Science.gov

Sample records for cells specific removal

  1. Metabolism of /sup 125/I-atrial natriuretic factor by vascular smooth muscle cells. Evidence for a peptidase that specifically removes the COOH-terminal tripeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.R.; Arik, L.; Foster, C.J.

    1989-07-15

    The addition of 200 pM monoiodinated human atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) (125I-hANF) to cultured bovine aortic smooth muscle cells at 37/degree/C resulted in a rapid clearance from the medium (t1/2 approximately 7.5 min). Within 5 min, (125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-Y), Arg125-(125I)iodotyrosine126 (125I-RY) and Phe124-Arg-(125)iodotyrosine126 (125I-FRY) appeared in the medium. The identities of these degradation products were confirmed by (1) retention time on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) relative to standards, (2) products generated by digestion with aminopeptidase M, and (3) the absence of the Met110. Preincubation of the cells with ammonium chloride or chloroquine resulted in a significant increase in the intracellular accumulation of radiolabel, indicative of endocytosis and rapid delivery of 125I-hANF to an acidic intracellular compartment (endosome and/or lysosome). Neither ammonium chloride, chloroquine, nor excess unlabeled hANF blocked the rapid appearance in the medium of 125I-RY or 125I-FRY. Bestatin inhibited the generation of 125I-RY, with a concomitant increase in 125I-FRY, suggesting that the 125I-RY is produced by aminopeptidase action on 125I-FRY. The endopeptidase 24.11 (enkephalinase) inhibitor, SCH 39370, did not inhibit the formation of 125I-FRY. These results provide evidence of a peptidase capable of specifically removing the COOH-terminal tripeptide from 125I-hANF. The COOH-terminal tripeptide, Phe124-Arg-Tyr126, was also isolated from cell digests of hANF by HPLC and its identity confirmed by amino acid analysis. Since it is generally believed that the COOH-terminal tripeptide is critical to many of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126)'s bioactivities, this enzyme may be involved in the inactivation of atrial natriuretic factor-(99-126) in target tissues.

  2. Dust removal from solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  3. Dust Removal from Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashpis, David E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A solar panel cleaning device includes a solar panel having a plurality of photovoltaic cells arranged in rows and embedded in the solar panel with space between the rows. A transparent dielectric overlay is affixed to the solar panel. A plurality of electrode pairs each of which includes an upper and a lower electrode are arranged on opposite sides of the transparent dielectric and are affixed thereto. The electrodes may be transparent electrodes which may be arranged without concern for blocking sunlight to the solar panel. The solar panel may be a dielectric and its dielectric properties may be continuously and spatially variable. Alternatively the dielectric used may have dielectric segments which produce different electrical field and which affects the wind "generated."

  4. Mechanisms regulating phosphatase specificity and the removal of individual phosphorylation sites during mitotic exit.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Samuel; McCloy, Rachael; Watkins, D Neil; Burgess, Andrew

    2016-07-01

    Entry into mitosis is driven by the activity of kinases, which phosphorylate over 7000 proteins on multiple sites. For cells to exit mitosis and segregate their genome correctly, these phosphorylations must be removed in a specific temporal order. This raises a critical and important question: how are specific phosphorylation sites on an individual protein removed? Traditionally, the temporal order of dephosphorylation was attributed to decreasing kinase activity. However, recent evidence in human cells has identified unique patterns of dephosphorylation during mammalian mitotic exit that cannot be fully explained by the loss of kinase activity. This suggests that specificity is determined in part by phosphatases. In this review, we explore how the physicochemical properties of an individual phosphosite and its surrounding amino acids can affect interactions with a phosphatase. These positive and negative interactions in turn help determine the specific pattern of dephosphorylation required for correct mitotic exit. PMID:27417119

  5. Debris Removal Project K West Canister Cleaning System Performance Specification

    SciTech Connect

    FARWICK, C.C.

    1999-12-09

    Approximately 2,300 metric tons Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) are currently stored within two water filled pools, the 105 K East (KE) fuel storage basin and the 105 K West (KW) fuel storage basin, at the U.S. Department of Energy, Richland Operations Office (RL). The SNF Project is responsible for operation of the K Basins and for the materials within them. A subproject to the SNF Project is the Debris Removal Subproject, which is responsible for removal of empty canisters and lids from the basins. Design criteria for a Canister Cleaning System to be installed in the KW Basin. This documents the requirements for design and installation of the system.

  6. Electrochemical antimony removal from accumulator acid: results from removal trials in laboratory cells.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, M E Henry; Koparal, A Savas

    2011-11-30

    Regeneration of spent accumulator acid could be an alternative process for crystallization, neutralisation and disposal. Therefore, for the first time in a study of the possibilities of electrochemical removal of antimony and accumulator acid regeneration on a laboratory scale, two synthetic and several real systems containing sulfuric acid of concentrations ranging between 28% and 36%, and antimony species were tested. Discontinuous electrochemical reactors with anion exchange membranes were successfully used in these experiments, which were conducted at a temperature of 35°C. Removal of antimony using cells that were not divided by a separator, however, was not possible. In selected experiments, by varying the electrode material, type of electrolyte, and cell current, the concentration of antimony could be reduced from the range of 5 ppm to 0.15 ppm. This resulted in current efficiencies between 0.00002% and 0.001%, and in specific electroenergy demands between 100 Wh L(-1) and 2000 Wh L(-1). In other experiments on substances with antimony contents up to 3500 mg L(-1), the current efficiencies obtained were more than a thousandfold higher. In contrast to the formally high relative energy consumption parameters absolute demand parameters are relatively small and favour the electrochemical method in small scale application. Besides plate electrodes, 3D-cathodes were used. Copper- and graphite cathodes produced the best results. PMID:21978586

  7. Specific removal of TACC3–ch-TOG–clathrin at metaphase deregulates kinetochore fiber tension

    PubMed Central

    Cheeseman, Liam P.; Harry, Edward F.; McAinsh, Andrew D.; Prior, Ian A.; Royle, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Microtubule-associated proteins of the mitotic spindle are thought to be important for the initial assembly and the maintenance of spindle structure and function. However, distinguishing assembly and maintenance roles for a given protein is difficult. Most experimental methods for protein inactivation are slow and therefore affect both assembly and maintenance. Here, we have used ‘knocksideways’ to rapidly (∼5 minutes) and specifically remove TACC3–ch-TOG–clathrin non-motor complexes from kinetochore fibers (K-fibers). This method allows the complex to be inactivated at defined stages of mitosis. Removal of TACC3–ch-TOG–clathrin after nuclear envelope breakdown caused severe delays in chromosome alignment. Inactivation at metaphase, following a normal prometaphase, significantly delayed progression to anaphase. In these cells, K-fiber tension was reduced and the spindle checkpoint was not satisfied. Surprisingly, there was no significant loss of K-fiber microtubules, even after prolonged removal. TACC3–ch-TOG–clathrin removal during metaphase also resulted in a decrease in spindle length and significant alteration in kinetochore dynamics. Our results indicate that TACC3–ch-TOG–clathrin complexes are important for the maintenance of spindle structure and function as well as for initial spindle assembly. PMID:23532825

  8. Gas diffusion cell removes carbon dioxide from occupied airtight enclosures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Small, lightweight permeable cell package separates and removes carbon dioxide from respiratory gas mixtures. The cell is regenerative while chemically inert in the presence of carbon dioxide so that only adsorption takes place.

  9. Surface-modified gold nanorods for specific cell targeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chan-Ung; Arai, Yoshie; Kim, Insun; Jang, Wonhee; Lee, Seonghyun; Hafner, Jason H.; Jeoung, Eunhee; Jung, Deokho; Kwon, Youngeun

    2012-05-01

    Gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have unique properties that make them highly attractive materials for developing functional reagents for various biomedical applications including photothermal therapy, targeted drug delivery, and molecular imaging. For in vivo applications, GNPs need to be prepared with very little or negligible cytotoxicitiy. Most GNPs are, however, prepared using growth-directing surfactants such as cetyl trimethylammonium bromide (CTAB), which are known to have considerable cytotoxicity. In this paper, we describe an approach to remove CTAB to a non-toxic concentration. We optimized the conditions for surface modification with methoxypolyethylene glycol thiol (mPEG), which replaced CTAB and formed a protective layer on the surface of gold nanorods (GNRs). The cytotoxicities of pristine and surface-modified GNRs were measured in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells and human cell lines derived from hepatic carcinoma cells, embryonic kidney cells, and thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Cytotoxicity assays revealed that treating cells with GNRs did not significantly affect cell viability except for thyroid papillary carcinoma cells. Thyroid cancer cells were more susceptible to residual CTAB, so CTAB had to be further removed by dialysis in order to use GNRs for thyroid cell targeting. PEGylated GNRs are further modified to present monoclonal antibodies that recognize a specific surface marker, Na-I symporter, for thyroid cells. Antibody-conjugated GNRs specifically targeted human thyroid cells in vitro.

  10. Reaction heat used in static water removal from fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platner, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Reaction heat is used for removal of water formed at the hydrogen fuel electrode in a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell. A portion of the heat inherent in the fuel cell current generation reaction is used to transfer excess water into water vapor and cause it to be exhausted from the cell by a porous vapor transport membrane adjoining a vapor cavity.

  11. Benchmark specifications for EBR-II shutdown heat removal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Sofu, T.; Briggs, L. L.

    2012-07-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) is hosting an IAEA-coordinated research project on benchmark analyses of sodium-cooled fast reactor passive safety tests performed at the Experimental Breeder Reactor-II (EBR-II). The benchmark project involves analysis of a protected and an unprotected loss of flow tests conducted during an extensive testing program within the framework of the U.S. Integral Fast Reactor program to demonstrate the inherently safety features of EBR-II as a pool-type, sodium-cooled fast reactor prototype. The project is intended to improve the participants' design and safety analysis capabilities for sodium-cooled fast reactors through validation and qualification of safety analysis codes and methods. This paper provides a description of the EBR-II tests included in the program, and outlines the benchmark specifications being prepared to support the IAEA-coordinated research project. (authors)

  12. AMMONIA REMOVAL FROM MAMMALIAN CELL CULTURE MEDIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Metabolites such as ammonia and lactic formed during mammalian cell culture can frequently be toxic to the cells themselves beyond a threshold concentration of the metabolites. ell culture conducted in the presence of such accumulated metabolites is therefore limited in productiv...

  13. Regulation of endothelial cell differentiation and specification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The circulatory system is the first organ system to develop in the vertebrate embryo and is critical throughout gestation for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to, as well as removal of metabolic waste products from, growing tissues. Endothelial cells, which constitute the luminal layer of all bl...

  14. Cell-Type-Specific Optogenetics in Monkeys.

    PubMed

    Namboodiri, Vijay Mohan K; Stuber, Garret D

    2016-09-01

    The recent advent of technologies enabling cell-type-specific recording and manipulation of neuronal activity spurred tremendous progress in neuroscience. However, they have been largely limited to mice, which lack the richness in behavior of primates. Stauffer et al. now present a generalizable method for achieving cell-type specificity in monkeys. PMID:27610562

  15. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  16. FOXA1 defines cancer cell specificity

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gaihua; Zhao, Yongbing; Liu, Yi; Kao, Li-Pin; Wang, Xiao; Skerry, Benjamin; Li, Zhaoyu

    2016-01-01

    A transcription factor functions differentially and/or identically in multiple cell types. However, the mechanism for cell-specific regulation of a transcription factor remains to be elucidated. We address how a single transcription factor, forkhead box protein A1 (FOXA1), forms cell-specific genomic signatures and differentially regulates gene expression in four human cancer cell lines (HepG2, LNCaP, MCF7, and T47D). FOXA1 is a pioneer transcription factor in organogenesis and cancer progression. Genomewide mapping of FOXA1 by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing annotates that target genes associated with FOXA1 binding are mostly common to these cancer cells. However, most of the functional FOXA1 target genes are specific to each cancer cell type. Further investigations using CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing technology indicate that cell-specific FOXA1 regulation is attributable to unique FOXA1 binding, genetic variations, and/or potential epigenetic regulation. Thus, FOXA1 controls the specificity of cancer cell types. We raise a “flower-blooming” hypothesis for cell-specific transcriptional regulation based on these observations. PMID:27034986

  17. Specification of germ cell fate in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Saitou, Mitinori; Payer, Bernhard; Lange, Ulrike C; Erhardt, Sylvia; Barton, Sheila C; Surani, M Azim

    2003-01-01

    An early fundamental event during development is the segregation of germ cells from somatic cells. In many organisms, this is accomplished by the inheritance of preformed germ plasm, which apparently imposes transcriptional repression to prevent somatic cell fate. However, in mammals, pluripotent epiblast cells acquire germ cell fate in response to signalling molecules. We have used single cell analysis to study how epiblast cells acquire germ cell competence and undergo specification. Germ cell competent cells express Fragilis and initially progress towards a somatic mesodermal fate. However, a subset of these cells, the future primordial germ cells (PGCs), then shows rapid upregulation of Fragilis with concomitant transcriptional repression of a number of genes, including Hox and Smad genes. This repression may be a key event associated with germ cell specification. Furthermore, PGCs express Stella and other genes, such as Oct-4 that are associated with pluripotency. While these molecules are also detected in mature oocytes as maternally inherited factors, their early role is to regulate development and maintain pluripotency, and they do not serve the role of classical germline determinants. PMID:14511483

  18. Apoptin: specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed

    Tavassoli, M; Guelen, L; Luxon, B A; Gäken, J

    2005-08-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.(1) These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at G2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.(2) In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin's function to kill tumor cells.(3) In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin's ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported "black and white" tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  19. Apoptin: Specific killer of tumor cells?

    PubMed Central

    Tavassoli, M.; Guelen, L.; Luxon, B. A.; Gäken, J.

    2010-01-01

    In the early 1990s it was discovered that the VP3/Apoptin protein encoded by the Chicken Anemia virus (CAV) possesses an inherent ability to specifically kill cancer cells. Apoptin was found to be located in the cytoplasm of normal cells while in tumor cells it was localized mainly in the nucleus.1 These differences in the localization pattern were suggested to be the main mechanism by which normal cells show resistance to Apoptin-mediated cell killing. Although the mechanism of action of Apoptin is presently unknown, it seems to function by the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) after translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and arresting the cell cycle at g2/M, possibly by interfering with the cyclosome.2 In addition, cancer specific phosphorylation of Threonine residue 108 has been suggested to be important for Apoptin’s function to kill tumor cells.3 In contrast to the large number of publications reporting that nuclear localization, induction of PCD and phosphorylation of Apoptin is restricted to cancer cells, several recent studies have shown that Apoptin has the ability to migrate to the nucleus and induce PCD in some of the normal cell lines tested. There is evidence that high protein expression levels as well as the cellular growth rate may influence Apoptin’s ability to specifically kill tumor cells. Thus far both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that Apoptin is a powerful apoptosis inducing protein with a promising prospective utility in cancer therapy. However, here we show that several recent findings contradict some of the earlier results on the tumor specificity of Apoptin, thus creating some controversy in the field. The aim of this article is to review the available data, some published and some unpublished, which either agree or contradict the reported “black and white” tumor cell specificity of Apoptin. Understanding what factors appear to influence its function should help to develop Apoptin into a potent anti

  20. Primordial Germ Cell Specification and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Marlow, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Primordial germ cells are the progenitor cells that give rise to the gametes. In some animals, the germline is induced by zygotic transcription factors, whereas in others, primordial germ cell specification occurs via inheritance of maternally provided gene products known as germ plasm. Once specified, the primordial germ cells of some animals must acquire motility and migrate to the gonad in order to survive. In all animals examined, perinuclear structures called germ granules form within germ cells. This review focuses on some of the recent studies, conducted by several groups using diverse systems, from invertebrates to vertebrates, which have provided mechanistic insight into the molecular regulation of germ cell specification and migration. PMID:26918157

  1. Cell cycle-specific effects of lovastatin.

    PubMed Central

    Jakóbisiak, M; Bruno, S; Skierski, J S; Darzynkiewicz, Z

    1991-01-01

    Lovastatin (LOV), the drug recently introduced to treat hypercholesteremia, inhibits the synthesis of mevalonic acid. The effects of LOV on the cell cycle progression of the human bladder carcinoma T24 cell line expressing activated p21ras were investigated. At a concentration of 2-10 microM, LOV arrested cells in G1 and also prolonged--or arrested a minor fraction of cells in--the G2 phase of the cell cycle; at a concentration of 50 microM, LOV was cytotoxic. The cytostatic effects were reversed by addition of exogenous mevalonate. Cells arrested in the cycle by LOV were viable for up to 72 hr and did not show any changes in RNA or protein content or chromatin condensation, which would be typical of either unbalanced growth or deep quiescence. The expression of the proliferation-associated nuclear proteins Ki-67 and p105 in these cells was reduced by up to 72% and 74%, respectively, compared with exponentially growing control cells. After removal of LOV, the cells resumed progression through the cycle; they entered S phase asynchronously after a lag of approximately 6 hr. Because mevalonate is essential for the posttranslational modification (isoprenylation) of p21ras, which in turn allows this protein to become attached to the cell membrane, the data suggest that the LOV-induced G1 arrest may be a consequence of the loss of the signal transduction capacity of p21ras. Indeed, while exposure of cells to LOV had no effect on the cellular content of p21ras (detected immunocytochemically), it altered the intracellular location of this protein, causing its dissociation from the cell membrane and translocation toward the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, it is also possible that inhibition of isoprenylation of proteins other than p21ras (e.g., nuclear lamins) by LOV may be responsible for the observed suppression of growth of T24 cells. Images PMID:1673788

  2. Cell specific, variable density, polymer microspheres

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Molday, Robert S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    Biocompatible polymeric microspheres having an average diameter below about 3 microns and having a density at least 15% greater or lesser than organic cells and having covalent binding sites are provided in accordance with this invention. The microspheres are obtained by copolymerizing a hydroxy or amine substituted acrylic monomer such as hydroxyethylmethacrylate with a light or dense comonomer such as a fluoromonomer. A lectin or antibody is bound to the hydroxy or amine site of the bead to provide cell specificity. When added to a cell suspension the marked bead will specifically label the cell membrane by binding to specific receptor sites thereon. The labelled membrane can then be separated by density gradient centrifugation.

  3. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Discher, Dennis

    2010-03-01

    Adhesion of stem cells - like most cells - is not just a membrane phenomenon. Most tissue cells need to adhere to a ``solid'' for viability, and over the last decade it has become increasingly clear that the physical ``elasticity'' of that solid is literally ``felt'' by cells. Here we show that Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) specify lineage and commit to phenotypes with extreme sensitivity to the elasticity typical of tissues [1]. In serum only media, soft matrices that mimic brain appear neurogenic, stiffer matrices that mimic muscle are myogenic, and comparatively rigid matrices that mimic collagenous bone prove osteogenic. Inhibition of nonmuscle myosin II activity blocks all elasticity directed lineage specification, which indicates that the cytoskeleton pulls on matrix through adhesive attachments. Results have significant implications for `therapeutic' stem cells and have motivated development of a proteomic-scale method to identify mechano-responsive protein structures [2] as well as deeper physical studies of matrix physics [3] and growth factor pathways [4]. [4pt] [1] A. Engler, et al. Matrix elasticity directs stem cell lineage specification. Cell (2006).[0pt] [2] C.P. Johnson, et al. Forced unfolding of proteins within cells. Science (2007).[0pt] [3] A.E.X. Brown, et al. Multiscale mechanics of fibrin polymer: Gel stretching with protein unfolding and loss of water. Science (2009).[0pt] [4] D.E. Discher, et al. Growth factors, matrices, and forces combine and control stem cells. Science (2009).

  4. Cadmium (II) removal mechanisms in microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Colantonio, Natalie; Kim, Younggy

    2016-07-01

    Cadmium is a toxic heavy metal, causing serious environmental and human health problems. Conventional methods for removing cadmium from wastewater are expensive and inefficient for low concentrations. Microbial electrolysis cells (MECs) can simultaneously treat wastewater, produce hydrogen gas, and remove heavy metals with low energy requirements. Lab-scale MECs were operated to remove cadmium under various electric conditions: applied voltages of 0.4, 0.6, 0.8, and 1.0 V; and a fixed cathode potential of -1.0 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Regardless of the electric condition, rapid removal of cadmium was demonstrated (50-67% in 24 h); however, cadmium concentration in solution increased after the electric current dropped with depleted organic substrate under applied voltage conditions. For the fixed cathode potential, the electric current was maintained even after substrate depletion and thus cadmium concentration did not increase. These results can be explained by three different removal mechanisms: cathodic reduction; Cd(OH)2 precipitation; and CdCO3 precipitation. When the current decreased with depleted substrates, local pH at the cathode was no longer high due to slowed hydrogen evolution reaction (2H(+)+2e(-)→H2); thus, the precipitated Cd(OH)2 and CdCO3 started dissolving. To prevent their dissolution, sufficient organic substrates should be provided when MECs are used for cadmium removal. PMID:26970043

  5. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Fuel cell power plants are being developed for transit bus and passenger car applications that use methanol as the on-board fuel. Commodity methanol by itself contains very little sulfur; however, it may occasionally be contaminated with up to about 1% diesel fuel or gasoline in current liquid-fuel distribution systems, leading to the presence of sulfur in the methanol fuel. This sulfur must be removed because of its deleterious effect on the reforming catalysts. International Fuel Cells has set the allowable sulfur limit in the methanol fuel at less than 1 ppm. The equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess the feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon adsorber for the removal of sulfur from transportation fuel cell systems.

  6. Autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Puig, Sebastià; Serra, Marc; Vilar-Sanz, Ariadna; Cabré, Marina; Bañeras, Lluís; Colprim, Jesús; Balaguer, M Dolors

    2011-03-01

    Nitrification to nitrite (nitritation process) followed by reduction to dinitrogen gas decreases the energy demand and the carbon requirements of the overall process of nitrogen removal. This work studies autotrophic nitrite removal in the cathode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Special attention was paid to determining whether nitrite is used as the electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria (biologic reaction) or by graphite electrodes (abiotic reaction). The results demonstrated that, after a nitrate pulse at the cathode, nitrite was initially accumulated; subsequently, nitrite was removed. Nitrite and nitrate can be used interchangeably as an electron acceptor by exoelectrogenic bacteria for nitrogen reduction from wastewater while producing bioelectricity. However, if oxygen is present in the cathode chamber, nitrite is oxidised via biological or electrochemical processes. The identification of a dominant bacterial member similar to Oligotropha carboxidovorans confirms that autotrophic denitrification is the main metabolism mechanism in the cathode of an MFC. PMID:21262566

  7. Monoclonal antibodies specific for sickle cell hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, R.H.; Vanderlaan, M.; Grabske, R.J.; Branscomb, E.W.; Bigbee, W.L.; Stanker, L.H.

    1985-01-01

    Two mouse hybridoma cell lines were isolated which produce monoclonal antibodies that bind hemoglobin S. The mice were immunized with peptide-protein conjugates to stimulate a response to the amino terminal peptide of the beta chain of hemoglobin S, where the single amino acid difference between A and S occurs. Immunocharacterization of the antibodies shows that they bind specifically to the immunogen peptide and to hemoglobin S. The specificity for S is high enough that one AS cell in a mixture with a million AA cells is labeled by antibody, and such cells can be analyzed by flow cytometry. Immunoblotting of electrophoretic gels allows definitive identification of hemoglobin S as compared with other hemoglobins with similar electrophoretic mobility. 12 references, 4 figures.

  8. Learning LM Specificity for Ganglion Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahumada, Albert J.

    2015-01-01

    Unsupervised learning models have been proposed based on experience (Ahumada and Mulligan, 1990;Wachtler, Doi, Lee and Sejnowski, 2007) that allow the cortex to develop units with LM specific color opponent receptive fields like the blob cells reported by Hubel and Wiesel on the basis of visual experience. These models used ganglion cells with LM indiscriminate wiring as inputs to the learning mechanism, which was presumed to occur at the cortical level.

  9. Specificity of human galectins on cell surfaces.

    PubMed

    Rapoport, E M; Bovin, N V

    2015-07-01

    Galectins are β-galactoside-binding proteins sharing homology in amino acid sequence of their carbohydrate-recognition domain. Their carbohydrate specificity outside cells has been studied previously. The main conclusion of these studies was that several levels of glycan ligand recognition exist for galectins: (i) disaccharide Galβ1-4GlcNAc (LN, N-acetyllactosamine) binds stronger than β-galactopyranose; (ii) substitution at O-2 and O-3 of galactose residue as well as core fragments ("right" from GlcNAc) provides significant increase in affinity; (iii) similarly glycosylated proteins can differ significantly in affinity to galectins. Information about the natural cellular receptors of galectins is limited. Until recently, it was impossible to study specificity of cell-bound galectins. A model based on controlled incorporation of a single protein into glycocalyx of cells and subsequent interaction of loaded cells with synthetic glycoprobes measured by flow cytometry made this possible recently. In this review, data about glycan specificity of proto-, chimera-, and tandem-repeat type galectins on the cell surface are systematized, and comparative analysis of the results with data on specificity of galectins in artificial systems was performed. The following conclusions from these studies were made: (i) cellular galectins have practically no ability to bind disaccharide LNn, but display affinity to 3'-substituted oligolactosamines and oligomers LNn; (ii) tandem-repeat type galectins recognize another disaccharide, namely Galβ1-3GlcNAc (Le(c)); (iii) on the cell surface, tandem-repeat type galectins conserve the ability to display high affinity to blood group antigens of ABH system; (iv) in general, when galectins are immersed into glycocalyx, they are more selective regarding glycan interactions. Thus, we conclude that competitive interaction of galectins with cell microenvironment (endogenous cell glycans) is the main factor providing selectivity of galectins in

  10. Evaluation of Alternatives for Hanford 327 Building Hot Cell Removal and Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, Ray W.; Jasen, William G.

    2003-02-27

    The Department of Energy (DOE) Hanford site 327 Building, built in 1953, played a key role in reactor material and fuel research programs. The facility includes nine shielded hot cells, a fuel storage basin, dry sample storage, and a large inerted hot (SERF) cell. In 1996, the 327 Building was transferred from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) to Fluor Hanford, Inc., to begin the transition from the mission of irradiated fuel examination to stabilization and deactivation. In 2001, a multi-contractor team conducted a review of the concept of intact (one piece) removal, packaging, and disposal of the 327 hot cells. This paper focuses on challenges related to preparing the 327 Building hot cells for intact one-piece disposal as Low Level Waste (LLW) at the Hanford Site. These challenges, described in this paper, are threefold and include: Sampling and characterization of the cells for low level waste designation; Packaging of the cells for transportation and waste disposal; Transportation from the facility to the disposal site. The primary technical challenges in one-piece removal, packaging, and disposal of the hot cells involve the techniques required to characterize, remove, handle, package and transport a large (approximately up to 12-feet long and 8-feet high) contaminated object that weighs 35 to 160 tons. Specific characterization results associated with two hot cells, G and H cells will be reported. A review of the activities and plans to stabilize and deactivate the 327 Building provides insight into the technical challenges faced by this project and identifies a potential opportunity to modify the baseline strategy by removing the hot cells in one piece instead of decontaminating and dismantling the cells.

  11. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lorton, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    This study consisted of a technical evaluation and economic comparison of sulfur removal processes for integration into a coal gasification-molten carbonate (CGMC) fuel cell power plant. Initially, the performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and screened for conformance to the conditions and requirements expected in commercial CGMC power plants. Four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen-blown and air-blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas (1 ppMv or 25 ppMv). The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed for the essentially complete removal of sulfur compounds. The impact on the overall plant performance was also determined. The total capital requirement for sulfur removal schemes ranged from $59.4/kW to $84.8/kW for the oxygen-blown cases and from $89.5/kW to $133/kW for the air-blown cases. The O and M costs for sulfur removal for 70% plant capacity factor ranged from 0.82 mills/kWh to 2.76 mills/kWh for the oxygen-blown cases and from 1.77 mills/kWh to 4.88 mills/kWh for the air-blown cases. The Selexol process benefitted the most from the addition of COS hydrolysis pretreatment.

  12. Cell-Specific Aptamers as Emerging Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Cindy; Hahn, Ulrich; Rentmeister, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Aptamers are short nucleic acids that bind to defined targets with high affinity and specificity. The first aptamers have been selected about two decades ago by an in vitro process named SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment). Since then, numerous aptamers with specificities for a variety of targets from small molecules to proteins or even whole cells have been selected. Their applications range from biosensing and diagnostics to therapy and target-oriented drug delivery. More recently, selections using complex targets such as live cells have become feasible. This paper summarizes progress in cell-SELEX techniques and highlights recent developments, particularly in the field of medically relevant aptamers with a focus on therapeutic and drug-delivery applications. PMID:21904667

  13. Targeting ALDHbright human carcinoma initiating cells with ALDH1A1- specific CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Visus, Carmen; Wang, Yangyang; Lozano-Leon, Antonio; Ferris, Robert L.; Silver, Susan; Szczepanski, Miroslaw J.; Brand, Randall E.; Ferrone, Cristina R.; Whiteside, Theresa L.; Ferrone, Soldano; DeLeo, Albert B.; Wang, Xinhui

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Tumor cells expressing elevated aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity attributed to ALDH1/3 isoforms have been identified as ALDHbright cells and have the properties attributed to cancer initiating cells (CIC). CIC represent the subpopulation of tumor cells that are resistant to conventional cancer treatments and highly tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. They are considered to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. The ALDH1A1 isoform was previously identified as a tumor antigen recognized by CD8+ T cells. This study examines the ability of ALDH1A1-specific CD8+ T cells to eliminate ALDHbright cells and control tumor growth and metastases. Experimental Design ALDHbright cells were isolated by flow cytometry from HLA-A2+ human head and neck, breast and pancreas carcinoma cell lines using ALDEFLUOR® and tested for their tumorigenicity in immunodeficient mice. ALDH1A1-specific CD8+ T cells were generated in vitro and tested for their ability to eliminate CIC in vitro and in vivo by adoptive transfer to immunodeficient mice bearing human tumor xenografts. Results ALDHbright cells isolated by flow cytometry from HLA-A2+ breast, head and neck and pancreas carcinoma cell lines at low numbers (500 cells) were tumorigenic in immunodeficient mice. ALDHbright cells present in these cell lines, xenografts or surgically removed lesions were recognized by ALDH1A1-specific CD8+ T cells in vitro. Adoptive therapy with ALDH1A1-specific CD8+ T cells eliminated ALDHbright cells, inhibited tumor growth, metastases or prolonged survival of xenograft-bearing immunodeficient mice. Conclusions The results of this translational study strongly support the potential of ALDH1A1-based immunotherapy to selectively target CIC in human cancer. PMID:21856769

  14. 2,4-Dichlorophenol hydroxylase for chlorophenol removal: Substrate specificity and catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Ren, Hejun; Li, Qingchao; Zhan, Yang; Fang, Xuexun; Yu, Dahai

    2016-01-01

    Chlorophenols (CPs) are common environmental pollutants. As such, different treatments have been assessed to facilitate their removal. In this study, 2,4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP) hydroxylase was used to systematically investigate the activity and removal ability of 19CP congeners at 25 and 0 °C. Results demonstrated that 2,4-DCP hydroxylase exhibited a broad substrate specificity to CPs. The activities of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against specific CP congeners, including 3-CP, 2,3,6-trichlorophenol, 2-CP, and 2,3-DCP, were higher than those against 2,4-DCP, which is the preferred substrate of previously reported 2,4-DCP hydroxylase. To verify whether cofactors are necessary to promote hydroxylase activity against CP congeners, we added FAD and found that the added FAD induced a 1.33-fold to 5.13-fold significant increase in hydroxylase activity against different CP congeners. The metabolic pathways of the CP degradation in the enzymatic hydroxylation step were preliminarily proposed on the basis of the analyses of the enzymatic activities against 19CP congeners. We found that the high activity and removal rate of 2,4-DCP hydroxylase against CPs at 0 °C enhance the low-temperature-adaptability of this enzyme to the CP congeners; as such, the proposed removal process may be applied to biochemical, bioremediation, and industrial processes, particularly in cold environments. PMID:26672451

  15. Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J.; Schurmann, Claudia; Schramm, Katharina; Kettunen, Johannes; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Li, Yang; Fu, Jingyuan; Karjalainen, Juha; Platteel, Mathieu; Visschedijk, Marijn; Weersma, Rinse K.; Kasela, Silva; Milani, Lili; Tserel, Liina; Peterson, Pärt; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Homuth, Georg; Petersmann, Astrid; Lorbeer, Roberto; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; Wood, Andrew R.; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B.; Hernandez, Dena G.; Knight, Julian C.; Melchiotti, Rossella; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Wang, De Yun; van den Berg, Leonard H.; Veldink, Jan H.; Rotzschke, Olaf; Makino, Seiko; Salomaa, Veikko; Strauch, Konstantin; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B. J.; Metspalu, Andres; Wijmenga, Cisca; Jansen, Ritsert C.; Franke, Lude

    2015-01-01

    The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE) meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn’s disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus. PMID:25955312

  16. Cell Specific eQTL Analysis without Sorting Cells.

    PubMed

    Westra, Harm-Jan; Arends, Danny; Esko, Tõnu; Peters, Marjolein J; Schurmann, Claudia; Schramm, Katharina; Kettunen, Johannes; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Fairfax, Benjamin P; Andiappan, Anand Kumar; Li, Yang; Fu, Jingyuan; Karjalainen, Juha; Platteel, Mathieu; Visschedijk, Marijn; Weersma, Rinse K; Kasela, Silva; Milani, Lili; Tserel, Liina; Peterson, Pärt; Reinmaa, Eva; Hofman, Albert; Uitterlinden, André G; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Homuth, Georg; Petersmann, Astrid; Lorbeer, Roberto; Prokisch, Holger; Meitinger, Thomas; Herder, Christian; Roden, Michael; Grallert, Harald; Ripatti, Samuli; Perola, Markus; Wood, Andrew R; Melzer, David; Ferrucci, Luigi; Singleton, Andrew B; Hernandez, Dena G; Knight, Julian C; Melchiotti, Rossella; Lee, Bernett; Poidinger, Michael; Zolezzi, Francesca; Larbi, Anis; Wang, De Yun; van den Berg, Leonard H; Veldink, Jan H; Rotzschke, Olaf; Makino, Seiko; Salomaa, Veikko; Strauch, Konstantin; Völker, Uwe; van Meurs, Joyce B J; Metspalu, Andres; Wijmenga, Cisca; Jansen, Ritsert C; Franke, Lude

    2015-05-01

    The functional consequences of trait associated SNPs are often investigated using expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) mapping. While trait-associated variants may operate in a cell-type specific manner, eQTL datasets for such cell-types may not always be available. We performed a genome-environment interaction (GxE) meta-analysis on data from 5,683 samples to infer the cell type specificity of whole blood cis-eQTLs. We demonstrate that this method is able to predict neutrophil and lymphocyte specific cis-eQTLs and replicate these predictions in independent cell-type specific datasets. Finally, we show that SNPs associated with Crohn's disease preferentially affect gene expression within neutrophils, including the archetypal NOD2 locus. PMID:25955312

  17. Copper cation removal in an electrokinetic cell containing zeolite.

    PubMed

    Elsayed-Ali, Omar H; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E

    2011-01-30

    Zeolites are used in environmental remediation of soil or water to immobilize or remove toxic materials by cation exchange. An experiment was conducted to test the use a low electric field to direct the toxic cations towards the zeolite. An electrokinetic cell was constructed using carbon electrodes. Synthetic Linde Type A (LTA) zeolite was placed in the cell. Copper(II) chloride dissolved in water was used as a contaminant. The Cu(2+) concentration was measured for ten hours with and without an applied electric field. The removal of the Cu(2+) ions was accelerated by the applied field in the first two hours. For longer time, the electric field did not improve the removal rate of the Cu(2+) ions. The presence of zeolite and applied electric field complicates the chemistry near the cathode and causes precipitation of Cu(2+) ions as copper oxide on the surface of the zeolite. With increased electric field the zeolite farther away from the cathode had little cation exchange due to the higher drift velocity of the Cu(2+) ions. The results also show that, in the LTA Zeolite A pellets, the cation exchange of Cu is limited to a shell of several tens of micrometers. PMID:21109348

  18. The effect of fat removal on glucose tolerance is depot specific in male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Shi, Haifei; Strader, April D; Woods, Stephen C; Seeley, Randy J

    2007-10-01

    Energy is stored predominately as lipid in white adipose tissue (WAT) in distinct anatomical locations, with each site exerting different effects on key biological processes, including glucose homeostasis. To determine the relative contributions of subcutaneous and visceral WAT on glucose homeostasis, comparable amounts of adipose tissue from abdominal subcutaneous inguinal WAT (IWAT), intra-abdominal retroperitoneal WAT (RWAT), male gonadal epididymal WAT (EWAT), or female gonadal parametrial WAT (PWAT) were removed. Gonadal fat removal in both male and female chow-fed lean mice resulted in lowered glucose levels across glucose tolerance tests. Female lean C57BL/6J mice as well as male and female lean FVBN mice significantly improved glucose tolerance, indicated by decreased areas under glucose clearance curves. For the C57BL/6J mice maintained on a high-fat butter-based diet, glucose homeostasis was improved only in female mice with PWAT removal. Removal of IWAT or RWAT did not affect glucose tolerance in either dietary condition. We conclude that WAT contribution to glucose homeostasis is depot specific, with male gonadal EWAT contributing to glucose homeostasis in the lean state, whereas female gonadal PWAT contributes to glucose homeostasis in both lean and obese mice. These data illustrate both critical differences among various WAT depots and how they influence glucose homeostasis and highlight important differences between males and females in glucose regulation. PMID:17652151

  19. Typical low cost biosorbents for adsorptive removal of specific organic pollutants from water.

    PubMed

    Tran, Van Son; Ngo, Huu Hao; Guo, Wenshan; Zhang, Jian; Liang, Shuang; Ton-That, Cuong; Zhang, Xinbo

    2015-04-01

    Specific organic pollutants (SOPs) such as phenolic compounds, PAHs, organic pesticides, and organic herbicides cause health and environmental problems due to their excessive toxic properties and poor biodegradability. Low-cost biosorbents are considered as a promising alternative for conventional adsorbents to remove SOPs from water. These materials have several advantages such as high sorption capacities, good modifiability and recoverability, insensitivity to toxic substances, simple operation in the treatment processes. However, previous reports on various types of biosorbents for removing SOPs are still moderately fragmented. Hence, this paper provides a comprehensive review on using typical low-cost biosorbents obtained from lignocellulose and chitin/chitosan for SOPs adsorption. Especially, their characteristics, biosorption mechanism together with utilization for eliminating SOPs are presented and discussed. The paper also gives a critical view regarding future applications of low-cost biosorbents in SOPs-contaminated water treatment. PMID:25690682

  20. Cell therapy to remove excess copper in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Sanjeev

    2014-05-01

    To achieve permanent correction of Wilson's disease by a cell therapy approach, replacement of diseased hepatocytes with healthy hepatocytes is desirable. There is a physiological requirement for hepatic ATP7B-dependent copper (Cu) transport in bile, which is deficient in Wilson's disease, producing progressive Cu accumulation in the liver or brain with organ damage. The ability to repopulate the liver with healthy hepatocytes raises the possibility of cell therapy in Wilson's disease. Therapeutic principles included reconstitution of bile canalicular network as well as proliferation in transplanted hepatocytes, despite toxic amounts of Cu in the liver. Nonetheless, cell therapy studies in animal models elicited major differences in the mechanisms driving liver repopulation with transplanted hepatocytes in Wilson's disease versus nondiseased settings. Recently, noninvasive imaging was developed to demonstrate Cu removal from the liver, including after cell therapy in Wilson's disease. Such developments will help advance cell/gene therapy approaches, particularly by offering roadmaps for clinical trials in people with Wilson's disease. PMID:24820353

  1. Imaging Specific Genomic DNA in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Baohui; Guan, Juan; Huang, Bo

    2016-07-01

    The three-dimensional organization of the genome plays important roles in regulating the functional output of the genome and even in the maintenance of epigenetic inheritance and genome stability. Here, we review and compare a number of newly developed methods-especially those that utilize the CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat)-Cas9 (CRISPR-associated protein 9) system-that enable the direct visualization of specific, endogenous DNA sequences in living cells. We also discuss the practical considerations in implementing the CRISPR imaging technique to achieve sufficient signal-to-background levels, high specificity, and high labeling efficiency. These DNA labeling methods enable tracking of the copy number, localization, and movement of genomic elements, and we discuss the potential applications of these methods in understanding the searching and targeting mechanism of the Cas9-sgRNA complex, investigating chromosome organization, and visualizing genome instability and rearrangement. PMID:27145877

  2. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hong; Lin, Hua-Tay; Wereszczak, Andrew A

    2006-11-01

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was ~ 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity used was ~ 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the depth of groove. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch of the tested TiAls, which facilitated both the detachments of developing chips and the pile-ups of materials on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction on the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the tested TiAls. The materiel removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall response of materials can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The obtained depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen the candidate materials for the specific purpose depending on whether the application is scratch-dominant or impact-dominant. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation in the material loss or material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size show a higher resistance against the indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and

  3. Cell-Specific Cardiac Electrophysiology Models

    PubMed Central

    Groenendaal, Willemijn; Ortega, Francis A.; Kherlopian, Armen R.; Zygmunt, Andrew C.; Krogh-Madsen, Trine; Christini, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The traditional cardiac model-building paradigm involves constructing a composite model using data collected from many cells. Equations are derived for each relevant cellular component (e.g., ion channel, exchanger) independently. After the equations for all components are combined to form the composite model, a subset of parameters is tuned, often arbitrarily and by hand, until the model output matches a target objective, such as an action potential. Unfortunately, such models often fail to accurately simulate behavior that is dynamically dissimilar (e.g., arrhythmia) to the simple target objective to which the model was fit. In this study, we develop a new approach in which data are collected via a series of complex electrophysiology protocols from single cardiac myocytes and then used to tune model parameters via a parallel fitting method known as a genetic algorithm (GA). The dynamical complexity of the electrophysiological data, which can only be fit by an automated method such as a GA, leads to more accurately parameterized models that can simulate rich cardiac dynamics. The feasibility of the method is first validated computationally, after which it is used to develop models of isolated guinea pig ventricular myocytes that simulate the electrophysiological dynamics significantly better than does a standard guinea pig model. In addition to improving model fidelity generally, this approach can be used to generate a cell-specific model. By so doing, the approach may be useful in applications ranging from studying the implications of cell-to-cell variability to the prediction of intersubject differences in response to pharmacological treatment. PMID:25928268

  4. Material Removal and Specific Energy in the Dynamic Scratching of Gamma Titanium Aluminides

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H.; Lin, H.-T.; Wereszczak, A.A.

    2006-11-30

    Mechanical responses of three gamma titanium aluminides (TiAls) (denoted as Alloy A, Alloy B and Alloy C) subjected to dynamic scratching were studied by using a single-grit pendulum (rotating) scratch tester. The maximum depth of groove was {approx} 0.07 mm, and the scratch velocity was {approx} 1.0 m/s. Normal and tangential forces were monitored. The material removal mechanisms were examined using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the scratches were measured by using a laser profilometer. The mechanical properties of the tested TiAls were characterized by the instantaneous specific energy, scratch resistance and scratch hardness as related to the groove depth. Extensive thermal softening was observed in the dynamic scratch test of the TiAls, which facilitated both the detachment of developing chips and pile-up of material on side ridges. Sizable fractures were observed in the transverse direction in the tested TiAls; these fractures tended to participate in the chip formation, depending on the microstructure of the TiAl and the size of the scratch groove. Specific energy and scratch hardness are depth-dependent to various degrees for the TiAls tested. The material removal might be subjected to different mechanisms, but the overall material response can be effectively characterized by the HEM (Hwang, Evans and Malkin) model and the PSR (proportional specimen resistance) model. The depth-independent specific energy and scratch hardness can be used to screen candidate materials for the applications that are scratch-dominated versus impact-dominated. Among the three tested TiAls, the TiAl with larger colony or grain size exhibits a stronger capability of energy dissipation during material removal (higher depth-independent specific energy), while the TiAl with smaller colony size shows a higher resistance to indentation (higher depth-independent scratch hardness). The observations and conclusions in this study can serve as a base line for the further

  5. Removal of sulfur contaminants in methanol for fuel cell applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.H.D.; Kumar, R.; Sederquist, R.

    1996-12-31

    Equilibrium adsorption isotherm and breakthrough data were used to assess feasibility of developing a granular activated carbon (GAC) adsorber for use as a sulfur removal subsystem in transportation fuel cell systems. Results suggest that an on-board GAC adsorber may not be attractive due to size and weight constraints. However, it may be feasible to install this GAC adsorber at methanol distribution stations, where space and weight are not a critical concern. Preliminary economic analysis indicated that the GAC adsorber concept will be attractive if the spent AC can be regenerated for reuse. These preliminary analyses were made on basis of very limited breakthrough data obtained from the bench-scale testing. Optimization on dynamic testing parameters and study on regeneration of spent AC are needed.

  6. Cell-specific analysis of tracheobronchial secretory cells and secretions

    SciTech Connect

    Finkbeiner, W.E.

    1989-01-01

    In these studies, two methods (cell culture and monoclonal antibody production) that allowed cell-specific analysis of tracheobronchial secretion were used. Bovine tracheal submucosal gland cells were isolated, placed into culture and serially propagated. In culture, the cells maintained features of serous cells. The cells incorporated {sup 35}S into high molecular weight molecules. {beta}-adrenergic agonists stimulated release of radiolabeled molecules and elevations in intracellular cAMP levels, responses that could be blocked by the {beta}-adrenergic antagonist propranolol. Cyclic AMP appeared to be involved in the stimulus-secretion coupling events in serous cells since the phosphodiesterase inhibitor 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine potentiated the effects of isoproterenol on the secretory response and the elevation of intracellular cAMP levels. Furthermore, cAMP analogues elicited a secretory response in the absence of cAMP. The phosphorylation state of several cytosolic and particulate phosphoproteins was altered by cAMP-activated kinase activity. Monoclonal antibodies were produced against human airway secretions.

  7. Facial dermis grafts after removal of basal cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Han, Seung-Kyu; Yoon, Won-Young; Jeong, Seong-Ho; Kim, Woo-Kyung

    2012-11-01

    Selecting a proper reconstruction method is the key to success in skin cancer management, especially for lesions involving the face. Using a skin graft is usually straightforward when covering a skin defect; however, major concerns in skin grafting include a poor color match in the recipient-site and donor-site morbidity. To overcome these limitations, the authors have developed a dermis graft, which utilizes a de-epithelialized split-thickness skin graft method. The purpose of this retrospective study was to report reliability of dermis grafts after removal of basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) on the face by presenting our clinical experience with them. This study included 38 patients who were treated for facial defects created by resection of BCCs. The locations of the defects were as follows: nose (n = 17), orbital area (n = 14), cheek (n = 4), temple area (n = 2), and forehead (n = 1). The defects ranged in size from 3.3 to 6.5 cm. Functional and cosmetic outcomes, postoperative complications, and patient satisfaction were assessed. The patients were followed up for 12 to 36 months. The entire dermis graft re-epithelialized after grafting within 17 to 27 days. Most of the patients had satisfactory results in both functional and cosmetic matters with high-quality skin characteristics. There were no significant complications and no recurrences were observed during the follow-up period. Patient satisfaction with the dermis graft was also excellent. The dermis graft may be used reliably for covering defects after removal of BCCs on the face. PMID:23172436

  8. Induction of type I IFN is required for overcoming tumor-specific T-cell tolerance after stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Horkheimer, Ian; Quigley, Michael; Zhu, Jiangao; Huang, Xiaopei; Chao, Nelson J; Yang, Yiping

    2009-05-21

    Tumor-specific T-cell tolerance represents one major mechanism of tumor-induced immune evasion. Myeloablative chemotherapy with stem cell transplantation may offer the best chance of achieving a state of minimal residual disease and, thus, minimize tumor-induced immune evasion. However, studies have shown that tumor-specific T-cell tolerance persists after transplantation. Here, we showed that CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T (T(Reg)) cells play a critical role in tumor-specific CD8(+) T-cell tolerance after transplantation. Removal of T(Reg) cells from the donor lymphocyte graft did not overcome this tolerance because of rapid conversion of donor CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells into CD4(+)CD25(+)Foxp3(+) T(Reg) cells in recipients after transplantation, and depletion of T(Reg) cells in recipients was necessary for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance. These results suggest that strategies capable of overcoming T-cell tolerance in recipients are required to promote antitumor immunity after transplantation. Toward this goal, we showed that dendritic cell (DC) vaccines coadministered with the TLR9 ligand, CpG could effectively overcome tumor-specific tolerance, leading to significant prolongation of tumor-free survival after transplantation. We further showed that CpG-induced type I interferon was critical for the reversal of tumor-specific tolerance in vivo. Collectively, these results may suggest effective immunotherapeutic strategies for treating cancer after stem cell transplantation. PMID:19279333

  9. Development of standardized specifications for silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott-Monck, J. A.

    1977-01-01

    A space silicon solar cell assembly (cell and coverglass) specification aimed at standardizing the diverse requirements of current cell or assembly specifications was developed. This specification was designed to minimize both the procurement and manufacturing costs for space qualified silicon solar cell assembilies. In addition, an impact analysis estimating the technological and economic effects of employing a standardized space silicon solar cell assembly was performed.

  10. Cell-specific transmembrane injection of molecular cargo with gold nanoparticle-generated transient plasmonic nanobubbles.

    PubMed

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y; Wagner, Daniel S; Brenner, Malcolm K; Lapotko, Dmitri O

    2012-07-01

    Optimal cell therapies require efficient, selective and rapid delivery of molecular cargo into target cells without compromising their viability. Achieving these goals ex vivo in bulk heterogeneous multi-cell systems such as human grafts is impeded by low selectivity and speed of cargo delivery and by significant damage to target and non-target cells. We have developed a cell level approach for selective and guided transmembrane injection of extracellular cargo into specific target cells using transient plasmonic nanobubbles (PNB) as cell-specific nano-injectors. As a technical platform for this method we developed a laser flow cell processing system. The PNB injection method and flow system were tested in heterogeneous cell suspensions of target and non-target cells for delivery of Dextran-FITC dye into squamous cell carcinoma HN31 cells and transfection of human T-cells with a green fluorescent protein-encoding plasmid. In both models the method demonstrated single cell type selectivity, high efficacy of delivery (96% both for HN31 cells T-cells), speed of delivery (nanoseconds) and viability of treated target cells (96% for HN31 cells and 75% for T-cells). The PNB injection method may therefore be beneficial for real time processing of human grafts without removal of physiologically important cells. PMID:22521612

  11. Dermis mechanical behaviour after different cell removal treatments.

    PubMed

    Terzini, Mara; Bignardi, Cristina; Castagnoli, Carlotta; Cambieri, Irene; Zanetti, Elisabetta M; Audenino, Alberto L

    2016-09-01

    Human acellular dermal matrices (HADMs) are used in reconstructive surgery as scaffolds promoting autologous tissue regeneration. Critical to the HADM ability to remodel and integrate into the host tissue is the removal of cells while maintaining an intact extracellular architecture. The objective of this work is to develop a methodology to analyse the mechanical properties of HADMs after decellularization to identify its ideal form of treatment and its duration. Two different decellularization techniques were used as a benchmark: the first is a well-established technique (incubation in NaOH for 1-7 weeks), and the second is an innovative technique developed by this research group (incubation in DMEM (Dulbecco's modified Eagle medium) for 1-7 weeks). After decellularization, the specimens underwent uniaxial tensile tests, and experimental data were represented with stress strain curves, calculating both engineering and true values. Mechanical tests have led to the identification of the optimal method (NaOH or DMEM) and duration for the decellularization treatment; differences between engineering and true values can reach 84%, but the engineering values remain useful to make comparisons, providing reliable indications with a simpler experimental set up and data processing. PMID:26997564

  12. Cell-Specific Promoters Enable Lipid-Based Nanoparticles to Deliver Genes to Specific Cells of the Retina In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuhong; Rajala, Ammaji; Cao, Binrui; Ranjo-Bishop, Michelle; Agbaga, Martin-Paul; Mao, Chuanbin; Rajala, Raju V.S.

    2016-01-01

    Non-viral vectors, such as lipid-based nanoparticles (liposome-protamine-DNA complex [LPD]), could be used to deliver a functional gene to the retina to correct visual function and treat blindness. However, one of the limitations of LPD is the lack of cell specificity, as the retina is composed of seven types of cells. If the same gene is expressed in multiple cell types or is absent from one desired cell type, LPD-mediated gene delivery to every cell may have off-target effects. To circumvent this problem, we have tested LPD-mediated gene delivery using various generalized, modified, and retinal cell-specific promoters. We achieved retinal pigment epithelium cell specificity with vitelliform macular dystrophy (VMD2), rod cell specificity with mouse rhodopsin, cone cell specificity with red/green opsin, and ganglion cell specificity with thymocyte antigen promoters. Here we show for the first time that cell-specific promoters enable lipid-based nanoparticles to deliver genes to specific cells of the retina in vivo. This work will inspire investigators in the field of lipid nanotechnology to couple cell-specific promoters to drive expression in a cell- and tissue-specific manner. PMID:27446487

  13. Automated Cell Enrichment of Cytomegalovirus-specific T cells for Clinical Applications using the Cytokine-capture System.

    PubMed

    Kumaresan, Pappanaicken; Figliola, Mathew; Moyes, Judy S; Huls, M Helen; Tewari, Priti; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Champlin, Richard; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of pathogen-specific T cells can be used to prevent and treat opportunistic infections such as cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection occurring after allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation. Viral-specific T cells from allogeneic donors, including third party donors, can be propagated ex vivo in compliance with current good manufacturing practice (cGMP), employing repeated rounds of antigen-driven stimulation to selectively propagate desired T cells. The identification and isolation of antigen-specific T cells can also be undertaken based upon the cytokine capture system of T cells that have been activated to secrete gamma-interferon (IFN-γ). However, widespread human application of the cytokine capture system (CCS) to help restore immunity has been limited as the production process is time-consuming and requires a skilled operator. The development of a second-generation cell enrichment device such as CliniMACS Prodigy now enables investigators to generate viral-specific T cells using an automated, less labor-intensive system. This device separates magnetically labeled cells from unlabeled cells using magnetic activated cell sorting technology to generate clinical-grade products, is engineered as a closed system and can be accessed and operated on the benchtop. We demonstrate the operation of this new automated cell enrichment device to manufacture CMV pp65-specific T cells obtained from a steady-state apheresis product obtained from a CMV seropositive donor. These isolated T cells can then be directly infused into a patient under institutional and federal regulatory supervision. All the bio-processing steps including removal of red blood cells, stimulation of T cells, separation of antigen-specific T cells, purification, and washing are fully automated. Devices such as this raise the possibility that T cells for human application can be manufactured outside of dedicated good manufacturing practice (GMP) facilities and instead be produced

  14. Method of improving fuel cell performance by removing at least one metal oxide contaminant from a fuel cell electrode

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Choi, Jong-Ho; Zelenay, Piotr

    2009-08-18

    A method of removing contaminants from a fuel cell catalyst electrode. The method includes providing a getter electrode and a fuel cell catalyst electrode having at least one contaminant to a bath and applying a voltage sufficient to drive the contaminant from the fuel cell catalyst electrode to the getter electrode. Methods of removing contaminants from a membrane electrode assembly of a fuel cell and of improving performance of a fuel cell are also provided.

  15. Specific cell cycle synchronization with butyrate and cell cycle analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Synchronized cells have been invaluable for many kinds of cell cycle and cell proliferation studies. Butyrate induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in MDBK cells. To explore the possibility of using butyrate-blocked cells to obtain synchronized cells, we investigated the property of the cell cyc...

  16. Assessment of sulfur removal processes for advanced fuel cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorton, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The performance characteristics of potential sulfur removal processes were evaluated and four of these processes, the Selexol process, the Benfield process, the Sulfinol process, and the Rectisol process, were selected for detailed technical and economic comparison. The process designs were based on a consistent set of technical criteria for a grass roots facility with a capacity of 10,000 tons per day of Illinois No. 6 coal. Two raw gas compositions, based on oxygen blown and air blown Texaco gasification, were used. The bulk of the sulfur was removed in the sulfur removal unit, leaving a small amount of sulfur compounds in the gas. The remaining sulfur compounds were removed by reaction with zinc oxide in the sulfur polishing unit. The impact of COS hydrolysis pretreatment on sulfur removal was evaluated. Comprehensive capital and O and M cost estimates for each of the process schemes were developed.

  17. Skin Biopsy and Patient-Specific Stem Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yao; Nguyen, Huy V.; Tsang, Stephen H.

    2016-01-01

    The generation of patient-specific induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells permits the development of next-generation patient-specific systems biology models reflecting personalized genomics profiles to better understand pathophysiology. In this chapter, we describe how to create a patient-specific iPS cell line. There are three major steps: (1) performing a skin biopsy procedure on the patient; (2) extracting human fibroblast cells from the skin biopsy tissue; and (3) reprogramming patient-specific fibroblast cells into the pluripotent stem cell stage. PMID:26141312

  18. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, J.E.; Dederer, J.T.; Zafred, P.R.; Collie, J.C.

    1998-04-21

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack. 8 figs.

  19. Solid oxide fuel cell generator with removable modular fuel cell stack configurations

    DOEpatents

    Gillett, James E.; Dederer, Jeffrey T.; Zafred, Paolo R.; Collie, Jeffrey C.

    1998-01-01

    A high temperature solid oxide fuel cell generator produces electrical power from oxidation of hydrocarbon fuel gases such as natural gas, or conditioned fuel gases, such as carbon monoxide or hydrogen, with oxidant gases, such as air or oxygen. This electrochemical reaction occurs in a plurality of electrically connected solid oxide fuel cells bundled and arrayed in a unitary modular fuel cell stack disposed in a compartment in the generator container. The use of a unitary modular fuel cell stack in a generator is similar in concept to that of a removable battery. The fuel cell stack is provided in a pre-assembled self-supporting configuration where the fuel cells are mounted to a common structural base having surrounding side walls defining a chamber. Associated generator equipment may also be mounted to the fuel cell stack configuration to be integral therewith, such as a fuel and oxidant supply and distribution systems, fuel reformation systems, fuel cell support systems, combustion, exhaust and spent fuel recirculation systems, and the like. The pre-assembled self-supporting fuel cell stack arrangement allows for easier assembly, installation, maintenance, better structural support and longer life of the fuel cells contained in the fuel cell stack.

  20. Tolerance induction in memory CD4 T cells requires two rounds of antigen-specific activation.

    PubMed

    David, Alexandria; Crawford, Frances; Garside, Paul; Kappler, John W; Marrack, Philippa; MacLeod, Megan

    2014-05-27

    A major goal for immunotherapy is to tolerize the immune cells that coordinate tissue damage in autoimmune and alloantigen responses. CD4 T cells play a central role in many of these conditions and improved antigen-specific regulation or removal of these cells could revolutionize current treatments. A confounding factor is that little is known about whether and how tolerance is induced in memory CD4 T cells. We used MHC class II tetramers to track and analyze a population of endogenous antigen-specific memory CD4 T cells exposed to soluble peptide in the absence of adjuvant. We found that such memory T cells proliferated and reentered the memory pool apparently unperturbed by the incomplete activation signals provided by the peptide. Upon further restimulation in vivo, CD4 memory T cells that had been previously exposed to peptide proliferated, provided help to primary responding B cells, and migrated to inflamed sites. However, these reactivated memory cells failed to survive. The reduction in T-cell number was marked by low expression of the antiapoptotic molecule B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl2) and increased expression of activated caspase molecules. Consequently, these cells failed to sustain a delayed-type hypersensitivity response. Moreover, following two separate exposures to soluble antigen, no T-cell recall response and no helper activity for B cells could be detected. These results suggest that the induction of tolerance in memory CD4 T cells is possible but that deletion and permanent removal of the antigen-specific T cells requires reactivation following exposure to the tolerogenic antigen. PMID:24821788

  1. Enteric glial cells have specific immunosuppressive properties.

    PubMed

    Kermarrec, Laetitia; Durand, Tony; Neunlist, Michel; Naveilhan, Philippe; Neveu, Isabelle

    2016-06-15

    Enteric glial cells (EGC) have trophic and neuroregulatory functions in the enteric nervous system, but whether they exert a direct effect on immune cells is unknown. Here, we used co-cultures to show that human EGC can inhibit the proliferation of activated T lymphocytes. Interestingly, EGC from Crohn's patients were effective at one EGC for two T cells whereas EGC from control patients required a ratio of 1:1. These data suggest that EGC contribute to local immune homeostasis in the gastrointestinal wall. They also raise the possibility that EGC have particular immunosuppressive properties in inflammatory bowel diseases such as Crohn's disease. PMID:27235353

  2. Habitat-specific nutrient removal and release in Oregon salt marshes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  3. Cell-specific nitrogen responses mediate developmental plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Gifford, Miriam L.; Dean, Alexis; Gutierrez, Rodrigo A.; Coruzzi, Gloria M.; Birnbaum, Kenneth D.

    2008-01-01

    The organs of multicellular species consist of cell types that must function together to perform specific tasks. One critical organ function is responding to internal or external change. Some cell-specific responses to changes in environmental conditions are known, but the scale of cell-specific responses within an entire organ as it perceives an environmental flux has not been well characterized in plants or any other multicellular organism. Here, we use cellular profiling of five Arabidopsis root cell types in response to an influx of a critical resource, nitrogen, to uncover a vast and predominantly cell-specific response. We show that cell-specific profiling increases sensitivity several-fold, revealing highly localized regulation of transcripts that were largely hidden from previous global analyses. The cell-specific data revealed responses that suggested a coordinated developmental response in distinct cell types or tissues. One example is the cell-specific regulation of a transcriptional circuit that we showed mediates lateral root outgrowth in response to nitrogen via microRNA167, linking small RNAs to nitrogen responses. Together, these results reveal a previously cryptic component of cell-specific responses to nitrogen. Thus, the results make an important advance in our understanding of how multicellular organisms cope with environmental change at the cell level. PMID:18180456

  4. Induction of tissue-specific stem cells by reprogramming factors, and tissue-specific selection.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, H; Saitoh, I; Tsugata, T; Kataoka, H; Watanabe, M; Noguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Although induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have significant implications for overcoming most of the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells, there are still several unresolved issues related to the use of iPS cells for clinical applications, such as teratoma formation. In this study, we were able to generate tissue-specific stem (induced tissue-specific stem; iTS) cells from the pancreas (iTS-P) or liver (iTS-L) by transient overexpression of reprogramming factors, combined with tissue-specific selection. The generation of iTS cells was easier than that of iPS cells. The iTS-P/iTS-L cells express genetic markers of endoderm and pancreatic/hepatic progenitors and were able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells/hepatocytes more efficiently than ES cells. Subcutaneous transplantation of both types of iTS cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in no teratoma formation. The technology used for the transient overexpression of reprogramming factors and tissue-specific selection may be useful for the generation of other tissue-specific stem cells, and the generation of iTS cells could have important implications for the clinical application of stem cells. PMID:25190146

  5. Induction of tissue-specific stem cells by reprogramming factors, and tissue-specific selection

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi, H; Saitoh, I; Tsugata, T; Kataoka, H; Watanabe, M; Noguchi, Y

    2015-01-01

    Although induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells have significant implications for overcoming most of the ethical issues associated with embryonic stem (ES) cells, there are still several unresolved issues related to the use of iPS cells for clinical applications, such as teratoma formation. In this study, we were able to generate tissue-specific stem (induced tissue-specific stem; iTS) cells from the pancreas (iTS-P) or liver (iTS-L) by transient overexpression of reprogramming factors, combined with tissue-specific selection. The generation of iTS cells was easier than that of iPS cells. The iTS-P/iTS-L cells express genetic markers of endoderm and pancreatic/hepatic progenitors and were able to differentiate into insulin-producing cells/hepatocytes more efficiently than ES cells. Subcutaneous transplantation of both types of iTS cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in no teratoma formation. The technology used for the transient overexpression of reprogramming factors and tissue-specific selection may be useful for the generation of other tissue-specific stem cells, and the generation of iTS cells could have important implications for the clinical application of stem cells. PMID:25190146

  6. Xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C cells remove pyrimidine dimers selectively from the transcribed strand of active genes

    SciTech Connect

    Venema, J.; van Hoffen, A.; Karcagi, V.; Natarajan, A.T.; van Zeeland, A.A.; Mullenders, L.H. )

    1991-08-01

    The authors have measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from DNA fragments of the adenosine deaminase (ADA) and dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) genes in primary normal human and xeroderma pigmentosum complementation group C (XP-C) cells. Using strand-specific probes, we show that in normal cells, preferential repair of the 5{prime} part of the ADA gene is due to the rapid and efficient repair of the transcribed strand. Within 8 h after irradiation with UV at 10 J m-2, 70% of the pyrimidine dimers in this strand are removed. The nontranscribed strand is repaired at a much slower rate, with 30% dimers removed after 8 h. Repair of the transcribed strand in XP-C cells occurs at a rate indistinguishable from that in normal cells, but the nontranscribed strand is not repaired significantly in these cells. Similar results were obtained for the DHFR gene. In the 3{prime} part of the ADA gene, however, both normal and XP-C cells perform fast and efficient repair of either strand, which is likely to be caused by the presence of transcription units on both strands. The factor defective in XP-C cells is apparently involved in the processing of DNA damage in inactive parts of the genome, including nontranscribed strands of active genes. These findings have important implications for the understanding of the mechanism of UV-induced excision repair and mutagenesis in mammalian cells.

  7. Flexible Octopus-Shaped Hydrogel Particles for Specific Cell Capture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lynna; An, Harry Z; Haghgooie, Ramin; Shank, Aaron T; Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet; Doyle, Patrick S

    2016-04-01

    Multiarm hydrogel microparticles with varying geometry are fabricated to specifically capture cells expressing epithelial cell adhesion molecule. Results show that particle shape influences cell-capture efficiency due to differences in surface area, hydrodynamic effects, and steric constraints. These findings can lead to improved particle design for cell separation and diagnostic applications. PMID:26929053

  8. Method for removal of metal atoms from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1992-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells were also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  9. Method for removal of explosives from aqueous solution using suspended plant cells

    DOEpatents

    Jackson, Paul J.; Torres, deceased, Agapito P.; Delhaize, Emmanuel

    1994-01-01

    The use of plant suspension cultures to remove ionic metallic species and TNT-based explosives and their oxidation products from aqueous solution is described. Several plant strains were investigated including D. innoxia, Citrus citrus, and Black Mexican Sweet Corn. All showed significant ability to remove metal ions. Ions removed to sub-ppm levels include barium, iron, and plutonium. D. innoxia cells growing in media containing weapons effluent contaminated with Ba.sup.2+ also remove TNT, other explosives and oxidation products thereof from solution. The use of dead, dehydrated cells was also found to be of use in treating waste directly.

  10. Allergen-Specific CD4(+) T Cells in Human Asthma.

    PubMed

    Ling, Morris F; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-03-01

    In allergic asthma, aeroallergen exposure of sensitized individuals mobilizes robust innate and adaptive airway immune responses, stimulating eosinophilic airway inflammation and the activation and infiltration of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells into the airways. Allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells are thought to be central players in the asthmatic response as they specifically recognize the allergen and initiate and orchestrate the asthmatic inflammatory response. In this article, we briefly review the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in the pathogenesis of human allergic airway inflammation in allergic individuals, discuss the use of allergen-major histocompatibility complex class II tetramers to characterize allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells, and highlight current gaps in knowledge and directions for future research pertaining to the role of allergen-specific CD4(+) T cells in human asthma. PMID:27027948

  11. Effectiveness of two synthetic fiber filters for removing white cells from AS-1 red cells.

    PubMed

    Pikul, F J; Farrar, R P; Boris, M B; Estok, L; Marlo, D; Wildgen, M; Chaplin, H

    1989-09-01

    Two commercially available synthetic fiber filters were studied for their effectiveness at removing white cells (WBCs) from AS-1-preserved red cells (RBCs) stored less than or equal to 14 days. In all, 65 filtrations were performed. An automated microprocessor-controlled hydraulic system designed for use with cellulose acetate fiber filters was employed to prepare filtered RBCs before release for transfusion. Studies were also carried out on polyester fiber filters, which are designed to be used in-line during transfusion. Residual WBCs were below the accurate counting range of Coulter counters and of conventional manual chamber counts. An isosmotic ammonium chloride RBC lysis method, plus a modified chamber counting technique, permitted a 270-fold increase over the number of WBCs counted by the conventional manual method. For the polyester fiber-filtered products, residual WBCs per unit were not affected by speed of filtration, prior length of storage, or mechanical tapping during filtration. The effectiveness of WBC removal (mean 99.7%), total residual WBCs (means, 4.8 and 5.5 x 10(6], and RBC recovery (mean, 93%) was the same for both filters. The majority of residual WBCs were lymphocytes. WBC removal and RBC recovery were strikingly superior to results reported with nonfiltration methods. PMID:2505411

  12. Sex Specification and Heterogeneity of Primordial Germ Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakashita, Akihiko; Kawabata, Yukiko; Jincho, Yuko; Tajima, Shiun; Kumamoto, Soichiro; Kobayashi, Hisato; Matsui, Yasuhisa; Kono, Tomohiro

    2015-01-01

    In mice, primordial germ cells migrate into the genital ridges by embryonic day 13.5 (E13.5), where they are then subjected to a sex-specific fate with female and male primordial germ cells undergoing mitotic arrest and meiosis, respectively. However, the sex-specific basis of primordial germ cell differentiation is poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the sex-specific features of mouse primordial germ cells. We performed RNA-sequencing (seq) of E13.5 female and male mouse primordial germ cells using next-generation sequencing. We identified 651 and 428 differentially expressed transcripts (>2-fold, P < 0.05) in female and male primordial germ cells, respectively. Of these, many transcription factors were identified. Gene ontology and network analysis revealed differing functions of the identified female- and male-specific genes that were associated with primordial germ cell acquisition of sex-specific properties required for differentiation into germ cells. Furthermore, DNA methylation and ChIP-seq analysis of histone modifications showed that hypomethylated gene promoter regions were bound with H3K4me3 and H3K27me3. Our global transcriptome data showed that in mice, primordial germ cells are decisively assigned to a sex-specific differentiation program by E13.5, which is necessary for the development of vital germ cells. PMID:26700643

  13. Mechanisms regulating dendritic cell specification and development

    PubMed Central

    Watowich, Stephanie S.; Liu, Yong-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Summary Understanding the diversification of dendritic cell (DC) lineages is one of the last frontiers in mapping the developmental hierarchy of the hematopoietic system. DCs are a vital link between the innate and adaptive immune responses, thus elucidating their developmental pathways is crucial for insight into the generation of natural immunity and for learning how to regulate DCs in clinical settings. DCs arise from hematopoietic stem cells through specialized progenitor subsets under the direction of FMS-like tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt3L) and Flt3L receptor (Flt3) signaling. Recent studies have revealed important contributions from granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and type I interferons (IFNs) in vivo. Furthermore, DC development is guided by lineage-restricted transcription factors such as IRF8, E2-2, and Batf3. A critical question centers on how cytokines and lineage-restricted transcription factors operate molecularly to direct DC diversification. Here we review recent findings that provide new insight into the DC developmental process. PMID:20969586

  14. Birthdating studies reshape models for pituitary gland cell specification.

    PubMed

    Davis, Shannon W; Mortensen, Amanda H; Camper, Sally A

    2011-04-15

    The intermediate and anterior lobes of the pituitary gland are derived from an invagination of oral ectoderm that forms Rathke's pouch. During gestation proliferating cells are enriched around the pouch lumen, and they appear to delaminate as they exit the cell cycle and differentiate. During late mouse gestation and the postnatal period, anterior lobe progenitors re-enter the cell cycle and expand the populations of specialized, hormone-producing cells. At birth, all cell types are present, and their localization appears stratified based on cell type. We conducted a birth dating study of Rathke's pouch derivatives to determine whether the location of specialized cells at birth is correlated with the timing of cell cycle exit. We find that all of the anterior lobe cell types initiate differentiation concurrently with a peak between e11.5 and e13.5. Differentiation of intermediate lobe melanotropes is delayed relative to anterior lobe cell types. We discovered that specialized cell types are not grouped together based on birth date and are dispersed throughout the anterior lobe. Thus, the apparent stratification of specialized cells at birth is not correlated with cell cycle exit. Thus, the currently popular model of cell specification, dependent upon timing of extrinsic, directional gradients of signaling molecules, needs revision. We propose that signals intrinsic to Rathke's pouch are necessary for cell specification between e11.5 and e13.5 and that cell-cell communication likely plays an important role in regulating this process. PMID:21262217

  15. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains

    PubMed Central

    LoVerso, Peter R.; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  16. Cell type-specific transcriptome profiling in mammalian brains.

    PubMed

    LoVerso, Peter R; Cui, Feng

    2016-01-01

    A mammalian brain contains numerous types of cells. Advances in neuroscience in the past decade allow us to identify and isolate neural cells of interest from mammalian brains. Recent developments in high-throughput technologies, such as microarrays and next-generation sequencing (NGS), provide detailed information on gene expression in pooled cells on a genomic scale. As a result, many novel genes have been found critical in cell type-specific transcriptional regulation. These differentially expressed genes can be used as molecular signatures, unique to a particular class of neural cells. Use of this gene expression-based approach can further differentiate neural cell types into subtypes, potentially linking some of them with neurological diseases. In this article, experimental techniques used to purify neural cells are described, followed by a review on recent microarray- or NGS-based transcriptomic studies of common neural cell types. The future prospects of cell type-specific research are also discussed. PMID:27100485

  17. The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cooling, Michael T; Hunter, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The CellML Metadata Framework 2.0 is a modular framework that describes how semantic annotations should be made about mathematical models encoded in the CellML (www.cellml.org) format, and their elements. In addition to the Core specification, there are several satellite specifications, each designed to cater for model annotation in a different context. Basic Model Information, Citation, License and Biological Annotation specifications are presented. PMID:26528558

  18. Organ-Specific and Memory Treg Cells: Specificity, Development, Function, and Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Iris K.; Campbell, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential for establishing and maintaining self-tolerance, and also inhibit immune responses to innocuous environmental antigens. Imbalances and dysfunction in Treg cells lead to a variety of immune-mediated diseases, as deficits in Treg cell function contribute to the development autoimmune disease and pathological tissue damage, whereas overabundance of Treg cells can promote chronic infection and tumorigenesis. Recent studies have highlighted the fact that Treg cells themselves are a diverse collection of phenotypically and functionally specialized populations, with distinct developmental origins, antigen-specificities, tissue-tropisms, and homeostatic requirements. The signals directing the differentiation of these populations, their specificities and the mechanisms by which they combine to promote organ-specific and systemic tolerance, and how they embody the emerging property of regulatory memory are the focus of this review. PMID:25076948

  19. Marker-specific sorting of rare cells using dielectrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyuan; Bessette, Paul H.; Qian, Jiangrong; Meinhart, Carl D.; Daugherty, Patrick S.; Soh, Hyongsok T.

    2005-01-01

    Current techniques in high-speed cell sorting are limited by the inherent coupling among three competing parameters of performance: throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. Microfluidics provides an alternate strategy to decouple these parameters through the use of arrayed devices that operate in parallel. To efficiently isolate rare cells from complex mixtures, an electrokinetic sorting methodology was developed that exploits dielectrophoresis (DEP) in microfluidic channels. In this approach, the dielectrophoretic amplitude response of rare target cells is modulated by labeling cells with particles that differ in polarization response. Cell mixtures were interrogated in the DEP-activated cell sorter in a continuous-flow manner, wherein the electric fields were engineered to achieve efficient separation between the dielectrophoretically labeled and unlabeled cells. To demonstrate the efficiency of marker-specific cell separation, DEP-activated cell sorting (DACS) was applied for affinity-based enrichment of rare bacteria expressing a specific surface marker from an excess of nontarget bacteria that do not express this marker. Rare target cells were enriched by >200-fold in a single round of sorting at a single-channel throughput of 10,000 cells per second. DACS offers the potential for automated, surface marker-specific cell sorting in a disposable format that is capable of simultaneously achieving high throughput, purity, and rare cell recovery. PMID:16236724

  20. Cell type-specific bipolar cell input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Neumann, S; Hüser, L; Ondreka, K; Auler, N; Haverkamp, S

    2016-03-01

    Many distinct ganglion cell types, which are the output elements of the retina, were found to encode for specific features of a visual scene such as contrast, color information or movement. The detailed composition of retinal circuits leading to this tuning of retinal ganglion cells, however, is apart from some prominent examples, largely unknown. Here we aimed to investigate if ganglion cell types in the mouse retina receive selective input from specific bipolar cell types or if they sample their synaptic input non-selectively from all bipolar cell types stratifying within their dendritic tree. To address this question we took an anatomical approach and immunolabeled retinae of two transgenic mouse lines (GFP-O and JAM-B) with markers for ribbon synapses and type 2 bipolar cells. We morphologically identified all green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing ganglion cell types, which co-stratified with type 2 bipolar cells and assessed the total number of bipolar input synapses and the proportion of synapses deriving from type 2 bipolar cells. Only JAM-B ganglion cells received synaptic input preferentially from bipolar cell types other than type 2 bipolar cells whereas the other analyzed ganglion cell types sampled their bipolar input most likely from all bipolar cell terminals within their dendritic arbor. PMID:26751712

  1. Integrated Droplet-Based Microextraction with ESI-MS for Removal of Matrix Interference in Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Chao; Wei, Zhen-Wei; Gong, Xiao-Yun; Si, Xing-Yu; Zhao, Yao-Yao; Yang, Cheng-Dui; Zhang, Si-Chun; Zhang, Xin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Integrating droplet-based microfluidics with mass spectrometry is essential to high-throughput and multiple analysis of single cells. Nevertheless, matrix effects such as the interference of culture medium and intracellular components influence the sensitivity and the accuracy of results in single-cell analysis. To resolve this problem, we developed a method that integrated droplet-based microextraction with single-cell mass spectrometry. Specific extraction solvent was used to selectively obtain intracellular components of interest and remove interference of other components. Using this method, UDP-Glc-NAc, GSH, GSSG, AMP, ADP and ATP were successfully detected in single MCF-7 cells. We also applied the method to study the change of unicellular metabolites in the biological process of dysfunctional oxidative phosphorylation. The method could not only realize matrix-free, selective and sensitive detection of metabolites in single cells, but also have the capability for reliable and high-throughput single-cell analysis. PMID:27126222

  2. Mucorales-Specific T Cells in Patients with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Forghieri, Fabio; Candoni, Anna; Cesaro, Simone; Quadrelli, Chiara; Maertens, Johan; Rossi, Giulio; Morselli, Monica; Codeluppi, Mauro; Mussini, Cristina; Colaci, Elisabetta; Messerotti, Andrea; Paolini, Ambra; Maccaferri, Monica; Fantuzzi, Valeria; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Stefani, Alessandro; Morandi, Uliano; Maffei, Rossana; Marasca, Roberto; Narni, Franco; Fanin, Renato; Comoli, Patrizia; Romani, Luigina; Beauvais, Anne; Viale, Pier Luigi; Latgè, Jean Paul; Luppi, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Invasive mucormycosis (IM) is an emerging life-threatening fungal infection. It is difficult to obtain a definite diagnosis and to initiate timely intervention. Mucorales-specific T cells occur during the course of IM and are involved in the clearance of the infection. We have evaluated the feasibility of detecting Mucorales-specific T cells in hematological patients at risk for IM, and have correlated the detection of such cells with the clinical conditions of the patients. Methods and Findings By using an enzyme linked immunospot assay, the presence of Mucorales-specific T cells in peripheral blood (PB) samples has been investigated at three time points during high-dose chemotherapy for hematologic malignancies. Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-γ, interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 were analysed in order to detect a correlation between the immune response and the clinical picture. Twenty-one (10.3%) of 204 patients, accounting for 32 (5.3%) of 598 PB samples, tested positive for Mucorales-specific T cells. Two groups could be identified. Group 1, including 15 patients without signs or symptoms of invasive fungal diseases (IFD), showed a predominance of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interferon-gamma. Group 2 included 6 patients with a clinical picture consistent with invasive fungal disease (IFD): 2 cases of proven IM and 4 cases of possible IFD. The proven patients had significantly higher number of Mucorales-specific T cells producing interleukin-10 and interleukin-4 and higher rates of positive samples by using derived diagnostic cut-offs when compared with the 15 patients without IFD. Conclusions Mucorales-specific T cells can be detected and monitored in patients with hematologic malignancies at risk for IM. Mucorales-specific T cells polarized to the production of T helper type 2 cytokines are associated with proven IM and may be evaluated as a surrogate diagnostic marker for IM. PMID:26871570

  3. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... tank car tanks designed to be removed from car structure for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300 General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

  4. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... tank car tanks designed to be removed from car structure for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300 General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

  5. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... tank car tanks designed to be removed from car structure for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300 General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

  6. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... tank car tanks designed to be removed from car structure for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and...) SPECIFICATIONS FOR TANK CARS Specifications for Multi-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300 General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

  7. Tissue Specific Heterogeneity in Effector Immune Cell Response

    PubMed Central

    Tufail, Saba; Badrealam, Khan Farheen; Sherwani, Asif; Gupta, Umesh D.; Owais, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Post pathogen invasion, migration of effector T-cell subsets to specific tissue locations is of prime importance for generation of robust immune response. Effector T cells are imprinted with distinct “homing codes” (adhesion molecules and chemokine receptors) during activation which regulate their targeted trafficking to specific tissues. Internal cues in the lymph node microenvironment along with external stimuli from food (vitamin A) and sunlight (vitamin D3) prime dendritic cells, imprinting them to play centre stage in the induction of tissue tropism in effector T cells. B cells as well, in a manner similar to effector T cells, exhibit tissue-tropic migration. In this review, we have focused on the factors regulating the generation and migration of effector T cells to various tissues along with giving an overview of tissue tropism in B cells. PMID:23986763

  8. Sertoli cells secrete both testis-specific and serum proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, W W; Musto, N A; Mather, J P; Bardin, C W

    1981-01-01

    The secretions of the Sertoli cell were examined with two polyvalent antisera--one prepared against proteins in rat serum and the other against testis-specific proteins in rete testis fluid. These antisera detected 12 serum and 9 testis-specific proteins in rete testis fluid. To determine the origin of these proteins, primary cultures enriched in Sertoli cells were incubated with [35S]methionine, and the radiolabeled proteins in the medium were immunoprecipitated. Gel electrophoresis of the two immunoprecipitates resolved eight serum and nine testis-specific proteins. These two sets of proteins were specifically bound to their respective antiserum and were immunologically distinct. Medium from Sertoli cell cultures contained 10 times more of the testis-specific proteins than did cultures enriched for testicular myoid or interstitial cells. The concentration of the serum proteins in Sertoli cell medium was 5 and 10 times greater, respectively, than in myoid or interstitial cell preparations. The proteins from Sertoli cells were next characterized on two-dimensional gels. Seven of the proteins recognized by antiserum against serum proteins had identical molecular weights and isoelectric points as serum proteins. Three of these proteins were ceruloplasmin, transferrin, and glycoprotein 2. In addition to the proteins immunoprecipitated by the two antisera, more than 60 other proteins were detected on two-dimensional gels of the total secretory proteins. We conclude that the Sertoli cell secretes many proteins, some of which are specific to the testis and others of which are similar to serum proteins. Images PMID:6950398

  9. An association between antibodies specific for endothelial cells and renal transplant failure.

    PubMed

    Perrey, C; Brenchley, P E; Johnson, R W; Martin, S

    1998-06-01

    Human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-specific antibodies, present at the time of transplant, cause renal transplant rejection but cases of rejection of HLA-identical renal transplants indicate that antibodies to non-HLA antigens may also be detrimental. There is increasing evidence that antibodies to antigens present on endothelial cells and monocytes, and on endothelial cells alone, are associated with transplant rejection. We investigated 105 patients with failed renal transplants for the presence of endothelial cell reactive antibodies and compared them with 94 successful transplant patients to determine the role of non-HLA antibodies in transplant failure. Patient sera were tested by enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) using as a target fixed cells either from the endothelial/epithelial cell line EAHy.926 or primary cultures of human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Antibody binding was detected using an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated anti-human immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody. Fourteen of the 105 failed transplant patients had endothelial cell-reactive antibodies as compared with only three of the 94 patients with successful transplants (Fisher's exact test, p = 0.02). Antibody-positive sera were absorbed with the epithelial cell line A549 to remove antibodies directed against the epithelial component of EAHy.926 and with a pool of lymphoblastoid cell line cells to remove HLA-specific antibodies. Absorption did not reduce antibody activity showing the antibodies to be directed against endothelial cell determinants. Antibody-positive sera were also tested by flow cytometry against the monocyte cell line THP-1 and 13 of the 14 patients were negative. In conclusion, we have demonstrated the presence of IgG antibodies directed against endothelial cell determinants in renal transplant recipients in association with renal transplant failure. PMID:9777698

  10. The selection and function of cell type-specific enhancers.

    PubMed

    Heinz, Sven; Romanoski, Casey E; Benner, Christopher; Glass, Christopher K

    2015-03-01

    The human body contains several hundred cell types, all of which share the same genome. In metazoans, much of the regulatory code that drives cell type-specific gene expression is located in distal elements called enhancers. Although mammalian genomes contain millions of potential enhancers, only a small subset of them is active in a given cell type. Cell type-specific enhancer selection involves the binding of lineage-determining transcription factors that prime enhancers. Signal-dependent transcription factors bind to primed enhancers, which enables these broadly expressed factors to regulate gene expression in a cell type-specific manner. The expression of genes that specify cell type identity and function is associated with densely spaced clusters of active enhancers known as super-enhancers. The functions of enhancers and super-enhancers are influenced by, and affect, higher-order genomic organization. PMID:25650801

  11. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Preface Endothelial cells lining blood vessel capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establish specialized vascular niches that deploy specific sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors, which actively participate in inducing, specifying, patterning, and guiding organ regeneration and maintaining homeostasis and metabolism. Angiocrine factors upregulated in response to injury orchestrates self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific repopulating resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the precise mechanisms whereby physiological-levels of angiocrine factors are spatially and temporally produced, and distributed by organotypic endothelium to repopulating cells, will lay the foundation for driving organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  12. Isolating specific embryonic cells of the sea urchin by FACS.

    PubMed

    Juliano, Celina; Swartz, S Zachary; Wessel, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Isolating cells based on specific gene expression enables a focused biochemical and molecular analysis. While cultured cells and hematopoietic cells, for example, are routinely isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS), early embryonic cells are a relatively untapped source for FACS applications often because the embryos of many animals are quite limiting. Furthermore, many applications require genetic model organisms in which cells can be labeled by fluorescent transgenes, or antibodies against cell surface antigens. Here we define conditions in the sea urchin embryo for isolation of embryonic cells based on expression of specific proteins. We use the sea urchin embryo for which a nearly unlimited supply of embryonic cells is available and demonstrate the conditions for separation of the embryo into single cells, fixation of the cells for antibody penetration into the cells, and conditions for FACS of a rare cell type in the embryo. This protocol may be adapted for analysis of mRNA, chromatin, protein, or carbohydrates and depends only on the probe availability for the cell of interest. We anticipate that this protocol will be broadly applicable to embryos of other species. PMID:24567215

  13. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell has been designed and tested to deliver high capacity at a C/1.5 discharge rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet made at a discharge rate this high in the 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters, performance, and future test plans are described.

  14. Organ-specific features of natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fu-Dong; Ljunggren, Hans-Gustaf; La Cava, Antonio; Van Kaer, Luc

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can be swiftly mobilized by danger signals and are among the earliest arrivals at target organs of disease. However, the role of NK cells in mounting inflammatory responses is often complex and sometimes paradoxical. Here, we examine the divergent phenotypic and functional features of NK cells, as deduced largely from experimental mouse models of pathophysiological responses in the liver, mucosal tissues, uterus, pancreas, joints and brain. Moreover, we discuss how organ-specific factors, the local microenvironment and unique cellular interactions may influence the organ-specific properties of NK cells. PMID:21941294

  15. Heparin induces the expression of specific matrix proteins by human intestinal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, D.L.; Perr, H.; Graham, M.F.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells have recently been identified as the major cell type responsible for stricture formation in Crohn's disease. Heparin, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to be a key modulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth both in vivo and in vitro and to affect the phenotypic expression of proteins made by VSMC. Heparin has also been shown to effect the growth of HISM cells and in this report the authors demonstrate that heparin also has very specific effects on proteins released by HISM cells in vitro. Examination of the proteins in the culture medium of heparin-treated HISM cells observed at 3 time points following sparse plating and proliferation revealed an increase in /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled 200, 37, and 35 kd proteins. A transient effect on a 48 kd protein was observed in substrate-attached material left on the culture dish after the cells were removed with EGTA. No effects on intracellular labeled proteins could be demonstrated. The protein phenotype of HISM cells exposed to heparin appears very similar to that observed in VSMC. The release of specific proteins following exposure to heparin does not appear to be species specific. This response to heparin may reflect a significant influence of this glycosaminoglycan on the phenotypic expression of these cells.

  16. Cell-specific translational profiling in acute kidney injury

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Krautzberger, A. Michaela; Sui, Shannan H.; Hofmann, Oliver M.; Chen, Ying; Baetscher, Manfred; Grgic, Ivica; Kumar, Sanjeev; Humphreys, Benjamin; Hide, Winston A.; McMahon, Andrew P.

    2014-01-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) promotes an abrupt loss of kidney function that results in substantial morbidity and mortality. Considerable effort has gone toward identification of diagnostic biomarkers and analysis of AKI-associated molecular events; however, most studies have adopted organ-wide approaches and have not elucidated the interplay among different cell types involved in AKI pathophysiology. To better characterize AKI-associated molecular and cellular events, we developed a mouse line that enables the identification of translational profiles in specific cell types. This strategy relies on CRE recombinase–dependent activation of an EGFP-tagged L10a ribosomal protein subunit, which allows translating ribosome affinity purification (TRAP) of mRNA populations in CRE-expressing cells. Combining this mouse line with cell type–specific CRE-driver lines, we identified distinct cellular responses in an ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI) model of AKI. Twenty-four hours following IRI, distinct translational signatures were identified in the nephron, kidney interstitial cell populations, vascular endothelium, and macrophages/monocytes. Furthermore, TRAP captured known IRI-associated markers, validating this approach. Biological function annotation, canonical pathway analysis, and in situ analysis of identified response genes provided insight into cell-specific injury signatures. Our study provides a deep, cell-based view of early injury-associated molecular events in AKI and documents a versatile, genetic tool to monitor cell-specific and temporal-specific biological processes in disease modeling. PMID:24569379

  17. A comparison of simultaneous organic carbon and nitrogen removal in microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Abid; Manuel, Michelle; Tartakovsky, Boris

    2016-05-15

    This study demonstrates simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal in laboratory-scale continuous flow microbial fuel cell (MFC) and microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and provides side-by side comparison of these bioelectrochemical systems. The maximum organic carbon removal rates in MFC and MEC tests were similar at 5.1 g L(-1) d(-1) and 4.16 g L(-1) d(-1), respectively, with a near 100% carbon removal efficiency at an organic load of 3.3 g L(-1) d(-1). An ammonium removal efficiency of 30-55% with near-zero nitrite and nitrate concentrations was observed in the MFC operated at an optimal external resistance, while open-circuit MFC operation resulted in a reduced carbon and ammonium removal of 53% and 21%, respectively. In the MEC ammonium removal was limited to 7-12% under anaerobic conditions, while micro-aerobic conditions increased the removal efficiency to 31%. Also, at zero applied voltage both carbon and ammonium removal efficiencies were reduced to 42% and 4%, respectively. Based on the observed performance under different operating conditions, it was concluded that simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal was facilitated by concurrent anaerobic and aerobic biotransformation pathways at the anode and cathode, which balanced bioelectrochemical nitrification and denitrification reactions. PMID:26950500

  18. Parametric Study to Characterize Low Activity Waste Tank Heat Removal Alternatives for Phase 1 Specification Development

    SciTech Connect

    GRENARD, C.E.

    2000-09-11

    Alternative for removing heat from Phase 1, low-activity waste feed double-shell tanks using the ventilation systems have been analyzed for Phase 1 waste feed delivery. The analysis was a parametric study using a model that predicted the waste temperatures for a range of primary and annulus ventilation system flow rates. The analysis was performed to determine the ventilation flow required to prevent the waste temperature from exceeding the Limiting Conditions for Operation limits during normal operation and the Safety Limits during off-normal events.

  19. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  20. Galectin-1 Regulates Tissue Exit of Specific Dendritic Cell Populations*

    PubMed Central

    Thiemann, Sandra; Man, Jeanette H.; Chang, Margaret H.; Lee, Benhur; Baum, Linda G.

    2015-01-01

    During inflammation, dendritic cells emigrate from inflamed tissue across the lymphatic endothelium into the lymphatic vasculature and travel to regional lymph nodes to initiate immune responses. However, the processes that regulate dendritic cell tissue egress and migration across the lymphatic endothelium are not well defined. The mammalian lectin galectin-1 is highly expressed by vascular endothelial cells in inflamed tissue and has been shown to regulate immune cell tissue entry into inflamed tissue. Here, we show that galectin-1 is also highly expressed by human lymphatic endothelial cells, and deposition of galectin-1 in extracellular matrix selectively regulates migration of specific human dendritic cell subsets. The presence of galectin-1 inhibits migration of immunogenic dendritic cells through the extracellular matrix and across lymphatic endothelial cells, but it has no effect on migration of tolerogenic dendritic cells. The major galectin-1 counter-receptor on both dendritic cell populations is the cell surface mucin CD43; differential core 2 O-glycosylation of CD43 between immunogenic dendritic cells and tolerogenic dendritic cells appears to contribute to the differential effect of galectin-1 on migration. Binding of galectin-1 to immunogenic dendritic cells reduces phosphorylation and activity of the protein-tyrosine kinase Pyk2, an effect that may also contribute to reduced migration of this subset. In a murine lymphedema model, galectin-1−/− animals had increased numbers of migratory dendritic cells in draining lymph nodes, specifically dendritic cells with an immunogenic phenotype. These findings define a novel role for galectin-1 in inhibiting tissue emigration of immunogenic, but not tolerogenic, dendritic cells, providing an additional mechanism by which galectin-1 can dampen immune responses. PMID:26216879

  1. Gas block mechanism for water removal in fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Issacci, Farrokh; Rehg, Timothy J.

    2004-02-03

    The present invention is directed to apparatus and method for cathode-side disposal of water in an electrochemical fuel cell. There is a cathode plate. Within a surface of the plate is a flow field comprised of interdigitated channels. During operation of the fuel cell, cathode gas flows by convection through a gas diffusion layer above the flow field. Positioned at points adjacent to the flow field are one or more porous gas block mediums that have pores sized such that water is sipped off to the outside of the flow field by capillary flow and cathode gas is blocked from flowing through the medium. On the other surface of the plate is a channel in fluid communication with each porous gas block mediums. The method for water disposal in a fuel cell comprises installing the cathode plate assemblies at the cathode sides of the stack of fuel cells and manifolding the single water channel of each of the cathode plate assemblies to the coolant flow that feeds coolant plates in the stack.

  2. Engineering Human Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Grafts That Are Depleted of Naïve T Cells and Retain Functional Pathogen-Specific Memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Bleakley, Marie; Heimfeld, Shelly; Jones, Lori A.; Turtle, Cameron; Riddell, Stanley R.; Shlomchik, Warren

    2014-01-01

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is a frequent major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). The development of approaches that selectively deplete T cells that cause GVHD from allogeneic stem cell grafts and preserve T cells specific for pathogens may improve HCT outcomes. It has been hypothesized that the majority of T cells that can cause GVHD reside within the naïve T cell (TN) subset, and previous studies performed in mouse models and with human cells in vitro support this hypothesis. As a prelude to translating these findings to the clinic, we developed and evaluated a novel, two-step, clinically compliant procedure for manipulating peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) to remove TN, preserve CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells, and provide for a fixed dose of memory T cells (TM) that includes T cells with specificity for common opportunistic pathogens encountered after HCT. Our studies demonstrate effective and reproducible performance of the immunomagnetic cell selection procedure for depleting TN. Moreover, after cell processing the CD45RA-depleted PBSC products are enriched for CD4+ and CD8+ TM with a central memory phenotype and contain TM cells that are capable of proliferating and producing effector cytokines in response to opportunistic pathogens. PMID:24525279

  3. Cell-Specific Multifunctional Processing of Heterogeneous Cell Systems in a Single Laser Pulse Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Mutonga, Martin B. G.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    Current methods of cell processing for gene and cell therapies use several separate procedures for gene transfer and cell separation or elimination, because no current technology can offer simultaneous multi-functional processing of specific cell sub-sets in highly heterogeneous cell systems. Using the cell-specific generation of plasmonic nanobubbles of different sizes around cell-targeted gold nanoshells and nanospheres, we achieved simultaneous multifunctional cell-specific processing in a rapid single 70 ps laser pulse bulk treatment of heterogeneous cell suspension. This method supported the detection of cells, delivery of external molecular cargo to one type of cells and the concomitant destruction of another type of cells without damaging other cells in suspension, and real-time guidance of the two above cellular effects. PMID:23167546

  4. Multilayered specification of the T-cell lineage fate

    PubMed Central

    Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Zhang, Jingli; Li, Long

    2010-01-01

    Summary T-cell development from stem cells has provided a highly accessible and detailed view of the regulatory processes that can go into the choice of a cell fate in a postembryonic, stem cell-based system. But, it has been a view from the outside. The problems in understanding the regulatory basis for this lineage choice begin with the fact that too many transcription factors are needed to provide crucial input: without any one of them, T-cell development fails. Furthermore, almost all the factors known to provide crucial functions during the climax of T-lineage commitment itself are also vital for earlier functions that establish the pool of multilineage precursors that would normally feed into the T-cell specification process. When the regulatory genes that encode them are mutated, the confounding effects on earlier stages make it difficult to dissect T-cell specification genetically. Yet both the positive and the negative regulatory events involved in the choice of a T-cell fate are actually a mosaic of distinct functions. New evidence has emerged recently that finally provides a way to separate the major components that fit together to drive this process. Here, we review insights into T-cell specification and commitment that emerge from a combination of molecular, cellular, and systems biology approaches. The results reveal the regulatory structure underlying this lineage decision. PMID:20969591

  5. Modeling BOD removal in constructed wetlands with mixing cell method

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S.; Wang, G.T.; Xue, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    A new concept, transport detention time, is proposed in this paper to describe solute-transport processes. Using this concept, a new mathematical model was developed to describe biochemical oxygen demand removal in constructed wetlands. By treating a constructed wetland as a series of continuous stir tank reactors, an nth-order ordinary differential equation was derived based on the principle of mass balance and convective-dispersive equation and by introducing transfer function and Laplace transform. The number of continuous stir tank reactors of a particular wetland was determined by the parameters, such as dispersion coefficient and flow velocity, occurring in the wetland. Two examples were presented to illustrate the applications of the model. Moment method and a combination of moment and optimization methods were used to estimate the model parameters from tracer experiment data. A comparison between the model presented in this paper and the currently used plug-flow-constructed wetland model indicated that the former was more accurate. Additionally, this model can be applied to transient conditions, is theoretically sound, and represents a theoretical advance in constructed wetland research.

  6. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  7. Circulating tumor cell detection using carbon nanotube devices: specific versus non-specific interactions

    PubMed Central

    King, Benjamin C.; Burkhead, Thomas; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress certain surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines are tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s causes significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes.

  8. pH-dependent ammonia removal pathways in microbial fuel cell system.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Lee, Hyeryeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2016-09-01

    In this work, ammonia removal paths in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) under different initial pH conditions (pH 7.0, 8.0, and 8.6) were investigated. At a neutral pH condition (pH 7.0), MFC used an electrical energy of 27.4% and removed 23.3% of total ammonia by electrochemical pathway for 192h. At the identical pH condition, 36.1% of the total ammonia was also removed by the biological path suspected to be biological ammonia oxidation process (e.g., Anammox). With the initial pH increased, the electrochemical removal efficiency decreased to less than 5.0%, while the biological removal efficiency highly increased to 61.8%. In this study, a neutral pH should be maintained in the anode to utilize MFCs for ammonia recovery via electrochemical pathways from wastewater stream. PMID:27090407

  9. Angiocrine functions of organ-specific endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Shahin; Butler, Jason M; Ding, Bi-Sen

    2016-01-21

    Endothelial cells that line capillaries are not just passive conduits for delivering blood. Tissue-specific endothelium establishes specialized vascular niches that deploy sets of growth factors, known as angiocrine factors. These cues participate actively in the induction, specification, patterning and guidance of organ regeneration, as well as in the maintainance of homeostasis and metabolism. When upregulated following injury, they orchestrate self-renewal and differentiation of tissue-specific resident stem and progenitor cells into functional organs. Uncovering the mechanisms by which organotypic endothelium distributes physiological levels of angiocrine factors both spatially and temporally will lay the foundation for clinical trials that promote organ repair without scarring. PMID:26791722

  10. Removing the mustard oil bomb from seeds: transgenic ablation of myrosin cells in oilseed rape (Brassica napus) produces MINELESS seeds

    PubMed Central

    Borgen, Birgit Hafeld; Thangstad, Ole Petter; Ahuja, Ishita; Rossiter, John Trevor; Bones, Atle Magnar

    2010-01-01

    Many plant phytochemicals constitute binary enzyme–glucoside systems and function in plant defence. In brassicas, the enzyme myrosinase is confined to specific myrosin cells that separate the enzyme from its substrate; the glucosinolates. The myrosinase-catalysed release of toxic and bioactive compounds such as isothiocyanates, upon activation or tissue damage, has been termed ‘the mustard oil bomb’ and characterized as a ‘toxic mine’ in plant defence. The removal of myrosin cells and the enzyme that triggers the release of phytochemicals have been investigated by genetically modifying Brassica napus plants to remove myrosinase-storing idioblasts. A construct with the seed myrosin cell-specific Myr1.Bn1 promoter was used to express a ribonuclease, barnase. Transgenic plants ectopically expressing barnase were embryo lethal. Co-expressing barnase under the control of the Myr1.Bn1 promoter with the barnase inhibitor, barstar, under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S promoter enabled a selective and controlled death of myrosin cells without affecting plant viability. Ablation of myrosin cells was confirmed with light and electron microscopy, with immunohistological analysis and immunogold-electron microscopy analysis showing empty holes where myrosin cells normally are localized. Further evidence for a successful myrosin cell ablation comes from immunoblots showing absence of myrosinase and negligible myrosinase activity, and autolysis experiments showing negligible production of glucosinolate hydrolysis products. The plants where the myrosin defence cells have been ablated and named ‘MINELESS plants’. The epithiospecifier protein profile and glucosinolate levels were changed in MINELESS plants, pointing to localization of myrosinases and a 35 kDa epithiospecifier protein in myrosin cells and a reduced turnover of glucosinolates in MINELESS plants. PMID:20219777

  11. Overexpression of apoptotic cell removal receptor MERTK in alveolar macrophages of cigarette smokers.

    PubMed

    Kazeros, Angeliki; Harvey, Ben-Gary; Carolan, Brendan J; Vanni, Holly; Krause, Anja; Crystal, Ronald G

    2008-12-01

    Mononuclear phagocytes play an important role in the removal of apoptotic cells by expressing cell surface receptors that recognize and remove apoptotic cells. Based on the knowledge that cigarette smoking is associated with increased lung cell turnover, we hypothesized that alveolar macrophages (AMs) of normal cigarette smokers may exhibit enhanced expression of apoptotic cell removal receptor genes. AMs obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage of normal nonsmokers (n = 11) and phenotypic normal smokers (n = 13; 36 +/- 6 pack-years) were screened for mRNA expression of all known apoptotic cell removal receptors using Affymetrix HG-U133 Plus 2.0 microarray chips with TaqMan RT-PCR confirmation. Of the 14 known apoptotic receptors expressed, only MER tyrosine kinase (MERTK), a transmembrane tyrosine kinase receptor, was significantly up-regulated in smokers. MERTK expression was then assessed in AMs of smokers versus nonsmokers by TaqMan RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, Western analysis, and flow analysis. Smoker AMs had up-regulation of MERTK mRNA levels (smoker vs. nonsmoker: 3.6-fold by microarray, P < 0.003; 9.5-fold by TaqMan RT-PCR, P < 0.02). Immunocytochemistry demonstrated a qualitative increase in MERTK protein expression on AMs of smokers. Increased protein expression of MERTK on AMs of smokers was confirmed by Western and flow analyses (P < 0.007 and P < 0.0002, respectively). MERTK, a cell surface receptor that recognizes apoptotic cells, is expressed on human AMs, and its expression is up-regulated in AMs of cigarette smokers. This up-regulation of MERTK may reflect an increased demand for removal of apoptotic cells in smokers, an observation with implications for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, a disorder associated with dysregulated apoptosis of lung parenchymal cells. PMID:18587056

  12. Control of NKT cell differentiation by tissue-specific microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ueno, Aito; Bao, Min; Wang, Zhongying; Im, Jin Seon; Porcelli, Steven; Yoon, Ji-Won

    2003-12-01

    CD1d-restricted Valpha14 NKT cells play an important role in both Th1- and Th2-type immune responses. To determine whether NKT cells develop two functionally distinct subsets that provoke different types of responses, we examined the phenotypes and cellular functions of NK1.1(+) and DX5(+) T cells. We found that both NK1.1(+) and DX5(+) T cells are CD1d-restricted Valpha14 T cells with identical Ag specificities, phenotypes, tissue locations, and functions. Similar to the NK1.1 marker, the DX5 marker (CD49b) is expressed on mature NKT cells in both NK1.1 allele-positive and allele-negative strains. However, when NK1.1(+) and DX5(+) NKT cells isolated from different tissues were compared, we found that thymic and splenic NKT cells differed not only in their cytokine profiles, but also in their phenotype and requirements for costimulatory signals. Thymic NKT cells displayed the phenotype of activated T cells and could be fully activated by TCR ligation. In contrast, splenic NKT cells displayed the phenotype of memory T cells and required a costimulatory signal for activation. Furthermore, the function and phenotype of thymic and splenic NKT cells were modulated by APCs from various tissues that expressed different levels of costimulatory molecules. Modulation of NKT cell function and differentiation may be mediated by synergic effects of costimulatory molecules on the surface of APCs. The results of the present study suggest that the costimulatory signals of tissue-specific APCs are key factors for NKT cell differentiation, and these signals cannot be replaced by anti-CD28 or anti-CD40 ligand Abs. PMID:14634102

  13. Performance and recent improvement in microbial fuel cells for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal: A review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Haishu; Xu, Shengjun; Zhuang, Guoqiang; Zhuang, Xuliang

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have become a promising technology for wastewater treatment accompanying electricity generation. Carbon and nitrogen removal can be achieved by utilizing the electron transfer between the anode and cathode in an MFC. However, large-scale power production and high removal efficiency must be achieved at a low cost to make MFCs practical and economically competitive in the future. This article reviews the principles, feasibility and bottlenecks of MFCs for simultaneous carbon and nitrogen removal, the recent advances and prospective strategies for performance improvement, as well as the involved microbes and electron transfer mechanisms. PMID:26899662

  14. Distinct interactions select and maintain a specific cell fate

    PubMed Central

    Dončić, Andreas; Falleur-Fettig, Melody; Skotheim, Jan M.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to specify and maintain discrete cell fates is essential for development. However, the dynamics underlying selection and stability of distinct cell types remains poorly understood. Here, we provide a quantitative single-cell analysis of commitment dynamics during the mating-mitosis switch in budding yeast. Commitment to division corresponds precisely to activating the G1 cyclin positive feedback loop in competition with the cyclin inhibitor Far1. Cyclin-dependent phosphorylation and inhibition of the mating pathway scaffold Ste5 is required to ensure exclusive expression of the mitotic transcriptional program after cell cycle commitment. Failure to commit exclusively results in coexpression of both cell cycle and pheromone-induced genes, and a morphologically-mixed inviable cell fate. Thus, specification and maintenance of a cellular state are performed by distinct interactions, which is likely a consequence of disparate reaction rates and may be a general feature of the interlinked regulatory networks responsible for selecting cell fates. PMID:21855793

  15. Coupling of anaerobic digester and microbial fuel cell for COD removal and ammonia recovery.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taeyoung; An, Junyeong; Jang, Jae Kyung; Chang, In Seop

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were investigated for use in removing total ammonia nitrogen (TAN) and residual COD from effluent digested in an anaerobic digester (AD) fed with actual swine wastewater for 32 days in batch mode. Cumulative COD removal in the AD was as high as 59,647±2096 mg/L (80.5% removed), whereas TAN removal in the AD was negligible at 296±116 mg-N/L (5.8% removed), causing a decrease in the COD/TAN ratio from 14.5 to 3.0. In a subsequent MFC system, 77.5% of TAN was removed at 36 days, leading to an increase in COD/TAN ratio from 4.6 to 8.1. As a result, the COD in the anode was further reduced from 19,319±417 mg/L to 7519±554 mg/L (61.1% removed). From these results, removing the TAN in MFCs was found to increase the COD/TAN ratio, with the COD being further degraded. PMID:26142819

  16. Cell-specific DNA methylation patterns of retina-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Merbs, Shannath L; Khan, Miriam A; Hackler, Laszlo; Oliver, Verity F; Wan, Jun; Qian, Jiang; Zack, Donald J

    2012-01-01

    Many studies have demonstrated that epigenetic mechanisms are important in the regulation of gene expression during embryogenesis, gametogenesis, and other forms of tissue-specific gene regulation. We sought to explore the possible role of epigenetics, specifically DNA methylation, in the establishment and maintenance of cell type-restricted gene expression in the retina. To assess the relationship between DNA methylation status and expression level of retinal genes, bisulfite sequence analysis of the 1000 bp region around the transcription start sites (TSS) of representative rod and cone photoreceptor-specific genes and gene expression analysis were performed in the WERI and Y79 human retinoblastoma cell lines. Next, the homologous genes in mouse were bisulfite sequenced in the retina and in non-expressing tissues. Finally, bisulfite sequencing was performed on isolated photoreceptor and non-photoreceptor retinal cells isolated by laser capture microdissection. Differential methylation of rhodopsin (RHO), retinal binding protein 3 (RBP3, IRBP) cone opsin, short-wave-sensitive (OPN1SW), cone opsin, middle-wave-sensitive (OPN1MW), and cone opsin, long-wave-sensitive (OPN1LW) was found in the retinoblastoma cell lines that inversely correlated with gene expression levels. Similarly, we found tissue-specific hypomethylation of the promoter region of Rho and Rbp3 in mouse retina as compared to non-expressing tissues, and also observed hypomethylation of retinal-expressed microRNAs. The Rho and Rbp3 promoter regions were unmethylated in expressing photoreceptor cells and methylated in non-expressing, non-photoreceptor cells from the inner nuclear layer. A third regional hypomethylation pattern of photoreceptor-specific genes was seen in a subpopulation of non-expressing photoreceptors (Rho in cones from the Nrl -/- mouse and Opn1sw in rods). These results demonstrate that a number of photoreceptor-specific genes have cell-specific differential DNA methylation that

  17. Removal of an acid fume system contaminated with perchlorates located within hot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rosenberg, K.E.; Henslee, S.P.; Vroman, W.R.; Krsul, J.R.; Michelbacher, J.A.; Knighton, G.C.

    1992-09-01

    An add scrubbing system located within the confines of a highly radioactive hot cell at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was remotely removed. The acid scrubbing system was routinely used for the dissolution of irradiated reactor fuel samples and structural materials. Perchloric acid was one of the acids used in the dissolution process and remained in the system with its inherent risks. Personnel could not enter the hot cell to perform the dismantling of the acid scabbing system due to the high radiation field and the explosion potential associated with the perchlorates. A robot was designed and built at ANL-W and used to dismantle the system without the need for personnel entry into the hot cell. The robot was also used for size reduction of removed components and loading of the removed components into waste containers.

  18. Redirecting T-cell specificity by introducing a tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bipulendu; Dotti, Gianpietro

    2010-01-01

    Infusions of antigen-specific T cells have yielded therapeutic responses in patients with pathogens and tumors. To broaden the clinical application of adoptive immunotherapy against malignancies, investigators have developed robust systems for the genetic modification and characterization of T cells expressing introduced chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to redirect specificity. Human trials are under way in patients with aggressive malignancies to test the hypothesis that manipulating the recipient and reprogramming T cells before adoptive transfer may improve their therapeutic effect. These examples of personalized medicine infuse T cells designed to meet patients' needs by redirecting their specificity to target molecular determinants on the underlying malignancy. The generation of clinical grade CAR+ T cells is an example of bench-to-bedside translational science that has been accomplished using investigator-initiated trials operating largely without industry support. The next-generation trials will deliver designer T cells with improved homing, CAR-mediated signaling, and replicative potential, as investigators move from the bedside to the bench and back again. PMID:20439624

  19. A Hypersweet Protein: Removal of The Specific Negative Charge at Asp21 Enhances Thaumatin Sweetness

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Tetsuya; Ohta, Keisuke; Ojiro, Naoko; Murata, Kazuki; Mikami, Bunzo; Tani, Fumito; Temussi, Piero Andrea; Kitabatake, Naofumi

    2016-01-01

    Thaumatin is an intensely sweet-tasting protein that elicits sweet taste at a concentration of 50 nM, a value 100,000 times larger than that of sucrose on a molar basis. Here we attempted to produce a protein with enhanced sweetness by removing negative charges on the interacting side of thaumatin with the taste receptor. We obtained a D21N mutant which, with a threshold value 31 nM is much sweeter than wild type thaumatin and, together with the Y65R mutant of single chain monellin, one of the two sweetest proteins known so far. The complex model between the T1R2-T1R3 sweet receptor and thaumatin, derived from tethered docking in the framework of the wedge model, confirmed that each of the positively charged residues critical for sweetness is close to a receptor residue of opposite charge to yield optimal electrostatic interaction. Furthermore, the distance between D21 and its possible counterpart D433 (located on the T1R2 protomer of the receptor) is safely large to avoid electrostatic repulsion but, at the same time, amenable to a closer approach if D21 is mutated into the corresponding asparagine. These findings clearly confirm the importance of electrostatic potentials in the interaction of thaumatin with the sweet receptor. PMID:26837600

  20. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affects tissue specific stem cells in mice

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yuriko; Doi, Hanako; Ono, Yusuke; Urata, Yoshishige; Goto, Shinji; Kitajima, Michio; Miura, Kiyonori; Li, Tao-Sheng; Masuzaki, Hideaki

    2015-01-01

    Postmenopausal disorders are frequently observed in various organs, but their relationship with estrogen deficiency and mechanisms remain unclear. As tissue-specific stem cells have been found to express estrogen receptors, we examined the hypothesis that estrogen deficiency impairs stem cells, which consequently contributes to postmenopausal disorders. Six-week-old C57BL/6 female mice were ovariectomized, following which they received 17β-estradiol replacement or vehicle (control). Sham-operated mice were used as healthy controls. All mice were killed for evaluation 2 months after treatments. Compared with the healthy control, ovariectomy significantly decreased uterine weight, which was partially recovered by 17β-estradiol replacement. Ovariectomy significantly increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, but impaired their capacity to grow mixed cell-type colonies in vitro. Estrogen replacement further increased the numbers of c-kit-positive hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in bone marrow, without significantly affecting colony growth in vitro. The number of CD105-positive mesenchymal stem cells in bone marrow also significantly decreased after ovariectomy, but completely recovered following estrogen replacement. Otherwise, neither ovariectomy nor estrogen replacement changed the number of Pax7-positive satellite cells, which are a skeletal muscle-type stem cell. Estrogen deficiency heterogeneously affected tissue-specific stem cells, suggesting a likely and direct relationship with postmenopausal disorders. PMID:26245252

  1. Removal of malaria-infected red blood cells using magnetic cell separators: A computational study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongho; Massoudi, Mehrdad; Antaki, James F; Gandini, Alberto

    2012-02-15

    High gradient magnetic field separators have been widely used in a variety of biological applications. Recently, the use of magnetic separators to remove malaria-infected red blood cells (pRBCs) from blood circulation in patients with severe malaria has been proposed in a dialysis-like treatment. The capture efficiency of this process depends on many interrelated design variables and constraints such as magnetic pole array pitch, chamber height, and flow rate. In this paper, we model the malaria-infected RBCs (pRBCs) as paramagnetic particles suspended in a Newtonian fluid. Trajectories of the infected cells are numerically calculated inside a micro-channel exposed to a periodic magnetic field gradient. First-order stiff ordinary differential equations (ODEs) governing the trajectory of particles under periodic magnetic fields due to an array of wires are solved numerically using the 1(st) -5(th) order adaptive step Runge-Kutta solver. The numerical experiments show that in order to achieve a capture efficiency of 99% for the pRBCs it is required to have a longer length than 80 mm; this implies that in principle, using optimization techniques the length could be adjusted, i.e., shortened to achieve 99% capture efficiency of the pRBCs. PMID:22345827

  2. Secondary specific immune response in vitro to MSV tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Senik, A; Hebrero, F P; Levy, J P

    1975-12-15

    The interactions which occur between antigenic tumor cells and normal or immune lymphoid cells in a 3-day in vitro culture, have been studied with a murine sarcoma virus (MSV)-induced tumor. The 3H-thymidine incorporation of lymphoma cells growing in suspension, and the radioactive-chromium release of freshly sampled lymphoma cells regularly added to the culture, have been compared to determine the part played by immune lymphoid cells in cytolysis and cytostasis of the tumor-cell population. The cytolytic activity increases in the culture from day 0 to day 3. It is due, predominantly, to T-cells, and remains specific to antigens shared by MSV tumors and related lymphomas. This activity would be difficult to detect unless freshly sampled ascitic cells were used as targets, since the lymphoma cells spontaneously lose a part of their sensitivity to immune cytolysis during in vitro culture. The method used in the present experiments is a secondary chromium release test (SCRT), which measures the invitro secondary stimulation of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) by tumor cells. In the absence of stimulatory cells, the CTL activity would have rapidly fallen in vitro. The cytostatic activity also increases during the 3 days in vitro, in parallel to the cytolytic activity: it is due to non-T-cells and remains mainly non-specific. The significance of these data for the interpretation of invitro demonstrated cell-mediated anti-tumor immune reactions is briefly discussed, as well as their relevance in the in vivo role of immune CTL. PMID:53210

  3. Type-Specific Cell Line Models for Type-Specific Ovarian Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Anglesio, Michael S.; Wiegand, Kimberly C.; Melnyk, Nataliya; Chow, Christine; Salamanca, Clara; Prentice, Leah M.; Senz, Janine; Yang, Winnie; Spillman, Monique A.; Cochrane, Dawn R.; Shumansky, Karey; Shah, Sohrab P.; Kalloger, Steve E.; Huntsman, David G.

    2013-01-01

    Background Ovarian carcinomas consist of at least five distinct diseases: high-grade serous, low-grade serous, clear cell, endometrioid, and mucinous. Biomarker and molecular characterization may represent a more biologically relevant basis for grouping and treating this family of tumors, rather than site of origin. Molecular characteristics have become the new standard for clinical pathology, however development of tailored type-specific therapies is hampered by a failure of basic research to recognize that model systems used to study these diseases must also be stratified. Unrelated model systems do offer value for study of biochemical processes but specific cellular context needs to be applied to assess relevant therapeutic strategies. Methods We have focused on the identification of clear cell carcinoma cell line models. A panel of 32 “ovarian cancer” cell lines has been classified into histotypes using a combination of mutation profiles, IHC mutation-surrogates, and a validated immunohistochemical model. All cell lines were identity verified using STR analysis. Results Many described ovarian clear cell lines have characteristic mutations (including ARID1A and PIK3CA) and an overall molecular/immuno-profile typical of primary tumors. Mutations in TP53 were present in the majority of high-grade serous cell lines. Advanced genomic analysis of bona-fide clear cell carcinoma cell lines also support copy number changes in typical biomarkers such at MET and HNF1B and a lack of any recurrent expressed re-arrangements. Conclusions: As with primary ovarian tumors, mutation status of cancer genes like ARID1A and TP53 and a general immuno-profile serve well for establishing histotype of ovarian cancer cell We describe specific biomarkers and molecular features to re-classify generic “ovarian carcinoma” cell lines into type specific categories. Our data supports the use of prototype clear cell lines, such as TOV21G and JHOC-5, and questions the use of SKOV3 and A

  4. Cell specific cytotoxicity and uptake of graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Mullick Chowdhury, Sayan; Lalwani, Gaurav; Zhang, Kevin; Yang, Jeong Y; Neville, Kayla; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2013-01-01

    . Additional analysis indicates that this increased uptake is the dominant cause of the significantly higher toxicity exhibited by HeLa cells. The results suggest that water-solubilized O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs have a heterogenous cell-specific cytotoxicity, and have significantly different cytotoxicity profile compared to graphene nanoparticles prepared by the modified Hummer's method (graphene nanoparticles prepared by oxidation of graphite, and its mechanical exfoliation) or its variations. PMID:23072942

  5. Cell Specific Cytotoxicity and Uptake of Graphene Nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lalwani, Gaurav; Zhang, Kevin; Yang, Jeong Yun; Neville, Kayla; Sitharaman, Balaji

    2012-01-01

    types. Additional analysis indicates that this increased uptake is the dominant cause of the significantly higher toxicity exhibited by HeLa cells. The results suggest that water-solubilized O-GNR-PEG-DSPEs have a heterogeneous cell-specific cytotoxicity, and have significantly different cytotoxicity profile compared to graphene nanoparticles prepared by the modified Hummer’s method (graphene nanoparticles prepared by oxidation of graphite, and its mechanical exfoliation) or its variations. PMID:23072942

  6. Specification of epidermal cell fate in plant shoots.

    PubMed

    Takada, Shinobu; Iida, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    Land plants have evolved a single layer of epidermal cells, which are characterized by mostly anticlinal cell division patterns, formation of a waterproof coat called cuticle, and unique cell types such as stomatal guard cells and trichomes. The shoot epidermis plays important roles not only to protect plants from dehydration and pathogens but also to ensure their proper organogenesis and growth control. Extensive molecular genetic studies in Arabidopsis and maize have identified a number of genes that are required for epidermal cell differentiation. However, the mechanism that specifies shoot epidermal cell fate during plant organogenesis remains largely unknown. Particularly, little is known regarding positional information that should restrict epidermal cell fate to the outermost cell layer of the developing organs. Recent studies suggested that certain members of the HD-ZIP class IV homeobox genes are possible master regulators of shoot epidermal cell fate. Here, we summarize the roles of the regulatory genes that are involved in epidermal cell fate specification and discuss the possible mechanisms that limit the expression and/or activity of the master transcriptional regulators to the outermost cell layer in plant shoots. PMID:24616724

  7. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species. PMID:26824243

  8. Probing Coagulation Behavior of Individual Aluminum Species for Removing Corresponding Disinfection Byproduct Precursors: The Role of Specific Ultraviolet Absorbance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, He; Hu, Chengzhi; Zhang, Di; Liu, Huijuan; Qu, Jiuhui

    2016-01-01

    Coagulation behavior of aluminum chloride and polyaluminum chloride (PACl) for removing corresponding disinfection byproduct (DBP) precursors was discussed in this paper. CHCl3, bromine trihalomethanes (THM-Br), dichloroacetic acid (DCAA) and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) formation potential yields were correlated with specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) values in different molecular weight (MW) fractions of humic substances (HS), respectively. Correlation analyses and principal component analysis were performed to examine the relationships between SUVA and different DBP precursors. To acquire more structural characters of DBP precursors and aluminum speciation, freeze-dried precipitates were analyzed by fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and C 1s, Al 2p X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicated that TCAA precursors (no MW limits), DCAA and CHCl3 precursors in low MW fractions (MW<30 kDa) had a relatively good relations with SUVA values. These DBP precursors were coagulated more easily by in situ Al13 of AlCl3 at pH 5.0. Due to relatively low aromatic content and more aliphatic structures, THM-Br precursors (no MW limits) and CHCl3 precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) were preferentially removed by PACl coagulation with preformed Al13 species at pH 5.0. Additionally, for DCAA precursors in high MW fractions (MW>30 kDa) with relatively low aromatic content and more carboxylic structures, the greatest removal occurred at pH 6.0 through PACl coagulation with aggregated Al13 species. PMID:26824243

  9. Erythropoietin gene expression: developmental-stage specificity, cell-type specificity, and hypoxia inducibility.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norio

    2015-01-01

    Erythrocytes play an essential role in the delivery of oxygen from the lung to every organ; a decrease in erythrocytes (anemia) causes hypoxic stress and tissue damage. To maintain oxygen homeostasis in adult mammals, when the kidney senses hypoxia, it secretes an erythroid growth factor, erythropoietin (Epo), which stimulates erythropoiesis in the bone marrow. Recently, studies using genetically modified mice have shown that the in vivo expression profile of the Epo gene changes dramatically during development. The first Epo-producing cells emerge in the neural crest and neuroepithelium of mid-stage embryos and support primitive erythropoiesis in the yolk sac. Subsequently, Epo from the hepatocytes stimulates erythropoiesis in the fetal liver of later stage embryos in a paracrine manner. In fact, erythroid lineage cells comprise the largest cell population in the fetal liver, and hepatocytes are distributed among the erythroid cell clusters. Adult erythropoiesis in the bone marrow requires Epo that is secreted by renal Epo-producing cells (REP cells). REP cells are widely distributed in the renal cortex and outer medulla. Hypoxia-inducible Epo production both in hepatocytes and REP cells is controlled at the gene transcription level that is mainly mediated by the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor (HIF) pathway. These mouse studies further provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of the cell-type specific, hypoxia-inducible expression of the Epo gene, which involves multiple sets of cis- and trans-regulatory elements. PMID:25786542

  10. High specific energy, high capacity nickel-hydrogen cell design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, James R.

    1993-01-01

    A 3.5 inch rabbit-ear-terminal nickel-hydrogen cell was designed and tested to deliver high capacity at steady discharge rates up to and including a C rate. Its specific energy yield of 60.6 wh/kg is believed to be the highest yet achieved in a slurry-process nickel-hydrogen cell, and its 10 C capacity of 113.9 AH the highest capacity yet of any type in a 3.5 inch diameter size. The cell also demonstrated a pulse capability of 180 amps for 20 seconds. Specific cell parameters and performance are described. Also covered is an episode of capacity fading due to electrode swelling and its successful recovery by means of additional activation procedures.

  11. Cell-specific activity of neprilysin 2 isoforms and enzymic specificity compared with neprilysin.

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Christiane; Voisin, Stéphanie; Gros, Claude; Schwartz, Jean-Charles; Ouimet, Tanja

    2002-01-01

    Neprilysin (NEP) 2 is a recently cloned glycoprotein displaying a high degree of sequence identity with neprilysin (EC 3.4.24.11), the prototypical member of the M13 subfamily of metalloproteases. Whereas NEP is involved in the metabolism of several bioactive peptides by plasma membranes of various cells, the enzymic properties and physiological functions of NEP2 are unknown. Here we characterize the cell-expression modalities and enzymic specificity of two alternatively spliced isoforms of NEP2 in Chinese hamster ovary and AtT20 cells. In the two cell lines, both isoforms are type II glycoproteins inserted in the endoplasmic reticulum as inactive precursors. Maturation detected by Western-blot analysis of glycosidase digests was cell-specific and more efficient in the endocrine cell line. The enzymic activity of both isoforms semi-purified from AtT20 cells reveals comparable specificities in terms of model substrates, pH optima and inhibitory patterns. NEP2 activity was compared with that of NEP regarding potencies of transition-state inhibitors, modes of hydrolysis, maximal hydrolysis rates and apparent affinities of bioactive peptides. Although all transition-state inhibitors of NEP inhibited NEP2 activity, albeit with different potencies, and many peptides were cleaved at the same amide bond by both peptidases, differences could be observed, i.e. in the hydrolysis of gonadotropin-releasing hormone and cholecystokinin, which occurred at different sites and more efficiently in the case of NEP2. Differences in cleavage of bioactive peptides, in cell-trafficking patterns and in tissue distribution indicate that NEP and NEP2 play distinct physiological roles in spite of their high degree of sequence identity. PMID:11964170

  12. Current tools for predicting cancer-specific T cell immunity.

    PubMed

    Gfeller, David; Bassani-Sternberg, Michal; Schmidt, Julien; Luescher, Immanuel F

    2016-07-01

    Tumor exome and RNA sequencing data provide a systematic and unbiased view on cancer-specific expression, over-expression, and mutations of genes, which can be mined for personalized cancer vaccines and other immunotherapies. Of key interest are tumor-specific mutations, because T cells recognizing neoepitopes have the potential to be highly tumoricidal. Here, we review recent developments and technical advances in identifying MHC class I and class II-restricted tumor antigens, especially neoantigen derived MHC ligands, including in silico predictions, immune-peptidome analysis by mass spectrometry, and MHC ligand validation by biochemical methods on T cells. PMID:27622028

  13. Tagging and Enriching Proteins Enables Cell-Specific Proteomics.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Thomas S; Bianco, Ambra; Townsley, Fiona M; Fried, Stephen D; Chin, Jason W

    2016-07-21

    Cell-specific proteomics in multicellular systems and whole animals is a promising approach to understand the differentiated functions of cells and tissues. Here, we extend our stochastic orthogonal recoding of translation (SORT) approach for the co-translational tagging of proteomes with a cyclopropene-containing amino acid in response to diverse codons in genetically targeted cells, and create a tetrazine-biotin probe containing a cleavable linker that offers a way to enrich and identify tagged proteins. We demonstrate that SORT with enrichment, SORT-E, efficiently recovers and enriches SORT tagged proteins and enables specific identification of enriched proteins via mass spectrometry, including low-abundance proteins. We show that tagging at distinct codons enriches overlapping, but distinct sets of proteins, suggesting that tagging at more than one codon enhances proteome coverage. Using SORT-E, we accomplish cell-specific proteomics in the fly. These results suggest that SORT-E will enable the definition of cell-specific proteomes in animals during development, disease progression, and learning and memory. PMID:27447048

  14. Clostridium butyricum in combination with specific immunotherapy converts antigen-specific B cells to regulatory B cells in asthmatic patients

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hong-Ying; Tao, Li; Zhao, Jian; Qin, Jie; Zeng, Gu-Cheng; Cai, Song-Wang; Li, Yun; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hui-Guo

    2016-01-01

    The effect of antigen specific immunotherapy (SIT) on asthma is supposed to be improved. Published data indicate that administration of probiotics alleviates allergic diseases. B cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. This study aims to modulate antigen specific B cell property by the administration of Clostridium butyrate (CB) in combination with SIT. The results showed that after a 3-month treatment, the total asthma clinical score and serum specific IgE were improved in the patients treated with SIT, which was further improved in those treated with both SIT and CB, but not in those treated with CB alone. Treatment with SIT and CB increased p300 and STAT3 activation, up regulated the IL-10 gene transcription and increased the frequency of peripheral antigen specific B cells. In conclusion, administration with SIT in combination with CB converts Der p 1 specific B cells to regulatory B cells in asthma patients allergic to Der p 1. The data suggest a potential therapeutic remedy in the treatment of allergic diseases. PMID:26857726

  15. Engineered antigen-specific human regulatory T cells: immunosuppression of FVIII-specific T- and B-cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yong Chan; Zhang, Ai-Hong; Su, Yan; Rieder, Sadiye Amcaoglu; Rossi, Robert J.; Ettinger, Ruth A.; Pratt, Kathleen P.; Shevach, Ethan M.

    2015-01-01

    Expansion of human regulatory T cells (Tregs) for clinical applications offers great promise for the treatment of undesirable immune responses in autoimmunity, transplantation, allergy, and antidrug antibody responses, including inhibitor responses in hemophilia A patients. However, polyclonal Tregs are nonspecific and therefore could potentially cause global immunosuppression. To avoid this undesirable outcome, the generation of antigen-specific Tregs would be advantageous. Herein, we report the production and properties of engineered antigen-specific Tregs, created by transduction of a recombinant T-cell receptor obtained from a hemophilia A subject’s T-cell clone, into expanded human FoxP3+ Tregs. Such engineered factor VIII (FVIII)-specific Tregs efficiently suppressed the proliferation and cytokine production of FVIII-specific T-effector cells. Moreover, studies with an HLA-transgenic, FVIII-deficient mouse model demonstrated that antibody production from FVIII-primed spleen cells in vitro were profoundly inhibited in the presence of these FVIII-specific Tregs, suggesting potential utility to treat anti-FVIII inhibitory antibody formation in hemophilia A patients. PMID:25498909

  16. T-cell regulatory mechanisms in specific immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jutel, Marek; Akdis, Cezmi A

    2008-01-01

    Allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT) is the only treatment which leads to a lifelong tolerance against previously disease-causing allergens due to restoration of normal immunity against allergens. The description of T-regulatory (Treg) cells being involved in prevention of sensitization to allergens has led to great interest whether they represent a major target for allergen-SIT and whether it would be possible to manipulate Treg cells to increase its efficacy. Activationinduced cell death, anergy and/or immune response modulation by Treg cells are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. There is growing evidence that anergy, tolerance and active suppression are not entirely distinct, but rather represent linked mechanisms possibly involving the same cells and multiple suppressor mechanisms. Skewing of allergen-specific effector T cells to Treg cells appears as a crucial event in the control of healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-SIT. The Treg cell response is characterized by abolished allergen- induced specific T-cell proliferation and suppressed Thelper (Th)1- and Th2-type cytokine secretion. In addition, mediators of allergic inflammation that trigger cAMP-associated G-protein-coupled receptors, such as histamine receptor-2, may contribute to peripheral tolerance mechanisms. The increased levels of interleukin-10 and transforming growth factor-Beta that are produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production, while simultaneously increasing production of non-inflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress effector cells of allergic inflammation such as mast cells, basophils and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms. It is associated with regulation of antibody isotypes and effector cells to the direction of a healthy immune response. By the application of the recent knowledge in Treg

  17. Bioelectrochemical Chromium(VI) Removal in Plant-Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Habibul, Nuzahat; Hu, Yi; Wang, Yun-Kun; Chen, Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2016-04-01

    Plant-microbial fuel cell (PMFC) is a renewable and sustainable energy technology that generates electricity with living plants. However, little information is available regarding the application of PMFC for the remediation of heavy metal contaminated water or soil. In this study, the potential for the removal of heavy metal Cr(VI) using PMFC was evaluated, and the performance of the PMFC at various initial Cr(VI) contents was investigated. The Cr(VI) removal efficiency could reached 99% under various conditions. Both the Cr(VI) removal rates and the removal efficiencies increased with the increasing initial Cr(VI) concentration. Furthermore, the long-term operation of the PMFC indicated that the system was stable and sustainable for Cr(VI) removal. The mass balance results and XPS analysis results demonstrate that only a small amount of soluble Cr(III) remained in the PMFC and that most Cr(III) precipitated in the form of the Cr(OH)3(s) or was adsorbed onto the electrodes. The PMFC experiments of without acetate addition also show that plants can provide carbon source for MFC through secrete root exudates and bioelectrochemical reduction of Cr(VI) was the main mechanism for the Cr(VI) removal. These results extend the application fields of PMFC and might provide a new insight for Cr(VI) removal from wastewater or soil. PMID:26962848

  18. Local Area Water Removal Analysis of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell under Gas Purge Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold. PMID:22368495

  19. Local area water removal analysis of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell under gas purge conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi-Yuan; Lee, Yu-Ming; Lee, Shuo-Jen

    2012-01-01

    In this study, local area water content distribution under various gas purging conditions are experimentally analyzed for the first time. The local high frequency resistance (HFR) is measured using novel micro sensors. The results reveal that the liquid water removal rate in a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) is non-uniform. In the under-the-channel area, the removal of liquid water is governed by both convective and diffusive flux of the through-plane drying. Thus, almost all of the liquid water is removed within 30 s of purging with gas. However, liquid water that is stored in the under-the-rib area is not easy to remove during 1 min of gas purging. Therefore, the re-hydration of the membrane by internal diffusive flux is faster than that in the under-the-channel area. Consequently, local fuel starvation and membrane degradation can degrade the performance of a fuel cell that is started from cold. PMID:22368495

  20. Effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous anaerobic sulfide and nitrate removal in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Mahmood, Qaisar

    2016-01-01

    The current investigation reports the effect of cathode electron acceptors on simultaneous sulfide and nitrate removal in two-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Potassium permanganate and potassium ferricyanide were common cathode electron acceptors and evaluated for substrate removal and electricity generation. The abiotic MFCs produced electricity through spontaneous electrochemical oxidation of sulfide. In comparison with abiotic MFC, the biotic MFC showed better ability for simultaneous nitrate and sulfide removal along with electricity generation. Keeping external resistance of 1,000 Ω, both MFCs showed good capacities for substrate removal where nitrogen and sulfate were the main end products. The steady voltage with potassium permanganate electrodes was nearly twice that of with potassium ferricyanide. Cyclic voltammetry curves confirmed that the potassium permanganate had higher catalytic activity than potassium ferricyanide. The potassium permanganate may be a suitable choice as cathode electron acceptor for enhanced electricity generation during simultaneous treatment of sulfide and nitrate in MFCs. PMID:26901739

  1. On-board removal of CO and other impurities in hydrogen for PEM fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Cunping; Jiang, Ruichun; Elbaccouch, Mohamed; Muradov, Nazim; Fenton, James M.

    Carbon monoxide (CO) in the hydrogen (H 2) stream can cause severe performance degradation for an H 2 polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. The on-board removal of CO from an H 2 stream requires a process temperature less than 80 °C, and a fast reaction rate in order to minimize the reactor volume. At the present time, few technologies have been developed that meet these two requirements. This paper describes a concept of electrochemical water gas shift (EWGS) process to remove low concentration CO under ambient conditions for on-board applications. No on-board oxygen or air supply is needed for CO oxidation. Experimental work has been carried out to prove the concept of EWGS and the results indicate that the process can completely remove low level CO and improve the performance of a PEM fuel cell to the level of a pure H 2 stream. Because the EWGS electrolyzer can be modified from a humidifier for a PEM fuel cell system, no additional device is needed for the CO removal. More experimental data are needed to determine the rate of CO electrochemical removal and to explore the mechanism of the proposed process.

  2. Artesunate exerts specific cytotoxicity in retinoblastoma cells via CD71.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fei; Wang, Han; Kunda, Patricilia; Chen, Xuemei; Liu, Qiu-Ling; Liu, Tao

    2013-09-01

    Retinoblastoma (RB) is an intraocular cancer that affects young children. There is an ongoing effort to find new agents for RB management that are effective, specific and with few side-effects. In the present study, we tested artesunate (ART), a synthetic derivative from the herbal drug artemisinin, used in the clinic for the treatment of malaria. We analyzed ART cytotoxicity in an RB cell line (RB-Y79) and in a retinal epithelial cell line (hTERT-RPE1) by flow cytometric analysis (FCM). We related the effect of ART to the expression of transferrin receptor 1 (TfR-1, also known as CD71) by knocking down CD71 with RNAi and analyzing cell cycle variables by FCM. We found that the cytotoxic action of ART is specific for RB cells in a dose-dependent manner, with low toxicity in normal retina cells. ART is more effective in RB than carboplatin with a markedly strong cytotoxic effect on carboplatin-resistant RB cells. RB had higher CD71 levels at the membrane compared to normal retinal cells. We showed that ART internalization in RB cells is dependent upon the expression of the CD71. In addition, ART blocked the cell cycle progression at the G1 phase, even at low doses, and decreased the proportion of RB cells in the S phase. In conclusion, we showed that ART is a promising drug exhibiting high selective cytotoxicity even against multidrug-resistant RB cells. Thus, we suggest that ART could be used in the treatment of RB. PMID:23818062

  3. Positive selection of self-antigen-specific CD8+ T cells by hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Hisakata; Shibata, Kensuke; Sakuraba, Koji; Fujimura, Kenjiro; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2013-08-01

    In contrast to thymic epithelial cells, which induce the positive selection of conventional CD8(+) T cells, hematopoietic cells (HCs) select innate CD8(+) T cells whose Ag specificity is not fully understood. Here we show that CD8(+) T cells expressing an H-Y Ag-specific Tg TCR were able to develop in mice in which only HCs expressed MHC class I, when HCs also expressed the H-Y Ag. These HC-selected self-specific CD8(+) T cells resemble innate CD8(+) T cells in WT mice in terms of the expression of memory markers and effector functions, but are phenotypically distinct from the thymus-independent CD8(+) T-cell population. The peripheral maintenance of H-Y-specific CD8(+) T cells required presentation of the self-Ag and IL-15 on HCs. HC-selected CD8(+) T cells in mice lacking the Tg TCR also showed these features. Furthermore, by using MHC class I tetramers with a male Ag peptide, we found that self-Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells in TCR non-Tg mice could develop via HC-induced positive selection, supporting results obtained from H-Y TCR Tg mice. These findings indicate the presence of self-specific CD8(+) T cells that are positively selected by HCs in the peripheral T-cell repertoire. PMID:23636825

  4. Target cell specific antibody-based photosensitizers for photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenblum, Lauren T.; Mitsunaga, Makoto; Kakareka, John W.; Morgan, Nicole Y.; Pohida, Thomas J.; Choyke, Peter L.; Kobayashi, Hisataka

    2011-03-01

    In photodynamic therapy (PDT), localized monochromatic light is used to activate targeted photosensitizers (PS) to induce cellular damage through the generation of cytotoxic species such as singlet oxygen. While first-generation PS passively targeted malignancies, a variety of targeting mechanisms have since been studied, including specifically activatable agents. Antibody internalization has previously been employed as a fluorescence activation system and could potentially enable similar activation of PS. TAMRA, Rhodamine-B and Rhodamine-6G were conjugated to trastuzumab (brand name Herceptin), a humanized monoclonal antibody with specificity for the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), to create quenched PS (Tra-TAM, Tra-RhoB, and Tra-Rho6G). Specific PDT with Tra-TAM and Tra-Rho6G, which formed covalently bound H-dimers, was demonstrated in HER2+ cells: Minimal cell death (<6%) was observed in all treatments of the HER2- cell line (BALB/3T3) and in treatments the HER2+ cell line (3T3/HER2) with light or trastuzumab only. There was significant light-induced cell death in HER2 expressing cells using Tra-TAM (3% dead without light, 20% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2) and Tra-Rho6G (5% dead without light, 22% at 50 J/cm2, 46% at 100 J/cm2). No efficacy was observed in treatment with Tra-RhoB, which was also non-specifically taken up by BALB/3T3 cells and which had weaker PS-antibody interactions (as demonstrated by visualization of protein and fluorescence on SDS-PAGE).

  5. Micro-magnet arrays for specific single bacterial cell positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivetal, Jérémy; Royet, David; Ciuta, Georgeta; Frenea-Robin, Marie; Haddour, Naoufel; Dempsey, Nora M.; Dumas-Bouchiat, Frédéric; Simonet, Pascal

    2015-04-01

    In various contexts such as pathogen detection or analysis of microbial diversity where cellular heterogeneity must be taken into account, there is a growing need for tools and methods that enable microbiologists to analyze bacterial cells individually. One of the main challenges in the development of new platforms for single cell studies is to perform precise cell positioning, but the ability to specifically target cells is also important in many applications. In this work, we report the development of new strategies to selectively trap single bacterial cells upon large arrays, based on the use of micro-magnets. Escherichia coli bacteria were used to demonstrate magnetically driven bacterial cell organization. In order to provide a flexible approach adaptable to several applications in the field of microbiology, cells were magnetically and specifically labeled using two different strategies, namely immunomagnetic labeling and magnetic in situ hybridization. Results show that centimeter-sized arrays of targeted, isolated bacteria can be successfully created upon the surface of a flat magnetically patterned hard magnetic film. Efforts are now being directed towards the integration of a detection tool to provide a complete micro-system device for a variety of microbiological applications.

  6. Factors affecting the performance of microbial fuel cells for sulfur pollutants removal.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Rahunen, Nelli; Varcoe, John R; Roberts, Alexander J; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio; Thumser, Alfred E; Slade, Robert C T

    2009-03-15

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) has been developed for removal of sulfur-based pollutants and can be used for simultaneous wastewater treatment and electricity generation. This fuel cell uses an activated carbon cloth+carbon fibre veil composite anode, air-breathing dual cathodes and the sulfate-reducing species Desulfovibrio desulfuricans. 1.16gdm(-3) sulfite and 0.97gdm(-3) thiosulfate were removed from the wastewater at 22 degrees C, representing sulfite and thiosulfate removal conversions of 91% and 86%, respectively. The anode potential was controlled by the concentration of sulfide in the compartment. The performance of the cathode assembly was affected by the concentration of protons in the cation-exchanging ionomer with which the electrocatalyst is co-bound at the three-phase (air, catalyst and support) boundary. PMID:19022647

  7. Analysis of a heat recirculating cooler for fuel gas sulfur removal in solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Geo. A.; Berry, David A.; Freed, Adam

    When using conventional fossil fuels, most fuel cell systems require sulfur removal as part of their fuel processing. A novel approach to enable conventional sulfur removal in high-temperature fuel processing is presented. Using established principles from heat-recirculating combustors, it is suggested that high-temperature syngas can be momentarily cooled to conditions that would permit conventional sulfur removal to be carried out at relatively low temperatures. The recirculated heat is then used to heat the gas back to conditions that are minimally less than the original temperature. A model for evaluating the performance of this concept is presented, and calculations suggest that relative to fuel cell applications, reasonable physical dimensions can be expected in actual applications. For high-pressure syngas (i.e., coal gasification), the physical dimensions will rise with the operating pressure.

  8. Cell adhesion. Competition between nonspecific repulsion and specific bonding.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, G I; Dembo, M; Bongrand, P

    1984-01-01

    We develop a thermodynamic calculus for the modeling of cell adhesion. By means of this approach, we are able to compute the end results of competition between the formation of specific macromolecular bridges and nonspecific repulsion arising from electrostatic forces and osmotic (steric stabilization) forces. Using this calculus also allows us to derive in a straightforward manner the effects of cell deformability, the Young's modulus for stretching of bridges, diffusional mobility of receptors, heterogeneity of receptors, variation in receptor number, and the strength of receptor-receptor binding. The major insight that results from our analysis concerns the existence and characteristics of two phase transitions corresponding, respectively, to the onset of stable cell adhesion and to the onset of maximum cell-cell or cell-substrate contact. We are also able to make detailed predictions of the equilibrium contact area, equilibrium number of bridges, and the cell-cell or cell-substrate separation distance. We illustrate how our approach can be used to improve the analysis of experimental data, by means of two concrete examples. PMID:6743742

  9. Routine detection of Epstein-Barr virus specific T-cells in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Stowe, R. P.; Pierson, D. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2001-01-01

    The ability to detect cytomegalovirus-specific T-cells (CD4(+)) in the peripheral blood by flow cytometry has been recently described by Picker et al. In this method, cells are incubated with viral antigen and responding (cytokine producing) T-cells are then identified by flow cytometry. To date, this technique has not been reliably used to detect Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T-cells primarily due to the superantigen/mitogenic properties of the virus which non-specifically activate T-cells. By modifying culture conditions under which the antigens are presented, we have overcome this limitation and developed an assay to detect and quantitate EBV-specific T-cells. The detection of cytokine producing T-cells by flow cytometry requires an extremely strong signal (such as culture in the presence of PMA and ionomycin). Our data indicate that in modified culture conditions (early removal of viral antigen) the non-specific activation of T-cells by EBV is reduced, but antigen presentation will continue uninhibited. Using this method, EBV-specific T-cells may be legitimately detected using flow cytometry. No reduction in the numbers of antigen-specific T-cells was observed by the early removal of target antigen when verified using cytomegalovirus antigen (a virus with no non-specific T-cell activation properties). In EBV-seropositive individuals, the phenotype of the EBV-specific cytokine producing T-cells was evaluated using four-color flow cytometry and found to be CD45(+), CD3(+), CD4(+), CD45RA(-), CD69(+), CD25(-). This phenotype indicates the stimulation of circulating previously unactivated memory T-cells. No cytokine production was observed in CD4(+) T-cells from EBV-seronegative individuals, confirming the specificity of this assay. In addition, the use of four color cytometry (CD45, CD3, CD69, IFNgamma/IL-2) allows the total quantitative assessment of EBV-specific T-cells while monitoring the interference of EBV non-specific mitogenic activity. This method may

  10. Acid Gas Removal by Customized Sorbents for Integrated Gasification Fuel Cell Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Kapfenberger, J.; Sohnemann, J.; Schleitzer, D.; Loewen, A.

    2002-09-20

    In order to reduce exergy losses, gas cleaning at high temperatures is favored in IGFC systems. As shown by thermodynamic data, separation efficiencies of common sorbents decrease with increasing temperature. Therefore, acid gas removal systems have to be developed for IGFC applications considering sorbent capacity, operation temperature, gasification feedstock composition and fuel cell threshold values.

  11. Surgical removal of a mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor in an African pygmy hedgehog

    PubMed Central

    Wellehan, James F.X.; Southorn, Erin; Smith, Dale A.; Taylor, Michael

    2003-01-01

    A 3-year-old, female African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was referred with a history of hematuria. Hyperglycemia and glucosuria were found at presentation. Mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor were found and removed surgically. Glucosuria and hematuria resolved, and the hedgehog has done well for 10 mo postoperatively. PMID:12677695

  12. Surgical removal of a mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor in an African pygmy hedgehog.

    PubMed

    Wellehan, James F X; Southorn, Erin; Smith, Dale A; Taylor, W Michael

    2003-03-01

    A 3-year-old, female African pygmy hedgehog (Atelerix albiventris) was referred with a history of hematuria. Hyperglycemia and glucosuria were found at presentation. Mammary adenocarcinoma and a granulosa cell tumor were found and removed surgically. Glucosuria and hematuria resolved, and the hedgehog has done well for 10 mo postoperatively. PMID:12677695

  13. Development and qualification of a novel virus removal filter for cell culture applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, S; Carroll, M; Iverson, R; Valera, C; Vennari, J; Turco, K; Piper, R; Kiss, R; Lutz, H

    2000-01-01

    Commercial bioreactors employing mammalian cell cultures to express biological or pharmaceutical products can become contaminated with adventitious viruses. The high expense of such a contamination can be reduced by passing all gases and fluids feeding the bioreactor through virus inactivation or removal steps, which act as viral barriers around the bioreactor. A novel virus barrier filter has been developed for removing viruses from serum-free cell culture media. This filter removes the 20 nm minute virus of mice by >3 log reduction value (LRV), the 28 nm bacteriophage PhiX174 by >4.5 LRV, the mycoplasma Acholeplasma laidlawii by > or =8.8 LRV, and the bacteria Brevundimonas diminuta by > or =9.2 LRV. Robust removal occurs primarily by size exclusion as demonstrated over a wide range of feedstocks and operating conditions. The filtered media are indistinguishable from unfiltered media in growth of cells to high densities, maintenance of cell viability, and productivity in expressing protein product. Insulin and transferrin show high passage through the filter. The virus barrier filter can be autoclaved. The relatively high membrane permeability enables the use of a moderate filtration area. PMID:10835245

  14. Pilot test specific test plan for the removal of arsenic Socorro, New Mexico.

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Sue S.; Aragon, Malynda Jo; Everett, Randy L.; Siegel, Malcolm Dean; Aragon, Alicia R.; Dwyer, Brian P.; Marbury, Justin Luke

    2006-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) is conducting pilot scale evaluations of the performance and cost of innovative drinking water treatment technologies designed to meet the new arsenic maximum contaminant level (MCL) of 10 {micro}g/L (effective January 2006). As currently envisioned, pilots tests may include multiple phases. Phase I tests will involve side-by-side comparisons of several commercial technologies primarily using design parameters suggested by the Vendors. Subsequent tests (Phase II) may involve repeating some of the original tests, testing the same commercial technologies under different conditions and testing experimental technologies or additional commercial technologies. This Pilot Test Specific Test Plan (PTSTP) was written for Phase I of the Socorro Springs Pilot. The objectives of Phase I include evaluation of the treatment performance of five adsorptive media under ambient pH conditions (approximately 8.0) and assessment of the effect of contact time on the performance of one of the media. Addenda to the PTSTP may be written to cover Phase II studies and supporting laboratory studies. The Phase I demonstration began in the winter of 2004 and will last approximately 9 months. The information from the test will help the City of Socorro choose the best arsenic treatment technology for the Socorro Springs well. The pilot demonstration is a project of the Arsenic Water Technology Partnership program, a partnership between the American Water Works Association (AWWA) Research Foundation, SNL, and WERC (A Consortium for Environmental Education and Technology Development).

  15. High efficiency cell-specific targeting of cytokine activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcin, Geneviève; Paul, Franciane; Staufenbiel, Markus; Bordat, Yann; van der Heyden, José; Wilmes, Stephan; Cartron, Guillaume; Apparailly, Florence; de Koker, Stefaan; Piehler, Jacob; Tavernier, Jan; Uzé, Gilles

    2014-01-01

    Systemic toxicity currently prevents exploiting the huge potential of many cytokines for medical applications. Here we present a novel strategy to engineer immunocytokines with very high targeting efficacies. The method lies in the use of mutants of toxic cytokines that markedly reduce their receptor-binding affinities, and that are thus rendered essentially inactive. Upon fusion to nanobodies specifically binding to marker proteins, activity of these cytokines is selectively restored for cell populations expressing this marker. This ‘activity-by-targeting’ concept was validated for type I interferons and leptin. In the case of interferon, activity can be directed to target cells in vitro and to selected cell populations in mice, with up to 1,000-fold increased specific activity. This targeting strategy holds promise to revitalize the clinical potential of many cytokines.

  16. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    PubMed Central

    Phetsouphanh, Chansavath; Zaunders, John James; Kelleher, Anthony Dominic

    2015-01-01

    A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants) and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated. PMID:26274954

  17. Molecular targeting of intracellular compartments specifically in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-05-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells' nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein's intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells' nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  18. Probing Xylan-Specific Raman Bands for Label-Free Imaging Xylan in Plant Cell Wall

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Yining; Yarbrough, John M.; Mittal, Ashutosh; Tucker, Melvin P.; Vinzant, Todd; Himmel, Michael E.

    2015-06-15

    Xylan constitutes a significant portion of biomass (e.g. 22% in corn stover used in this study). Xylan is also an important source of carbohydrates, besides cellulose, for renewable and sustainable energy applications. Currently used method for the localization of xylan in biomass is to use fluorescence confocal microscope to image the fluorescent dye labeled monoclonal antibody that specifically binds to xylan. With the rapid adoption of the Raman-based label-free chemical imaging techniques in biology, identifying Raman bands that are unique to xylan would be critical for the implementation of the above label-free techniques for in situ xylan imaging. Unlike lignin and cellulose that have long be assigned fingerprint Raman bands, specific Raman bands for xylan remain unclear. The major challenge is the cellulose in plant cell wall, which has chemical units highly similar to that of xylan. Here we report using xylanase to specifically remove xylan from feedstock. Under various degree of xylan removal, with minimum impact to other major cell wall components, i.e. lignin and cellulose, we have identified Raman bands that could be further tested for chemical imaging of xylan in biomass in situ.

  19. Red blood cells do not contribute to removal of K+ released from exhaustively working forearm muscle.

    PubMed

    Maassen, N; Foerster, M; Mairbäurl, H

    1998-07-01

    K+ released from exercising muscle via K+ channels needs to be removed from the interstitium into the blood to maintain high muscle cell membrane potential and allow normal muscle contractility. Uptake by red blood cells has been discussed as one mechanism that would also serve to regulate red blood cell volume, which was found to be constant despite increased plasma osmolality and K+ concentration ([K+pl]). We evaluated exercise-related changes in [K+pl], pH, osmolality, mean cellular Hb concentration, cell water, and red blood cell K+ concentration during exhaustive handgrip exercise. Unidirectional 86Rb+ (K+) uptake by red blood cells was measured in media with elevated extracellular K+, osmolarity, and catecholamines to simulate particularly those exercise-related changes in plasma composition that are known to stimulate K+ uptake. During exercise [K+pl] increased from 4.4 +/- 0.7 to 7.1 +/- 0.5 mmol/l plasma water and red blood cell K+ concentration increased from 137.2 +/- 6.0 to 144.6 +/- 4.6 mmol/l cell water (P cells was increased by approximately 20% on stimulation, caused by activation of the Na+-K+ pump and Na+-K+-2Cl- cotransport. Results indicate the K+ content of red blood cells did not change as cells passed the exhaustively exercising forearm muscle despite the elevated [K+pl]. The tendency for an increase in intracellular K+ concentration was due to a slight, although statistically not significant, decrease in red blood cell volume. K+ uptake, although elevated, was too small to move significant amounts of K+ into red blood cells. Our results suggest that red blood cells do not contribute to the removal of K+ released from muscle and do not regulate their volume by K+ uptake during exhaustive forearm exercise. PMID:9655793

  20. Dimeric HER2-specific affibody molecules inhibit proliferation of the SKBR-3 breast cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Ekerljung, Lina Lindborg, Malin; Gedda, Lars; Frejd, Fredrik Y; Carlsson, Joergen; Lennartsson, Johan

    2008-12-12

    HER2-specific affibody molecules in different formats have previously been shown to be useful tumor targeting agents for radionuclide-based imaging and therapy applications, but their biological effect on tumor cells is not well known. In this study, two dimeric ((Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2}) and one monomeric (Z{sub HER2:342}) HER2-specific affibody molecules are investigated with respect to biological activity. Both (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2} were found to decrease the growth rate of SKBR-3 cells to the same extent as the antibody trastuzumab. When the substances were removed, the cells treated with the dimeric affibody molecules continued to be growth suppressed while the cells treated with trastuzumab immediately resumed normal proliferation. The effects of Z{sub HER2:342} were minor on both proliferation and cell signaling. The dimeric (Z{sub HER2:4}){sub 2} and (Z{sub HER2:342}){sub 2} both reduced growth of SKBR-3 cells and may prove therapeutically useful either by themselves or as carriers of radionuclides or other cytotoxic agents.

  1. Automated Analysis of Cell Cycle Phase-Specific DNA Damage Reveals Phase-Specific Differences in Cell Sensitivity to Etoposide.

    PubMed

    Luzhin, Artem V; Velichko, Artem K; Razin, Sergey V; Kantidze, Omar L

    2016-10-01

    The comet assay is one of the most widely used approaches for detecting DNA damage; generally, it provides information on the cell population-averaged level of DNA damage. Here, we present an automatic technique for easy measurement of standard comet characteristics and an annotation of the cell cycle phase of each comet. The approach includes the modified neutral comet assay and a pipeline for CellProfiler software designed to analyze DNA damage-related characteristics and annotate the cell cycle phase of each comet. Using this technique we have performed cell cycle phase-specific analysis of DNA damage induced by the topoisomerase II poison etoposide and have shown that the sensitivity of cells to this drug dramatically differed according to their cell cycle phase. It became evident from our results that the proposed protocol provides important additional information that often remains hidden in a standard comet analysis of an asynchronous cell population. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 2209-2214, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27240930

  2. Targeting vault nanoparticles to specific cell surface receptors.

    PubMed

    Kickhoefer, Valerie A; Han, Muri; Raval-Fernandes, Sujna; Poderycki, Michael J; Moniz, Raymond J; Vaccari, Dana; Silvestry, Mariena; Stewart, Phoebe L; Kelly, Kathleen A; Rome, Leonard H

    2009-01-27

    As a naturally occurring nanocapsule abundantly expressed in nearly all-eukaryotic cells, the barrel-shaped vault particle is perhaps an ideal structure to engineer for targeting to specific cell types. Recombinant vault particles self-assemble from 96 copies of the major vault protein (MVP), have dimensions of 72.5 x 41 nm, and have a hollow interior large enough to encapsulate hundreds of proteins. In this study, three different tags were engineered onto the C-terminus of MVP: an 11 amino acid epitope tag, a 33 amino acid IgG-binding peptide, and the 55 amino acid epidermal growth factor (EGF). These modified vaults were produced using a baculovirus expression system. Our studies demonstrate that recombinant vaults assembled from MVPs containing C-terminal peptide extensions display these tags at the top and bottom of the vault on the outside of the particle and can be used to specifically bind the modified vaults to epithelial cancer cells (A431) via the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), either directly (EGF modified vaults) or as mediated by a monoclonal antibody (anti-EGFR) bound to recombinant vaults containing the IgG-binding peptide. The ability to target vaults to specific cells represents an essential advance toward using recombinant vaults as delivery vehicles. PMID:19206245

  3. Extracellular Vesicles from Ovarian Carcinoma Cells Display Specific Glycosignatures

    PubMed Central

    Gomes, Joana; Gomes-Alves, Patrícia; Carvalho, Sofia B.; Peixoto, Cristina; Alves, Paula M.; Altevogt, Peter; Costa, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Cells release vesicles to the extracellular environment with characteristic nucleic acid, protein, lipid, and glycan composition. Here we have isolated and characterized extracellular vesicles (EVs) and total cell membranes (MBs) from ovarian carcinoma OVMz cells. EVs were enriched in specific markers, including Tsg101, CD63, CD9, annexin-I, and MBs contained markers of cellular membrane compartments, including calnexin, GRASP65, GS28, LAMP-1, and L1CAM. The glycoprotein galectin-3 binding protein (LGALS3BP) was strongly enriched in EVs and it contained sialylated complex N-glycans. Lectin blotting with a panel of lectins showed that EVs had specific glycosignatures relative to MBs. Furthermore, the presence of glycoproteins bearing complex N-glycans with α2,3-linked sialic acid, fucose, bisecting-GlcNAc and LacdiNAc structures, and O-glycans with the T-antigen were detected. The inhibition of N-glycosylation processing from high mannose to complex glycans using kifunensine caused changes in the composition of EVs and induced a decrease of several glycoproteins. In conclusion, the results showed that glycosignatures of EVs were specific and altered glycosylation within the cell affected the composition and/or dynamics of EVs release. Furthermore, the identified glycosignatures of EVs could provide novel biomarkers for ovarian cancer. PMID:26248080

  4. Redirecting T Cell Specificity Using T Cell Receptor Messenger RNA Electroporation.

    PubMed

    Koh, Sarene; Shimasaki, Noriko; Bertoletti, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Autologous T lymphocytes genetically modified to express T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors have shown great promise in the treatment of several cancers, including melanoma and leukemia. In addition to tumor-associated antigens and tumor-specific neoantigens, tumors expressing viral peptides can also be recognized by specific T cells and are attractive targets for cell therapy. Hepatocellular carcinoma cells often have hepatitis B virus DNA integration and can be targeted by hepatitis B virus-specific T cells. Here, we describe a method to engineer hepatitis B virus-specific T cell receptors in primary human T lymphocytes based on electroporation of hepatitis B virus T cell receptor messenger RNA. This method can be extended to a large scale therapeutic T cell production following current good manufacturing practice compliance and is applicable to the redirection of T lymphocytes with T cell receptors of other virus specificities such as Epstein-Barr virus, cytomegalovirus, and chimeric receptors specific for other antigens expressed on cancer cells. PMID:27236807

  5. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg RP

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14912.001 PMID:27218453

  6. Cell-specific synaptic plasticity induced by network oscillations.

    PubMed

    Zarnadze, Shota; Bäuerle, Peter; Santos-Torres, Julio; Böhm, Claudia; Schmitz, Dietmar; Geiger, Jörg Rp; Dugladze, Tamar; Gloveli, Tengis

    2016-01-01

    Gamma rhythms are known to contribute to the process of memory encoding. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms at the molecular, cellular and network levels. Using local field potential recording in awake behaving mice and concomitant field potential and whole-cell recordings in slice preparations we found that gamma rhythms lead to activity-dependent modification of hippocampal networks, including alterations in sharp wave-ripple complexes. Network plasticity, expressed as long-lasting increases in sharp wave-associated synaptic currents, exhibits enhanced excitatory synaptic strength in pyramidal cells that is induced postsynaptically and depends on metabotropic glutamate receptor-5 activation. In sharp contrast, alteration of inhibitory synaptic strength is independent of postsynaptic activation and less pronounced. Further, we found a cell type-specific, directionally biased synaptic plasticity of two major types of GABAergic cells, parvalbumin- and cholecystokinin-expressing interneurons. Thus, we propose that gamma frequency oscillations represent a network state that introduces long-lasting synaptic plasticity in a cell-specific manner. PMID:27218453

  7. CatacLysMic specificity when targeting myeloid cells?

    PubMed

    Blank, Thomas; Prinz, Marco

    2016-06-01

    The antibacterial enzyme lysozyme M (LysM) encoded by the Lyz2 gene is broadly expressed in myeloblasts, macrophages, and neutrophils, and thus has been used for a long time as a cell-specific marker for myeloid cells in mice. In order to delete loxP-site flanked genes in myeloid cells, a Cre-recombinase (Cre) expressing mouse line was created by inserting Cre-coding sequence into the translational start site of the LysM gene. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology [2016. 46: 1529-1532], Orthgiess et al. verify, with the help of tdTomato and YFP reporter mouse lines, LysM-driven recombination. Unexpectedly, the authors also describe major expression of the tdTomato reporter protein in brain neurons of the central nervous system (CNS), with only a very small percentage of gene recombination in myeloid cells of the brain, called microglia. These findings cause justified concerns regarding the efficient and specific targeting of microglia and peripheral myeloid cells using LysM-Cre mice and should stimulate thoughts on conclusions drawn from past experiments on the diseased CNS employing this Cre/loxP-deleter line. PMID:27198084

  8. Potential cell-specific functions of CXCR4 in atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Weber, Christian; Döring, Yvonne; Noels, Heidi

    2016-05-10

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its receptor CXCR4 form an important axis contributing to cellular functions in homeostasis and disease. In addition, the atypical CXCL12 receptor CXCR7 may shape the availability and function of CXCL12. Further to their role through progenitor cell mobilization, CXCL12 and CXCR4 may affect native atherogenesis by modifying atherosclerosis-relevant cellular functions. This short review intends to provide a concise summary of current knowledge with regards to cell-specific functions of CXCL12 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 with potential implications for the initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. PMID:25586789

  9. [Inhibition of adenovirus reproduction in cell culture by specific antibodies].

    PubMed

    Povnytsia, O Iu; Nosach, L M; Zhovnovata, V L; Zahorodnia, S D; Vantsak, N P; Tokarchuk, L V; Polishchuk, O M; Diachenko, N S

    2009-01-01

    The capacity of specific antibodies to inhibit the reproduction of homo- and heterologous adenoviruses in Hela cell added to culture medium after virus adsorption was studied. The inhibiting effect of polyclonal antivirus and monospecific antihexone antibodies to homo- and heterologous adenoviruses was shown. The effect was more expressed when using antibodies to homologous antibodies. The intensity of inhibition depended on antibodies concentration in the medium and infecting dose of the virus. Essential reduction of the quantity of infected cells and a decrease of the titer of adenovirus synthesized in the presence of homo- and heterologous antibodies was shown but adenovirus reproduction was not inhibited completely. PMID:19663330

  10. A chemical lift-off process: removing non-specific adsorption in an electrochemical Epstein-Barr virus immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Stratmann, Lutz; Gebala, Magdalena; Schuhmann, Wolfgang

    2013-07-22

    Upon contact of sensor surfaces with complex biological samples containing a variety of different proteins, non-specific adsorption hampers the high-sensitive detection of the analyte in question. To substantially decrease the impact of non-specific adsorption at thiol-based self-assembled monolayers, a chemical lift-off process is introduced. A sequence of local hydrolysis of isooctyl 3-mercaptopropionate, covalent binding of an antigen against the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), stepwise incubation with a serum sample possibly containing the EBV antibody and an enzyme-labeled anti-human antibody is completed with a lift-off by integral hydrolysis of the remaining ester groups at the self-assembled monolayer. The cleavage of the ester removes any non-specifically bound protein during a following stringent washing step. The substantial improvement of the detection limit of an electrochemical immunoassay against EBV using native recombinant antigens, their immobilization after local deprotection using a scanning electrochemical microscope (SECM) and the local read-out using the generator-collector mode of SECM with redox cycling amplification demonstrates the successful application of the proposed lift-off procedure. PMID:23681905

  11. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  12. Site-Specific Genome Engineering in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Merkert, Sylvia; Martin, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    The possibility to generate patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) offers an unprecedented potential of applications in clinical therapy and medical research. Human iPSCs and their differentiated derivatives are tools for diseases modelling, drug discovery, safety pharmacology, and toxicology. Moreover, they allow for the engineering of bioartificial tissue and are promising candidates for cellular therapies. For many of these applications, the ability to genetically modify pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) is indispensable, but efficient site-specific and safe technologies for genetic engineering of PSCs were developed only recently. By now, customized engineered nucleases provide excellent tools for targeted genome editing, opening new perspectives for biomedical research and cellular therapies. PMID:27347935

  13. Epigenetic control of cell specification during female gametogenesis.

    PubMed

    Armenta-Medina, Alma; Demesa-Arévalo, Edgar; Vielle-Calzada, Jean-Philippe

    2011-06-01

    In flowering plants, the formation of gametes depends on the differentiation of cellular precursors that divide meiotically before giving rise to a multicellular gametophyte. The establishment of this gametophytic phase presents an opportunity for natural selection to act on the haploid plant genome by means of epigenetic mechanisms that ensure a tight regulation of plant reproductive development. Despite this early acting selective pressure, there are numerous examples of naturally occurring developmental alternatives that suggest a flexible regulatory control of cell specification and subsequent gamete formation in flowering plants. In this review, we discuss recent findings indicating that epigenetic mechanisms related to the activity of small RNA pathways prevailing during ovule formation play an essential role in cell specification and genome integrity. We also compare these findings to small RNA pathways acting during gametogenesis in animals and discuss their implications for the understanding of the mechanisms that control the establishment of the female gametophytic lineage during both sexual reproduction and apomixis. PMID:21484604

  14. Effect of dissolved oxygen on nitrogen and phosphorus removal and electricity production in microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Tao, Qinqin; Luo, Jingjing; Zhou, Juan; Zhou, Shaoqi; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo

    2014-07-01

    Performance of a two-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) was evaluated with the influence of cathodic dissolved oxygen (DO). The maximum voltage, coulombic efficiency and maximum power density outputs of MFC decreased from 521 to 303 mV, 52.48% to 23.09% and 530 to 178 mW/m(2) with cathodic DO declining. Furthermore, a great deal of total phosphorus (TP) was removed owing to chemical precipitation (about 80%) and microbial absorption (around 4-17%). COD was first removed in anode chamber (>70%) then in cathode chamber (<5%). Most of nitrogen was removed when the cathodic DO was at low levels. Chemical precipitates formed in cathode chamber were verified as phosphate, carbonate and hydroxyl compound with the aid of scanning electron microscope capable of energy dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). PMID:24880930

  15. Identifying States along the Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Hierarchy with Single Cell Specificity via Raman Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ilin, Yelena; Choi, Ji Sun; Harley, Brendan A C; Kraft, Mary L

    2015-11-17

    A major challenge for expanding specific types of hematopoietic cells ex vivo for the treatment of blood cell pathologies is identifying the combinations of cellular and matrix cues that direct hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) to self-renew or differentiate into cell populations ex vivo. Microscale screening platforms enable minimizing the number of rare HSCs required to screen the effects of numerous cues on HSC fate decisions. These platforms create a strong demand for label-free methods that accurately identify the fate decisions of individual hematopoietic cells at specific locations on the platform. We demonstrate the capacity to identify discrete cells along the HSC differentiation hierarchy via multivariate analysis of Raman spectra. Notably, cell state identification is accurate for individual cells and independent of the biophysical properties of the functionalized polyacrylamide gels upon which these cells are cultured. We report partial least-squares discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) models of single cell Raman spectra enable identifying four dissimilar hematopoietic cell populations across the HSC lineage specification. Successful discrimination was obtained for a population enriched for long-term repopulating HSCs (LT-HSCs) versus their more differentiated progeny, including closely related short-term repopulating HSCs (ST-HSCs) and fully differentiated lymphoid (B cells) and myeloid (granulocytes) cells. The lineage-specific differentiation states of cells from these four subpopulations were accurately identified independent of the stiffness of the underlying biomaterial substrate, indicating subtle spectral variations that discriminated these populations were not masked by features from the culture substrate. This approach enables identifying the lineage-specific differentiation stages of hematopoietic cells on biomaterial substrates of differing composition and may facilitate correlating hematopoietic cell fate decisions with the extrinsic cues that

  16. Molecular Targeting of Intracellular Compartments Specifically in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pandya, Hetal; Gibo, Denise M.; Debinski, Waldemar

    2010-01-01

    We have implemented a strategy in which a genetically engineered, single-chain protein specifically recognizes cancer cells and is trafficked to a targeted subcellular compartment, such as the nucleus. The recombinant protein termed IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS has a triple functional property: (1) it binds a cancer-associated receptor, interleukin 13 receptor alpha 2 (IL-13Rα2), using modified IL-13 ligand, IL-13.E13K; (2) it exports its C-terminal portion out of the endosomal compartment using Pseudomonas aeruginosa exotoxin A (PE) translocation domain (D2); and (3) it travels to and accumulates in the nucleus guided by the nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we have demonstrated that this protein is transported into the brain tumor cells’ nucleus, using 3 different methods of protein conjugation to dyes for the purpose of direct visualization of the protein’s intracellular trafficking. IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS, and not the controls such as IL-13.E13K-D2, IL-13.E13K-NLS, or IL-13.E13K, accumulated in nuclei very efficiently, which increased with the time the cells were exposed to the protein. Also, IL-13.E13K-D2-NLS did not exhibit nuclear transport in cells with low expression levels of IL-13Rα2. Thus, it is possible to recognize cancer cells through their specific receptors and deliver a conjugated protein that travels specifically to the nucleus. Hence, our molecular targeting strategy succeeded in generating a single-chain proteinaceous agent capable of delivering drugs/labels needed to be localized to the cells’ nuclei or potentially any other subcellular compartment, for their optimal efficacy or ability to exert their specific action. PMID:20740056

  17. Statistical Physics of T-Cell Development and Pathogen Specificity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Košmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-04-01

    In addition to an innate immune system that battles pathogens in a nonspecific fashion, higher organisms, such as humans, possess an adaptive immune system to combat diverse (and evolving) microbial pathogens. Remarkably, the adaptive immune system mounts pathogen-specific responses, which can be recalled upon reinfection with the same pathogen. It is difficult to see how the adaptive immune system can be preprogrammed to respond specifically to a vast and unknown set of pathogens. Although major advances have been made in understanding pertinent molecular and cellular phenomena, the precise principles that govern many aspects of an immune response are largely unknown. We discuss complementary approaches from statistical mechanics and cell biology that can shed light on how key components of the adaptive immune system, T cells, develop to enable pathogen-specific responses against many diverse pathogens. The mechanistic understanding that emerges has implications for how host genetics may influence the development of T cells with differing responses to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection.

  18. Cell theory, specificity, and reproduction, 1837-1870.

    PubMed

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2010-09-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental unit of life, but also the reproductive one. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention from historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, that is, that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question then became one of whether cells could be considered as autonomous agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus only a stage in the development of the whole organism. This question became an important issue for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as autonomous agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of inheritance as a lawful process. PMID:20934643

  19. Cell Theory, Specificity, and Reproduction, 1837–1870

    PubMed Central

    Müller-Wille, Staffan

    2015-01-01

    The cell is not only the structural, physiological, and developmental, but also the reproductive unit of life. So far, however, this aspect of the cell has received little attention by historians and philosophers of biology. I will argue that cell theory had far-reaching consequences for how biologists conceptualized the reproductive relationships between germs and adult organisms. Cell theory, as formulated by Theodor Schwann in 1839, implied that this relationship was a specific and lawful one, i.e. that germs of a certain kind, all else being equal, would produce adult organisms of the same kind, and vice versa. Questions of preformation and epigenesis took on a new meaning under this presupposition. The question now was whether cells could be considered as independent agents producing adult organisms of a given species, or whether they were the product of external, organizing forces and thus a stage in the development of the whole organism only. The question was an important one for nineteenth-century biology. As I will demonstrate, it was the view of cells as independent agents which helped both Charles Darwin and Gregor Mendel to think of differential reproduction as a lawful process. PMID:20934643

  20. Tissue-specific cell wall hydration in sugarcane stalks.

    PubMed

    Maziero, Priscila; Jong, Jennifer; Mendes, Fernanda M; Gonçalves, Adilson R; Eder, Michaela; Driemeier, Carlos

    2013-06-19

    Plant cell walls contain water, especially under biological and wet processing conditions. The present work characterizes this water in tissues of sugarcane stalks. Environmental scanning electron microscopy shows tissue deformation upon drying. Dynamic vapor sorption determines the equilibrium and kinetics of moisture uptake. Thermoporometry by differential scanning calorimetry quantifies water in nanoscale pores. Results show that cell walls from top internodes of stalks are more deformable, slightly more sorptive to moisture, and substantially more porous. These differences of top internode are attributed to less lignified walls, which is confirmed by lower infrared spectral signal from aromatics. Furthermore, cell wall nanoscale porosity, an architectural and not directly compositional characteristic, is shown to be tissue-specific. Nanoscale porosities are ranked as follows: pith parenchyma > pith vascular bundles > rind. This ranking coincides with wall reactivity and digestibility in grasses, suggesting that nanoscale porosity is a major determinant of wall recalcitrance. PMID:23738592

  1. Specific inactivation of glucose metabolism from eucaryotic cells by pentalenolactone.

    PubMed

    Duszenko, M; Balla, H; Mecke, D

    1982-02-01

    Pentalenolactone, an antibiotic related to the class of the sesquiterpene-lactones and produced by the strain Streptomyces arenae Tü-469, inhibits specifically the glucose metabolism by inactivation of the enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate: NAD oxidoreductase (phosphorylating) ED 1.2.1.1.2). The sensitivity of several eucaryotic cell-systems for pentalenolactone was shown under in vivo conditions. The glycolytic as well as the gluconeogenetic pathway of mammalian cells can be completely inhibited with low concentrations of the antibiotic. In all cases, the minimum inhibitory concentration is dependent on cell density. The inhibitory effect in vivo and in vitro does not seem to be species-specific. In erythrocytes from rats, in Ehrlich-ascites tumor cells and in Plasmodium vinckei infected erythrocytes from mice glycolysis can be inhibited with concentrations of 18--90 micrometers pentalenolactone. In hepatocytes, glycolysis as well as gluconeogenesis in prevented by the same concentrations. In contrast to these results, in yeast the inhibition depends on growth conditions. The inhibition in glucose medium is cancelled by precultivation on acetate-containing medium. PMID:7034785

  2. Germ tube-specific antigens of Candida albicans cell walls

    SciTech Connect

    Sundstrom, P.R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were performed to characterize the surface differences between blastospores and germ tubes of the pathogenic, dimorphic yeast, Candida albicans, and to identify components of yeast cells responsible for these differences. Investigation of surfaces differences of the two growth forms was facilitated by the production of rabbit antiserum prepared against Formalin-treated yeast possessing germ tubes. To prepare antiserum specific for germ tubes, this serum was adsorbed with stationary phase blastospores. Whereas the unadsorbed antiserum reacted with both blastospore and germ tube forms by immunofluorescence and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay, the adsorbed antiserum did not react with blastospores but detected germ tube-specific antigens in hyphal forms. The differences between blastospores and germ tubes of Candida albicans, were further studied by comparing enzymatic digests of cell walls of both growth forms in radiolabeled organisms. Organisms were labeled either on the surface with /sup 125/I, or metabolically with (/sup 35/S) methionine or (/sup 3/H) mannose. Three-surface-located components (as shown by antibody adsorption and elution experiments) were precipitated from Zymolase digests. All three components were mannoproteins as shown by their ability to bind Concanavalin A, and to be labeled in protein labeling procedures, and two of these (200,000 and 155,000 molecular weight) were germ tube specific, as shown by their ability to be precipitated by germ tube-specific antiserum. Monoclonal antibodies were prepared to C. albicans, using blastospores bearing germ tubes as immunogen.

  3. Efficient salt removal in a continuously operated upflow microbial desalination cell with an air cathode.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kyle S; Drew, David M; He, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Microbial desalination cells (MDCs) hold great promise for drinking water production because of potential energy savings during the desalination process. In this study, we developed a continuously operated MDC--upflow microbial desalination cell (UMDC) for the purpose of salt removal. During the 4-month operation, the UMDC constantly removed salts and generated bio-electricity. At a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 4 days (salt solution) and current production of ∼62 mA, the UMDC was able to remove more than 99% of NaCl from the salt solution that had an initial salt concentration of 30 g total dissolved solids (TDS)/L. In addition, the TDS removal rate was 7.50 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (salt solution volume) or 5.25 g TDSL(-1)d(-1) (wastewater volume), and the desalinated water met the drinking water standard, in terms of TDS concentration. A high charge transfer efficiency of 98.6% or 81% was achieved at HRT 1 or 4d. The UMDC produced a maximum power density of 30.8 W/m(3). The phenomena of bipolar electrodialysis and proton transport in the UMDC were discussed. These results demonstrated the potential of the UMDC as either a sole desalination process or a pre-desalination reactor for downstream desalination processes. PMID:20584603

  4. Removing heavy metals from synthetic effluents using "kamikaze" Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia; Paraschivescu, Codruta; Matache, Mihaela; Avramescu, Sorin; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    One key step of the bioremediation processes designed to clean up heavy metal contaminated environments is growing resistant cells that accumulate the heavy metals to ensure better removal through a combination of biosorption and continuous metabolic uptake after physical adsorption. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can easily act as cation biosorbents, but isolation of mutants that are both hyperaccumulating and tolerant to heavy metals proved extremely difficult. Instead, mutants that are hypersensitive to heavy metals due to increased and continuous uptake from the environment were considered, aiming to use such mutants to reduce the heavy metal content of contaminated waters. In this study, the heavy metal hypersensitive yeast strain pmr1Delta was investigated for the ability to remove Mn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, or Cd2+ from synthetic effluents. Due to increased metal accumulation, the mutant strain was more efficient than the wild-type in removing Mn2+, Cu2+, or Co2+ from synthetic effluents containing 1-2 mM cations, with a selectivity and also in removing Mn2+ and Cd2+ from synthetic effluents containing 20-50 microM cations, with a selectivity Mn2+ > Cd2+. PMID:19795117

  5. Isotherm kinetics of Cr(III) removal by non-viable cells of Acinetobacter haemolyticus.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Siti Khairunnisa; Zakaria, Zainul Akmar; Samin, Jefri; Raj, A S Santhana; Ahmad, Wan Azlina

    2012-06-01

    The potential use of non-viable biomass of a Gram negative bacterium i.e. Acinetobacter haemolyticus to remove Cr(III) species from aqueous environment was investigated. Highest Cr(III) removal of 198.80 mg g(-1) was obtained at pH 5, biomass dosage of 15 mg cell dry weight, initial Cr(III) of 100 mg L(-1) and 30 min of contact time. The Langmuir and Freundlich models fit the experimental data (R(2)>0.95) while the kinetic data was best described using the pseudo second-order kinetic model (R(2)>0.99). Cr(III) was successfully recovered from the bacterial biomass using either 1M of CH(3)COOH, HNO(3) or H(2)SO(4) with 90% recovery. TEM and FTIR suggested the involvement of amine, carboxyl, hydroxyl and phosphate groups during the biosorption of Cr(III) onto the cell surface of A. haemolyticus. A. haemolyticus was also capable to remove 79.87 mg g(-1) Cr(III) (around 22.75%) from raw leather tanning wastewater. This study demonstrates the potential of using A. haemolyticus as biosorbent to remove Cr(III) from both synthetic and industrial wastewater. PMID:22398363

  6. A systematic mRNA control mechanism for germline stem cell homeostasis and cell fate specification

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myon-Hee; Mamillapalli, Srivalli Swathi; Keiper, Brett D.; Cha, Dong Seok

    2016-01-01

    Germline stem cells (GSCs) are the best understood adult stem cell types in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans, and have provided an important model system for studying stem cells and their cell fate in vivo, in mammals. In this review, we propose a mechanism that controls GSCs and their cell fate through selective activation, repression and mobilization of the specific mRNAs. This mechanism is acutely controlled by known signal transduction pathways (e.g., Notch signaling and Ras-ERK MAPK signaling pathways) and P granule (analogous to mammalian germ granule)-associated mRNA regulators (FBF-1, FBF-2, GLD-1, GLD-2, GLD-3, RNP-8 and IFE-1). Importantly, all regulators are highly conserved in many multi-cellular animals. Therefore, GSCs from a simple animal may provide broad insight into vertebrate stem cells (e.g., hematopoietic stem cells) and their cell fate specification. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(2): 93-98] PMID:26303971

  7. Removal of phenol in phenolic resin wastewater by a novel biomaterial: the Phanerochaete chrysosporium pellet containing chlamydospore-like cells.

    PubMed

    Hailei, Wang; Ping, Li; Yu, Qin; Hui, Yang

    2016-06-01

    A novel biomaterial, the Phanerochaete chrysosporium pellet (CP) composed of chlamydospore-like cells (CLCs), was prepared and its potential in treating phenolic resin wastewater was evaluated. CP possesses higher phenol removal ability in contrast with mycelial pellets of P. chrysosporium, and CLC can be seen as the naturally immobilized enzymes. At shake-flask level, the ideal pH value, temperature, and inoculation quantity of CP for treatment of 1430 mg/l phenol wastewater were pH 4-6, 30 °C, and 5.0 g/l, respectively, and the maximum specific removal rate, 41.1 mg phenol/g CP/h, was obtained in fixed bed reactor (FBR) when the flow rate of wastewater was 3.4 l/h. During the treatment, FBR harbored amounts of bacteria (135 genera) and eukaryotes, as analyzed by metagenomic sequencing. Bacterial pollution not only decreased reactor performance but also had a negative impact on reusability of CP. Hot water treatment (80-85 °C) is effective to inhibit bacterial pollution, and heat resistance of CLC makes the repeated regrowing of CP be feasible. This work presents an innovative and low-cost biomaterial for phenol removal and will be helpful for the practical application of P. chrysosporium in wastewater treatment. PMID:26860939

  8. Memory T Cell-Specific Therapeutics in Organ Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Page, Andrew J.; Ford, Mandy L.; Kirk, Allan D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose of the Review This review details the role of memory T cells in physiologic and allospecific immunity, and summarizes the effects of immunosuppressive agents used to manipulate their function in the context of organ transplantation. Recent Findings Memory T cells are lymphocytes with characteristics that are thought to promote anamnestic immune responses. They have a unique capacity to generate rapid effector functions upon secondary exposure to a pathogen, and this is achieved through truncated requirements for antigen presentation, reduced activation thresholds, and enhanced trafficking and adhesion mechanisms. In general, these same mechanisms also appear to evoke improved efficiency in mediating allograft rejection. The phenotype of these cells has been increasingly well defined and associated with a characteristic pattern of susceptibility to immunosuppressive agents. This knowledge is now being exploited in the development of immune therapeutic regimens to selectively mollify T memory cell effects. Summary A specific targeting of memory T cells has potential to prevent allograft rejection in a more precise manner that current means of immunosuppression. However, these benefits will be balanced by the reciprocal risk of susceptibility to recurrent infection. PMID:19779342

  9. Site-specific Proteasome Phosphorylation Controls Cell Proliferation and Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xing; Wang, Xiaorong; Wang, Zhiping; Banerjee, Sourav; Yang, Jing; Huang, Lan; Dixon, Jack E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the fundamental importance of proteasomal degradation in cells, little is known about whether and how the 26S proteasome itself is regulated in coordination with various physiological processes. Here we show that the proteasome is dynamically phosphorylated during cell cycle at Thr25 of the 19S subunit Rpt3. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing, RNA interference and biochemical studies demonstrate that blocking Rpt3-Thr25 phosphorylation markedly impairs proteasome activity and impedes cell proliferation. Through a kinome-wide screen, we have identified dual-specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase 2 (DYRK2) as the primary kinase that phosphorylates Rpt3-Thr25, leading to enhanced substrate translocation and degradation. Importantly, loss of the single phosphorylation of Rpt3-Thr25 or knockout of DYRK2 significantly inhibits tumor formation by proteasome-addicted human breast cancer cells in mice. These findings define an important mechanism for proteasome regulation and demonstrate the biological significance of proteasome phosphorylation in regulating cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. PMID:26655835

  10. Identification and Specification of the Mouse Skeletal Stem Cell

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Charles K.F.; Seo, Eun Young; Chen, James Y.; Lo, David; McArdle, Adrian; Sinha, Rahul; Tevlin, Ruth; Seita, Jun; Vincent-Tompkins, Justin; Wearda, Taylor; Lu, Wan-Jin; Senarath-Yapa, Kshemendra; Chung, Michael T.; Marecic, Owen; Tran, Misha; Yan, Kelley S.; Upton, Rosalynd; Walmsley, Graham G.; Lee, Andrew S.; Sahoo, Debashis; Kuo, Calvin; Weissman, Irving L.; Longaker, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary How are skeletal tissues derived from skeletal stem cells? Here, we map bone, cartilage and stromal development from a population of highly pure, post-natal skeletal stem cells (mouse Skeletal Stem Cell, mSSC) to its downstream progenitors of bone, cartilage and stromal tissue. We then investigated the transcriptome of the stem/progenitor cells for unique gene expression patterns that would indicate potential regulators of mSSC lineage commitment. We demonstrate that mSSC niche factors can be potent inducers of osteogenesis, and several specific combinations of recombinant mSSC niche factors can activate mSSC genetic programs in situ, even in non-skeletal tissues, resulting in de novo formation of cartilage or bone and bone marrow stroma. Inducing mSSC formation with soluble factors and subsequently regulating the mSSC niche to specify its differentiation towards bone, cartilage, or stromal cells could represent a paradigm shift in the therapeutic regeneration of skeletal tissues. PMID:25594184

  11. Cell Cycle Phase-Specific Drug Resistance as an Escape Mechanism of Melanoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Hill, David S; Daignault, Sheena M; Lui, Goldie Y L; Sharp, Danae M; Gabrielli, Brian; Weninger, Wolfgang; Haass, Nikolas K

    2016-07-01

    The tumor microenvironment is characterized by cancer cell subpopulations with heterogeneous cell cycle profiles. For example, hypoxic tumor zones contain clusters of cancer cells that arrest in G1 phase. It is conceivable that neoplastic cells exhibit differential drug sensitivity based on their residence in specific cell cycle phases. In this study, we used two-dimensional and organotypic melanoma culture models in combination with fluorescent cell cycle indicators to investigate the effects of cell cycle phases on clinically used drugs. We demonstrate that G1-arrested melanoma cells, irrespective of the underlying cause mediating G1 arrest, are resistant to apoptosis induced by the proteasome inhibitor bortezomib or the alkylating agent temozolomide. In contrast, G1-arrested cells were more sensitive to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor-induced cell death. Of clinical relevance, pretreatment of melanoma cells with a mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitor, which induced G1 arrest, resulted in resistance to temozolomide or bortezomib. On the other hand, pretreatment with temozolomide, which induced G2 arrest, did not result in resistance to mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway inhibitors. In summary, we established a model to study the effects of the cell cycle on drug sensitivity. Cell cycle phase-specific drug resistance is an escape mechanism of melanoma cells that has implications on the choice and timing of drug combination therapies. PMID:26970356

  12. Gene-specific cell labeling using MiMIC transposons

    PubMed Central

    Gnerer, Joshua P.; Venken, Koen J. T.; Dierick, Herman A.

    2015-01-01

    Binary expression systems such as GAL4/UAS, LexA/LexAop and QF/QUAS have greatly enhanced the power of Drosophila as a model organism by allowing spatio-temporal manipulation of gene function as well as cell and neural circuit function. Tissue-specific expression of these heterologous transcription factors relies on random transposon integration near enhancers or promoters that drive the binary transcription factor embedded in the transposon. Alternatively, gene-specific promoter elements are directly fused to the binary factor within the transposon followed by random or site-specific integration. However, such insertions do not consistently recapitulate endogenous expression. We used Minos-Mediated Integration Cassette (MiMIC) transposons to convert host loci into reliable gene-specific binary effectors. MiMIC transposons allow recombinase-mediated cassette exchange to modify the transposon content. We developed novel exchange cassettes to convert coding intronic MiMIC insertions into gene-specific binary factor protein-traps. In addition, we expanded the set of binary factor exchange cassettes available for non-coding intronic MiMIC insertions. We show that binary factor conversions of different insertions in the same locus have indistinguishable expression patterns, suggesting that they reliably reflect endogenous gene expression. We show the efficacy and broad applicability of these new tools by dissecting the cellular expression patterns of the Drosophila serotonin receptor gene family. PMID:25712101

  13. Site-specific DNA excision in transgenic rice with a cell-permeable cre recombinase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ming-Xia; Huang, Jian-Qiu; Yao, Quan-Hong; Liu, Sheng-Jun; Wang, Cheng-Long; Wei, Zhi-Ming

    2006-01-01

    The removal of selected marker genes from transgenic plants is necessary to address biosafety concerns and to carry out further experiments with transgenic organisms. In the present study, the 12-amino-acid membrane translocation sequence (MTS) from the Kaposi fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-4 was used as a carrier to deliver enzymatically active Cre proteins into living plant cells, and to produce a site-specific DNA excision in transgenic rice plants. The process, which made cells permeable to Cre recombinase-mediated DNA recombination, circumvented the need to express Cre under spatiotemporal control and was proved to be a simple and efficient system to achieve marker-free transgenic plants. The ultimate aim of the present study is to develop commercial rice cultivars free from selected marker genes to hasten public acceptance of transgenic crops. PMID:16382182

  14. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  15. Isoform-specific targeting of ROCK proteins in immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Flynn, Ryan; Waksal, Samuel D.; Blazar, Bruce R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Rho-associated kinase 1 (ROCK1) and ROCK2 are activated by Rho GTPase and control cytoskeleton rearrangement through modulating the phosphorylation of their down-stream effector molecules. Although these 2 isoforms share more than 90% homology within their kinase domain the question of whether ROCK proteins function identically in different cell types is not clear. By using both pharmacological inhibition and genetic knockdown approaches recent studies suggest that the ROCK2 isoform plays an exclusive role in controlling of T-cell plasticity and macrophage polarization. Specifically, selective ROCK2 inhibition shifts the balance between pro-inflammatory and regulatory T-cell subsets via concurrent regulation of STAT3 and STAT5 phosphorylation, respectively. Furthermore, the administration of an orally available selective ROCK2 inhibitor effectively ameliorates clinical manifestations in experimental models of autoimmunity and chronic graft-vs.-host disease (cGVHD). Because ROCK2 inhibition results in the suppression of M2-type macrophages while favoring polarization of M1-type macrophages, ROCK2 inhibition can correct the macrophage imbalance seen during age-related macular degeneration (AMD). In summary, the exclusive role of ROCK2 in immune system modulation argues for the development and testing of isoform-specific ROCK2 inhibitors for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. PMID:27254302

  16. Patient-specific blood rheology in sickle-cell anaemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E; Lei, Huan; Tang, Yu-Hang; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2016-02-01

    Sickle-cell anaemia (SCA) is an inherited blood disorder exhibiting heterogeneous cell morphology and abnormal rheology, especially under hypoxic conditions. By using a multiscale red blood cell (RBC) model with parameters derived from patient-specific data, we present a mesoscopic computational study of the haemodynamic and rheological characteristics of blood from SCA patients with hydroxyurea (HU) treatment (on-HU) and those without HU treatment (off-HU). We determine the shear viscosity of blood in health as well as in different states of disease. Our results suggest that treatment with HU improves or worsens the rheological characteristics of blood in SCA depending on the degree of hypoxia. However, on-HU groups always have higher levels of haematocrit-to-viscosity ratio (HVR) than off-HU groups, indicating that HU can indeed improve the oxygen transport potential of blood. Our patient-specific computational simulations suggest that the HVR level, rather than the shear viscosity of sickle RBC suspensions, may be a more reliable indicator in assessing the response to HU treatment. PMID:26855752

  17. Specific cell surface labeling of GPCRs using split GFP.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Wen-Xue; Dong, Xu; Jiang, Jing; Yang, Yu-Hong; Yang, Ju; Lu, Yun-Bi; Fang, San-Hua; Wei, Er-Qing; Tang, Chun; Zhang, Wei-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Specific cell surface labeling is essential for visualizing the internalization processes of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) and for gaining mechanistic insight of GPCR functions. Here we present a rapid, specific, and versatile labeling scheme for GPCRs at living-cell membrane with the use of a split green fluorescent protein (GFP). Demonstrated with two GPCRs, GPR17 and CysLT2R, we show that two β-stands (β-stands 10 and 11) derived from a superfolder GFP (sfGFP) can be engineered to one of the three extracellular loop of a GPCR. The complementary fragment of sfGFP has nine β-strands (β-stands 1-9) that carries the mature fluorophore, and can be proteolytically derived from the full-length sfGFP. Separately the GFP fragments are non-fluorescent, but become fluorescent upon assembly, thus allowing specific labeling of the target proteins. The two GFP fragments rapidly assemble and the resulting complex is extremely tight under non-denaturing conditions, which allows real-time and quantitative assessment of the internalized GPCRs. We envision that this labeling scheme will be of great use for labeling other membrane proteins in various biological and pharmacological applications. PMID:26857153

  18. Removal of hexavalent chromium ions by Yarrowia lipolytica cells modified with phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Ashit; Bankar, Ashok; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Gosavi, Suresh; Zinjarde, Smita

    2013-03-01

    The removal of hexavalent chromium [Cr (VI)], an important ground water pollutant by phyto-inspired Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposite-modified cells of Yarrowia lipolytica (NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590), was investigated. Electron microscopy and magnetometer studies indicated an effective modification of yeast cell surfaces by the nanocomposites. The effect of pH, temperature, agitation speed, contact time and initial metal ion concentration on the removal of Cr (VI) was determined. The specific uptake values at pH 2.0 were 186.32 ± 3.17 and 137.31 ± 4.53 mg g- 1 for NCIM 3589 and NCIM 3590, respectively, when 1000 mg L- 1 of metal ion concentrations were used. The equilibrium data fitted to Scatchard, Langmuir and linearized Freundlich models suggesting that adsorption played a role in the removal of Cr (VI) ions. The surface modified yeast cells displayed higher values of Langmuir and Scatchard coefficients than the unmodified cells indicating that the former were more efficient in Cr (VI) removal. The enhanced detoxification of Cr (VI) ions by this composite material could be attributed to the reductive power of the Fe0/Fe3O4 nanocomposites as well the yeast cell surface functional groups.

  19. Effect of Removal of Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) from In Vitro Culture on Gene Expression of Niche Factors in Bovine

    PubMed Central

    Akbarinejad, Vahid; Tajik, Parviz; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Youssefi, Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background: Niche cells, regulating Spermatogonial Stem Cells (SSCs) fate are believed to have a reciprocal communication with SSCs. The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of SSC elimination on the gene expression of Glial cell line-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (GDNF), Fibroblast Growth Factor 2 (FGF2) and Kit Ligand (KITLG), which are the main growth factors regulating SSCs development and secreted by niche cells, primarily Sertoli cells. Methods: Following isolation, bovine testicular cells were cultured for 12 days on extracellular matrix-coated plates. In the germ cell-removed group, the SSCs were removed from the in vitro culture using differential plating; however, in the control group, no intervention in the culture was performed. Colony formation of SSCs was evaluated using an inverted microscope. The gene expression of growth factors and spermatogonia markers were assessed using quantitative real time PCR. Results: SSCs colonies were developed in the control group but they were rarely observed in the germ cell-removed group; moreover, the expression of spermatogonia markers was detected in the control group while it was not observed in the germ cell-removed group, substantiating the success of SSCs removal. The expression of Gdnf and Fgf2 was greater in the germ cell-removed than control group (p<0.05), whereas the expression of Kitlg was lower in the germ cell-removed than control group (p< 0.05). Conclusion: In conclusion, the results revealed that niche cells respond to SSCs removal by upregulation of GDNF and FGF2, and downregulation of KITLG in order to stimulate self-renewal and arrest differentiation. PMID:27563426

  20. Linking the T cell receptor to the single cell transcriptome in antigen-specific human T cells.

    PubMed

    Eltahla, Auda A; Rizzetto, Simone; Pirozyan, Mehdi R; Betz-Stablein, Brigid D; Venturi, Vanessa; Kedzierska, Katherine; Lloyd, Andrew R; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio

    2016-07-01

    Heterogeneity of T cells is a hallmark of a successful adaptive immune response, harnessing the vast diversity of antigen-specific T cells into a coordinated evolution of effector and memory outcomes. The T cell receptor (TCR) repertoire is highly diverse to account for the highly heterogeneous antigenic world. During the response to a virus multiple individual clones of antigen specific CD8+ (Ag-specific) T cells can be identified against a single epitope and multiple epitopes are recognised. Advances in single-cell technologies have provided the potential to study Ag-specific T cell heterogeneity at both surface phenotype and transcriptome levels, thereby allowing investigation of the diversity within the same apparent sub-population. We propose a new method (VDJPuzzle) to reconstruct the native TCRαβ from single cell RNA-seq data of Ag-specific T cells and then to link these with the gene expression profile of individual cells. We applied this method using rare Ag-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood of a subject who cleared hepatitis C virus infection. We successfully reconstructed productive TCRαβ in 56 of a total of 63 cells (89%), with double α and double β in 18, and 7% respectively, and double TCRαβ in 2 cells. The method was validated via standard single cell PCR sequencing of the TCR. We demonstrate that single-cell transcriptome analysis can successfully distinguish Ag-specific T cell populations sorted directly from resting memory cells in peripheral blood and sorted after ex vivo stimulation. This approach allows a detailed analysis of the TCR diversity and its relationship with the transcriptional profile of different clones. PMID:26860370

  1. Effect of damage removal etch (DRE) on plasma textured, multi-crystalline solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majumdar, S.; Pathak, M.; Chahar, N.; Sharan, A.; Saxena, A. K.; Bhattacharya, S.

    2014-10-01

    In the present work, a self-masked, dry, plasma texturing process for multi crystalline silicon (mc-Si) wafers has been developed that results in a higher cell performance than that with un-textured wafers. Plasma textured samples prepared have low levels (∼4%) of reflectance. Plasma damage of textured wafers has been eliminated by a damage removal etch (DRE). The improvement in efficiency of mc-Si solar cells up to 15.1% has been attributed to complete suppression of reflectivity (4-5%) in a broad spectral range (350-800 nm) leading to black silicon surface. Also, DRE on plasma textured wafers has been found to result in reduced surface damage compared to cells without DRE leading to higher cell efficiencies.

  2. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, M.W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-08-04

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4 C storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4 C for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials. 8 figs.

  3. Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage

    DOEpatents

    Bitensky, Mark W.; Yoshida, Tatsuro

    1998-01-01

    Prolonged cold storage of red blood cells by oxygen removal and additive usage. A cost-effective, 4.degree. C. storage procedure that preserves red cell quality and prolongs post-transfusion in vivo survival is described. The improved in vivo survival and the preservation of adenosine triphosphate levels, along with reduction in hemolysis and membrane vesicle production of red blood cells stored at 4.degree. C. for prolonged periods of time, is achieved by reducing the oxygen level therein at the time of storage; in particular, by flushing the cells with an inert gas, and storing them in an aqueous solution which includes adenine, dextrose, mannitol, citrate ion, and dihydrogen phosphate ion, but no sodium chloride, in an oxygen-permeable container which is located in an oxygen-free environment containing oxygen-scavenging materials.

  4. Tract specific analysis in patients with sickle cell disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yaqiong; Coloigner, Julie; Qu, Xiaoping; Choi, Soyoung; Bush, Adam; Borzage, Matt; Vu, Chau; Lepore, Natasha; Wood, John

    2015-12-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a hereditary blood disorder in which the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells is abnormal. It affects numerous people in the world and leads to a shorter life span, pain, anemia, serious infections and neurocognitive decline. Tract-Specific Analysis (TSA) is a statistical method to evaluate white matter alterations due to neurocognitive diseases, using diffusion tensor magnetic resonance images. Here, for the first time, TSA is used to compare 11 major brain white matter (WM) tracts between SCD patients and age-matched healthy subjects. Alterations are found in the corpus callosum (CC), the cortico-spinal tract (CST), inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus (IFO), inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF), superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), and uncinated fasciculus (UNC). Based on previous studies on the neurocognitive functions of these tracts, the significant areas found in this paper might be related to several cognitive impairments and depression, both of which are observed in SCD patients.

  5. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  6. Analyzing center specific outcomes in hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Logan, Brent R; Nelson, Gene O; Klein, John P

    2008-12-01

    Reporting transplant center-specific survival rates after hematopoietic cell transplantation is required in the United States. We describe a method to report 1-year survival outcomes by center, as well as to quantify center performance relative to the transplant center network average, which can be reliably used with censored data and for small center sizes. Each center's observed 1-year survival outcome is compared to a predicted survival outcome adjusted for patient characteristics using a pseudovalue regression technique. A 95% prediction interval for 1-year survival assuming no center effect is computed for each center by bootstrapping the scaled residuals from the regression model, and the observed 1-year survival is compared to this prediction interval to determine center performance. We illustrate the technique using a recent center specific analysis performed by the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research, and study the performance of this method using simulation. PMID:18836830

  7. Role of specific endocytic pathways in electrotransfection of cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chun-Chi; Wu, Mina; Yuan, Fan

    2014-01-01

    Electrotransfection is a technique utilized for gene delivery in both preclinical and clinical studies. However, its mechanisms are not fully understood. The goal of this study was to investigate specific pathways of endocytosis involved in electrotransfection. In the study, three different human cell lines (HEK293, HCT116, and HT29) were either treated with ice cold medium postelectrotransfection or endocytic inhibitors prior to electrotransfection. The inhibitors were pharmacological agents (chlorpromazine, genistein, and amiloride) or different small interfering RNA (siRNA) molecules that could knockdown expression of clathrin heavy chain (CLTC), caveolin-1, and Rab34, respectively. The reduction in gene expressions was confirmed with western blot analysis at 48-72h post-siRNA treatment. It was observed that treatments with either ice cold medium, chlorpromazine, or genistein resulted in significant reductions in electrotransfection efficiency (eTE) in all three cell lines, compared to the matched controls, but amiloride treatment had insignificant effects on eTE. For cells treated with siRNA, only CLTC knockdown resulted in eTE reduction for all three cell lines. Together, these data demonstrated that the clathrin-mediated endocytosis played an important role in electrotransfection. PMID:26052524

  8. Electrosorption driven by microbial fuel cells to remove phenol without external power supply.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Minghua; Zhao, Yingying; Zhang, Chao; Hu, Youshuang

    2013-12-01

    This work studied the operating parameters (pH, electrolyte concentration, initial phenol concentration, MFCs connection numbers and mode), adsorption isotherms and kinetics of a novel electrosorption driven by microbial fuel cells (MFC-Sorption) to remove phenol without external electric grid energy supply. It proved that high electrolyte concentration and low solution pH promoted the performance of phenol removal. 3 MFCs connections in series achieved a adsorption capacity of 1.76 mmol/g, which was much higher than that in parallel connection (1.46 mmol/g). Well fitted with Langmuir isotherm, the maximum adsorption capacity by MFC-Sorption and electrosorption was observed 48% and 65% higher than that by conventional adsorption. The phenol removal by MFC-Sorption was supposed to be more suitable for a pseudo-second-order kinetics, and with the increase of initial phenol concentration from 20 mg/L to 300 mg/L, the initial adsorption rate increased 26.99-fold. It concluded that the MFC-Sorption system could cost-effectively remove pollutant of phenol. PMID:24177161

  9. Natural killer cells facilitate PRAME-specific T-cell reactivity against neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Spel, Lotte; Boelens, Jaap-Jan; van der Steen, Dirk M.; Blokland, Nina J.G.; van Noesel, Max M.; Molenaar, Jan J.; Heemskerk, Mirjam H.M.

    2015-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common solid tumor in children with an estimated 5-year progression free survival of 20–40% in stage 4 disease. Neuroblastoma actively avoids recognition by natural killer (NK) cells and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). Although immunotherapy has gained traction for neuroblastoma treatment, these immune escape mechanisms restrain clinical results. Therefore, we aimed to improve neuroblastoma immunogenicity to further the development of antigen-specific immunotherapy against neuroblastoma. We found that neuroblastoma cells significantly increase surface expression of MHC I upon exposure to active NK cells which thereby readily sensitize neuroblastoma cells for recognition by CTLs. We show that oncoprotein PRAME serves as an immunodominant antigen for neuroblastoma as NK-modulated neuroblastoma cells are recognized by PRAMESLLQHLIGL/A2-specific CTL clones. Furthermore, NK cells induce MHC I upregulation in neuroblastoma through contact-dependent secretion of IFNγ. Our results demonstrate remarkable plasticity in the peptide/MHC I surface expression of neuroblastoma cells, which is reversed when neuroblastoma cells experience innate immune attack by sensitized NK cells. These findings support the exploration of NK cells as adjuvant therapy to enforce neuroblastoma-specific CTL responses. PMID:26452036

  10. Polyfunctional T cells accumulate in large human cytomegalovirus-specific T cell responses.

    PubMed

    Lachmann, Raskit; Bajwa, Martha; Vita, Serena; Smith, Helen; Cheek, Elizabeth; Akbar, Arne; Kern, Florian

    2012-01-01

    Large cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8 T-cell responses are observed in both young and, somewhat more often, old people. Frequent CMV reactivation is thought to exhaust these cells and render them dysfunctional so that larger numbers of them are needed to control CMV. Expansions of CMV-specific CD4 T cells are also seen but are less well studied. In this study, we examined the T-cell response to the dominant CMV pp65 and IE-1 antigens in healthy CMV-infected people across a wide age range (20 to 84 years) by using multicolor flow cytometry. CMV-specific T cells were characterized by the activation markers CD40 ligand (CD40L), interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α), and gamma interferon (IFN-γ) and the memory markers CD27 and CD45RA. The proportions of effector memory T cells increased in large responses, as did the proportions of polyfunctional CD8 (IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+/-) TNF-α(+)) and CD4 (CD40L(+/-) IFN-γ(+) IL-2(+) TNF-α(+)) T-cell subsets, while the proportion of naïve T cells decreased. The bigger the CD4 or CD8 T-cell response to pp65, the larger was the proportion of T cells with an advanced memory phenotype in the entire (including non-CMV-specific) T-cell compartment. In addition, the number of activation markers per cell correlated with the degree of T-cell receptor downregulation, suggesting increased antigen sensitivity in polyfunctional cells. In summary, our findings show that polyfunctional CMV-specific T cells were not superseded by dysfunctional cells, even in very large responses. At the same time, however, the memory subset composition of the entire T-cell compartment correlated with the size of the T-cell response to CMV pp65, confirming a strong effect of CMV infection on the immune systems of some, but not all, infected people. PMID:22072753

  11. Removal of myeloid cytokines from the cellular environment enhances T-cell development in vitro.

    PubMed

    Smeets, Monique F M A; Mackenzie-Kludas, Charley; Mohtashami, Mahmood; Zhang, Hui-Hua; Zúñiga-Pflücker, Juan Carlos; Izon, David J

    2013-10-01

    The majority of T-cell development occurs in the thymus. Thymic epithelial cells are specialized cells that express NOTCH ligands and secrete specific cytokines required for normal T-cell lymphopoiesis. It has been demonstrated that OP9 cells derived from macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF)-deficient mice can support T-cell development when transduced with a NOTCH ligand, Delta-like 1 (Dll1). In this report, we have tested CSF-deficient mouse fibroblasts transduced with Dll1 for their ability to support T-cell differentiation. The data provided here demonstrate that CSF-deficient fibroblasts expressing DLL1 can support T-cell development. Indeed, co-cultures with these fibroblasts produced more T-cell progenitors compared with OP9-DL1 cultures. Addition of myeloid cytokines to OP9-DL1 co-cultures significantly inhibited T-cell development while CSF-deficient DLL1(+) fibroblasts retained partial T-cell differentiation. Taken together, these data imply that their lack of myeloid cytokines allows DLL1(+) fibroblasts to more efficiently generate T-cells. Development of this fibroblast system suggests that there is potential for generating human T-cell precursors via co-culture with human fibroblasts expressing DLL1 or DLL4. These T-cell precursors could be used for treating immunodeficient patients. PMID:23988615

  12. Immuno-Navigator, a batch-corrected coexpression database, reveals cell type-specific gene networks in the immune system

    PubMed Central

    Vandenbon, Alexis; Dinh, Viet H.; Mikami, Norihisa; Kitagawa, Yohko; Teraguchi, Shunsuke; Ohkura, Naganari; Sakaguchi, Shimon

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput gene expression data are one of the primary resources for exploring complex intracellular dynamics in modern biology. The integration of large amounts of public data may allow us to examine general dynamical relationships between regulators and target genes. However, obstacles for such analyses are study-specific biases or batch effects in the original data. Here we present Immuno-Navigator, a batch-corrected gene expression and coexpression database for 24 cell types of the mouse immune system. We systematically removed batch effects from the underlying gene expression data and showed that this removal considerably improved the consistency between inferred correlations and prior knowledge. The data revealed widespread cell type-specific correlation of expression. Integrated analysis tools allow users to use this correlation of expression for the generation of hypotheses about biological networks and candidate regulators in specific cell types. We show several applications of Immuno-Navigator as examples. In one application we successfully predicted known regulators of importance in naturally occurring Treg cells from their expression correlation with a set of Treg-specific genes. For one high-scoring gene, integrin β8 (Itgb8), we confirmed an association between Itgb8 expression in forkhead box P3 (Foxp3)-positive T cells and Treg-specific epigenetic remodeling. Our results also suggest that the regulation of Treg-specific genes within Treg cells is relatively independent of Foxp3 expression, supporting recent results pointing to a Foxp3-independent component in the development of Treg cells. PMID:27078110

  13. Selective removal of DNA from dead cells of mixed bacterial communities by use of ethidium monoazide.

    PubMed

    Nocker, Andreas; Camper, Anne K

    2006-03-01

    The distinction between viable and dead bacterial cells poses a major challenge in microbial diagnostics. Due to the persistence of DNA in the environment after cells have lost viability, DNA-based quantification methods overestimate the number of viable cells in mixed populations or even lead to false-positive results in the absence of viable cells. On the other hand, RNA-based diagnostic methods, which circumvent this problem, are technically demanding and suffer from some drawbacks. A promising and easy-to-use alternative utilizing the DNA-intercalating dye ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) was published recently. This chemical is known to penetrate only into "dead" cells with compromised cell membrane integrity. Subsequent photoinduced cross-linking was reported to inhibit PCR amplification of DNA from dead cells. We provide evidence here that in addition to inhibition of amplification, most of the DNA from dead cells is actually lost during the DNA extraction procedure, probably together with cell debris which goes into the pellet fraction. Exposure of bacteria to increasing stress and higher proportions of dead cells in defined populations led to increasing loss of genomic DNA. Experiments were performed using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as model pathogens and using real-time PCR for their quantification. Results showed that EMA treatment of mixed populations of these two species provides a valuable tool for selective removal of DNA of nonviable cells by using conventional extraction protocols. Furthermore, we provide evidence that prior to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, EMA treatment of a mature mixed-population drinking-water biofilm containing a substantial proportion of dead cells can result in community fingerprints dramatically different from those for an untreated biofilm. The interpretation of such fingerprints can have important implications in the field of microbial ecology. PMID:16517648

  14. Selective Removal of DNA from Dead Cells of Mixed Bacterial Communities by Use of Ethidium Monoazide

    PubMed Central

    Nocker, Andreas; Camper, Anne K.

    2006-01-01

    The distinction between viable and dead bacterial cells poses a major challenge in microbial diagnostics. Due to the persistence of DNA in the environment after cells have lost viability, DNA-based quantification methods overestimate the number of viable cells in mixed populations or even lead to false-positive results in the absence of viable cells. On the other hand, RNA-based diagnostic methods, which circumvent this problem, are technically demanding and suffer from some drawbacks. A promising and easy-to-use alternative utilizing the DNA-intercalating dye ethidium monoazide bromide (EMA) was published recently. This chemical is known to penetrate only into “dead” cells with compromised cell membrane integrity. Subsequent photoinduced cross-linking was reported to inhibit PCR amplification of DNA from dead cells. We provide evidence here that in addition to inhibition of amplification, most of the DNA from dead cells is actually lost during the DNA extraction procedure, probably together with cell debris which goes into the pellet fraction. Exposure of bacteria to increasing stress and higher proportions of dead cells in defined populations led to increasing loss of genomic DNA. Experiments were performed using Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium as model pathogens and using real-time PCR for their quantification. Results showed that EMA treatment of mixed populations of these two species provides a valuable tool for selective removal of DNA of nonviable cells by using conventional extraction protocols. Furthermore, we provide evidence that prior to denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, EMA treatment of a mature mixed-population drinking-water biofilm containing a substantial proportion of dead cells can result in community fingerprints dramatically different from those for an untreated biofilm. The interpretation of such fingerprints can have important implications in the field of microbial ecology. PMID:16517648

  15. Osmotically induced removal of water from fungal cells as determined by a spin probe technique.

    PubMed

    Miller, R W

    1978-11-01

    Effects of physical environment on plasma membrane semipermeability and osmotic induction of changes in aqueous cytoplasmic volume were studied in vegetative and spore cells of a plant pathogenic fungus, Fusarium sulphureum. A direct method, employing a spin probe molecule that partitioned between intracellular aqueous and hydrophobic phases, allowed measurement of reversible water movement out of macroconidial cells and chlamydospores exposed to solutions of high osmolarity. Equilibrium distribution of the spin probe between intracellular aqueous and lipid phases was more rapid than movement of water in and out of the cells. The extent of water removal was exponentially dependent on osmotic strength. Some cells became irreversibly permeable to divalent cations on treatment with sodium chloride above 1.5 osmolar but addition of sucrose to the suspension medium at equivalent osmolar concentrations caused water removal without adversely affecting the viability. Sucrose also protected the plasma membrane against damage during freeze-drying. Induction of plasma membrane damage by osmotic shock or freeze-drying permitted rapid permeation of nickel ions. Neither slow equilibration of intracellular components with divalent paramagnetic cations nor partial permeability of damaged plasma membranes to these ions was observed. PMID:16660597

  16. Sickle cell hospital unit: a disease-specific model.

    PubMed

    Adams-Graves, Patricia; Ostric, Elizabeth J; Martin, Mary; Richardson, Pat; Lewis, James B

    2008-01-01

    American urban hospitals often serve large populations of sickle cell disease (SCD) patients. Those hospitals that choose to implement an adult SCD-specific inpatient unit have the opportunity to acquire multiple operational benefits. Such units may ultimately reduce patient morbidity and mortality; improve timely access to quality medical care in a cost-effective manner; reduce overcrowding in the emergency department; and increase patient, family, physician, and payer satisfaction. SCD is a serious, painful, genetic blood disorder that affects a growing population of adults in the United States. A single mistake in the gene that codes for hemoglobin causes crescent-shaped red blood cells that are sticky, are stiff, and have a short life span. These cells cause blockages, tremendous pain brought on by lack of oxygen in the muscles, organ damage, stroke, and problems with infections. The cells' short life span often results in anemia. The unpredictable pain event-sickle cell disease with crisis-is the most common reason for presentation to the emergency department and for hospital admission. For many SCD patients, the emergency department process and the general, overly conservative approach to pain relief lead to a delay in treatment and prolong needless suffering. Regional Medical Center at Memphis (Tennessee) established an SCD unit and developed an inpatient care delivery model that decreases the burden of caring for SCD patients on its busy emergency department, improves SCD patients' satisfaction and access to timely quality care, and reduces the needless pain and suffering of SCD patients. This SCD model may be replicated in large urban hospitals with a daily SCD patient census of five or more. PMID:18856136

  17. A recombinant antibody with the antigen-specific, major histocompatibility complex-restricted specificity of T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, P S; Stryhn, A; Hansen, B E; Fugger, L; Engberg, J; Buus, S

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of peptide/major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule complexes by the T-cell receptor is a key reaction in the specific immune response. Antibodies against peptide/MHC complexes would therefore be valuable tools in studying MHC function and T-cell recognition and might lead to novel approaches in immunotherapy. However, it has proven difficult to generate antibodies with the specificity of T cells by conventional hybridoma techniques. Here we report that the phage display technology is a feasible alternative to generate antibodies recognizing specific, predetermined peptide/MHC complexes. Images Fig. 2 PMID:8700842

  18. Periodic Shorting of SOM Cell to Remove Soluble Magnesium in Molten Flux and Improve Faradaic Efficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xiaofei; Su, Shizhao; Pal, Uday B.; Powell, Adam C.

    2014-12-01

    Solid oxide membrane (SOM) electrolysis has been used for magnesium production directly from magnesium oxide. Magnesium dissolution in molten flux electrolyte is of particular concern in SOM electrolysis, because it imparts electronic conductivity to the flux and thereby decreases the faradaic current efficiency. In this work, a new approach for removing soluble magnesium in the flux is explored. Periodic shorting is performed between the anode and the cathode of SOM electrolysis cell. During shorting, soluble magnesium in the flux is oxidized to magnesium oxide. This significantly reduces the electronic current in the flux and therefore keeps the faradaic current efficiency high during SOM electrolysis. Electronic transference numbers in the flux are measured to assess the soluble magnesium concentration. Potentiodynamic scan results also confirm the feasibility of shorting the electrodes to remove soluble magnesium.

  19. Optimization of enhanced bioelectrical reactor with electricity from microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ye; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Feng, Chuanping; Wang, Zhijun; Cheng, Ming; Hu, Weiwu

    2016-04-01

    Factors influencing the performance of a continual-flow bioelectrical reactor (BER) intensified by microbial fuel cells for groundwater nitrate removal, including nitrate load, carbon source and hydraulic retention time (HRT), were investigated and optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). With the target of maximum nitrate removal and minimum intermediates accumulation, nitrate load (for nitrogen) of 60.70 mg/L, chemical oxygen demand (COD) of 849.55 mg/L and HRT of 3.92 h for the BER were performed. COD was the dominant factor influencing performance of the system. Experimental results indicated the undistorted simulation and reliable optimized values. These demonstrate that RSM is an effective method to evaluate and optimize the nitrate-reducing performance of the present system and can guide mathematical models development to further promote its practical applications. PMID:26402418

  20. Cost-effective copper removal by electrosorption powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jie; Zhou, Minghua; Hu, Youshuang; Yang, Weilu

    2016-03-01

    This work studied a cost-effective electrosorption that driven by microbial fuel cells (MFC-sorption) to remove Cu(2+) from wastewater without an external energy supply. The impact factors, adsorption isotherms and kinetics of the novel process were investigated. It indicated that a low electrolyte concentration and a high solution pH could enhance the Cu(2+) removal efficiency, while the adsorption capacity increased with the increase of numbers of MFCs in series and the initial Cu(2+) concentration. The adsorption isotherms study indicated that the monolayer adsorption in MFC-sorption was dominant. The kinetics study suggested the increase of initial Cu(2+) concentration could enhance the initial adsorption rate. The electrode characterizations verified the existence of Cu2O and Cu on the electrode surface of active carbon fibers (ACFs), suggesting that MFC-sorption was not only an adsorption process, but also a redox reaction process. PMID:26747441

  1. Enhancement of bacterial denitrification for nitrate removal in groundwater with electrical stimulation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Baogang; Liu, Ye; Tong, Shuang; Zheng, Maosheng; Zhao, Yinxin; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Hengyuan; Feng, Chuanping

    2014-12-01

    Electricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly as electrical stimulation means for enhancement of bacterial denitrification to remove nitrate effectively from groundwater. With maximum power density of 502.5 mW m-2 and voltage outputs ranging from 500 mV to 700 mV, the nitrate removal is accelerated, with less intermediates accumulation, compared with control sets without electrical stimulation. Denitrification bacteria proliferations and activities are promoted as its number and Adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) concentration increased one order of magnitude (3.5 × 107 in per milliliter biofilm solution) and about 1.5 folds, respectively. Effects of electricity from MFCs on enhancement of bacterial behaviors are demonstrated for the first time. These results indicate that MFCs can be applied in the in-situ bioremediation of nitrate polluted groundwater for efficiency improvement.

  2. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment.

    PubMed

    Seifart, Carola; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf; Müller, Bernd; Vogelmeier, Claus; von Wichert, Peter; Fehrenbach, Heinz

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression. PMID:15694461

  3. Cell-specific modulation of surfactant proteins by ambroxol treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Seifart, Carola . E-mail: zwiebel@mailer.uni-marburg.de; Clostermann, Ursula; Seifart, Ulf

    2005-02-15

    Ambroxol [trans-4-(2-amino-3,5-dibromobenzylamino)-cyclohexanole hydrochloride], a mucolytic agent, was postulated to provide surfactant stimulatory properties and was previously used to prevent surfactant deficiency. Currently, the underlying mechanisms are not exactly clear. Because surfactant homeostasis is regulated by surfactant-specific proteins (SP), we analyzed protein amount and mRNA expression in whole lung tissue, isolated type II pneumocytes and bronchoalveolar lavage of Sprague-Dawley rats treated with ambroxol i.p. (75 mg/kg body weight, twice a day [every 12 h]). The methods used included competitive polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), Northern blotting, Western immunoblotting, and immunohistochemistry. In isolated type II pneumocytes of ambroxol-treated animals, SP-C protein and mRNA content were increased, whereas SP-A, -B and -D protein, mRNA, and immunoreactivity remained unaffected. However, ambroxol treatment resulted in a significant increase of SP-B and in a decrease of SP-D in whole lung tissue with enhanced immunostaining for SP-B in Clara Cells. SP-A and SP-D were significantly decreased in BAL fluid of ambroxol-treated animals. The data suggest that surfactant protein expression is modulated in a cell-specific manner by ambroxol, as type II pneumocytes exhibited an increase in SP-C, whereas Clara cells exhibited an increase in the immunoreactivity for SP-B accounting for the increased SP-B content of whole lung tissue. The results indicate that ambroxol may exert its positive effects, observed in the treatment of diseases related to surfactant deficiency, via modulation of surfactant protein expression.

  4. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  5. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal eff...

  6. Oncolytic viruses & their specific targeting to tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Prafull K.; Doley, Juwar; Kumar, G. Ravi; Sahoo, A.P.; Tiwari, Ashok K.

    2012-01-01

    Cancer is one of the major causes of death worldwide. In spite of achieving significant successes in medical sciences in the past few decades, the number of deaths due to cancer remains unchecked. The conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy have limited therapeutic index and a plethora of treatment related side effects. This situation has provided an impetus for search of novel therapeutic strategies that can selectively destroy the tumour cells, leaving the normal cells unharmed. Viral oncotherapy is such a promising treatment modality that offers unique opportunity for tumour targeting. Numerous viruses with inherent anti-cancer activity have been identified and are in different phases of clinical trials. In the era of modern biotechnology and with better understanding of cancer biology and virology, it has become feasible to engineer the oncolytic viruses (OVs) to increase their tumour selectivity and enhance their oncolytic activity. In this review, the mechanisms by which oncolytic viruses kill the tumour cells have been discussed as also the development made in virotherapy for cancer treatment with emphasis on their tumour specific targeting. PMID:23168697

  7. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neuronal cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Parveen, Zahida; Mukhtar, Muhammad; Rafi, Mohammed; Wenger, David A; Siddiqui, Khwaja M; Siler, Catherine A; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Pomerantz, Roger J; Schnell, Matthias J; Dornburg, Ralph

    2003-09-15

    The avian retroviruses reticuloendotheliosis virus strain A (REV-A) and spleen necrosis virus (SNV) are not naturally infectious in human cells. However, REV-A-derived viral vectors efficiently infect human cells when they are pseudotyped with envelope proteins displaying targeting ligands specific for human cell-surface receptors. Here we report that vectors containing the gag region of REV-A and pol of SNV can be pseudotyped with the envelope protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and the glycoproteins of different rabies virus (RV) strains. Vectors pseudotyped with the envelope protein of the highly neurotropic RV strain CVS-N2c facilitated cell type-specific gene delivery into mouse and human neurons, but did not infect other human cell types. Moreover, when such vector particles were injected into the brain of newborn mice, only neuronal cells were infected in vivo. Cell-type-specific gene delivery into neurons may present quite specific gene therapy approaches for many degenerative diseases of the brain. PMID:14517061

  8. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales - CERF

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  9. Comparison of Habitat-Specific Nutrient Removal and Release in Pacific NW Salt Marshes at Multiple Spatial Scales

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wetlands can be sources, sinks and transformers of nutrients, although it is their role in nutrient removal that is valued as a water purification ecosystem service. In order to quantify that service for any wetland, it is important to understand the drivers of nutrient removal w...

  10. Post-growth process for flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power.

    PubMed

    Cho, Eunwoo; Kang, Yoonmook; Kim, Donghwan; Kim, Jihyun

    2016-05-16

    We demonstrated a flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cell with high specific power of approximately 254 W/kg. A flexible and ultra-light weight CdS/CdTe cell treated with pre-NP etch process exhibited high conversion efficiency of 13.56% in superstrate configuration. Morphological, structural and optical changes of CdS/CdTe thin films were characterized when pre-NP etch step was incorporated to the conventional post-deposition process. Improvement of photovoltaic parameters can be attributed to the removal of the oxide and the formation of Te-rich layer, which benefit the activation process. Pre-NP etched cell maintained their flexibility and performance under the repeated tensile strain of 0.13%. Our method can pave a way for manufacturing flexible CdS/CdTe thin film solar cells with high specific power for mobile and aerospace applications. PMID:27409952

  11. A Cytokine-Independent Approach To Identify Antigen-Specific Human Germinal Center T Follicular Helper Cells and Rare Antigen-Specific CD4+ T Cells in Blood.

    PubMed

    Dan, Jennifer M; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; Weiskopf, Daniela; da Silva Antunes, Ricardo; Havenar-Daughton, Colin; Reiss, Samantha M; Brigger, Matthew; Bothwell, Marcella; Sette, Alessandro; Crotty, Shane

    2016-08-01

    Detection of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells is central to the study of many human infectious diseases, vaccines, and autoimmune diseases. However, such cells are generally rare and heterogeneous in their cytokine profiles. Identification of Ag-specific germinal center (GC) T follicular helper (Tfh) cells by cytokine production has been particularly problematic. The function of a GC Tfh cell is to selectively help adjacent GC B cells via cognate interaction; thus, GC Tfh cells may be stingy cytokine producers, fundamentally different from Th1 or Th17 cells in the quantities of cytokines produced. Conventional identification of Ag-specific cells by intracellular cytokine staining relies on the ability of the CD4(+) T cell to generate substantial amounts of cytokine. To address this problem, we have developed a cytokine-independent activation-induced marker (AIM) methodology to identify Ag-specific GC Tfh cells in human lymphoid tissue. Whereas Group A Streptococcus-specific GC Tfh cells produced minimal detectable cytokines by intracellular cytokine staining, the AIM method identified 85-fold more Ag-specific GC Tfh cells. Intriguingly, these GC Tfh cells consistently expressed programmed death ligand 1 upon activation. AIM also detected non-Tfh cells in lymphoid tissue. As such, we applied AIM for identification of rare Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells in human peripheral blood. Dengue, tuberculosis, and pertussis vaccine-specific CD4(+) T cells were readily detectable by AIM. In summary, cytokine assays missed 98% of Ag-specific human GC Tfh cells, reflecting the biology of these cells, which could instead be sensitively identified by coexpression of TCR-dependent activation markers. PMID:27342848

  12. Cell-of-Origin-Specific 3D Genome Structure Acquired during Somatic Cell Reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Krijger, Peter Hugo Lodewijk; Di Stefano, Bruno; de Wit, Elzo; Limone, Francesco; van Oevelen, Chris; de Laat, Wouter; Graf, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced expression of reprogramming factors can convert somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Here we studied genome topology dynamics during reprogramming of different somatic cell types with highly distinct genome conformations. We find large-scale topologically associated domain (TAD) repositioning and alterations of tissue-restricted genomic neighborhoods and chromatin loops, effectively erasing the somatic-cell-specific genome structures while establishing an embryonic stem-cell-like 3D genome. Yet, early passage iPSCs carry topological hallmarks that enable recognition of their cell of origin. These hallmarks are not remnants of somatic chromosome topologies. Instead, the distinguishing topological features are acquired during reprogramming, as we also find for cell-of-origin-dependent gene expression patterns. PMID:26971819

  13. Tissue-Specific Stem Cells in the Myometrium and Tumor-Initiating Cells in Leiomyoma1

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Masanori; Bulun, Serdar E.; Maruyama, Tetsuo

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tissue-specific (or somatic) stem cells constitute a subset of cells residing in normal adult tissues. By undergoing asymmetric division, they retain their ability to self-renew while producing daughter cells that go on to differentiate and play a role in tissue regeneration and repair. The human uterus consists primarily of endometrium and myometrium (the smooth muscle layer) that rapidly enlarges through its tremendous regenerative and remodeling capacity to accommodate the developing fetus. Such uterine enlargement and remodeling can take place repeatedly and cyclically over the course of a woman's reproductive life. These unique properties of the uterus suggest the existence of endometrial and myometrial stem cell systems. In addition, like somatic cells, tumor stem cells or tumor-initiating cells, a subset of cells within a tumor, retain the ability to reconstitute tumors. Uterine smooth muscle cells are thought to be the origin of leiomyomas that are the most common type of gynecologic tumor. Recent work has identified, isolated, and characterized putative stem/progenitor cells in the myometrium and in leiomyomas. Here, we review current studies of myometrial and leiomyoma stem/progenitor cells and provide a new paradigm for understanding myometrial physiology and pathology and how these cells might contribute to uterine remodeling during pregnancy and the formation of leiomyomas. The role of the WNT/CTNNB1 pathway in the pathogenesis of leiomyoma is also discussed. PMID:25376230

  14. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gaitas, Angelo; Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient’s entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing. PMID:26176235

  15. Chemically Modified Plastic Tube for High Volume Removal and Collection of Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Gaitas, Angelo; Kim, Gwangseong

    2015-01-01

    In this preliminary effort, we use a commercially available and chemically modified tube to selectively capture circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood stream by immobilizing human anti-EpCAM antibodies on the tube's interior surface. We describe the requisite and critical steps required to modify a tube into a cancer cell-capturing device. Using these simple modifications, we were able to capture or entrap about 85% of cancer cells from suspension and 44% of cancer cells from spiked whole blood. We also found that the percentage of cells captured was dependent on the tube's length and also the number of cancer cells present. It is our strong belief that with the utilization of appropriate tube lengths and procedures, we can ensure capture and removal of nearly the entire CTC population in whole blood. Importantly after a patient's entire blood volume has circulated through the tube, the tube can then be trypsinized to release the captured live CTCs for further analysis and testing. PMID:26176235

  16. Renal Cell Carcinoma Presenting as Right Atrial Tumor with Successful Removal Using Cardiopulmonary Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Joy G.; Rhodes, Donald B.; Skow, James R.

    1975-01-01

    A 58-year-old male presented with signs and symptoms of right sided heart failure. Diagnostic evaluation revealed a right renal cell carcinoma with extension into the vena cava and right atrium. Surgical management included radical right nephrectomy with retroperitoneal lymph node dissection, inferior vena caval resection, and removal of the intra-atrial tumor thrombus using a cardiopulmonary bypass. Two years after surgery the patient is alive and well with no evidence of recurrent disease. ImagesFig. 1.Fig. 2a.Fig. 2b.Fig. 3. PMID:1130867

  17. The specific reactive surface area of granular zero-valent iron in metal contaminant removal: Column experiments and modelling.

    PubMed

    Statham, Tom M; Mason, Lachlan R; Mumford, Kathryn A; Stevens, Geoffrey W

    2015-06-15

    A series of dynamic-flow kinetic experiments were conducted to assess the removal rates of aqueous Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) ions by zero-valent iron (ZVI), a promising material for inclusion in cold-climate remediation applications. The influence of experimental parameters on contaminant removal rates, including aqueous flow rate, operating temperature, and the concentrations of ZVI, salt and dissolved oxygen, was investigated. A mass transport model has been developed that accounts (i) aqueous-phase dispersion processes, (ii) film diffusion of contaminant ions to the reactive ZVI surface and (iii) the reactive removal mechanism itself. Regression to the experimental data indicated that when oxygen is present in the solution feed Cu(2+) and Zn(2+) removal processes were limited by film diffusion. In de-aerated solutions film diffusion still controls Cu(2+) removal but a first-order surface reaction provides a better model for Zn(2+) kinetics. Using air as the equilibrium feed gas, the reactive proportion of the total surface area for contaminant removal was calculated to be 97% and 64% of the active spherically-assumed geometric area associated with ZVI media for Cu(2+) and Zn(2+), respectively. Relative to a gas absorption area, determined in previous studies, the reactive proportion is less than 0.41% of the unreacted ZVI total surface area. These findings suggest that only part of the iron oxyhydroxide surface is reacting during ZVI based metal contaminant removal. PMID:25839833

  18. Increasing functional avidity of TCR-redirected T cells by removing defined N-glycosylation sites in the TCR constant domain

    PubMed Central

    Hauptrock, Beate; Malina, Victoria; Antunes, Edite; Voss, Ralf-Holger; Wolfl, Matthias; Strong, Roland; Theobald, Matthias; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes transduced with a T cell receptor (TCR) to impart tumor reactivity has been reported as a potential strategy to redirect immune responses to target cancer cells (Schumacher, T.N. 2002. Nat. Rev. Immunol. 2:512–519). However, the affinity of most TCRs specific for shared tumor antigens that can be isolated is usually low. Thus, strategies to increase the affinity of TCRs or the functional avidity of TCR-transduced T cells might be therapeutically beneficial. Because glycosylation affects the flexibility, movement, and interactions of surface molecules, we tested if selectively removing conserved N-glycoslyation sites in the constant regions of TCR α or β chains could increase the functional avidity of T cells transduced with such modified TCRs. We observed enhanced functional avidity and improved recognition of tumor cells by T cells harboring TCR chains with reduced N-glycosylation (ΔTCR) as compared with T cells with wild-type (WT) TCR chains. T cells transduced with WT or ΔTCR chains bound tetramer equivalently at 4°C, but tetramer binding was enhanced at 37°C, predominantly as a result of reduced tetramer dissociation. This suggested a temperature-dependent mechanism such as TCR movement in the cell surface or structural changes of the TCR allowing improved multimerization. This strategy was effective with mouse and human TCRs specific for different antigens and, thus, should be readily translated to TCRs with any specificity. PMID:19171765

  19. Reinnervation of Hair Cells by Auditory Neurons after Selective Removal of Spiral Ganglion Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Monedero, Rodrigo; Corrales, C. Eduardo; Cuajungco, Math P.; Heller, Stefan; Edge, Albert S.B.

    2007-01-01

    Hearing loss can be caused by primary degeneration of spiral ganglion neurons or by secondary degeneration of these neurons after hair cell loss. The replacement of auditory neurons would be an important step in any attempt to restore auditory function in patients with damaged inner ear neurons or hair cells. Application of β-bungarotoxin, a toxin derived from snake venom, to an explant of the cochlea eradicates spiral ganglion neurons while sparing the other cochlear cell types. The toxin was found to bind to the neurons and to cause apoptotic cell death without affecting hair cells or other inner ear cell types as indicated by TUNEL staining, and, thus, the toxin provides a highly specific means of deafferentation of hair cells. We therefore used the denervated organ of Corti for the study of neuronal regeneration and synaptogenesis with hair cells and found that spiral ganglion neurons obtained from the cochlea of an untreated newborn mouse reinnervated hair cells in the toxin-treated organ of Corti and expressed synaptic vesicle markers at points of contact with hair cells. These findings suggest that it may be possible to replace degenerated neurons by grafting new cells into the organ of Corti. PMID:16408287

  20. A novel and highly specific phage endolysin cell wall binding domain for detection of Bacillus cereus.

    PubMed

    Kong, Minsuk; Sim, Jieun; Kang, Taejoon; Nguyen, Hoang Hiep; Park, Hyun Kyu; Chung, Bong Hyun; Ryu, Sangryeol

    2015-09-01

    Rapid, specific and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is crucial for public health and safety. Bacillus cereus is harmful as it causes foodborne illness and a number of systemic and local infections. We report a novel phage endolysin cell wall-binding domain (CBD) for B. cereus and the development of a highly specific and sensitive surface plasmon resonance (SPR)-based B. cereus detection method using the CBD. The newly discovered CBD from endolysin of PBC1, a B. cereus-specific bacteriophage, provides high specificity and binding capacity to B. cereus. By using the CBD-modified SPR chips, B. cereus can be detected at the range of 10(5)-10(8) CFU/ml. More importantly, the detection limit can be improved to 10(2) CFU/ml by using a subtractive inhibition assay based on the pre-incubation of B. cereus and CBDs, removal of CBD-bound B. cereus, and SPR detection of the unbound CBDs. The present study suggests that the small and genetically engineered CBDs can be promising biological probes for B. cereus. We anticipate that the CBD-based SPR-sensing methods will be useful for the sensitive, selective, and rapid detection of B. cereus. PMID:26043681

  1. Nitrogen removal from wastewater through microbial electrolysis cells and cation exchange membrane

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Vulnerability of water resources to nutrients led to progressively stricter standards for wastewater effluents. Modification of the conventional procedures to meet the new standards is inevitable. New technologies should give a priority to nitrogen removal. In this paper, ammonium chloride and urine as nitrogen sources were used to investigate the capacity of a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) configured by cation exchange membrane (CEM) for electrochemical removal of nitrogen over open-and closed-circuit potentials (OCP and CCP) during biodegradation of organic matter. Results obtained from this study indicated that CEM was permeable to both organic and ammonium nitrogen over OCP. Power substantially mediated ammonium migration from anodic wastewater to the cathode, as well. With a urine rich wastewater in the anode, the maximum rate of ammonium intake into the cathode varied from 34.2 to 40.6 mg/L.h over CCP compared to 10.5-14.9 mg/L.h over OCP. Ammonium separation over CCP was directly related to current. For 1.46-2.12 mmol electron produced, 20.5-29.7 mg-N ammonium was removed. Current also increased cathodic pH up to 12, a desirable pH for changing ammonium ion to ammonia gas. Results emphasized the potential for MEC in control of ammonium through ammonium separation and ammonia volatilization provided that membrane characteristic is considered in their development. PMID:24533446

  2. A microbial fuel cell driven capacitive deionization technology for removal of low level dissolved ions.

    PubMed

    Feng, Cuijie; Hou, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shaohua; Yu, Chang-Ping

    2013-04-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging technology, which uses exoelectrogenic microorganisms to oxidize organic matter in the wastewater to produce electricity. However, the low energy output limits its application in practice. Capacitive deionization (CDI), an electrochemically controlled method for deionization by the adsorption of ions in the electrical double layer region at an electrode-solution interface, requires a low external power supply. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the MFC driven CDI (MFC-CDI) technology to integrate deionization with wastewater treatment and electricity production. Taking advantage of the low potential requirement of CDI, voltage generated from a continuous flow MFC could be used to drive the CDI to achieve removal of the electrolyte to a stable status. The results indicated that among the three connection types of MFCs including single-, series-, and parallel-configuration, the parallel connection of two MFCs resulted in the highest potential (0.63V) applied to CDI and the conductivity removal of NaCl solution was more than 60%. The electrosorption capacities under different electrolyte concentrations of 50, 100 and 150 mg L(-1) were 150, 346 and 295 μg g(-1), respectively. These results suggest that the new MFC-CDI technology, which utilizes energy recovery from the wastewater, has great potential to be an energy saving technology to remove low level dissolved ions from aqueous solutions for the water and wastewater treatment processes. PMID:23375820

  3. Simultaneous Removal of Phenol and Dissolved Solids from Wastewater Using Multichambered Microbial Desalination Cell.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Harapriya; Jain, Sumat Chand; Ghangrekar, Makarand M

    2015-12-01

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) has great potential toward direct electricity generation from wastewater and concurrent desalination through potential difference developed due to microbial activity. Degradation of phenol by isolate Pseudomonas aeruginosa in anodic chamber and simultaneous desalination of water in middle desalination chamber of multichamber MDC is demonstrated in this study. Performance of the MDCs with different anodic inoculum conditions, namely pure culture of P. aeruginosa (MDC-1), 50 % v/v mixture of P. aeruginosa and anaerobic mixed consortia (MDC-2) and anaerobic mixed consortia (MDC-3), was evaluated to compare the phenol degradation in anodic chamber, bioelectricity generation, and simultaneous total dissolved solids (TDS) removal from saline water in desalination chamber. Synergistic effect between P. aeruginosa and mixed anaerobic consortia as inoculum was evident in MDC-2 demonstrating phenol degradation of 90 %, TDS removal of 75 % in 72 h of reaction time along with higher power generation of 27.5 mW/m(2) as compared to MDC-1 (95 %, 64 %, 12.8 mW/m(2), respectively) and MDC-3 (58 %, 52 %, 4.8 mW/m(2), respectively). The results illustrate that the multichamber MDC-2 is effective for simultaneous removal of phenol and dissolved solids contained in industrial wastewaters. PMID:26373945

  4. Simultaneous phenol removal, nitrification and denitrification using microbial fuel cell technology.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunhua; Huang, Liqiao; Yu, Hui; Yi, Xiaoyun; Wei, Chaohai

    2015-06-01

    Here we show that concomitant removal of phenol and nitrogen can be accomplished in a single dual-chamber microbial fuel cell (MFC) reactor, in which the two chambers are separated with an anion-exchange membrane. A series of experiments were performed with ammonium (230 NH4(+)-N mg L(-1)) and phenol (with concentrations varying from 0 to 1400 mg L(-1)) fed to the aerobic cathode chamber of the MFC. Experimental results demonstrated that no apparent inhibitory effect of phenol on the nitrifying reaction was noted even at the phenol concentration up to 600 mg L(-1). For all the experiments, simultaneous nitrification and denitrification was achieved in the MFC. In comparison to the traditional aerobic bioreactor (ABR) and the same MFC run under the open-circuit condition, the MFC reactor allowed less inhibition of nitrification to phenol exposure and higher rate of nitrogen removal. The data of bacterial analysis revealed that electrochemically active bacteria and denitrifiers in the anaerobic chamber play a significant role in electricity generation and anaerobic denitrification, respectively, while phenol-degrading bacteria, nitrifiers, and denitrifiers in the aerobic cathode chamber are responsible for phenol oxidation, aerobic nitrification and aerobic denitrification, respectively. These results imply that the MFC holds potential for simultaneous removal of phenolic compounds and nitrogen contained in some particular industrial wastewaters. PMID:25813490

  5. Human T-Cell Clones from Autoimmune Thyroid Glands: Specific Recognition of Autologous Thyroid Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Londei, Marco; Bottazzo, G. Franco; Feldmann, Marc

    1985-04-01

    The thyroid glands of patients with autoimmune diseases such as Graves' disease and certain forms of goiter contain infiltrating activated T lymphocytes and, unlike cells of normal glands, the epithelial follicular cells strongly express histocompatability antigens of the HLA-DR type. In a study of such autoimmune disorders, the infiltrating T cells from the thyroid glands of two patients with Graves' disease were cloned in mitogen-free interleukin-2 (T-cell growth factor). The clones were expanded and their specificity was tested. Three types of clones were found. One group, of T4 phenotype, specifically recognized autologous thyroid cells. Another, also of T4 phenotype, recognized autologous thyroid or blood cells and thus responded positively in the autologous mixed lymphocyte reaction. Other clones derived from cells that were activated in vivo were of no known specificity. These clones provide a model of a human autoimmune disease and their analysis should clarify mechanisms of pathogenesis and provide clues to abrogating these undesirable immune responses.

  6. Specific Visualization of Tumor Cells Using Upconversion Nanophosphors

    PubMed Central

    Grebenik, E. A.; Generalova, A. N.; Nechaev, A. V.; Khaydukov, E.V.; Mironova, K. E.; Stremovskiy, O. A.; Lebedenko, E.N.; Zvyagin, A. V.; Deyev, S. M.

    2014-01-01

    The development of targeted constructs on the basis of photoluminescent nanoparticles with a high photo- and chemical stability and absorption/emission spectra in the “transparency window” of biological tissues is an important focus area of present-day medical diagnostics. In this work, a targeted two-component construct on the basis of upconversion nanophosphors (UCNPs) and anti-tumor 4D5 scFv was developed for selective labeling of tumor cells overexpressing the HER2 tumor marker characteristic of a number of human malignant tumors. A high affinity barnase : barstar (Bn : Bs) protein pair, which exhibits high stability in a wide range of pH and temperatures, was exploited as a molecular adapter providing self-assembly of the two-component construct. High selectivity for the binding of the two-component 4D5 scFv-Bn : UCNP-Bs construct to human breast adenocarcinoma SK-BR-3 cells overexpressing HER2 was demonstrated. This approach provides an opportunity to produce similar constructs for the visualization of different specific markers in pathogenic tissues, including malignant tumors. PMID:25558394

  7. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed "lowest supercomplex" (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh's disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  8. Quantum dot-labeled aptamer nanoprobes specifically targeting glioma cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xue-Chai; Deng, Yu-Lin; Lin, Yi; Pang, Dai-Wen; Qing, Hong; Qu, Feng; Xie, Hai-Yan

    2008-06-01

    Two new techniques, aptamer-based specific recognition and quantum dot (QD)-based fluorescence labeling, are becoming increasingly important in biosensing. In this study, these two techniques have been coupled together to construct a new kind of fluorescent QD-labeled aptamer (QD-Apt) nanoprobe by conjugating GBI-10 aptamer to the QD surface. GBI-10 is a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) aptamer for tenascin-C, which distributes on the surface of glioma cells as a dominant extracellular matrix protein. The QD-Apt nanoprobe can recognize the tenascin-C on the human glioma cell surface, which will be helpful for the development of new convenient and sensitive in vitro diagnostic assays for glioma. The QD-Apt nanoprobe has particular features such as strong fluorescence, stability, monodispersity and uniformity. In addition, this probe preparation method is universal, so it is expected to provide a new type of stable nanoprobe for high-throughput and fast biosensing detection and bioimaging. New methods for real-time and dynamic tracking and imaging can be accordingly developed.

  9. T cells in the control of organ-specific autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A.; Bour-Jordan, Hélène; Cheng, Mickie; Anderson, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Immune tolerance is critical to the avoidance of unwarranted immune responses against self antigens. Multiple, non-redundant checkpoints are in place to prevent such potentially deleterious autoimmune responses while preserving immunity integral to the fight against foreign pathogens. Nevertheless, a large and growing segment of the population is developing autoimmune diseases. Deciphering cellular and molecular pathways of immune tolerance is an important goal, with the expectation that understanding these pathways will lead to new clinical advances in the treatment of these devastating diseases. The vast majority of autoimmune diseases develop as a consequence of complex mechanisms that depend on genetic, epigenetic, molecular, cellular, and environmental elements and result in alterations in many different checkpoints of tolerance and ultimately in the breakdown of immune tolerance. The manifestations of this breakdown are harmful inflammatory responses in peripheral tissues driven by innate immunity and self antigen–specific pathogenic T and B cells. T cells play a central role in the regulation and initiation of these responses. In this Review we summarize our current understanding of the mechanisms involved in these fundamental checkpoints, the pathways that are defective in autoimmune diseases, and the therapeutic strategies being developed with the goal of restoring immune tolerance. PMID:25985270

  10. Cell Type-Specific Modulation of Respiratory Chain Supercomplex Organization

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayan; Li, Bin; Qiu, Ruyi; Fang, Hezhi; Lyu, Jianxin

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory chain complexes are organized into large supercomplexes among which supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is the only one that can directly transfer electrons from NADH to oxygen. Recently, it was reported that the formation of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in mice largely depends on their genetic background. However, in this study, we showed that the composition of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn is well conserved in various mouse and human cell lines. Strikingly, we found that a minimal supercomplex In + IIIn, termed “lowest supercomplex” (LSC) in this study because of its migration at the lowest position close to complex V dimers in blue native polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, was associated with complex IV to form a supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn in some, but not all of the human and mouse cells. In addition, we observed that the 3697G>A mutation in mitochondrial-encoded NADH dehydrogenase 1 (ND1) in one patient with Leigh’s disease specifically affected the assembly of supercomplex In + IIIn + IVn containing LSC, leading to decreased cellular respiration and ATP generation. In conclusion, we showed the existence of LSC In + IIIn + IVn and impairment of this supercomplex causes disease. PMID:27338358

  11. Analysis of mammary specific gene locus regulation in differentiated cells derived by somatic cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Claire; Kolb, Andreas F.

    2009-02-01

    The transcriptional regulation of a gene is best analysed in the context of its normal chromatin surroundings. However, most somatic cells, in contrast to embryonic stem cells, are refractory to accurate modification by homologous recombination. We show here that it is possible to introduce precise genomic modifications in ES cells and to analyse the phenotypic consequences in differentiated cells by using a combination of gene targeting, site-specific recombination and somatic cell fusion. To provide a proof of principle, we have analysed the regulation of the casein gene locus in mammary gland cells derived from modified murine ES cells by somatic cell fusion. A {beta}-galactosidase reporter gene was inserted in place of the {beta}-casein gene and the modified ES cells, which do not express the reporter gene, were fused with the mouse mammary gland cell line HC11. The resulting cell clones expressed the {beta}-galactosidase gene to a similar extent and with similar hormone responsiveness as the endogenous gene. However, a reporter gene under the control of a minimal {beta}-casein promoter (encompassing the two consensus STAT5 binding sites which mediate the hormone response of the casein genes) was unable to replicate expression levels or hormone responsiveness of the endogenous gene when inserted into the same site of the casein locus. As expected, these results implicate sequences other than the STAT5 sites in the regulation of the {beta}-casein gene.

  12. A new and effective approach to boron removal by using novel boron-specific fungi isolated from boron mining wastewater.

    PubMed

    Taştan, Burcu Ertit; Çakir, Dilara Nur; Dönmez, Gönül

    2016-01-01

    Boron-resistant fungi were isolated from the wastewater of a boron mine in Turkey. Boron removal efficiencies of Penicillium crustosum and Rhodotorula mucilaginosa were detected in different media compositions. Minimal Salt Medium (MSM) and two different waste media containing molasses (WM-1) or whey + molasses (WM-2) were tested to make this process cost effective when scaled up. Both isolates achieved high boron removal yields at the highest boron concentrations tested in MSM and WM-1. The maximum boron removal yield by P. crustosum was 45.68% at 33.95 mg l(-1) initial boron concentration in MSM, and was 38.97% at 42.76 mg l(-1) boron for R. mucilaginosa, which seemed to offer an economically feasible method of removing boron from the effluents. PMID:26877036

  13. Microbial fuel cell assisted nitrate nitrogen removal using cow manure and soil.

    PubMed

    Vijay, Ankisha; Vaishnava, Monika; Chhabra, Meenu

    2016-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are emerging wastewater treatment systems with a proven potential for denitrification. In this study, we have developed a high-rate denitrifying MFC. The anode consisted of cow manure and fruit waste and the cathode consisted of cow manure and soil. The initial chemical oxygen demand (COD)/nitrate nitrogen (NO3 (-)-N) was varied from 2 to 40 at the cathode while keeping the anode ratio fixed at 100. NO3 (-)-N removal rate of 7.1 ± 0.9 kg NO3 (-)-N/m(3) net cathodic compartment (NCC)/day was achieved at cathode COD/NO3 (-)-N ratio 7.31 with the current density of 190 ± 9.1 mA/m(2) and power density of 31.92 ± 4 mW/m(2) of electrode surface area. We achieved an open-circuit voltage (OCV) of 410 ± 20 mV at initial cathodic NO3 (-)-N of 0.345 g/l. The cathode COD/NO3 (-)-N ratio had a significant influence on MFC's OCV and nitrate removal rate. Lower OCV (<150 mV) and NO3 (-)-N removal rates were observed at COD/NO3 (-)-N ratio >12 and <7. Experiments done at different cathode pH values indicated that the optimum pH for denitrification was 7. Under optimized biochemical conditions, nitrate removal rate of 6.5 kg NO3 (-)-N/m(3) net cathodic compartment (NCC)/day and power density of 210 mW/m(2) were achieved in a low resistance MFC. The present study thus demonstrates the utility of MFCs for the treatment of high nitrate wastes. PMID:26755171

  14. Cell-specific RNA aptamer against human CCR5 specifically targets HIV-1 susceptible and inhibits HIV-1 infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Satheesan, Sangeetha; Li, Haitang; Weinberg, Marc S.; Morris, Kevin V.; Burnett, John; Rossi, John

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5) is a receptor expressed by T-cells and macrophages that serves as a co-receptor for macrophage-tropic HIV-1. Loss of CCR5 is associated with resistance to HIV-1. Here we combine the live cell-based SELEX with high throughput sequencing technology to generate CCR5 RNA aptamers capable of specifically targeting HIV-1 susceptible cells (as siRNA delivery agent) and inhibiting HIV-1 infectivity (as antiviral agent) via block of the CCR5 required for HIV-1 to enter cells. One of the best candidates, G-3, efficiently bound and was internalized into human CCR5 expressing cells. The G-3 specifically neutralized R5 virus infection in primary peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and in vivo generated human CD4+ T cells with a nanomolar IC50. G-3 was also capable of transferring functional siRNAs to CCR5 expressing cells. Collectively, the cell-specific, internalizing, CCR5-targeted aptamers and aptamer-siRNA conjugates offer promise for overcoming some of the current challenges of drug resistance in HIV-1 by providing cell-type- or tissue-specific delivery of various therapeutic moieties. PMID:25754473

  15. Single cell lineage tracing reveals that oriented cell division contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and regional specification

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jingjing; Miao, Lianjie; Shieh, David; Spiotto, Ernest; Li, Jian; Zhou, Bin; Paul, Antoni; Schwartz, Robert J.; Firulli, Anthony B.; Singer, Harold A.; Huang, Guoying; Wu, Mingfu

    2016-01-01

    Summary The cardiac trabeculae are sheet-like structures extending from the myocardium that function to increase surface area. A lack of trabeculation causes embryonic lethality due to compromised cardiac function. To understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of trabecular formation, we genetically labeled individual cardiomyocytes prior to trabeculation via the brainbow multicolor system, and traced and analyzed the labeled cells during trabeculation by whole-embryo clearing and imaging. The clones derived from labeled single cells displayed four different geometric patterns that are derived from different patterns of oriented cell division (OCD) and migration. Of the four types of clones, the inner, transmural, and mixed clones contributed to trabecular cardiomyocytes. Further studies showed that perpendicular OCD is an extrinsic asymmetric cell division that putatively contributes to trabecular regional specification. Furthermore, N-Cadherin deletion in labeled clones disrupted the clonal patterns. In summary, our data demonstrate that OCD contributes to trabecular morphogenesis and specification. PMID:27052172

  16. A versatile method for the removal of melanin from ribonucleic acids in melanocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Satyamoorthy, K; Li, G; Van Belle, P A; Elder, D E; Herlyn, M

    2002-10-01

    Melanin pigments often co-purify during preparation of nucleic acids from cells or tissues of melanocytic origin. Contaminating melanin can severely impede subsequent analyses of RNA. We attempted to eliminate melanin in RNA preparations using selected gel matrices. We show here that co-purified melanin pigments can be largely eliminated from RNA samples after passing through polyacrylamide-based beads (Bio-Gel P-60). After isolation from the pigment-containing cells or tissues, RNA was subsequently processed through batch or column purification under acidic pH conditions. The resulting RNA was devoid of contaminating melanin pigments and amenable to molecular reactions such as polymerase chain reaction and cDNA synthesis by reverse transcriptase. Although the process results in some loss of input RNA, this purification procedure is simple, robust and can easily be adopted in any laboratory for the molecular analysis of RNA that requires removal of melanin contamination. PMID:12394186

  17. Extremely small test cell structure for resistive random access memory element with removable bottom electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Koh, Sang-Gyu; Kishida, Satoru; Kinoshita, Kentaro

    2014-02-24

    We established a method of preparing an extremely small memory cell by fabricating a resistive random access memory (ReRAM) structure on the tip of a cantilever of an atomic force microscope. This structure has the high robustness against the drift of the cantilever, and the effective cell size was estimated to be less than 10 nm in diameter due to the electric field concentration at the tip of the cantilever, which was confirmed using electric field simulation. The proposed structure, which has a removable bottom electrode, enables not only the preparation of a tiny ReRAM structure but also the performance of unique experiments, by making the most of its high robustness against the drift of the cantilever.

  18. 49 CFR 179.300 - General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false General specifications applicable to multi-unit tank car tanks designed to be removed from car structure for filling and emptying (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW). 179.300 Section 179.300 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...

  19. Escape from suppression: tumor-specific effector cells outcompete regulatory T cells following stem-cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mirmonsef, Paria; Tan, Gladys; Zhou, Gang; Morino, Tricia; Noonan, Kimberly; Borrello, Ivan

    2008-01-01

    Immune reconstitution of autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplant recipients with the progeny of mature T cells in the graft leads to profound changes in the emerging functional T-cell repertoire. In the steady state, the host is frequently tolerant to tumor antigens, reflecting dominant suppression of naive and effector T cells by regulatory T cells (Tregs). We examined the relative frequency and function of these 3 components within the tumor-specific T-cell compartment during immune reconstitution. Grafts from tumor-bearing donors exerted a significant antitumor effect in irradiated, syngeneic tumor-bearing recipients. This was associated with dramatic clonal expansion and interferon-γ (IFNγ) production by previously tolerant tumor-specific T cells. While donor-derived Tregs expanded in recipients, they did not inhibit the antigen-driven expansion of effector T cells in the early posttransplantation period. Indeed, the repopulation of tumor-specific effector T cells significantly exceeded that of Tregs, the expansion of which was limited by IL-2 availability. Although the intrinsic suppressive capacity of Tregs remained intact, their diminished frequency was insufficient to suppress effector cell function. These findings provide an explanation for the reversal of tolerance leading to tumor rejection in transplant recipients and likely contribute to the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies in lymphopenic hosts. PMID:18063750

  20. Novel mixed matrix membranes for sulfur removal and for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Ligang; Wang, Andong; Zhang, Longhui; Dong, Meimei; Zhang, Yuzhong

    2012-12-01

    Sulfur removal is significant for fuels used as hydrogen source for fuel cell applications and to avoid sulfur poisoning of therein used catalysts. Novel mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) with well-defined transport channels are proposed for sulfur removal. MMMs are fabricated using polyimide (PI) as matrix material and Y zeolites as adsorptive functional materials. The influence of architecture conditions on the morphology transition from finger-like to sponge-like structure and the “short circuit” effect are investigated. The adsorption and regeneration behavior of MMMs is discussed, combining the detailed analysis of FT-IR, morphology, XPS, XRD and thermal properties of MMMs, the process-structure-function relationship is obtained. The results show that the functional zeolites are incorporated into three-dimensional network and the adsorption capacity of MMMs comes to 8.6 and 9.5 mg S g-1 for thiophene and dibenzothiophene species, respectively. And the regeneration behavior suggests that the spent membranes can recover about 88% and 96% of the desulfurization capacity by solvent washing and thermal treating regeneration, respectively. The related discussions provide some general suggestions in promoting the novel application of MMMs on the separation of organic-organic mixtures, and a potential alternative for the production of sulfur-free hydrogen source for fuel cell applications.

  1. T-cell hybridoma specific for a cytochrome c peptide: specific antigen binding and interleukin 2 production.

    PubMed Central

    Carel, S; Bron, C; Corradin, G

    1983-01-01

    T-cell hybridomas were obtained after fusion of BW 5147 thymoma and long-term cultured T cells specific for cytochrome c peptide 66-80 derivatized with a 2,4-dinitroaminophenyl (DNAP) group. The resulting hybridomas were selected for their capacity to specifically bind to soluble radiolabeled peptide antigen. One T-cell hybrid was positive for antigen binding. This hybrid T cell exhibits surface phenotypic markers of the parent antigen-specific T cells. The binding could be inhibited either by an excess of unlabeled homologous antigen or by cytochrome c peptide 11-25 derivatized with a 2-nitrophenylsulfenyl group. Several other peptide antigens tested failed to inhibit binding of the radioactive peptide. This suggests that a specific amino acid sequence, modified by a DNAP group, is the antigenic structure recognized by the putative T-cell receptor. In addition, direct interaction of DNAP-66-80 peptide with the hybridoma cell line induced production of the T-cell growth factor interleukin 2. Furthermore, supernatants derived from syngeneic macrophages pulsed with the relevant peptide also induced the antigen-specific hybridoma to produce interleukin 2. Images PMID:6192442

  2. Adhesion of axolemmal fragments to Schwann cells: a signal- and target-specific process closely linked to axolemmal induction of Schwann cell mitosis

    SciTech Connect

    Sobue, G.; Pleasure, D.

    1985-02-01

    Radioiodinated rat CNS axolemmal fragments adhered to cultured rat Schwann cells by a time-, temperature-, and concentration-dependent process independent of extracellular ionized calcium. Adhesion showed target and signal specificity; axolemmal fragments adhered to endoneurial or dermal fibroblasts to a much lesser extent than to Schwann cells, and plasma membrane fragments from skeletal muscle, erythrocytes, or PNS myelin adhered to Schwann cells to a lesser extent than did axolemmal fragments. Brief trypsinization removed 94 to 97% of bound radioactivity from Schwann cells previously incubated with /sup 125/I-axolemmal fragments for up to 24 hr, indicating that adhesion was largely a surface phenomenon rather than the result of rapid internalization of axolemmal fragments by the Schwann cells. When adhesion was compared to the axolemmal mitogenic response of Schwann cells, the concentration of axolemmal fragments yielding half-maximal adhesion was the same as the concentration producing half-maximal stimulation of Schwann cell mitosis. Trypsin digestion, homogenization, or heating of axolemmal fragments before application to cultured Schwann cells diminished adhesion and axolemmal fragment-induced stimulation of Schwann cell mitosis in a parallel fashion. Whereas adhesion of axolemmal fragments to the surfaces of the cultured Schwann cells reached completion within 4 hr in this assay system, induction of Schwann cell mitosis by the fragments required contact with Schwann cells for a minimum of 6 to 8 hr and reached a maximum when the axolemmal fragments had adhered to the Schwann cells for 24 hr or more.

  3. Spleen removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders of blood cells, such as idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura (ITP), hereditary spherocytosis , thalassemia, hemolytic anemia , and hereditary ... spherocytic anemia Hemolytic anemia Hodgkin lymphoma Idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) Patient Instructions Spleen removal - child - discharge Spleen ...

  4. Removal of hepatitis C virus-infected cells by a zymogenized bacterial toxin.

    PubMed

    Shapira, Assaf; Shapira, Shiran; Gal-Tanamy, Meital; Zemel, Romy; Tur-Kaspa, Ran; Benhar, Itai

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic liver disease and has become a global health threat. No HCV vaccine is currently available and treatment with antiviral therapy is associated with adverse side effects. Moreover, there is no preventive therapy for recurrent hepatitis C post liver transplantation. The NS3 serine protease is necessary for HCV replication and represents a prime target for developing anti HCV therapies. Recently we described a therapeutic approach for eradication of HCV infected cells that is based on protein delivery of two NS3 protease-activatable recombinant toxins we named "zymoxins". These toxins were inactivated by fusion to rationally designed inhibitory peptides via NS3-cleavable linkers. Once delivered to cells where NS3 protease is present, the inhibitory peptide is removed resulting in re-activation of cytotoxic activity. The zymoxins we described suffered from two limitations: they required high levels of protease for activation and had basal activities in the un-activated form that resulted in a narrow potential therapeutic window. Here, we present a solution that overcame the major limitations of the "first generation zymoxins" by converting MazF ribonuclease, the toxic component of the E. coli chromosomal MazEF toxin-antitoxin system, into an NS3-activated zymoxin that is introduced to cells by means of gene delivery. We constructed an expression cassette that encodes for a single polypeptide that incorporates both the toxin and a fragment of its potent natural antidote, MazE, linked via an NS3-cleavable linker. While covalently paired to its inhibitor, the ribonuclease is well tolerated when expressed in naïve, healthy cells. In contrast, activating proteolysis that is induced by even low levels of NS3, results in an eradication of NS3 expressing model cells and HCV infected cells. Zymoxins may thus become a valuable tool in eradicating cells infected by intracellular pathogens that express intracellular

  5. Lineage-specific interface proteins match up the cell cycle and differentiation in embryo stem cells.

    PubMed

    Re, Angela; Workman, Christopher T; Waldron, Levi; Quattrone, Alessandro; Brunak, Søren

    2014-09-01

    The shortage of molecular information on cell cycle changes along embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation prompts an in silico approach, which may provide a novel way to identify candidate genes or mechanisms acting in coordinating the two programs. We analyzed germ layer specific gene expression changes during the cell cycle and ESC differentiation by combining four human cell cycle transcriptome profiles with thirteen in vitro human ESC differentiation studies. To detect cross-talk mechanisms we then integrated the transcriptome data that displayed differential regulation with protein interaction data. A new class of non-transcriptionally regulated genes was identified, encoding proteins which interact systematically with proteins corresponding to genes regulated during the cell cycle or cell differentiation, and which therefore can be seen as interface proteins coordinating the two programs. Functional analysis gathered insights in fate-specific candidates of interface functionalities. The non-transcriptionally regulated interface proteins were found to be highly regulated by post-translational ubiquitylation modification, which may synchronize the transition between cell proliferation and differentiation in ESCs. PMID:25173649

  6. Human T helper cells specific for HIV reverse transcriptase: possible role in intrastructural help for HIV envelope-specific antibodies.

    PubMed

    Manca, F; Fenoglio, D; Valle, M T; Li Pira, G; Kunkl, A; Balderas, R S; Baccala, R G; Kono, D H; Ferraris, A; Saverino, D

    1995-05-01

    Cooperation between B cells specific for an antigen exposed on a viral structure and T helper (Th) cells specific for an internal antigen, as demonstrated with influenza, hepatitis B and rabies viruses, has been termed intrastructural help. Th cells specific for internal proteins of HIV, which are much less mutated than its exposed antigens, may be valuable in vaccine design against this virus. We investigated the human Th repertoire specific for the core HIV antigen reverse transcriptase (p66), and determined whether these cells could be candidate intrastructural T helpers. CD4+ T lines and clones were generated from non-immune individuals by stimulation with p66-pulsed antigen-presenting cells (APC). Specific lines were obtained with p66 from 19 out of 21 (90%) of these individuals, vs. 7 out of 29 (24%) with gp120. Diverse epitopes were recognized by different individuals, and various V beta genes were used by these clones. Clones using the same V beta genes were of diverse origin, according to VDJ region sequence. Of these lines 45% responded to p66 in the context of HIV virions. Moreover, p66-specific clones could respond to APC that had internalized HIV complexed with envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies, suggesting that p66-specific Th cells may participate in intrastructural help. These studies indicate that p66-specific Th cells are detectable in vitro in most naive individuals and exhibit clonal heterogeneity, and that the majority recognize an HIV conserved antigen. They respond to p66 following processing of whole virions and are clearly candidates for intrastructural help. If confirmed in vivo, p66 should be included among vaccine candidates investigated to optimize the anti-HIV Th response. PMID:7539750

  7. Cell wall substrate specificity of six different lysozymes and lysozyme inhibitory activity of bacterial extracts.

    PubMed

    Nakimbugwe, Dorothy; Masschalck, Barbara; Deckers, Daphne; Callewaert, Lien; Aertsen, Abram; Michiels, Chris W

    2006-06-01

    We have investigated the specificity of six different lysozymes for peptidoglycan substrates obtained by extraction of a number of gram-negative bacteria and Micrococcus lysodeikticus with chloroform/Tris-HCl buffer (chloroform/buffer). The lysozymes included two that are commercially available (hen egg white lysozyme or HEWL, and mutanolysin from Streptomyces globisporus or M1L), and four that were chromatographically purified (bacteriophage lambda lysozyme or LaL, bacteriophage T4 lysozyme or T4L, goose egg white lysozyme or GEWL, and cauliflower lysozyme or CFL). HEWL was much more effective on M. lysodeikticus than on any of the gram-negative cell walls, while the opposite was found for LaL. Also the gram-negative cell walls showed remarkable differences in susceptibility to the different lysozymes, even for closely related species like Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. These differences could not be due to the presence of lysozyme inhibitors such as Ivy from E. coli in the cell wall substrates because we showed that chloroform extraction effectively removed this inhibitor. Interestingly, we found strong inhibitory activity to HEWL in the chloroform/buffer extracts of Salmonella Typhimurium, and to LaL in the extracts of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, suggesting that other lysozyme inhibitors than Ivy exist and are probably widespread in gram-negative bacteria. PMID:16684100

  8. Synapses: Sites of Cell Recognition, Adhesion, and Functional Specification

    PubMed Central

    Yamada, Soichiro; Nelson, W. James

    2012-01-01

    Synapses are specialized adhesive contacts characteristic of many types of cell-cell interactions involving neurons, immune cells, epithelial cells, and even pathogens and host cells. Cell-cell adhesion is mediated by structurally diverse classes of cell-surface glycoproteins, which form homophilic or heterophilic interactions across the intercellular space. Adhesion proteins bind to a cytoplasmic network of scaffolding proteins, regulators of the actin cytoskeleton, and signal transduction pathways that control the structural and functional organization of synapses. The themes of this review are to compare the organization of synapses in different cell types and to understand how different classes of cell adhesion proteins and cytoplasmic protein networks specify the assembly of functionally distinct synapses in different cell contexts. PMID:17506641

  9. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44(high)CD24(low)HER2(low) cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  10. Targeting breast cancer stem cells with HER2-specific antibodies and natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Diessner, Joachim; Bruttel, Valentin; Becker, Kathrin; Pawlik, Miriam; Stein, Roland; Häusler, Sebastian; Dietl, Johannes; Wischhusen, Jörg; Hönig, Arnd

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women worldwide. Every year, nearly 1.4 million new cases of breast cancer are diagnosed, and about 450.000 women die of the disease. Approximately 15-25% of breast cancer cases exhibit increased quantities of the trans-membrane receptor tyrosine kinase human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) on the tumor cell surface. Previous studies showed that blockade of this HER2 proto-oncogene with the antibody trastuzumab substantially improved the overall survival of patients with this aggressive type of breast cancer. Recruitment of natural killer (NK) cells and subsequent induction of antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) contributed to this beneficial effect. We hypothesized that antibody binding to HER2-positive breast cancer cells and thus ADCC might be further improved by synergistically applying two different HER2-specific antibodies, trastuzumab and pertuzumab. We found that tumor cell killing via ADCC was increased when the combination of trastuzumab, pertuzumab, and NK cells was applied to HER2-positive breast cancer cells, as compared to the extent of ADCC induced by a single antibody. Furthermore, a subset of CD44highCD24lowHER2low cells, which possessed characteristics of cancer stem cells, could be targeted more efficiently by the combination of two HER2-specific antibodies compared to the efficiency of one antibody. These in vitro results demonstrated the immunotherapeutic benefit achieved by the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab. These findings are consistent with the positive results of the clinical studies, CLEOPATRA and NEOSPHERE, conducted with patients that had HER2-positive breast cancer. Compared to a single antibody treatment, the combined application of trastuzumab and pertuzumab showed a stronger ADCC effect and improved the targeting of breast cancer stem cells. PMID:23593542

  11. Plasma Transglutaminase in Hypertrophic Chondrocytes: Expression and Cell-specific Intracellular Activation Produce Cell Death and Externalization

    PubMed Central

    Nurminskaya, Maria; Magee, Cordula; Nurminsky, Dmitry; Linsenmayer, Thomas F.

    1998-01-01

    We previously used subtractive hybridization to isolate cDNAs for genes upregulated in chick hypertrophic chondrocytes (Nurminskaya, M., and T.F. Linsenmayer. 1996. Dev. Dyn. 206:260–271). Certain of these showed homology with the “A” subunit of human plasma transglutaminase (factor XIIIA), a member of a family of enzymes that cross-link a variety of intracellular and matrix molecules. We now have isolated a full-length cDNA for this molecule, and confirmed that it is avian factor XIIIA. Northern and enzymatic analyses confirm that the molecule is upregulated in hypertrophic chondrocytes (as much as eightfold). The enzymatic analyses also show that appreciable transglutaminase activity in the hypertrophic zone becomes externalized into the extracellular matrix. This externalization most likely is effected by cell death and subsequent lysis—effected by the transglutaminase itself. When hypertrophic chondrocytes are transfected with a cDNA construct encoding the zymogen of factor XIIIA, the cells convert the translated protein to a lower molecular weight form, and they initiate cell death, become permeable to macromolecules and eventually undergo lysis. Non-hypertrophic cells transfected with the same construct do not show these degenerative changes. These results suggest that hypertrophic chondrocytes have a novel, tissue-specific cascade of mechanisms that upregulate the synthesis of plasma transglutaminase and activate its zymogen. This produces autocatalytic cell death, externalization of the enzyme, and presumably cross-linking of components within the hypertrophic matrix. These changes may in turn regulate the removal and/or calcification of this hypertrophic matrix, which are its ultimate fates. PMID:9722623

  12. Method of removing the effects of electrical shorts and shunts created during the fabrication process of a solar cell

    DOEpatents

    Nostrand, Gerald E.; Hanak, Joseph J.

    1979-01-01

    A method of removing the effects of electrical shorts and shunts created during the fabrication process and improving the performance of a solar cell with a thick film cermet electrode opposite to the incident surface by applying a reverse bias voltage of sufficient magnitude to burn out the electrical shorts and shunts but less than the break down voltage of the solar cell.

  13. Analysis of T cell responses in liver allograft recipients. Evidence for deletion of donor-specific cytotoxic T cells in the peripheral circulation.

    PubMed Central

    Mathew, J M; Marsh, J W; Susskind, B; Mohanakumar, T

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of cell-mediated lympholysis in long-term liver allograft recipients indicated that there was a donor-specific unresponsiveness that could not be reversed by the addition of rIL-2 and/or mixed lymphocyte culture supernatant or by nonspecific stimulation of the cultures with PHA. Stimulation of recipient cells with semisyngeneic cells having both donor and third-party HLA antigens failed to reveal the presence of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) specific to the donor, whereas the CTL response to third-party antigens remained normal. Removal of B lymphocytes from the responding cell population did not influence the responses. Furthermore, limiting dilution analysis showed that the liver transplant recipients did not have detectable levels of CTL precursors (CTLp) reactive to the donor antigens, whereas their CTLp to third-party antigens remained normal. Donor-specific CTLp were present before and during the early post-transplant period; these cells were eliminated from the peripheral circulation by 10 mo after transplantation. Taken together, these results indicate that there is a deletion of CTLp specific to donor MHC antigens in the peripheral circulation of long-term liver allograft recipients that may account in part for the success of liver transplantation across MHC barriers. Images PMID:8450068

  14. The cell-type specificity and endosomal escape of cell-penetrating peptides.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jing; Tang, Liling

    2015-01-01

    Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs) have become a great potential non-invasive carrier candidate for the delivery of various cell-impermeable therapeutic cargoes such as proteins, polypeptides and nucleic acid. However, the lack of tissue specificity and entrapment in the endocytic vesicles is the primary limitation to the application of these peptides in cargo delivery. Emphasis should be placed on developing novel methods to overcome these barriers. In this review, several current strategies to promote tissue specificity and endosomal escape of CPPs will be described, as well as the comparison of different approaches in efficacy and security. Finally, this review will be attributed to new ideas to improve the tissue specificity and cytosolic availability of CPP-cargoes. PMID:25341672

  15. Toxicity Minimized Cryoprotectant Addition and Removal Procedures for Adherent Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Allyson Fry; Glasscock, Cameron; McClanahan, Danielle R.; Benson, James D.; Higgins, Adam Z.

    2015-01-01

    Ice-free cryopreservation, known as vitrification, is an appealing approach for banking of adherent cells and tissues because it prevents dissociation and morphological damage that may result from ice crystal formation. However, current vitrification methods are often limited by the cytotoxicity of the concentrated cryoprotective agent (CPA) solutions that are required to suppress ice formation. Recently, we described a mathematical strategy for identifying minimally toxic CPA equilibration procedures based on the minimization of a toxicity cost function. Here we provide direct experimental support for the feasibility of these methods when applied to adherent endothelial cells. We first developed a concentration- and temperature-dependent toxicity cost function by exposing the cells to a range of glycerol concentrations at 21°C and 37°C, and fitting the resulting viability data to a first order cell death model. This cost function was then numerically minimized in our state constrained optimization routine to determine addition and removal procedures for 17 molal (mol/kg water) glycerol solutions. Using these predicted optimal procedures, we obtained 81% recovery after exposure to vitrification solutions, as well as successful vitrification with the relatively slow cooling and warming rates of 50°C/min and 130°C/min. In comparison, conventional multistep CPA equilibration procedures resulted in much lower cell yields of about 10%. Our results demonstrate the potential for rational design of minimally toxic vitrification procedures and pave the way for extension of our optimization approach to other adherent cell types as well as more complex systems such as tissues and organs. PMID:26605546

  16. Cell-specific regulation of type II phospholipase A2 expression in rat mesangial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Konieczkowski, M; Sedor, J R

    1993-01-01

    IL-1 stimulates mesangial cells to synthesize specific proteins, including a non-pancreatic (Type II) phospholipase A2 (PLA2). We have studied the regulation of PLA2 by proinflammatory mediators, implicated in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis, and have assessed whether the activation of second messenger systems modulates or mimics PLA2 gene expression by cytokines. IL-1 alpha and beta, TNF alpha, and LPS, but not serum, IL-2, or PDGF, potently induce PLA2 mRNA, and enzyme expression. IL-1-stimulated mesangial cells express a 1.0 kB PLA2 mRNA transcript that is induced in a dose- and time-dependent manner. IL-1-stimulated increases in steady-state PLA2 mRNA abundance result from a moderate increase in PLA2 transcription rate that is amplified by the prolonged persistence of the transcript. Forskolin and dibutyryl cAMP potentiate IL-1-induced PLA2 mRNA and enzyme expression, but have no effect in the absence of cytokine. 12-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate, sn-1, 2-dioctanoyl glycerol or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol fail to induce PLA2 expression or to alter the effect of IL-1 when coincubated with the cytokine. In contrast, serum deprivation for 24 h specifically enhances IL-1-stimulated PLA2. Genistein potentiates PLA2 mRNA expression in cells exposed to both IL-1 and serum. The inhibitory effect of serum on IL-1-induced PLA2 mRNA abundance is reproduced by PDGF but not dexamethasone. These data demonstrate that the signaling pathways directly engaged by IL-1 to induce PLA2 expression in mesangial cells interact with several second messenger systems in a cell-specific manner. We speculate that IL-1 induces specialized changes in mesangial cell structure and function through direct activation of a transcription factor(s), that result in induction of a specific gene set. Images PMID:8227365

  17. Experimental evaluation of a breadboard heat and product-water removal system for a space-power fuel cell designed with static water removal and evaporative cooling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hagedorn, N. H.; Prokipius, P. R.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted to evaluate the design of a heat and product-water removal system to be used with fuel cell having static water removal and evaporative cooling. The program, which was conducted on a breadboard version of the system, provided a general assessment of the design in terms of operational integrity and transient stability. This assessment showed that, on the whole, the concept appears to be inherently sound but that in refining this design, several facets will require additional study. These involve interactions between pressure regulators in the pumping loop that occur when they are not correctly matched and the question of whether an ejector is necessary in the system.

  18. Personalized Medicine: Cell and Gene Therapy Based on Patient-Specific iPSC-Derived Retinal Pigment Epithelium Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yao; Chan, Lawrence; Nguyen, Huy V; Tsang, Stephen H

    2016-01-01

    Interest in generating human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells for stem cell modeling of diseases has overtaken that of patient-specific human embryonic stem cells due to the ethical, technical, and political concerns associated with the latter. In ophthalmology, researchers are currently using iPS cells to explore various applications, including: (1) modeling of retinal diseases using patient-specific iPS cells; (2) autologous transplantation of differentiated retinal cells that undergo gene correction at the iPS cell stage via gene editing tools (e.g., CRISPR/Cas9, TALENs and ZFNs); and (3) autologous transplantation of patient-specific iPS-derived retinal cells treated with gene therapy. In this review, we will discuss the uses of patient-specific iPS cells for differentiating into retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) cells, uncovering disease pathophysiology, and developing new treatments such as gene therapy and cell replacement therapy via autologous transplantation. PMID:26427458

  19. Clonal induction of helper T cells: conversion of specific signals into nonspecific signals.

    PubMed

    Schreier, M H; Tees, R

    1980-01-01

    The mechanism by which murine helper T cells specific for sheep erythrocytes (SRC) or horse erythrocytes (HRC) exert their effect in an antibody response has been studied in a specific in vitro helper assay in which T cells specific for SRC (TSRC) do not support an antibody response against HRC and in which T cells specific for HRC (T'HRC) do not support an antibody response against SRC. Either population of helper T cells can support an antibody response to both antigens if the homologous and an unrelated antigen are present at the same time. The helper effect is mediated by stable soluble products, the induction of which is antigen specific and independent of B cells. To exclude T cell-T cell interactions, pure populations of specific helper T cells were obtained by long-term culture in vitro of in vivo primed T cells followed by single cell cloning. Clones of T'SRC or T'HRC are highly specific both in vitro and in vivo. For in vivo experiments syngeneic nude mice, selectively and specifically reconstituted with cloned helper T cells, were used. While specific helper T cells can also provide help in vitro for an unrelated antigen, in vivo only specific T cell help is revealed. PMID:6153171

  20. Innate cell communication kick-starts pathogen-specific immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Amariliz; Siracusa, Mark C.; Yap, George S.; Gause, William C.

    2016-01-01

    Innate cells are responsible for the rapid recognition of infection and mediate essential mechanisms of pathogen elimination, and also facilitate adaptive immune responses. We review here the numerous intricate interactions among innate cells that initiate protective immunity. The efficient eradication of pathogens depends on the coordinated actions of multiple cells, including innate cells and epithelial cells. Rather than acting as isolated effector cells, innate cells are in constant communication with other responding cells of the immune system, locally and distally. These interactions are critically important for the efficient control of primary infections as well for the development of ‘trained’ innate cells that facilitate the rapid elimination of homologous or heterologous infections. PMID:27002843

  1. Id3 Controls Cell Death of 2B4+ Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells in Chronic Viral Infection.

    PubMed

    Menner, Alexandra J; Rauch, Katharina S; Aichele, Peter; Pircher, Hanspeter; Schachtrup, Christian; Schachtrup, Kristina

    2015-09-01

    Sustained Ag persistence in chronic infection results in a deregulated CD8(+) T cell response that is characterized by T cell exhaustion and cell death of Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells. Yet, the underlying transcriptional mechanisms regulating CD8(+) T cell exhaustion and cell death are poorly defined. Using the experimental mouse model of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection, we demonstrate that the transcriptional regulator Id3 controls cell death of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in chronic infection. By comparing acute and chronic infection, we showed that Id3 (-) virus-specific CD8(+) T cells were less abundant, whereas the absolute numbers of Id3 (+) virus-specific CD8(+) T cells were equal in chronic and acute infection. Phenotypically, Id3 (-) and Id3 (+) cells most prominently differed with regard to expression of the surface receptor 2B4; although Id3 (-) cells were 2B4(+), almost all Id3 (+) cells lacked expression of 2B4. Lineage-tracing experiments showed that cells initially expressing Id3 differentiated into Id3 (-)2B4(+) cells; in turn, these cells were terminally differentiated and highly susceptible to cell death under conditions of persisting Ag. Enforced Id3 expression specifically increased the persistence of 2B4(+) virus-specific CD8(+) T cells by decreasing susceptibility to Fas/Fas ligand-mediated cell death. Thus, our findings reveal that the transcriptional regulator Id3 promotes the survival of virus-specific CD8(+) T cells in chronic infection and suggest that targeting Id3 might be beneficial for preventing cell death of CD8(+) T cells in chronic infection or for promoting cell death of uncontrolled, hyperactive CD8(+) T cells to prevent immunopathology. PMID:26232435

  2. Impact of Tissue-Specific Stem Cells on Lineage-Specific Differentiation: A Focus on the Musculoskeletal System

    PubMed Central

    Pizzute, Tyler; Lynch, Kevin; Pei, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Tissue-specific stem cells are found throughout the body and, with proper intervention and environmental cues, these stem cells exercise their capabilities for differentiation into several lineages to form cartilage, bone, muscle, and adipose tissue in vitro and in vivo. Interestingly, it has been widely demonstrated that they do not differentiate with the same efficacy during lineage-specific differentiation studies, as the tissue-specific stem cells are generally more effective when differentiating toward the tissues from which they were derived. This review focuses on four mesodermal lineages for tissue-specific stem cell differentiation: adipogenesis, chondrogenesis, myogenesis, and osteogenesis. It is intended to give insight into current multilineage differentiation and comparative research, highlight and contrast known trends regarding differentiation, and introduce supporting evidence which demonstrates particular tissue-specific stem cells’ superiority in lineage-specific differentiation, along with their resident tissue origins and natural roles. In addition, some epigenetic and transcriptomic differences between stem cells which may explain the observed trends are discussed. PMID:25113801

  3. The stability of Pb species during the Pb removal process by growing cells of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Guangming; Li, Ningjie; Huang, Danlian; Lai, Cui; Zhao, Meihua; Huang, Chao; Wei, Zhen; Xu, Piao; Zhang, Chen; Cheng, Min

    2015-04-01

    Extensive studies have been operated on the biosorption of heavy metal using white-rot fungi, whereas information on the stability of the sorbed metal species has never been taken into consideration, which is important for the later disposal of the used biomass. In this study, the growing cells of Phanerochaete chrysosporium were used to remove Pb from the fungal living environment. The bioremoval of Pb proceeded continually until 121 h. The bioremoved Pb was found to be stabilized at the first time P. chrysosporium was exposed to Pb ions. The extractable rate of removed Pb decreased constantly and kept at a stable level around 20 % after 121 h. The results indicated that the growing biomass is efficient for the stabilization of Pb, and the used biomass was suitable to be separated for further disposal at 121 h. With environment scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (ESEM-EDAX) and X-ray powder diffraction (XRD) analysis, the stabilized Pb species were identified to be lead oxalate and lead chloride phosphate. Further, it is found that the stabilization of Pb by growing P. chrysosporium is not strictly limited in the aspect of pH when pH in the environment is in the range of 4-6. PMID:25547831

  4. Human embryonic stem cell differentiation toward regional specific neural precursors.

    PubMed

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojković, Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types. This potentiality represents a promising source to overcome many human diseases by providing an unlimited supply of all cell types, including cells with neural characteristics. Therefore, this review summarizes early neural development and the potential of hESCs to differentiate under in vitro conditions, examining at the same time the potential use of differentiated hESCs for therapeutic applications for neural tissue and cell regeneration. PMID:18845761

  5. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation Toward Regional Specific Neural Precursors

    PubMed Central

    Erceg, Slaven; Ronaghi, Mohammad; Stojković, Miodrag

    2009-01-01

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) are self-renewing pluripotent cells that have the capacity to differentiate into a wide variety of cell types. This potentiality represents a promising source to overcome many human diseases by providing an unlimited supply of all cell types, including cells with neural characteristics. Therefore, this review summarizes early neural development and the potential of hESCs to differentiate under in vitro conditions, examining at the same time the potential use of differentiated hESCs for therapeutic applications for neural tissue and cell regeneration. PMID:18845761

  6. The ability of inner cell mass cells to self-renew as embryonic stem cells is acquired upon epiblast specification

    PubMed Central

    Boroviak, Thorsten; Loos, Remco; Bertone, Paul; Smith, Austin; Nichols, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    The precise relationship of embryonic stem cells (ESC) to cells in the mouse embryo remains controversial. We present transcriptional and functional data to identify the embryonic counterpart of ESC. Marker profiling shows that ESC are distinct from early inner cell mass (ICM) and closely resemble preimplantation epiblast. A characteristic feature of mouse ESC is propagation without ERK signalling. Single-cell culture reveals that cell autonomous capacity to thrive when the ERK pathway is inhibited arises late during blastocyst development and is lost after implantation. The frequency of deriving clonal ESC lines suggests that all E4.5 epiblast cells can become ESC. We further show that ICM cells from early blastocysts can progress to ERK-independence if provided with a specific laminin substrate. These findings suggest that formation of the epiblast coincides with competence for ERK-independent self-renewal in vitro and consequent propagation as ESC lines. PMID:24859004

  7. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  8. Coordinating cell proliferation and differentiation: Antagonism between cell cycle regulators and cell type-specific gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ruijtenberg, Suzan; van den Heuvel, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Cell proliferation and differentiation show a remarkable inverse relationship. Precursor cells continue division before acquiring a fully differentiated state, while terminal differentiation usually coincides with proliferation arrest and permanent exit from the division cycle. Mechanistic insight in the temporal coordination between cell cycle exit and differentiation has come from studies of cells in culture and genetic animal models. As initially described for skeletal muscle differentiation, temporal coordination involves mutual antagonism between cyclin-dependent kinases that promote cell cycle entry and transcription factors that induce tissue-specific gene expression. Recent insights highlight the contribution of chromatin-regulating complexes that act in conjunction with the transcription factors and determine their activity. In particular SWI/SNF chromatin remodelers contribute to dual regulation of cell cycle and tissue-specific gene expression during terminal differentiation. We review the concerted regulation of the cell cycle and cell type-specific transcription, and discuss common mutations in human cancer that emphasize the clinical importance of proliferation versus differentiation control. PMID:26825227

  9. Carbon and nitrogen removal and enhanced methane production in a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Villano, Marianna; Scardala, Stefano; Aulenta, Federico; Majone, Mauro

    2013-02-01

    The anode of a two-chamber methane-producing microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) was poised at +0.200V vs. the standard hydrogen electrode (SHE) and continuously fed (1.08gCOD/Ld) with acetate in anaerobic mineral medium. A gas mixture (carbon dioxide 30vol.% in N(2)) was continuously added to the cathode for both pH control and carbonate supply. At the anode, 94% of the influent acetate was removed, mostly through anaerobic oxidation (91% coulombic efficiency); the resulting electric current was mainly recovered as methane (79% cathode capture efficiency). Low biomass growth was observed at the anode and ammonium was transferred through the cationic membrane and concentrated at the cathode. These findings suggest that the MEC can be used for the treatment of low-strength wastewater, with good energy efficiency and low sludge production. PMID:23313682

  10. Cell type-specific responses to salinity - the epidermal bladder cell transcriptome of Mesembryanthemum crystallinum.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong-Ha; Barkla, Bronwyn J; Vera-Estrella, Rosario; Pantoja, Omar; Lee, Sang-Yeol; Bohnert, Hans J; Dassanayake, Maheshi

    2015-08-01

    Mesembryanthemum crystallinum (ice plant) exhibits extreme tolerance to salt. Epidermal bladder cells (EBCs), developing on the surface of aerial tissues and specialized in sodium sequestration and other protective functions, are critical for the plant's stress adaptation. We present the first transcriptome analysis of EBCs isolated from intact plants, to investigate cell type-specific responses during plant salt adaptation. We developed a de novo assembled, nonredundant EBC reference transcriptome. Using RNAseq, we compared the expression patterns of the EBC-specific transcriptome between control and salt-treated plants. The EBC reference transcriptome consists of 37 341 transcript-contigs, of which 7% showed significantly different expression between salt-treated and control samples. We identified significant changes in ion transport, metabolism related to energy generation and osmolyte accumulation, stress signalling, and organelle functions, as well as a number of lineage-specific genes of unknown function, in response to salt treatment. The salinity-induced EBC transcriptome includes active transcript clusters, refuting the view of EBCs as passive storage compartments in the whole-plant stress response. EBC transcriptomes, differing from those of whole plants or leaf tissue, exemplify the importance of cell type-specific resolution in understanding stress adaptive mechanisms. PMID:25944243

  11. Targeting specificity of dendritic cells on breast cancer stem cells: in vitro and in vivo evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Sinh Truong; Nguyen, Huyen Lam; Pham, Viet Quoc; Nguyen, Giang Thuy; Tran, Cuong Do-Thanh; Phan, Ngoc Kim; Pham, Phuc Van

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a leading cause of death in women, and almost all complications are due to chemotherapy resistance. Drug-resistant cells with stem cell phenotypes are thought to cause failure in breast cancer chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC) therapy is a potential approach to eradicate these cells. This study evaluates the specificity of DCs for breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) in vitro and in vivo. BCSCs were enriched by a verapamil-resistant screening method, and reconfirmed by ALDH expression analysis and mammosphere assay. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were isolated from allogeneic murine bone marrow. DCs were induced from bone marrow-derived monocytes with 20 ng/mL GC-MSF and 20 ng/mL IL-4. Immature DCs were primed with BCSC- or MSC-derived antigens to make two kinds of mature DCs: BCSC-DCs and MSC-DCs, respectively. In vitro ability of BCSC-DCs and MSC-DCs with cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) to inhibit BCSCs was tested using the xCELLigence technique. In vivo, BCSC-DCs and MSC-DCs were transfused into the peripheral blood of BCSC tumor-bearing mice. The results show that in vitro BCSC-DCs significantly inhibited BCSC proliferation at a DC:CTL ratio of 1:40, while MSC-DCs nonsignificantly decreased BCSC proliferation. In vivo, tumor sizes decreased from 18.8% to 23% in groups treated with BCSC-DCs; in contrast, tumors increased 14% in the control group (RPMI 1640) and 47% in groups treated with MSC-DCs. The results showed that DC therapy could target and be specific to BCSCs. DCs primed with MSCs could trigger tumor growth. These results also indicate that DCs may be a promising therapy for treating drug-resistant cancer cells as well as cancer stem cells. PMID:25674007

  12. Highly specific and potently activating Vγ9Vδ2-T cell specific nanobodies for diagnostic and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Renée C G; Lougheed, Sinéad M; van der Kruk, Liza; Stam, Anita G; Hooijberg, Erik; Roovers, Rob C; van Bergen En Henegouwen, Paul M P; Verheul, Henk M W; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van der Vliet, Hans J

    2016-08-01

    Vγ9Vδ2-T cells constitute the predominant subset of γδ-T cells in human peripheral blood and have been shown to play an important role in antimicrobial and antitumor immune responses. Several efforts have been initiated to exploit these cells for cancer immunotherapy, e.g. by using phosphoantigens, adoptive cell transfer, and by a bispecific monoclonal antibody based approach. Here, we report the generation of a novel set of Vγ9Vδ2-T cell specific VHH (or nanobody). VHH have several advantages compared to conventional antibodies related to their small size, stability, ease of generating multispecific molecules and low immunogenicity. With high specificity and affinity, the anti-Vγ9Vδ2-T cell receptor VHHs are shown to be useful for FACS, MACS and immunocytochemistry. In addition, some VHH were found to specifically activate Vγ9Vδ2-T cells. Besides being of possible immunotherapeutic value, these single domain antibodies will be of great value in the further study of this important immune effector cell subset. PMID:27373969

  13. Improved Cellular Specificity of Plasmonic Nanobubbles versus Nanoparticles in Heterogeneous Cell Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Ren, Xiaoyang; Constantinou, Pamela E.; Danysh, Brian P.; Shenefelt, Derek L.; Carson, Daniel D.; Farach-Carson, Mary C.; Kulchitsky, Vladimir A.; Wu, Xiangwei; Wagner, Daniel S.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2012-01-01

    The limited specificity of nanoparticle (NP) uptake by target cells associated with a disease is one of the principal challenges of nanomedicine. Using the threshold mechanism of plasmonic nanobubble (PNB) generation and enhanced accumulation and clustering of gold nanoparticles in target cells, we increased the specificity of PNB generation and detection in target versus non-target cells by more than one order of magnitude compared to the specificity of NP uptake by the same cells. This improved cellular specificity of PNBs was demonstrated in six different cell models representing diverse molecular targets such as epidermal growth factor receptor, CD3 receptor, prostate specific membrane antigen and mucin molecule MUC1. Thus PNBs may be a universal method and nano-agent that overcome the problem of non-specific uptake of NPs by non-target cells and improve the specificity of NP-based diagnostics, therapeutics and theranostics at the cell level. PMID:22509318

  14. Cell-Specific Cre Strains For Genetic Manipulation in Salivary Glands

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, Eri O.; Aure, Marit H.; Xie, Xiaoling; Myal, Yvonne; Gan, Lin; Ovitt, Catherine E.

    2016-01-01

    The secretory acinar cells of the salivary gland are essential for saliva secretion, but are also the cell type preferentially lost following radiation treatment for head and neck cancer. The source of replacement acinar cells is currently a matter of debate. There is evidence for the presence of adult stem cells located within specific ductal regions of the salivary glands, but our laboratory recently demonstrated that differentiated acinar cells are maintained without significant stem cell contribution. To enable further investigation of salivary gland cell lineages and their origins, we generated three cell-specific Cre driver mouse strains. For genetic manipulation in acinar cells, an inducible Cre recombinase (Cre-ER) was targeted to the prolactin-induced protein (Pip) gene locus. Targeting of the Dcpp1 gene, encoding demilune cell and parotid protein, labels intercalated duct cells, a putative site of salivary gland stem cells, and serous demilune cells of the sublingual gland. Duct cell-specific Cre expression was attempted by targeting the inducible Cre to the Tcfcp2l1 gene locus. Using the R26Tomato Red reporter mouse, we demonstrate that these strains direct inducible, cell-specific expression. Genetic tracing of acinar cells using PipGCE supports the recent finding that differentiated acinar cells clonally expand. Moreover, tracing of intercalated duct cells expressing DcppGCE confirms evidence of duct cell proliferation, but further analysis is required to establish that renewal of secretory acinar cells is dependent on stem cells within these ducts. PMID:26751783

  15. Most microbe-specific naïve CD4⁺ T cells produce memory cells during infection.

    PubMed

    Tubo, Noah J; Fife, Brian T; Pagan, Antonio J; Kotov, Dmitri I; Goldberg, Michael F; Jenkins, Marc K

    2016-01-29

    Infection elicits CD4(+) memory T lymphocytes that participate in protective immunity. Although memory cells are the progeny of naïve T cells, it is unclear that all naïve cells from a polyclonal repertoire have memory cell potential. Using a single-cell adoptive transfer and spleen biopsy method, we found that in mice, essentially all microbe-specific naïve cells produced memory cells during infection. Different clonal memory cell populations had different B cell or macrophage helper compositions that matched effector cell populations generated much earlier in the response. Thus, each microbe-specific naïve CD4(+) T cell produces a distinctive ratio of effector cell types early in the immune response that is maintained as some cells in the clonal population become memory cells. PMID:26823430

  16. DNA Replication Licensing Affects Cell Proliferation or Endoreplication in a Cell Type–Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    del Mar Castellano, María; Boniotti, María Beatrice; Caro, Elena; Schnittger, Arp; Gutierrez, Crisanto

    2004-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the function of DNA replication licensing components (Cdc6 and Cdt1, among others) is crucial for cell proliferation and genome stability. However, little is known about their role in whole organisms and whether licensing control interfaces with differentiation and developmental programs. Here, we study Arabidopsis thaliana CDT1, its regulation, and the consequences of overriding licensing control. The availability of AtCDT1 is strictly regulated at two levels: (1) at the transcription level, by E2F and growth-arresting signals, and (2) posttranscriptionally, by CDK phosphorylation, a step that is required for its proteasome-mediated degradation. We also show that CDC6 and CDT1 are key targets for the coordination of cell proliferation, differentiation, and development. Indeed, altered CDT1 or CDC6 levels have cell type–specific effects in developing Arabidopsis plants: in leaf cells competent to divide, cell proliferation is stimulated, whereas in cells programmed to undergo differentiation-associated endoreplication rounds, extra endocycles are triggered. Thus, we propose that DNA replication licensing control is critical for the proper maintenance of proliferative potential, developmental programs, and morphogenetic patterns. PMID:15316110

  17. Mechanical continuity and reversible chromosome disassembly within intact genomes removed from living cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maniotis, A. J.; Bojanowski, K.; Ingber, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Chromatin is thought to be structurally discontinuous because it is packaged into morphologically distinct chromosomes that appear physically isolated from one another in metaphase preparations used for cytogenetic studies. However, analysis of chromosome positioning and movement suggest that different chromosomes often behave as if they were physically connected in interphase as well as mitosis. To address this paradox directly, we used a microsurgical technique to physically remove nucleoplasm or chromosomes from living cells under isotonic conditions. Using this approach, we found that pulling a single nucleolus or chromosome out from interphase or mitotic cells resulted in sequential removal of the remaining nucleoli and chromosomes, interconnected by a continuous elastic thread. Enzymatic treatments of interphase nucleoplasm and chromosome chains held under tension revealed that mechanical continuity within the chromatin was mediated by elements sensitive to DNase or micrococcal nuclease, but not RNases, formamide at high temperature, or proteases. In contrast, mechanical coupling between mitotic chromosomes and the surrounding cytoplasm appeared to be mediated by gelsolin-sensitive microfilaments. Furthermore, when ion concentrations were raised and lowered, both the chromosomes and the interconnecting strands underwent multiple rounds of decondensation and recondensation. As a result of these dynamic structural alterations, the mitotic chains also became sensitive to disruption by restriction enzymes. Ion-induced chromosome decondensation could be blocked by treatment with DNA binding dyes, agents that reduce protein disulfide linkages within nuclear matrix, or an antibody directed against histones. Fully decondensed chromatin strands also could be induced to recondense into chromosomes with pre-existing size, shape, number, and position by adding anti-histone antibodies. Conversely, removal of histones by proteolysis or heparin treatment produced chromosome

  18. Harnessing Candida tenuis and Pichia stipitis in whole-cell bioreductions of o-chloroacetophenone: stereoselectivity, cell activity, in situ substrate supply and product removal.

    PubMed

    Gruber, Christoph; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kratzer, Regina

    2013-06-01

    Generally, recombinant and native microorganisms can be employed as whole-cell catalysts. The application of native hosts, however, shortens the process development time by avoiding multiple steps of strain construction. Herein, we studied the NAD(P)H-dependent reduction of o-chloroacetophenone by isolated xylose reductases and their native hosts Candida tenuis and Pichia stipitis. The natural hosts were benchmarked against Escherichia coli strains co-expressing xylose reductase and a dehydrogenase for co-enzyme recycling. Xylose-grown cells of C. tenuis and P. stipitis displayed specific o-chloroacetophenone reductase activities of 366 and 90 U gCDW (-1) , respectively, in the cell-free extracts. Fresh biomass was employed in batch reductions of 100 mM o-chloroacetophenone using glucose as co-substrate. Reaction stops at a product concentration of about 15 mM, which suggests sensitivity of the catalyst towards the formed product. In situ substrate supply and product removal by the addition of 40% hexane increased catalyst stability. Optimisation of the aqueous phase led to a (S)-1-(2-chlorophenyl)ethanol concentration of 71 mM (ee > 99.9%) obtained with 44 gCDW L(-1) of C. tenuis. The final difference in productivities between native C. tenuis and recombinant E. coli was < 1.7-fold. The optically pure product is a required key intermediate in the synthesis of a new class of chemotherapeutic substances (polo-like kinase 1 inhibitors). PMID:23589466

  19. High specific power, direct methanol fuel cell stack

    DOEpatents

    Ramsey, John C.; Wilson, Mahlon S.

    2007-05-08

    The present invention is a fuel cell stack including at least one direct methanol fuel cell. A cathode manifold is used to convey ambient air to each fuel cell, and an anode manifold is used to convey liquid methanol fuel to each fuel cell. Tie-bolt penetrations and tie-bolts are spaced evenly around the perimeter to hold the fuel cell stack together. Each fuel cell uses two graphite-based plates. One plate includes a cathode active area that is defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet manifold with an integral flow restrictor to the outlet manifold. The other plate includes an anode active area defined by serpentine channels connecting the inlet and outlet of the anode manifold. Located between the two plates is the fuel cell active region.

  20. Removal of sulphur-containing odorants from fuel gases for fuel cell-based combined heat and power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Wild, P. J.; Nyqvist, R. G.; de Bruijn, F. A.; Stobbe, E. R.

    Natural gas (NG) and liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) are important potential feedstocks for the production of hydrogen for fuel cell-based (e.g. proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC) or solid oxide fuel Cells (SOFC) combined heat and power (CHP) applications. To prevent detrimental effects on the (electro)catalysts in fuel cell-based combined heat and power installations (FC-CHP), sulphur removal from the feedstock is mandatory. An experimental bench-marking study of adsorbents has identified several candidates for the removal of sulphur containing odorants at low temperature. Among these adsorbents a new material has been discovered that offers an economically attractive means to remove TetraHydroThiophene (THT), the main European odorant, from natural gas at ambient temperature. The material is environmentally benign, easy to use and possesses good activity (residual sulphur levels below 20 ppbv) and capacity for the common odorant THT in natural gas. When compared to state-of-the-art metal-promoted active carbon the new material has a THT uptake capacity that is up to 10 times larger, depending on temperature and pressure. Promoted versions of the new material have shown potential for the removal of THT at higher temperatures and/or for the removal of other odorants such as mercaptans from natural gas or from LPG.

  1. RNAi Reveals Phase-Specific Global Regulators of Human Somatic Cell Reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Toh, Cheng-Xu Delon; Chan, Jun-Wei; Chong, Zheng-Shan; Wang, Hao Fei; Guo, Hong Chao; Satapathy, Sandeep; Ma, Dongrui; Goh, Germaine Yen Lin; Khattar, Ekta; Yang, Lin; Tergaonkar, Vinay; Chang, Young-Tae; Collins, James J; Daley, George Q; Wee, Keng Boon; Farran, Chadi A El; Li, Hu; Lim, Yoon-Pin; Bard, Frederic A; Loh, Yuin-Han

    2016-06-21

    Incomplete knowledge of the mechanisms at work continues to hamper efforts to maximize reprogramming efficiency. Here, we present a systematic genome-wide RNAi screen to determine the global regulators during the early stages of human reprogramming. Our screen identifies functional repressors and effectors that act to impede or promote the reprogramming process. Repressors and effectors form close interacting networks in pathways, including RNA processing, G protein signaling, protein ubiquitination, and chromatin modification. Combinatorial knockdown of five repressors (SMAD3, ZMYM2, SFRS11, SAE1, and ESET) synergistically resulted in ∼85% TRA-1-60-positive cells. Removal of the novel splicing factor SFRS11 during reprogramming is accompanied by rapid acquisition of pluripotency-specific spliced forms. Mechanistically, SFRS11 regulates exon skipping and mutually exclusive splicing of transcripts in genes involved in cell differentiation, mRNA splicing, and chromatin modification. Our study provides insights into the reprogramming process, which comprises comprehensive and multi-layered transcriptional, splicing, and epigenetic machineries. PMID:27292646

  2. DNA conformation driven by AP-1 triggers cell-specific expression via a strong epithelial enhancer.

    PubMed

    Virolle, T; Djabari, Z; Ortonne, J P; Aberdam, D

    2000-10-01

    We report here the characterization of the regulatory region of the human LAMA3 gene, coding for the alpha3A chain of laminin-5. A 202 bp fragment is sufficient to confer epithelial-specific expression to a thymidine kinase promoter through the cooperative effect of three AP-1 binding sites. Remarkably, removal of the sequences located between the AP-1 sites does not modify the promoter activity in keratinocytes but allows strong expression in fibroblasts. Replacement of the deleted sequences by non-homologous ones fully restores the restricted enhancement in keratinocytes. Functional analysis and mutagenesis experiments demonstrate that a minimal distance between the AP-1 sites is required for the enhancer DNA fragment to adopt a particular conformation driven by the binding of Jun-Fos heterodimers. In non-permissive cells, this conformation leads to the anchorage of non-DNA-binding fibroblastic cofactors to form an inhibitory ternary complex. Therefore, our results describe for the first time an unusual conformation-dependent epithelial-specific enhancer. PMID:11269498

  3. Antigen specificity of invariant natural killer T-cells.

    PubMed

    Birkholz, Alysia M; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2015-12-01

    Natural killer T-cells, with an invariant T-cell antigen receptor α-chain (iNKT cells), are unique and conserved subset of lymphocytes capable of altering the immune system through their rapid and potent cytokine responses. They are reactive to lipid antigens presented by the CD1d molecule, an antigen-presenting molecule that is not highly polymorphic. iNKT cell responses frequently involve mixtures of cytokines that work against each other, and therefore attempts are underway to develop synthetic antigens that elicit only strong interferon-gamma (IFNγ) or only strong interleukin-4 responses but not both. Strong IFNγ responses may correlate with tighter binding to CD1d and prolonged stimulation of iNKT cells, and this may be useful for vaccine adjuvants and for stimulating anti-tumor responses. iNKT cells are self-reactive although the structure of the endogenous antigen is controversial. By contrast, bacterial and fungal lipids that engage the T-cell receptor and activate IFNγ from iNKT cells have been identified from both pathogenic and commensal organisms and the responses are in some cases highly protective from pathogens in mice. It is possible that the expanding knowledge of iNKT cell antigens and iNKT cell activation will provide the basis for therapies for patients suffering from infectious and immune diseases and cancer. PMID:27013447

  4. Comparison of hydraulics and particle removal efficiencies in a mixed cell raceway and Burrows pond rearing system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moffitt, Christine M.

    2016-01-01

    We compared the hydrodynamics of replicate experimental mixed cell and replicate standard Burrows pond rearing systems at the Dworshak National Fish Hatchery, ID, in an effort to identify methods for improved solids removal. We measured and compared the hydraulic residence time, particle removal efficiency, and measures of velocity using several tools. Computational fluid dynamics was used first to characterize hydraulics in the proposed retrofit that included removal of the traditional Burrows pond dividing wall and establishment of four counter rotating cells with appropriate drains and inlet water jets. Hydraulic residence time was subsequently established in the four full scale test tanks using measures of conductivity of a salt tracer introduced into the systems both with and without fish present. Vertical and horizontal velocities were also measured with acoustic Doppler velocimetry in transects across each of the rearing systems. Finally, we introduced ABS sinking beads that simulated fish solids then followed the kinetics of their removal via the drains to establish relative purge rates. The mixed cell raceway provided higher mean velocities and a more uniform velocity distribution than did the Burrows pond. Vectors revealed well-defined, counter-rotating cells in the mixed cell raceway, and were likely contributing factors in achieving a relatively high particle removal efficiency-88.6% versus 8.0% during the test period. We speculate retrofits of rearing ponds to mixed cell systems will improve both the rearing environments for the fish and solids removal, improving the efficiency and bio-security of fish culture. We recommend further testing in hatchery production trials to evaluate fish physiology and growth.

  5. Gene-Specific Assessment of Guanine Oxidation as an Epigenetic Modulator for Cardiac Specification of Mouse Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joonghoon; Park, Jong Woo; Oh, Hawmok; Maria, Fernanda S.; Kang, Jaeku; Tian, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics have essential roles in development and human diseases. Compared to the complex histone modifications, epigenetic changes on mammalian DNA are as simple as methylation on cytosine. Guanine, however, can be oxidized as an epigenetic change which can undergo base-pair transversion, causing a genetic difference. Accumulating evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) are important signaling molecules for embryonic stem cell (ESC) differentiation, possibly through transient changes on genomic DNA such as 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG). Technical limitations on detecting such DNA modifications, however, restrict the investigation of the role of 8-oxoG in ESC differentiation. Here, we developed a Hoogsteen base pairing-mediated PCR-sequencing assay to detect 8-oxoG lesions that can subsequently cause G to T transversions during PCR. We then used this assay to assess the epigenetic and transient 8-oxoG formation in the Tbx5 gene of R1 mouse ESCs subjected to oxidative stress by removing 2-mercaptoethanol (2ME) from the culture media. To our surprise, significantly higher numbers of 8-oxoG-mediated G∙C to C∙G transversion, not G∙C to T∙A, were detected at 7th and 9th base position from the transcription start site of exon 1 of Tbx5 in ESCs in the (-)2ME than (+)2ME group (p < 0.05). This was consistent with the decrease in the amount of amplifiable of DNA harboring the 8-oxoG lesions at the Tbx5 promoter region in the oxidative stressed ESCs. The ESCs responded to oxidative stress, possibly through the epigenetic effects of guanine oxidation with decreased proliferation (p < 0.05) and increased formation of beating embryoid bodies (EBs; p < 0.001). Additionally, the epigenetic changes of guanine induced up-regulation of Ogg1 and PolB, two base excision repairing genes for 8-oxoG, in ESCs treated with (-)2ME (p < 0.01). Together, we developed a gene-specific and direct quantification assay for guanine oxidation. Using oxidative stressed

  6. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development.

    PubMed

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E; El-Sayed, Mesbah A; Shoaib, Mahmoud B; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  7. β-Cell-Specific Mafk Overexpression Impairs Pancreatic Endocrine Cell Development

    PubMed Central

    Abdellatif, Ahmed M.; Oishi, Hisashi; Itagaki, Takahiro; Jung, Yunshin; Shawki, Hossam H.; Okita, Yukari; Hasegawa, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Hiroyuki; El-Morsy, Salah E.; El-Sayed, Mesbah A.; Shoaib, Mahmoud B.; Sugiyama, Fumihiro; Takahashi, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    The MAF family transcription factors are homologs of v-Maf, the oncogenic component of the avian retrovirus AS42. They are subdivided into 2 groups, small and large MAF proteins, according to their structure, function, and molecular size. MAFK is a member of the small MAF family and acts as a dominant negative form of large MAFs. In previous research we generated transgenic mice that overexpress MAFK in order to suppress the function of large MAF proteins in pancreatic β-cells. These mice developed hyperglycemia in adulthood due to impairment of glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. The aim of the current study is to examine the effects of β-cell-specific Mafk overexpression in endocrine cell development. The developing islets of Mafk-transgenic embryos appeared to be disorganized with an inversion of total numbers of insulin+ and glucagon+ cells due to reduced β-cell proliferation. Gene expression analysis by quantitative RT-PCR revealed decreased levels of β-cell-related genes whose expressions are known to be controlled by large MAF proteins. Additionally, these changes were accompanied with a significant increase in key β-cell transcription factors likely due to compensatory mechanisms that might have been activated in response to the β-cell loss. Finally, microarray comparison of gene expression profiles between wild-type and transgenic pancreata revealed alteration of some uncharacterized genes including Pcbd1, Fam132a, Cryba2, and Npy, which might play important roles during pancreatic endocrine development. Taken together, these results suggest that Mafk overexpression impairs endocrine development through a regulation of numerous β-cell-related genes. The microarray analysis provided a unique data set of differentially expressed genes that might contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis that governs the development and function of endocrine pancreas. PMID:26901059

  8. Getting down to specifics: profiling gene expression and protein-DNA interactions in a cell type-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    McClure, Colin D.; Southall, Tony D.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of multicellular organisms are comprised of an extraordinary range of cell types, with different properties and gene expression profiles. Understanding what makes each cell type unique, and how their individual characteristics are attributed, are key questions for both developmental and neurobiologists alike. The brain is an excellent example of the cellular diversity expressed in the majority of eukaryotes. The mouse brain comprises of approximately 75 million neurons varying in morphology, electrophysiology, and preferences for synaptic partners. A powerful process in beginning to pick apart the mechanisms that specify individual characteristics of the cell, as well as their fate, is to profile gene expression patterns, chromatin states, and transcriptional networks in a cell type-specific manner, i.e. only profiling the cells of interest in a particular tissue. Depending on the organism, the questions being investigated, and the material available, certain cell type-specific profiling methods are more suitable than others. This chapter reviews the approaches presently available for selecting and isolating specific cell types and evaluates their key features. PMID:26410031

  9. Antigen-specific and non-specific CD4{sup +} T cell recruitment and proliferation during influenza infection

    SciTech Connect

    Chapman, Timothy J.; Castrucci, Maria R.; Padrick, Ryan C.; Bradley, Linda M.; Topham, David J. . E-mail: david_topham@urmc.rochester.edu

    2005-09-30

    To track epitope-specific CD4{sup +} T cells at a single-cell level during influenza infection, the MHC class II-restricted OVA{sub 323-339} epitope was engineered into the neuraminidase stalk of influenza/A/WSN, creating a surrogate viral antigen. The recombinant virus, influenza A/WSN/OVA{sub II}, replicated well, was cleared normally, and stimulated both wild-type and DO11.10 or OT-II TCR transgenic OVA-specific CD4{sup +} T cells. OVA-specific CD4 T cells proliferated during infection only when the OVA epitope was present. However, previously primed (but not naive) transgenic CD4{sup +} T cells were recruited to the infected lung both in the presence and absence of the OVA{sub 323-339} epitope. These data show that, when primed, CD4{sup +} T cells may traffic to the lung in the absence of antigen, but do not proliferate. These results also document a useful tool for the study of CD4 T cells in influenza infection.

  10. Removal of Cr{sup 6+} from waste water by dead cells of Pachymeniopsis sp.

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Y.H.; Yang, J.E.; Rhee, H.I.

    1995-12-31

    A red algae, Pachymeniopsis sp., was screened as a Cr{sup +6} specific biosorbent and its adsorption characteristics for Cr{sup +6} were studied. It is well known that several heavy metal ions such as cadmium, nickel, mercury can be selectively adsorbed by some specific marine algae. However, so far there has been no report that the biosorbent specific for Cr{sup +6} adsorption was successfully developed. Thus, trials of searching for a high Cr{sup +6} selective biosorbent with high adsorption capacity were made by examination of the Cr{sup +6} adsorption capacities of about fifty species of red, brown, or green marine algae which were sampled from the east coast of Korea. As the result of screening, a red marine algae showed most excellent adsorption characteristics among them and it was classified as Pachymeniopsis sp. Adsorption isotherms and adsorption kinetics were investigated to examine the applicability of Pachymeniopsis sp. as a Cr{sup +6} specific biosorbent. Pachymeniopsis sp. showed high selectivity for Cr{sup +6} ions since it showed low adsorption capacities for other heavy metal ions such as cadmium and manganese ions. An investigation of adsorption isotherms of dried powder of the Pachymeniopsis sp. for Cr{sup +6} adsorption at 25 C, pH 5.0 and 7.0 showed Langmuir type dependence. The isotherms show that the maximum Cr{sup +6} adsorption capacity of selected algae is about 20 (mg/g dry wt. of adsorbent). The 500 ml of artificial waste water with initial Cr{sup +6} concentration of 100 ppm was treated with 2.5 g of dried powder of Pachymeniopsis sp. in a batch slurry reactor. About 30 ppm of Cr{sup +6} remained after 1 hr`s contacting, showing 70% removal of Cr{sup +6}.

  11. Human corneal endothelial cell sheets for transplantation: thermo-responsive cell culture carriers to meet cell-specific requirements.

    PubMed

    Teichmann, J; Valtink, M; Gramm, S; Nitschke, M; Werner, C; Funk, R H W; Engelmann, K

    2013-02-01

    Corneal endothelial diseases lead to severe vision impairment, motivating the transplantation of donor corneae or corneal endothelial lamellae, which is, however, impeded by endothelial cell loss during processing. Therefore, one prioritized aim in corneal tissue engineering is the generation of transplantable human corneal endothelial cell (HCEC) layers. Thermo-responsive cell culture carriers are widely used for non-enzymatic harvest of cell sheets. The current study presents a novel thermo-responsive carrier based on simultaneous electron beam immobilization and cross-linking of poly(vinyl methyl ether) (PVME) on polymeric surfaces, which allows one to adjust layer thickness, stiffness, switching amplitude and functionalization with bioactive molecules to meet cell type specific requirements. The efficacy of this approach for HCEC, which require elaborate cell culture conditions and are strongly adherent to the substratum, is demonstrated. The developed method may pave the way to tissue engineering of corneal endothelium and significantly improve therapeutic options. PMID:23099299

  12. Antileukemic potency of CD19-specific T cells against chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Dolnikov, Alla; Shen, Sylvie; Klamer, Guy; Joshi, Swapna; Xu, Ning; Yang, Lu; Micklethwaite, Kenneth; O'Brien, Tracey A

    2015-12-01

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells (CART cells) has exhibited great promise in clinical trials, with efficient response correlated with CART-cell expansion and persistence. Despite extensive clinical use, the mechanisms regulating CART-cell expansion and persistence have not been completely elucidated. We have examined the antileukemia potency of CART cells targeting CD19 antigen using second-generation CAR containing a CD28 co-stimulatory domain cloned into piggyBac-transposon vector and patient-derived chemoresistant pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia samples. In the presence of large numbers of target cells characteristic of patients with high leukemia burden, excessive proliferation of CART cells leads to differentiation into short-lived effector cells. Transient leukemia growth delay was induced by CART-cell infusion in mice xenografted with rapidly growing CD19+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells and was followed by rapid CART-cell extinction. Conditioning with the hypomethylating agent 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-activating caspase 3 and promotion of apoptosis in leukemia cells maximized the effect of CART cells and improved CART-cell persistence. These data suggest that the clinical use of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine before CART cells could be considered. Coculture of leukemia cells with bone marrow stroma cells reduced target cell loss, suggesting that leukemia cell mobilization into circulation may help to remove the protective effect of bone marrow stroma and increase the efficacy of CART-cell therapy. PMID:26384559

  13. The CellML 1.1 Specification.

    PubMed

    Cuellar, Autumn; Hedley, Warren; Nelson, Melanie; Lloyd, Catherine; Halstead, Matt; Bullivant, David; Nickerson, David; Hunter, Peter; Nielsen, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This document specifies CellML 1.1, an XML-based language for describing and exchanging models of cellular and subcellular processes. MathML embedded in CellML documents is used to define the underlying mathematics of models. Models consist of a network of reusable components, each with variables and equations manipulating those variables. Models may import other models to create systems of increasing complexity. Metadata may be embedded in CellML documents using RDF. PMID:26528557

  14. Generation of Human Lens Epithelial-Like Cells From Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Dan; Qiu, Xiaodi; Yang, Jin; Liu, Tianjin; Luo, Yi; Lu, Yi

    2016-12-01

    Cataractogenesis begins from the dynamic lens epithelial cells (LECs) and adjacent fiber cells. LECs derived from cell lines cannot maintain the crystalline expression as the primary LECs. The current study aimed to efficiently generate large numbers of human LECs from patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). Anterior lens capsules were collected from cataract surgery and were used to culture primary hLECs. iPSCs were induced from these primary hLECs by lentiviral transduction of Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc. Then, the generated iPSCs were re-differentiated into hLECs by the 3-step addition of defined factor combinations (Noggin, BMP4/7, bFGF, and EGF) modified from an established method. During the re-differentiation process, colonies of interest were isolated using a glass picking tool and cloning cylinders based on the colony morphology. After two steps of isolation, populations of LEC-like cells (LLCs) were generated and identified by the expression of lens marker genes by qPCR, western blot and immunofluorescence staining. The study introduced a modified protocol to isolate LLCs from iPSCs by defined factors in a short time frame. This technique could be useful for mechanistic studies of lens-related diseases. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2555-2562, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26991066

  15. Analysis of antigen-specific, Ig-restricted cell-free material made by I-J+ Ly-1 cells (Ly-1 TsiF) that induces Ly-2+ cells to express suppressive activity.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, K; Murphy, D; Cantor, H; Gershon, R K

    1981-11-01

    A set of T cells defined by a unique profile of cell surface alloantigens (phenotype Ly-1+2-; Qa-1+; I-J+) produces biologically active cell-free material(s) (Ly-1 TsiF) which induces another T cell set (cell surface phenotype Ly-1,2+; I-J/; Qa-1+) to participate in the suppression of primary immune responses to heterologous erythrocytes. The suppression is specific for the inducing antigen, and the Ly-1 TsiF binds antigen in a specific way. The activity of Ly-1 TsiF can be removed by anti-I-J immunosorbents and will not be expressed if the functional producer and acceptor cells do not share gene products that are encoded in or are tightly linked to the VH portion of the Ig complex. There is no requirement for the Ly-1 TsiF and its acceptor cell(s) to share major histocompatibility complex gene products. Thus, for optimal induction of antigen-specific suppression by cell-gree materials from Ly-1 T cells, three necessary conditions must be met: (a) antigen recognition by Ly-1 TsiF; (b) the expression of I-J gene products and (c) identify of VH-linked Ig locus gene products (or other products influenced by those genes) on both the inducer molecule and its acceptor cell. The role of the Ig-linked restriction is particularly intriguing, and its possible meaning is considered in detail. PMID:6173228

  16. Activity-based ubiquitin-specific protease (USP) profiling of virus-infected and malignant human cells

    PubMed Central

    Ovaa, Huib; Kessler, Benedikt M.; Rolén, Ulrika; Galardy, Paul J.; Ploegh, Hidde L.; Masucci, Maria G.

    2004-01-01

    The family of ubiquitin (Ub)-specific proteases (USP) removes Ub from Ub conjugates and regulates a variety of cellular processes. The human genome contains many putative USP-encoding genes, but little is known about USP tissue distribution, pattern of expression, activity, and substrate specificity. We have used a chemistry-based functional proteomics approach to identify active USPs in normal, virus-infected, and tumor-derived human cells. Depending on tissue origin and stage of activation/differentiation, different USP activity profiles were revealed. The activity of specific USPs, including USP5, -7, -9, -13, -15, and -22, was up-regulated by mitogen activation or virus infection in normal T and B lymphocytes. UCH-L1 was highly expressed in tumor cell lines of epithelial and hematopoietic cell origin but was not detected in freshly isolated and mitogen-activated cells. Up-regulation of this USP was a late event in the establishment of Epstein–Barr virus-immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines and correlated with enhanced proliferation, suggesting a possible role in growth transformation. PMID:14982996

  17. Liquid-Water Uptake and Removal in PEM Fuel-Cell Components

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Prodip K.; Gunterman, Haluna P.; Kwong, Anthony; Weber, Adam Z.

    2011-09-23

    Management of liquid water is critical for optimal fuel-cell operation, especially at low temperatures. It is therefore important to understand the wetting properties and water holdup of the various fuel-cell layers. While the gas-diffusion layer is relatively hydrophobic and exhibits a strong intermediate wettability, the catalyst layer is predominantly hydrophilic. In addition, the water content of the ionomer in the catalyst layer is lower than that of the bulk membrane, and is affected by platinum surfaces. Liquid-water removal occurs through droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. In order to predict droplet instability and detachment, a force balance is used. While the pressure or drag force on the droplet can be derived, the adhesion or surface-tension force requires measurement using a sliding-angle approach. It is shown that droplets produced by forcing water through the gas-diffusion layer rather than placing them on top of it show much stronger adhesion forces owing to the contact to the subsurface water.

  18. A cell cycle-dependent co-repressor mediates photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Takezawa, Shinichiro; Yokoyama, Atsushi; Okada, Maiko; Fujiki, Ryoji; Iriyama, Aya; Yanagi, Yasuo; Ito, Hiroaki; Takada, Ichiro; Kishimoto, Masahiko; Miyajima, Atsushi; Takeyama, Ken-ichi; Umesono, Kazuhiko; Kitagawa, Hirochika; Kato, Shigeaki

    2007-01-01

    Photoreceptor cell-specific nuclear receptor (PNR) (NR2E3) acts as a sequence-specific repressor that controls neuronal differentiation in the developing retina. We identified a novel PNR co-repressor, Ret-CoR, that is expressed in the developing retina and brain. Biochemical purification of Ret-CoR identified a multiprotein complex that included E2F/Myb-associated proteins, histone deacetylases (HDACs) and NCoR/HDAC complex-related components. Ret-CoR appeared to function as a platform protein for the complex, and interacted with PNR via two CoRNR motifs. Purified Ret-CoR complex exhibited HDAC activity, co-repressed PNR transrepression function in vitro, and co-repressed PNR function in PNR target gene promoters, presumably in the retinal progenitor cells. Notably, the appearance of Ret-CoR protein was cell-cycle-stage-dependent (from G1 to S). Therefore, Ret-CoR appears to act as a component of an HDAC co-repressor complex that supports PNR repression function in the developing retina, and may represent a co-regulator class that supports transcriptional regulator function via cell-cycle-dependent expression. PMID:17255935

  19. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes

    PubMed Central

    Schaefer, Martin H.; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  20. Cell type-specific properties and environment shape tissue specificity of cancer genes.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Martin H; Serrano, Luis

    2016-01-01

    One of the biggest mysteries in cancer research remains why mutations in certain genes cause cancer only at specific sites in the human body. The poor correlation between the expression level of a cancer gene and the tissues in which it causes malignant transformations raises the question of which factors determine the tissue-specific effects of a mutation. Here, we explore why some cancer genes are associated only with few different cancer types (i.e., are specific), while others are found mutated in a large number of different types of cancer (i.e., are general). We do so by contrasting cellular functions of specific-cancer genes with those of general ones to identify properties that determine where in the body a gene mutation is causing malignant transformations. We identified different groups of cancer genes that did not behave as expected (i.e., DNA repair genes being tissue specific, immune response genes showing a bimodal specificity function or strong association of generally expressed genes to particular cancers). Analysis of these three groups demonstrates the importance of environmental impact for understanding why certain cancer genes are only involved in the development of some cancer types but are rarely found mutated in other types of cancer. PMID:26856619

  1. An experimental study of Au removal from solution by non-metabolizing bacterial cells and their exudates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenney, Janice P. L.; Song, Zhen; Bunker, Bruce A.; Fein, Jeremy B.

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we examine the initial interactions between aqueous Au(III)-hydroxide-chloride aqueous complexes and bacteria by measuring the effects of non-metabolizing cells on the speciation and distribution of Au. We conducted batch Au(III) removal experiments, measuring the kinetics and pH dependence of Au removal, and tracking valence state transformations and binding environments using XANES spectroscopy. These experiments were conducted using non-metabolizing cells of Bacillus subtilis or Pseudomonas putida suspended in a 5 ppm Au(III)-(hydroxide)-chloride starting solution of 0.1 M NaClO4 to buffer ionic strength. Both bacterial species removed greater than 85% of the Au from solution after 2 h of exposure time below approximately pH 5. Above pH 5, the extent of Au removed from solution decreased with increasing pH, with less than approximately 10% removal of Au from solution above pH 7.5. Kinetics experiments indicated that the Au removal with both bacterial species was rapid at pH 3, and slowed with increasing pH. Reversibility experiments demonstrated that (1) once the Au was removed from solution, adjusting 35 the pH alone did not remobilize the Au into solution and (2) the presence of cysteine in solution in the reversibility experiments caused Au to desorb, suggesting that the Au was not internalized within the bacterial cells. Our results suggest that Au removal occurs as a two-step pH-dependent adsorption reduction process. The speciation of the aqueous Au and the bacterial surface appears to control the rate of Au removal from solution. Under low pH conditions, the cell walls are only weakly negatively charged and aqueous Au complexes adsorb readily and rapidly. With increasing pH, the cell wall becomes more negatively charged, slowing adsorption significantly. The XANES data demonstrate that the reduction of Au(III) by bacterial exudates is slower and less extensive than the reduction observed in the bacteria-bearing systems, and we conclude that

  2. Specification of neural cell fate and regulation of neural stem cell proliferation by microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Jacqueline T; Gallicano, G Ian

    2012-01-01

    In the approximately 20 years since microRNAs (miRNAs) were first characterized, they have been shown to play important roles in diverse physiologic functions, particularly those requiring coordinated changes in networks of signaling pathways. The ability of miRNAs to silence expression of multiple gene targets hints at complex connections that research has only begun to elucidate. The nervous system, particularly the brain, and its progenitor cells offer opportunities to examine miRNA function due to the myriad different cell types, numerous functionally distinct regions, and fluidly dynamic connections between them. This review aims to summarize current understanding of miRNA regulation in neurodevelopment, beginning with miRNAs that establish a general neural fate in cells. Particular attention is given to miR-124, the most abundant brain-specific miRNA, along with its key regulators and targets as an example of the potentially far-reaching effects of miRNAs. These modulators and mediators enable miRNAs to subtly calibrate cellular proliferation and differentiation. To better understand their mechanisms of action, miRNA profiles in distinct populations and regions of cells have been examined as well as miRNAs that regulate proliferation of stem cells, a process marked by dramatic morphological shifts in response to temporally subtle and refined shifts in gene expression. To tease out the complex interactions of miRNAs and stem cells more accurately, future studies will require more sensitive methods of assessing miRNA expression and more rigorous models of miRNA pathways. Thorough characterization of similarities and differences in specific miRNAs’ effects in different species is vital to developing better disease models and therapeutics using miRNAs. PMID:23671807

  3. Antigen-specific B cell responses of vaccinated, neonatal calves

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Responses of newborn calves to vaccination are variable and often characterized by marginal humoral (i.e., antibody) responses. The immune cell population pivotal in the production of antibody is the B cell. The composition and functional capacity of this population in the newborn calf is not well...

  4. Properties of a potassium channel in cultured human gastric cells (HGT-1) possessing specific omeprazole binding sites.

    PubMed Central

    Sandle, G I; Fraser, G; Fogg, K; Warhurst, G

    1993-01-01

    The HGT-1 human gastric cell line is similar to acid secreting parietal cells in that it possesses H2 receptors, histamine sensitive adenyl cyclase, and Cl- channels, which are activated by histamine by a cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) dependent mechanism. To discover if HGT-1 cells have additional properties found in parietal cells, [3H]omeprazole and patch clamp recording techniques were used to evaluate specific omeprazole binding sites and K+ channels in the plasma membrane. HGT-1 cells exhibited [3H]omeprazole binding in the non-stimulated state, which increased 100% in the presence of 1 mM histamine. High conductance (about 155 pS) K+ channels were active spontaneously in 17% of cell attached or excised inside out patches in non-stimulated subconfluent HGT-1 cells. In inside out patches, channel activity increased fivefold during depolarisation, ion substitution experiments confirmed that the channels were highly selective for K+, and channel activity was almost abolished by removal of Ca2+ or addition of 5 mM Ba2+. In quiescent cell attached patches, 0.1 mM dibutyryl cAMP failed to activate K+ channels. In contrast, 6.7 microM A23187 (a Ca2+ ionophore) increased intracellular Ca2+ concentration from mean (SEM) 14 (3) nM to 248 (30) nM and activated K+ channels in 21% of patches. It is concluded that the plasma membrane of HGT-1 cells possesses (a) specific 3H-omeprazole binding sites, which may reflect the omeprazole sensitive H+,K(+)-ATPase present in gastric parietal cells; and (b) Ca(2+)-activated K+ channels, which may be located in the basolateral membrane of human gastric parietal cells and play a part in acid secretion triggered by Ca(2+)-mediated secretory agonists. PMID:8244097

  5. The diversity of nanos expression in echinoderm embryos supports different mechanisms in germ cell specification.

    PubMed

    Fresques, Tara; Swartz, Steven Zachary; Juliano, Celina; Morino, Yoshiaki; Kikuchi, Mani; Akasaka, Koji; Wada, Hiroshi; Yajima, Mamiko; Wessel, Gary M

    2016-07-01

    Specification of the germ cell lineage is required for sexual reproduction in all animals. However, the timing and mechanisms of germ cell specification is remarkably diverse in animal development. Echinoderms, such as sea urchins and sea stars, are excellent model systems to study the molecular and cellular mechanisms that contribute to germ cell specification. In several echinoderm embryos tested, the germ cell factor Vasa accumulates broadly during early development and is restricted after gastrulation to cells that contribute to the germ cell lineage. In the sea urchin, however, the germ cell factor Vasa is restricted to a specific lineage by the 32-cell stage. We therefore hypothesized that the germ cell specification program in the sea urchin/Euechinoid lineage has evolved to an earlier developmental time point. To test this hypothesis we determined the expression pattern of a second germ cell factor, Nanos, in four out of five extant echinoderm clades. Here we find that Nanos mRNA does not accumulate until the blastula stage or later during the development of all other echinoderm embryos except those that belong to the Echinoid lineage. Instead, Nanos is expressed in a restricted domain at the 32-128 cell stage in Echinoid embryos. Our results support the model that the germ cell specification program underwent a heterochronic shift in the Echinoid lineage. A comparison of Echinoid and non-Echinoid germ cell specification mechanisms will contribute to our understanding of how these mechanisms have changed during animal evolution. PMID:27402572

  6. Transactivation of pancreas-specific gene sequences in somatic cell hybrids.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, K J; Samuelson, L C; Howard, G; Meisler, M H; Darlington, G J

    1991-01-01

    Enhancer/promoter elements from two pancreas-specific genes, those encoding amylase and elastase, were ligated to the bacterial GPT gene. The resulting construct can be used to select for expression of gene products which activate these pancreas-specific promoters in hybrid cells. The selectable GPT construct was stably transferred into several cell lines either directly or by cotransfection with pSV2Neo. GPT was expressed when transferred to pancreatic cell lines but not when transferred to GPT-fibroblast (L) cells or hepatoma cells. When the transformed L cells and hepatoma cells were fused with pancreatic cell lines, GPT was activated in the hybrid cells. Endogenous pancreas-specific genes from the L-cell and hepatoma parents were also activated in the hybrids. In addition, a pancreas-specific nuclear protein, PTF1, was produced in pancreatic and hybrid cells, correlating with GPT expression. The transformed L cells and hepatoma cells thus contained a nonexpressed construct which could be activated in trans by factors present in pancreatic cells. The hepatoma hybrid also continued to produce albumin, demonstrating the coexpression of liver and pancreas-specific genes in the hybrid-cell population. Cell lines carrying the amylase/elastase/GPT construct may be useful as a selection system for cloning of pancreatic transcription activators. Images PMID:1715019

  7. A comparative review towards potential of microbial cells for heavy metal removal with emphasis on biosorption and bioaccumulation.

    PubMed

    Hansda, Arti; Kumar, Vipin; Anshumali

    2016-10-01

    The threat of heavy metal pollution to environmental health is getting worldwide attention due to their persistence and non-biodegradable nature. Ineffectiveness of various physicochemical methods due to economical and technical constraints resulted in the search for a cost-effective and eco-friendly biological technique for heavy metal removal from the environment. The two effective biotic methods used are biosorption and bioaccumulation. A comparison between these two processes demonstrated that biosorption is a better heavy metal removal process than bioaccumulation. This is due to the intoxication of heavy metal by inhibiting their entry into the microbial cell. Genes and enzymes related to bioremoval process are also discussed. On comparing the removal rate, bacteria are surpassed by algae and fungi. The aim of this review is to understand the biotic processes and to compare their metal removal efficiency. PMID:27565780

  8. Regulation of Lipid Specific and Vitamin Specific Non-MHC Restricted T Cells by Antigen Presenting Cells and Their Therapeutic Potentials

    PubMed Central

    Salio, Mariolina; Cerundolo, Vincenzo

    2015-01-01

    Since initial reports, more than 25 years ago, that T cells recognize lipids in the context on non-polymorphic CD1 molecules, our understanding of antigen presentation to non-peptide-specific T cell populations has deepened. It is now clear that αβ T cells bearing semi-invariant T cell receptor, as well as subsets of γδ T cells, recognize a variety of self and non-self lipids and contribute to shaping immune responses via cross talk with dendritic cells and B cells. Furthermore, it has been demonstrated that small molecules derived from the microbial riboflavin biosynthetic pathway (vitamin B2) bind monomorphic MR1 molecules and activate mucosal-associated invariant T cells, another population of semi-invariant T cells. Novel insights in the biological relevance of non-peptide-specific T cells have emerged with the development of tetrameric CD1 and MR1 molecules, which has allowed accurate enumeration and functional analysis of CD1- and MR1-restricted T cells in humans and discovery of novel populations of semi-invariant T cells. The phenotype and function of non-peptide-specific T cells will be discussed in the context of the known distribution of CD1 and MR1 molecules by different subsets of antigen-presenting cells at steady state and following infection. Concurrent modulation of CD1 transcription and lipid biosynthetic pathways upon TLR stimulation, coupled with efficient lipid antigen processing, result in the increased cell surface expression of antigenic CD1–lipid complexes. Similarly, MR1 expression is almost undetectable in resting APC and it is upregulated following bacterial infection, likely due to stabilization of MR1 molecules by microbial antigens. The tight regulation of CD1 and MR1 expression at steady state and during infection may represent an important mechanism to limit autoreactivity, while promoting T cell responses to foreign antigens. PMID:26284072

  9. Methods for Evaluating Cell-Specific, Cell-Internalizing RNA Aptamers

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Luiza I.; Flenker, Katie S.; Hernandez, Frank J.; Klingelhutz, Aloysius J.; II, James O. McNamara; Giangrande, Paloma H.

    2013-01-01

    Recent clinical trials of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) highlight the need for robust delivery technologies that will facilitate the successful application of these therapeutics to humans. Arguably, cell targeting by conjugation to cell-specific ligands provides a viable solution to this problem. Synthetic RNA ligands (aptamers) represent an emerging class of pharmaceuticals with great potential for targeted therapeutic applications. For targeted delivery of siRNAs with aptamers, the aptamer-siRNA conjugate must be taken up by cells and reach the cytoplasm. To this end, we have developed cell-based selection approaches to isolate aptamers that internalize upon binding to their cognate receptor on the cell surface. Here we describe methods to monitor for cellular uptake of aptamers. These include: (1) antibody amplification microscopy, (2) microplate-based fluorescence assay, (3) a quantitative and ultrasensitive internalization method (“QUSIM”) and (4) a way to monitor for cytoplasmic delivery using the ribosome inactivating protein-based (RNA-RIP) assay. Collectively, these methods provide a toolset that can expedite the development of aptamer ligands to target and deliver therapeutic siRNAs in vivo. PMID:23894227

  10. Evaluation of a red cell leukofilter performance and effect of buffy coat removal on filtration efficiency and post filtration storage.

    PubMed

    Sonker, Atul; Dubey, Anju; Chaudhary, Rajendra

    2014-12-01

    Prestorage leukoreduction of red cells is effective in reducing the incidence of HLA alloimmunization and improving the quality of stored packed red blood cells (PRBC). This study was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Imugard III-RC 4P in removing the leukocyte from packed red cells and the storage effects thereafter. The effects of buffy coat removal on the efficiency of leukofiltration, storage parameters of leukofiltered packed red blood cells and feasibility of prestorage leukofiltration were also assessed. Sixteen units each of buffy coat-depleted (LP) and nondepleted (NLP) PRBC were taken. Every unit was divided into two equal halves, one leukofiltered and other, non-leukofiltered. Cell counts, volume, hematocrit and hemoglobin were measured before and after filtration. Levels of K(+), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and hemolysis were assessed in all the units weekly, post leukofiltration. Post leukofiltration, red cell and volume loss was within the specified limit in all the units. Residual leukocytes were significantly lesser in LP- PRBC compared to NLPPRBC. K(+), LDH and hemolysis were significantly elevated in NLP- PRBC. Leukofiltered PRBC showed lesser elevation of K(+), LDH and hemolysis towards the end of the storage period as compared to their unfiltered counterparts. Leukofilter is capable of performing ~4 log reduction. Buffy coat removal prior to filtration improves the efficiency of leukofilter and aids in improving the storage of red cells in terms of hemolysis. PMID:25435736

  11. Dendritic Cells in the Periphery Control Antigen-Specific Natural and Induced Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamazaki, Sayuri; Morita, Akimichi

    2013-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are specialized antigen-presenting cells that regulate both immunity and tolerance. DCs in the periphery play a key role in expanding naturally occurring Foxp3+ CD25+ CD4+ regulatory T cells (Natural T-regs) and inducing Foxp3 expression (Induced T-regs) in Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. DCs are phenotypically and functionally heterogeneous, and further classified into several subsets depending on distinct marker expression and their location. Recent findings indicate the presence of specialized DC subsets that act to expand Natural T-regs or induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells. For example, two major subsets of DCs in lymphoid organs act differentially in inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− cells or expanding Natural T-regs with model-antigen delivery by anti-DC subset monoclonal antibodies in vivo. Furthermore, DCs expressing CD103 in the intestine induce Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− CD4+ T cells with endogenous TGF-β and retinoic acid. In addition, antigen-presenting DCs have a capacity to generate Foxp3+ T-regs in the oral cavity where many antigens and commensals exist, similar to intestine and skin. In skin and skin-draining lymph nodes, at least six DC subsets have been identified, suggesting a complex DC-T-reg network. Here, we will review the specific activity of DCs in expanding Natural T-regs and inducing Foxp3+ T-regs from Foxp3− precursors, and further discuss the critical function of DCs in maintaining tolerance at various locations including skin and oral cavity. PMID:23801989

  12. Cell cycle-specific replication of Escherichia coli minichromosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, A C; Helmstetter, C E

    1986-01-01

    The timing of Escherichia coli minichromosome replication in the cell division cycle was examined using an improved procedure for studying plasmid replication frequency. Cultures growing exponentially in glucose/Casamino acids minimal medium were pulse-labeled with [3H]thymidine, and the radioactivity incorporated into plasmid DNA in cells of different ages was analyzed. At the end of the labeling period the bacteria were bound to the surface of a nitrocellulose membrane filter, and the radioactivity in new daughter cells, which eluted continuously from the membrane, was quantitated following agarose gel electrophoresis. The minichromosomes replicated during a discrete interval in the cell division cycle that appeared to coincide with initiation of chromosome replication. In contrast, plasmid pBR322 replicated throughout the division cycle at a rate that increased gradually as a function of cell age. The difference in minichromosome and pBR322 replication was clearly discernible in cells harboring both plasmids. It was also found that the 16 kD gene adjacent to oriC was not a determinant of the timing of minichromosome replication during the division cycle. The results are consistent with the conclusion that minichromosome replication frequency is governed by the same mechanism that controls chromosome replication. Images PMID:3523483

  13. Spontaneous presence of FOXO3-specific T cells in cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Stine Kiaer; Ahmad, Shamaila Munir; Idorn, Manja; Met, Özcan; Martinenaite, Evelina; Svane, Inge Marie; Straten, Per thor; Andersen, Mads Hald

    2014-01-01

    In the present study, we describe forkhead box O3 (FOXO3)-specific, cytotoxic CD8+ T cells existent among peripheral-blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of cancer patients. FOXO3 immunogenicity appears specific, as we did not detect reactivity toward FOXO3 among T cells in healthy individuals. FOXO3 may naturally serve as a target antigen for tumor-reactive T cells as it is frequently over-expressed in cancer cells. In addition, expression of FOXO3 plays a critical role in immunosuppression mediated by tumor-associated dendritic cells (TADCs). Indeed, FOXO3-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were able to specifically recognize and kill both FOXO3-expressing cancer cells as well as dendritic cells. Thus, FOXO3 was processed and presented by HLA-A2 on the cell surface of both immune cells and cancer cells. As FOXO3 programs TADCs to become tolerogenic, FOXO3 signaling thereby comprises a significant immunosuppressive mechanism, such that FOXO3 targeting by means of specific T cells is an attractive clinical therapy to boost anticancer immunity. In addition, the natural occurrence of FOXO3-specific CTLs in the periphery suggests that these T cells hold a function in the complex network of immune regulation in cancer patients. PMID:25960934

  14. Single exposure to heat induces stage-specific germ cell apoptosis in rats: role of intratesticular testosterone on stage specificity.

    PubMed

    Lue, Y H; Hikim, A P; Swerdloff, R S; Im, P; Taing, K S; Bui, T; Leung, A; Wang, C

    1999-04-01

    Short term exposure of the testis to heat causes degeneration of germ cells. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. The major objectives of this study were to determine whether the heat-induced loss of germ cells in the adult rat occurs via apoptosis, to document its stage-specific and cell-specific distribution, and to examine whether intratesticular testosterone (T) plays any role in the stage specificity of heat-induced germ cell death. Testes of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to 22 C (control) or 43 C for 15 min. Animals were killed on days 1, 2, 9, and 56 after heat exposure. Germ cell apoptosis was characterized by DNA gel electrophoresis and in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxy-UTP nick end labeling assay. The incidence of germ cell apoptosis [apoptotic index (AI)] was quite low in control rats (AI = 0.04-0.1). Mild hyperthermia within 1 or 2 days resulted in a marked activation (AI = 4.7-5.6) of germ cell apoptosis predominantly at early (I-IV) and late (XII-XIV) stages. Stages V-VI and VII-VIII were relatively protected from heat-induced apoptosis. Spermatocytes, including pachytenes at stages I-IV and IX-XII, diplotene and dividing spermatocytes at stages XIII-XIV, and early (steps 1-4) spermatids, were most susceptible to heat. On day 9, the majority of the tubules were severely damaged and displayed only a few remaining apoptotic germ cells. By day 56, spermatogenesis was completely recovered, and the incidence of germ cell apoptosis was compatible with the control levels. To determine whether intratesticular T plays a role in protecting germ cells at stages VII-VIII against heat-induced cell death, adult rats were exposed to local testicular heating on day 2 or were given a daily sc injection of GnRH antagonist (GnRH-A) for 4 days with and without a single exposure of testes to heat applied on day 2. By day 4, the incidence of increased germ cell apoptosis at stages other than VII

  15. Screening of aptamers specific to colorectal cancer cells and stem cells by utilizing On-chip Cell-SELEX

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Lien-Yu; Wang, Chih-Hung; Che, Yu-Jui; Fu, Chien-Yu; Chang, Hwan-You; Wang, Kuan; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most frequently diagnosed cancer around the world, causing about 700,000 deaths every year. It is clear now that a small fraction of CRC, named colorectal cancer stem cells (CSCs) exhibiting self-renewal and extensive proliferative activities, are hard to be eradicated. Unfortunately, highly specific biomarkers for colorectal CSC (CR-CSCs) are lacking that prohibits the development of effective therapeutic strategies. This study designed and manufactured a novel microfluidic system capable of performing a fully automated cell-based, systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) process. Eight CR-CSC/CRC-specific aptamers were successfully selected using the microfluidic chip. Three of the aptamers showed high affinities towards their respective target cells with a dissociation constant of 27.4, 28.5 and 12.3 nM, which are comparable to that of antibodies. PMID:25999049

  16. Ubiquitously expressed genes participate in cell-specific functions via alternative promoter usage.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guihai; Tong, Man; Xia, Baolong; Luo, Guan-Zheng; Wang, Meng; Xie, Dongfang; Wan, Haifeng; Zhang, Ying; Zhou, Qi; Wang, Xiu-Jie

    2016-09-01

    How do different cell types acquire their specific identities and functions is a fundamental question of biology. Previously significant efforts have been devoted to search for cell-type-specifically expressed genes, especially transcription factors, yet how do ubiquitously expressed genes participate in the formation or maintenance of cell-type-specific features remains largely unknown. Here, we have identified 110 mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) specifically expressed transcripts with cell-stage-specific alternative transcription start sites (SATS isoforms) from 104 ubiquitously expressed genes, majority of which have active epigenetic modification- or stem cell-related functions. These SATS isoforms are specifically expressed in mESCs, and tend to be transcriptionally regulated by key pluripotency factors through direct promoter binding. Knocking down the SATS isoforms of Nmnat2 or Usp7 leads to differentiation-related phenotype in mESCs. These results demonstrate that cell-type-specific transcription factors are capable to produce cell-type-specific transcripts with alternative transcription start sites from ubiquitously expressed genes, which confer ubiquitously expressed genes novel functions involved in the establishment or maintenance of cell-type-specific features. PMID:27466324

  17. Regulatory T cells and antigen-specific tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kretschmer, Karsten; Apostolou, Irina; Verginis, Panos; von Boehmer, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Foxp3-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) have an essential function of preventing autoimmune disease in man and mouse. Foxp3 binds to forkhead motifs of about 1,100 genes and the strength of binding increases upon PMA/ionomycin stimulation. In Foxp3-expressing T-cell hybridomas, Foxp3 promoter binding does not lead to activation or suppression of genes which becomes only visible after T-cell activation. These findings are in line with observations by others that Foxp3 exerts important functions through association with Tcell receptor (TCR)-dependent transcription factors in a DNAbinding complex. Tregs can be generated when developing T cells encounter TCR agonist ligands in the thymus. This pro - cess requires costimulatory signals. In contrast, extra thymic conversion of naive T cells into Tregs is inhibited by costimulation. In fact, DC-derived retinoic acid (RA) helps the conversion process by counteracting the negative impact of costimulation. Since AP-1 is produced after costimulation and appears to interfere with Foxp3-NFAT transcription complexes, it is of interest to note that RA interferes with AP-1-dependent transcription. Thus, RA may interfere with the negative impact of costimulation on Treg conversion by interfering with the generation and/or function of AP-1. PMID:18802332

  18. Cell-Type-Specific Predictive Network Yields Novel Insights into Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Cell Fate

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Karen G.; Simons, Allen K.; Wang, Zack Z.; Yun, Kyuson; Hibbs, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    Self-renewal, the ability of a stem cell to divide repeatedly while maintaining an undifferentiated state, is a defining characteristic of all stem cells. Here, we clarify the molecular foundations of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) self-renewal by applying a proven Bayesian network machine learning approach to integrate high-throughput data for protein function discovery. By focusing on a single stem-cell system, at a specific developmental stage, within the context of well-defined biological processes known to be active in that cell type, we produce a consensus predictive network that reflects biological reality more closely than those made by prior efforts using more generalized, context-independent methods. In addition, we show how machine learning efforts may be misled if the tissue specific role of mammalian proteins is not defined in the training set and circumscribed in the evidential data. For this study, we assembled an extensive compendium of mESC data: ∼2.2 million data points, collected from 60 different studies, under 992 conditions. We then integrated these data into a consensus mESC functional relationship network focused on biological processes associated with embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cell fate determination. Computational evaluations, literature validation, and analyses of predicted functional linkages show that our results are highly accurate and biologically relevant. Our mESC network predicts many novel players involved in self-renewal and serves as the foundation for future pluripotent stem cell studies. This network can be used by stem cell researchers (at http://StemSight.org) to explore hypotheses about gene function in the context of self-renewal and to prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation. PMID:23468881

  19. Cell-type-specific predictive network yields novel insights into mouse embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cell fate.

    PubMed

    Dowell, Karen G; Simons, Allen K; Wang, Zack Z; Yun, Kyuson; Hibbs, Matthew A

    2013-01-01

    Self-renewal, the ability of a stem cell to divide repeatedly while maintaining an undifferentiated state, is a defining characteristic of all stem cells. Here, we clarify the molecular foundations of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) self-renewal by applying a proven Bayesian network machine learning approach to integrate high-throughput data for protein function discovery. By focusing on a single stem-cell system, at a specific developmental stage, within the context of well-defined biological processes known to be active in that cell type, we produce a consensus predictive network that reflects biological reality more closely than those made by prior efforts using more generalized, context-independent methods. In addition, we show how machine learning efforts may be misled if the tissue specific role of mammalian proteins is not defined in the training set and circumscribed in the evidential data. For this study, we assembled an extensive compendium of mESC data: ∼2.2 million data points, collected from 60 different studies, under 992 conditions. We then integrated these data into a consensus mESC functional relationship network focused on biological processes associated with embryonic stem cell self-renewal and cell fate determination. Computational evaluations, literature validation, and analyses of predicted functional linkages show that our results are highly accurate and biologically relevant. Our mESC network predicts many novel players involved in self-renewal and serves as the foundation for future pluripotent stem cell studies. This network can be used by stem cell researchers (at http://StemSight.org) to explore hypotheses about gene function in the context of self-renewal and to prioritize genes of interest for experimental validation. PMID:23468881

  20. Lactate exchange and removal abilities in sickle cell patients and in untrained and trained healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Freund, H; Lonsdorfer, J; Oyono-Enguéllé, S; Lonsdorfer, A; Bogui, P

    1992-12-01

    Arterial blood lactate concentrations obtained on seven black males with hemoglobin sickle cell disease (SC) before, during, and after graded bicycle exercise up to exhaustion were compared with those of seven untrained (HU) and seven trained (HT) healthy males of the same ethnic origin. Lactate recovery curves were fitted by a biexponential time function consisting of a rapidly increasing and a slowly decreasing component. Higher work rates were reached by the HU and HT than by the SC group. Blood lactate rose distinctly over the corresponding preexercise resting values after the 25-, 50-, and 100-W exercise steps for the SC, HU, and HT groups, respectively. The arterial oxygen content was significantly lower for the SC than for the HU group at rest and at the end of exercise. The velocity constants of the slowly decreasing component of the lactate recovery curves were similar for the SC, HU, and HT groups despite the fact that they cycled up to different absolute work rates. The velocity constant of the rapidly increasing component was significantly higher for the HT. In terms of the functional meaning given to these constants and in view of their inverse relationship with absolute work rate (Freund et al. J. Appl. Physiol. 61: 932-939, 1986), these results indicate that, relative to the HU, the HT and the SC display improved and impaired abilities, respectively, to exchange and to remove lactate. PMID:1490972

  1. Enhanced Salt Removal in an Inverted Capacitive Deionization Cell Using Amine Modified Microporous Carbon Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Omosebi, Ayokunle; Landon, James; Liu, Kunlei

    2015-09-15

    Microporous SpectraCarb carbon cloth was treated using nitric acid to enhance negative surface charges of COO(-) in a neutral solution. This acid-treated carbon was further modified by ethylenediamine to attach -NH2 surface functional groups, resulting in positive surface charges of -NH3(+) via pronation in a neutral solution. Through multiple characterizations, in comparison to pristine SpectraCarb carbon, amine-treated SpectraCarb carbon displays a decreased potential of zero charge but an increased point of zero charge, which is opposed to the effect obtained for acid-treated SpectraCarb carbon. An inverted capacitive deionization cell was constructed using amine-treated cathodes and acid-treated anodes, where the cathode is the negatively polarized electrode and the anode is the positively polarized electrode. Constant-voltage switching operation using NaCl solution showed that the salt removal capacity was approximately 5.3 mg g(-1) at a maximum working voltage of 1.1/0 V, which is an expansion in both the salt capacity and potential window from previous i-CDI results demonstrated for carbon xerogel materials. This improved performance is accounted for by the enlarged cathodic working voltage window through ethylenediamine-derived functional groups, and the enhanced microporosity of the SpectraCarb electrodes for salt adsorption. These results expand the use of i-CDI for efficient desalination applications. PMID:26302134

  2. A time dependent approach for removing the cell boundary error in elliptic homogenization problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, Doghonay; Runborg, Olof

    2016-06-01

    This paper concerns the cell-boundary error present in multiscale algorithms for elliptic homogenization problems. Typical multiscale methods have two essential components: a macro and a micro model. The micro model is used to upscale parameter values which are missing in the macro model. To solve the micro model, boundary conditions are required on the boundary of the microscopic domain. Imposing a naive boundary condition leads to O (ε / η) error in the computation, where ε is the size of the microscopic variations in the media and η is the size of the micro-domain. The removal of this error in modern multiscale algorithms still remains an important open problem. In this paper, we present a time-dependent approach which is general in terms of dimension. We provide a theorem which shows that we have arbitrarily high order convergence rates in terms of ε / η in the periodic setting. Additionally, we present numerical evidence showing that the method improves the O (ε / η) error to O (ε) in general non-periodic media.

  3. Role of T Cell Receptor Affinity in the Efficacy and Specificity of Adoptive T Cell Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Kranz, David M.

    2013-01-01

    Over the last several years, there has been considerable progress in the treatment of cancer using gene modified adoptive T cell therapies. Two approaches have been used, one involving the introduction of a conventional αβ T cell receptor (TCR) against a pepMHC cancer antigen, and the second involving introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) consisting of a single-chain antibody as an Fv fragment linked to transmembrane and signaling domains. In this review, we focus on one aspect of TCR-mediated adoptive T cell therapies, the impact of the affinity of the αβ TCR for the pepMHC cancer antigen on both efficacy and specificity. We discuss the advantages of higher-affinity TCRs in mediating potent activity of CD4 T cells. This is balanced with the potential disadvantage of higher-affinity TCRs in mediating greater self-reactivity against a wider range of structurally similar antigenic peptides, especially in synergy with the CD8 co-receptor. Both TCR affinity and target selection will influence potential safety issues. We suggest pre-clinical strategies that might be used to examine each TCR for possible on-target and off-target side effects due to self-reactivities, and to adjust TCR affinities accordingly. PMID:23970885

  4. Selection of restriction specificities of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells in the thymus: no evidence for a crucial role of antigen-presenting cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zinkernagel, R.M.

    1982-12-01

    The proposal was tested that (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressed predominantly P1-restricted T cells because donor derived stem cells were exposed to recipient derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus. Because P1 recipient-derived antigen-presenting cells are replaced only slowly after 6-8 wk by (P1 X P2) donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus and because replenished pools of mature T cells may by then prevent substantial numbers of P2-restricted T cells to be generated, a large portion of thymus cells and mature T cells were eliminated using the following treatments of 12-20-wk-old (P1 X P2) F1 leads to P1 irradiation bone marrow chimeras: (a) cortisone plus antilymphocyte serum, (b) Cytoxan, (c) three doses of sublethal irradiation (300 rad) 2d apart, and (d) lethal irradiation (850 rad) and reconstitution with T cell-depleted (P1 X P2) F1 stem cells. 12-20 wk after this second treatment, (P1 X P2) leads to P1 chimeras were infected with vaccinia-virus. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cell reactivity was expressed by chimeric T cells of (P1 X P(2) F1 origin and was restricted predominantly to P1. Virus-specific cytotoxic T cells, therefore, do not seem to be selected to measurable extent by the immigrating donor-derived antigen-presenting cells in the thymus; their selection depends apparently from the recipient-derived radioresistant thymus cells.

  5. Target cell-specific modulation of neuronal activity by astrocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. S.; Angulo, M. C.; Audinat, E.; Charpak, S.

    2006-06-01

    Interaction between astrocytes and neurons enriches the behavior of brain circuits. By releasing glutamate and ATP, astrocytes can directly excite neurons and modulate synaptic transmission. In the rat olfactory bulb, we demonstrate that the release of GABA by astrocytes causes long-lasting and synchronous inhibition of mitral and granule cells. In addition, astrocytes release glutamate, leading to a selective activation of granule-cell NMDA receptors. Thus, by releasing excitatory and inhibitory neurotransmitters, astrocytes exert a complex modulatory control on the olfactory network. glutamate | GABA | inhibition | olfactory bulb | synchronization

  6. Comparison of adsorbents for H2S and D4 removal for biogas conversion in a solid oxide fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sigot, Léa; Ducom, Gaëlle; Benadda, Belkacem; Labouré, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Biogas contains trace compounds detrimental for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) application, especially sulphur-containing compounds and volatile organic silicon compounds (VOSiCs). It is therefore necessary to remove these impurities from the biogas for fuelling an SOFC. In this paper, dynamic lab-scale adsorption tests were performed on synthetic polluted gas to evaluate the performance of a polishing treatment to remove hydrogen sulphide (H2S - sulphur compound) and octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4 - VOSiC). Three kinds of adsorbents were tested: an activated carbon, a silica gel (SG) and a zeolite (Z). Z proved to be the best adsorbent for H2S removal, with an adsorbed quantity higher than [Formula: see text] at the SOFC tolerance limit. However, as concerns D4 removal, SG was the most efficient adsorbent, with an adsorbed quantity of about 184 mgD4/gSG at the SOFC tolerance limit. These results could not be explained by structural characteristics of the adsorbents, but they were partly explained by chemical interactions between the adsorbate and the adsorbent. In these experiments, internal diffusion was the controlling step, Knudsen diffusion being predominant to molecular diffusion. As Z was also a good adsorbent for D4 removal, competition phenomena were investigated with Z for the simultaneous removal of H2S and D4. It was shown that H2S retention was dramatically decreased in the presence of D4, probably due to D4 polymerization resulting in pore blocking. PMID:26183696

  7. Autotrophic nitrogen removal from ammonium at low applied voltage in a single-compartment microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Guoqiang; Zhang, Lixia; Li, Daping; Su, Wentao; Tao, Yong; Qian, Junwei

    2012-07-01

    A new approach was developed to achieve autotrophic nitrogen removal from ammonium at low applied voltage in a single-compartment 3-dimensional microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). The MEC consisted of anodic and cathodic electrodes, on which nitrifying and denitrifying biofilms, respectively, were attached. Nitrogen removal can be enhanced at an applied voltage in the MEC. Besides, the nitrogen removal efficiency gradually increased from 70.3% to 92.6% with the increase of applied voltage from 0.2 to 0.4V, as well as the maximum current was varied from 4.4 to 14 mA. The corresponding coulombic efficiency also increased from 82% to 94.4%, indicating that the increasing applied voltage could enhance electron extraction from ammonium during its oxidative removal. The DO was found to be a critical factor which affected the nitrogen removal in this MEC system. These results demonstrated that the MEC process was applicable to achieve autotrophic nitrogen removal from wastewater containing ammonium. PMID:22572551

  8. Stage-specific embryonic antigen-4 identifies human dental pulp stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kawanabe, Noriaki; Murata, Satoko; Fukushima, Hiroaki; Ishihara, Yoshihito; Yanagita, Takeshi; Yanagita, Emmy; Ono, Mitsuaki; Kurosaka, Hiroshi; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Itoh, Tomoo; Kuboki, Takuo; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2012-03-10

    Embryonic stem cell-associated antigens are expressed in a variety of adult stem cells as well as embryonic stem cells. In the present study, we investigated whether stage-specific embryonic antigen (SSEA)-4 can be used to isolate dental pulp (DP) stem cells. DP cells showed plastic adherence, specific surface antigen expression, and multipotent differentiation potential, similar to mesenchymal stem cells (MSC). SSEA-4+ cells were found in cultured DP cells in vitro as well as in DP tissue in vivo. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated that 45.5% of the DP cells were SSEA-4+. When the DP cells were cultured in the presence of all-trans-retinoic acid, marked downregulation of SSEA-3 and SSEA-4 and the upregulation of SSEA-1 were observed. SSEA-4+ DP cells showed a greater telomere length and a higher growth rate compared to ungated and SSEA-4- cells. A clonal assay demonstrated that 65.5% of the SSEA-4+ DP cells had osteogenic potential, and the SSEA-4+ clonal DP cells showed multilineage differentiation potential toward osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and neurons in vitro. In addition, the SSEA-4+ DP cells had the capacity to form ectopic bone in vivo. Thus, our results suggest that SSEA-4 is a specific cell surface antigen that can be used to identify DP stem cells. PMID:22266579

  9. Adipose lineage specification of bone marrow-derived myeloid cells

    PubMed Central

    Majka, Susan M.; Miller, Heidi L.; Sullivan, Timothy; Erickson, Paul F.; Kong, Raymond; Weiser-Evans, Mary; Nemenoff, Raphael; Moldovan, Radu; Morandi, Shelley A.; Davis, James A.; Klemm, Dwight J.

    2012-01-01

    We have reported the production of white adipocytes in adipose tissue from hematopoietic progenitors arising from bone marrow. However, technical challenges have hindered detection of this adipocyte population by certain other laboratories. These disparate results highlight the need for sensitive and definitive techniques to identify bone marrow progenitor (BMP)-derived adipocytes. In these studies we exploited new models and methods to enhance detection of this adipocyte population. Here we showed that confocal microscopy with spectrum acquisition could effectively identify green fluorescent protein (GFP) positive BMP-derived adipocytes by matching their fluorescence spectrum to that of native GFP. Likewise, imaging flow cytometry made it possible to visualize intact unilocular and multilocular GFP-positive BMP-derived adipocytes and distinguished them from non-fluorescent adipocytes and cell debris in the cytometer flow stream. We also devised a strategy to detect marker genes in flow-enriched adipocytes from which stromal cells were excluded. This technique also proved to be an efficient means for detecting genetically labeled adipocytes and should be applicable to models in which marker gene expression is low or absent. Finally, in vivo imaging of mice transplanted with BM from adipocyte-targeted luciferase donors showed a time-dependent increase in luciferase activity, with the bulk of luciferase activity confined to adipocytes rather than stromal cells. These results confirmed and extended our previous reports and provided proof-of-principle for sensitive techniques and models for detection and study of these unique cells. PMID:23700536

  10. Selective culling of high avidity antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection

    PubMed Central

    Ertelt, James M; Johanns, Tanner M; Mysz, Margaret A; Nanton, Minelva R; Rowe, Jared H; Aguilera, Marijo N; Way, Sing Sing

    2011-01-01

    Typhoid fever is a persistent infection caused by host-adapted Salmonella strains adept at circumventing immune-mediated host defences. Given the importance of T cells in protection, the culling of activated CD4+ T cells after primary infection has been proposed as a potential immune evasion strategy used by this pathogen. We demonstrate that the purging of activated antigen-specific CD4+ T cells after virulent Salmonella infection requires SPI-2 encoded virulence determinants, and is not restricted only to cells with specificity to Salmonella-expressed antigens, but extends to CD4+ T cells primed to expand by co-infection with recombinant Listeria monocytogenes. Unexpectedly, however, the loss of activated CD4+ T cells during Salmonella infection demonstrated using a monoclonal population of adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells was not reproduced among the endogenous repertoire of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells identified with MHC class II tetramer. Analysis of T-cell receptor variable segment usage revealed the selective loss and reciprocal enrichment of defined CD4+ T-cell subsets after Salmonella co-infection that is associated with the purging of antigen-specific cells with the highest intensity of tetramer staining. Hence, virulent Salmonella triggers the selective culling of high avidity activated CD4+ T-cell subsets, which re-shapes the repertoire of antigen-specific T cells that persist later after infection. PMID:22044420

  11. Autoantigen-specific B-cell depletion overcomes failed immune tolerance in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Henry, Rachel A; Kendall, Peggy L; Thomas, James W

    2012-08-01

    Eliminating autoantigen-specific B cells is an attractive alternative to global B-cell depletion for autoimmune disease treatment. To identify the potential for targeting a key autoimmune B-cell specificity in type 1 diabetes, insulin-binding B cells were tracked within a polyclonal repertoire using heavy chain B-cell receptor (BCR) transgenic (VH125Tg) mice. Insulin-specific B cells are rare in the periphery of nonautoimmune VH125Tg/C57BL/6 mice and WT/NOD autoimmune mice, whereas they clearly populate 1% of mature B-cell subsets in VH125Tg/NOD mice. Autoantigen upregulates CD86 in anti-insulin B cells, suggesting they are competent to interact with T cells. Endogenous insulin occupies anti-insulin BCR beginning with antigen commitment in bone marrow parenchyma, as identified by a second anti-insulin monoclonal antibody. Administration of this monoclonal antibody selectively eliminates insulin-reactive B cells in vivo and prevents disease in WT/NOD mice. Unexpectedly, developing B cells are less amenable to depletion, despite increased BCR sensitivity. These findings exemplify how a critical type 1 diabetes B-cell specificity escapes immune tolerance checkpoints. Disease liability is corrected by eliminating this B-cell specificity, providing proof of concept for a novel therapeutic approach for autoimmune disease. PMID:22698916

  12. Quantification of HLA class II-specific memory B cells in HLA-sensitized individuals.

    PubMed

    Karahan, Gonca E; de Vaal, Yvonne J H; Roelen, Dave L; Buchli, Rico; Claas, Frans H J; Heidt, Sebastiaan

    2015-03-01

    For the quantification of HLA-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood of sensitized individuals, a limited number of methods are available. However, none of these are capable of detecting memory B cells directed at HLA class II molecules. Since the majority of antibodies that occur after transplantation appear to be specific for HLA class II, our aim was to develop an assay to detect and quantify HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. By using biotinylated soluble HLA class II molecules as detection agent, we were able to develop an HLA class II-specific memory B cell ELISPOT assay. The assay was validated using B cell-derived hybridomas that produce human monoclonal antibodies directed at specific HLA class II molecules. In pregnancy-immunized females, we found memory B cell frequencies ranging from 25 to 756 spots per 10(6) B cells specific for the immunizing paternal HLA class II molecules, whereas in non-immunized males no significant spot formation was detected. Here, we present a novel ELISPOT assay for quantifying HLA class II-specific memory B cells from peripheral blood. This technique provides a unique tool for monitoring the HLA class II-specific memory B cell pool in sensitized transplant recipients. PMID:25636565

  13. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  14. Utility of the Clostridial Site-Specific Recombinase TnpX To Clone Toxic-Product-Encoding Genes and Selectively Remove Genomic DNA Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Vicki; Bantwal, Radhika; Stevenson, Lauren; Cheung, Jackie K.; Awad, Milena M.; Nicholson, Joel; Carter, Glen P.; Mackin, Kate E.; Rood, Julian I.

    2014-01-01

    TnpX is a site-specific recombinase responsible for the excision and insertion of the transposons Tn4451 and Tn4453 in Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium difficile, respectively. Here, we exploit phenotypic features of TnpX to facilitate genetic mutagenesis and complementation studies. Genetic manipulation of bacteria often relies on the use of antibiotic resistance genes; however, a limited number are available for use in the clostridia. The ability of TnpX to recognize and excise specific DNA fragments was exploited here as the basis of an antibiotic resistance marker recycling system, specifically to remove antibiotic resistance genes from plasmids in Escherichia coli and from marked chromosomal C. perfringens mutants. This methodology enabled the construction of a C. perfringens plc virR double mutant by allowing the removal and subsequent reuse of the same resistance gene to construct a second mutation. Genetic complementation can be challenging when the gene of interest encodes a product toxic to E. coli. We show that TnpX represses expression from its own promoter, PattCI, which can be exploited to facilitate the cloning of recalcitrant genes in E. coli for subsequent expression in the heterologous host C. perfringens. Importantly, this technology expands the repertoire of tools available for the genetic manipulation of the clostridia. PMID:24682304

  15. Cell-Type-Specific Alternative Splicing Governs Cell Fate in the Developing Cerebral Cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaochang; Chen, Ming Hui; Wu, Xuebing; Kodani, Andrew; Fan, Jean; Doan, Ryan; Ozawa, Manabu; Ma, Jacqueline; Yoshida, Nobuaki; Reiter, Jeremy F; Black, Douglas L; Kharchenko, Peter V; Sharp, Phillip A; Walsh, Christopher A

    2016-08-25

    Alternative splicing is prevalent in the mammalian brain. To interrogate the functional role of alternative splicing in neural development, we analyzed purified neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and neurons from developing cerebral cortices, revealing hundreds of differentially spliced exons that preferentially alter key protein domains-especially in cytoskeletal proteins-and can harbor disease-causing mutations. We show that Ptbp1 and Rbfox proteins antagonistically govern the NPC-to-neuron transition by regulating neuron-specific exons. Whereas Ptbp1 maintains apical progenitors partly through suppressing a poison exon of Flna in NPCs, Rbfox proteins promote neuronal differentiation by switching Ninein from a centrosomal splice form in NPCs to a non-centrosomal isoform in neurons. We further uncover an intronic human mutation within a PTBP1-binding site that disrupts normal skipping of the FLNA poison exon in NPCs and causes a brain-specific malformation. Our study indicates that dynamic control of alternative splicing governs cell fate in cerebral cortical development. PMID:27565344

  16. Defect behavior, carrier removal and predicted in-space injection annealing of InP solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Drevinsky, P. J.

    1992-01-01

    Defect behavior, observed by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), is used to predict carrier removal and the effects of simultaneous electron irradiation and injection annealing of the performance of InP solar cells. For carrier removal, the number of holes trapped per defect is obtained from measurements of both carrier concentrations and defect concentrations during an isochronal anneal. In addition, from kinetic considerations, the behavior of the dominant defect during injection annealing is used to estimate the degradation expected from exposure to the ambient electron environment in geostationary orbit.

  17. Colour removal from aqueous solutions of metal-complex azo dyes using bacterial cells of Shewanella strain J18 143.

    PubMed

    Li, Tie; Guthrie, James Thomas

    2010-06-01

    The decoloration treatment of textile dye effluents through biodegradation, using bacterial cells, has been studied as a possible means of solving some of the problems that are associated with the pollution of water sources by colorants. In this paper, the use of whole bacterial cells of Shewanella J18 143 for the reduction of aqueous solutions of selected mono-azo, metal-complex dyes, namely Irgalan Grey GLN, Irgalan Black RBLN and Irgalan Blue 3GL, was investigated. The effects of temperature, pH and dye concentration on colour removal were also investigated and shown to be important. The operative conditions for the removal of colour were 30 degrees C, at pH 6.8, with a final dye concentration of 0.12 g/L in the colour reduction system. This study provides an extension to the application of Shewanella strain J18 143 bacterial cells in the decoloration of textile wastewaters. PMID:20167478

  18. Endothelial Cells Mediate Islet-Specific Maturation of Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Pancreatic Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Maria; Mathew, Shibin; Mamiya, Hikaru; Goh, Saik Kia

    2015-01-01

    It is well recognized that in vitro differentiation of embryonic stem cells (ESC) can be best achieved by closely recapitulating the in vivo developmental niche. Thus, implementation of directed differentiation strategies has yielded encouraging results in the area of pancreatic islet differentiation. These strategies have concentrated on direct addition of chemical signals, however, other aspect of the developmental niche are yet to be explored. During development, pancreatic progenitor (PP) cells grow as an epithelial sheet, which aggregates with endothelial cells (ECs) during the final stages of maturation. Several findings suggest that the interactions with EC play a role in pancreatic development. In this study, we recapitulated this phenomenon in an in vitro environment by maturing the human ESC (hESC)-derived PP cells in close contact with ECs. We find that co-culture with different ECs (but not fibroblast) alone results in pancreatic islet-specific differentiation of hESC-derived PP cells even in the absence of additional chemical induction. The differentiated cells responded to exogenous glucose levels by enhanced C-peptide synthesis. The co-culture system aligned well with endocrine development as determined by comprehensive analysis of involved signaling pathways. By recapitulating cell–cell interaction aspects of the developmental niche we achieved a differentiation model that aligns closely with islet organogenesis. PMID:24943736

  19. Specific capture and temperature-mediated release of cells in an aptamer-based microfluidic device†

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jing; Nguyen, ThaiHuu; Pei, Renjun; Stojanovic, Milan; Lin, Qiao

    2014-01-01

    Isolation of cells from heterogeneous mixtures is critically important in both basic cell biology studies and clinical diagnostics. Cell isolation can be realized based on physical properties such as size, density and electrical properties. Alternatively, affinity binding of target cells by surface-immobilized ligands, such as antibodies, can be used to achieve specific cell isolation. Microfluidics technology has recently been used in conjunction with antibody-based affinity isolation methods to capture, purify and isolate cells with higher yield rates, better efficiencies and lower costs. However, a method that allows easy release and collection of live cells from affinity surfaces for subsequent analysis and detection has yet to be developed. This paper presents a microfluidic device that not only achieves specific affinity capture and enrichment, but also enables non-destructive, temperature-mediated release and retrieval of cells. Specific cell capture is achieved using surface-immobilized aptamers in a microchamber. Release of the captured cells is realized by a moderate temperature change, effected via integrated heaters and a temperature sensor, to reversibly disrupt the cell-aptamer interaction. Experimental results with CCRF-CEM cells have demonstrated that the device is capable of specific capture and temperature-mediated release of cells, that the released cells remain viable and that the aptamer-functionalized surface is regenerable. PMID:22854859

  20. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  1. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets

    PubMed Central

    Barsi, Julius C.; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H.

    2014-01-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database. PMID:24604781

  2. General approach for in vivo recovery of cell type-specific effector gene sets.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Julius C; Tu, Qiang; Davidson, Eric H

    2014-05-01

    Differentially expressed, cell type-specific effector gene sets hold the key to multiple important problems in biology, from theoretical aspects of developmental gene regulatory networks (GRNs) to various practical applications. Although individual cell types of interest have been recovered by various methods and analyzed, systematic recovery of multiple cell type-specific gene sets from whole developing organisms has remained problematic. Here we describe a general methodology using the sea urchin embryo, a material of choice because of the large-scale GRNs already solved for this model system. This method utilizes the regulatory states expressed by given cells of the embryo to define cell type and includes a fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS) procedure that results in no perturbation of transcript representation. We have extensively validated the method by spatial and qualitative analyses of the transcriptome expressed in isolated embryonic skeletogenic cells and as a consequence, generated a prototypical cell type-specific transcriptome database. PMID:24604781

  3. Understanding the molecular circuitry of cell lineage specification in the early mouse embryo.

    PubMed

    Bergsmedh, Anna; Donohoe, Mary E; Hughes, Rebecca-Ayme; Hadjantonakis, Anna-Katerina

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells hold great promise for cell-based therapies in regenerative medicine. However, critical to understanding and exploiting mechanisms of cell lineage specification, epigenetic reprogramming, and the optimal environment for maintaining and differentiating pluripotent stem cells is a fundamental knowledge of how these events occur in normal embryogenesis. The early mouse embryo has provided an excellent model to interrogate events crucial in cell lineage commitment and plasticity, as well as for embryo-derived lineage-specific stem cells and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Here we provide an overview of cell lineage specification in the early (preimplantation) mouse embryo focusing on the transcriptional circuitry and epigenetic marks necessary for successive differentiation events leading to the formation of the blastocyst. PMID:24710206

  4. EBV LMP2A-specific T Cell Immune Responses Elicited by Dendritic Cells Loaded with LMP2A Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yun; Sun, Hua; Liu, Genyan; Wang, Bing; Wang, Fang; Sun, Beicheng; Yao, Kun

    2009-01-01

    Type II Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) associated malignancies such as nasopharyngeal carcinoma and non-Hodgkin's lymphomas consistently express latent membrane 2A (LMP2A) proteins, which have been suggested to be an ideal target for immunotherapy. In previous studies we have demonstrated that using LMP2A protein loaded dendritic cells, the most powerful antigen processing cells in the body can elicit specific and robust anti-tumor cellular immune response in vitro. In this paper, we further investigated the T cell profile of the anti-tumor immune response. We found that LMP2A specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells could be stimulated by LMP2A protein loaded dendritic cells (DCs). The Th1 type immune response is dominant in the immune response mediated by LMP2A specific CD4+ T cells. The CD8+ cytotoxic T cells can lyse LMP2A bearing cells effectively and specifically. The CD8+ cytotoxic T cells can also secrete high level of intracellular IFN-γ, which indicates these cells are EBV-LMP2A specific cytotoxic T cells. Altogether, our studies proved that LMP2A protein loaded DCs can elicit anti-tumor cellular immune responses efficiently. This study provides a rationale for the DC-based immunotherapy against EBV-LMP2A expressing malignancies. PMID:19728928

  5. Rapid generation of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ THELPER1 cells for adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Simone; Boβ, Cristina; Feucht, Judith; Witte, Kai-Erik; Scheu, Alexander; Bülow, Hans-Jörg; Joachim, Stefanie; Stevanović, Stefan; Schumm, Michael; Rittig, Susanne M; Lang, Peter; Röcken, Martin; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated antigens such as NY-ESO-1 are expressed in a variety of solid tumors but absent in mature healthy tissues with the exception of germline cells. The immune system anti-cancer attack is mediated by cell lysis or induction of growth arrest through paralysis of tumor cells, the latter of which can be achieved by tumor-specific CD4+, IFNγ-producing THelper type 1 (TH1) cells. Translation of these immune-mediated mechanisms into clinical application has been limited by availability of immune effectors, as well as the need for complex in vitro protocols and regulatory hurdles. Here, we report a procedure to generate cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1-targeting CD4+ TH1 cells in vitro for cancer immunotherapy in the clinic. After in vitro sensitization by stimulating T cells with protein-spanning, overlapping peptide pools of NY-ESO-1 in combination with IL-7 and low dose IL-2, antigen-specific T cells were isolated using IFNγ capture technique and subsequently expanded with IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15. Large numbers of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells with a TH1 cytokine profile and lower numbers of cytokine-secreting CD8+ T cells could be generated from healthy donors with a high specificity and expansion potential. Manufactured CD4+ T cells showed strong specific TH1-responses with IFNγ+, TNFα+, IL-2+ and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells. The protocol is GMP-grade and approved by the regulatory authorities. The tumor-antigen specific CD4+ TH1 lymphocytes can be adoptively transferred as a T-cell therapy to boost anticancer immunity and this novel cancer treatment approach is applicable to both T cells from healthy allogeneic donors as well as to autologous T cells derived from cancer patients. PMID:26155389

  6. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Histone Modifications at Human Enhancers Reflect Global Cell Type-Specific Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Heintzman, Nathaniel D.; Hon, Gary C.; Hawkins, R. David; Kheradpour, Pouya; Stark, Alexander; Harp, Lindsey F.; Ye, Zhen; Lee, Leonard K.; Stuart, Rhona K.; Ching, Christina W.; Ching, Keith A.; Antosiewicz, Jessica E.; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Xinmin; Green, Roland D.; Stewart, Ron; Thomson, James A.; Crawford, Gregory E.; Kellis, Manolis; Ren, Bing

    2010-01-01

    The human body is composed of diverse cell types with distinct functions. While it is known that lineage specification depends on cell specific gene expression, which in turn is driven by promoters, enhancers, insulators and other cis-regulatory DNA sequences for each gene1–3, the relative roles of these regulatory elements in this process is not clear. We have previously developed a chromatin immunoprecipitation-based microarray method (ChIP-chip) to locate promoters, enhancers, and insulators in the human genome4–6. Here, we use the same approach to identify these elements in multiple cell types and investigated their roles in cell type-specific gene expression. We observed that chromatin state at promoters and CTCF-binding at insulators are largely invariant across diverse cell types. By contrast, enhancers are marked with highly cell type-specific histone modification patterns, strongly correlate to cell type-specific gene expression programs on a global scale, and are functionally active in a cell type-specific manner. Our results defined over 55,000 potential transcriptional enhancers in the human genome, significantly expanding the current catalog of human enhancers and highlighting the role of these elements in cell type-specific gene expression. PMID:19295514

  8. Mechanisms of allergen specific immunotherapy--T-cell tolerance and more.

    PubMed

    Jutel, M; Akdis, M; Blaser, K; Akdis, C A

    2006-07-01

    Specific immune suppression and induction of tolerance are essential processes in the regulation and circumvention of immune defence. The balance between allergen-specific T-regulatory (Treg) cells and T helper 2 cells appears to be decisive in the development of allergic and healthy immune response against allergens. Treg cells consistently represent the dominant subset specific for common environmental allergens in healthy individuals. In contrast, there is a high frequency of allergen-specific T helper 2 cells in allergic individuals. A decrease in interleukin (IL)-4, IL-5 and IL-13 production by allergen-specific CD4+ T cells due to the induction of peripheral T cell tolerance is the most essential step in allergen-specific immunotherapy (SIT). Suppressed proliferative and cytokine responses against the major allergens are induced by multiple suppressor factors, such as cytokines like IL-10 and transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta and cell surface molecules like cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed death-1 and histamine receptor 2. There is considerable rationale for targeting T cells to increase efficacy of SIT. Such novel approaches include the use of modified allergens produced using recombinant DNA technology and adjuvants or additional drugs, which may increase the generation of allergen-specific peripheral tolerance. By the application of the recent knowledge in Treg cells and related mechanisms of peripheral tolerance, more rational and safer approaches are awaiting for the future of prevention and cure of allergic diseases. PMID:16792576

  9. Cooperativity of HIV-Specific Cytolytic CD4 T Cells and CD8 T Cells in Control of HIV Viremia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Susan; Eller, Michael; Teigler, Jeffrey E.; Maloveste, Sebastien M.; Schultz, Bruce T.; Soghoian, Damien Z.; Lu, Richard; Oster, Alexander F.; Chenine, Agnès-Laurence; Alter, Galit; Dittmer, Ulf; Marovich, Mary; Robb, Merlin L.; Michael, Nelson L.; Bolton, Diane

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT CD4+ T cells play a pivotal role in the control of chronic viral infections. Recently, nontraditional CD4+ T cell functions beyond helper effects have been described, and a role for cytolytic CD4+ T cells in the control of HIV infection has been suggested. We define here the transcriptional, phenotypic, and functional profiles of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells. Fluidigm BioMark and multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells revealed a distinct transcriptional signature compared to Th1 CD4+ cells but shared similar features with HIV-specific cytolytic CD8+ T cells. Furthermore, HIV-specific cytolytic CD4+ T cells showed comparable killing activity relative to HIV-specific CD8+ T cells and worked cooperatively in the elimination of virally infected cells. Interestingly, we found that cytolytic CD4+ T cells emerge early during acute HIV infection and tightly follow acute viral load trajectory. This emergence was associated to the early viral set point, suggesting an involvement in early control, in spite of CD4 T cell susceptibility to HIV infection. Our data suggest cytolytic CD4+ T cells as an independent subset distinct from Th1 cells that show combined activity with CD8+ T cells in the long-term control of HIV infection. IMPORTANCE The ability of the immune system to control chronic HIV infection is of critical interest to both vaccine design and therapeutic approaches. Much research has focused on the effect of the ability of CD8+ T cells to control the virus, while CD4+ T cells have been overlooked as effectors in HIV control due to the fact that they are preferentially infected. We show here that a subset of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells cooperate in the cytolytic control of HIV replication. Moreover, these cells represent a distinct subset of CD4+ T cells showing significant transcriptional and phenotypic differences compared to HIV-specific Th1 cells but with similarities to CD8+ T cells. These findings are

  10. Survival and persistence of fecal host-specific Bacteroidales cells and their DNA assessed by PMA-qPCR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, S.; Bombardelli, F.; Wuertz, S.

    2008-12-01

    Understanding and managing microbial pollutions in water is one of the foremost challenges of establishing effective managements and remediation strategies to impaired water bodies polluted by uncharacterized fecal sources. Quantitative microbial source tracking (MST) approaches using fecal Bacteroidales and quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays to measure gene copies of host-specific 16S rRNA genetic markers are promising because they can allow for identifying and quantifying fecal loadings from a particular animal host and understanding the fate and transport of host-specific Bacteroidales over a range of conditions in water bodies. Similar to the case of traditional fecal indicator bacteria, a relatively long persistence of target DNA may hamper applied MST studies, if genetic markers cannot be linked to recent fecal pollution in water. We report a successful approach to removing the qPCR signal derived from free DNA and dead host-specific Bacteroidales cells by selectively binding the DNA and consequently inhibiting PCR amplification using light- activated propidium monoazide (PMA). Optimal PMA-qPCR conditions were determined as 100 µM of PMA concentration and a 10-min light exposure time at different solids concentrations in order to mimic a range of water samples. Under these conditions, PMA-qPCR resulted in the selective exclusion of DNA from heat- treated cells of non-culturable Bacteroidales in human feces and wastewater influent and effluent samples. Also, the persistence of feces-derived host-specific Bacteroidales DNA and their cells (determined by universal, human-, cow- and dog-specific Bacteroidales qPCR assays) in seawater was investigated in microcosms at environmental conditions. The average T99 (two log reduction) value for host-specific viable Bacteroidales cells was 28 h, whereas that for total host-specific Bacteroidales DNA was 177 h. Natural sunlight did not have a strong influence on the fate of fecal Bacteroidales cells and their DNA, presumably

  11. Antigen Load and Viral Sequence Diversification Determine the Functional Profile of HIV-1–Specific CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Streeck, Hendrik; Brumme, Zabrina L; Anastario, Michael; Cohen, Kristin W; Jolin, Jonathan S; Meier, Angela; Brumme, Chanson J; Rosenberg, Eric S; Alter, Galit; Allen, Todd M; Walker, Bruce D; Altfeld, Marcus

    2008-01-01

    Background Virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes play a key role in the initial reduction of peak viremia during acute viral infections, but display signs of increasing dysfunction and exhaustion under conditions of chronic antigen persistence. It has been suggested that virus-specific CD8+ T cells with a “polyfunctional” profile, defined by the capacity to secrete multiple cytokines or chemokines, are most competent in controlling viral replication in chronic HIV-1 infection. We used HIV-1 infection as a model of chronic persistent viral infection to investigate the process of exhaustion and dysfunction of virus-specific CD8+ T cell responses on the single-epitope level over time, starting in primary HIV-1 infection. Methods and Findings We longitudinally analyzed the polyfunctional epitope-specific CD8+ T cell responses of 18 patients during primary HIV-1 infection before and after therapy initiation or sequence variation in the targeted epitope. Epitope-specific CD8+ T cells responded with multiple effector functions to antigenic stimulation during primary HIV-1 infection, but lost their polyfunctional capacity in response to antigen and up-regulated programmed death 1 (PD-1) expression with persistent viremic infection. This exhausted phenotype significantly decreased upon removal of stimulation by antigen, either in response to antiretroviral therapy or by reduction of epitope-specific antigen load in the presence of ongoing viral replication, as a consequence of in vivo selection of cytotoxic T lymphocyte escape mutations in the respective epitopes. Monofunctionality increased in CD8+ T cell responses directed against conserved epitopes from 49% (95% confidence interval 27%–72%) to 76% (56%–95%) (standard deviation [SD] of the effect size 0.71), while monofunctionality remained stable or slightly decreased for responses directed against escaped epitopes from 61% (47%–75%) to 56% (42%–70%) (SD of the effect size 0.18) (p < 0.05). Conclusion These data

  12. Identification and visualization of multidimensional antigen-specific T-cell populations in polychromatic cytometry data

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Lin; Frelinger, Jacob; Jiang, Wenxin; Finak, Greg; Seshadri, Chetan; Bart, Pierre-Alexandre; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; McElrath, Julie; DeRosa, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    An important aspect of immune monitoring for vaccine development, clinical trials, and research is the detection, measurement, and comparison of antigen-specific T-cells from subject samples under different conditions. Antigen-specific T-cells compose a very small fraction of total T-cells. Developments in cytometry technology over the past five years have enabled the measurement of single-cells in a multivariate and high-throughput manner. This growth in both dimensionality and quantity of data continues to pose a challenge for effective identification and visualization of rare cell subsets, such as antigen-specific T-cells. Dimension reduction and feature extraction play pivotal role in both identifying and visualizing cell populations of interest in large, multi-dimensional cytometry datasets. However, the automated identification and visualization of rare, high-dimensional cell subsets remains challenging. Here we demonstrate how a systematic and integrated approach combining targeted feature extraction with dimension reduction can be used to identify and visualize biological differences in rare, antigen-specific cell populations. By using OpenCyto to perform semi-automated gating and features extraction of flow cytometry data, followed by dimensionality reduction with t-SNE we are able to identify polyfunctional sub-populations of antigen-specific T-cells and visualize treatment-specific differences between them. PMID:25908275

  13. Specific immunotherapy generates CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells to suppress lung cancer growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Jing; Chen, Huiguo; Wu, Weibin; Li, Xiaojun; Wu, Yonghui; Wang, Zhigang; Zhang, Kai; Li, Yun; Weng, Yimin; Liao, Hongying; Gu, Lijia

    2016-08-01

    That specific immunotherapy can inhibit cancer growth has been recognized; its efficiency is to be improved. This study aimed to inhibit lung cancer (LC) growth in a mouse model by using an LC-specific vaccination. In this study, a LC mouse model was created by adoptive transplantation with LC cells. The tumor-bearing mice were vaccinated with LC cell extracts plus adjuvant TNBS or adoptive transplantation with specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells. The results showed that the vaccination with LC extracts (LCE)/TNBS markedly inhibited the LC growth and induced CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells in LC tissue and the spleen. These CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells proliferated and produce high levels of perforin upon exposure to LCE and specifically induced LC cell apoptosis. Exposure to TNBS induced RAW264.7 cells to produce macrophage inflammatory protein-3α; the latter activated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 and further induced perforin expression in the CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells. Adoptive transfer with specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells suppressed LC growth in mice. In conclusion, immunization with LC extracts and TNBS can induce LC-specific CD8(+) CD196(+) T cells in LC-bearing mice and inhibit LC growth. PMID:26910585

  14. Long-term in vivo provision of antigen-specific T cell immunity by programming hematopoietic stem cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Lili; Baltimore, David

    2005-03-01

    A method to genetically program mouse hematopoietic stem cells to develop into functional CD8 or CD4 T cells of defined specificity in vivo is described. For this purpose, a bicistronic retroviral vector was engineered that efficiently delivers genes for both and chains of T cell receptor (TCR) to hematopoietic stem cells. When modified cell populations were used to reconstruct the hematopoietic lineages of recipient mice, significant percentages of antigen-specific CD8 or CD4 T cells were observed. These cells expressed normal surface markers and responded to peptide antigen stimulation by proliferation and cytokine production. Moreover, they could mature into memory cells after peptide stimulation. Using TCRs specific for a model tumor antigen, we found that the recipient mice were able to partially resist a challenge with tumor cells carrying the antigen. By combining cells modified with CD8- and CD4-specific TCRs, and boosting with dendritic cells pulsed with cognate peptides, complete suppression of tumor could be achieved and even tumors that had become established would regress and be eliminated after dendritic cell/peptide immunization. This methodology of "instructive immunotherapy" could be developed for controlling the growth of human tumors and attacking established pathogens.

  15. Cell-specific expression and pathway analyses reveal alterations in trauma-related human T cell and monocyte pathways

    PubMed Central

    Laudanski, Krzysztof; Miller-Graziano, Carol; Xiao, Wenzhong; Mindrinos, Michael N.; Richards, Daniel R.; De, Asit; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Maier, Ronald V.; Bankey, Paul; Baker, Henry V.; Brownstein, Bernard H.; Cobb, J. Perren; Calvano, Steve E.; Davis, Ronald W.; Tompkins, Ronald G.

    2006-01-01

    Monitoring genome-wide, cell-specific responses to human disease, although challenging, holds great promise for the future of medicine. Patients with injuries severe enough to develop multiple organ dysfunction syndrome have multiple immune derangements, including T cell apoptosis and anergy combined with depressed monocyte antigen presentation. Genome-wide expression analysis of highly enriched circulating leukocyte subpopulations, combined with cell-specific pathway analyses, offers an opportunity to discover leukocyte regulatory networks in critically injured patients. Severe injury induced significant changes in T cell (5,693 genes), monocyte (2,801 genes), and total leukocyte (3,437 genes) transcriptomes, with only 911 of these genes common to all three cell populations (12%). T cell-specific pathway analyses identified increased gene expression of several inhibitory receptors (PD-1, CD152, NRP-1, and Lag3) and concomitant decreases in stimulatory receptors (CD28, CD4, and IL-2Rα). Functional analysis of T cells and monocytes confirmed reduced T cell proliferation and increased cell surface expression of negative signaling receptors paired with decreased monocyte costimulation ligands. Thus, genome-wide expression from highly enriched cell populations combined with knowledge-based pathway analyses leads to the identification of regulatory networks differentially expressed in injured patients. Importantly, application of cell separation, genome-wide expression, and cell-specific pathway analyses can be used to discover pathway alterations in human disease. PMID:17032758

  16. Microbial translocation augments the function of adoptively transferred self/tumor-specific CD8+ T cells via TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Kaiser,, Andrew; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Chieppa, Marcello; Cassard, Lydie; Palmer, Douglas C.; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Yu, Zhiya; Gattinoni, Luca; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with total body irradiation (TBI) increases the efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD8+ T cells by depleting inhibitory lymphocytes and increasing homeostatic cytokine levels. We found that TBI augmented the function of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in mice genetically deficient in all lymphocytes, indicating the existence of another TBI mechanism of action. Additional investigation revealed commensal gut microflora in the mesenteric lymph nodes and elevated LPS levels in the sera of irradiated mice. These findings correlated with increased dendritic cell activation and heightened levels of systemic inflammatory cytokines. Reduction of host microflora using antibiotics, neutralization of serum LPS using polymyxin B, or removal of LPS signaling components using mice genetically deficient in CD14 and TLR4 reduced the beneficial effects of TBI on tumor regression. Conversely, administration of microbial ligand–containing serum or ultrapure LPS from irradiated animals to nonirradiated antibody-lymphodepleted mice enhanced CD8+ T cell activation and improved tumor regression. Administration of ultrapure LPS to irradiated animals further enhanced the number and function of the adoptively transferred cells, leading to long-term cure of mice with large B16F10 tumors and enhanced autoimmune vitiligo. Thus, disruption of the homeostatic balance between the host and microbes can enhance cell-based tumor immunotherapy. PMID:17657310

  17. THAP5 is a human cardiac-specific inhibitor of cell cycle that is cleaved by the proapoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease during cell death.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, Meenakshi P; Cilenti, Lucia; Mashak, Zineb; Popat, Paiyal; Alnemri, Emad S; Zervos, Antonis S

    2009-08-01

    Omi/HtrA2 is a mitochondrial serine protease that has a dual function: while confined in the mitochondria, it promotes cell survival, but when released into the cytoplasm, it participates in caspase-dependent as well as caspase-independent cell death. To investigate the mechanism of Omi/HtrA2's function, we set out to isolate and characterize novel substrates for this protease. We have identified Thanatos-associated protein 5 (THAP5) as a specific interactor and substrate of Omi/HtrA2 in cells undergoing apoptosis. This protein is an uncharacterized member of the THAP family of proteins. THAP5 has a unique pattern of expression and is found predominantly in the human heart, although a very low expression is also seen in the human brain and muscle. THAP5 protein is localized in the nucleus and, when ectopically expressed, induces cell cycle arrest. During apoptosis, THAP5 protein is degraded, and this process can be blocked using a specific Omi/HtrA2 inhibitor, leading to reduced cell death. In patients with coronary artery disease, THAP5 protein levels substantially decrease in the myocardial infarction area, suggesting a potential role of this protein in human heart disease. This work identifies human THAP5 as a cardiac-specific nuclear protein that controls cell cycle progression. Furthermore, during apoptosis, THAP5 is cleaved and removed by the proapoptotic Omi/HtrA2 protease. Taken together, we provide evidence to support that THAP5 and its regulation by Omi/HtrA2 provide a new link between cell cycle control and apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. PMID:19502560

  18. Cell-free plasma hemoglobin removal by dialyzers with various permeability profiles

    PubMed Central

    Hulko, Michael; Kunz, Melanie; Yildirim, Mehmet; Homeyer, Sandra; Amon, Oliver; Krause, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    The release of hemoglobin from mechanically stressed erythrocytes into plasma is a general side effect of extracorporeal therapies, such as extracorporeal membrane oxygenation or hemodialysis. In many reported cases dialysis patients showed elevated cell-free plasma hemoglobin (CPH) levels which are associated with pathophysiological effects. In this in vitro study, the CPH clearance capacity of various filters with different permeability profiles was measured. Simulated dialysis treatments were conducted and clearance was calculated from variations in CPH concentrations over time by measuring plasma absorbance at 405 nm. Conventional high-flux filters exhibited no detectable clearance of CPH. High-flux filters with extended permeability exhibited clearances between 5.8 ± 1.2 and 12.7 ± 1.7 ml/min when tested with plasma and between 5.8 ± 1.2 and 11.3 ± 1.6 ml/min when tested with whole blood. septeX high-cutoff filters had clearances between 13.8 ± 1.8 and 15.5 ± 1.7 ml/min when tested with plasma and of 22.6 ± 2.9 ml/min when tested with whole blood. This study demonstrated that filters with extended permeability and the septeX filter enable CPH removal when used as in chronic and acute settings. PMID:26553708

  19. Removal of cell surface heparan sulfate increases TACE activity and cleavage of ErbB4 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Määttä, Jorma A; Olli, Kaisa; Henttinen, Tiina; Tuittila, Minna T; Elenius, Klaus; Salmivirta, Markku

    2009-01-01

    Background Nuclear localization of proteolytically formed intracellular fragment of ErbB4 receptor tyrosine kinase has been shown to promote cell survival, and nuclear localization of ErbB4 receptor has been described in human breast cancer. Tumor necrosis factor alpha converting enzyme (TACE) initiates the proteolytic cascade leading to ErbB4 intracellular domain formation. Interactions between matrix metalloproteases and heparan sulfate have been described, but the effect of cell surface heparan sulfate on TACE activity has not been previously described. Results As indicated by immunodetection of increased ErbB4 intracellular domain formation and direct enzyme activity analysis, TACE activity was substantially amplified by enzymatic removal of cell surface heparan sulfate but not chondroitin sulfate. Conclusion In this communication, we suggest a novel role for cell surface heparan sulfate. Removal of cell surface heparan sulfate led to increased formation of ErbB4 intracellular domain. As ErbB4 intracellular domain has previously been shown to promote cell survival this finding may indicate a novel mechanism how HS degradation active in tumor tissue may favor cell survival. PMID:19171023

  20. Isolation of Antagonists of Antigen-Specific Autoimmune T Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Gocke, Anne R.; Udugamasooriya, D. Gomika; Archer, Chase T.; Lee, Jiyong; Kodadek, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Antigen-specific T cells play a major role in mediating the pathogenesis of a variety of autoimmune conditions as well as other diseases. In the context of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a murine model of multiple sclerosis, we present here a general approach to the discovery of highly specific ligands for autoreactive cells. These ligands are obtained from a combinatorial library of hundreds of thousands of synthetic peptoids that is screened simultaneously against two populations of CD4+ T cells. Peptoids that recognize autoreactive T cells with extremely high specificity can be identified in the library. Since no specific knowledge is required regarding the nature of the native antigens recognized by the autoreactive T cells, this technology provides a powerful tool for the enrichment and inhibition of autoimmune cells in a variety of disease states. PMID:19942136

  1. Human Skin Cells That Express Stage-Specific Embryonic Antigen 3 Associate with Dermal Tissue Regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Vega Crespo, Agustin; Awe, Jason P.; Reijo Pera, Renee

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Stage-specific embryonic antigen 3 (SSEA3) is a glycosphingolipid that has previously been used to identify cells with stem cell-like, multipotent, and pluripotent characteristics. A rare subpopulation of SSEA3-expressing cells exists in the dermis of adult human skin. These SSEA3-expressing cells undergo a significant increase in cell number in response to injury, suggesting a possible role in regeneration. These SSEA3-expressing regeneration-associated (SERA) cells were derived through primary cell culture, purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and characterized. Longer in vitro culture of the primary skin cells led to lower SSEA3 expression stability after FACS-based purification, suggesting that the current culture conditions may need to be optimized to permit the large-scale expansion of SERA cells. The SERA cells demonstrated a global transcriptional state that was most similar to bone marrow- and fat-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), and the highest expressing SSEA3-expressing cells co-expressed CD105 (clone 35). However, while a rare population of MSCs was observed in primary human skin cell cultures that could differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, or chondrocytes, SERA cells did not possess this differentiation capacity, suggesting that there are at least two different rare subpopulations in adult human skin primary cultures. The identification, efficient purification, and large-scale expansion of these rare subpopulations (SERA cells and MSCs) from heterogeneous adult human skin primary cell cultures may have applications for future patient-specific cellular therapies. PMID:23514702

  2. Specific bone cells produce DLL4 to generate thymus-seeding progenitors from bone marrow

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Vionnie W.C.; Saez, Borja; Cook, Colleen; Lotinun, Sutada; Pardo-Saganta, Ana; Wang, Ying-Hua; Lymperi, Stefania; Ferraro, Francesca; Raaijmakers, Marc H.G.P.; Wu, Joy Y.; Zhou, Lan; Rajagopal, Jayaraj; Kronenberg, Henry M.; Baron, Roland

    2015-01-01

    Production of the cells that ultimately populate the thymus to generate α/β T cells has been controversial, and their molecular drivers remain undefined. Here, we report that specific deletion of bone-producing osteocalcin (Ocn)-expressing cells in vivo markedly reduces T-competent progenitors and thymus-homing receptor expression among bone marrow hematopoietic cells. Decreased intrathymic T cell precursors and decreased generation of mature T cells occurred despite normal thymic function. The Notch ligand DLL4 is abundantly expressed on bone marrow Ocn+ cells, and selective depletion of DLL4 from these cells recapitulated the thymopoietic abnormality. These data indicate that specific mesenchymal cells in bone marrow provide key molecular drivers enforcing thymus-seeding progenitor generation and thereby directly link skeletal biology to the production of T cell–based adaptive immunity. PMID:25918341

  3. Tumor Specific Recruitment and Reprogramming of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Berger, Liron; Shamai, Yeela; Skorecki, Karl L; Tzukerman, Maty

    2016-04-01

    Non-neoplastic stromal cells harvested from patient tumors were identified as tumor-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) by their multipotential capacity to differentiate into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondrocytes and by the expression of MSC specific cell surface markers. These procedures yielded also epithelial cancer cells and their counterpart MSC from gastric carcinoma (GSC1) and lung carcinoma (LC2). While the LC2 cancer cell growth is independent of their LC-MSC, the GSC1 cancer cell growth is critically dependent on the presence of their counterpart GSC-MSC or their conditioned medium (CM). The fact that none of the various other tumor-derived MSCs was able to restore the specific effect of GSC-MSC on GSC1 cancer cell growth suggests specificity of tumor-derived MSC, which are specifically recruited and "educated"/reprogrammed by the cancer cells to support tumor growth. Using cytokine array analysis, we were able to demonstrate that GSC1 cell growth is mediated through hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)/c-MET signaling pathway which is activated exclusively by HGF secreted from GSC-MSC. An innovative approach demonstrates GSC1-mediated specific tropism of "naïve" MSC from the adjacent tissue in a tumor specific manner to support tumor progression. The results suggest that specific tumor tropic "naïve" MSC are reprogrammed in a tumor-specific manner to support gastric tumor progression. Understanding the mechanisms involved in the interactions of the tumor cancer cells and tumor-derived MSC will constitute the basis for developing multimodal anticancer therapeutic strategies that will also take into account the specific tumor tropism properties of MSC and their reprogramming. Stem Cells 2016;34:1011-1026. PMID:26676563

  4. Analysis of possibilities for carbon removal from porous anode of solid oxide fuel cells after different failure modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subotić, Vanja; Schluckner, Christoph; Schroettner, Hartmuth; Hochenauer, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    This study focuses on the investigation of possibilities for carbon removal from the fuel electrode of anode supported solid oxide fuel cells (ASC-SOFCs) after different degradation modes. To design the conditions which generally lead the cell in the range of carbon depositions the performed thermodynamic calculations show that the SOFC operating temperature range seems to be appropriate for formation of elemental carbon in various types. Concerning this the loaded large planar single SOFCs are fed with synthetic diesel reformate thus simulating realistic operating conditions and enabling the formation and deposition of carbon on the anode side. A mixture of hydrogen/water vapor/nitrogen is used to remove the detected carbon depositions in a cell-protecting manner. For the purpose of this investigation several failure modes are induced after which determination the already defined regeneration strategy is applied. The cathode degradation is first induced and secondly the fuel supply is interrupted to induce re-oxidation of nickel (Ni) on the anode side. The undertaken investigations determine that carbon can be fully removed from the anode surface after nickel oxidation, while cathode degradation disables the complete cell regeneration.

  5. Sequence and chromatin determinants of cell-type-specific transcription factor binding.

    PubMed

    Arvey, Aaron; Agius, Phaedra; Noble, William Stafford; Leslie, Christina

    2012-09-01

    Gene regulatory programs in distinct cell types are maintained in large part through the cell-type-specific binding of transcription factors (TFs). The determinants of TF binding include direct DNA sequence preferences, DNA sequence preferences of cofactors, and the local cell-dependent chromatin context. To explore the contribution of DNA sequence signal, histone modifications, and DNase accessibility to cell-type-specific binding, we analyzed 286 ChIP-seq experiments performed by the ENCODE Consortium. This analysis included experiments for 67 transcriptional regulators, 15 of which were profiled in both the GM12878 (lymphoblastoid) and K562 (erythroleukemic) human hematopoietic cell lines. To model TF-bound regions, we trained support vector machines (SVMs) that use flexible k-mer patterns to capture DNA sequence signals more accurately than traditional motif approaches. In addition, we trained SVM spatial chromatin signatures to model local histone modifications and DNase accessibility, obtaining significantly more accurate TF occupancy predictions than simpler approaches. Consistent with previous studies, we find that DNase accessibility can explain cell-line-specific binding for many factors. However, we also find that of the 10 factors with prominent cell-type-specific binding patterns, four display distinct cell-type-specific DNA sequence preferences according to our models. Moreover, for two factors we identify cell-specific binding sites that are accessible in both cell types but bound only in one. For these sites, cell-type-specific sequence models, rather than DNase accessibility, are better able to explain differential binding. Our results suggest that using a single motif for each TF and filtering for chromatin accessible loci is not always sufficient to accurately account for cell-type-specific binding profiles. PMID:22955984

  6. Property of Human Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Derived From Bone Fragments Removed in Sagittal Split Ramus Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Chihiro; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Abe, Shigehiro; Harada, Kiyoshi

    2016-06-01

    Bone tissue engineering is in the process of making the shift from bench to bed. Organ as a cell source is important for tissue engineering. The appropriate cells should be harvested without invasiveness and ethical problems. The authors focused on mandibular cortex bone fragments removed in sagittal split ramus osteotomy as a cell source for bone tissue engineering. These bone fragments were discarded after surgery until now. Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) were harvested from inside of bone fragments, which is an endosteal region. Endosteal region is known to be a hematopoietic stem cell niche and harbors osteoblasts, preosteoblasts, and mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Bone marrow stromal cells could be cultured easily, and grew rapidly in vitro under ordinary serum-supplemented culture condition. The expression pattern of surface markers of BMSCs was the same as that of MSCs. Bone marrow stromal cells could differentiated into multiple mesenchymal lineages (osteoblasts, adipocytes, chondrocytes, and smooth muscle cells). These results indicated the existence of MSCs in BMSCs. The osteoblastic characters of BMSCs were examined more closely. Bone marrow stromal cells showed a high alkaline phosphatase activity, and expressed osteoblastic markers (PTHr, bone sialoprotein, Type I collagen, Rnut-related transcription factor 2, and osteocalcin). In transplantation experiments, BMSCs generated ectopic bone tissues on the border of hydroxyapatite scaffold without osteogenic differentiation-inducing agents such as dexamethasone (Dex) or bone morphogenetic protein. The results of this study suggest that mandibular cortex bone fragments removed in sagittal split ramus osteotomy are a good cell source for bone tissue engineering. PMID:27171960

  7. Coordinated Changes in DNA Methylation in Antigen-Specific Memory CD4 T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ogoshi, Katsumi; Sasaki, Atsushi; Abe, Jun; Qu, Wei; Nakatani, Yoichiro; Ahsan, Budrul; Oshima, Kenshiro; Shand, Francis H. W.; Ametani, Akio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kaneko, Shuichi; Wada, Takashi; Hattori, Masahira; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Matsushima, Kouji

    2013-01-01

    Memory CD4+ T cells are central regulators of both humoral and cellular immune responses. T cell differentiation results in specific changes in chromatin structure and DNA methylation of cytokine genes. Although the methylation status of a limited number of gene loci in T cells has been examined, the genome-wide DNA methylation status of memory CD4+ T cells remains unexplored. To further elucidate the molecular signature of memory T cells, we conducted methylome and transcriptome analyses of memory CD4+ T cells generated using T cells from TCR-transgenic mice. The resulting genome-wide DNA methylation profile revealed 1144 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) across the murine genome during the process of T cell differentiation, 552 of which were associated with gene loci. Interestingly, the majority of these DMRs were located in introns. These DMRs included genes such as CXCR6, Tbox21, Chsy1, and Cish, which are associated with cytokine production, homing to bone marrow, and immune responses. Methylation changes in memory T cells exposed to specific Ag appeared to regulate enhancer activity rather than promoter activity of immunologically relevant genes. In addition, methylation profiles differed between memory T cell subsets, demonstrating a link between T cell methylation status and T cell differentiation. By comparing DMRs between naive and Ag-specific memory T cells, this study provides new insights into the functional status of memory T cells. PMID:23509353

  8. Specific ablation of thyroid follicle cells in adult transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Wallace, H; Ledent, C; Vassart, G; Bishop, J O; al-Shawi, R

    1991-12-01

    The coding region of the herpes simplex type 1 virus thymidine kinase gene was coupled to the promoter of the bovine thyroglobulin gene and introduced into the genome of mice. The viral thymidine kinase (HSV1-TK) was expressed mainly in the thyroid glands and testis. Upon treatment of transgenic females with the antiherpetic agent Ganciclovir the thyroid regressed, while the parathyroid gland was unaffected. The number of thyroid follicle cells was greatly reduced after 3 days, and they were completely absent after 7 days of treatment. After 14 days, the levels of circulating T4 and T3 were below the limits of detection, total soluble protein recovered from the thyroid and parathyroid glands together was 10% of the control value, and the level of thyroid HSV1-TK was more than 100-fold lower than that in transgenic controls. Levels of circulating PTH and calcitonin remained normal. At the time of treatment the mice were adults. Thus, the thyroid follicle cells were selectively ablated after normal development with a functional thyroid gland. When treatment with Ganciclovir was terminated after 14 days, no circulating T4 or T3 or other indications of thyroid regeneration were detected for a subsequent period of 90 days. During this time the mice gained weight more slowly than controls, at a rate consistent with the suppression of GH synthesis by thyroid deficiency. The production of mouse major urinary protein (MUP) ceased in the treated mice and was completely restored by the administration of T4. MUP production was not restored by GH, demonstrating that the expression of the Mup genes requires T4 in addition to GH. PMID:1659524

  9. CARs: Driving T-cell specificity to enhance anti-tumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, Partow; Kelly, Susan S.; Manuri, Pallavi; Jena, Bipulendu; Jackson, Rineka; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells is a compelling tool to treat cancer. To overcome issues of immune tolerance which limits the endogenous adaptive immune response to tumor-associated antigens, robust systems for the genetic modification and characterization of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) to redirect specificity have been produced. Refinements with regards to persistence and trafficking of the genetically modified T cells are underway to help improve the potency of genetically modified T cells. Clinical trials utilizing this technology demonstrate feasibility, and increasingly, antitumor activity, paving the way for multi-center trials to establish the efficacy of this novel T-cell therapy. PMID:22202074

  10. Plasmonic nanobubbles for target cell-specific gene and drug delivery and multifunctional processing of heterogeneous cell systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lukianova-Hleb, Ekaterina Y.; Huye, Leslie E.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Lapotko, Dmitri O.

    2014-03-01

    Cell and gene cancer therapies require ex vivo cell processing of human grafts. Such processing requires at least three steps - cell enrichment, cell separation (destruction), and gene transfer - each of which requires the use of a separate technology. While these technologies may be satisfactory for research use, they are of limited usefulness in the clinical treatment setting because they have a low processing rate, as well as a low transfection and separation efficacy and specificity in heterogeneous human grafts. Most problematic, because current technologies are administered in multiple steps - rather than in a single, multifunctional, and simultaneous procedure - they lengthen treatment process and introduce an unnecessary level of complexity, labor, and resources into clinical treatment; all these limitations result in high losses of valuable cells. We report a universal, high-throughput, and multifunctional technology that simultaneously (1) inject free external cargo in target cells, (2) destroys unwanted cells, and (3) preserve valuable non-target cells in heterogeneous grafts. Each of these functions has single target cell specificity in heterogeneous cell system, processing rate > 45 mln cell/min, injection efficacy 90% under 96% viability of the injected cells, target cell destruction efficacy > 99%, viability of not-target cells >99% The developed technology employs novel cellular agents, called plasmonic nanobubbles (PNBs). PNBs are not particles, but transient, intracellular events, a vapor nanobubbles that expand and collapse in mere nanoseconds under optical excitation of gold nanoparticles with short picosecond laser pulses. PNBs of different, cell-specific, size (1) inject free external cargo with small PNBs, (2) Destroy other target cells mechanically with large PNBs and (3) Preserve non-target cells. The multi-functionality, precision, and high throughput of all-in-one PNB technology will tremendously impact cell and gene therapies and other

  11. A laser microsurgical method of cell wall removal allows detection of large-conductance ion channels in the guard cell plasma membrane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miedema, H.; Henriksen, G. H.; Assmann, S. M.; Evans, M. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Application of patch clamp techniques to higher-plant cells has been subject to the limitation that the requisite contact of the patch electrode with the cell membrane necessitates prior enzymatic removal of the plant cell wall. Because the wall is an integral component of plant cells, and because cell-wall-degrading enzymes can disrupt membrane properties, such enzymatic treatments may alter ion channel behavior. We compared ion channel activity in enzymatically isolated protoplasts of Vicia faba guard cells with that found in membranes exposed by a laser microsurgical technique in which only a tiny portion of the cell wall is removed while the rest of the cell remains intact within its tissue environment. "Laser-assisted" patch clamping reveals a new category of high-conductance (130 to 361 pS) ion channels not previously reported in patch clamp studies on plant plasma membranes. These data indicate that ion channels are present in plant membranes that are not detected by conventional patch clamp techniques involving the production of individual plant protoplasts isolated from their tissue environment by enzymatic digestion of the cell wall. Given the large conductances of the channels revealed by laser-assisted patch clamping, we hypothesize that these channels play a significant role in the regulation of ion content and electrical signalling in guard cells.

  12. Cell-type-specific, Aptamer-functionalized Agents for Targeted Disease Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jiehua; Rossi, John J.

    2014-01-01

    One hundred years ago, Dr. Paul Ehrlich popularized the “magic bullet” concept for cancer therapy in which an ideal therapeutic agent would only kill the specific tumor cells it targeted. Since then, “targeted therapy” that specifically targets the molecular defects responsible for a patient's condition has become a long-standing goal for treating human disease. However, safe and efficient drug delivery during the treatment of cancer and infectious disease remains a major challenge for clinical translation and the development of new therapies. The advent of SELEX technology has inspired many groundbreaking studies that successfully adapted cell-specific aptamers for targeted delivery of active drug substances in both in vitro and in vivo models. By covalently linking or physically functionalizing the cell-specific aptamers with therapeutic agents, such as siRNA, microRNA, chemotherapeutics or toxins, or delivery vehicles, such as organic or inorganic nanocarriers, the targeted cells and tissues can be specifically recognized and the therapeutic compounds internalized, thereby improving the local concentration of the drug and its therapeutic efficacy. Currently, many cell-type-specific aptamers have been developed that can target distinct diseases or tissues in a cell-type-specific manner. In this review, we discuss recent advances in the use of cell-specific aptamers for targeted disease therapy, as well as conjugation strategies and challenges. PMID:24936916

  13. CMV-specific central memory T cells reside in bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Knoedler, Maren; Na, Il-Kang; Kern, Florian; Asemissen, Anne-Marie; Keilholz, Ulrich; Loesch, Michael; Thiel, Eckhard; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2007-11-01

    CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell responses in peripheral blood (PB) are characterized by a preponderance of effector and effector memory T cells. CMV-specific central memory T cells (T(CM)), which are considered crucial in maintaining long-term immunity, are rarely detectable in PB. In this study we have analyzed differentiation and function of CMV pp65-specific CD8(+) T cells in paired samples of human PB and BM using intracellular cytokine and tetramer staining. Overall frequencies of CMV pp65-specific T cells were similar in PB compared to BM; however, CMV-specific CD45RA(-)CCR7(+) T(CM) were almost exclusively detectable in BM, which was not related to a general accumulation of T(CM) in BM. In vitro, CMV-specific T cells could be more efficiently expanded from BM (median 128-fold, n=6) than from PB (median 72-fold, p=0.01). Taken together, these data show that the BM is a compartment harboring CMV-specific T(CM) and underline the concept of the BM as a secondary immune organ. CMV specific BM-derived T(CM) might be a valuable source for generating T cells for adoptive transfer. PMID:17960663

  14. Programmed death-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells is shaped by epitope specificity, T-cell receptor clonotype usage and antigen load

    PubMed Central

    Kløverpris, Henrik N.; McGregor, Reuben; McLaren, James E.; Ladell, Kristin; Stryhn, Anette; Koofhethile, Catherine; Brener, Jacqui; Chen, Fabian; Riddell, Lynn; Graziano, Luzzi; Klenerman, Paul; Leslie, Alasdair; Buus, Søren; Price, David A.; Goulder, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Although CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the control of HIV-1 infection, their antiviral efficacy can be limited by antigenic variation and immune exhaustion. The latter phenomenon is characterized by the upregulation of multiple inhibitory receptors, such as programmed death-1 (PD-1), CD244 and lymphocyte activation gene-3 (LAG-3), which modulate the functional capabilities of CD8+ T cells. Design and methods: Here, we used an array of different human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-B∗15 : 03 and HLA-B∗42 : 01 tetramers to characterize inhibitory receptor expression as a function of differentiation on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations (n = 128) spanning 11 different epitope targets. Results: Expression levels of PD-1, but not CD244 or LAG-3, varied substantially across epitope specificities both within and between individuals. Differential expression of PD-1 on T-cell receptor (TCR) clonotypes within individual HIV-1-specific CD8+ T-cell populations was also apparent, independent of clonal dominance hierarchies. Positive correlations were detected between PD-1 expression and plasma viral load, which were reinforced by stratification for epitope sequence stability and dictated by effector memory CD8+ T cells. Conclusion: Collectively, these data suggest that PD-1 expression on HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells tracks antigen load at the level of epitope specificity and TCR clonotype usage. These findings are important because they provide evidence that PD-1 expression levels are influenced by peptide/HLA class I antigen exposure. PMID:24906112

  15. Studies on thyroglobulin-specific suppressor T cell function in autoimmune thyroid disease

    SciTech Connect

    Mori, H.; Hamada, N.; DeGroot, L.J.

    1985-08-01

    T cell regulation of the generation of thyroglobulin plaque-forming cells (Tg PFC) and protein A plaque-forming cells (Prot A PFC) was investigated using lymphocytes from patients with autoimmune thyroid disease. T and B cell mixed cultures (T-B MC) were carried out without mitogenic or antigenic stimulation to identify physiological T cell effects in the system. Tg PFC were found in 8 (44%) of 18 patients who had high titers of thyroglobulin antibody in their sera. Tg-specific and nonspecific immunoregulation by T cells from patients and normal subjects was studied using B cells from these eight patients in the T-B MC system. Remarkably lower values of Tg PFC induction compared to Prot A PFC induction were found after T cell addition. Normal T cells inhibited Tg PFC induction, but patient T cells did not, while the same extent of helper effects were found on Prot A PFC induction by the addition of patient and normal T cells. Irradiation (1500 rads) of T cells from patients and normal subjects significantly enhanced both Tg PFC and Prot A PFC induction. Thus, Tg-specific suppressor T cells are present in all normal subjects as part of the radiosensitive suppressor T cell subset. The increase in Tg-PFC caused by irradiation-induced inhibition of Tg-specific suppressor T cell function was significantly greater in normal subjects than in patients. Histamine type 2 receptor-bearing T cells inhibited Prot A PFC induction, but not Tg PFC induction, in the autologous T-B MC system. No Tg PFC were induced from normal B cells in any combination with untreated T cells, irradiated T cells, or histamine type 2 receptor-negative T cells from patients or normal subjects.

  16. Complete suppression of in vivo growth of human leukemia cells by specific immunotoxins: nude mouse models

    SciTech Connect

    Hara, H.; Seon, B.K.

    1987-05-01

    In this study, immunotoxins containing monoclonal anti-human T-cell leukemia antibodies are shown to be capable of completely suppressing the tumor growth of human T-cell leukemia cells in vivo without any overt undersirable toxicity. These immunotoxins were prepared by conjugating ricin A chain (RA) with our monoclonal antibodies, SN1 and SN2, directed specifically to the human T-cell leukemia cell surface antigens TALLA and GP37, respectively. The authors have shown that these monoclonal antibodies are highly specific for human T-cell leukemia cells and do not react with various normal cells including normal T and B cells, thymocytes, and bone marrow cells. Ascitic and solid human T-cell leukemia cell tumors were generated in nude mice. The ascitic tumor was generated by transplanting Ichikawa cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell) i.p. into nude mice, whereas the solid tumor was generated by transplanting s.c. MOLT-4 cells (a human T-cell leukemia cell line) and x-irradiated human fibrosarcoma cells into x-irradiated nude mice. To investigate the efficacy of specific immunotoxins in suppression the in vivo growth of the ascitic tumor, they divided 40 nude mice that were injected with Ichikawa cells into four groups. None of the mice in group 4 that were treated with SN1-RA and SN2-RA showed any signs of a tumor or undesirable toxic effects for the 20 weeks that they were followed after the transplantation. Treatment with SN1-RA plus SN2-RA completely suppressed solid tumor growth in 4 of 10 nude mice carrying solid tumors and partially suppressed the tumor growth in the remaining 6 nude mice. These results strongly suggest that SN1-RA and SN2-RA may be useful for clinical treatment.

  17. T cells expressing CD19-specific Engager Molecules for the Immunotherapy of CD19-positive Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Velasquez, Mireya Paulina; Torres, David; Iwahori, Kota; Kakarla, Sunitha; Arber, Caroline; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Szoor, Arpad; Bonifant, Challice L.; Gerken, Claudia; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Song, Xiao-Tong; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or the infusion of bispecific T-cell engagers (BITEs) have shown antitumor activity in humans for CD19-positive malignancies. While BITEs redirect the large reservoir of resident T cells to tumors, CAR T cells rely on significant in vivo expansion to exert antitumor activity. We have shown that it is feasible to modify T cells to secrete solid tumor antigen-specific BITEs, enabling T cells to redirect resident T cells to tumor cells. To adapt this approach to CD19-positive malignancies we now generated T cells expressing secretable, CD19-specific BITEs (CD19-ENG T cells). CD19-ENG T cells recognized tumor cells in an antigen-dependent manner as judged by cytokine production and tumor killing, and redirected bystander T cells to tumor cells. Infusion of CD19-ENG T cells resulted in regression of leukemia or lymphoma in xenograft models and a survival advantage in comparison to control mice. Genetically modified T cells expressing engager molecules may present a promising addition to current CD19-targeted immunotherapies. PMID:27255991

  18. T cells expressing CD19-specific Engager Molecules for the Immunotherapy of CD19-positive Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Velasquez, Mireya Paulina; Torres, David; Iwahori, Kota; Kakarla, Sunitha; Arber, Caroline; Rodriguez-Cruz, Tania; Szoor, Arpad; Bonifant, Challice L; Gerken, Claudia; Cooper, Laurence J N; Song, Xiao-Tong; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or the infusion of bispecific T-cell engagers (BITEs) have shown antitumor activity in humans for CD19-positive malignancies. While BITEs redirect the large reservoir of resident T cells to tumors, CAR T cells rely on significant in vivo expansion to exert antitumor activity. We have shown that it is feasible to modify T cells to secrete solid tumor antigen-specific BITEs, enabling T cells to redirect resident T cells to tumor cells. To adapt this approach to CD19-positive malignancies we now generated T cells expressing secretable, CD19-specific BITEs (CD19-ENG T cells). CD19-ENG T cells recognized tumor cells in an antigen-dependent manner as judged by cytokine production and tumor killing, and redirected bystander T cells to tumor cells. Infusion of CD19-ENG T cells resulted in regression of leukemia or lymphoma in xenograft models and a survival advantage in comparison to control mice. Genetically modified T cells expressing engager molecules may present a promising addition to current CD19-targeted immunotherapies. PMID:27255991

  19. Differentiation of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Lentoid Bodies Expressing a Lens Cell-Specific Fluorescent Reporter

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Dharmendra; Garrels, Wiebke; Mukherjee, Ayan; Debowski, Katharina; Behr, Rüdiger

    2016-01-01

    Curative approaches for eye cataracts and other eye abnormalities, such as myopia and hyperopia currently suffer from a lack of appropriate models. Here, we present a new approach for in vitro growth of lentoid bodies from induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells as a tool for ophthalmological research. We generated a transgenic mouse line with lens-specific expression of a fluorescent reporter driven by the alphaA crystallin promoter. Fetal fibroblasts were isolated from transgenic fetuses, reprogrammed to iPS cells, and differentiated to lentoid bodies exploiting the specific fluorescence of the lens cell-specific reporter. The employment of cell type-specific reporters for establishing and optimizing differentiation in vitro seems to be an efficient and generally applicable approach for developing differentiation protocols for desired cell populations. PMID:27322380

  20. Influenza virus-specific TCR-transduced T cells as a model for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Berdien, Belinda; Reinhard, Henrike; Meyer, Sabrina; Spöck, Stefanie; Kröger, Nicolaus; Atanackovic, Djordje; Fehse, Boris

    2013-06-01

    Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes equipped with tumor-antigen specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) represents a promising strategy in cancer immunotherapy, but the approach remains technically demanding. Using influenza virus (Flu)-specific T-cell responses as a model system we compared different methods for the generation of T-cell clones and isolation of antigen-specific TCRs. Altogether, we generated 12 CD8(+) T-cell clones reacting to the Flu matrix protein (Flu-M) and 6 CD4(+) T-cell clones reacting to the Flu nucleoprotein (Flu-NP) from 4 healthy donors. IFN-γ-secretion-based enrichment of antigen-specific cells, optionally combined with tetramer staining, was the most efficient way for generating T-cell clones. In contrast, the commonly used limiting dilution approach was least efficient. TCR genes were isolated from T-cell clones and cloned into both a previously used gammaretroviral LTR-vector, MP91 and the novel lentiviral self-inactivating vector LeGO-MP that contains MP91-derived promotor and regulatory elements. To directly compare their functional efficiencies, we in parallel transduced T-cell lines and primary T cells with the two vectors encoding identical TCRs. Transduction efficiencies were approximately twice higher with the gammaretroviral vector. Secretion of high amounts of IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α by transduced cells after exposure to the respective influenza target epitope proved efficient specificity transfer of the isolated TCRs to primary T-cells for both vectors, at the same time indicating superior functionality of MP91-transduced cells. In conclusion, we have developed optimized strategies to obtain and transfer antigen-specific TCRs as well as designed a novel lentiviral vector for TCR-gene transfer. Our data may help to improve adoptive T-cell therapies. PMID:23428899

  1. Cell-type-specific responses of RT4 neural cell lines to dibutyryl-cAMP: branch determination versus maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Droms, K.; Sueoka, N.

    1987-03-01

    This report describes the induction of cell-type-specific maturation, by dibutyryl-cAMP and testololactone, of neuronal and glial properties in a family of cell lines derived from a rat peripheral neurotumor, RT4. This maturation allows further understanding of the process of determination because of the close lineage relationship between the cell types of the RT4 family. The RT4 family is characterized by the spontaneous conversion of one of the cell types, RT4-AC (stem-cell type), to any of three derivative cell types, RT4-B, RT4-D, or RT4-E, with a frequency of about 10(-5). The RT4-AC cells express some properties characteristic of both neuronal and glial cells. Of these neural properties expressed by RT4-AC cells, only the neuronal properties are expressed by the RT4-B and RT4-E cells, and only the glial properties are expressed by the RT4-D cells. This in vitro cell-type conversion of RT4-AC to three derivative cell types is a branch point for the coordinate regulation of several properties and seems to resemble determination in vivo. In our standard culture conditions, several other neuronal and glial properties are not expressed by these cell types. However, addition of dibutyryl-cAMP induces expression of additional properties, in a cell-type-specific manner: formation of long cellular processes in the RT4-B8 and RT4-E5 cell lines and expression of high-affinity uptake of gamma-aminobutyric acid, by a glial-cell-specific mechanism, in the RT4-D6-2 cell line. These new properties are maximally expressed 2-3 days after addition of dibutyryl-cAMP.

  2. Specific phase arrest of cell cycle restores cell viability against tRNA cleavage by killer toxin.

    PubMed

    Shigematsu, Megumi; Ogawa, Tetsuhiro; Kitamoto, Hiroko K; Hidaka, Makoto; Masaki, Haruhiko

    2012-04-20

    Zymocin and PaT are killer toxins that induce cell cycle arrest of sensitive yeast cells in G1 and S phase, respectively. Recent studies have revealed that these two toxins cleave specific tRNAs, indicating that the cell growth impairment is due to the tRNA cleavage. Additionally, we have previously shown that the active domain of colicin D (D-CRD), which also cleaves specific Escherichia coli tRNAs, statically impairs growth when expressed in yeast cells. To verify that phase-specific cell cycle arrest is also induced by the expression of D-CRD, D-CRD and the subunits of zymocin and PaT that have tRNA cleaving activity were expressed in yeast cells and cell cycle status was analyzed. Our results indicate that phase-specific arrest does not commonly occur by tRNA cleavage, and it saves the cell viability. Furthermore, the extent of protein synthesis impairment may determine the phase specificity of cell cycle arrest. PMID:22450321

  3. The Potential to Improve Cell Infiltration in Composite Fiber-Aligned Electrospun Scaffolds by the Selective Removal of Sacrificial Fibers

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Brendon M.; Gee, Albert O.; Metter, Robert B.; Nathan, Ashwin S.; Marklein, Ross L.; Burdick, Jason A.; Mauck, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Aligned electrospun scaffolds are a promising tool for engineering fibrous musculoskeletal tissues as they reproduce the mechanical anisotropy of these tissues and can direct ordered neo-tissue formation. However, these scaffolds suffer from a slow cellular infiltration rate, likely due in part to their dense fiber packing. We hypothesized that cell ingress could be expedited in scaffolds by increasing porosity, while at the same time preserving overall scaffold anisotropy. To test this hypothesis, poly(ε-caprolactone) (a slow-degrading polyester) and poly(ethylene oxide) (a water-soluble polymer) were co-electrospun from two separate spinnerets to form dual-polymer composite fiber-aligned scaffolds. Adjusting fabrication parameters produced aligned scaffolds with a full range of sacrificial (PEO) fiber contents. Tensile properties of scaffolds were a function of the ratio of PCL to PEO in the composite scaffolds, and were altered in a predictable fashion with removal of the PEO component. When seeded with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), increases in the starting sacrificial fraction (and porosity) improved cell infiltration and distribution after three weeks in culture. In pure PCL scaffolds, cells lined the scaffold periphery, while scaffolds containing >50% sacrificial PEO content had cells present throughout the scaffold. These findings indicate that cell infiltration can be expedited in dense fibrous assemblies with the removal of sacrificial fibers. This strategy may enhance in vitro and in vivo formation and maturation of a functional constructs for fibrous tissue engineering. PMID:18313138

  4. Vaccination Expands Antigen-Specific CD4+ Memory T Cells and Mobilizes Bystander Central Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li Causi, Eleonora; Parikh, Suraj C.; Chudley, Lindsey; Layfield, David M.; Ottensmeier, Christian H.; Stevenson, Freda K.; Di Genova, Gianfranco

    2015-01-01

    CD4+ T helper memory (Thmem) cells influence both natural and vaccine-boosted immunity, but mechanisms for their maintenance remain unclear. Pro-survival signals from the common gamma-chain cytokines, in particular IL-7, appear important. Previously we showed in healthy volunteers that a booster vaccination with tetanus toxoid (TT) expanded peripheral blood TT-specific Thmem cells as expected, but was accompanied by parallel increase of Thmem cells specific for two unrelated and non cross-reactive common recall antigens. Here, in a new cohort of healthy human subjects, we compare blood vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells in terms of differentiation stage, function, activation and proliferative status. Both responses peaked 1 week post-vaccination. Vaccine-specific cytokine-producing Thmem cells were predominantly effector memory, whereas bystander cells were mainly of central memory phenotype. Importantly, TT-specific Thmem cells were activated (CD38High HLA-DR+), cycling or recently divided (Ki-67+), and apparently vulnerable to death (IL-7RαLow and Bcl-2 Low). In contrast, bystander Thmem cells were resting (CD38Low HLA-DR- Ki-67-) with high expression of IL-7Rα and Bcl-2. These findings allow a clear distinction between vaccine-specific and bystander Thmem cells, suggesting the latter do not derive from recent proliferation but from cells mobilized from as yet undefined reservoirs. Furthermore, they reveal the interdependent dynamics of specific and bystander T-cell responses which will inform assessments of responses to vaccines. PMID:26332995

  5. Guiding Epithelial Cell Phenotypes with Engineered Integrin-Specific Recombinant Fibronectin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Ashley C.; Rowe, Jessica A.

    2011-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) provides important cues for directing cell phenotype. Cells interact with underlying ECM through cell-surface receptors known as integrins, which bind to specific sequences on their ligands. During tissue development, repair, and regeneration of epithelial tissues, cells must interact with an interstitial fibronectin (Fn)-rich matrix, which has been shown to direct a more migratory/repair phenotype, presumably through interaction with Fn’s cell binding domain comprised of both synergy Pro-His-Ser-Arg-Asn (PHSRN) and Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequences. We hypothesized that the Fn synergy site is critical to the regulation of epithelial cell phenotype by directing integrin specificity. Epithelial cells were cultured on Fn fragments displaying stabilized synergy and RGD (FnIII9’10), or RGD alone (FnIII10) and cell phenotype analyzed by cytoskeleton changes, epithelial cell–cell contacts, changes in gene expression of epithelial and mesenchymal markers, and wound healing assay. Data indicate that epithelial cells engage RGD only with αv integrins and display a significant shift toward a mesenchymal phenotype due, in part, to enhanced transforming growth factor-β activation and/or signaling compared with cells on the synergy containing FnIII9’10. These studies demonstrate the importance of synergy in regulating epithelial cell phenotype relevant to tissue engineering as well as the utility of engineered integrin-specific ECM fragments in guiding cell phenotype. PMID:20695776

  6. The Self-Specific Activation Receptor SLAM Family Is Critical for NK Cell Education.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shasha; Yang, Meixiang; Du, Juan; Li, Dan; Li, Zehua; Cai, Chenxu; Ma, Yuanwu; Zhang, Lianfeng; Tian, Zhigang; Dong, Zhongjun

    2016-08-16

    NK cell education, a term describing a process for NK cell acquisition of functional competence, is primarily achieved by self-MHC-I-specific inhibitory receptors. In this study, we have demonstrated that SLAM family receptors (SFRs) redundantly expressed on hematopoietic cells function as self-specific activation receptors critical for NK cell education. To overcome gene redundancy, we generated mice simultaneously lacking seven SFRs, revealing that NK-cell-mediated rejection of semi-allogeneic hematopoietic cells largely depended on the presence of SFRs on target cells. This stimulatory effect was determined by the presence of SFR-coupled adaptors; however, SFR-deficient mice displayed enhanced reactivity to hematopoietic cells. These findings demonstrate that SFRs endow NK cells with an ability to kill hematopoietic cells during the effector phase; however, the sustained engagement of SFRs can desensitize NK cell responses during an education process. Therefore, self-specific activating ligands may be "tolerogens" for NK cells, akin to self-antigens that induce T cell tolerance. PMID:27521267

  7. Mechanisms of allergen-specific immunotherapy: T-regulatory cells and more.

    PubMed

    Verhagen, Johan; Blaser, Kurt; Akdis, Cezmi A; Akdis, Mübeccel

    2006-05-01

    Activation-induced cell death, anergy, or immune response modulation by regulatory T cells (Treg cells) are essential mechanisms of peripheral T-cell tolerance. Genetic predisposition and environmental instructions tune thresholds for the activation of T cells, other inflammatory cells, and resident tissue cells in allergic diseases. Skewing allergen-specific effector T cells to a Treg-cell phenotype seems to be crucial in maintaining a healthy immune response to allergens and successful allergen-specific immunotherapy. The Treg-cell response is characterized by an abolished allergen-specific T-cell proliferation and the suppressed secretion of T-helper 1- and T-helper 2-type cytokines. Suppressed proliferative and cytokine responses against allergens are induced by multiple suppressor factors, including cytokines such as interleukin-10 (IL-10) and transforming growth factor beta (TGF-beta), and cell surface molecules such as cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4, programmed death-1, and histamine receptor 2. The increased levels of IL-10 and TGF-beta produced by Treg cells potently suppress IgE production while simultaneously increasing the production of noninflammatory isotypes IgG4 and IgA, respectively. In addition, Treg cells directly or indirectly suppress the activity of effector cells of allergic inflammation, such as mast cells, basophils, and eosinophils. In conclusion, peripheral tolerance to allergens is controlled by multiple active suppression mechanisms on T cells, regulation of antibody isotypes, and suppression of effector cells. The application of current knowledge of Treg cells and related mechanisms of peripheral tolerance may soon lead to more rational and safer approaches to the prevention and cure of allergic disease. PMID:16701141

  8. Integration of microbial fuel cell techniques into activated sludge wastewater treatment processes to improve nitrogen removal and reduce sludge production.

    PubMed

    Gajaraj, Shashikanth; Hu, Zhiqiang

    2014-12-01

    Bioelectrochemical systems are emerging for wastewater treatment, yet little is known about how well they can be integrated with current wastewater treatment processes. In this bench-scale study, the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technique was incorporated into the Modified Ludzack-Ettinger (MLE) process (phase I) and later with the membrane bioreactor (MBR) process (phase II) to evaluate the performance of MFC assisted wastewater treatment systems (i.e., MLE-MFC and MBR-MFC). There was no significant difference in the effluent NH4(+)-N concentration between the systems integrating MFC and the open circuit controls. The average effluent COD concentration was significantly lower in the MLE-MFC, but it did not change much in the MBR-MFC because of the already low COD concentrations in MBR operation. The MLE-MFC and MBR-MFC systems increased the NO3(-)-N removal efficiencies by 31% (±12%) and 20% (±12%), respectively, and reduced sludge production by 11% and 6%, respectively, while generating an average voltage of 0.13 (±0.03) V in both systems. Analysis of the bacterial specific oxygen uptake rate, the sludge volume index, and ammonia-oxidizing bacterial population (dominated by Nitrosomonas through terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis) indicated that there was no significant difference in sludge activity, settling property, and nitrifying community structure between the MFC assisted systems and the open circuit controls. The results suggest that the wastewater treatment systems could achieve higher effluent water quality and lower sludge production if it is integrated well with MFC techniques. PMID:25014565

  9. Specific polar subpopulations of astral microtubules control spindle orientation and symmetric neural stem cell division.

    PubMed

    Mora-Bermúdez, Felipe; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic spindle orientation is crucial for symmetric vs asymmetric cell division and depends on astral microtubules. Here, we show that distinct subpopulations of astral microtubules exist, which have differential functions in regulating spindle orientation and division symmetry. Specifically, in polarized stem cells of developing mouse neocortex, astral microtubules reaching the apical and basal cell cortex, but not those reaching the central cell cortex, are more abundant in symmetrically than asymmetrically dividing cells and reduce spindle orientation variability. This promotes symmetric divisions by maintaining an apico-basal cleavage plane. The greater abundance of apical/basal astrals depends on a higher concentration, at the basal cell cortex, of LGN, a known spindle-cell cortex linker. Furthermore, newly developed specific microtubule perturbations that selectively decrease apical/basal astrals recapitulate the symmetric-to-asymmetric division switch and suffice to increase neurogenesis in vivo. Thus, our study identifies a novel link between cell polarity, astral microtubules, and spindle orientation in morphogenesis. PMID:24996848

  10. Altered gp130 signalling ameliorates experimental colitis via myeloid cell-specific STAT3 activation and myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Däbritz, Jan; Judd, Louise M.; Chalinor, Heather V.; Menheniott, Trevelyan R.; Giraud, Andrew S.

    2016-01-01

    STAT3 regulates the expansion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) during inflammation, infection and cancer. Hyperactivation of STAT3 in gp130757F/F mice is associated with protection from experimental colitis. This study determined mechanisms for this protection and compared this to mice with myeloid-specific STAT3-deficiency (LysMcre/STAT3flox; gp130757F/F LysMcre/STAT3flox). Acute and chronic colitis was induced and colons were removed for histological, mRNA and protein analysis. Cell populations from spleen, mesenteric lymph node and colon were analyzed for different myeloid cell populations using flow cytometry. Functions of MDSCs and LPS-stimulated peritoneal macrophages were further characterized by in vitro and in vivo assays. Here we show that the resistance to experimental colitis in gp130757F/F mice is via myeloid-cell specific STAT3 activation, MDSC expansion and increased production of suppressive and protective cytokines. PMID:26848037

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation with Cryopreserved Grafts: Adverse Reactions after Transplantation and Cryoprotectant Removal Prior to Infusion

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Zhiquan; Heimfeld, Shelly; Gao, Dayong

    2015-01-01

    Transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has been successfully developed as a part of treatment protocols for a large number of clinical indications, and cryopreservation of both autologous and allogeneic sources of HSC grafts is increasingly being employed to facilitate logistical challenges in coordinating the collection, processing, preparation, quality control testing and release of the final HSC product with delivery to the patient. Direct infusion of cryopreserved cell products into patients has been associated with the development of adverse reactions, ranging from relatively mild symptoms to much more serious, life-threatening complications, including allergic/gastrointestinal/cardiovascular/neurological complications, renal/hepatic dysfunctions, etc. In many cases the cryoprotective agent (CPA) used — which is typically dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), is believed to be the main causal agent of these adverse reactions and thus many studies recommend depletion of DMSO before cell infusion. In this paper, we will briefly review the history of HSC cryopreservation, the side effects reported after transplantation, along with advances in strategies for reducing the adverse reactions, including methods and devices for removal of DMSO. Strategies to minimize adverse effects include medication before and after transplantation, optimizing the infusion procedure, reducing the DMSO concentration or using alternative CPAs for cryopreservation, and removing DMSO prior to infusion. For DMSO removal, besides the traditional and widely applied method of centrifugation, new approaches have been explored in the last decade, such as filtration by spinning membrane, stepwise dilution-centrifugation using rotating syringe, diffusion-based DMSO extraction in microfluidic channels, dialysis and dilution-filtration through hollow-fiber dialyzers, and some instruments (CytoMate™, Sepax S-100, Cobe 2991, microfluidic channels, dilution-filtration system, etc.) as well

  12. Epigenetic Regulation of Bovine Spermatogenic Cell-Specific Gene Boule

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Hua; Xu, Hongtao; Pan, Zengxiang; Xie, Zhuang; Li, Qifa

    2015-01-01

    Non-primate mammals have two deleted azoospermia (DAZ) family genes, DAZL and Boule; genes in this family encode RNA-binding proteins essential for male fertility in diverse animals. Testicular DAZL transcription is regulated by epigenetic factors such as DNA methylation. However, nothing is known about the epigenetic regulation of Boule. Here, we explored the role of DNA methylation in the regulation of the bovine Boule (bBoule) gene. We found that a long CpG island (CGI) in the bBoule promoter was hypermethylated in the testes of cattle-yak hybrids with low bBoule expression, whereas cattle had relatively low methylation levels (P < 0.01), and there was no difference in the methylation level in the short CGI of the gene body between cattle and cattle-yak hybrids (P > 0.05). We identified a 107 bp proximal core promoter region of bBoule. Intriguingly, the differences in the methylation level between cattle and cattle-yak hybrids were larger in the core promoter than outside the core promoter. An in vitro methylation assay showed that the core promoter activity of bBoule decreased significantly after M.SssI methylase treatment (P < 0.01). We also observed dramatically increased bBoule transcription in bovine mammary epithelial cells (BMECs) after treatment with the methyltransferase inhibitor 5-Aza-dC. Taken together, our results establish that methylation status of the core promoter might be involved in testicular bBoule transcription, and may provide new insight into the epigenetic regulation of DAZ family genes and clinical insights regarding male infertility. PMID:26030766

  13. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones.

    PubMed

    Theaker, Sarah M; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J; Cole, David K; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K; Dolton, Garry

    2016-03-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8(+) or CD4(+) polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein-Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  14. T-cell libraries allow simple parallel generation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones

    PubMed Central

    Theaker, Sarah M.; Rius, Cristina; Greenshields-Watson, Alexander; Lloyd, Angharad; Trimby, Andrew; Fuller, Anna; Miles, John J.; Cole, David K.; Peakman, Mark; Sewell, Andrew K.; Dolton, Garry

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of peptide-specific T-cell clones is highly desirable for determining the role of T-cells in human disease, as well as for the development of therapies and diagnostics. However, generation of monoclonal T-cells with the required specificity is challenging and time-consuming. Here we describe a library-based strategy for the simple parallel detection and isolation of multiple peptide-specific human T-cell clones from CD8+ or CD4+ polyclonal T-cell populations. T-cells were first amplified by CD3/CD28 microbeads in a 96U-well library format, prior to screening for desired peptide recognition. T-cells from peptide-reactive wells were then subjected to cytokine-mediated enrichment followed by single-cell cloning, with the entire process from sample to validated clone taking as little as 6 weeks. Overall, T-cell libraries represent an efficient and relatively rapid tool for the generation of peptide-specific T-cell clones, with applications shown here in infectious disease (Epstein–Barr virus, influenza A, and Ebola virus), autoimmunity (type 1 diabetes) and cancer. PMID:26826277

  15. Genetic and epigenetic variation in the lineage specification of regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Arvey, Aaron; van der Veeken, Joris; Plitas, George; Rich, Stephen S; Concannon, Patrick; Rudensky, Alexander Y

    2015-01-01

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells, which suppress autoimmunity and other inflammatory states, are characterized by a distinct set of genetic elements controlling their gene expression. However, the extent of genetic and associated epigenetic variation in the Treg cell lineage and its possible relation to disease states in humans remain unknown. We explored evolutionary conservation of regulatory elements and natural human inter-individual epigenetic variation in Treg cells to identify the core transcriptional control program of lineage specification. Analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms in core lineage-specific enhancers revealed disease associations, which were further corroborated by high-resolution genotyping to fine map causal polymorphisms in lineage-specific enhancers. Our findings suggest that a small set of regulatory elements specify the Treg lineage and that genetic variation in Treg cell-specific enhancers may alter Treg cell function contributing to polygenic disease. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07571.001 PMID:26510014

  16. Germ cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase using the VASA promoter in the pig.

    PubMed

    Song, Yuning; Lai, Liangxue; Li, Li; Huang, Yongye; Wang, Anfeng; Tang, Xiaochun; Pang, Daxin; Li, Zhanjun; Ouyang, Hongsheng

    2016-01-01

    The Cre-loxP system is a powerful tool for genetic analysis of distinct cell lineages and tissue-specific gene knockout in animal models. VASA is specifically expressed in reproductive tissues, and is known to play important roles in spermatogenesis and germ-cell growth. In this study, Cre recombinase transgenic pigs under the control of the VASA promoter were generated by somatic cell nuclear transfer. Germ cell-specific expression of Cre recombinase in VASA-Cre transgenic pigs was shown by western blotting and immunohistochemistry. VASA-Cre transgenic pigs will be a useful tool for germ cell-specific gene knockout and a disease model for disorders of the reproductive system. PMID:27047735

  17. Differing HLA types influence inhibitory receptor signalling in CMV-specific CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Macaulay, Richard; Riddell, Natalie E; Griffiths, Stephen J; Akbar, Arne N; Henson, Sian M

    2013-03-01

    The dysregulated immune response to CMV constitutes a major force driving T cell immunosenescence and growing evidence suggests that it is not a benign virus in old age. We show here that the PD-1/L pathway defines a reversible defect in CMV specific CD8(+) T cell proliferative responses in both young and old individuals. More specifically, highly differentiated CD45RA(+)CD27(-) CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells exhibit a proliferative deficit compared their central and effector memory counterparts, which is reversed following PD-L blockade. However, we also report that HLA-B(∗)07/TPR specific CD8(+) T cells express higher levels of PD-1 than HLA-A(∗)02/NLV specific cells and HLA-A(∗)02 individuals show a higher proliferative response to PD-L blockade, than HLA-B(∗)07 individuals, which we postulate may be due to the differing functional avidities for these two CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells populations. Nevertheless data presented here demonstrate that CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells can be functionally enhanced by perturbation of the PD-1/L signalling pathway, whose manipulation may provide a therapeutic modality to combat age-associated immune decline. PMID:23220495

  18. Methodologies for the Analysis of HCV-Specific CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lokhande, Megha U.; Thimme, Robert; Klenerman, Paul; Semmo, Nasser

    2015-01-01

    Virus-specific CD4+ T cells play a major role in viral infections, such as hepatitis C virus (HCV). Viral clearance is associated with vigorous and multi-specific CD4+ T-cell responses, while chronic infection has been shown to be associated with weak or absent T-cell responses. Most of these studies have used functional assays to analyze virus-specific CD4+ T-cell responses; however, these and other detection methods have various limitations. Therefore, the important question of whether virus-specific CD4+ T cells are completely absent or primarily impaired in specific effector functions during chronic infection, has yet to be analyzed in detail. A novel assay, in which virus-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies can be determined by de novo CD154 (CD40 ligand) expression in response to viral antigens, can help to overcome some of the limitations of functional assays and restrictions of multimer-based methods. This and other current established methods for the detection of HCV-specific CD4+ T cells will be discussed in this review. PMID:25767470

  19. Spider Silk-Based Gene Carriers for Tumor Cell-Specific Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Numata, Keiji; Reagan, Michaela R; Goldstein, Robert H; Rosenblatt, Michael; Kaplan, David L

    2011-01-01

    The present study demonstrates pDNA complexes of recombinant silk proteins containing poly(L-lysine) and tumor-homing peptides (THPs), which are globular and approximately 150–250 nm in diameter, show significant enhancement of target specificity to tumor cells by additions of F3 and CGKRK THPs. We report herein the preparation and study of novel nano-scale silk-based ionic complexes containing pDNA able to home specifically to tumor cells. Particular focus was on how the THP, F3 (KDEPQRRSARLSAKPAPPKPEPKPKKAPAKK) and CGKRK, enhanced transfection specificity to tumor cells. Genetically engineered silk proteins containing both poly(L-lysine) domains to interact with pDNA and the THP to bind to specific tumor cells for target-specific pDNA delivery were prepared using Escherichia coli, followed by in-vitro and in-vivo transfection experiments into MDA-MB-435 melanoma cells and highly metastatic human breast tumor MDA-MB-231 cells. Non-tumorigenic MCF-10A breast epithelial cells were used as a control cell line for in-vitro tumor-specific delivery studies. These results demonstrate that combination of the bioengineered silk delivery systems and THP can serve as a versatile and useful new platform for non-viral gene delivery. PMID:21739966

  20. Alloantigen-specific regulatory T cells generated with a chimeric antigen receptor

    PubMed Central

    MacDonald, Katherine G.; Hoeppli, Romy E.; Huang, Qing; Gillies, Jana; Luciani, Dan S.; Orban, Paul C.; Broady, Raewyn; Levings, Megan K.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with regulatory T cells (Tregs) is a promising treatment for allograft rejection and graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Emerging data indicate that, compared with polyclonal Tregs, disease-relevant antigen-specific Tregs may have numerous advantages, such as a need for fewer cells and reduced risk of nonspecific immune suppression. Current methods to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs rely on expansion with allogeneic antigen-presenting cells, which requires access to donor and recipient cells and multiple MHC mismatches. The successful use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for the generation of antigen-specific effector T cells suggests that a similar approach could be used to generate alloantigen-specific Tregs. Here, we have described the creation of an HLA-A2–specific CAR (A2-CAR) and its application in the generation of alloantigen-specific human Tregs. In vitro, A2-CAR–expressing Tregs maintained their expected phenotype and suppressive function before, during, and after A2-CAR–mediated stimulation. In mouse models, human A2-CAR–expressing Tregs were superior to Tregs expressing an irrelevant CAR at preventing xenogeneic GVHD caused by HLA-A2+ T cells. Together, our results demonstrate that use of CAR technology to generate potent, functional, and stable alloantigen-specific human Tregs markedly enhances their therapeutic potential in transplantation and sets the stage for using this approach for making antigen-specific Tregs for therapy of multiple diseases. PMID:26999600

  1. Quantifying Biomass Changes of Single CD8+ T Cells during Antigen Specific Cytotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Colleen; Witte, Owen N.; Teitell, Michael A.

    2013-01-01

    Existing approaches that quantify cytotoxic T cell responses rely on bulk or surrogate measurements which impede the direct identification of single activated T cells of interest. Single cell microscopy or flow cytometry methodologies typically rely on fluorescent labeling, which limits applicability to primary cells such as human derived T lymphocytes. Here, we introduce a quantitative method to track single T lymphocyte mediated cytotoxic events within a mixed population of cells using live cell interferometry (LCI), a label-free microscopy technique that maintains cell viability. LCI quantifies the mass distribution within individual cells by measuring the phase shift caused by the interaction of light with intracellular biomass. Using LCI, we imaged cytotoxic T cells killing cognate target cells. In addition to a characteristic target cell mass decrease of 20–60% over 1–4 h following attack by a T cell, there was a significant 4-fold increase in T cell mass accumulation rate at the start of the cytotoxic event and a 2–3 fold increase in T cell mass relative to the mass of unresponsive T cells. Direct, label-free measurement of CD8+ T and target cell mass changes provides a kinetic, quantitative assessment of T cell activation and a relatively rapid approach to identify specific, activated patient-derived T cells for applications in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:23935904

  2. Manipulation of regulatory T cells and antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte-based tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Shirin; Chattopadhyay, Subhasis; Chakraborty, Nitya G

    2015-01-01

    The most potent killing machinery in our immune system is the cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL). Since the possibility for self-destruction by these cells is high, many regulatory activities exist to prevent autoimmune destruction by these cells. A tumour (cancer) grows from the cells of the body and is tolerated by the body's immune system. Yet, it has been possible to generate tumour-associated antigen (TAA) -specific CTL that are also self-antigen specific in vivo, to achieve a degree of therapeutic efficacy. Tumour-associated antigen-specific T-cell tolerance through pathways of self-tolerance generation represents a significant challenge to successful immunotherapy. CD4+ CD25+ FoxP3+ T cells, referred to as T regulatory (Treg) cells, are selected in the thymus as controllers of the anti-self repertoire. These cells are referred to as natural T regulatory (nTreg) cells. According to the new consensus (Nature Immunology 2013; 14:307–308) these cells are to be termed as (tTreg). There is another class of CD4+ Treg cells also involved in regulatory function in the periphery, also phenotypically CD4+ CD25±, classified as induced Treg (iTreg) cells. These cells are to be termed as peripherally induced Treg (pTreg) cells. In vitro-induced Treg cells with suppressor function should be termed as iTreg. These different Treg cells differ in their requirements for activation and in their mode of action. The current challenges are to determine the degree of specificity of these Treg cells in recognizing the same TAA as the CTL population and to circumvent their regulatory constraints so as to achieve robust CTL responses against cancer. PMID:25243729

  3. Synthesis of milk specific fatty acids and proteins by dispersed goat mammary-gland epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hansen, H O; Tornehave, D; Knudsen, J

    1986-01-01

    The method now described for preparation of dispersed lactating goat mammary-gland cells gives a high yield of morphologically and functionally normal mammary cells. The cells synthesize specific goat milk fatty acids in the right proportions, and they respond to hormones by increased protein synthesis. The cells can be frozen and thawed without losing the above properties, which makes them an excellent tool for metabolic and hormonal studies. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3800930

  4. Functional TCR retrieval from single antigen-specific human T cells reveals multiple novel epitopes.

    PubMed

    Simon, Petra; Omokoko, Tana A; Breitkreuz, Andrea; Hebich, Lisa; Kreiter, Sebastian; Attig, Sebastian; Konur, Abdo; Britten, Cedrik M; Paret, Claudia; Dhaene, Karl; Türeci, Özlem; Sahin, Ugur

    2014-12-01

    The determination of the epitope specificity of disease-associated T-cell responses is relevant for the development of biomarkers and targeted immunotherapies against cancer, autoimmune, and infectious diseases. The lack of known T-cell epitopes and corresponding T-cell receptors (TCR) for novel antigens hinders the efficient development and monitoring of new therapies. We developed an integrated approach for the systematic retrieval and functional characterization of TCRs from single antigen-reactive T cells that includes the identification of epitope specificity. This is accomplished through the rapid cloning of full-length TCR-α and TCR-β chains directly from single antigen-specific CD8(+) or CD4(+) T lymphocytes. The functional validation of cloned TCRs is conducted using in vitro-transcribed RNA transfer for expression of TCRs in T cells and HLA molecules in antigen-presenting cells. This method avoids the work and bias associated with repetitive cycles of in vitro T-cell stimulation, and enables fast characterization of antigen-specific T-cell responses. We applied this strategy to viral and tumor-associated antigens (TAA), resulting in the retrieval of 56 unique functional antigen-specific TCRs from human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells (13 specific for CMV-pp65, 16 specific for the well-known TAA NY-ESO-1, and 27 for the novel TAA TPTE), which are directed against 39 different epitopes. The proof-of-concept studies with TAAs NY-ESO-1 and TPTE revealed multiple novel TCR specificities. Our approach enables the rational development of immunotherapy strategies by providing antigen-specific TCRs and immunogenic epitopes. PMID:25245536

  5. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-10-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  6. Evaluating bacterial activity from cell-specific ribosomal RNA content measured with oligonucleotide probes

    SciTech Connect

    Kemp, P.F.; Lee, S.; LaRoche, J.

    1992-01-01

    We describe a procedure for measuring the cell-specific quantity of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) and DNA in order to evaluate the frequency distribution of activity among cells. The procedure is inherently quantitative, does not require sample incubation and potentially can be taxon-specific. Fluorescently-labelled oligonucleotide probes are hybridized to the complementary 16S rRNA sequences in preserved, intact cells. The resulting cell fluorescence is proportional to cellular rRNA content and can be measured with a microscope-mounted photometer system, by image analysis, or by flow cytometry. Similarly, DNA content is measured as fluorescence of cells stained with the DNA specific fluorochrome DAPI. These are either prepared as separate samples for purposes of enumeration and DNA measurements, or are dual-labelled cells which are also hybridized with oligonucleotide probes.

  7. Tissue-specific DNA demethylation is required for proper B-cell differentiation and function.

    PubMed

    Orlanski, Shari; Labi, Verena; Reizel, Yitzhak; Spiro, Adam; Lichtenstein, Michal; Levin-Klein, Rena; Koralov, Sergei B; Skversky, Yael; Rajewsky, Klaus; Cedar, Howard; Bergman, Yehudit

    2016-05-01

    There is ample evidence that somatic cell differentiation during development is accompanied by extensive DNA demethylation of specific sites that vary between cell types. Although the mechanism of this process has not yet been elucidated, it is likely to involve the conversion of 5mC to 5hmC by Tet enzymes. We show that a Tet2/Tet3 conditional knockout at early stages of B-cell development largely prevents lineage-specific programmed demethylation events. This lack of demethylation affects the expression of nearby B-cell lineage genes by impairing enhancer activity, thus causing defects in B-cell differentiation and function. Thus, tissue-specific DNA demethylation appears to be necessary for proper somatic cell development in vivo. PMID:27091986

  8. Adoptive therapy with redirected primary regulatory T cells results in antigen-specific suppression of arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Graham P; Notley, Clare A; Xue, Shao-An; Bendle, Gavin M; Holler, Angelika; Schumacher, Ton N; Ehrenstein, Michael R; Stauss, Hans J

    2009-11-10

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) can suppress a wide range of immune cells, making them an ideal candidate for the treatment of autoimmunity. The potential clinical translation of targeted therapy with antigen-specific Tregs is hampered by the difficulties of isolating rare specificities from the natural polyclonal T cell repertoire. Moreover, the initiating antigen is often unknown in autoimmune disease. Here we tested the ability of antigen-specific Tregs generated by retroviral gene transfer to ameliorate arthritis through linked suppression and therefore without cognate recognition of the disease-initiating antigen. We explored two distinct strategies: T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer into purified CD4+CD25+ T cells was used to redirect the specificity of naturally occurring Tregs; and co-transfer of FoxP3 and TCR genes served to convert conventional CD4(+) T cells into antigen-specific regulators. Following adoptive transfer into recipient mice, the gene-modified T cells engrafted efficiently and retained TCR and FoxP3 expression. Using an established arthritis model, we demonstrate antigen-driven accumulation of the gene modified T cells at the site of joint inflammation, which resulted in a local reduction in the number of inflammatory Th17 cells and a significant decrease in arthritic bone destruction. Together, we describe a robust strategy to rapidly generate antigen-specific regulatory T cells capable of highly targeted inhibition of tissue damage in the absence of systemic immune suppression. This opens the possibility to target Tregs to tissue-specific antigens for the treatment of autoimmune tissue damage without the knowledge of the disease-causing autoantigens recognized by pathogenic T cells. PMID:19884493

  9. Cell-Type Specific Expression of Apc in Lung Development, Injury and Repair

    PubMed Central

    Li, Aimin; Xing, Yiming; Chan, Belinda; Heisterkamp, Nora; Groffen, John; Borok, Zea; Minoo, Parviz; Li, Changgong

    2010-01-01

    Adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) is critical for Wnt signaling and cell migration. The current study examined Apc expression during lung development, injury and repair. Apc was first detectable in smooth muscle layers in early lung morphogenesis, and was highly expressed in ciliated and neuroendocrine cells in the advanced stages. No Apc immunoreactivity was detected in Clara or basal cells, which function as stem/progenitor cell in adult lung. In ciliated cells, Apc is associated mainly with apical cytoplasmic domain. In response to naphthalene induced injury, Apcpositive cells underwent squamous metaplasia, accompanied by changes in Apc subcellular distribution. In conclusion, both spatial and temporal expression of Apc is dynamically regulated during lung development and injury repair. Differential expression of Apc in progenitor vs. non-progenitor cells suggests a functional role in cell type specification. Subcellular localization changes of Apc in response to naphthalene injury suggest a role in cell shape and cell migration. PMID:20658693

  10. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy in patients with iron overload after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Eisfeld, Ann-Kathrin; Krahl, Rainer; Jaekel, Nadja; Niederwieser, Dietger; Al-Ali, Haifa Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Excess body iron could persist for years after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) with possible deleterious sequels. An iron depletive therapy with phlebotomy seems rational. Kinetics of iron removal by phlebotomy without erythropoietin support in non-thalassemic adult patients with iron overload after HCT and the impact of pre- and post-HCT hemochromatosis (HFE) genotype on iron mobilization were investigated. Patients and methods: Phlebotomy was initiated in 61 recipients of allografts due to hematologic malignancies (median age 48 years) after a median of 18 months. The prephlebotomy median serum ferritin (SF) was 1697ng/ml and the median number of blood transfusions 28 units. Alanine aminotransferase (ALT)/aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alkaline phosphates (AP), and bilirubin were elevated in 55.7%, 64% and 11.5% patients respectively. HFE-genotype was elucidated by polymerase chain reaction using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. Results: Phlebotomy was well-tolerated irrespective of age or conditioning. A negative iron balance in 80% of patients (median SF 1086 ng/ml) and a rise in hemoglobin were observed (p<0.0001). Higher transfusional burden and SF were associated with a greater iron mobilization per session (p=0.02). In 58% of patients, a plateau after an initial steady decline in SF was followed by a second decline under further phlebotomy. The improvement in ALT (p=0.002), AST (p=0.03), AP (p=0.01), and bilirubin (p<0.0001) did not correlate with the decline in SF. Mutant HFE-gene variants were detected in 14/55 (25%) pre-HCT and 22/55 (40%) patients post-HCT. Overall, dissimilar pre- and posttransplantational HFE-genotypes were detected in 20/55 (40%) patients. Posttransplantational mutant HFE variants correlated with a slower decline in SF (p=0.007). Conclusions: Phlebotomy is a convenient therapy of iron overload in survivors of HCT. A negative iron balance and a rise in hemoglobin were observed in the majority of

  11. Sleeping Beauty system to redirect T-cell specificity for human applications

    PubMed Central

    Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Dawson, Margaret; Figliola, Matthew; Olivares, Simon; Rao, Pullavathi; Jue, Yi; Multani, Asha; Yang, Ge; Zhang, Ling; Kellar, Denise; Ang, Sonny; Torikai, Hiroki; Rabinovich, Brian; Lee, Dean A.; Kebriaei, Partow; Hackett, Perry; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2013-01-01

    The Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase DNA plasmid system is used to genetically modify cells for long-term transgene expression. We adapted the SB system for human application and generated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19. Electro-transfer of CD19-specific SB DNA plasmids in PBMC and propagation on CD19+ artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) was used to numerically expand CD3+ T cells expressing CAR. By Day 28 of co-culture >90% of expanded CD3+ T cells expressed CAR. CAR+ T cells specifically killed CD19+ target cells and consisted of subsets expressing biomarkers consistent with central memory, ieffector memory, and effector phenotypes. CAR+ T cells contracted numerically in the absence of CD19 antigen, did not express SB11 transposase, and maintained a polyclonal TCRVα and TCRVβ repertoire. Quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (Q-FISH) revealed that CAR+ T cells preserved telomere length. Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) and FISH showed CAR transposon integrated on average once per T-cell genome. CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood can be detected by Q-PCR at a sensitivity of 0.01%. These findings lay the groundwork as the basis of our first-in-human clinical trials of the non-viral SB system for the investigational treatment of CD19+ B-cell malignancies (currently under three INDs #: 14193, 14577, and 14739). PMID:23377665

  12. L1 Cell Adhesion Molecule-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Redirected Human T Cells Exhibit Specific and Efficient Antitumor Activity against Human Ovarian Cancer in Mice.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hao; Brown, Christine E; Ostberg, Julie R; Priceman, Saul J; Chang, Wen-Chung; Weng, Lihong; Lin, Paul; Wakabayashi, Mark T; Jensen, Michael C; Forman, Stephen J

    2016-01-01

    New therapeutic modalities are needed for ovarian cancer, the most lethal gynecologic malignancy. Recent clinical trials have demonstrated the impressive therapeutic potential of adoptive therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells to target hematological cancers, and emerging studies suggest a similar impact may be achieved for solid cancers. We sought determine whether genetically-modified T cells targeting the CE7-epitope of L1-CAM, a cell adhesion molecule aberrantly expressed in several cancers, have promise as an immunotherapy for ovarian cancer, first demonstrating that L1-CAM was highly over-expressed on a panel of ovarian cancer cell lines, primary ovarian tumor tissue specimens, and ascites-derived primary cancer cells. Human central memory derived T cells (TCM) were then genetically modified to express an anti-L1-CAM CAR (CE7R), which directed effector function upon tumor antigen stimulation as assessed by in vitro cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity assays. We also found that CE7R+ T cells were able to target primary ovarian cancer cells. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of CE7R+ TCM induced a significant regression of i.p. established SK-OV-3 xenograft tumors in mice, inhibited ascites formation, and conferred a significant survival advantage compared with control-treated animals. Taken together, these studies indicate that adoptive transfer of L1-CAM-specific CE7R+ T cells may offer a novel and effective immunotherapy strategy for advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:26761817

  13. Generation and characterization of human cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells from urine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Junmei; Wang, Xue; Zhang, Shengli; Gu, Yijun; Yu, Ling; Wu, Jing; Gao, Tongbin; Chen, Fang

    2013-03-01

    Cryptorchidism is a common congenital birth defect in human beings with the possible complication of infertility. An in vitro model of cryptorchidism might be valuable due to the inaccessibility of human embryos for research purposes. In this study, we reprogrammed urine cells containing genetic variations in insulin-like factor 3, zinc finger (ZNF) 214, and ZNF215 from a cryptorchid patient by introducing human OCT4, SOX2, C-MYC, and KLF4 with lentivirus. The cells were then replated on irradiated mouse embryonic fibroblasts and cultured with the human embryonic stem (ES) cell medium. The compact colonies with well-defined borders were manually picked, and 2 induced pluripotent cell lines were fully characterized. Our results demonstrated that these 2 cell lines were similar to human ES cells in morphological appearance, marker expression, and epigenetic status of the pluripotent cell-specific gene, OCT4. These cells could be differentiated into cells of all 3 germ layers in teratomas and in vitro, including into the VASA-positive germ cell lineage. Both parental urine cells and the reprogrammed cells possessed the normal karyotype and the same short tandem repeat loci, indicating that these 2 cell population share the same genetic identity. This establishment and characterization of human urine-derived cryptorchid-specific induced pluripotent stem cells could present a good human genetic system for future studies investigating the molecular mechanism of cryptorchidism. PMID:23025704

  14. Specific central memory T cells in the bone marrow of patients immunized against tyrosinase peptides.

    PubMed

    Letsch, Anne; Keilholz, Ulrich; Kern, Florian; Asemissen, Anne Marie; Thiel, Eckhard; Scheibenbogen, Carmen

    2006-01-01

    The goal of vaccination against tumors is the induction of effector T cells mediating tumor destruction and memory T cells providing long-term immunity. Several previous studies in patients vaccinated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I peptides failed to show induction of central memory T cells, which are considered important to provide long-term memory. This study examined the subset composition and function of specific T cells generated by immunization with MHC class I binding tyrosinase peptides in combination with the adjuvants granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and keyhole limpet hemocyanin in peripheral blood (PB) and bone marrow (BM) of melanoma patients. Most of the tyrosinase-specific T cells in PB had a CD45RA(+)CCR7(-) effector phenotype. In contrast to this, a large subset of tyrosinase-specific T cells in BM were memory T cells, including CD45RA(+)CCR7(-) central and CD45RA(-)CCR7(-) effector memory T cells. BM tyrosinase-specific T cells were functional, because they produced interferon-gamma and had a high proliferative potential. This study suggests that peptide vaccination can generate a fully functional memory T-cell response characterized by central and effector memory phenotypes, proliferative potential, and BM tropism. PMID:16531820

  15. Gene expression profiles of hepatic cell-type specific marker genes in progression of liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Takahara, Yoshiyuki; Takahashi, Mitsuo; Wagatsuma, Hiroki; Yokoya, Fumihiko; Zhang, Qing-Wei; Yamaguchi, Mutsuyo; Aburatani, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Norifumi

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To determine the gene expression profile data for the whole liver during development of dimethylni-trosamine (DMN)-induced hepatic fibrosis. METHODS: Marker genes were identified for different types of hepatic cells, including hepatic stellate cells (HSCs), Kupffer cells (including other inflammatory cells), and hepatocytes, using independent temporal DNA microarray data obtained from isolated hepatic cells. RESULTS: The cell-type analysis of gene expression gave several key results and led to formation of three hypotheses: (1) changes in the expression of HSC-specific marker genes during fibrosis were similar to gene expression data in in vitro cultured HSCs, suggesting a major role of the self-activating characteristics of HSCs in formation of fibrosis; (2) expression of mast cell-specific marker genes reached a peak during liver fibrosis, suggesting a possible role of mast cells in formation of fibrosis; and (3) abnormal expression of hepatocyte-specific marker genes was found across several metabolic pathways during fibrosis, including sulfur-containing amino acid metabolism, fatty acid metabolism, and drug metabolism, suggesting a mechanistic relationship between these abnormalities and symptoms of liver fibrosis. CONCLUSION: Analysis of marker genes for specific hepatic cell types can identify the key aspects of fibrogenesis. Sequential activation of inflammatory cells and the self-supporting properties of HSCs play an important role in development of fibrosis. PMID:17072980

  16. Follicular regulatory T cells can be specific for the immunizing antigen and derive from naive T cells

    PubMed Central

    Aloulou, Meryem; Carr, Edward J.; Gador, Mylène; Bignon, Alexandre; Liblau, Roland S.; Fazilleau, Nicolas; Linterman, Michelle A.

    2016-01-01

    T follicular regulatory (Tfr) cells are a subset of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells that form in response to immunization or infection, which localize to the germinal centre where they control the magnitude of the response. Despite an increased interest in the role of Tfr cells in humoral immunity, many fundamental aspects of their biology remain unknown, including whether they recognize self- or foreign antigen. Here we show that Tfr cells can be specific for the immunizing antigen, irrespective of whether it is a self- or foreign antigen. We show that, in addition to developing from thymic derived Treg cells, Tfr cells can also arise from Foxp3− precursors in a PD-L1-dependent manner, if the adjuvant used is one that supports T-cell plasticity. These findings have important implications for Tfr cell biology and for improving vaccine efficacy by formulating vaccines that modify the Tfr:Tfh cell ratio. PMID:26818004

  17. Target-Specific Glycinergic Transmission from VGluT3-Expressing Amacrine Cells Shapes Suppressive Contrast Responses in the Retina.

    PubMed

    Tien, Nai-Wen; Kim, Tahnbee; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2016-05-17

    Neurons that release more than one transmitter exist throughout the CNS. Yet, how these neurons deploy multiple transmitters and shape the function of specific circuits is not well understood. VGluT3-expressing amacrine cells (VG3-ACs) provide glutamatergic input to ganglion cells activated by contrast and motion. Using optogenetics, we find that VG3-ACs provide selective glycinergic input to a retinal ganglion cell type suppressed by contrast and motion (SbC-RGCs). Firing of SbC-RGCs is suppressed at light ON and OFF over a broad range of stimulus sizes. Anatomical circuit reconstructions reveal that VG3-ACs form inhibitory synapses preferentially on processes that link ON and OFF arbors of SbC-RGC dendrites. Removal of VG3-ACs from mature circuits reduces inhibition and attenuates spike suppression of SbC-RGCs in a contrast- and size-selective manner, illustrating the modularity of retinal circuits. VG3-ACs thus use dual transmitters in a target-specific manner and shape suppressive contrast responses in the retina by glycinergic transmission. PMID:27160915

  18. Specificity of endothelial cell reorientation in response to cyclic mechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Wang, J H; Goldschmidt-Clermont, P; Wille, J; Yin, F C

    2001-12-01

    Evidence suggests that cellular responses to mechanical stimuli depend specifically on the type of stimuli imposed. For example, when subjected to fluid shear stress, endothelial cells align along the flow direction. In contrast, in response to cyclic stretching, cells align away from the stretching direction. However, a few aspects of this cell alignment response remain to be clarified: (1) Is the cell alignment due to actual cell reorientation or selective cell detachment? (2) Does the resulting cell alignment represent a response of the cells to elongation or shortening, or both? (3) Does the cell alignment depend on the stretching magnitude or rate, or both? Finally, the role of the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules in the cell alignment response remains unclear. To address these questions, we grew human aortic endothelial cells on deformable silicone membranes and subjected them to three types of cyclic stretching: simple elongation, pure uniaxial stretching and equi-biaxial stretching. Examination of the same cells before and after stretching revealed that they reoriented. Cells subjected to either simple elongation or pure uniaxial stretching reoriented specifically toward the direction of minimal substrate deformation, even though the directions for the two types of stretching differed by only about 20 degrees. At comparable stretching durations, the extent of cell reorientation was more closely related to the stretching magnitude than the stretching rate. The actin cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell subjected to either type of stretching was reorganized into parallel arrays of actin filaments (i.e., stress fibers) aligned in the direction of the minimal substrate deformation. Furthermore, in response to equi-biaxial stretching, the actin cytoskeleton was remodeled into a "tent-like" structure oriented out of the membrane plane-again towards the direction of the minimal substrate deformation. Finally, abolishing microtubules prevented neither the

  19. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  20. Heterogeneity of transcription factor binding specificity models within and across cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Mahfuza; Bravo, Héctor Corrada; Hannenhalli, Sridhar

    2016-08-01

    Complex gene expression patterns are mediated by the binding of transcription factors (TFs) to specific genomic loci. The in vivo occupancy of a TF is, in large part, determined by the TF's DNA binding interaction partners, motivating genomic context-based models of TF occupancy. However, approaches thus far have assumed a uniform TF binding model to explain genome-wide cell-type-specific binding sites. Therefore, the cell type heterogeneity of TF occupancy models, as well as the extent to which binding rules underlying a TF's occupancy are shared across cell types, has not been investigated. Here, we develop an ensemble-based approach (TRISECT) to identify the heterogeneous binding rules for cell-type-specific TF occupancy and analyze the inter-cell-type sharing of such rules. Comprehensive analysis of 23 TFs, each with ChIP-seq data in four to 12 different cell types, shows that by explicitly capturing the heterogeneity of binding rules, TRISECT accurately identifies in vivo TF occupancy. Importantly, many of the binding rules derived from individual cell types are shared across cell types and reveal distinct yet functionally coherent putative target genes in different cell types. Closer inspection of the predicted cell-type-specific interaction partners provides insights into the context-specific functional landscape of a TF. Together, our novel ensemble-based approach reveals, for the first time, a widespread heterogeneity of binding rules, comprising the interaction partners within a cell type, many of which nevertheless transcend cell types. Notably, the putative targets of shared binding rules in different cell types, while distinct, exhibit significant functional coherence. PMID:27311443

  1. TIGIT and PD-1 impair tumor antigen–specific CD8+ T cells in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Chauvin, Joe-Marc; Pagliano, Ornella; Fourcade, Julien; Sun, Zhaojun; Wang, Hong; Sander, Cindy; Kirkwood, John M.; Chen, Tseng-hui Timothy; Maurer, Mark; Korman, Alan J.; Zarour, Hassane M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell Ig and ITIM domain (TIGIT) is an inhibitory receptor expressed by activated T cells, Tregs, and NK cells. Here, we determined that TIGIT is upregulated on tumor antigen–specific (TA-specific) CD8+ T cells and CD8+ tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) from patients with melanoma, and these TIGIT-expressing CD8+ T cells often coexpress the inhibitory receptor PD-1. Moreover, CD8+ TILs from patients exhibited downregulation of the costimulatory molecule CD226, which competes with TIGIT for the same ligand, supporting a TIGIT/CD226 imbalance in metastatic melanoma. TIGIT marked early T cell activation and was further upregulated by T cells upon PD-1 blockade and in dysfunctional PD-1+TIM-3+ TA-specific CD8+ T cells. PD-1+TIGIT+, PD-1–TIGIT+, and PD-1+TIGIT– CD8+ TILs had similar functional capacities ex vivo, suggesting that TIGIT alone, or together with PD-1, is not indicative of T cell dysfunction. However, in the presence of TIGIT ligand–expressing cells, TIGIT and PD-1 blockade additively increased proliferation, cytokine production, and degranulation of both TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs. Collectively, our results show that TIGIT and PD-1 regulate the expansion and function of TA-specific CD8+ T cells and CD8+ TILs in melanoma patients and suggest that dual TIGIT and PD-1 blockade should be further explored to elicit potent antitumor CD8+ T cell responses in patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:25866972

  2. Dual-specificity anti-sigma factor reinforces control of cell-type specific gene expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P; Henriques, Adriano O

    2015-04-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  3. Dual-Specificity Anti-sigma Factor Reinforces Control of Cell-Type Specific Gene Expression in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Mónica; Gao, JinXin; Bota, João; Bate, Ashley R.; Meisner, Jeffrey; Eichenberger, Patrick; Moran, Charles P.; Henriques, Adriano O.

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression during spore development in Bacillus subtilis is controlled by cell type-specific RNA polymerase sigma factors. σFand σE control early stages of development in the forespore and the mother cell, respectively. When, at an intermediate stage in development, the mother cell engulfs the forespore, σF is replaced by σG and σE is replaced by σK. The anti-sigma factor CsfB is produced under the control of σF and binds to and inhibits the auto-regulatory σG, but not σF. A position in region 2.1, occupied by an asparagine in σG and by a glutamate in οF, is sufficient for CsfB discrimination of the two sigmas, and allows it to delay the early to late switch in forespore gene expression. We now show that following engulfment completion, csfB is switched on in the mother cell under the control of σK and that CsfB binds to and inhibits σE but not σK, possibly to facilitate the switch from early to late gene expression. We show that a position in region 2.3 occupied by a conserved asparagine in σE and by a conserved glutamate in σK suffices for discrimination by CsfB. We also show that CsfB prevents activation of σG in the mother cell and the premature σG-dependent activation of σK. Thus, CsfB establishes negative feedback loops that curtail the activity of σE and prevent the ectopic activation of σG in the mother cell. The capacity of CsfB to directly block σE activity may also explain how CsfB plays a role as one of the several mechanisms that prevent σE activation in the forespore. Thus the capacity of CsfB to differentiate between the highly similar σF/σG and σE/σK pairs allows it to rinforce the cell-type specificity of these sigma factors and the transition from early to late development in B. subtilis, and possibly in all sporeformers that encode a CsfB orthologue. PMID:25835496

  4. Vaccination Against Human Papilloma Viruses Leads to a Favorable Cytokine Profile of Specific T Cells.

    PubMed

    Luckau, Stefanie; Wehrs, Tim P; Brandau, Sven; Horn, Peter A; Lindemann, Monika

    2016-10-01

    Several human papilloma viruses (HPV) are known to cause malignant transformation. The high-risk type HPV 16 is associated with cervical carcinoma and head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. HPV 16-positive tumor cells exclusively carry the HPV 16 oncogenes E6 and E7. These oncogenes appear as excellent targets for an adoptive immunotherapy. We here addressed the question whether specific T cells from HPV-vaccinated healthy volunteers could be especially suitable for an HPV-specific cellular immunotherapy. Of note, vaccines contain HPV 16. To quantify HPV 16 E6-specific and E7-specific cells, enzyme-linked immunospot assays to measure interferon-γ (IFN-γ) and interleukin-10 (Th1-Th2 balance) and the secretion of the cytotoxic molecules granzyme B and perforin have been optimized. The frequency of peripheral blood mononuclear cells secreting IFN-γ and perforin was significantly (P<0.05) increased in HPV-vaccinated versus nonvaccinated volunteers. Overall, however, the median frequency of HPV 16-specific cells with a favorable secretion profile (Th1 balanced and cytotoxic) was low even in vaccinated volunteers (IFN-γ: 0.0018% and 0.0023%, perforin: 0.01% and 0.0087% for E6-specific and E7-specific cells, respectively). But some vaccinated volunteers showed up to 0.1% HPV-specific, IFN-γ or perforin-secreting cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that vaccinated volunteers are superior to nonvaccinated donors for HPV-specific cellular cancer immunotherapy. PMID:27548034

  5. Laminin-511 and laminin-521-based matrices for efficient hepatic specification of human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Kanninen, Liisa K; Harjumäki, Riina; Peltoniemi, Pasi; Bogacheva, Mariia S; Salmi, Tuuli; Porola, Pauliina; Niklander, Johanna; Smutný, Tomáš; Urtti, Arto; Yliperttula, Marjo L; Lou, Yan-Ru

    2016-10-01

    Human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have gained a solid foothold in basic research and drug industry as they can be used in vitro to study human development and have potential to offer limitless supply of various somatic cell types needed in drug development. Although the hepatic differentiation of hPSCs has been extensively studied, only a little attention has been paid to the role of the extracellular matrix. In this study we used laminin-511, laminin-521, and fibronectin, found in human liver progenitor cells, as culture matrices for hPSC-derived definitive endoderm cells. We observed that laminin-511 and laminin-521 either alone or in combination support the hepatic specification and that fibronectin is not a vital matrix protein for the hPSC-derived definitive endoderm cells. The expression of the laminin-511/521-specific integrins increased during the definitive endoderm induction and hepatic specification. The hepatic cells differentiated on laminin matrices showed the upregulation of liver-specific markers both at mRNA and protein levels, secreted human albumin, stored glycogen, and exhibited cytochrome P450 enzyme activity and inducibility. Altogether, we found that laminin-511 and laminin-521 can be used as stage-specific matrices to guide the hepatic specification of hPSC-derived definitive endoderm cells. PMID:27372423

  6. A critical examination of the numerology of antigen-binding cells: evidence for multiple receptor specificities on single cells.

    PubMed

    Miller, A

    1977-01-01

    The data available from other laboratories as well as our own on the frequency of cells recognizing major histocompatibility antigens or conventional protein and hapten antigens is critically evaluated. The frequency of specific binding for a large number of antigens is sufficiently high to support the idea that at least part of the antigen-binding cell population must have multiple specificities. Our results suggest that these multiple specific cells result from single cells synthesizing and displaying as many as 50-100 species of receptor, each at a frequency of 10(4) per cell. A model involving gene expansion of constant-region genes is suggested and some auxilliary evidence consistent with such C-gene expansion is presented. PMID:68706

  7. Absence of transitive and systemic pathways allows cell-specific and isoform-specific RNAi in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    ROIGNANT, JEAN-YVES; CARRÉ, CLÉMENT; MUGAT, BRUNO; SZYMCZAK, DIMITRI; LEPESANT, JEAN-ANTOINE; ANTONIEWSKI, CHRISTOPHE

    2003-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) designates the multistep process by which double-stranded RNA induces the silencing of homologous endogenous genes. Some aspects of RNAi appear to be conserved throughout evolution, including the processing of trigger dsRNAs into small 21–23-bp siRNAs and their use to guide the degradation of complementary mRNAs. Two remarkable features of RNAi were uncovered in plants and Caenorhabditid elegans. First, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase activities allow the synthesis of siRNA complementary to sequences upstream of or downstream from the initial trigger region in the target mRNA, leading to a transitive RNAi with sequences that had not been initially targeted. Secondly, systemic RNAi may cause the targeting of gene silencing in one tissue to spread to other tissues. Using transgenes expressing dsRNA, we investigated whether transitive and systemic RNAi occur in Drosophila. DsRNA-producing transgenes targeted RNAi to specific regions of alternative mRNA species of one gene without transitive effect directed to sequences downstream from or upstream of the initial trigger region. Moreover, specific expression of a dsRNA, using either cell-specific GAL4 drivers or random clonal activation of a GAL4 driver, mediated a cell-autonomous RNAi. Together, our results provide evidence that transitive and systemic aspects of RNAi are not conserved in Drosophila and demonstrate that dsRNA-producing transgenes allow powerful reverse genetic approaches to be conducted in this model organism, by knocking down gene functions at the resolution of a single-cell type and of a single isoform. PMID:12592004

  8. Iatrogenic Seeding of Tumor Cells in Thigh Soft Tissue Upon Surgical Removal of Intracranial Meningioma

    PubMed Central

    Maddah, Ghodratollah; Shabahang, Hossein; Zehi, Vahid; Sharifi Sistani, Nouriyeh; Mashhadi Nejad, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Meningioma is a benign and slowly-growing tumor that is responsible for 20% of brain neoplasms. It can be accompanied by some genetic disorders such as neurofibromatosis type 2 and is more common among women. As a space occupying lesion, it produces a wide range of signs and symptoms by compressing the adjacent and underlying tissues in the brain. Trauma and viruses are possible etiologies for meningioma. The ideal treatment of benign meningioma is surgical resection. Case Presentation: In this case report, we present a middle-aged man with a seeding metastasis of the cranial meningioma (after its removal) in the left thigh. During the removal operation, fascia lata had been used to repair the dura mater and the skin defect was repaired primarily. Conclusion: We believe that the occurrence of meningioma at the site of incision in the thigh is related to using the same surgical instruments for the removal of the brain tumor. PMID:27303610

  9. Heterologous vaccination against human tuberculosis modulates antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell function.

    PubMed

    Dintwe, One B; Day, Cheryl L; Smit, Erica; Nemes, Elisa; Gray, Clive; Tameris, Michele; McShane, Helen; Mahomed, Hassan; Hanekom, Willem A; Scriba, Thomas J

    2013-09-01

    Heterologous prime-boost strategies hold promise for vaccination against tuberculosis. However, the T-cell characteristics required for protection are not known. We proposed that boost vaccines should induce long-lived functional and phenotypic changes to T cells primed by Bacille Calmette Guerin (BCG) and/or natural exposure to mycobacteria. We characterized changes among specific CD4(+) T cells after vaccination with the MVA85A vaccine in adults, adolescents, and children. CD4(+) T cells identified with Ag85A peptide-bearing HLA class II tetramers were characterized by flow cytometry. We also measured proliferative potential and cytokine expression of Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T cells. During the effector phase, MVA85A-induced specific CD4(+) T cells coexpressed IFN-γ and IL-2, skin homing integrins, and the activation marker CD38. This was followed by contraction and a transition to predominantly IL-2-expressing, CD45RA(-) CCR7(+) CD27(+) or CD45RA(+) CCR7(+) CD27(+) specific CD4(+) T cells. These surface phenotypes were similar to Ag85A-specific T cells prior to MVA85A. However, functional differences were observed postvaccination: specific proliferative capacity was markedly higher after 6-12 months than before vaccination. Our data suggest that MVA85A vaccination may modulate Ag85A-specific CD4(+) T-cell function, resulting in greater recall potential. Importantly, surface phenotypes commonly used as proxies for memory T-cell function did not associate with functional effects of vaccination. PMID:23737382

  10. Pancreas-Specific Delivery of β-Cell Proliferating Small Molecules.

    PubMed

    Hao, Xueshi; Jin, Qihui; Va, Porino; Li, Chun; Shen, Weijun; Laffitte, Bryan; Wu, Tom Y-H

    2016-06-01

    Our research groups recently described a series of small-molecule inducers of β-cell proliferation that could be used to increase β-cell mass. To mitigate the risk of nonspecific proliferation of other cell types, we devised a delivery strategy built on the tissue specificity observed in the experimental β-cell imaging agent (+)-dihydrotetrabenazine (DTBZ). The β-cell proliferator agent aminopyrazine (AP) was covalently linked with (+)-DTBZ to afford conjugates that retain both the proliferation activity and binding affinity for vesicular monoamine transporter-2 (VMAT2). In vivo mouse tissue distribution studies of a prototypical AP-DTBZ conjugate showed 15-fold pancreas exposure over plasma. Tissue-to-plasma ratios in liver and kidneys were two- and five-fold, respectively. This work is the first demonstration of enhanced delivery of β-cell-proliferating molecules to the pancreas by leveraging the intrinsic tissue specificity of a β-cell imaging agent. PMID:27095073

  11. Direct roles of SPEECHLESS in the specification of stomatal self-renewing cells

    PubMed Central

    Lau, On Sun; Davies, Kelli A.; Chang, Jessica; Adrian, Jessika; Rowe, Matthew H.; Ballenger, Catherine E.; Bergmann, Dominique C.

    2015-01-01

    Lineage-specific stem cells are critical for the production and maintenance of specific cell types and tissues in multicellular organisms. In Arabidopsis, the initiation and proliferation of stomatal lineage cells is controlled by the basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor SPEECHLESS (SPCH). SPCH-driven asymmetric and self-renewing divisions allow flexibility in stomatal production and overall organ growth. How SPCH directs stomatal lineage cell behaviors, however, is unclear. Here, we improved the chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay and profiled the genome-wide targets of Arabidopsis SPCH in vivo. We found that SPCH controls key regulators of cell fate and asymmetric cell divisions and modulates responsiveness to peptide and phytohormone-mediated intercellular communication. Our results delineate the molecular pathways that regulate an essential adult stem cell lineage in plants. PMID:25190717

  12. Definition of Drosophila hemocyte subsets by cell-type specific antigens.

    PubMed

    Kurucz, Eva; Váczi, B; Márkus, R; Laurinyecz, Barbara; Vilmos, P; Zsámboki, J; Csorba, Kinga; Gateff, Elisabeth; Hultmark, D; Andó, I

    2007-01-01

    We analyzed the heterogeneity of Drosophila hemocytes on the basis of the expression of cell-type specific antigens. The antigens characterize distinct subsets which partially overlap with those defined by morphological criteria. On the basis of the expression or the lack of expression of blood cell antigens the following hemocyte populations have been defined: crystal cells, plasmatocytes, lamellocytes and precursor cells. The expression of the antigens and thus the different cell types are developmentally regulated. The hemocytes are arranged in four main compartments: the circulating blood cells, the sessile tissue, the lymph glands and the posterior hematopoietic tissue. Each hemocyte compartment has a specific and characteristic composition of the various cell types. The described markers represent the first successful attempt to define hemocyte lineages by immunological markers in Drosophila and help to define morphologically, functionally, spatially and developmentally distinct subsets of hemocytes. PMID:18297797

  13. Gamma delta T cells recognize haptens and mount a hapten-specific response

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xun; Meyer, Christina; Wei, Yu-Ling; Chien, Yueh-hsiu

    2014-01-01

    The ability to recognize small organic molecules and chemical modifications of host molecules is an essential capability of the adaptive immune system, which until now was thought to be mediated mainly by B cell antigen receptors. Here we report that small molecules, such as cyanine 3 (Cy3), a synthetic fluorescent molecule, and 4-hydroxy-3-nitrophenylacetyl (NP), one of the most noted haptens, are γδ T cell antigens, recognized directly by specific γδ TCRs. Immunization with Cy3 conjugates induces a rapid Cy3-specific γδ T cell IL-17 response. These results expand the role of small molecules and chemical modifications in immunity and underscore the role of γδ T cells as unique adaptive immune cells that couple B cell-like antigen recognition capability with T cell effector function. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03609.001 PMID:25255099

  14. TALEN-mediated genetic inactivation of the glucocorticoid receptor in cytomegalovirus-specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Menger, Laurie; Gouble, Agnes; Marzolini, Maria A V; Pachnio, Annette; Bergerhoff, Katharina; Henry, Jake Y; Smith, Julianne; Pule, Martin; Moss, Paul; Riddell, Stanley R; Quezada, Sergio A; Peggs, Karl S

    2015-12-24

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection is responsible for substantial morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant. T-cell immunity is critical for control of CMV infection, and correction of the immune deficiency induced by transplant is now clinically achievable by the adoptive transfer of donor-derived CMV-specific T cells. It is notable, however, that most clinical studies of adoptive T- cell therapy exclude patients with graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) from receiving systemic corticosteroid therapy, which impairs cellular immunity. This group of patients remains the highest clinical risk group for recurrent and problematic infections. Here, we address this unmet clinical need by genetic disruption of the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene using electroporation of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) messenger RNA. We demonstrate efficient inactivation of the GR gene without off-target activity in Streptamer-selected CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells (HLA-A02/NLV peptide), conferring resistance to glucocorticoids. TALEN-modified CMV-specific T cells retained specific killing of target cells pulsed with the CMV peptide NLV in the presence of dexamethasone (DEX). Inactivation of the GR gene also conferred resistance to DEX in a xenogeneic GVHD model in sublethally irradiated NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) mice. This proof of concept provides the rationale for the development of clinical protocols for producing and administering high-purity genetically engineered virus-specific T cells that are resistant to the suppressive effects of corticosteroids. PMID:26508783

  15. The use of quantitative structure-activity relationship models to develop optimized processes for the removal of tobacco host cell proteins during biopharmaceutical production.

    PubMed

    Buyel, J F; Woo, J A; Cramer, S M; Fischer, R

    2013-12-27

    The production of recombinant pharmaceutical proteins in plants benefits from the low cost of upstream production and the greater scalability of plants compared to fermenter-based systems. Now that manufacturing processes that comply with current good manufacturing practices have been developed, plants can compete with established platforms on equal terms. However, the costs of downstream processing remain high, in part because of the dedicated process steps required to remove plant-specific process-related impurities. We therefore investigated whether the ideal strategy for the chromatographic removal of tobacco host cell proteins can be predicted by quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) modeling to reduce the process development time and overall costs. We identified more than 100 tobacco proteins by mass spectrometry and their structures were reconstructed from X-ray crystallography, nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and/or homology modeling data. The resulting three-dimensional models were used to calculate protein descriptors, and significant descriptors were selected based on recently-published retention data for model proteins to develop QSAR models for protein retention on anion, cation and mixed-mode resins. The predicted protein retention profiles were compared with experimental results using crude tobacco protein extracts. Because of the generic nature of the method, it can easily be transferred to other expression systems such as mammalian cells. The quality of the models and potential improvements are discussed. PMID:24268820

  16. Association Between Specific Timothy Grass Antigens and Changes in Thelper 1 and 2 Cell Responses Following Specific Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Schulten, Véronique; Tripple, Victoria; Sidney, John; Greenbaum, Jason; Frazier, April; Alam, Rafeul; Broide, David; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Background Different populations of T cells are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases. Objective We investigated changes in T-helper (Th) cell populations in patients with allergies following specific immunotherapy (SIT). Methods Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were isolated from patients with allergies who received specific immunotherapy (SIT) and those who did not (controls). We tested the ability of peptides from 93 Timothy grass (TG) proteins to induce T-cell responses (cytokine production). We used ELISPOT and staining assays for intracellular cytokines to measure production of interleukin (IL)4, IL5, IL13, interferon (IFN)γ, and IL10. Results Compared with PBMC from controls, PBMC from patients who received SIT produced lower levels of Th2 cytokines upon incubation with several different TG peptides. These data were used to select 20 peptides to be tested an independent cohort of 20 patients with allergies who received SIT and 20 controls. We again observed a significant decrease in production of Th2 cytokines, and an increase in production of the Th1 cytokine IFNγ, in PBMC from the validation groups. These changes correlated with improved symptoms after SIT. Immunization with this selected pool of peptides (or their associated antigens) could protect a substantial proportion of the population from TG allergy. Conclusions We observed a significant decrease in production of Th2 cytokines by PBMC from patients who received SIT for TG allergy, compared with those who did not. These changes might be used to monitor response to therapy. The decrease occurred in response to antigens that elicit little (if any) immunoglobulin (Ig)E responses; these antigens might be developed for use in immunotherapy. PMID:25042980

  17. Type 1 regulatory T cells specific for collagen type II as an efficient cell-based therapy in arthritis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Regulatory T (Treg) cells play a crucial role in preventing autoimmune diseases and are an ideal target for the development of therapies designed to suppress inflammation in an antigen-specific manner. Type 1 regulatory T (Tr1) cells are defined by their capacity to produce high levels of interleukin 10 (IL-10), which contributes to their ability to suppress pathological immune responses in several settings. The aim of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of collagen type II–specific Tr1 (Col-Treg) cells in two models of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in mice. Methods Col-Treg clones were isolated and expanded from collagen-specific TCR transgenic mice. Their cytokine secretion profile and phenotype characterization were studied. The therapeutic potential of Col-Treg cells was evaluated after adoptive transfer in collagen-antibody– and collagen-induced arthritis models. The in vivo suppressive mechanism of Col-Treg clones on effector T-cell proliferation was also investigated. Results Col-Treg clones are characterized by their specific cytokine profile (IL-10highIL-4negIFN-γint) and mediate contact-independent immune suppression. They also share with natural Tregs high expression of GITR, CD39 and granzyme B. A single infusion of Col-Treg cells reduced the incidence and clinical symptoms of arthritis in both preventive and curative settings, with a significant impact on collagen type II antibodies. Importantly, injection of antigen-specific Tr1 cells decreased the proliferation of antigen-specific effector T cells in vivo significantly. Conclusions Our results demonstrate the therapeutic potential of Col-Treg cells in two models of RA, providing evidence that Col-Treg could be an efficient cell-based therapy for RA patients whose disease is refractory to current treatments. PMID:24886976

  18. Cell line-specific oxidative stress in cellular toxicity: A toxicogenomics-based comparison between liver and colon cell models.

    PubMed

    Deferme, L; Briedé, J J; Claessen, S M H; Cavill, R; Kleinjans, J C S

    2015-08-01

    Imbalance between high reactive oxygen species formation and antioxidant capacity in the colon and liver has been linked to increased cancer risk. However, knowledge about possible cell line-specific oxidative stress-mechanisms is limited. To explore this further, gene expression data from a human liver and colon cell line (HepG2/Caco-2), both exposed to menadione and H2O2 at six time points (0.5-1-2-4-8 and 24h) were compared in association with cell cycle distribution. In total, 3164 unique- and 1827 common genes were identified between HepG2 and Caco-2 cells. Despite the higher number of unique genes, most oxidative stress-related genes such as CAT, OGG1, NRF2, NF-κB, GCLC, HMOX1 and GSR were differentially expressed in both cell lines. However, cell-specific regulation of genes such as KEAP1 and GCLM, or of the EMT pathway, which are of pathophysiological importance, indicates that oxidative stress induces different transcriptional effects and outcomes in the two selected cell lines. In addition, expression levels and/or -direction of common genes were often different in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells, and this led to very diverse downstream effects as confirmed by correlating pathways to cell cycle changes. Altogether, this work contributes to obtaining a better molecular understanding of cell line-specific toxicity upon exposure to oxidative stress-inducing compounds. PMID:25800948

  19. Cell-specific uptake of mantle cell lymphoma-derived exosomes by malignant and non-malignant B-lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Rosenblum, Daniel; Weinstein, Shiri; Bairey, Osnat; Raanani, Pia; Peer, Dan

    2015-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is an aggressive and incurable mature B cell neoplasm. The current treatments are based on chemotherapeutics and new class of drugs (e.g. Ibrutinib®), which in most cases ends with tumor resistance and relapse. Therefore, further development of novel therapeutic modalities are needed. Exosomes are natural extracellular vesicles, which play an important role in intercellular communication. The specificity of exosome uptake by different target cells remains unknown. In this study, we observed that MCL exosomes are taken up rapidly and preferentially by MCL cells. Only minor fraction of exosomes was internalized into T-cell leukemia and bone marrow stroma cell lines, when these cells were co-cultured with MCL cells. Moreover, MCL patients’ exosomes were taken up by both healthy and patients’ B-lymphocytes with no apparent internalization to T lymphocytes and NK cells. Exosome internalization was not inhibited by specific siRNA against caveolin1 and clathrin but was found to be mediated by cholesterol-dependent pathway. These findings demonstrate natural specificity of exosomes to B-lymphocytes and ultimately might be used for therapeutic intervention in B cells malignancies. PMID:25933830

  20. Trifunctional bispecific antibodies induce tumor-specific T cells and elicit a vaccination effect.

    PubMed

    Eissler, Nina; Ruf, Peter; Mysliwietz, Josef; Lindhofer, Horst; Mocikat, Ralph

    2012-08-15

    A major goal of tumor immunotherapy is the induction of long-lasting systemic T-cell immunity. Bispecific antibodies (bsAbs) that lack the immunoglobulin Fc region confer T-cell-mediated killing of tumor cells but do not induce long-term memory. In contrast, trifunctional bsAbs comprise an appropriate Fc region and, therefore, not only recruit T cells but also accessory cells that bear activating Fcγ receptors (FcγR), providing additional T-cell-activating signals and securing presentation of tumor-derived antigens to T cells. In this study, we show that trifunctional bsAbs induce a polyvalent T-cell response and, therefore, a vaccination effect. Mice were treated with melanoma cells and with a trifunctional bsAb directed against the melanoma target antigen ganglioside GD2 in addition to murine CD3. The trifunctional bsAb activated dendritic cells and induced a systemic immune response that was not replicated by treatment with the F(ab')2-counterpart lacking the Fc region. Restimulation of spleen and lymph node cells in vitro yielded T-cell lines that specifically produced interferon-γ in response to tumor. In addition, trifunctional bsAb-induced T cells recognized various specific peptides derived from melanoma-associated antigens. Moreover, these polyvalent responses proved to be tumor-suppressive and could not be induced by the corresponding bsF(ab')2-fragment. Taken together, our findings provide preclinical proof of concept that trifunctional bsAbs can induce tumor-specific T cells with defined antigen specificity. PMID:22745368

  1. Induction of human pancreatic beta cell replication by inhibitors of dual specificity tyrosine regulated kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Alvarez-Perez, Juan-Carlos; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Liu, Hongtao; Sivendran, Sharmila; Bender, Aaron; Kumar, Anil; Sanchez, Roberto; Scott, Donald K.; Garcia-Ocaña, Adolfo; Stewart, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Types 1 and 2 diabetes affect some 380 million people worldwide. Both result ultimately from a deficiency of functional pancreatic insulin-producing beta cells. Beta cells proliferate in humans during a brief temporal window beginning around the time of birth, with peak beta cell labeling indices achieving approximately 2% in first year of life1-4. In embryonic life and after early childhood, beta cell replication rates are very low. While beta cell expansion seems an obvious therapeutic approach to beta cell deficiency, adult human beta cells have proven recalcitrant to such efforts1-8. Hence, there remains an urgent need for diabetes therapeutic agents that can induce regeneration and expansion of adult human beta cells in vivo or ex vivo. Here, we report the results of a high-throughput small molecule screen (HTS) revealing a novel class of human beta cell mitogenic compounds, analogues of the small molecule, harmine. We also define dual specificity tyrosine-regulated kinase-1a (DYRK1A) as the likely target of harmine, and the Nuclear Factors of activated T-cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors as likely mediators of human beta cell proliferation as well as beta cell differentiation. These observations suggest that harmine analogues (“harmalogs”) may have unique therapeutic promise for human diabetes therapy. Enhancing potency and beta cell specificity are important future challenges. PMID:25751815

  2. The phenotype and tissue-specific nature of multipotent cells derived from human mature adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Kou, Liang; Lu, Xiao-Wen; Wu, Min-Ke; Wang, Hang; Zhang, Yu-Jiao; Sato, Soh; Shen, Jie-Fei

    2014-02-21

    Dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells derived from mature adipocytes have been considered to be a homogeneous group of multipotent cells, which present to be an alternative source of adult stem cells for regenerative medicine. However, many aspects of the cellular nature about DFAT cells remained unclarified. This study aimed to elucidate the basic characteristics of DFAT cells underlying their functions and differentiation potentials. By modified ceiling culture technique, DFAT cells were converted from human mature adipocytes from the human buccal fat pads. Flow cytometry analysis revealed that those derived cells were a homogeneous population of CD13(+) CD29(+) CD105(+) CD44(+) CD31(-) CD34(-) CD309(-) α-SMA(-) cells. DFAT cells in this study demonstrated tissue-specific differentiation properties with strong adipogenic but much weaker osteogenic capacity. Neither did they express endothelial markers under angiogenic induction. PMID:24486314

  3. Fabrication of a biomimetic adsorbent imprinted with a common specificity determinant for the removal of α- and β-amanitin from plasma.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lei; He, Rong; Li, Yongxian; Liang, Yong; Li, He; Tang, Youwen

    2016-08-12

    α-Amanitin and β-amanitin are the main toxins of mushroom poisoning. The application of traditional non-selective adsorbents is not satisfactory in clinical treatment of amanita mushroom poisoning due to lack of specificity adsorption capability of these adsorbents toward amanitin toxins. In the current work, we introduce a novel molecularly imprinted biomimetic adsorbent based on a ligand specificity determinant through surface imprinted strategy. Owing to the expensive price of the amanitin sources, we selected a typical common moiety of α, β-amanitin as specificity determinant to synthesize a template necessary for the preparation of molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs). Computer simulation was used to initially select acidic methacrylic acid (MAA) and basic 4-vinyl pyridine (4-VP) together as functional monomers. The experiments further demonstrated that the synergistic interaction of MAA and 4-VP played a primary role in the recognition of α, β-amanitin by MIPs. By means of batch and packed-bed column experiment and the hemocompatibility evaluation, the resultant biomimetic adsorbent has been proved to be capable of selectively removing α, β-amanitin and possess good hemocompatibility. This novel adsorbent has great potential to find application in human plasma purification. PMID:27394089

  4. Chromatin states modify network motifs contributing to cell-specific functions

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongying; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Ling; Zhang, Guanxiong; Pang, Lin; Yu, Fulong; Fan, Huihui; Ping, Yanyan; Wang, Li; Xu, Chaohan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Xia

    2015-01-01

    Epigenetic modification can affect many important biological processes, such as cell proliferation and apoptosis. It can alter chromatin conformation and contribute to gene regulation. To investigate how chromatin states associated with network motifs, we assembled chromatin state-modified regulatory networks by combining 269 ChIP-seq data and chromatin states in four cell types. We found that many chromatin states were significantly associated with network motifs, especially for feedforward loops (FFLs). These distinct chromatin state compositions contribute to different expression levels and translational control of targets in FFLs. Strikingly, the chromatin state-modified FFLs were highly cell-specific and, to a large extent, determined cell-selective functions, such as the embryonic stem cell-specific bivalent modification-related FFL with an important role in poising developmentally important genes for expression. Besides, comparisons of chromatin state-modified FFLs between cancerous/stem and primary cell lines revealed specific type of chromatin state alterations that may act together with motif structural changes cooperatively contribute to cell-to-cell functional differences. Combination of these alterations could be helpful in prioritizing candidate genes. Together, this work highlights that a dynamic epigenetic dimension can help network motifs to control cell-specific functions. PMID:26169043

  5. Highly sensitive and specific colorimetric detection of cancer cells via dual-aptamer target binding strategy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kun; Fan, Daoqing; Liu, Yaqing; Wang, Erkang

    2015-11-15

    Simple, rapid, sensitive and specific detection of cancer cells is of great importance for early and accurate cancer diagnostics and therapy. By coupling nanotechnology and dual-aptamer target binding strategies, we developed a colorimetric assay for visually detecting cancer cells with high sensitivity and specificity. The nanotechnology including high catalytic activity of PtAuNP and magnetic separation & concentration plays a vital role on the signal amplification and improvement of detection sensitivity. The color change caused by small amount of target cancer cells (10 cells/mL) can be clearly distinguished by naked eyes. The dual-aptamer target binding strategy guarantees the detection specificity that large amount of non-cancer cells and different cancer cells (10(4) cells/mL) cannot cause obvious color change. A detection limit as low as 10 cells/mL with detection linear range from 10 to 10(5) cells/mL was reached according to the experimental detections in phosph