, and CKIs are known, and many of the kinases and phosphatases that modify the CDKs have been identified, little is known about the additional layers of regulation that impinge upon these molecules. To identify new regulators of cell proliferation, we have selected for human and yeast cDNAs that when overexpressed were capable of specifically overcoming G(1) arrest signals from the cell cycle branch of the mating pheromone pathway, while still maintaining the integrity of the transcriptional induction branch. We have identified 13 human CPR (cell cycle progression restoration) genes and 11 yeast OPY (overproduction-induced pheromone-resistant yeast) genes that specifically block the G(1) arrest by mating pheromone. The CPR genes represent a variety of biochemical functions including a new cyclin, a tumor suppressor binding protein, chaperones, transcription factors, translation factors, RNA-binding proteins, as well as novel proteins. Several CPR genes require individual CLNs to promote pheromone resistance and those that require CLN3 increase the basal levels of Cln3 protein. Moreover, several of the yeast OPY genes have overlapping functions with the human CPR genes, indicating a possible conservation of roles. PMID:9383053

  9. Gene expression analysis of PTEN positive glioblastoma stem cells identifies DUB3 and Wee1 modulation in a cell differentiation model.

    PubMed

    Forte, Stefano; Pagliuca, Alfredo; Maniscalchi, Eugenia T; Gulino, Rosario; Calabrese, Giovanna; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Pallini, Roberto; Signore, Michele; Parenti, Rosalba; De Maria, Ruggero; Gulisano, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    The term astrocytoma defines a quite heterogeneous group of neoplastic diseases that collectively represent the most frequent brain tumors in humans. Among them, glioblastoma multiforme represents the most malignant form and its associated prognosis is one of the poorest among tumors of the central nervous system. It has been demonstrated that a small population of tumor cells, isolated from the brain neoplastic tissue, can reproduce the parental tumor when transplanted in immunodeficient mouse. These tumor initiating cells are supposed to be involved in cancer development and progression and possess stem cell-like features; like their normal counterpart, these cells remain quiescent until they are committed to differentiation. Many studies have shown that the role of the tumor suppressor protein PTEN in cell cycle progression is fundamental for tumor dynamics: in low grade gliomas, PTEN contributes to maintain cells in G1 while the loss of its activity is frequently observed in high grade gliomas. The mechanisms underlying the above described PTEN activity have been studied in many tumors, but those involved in the maintenance of tumor initiating cells quiescence remain to be investigated in more detail. The aim of the present study is to shed light on the role of PTEN pathway on cell cycle regulation in Glioblastoma stem cells, through a cell differentiation model. Our results suggest the existence of a molecular mechanism, that involves DUB3 and WEE1 gene products in the regulation of Cdc25a, as functional effector of the PTEN/Akt pathway. PMID:24349068

  10. Altered epigenetic regulation of homeobox genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Marcinkiewicz, Katarzyna M.; Gudas, Lorraine J.

    2014-01-01

    To gain insight into oral squamous cell carcinogenesis, we performed deep sequencing (RNAseq) of non-tumorigenic human OKF6-TERT1R and tumorigenic SCC-9 cells. Numerous homeobox genes are differentially expressed between OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells. Data from Oncomine, a cancer microarray database, also show that homeobox (HOX) genes are dysregulated in oral SCC patients. The activity of Polycomb repressive complexes (PRC), which causes epigenetic modifications, and retinoic acid (RA) signaling can control HOX gene transcription. HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcripts are higher in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells; using ChIP (chromatin immunoprecipitation) we detected PRC2 protein SUZ12 and the epigenetic H3K27me3 mark on histone H3 at these genes in OKF6-TERT1R, but not in SCC-9 cells. In contrast, IRX1, IRX4, SIX2 and TSHZ3 transcripts are lower in SCC-9 than in OKF6-TERT1R cells. We detected SUZ12 and the H3K27me3 mark at these genes in SCC-9, but not in OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 depletion increased HOXB7, HOXC10, HOXC13, and HOXD8 transcript levels and decreased the proliferation of OKF6-TERT1R cells. Transcriptional responses to RA are attenuated in SCC-9 versus OKF6-TERT1R cells. SUZ12 and H3K27me3 levels were not altered by RA at these HOX genes in SCC-9 and OKF6-TERT1R cells. We conclude that altered activity of PRC2 is associated with dysregulation of homeobox gene expression in human SCC cells, and that this dysregulation potentially plays a role in the neoplastic transformation of oral keratinocytes. - Highlights: • RNAseq elucidates differences between non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic oral keratinocytes. • Changes in HOX mRNA in SCC-9 vs. OKF6-TERT1R cells are a result of altered epigenetic regulation. • RNAseq shows that retinoic acid (RA) influences gene expression in both OKF6-TERT1R and SCC-9 cells.

  11. Hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Shu-Ching; Claffey, Kevin P.

    1998-01-01

    The molecular mechanism underlying oxygen sensing in mammalian cells has been extensively investigated in the areas of glucose transport, glycolysis, erythropoiesis, angiogenesis and catecholamine metabolism. Expression of functionally operative representative proteins in these specific areas, such as the glucose transporter 1, glycolytic enzymes, erythropoietin, vascular endothelial growth factor and tyrosine hydroxylase are all induced by hypoxia. Recent studies demonstrated that both transcriptional activation and post-transcriptional mechanisms are important to the hypoxia-mediated regulation of gene expression. In this article, the cis-acting elements and trans-acting factors involved in the transcriptional activation of gene expression will be reviewed. In addition, the mechanisms of post-transcriptional mRNA stabilization will also be addressed. We will discuss whether these two processes of regulation of hypoxia-responsive genes are mechanistically linked and co-operative in nature. PMID:10319016

  12. Lentiviral hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy benefits metachromatic leukodystrophy.

    PubMed

    Biffi, Alessandra; Montini, Eugenio; Lorioli, Laura; Cesani, Martina; Fumagalli, Francesca; Plati, Tiziana; Baldoli, Cristina; Martino, Sabata; Calabria, Andrea; Canale, Sabrina; Benedicenti, Fabrizio; Vallanti, Giuliana; Biasco, Luca; Leo, Simone; Kabbara, Nabil; Zanetti, Gianluigi; Rizzo, William B; Mehta, Nalini A L; Cicalese, Maria Pia; Casiraghi, Miriam; Boelens, Jaap J; Del Carro, Ubaldo; Dow, David J; Schmidt, Manfred; Assanelli, Andrea; Neduva, Victor; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gardner, Jason; von Kalle, Christof; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Rovelli, Attilio; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Sessa, Maria; Naldini, Luigi

    2013-08-23

    Metachromatic leukodystrophy (MLD) is an inherited lysosomal storage disease caused by arylsulfatase A (ARSA) deficiency. Patients with MLD exhibit progressive motor and cognitive impairment and die within a few years of symptom onset. We used a lentiviral vector to transfer a functional ARSA gene into hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from three presymptomatic patients who showed genetic, biochemical, and neurophysiological evidence of late infantile MLD. After reinfusion of the gene-corrected HSCs, the patients showed extensive and stable ARSA gene replacement, which led to high enzyme expression throughout hematopoietic lineages and in cerebrospinal fluid. Analyses of vector integrations revealed no evidence of aberrant clonal behavior. The disease did not manifest or progress in the three patients 7 to 21 months beyond the predicted age of symptom onset. These findings indicate that extensive genetic engineering of human hematopoiesis can be achieved with lentiviral vectors and that this approach may offer therapeutic benefit for MLD patients. PMID:23845948

  13. Curcumin alters gene expression-associated DNA damage, cell cycle, cell survival and cell migration and invasion in NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Chiang, I-Tsang; Wang, Wei-Shu; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Yang, Su-Tso; Tang, Nou-Ying; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer mortality and new cases are on the increase worldwide. However, the treatment of lung cancer remains unsatisfactory. Curcumin has been shown to induce cell death in many human cancer cells, including human lung cancer cells. However, the effects of curcumin on genetic mechanisms associated with these actions remain unclear. Curcumin (2 µM) was added to NCI-H460 human lung cancer cells and the cells were incubated for 24 h. Total RNA was extracted from isolated cells for cDNA synthesis, labeling, microarray hybridization and flour‑labeled cDNA hybridized on chip. Localized concentrations of fluorescent molecules were detected and quantified using Expression Console software (Affymetrix) with default RMA parameters. GeneGo software was used for the key genes involved and their possible interaction pathways. The results showed that ~170 genes were significantly upregulated and 577 genes were significantly downregulated in curcumin‑treated cells. Specifically, the up‑ and downregulated genes included CCNE2, associated with DNA damage; ID3, associated with cell survival and 146 genes with a >2- to 3-fold change including the TP53INP1 gene, associated with DNA damage; CDC6, CDCA5, TAKMIP2, CDK14, CDK5, CDCA76, CDC25A, CDC5L and SKP2, associated with cell cycle; the CARD6, ID1 and ID2 genes, associated with cell survival and the BRMS1L, associated with cell migration and invasion. Additionally, 59 downregulated genes exhibited a >4-fold change, including the DDIT3 gene, associated with DNA damage; while 97 genes had a >3- to 4-fold change including the DDIT4 gene, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle and 321 genes with a >2- to 3-fold including the GADD45A and CGREF1 genes, associated with DNA damage; the CCPG1 gene, associated with cell cycle, the TNFRSF10B, GAS5, TSSC1 and TNFRSF11B gene, associated with cell survival and the ARHAP29 and CADM2 genes, associated with cell migration

  14. Gene expression profiling analysis of osteosarcoma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    SUN, LU; LI, JIE; YAN, BING

    2015-01-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common type of primary bone malignancy and has a poor prognosis. To investigate the mechanisms of osteosarcoma, the present analyzed the GSE28424 microarray. GSE28424 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and included a collective of 19 OS cell lines and four normal bone cell lines, which were used as controls. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using the Limma package in Bioconductor. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery, interactions between the proteins encoded by the DEGs were identified using STRING, and the protein-protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized using Cytoscape. In addition, modular analysis of the PPI network was performed using the Clique Percolation Method (CPM) in CFinder. A total of 1,170 DEGs were screened, including 530 upreguated and 640 downregulated genes. The enriched functions included organelle fission, immune response and response to wounding. In addition, RPL8 was observed to be involved with the ribosomal pathway in module A of the PPI network of the DEGs. PLCG1, SYK and PLCG2 were also involved in the B-cell receptor signaling pathway in module B and the Fc-epsilon RI signaling pathway in module C. In addition, AURKA (degree=39), MAD2L1 (degree=38), CDCA8 (degree=38), BUB1 (degree=37) and MELK (degree=37) exhibited higher degrees of connectivity in module F. The results of the present study suggested that the RPL8, PLCG1, PLCG2, SYK, MAD2L1, AURKA, CDCA8, BUB1 and MELK genes may be involved in OS. PMID:26096802

  15. Perinatal stem-cell and gene therapy for hemoglobinopathies.

    PubMed

    Surbek, Daniel; Schoeberlein, Andreina; Wagner, Anna

    2008-08-01

    Most genetic diseases of the lymphohematopoietic system, including hemoglobinopathies, can now be diagnosed early in gestation. However, as yet, prenatal treatment is not available. Postnatal therapy by hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation from bone marrow, mobilized peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood is possible for several of these diseases, in particular for the hemoglobinopathies, but is often limited by a lack of histocompatible donors, severe treatment-associated morbidity, and preexisting organ damage that developed before birth. In-utero transplantation of allogeneic HSC has been performed successfully in various animal models and recently in humans. However, the clinical success of this novel treatment is limited to diseases in which the fetus is affected by severe immunodeficiency. The lack of donor cell engraftment in nonimmunocompromised hosts is thought to be due to immunologic barriers, as well as to competitive fetal marrow population by host HSCs. Among the possible strategies to circumvent allogeneic HLA barriers, the use of gene therapy by genetically corrected autologous HSCs in the fetus is one of the most promising approaches. The recent development of strategies to overcome failure of efficient transduction of quiescent hematopoietic cells using new vector constructs and transduction protocols opens new perspectives for gene therapy in general, as well as for prenatal gene transfer in particular. The fetus might be especially susceptible for successful gene therapy approaches because of the developing, expanding hematopoietic system during gestation and the immunologic naiveté early in gestation, precluding immune reaction towards the transgene by inducing tolerance. Ethical issues, in particular regarding treatment safety, must be addressed more closely before clinical trials with fetal gene therapy in human pregnancies can be initiated. PMID:18420474

  16. Gene expression profiling analysis of osteosarcoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lu; Li, Jie; Yan, Bing

    2015-09-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common type of primary bone malignancy and has a poor prognosis. To investigate the mechanisms of osteosarcoma, the present analyzed the GSE28424 microarray. GSE28424 was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus, and included a collective of 19 OS cell lines and four normal bone cell lines, which were used as controls. Subsequently, the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were screened using the Limma package in Bioconductor. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery, interactions between the proteins encoded by the DEGs were identified using STRING, and the protein‑protein interaction (PPI) network was visualized using Cytoscape. In addition, modular analysis of the PPI network was performed using the Clique Percolation Method (CPM) in CFinder. A total of 1,170 DEGs were screened, including 530 upreguated and 640 downregulated genes. The enriched functions included organelle fission, immune response and response to wounding. In addition, RPL8 was observed to be involved with the ribosomal pathway in module A of the PPI network of the DEGs. PLCG1, SYK and PLCG2 were also involved in the B‑cell receptor signaling pathway in module B and the Fc‑epsilon RI signaling pathway in module C. In addition, AURKA (degree=39), MAD2L1 (degree=38), CDCA8 (degree=38), BUB1 (degree=37) and MELK (degree=37) exhibited higher degrees of connectivity in module F. The results of the present study suggested that the RPL8, PLCG1, PLCG2, SYK, MAD2L1, AURKA, CDCA8, BUB1 and MELK genes may be involved in OS. PMID:26096802

  17. The Identification of Transposon-Tagged Mutations in Essential Genes That Affect Cell Morphology in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chun, K. T.; Goebl, M. G.

    1996-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae reproduces by budding, and many genes are required for proper bud development. Mutations in some of these genes cause cells to die with an unusual terminal morphology--elongated or otherwise aberrantly shaped buds. To gain insight into bud development, we set out to identify novel genes that encode proteins required for proper bud morphogenesis. Previous studies screened collections of conditional mutations to identify genes required for essential functions, including bud formation. However, genes that are not susceptible to the generation of mutations that cause a conditional phenotype will not be identified in such screens. To identify a more comprehensive collection of mutants, we used transposon mutagenesis to generate a large collection of lethal disruption mutations. This collection was used to identify 209 mutants with disruptions that cause an aberrant terminal bud morphology. The disruption mutations in 33 of these mutants identify three previously uncharacterized genes as essential, and the mutant phenotypes suggest roles for their products in bud morphogenesis. PMID:8770583

  18. Identification of Novel Fusion Genes in Testicular Germ Cell Tumors.

    PubMed

    Hoff, Andreas M; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W; Lothe, Ragnhild A; Skotheim, Rolf I

    2016-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their nonmalignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. PMID:26659575

  19. Identification of novel fusion genes in testicular germ cell tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hoff, Andreas M.; Alagaratnam, Sharmini; Zhao, Sen; Bruun, Jarle; Andrews, Peter W.; Lothe, Ragnhild A.; Skotheim, Rolf I.

    2015-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumors (TGCT) are the most frequently diagnosed solid tumors in young men ages 15 to 44 years. Embryonal carcinomas (EC) comprise a subset of TGCTs that exhibit pluripotent characteristics similar to embryonic stem (ES) cells, but the genetic drivers underlying malignant transformation of ECs are unknown. To elucidate the abnormal genetic events potentially contributing to TGCT malignancy, such as the existence of fusion genes or aberrant fusion transcript expression, we performed RNA sequencing of EC cell lines and their non-malignant ES cell line counterparts. We identified eight novel fusion transcripts and one gene with alternative promoter usage, ETV6. Four out of nine transcripts were found recurrently expressed in an extended panel of primary TGCTs and additional EC cell lines, but not in normal parenchyma of the testis, implying tumor-specific expression. Two of the recurrent transcripts involved an intrachromosomal fusion between RCC1 and HENMT1 located 80 Mbp apart and an interchromosomal fusion between RCC1 and ABHD12B. RCC1-ABHD12B and the ETV6 transcript variant were found to be preferentially expressed in the more undifferentiated TGCT subtypes. In vitro differentiation of the NTERA2 EC cell line resulted in significantly reduced expression of both fusion transcripts involving RCC1 and the ETV6 transcript variant, indicating that they are markers of pluripotency in a malignant setting. In conclusion, we identified eight novel fusion transcripts that, to our knowledge, are the first fusion genes described in TGCT and may therefore potentially serve as genomic biomarkers of malignant progression. PMID:26659575

  20. Diversity of Gene Expression in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Fan; Cui, Li; Kuo, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding tumor diversity has been a long-lasting and challenging question for researchers in the field of cancer heterogeneity or tumor evolution. Studies have reported that compared to normal cells, there is a higher genetic diversity in tumor cells, while higher genetic diversity is associated with higher progression risks of tumor. We thus hypothesized that tumor diversity also holds true at the gene expression level. To test this hypothesis, we used t-test to compare the means of Simpson’s diversity index for gene expression (SDIG) between tumor and non-tumor samples. We found that the mean SDIG in tumor tissues is significantly higher than that in the non-tumor or normal tissues (P < 0.05) for most datasets. We also combined microarrays and next-generation sequencing data for validation. This cross-platform and cross-experimental validation greatly increased the reliability of our results. PMID:26779818

  1. Mesenchymal stem cell-based gene therapy for erectile dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Kim, J H; Lee, H J; Song, Y S

    2016-05-01

    Despite the overwhelming success of PDE5 inhibitor (PDE5I), the demand for novel pharmacotherapeutic and surgical options for ED continues to rise owing to the increased proportion of elderly individuals in the population, in addition to the growing percentage of ED patients who do not respond to PDE5I. Surgical treatment of ED is associated with many complications, thus warranting the need for nonsurgical therapies. Moreover, none of the above-mentioned treatments essentially corrects, cures or prevents ED. Although gene therapy is a promising option, many challenges and obstacles such as local inflammatory response and random transgene expression, in addition to other safety issues, limit its use at the clinical level. The use of stem cell therapy alone also has many shortcomings. To overcome these inadequacies, many scientists and clinicians are investigating new gene and stem cell therapies. PMID:26888355

  2. MGMT enrichment and second gene co-expression in hematopoietic progenitor cells using separate or dual-gene lentiviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Roth, Justin C; Alberti, Michael O; Ismail, Mourad; Lingas, Karen T; Reese, Jane S; Gerson, Stanton L

    2015-01-22

    The DNA repair gene O(6)-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase (MGMT) allows efficient in vivo enrichment of transduced hematopoietic stem cells (HSC). Thus, linking this selection strategy to therapeutic gene expression offers the potential to reconstitute diseased hematopoietic tissue with gene-corrected cells. However, different dual-gene expression vector strategies are limited by poor expression of one or both transgenes. To evaluate different co-expression strategies in the context of MGMT-mediated HSC enrichment, we compared selection and expression efficacies in cells cotransduced with separate single-gene MGMT and GFP lentivectors to those obtained with dual-gene vectors employing either encephalomyocarditis virus (EMCV) internal ribosome entry site (IRES) or foot and mouth disease virus (FMDV) 2A elements for co-expression strategies. Each strategy was evaluated in vitro and in vivo using equivalent multiplicities of infection (MOI) to transduce 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) or Lin(-)Sca-1(+)c-kit(+) (LSK)-enriched murine bone marrow cells (BMCs). The highest dual-gene expression (MGMT(+)GFP(+)) percentages were obtained with the FMDV-2A dual-gene vector, but half of the resulting gene products existed as fusion proteins. Following selection, dual-gene expression percentages in single-gene vector cotransduced and dual-gene vector transduced populations were similar. Equivalent MGMT expression levels were obtained with each strategy, but GFP expression levels derived from the IRES dual-gene vector were significantly lower. In mice, vector-insertion averages were similar among cells enriched after dual-gene vectors and those cotransduced with single-gene vectors. These data demonstrate the limitations and advantages of each strategy in the context of MGMT-mediated selection, and may provide insights into vector design with respect to a particular therapeutic gene or hematologic defect. PMID:25479595

  3. In search of a suitable reference gene for normalization of gene expression in MDV-infected chicken cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Marek’s disease (MD) is a contagious lymphoproliferative disease of domestic chickens caused by a highly cell-associated alpha-herpesvirus, MD virus (MDV). The choice of an appropriate housekeeping gene as an endogenous reference gene is an essential requirement for relative quantification of gene ...

  4. Gene number determination and genetic polymorphism of the gamma delta T cell co-receptor WC1 genes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background WC1 co-receptors belong to the scavenger receptor cysteine-rich superfamily and are encoded by a multi-gene family. Expression of particular WC1 genes defines functional subpopulations of WC1+ '' T cells. Our previous study identified partial sequences for 13 different WC1 genes by annota...

  5. Spatial reconstruction of single-cell gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Satija, Rahul; Farrell, Jeffrey A.; Gennert, David; Schier, Alexander F.; Regev, Aviv

    2015-01-01

    Spatial localization is a key determinant of cellular fate and behavior, but spatial RNA assays traditionally rely on staining for a limited number of RNA species. In contrast, single-cell RNA-seq allows for deep profiling of cellular gene expression, but established methods separate cells from their native spatial context. Here we present Seurat, a computational strategy to infer cellular localization by integrating single-cell RNA-seq data with in situ RNA patterns. We applied Seurat to spatially map 851 single cells from dissociated zebrafish (Danio rerio) embryos, inferring a transcriptome-wide map of spatial patterning. We confirmed Seurat’s accuracy using several experimental approaches, and used it to identify a set of archetypal expression patterns and spatial markers. Additionally, Seurat correctly localizes rare subpopulations, accurately mapping both spatially restricted and scattered groups. Seurat will be applicable to mapping cellular localization within complex patterned tissues in diverse systems. PMID:25867923

  6. Generation of Gene Knockout Mice by ES Cell Microinjection

    PubMed Central

    Longenecker, Glenn; Kulkarni, Ashok B

    2009-01-01

    This unit lists and describes protocols used in the production of chimeric mice leading to the generation of gene knockout mice. These protocols include the collection of blastocyst embryos, ES cell injection, and uterine transfer of injected blastocysts. Support protocols in the superovulation of blastocyst donor mice, generation of pseudopregnant recipients, fabrication of glass pipettes, and generation of germline mice are also included. Practical tips and solutions are mentioned to help troubleshoot problems that may occur. PMID:19731226

  7. Differential Regulation of Gene Expression of Alveolar Epithelial Cell Markers in Human Lung Adenocarcinoma-Derived A549 Clones

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Hiroshi; Miyoshi, Keiko; Sakiyama, Shoji; Tangoku, Akira; Noma, Takafumi

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy appears to be promising for restoring damaged or irreparable lung tissue. However, establishing a simple and reproducible protocol for preparing lung progenitor populations is difficult because the molecular basis for alveolar epithelial cell differentiation is not fully understood. We investigated an in vitro system to analyze the regulatory mechanisms of alveolus-specific gene expression using a human alveolar epithelial type II (ATII) cell line, A549. After cloning A549 subpopulations, each clone was classified into five groups according to cell morphology and marker gene expression. Two clones (B7 and H12) were further analyzed. Under serum-free culture conditions, surfactant protein C (SPC), an ATII marker, was upregulated in both H12 and B7. Aquaporin 5 (AQP5), an ATI marker, was upregulated in H12 and significantly induced in B7. When the RAS/MAPK pathway was inhibited, SPC and thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) expression levels were enhanced. After treatment with dexamethasone (DEX), 8-bromoadenosine 3′5′-cyclic monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX), and keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), surfactant protein B and TTF-1 expression levels were enhanced. We found that A549-derived clones have plasticity in gene expression of alveolar epithelial differentiation markers and could be useful in studying ATII maintenance and differentiation. PMID:26167183

  8. Human T-cell receptor variable gene segment families

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, B.; Kabelitz, D.; Clark, S.P.; Mak, T.W.

    1995-10-01

    Multiple DNA and protein sequence alignments have been constructed for the human T-cell receptor {alpha}/{delta}, {beta}, and {gamma} (TCRA/D, B, and G) variable (V) gene segments. The traditional classification into subfamilies was confirmed using a much larger pool of sequences. For each sequence, a name was derived which complies with the standard nomenclature. The traditional numbering of V gene segments in the order of their discovery was continued and changed when in conflict with names of other segments. By discriminating between alleles at the same locus versus genes from different loci, we were able to reduce the number of more than 150 different TCRBV sequences in the database to a repertoire of only 47 functional TCRBV gene segments. An extension of this analysis to the over 100 TCRAV sequences results in a predicted repertoire of 42 functional TCRAV gene segments. Our alignment revealed two residues that distinguish between the highly homologous V{delta} and V{alpha}, one at a site that in V{sub H} contacts the constant region, the other at the interface between immunoglobulin V{sub H} and V{sub L}. This site may be responsible for restricted pairing between certain V{delta} and V{gamma} chains. On the other hand, V{beta} and V{gamma} appear to be related by the fact that their CDR2 length is increased by four residues as compared with that of V{alpha}/{delta} peptides. 150 refs., 12 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. Transcriptional regulation of cathelicidin genes in chicken bone marrow cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang In; Jang, Hyun June; Jeon, Mi-hyang; Lee, Mi Ock; Kim, Jeom Sun; Jeon, Ik-Soo; Byun, Sung June

    2016-04-01

    Cathelicidins form a family of vertebrate-specific immune molecules with an evolutionarily conserved gene structure. We analyzed the expression patterns of cathelicidin genes (CAMP, CATH3, and CATHB1) in chicken bone marrow cells (BMCs) and chicken embryonic fibroblasts (CEFs). We found that CAMP and CATHB1 were significantly up-regulated in BMCs, whereas the expression of CATH3 did not differ significantly between BMCs and CEFs. To study the mechanism underlying the up-regulation of cathelicidin genes in BMCs, we predicted the transcription factors (TFs) that bind to the 5'-flanking regions of cathelicidin genes. CEBPA, EBF1, HES1, MSX1, and ZIC3 were up-regulated in BMCs compared to CEFs. Subsequently, when a siRNA-mediated knockdown assay was performed for MSX1, the expression of CAMP and CATHB1 was decreased in BMCs. We also showed that the transcriptional activity of the CAMP promoter was decreased by mutation of the MSX1-binding sites present within the 5'-flanking region of CAMP. These results increase our understanding of the regulatory mechanisms controlling cathelicidin genes in BMCs. PMID:26908883

  10. Interchromosomal gene conversion at an endogenous human cell locus.

    PubMed Central

    Quintana, P J; Neuwirth, E A; Grosovsky, A J

    2001-01-01

    To examine the relationship between gene conversion and reciprocal exchange at an endogenous chromosomal locus, we developed a reversion assay in a thymidine kinase deficient mutant, TX545, derived from the human lymphoblastoid cell line TK6. Selectable revertants of TX545 can be generated through interchromosomal gene conversion at the site of inactivating mutations on each tk allele or by reciprocal exchange that alters the linkage relationships of inactivating polymorphisms within the tk locus. Analysis of loss of heterozygosity (LOH) at intragenic polymorphisms and flanking microsatellite markers was used to initially evaluate allelotypes in TK(+) revertants for patterns associated with either gene conversion or crossing over. The linkage pattern in a subset of convertants was then unambiguously established, even in the event of prereplicative recombinational exchanges, by haplotype analysis of flanking microsatellite loci in tk(-/-) LOH mutants collected from the tk(+/-) parental convertant. Some (7/38; 18%) revertants were attributable to easily discriminated nonrecombinational mechanisms, including suppressor mutations within the tk coding sequence. However, all revertants classified as a recombinational event (28/38; 74%) were attributed to localized gene conversion, representing a highly significant preference (P < 0.0001) over gene conversion with associated reciprocal exchange, which was never observed. PMID:11404339

  11. Targeting human melanoma neoantigens by T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Leisegang, Matthias; Kammertoens, Thomas; Uckert, Wolfgang; Blankenstein, Thomas

    2016-03-01

    In successful cancer immunotherapy, T cell responses appear to be directed toward neoantigens created by somatic mutations; however, direct evidence that neoantigen-specific T cells cause regression of established cancer is lacking. Here, we generated T cells expressing a mutation-specific transgenic T cell receptor (TCR) to target different immunogenic mutations in cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) that naturally occur in human melanoma. Two mutant CDK4 isoforms (R24C, R24L) similarly stimulated T cell responses in vitro and were analyzed as therapeutic targets for TCR gene therapy. In a syngeneic HLA-A2-transgenic mouse model of large established tumors, we found that both mutations differed dramatically as targets for TCR-modified T cells in vivo. While T cells expanded efficiently and produced IFN-γ in response to R24L, R24C failed to induce an effective antitumor response. Such differences in neoantigen quality might explain why cancer immunotherapy induces tumor regression in some individuals, while others do not respond, despite similar mutational load. We confirmed the validity of the in vivo model by showing that the melan-A-specific (MART-1-specific) TCR DMF5 induces rejection of tumors expressing analog, but not native, MART-1 epitopes. The described model allows identification of those neoantigens in human cancer that serve as suitable T cell targets and may help to predict clinical efficacy. PMID:26808500

  12. Gene stability in mammalian cells and protein consistency.

    PubMed

    Berthold, W

    1994-01-01

    The safety of a patient who is the recipient of protein drugs has to be assured. A "wrong" protein is thought to represent a great risk. The philosophy of testing strategies related to gene stability with product safety will be discussed in the light of experimental data available today. Although all mammalian cell lines used in the production of biologicals including recombinant DNA-derived lines have been produced from individual clones (functional monoclonality) they have been found to be heterogenous with regard to the genomic content (number of chromosomes, characteristics of identifiable chromosomes and position and number of integrated recombinant sequences). The verification of the presence of correct gene in a production cell line constitutes a well accepted and useful test, especially if derived by "population sequencing". A batch not related repeated confirmation of this fact cannot lead to any additional assurance for the correctness of all proteins constituting a given product beyond the level provided by cheminal testing. In contrast to this obvious and unavoidable heterogeneity in cellular genomes, the coding regions of genes have not been shown to change. Evidence is available to demonstrate the consistency of protein products originating from recombinant (and hybridoma) cell lines, e.g. more than 500,000 patients have received and tolerated rtPA well. PMID:7883100

  13. An International Ki67 Reproducibility Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In breast cancer, immunohistochemical assessment of proliferation using the marker Ki67 has potential use in both research and clinical management. However, lack of consistency across laboratories has limited Ki67’s value. A working group was assembled to devise a strategy to harmonize Ki67 analysis and increase scoring concordance. Toward that goal, we conducted a Ki67 reproducibility study. Methods Eight laboratories received 100 breast cancer cases arranged into 1-mm core tissue microarrays—one set stained by the participating laboratory and one set stained by the central laboratory, both using antibody MIB-1. Each laboratory scored Ki67 as percentage of positively stained invasive tumor cells using its own method. Six laboratories repeated scoring of 50 locally stained cases on 3 different days. Sources of variation were analyzed using random effects models with log2-transformed measurements. Reproducibility was quantified by intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC), and the approximate two-sided 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the true intraclass correlation coefficients in these experiments were provided. Results Intralaboratory reproducibility was high (ICC = 0.94; 95% CI = 0.93 to 0.97). Interlaboratory reproducibility was only moderate (central staining: ICC = 0.71, 95% CI = 0.47 to 0.78; local staining: ICC = 0.59, 95% CI = 0.37 to 0.68). Geometric mean of Ki67 values for each laboratory across the 100 cases ranged 7.1% to 23.9% with central staining and 6.1% to 30.1% with local staining. Factors contributing to interlaboratory discordance included tumor region selection, counting method, and subjective assessment of staining positivity. Formal counting methods gave more consistent results than visual estimation. Conclusions Substantial variability in Ki67 scoring was observed among some of the world’s most experienced laboratories. Ki67 values and cutoffs for clinical decision-making cannot be transferred between laboratories without

  14. Identification of genes needed for regeneration, stem cell function, and tissue homeostasis by systematic gene perturbation in planaria

    PubMed Central

    Reddien, Peter W.; Bermange, Adam L.; Murfitt, Kenneth J.; Jennings, Joya R.; Alvarado, Alejandro Sánchez

    2007-01-01

    Summary Planarians have been a classic model system for the study of regeneration, tissue homeostasis, and stem cell biology for over a century, but have not historically been accessible to extensive genetic manipulation. Here we utilize RNA-mediated genetic interference (RNAi) to introduce large-scale gene inhibition studies to the classic planarian system. 1065 genes were screened. Phenotypes associated with the RNAi of 240 genes identify many specific defects in the process of regeneration and define the major categories of defects planarians display following gene perturbations. We assessed the effects of inhibiting genes with RNAi on tissue homeostasis in intact animals and stem cell (neoblast) proliferation in amputated animals identifying candidate stem cell, regeneration, and homeostasis regulators. Our study demonstrates the great potential of RNAi for the systematic exploration of gene function in understudied organisms and establishes planarians as a powerful model for the molecular genetic study of stem cells, regeneration, and tissue homeostasis. PMID:15866156

  15. Flux balance analysis predicts essential genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Gatto, Francesco; Miess, Heike; Schulze, Almut; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is the only modelling approach that is capable of producing genome-wide predictions of gene essentiality that may aid to unveil metabolic liabilities in cancer. Nevertheless, a systemic validation of gene essentiality predictions by flux balance analysis is currently missing. Here, we critically evaluated the accuracy of flux balance analysis in two cancer types, clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) and prostate adenocarcinoma, by comparison with large-scale experiments of gene essentiality in vitro. We found that in ccRCC, but not in prostate adenocarcinoma, flux balance analysis could predict essential metabolic genes beyond random expectation. Five of the identified metabolic genes, AGPAT6, GALT, GCLC, GSS, and RRM2B, were predicted to be dispensable in normal cell metabolism. Hence, targeting these genes may selectively prevent ccRCC growth. Based on our analysis, we discuss the benefits and limitations of flux balance analysis for gene essentiality predictions in cancer metabolism, and its use for exposing metabolic liabilities in ccRCC, whose emergent metabolic network enforces outstanding anabolic requirements for cellular proliferation. PMID:26040780

  16. The regulation of the B-cell gene expression programme by Pax5.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Melissa L; Pridans, Clare; Nutt, Stephen L

    2008-01-01

    The activity of the transcription factor paired box gene 5 (Pax5) is essential for many aspects of B lymphopoiesis including the initial commitment to the lineage, immunoglobulin rearrangement, pre-B cell receptor signalling and maintaining cell identity in mature B cells. Deregulated or reduced Pax5 activity has also been implicated in B-cell malignancies both in human disease and mouse models. Candidate gene approaches and biochemical analysis have revealed that Pax5 regulates B lymphopoiesis by concurrently activating B cell-specific gene expression as well as repressing the expression of genes, many of which are associated with non-B cell lineages. These studies have been recently complemented with more exhaustive microarray studies, which have identified and validated a large panel of Pax5 target genes. These target genes reveal a gene regulatory network, with Pax5 at its centre that controls the B-cell gene expression programme. PMID:17998914

  17. Expression of insulin-like growth factor family genes in clear cell renal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Białożyt, Michał; Plato, Marta; Mazurek, Urszula; Braczkowska, Bogumiła

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Despite significant progress in the pathology of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), diagnostic and predictive factors of major importance have not been discovered. Some hopes are associated with insulin-like growth factors. The aim of the study was to compare the expression of genes for insulin-like growth factor family in tumours and in tissue of kidneys without cancer. Material and methods Fifty-two patients years with clear cell renal cell cancer were qualified to the study group; patients nephrectomised because of hydronephrosis were included in the control group. Expression of genes were evaluated by RT-PCR. Results Expression of IGFR-1 gene in tumour accounts for about 60% of cases. The incidence is higher than in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues and higher (but with no statistical significance) than in kidney without cancer. Expression of IGFR-2 gene in tumours has not been established. The incidence of the expression in corresponding adjacent non-cancerous kidney tissues is small. Expression of this gene has been present in all specimens from kidneys without cancer. Expression of IGFBP-3 gene ascertained in all (except four) cases of ccRCC and in the majority of clippings from adjacent tissue. It was not found in kidneys from the control group. IGF-1, IGF-2, and IGFR-1 mRNA copy numbers in ccRCC were higher than in the material from the control group PMID:27358591

  18. Genomic instability, driver genes and cell selection: Projections from cancer to stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ben-David, Uri

    2015-04-01

    Cancer cells and stem cells share many traits, including a tendency towards genomic instability. Human cancers exhibit tumor-specific genomic aberrations, which often affect their malignancy and drug response. During their culture propagation, human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) also acquire characteristic genomic aberrations, which may have significant impact on their molecular and cellular phenotypes. These aberrations vary in size from single nucleotide alterations to copy number alterations to whole chromosome gains. A prominent challenge in both cancer and stem cell research is to identify "driver aberrations" that confer a selection advantage, and "driver genes" that underlie the recurrence of these aberrations. Following principles that are already well-established in cancer research, candidate driver genes have also been suggested in hPSCs. Experimental validation of the functional role of such candidates can uncover whether these are bona fide driver genes. The identification of driver genes may bring us closer to a mechanistic understanding of the genomic instability of stem cells. Guided by terminologies and methodologies commonly applied in cancer research, such understanding may have important ramifications for both stem cell and cancer biology. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Stress as a fundamental theme in cell plasticity. PMID:25132386

  19. [Single-cell detection of EGFR gene mutation in circulating tumor cells in lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Shuai, Sun; Yuliang, Deng

    2015-12-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are cells that shed from a primary tumor and enter the peripheral blood circulation. The CTCs are closely associated with tumor development and metastasis because of its high heterogeneity. However, there are still no effective methods to detect single-cell heterogeneity of the CTCs. To this end, we developed a method to detect gene mutation in CTCs at the single-cell level and applied it to the detection of EGFR gene mutation in single lung cancer CTC. Specifically, the rare CTCs were captured from blood using an integrated microfluidic system, and then were released into a microchip with thousands of nanoliter wells to isolate single CTC. The single CTC was then transferred into a PCR tube under the microscope for single-cell genome amplification and detection of EGFR gene mutation. We firstly modified chip and capillary and optimized PCR conditions (annealing temperature, number of cycles) using non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines A549, NCI-H1650 and NCI-H1975 as samples, which showed maximal amplification after 30 cycles with an annealing temperature at 59℃. We then successfully detected blood samples from NSCLC patients using this method. 5 CTCs were obtained from 2 mL patient's blood and the sequencing of EGFR exons 18, 19, 20 and 21 showed no mutations. Our results demonstrated that this method is sensitive enough to detect gene mutation in single CTC and has guiding significance in clinic research. PMID:26704950

  20. Global gene expression analyses of hematopoietic stem cell-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Karin; Wirta, Valtteri; Dahl, Lina; Bruce, Sara; Lundeberg, Joakim; Carlsson, Leif; Williams, Cecilia

    2006-01-01

    Background Expression of the LIM-homeobox gene Lhx2 in murine hematopoietic cells allows for the generation of hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-like cell lines. To address the molecular basis of Lhx2 function, we generated HSC-like cell lines where Lhx2 expression is regulated by a tet-on system and hence dependent on the presence of doxycyclin (dox). These cell lines efficiently down-regulate Lhx2 expression upon dox withdrawal leading to a rapid differentiation into various myeloid cell types. Results Global gene expression of these cell lines cultured in dox was compared to different time points after dox withdrawal using microarray technology. We identified 267 differentially expressed genes. The majority of the genes overlapping with HSC-specific databases were those down-regulated after turning off Lhx2 expression and a majority of the genes overlapping with those defined as late progenitor-specific genes were the up-regulated genes, suggesting that these cell lines represent a relevant model system for normal HSCs also at the level of global gene expression. Moreover, in situ hybridisations of several genes down-regulated after dox withdrawal showed overlapping expression patterns with Lhx2 in various tissues during embryonic development. Conclusion Global gene expression analysis of HSC-like cell lines with inducible Lhx2 expression has identified genes putatively linked to self-renewal / differentiation of HSCs, and function of Lhx2 in organ development and stem / progenitor cells of non-hematopoietic origin. PMID:16600034

  1. Limitations of allotopic expression of mitochondrial genes in mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Oca-Cossio, Jose; Kenyon, Lesley; Hao, Huiling; Moraes, Carlos T

    2003-01-01

    The possibility of expressing mitochondrial DNA-coded genes in the nuclear-cytoplasmic compartment provides an attractive system for genetic treatment of mitochondrial disorders associated with mitochondrial DNA mutations. In theory, by recoding mitochondrial genes to adapt them to the universal genetic code and by adding a DNA sequence coding for a mitochondrial-targeting sequence, one could achieve correct localization of the gene product. Such transfer has occurred in nature, and certain species of algae and plants express a number of polypeptides that are commonly coded by mtDNA in the nuclear-cytoplasmic compartment. In the present study, allotopic expression of three different mtDNA-coded polypeptides (ATPase8, apocytochrome b, and ND4) into COS-7 and HeLa cells was analyzed. Among these, only ATPase8 was correctly expressed and localized to mitochondria. The full-length, as well as truncated forms, of apocytochrome b and ND4 decorated the periphery of mitochondria, but also aggregated in fiber-like structures containing tubulin and in some cases also vimentin. The addition of a hydrophilic tail (EGFP) to the C terminus of these polypeptides did not change their localization. Overexpression of molecular chaperones also did not have a significant effect in preventing aggregations. Allotopic expression of apocytochrome b and ND4 induced a loss of mitochondrial membrane potential in transfected cells, which can lead to cell death. Our observations suggest that only a subset of mitochondrial genes can be replaced allotopically. Analyses of the hydrophobic patterns of different polypeptides suggest that hydrophobicity of the N-terminal segment is the main determinant for the importability of peptides into mammalian mitochondria. PMID:14573482

  2. Gene expression and cell turnover in human renal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Woolf, A S; Winyard, P J

    2000-01-01

    Kidney malformations are common causes of chronic renal failure in children. Dysplastic kidneys represent a unique model of perturbed epithelial-mesenchymal interaction which leads to the formation of malformed branching tubules surrounded by undifferentiated and metaplastic mesenchymal cells. We have found that human dysplastic epithelia express PAX2 (a transcription factor), BCL2 (a survival factor) and galectin-3 (a cell adhesion/signaling molecule). These genes are implicated in oncogenesis and their persistent expression may drive proliferation of dysplastic cysts, hence explaining the massive growth of some multicystic dysplastic kidneys. We have also detected prominent apoptosis in undifferentiated tissues around dysplastic epithelia, and this may provide a potential mechanism for the well-documented regression of dysplastic kidneys. Hence, although these kidneys may not have any excretory function, it is incorrect to consider them as 'end stage organs' because they are highly active in terms of cell turnover and gene expression; furthermore, these processes can be correlated with patterns of tissue growth and involution. Further elucidation of 'molecular lesions' in renal malformations may lead to novel therapies to enhance the differentiation of progenitor cells. PMID:10668206

  3. Treating hearing disorders with cell and gene therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillespie, Lisa N.; Richardson, Rachael T.; Nayagam, Bryony A.; Wise, Andrew K.

    2014-12-01

    Hearing loss is an increasing problem for a substantial number of people and, with an aging population, the incidence and severity of hearing loss will become more significant over time. There are very few therapies currently available to treat hearing loss, and so the development of new therapeutic strategies for hearing impaired individuals is of paramount importance to address this unmet clinical need. Most forms of hearing loss are progressive in nature and therefore an opportunity exists to develop novel therapeutic approaches to slow or halt hearing loss progression, or even repair or replace lost hearing function. Numerous emerging technologies have potential as therapeutic options. This paper details the potential of cell- and gene-based therapies to provide therapeutic agents to protect sensory and neural cells from various insults known to cause hearing loss; explores the potential of replacing lost sensory and nerve cells using gene and stem cell therapy; and describes the considerations for clinical translation and the challenges that need to be overcome.

  4. Regulation of proliferation and gene expression in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells by resveratrol and standardized grape extracts

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhirong; Chen Yan; Labinskyy, Nazar; Hsieh Tzechen; Ungvari, Zoltan; Wu, Joseph M. . E-mail: Joseph_Wu@nymc.edu

    2006-07-21

    Epidemiologic studies suggest that low to moderate consumption of red wine is inversely associated with the risk of coronary heart disease; the protection is in part attributed to grape-derived polyphenols, notably trans-resveratrol, present in red wine. It is not clear whether the cardioprotective effects of resveratrol can be reproduced by standardized grape extracts (SGE). In the present studies, we determined, using cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC), growth and specific gene responses to resveratrol and SGE provided by the California Table Grape Commission. Suppression of HASMC proliferation by resveratrol was accompanied by a dose-dependent increase in the expression of tumor suppressor gene p53 and heat shock protein HSP27. Using resveratrol affinity chromatography and biochemical fractionation procedures, we showed by immunoblot analysis that treatment of HASMC with resveratrol increased the expression of quinone reductase I and II, and also altered their subcellular distribution. Growth of HASMC was significantly inhibited by 70% ethanolic SGE; however, gene expression patterns in various cellular compartments elicited in response to SGE were substantially different from those observed in resveratrol-treated cells. Further, SGE also differed from resveratrol in not being able to induce relaxation of rat carotid arterial rings. These results indicate that distinct mechanisms are involved in the regulation of HASMC growth and gene expression by SGE and resveratrol.

  5. Mutation and gene transfer of neutral amino acid transport System L genes in mammalian cells

    SciTech Connect

    El-Gewely, M.R.; Collarini, E.J.; Campbell, G.S.; Oxender, D.L.

    1987-05-01

    The authors are attempting to clone the genes coding for amino acid transport System L. Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell mutants that are temperature sensitive in their leucyl-tRNA synthetase show temperature-dependent regulation of System L. Temperature resistant mutants isolated from these cells have constitutively derepressed System L activity. Somatic cell fusion studies using these mutants have suggested that a trans-acting element controls regulation of System L. Mutants with reduced transport activity were isolated by a TH-suicide selection. The growth of these mutant cells is limited by the transport defect. CHO mutants were transformed with a human cosmid library, followed by selection at high temperatures and low leucine concentrations. Some transformants have increased levels of System L activity, suggesting that human genes coding for leucine transport have been incorporated into the CHO genome. Human sequences were rescued by a lambda in vitro packaging system. These sequences hybridize to vector and total human DNA. Experiments are being done to confirm that these sequences indeed code for transport System L. They are also attempting to label membrane components of amino acid transporters by group-specific modifying reagents.

  6. Calfection: a novel gene transfer method for suspension cells.

    PubMed

    Lindell, Jeanette; Girard, Philippe; Müller, Natalie; Jordan, Martin; Wurm, Florian

    2004-01-20

    We have developed a novel method called Calfection for gene delivery to and protein expression from suspension-cultivated mammalian cells. Plasmid DNA was simply diluted into a calcium chloride solution and then added to the cell culture for transfection. We evaluated and optimized this approach using suspension-adapted HEK293 cells grown in 12-well plates that were shaken on an orbital shaker. Highest expression levels were obtained when cells were transfected at a density of 5x10(5) cells/ml in the presence of 9 mM calcium and 5 microg/ml of plasmid DNA while maintaining a culture pH of 7.6 at the time of transfection. Suspension-adapted BHK 21 and CHO DG 44 cells could also be transfected using this method. Calfection differs from the widely known calcium phosphate coprecipitation technique. The physico-chemical composition of the DNA interacting complexes is not yet known. The transfection cocktail, DNA in a calcium chloride solution, remained highly efficient during long-term storage at temperatures ranging from room temperature to -80 degrees C. In contrast, calcium phosphate-DNA cocktails are only efficient for gene transfer when prepared fresh. Furthermore, passing the calcium-plasmid DNA mixture through a 0.2-microm filter did not compromise protein expression, whereas calcium phosphate-DNA coprecipitates were retained by the filter. High protein expression levels, a limited number of manipulations and the possibility to filter the cocktail make the Calfection approach suitable for both large-scale transfection in bioreactors and for high-throughput transfection experiments in microtiter plates. PMID:14746910

  7. Tbx16 regulates hox gene activation in mesodermal progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Payumo, Alexander Y; McQuade, Lindsey E; Walker, Whitney J; Yamazoe, Sayumi; Chen, James K

    2016-09-01

    The transcription factor T-box 16 (Tbx16, or Spadetail) is an essential regulator of paraxial mesoderm development in zebrafish (Danio rerio). Mesodermal progenitor cells (MPCs) fail to differentiate into trunk somites in tbx16 mutants and instead accumulate within the tailbud in an immature state. However, the mechanisms by which Tbx16 controls mesoderm patterning have remained enigmatic. We describe here the use of photoactivatable morpholino oligonucleotides to determine the Tbx16 transcriptome in MPCs. We identified 124 Tbx16-regulated genes that were expressed in zebrafish gastrulae, including several developmental signaling proteins and regulators of gastrulation, myogenesis and somitogenesis. Unexpectedly, we observed that a loss of Tbx16 function precociously activated posterior hox genes in MPCs, and overexpression of a single posterior hox gene was sufficient to disrupt MPC migration. Our studies support a model in which Tbx16 regulates the timing of collinear hox gene activation to coordinate the anterior-posterior fates and positions of paraxial MPCs. PMID:27376691

  8. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation. PMID:26427458

  9. Targeting the Gdnf Gene in peritubular myoid cells disrupts undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Willis, William D.; Eddy, Edward M.

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia located in a niche at the base of the seminiferous epithelium delimited by Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid (PM) cells. SSCs self-renew or differentiate into spermatogonia that proliferate to give rise to spermatocytes and maintain spermatogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for this process. Sertoli cells produce GDNF and other growth factors and are commonly thought to be responsible for regulating SSC development, but limited attention has been paid to the role of PM cells in this process. A conditional knockout (cKO) of the androgen receptor gene in PM cells resulted in male infertility. We found that testosterone (T) induces GDNF expression in mouse PM cells in vitro and neonatal spermatogonia (including SSCs) co-cultured with T-treated PM cells were able to colonize testes of germ cell-depleted mice after transplantation. This strongly suggested that T-regulated production of GDNF by PM cells is required for spermatogonial development, but PM cells might produce other factors in vitro that are responsible. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for spermatogonial development by generating mice with a cKO of the Gdnf gene in PM cells. The cKO males sired up to two litters but became infertile due to collapse of spermatogenesis and loss of undifferentiated spermatogonia. These studies show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development in vivo. PMID:26831079

  10. Targeting the Gdnf Gene in peritubular myoid cells disrupts undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liang-Yu; Willis, William D; Eddy, Edward M

    2016-02-16

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are a subpopulation of undifferentiated spermatogonia located in a niche at the base of the seminiferous epithelium delimited by Sertoli cells and peritubular myoid (PM) cells. SSCs self-renew or differentiate into spermatogonia that proliferate to give rise to spermatocytes and maintain spermatogenesis. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) is essential for this process. Sertoli cells produce GDNF and other growth factors and are commonly thought to be responsible for regulating SSC development, but limited attention has been paid to the role of PM cells in this process. A conditional knockout (cKO) of the androgen receptor gene in PM cells resulted in male infertility. We found that testosterone (T) induces GDNF expression in mouse PM cells in vitro and neonatal spermatogonia (including SSCs) co-cultured with T-treated PM cells were able to colonize testes of germ cell-depleted mice after transplantation. This strongly suggested that T-regulated production of GDNF by PM cells is required for spermatogonial development, but PM cells might produce other factors in vitro that are responsible. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for spermatogonial development by generating mice with a cKO of the Gdnf gene in PM cells. The cKO males sired up to two litters but became infertile due to collapse of spermatogenesis and loss of undifferentiated spermatogonia. These studies show for the first time, to our knowledge, that the production of GDNF by PM cells is essential for undifferentiated spermatogonial cell development in vivo. PMID:26831079

  11. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-03-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy.

  12. A systematic study on drug-response associated genes using baseline gene expressions of the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Fang, Yun; Wang, Fayou; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Xiaoqi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    We have studied drug-response associated (DRA) gene expressions by applying a systems biology framework to the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia data. More than 4,000 genes are inferred to be DRA for at least one drug, while the number of DRA genes for each drug varies dramatically from almost 0 to 1,226. Functional enrichment analysis shows that the DRA genes are significantly enriched in genes associated with cell cycle and plasma membrane. Moreover, there might be two patterns of DRA genes between genders. There are significantly shared DRA genes between male and female for most drugs, while very little DRA genes tend to be shared between the two genders for a few drugs targeting sex-specific cancers (e.g., PD-0332991 for breast cancer and ovarian cancer). Our analyses also show substantial difference for DRA genes between young and old samples, suggesting the necessity of considering the age effects for personalized medicine in cancers. Lastly, differential module and key driver analyses confirm cell cycle related modules as top differential ones for drug sensitivity. The analyses also reveal the role of TSPO, TP53, and many other immune or cell cycle related genes as important key drivers for DRA network modules. These key drivers provide new drug targets to improve the sensitivity of cancer therapy. PMID:26960563

  13. Gene amplification during differentiation of mammalian neural stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Ulrike; Backes, Christina; Raslan, Abdulrahman; Keller, Andreas; Meier, Carola; Meese, Eckart

    2015-03-30

    In development of amphibians and flies, gene amplification is one of mechanisms to increase gene expression. In mammalian cells, gene amplification seems to be restricted to tumorigenesis and acquiring of drug-resistance in cancer cells. Here, we report a complex gene amplification pattern in mouse neural progenitor cells during differentiation with approximately 10% of the genome involved. Half of the amplified mouse chromosome regions overlap with amplified regions previously reported in human neural progenitor cells, indicating conserved mechanisms during differentiation. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we verified the amplification in single cells of primary mouse mesencephalon E14 (embryonic stage) neurosphere cells during differentiation. In vivo we confirmed gene amplifications of the TRP53 gene in cryosections from mouse embryos at stage E11.5. Gene amplification is not only a cancer-related mechanism but is also conserved in evolution, occurring during differentiation of mammalian neural stem cells. PMID:25760141

  14. Early BrdU-responsive genes constitute a novel class of senescence-associated genes in human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Minagawa, Sachi; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Fujii, Michihiko; Scherer, Stephen W.; Ayusawa, Dai . E-mail: dayusawa@yokohama-cu.ac.jp

    2005-04-01

    We identified genes that immediately respond to 5-bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) in SUSM-1, an immortal fibroblastic line, with DNA microarray and Northern blot analysis. At least 29 genes were found to alter gene expression greater than twice more or less than controls within 36 h after addition of BrdU. They took several different expression patterns upon addition of BrdU, and the majority showed a significant alteration within 12 h. When compared among SUSM-1, HeLa, and TIG-7 normal human fibroblasts, 19 genes behaved similarly upon addition of BrdU. In addition, 14 genes, 9 of which are novel as regards senescence, behaved similarly in senescent TIG-7 cells. The genes do not seem to have a role in proliferation or cell cycle progression. These results suggest that the early BrdU-responsive genes represent early signs of cellular senescence and can be its new biomarkers.

  15. Benzyl isothiocyanate alters the gene expression with cell cycle regulation and cell death in human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Nou-Ying; Chueh, Fu-Shin; Yu, Chien-Chih; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Wu, King-Chuen; Liu, Hsin-Chung; Lu, Kung-Wen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly malignant devastating brain tumor in adults. Benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC) is one of the isothiocyanates that have been shown to induce human cancer cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Herein, the effect of BITC on cell viability and apoptotic cell death and the genetic levels of human brain glioblastoma GBM 8401 cells in vitro were investigated. We found that BITC induced cell morphological changes, decreased cell viability and the induction of cell apoptosis in GBM 8401 cells was time-dependent. cDNA microarray was used to examine the effects of BITC on GBM 8401 cells and we found that numerous genes associated with cell death and cell cycle regulation in GBM 8401 cells were altered after BITC treatment. The results show that expression of 317 genes was upregulated, and two genes were associated with DNA damage, the DNA-damage-inducible transcript 3 (DDIT3) was increased 3.66-fold and the growth arrest and DNA-damage-inducible α (GADD45A) was increased 2.34-fold. We also found that expression of 182 genes was downregulated and two genes were associated with receptor for cell responses to stimuli, the EGF containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 (EFEMP1) was inhibited 2.01-fold and the TNF receptor-associated protein 1 (TRAP1) was inhibited 2.08-fold. BITC inhibited seven mitochondria ribosomal genes, the mitochondrial ribosomal protein; tumor protein D52 (MRPS28) was inhibited 2.06-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L23 (MRPL23) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S2 (MRPS2) decreased 2.07-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein S12 (MRPS12) decreased 2.08-fold, the mitochondria ribosomal protein L12 (MRPL12) decreased 2.25-fold and the mitochondria ribosomal protein S34 (MRPS34) was decreased 2.30-fold in GBM 8401 cells. These changes of gene expression can provide the effects of BITC on the genetic level and are

  16. Epigenetic re-programming of the Germ Cell Nuclear Factor gene is required for proper differentiation of induced pluripotent cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Zwaka, Thomas P.; Cooney, Austin J.

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cells have been reprogrammed into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells that recapitulate the pluripotent nature of embryonic stem (ES) cells. Reduced pluripotency and variable differentiation capacities have hampered progress with this technology for applications in regeneration medicine. We have previously shown that Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (Gcnf) is required for the repression of pluripotency genes during ES cell differentiation and embryonic development. Here we report that iPS cell lines, in which the Gcnf gene was properly re-programmed, allowing expression of Gcnf, repress pluripotency genes during subsequent differentiation. In contrast, iPS clones in which the Gcnf gene was not re-programmed maintained pluripotency gene expression during differentiation and did not differentiate properly either in vivo or in vitro. These mal-reprogrammed cells re-capitulated the phenotype of Gcnf knock out (Gcnf−/−) ES cells. Re-introduction of Gcnf into either the Gcnf negative iPS cells or the Gcnf−/− ES cells, rescued repression of Oct4 during differentiation. Our findings establish a key role for Gcnf as a regulator of iPS cell pluripotency gene expression. It also demonstrates that reactivation of the Gcnf gene may serve as a marker to distinguish completely re-programmed iPS cells from incompletely pluripotent cells, which would make therapeutic use of iPS cells safer and more practical as it would reduce the oncogenic potential of iPS cells. PMID:23495137

  17. T cell receptor gene deletion circles identify recent thymic emigrants in the peripheral T cell pool

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Fan-kun; Chen, Chen-lo H.; Six, Adrien; Hockett, Richard D.; Cooper, Max D.

    1999-01-01

    Progenitor cells undergo T cell receptor (TCR) gene rearrangements during their intrathymic differentiation to become T cells. Rearrangements of the variable (V), diversity (D), and joining (J) segments of the TCR genes result in deletion of the intervening chromosomal DNA and the formation of circular episomes as a byproduct. Detection of these extrachromosomal excision circles in T cells located in the peripheral lymphoid tissues has been viewed as evidence for the existence of extrathymic T cell generation. Because all of the T cells in chickens apparently are generated in the thymus, we have employed this avian model to determine the fate of the V(D)J deletion circles. In normal animals we identified TCR Vγ-Jγ and Vβ-Dβ deletion circles in the blood, spleen, and intestines, as well as in the thymus. Thymectomy resulted in the gradual loss of these DNA deletion circles in all of the peripheral lymphoid tissues. A quantitative PCR analysis of Vγ1-Jγ1 and Vβ1-Dβ deletion circles in splenic γδ and Vβ1+ αβ T cells indicated that their numbers progressively decline after thymectomy with a half-life of approximately 2 weeks. Although TCR deletion circles therefore cannot be regarded as reliable indicators of in situ V(D)J rearrangement, measuring their levels in peripheral T cell samples can provide a valuable index of newly generated T cells entering the T cell pool. PMID:9990059

  18. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  19. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Domachowske, Joseph B; Bonville, Cynthia A; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2001-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner. PMID:11686888

  20. Highly efficient transient gene expression and gene targeting in primate embryonic stem cells with helper-dependent adenoviral vectors

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Keiichiro; Mitsui, Kaoru; Aizawa, Emi; Hasegawa, Kouichi; Kawase, Eihachiro; Yamagishi, Toshiyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihiko; Suemori, Hirofumi; Nakatsuji, Norio; Mitani, Kohnosuke

    2008-01-01

    Human embryonic stem (hES) cells are regarded as a potentially unlimited source of cellular materials for regenerative medicine. For biological studies and clinical applications using primate ES cells, the development of a general strategy to obtain efficient gene delivery and genetic manipulation, especially gene targeting via homologous recombination (HR), would be of paramount importance. However, unlike mouse ES (mES) cells, efficient strategies for transient gene delivery and HR in hES cells have not been established. Here, we report that helper-dependent adenoviral vectors (HDAdVs) were able to transfer genes in hES and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fasicularis) ES (cES) cells efficiently. Without losing the undifferentiated state of the ES cells, transient gene transfer efficiency was ≈100%. Using HDAdVs with homology arms, approximately one out of 10 chromosomal integrations of the vector was via HR, whereas the rate was only ≈1% with other gene delivery methods. Furthermore, in combination with negative selection, ≈45% of chromosomal integrations of the vector were targeted integrations, indicating that HDAdVs would be a powerful tool for genetic manipulation in hES cells and potentially in other types of human stem cells, such as induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. PMID:18768795

  1. Epithelial cell polarity genes are required for neural tube closure.

    PubMed

    Doudney, Kit; Stanier, Philip

    2005-05-15

    Human neural tube defects (NTD) are a heterogeneous group that exhibit complex inheritance, making it difficult to identify the underlying cause. Due to the uniform genetic background, inbred mouse strains are a more amenable target for genetic studies. We investigated the loop-tail (Lp) mouse as a model for the severe NTD, craniorachischisis. A homozygous point mutation was identified in the transmembrane protein Vangl2, which in Drosophila has been shown to function in the planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway. Morphological analysis of the Lp mice shows that the defect results from an abnormally broad floor plate, most likely through a failure in convergent extension. The elevated neural folds remain too far apart to contact, inhibiting neural tube closure. Recently, two other mouse mutants (crash and circletail) were described with a similar phenotype to Lp and were investigated as potentially new alleles. Mapping studies, however, showed that both mutants segregated to distinct loci. In the crash (Crsh) mouse, a mutation was identified in Celsr1, a seven pass transmembrane receptor that encodes a protein orthologous to Drosophila Flamingo. Like Vangl2, this gene also functions in the PCP pathway. While in circletail, a point mutation was identified introducing a premature stop codon into the apical-basal cell polarity gene scribble (Scrb1). We subsequently demonstrated a genetic interaction between all three genes, where double heterozygotes exhibit the same homozygous NTD phenotype. This strongly suggests both a candidate gene pathway and that interaction between independent recessive alleles may be a possible explanation for the complex inheritance in severe human NTD. PMID:15800847

  2. Combined Single-Cell Functional and Gene Expression Analysis Resolves Heterogeneity within Stem Cell Populations

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Nicola K.; Kent, David G.; Buettner, Florian; Shehata, Mona; Macaulay, Iain C.; Calero-Nieto, Fernando J.; Sánchez Castillo, Manuel; Oedekoven, Caroline A.; Diamanti, Evangelia; Schulte, Reiner; Ponting, Chris P.; Voet, Thierry; Caldas, Carlos; Stingl, John; Green, Anthony R.; Theis, Fabian J.; Göttgens, Berthold

    2015-01-01

    Summary Heterogeneity within the self-renewal durability of adult hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) challenges our understanding of the molecular framework underlying HSC function. Gene expression studies have been hampered by the presence of multiple HSC subtypes and contaminating non-HSCs in bulk HSC populations. To gain deeper insight into the gene expression program of murine HSCs, we combined single-cell functional assays with flow cytometric index sorting and single-cell gene expression assays. Through bioinformatic integration of these datasets, we designed an unbiased sorting strategy that separates non-HSCs away from HSCs, and single-cell transplantation experiments using the enriched population were combined with RNA-seq data to identify key molecules that associate with long-term durable self-renewal, producing a single-cell molecular dataset that is linked to functional stem cell activity. Finally, we demonstrated the broader applicability of this approach for linking key molecules with defined cellular functions in another stem cell system. PMID:26004780

  3. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Zahida; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Rafi, Mohammed; Wenger, David A; Siddiqui, Khwaja M; Siler, Catherine A; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Pomerantz, Roger J; Schnell, Matthias J; Dornburg, Ralph

    2003-09-15

    The avian retroviruses reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (REV-A) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV) are not naturally infectious in human cells. However, REV-A-derived viral vectors efficiently infect human cells when they are pseudotyped with envelope proteins displaying targeting ligands specific for human cell-surface receptors. Here we report that vectors containing the gag region of REV-A and pol of SNV can be pseudotyped with the envelope protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the glycoproteins of different rabies virus (RV) strains. Vectors pseudotyped with the envelope protein of the highly neurotropic RV strain CVS-N2c facilitated cell type-specific gene delivery into mouse and human neurons, but did not infect other human cell types. Moreover, when such vector particles were injected into the brain of newborn mice, only neuronal cells were infected in vivo. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neurons may present quite specific gene therapy approaches for many degenerative diseases of the brain. PMID:14517061

  4. Conditional IL-2 Gene Deletion: Consequences for T Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Popmihajlov, Zoran; Xu, Dong; Morgan, Heather; Milligan, Zoie; Smith, Kendall A.

    2012-01-01

    To explore the role of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in T cell proliferation, and to circumvent the IL-2 deficiency autoimmune syndrome of conventional il2 gene deletion, mice were created to allow conditional il2 gene deletion when treated with the estrogen analog, tamoxifen (TAM) as adults. Splenocytes from four different mouse strains, C57Bl/6 wild type (WT), conventional IL-2(−/−), TAM-treated Cre recombinase-negative (Cre−)/IL2fl/fl, and Cre recombinase-positive (Cre+)/IL2fl/fl, were activated with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and monitored for CD4+ and CD8+ T cell lymphocyte blastogenesis, aerobic glycolysis, BrdU incorporation into newly synthesized DNA, and CFSE dye dilution to monitor cell division. IL-2 production was monitored by quantitative ELISA and multiple additional cytokines were monitored by quantitative protein-bead arrays. Splenocytes from conventional IL-2(−/−) and TAM-treated Cre+ mice resulted in undetectable IL-2 production by ELISA, so that both strains were IL-2-deficient. As monitored by flow cytometry, activated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+, and Cre− mice all underwent blastogenesis, whereas far fewer cells from conventional IL-2(−/−) mice did so. By comparison, only cells from IL-2 sufficient WT and Cre− mice switched to aerobic glycolysis as evidenced by a drop in media pH. Blastogenesis was mirrored by BrdU incorporation and CFSE dye dilution by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from WT, Cre+, and Cre− mice, which were all equivalent, while proliferation of cells from conventional IL-2(−/−) mice was compromised. Splenocytes from IL-2 deficient conventional IL-2(−/−) mice produced low or undetectable other γc-chain cytokines (IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-13, IL-15, and IL-21), whereas production of these γc-chain cytokines from IL-2-deficient conditional IL-2(−/−) Cre+ mice were comparable with WT and Cre− mice. These results indicate that CD4+ and CD8+ T cell blastogenesis cannot be attributable to IL-2 alone, but a switch

  5. Heterozygous inactivation of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells enhances neointima formation via a rosuvastatin-sensitive cellular pathway

    PubMed Central

    Stansfield, Brian K.; Bessler, Waylan K.; Mali, Raghuveer; Mund, Julie A.; Downing, Brandon; Li, Fang; Sarchet, Kara N.; DiStasi, Matthew R.; Conway, Simon J.; Kapur, Reuben; Ingram, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the NF1 tumor suppressor gene cause Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1). Neurofibromin, the protein product of NF1, functions as a negative regulator of Ras activity. Some NF1 patients develop cardiovascular disease, which represents an underrecognized disease complication and contributes to excess morbidity and mortality. Specifically, NF1 patients develop arterial occlusion resulting in tissue ischemia and sudden death. Murine studies demonstrate that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 (Nf1+/−) in bone marrow cells enhances neointima formation following arterial injury. Macrophages infiltrate Nf1+/− neointimas, and NF1 patients have increased circulating inflammatory monocytes in their peripheral blood. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient for neointima formation. Specific ablation of a single copy of the Nf1 gene in myeloid cells alone mobilizes a discrete pro-inflammatory murine monocyte population via a cell autonomous and gene-dosage dependent mechanism. Furthermore, lineage-restricted heterozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells is sufficient to reproduce the enhanced neointima formation observed in Nf1+/− mice when compared with wild-type controls, and homozygous inactivation of Nf1 in myeloid cells amplified the degree of arterial stenosis after arterial injury. Treatment of Nf1+/− mice with rosuvastatin, a stain with anti-inflammatory properties, significantly reduced neointima formation when compared with control. These studies identify neurofibromin-deficient myeloid cells as critical cellular effectors of Nf1+/− neointima formation and propose a potential therapeutic for NF1 cardiovascular disease. PMID:23197650

  6. Regulatory Oversight of Cell and Gene Therapy Products in Canada.

    PubMed

    Ridgway, Anthony; Agbanyo, Francisca; Wang, Jian; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Health Canada regulates gene therapy products and many cell therapy products as biological drugs under the Canadian Food and Drugs Act and its attendant regulations. Cellular products that meet certain criteria, including minimal manipulation and homologous use, may be subjected to a standards-based approach under the Safety of Human Cells, Tissues and Organs for Transplantation Regulations. The manufacture and clinical testing of cell and gene therapy products (CGTPs) presents many challenges beyond those for protein biologics. Cells cannot be subjected to pathogen removal or inactivation procedures and must frequently be administered shortly after final formulation. Viral vector design and manufacturing control are critically important to overall product quality and linked to safety and efficacy in patients through concerns such as replication competence, vector integration, and vector shedding. In addition, for many CGTPs, the value of nonclinical studies is largely limited to providing proof of concept, and the first meaningful data relating to appropriate dosing, safety parameters, and validity of surrogate or true determinants of efficacy must come from carefully designed clinical trials in patients. Addressing these numerous challenges requires application of various risk mitigation strategies and meeting regulatory expectations specifically adapted to the product types. Regulatory cooperation and harmonisation at an international level are essential for progress in the development and commercialisation of these products. However, particularly in the area of cell therapy, new regulatory paradigms may be needed to harness the benefits of clinical progress in situations where the resources and motivation to pursue a typical drug product approval pathway may be lacking. PMID:26374212

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Bovine Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Gene Boule

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hua; Xu, Hongtao; Pan, Zengxiang; Xie, Zhuang; Li, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Non-primate mammals have two deleted azoospermia (DAZ) family genes, DAZL and Boule; genes in this family encode RNA-binding proteins essential for male fertility in diverse animals. Testicular DAZL transcription is regulated by epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation. However, nothing is known about the epigenetic regulation of Boule. Here, we explored the role of DNA methylation in the regulation of the bovine Boule (bBoule) gene. We found that a long CpG island (CGI) in the bBoule promoter was hypermethylated in the testes of cattle-yak hybrids with low bBoule expression, whereas cattle had relatively low methylation levels (P < 0.01), and there was no difference in the methylation level in the short CGI of the gene body between cattle and cattle-yak hybrids (P > 0.05). We identified a 107 bp proximal core promoter region of bBoule. Intriguingly, the differences in the methylation level between cattle and cattle-yak hybrids were larger in the core promoter than outside the core promoter. An in vitro methylation assay showed that the core promoter activity of bBoule decreased significantly after M.SssI methylase treatment (P < 0.01). We also observed dramatically increased bBoule transcription in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) after treatment with the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-dC. Taken together, our results establish that methylation status of the core promoter might be involved in testicular bBoule transcription, and may provide new insight into the epigenetic regulation of DAZ family genes and clinical insights regarding male infertility. PMID:26030766

  8. Gene expression profiling in multipotent DFAT cells derived from mature adipocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ono, Hiromasa; Oki, Yoshinao; Bono, Hidemasa; Kano, Koichiro

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: {yields} Adipocyte dedifferentiation is evident in a significant decrease in typical genes. {yields} Cell proliferation is strongly related to adipocyte dedifferentiation. {yields} Dedifferentiated adipocytes express several lineage-specific genes. {yields} Comparative analyses using publicly available datasets boost the interpretation. -- Abstract: Cellular dedifferentiation signifies the withdrawal of cells from a specific differentiated state to a stem cell-like undifferentiated state. However, the mechanism of dedifferentiation remains obscure. Here we performed comparative transcriptome analyses during dedifferentiation in mature adipocytes (MAs) to identify the transcriptional signatures of multipotent dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from MAs. Using microarray systems, we explored similarly expressed as well as significantly differentially expressed genes in MAs during dedifferentiation. This analysis revealed significant changes in gene expression during this process, including a significant reduction in expression of genes for lipid metabolism concomitantly with a significant increase in expression of genes for cell movement, cell migration, tissue developmental processes, cell growth, cell proliferation, cell morphogenesis, altered cell shape, and cell differentiation. Our observations indicate that the transcriptional signatures of DFAT cells derived from MAs are summarized in terms of a significant decrease in functional phenotype-related genes and a parallel increase in cell proliferation, altered cell morphology, and regulation of the differentiation of related genes. A better understanding of the mechanisms involved in dedifferentiation may enable scientists to control and possibly alter the plasticity of the differentiated state, which may lead to benefits not only in stem cell research but also in regenerative medicine.

  9. Single-Cell Cytokine Gene Expression in Peripheral Blood Cells Correlates with Latent Tuberculosis Status

    PubMed Central

    Lakehal, Karim; Davidow, Amy L.; Pine, Richard; Tyagi, Sanjay; Bushkin, Yuri; Lardizabal, Alfred; Gennaro, Maria Laura

    2015-01-01

    RNA flow cytometry (FISH-Flow) achieves high-throughput measurement of single-cell gene expression by combining in-situ nucleic acid hybridization with flow cytometry. We tested whether antigen-specific T-cell responses detected by FISH-Flow correlated with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI), a condition affecting one-third of the world population. Peripheral-blood mononuclear cells from donors, identified as positive or negative for LTBI by current medical practice, were stimulated ex vivo with mycobacterial antigen. IFNG and IL2 mRNA production was assayed by FISH-Flow. Concurrently, immunophenotypes of the cytokine mRNA-positive cells were characterized by conventional, antibody-based staining of cell-surface markers. An association was found between donor LTBI status and antigen-specific induction of IFNG and IL2 transcripts. Induction of these cytokine genes, which was detected by FISH-Flow in a quarter the time required to see release of the corresponding proteins by ELISA, occurred primarily in activated CD4+ T cells via T-cell receptor engagement. Moreover, NK cells contributed to IFNG gene induction. These results show that antigen-driven induction of T-cell cytokine mRNA is a measurable single-cell parameter of the host responses associated with latent tuberculosis. FISH-Flow read-outs contribute a multi-scale dimension to the immunophenotyping afforded by antibody-based flow cytometry. Multi-scale, single-cell analyses may satisfy the need to determine disease stage and therapy response for tuberculosis and other infectious pathologies. PMID:26658491

  10. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptor gene association with cryptorchidism.

    PubMed

    Niepiekło-Miniewska, Wanda; Kuśnierczyk, Piotr; Havrylyuk, Anna; Kamieniczna, Marzena; Nakonechnyy, Andrij; Chopyak, Valentyna; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-12-01

    Cryptorchidism is a condition where a testis persists in the abdominal cavity. Thus, due to elevated temperature we may expect induction of aberrant immune reactions depending on genetic constitution of individual. This may be reflected by development of anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in cryptorchid males. Also, natural killer (NK) cells which belong to innate immunity may control adaptive immunity. Therefore, the gene system encoding polymorphic NK cell immunoglobulin receptors (KIRs) has been studied. 109 prepubertal boys with cryptorchidism and 136 ethnically matched young male donors were selected to study NK cell KIRs. DNA was isolated using automatic Maxwell(®) system from the peripheral venous blood drawn onto anticoagulant. Olerup SSP KIR Genotyping kit including Taq polymerase was used for detection of KIR genes. Human leukocyte antigen-C (HLA-C) groups, C1 and C2 were established using a Olerup SSP KIR HLA Ligand kit. KIR2DL2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain long 2) and KIR2DS2 (killer immunoglobulin-like receptor two-domain short 2) genes were less frequent in patients than in control individuals (corrected p values: 0.0110 and 0.0383, respectively). However, no significant differences were observed between ASA-positive and ASA-negative patients, or between bilateral or unilateral cryptorchidism. No association between KIR ligands C1 and C2, alone or together with KIR2DL2, was found. However, the results suggest that KIR2DL2+/KIR2DS2+ genotype may be, to some extent, protective against cryptorchidism. PMID:26679162

  11. Association between cell cycle gene transcription and tumor size in oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Diniz, Marina Gonçalves; Silva, Jeane de Fatima Correia; de Souza, Fabricio Tinôco Alvim; Pereira, Núbia Braga; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago

    2015-12-01

    Higher tumor size correlates with poor prognosis and is an independent predictive survival factor in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) patients. However, the molecular events underlining OSCC tumor evolution are poorly understood. We aimed to investigate if large OSCC tumors show different cell cycle gene transcriptional signature compared to small tumors. Seventeen fresh OSCC tumor samples with different tumor sizes (T) were included in the study. Tumors were from the tongue or from the floor of the mouth, and only three patients were nonsmokers. Samples were categorized according to clinical tumor size in tumors ≤2 cm (T1, n = 5) or tumors >2 cm (T2, n = 9; T3, n = 2; T4, n = 1). The group of tumors ≤2 cm was considered the reference group, while the larger tumors were considered the test group. We assessed the expression of 84 cell cycle genes by qRT-PCR array and normalized it to the expression of two housekeeping genes. Results were analyzed according to the formula 2(^-DeltaCt). A five-fold change cutoff was used, and p values <0.05 were considered statistically significant. Ki-67 immunohistochemistry was performed to estimate cell proliferation index. Twenty-nine genes were downregulated in the test group (larger tumors) compared to the reference group (smaller tumors). Among these genes, 13 reached statistical significance: ANAPC4, CUL1, SUMO1, KPNA2, MAD2L2, CCNG2, E2F4, NBN, CUL2, PCNA, TFDP1, KNTC1, and ATR. Ki-67 labeling index was similar in both tumor groups. Our findings suggest that the transcriptional activity of specific cell cycle genes varies according to the size of OSCC tumor, which probably reflects tumor molecular evolution and adaptation to the microenvironment. PMID:26152289

  12. Gene expression analysis uncovers novel Hedgehog interacting protein (HHIP) effects in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiaobo; Qiu, Weiliang; Sathirapongsasuti, J. Fah.; Cho, Michael H.; Mancini, John D.; Lao, Taotao; Thibault, Derek M.; Litonjua, Gus; Bakke, Per S.; Gulsvik, Amund; Lomas, David A.; Beaty, Terri H.; Hersh, Craig P.; Anderson, Christopher; Geigenmuller, Ute; Raby, Benjamin A.; Rennard, Stephen I.; Perrella, Mark A.; Choi, Augustine M.K.; Quackenbush, John; Silverman, Edwin K.

    2013-01-01

    Hedgehog Interacting Protein (HHIP) was implicated in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by genome-wide association studies (GWAS). However, it remains unclear how HHIP contributes to COPD pathogenesis. To identify genes regulated by HHIP, we performed gene expression microarray analysis in a human bronchial epithelial cell line (Beas-2B) stably infected with HHIP shRNAs. HHIP silencing led to differential expression of 296 genes; enrichment for variants nominally associated with COPD was found. Eighteen of the differentially expressed genes were validated by real-time PCR in Beas-2B cells. Seven of 11 validated genes tested in human COPD and control lung tissues demonstrated significant gene expression differences. Functional annotation indicated enrichment for extracellular matrix and cell growth genes. Network modeling demonstrated that the extracellular matrix and cell proliferation genes influenced by HHIP tended to be interconnected. Thus, we identified potential HHIP targets in human bronchial epithelial cells that may contribute to COPD pathogenesis. PMID:23459001

  13. Cell and gene therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J E

    1994-02-01

    Experiments in mice have supported the idea of treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) by implanting normal muscle precursor cells into dystrophin-deficient muscles. However, similar experiments on DMD patients have had little success. Gene therapy for DMD, by introducing dystrophin constructs via retroviral or adenoviral vectors, has been shown to be possible in the mouse, but the efficiency and safety aspects of this technique will have to be carefully examined before similar experiments can be attempted in man. Direct injection of dystrophin cDNA constructs into mdx muscles has given rise to very low levels of dystrophin and this may be a possibility for the treatment of heart muscle. PMID:7514447

  14. Transcriptional Regulation of Tlr11 Gene Expression in Epithelial Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Zhenyu; Shi, Zhongcheng; Sanchez, Amir; Zhang, Tingting; Liu, Mingyao; Yang, Jianghua; Wang, Fen; Zhang, Dekai

    2009-01-01

    As sensors of invading microorganisms, Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are expressed not only on macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) but also on epithelial cells. In the TLR family, Tlr11 appears to have the unique feature in that it is expressed primarily on epithelial cells, although it is also expressed on DCs and macrophages. Here, we demonstrate that transcription of the Tlr11 gene is regulated through two cis-acting elements, one Ets-binding site and one interferon regulatory factor (IRF)-binding site. The Ets element interacts with the epithelium-specific transcription factors, ESE-1 and ESE-3, and the IRF motif interacts with IRF-8. Thus, Tlr11 expression on epithelial cells is regulated by the transcription factors that are presumably distinct from transcription factors that regulate the expression of TLRs in innate immune cells such as macrophages and DCs. Our results imply that the distinctive transcription regulatory machinery for TLRs on epithelium may represent a promising new avenue for the development of epithelia-specific therapeutic interventions. PMID:19801549

  15. A gold nanoparticle pentapeptide: gene fusion to induce therapeutic gene expression in mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Muroski, Megan E; Morgan, Thomas J; Levenson, Cathy W; Strouse, Geoffrey F

    2014-10-22

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) have been identified as having great potential as autologous cell therapeutics to treat traumatic brain injury and spinal injury as well as neuronal and cardiac ischemic events. All future clinical applications of MSC cell therapies must allow the MSC to be harvested, transfected, and induced to express a desired protein or selection of proteins to have medical benefit. For the full potential of MSC cell therapy to be realized, it is desirable to systematically alter the protein expression of therapeutically beneficial biomolecules in harvested MSC cells with high fidelity in a single transfection event. We have developed a delivery platform on the basis of the use of a solid gold nanoparticle that has been surface modified to produce a fusion containing a zwitterionic, pentapeptide designed from Bax inhibiting peptide (Ku70) to enhance cellular uptake and a linearized expression vector to induce enhanced expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat-derived MSCs. Ku70 is observed to effect >80% transfection following a single treatment of femur bone marrow isolated rat MSCs with efficiencies for the delivery of a 6.6 kbp gene on either a Au nanoparticle (NP) or CdSe/ZnS quantum dot (QD). Gene expression is observed within 4 d by optical measurements, and secretion is observed within 10 d by Western Blot analysis. The combination of being able to selectively engineer the NP, to colocalize biological agents, and to enhance the stability of those agents has provided the strong impetus to utilize this novel class of materials to engineer primary MSCs. PMID:25198921

  16. The impact of reference gene selection in quantification of gene expression levels in guinea pig cervical tissues and cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Accurate measurements of mRNA expression levels in tissues or cells are crucially dependent on the use of relevant reference genes for normalization of data. In this study we used quantitative real-time PCR and two Excel-based applets (geNorm and BestKeeper) to determine the best reference genes for quantification of target gene mRNA in a complex tissue organ such as the guinea pig cervix. Results Gene expression studies were conducted in cervical epithelium and stroma during pregnancy and parturition and in cultures of primary cells from this tissue. Among 15 reference gene candidates examined, both geNorm and BestKeeper found CLF1 and CLTC to be the most stable in cervical stroma and cervical epithelium, ACTB and PPIB in primary stroma cells, and CLTC and PPIB in primary epithelial cells. The order of stability among the remaining candidate genes was not in such an agreement. Commonly used reference such as GAPDH and B2M demonstrated lower stability. Determination of pairwise variation values for reference gene combinations using geNorm revealed that the geometric mean of the two most stable genes provides sufficient normalization in most cases. However, for cervical stroma tissue in which many reference gene candidates displayed low stability, inclusion of three reference genes in the geometric mean may improve accuracy of target gene expression level analyses. Using the top ranked reference genes we examined the expression levels of target gene PTGS2 in cervical tissue and cultured cervical cells. We compared the results with PTGS2 expression normalized to the least stable gene and found significant differences in gene expression, up to 10-fold in some samples, emphasizing the importance of appropriately selecting reference genes. Conclusions We recommend using the geometric mean of CFL1 and CLTC for normalization of qPCR studies in guinea pig cervical tissue studies, ACTB and PPIB in primary stroma cells and CLTC and PPIB in primary epithelial cells

  17. Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Fanconi Anemia: Report from the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting

    PubMed Central

    Tolar, Jakub; Adair, Jennifer E; Antoniou, Michael; Bartholomae, Cynthia C; Becker, Pamela S; Blazar, Bruce R; Bueren, Juan; Carroll, Thomas; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina; Clapp, D Wade; Dalgleish, Robert; Galy, Anne; Gaspar, H Bobby; Hanenberg, Helmut; Von Kalle, Christof; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Lindeman, Dirk; Naldini, Luigi; Navarro, Susana; Renella, Raffaele; Rio, Paula; Sevilla, Julián; Schmidt, Manfred; Verhoeyen, Els; Wagner, John E; Williams, David A; Thrasher, Adrian J

    2011-01-01

    Survival rates after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for Fanconi anemia (FA) have increased dramatically since 2000. However, the use of autologous stem cell gene therapy, whereby the patient's own blood stem cells are modified to express the wild-type gene product, could potentially avoid the early and late complications of allogeneic HCT. Over the last decades, gene therapy has experienced a high degree of optimism interrupted by periods of diminished expectation. Optimism stems from recent examples of successful gene correction in several congenital immunodeficiencies, whereas diminished expectations come from the realization that gene therapy will not be free of side effects. The goal of the 1st International Fanconi Anemia Gene Therapy Working Group Meeting was to determine the optimal strategy for moving stem cell gene therapy into clinical trials for individuals with FA. To this end, key investigators examined vector design, transduction method, criteria for large-scale clinical-grade vector manufacture, hematopoietic cell preparation, and eligibility criteria for FA patients most likely to benefit. The report summarizes the roadmap for the development of gene therapy for FA. PMID:21540837

  18. Comprehensive Gene Expression Analysis of Human Embryonic Stem Cells during Differentiation into Neural Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fathi, Ali; Hatami, Maryam; Hajihosseini, Vahid; Fattahi, Faranak; Kiani, Sahar; Baharvand, Hossein; Salekdeh, Ghasem Hosseini

    2011-01-01

    Global gene expression analysis of human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) that differentiate into neural cells would help to further define the molecular mechanisms involved in neurogenesis in humans. We performed a comprehensive transcripteome analysis of hESC differentiation at three different stages: early neural differentiation, neural ectoderm, and differentiated neurons. We identified and validated time-dependent gene expression patterns and showed that the gene expression patterns reflect early ESC differentiation. Sets of genes are induced in primary ectodermal lineages and then in differentiated neurons, constituting consecutive waves of known and novel genes. Pathway analysis revealed dynamic expression patterns of members of several signaling pathways, including NOTCH, mTOR and Toll like receptors (TLR), during neural differentiation. An interaction network analysis revealed that the TGFβ family of genes, including LEFTY1, ID1 and ID2, are possible key players in the proliferation and maintenance of neural ectoderm. Collectively, these results enhance our understanding of the molecular dynamics underlying neural commitment and differentiation. PMID:21829537

  19. Simvastatin modulates mesenchymal stromal cell proliferation and gene expression.

    PubMed

    Zanette, Dalila Lucíola; Lorenzi, Julio Cesar Cetrulo; Panepucci, Rodrigo Alexandre; Palma, Patricia Vianna Bonini; Dos Santos, Daiane Fernanda; Prata, Karen Lima; Silva, Wilson Araújo

    2015-01-01

    Statins are widely used hypocholesterolemic drugs that block the mevalonate pathway, responsible for the biosysnthesis of cholesterol. However, statins also have pleiotropic effects that interfere with several signaling pathways. Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are a heterogeneous mixture of cells that can be isolated from a variety of tissues and are identified by the expression of a panel of surface markers and by their ability to differentiate in vitro into osteocytes, adipocytes and chondrocytes. MSC were isolated from amniotic membranes and bone marrows and characterized based on ISCT (International Society for Cell Therapy) minimal criteria. Simvastatin-treated cells and controls were directly assayed by CFSE (Carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) staining to assess their cell proliferation and their RNA was used for microarray analyses and quantitative PCR (qPCR). These MSC were also evaluated for their ability to inhibit PBMC (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) proliferation. We show here that simvastatin negatively modulates MSC proliferation in a dose-dependent way and regulates the expression of proliferation-related genes. Importantly, we observed that simvastatin increased the percentage of a subset of smaller MSC, which also were actively proliferating. The association of MSC decreased size with increased pluripotency and the accumulating evidence that statins may prevent cellular senescence led us to hypothesize that simvastatin induces a smaller subpopulation that may have increased ability to maintain the entire pool of MSC and also to protect them from cellular senescence induced by long-term cultures/passages in vitro. These results may be important to better understand the pleiotropic effects of statins and its effects on the biology of cells with regenerative potential. PMID:25874574

  20. Aristaless Related Homeobox Gene, Arx, Is Implicated in Mouse Fetal Leydig Cell Differentiation Possibly through Expressing in the Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Miyabayashi, Kanako; Katoh-Fukui, Yuko; Ogawa, Hidesato; Baba, Takashi; Shima, Yuichi; Sugiyama, Noriyuki; Kitamura, Kunio; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2013-01-01

    Development of the testis begins with the expression of the SRY gene in pre-Sertoli cells. Soon after, testis cords containing Sertoli and germ cells are formed and fetal Leydig cells subsequently develop in the interstitial space. Studies using knockout mice have indicated that multiple genes encoding growth factors and transcription factors are implicated in fetal Leydig cell differentiation. Previously, we demonstrated that the Arx gene is implicated in this process. However, how ARX regulates Leydig cell differentiation remained unknown. In this study, we examined Arx KO testes and revealed that fetal Leydig cell numbers largely decrease throughout the fetal life. Since our study shows that fetal Leydig cells rarely proliferate, this decrease in the KO testes is thought to be due to defects of fetal Leydig progenitor cells. In sexually indifferent fetal gonads of wild type, ARX was expressed in the coelomic epithelial cells and cells underneath the epithelium as well as cells at the gonad-mesonephros border, both of which have been described to contain progenitors of fetal Leydig cells. After testis differentiation, ARX was expressed in a large population of the interstitial cells but not in fetal Leydig cells, raising the possibility that ARX-positive cells contain fetal Leydig progenitor cells. When examining marker gene expression, we observed cells as if they were differentiating into fetal Leydig cells from the progenitor cells. Based on these results, we propose that ARX acts as a positive factor for differentiation of fetal Leydig cells through functioning at the progenitor stage. PMID:23840809

  1. Reproducibility of muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    Thiel, C; Vogt, L; Himmelreich, H; Hübscher, M; Banzer, W

    2011-04-01

    The present study evaluated the reproducibility of tissue oxygenation in relation to oxygen consumption (VO2) across cycle exercise intensities in a test-retest design. 12 subjects (25.7±2.1 years; 24.7±1.9 kg · m(-2)) twice performed an incremental bicycle exercise protocol, while tissue oxygen saturation (StO2) in the vastus lateralis muscle was monitored by a commercially available NIRS unit and VO2 determined by an open-circuit indirect calorimetric system. Coefficients of variation across rest, workloads corresponding to 25, 50 and 75% of individual maximum capacity, and maximum load were 5.8, 4.6, 6.1, 8.0, 11.0% (StO2) and 7.6, 6.0, 3.7, 3.4, 3.1% (VO2), respectively. 95 % CI of relative test-retest differences ranged from -5.6 to +5.4% at 25% load to -17.2 to +7.5% at maximum load for StO2 and from -7.3 to +7.7% at rest to -3.3 to +3.2% at maximum load for VO2. With advancing exercise intensity, within-subject variability of StO2 was augmented, whereas VO2 variability slightly attenuated. NIRS measurements at higher workloads need to be interpreted with caution. PMID:21271493

  2. Predicting stochastic gene expression dynamics in single cells.

    PubMed

    Mettetal, Jerome T; Muzzey, Dale; Pedraza, Juan M; Ozbudak, Ertugrul M; van Oudenaarden, Alexander

    2006-05-01

    Fluctuations in protein numbers (noise) due to inherent stochastic effects in single cells can have large effects on the dynamic behavior of gene regulatory networks. Although deterministic models can predict the average network behavior, they fail to incorporate the stochasticity characteristic of gene expression, thereby limiting their relevance when single cell behaviors deviate from the population average. Recently, stochastic models have been used to predict distributions of steady-state protein levels within a population but not to predict the dynamic, presteady-state distributions. In the present work, we experimentally examine a system whose dynamics are heavily influenced by stochastic effects. We measure population distributions of protein numbers as a function of time in the Escherichia coli lactose uptake network (lac operon). We then introduce a dynamic stochastic model and show that prediction of dynamic distributions requires only a few noise parameters in addition to the rates that characterize a deterministic model. Whereas the deterministic model cannot fully capture the observed behavior, our stochastic model correctly predicts the experimental dynamics without any fit parameters. Our results provide a proof of principle for the possibility of faithfully predicting dynamic population distributions from deterministic models supplemented by a stochastic component that captures the major noise sources. PMID:16648266

  3. Aging: a portrait from gene expression profile in blood cells.

    PubMed

    Calabria, Elisa; Mazza, Emilia Maria Cristina; Dyar, Kenneth Allen; Pogliaghi, Silvia; Bruseghini, Paolo; Morandi, Carlo; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Gelati, Matteo; Guidi, Gian Cesare; Bicciato, Silvio; Schiaffino, Stefano; Schena, Federico; Capelli, Carlo

    2016-08-01

    The availability of reliable biomarkers of aging is important not only to monitor the effect of interventions and predict the timing of pathologies associated with aging but also to understand the mechanisms and devise appropriate countermeasures. Blood cells provide an easily available tissue and gene expression profiles from whole blood samples appear to mirror disease states and some aspects of the aging process itself. We report here a microarray analysis of whole blood samples from two cohorts of healthy adult and elderly subjects, aged 43±3 and 68±4 years, respectively, to monitor gene expression changes in the initial phase of the senescence process. A number of significant changes were found in the elderly compared to the adult group, including decreased levels of transcripts coding for components of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, which correlate with a parallel decline in the maximum rate of oxygen consumption (VO2max), as monitored in the same subjects. In addition, blood cells show age-related changes in the expression of several markers of immunosenescence, inflammation and oxidative stress. These findings support the notion that the immune system has a major role in tissue homeostasis and repair, which appears to be impaired since early stages of the aging process. PMID:27545843

  4. Bisphenol A disrupts gene expression in human placental trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Chandrew; Guan, Haiyan; Langlois, David; Cernea, Maria; Yang, Kaiping

    2015-06-01

    This study examined the effect of bisphenol A (BPA) on human placental gene expression using primary trophoblast cells as an in vitro model system. Trophoblast cells were isolated from human placentas at term, cultured and then exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of BPA (0.1-2 μg/ml) for up to 24h, after which levels of 11β-HSD2 mRNA, protein and activity were determined by standard radiometric conversion assay, western blotting, and qRT-PCR, respectively. The mRNA levels of several other prominent placental hormones/factors were also assessed by qRT-PCR. BPA dramatically increased levels of 11β-HSD2 activity, protein and mRNA in a time- and concentration-dependent manner (> 4-fold). BPA also augmented aromatase, glucose transporter-1, CRH, and hCG mRNA levels while reducing the level of leptin mRNA. These findings demonstrate that BPA severely disrupts human placental gene expression in vitro, which suggests that exposure to BPA may contribute to altered placental function and consequent pregnancy complications. PMID:25784278

  5. CD133-targeted gene transfer into long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwäble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Müller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J; Grez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as entry receptor, transfers genes preferentially into cells with high engraftment capability. Transduction of unstimulated CD34(+) cells with CD133-LV resulted in gene marking of cells with competitive proliferative advantage in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The CD133-LV-transduced population contained significantly more cells with repopulating capacity than cells transduced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-LV, a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Upon transfer of a barcode library, CD133-LV-transduced cells sustained gene marking in vivo for a prolonged period of time with a 6.7-fold higher recovery of barcodes compared to transduced control cells. Moreover, CD133-LV-transduced cells were capable of repopulating secondary recipients. Lastly, we show that this targeting strategy can be used for transfer of a therapeutic gene into CD34(+) cells obtained from patients suffering of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. In conclusion, direct gene transfer into CD133(+) cells allows for sustained long-term engraftment of gene corrected cells. PMID:25189742

  6. Reporter gene technologies for imaging cell fates in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Kusy, Sophie; Contag, Christopher H

    2014-01-01

    protocols for gene delivery into hematopoietic cells for the purposes of applying these specific labels to cell trafficking. The goal of this chapter is to provide adequate background information to allow the design and implementation of an experimental system for in vivo imaging in mice. PMID:24473775

  7. Expression changes of cell-cell adhesion-related genes in colorectal tumors

    PubMed Central

    BUJKO, MATEUSZ; KOBER, PAULINA; MIKULA, MICHAL; LIGAJ, MARCIN; OSTROWSKI, JERZY; SIEDLECKI, JANUSZ ALEKSANDER

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial tissues achieve a highly organized structure due to cell-cell junction complexes. Carcinogenesis is accompanied by changes in cell interactions and tissue morphology, which appear in the early stages of benign tumors and progress along with invasive potential. The aim of the present study was to analyze the changes in expression levels of genes encoding intercellular junction proteins that have been previously identified to be differentially expressed in colorectal tumors compared with normal mucosa samples (fold change, >2.5) in genome-wide expression profiling. The expression of 20 selected genes was assessed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in 26 colorectal cancer, 42 adenoma and 24 normal mucosa samples. Between these tissue types, differences were observed in the mRNA levels of genes encoding adherens junction proteins (upregulation of CDH3 and CDH11, and downregulation of CDH19 and PTPRF), tight junction proteins (upregulation of CLDN1 and CLDN2, and downregulation of CLDN5, CLDN8, CLDN23, CLDN15, JAM2 and CGN) and desmosomes (upregulation of DSC3 and DSG3, and downregulation of DSC2), in addition to a decrease in the expression of certain other genes involved in intercellular connections: PCDHB14, PCDH7, MUPCDH and NEO1. The differences between tissue types were statistically significant, and separate clustering of normal adenoma and carcinoma samples was observed in a hierarchical clustering analysis. These results indicate that the morphological changes in neoplastic colon tissue that occur during the ‘adenoma-carcinoma sequence’ are accompanied by specific changes in the expression of multiple genes encoding the majority of cell-cell junction complexes. The particular differential expression patterns appear to be consistent among patients with cancer and adenoma, in addition to normal mucosa samples. PMID:26137091

  8. Cell types differ in global coordination of splicing and proportion of highly expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F; Pho, Nam; Holton, Kristina M; Chittenden, Thomas W; Goldberg, Jeffrey L; Dong, Lingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Balance in the transcriptome is regulated by coordinated synthesis and degradation of RNA molecules. Here we investigated whether mammalian cell types intrinsically differ in global coordination of gene splicing and expression levels. We analyzed RNA-seq transcriptome profiles of 8 different purified mouse cell types. We found that different cell types vary in proportion of highly expressed genes and the number of alternatively spliced transcripts expressed per gene, and that the cell types that express more variants of alternatively spliced transcripts per gene are those that have higher proportion of highly expressed genes. Cell types segregated into two clusters based on high or low proportion of highly expressed genes. Biological functions involved in negative regulation of gene expression were enriched in the group of cell types with low proportion of highly expressed genes, and biological functions involved in regulation of transcription and RNA splicing were enriched in the group of cell types with high proportion of highly expressed genes. Our findings show that cell types differ in proportion of highly expressed genes and the number of alternatively spliced transcripts expressed per gene, which represent distinct properties of the transcriptome and may reflect intrinsic differences in global coordination of synthesis, splicing, and degradation of RNA molecules. PMID:27577089

  9. Cell types differ in global coordination of splicing and proportion of highly expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    Trakhtenberg, Ephraim F.; Pho, Nam; Holton, Kristina M.; Chittenden, Thomas W.; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Dong, Lingsheng

    2016-01-01

    Balance in the transcriptome is regulated by coordinated synthesis and degradation of RNA molecules. Here we investigated whether mammalian cell types intrinsically differ in global coordination of gene splicing and expression levels. We analyzed RNA-seq transcriptome profiles of 8 different purified mouse cell types. We found that different cell types vary in proportion of highly expressed genes and the number of alternatively spliced transcripts expressed per gene, and that the cell types that express more variants of alternatively spliced transcripts per gene are those that have higher proportion of highly expressed genes. Cell types segregated into two clusters based on high or low proportion of highly expressed genes. Biological functions involved in negative regulation of gene expression were enriched in the group of cell types with low proportion of highly expressed genes, and biological functions involved in regulation of transcription and RNA splicing were enriched in the group of cell types with high proportion of highly expressed genes. Our findings show that cell types differ in proportion of highly expressed genes and the number of alternatively spliced transcripts expressed per gene, which represent distinct properties of the transcriptome and may reflect intrinsic differences in global coordination of synthesis, splicing, and degradation of RNA molecules. PMID:27577089

  10. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2015-07-14

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  11. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir; Sanjiv , Pritha; Ray

    2009-04-28

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imageable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  12. Multimodality imaging of reporter gene expression using a novel fusion vector in living cells and animals

    DOEpatents

    Gambhir, Sanjiv; Pritha, Ray

    2011-06-07

    Novel double and triple fusion reporter gene constructs harboring distinct imagable reporter genes are provided, as well as applications for the use of such double and triple fusion constructs in living cells and in living animals using distinct imaging technologies.

  13. Identification of differentially expressed genes between lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma by gene expression profiling.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chaojing; Chen, Hezhong; Shan, Zhengxiang; Yang, Lixin

    2016-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between lung adenocarcinoma and normal lung tissues, and between lung squamous cell carcinoma and normal lung tissues, with the purpose of identifying potential biomarkers for the treatment of lung cancer. The gene expression profile (GSE6044) was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included data from 10 lung adenocarcinoma samples, 10 lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, and five matched normal lung tissue samples. After data processing, DEGs were identified using the Student's t‑test adjusted via the Benjamini‑Hochberg method. Subsequently, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery, and a global network was constructed. A total of 95 upregulated and 241 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung adenocarcinoma samples, and 204 upregulated and 285 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, as compared with the normal lung tissue samples. The DEGs in the lung squamous cell carcinoma group were enriched in the following three pathways: Hsa04110, Cell cycle; hsa03030, DNA replication; and hsa03430, mismatch repair. However, the DEGs in the lung adenocarcinoma group were not significantly enriched in any specific pathway. Subsequently, a global network of lung cancer was constructed, which consisted of 341 genes and 1,569 edges, of which the top five genes were HSP90AA1, BCL2, CDK2, KIT and HDAC2. The expression trends of the above genes were different in lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma when compared with normal tissues. Therefore, these genes were suggested to be crucial genes for differentiating lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27356570

  14. Identification of differentially expressed genes between lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma by gene expression profiling

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chaojing; Chen, Hezhong; Shan, Zhengxiang; Yang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between lung adenocarcinoma and normal lung tissues, and between lung squamous cell carcinoma and normal lung tissues, with the purpose of identifying potential biomarkers for the treatment of lung cancer. The gene expression profile (GSE6044) was downloaded from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included data from 10 lung adenocarcinoma samples, 10 lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, and five matched normal lung tissue samples. After data processing, DEGs were identified using the Student's t-test adjusted via the Benjamini-Hochberg method. Subsequently, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway enrichment analysis of the DEGs was performed using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery, and a global network was constructed. A total of 95 upregulated and 241 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung adenocarcinoma samples, and 204 upregulated and 285 downregulated DEGs were detected in lung squamous cell carcinoma samples, as compared with the normal lung tissue samples. The DEGs in the lung squamous cell carcinoma group were enriched in the following three pathways: Hsa04110, Cell cycle; hsa03030, DNA replication; and hsa03430, mismatch repair. However, the DEGs in the lung adenocarcinoma group were not significantly enriched in any specific pathway. Subsequently, a global network of lung cancer was constructed, which consisted of 341 genes and 1,569 edges, of which the top five genes were HSP90AA1, BCL2, CDK2, KIT and HDAC2. The expression trends of the above genes were different in lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma when compared with normal tissues. Therefore, these genes were suggested to be crucial genes for differentiating lung adenocarcinoma and lung squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:27356570

  15. Role of cell signaling in poxvirus-mediated foreign gene expression in mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Ningjie; Yu, Richard; Shikuma, Cecilia; Shiramizu, Bruce; Ostrwoski, Mario A.; Yu, Qigui

    2011-01-01

    Poxviruses have been extensively used as a promising vehicle to efficiently deliver a variety of antigens in mammalian hosts to induce immune responses against infectious diseases and cancer. Using recombinant vaccinia virus (VV) and canarypox virus (ALVAC) expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) or multiple HIV-1 gene products, we studied the role of four cellular signaling pathways, the phosphoinositide-3-OH kinase (PI3K), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK), and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), in poxvirus-mediated foreign gene expression in mammalian cells. In nonpermissive infection (human monocytes), activation of PI3K, ERK, p38 MAPK, and JNK was observed both VV and ALVAC and blocking PI3K, p38 MAKP, and JNK pathways with their specific inhibitors significantly reduced viral and vaccine antigen gene expression. Whereas, blocking the ERK pathway had no significant effect. Among these cellular signaling pathways studied, PI3K was the most critical pathway involved in gene expression by VV- or ALVAC-infected monocytes. The important role of PI3K in poxvirus-mediated gene expression was further confirmed in mouse epidermal cells stably transfected with dominant-negative PI3K mutant, as poxvirus-mediated targeted gene expression was significantly decreased in these cells when compared with their parental cells. Signaling pathway activation was influenced gene expression at the mRNA level rather than virus binding. In permissive mammalian cells, however, VV DNA copies were also significantly decreased in the absence of normal function of PI3K pathway. Poxvirus-triggered activation of PI3K pathway could be completely abolished by atazanavir, a new generation of antiretroviral protease inhibitors (PIs). As a consequence, ALVAC-mediated EGFP or HIV-1 gag gene expression in infected primary human monocytes was significantly reduced in the presence of atazanavir. These findings implicate that

  16. Development of a method to quantify gene expression levels for glycosylation pathway genes in chinese hamster ovary cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Clark, Kevin J-R; Harcum, Sarah W; Griffiths, Jennifer; Bailey, Kevin M

    2005-06-01

    Changes in protein glycosylation owing to changes in environmental conditions are not well understood. To better understand these relationships, methods to quantify controlling factors are needed. Because enzymes are translated from genes, the ability to quantify gene expression levels for glycosylation-related enzymes would be advantageous. We developed quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays to monitor gene expression in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells for five terminal glycosylation genes. The five enzymes were sialidase, a putative alpha2,3-sialyltransferase, beta1,4-galactosyltransferase, cytosine monophosphate-sialic acid transporter, and uracil diphosphate-galactosyl transporter. Four of these CHO cell genes were publicly available from GenBank; however, the alpha2,3-sialyltransferase gene for Cricetulus griseus (CHO cell species) was not available and, therefore, was sequenced as a part of this work. The qRT-PCR primers and probes (based on the TaqMan chemistry) were designed and validated for these five genes. The gene expression profiles were obtained for CHO cells producing the recombinant interleukin-4/13 cytokine trap molecule in batch reactors. PMID:15917580

  17. Bach2 represses plasma cell gene regulatory network in B cells to promote antibody class switch

    PubMed Central

    Muto, Akihiko; Ochiai, Kyoko; Kimura, Yoshitaka; Itoh-Nakadai, Ari; Calame, Kathryn L; Ikebe, Dai; Tashiro, Satoshi; Igarashi, Kazuhiko

    2010-01-01

    Two transcription factors, Pax5 and Blimp-1, form a gene regulatory network (GRN) with a double-negative loop, which defines either B-cell (Pax5 high) or plasma cell (Blimp-1 high) status as a binary switch. However, it is unclear how this B-cell GRN registers class switch DNA recombination (CSR), an event that takes place before the terminal differentiation to plasma cells. In the absence of Bach2 encoding a transcription factor required for CSR, mouse splenic B cells more frequently and rapidly expressed Blimp-1 and differentiated to IgM plasma cells as compared with wild-type cells. Genetic loss of Blimp-1 in Bach2−/− B cells was sufficient to restore CSR. These data with mathematical modelling of the GRN indicate that Bach2 achieves a time delay in Blimp-1 induction, which inhibits plasma cell differentiation and promotes CSR (Delay-Driven Diversity model for CSR). Reduction in mature B-cell numbers in Bach2−/− mice was not rescued by Blimp-1 ablation, indicating that Bach2 regulates B-cell differentiation and function through Blimp-1-dependent and -independent GRNs. PMID:20953163

  18. Large Scale Identification of Genes Involved in Cell Surface Biosynthesis and Architecture in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, M.; White, A. M.; Sheraton, J.; di-Paolo, T.; Treadwell, J.; Southard, S. B.; Horenstein, C. I.; Chen-Weiner, J.; Ram, AFJ.; Kapteyn, J. C.; Roemer, T. W.; Vo, D. H.; Bondoc, D. C.; Hall, J.; Wei Zhong, W.; Sdicu, A. M.; Davies, J.; Klis, F. M.; Robbins, P. W.; Bussey, H.

    1997-01-01

    The sequenced yeast genome offers a unique resource for the analysis of eukaryotic cell function and enables genome-wide screens for genes involved in cellular processes. We have identified genes involved in cell surface assembly by screening transposon-mutagenized cells for altered sensitivity to calcofluor white, followed by supplementary screens to further characterize mutant phenotypes. The mutated genes were directly retrieved from genomic DNA and then matched uniquely to a gene in the yeast genome database. Eighty-two genes with apparent perturbation of the cell surface were identified, with mutations in 65 of them displaying at least one further cell surface phenotype in addition to their modified sensitivity to calcofluor. Fifty of these genes were previously known, 17 encoded proteins whose function could be anticipated through sequence homology or previously recognized phenotypes and 15 genes had no previously known phenotype. PMID:9335584

  19. Silencing of Taxol-Sensitizer Genes in Cancer Cells: Lack of Sensitization Effects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shang-Lang; Chao, Chuck C.-K.

    2015-01-01

    A previous genome-wide screening analysis identified a panel of genes that sensitize the human non-small-cell lung carcinoma cell line NCI-H1155 to taxol. However, whether the identified genes sensitize other cancer cells to taxol has not been examined. Here, we silenced the taxol-sensitizer genes identified (acrbp, atp6v0d2, fgd4, hs6st2, psma6, and tubgcp2) in nine other cancer cell types (including lung, cervical, ovarian, and hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines) that showed reduced cell viability in the presence of a sub-lethal concentration of taxol. Surprisingly, none of the genes studied increased sensitivity to taxol in the tested panel of cell lines. As observed in H1155 cells, SKOV3 cells displayed induction of five of the six genes studied in response to a cell killing dose of taxol. The other cell types were much less responsive to taxol. Notably, four of the five inducible taxol-sensitizer genes tested (acrbp, atp6v0d2, psma6, and tubgcp2) were upregulated in a taxol-resistant ovarian cancer cell line. These results indicate that the previously identified taxol-sensitizer loci are not conserved genetic targets involved in inhibiting cell proliferation in response to taxol. Our findings also suggest that regulation of taxol-sensitizer genes by taxol may be critical for acquired cell resistance to the drug. PMID:26086592

  20. Association of luteinizing hormone receptor gene expression with cell cycle progression in granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    Cannon, Jennifer D.; Seekallu, Srinivas V.; VandeVoort, Catherine A.; Chaffin, Charles L.

    2009-01-01

    During hormonally induced ovarian follicle growth, granulosa cell proliferation increases and returns to baseline prior to the administration of an ovulatory stimulus. Several key genes appear to follow a similar pattern, including the luteinizing hormone receptor (LHCGR), suggesting an association between cell cycle progression and gene expression. The expression of LHCGR mRNA in granulosa cells isolated from immature rats and treated in culture with FSH increased in a time-dependent manner, whereas administration of the cell cycle inhibitor mimosine completely suppressed expression. Although forskolin was able to induce luteinization in cells treated with mimosine, human chorionic gonadotropin had no effect, indicating the functional loss of LHCGR. The effects of mimosine on cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression were reversible within 24 h of mimosine removal. Cell cycle inhibition did not alter the stability of LHCGR mRNA, indicating that the primary effect was at the transcriptional level. To determine whether the relationship between LHCGR expression and cell cycle were relevant in vivo, immature rats were given a bolus of PMSG, followed by a second injection of either saline or PMSG 24 h later to augment levels of proliferation. The expression of LHCGR mRNA was elevated in the ovaries of animals receiving a supplement of PMSG. Mimosine also blocked cell cycle progression and LHCGR mRNA expression in macaque granulosa cells isolated following controlled ovarian stimulation cycles and in two different mouse Leydig tumor lines. These data collectively indicate that LHCGR mRNA is expressed as a function of the passage of cells across the G1-S phase boundary. PMID:19293332

  1. Cell surface modulation of gene expression in brain cells by down regulation of glucocorticoid receptors

    SciTech Connect

    McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1981-02-01

    The concentration of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH; sn-glycerol-3-phosphate:NAD/sup +/ 2-oxidoreductase, EC 1.1.1.8) had previously been determined to be regulated by glucocorticoids in rat brain cells in vivo and in cell culture. We now demonstrate that concanavalin A (Con A) can inhibit the induction of GPDH in a dose-dependent manner in C6 rat glioma cells and in primary cultures of rat brain oligodendrocytes. The inhibition specifically prevents the appearance of new molecules of GPDH, although Con A does not significantly inhibit protein synthesis in these cells, nor does it affect the activity of another solube enzyme, lactate dehydrogenase. The ability to block enzyme induction is not limited to Con A, because other lectins also inhibit induction. The molecular mechanism by which Con A inhibits GPDH induction appears to be by the down regulation of the cytoplasmic glucocorticoid receptors, because exposure to Con A results in the loss of more than 90% of the receptor activity. Con A does not inhibit the receptor assay and no direct interaction between the receptor and Con A could be demonstrated. This down regulation is not tumor cell specific and appears to be a general phenomenon, because it occurs in normal oligodendrocytes and even in normal astrocytes (a cell type in which the gene for GPDH is not expressed). The down regulation of glucocorticoid receptors in normal brain cells suggests two important corollaries. First, it demonstrates the existence of a rate-limiting step controlling the glucocorticoid-dependent gene expression in brain cells and possibly represents a regulatory site common to all glucocorticoid target cells. Second, it suggests that the response to glucocorticoids of oligodendrocytes and astrocytes can be regulated in vivo by cell surface contact with endogenous lectins, neighboring cells, or both.

  2. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. The authors report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 x 10 /sup -4/-3 x 10/sup -3/. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  3. Differences in the expression of chromosome 1 genes between lung telocytes and other cells: mesenchymal stem cells, fibroblasts, alveolar type II cells, airway epithelial cells and lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoru; Zheng, Minghuan; Zhang, Miaomiao; Qian, Mengjia; Zheng, Yonghua; Li, Meiyi; Cretoiu, Dragos; Chen, Chengshui; Chen, Luonan; Popescu, Laurentiu M; Wang, Xiangdong

    2014-01-01

    Telocytes (TCs) are a unique type of interstitial cells with specific, extremely long prolongations named telopodes (Tps). Our previous study showed that TCs are distinct from fibroblasts (Fbs) and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as concerns gene expression and proteomics. The present study explores patterns of mouse TC-specific gene profiles on chromosome 1. We investigated the network of main genes and the potential functional correlations. We compared gene expression profiles of mouse pulmonary TCs, MSCs, Fbs, alveolar type II cells (ATII), airway basal cells (ABCs), proximal airway cells (PACs), CD8+ T cells from bronchial lymph nodes (T-BL) and CD8+ T cells from lungs (T-LL). The functional and feature networks were identified and compared by bioinformatics tools. Our data showed that on TC chromosome 1, there are about 25% up-regulated and 70% down-regulated genes (more than onefold) as compared with the other cells respectively. Capn2, Fhl2 and Qsox1 were over-expressed in TCs compared to the other cells, indicating that biological functions of TCs are mainly associated with morphogenesis and local tissue homoeostasis. TCs seem to have important roles in the prevention of tissue inflammation and fibrogenesis development in lung inflammatory diseases and as modulators of immune cell response. In conclusion, TCs are distinct from the other cell types. PMID:24826900

  4. Timing of flagellar gene expression in the Caulobacter cell cycle is determined by a transcriptional cascade of positive regulatory genes.

    PubMed Central

    Ohta, N; Chen, L S; Mullin, D A; Newton, A

    1991-01-01

    The Caulobacter crescentus flagellar (fla) genes are organized in a regulatory hierarchy in which genes at each level are required for expression of those at the next lower level. To determine the role of this hierarchy in the timing of fla gene expression, we have examined the organization and cell cycle regulation of genes located in the hook gene cluster. As shown here, this cluster is organized into four multicistronic transcription units flaN, flbG, flaO, and flbF that contain fla genes plus a fifth transcription unit II.1 of unknown function. Transcription unit II.1 is regulated independently of the fla gene hierarchy, and it is expressed with a unique pattern of periodicity very late in the cell cycle. The flaN, flbG, and flaO operons are all transcribed periodically, and flaO, which is near the top of the hierarchy and required in trans for the activation of flaN and flbG operons, is expressed earlier in the cell cycle than the other two transcription units. We have shown that delaying flaO transcription by fusing it to the II.1 promoter also delayed the subsequent expression of the flbG operon and the 27- and 25-kDa flagellin genes that are at the bottom of the regulatory hierarchy. Thus, the sequence and timing of fla gene expression in the cell cycle are determined in large measure by the positions of these genes in the regulatory hierarchy. These results also suggest that periodic transcription is a general feature of fla gene expression in C. crescentus. Images PMID:1847367

  5. Gene set enrichment analysis and ingenuity pathway analysis of metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed I; Dębski, Konrad J; Dabrowski, Michał; Czarnecka, Anna M; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-08-01

    In recent years, genome-wide RNA expression analysis has become a routine tool that offers a great opportunity to study and understand the key role of genes that contribute to carcinogenesis. Various microarray platforms and statistical approaches can be used to identify genes that might serve as prognostic biomarkers and be developed as antitumor therapies in the future. Metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) is a serious, life-threatening disease, and there are few treatment options for patients. In this study, we performed one-color microarray gene expression (4×44K) analysis of the mRCC cell line Caki-1 and the healthy kidney cell line ASE-5063. A total of 1,921 genes were differentially expressed in the Caki-1 cell line (1,023 upregulated and 898 downregulated). Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) and Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) approaches were used to analyze the differential-expression data. The objective of this research was to identify complex biological changes that occur during metastatic development using Caki-1 as a model mRCC cell line. Our data suggest that there are multiple deregulated pathways associated with metastatic clear cell renal cell carcinoma (mccRCC), including integrin-linked kinase (ILK) signaling, leukocyte extravasation signaling, IGF-I signaling, CXCR4 signaling, and phosphoinositol 3-kinase/AKT/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling. The IPA upstream analysis predicted top transcriptional regulators that are either activated or inhibited, such as estrogen receptors, TP53, KDM5B, SPDEF, and CDKN1A. The GSEA approach was used to further confirm enriched pathway data following IPA. PMID:27279483

  6. Type 1 neurofibromatosis: selective expression of extracellular matrix genes by Schwann cells, perineurial cells, and fibroblasts in mixed cultures.

    PubMed Central

    Jaakkola, S; Peltonen, J; Riccardi, V; Chu, M L; Uitto, J

    1989-01-01

    Cutaneous neurofibromas, characteristic lesions of neurofibromatosis 1, are composed of an abundant extracellular matrix and nerve connective tissue-derived cell types: Schwann cells, perineurial cells, and fibroblasts. In this study, the extracellular matrix gene expression by these cells was examined under culture conditions that allowed them to be metabolically active and readily identifiable by morphologic and immunocytochemical criteria. Northern hybridizations demonstrated expression of genes for type I, III, IV, and VI collagens, as well as for fibronectin, laminin, and elastin. In situ hybridizations revealed that all three cell types expressed pro alpha 1 (I), pro alpha 2 (VI), and laminin B1 chain genes. However, fibroblasts did not contain [35S]cDNA-mRNA hybrids specific for type IV collagen, whereas both Schwann cells and perineurial cells expressed these genes. Perineurial cells and fibroblasts readily expressed the fibronectin gene whereas Schwann cells were essentially devoid of the corresponding mRNA. Perineurial cells also expressed the gene for laminin A chain. The results indicate that the extracellular matrix gene expression profiles of Schwann cells, perineurial cells, and fibroblasts are distinct: all three cell types are capable of expressing some of the genes for extracellular matrix components, such as type I and VI collagens, whereas Schwann cells and perineurial cells may have the primary role in synthesizing basement membrane zone components, type IV collagen and laminin. These observations potentially relate to the mechanisms of growth and development of human neurofibromas. The results attest to the applicability of the methodology utilized here to study other human tumors with mixed cell populations. Images PMID:2500456

  7. Identification of global gene expression differences between human lens epithelial and cortical fiber cells reveals specific genes and their associated pathways important for specialized lens cell functions

    PubMed Central

    Hawse, John R.; DeAmicis-Tress, Candida; Cowell, Tracy L.; Kantorow, Marc

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: In order to identify specific genes that may play important roles in maintaining the specialized functions of lens epithelial and fiber cells, we have analyzed the global gene expression profiles of these two cell types in the human lens. This analysis will also reveal those genes that are exclusively expressed in the epithelial and cortical fiber cells and those genes that may play important roles in the differentiation of epithelial cells to mature fiber cells. Methods: Oligonucleotide microarray hybridization was used to analyze the expression profiles of 22,215 genes between adult (average age greater than 56 years) human lens epithelial and cortical fiber cells. The expression levels of selected genes were further compared by semi-quantitative RT-PCR and selected genes were functionally clustered into common categories using the EASE bioinformatics software package. Results: Analysis of three separate microarray hybridizations revealed 1,196 transcripts that exhibit increased expression and 1,278 transcripts that exhibit decreased expression at the 2 fold or greater level between lens epithelial cells and cortical fiber cells on all three of the arrays analyzed. Of these, 222 transcripts exhibited increased expression and 135 transcripts exhibited decreased expression by an average of 5 fold or greater levels on all three arrays. Semi-quantitative RT-PCR analysis of 21 randomly selected genes revealed identical expression patterns as those detected by microarray hybridization indicating that the microarray data are accurate. Functional clustering of the identified gene expression patterns using the EASE program revealed a wide variety of biological pathways that exhibited altered expression patterns between the two cell types including mRNA processing, cell adhesion, cell proliferation, translation, protein folding, oxidative phosphorylation, and apoptosis, among others. Conclusions: These data reveal novel and previously identified gene expression

  8. Direct Imaging of Gene-Carrier Complexes in Animal Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Alison J.; Slack, Nelle L.; Ahmad, Ayesha; Matsumoto, Brian; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    1998-03-01

    Cationic lipids are promising gene carriers for DNA transfection. Establishing the correlations between structures of cationic lipid/DNA complexes (CL-DNA) and pathways of transfection will greatly aid us in achieving the optimal CL-DNA transfections. Our first step is to determine the uptake mechanism of DNA by studying the interactions and structures of DNA and cationic lipids. X-ray diffraction shows that the CL-DNA undergoes structural phase transitions from lamellar( J. Raedler, I. Koltover, T. Salditt, C. R. Safinya, Science 275, 810 (1997).) to inverted hexagonal self-assemblies as we change the lipid composition. X-ray diffraction and optical microscopy techniques are used to directly image the progress of the CL-DNA in mouse L-cells and unravel the complex structure in-situ. Fluorescence and confocal optical microscopy techniques allow us to monitor the interactions between the complexes and different organelles in the cell cytoplasm. Current results indicate that once inside cells, complexes containing DOPE follow a different pathway from those containing DOPC. This research is funded by NSF-DMR-9624091, PRF-31352-AC7, and Los Alamos-STB/UC:96-108.

  9. Whole Cell Formaldehyde Cross-Linking Simplifies Purification of Mitochondrial Nucleoids and Associated Proteins Involved in Mitochondrial Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Rajala, Nina; Hensen, Fenna; Wessels, Hans J. C. T.; Ives, Daniel; Gloerich, Jolein; Spelbrink, Johannes N.

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial DNA/protein complexes (nucleoids) appear as discrete entities inside the mitochondrial network when observed by live-cell imaging and immunofluorescence. This somewhat trivial observation in recent years has spurred research towards isolation of these complexes and the identification of nucleoid-associated proteins. Here we show that whole cell formaldehyde crosslinking combined with affinity purification and tandem mass-spectrometry provides a simple and reproducible method to identify potential nucleoid associated proteins. The method avoids spurious mitochondrial isolation and subsequent multifarious nucleoid enrichment protocols and can be implemented to allow for label-free quantification (LFQ) by mass-spectrometry. Using expression of a Flag-tagged Twinkle helicase and appropriate controls we show that this method identifies many previously identified nucleoid associated proteins. Using LFQ to compare HEK293 cells with and without mtDNA, but both expressing Twinkle-FLAG, identifies many proteins that are reduced or absent in the absence of mtDNA. This set not only includes established mtDNA maintenance proteins but also many proteins involved in mitochondrial RNA metabolism and translation and therefore represents what can be considered an mtDNA gene expression proteome. Our data provides a very valuable resource for both basic mitochondrial researchers as well as clinical geneticists working to identify novel disease genes on the basis of exome sequence data. PMID:25695250

  10. Activation of the c-fos gene in prodynorphin- and proenkephalin-expressing cells of nucleus tractus solitarius after seizures.

    PubMed

    Kanter, R K; Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    We performed studies to determine the anatomical regions and chemical phenotypes of neurons within the rat medulla oblongata activated by pentylenetetrazole-induced seizures. Activated cells were identified by their expression of the c-fos gene, detected by in situ hybridization for c-fos mRNA and immunocytochemistry for Fos protein. Activated cells were located predominantly in nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), with c-fos mRNA appearing within 20 min after seizures (peak at 1-2 h), followed by Fos immunoreactivity visible at 1 h (peak at 2-4 h). Neither nonspecific noxious stimulation by intraperitoneal injection of saline nor brief exposure to hypoxic or hypercapnic gas mixtures to stimulate chemoreceptors reproduced this pattern of labeling. Prodynorphin or proenkephalin mRNA, detected by in situ hybridization, was colocalized with Fos immunoreactivity in many NTS cells. Thus, seizures activate neuronal pathways in the medulla oblongata which express genes for endogenous opioids. Potential long-term effects of seizures are suggested by the in situ hybridization finding that NTS prodynorphin mRNA increased 24 h after seizures compared to control levels. PMID:7957742

  11. Using intron splicing trick for preferential gene expression in transduced cells: an approach for suicide gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Pourzadegan, F; Shariati, L; Taghizadeh, R; Khanahmad, H; Mohammadi, Z; Tabatabaiefar, M A

    2016-01-01

    Suicide gene therapy is one of the most innovative approaches in which a potential toxic gene is delivered to the targeted cancer cell by different target delivery methods. We constructed a transfer vector to express green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transduced cells but not in packaging cells. We placed gfp under the control of the cytomegalovirus (CMV) promoter, which is positioned between the two long-terminal repeats in reverse direction. The intron-2 sequence of the human beta globin gene with two poly-A signals and several stop codons on the antisense strand was placed on the leading strand between the CMV promoter and gfp. For lentiviral production, the HEK293T and line were co-transfected with the PMD2G, psPAX2 and pLentiGFP-Ins2 plasmids. The HEK293T and line were transduced with this virus. PCR was performed for evaluation of intron splicing in transduced cells. The GFP expression was seen in 65% of the cells transduced. The PCR amplification of the genomic DNA of transduced cells confirmed the splicing of intron 2. The strategy is significant to accomplish our goal for preserving the packaging cells from the toxic gene expression during viral assembly and the resultant reduction in viral titration. Also it serves to address several other issues in the gene therapy. PMID:26679755

  12. Pluripotent embryonic stem cells and multipotent adult germline stem cells reveal similar transcriptomes including pluripotency-related genes.

    PubMed

    Meyer, S; Nolte, J; Opitz, L; Salinas-Riester, G; Engel, W

    2010-11-01

    DNA microarray analysis was performed with mouse multipotent adult germline stem cells (maGSCs) and embryonic stem cells (ESCs) from different genetic backgrounds cultured under standard ESC-culture conditions and under differentiation-promoting conditions by the withdrawal of the leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and treatment with retinoic acid (RA). The analyzed undifferentiated cell lines are very similar based on their global gene expression pattern and show 97-99% identity dependent on the analyzed background. Only 621 genes are differentially expressed in cells derived from mouse 129SV-background and 72 genes show differences in expression in cells generated from transgenic Stra8-EGFP/Rosa26-LacZ-background. Both maGSCs and ESCs express the same genes involved in the regulation of pluripotency and even show no differences in the expression level of these genes. When comparing maGSCs with previously published signature genes of other pluripotent cell lines, we found that maGSCs shared a very similar gene expression pattern with embryonic germ cells (EGCs). Also after differentiation of maGSCs and ESCs the transcriptomes of the cell lines are nearly identical which suggests that both cell types differentiate spontaneously in a very similar way. This is the first study, at transcriptome level, to compare ESCs and a pluripotent cell line derived from an adult organism (maGSCs). PMID:20624824

  13. Using Magnetic Nanoparticles for Gene Transfer to Neural Stem Cells: Stem Cell Propagation Method Influences Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension “neurospheres” or 2-D adherent “monolayers”. MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields (“magnetofection technology”) mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population. PMID:25918990

  14. Circadian Clock Genes Modulate Human Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cell Differentiation, Migration and Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Boucher, Helene; Vanneaux, Valerie; Domet, Thomas; Parouchev, Alexandre; Larghero, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Many of the components that regulate the circadian clock have been identified in organisms and humans. The influence of circadian rhythm (CR) on the regulation of stem cells biology began to be evaluated. However, little is known on the role of CR on human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSCs) properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of CR on the differentiation capacities of bone marrow hMSCs, as well as the regulation of cell cycle and migration capabilities. To that, we used both a chemical approach with a GSK-3β specific inhibitor (2’E,3’Z-6-bromoindirubin-3’-oxime, BIO) and a knockdown of CLOCK and PER2, two of the main genes involved in CR regulation. In these experimental conditions, a dramatic inhibition of adipocyte differentiation was observed, while osteoblastic differentiation capacities were not modified. In addition, cell migration was decreased in PER2-/- cells. Lastly, downregulation of circadian clock genes induced a modification of the hMSCs cell cycle phase distribution, which was shown to be related to a change of the cyclin expression profile. Taken together, these data showed that CR plays a role in the regulation of hMSCs differentiation and division, and likely represent key factor in maintaining hMSCs properties. PMID:26741371

  15. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  16. Synthesis of a novel cytokine and its gene (LD78) expressions in hematopoietic fresh tumor cells and cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Y; Hattori, T; Obaru, K; Sakai, K; Asou, N; Takatsuki, K; Ohmoto, Y; Nomiyama, H; Shimada, K

    1989-01-01

    The gene coding for the protein LD78 was isolated from stimulated human tonsillar lymphocytes by differential hybridization. The gene product consisted of 92 amino acids with characteristics of cytokines. LD78 gene transcripts were detected in eight of eight fresh samples of cells from patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia (ANLL) by Northern blot analysis. ANLL cells with monocytic features gave the strongest bands. RNA transcripts were found in two of three samples of cells from patients with adult T cell leukemia (ATL), eight of nine samples from patients with acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) of B cell lineage, and one of the three samples from patients with T cell ALL. KG-1, HL-60, HUT 102, MT-2, and MJ cell lines expressed the LD78 gene constitutively. The LD78 protein was detected in culture supernatants and cell lysates of HUT 102, MT-2, MJ, and fresh ATL cells by Western blot analysis. This protein was not found in culture supernatants or cell lysates of monocytic leukemia cells and HL-60 cells, although LD78 transcripts were found in those cells. The discrepancy between gene and protein expression might be explained by the stability of the mRNA. Thus, the protein may be involved in the neoplastic transformation of hematopoietic cells. Images PMID:2687328

  17. Microarray Analysis on Gene Regulation by Estrogen, Progesterone and Tamoxifen in Human Endometrial Stromal Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Chun-E; Zhu, Xueqiong; Li, Jinping; Lyle, Christian; Dowdy, Sean; Podratz, Karl C.; Byck, David; Chen, Hai-Bin; Jiang, Shi-Wen

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial stromal cells represent a major cellular component of human uterine endometrium that is subject to tight hormonal regulation. Through cell-cell contacts and/or paracrine mechanisms, stromal cells play a significant role in the malignant transformation of epithelial cells. We isolated stromal cells from normal human endometrium and investigated the morphological and transcriptional changes induced by estrogen, progesterone and tamoxifen. We demonstrated that stromal cells express appreciable levels of estrogen and progesterone receptors and undergo different morphological changes upon hormonal stimulation. Microarray analysis indicated that both estrogen and progesterone induced dramatic alterations in a variety of genes associated with cell structure, transcription, cell cycle, and signaling. However, divergent patterns of changes, and in some genes opposite effects, were observed for the two hormones. A large number of genes are identified as novel targets for hormonal regulation. These hormone-responsive genes may be involved in normal uterine function and the development of endometrial malignancies. PMID:25782154

  18. Gene expression profiles of bladder cancers: evidence for a striking effect of in vitro cell models on gene patterns

    PubMed Central

    Dangles, V; Lazar, V; Validire, P; Richon, S; Wertheimer, M; Laville, V; Janneau, J-L; Barrois, M; Bovin, C; Poynard, T; Vallancien, G; Bellet, D

    2002-01-01

    In order to assess the effect of in vitro models on the expression of key genes known to be implicated in the development or progression of cancer, we quantified by real-time quantitative PCR the expression of 28 key genes in three bladder cancer tissue specimens and in their derived cell lines, studied either as one-dimensional single cell suspensions, two-dimensional monolayers or three-dimensional spheroids. Global analysis of gene expression profiles showed that in vitro models had a dramatic impact upon gene expression. Remarkably, quantitative differences in gene expression of 2–63-fold were observed in 24 out of 28 genes among the cell models. In addition, we observed that the in vitro model which most closely mimicked in vivo mRNA phenotype varied with both the gene and the patient. These results provide evidence that mRNA expression databases based on cancer cell lines, which are studied to provide a rationale for selection of therapy on the basis of molecular characteristics of a patient's tumour, must be carefully interpreted. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 1283–1289. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600239 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11953886

  19. Alterations in replication timing of cancer-related genes in malignant human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Fritz, Andrew; Sinha, Seema; Marella, Narasimharao; Berezney, Ronald

    2013-05-01

    The replication timing of nine genes commonly involved in cancer was investigated in the MCF10 cell lines for human breast cancer progression. Six of these nine genes are part of a constellation of tumor suppressor genes that play a major role in familial human breast cancer (TP53, ATM, PTEN, CHK2, BRCA1, and BRCA2). Three other genes are involved in a large number of human cancers including breast as either tumor suppressors (RB1 and RAD51) or as an oncogene (cMYC). Five of these nine genes (TP53, RAD51, ATM, PTEN, and cMYC) show significant differences (P < 0.05) in replication timing between MCF10A normal human breast cells and the corresponding malignant MCF10CA1a cells. These differences are specific to the malignant state of the MCF10CA1a cells since there were no significant differences in the replication timing of these genes between normal MCF10A cells and the non-malignant cancer MCF10AT1 cells. Microarray analysis further demonstrated that three of these five genes (TP53, RAD51, and cMYC) showed significant changes in gene expression (≥2-fold) between normal and malignant cells. Our findings demonstrate an alteration in the replication timing of a small subset of cancer-related genes in malignant breast cancer cells. These alterations partially correlate with the major transcriptional changes characteristic of the malignant state in these cells. PMID:23161755

  20. Monoterpenes inhibit cell growth, cell cycle progression, and cyclin D1 gene expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bardon, S; Picard, K; Martel, P

    1998-01-01

    Monoterpenes are found in the essential oils of many commonly consumed fruits and vegetables. These compounds have been shown to exert chemopreventive and chemotherapeutic activities in mammary tumor models and represent a new class of breast cancer therapeutic agents. In this study, we investigated the effects of limonene and limonene-related monoterpenes, perillyl alcohol and perillic acid, on cell growth, cell cycle progression, and expression of cyclin D1 cell cycle-regulatory gene in T-47D, MCF-7, and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines. Our results revealed that limonene-related monoterpenes caused a dose-dependent inhibition of cell proliferation. Of the three monoterpenes tested, perillyl alcohol was the most potent and limonene was the least potent inhibitor of cell growth. The enantiomeric composition of limonene and perillyl alcohol did not interfere with their effect on cell growth. Sensitivity of breast cancer cell lines to monoterpenes was in the following order: T-47D > MCF-7 > MDA-MB-231. Growth inhibition induced by perillyl alcohol and perillic acid was associated with a fall in the proportion of cells in the S phase and an accumulation of cells in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Finally, we showed that the effects of limonene-related monoterpenes on cell proliferation and cell cycle progression were preceded by a decrease in cyclin D1 mRNA levels. PMID:9824849

  1. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Martin A.; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C.; Streit, Wolfgang R.; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  2. Evaluation of 16S rRNA Gene Primer Pairs for Monitoring Microbial Community Structures Showed High Reproducibility within and Low Comparability between Datasets Generated with Multiple Archaeal and Bacterial Primer Pairs.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Martin A; Güllert, Simon; Neulinger, Sven C; Streit, Wolfgang R; Schmitz, Ruth A

    2016-01-01

    The application of next-generation sequencing technology in microbial community analysis increased our knowledge and understanding of the complexity and diversity of a variety of ecosystems. In contrast to Bacteria, the archaeal domain was often not particularly addressed in the analysis of microbial communities. Consequently, established primers specifically amplifying the archaeal 16S ribosomal gene region are scarce compared to the variety of primers targeting bacterial sequences. In this study, we aimed to validate archaeal primers suitable for high throughput next generation sequencing. Three archaeal 16S primer pairs as well as two bacterial and one general microbial 16S primer pairs were comprehensively tested by in-silico evaluation and performing an experimental analysis of a complex microbial community of a biogas reactor. The results obtained clearly demonstrate that comparability of community profiles established using different primer pairs is difficult. 16S rRNA gene data derived from a shotgun metagenome of the same reactor sample added an additional perspective on the community structure. Furthermore, in-silico evaluation of primers, especially those for amplification of archaeal 16S rRNA gene regions, does not necessarily reflect the results obtained in experimental approaches. In the latter, archaeal primer pair ArchV34 showed the highest similarity to the archaeal community structure compared to observed by the metagenomic approach and thus appears to be the appropriate for analyzing archaeal communities in biogas reactors. However, a disadvantage of this primer pair was its low specificity for the archaeal domain in the experimental application leading to high amounts of bacterial sequences within the dataset. Overall our results indicate a rather limited comparability between community structures investigated and determined using different primer pairs as well as between metagenome and 16S rRNA gene amplicon based community structure analysis

  3. Regulatory Frameworks for Gene and Cell Therapies in Japan.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Daisuke; Yamaguchi, Teruhide; Ishizuka, Takami; Hirata, Masakazu; Takekita, Kazuhiro; Sato, Daisaku

    2015-01-01

    The regulations for the human use of advanced therapy medical products such as gene and cell therapy products have evolved in accordance with advance of clinical experience, scientific knowledge, and social acceptance to these technologies. In Japan, two laws, the Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices (PMD) Act and the Act on the Safety of Regenerative Medicine (ASRM), were enacted in November 2014. The PMD Act defines regenerative medical products for the first time and introduces a system for the conditional and time-limited marketing authorization of regenerative medical products. Under ASRM, the responsibilities of medical institutions to ensure the safety and provide transparency of such medical technologies are described. Amendments to accompanying guidelines for these two Acts are currently in preparation. It is expected that the new legislative frameworks will promote the timely development of new products and technologies, to bring safe and effective regenerative medicines to Japanese patients. PMID:26374217

  4. Gene Expression of Purified β-Cell Tissue Obtained from Human Pancreas with Laser Capture Microdissection

    PubMed Central

    Marselli, Lorella; Thorne, Jeffrey; Ahn, Yu-Bae; Omer, Abdulkadir; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Libermann, Towia; Otu, Hasan H.; Sharma, Arun; Bonner-Weir, Susan; Weir, Gordon C.

    2008-01-01

    Context: Human β-cell gene profiling is a powerful tool for understanding β-cell biology in normal and pathological conditions. Assessment is complicated when isolated islets are studied because of contamination by non-β-cells and the trauma of the isolation procedure. Objective: The objective was to use laser capture microdissection (LCM) of human β-cells from pancreases of cadaver donors and compare their gene expression with that of handpicked isolated islets. Design: Endogenous autofluorescence of β-cells facilitated procurement of purified β-cell tissue from frozen pancreatic sections with LCM. Gene expression profiles of three microdissected β-cell samples and three isolated islet preparations were obtained. The array data were normalized using DNA-Chip Analyzer software (Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA), and the lower confidence bound evaluated differentially expressed genes. Real-time PCR was performed on selected acinar genes and on the duct cell markers, carbonic anhydrase II and keratin 19. Results: Endogenous autofluorescence facilitates the microdissection of β-cell rich tissue in human pancreas. When compared with array profiles of purified β-cell tissue, with lower confidence bound set at 1.2, there were 4560 genes up-regulated and 1226 genes down-regulated in the isolated islets. Among the genes up-regulated in isolated islets were pancreatic acinar and duct genes, chemokine genes, and genes associated with hypoxia, apoptosis, and stress. Quantitative RT-PCR confirmed the differential expression of acinar gene transcripts and the duct marker carbonic anhydrase II in isolated islets. Conclusion: LCM makes it possible to obtain β-cell enriched tissue from human pancreas sections without the trauma and ischemia of islet isolation. PMID:18073315

  5. Differentiation of early germ cells from human skin-derived stem cells without exogenous gene integration.

    PubMed

    Ge, Wei; Ma, Hua-Gang; Cheng, Shun-Feng; Sun, Yuan-Chao; Sun, Li-Lan; Sun, Xiao-Feng; Li, Lan; Dyce, Paul; Li, Julang; Shi, Qing-Hua; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Infertility has long been a difficult issue for many couples. The successful differentiation of germ cells and live progeny from pluripotent stem cells brings new hope to the couples suffering with infertility. Here we successfully isolated human fetus skin-derived stem cells (hfSDSCs) from fetus skin tissue and demonstrated that hfSDSCs can be differentiated into early human germ cell-like cells (hGCLCs). These cells express human germ cell markers DAZL and VASA. Moreover, these pluripotent stem cell-derived hGCLCs are free of exogenous gene integration. When hfSDSCs were differentiated in porcine follicle fluid (PFF) conditioned media, which has been shown to promote the differentiation of mouse and porcine SDSCs into oocyte-like cells (OLCs), we observed some vesicular structures formed from hfSDSCs. Moreover, when hfSDSCs were cultured with specific conditioned media, we observed punctate and elongated SCP3 staining foci, indicating the initiation of meiosis. Ploidy analysis and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis indicated that a small percentage of putative 1N populations formed from hfSDSCs when compared with positive controls. In conclusion, our data here, for the first time, demonstrated that hfSDSCs possess the differentiation potential into germ lines, and they may differentiate both male and female hGCLCs in vitro under appropriate conditions. PMID:26347377

  6. Effect of mouse Sim2 gene on the cell cycle of PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xianfang; Shi, Jing; Peng, Bin; Zou, Xiaojing; Zhang, Chun

    2006-04-01

    Sim2 gene plays an important role in the pathogenesis of Down syndrome (DS). To observe the effect of mouse Sim2 (mSim2) on the cell cycle of PC12 cells in vitro and explore the role of Sim2 in the pathogenesis of DS, we cloned the full open reading frame of mSim2 into the pcDNA3 vector and transfected it into PC12 cells, before analysing the effect of mSim2 on the cell cycle. A eukaryotic expression vector of mSim2 (pcDNA3-mSim2) was successfully constructed. There was notable expression of mSim2 mRNA in the cells transfected with pcDNA3-Sim2. Flow cytometry showed that there were more cells in G(0)/G(1) phase in the Sim2-transfected cells than that in the controls (P < 0.01), and significantly fewer in G(2)/M phase (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein expressions of cyclin E decreased in the Sim2-transfected cells, while p27 expression increased significantly (P < 0.01). It is concluded that Sim2 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of DS by inhibiting the cell cycle, which is related to the decreased expression of cyclin E and increased expression of p27. PMID:16530433

  7. Frequent CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion in diverse types of T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Pora; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sangok; Kang, So Young; Jang, Hye Yoon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jaesang; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2016-06-01

    CTLA4 and CD28 are co-regulatory receptors with opposite roles in T-cell signaling. By RNA sequencing, we identified a fusion between the two genes from partial gene duplication in a case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The fusion gene, which codes for the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and the cytoplasmic region of CD28, is likely capable of transforming inhibitory signals into stimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Ectopic expression of the fusion transcript in Jurkat and H9 cells resulted in enhanced proliferation and AKT and ERK phosphorylation, indicating activation of downstream oncogenic pathways. To estimate the frequency of this gene fusion in mature T-cell lymphomas, we examined 115 T-cell lymphoma samples of diverse subtypes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and Sanger sequencing. We identified the fusion in 26 of 45 cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (58%), nine of 39 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified (23%), and nine of 31 extranodal NK/T cell lymphomas (29%). We further investigated the mutation status of 70 lymphoma-associated genes using ultra-deep targeted resequencing for 74 mature T-cell lymphoma samples. The mutational landscape we obtained suggests that T-cell lymphoma results from diverse combinations of multiple gene mutations. The CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion is likely a major contributor to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas and represents a potential target for anti-CTLA4 cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26819049

  8. Frequent CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion in diverse types of T-cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Hae Yong; Kim, Pora; Kim, Won Seog; Lee, Seung Ho; Kim, Sangok; Kang, So Young; Jang, Hye Yoon; Lee, Jong-Eun; Kim, Jaesang; Kim, Seok Jin; Ko, Young Hyeh; Lee, Sanghyuk

    2016-01-01

    CTLA4 and CD28 are co-regulatory receptors with opposite roles in T-cell signaling. By RNA sequencing, we identified a fusion between the two genes from partial gene duplication in a case of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma. The fusion gene, which codes for the extracellular domain of CTLA4 and the cytoplasmic region of CD28, is likely capable of transforming inhibitory signals into stimulatory signals for T-cell activation. Ectopic expression of the fusion transcript in Jurkat and H9 cells resulted in enhanced proliferation and AKT and ERK phosphorylation, indicating activation of downstream oncogenic pathways. To estimate the frequency of this gene fusion in mature T-cell lymphomas, we examined 115 T-cell lymphoma samples of diverse subtypes using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction analysis and Sanger sequencing. We identified the fusion in 26 of 45 cases of angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphomas (58%), nine of 39 peripheral T-cell lymphomas, not otherwise specified (23%), and nine of 31 extranodal NK/T cell lymphomas (29%). We further investigated the mutation status of 70 lymphoma-associated genes using ultra-deep targeted resequencing for 74 mature T-cell lymphoma samples. The mutational landscape we obtained suggests that T-cell lymphoma results from diverse combinations of multiple gene mutations. The CTLA4-CD28 gene fusion is likely a major contributor to the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas and represents a potential target for anti-CTLA4 cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26819049

  9. Promoter architecture dictates cell-to-cell variability in gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Daniel L.; Brewster, Robert C.; Phillips, Rob

    2015-01-01

    Variability in gene expression among genetically identical cells has emerged as a central preoccupation in the study of gene regulation; however, a divide exists between the predictions of molecular models of prokaryotic transcriptional regulation and genome-wide experimental studies suggesting that this variability is indifferent to the underlying regulatory architecture. We constructed a set of promoters in Escherichia coli in which promoter strength, transcription factor binding strength, and transcription factor copy numbers are systematically varied, and used messenger RNA (mRNA) fluorescence in situ hybridization to observe how these changes affected variability in gene expression. Our parameter-free models predicted the observed variability; hence, the molecular details of transcription dictate variability in mRNA expression, and transcriptional noise is specifically tunable and thus represents an evolutionarily accessible phenotypic parameter. PMID:25525251

  10. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3' UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner. PMID:26338775

  11. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    PubMed Central

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3′ UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner. PMID:26338775

  12. Evaluation of cytokine gene expression after avian influenza virus infection in avian cell lines and primary cell cultures

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The innate immune responses elicited by avian influenza virus (AIV) infection has been studied by measuring cytokine gene expression by relative real time PCR (rRT-PCR) in vitro, using both cell lines and primary cell cultures. Continuous cell lines offer advantages over the use of primary cell cult...

  13. Kisspeptin regulation of genes involved in cell invasion and angiogenesis in first trimester human trophoblast cells.

    PubMed

    Francis, Víctor A; Abera, Aron B; Matjila, Mushi; Millar, Robert P; Katz, Arieh A

    2014-01-01

    The precise regulation of extravillous trophoblast invasion of the uterine wall is a key process in successful pregnancies. Kisspeptin (KP) has been shown to inhibit cancer cell metastasis and placental trophoblast cell migration. In this study primary cultures of first trimester human trophoblast cells have been utilized in order to study the regulation of invasion and angiogenesis-related genes by KP. Trophoblast cells were isolated from first trimester placenta and their identity was confirmed by immunostaining for cytokeratin-7. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that primary trophoblast cells express higher levels of GPR54 (KP receptor) and KP mRNA than the trophoblast cell line HTR8Svneo. Furthermore, trophoblast cells also expressed higher GPR54 and KP protein levels. Treating primary trophoblast cells with KP induced ERK1/2 phosphorylation, while co-treating the cells with a KP antagonist almost completely blocked the activation of ERK1/2 and demonstrated that KP through its cognate GPR54 receptor can activate ERK1/2 in trophoblast cells. KP reduced the migratory capability of trophoblast cells in a scratch-migration assay. Real-time quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that KP treatment reduced the expression of matrix metalloproteinase 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, 10, 14 and VEGF-A, and increased the expression of tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 1 and 3. These results suggest that KP can inhibit first trimester trophoblast cells invasion via inhibition of cell migration and down regulation of the metalloproteinase system and VEGF-A. PMID:24923321

  14. ImmuCo: a database of gene co-expression in immune cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pingzhang; Qi, Huiying; Song, Shibin; Li, Shuang; Huang, Ningyu; Han, Wenling; Ma, Dalong

    2015-01-01

    Current gene co-expression databases and correlation networks do not support cell-specific analysis. Gene co-expression and expression correlation are subtly different phenomena, although both are likely to be functionally significant. Here, we report a new database, ImmuCo (http://immuco.bjmu.edu.cn), which is a cell-specific database that contains information about gene co-expression in immune cells, identifying co-expression and correlation between any two genes. The strength of co-expression of queried genes is indicated by signal values and detection calls, whereas expression correlation and strength are reflected by Pearson correlation coefficients. A scatter plot of the signal values is provided to directly illustrate the extent of co-expression and correlation. In addition, the database allows the analysis of cell-specific gene expression profile across multiple experimental conditions and can generate a list of genes that are highly correlated with the queried genes. Currently, the database covers 18 human cell groups and 10 mouse cell groups, including 20,283 human genes and 20,963 mouse genes. More than 8.6 × 10(8) and 7.4 × 10(8) probe set combinations are provided for querying each human and mouse cell group, respectively. Sample applications support the distinctive advantages of the database. PMID:25326331

  15. Gene expression down-regulation in CD90+ prostate tumor-associated stromal cells involves potential organ-specific genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The prostate stroma is a key mediator of epithelial differentiation and development, and potentially plays a role in the initiation and progression of prostate cancer. The tumor-associated stroma is marked by increased expression of CD90/THY1. Isolation and characterization of these stromal cells could provide valuable insight into the biology of the tumor microenvironment. Methods Prostate CD90+ stromal fibromuscular cells from tumor specimens were isolated by cell-sorting and analyzed by DNA microarray. Dataset analysis was used to compare gene expression between histologically normal and tumor-associated stromal cells. For comparison, stromal cells were also isolated and analyzed from the urinary bladder. Results The tumor-associated stromal cells were found to have decreased expression of genes involved in smooth muscle differentiation, and those detected in prostate but not bladder. Other differential expression between the stromal cell types included that of the CXC-chemokine genes. Conclusion CD90+ prostate tumor-associated stromal cells differed from their normal counterpart in expression of multiple genes, some of which are potentially involved in organ development. PMID:19737398

  16. Transactivation of pancreas-specific gene sequences in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K J; Samuelson, L C; Howard, G; Meisler, M H; Darlington, G J

    1991-01-01

    Enhancer/promoter elements from two pancreas-specific genes, those encoding amylase and elastase, were ligated to the bacterial GPT gene. The resulting construct can be used to select for expression of gene products which activate these pancreas-specific promoters in hybrid cells. The selectable GPT construct was stably transferred into several cell lines either directly or by cotransfection with pSV2Neo. GPT was expressed when transferred to pancreatic cell lines but not when transferred to GPT-fibroblast (L) cells or hepatoma cells. When the transformed L cells and hepatoma cells were fused with pancreatic cell lines, GPT was activated in the hybrid cells. Endogenous pancreas-specific genes from the L-cell and hepatoma parents were also activated in the hybrids. In addition, a pancreas-specific nuclear protein, PTF1, was produced in pancreatic and hybrid cells, correlating with GPT expression. The transformed L cells and hepatoma cells thus contained a nonexpressed construct which could be activated in trans by factors present in pancreatic cells. The hepatoma hybrid also continued to produce albumin, demonstrating the coexpression of liver and pancreas-specific genes in the hybrid-cell population. Cell lines carrying the amylase/elastase/GPT construct may be useful as a selection system for cloning of pancreatic transcription activators. Images PMID:1715019

  17. Demethylation effects of elemene on the GSTP1 gene in HCC cell line QGY7703

    PubMed Central

    WU, BAOQIANG; JIANG, YONG; ZHU, FENG; SUN, DONGLIN; HUANG, HONGJUN

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate elemene's effects on cell proliferation, apoptosis, and the cell cycle in the hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell line, QYG7703, and to investigate GSTP1 gene methylation change in QGY7703 cells after being treated with elemene to explore whether elemene reversed the abnormal GSTP1 gene methylation. QGY7703 cells were treated with different elemene concentrations. Cell proliferation was measured with MTT assay, cell apoptosis and cell cycle were analyzed by flow cytometry, and GSTP1 gene methylation was analyzed by methlation-specific polymerase chain reaction. The cells' apoptotic rate increased dose-dependently with elemene concentration, and the difference was statistically significant (P<0.05). Elemene treatment arrested the cells in S phase, and thus the percentage of cells in G1 phase decreased while the cells in S phase increased dose-dependently, and the difference was statistically significant compared to the control group (P<0.05). All QGY7703 cells were identified to contain GSTP1 gene methylation before being treated with elemene and the methylation state decreased after treatment. In the present study, elemene induced cell apoptosis, inhibited the cell cycle, and reversed GSTP1 gene methylation in QGY7703 cells. PMID:27073515

  18. Pinhole-Free and Surface-Nanostructured NiOx Film by Room-Temperature Solution Process for High-Performance Flexible Perovskite Solar Cells with Good Stability and Reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hong; Cheng, Jiaqi; Lin, Francis; He, Hexiang; Mao, Jian; Wong, Kam Sing; Jen, Alex K-Y; Choy, Wallace C H

    2016-01-26

    Recently, researchers have focused on the design of highly efficient flexible perovskite solar cells (PVSCs), which enables the implementation of portable and roll-to-roll fabrication in large scale. While NiOx is a promising material for hole transport layer (HTL) candidate for fabricating efficient PVSCs on a rigid substrate, the reported NiOx HTLs are formed using different multistep treatments (such as 300-500 °C annealing, O2-plasma, UVO, etc.), which hinders the development of flexible PVSCs based on NiOx. Meanwhile, the features of nanostructured morphology and flawless film quality are very important for the film to function as highly effective HTL of PVSCs. However, it is difficult to have the two features coexist natively, particularly in a solution process that flawless film will usually come with smooth morphology. Here, we demonstrate the flawless and surface-nanostructured NiOx film from a simple and controllable room-temperature solution process for achieving high performance flexible PVSCs with good stability and reproducibility. The power conversion efficiency (PCE) can reaches a promising value of 14.53% with no obvious hysteresis (and a high PCE of 17.60% for PVSC on ITO glass). Furthermore, the NiOx-based PVSCs show markedly improved air stability. Regarding the performance improvement, the flawless and surface-nanostructured NiOx film can make the interfacial recombination and monomolecular Shockley-Read-Hall recombination of PVSC reduce. In addition, the formation of an intimate junction of large interfacial area at NiOx film/the perovskite layer improve the hole extraction and thus PVSC performances. This work contributes to the evolution of flexible PVSCs with simple fabrication process and high device performances. PMID:26688212

  19. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  20. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  1. Space experiment "Rad Gene"-report 1; p53-Dependent gene expression in human cultured cells exposed to space environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Akihisa; Ohnishi, Takeo; Suzuki, Hiromi; Omori, Katsunori; Seki, Masaya; Hashizume, Toko; Shimazu, Toru; Ishioka, Noriaki

    The space environment contains two major biologically significant influences: space radiations and microgravity. A p53 tumor suppressor protein plays a role as a guardian of the genome through the activity of p53-centered signal transduction pathways. The aim of this study was to clarify the biological effects of space radiations, microgravity and a space environment on the gene and protein expression of p53-dependent regulated genes. Space experiments were performed with two human cultured lymphoblastoid cell lines: one cells line (TSCE5) bears a wild-type p53 gene status, and another cells line (WTK1) bears a mutated p53 gene status. Un-der one gravity or microgravity condition, the cells were grown in the cell biology experimental facility (CBEF) of the International Space Station (ISS) for 8 days without experiencing the stress during launching and landing because the cells were frozen during these periods. Ground control samples also were cultured for 8 days in the CBEF on the ground during the same periods as space flight. Gene and protein expression was analyzed by using DNA chip (a 44k whole human genome microarray, Agilent Technologies Inc.) and protein chip (PanoramaTM Ab MicroArray, Sigma-Aldrich Co.), respectively. In addition, we analyzed the gene expression in cultured cells after space flight during 133 days with frozen condition. We report the results and discussion from the viewpoint of the functions of the up-regulated and down-regulated genes after an exposure to space radiations and/or microgravity. The initial goal of this space experiment was completely achieved. It is expected that data from this type of work will be helpful in designing physical protection from the deleterious effects of space radiations during long term stays in space.

  2. Analysis of gene expression in fetal and adult cells infected with rubella virus

    SciTech Connect

    Adamo, Maria Pilar; Zapata, Marta; Frey, Teryl K.

    2008-01-05

    Congenital infection with rubella virus (RUB) leads to persistent infection and congenital defects and we showed previously that primary human fetal fibroblasts did not undergo apoptosis when infected with RUB, which could promote fetal virus persistence [Adamo, P., Asis, L., Silveyra, P., Cuffini, C., Pedranti, M., Zapata, M., 2004. Rubella virus does not induce apoptosis in primary human embryo fibroblasts cultures: a possible way of viral persistence in congenital infection. Viral Immunol. 17, 87-100]. To extend this observation, gene chip analysis was performed on a line of primary human fetal fibroblasts (10 weeks gestation) and a line of human adult lung fibroblasts (which underwent apoptosis in response to RUB infection) to compare gene expression in infected and uninfected cells. A total of 632 and 516 genes were upregulated or downregulated in the infected fetal and adult cells respectively in comparison to uninfected cells, however only 52 genes were regulated in both cell types. Although the regulated genes were different, across functional gene categories the patterns of gene regulation were similar. In general, regulation of pro- and anti-apoptotic genes following infection appeared to favor apoptosis in the adult cells and lack of apoptosis in the fetal cells, however there was a greater relative expression of anti-apoptotic genes and reduced expression of pro-apoptotic genes in uninfected fetal cells versus uninfected adult cells and thus the lack of apoptosis in fetal cells following RUB infection was also due to the prevailing background of gene expression that is antagonistic to apoptosis. In support of this hypothesis, it was found that of a battery of five chemicals known to induce apoptosis, two induced apoptosis in the adult cells, but not in fetal cells, and two induced apoptosis more rapidly in the adult cells than in fetal cells (the fifth did not induce apoptosis in either). A robust interferon-stimulated gene response was induced

  3. Gene Concepts in Higher Education Cell and Molecular Biology Textbooks

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albuquerque, Pitombo Maiana; de Almeida, Ana Maria Rocha; El-Hani, Nino Charbel

    2008-01-01

    Despite being a landmark of 20th century biology, the "classical molecular gene concept," according to which a gene is a stretch of DNA encoding a functional product, which may be a single polypeptide or RNA molecule, has been recently challenged by a series of findings (e.g., split genes, alternative splicing, overlapping and nested genes, mRNA…

  4. Differential gene expression in mouse spermatogonial stem cells and embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Yinshan; Feng, Meiying; Liu, Shanshan; Wei, Hengxi; Li, Li; Zhang, Xianwei; Shen, Chao; Zhang, Shouquan; Ma, Ningfang

    2016-01-01

    Mouse spermatogonial stem cells (mSSCs) may be reprogrammed to become pluripotent stem cells under in vitro culture conditions, due to epigenetic modifications, which are closely associated with the expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. Thus, this study was conducted to compare the gene expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors in mSSCs and mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs). Firstly, the freshly isolated mSSCs [mSSCs (f)] were enriched by magnetic-activated cell sorting with Thy1.2 (CD90.2) microbeads, and the typical morphological characteristics were maintained under in vitro culture conditions for over 5 months to form long-term propagated mSSCs [mSSCs (l)]. These mSSCs (l) expressed pluripotency-associated genes and were induced to differentiate into sperm. Our findings indicated that the mSSCs (l) expressed high levels of the transcription factors, Lin28 and Prmt5, and the epigenetic factors, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1, in comparison with the mESCs, with the levels of Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1 and Tert significantly higher than those in the mESCs. There was no significant difference in Kdm2b expression between mSSCs (l) and mESCs. Furthermore, the gene expression of N-Myc, Dppa2, Tbx3, Nr5a2, Prmt5, Tet3, Parp1, Max, Tert and Trf1 in the mSSCs (l) was markedly higher in comparison to that in the mSSCs (f). Collectively, our results suggest that the mSSCs and the mESCs displayed differential gene expression profiles, and the mSSCs possessed the potential to acquire pluripotency based on the high expression of transcription factors and epigenetic factors. These data may provide novel insights into the reprogramming mechanism of mSSCs. PMID:27353491

  5. Assessment of high resolution melt analysis feasibility for evaluation of beta-globin gene mutations as a reproducible, cost-efficient and fast alternative to the present conventional method

    PubMed Central

    Ramezanzadeh, Mahboubeh; Salehi, Mansour; Salehi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beta-thalassemia is the most prevalent monogenic disease throughout the world. It was the first genetic disorder nominated for nation-wide prevention programs involving population screening for heterozygotes and prenatal diagnosis (PND) in Iran. Due to the high prevalence of beta-thalassemia, the shift from conventional mutation detection methods to more recently developed techniques based on novel innovative technologies are essential. We aimed to develop a real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) based protocol using high resolution melting (HRM) analysis for diagnosis of common beta-thalassemia mutations. Materials and Methods: Forty DNA samples extracted from peripheral blood of suspected beta-thalassemia carriers participated in this study were subjected to amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS). We then used 20 of these samples for HRM optimization. When 100% sensitivity and specificity was obtained with HRM procedure, we applied the technique for mutation detection on another remaining 20 samples as thalassemia cases with unknown mutations (detected mutations with ARMS-PCR kept confidential). Finally, the HRM procedure applied on 2 chorionic villous sample (CVS) biopsied from 12 weeks gestational age pregnant women for routine PND analysis. Results: In the first step of study, Fr 8/9 (+G), IVSI-1 (G > A), IVSI-5 (G > C), IVSI-110 (G > A), and CD44 (−C) mutations were diagnosed in samples under study using ARMS-PCR technique. Finally, the HRM procedure applied on 20 unknown samples and 2 CVS The results of HRM were in complete concordance with ARMS and confirmed by sequencing. Conclusions: The advantages of HRM analysis over conventional methods is high throughput, rapid, accurate, cost-effective, and reproducible. PMID:27169102

  6. The effect of the suspension cells in plasma gene transfection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isozaki, Yuki; Nakano, Koki; Ikeda, Yoshihisa; Motomura, Hideki; Kido, Yugo; Satoh, Susumu; Tachibana, Kunihide; Jinno, Masafumi

    2015-09-01

    Plasma gene transfection method is a unique technique for introducing nucleic acids into cells by using plasma irradiation. In our previous works, plasma gene transfection method was performed for the adherent cells, e.g. COS-7 cells, and the influence of plasma on gene transfection has been investigated. As a next step for plasma medicine, transfection to much more various kinds of target cells is required. In this study, the authors attempted gene transfection to two kinds of suspension and four kinds of adherent cells. Although the transfection ratios to the suspension cells were low, transfection to all the kinds of cells were validated. To upregulate the transfection ratio for suspension cells, the authors are validating related factors by plasma irradiation. This work was partly supported by JSPS KAKENHI Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas (Number 25108509, 15H00896) and a grant from Ehime University.

  7. Genome-wide differential gene expression in immortalized DF-1 chicken embryo fibroblast cell line

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background When compared to primary chicken embryo fibroblast (CEF) cells, the immortal DF-1 CEF line exhibits enhanced growth rates and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Although genes responsible for cell cycle regulation and antioxidant functions have been identified, the genome-wide transcription profile of immortal DF-1 CEF cells has not been previously reported. Global gene expression in primary CEF and DF-1 cells was performed using a 4X44K chicken oligo microarray. Results A total of 3876 differentially expressed genes were identified with a 2 fold level cutoff that included 1706 up-regulated and 2170 down-regulated genes in DF-1 cells. Network and functional analyses using Ingenuity Pathways Analysis (IPA, Ingenuity® Systems, http://www.ingenuity.com) revealed that 902 of 3876 differentially expressed genes were classified into a number of functional groups including cellular growth and proliferation, cell cycle, cellular movement, cancer, genetic disorders, and cell death. Also, the top 5 gene networks with intermolecular connections were identified. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that DF-1 cells were characterized by enhanced molecular mechanisms for cell cycle progression and proliferation, suppressing cell death pathways, altered cellular morphogenesis, and accelerated capacity for molecule transport. Key molecules for these functions include E2F1, BRCA1, SRC, CASP3, and the peroxidases. Conclusions The global gene expression profiles provide insight into the cellular mechanisms that regulate the unique characteristics observed in immortal DF-1 CEF cells. PMID:22111699

  8. Nitric Oxide Prevents Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Through Regulation of Gene Expression, Cell Signaling, and Control of Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Tapia-Limonchi, Rafael; Cahuana, Gladys M; Caballano-Infantes, Estefania; Salguero-Aranda, Carmen; Beltran-Povea, Amparo; Hitos, Ana B; Hmadcha, Abdelkrim; Martin, Franz; Soria, Bernat; Bedoya, Francisco J; Tejedo, Juan R

    2016-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) delays mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by regulating genes linked to pluripotency and differentiation. Nevertheless, no profound study has been conducted on cell differentiation regulation by this molecule through signaling on essential biological functions. We sought to demonstrate that NO positively regulates the pluripotency transcriptional core, enforcing changes in the chromatin structure, in addition to regulating cell proliferation, and signaling pathways with key roles in stemness. Culturing mESCs with 2 μM of the NO donor diethylenetriamine/NO (DETA/NO) in the absence of leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) induced significant changes in the expression of 16 genes of the pluripotency transcriptional core. Furthermore, treatment with DETA/NO resulted in a high occupancy of activating H3K4me3 at the Oct4 and Nanog promoters and repressive H3K9me3 and H3k27me3 at the Brachyury promoter. Additionally, the activation of signaling pathways involved in pluripotency, such as Gsk3-β/β-catenin, was observed, in addition to activation of PI3 K/Akt, which is consistent with the protection of mESCs from cell death. Finally, a decrease in cell proliferation coincides with cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Our results provide novel insights into NO-mediated gene regulation and cell proliferation and suggest that NO is necessary but not sufficient for the maintenance of pluripotency and the prevention of cell differentiation. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2078-2088, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26853909

  9. The clock gene PER1 suppresses expression of tumor-related genes in human oral squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Han-Xue; Fu, Xiao-Juan; Yang, Kai; Chen, Dan; Tang, Hong; Zhao, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Abnormal expression of the clock gene PER1 is highly correlated with carcinogenesis and the development of malignant tumors. Here, we designed short hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to effectively knock down PER1 in SCC15 human oral squamous cell carcinoma cells. shRNA-mediated PER1 knockdown promoted SCC15 cell growth, proliferation, apoptosis resistance, migration and invasion in vitro. PER1 knockdown also increased the cells' expression of KI-67, MDM2, BCL-2, MMP2 and MMP9 mRNA, and decreased expression of C-MYC, p53, BAX and TIMP-2. In BALB/c nu/nu nude mice subcutaneously injected with SCC15 cells, PER1 knockdown in the cells enhanced tumor development, leading to increased tumor weights and volumes. These results suggest that PER1 is an important tumor suppressor gene and may be a useful molecular target for the treatment of cancer. PMID:26943040

  10. Transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening of genes involved in cell migration.

    PubMed

    Onuki-Nagasaki, Reiko; Nagasaki, Akira; Hakamada, Kazumi; Uyeda, Taro Q P; Fujita, Satoshi; Miyake, Masato; Miyake, Jun

    2010-01-01

    Cell migration is important in several biological phenomena, such as cancer metastasis. Therefore, the identification of genes involved in cell migration might facilitate the discovery of antimetastatic drugs. However, screening of genes by the current methods can be complicated by factors related to cell stimulation, for example, abolition of contact inhibition and the release inflammatory cytokines from wounded cells during examinations of wound healing in vitro. To overcome these problems and identify genes involved in cell migration, in this chapter we describe the use of transfection microarrays for high-throughput phenotypic screening. PMID:20387151

  11. Expression and rearrangement of the ROS1 gene in human glioblastoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Birchmeier, C.; Sharma, S.; Wigler, M.

    1987-12-01

    The human ROS1 gene, which possibly encodes a growth factor receptor, was found to be expressed in human tumor cell lines. In a survey of 45 different human cell lines, the authors found ROS1 to be expressed in glioblastoma-derived cell lines at high levels and not to be expressed at all, or expressed at very low levels, in the remaining cell lines. The ROS1 gene was present in normal copy numbers in all cell lines that expressed the gene. However, in one particular glioblastoma line, they detected a potentially activating mutation at the ROS1 locus.

  12. Gene Delivery into Plant Cells for Recombinant Protein Production

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  13. Control of sleep by a network of cell cycle genes.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Dinis J S; Machado, Daniel R; Koh, Kyunghee

    2015-01-01

    Sleep is essential for health and cognition, but the molecular and neural mechanisms of sleep regulation are not well understood. We recently reported the identification of TARANIS (TARA) as a sleep-promoting factor that acts in a previously unknown arousal center in Drosophila. tara mutants exhibit a dose-dependent reduction in sleep amount of up to ∼60%. TARA and its mammalian homologs, the Trip-Br (Transcriptional Regulators Interacting with PHD zinc fingers and/or Bromodomains) family of proteins, are primarily known as transcriptional coregulators involved in cell cycle progression, and contain a conserved Cyclin-A (CycA) binding homology domain. We found that tara and CycA synergistically promote sleep, and CycA levels are reduced in tara mutants. Additional data demonstrated that Cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (Cdk1) antagonizes tara and CycA to promote wakefulness. Moreover, we identified a subset of CycA expressing neurons in the pars lateralis, a brain region proposed to be analogous to the mammalian hypothalamus, as an arousal center. In this Extra View article, we report further characterization of tara mutants and provide an extended discussion of our findings and future directions within the framework of a working model, in which a network of cell cycle genes, tara, CycA, and Cdk1, interact in an arousal center to regulate sleep. PMID:26925838

  14. Stem Cells and Gene Therapy for Cartilage Repair

    PubMed Central

    Longo, Umile Giuseppe; Petrillo, Stefano; Franceschetti, Edoardo; Berton, Alessandra; Maffulli, Nicola; Denaro, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Cartilage defects represent a common problem in orthopaedic practice. Predisposing factors include traumas, inflammatory conditions, and biomechanics alterations. Conservative management of cartilage defects often fails, and patients with this lesions may need surgical intervention. Several treatment strategies have been proposed, although only surgery has been proved to be predictably effective. Usually, in focal cartilage defects without a stable fibrocartilaginous repair tissue formed, surgeons try to promote a natural fibrocartilaginous response by using marrow stimulating techniques, such as microfracture, abrasion arthroplasty, and Pridie drilling, with the aim of reducing swelling and pain and improving joint function of the patients. These procedures have demonstrated to be clinically useful and are usually considered as first-line treatment for focal cartilage defects. However, fibrocartilage presents inferior mechanical and biochemical properties compared to normal hyaline articular cartilage, characterized by poor organization, significant amounts of collagen type I, and an increased susceptibility to injury, which ultimately leads to premature osteoarthritis (OA). Therefore, the aim of future therapeutic strategies for articular cartilage regeneration is to obtain a hyaline-like cartilage repair tissue by transplantation of tissues or cells. Further studies are required to clarify the role of gene therapy and mesenchimal stem cells for management of cartilage lesions. PMID:22481959

  15. Gene delivery into plant cells for recombinant protein production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2015-01-01

    Recombinant proteins are primarily produced from cultures of mammalian, insect, and bacteria cells. In recent years, the development of deconstructed virus-based vectors has allowed plants to become a viable platform for recombinant protein production, with advantages in versatility, speed, cost, scalability, and safety over the current production paradigms. In this paper, we review the recent progress in the methodology of agroinfiltration, a solution to overcome the challenge of transgene delivery into plant cells for large-scale manufacturing of recombinant proteins. General gene delivery methodologies in plants are first summarized, followed by extensive discussion on the application and scalability of each agroinfiltration method. New development of a spray-based agroinfiltration and its application on field-grown plants is highlighted. The discussion of agroinfiltration vectors focuses on their applications for producing complex and heteromultimeric proteins and is updated with the development of bridge vectors. Progress on agroinfiltration in Nicotiana and non-Nicotiana plant hosts is subsequently showcased in context of their applications for producing high-value human biologics and low-cost and high-volume industrial enzymes. These new advancements in agroinfiltration greatly enhance the robustness and scalability of transgene delivery in plants, facilitating the adoption of plant transient expression systems for manufacturing recombinant proteins with a broad range of applications. PMID:26075275

  16. PBRM1 Regulates the Expression of Genes Involved in Metabolism and Cell Adhesion in Renal Clear Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Basudev; Porter, Elizabeth G.; Stewart, Jane C.; Ferreira, Christina R.; Schipma, Matthew J.; Dykhuizen, Emily C.

    2016-01-01

    Polybromo-1 (PBRM1) is a component of the PBAF (Polybromo-associated-BRG1- or BRM-associated factors) chromatin remodeling complex and is the second most frequently mutated gene in clear-cell renal cell Carcinoma (ccRCC). Mutation of PBRM1 is believed to be an early event in carcinogenesis, however its function as a tumor suppressor is not understood. In this study, we have employed Next Generation Sequencing to profile the differentially expressed genes upon PBRM1 re-expression in a cellular model of ccRCC. PBRM1 re-expression led to upregulation of genes involved in cellular adhesion, carbohydrate metabolism, apoptotic process and response to hypoxia, and a downregulation of genes involved in different stages of cell division. The decrease in cellular proliferation upon PBRM1 re-expression was confirmed, validating the functional role of PBRM1 as a tumor suppressor in a cell-based model. In addition, we identified a role for PBRM1 in regulating metabolic pathways known to be important for driving ccRCC, including the regulation of hypoxia response genes, PI3K signaling, glucose uptake, and cholesterol homeostasis. Of particular novelty is the identification of cell adhesion as a major downstream process uniquely regulated by PBRM1 expression. Cytoskeletal reorganization was induced upon PBRM1 reexpression as evidenced from the increase in the number of cells displaying cortical actin, a hallmark of epithelial cells. Genes involved in cell adhesion featured prominently in our transcriptional dataset and overlapped with genes uniquely regulated by PBRM1 in clinical specimens of ccRCC. Genes involved in cell adhesion serve as tumor suppressor and maybe involved in inhibiting cell migration. Here we report for the first time genes linked to cell adhesion serve as downstream targets of PBRM1, and hope to lay the foundation of future studies focusing on the role of chromatin remodelers in bringing about these alterations during malignancies. PMID:27100670

  17. Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Microvesicles Induce Gene Expression Changes in Müller Cells of the Retina

    PubMed Central

    Katsman, Diana; Stackpole, Emma J.; Domin, Daniel R.; Farber, Debora B.

    2012-01-01

    Cell-derived microvesicles (MVs), recognized as important components of cell-cell communication, contain mRNAs, miRNAs, proteins and lipids and transfer their bioactive contents from parent cells to cells of other origins. We have studied the effect that MVs released from embryonic stem cells (ESMVs) have on retinal progenitor Müller cells. Cultured human Müller cells were exposed to mouse ESMVs every 48 hours for a total of 9 treatments. Morphological changes were observed by light microscopy in the treated cells, which grew as individual heterogeneous cells, compared to the uniform, spindle-like adherent cellular sheets of untreated cells. ESMVs transferred to Müller cells embryonic stem cell (ESC) mRNAs involved in the maintenance of pluripotency, including Oct4 and Sox2, and the miRNAs of the 290 cluster, important regulators of the ESC-specific cell cycle. Moreover, ESMV exposure induced up-regulation of the basal levels of endogenous human Oct4 mRNA in Müller cells. mRNA and miRNA microarrays of ESMV-treated vs. untreated Müller cells revealed the up-regulation of genes and miRNAs involved in the induction of pluripotency, cellular proliferation, early ocular genes and genes important for retinal protection and remodeling, as well as the down-regulation of inhibitory and scar-related genes and miRNAs involved in differentiation and cell cycle arrest. To further characterize the heterogeneous cell population of ESMV-treated Müller cells, their expression of retinal cell markers was compared to that in untreated control cells by immunocytochemistry. Markers for amacrine, ganglion and rod photoreceptors were present in treated but not in control Müller cells. Together, our findings indicate that ESMs induce de-differentiation and pluripotency in their target Müller cells, which may turn on an early retinogenic program of differentiation. PMID:23226281

  18. Global Analysis of Host Cell Gene Expression Late during Cytomegalovirus Infection Reveals Extensive Dysregulation of Cell Cycle Gene Expression and Induction of Pseudomitosis Independent of US28 Function†

    PubMed Central

    Hertel, Laura; Mocarski, Edward S.

    2004-01-01

    Replication of human cytomegalovirus (CMV) depends on host cell gene products working in conjunction with viral functions and leads to a dramatic dysregulation of cell cycle gene expression. Comprehensive transcriptional profiling was used to identify pathways most dramatically modulated by CMV at late times during infection and to determine the extent to which expression of the viral chemokine receptor US28 contributed to modulating cellular gene expression. Cells infected with the AD169 strain of virus or a fully replication competent US28-deficient derivative (RV101) were profiled throughout the late phase of infection (50, 72, and 98 h postinfection). Although sensitive statistical analysis showed striking global changes in transcript levels in infected cells compared to uninfected cells, the expression of US28 did not contribute to these alterations. CMV infection resulted in lower levels of transcripts encoding cytoskeletal, extracellular matrix, and adhesion proteins, together with small GTPases and apoptosis regulators, and in higher levels of transcripts encoding cell cycle, DNA replication, energy production, and inflammation-related gene products. Surprisingly, a large number of cellular transcripts encoding mitosis-related proteins were upmodulated at late times in infection, and these were associated with the formation of abnormal mitotic spindles and the appearance of pseudomitotic cells. These data extend our understanding of how broadly CMV alters the regulation of host cell cycle gene products and highlight the establishment of a mitosis-like environment in the absence of cellular DNA replication as important for viral replication and maturation. PMID:15479839

  19. Somatic stem cells express Piwi and Vasa genes in an adult ctenophore: ancient association of "germline genes" with stemness.

    PubMed

    Alié, Alexandre; Leclère, Lucas; Jager, Muriel; Dayraud, Cyrielle; Chang, Patrick; Le Guyader, Hervé; Quéinnec, Eric; Manuel, Michaël

    2011-02-01

    Stem cells are essential for animal development and adult tissue homeostasis, and the quest for an ancestral gene fingerprint of stemness is a major challenge for evolutionary developmental biology. Recent studies have indicated that a series of genes, including the transposon silencer Piwi and the translational activator Vasa, specifically involved in germline determination and maintenance in classical bilaterian models (e.g., vertebrates, fly, nematode), are more generally expressed in adult multipotent stem cells in other animals like flatworms and hydras. Since the progeny of these multipotent stem cells includes both somatic and germinal derivatives, it remains unclear whether Vasa, Piwi, and associated genes like Bruno and PL10 were ancestrally linked to stemness, or to germinal potential. We have investigated the expression of Vasa, two Piwi paralogues, Bruno and PL10 in Pleurobrachia pileus, a member of the early-diverging phylum Ctenophora, the probable sister group of cnidarians. These genes were all expressed in the male and female germlines, and with the exception of one of the Piwi paralogues, they showed similar expression patterns within somatic territories (tentacle root, comb rows, aboral sensory complex). Cytological observations and EdU DNA-labelling and long-term retention experiments revealed concentrations of stem cells closely matching these gene expression areas. These stem cell pools are spatially restricted, and each specialised in the production of particular types of somatic cells. These data unveil important aspects of cell renewal within the ctenophore body and suggest that Piwi, Vasa, Bruno, and PL10 belong to a gene network ancestrally acting in two distinct contexts: (i) the germline and (ii) stem cells, whatever the nature of their progeny. PMID:21036163

  20. Single-Cell Gene Expression Profiles Define Self-Renewing, Pluripotent, and Lineage Primed States of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hough, Shelley R.; Thornton, Matthew; Mason, Elizabeth; Mar, Jessica C.; Wells, Christine A.; Pera, Martin F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Pluripotent stem cells display significant heterogeneity in gene expression, but whether this diversity is an inherent feature of the pluripotent state remains unknown. Single-cell gene expression analysis in cell subsets defined by surface antigen expression revealed that human embryonic stem cell cultures exist as a continuum of cell states, even under defined conditions that drive self-renewal. The majority of the population expressed canonical pluripotency transcription factors and could differentiate into derivatives of all three germ layers. A minority subpopulation of cells displayed high self-renewal capacity, consistently high transcripts for all pluripotency-related genes studied, and no lineage priming. This subpopulation was characterized by its expression of a particular set of intercellular signaling molecules whose genes shared common regulatory features. Our data support a model of an inherently metastable self-renewing population that gives rise to a continuum of intermediate pluripotent states, which ultimately become primed for lineage specification. PMID:24936473

  1. Gene networks modified by sulphonylureas in beta cells: a pathway-based analysis of insulin secretion and cell death.

    PubMed

    Magnusson, Nils E; Dyrskjøt, Lars; Grimm, Daniela; Wehland, Markus; Pietsch, Jessica; Rungby, Jørgen

    2012-10-01

    Sulphonylureas (SUs) used in the treatment for type 2 diabetes have been shown to result in different clinical outcome. This study hypothesized that three widely used SUs, glibenclamide, glimepiride and gliclazide, may affect function and survival of insulin-producing cells differently. To evaluate differences between SUs, insulin secretion and cell death were measured, and genome-wide gene expression patterns were compared using a bioinformatics approach focusing on functional relationships between molecules. Insulin-producing INS-1E cells exposed to SUs for 6 and 24 hr were assayed using GeneChip. Cluster and pathway analyses were used to identify differentially expressed genes and patterns of potential biological functions associated with SU treatment. Cell death was measured using acridine orange/Hoechst 33342 staining. Short-term treatment (6 hr) yielded up-regulation of insulin secretion and genes associated with insulin secretion for all three SUs applied. While long-term treatment (24-72 hr) with gliclazide did not change gene expression or cell survival, treatment with glibenclamide or glimepiride up-regulated genes associated with oxidative stress and hypoxia, but did not induce cell death. Short-term treatment with SUs initiates gene regulation that can be attributed to insulin secretion with few differences between individual SUs. This regulation was temporal and returned to baseline after 24 hr. Individual differences observed after 24-72 hr indicate that glibenclamide and glimepiride induce potentially harmful cell signalling insufficient for triggering beta cell death. PMID:22642398

  2. Changes in winter depression phenotype correlate with white blood cell gene expression profiles: a combined metagene and gene ontology approach.

    PubMed

    Bosker, Fokko J; Terpstra, Peter; Gladkevich, Anatoliy V; Janneke Dijck-Brouwer, D A; te Meerman, Gerard; Nolen, Willem A; Schoevers, Robert A; Meesters, Ybe

    2015-04-01

    In the present study we evaluate the feasibility of gene expression in white blood cells as a peripheral marker for winter depression. Sixteen patients with winter type seasonal affective disorder were included in the study. Blood was taken by venous puncture at three time points; in winter prior and following bright light therapy and in summer. RNA was isolated, converted into cRNA, amplified and hybridized on Illumina® gene expression arrays. The raw optical array data were quantile normalized and thereafter analyzed using a metagene approach, based on previously published Affymetrix gene array data. The raw data were also subjected to a secondary analysis focusing on circadian genes and genes involved in serotonergic neurotransmission. Differences between the conditions were analyzed, using analysis of variance on the principal components of the metagene score matrix. After correction for multiple testing no statistically significant differences were found. Another approach uses the correlation between metagene factor weights and the actual expression values, averaged over conditions. When comparing the correlations of winter vs. summer and bright light therapy vs. summer significant changes for several metagenes were found. Subsequent gene ontology analyses (DAVID and GeneTrail) of 5 major metagenes suggest an interaction between brain and white blood cells. The hypothesis driven analysis with a smaller group of genes failed to demonstrate any significant effects. The results from the combined metagene and gene ontology analyses support the idea of communication between brain and white blood cells. Future studies will need a much larger sample size to obtain information at the level of single genes. PMID:25455571

  3. Gene expression profile of Xenopus A6 cells cultured under random positioning machine shows downregulation of ion transporter genes and inhibition of dome formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuzawa, Masayuki; Akiduki, Saori; Asashima, Makoto

    Random positioning machine (RPM) devices that generate a simulated microgravity environment of approximately 0 g prevent the formation of dome structures in Xenopus kidney-derived A6 cells. In the present study, the gene expression profile of A6 cells cultured under RPM was determined using the Xenopus 22K scale microarray, and those genes up- or downregulated twofold or more were investigated. We identified 29 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 4 genes) on day 5, 68 genes (up, 25 genes; down, 43 genes) on day 8, 111 genes (up, 69 genes; down, 42 genes) on day 10, and 283 genes (up, 153 genes; down, 130 genes) on day 15 of culture under RPM. These genes were classified according to categories described in the KOG database, such as "extracellular structure", "cytoskeleton", and "transcription". Almost all the genes involved in "inorganic ion transport and metabolism" were downregulated under RPM. Our study further investigated some of these including the epithelial Na + channel (ENaC) and Na +/K +-ATPase transporter genes. A specific inhibitor of Na +/K +-ATPases, ouabain, inhibited dome formation in the A6 cells, even under control culturing conditions of 1 g (the static condition). Together these data suggested that downregulation of sodium ion transporter gene expression plays a significant role in the RPM-dependent prevention of the dome formation in kidney epithelial cells.

  4. Targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells by using engineered zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Santiago, Yolanda; Chan, Edmond; Liu, Pei-Qi; Orlando, Salvatore; Zhang, Lin; Urnov, Fyodor D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Guschin, Dmitry; Waite, Adam; Miller, Jeffrey C.; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Klug, Aaron; Collingwood, Trevor N.

    2008-01-01

    Gene knockout is the most powerful tool for determining gene function or permanently modifying the phenotypic characteristics of a cell. Existing methods for gene disruption are limited by their efficiency, time to completion, and/or the potential for confounding off-target effects. Here, we demonstrate a rapid single-step approach to targeted gene knockout in mammalian cells, using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs). ZFNs can be designed to target a chosen locus with high specificity. Upon transient expression of these nucleases the target gene is first cleaved by the ZFNs and then repaired by a natural—but imperfect—DNA repair process, nonhomologous end joining. This often results in the generation of mutant (null) alleles. As proof of concept for this approach we designed ZFNs to target the dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) gene in a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line. We observed biallelic gene disruption at frequencies >1%, thus obviating the need for selection markers. Three ne